Science.gov

Sample records for acid rain precipitation

  1. Primer on acid precipitation. A killing rain: the global threat of acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlick, T.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews the book A Killing Rain: The Global Threat of Acid Precipitation by Thomas Pawlick which presents an overview of the problems associated with acid rain. The book covers the effects of acid rain on aquatic ecosystems, forests materials, and agriculture. It also deals with abatement technologies and sociopolitical topics associated with acid rain.

  2. NAPAP (National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program) results on acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    The National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) was mandated by Congress in 1980 to study the effects of acid rain. The results of 10 years of research on the effect of acid deposition and ozone on forests, particularly high elevation spruce and fir, southern pines, eastern hardwoods and western conifers, will be published this year.

  3. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  4. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, F.D.

    1980-01-01

    The acid rain problem in the northeastern U.S. has been growing in severity and geographical areas affected. Acid rain has damaged, or will result in damage to visibility, physical structures and materials, aquatic life, timber, crops, and soils. The principal causes of acid rain in the northeastern U.S. are sulfur oxide and nitrogen oxide emissions from large power plants and smelters in the Ohio River Valley. Immediate corrective action and appropriate research are needed to reduce acid precipitation. Short-term programs that will define the rate of environmental deterioration, remaining environmental capacity to resist sudden deterioration, mechanisms of acid rain formation, and costs of various control options must be developed. (3 maps, 13 references, 1 table)

  5. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report has four parts: they discuss acid rain in relation to acid soils, agriculture, forests, and aquatic ecosystems. Among findings: modern sources of acid deposition from the atmosphere for all the acid soils in the world, nor even chiefly responsible for those of northern U.S. Agriculture has its problems, but acid precipitation is probably not one of them. More research is needed to determine to what extent acid precipitation is responsible for forest declines and for smaller detrimental effects on forest growth where no damage to the foliage is evident. Many lakes and streams are extremely sensitive to added acids.

  6. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  7. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  8. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  9. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C. )

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse (ARIC). Topics covered include: Legal aspects of the source-receptor relationship: an energy perspective; Scientific uncertainty, agency inaction, and the courts; and Acid rain: the emerging legal framework.

  10. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  11. Whither acid rain?

    PubMed

    Brimblecombe, P

    2001-04-01

    Acid rain, the environmental cause célèbre of the 1980s seems to have vanished from popular conscience. By contrast, scientific research, despite funding difficulties, has continued to produce hundreds of research papers each year. Studies of acid rain taught much about precipitation chemistry, the behaviour of snow packs, long-range transport of pollutants and new issues in the biology of fish and forested ecosystems. There is now evidence of a shift away from research in precipitation and sulfur chemistry, but an impressive theoretical base remains as a legacy.

  12. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  13. Acid Rain: What It Is -- How You Can Help!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This publication discusses the nature and consequences of acid precipitation (commonly called acid rain). Topic areas include: (1) the chemical nature of acid rain; (2) sources of acid rain; (3) geographic areas where acid rain is a problem; (4) effects of acid rain on lakes; (5) effect of acid rain on vegetation; (6) possible effects of acid rain…

  14. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  15. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  16. Precipitation chemistry and occurrence of acid rain over Dhanbad, coal city of India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhay Kr; Mondal, G C; Kumar, Suresh; Singh, K K; Kamal, K P; Sinha, A

    2007-02-01

    The present study investigated the chemical composition of wet atmospheric precipitation over Dhanbad, coal city of India. The precipitation samples were collected on event basis for three years (July 2003 to October 2005) at Central Mining Research Institute. The precipitation samples were analyzed for pH, conductivity, major anions (F, Cl, NO(3), SO(4)) and cations (Ca, Mg, Na, K, NH(4)). The pH value varied from 4.01 to 6.92 (avg. 5.37) indicating acidic to alkaline nature of rainwater. The pH of the rainwater was found well above the reference pH (5.6), showing alkalinity during the non-monsoon and early phase of monsoon, but during the late phase of monsoon, pH tendency was towards acidity (<5.6 pH) indicating the non-availability of proper neutralizer for acidic ions. The observed acidic events at this site were 91, (n = 162) accounting 56% for the entire monitoring months. The (NO(3) + Cl)/SO(4) ratio in majority of samples was found below 1.0, indicating that the acidity is greatly influenced by SO(4). The calculated ratio of (Ca + NH(4))/(NO(3) + SO(4)) ranges between 0.42-5.13 (average 1.14), however in most of the samples, the ratio is greater than unity (>1.0) indicating that Ca and NH(4) play an important role in neutralization of acidic ions in rainwater. Ca and SO(4) dominate the bulk ionic deposition and these two ions along with NH(4) accounts 63% of the annual ionic deposition.

  17. Acid Rain. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollmann, Pauline, Comp.

    The term "acid rain," also called "acid precipitation," generally refers to any precipitation having a pH value of less than 5.6. This guide to the literature on acid rain in the collections of the Library of Congress is not necessarily intended to be a comprehensive bibliography. It is designed to provide the reader with a set of resources that…

  18. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  19. Acid rain degradation of nylon

    SciTech Connect

    Kyllo, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    Acid rain, precipitation with a pH less than 5.6, is known to damage lakes, vegetation and buildings. Degradation of outdoor textiles by acid rain is strongly suspected but not well documented. This study reports the effects of sunlight, aqueous acid, heat and humidity (acid rain conditions) on spun delustered nylon 6,6 fabric. Untreated nylon and nylon treated with sulfuric acid of pH 2.0, 3.0, and 4.4 were exposed to light in an Atlas Xenon-arc fadeometer at 63/sup 0/C and 65% R.H. for up to 640 AATCC Fading Units. The untreated and acid treated nylon fabrics were also exposed to similar temperature and humidity condition without light. Nylon degradation was determined by changes in breaking strength, elongation, molecular weight, color, amino end group concentration (NH/sub 2/) and /sup 13/C NMR spectra. Physical damage was assessed using SEM.

  20. Acid Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  1. Acidification and Acid Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution by acids has been known as a problem for centuries (Ducros, 1845; Smith, 1872; Camuffo, 1992; Brimblecombe, 1992). Only in the mid-1900s did it become clear that it was a problem for more than just industrially developed areas, and that precipitation quality can affect aquatic resources ( Gorham, 1955). The last three decades of the twentieth century saw tremendous progress in the documentation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, precipitation, and the systems impacted by acid atmospheric deposition. Chronic acidification of ecosystems results in chemical changes to soil and to surface waters and groundwater as a result of reduction of base cation supply or an increase in acid (H+) supply, or both. The most fundamental changes during chronic acidification are an increase in exchangeable H+ or Al3+ (aluminum) in soils, an increase in H+ activity (˜concentration) in water in contact with soil, and a decrease in alkalinity in waters draining watersheds. Water draining from the soil is acidified and has a lower pH (=-log [H+]). As systems acidify, their biotic community changes.Acidic surface waters occur in many parts of the world as a consequence of natural processes and also due to atmospheric deposition of strong acid (e.g., Canada, Jeffries et al. (1986); the United Kingdom, Evans and Monteith (2001); Sweden, Swedish Environmental Protection Board (1986); Finland, Forsius et al. (1990); Norway, Henriksen et al. (1988a); and the United States (USA), Brakke et al. (1988)). Concern over acidification in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere has been driven by the potential for accelerating natural acidification by pollution of the atmosphere with acidic or acidifying compounds. Atmospheric pollution ( Figure 1) has resulted in an increased flux of acid to and through ecosystems. Depending on the ability of an ecosystem to neutralize the increased flux of acidity, acidification may increase only imperceptibly or be accelerated at a rate that

  2. Acid Rain Students Do Original Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outdoor Communicator, 1984

    1984-01-01

    At Park Senior High School (Cottage Grove, Minnesota), 46 juniors and seniors planted 384 red pine seedlings in connection with their original research on acid rain, with advice from Dr. Harriet Stubbs, director of the Acid Precipitation Awareness Program (West Saint Paul), which has been developing acid rain teaching materials. (MH)

  3. Understanding acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Budiansky, S.

    1981-06-01

    The complexities of the phenomenon of acid rain are described. Many factors, including meteorology, geology, chemistry, and biology, all play parts. Varying weather, varying soils, the presence of other pollutants and species differences all act to blur the connections between industrial emissions, acid rain, and environmental damage. Some experts believe that the greatest pH shock to lakes occurs during snow melt and runoff in the spring; others believe that much of the plant damage ascribed to acid rain is actually due to the effects of ozone. Much work needs to be done in the area of sampling. Historical data are lacking and sampling methods are not sufficiently accurate. (JMT)

  4. Acid rain: a primer on what, where, and how much

    SciTech Connect

    Barchet, W.R.

    1985-04-01

    Acid rain is introduced by defining its components: wet and dry deposition. Data bases on precipitation chemistry from several monitoring networks are used to show where acid rain occurs. Precipitation chemistry and air quality data are used to discuss what is in acid rain. Maps of the deposition of the major constituents of wet deposition are presented to contrast the amount of material deposited (deposition) in acid rain with its composition (concentration). The interactions of acid rain with the surfaces on which it falls are used to trace the paths by which acid rain reaches surface and soil waters. Implications of acid rain effects are introduced but not discussed in detail.

  5. Difficult Decisions: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John A.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributing factors and chemical reactions involved in the production of acid rain, its effects, and political issues pertaining to who should pay for the clean up. Supplies questions for consideration and discussion. (RT)

  6. (Acid rain workshop)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.

    1990-12-05

    The traveler presented a paper entitled Susceptibility of Asian Ecosystems to Soil-Mediated Acid Rain Damage'' at the Second Workshop on Acid Rain in Asia. The workshop was organized by the Asian Institute of Technology (Bangkok, Thailand), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois), and Resource Management Associates (Madison, Wisconsin) and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the United Nations Environment Program, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, and the World Bank. Papers presented on the first day discussed how the experience gained with acid rain in North America and Europe might be applied to the Asian situation. Papers describing energy use projections, sulfur emissions, and effects of acid rain in several Asian countries were presented on the second day. The remaining time was allotted to discussion, planning, and writing plans for a future research program.

  7. Acid rain and soil.

    PubMed

    vanLoon, G W

    1984-08-01

    A summary of important chemical properties of soil is given and the way in which acid rain may affect these properties is discussed. Acid rain may suppress microbiological decomposition and nitrification processes, thus influencing the nutrient status of soils. It has also been found that soil organic matter is less soluble in more acid solutions. Changed nutrient availability patterns are predicted in a low pH environment and enhanced leaching of essential elements from the soil exchange complex has been observed. Increased solubility of potentially toxic elements such as aluminium may also occur from soils which have been exposed to acidified rainfall.

  8. Scientist, researchers, and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Alm, L.R. )

    1989-01-01

    The role of the hidden participants in agenda-setting for environmental issues is discussed. These personnel involve academics, researchers, career bureaucrats, congressional staffers, consultants, and administration appointees below the top level. Scientists have been publicly involved in the acid rain issue from the beginning, using the media to dramatize the possible catastrophic consequences of acid rain. Presently, the scientific community is not in consensus about the solutions to the problem. Since the initial enactment of the National Acid Precipitation Act in 1980, not a single acid rain law has been passed, although many bills have been proposed. Spokesman for the coal and utility industries and Reagan administration personnel have used the scientific disagreements to delay abatement actions and refute claims that acid rain is a severe problem. Another result of the confusion is a distrust and even disdain for academic work. One possible solution to the stalemate is an accurate form for resolving scientific disputes that have a strong political component and that the forum should have a mechanism for converging on accurate science. 19 refs.

  9. Acid Rain Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugo, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students investigate the formation of solid ammonium chloride aerosol particles to help students better understand the concept of acid rain. Provides activity objectives, procedures, sample data, clean-up instructions, and questions and answers to help interpret the data. (MDH)

  10. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oates-Bockenstedt, Catherine

    1997-01-01

    Details an activity designed to motivate students by incorporating science-related issues into a classroom debate. Includes "The Acid Rain Bill" and "Position Guides" for student roles as committee members, consumers, governors, industry owners, tourism professionals, senators, and debate directors. (DKM)

  11. Acid rain bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Sayers, C.S.

    1983-09-01

    This bibliography identifies 900 citations on various aspects of Acid Rain, covering published bibliographies, books, reports, conference and symposium proceedings, audio visual materials, pamphlets and newsletters. It includes five sections: citations index (complete record of author, title, source, order number); KWIC index; title index; author index; and source index. 900 references.

  12. Acid Rain Classroom Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demchik, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a curriculum plan in which students learn about acid rain through instructional media, research and class presentations, lab activities, simulations, design, and design implementation. Describes the simulation activity in detail and includes materials, procedures, instructions, examples, results, and discussion sections. (SAH)

  13. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an activity which provides opportunities for role-playing as industrialists, ecologists, and government officials. The activity involves forming an international commission on acid rain, taking testimony, and, based on the testimony, making recommendations to governments on specific ways to solve the problem. Includes suggestions for…

  14. The Acid Rain Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakow, Steven J.; Glenn, Allen

    1982-01-01

    Provides rationale for and description of an acid rain game (designed for two players), a problem-solving model for elementary students. Although complete instructions are provided, including a copy of the game board, the game is also available for Apple II microcomputers. Information for the computer program is available from the author.…

  15. Effects of acid rain on crops and trees

    SciTech Connect

    Cowling, E.B.; Dochinger, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    A general treatment of the subject of acid rain and its effets are discussed along with sources of acid rain and its near-term (the last couple of decades). The effects of acid rain on terrestrial ecosystems are treated in some detail. Some treatment is given of the ecosystem-level effects of acid precipitation.

  16. Acid rain: Reign of controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Acid Rain is a primer on the science and politics of acid rain. Several introductory chapters describe in simple terms the relevant principles of water chemistry, soil chemistry, and plant physiology and discuss the demonstrated or postulated effects of acid rain on fresh waters and forests as well as on statuary and other exposed objects. There follow discussions on the economic and social implications of acid rain (for example, possible health effects) and on the sources, transport, and distribution of air pollutants.

  17. Precipitation: its acidic nature.

    PubMed

    Frohliger, J O; Kane, R

    1975-08-01

    A comparison of the free hydrogen ion concentration and the total hydrogen ion concentration of rain samples shows that rain is a weak acid. The weak acid nature of rain casts doubt on the concepts that the acidity of rain is increasing and that these increases are due to strong acids such as sulfuric acid.

  18. The politics of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcher, M.E. )

    1989-01-01

    This work examines and compares the acid rain policies through the different political systems of Canada, Great Britain and the United States. Because the flow of acid rain can transcend national boundaries, acid rain has become a crucial international problem. According to the author, because of differences in governmental institutions and structure, the extent of governmental intervention in the industrial economy, the degree of reliance on coal for power generation, and the extent of acid rain damage, national responses to the acid rain problem have varied.

  19. Beyond acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.S.; Streit, G.E.; Spall, W.D.; Hall, J.H.

    1987-06-01

    This paper discussed the effects of the interactions of soluble oxidants and organic toxins with sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide. It suggested that these chemical reactions in the atmosphere produced a more potent acid rain which was harmful not only because it had a low pH but because it contained oxidants and organic toxins which were harmful to surface vegetation and the organisms found in surface waters. It was stressed that air pollution is a global problem and that is is necessary to develop a better fundamental understanding of how air pollution is causing damage to the streams and forests of the world. 50 references.

  20. A Demonstration of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Man Wai

    2004-01-01

    A demonstration showing acid rain formation is described. Oxides of sulfur and nitrogen that result from the burning of fossil fuels are the major pollutants of acid rain. In this demonstration, SO[subscript 2] gas is produced by the burning of matches. An acid-base indicator will show that the dissolved gas turns an aqueous solution acidic.

  1. Acid rain in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Neeloo; Streets, David G.; Foell, Wesley K.

    1992-07-01

    Acid rain has been an issue of great concern in North America and Europe during the past several decades. However, due to the passage of a number of recent regulations, most notably the Clean Air Act in the United States in 1990, there is an emerging perception that the problem in these Western nations is nearing solution. The situation in the developing world, particularly in Asia, is much bleaker. Given the policies of many Asian nations to achieve levels of development comparable with the industrialized world—which necessitate a significant expansion of energy consumption (most derived from indigenous coal reserves)—the potential for the formation of, and damage from, acid deposition in these developing countries is very high. This article delineates and assesses the emissions patterns, meteorology, physical geology, and biological and cultural resources present in various Asian nations. Based on this analysis and the risk factors to acidification, it is concluded that a number of areas in Asia are currently vulnerable to acid rain. These regions include Japan, North and South Korea, southern China, and the mountainous portions of Southeast Asia and southwestern India. Furthermore, with accelerated development (and its attendant increase in energy use and production of emissions of acid deposition precursors) in many nations of Asia, it is likely that other regions will also be affected by acidification in the near future. Based on the results of this overview, it is clear that acid deposition has significant potential to impact the Asian region. However, empirical evidence is urgently needed to confirm this and to provide early warning of increases in the magnitude and spread of acid deposition and its effects throughout this part of the world.

  2. Acid rain: Rhetoric and reality

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Acid rain is now one of the most serious environmental problems in developed countries. Emissions and fallout were previously extremely localized, but since the introduction of tall stacks policies in both Britain and the US - pardoxically to disperse particulate pollutants and hence reduce local damage - emissions are now lifted into the upper air currents and carried long distances downwind. The acid rain debate now embraces many western countries - including Canada, the US, England, Scotland, Wales, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, West Germany, the Netherlands, Austria, Switzerland - and a growing number of eastern countries - including the Soviet Union, Poland, East Germany, and Czechoslovakia. The problem of acid rain arises, strictly speaking, not so much from the rainfall itself as from its effects on the environment. Runoff affects surface water and groundwater, as well as soils and vegetation. Consequently changes in rainfall acidity can trigger off a range of impacts on the chemistry and ecology of lakes and rivers, soil chemistry and processes, the health and productivity of plants, and building materials, and metallic structures. The most suitable solutions to the problems of acid rain require prevention rather than cure, and there is broad agreement in both the political scientific communities on the need to reduce emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides to the atmosphere. Book divisions discuss: the problem of acid rain, the science of acid rain, the technology of acid rain, and the politics of acid rain, in an effort to evaluate this growing global problem of acid rain.

  3. Industrial ecotoxicology "acid rain".

    PubMed

    Astolfi, E; Gotelli, C; Higa, J

    1986-01-01

    The acid rain phenomenon was studied in the province of Cordoba, Argentina. This study, based on a previously outlined framework, determined the anthropogenic origin of the low pH due to the presence of industrial hydrochloric acid wastage. This industrial ecotoxicological phenomenon seriously affected the forest wealth, causing a great defoliation of trees and shrubs, with a lower effect on crops. A survey on its effects on human beings has not been carried out, but considering the corrosion caused to different metals and its denouncing biocide effect on plants and animals, we should expect to find some kind of harm to the health of the workers involved or others engaged in farming, and even to those who are far away from the polluting agent. PMID:3758667

  4. Industrial ecotoxicology "acid rain".

    PubMed

    Astolfi, E; Gotelli, C; Higa, J

    1986-01-01

    The acid rain phenomenon was studied in the province of Cordoba, Argentina. This study, based on a previously outlined framework, determined the anthropogenic origin of the low pH due to the presence of industrial hydrochloric acid wastage. This industrial ecotoxicological phenomenon seriously affected the forest wealth, causing a great defoliation of trees and shrubs, with a lower effect on crops. A survey on its effects on human beings has not been carried out, but considering the corrosion caused to different metals and its denouncing biocide effect on plants and animals, we should expect to find some kind of harm to the health of the workers involved or others engaged in farming, and even to those who are far away from the polluting agent.

  5. An Umbrella for Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, Judith

    1979-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded several grants to study effects of and possible solutions to the problem of "acid rain"; pollution from atmospheric nitric and sulfuric acids. The research program is administered through North Carolina State University at Raleigh and will focus on biological effects of acid rain. (JMF)

  6. Acid rain: effects on fish and wildlife

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, K.S.; Multer, E.P.; Schreiber, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The following questions concerning acid rain are discussed: what is acid rain; what causes acid rain; where do sulfur and nitrogen oxides originate; what areas in the U.S. are susceptible to acid rain; are there early warning signals of acidification to aquatic resources; how does acid rain affect fishery resources; does acid rain affect wildlife; and how can effects of acid rain be reduced.

  7. Acid rain threatens marine life

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    In freshwater, acid rain harms aquatic organisms because one of its components, sulfur dioxide, lowers the water's pH. In seawater, the damage comes from other components of acid precipitation: nitrogen oxides. Acting as a nutrient, nitrogen promotes excessive algal growth, which blocks sunlight and depletes dissolved oxygen, thereby suffocating other plants and animals. Known as eutrophication, this phenomenon has been increasing in both frequency and intensity on the Atlantic coast during the past few years. The New York City-based Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), study focused on the Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary and an important spawning ground for many species of economic importance. It has long been known that the bay is suffering from nitrogen pollution. Until now, it was assumed that most of the nitrogen was coming from sewage and agricultural runoff. However, based on data collected from both federal and state agencies, EDF scientists estimated that nitrates from acid rain are responsible for 25% of the nitrogen entering the bay. The report says that if present trends continue, airborne nitrates will contribute 42% of annual nitrogen deposits into the Chesapeake Bay by the year 2030.

  8. Simulated acid rain on crops

    SciTech Connect

    Plocher, M.D.; Perrigan, S.C.; Hevel, R.J.; Cooper, R.M.; Moss, D.N.

    1985-10-01

    In 1981, simulated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ acid rain was applied to alfalfa and tall fescue and a 2:1 ratio of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/:HNO/sub 3/ acid rain was applied to alfalfa, tall fescue, barley, wheat, potato, tomato, radish, and corn crops growing in the open field at Corvallis, Oregon. Careful attention was given to effects of the acid rain on the appearance of the foliage, and the effects on yield were measured. Because the effect of pH 4.0 rain on corn yield was the only significant effect noted in the 1981 studies, in 1982, more-extensive studies of the effect of simulated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4//HNO/sub 3/ rain on corn were conducted. No significant effects of acid rain were found on foliage appearance, or on yield of grain or stover in the 1982 studies.

  9. Geographical distribution and temporal variation of rain acidity over China

    SciTech Connect

    Wen-Xing Wang; Yan-Bo Pang; Guo-An Ding

    1996-12-31

    In recent decade, large areas of acid rain have appeared in China. With the increasing emission of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} year by year, the acidity of precipitation has increased, and the acid rain area is expanding. Presently, the acid rain in China has become the third largest area of acid rain in the world, next to Europe and North America. The Chinese government took action against acid rain and planned a five-year National Acid Deposition Research Project. The space-time distribution and variation of rain acidity described in this paper is a part of this project. China is a large country. The area is almost equal to that of Europe. Its climate varies greatly and spans the tropics, subtropics, temperate and frigid zone. There is a varied topography including mountain, hilly country, desert and plain, on the other hand the distribution of anthropogenic sources are not even. All of the human and natural factors caused different chemical composition in different parts of China, the acidity of precipitation varies also. The acidity of the precipitation is the most important parameter in the acid rain research. In order to obtain the regional representative distribution of rain acidity, National Acidic Deposition Research Monitoring Network with 261 monitoring sites was established in 1992. This paper summarizes the rain acidity of 21355 precipitation samples, and gave the annual, seasonal, and the monthly pH contours. Results show that the acid rain area has expanded from the south during winter. Regional differences of monthly acid precipitation exists, generally, the rain acidity level is higher during summer and fall and lower during winter and spring in the northern provinces. The 9 opposite is the case in the southern provinces. The central areas are in a transitional situation. The geographical distribution and temporal variation of rain acidity are quite different from North America and Europe.

  10. Acid rains over semi-urban atmosphere at eastern Himalaya and near coast of Bay of Bengal and alkaline rains over typical urban atmosphere in India: A study on precipitation chemistry during monsoon, 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arindam; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Sarkar, Chirantan; Ghosh, Sanjay; Raha, Sibaji

    A study has been made on precipitation chemistry over three different atmosphere in India. Rain samples were collected during the entire period of monsoon (June-October) in the year of 2013 over Kolkata (22.6 (°) N, 89.4 (°) E), a mega city with typical urban atmosphere; Falta (22.3 (°) N, 88.1 (°) E), a rural atmosphere near eastern coast of Bay of Bengal and Darjeeling (27.01 (°) N, 88.15 (°) E), a high altitude (2200 m asl)hill station over eastern Himalaya in India. The major focus of the study is to investigate the composition of various types of aerosol ionic components scavenged and its effect on the acidity and how it differs between these three distinctly different atmospheres. The results showed that the sea-salt components were higher in Falta (140 mueqv/lit) followed by Kolkata (120 mueqv/lit) and minimum in Darjeeling (30 mueqv/lit). Over all the stations, Na (+) and Cl (-) showed strong correlations indicating common marine source. The marine air masses originated from Bay of Bengal (BoB) were found to significantly enrich sea-salt particles over Falta, the nearest station from BoB and having least effect on Darjeeling, the farthest station from BoB. Dust and anthropogenic aerosols particles were significantly higher over Kolkata compared to other two stations. Dust particles were found to scavenge more in the initial phase of monsoon and it gradually decreased as the monsoon progressed. The average pH of rain water over Kolkata was 6.0 indicating alkaline in nature. pH over Falta was 5.2 indicating slightly acidic in nature and the most important fact is that pH over Darjeeling was 4.6 indicating highly acidic in nature. It was found that Ca (2+) , Mg (2+) and NH _{4} (+) neutralized the acidity of rain water over all the stations with the maximum neutralizing factor for Ca (2+) . However, NH _{4} (+) played important role over Darjeeling in neutralizing rain water acidity. The major reason for high acidity of rain water was not due to high

  11. Acid rain in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatti, N.; Streets, D.G. ); Foell, W.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Acid rain has been an issue of widespread concern in North America and Europe for more than fifteen years. However, there is an emerging feeling that the problem in Europe and North America is nearing solution, largely as a result of existing and newly enacted legislation, decreased energy use due to conservation and efficiency improvements, and/or trends in energy policy away from fossil fuels. The situation in Asia appears much bleaker. Fossil fuels are already used in large quantities, such that local air pollution is becoming a serious problem and high deposition levels are being measured. Emission regulations in most countries (with the notable exception of Japan) are not very stringent. Energy plans in many countries (particularly PRC, India, Thailand, and South Korea) call for very large increases in coal combustion in the future. Finally, there is not presently a strong scientific or public constituency for action to mitigate the potential effects of acid deposition. These factors imply potentially serious problems in the future for long-range transport and deposition of sulfur and nitrogen species and consequent damage to ecosystems and materials. The political ramifications of transboundary environmental pollution in this region are also potentially serious. The purpose of this paper is to provide background information on the acid deposition situation in Asia, with the intention of laying the foundation for the development of a possible research program for this region. 36 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Acid rain: a background report

    SciTech Connect

    Glustrom, L.; Stolzenberg, J.

    1982-07-08

    This Staff Brief was prepared for the Wisconsin Legislative Council's Special Committee on Acid Rain to provide an introduction to the issue of acid rain. It is divided into four parts. Part I provides an overview on the controversies surrounding the measurement, formation and effects of acid rain. As described in Part I, the term acid rain is used to describe the deposition of acidic components through both wet deposition (e.g., rain or snow) and dry deposition (e.g., direct contact between atmospheric constituents and the land, water or vegetation of the earth). Part II presents background information on state agency activities relating to acid rain in Wisconsin, describes what is known about the occurrence of, susceptibility to and effects of acid rain in Wisconsin, and provides information related to man-made sources of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in Wisconsin. Part III describes major policies and regulations relating to acid rain which have been or are being developed jointly by the United States and Canadian governments, by the United States government and by the State of Wisconsin. Part IV briefly discusses possible areas for Committee action.

  13. Acid Rain: An Educational Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, James I.

    1984-01-01

    Deals with how educators can handle the subject of acid rain; illustrates suggestions with experiences of grade nine students visiting Frost Valley Environmental Education Center (Oliverea, New York) to learn scientific concepts through observation of outdoor phenomena, including a stream; and discusses acid rain, pH levels, and pollution control…

  14. Acid rain & electric utilities II

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This document presents reports which were presented at the Acid Rain and Electric Utilities Conference. Topics include environmental issues and electric utilities; acid rain program overview; global climate change and carbon dioxide; emissions data management; compliance; emissions control; allowance and trading; nitrogen oxides; and assessment. Individual reports have been processed separately for the United States Department of Energy databases.

  15. Acid Rain: The Scientific Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Documents the workings and findings of the Massachusetts Acid Rain Monitoring Project, which has pooled the volunteer efforts of more than 1,000 amateur and professional scientists since 1983. Reports on the origins of air pollution, the prediction of acid rain, and its effects on both water life and land resources. (JJK)

  16. Acid Rain: What's the Forecast?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various types of acid rain, considered to be a century-old problem. Topics include: wet and dry deposition, effects on a variety of environments, ecosystems subject to detrimental effects, and possible solutions to the problem. A list of recommended resources on acid rain is provided. (BC)

  17. Acid rain and environmental policy

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J.S.

    1981-10-01

    Various seemingly paradoxical scientific questions are posed which relate to the problem of acid rain and its effect on the environment and environmental policy. The first paradox discussed concerns the supposed increase in fossil fuel usage over the last several decades, with the resultant increases in emissions of pollutants from the combustion of fuels which cause acid rain. Despite these increases, experts do not agree on whether acidity of rain has increased in eastern North America. The second paradox concerns the effect of acid rain on vegetation. If the rain is supposedly harmful, why have some reports shown increases and others, decreases in the growth of crops and trees with the application of simulated acid rain. The third paradox concerns the effect of acid rains on fish life in lakes. If acid rain falls throughout eastern North America, why have some lakes become acid and lost fish populations while others have not. Since unequivocal answers to these scientific questions are not available, a systematic approach is needed for developing policy which can be useful for solving the problem. It appears that traditional cost-benefit analysis can not be the sole basis for decision-making, but that it will be helpful. Research needs must be identified, and the upper and lower limits for alternative strategies must be determined. 14 references, 1 table.

  18. Acid rain: dousing community resources

    SciTech Connect

    Anderberg, K.

    1985-02-01

    While almost everyone agrees that there is a problem regarding acid rain, the differences occur in whether to implement control measures now, or wait for several more years of study to be completed. Most observers are convinced that coal-burning power plants are the major contributors to the problem. In the West, large smelter operations are also identified as sources. Usually, the areas affected are far removed from the actual source. Northeastern states have perhaps the greatest concern about acid precipitation's effect on water quality, since water distribution systems in this region often have been in place for decades and lead piping is far from uncommon. Combined with the historically corrosive nature of the region's water sources and the low buffering capacity of the soil acid precipitation is cited by many experts as an added burden impacting water quality. The challenge to water system operators focuses on the corrosive water's effect on the distribution system. Treatment can be very expensive, but must be addressed. Only 25% of the water systems in New England currently treat water for corrosivity. The most effective method of protecting consumers from corrosive water and associated contaminants is through corrosion control at the treatment plant. Large-scale plans for sulfur emission control still seem to be a long way off. 2 figures.

  19. Acid Precipitation: Causes and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babich, Harvey; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This article is the first of three articles in a series on the acid rain problem in recent years. Discussed are the causes of acid precipitation and its consequences for the abiotic and biotic components of the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and for man-made materials. (Author/SA)

  20. Be an acid rain detective

    SciTech Connect

    Atwill, L.

    1982-07-01

    Acid rain is discussed in a question and answer format. The article is aimed at educating sport fishermen on the subject, and also to encourage them to write their congressmen, senators, and the President about the acid rain problem. The article also announces the availability of an acid rain test kit available through the magazine, ''Sports Afield.'' The kit consists of pH-test paper that turns different shades of pink and blue according to the pH of the water tested. The color of the test paper is then compared to a color chart furnished in the kit and an approximate pH can be determined.

  1. Can crops tolerate acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.K.

    1989-11-01

    This brief article describes work by scientists at the ARS Air Quality-Plant Growth and Development Laboratory in Raleigh, North Carolina, that indicates little damage to crops as a result of acid rain. In studies with simulated acid rain and 216 exposed varieties of 18 crops, there were no significant injuries nor was there reduced growth in most species. Results of chronic and acute exposures were correlated in sensitive tomato and soybean plants and in tolerant winter wheat and lettuce plants. These results suggest that 1-hour exposures could be used in the future to screen varieties for sensitivity to acid rain.

  2. MAP3S/RAINE precipitation chemistry network: quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    The participants of the precipitation chemistry network of the Multi-State Atmospheric Power Production Pollution Study/Regional Acidity of Industrial Emissions (MAP3S/RAINE) have developed procedures for maintenance of high quality output from the network operation. The documented procedures-most of which were in place before the network began sampling in 1976-include those for site selection and verification, field equipment, laboratory and data handling, and external laboratory quality testing.

  3. Editorial: Acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This editorial focuses on acid rain and the history of public and governmental response to acid rain. Comments on a book by Gwineth Howell `Acid Rain and Acid Waters` are included. The editor feels that Howells has provide a service to the environmental scientific community, with a textbook useful to a range of people, as well as a call for decision makers to learn from the acid rain issue and use it as a model for more sweeping global environmental issues. A balance is needed among several parameters such as level of evidence, probability that the evidence will lead to a specific direction and the cost to the global community. 1 tab.

  4. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  5. Atmospheric dust and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Hedin, L.O.; Likens, G.E.

    1996-12-01

    Why is acid rain still an environmental problem in Europe and North America despite antipollution reforms? The answer really is blowing in the wind: atmospheric dust. These airborne particles can help neutralize the acids falling on forests, but dust levels are unusually low these days. In the air dust particles can neutralize acid rain. What can we do about acid rain and atmospheric dust? Suggestions range from the improbable to the feasible. One reasonable suggestion is to reduce emissions of acidic pollutants to levels that can be buffered by natural quantities of basic compounds in the atmosphere; such a goal would mean continued reductions in sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, perhaps even greater than those prescribed in the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act in the U.S. 5 figs.

  6. Impacts of acid rain legislation

    SciTech Connect

    Addison, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    The author warns against hasty acid rain legislation that would involve billions of dollars and affect thousands of jobs. He recommends further study into the causes of high acidity in lakes and streams. He states that there are too many uncertainties of whether the problem would be solved by reducing sulfur dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants. (DMC)

  7. Acid rain erodes business profits, too

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    Evidence is mounting that acid rain may be more expensive, in the long run, than even the most sophisticated, costly pollution control. Unabated, the pollution will have increasingly devastating economic effects. It is difficult to quantify acid rain's economically damaging effects, since they vary considerably with soil quality. Well-buffered soils can tolerate greater quantities of acidic precipitation than can those not well-buffered. Unfortunately, some of the most susceptible areas of the country are also most dependent on agricultural ore recreational business for economic survival. Economically damaging effects vary: they can be either short- or long-term; reversible or irreversible. A partial list might include crop damage, long-term effects on forest growth, fisheries losses, long-term declines in property values on acidified lakes, effects on recreational industries in acid-sensitive areas, and costs incurred by having to treat chemically altered groundwater.

  8. Benefits of acid rain controls

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, D.G.

    1984-04-01

    The acid rain debate has been distorted by a mistaken political paradigm. This paradigm holds that acid rain controls will benefit only a few lakes and streams, mostly in the Adirondack Mountains in northeastern New York State. It holds that the costs of a control program will fall on the Midwest but that none of the benefits will occur there since no sensitive lakes and streams are found in that area. The author discussed this problem and pointed out that sulfur dioxide was responsible for several types of pollution damage and that all the states would benefit from the reduction of sulfur dioxide emissions.

  9. Acid rain: Microphysical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingle, A. N.

    1980-01-01

    A microphysical model was used to simulate the case of a ground cloud without dilution by entrainment and without precipitation. The numerical integration techniques of the model are presented. The droplet size spectra versus time and the droplet molalities for each value of time are discussed.

  10. Acid rain reduced in eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Bowersox, V.C.; Lynch, J.A.; Grimm, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    Sulfate and free hydrogen ion concentrations in precipitation decreased 10 to 25 percent over large areas of the eastern United States in 1995. The largest decreases in both ions occurred in and downwind of the Ohio River Valley, the same area where Phase I of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments set limitations, effective January 1, 1995, on sulfur dioxide emissions from affected coal-fired sources. Based on our analysis of precipitation chemistry and emissions data, we conclude that substantial declines in acid rain occurred in the eastern United States in 1995 because of large reductions in sulfur dioxide emissions in the same region.

  11. Federal report on acid rain draws criticism

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L.

    1987-09-18

    Congress established a 10-year interagency research program in 1980 to examine the causes and effects of acid rain and recommend actions to limit or reduce its harmful effects. On September 17, the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) is scheduled to release its interim assessment. The impression that emerges from the summary is that there is not much to worry about. Acid rain has negligible or no effects on crops and forests, though tropospheric ozone may be a serious problem. Only a small number of lakes have been acidified, and no further significant acidification is likely in the northeast. No abrupt increase in damage to crops, forests, and lakes is likely at current emissions.

  12. THE ACID RAIN NOX PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Between 350,000 and 400,000 tons of annual NOx emissions have been eliminated as a result of Phase I of the Acid Rain NOx Program. As expected. the utilities have chosen emissions averaging as the primary compliance option. This reflects that, in general, NO x reductions have ...

  13. Precipitation chemistry and occurrence of acid rain over the oil-producing Niger Delta region of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nduka, John K C; Orisakwe, Orish Ebere

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the nitrate, sulfate, total dissolved solid (TDS), electrical conductivity, total hardness (TH), and bicarbonates of rainwater samples collected from Warri and Port Harcourt between April-June, July-August, and September-October of 2005 and 2006 to depict onset of rainy season, mid-rainy season, and end of rainy season for the two major crude oil-producing cities of the Niger Delta region of Nigeria (although Port Harcourt is also noted for non-oil manufacturing industries). The same was done in Awka, a non-oil producing city in the hinterland of southeastern Nigeria. In each of the cities, rain samples were collected from three points in a triangular equilibrium using a clean plastic basin fastened to a table 2 m above ground level and 115 m away from tall buildings and trees. The parameters were determined after filtering, using their respective standard methods. Averages of 1.50, 1.81, 1.13 and 2.14, 1.50, 1.86 mg/l of nitrate for April-June, July-August, and September-October were recorded for Warri in 2005 and 2006, respectively. While 15.21, 3.23, 22.31 and 20.89, 9.96, and 14.27mg/l were recorded in Port Harcourt. Sulfate levels for Warri and Port Harcourt for the same periods are follows: 1.38, 1.88, 1.06, 1.50, 1.43, 1.50 and 2.64, 1.15, 5.88, 4.73, 1.90, 1.55 mg/l, respectively. Nitrate levels were higher than sulfate. Other parameters include TDS (5.44, 4.79, 3.30 and 7.63, 3.69, 2.56 mg/l for Warri in 2005 and 2006; 12.57, 2.07, 25.214 and 28.87, 6.73, 7.80 mg/l for Port Harcourt for the same periods). Other parameters also varied in that order for the 2 years in same cities. Crude oil exploration and gas flaring in the Niger Delta, and multiplicity of cottage industries in Awka, impacted on the inorganic ion pollution of the rainwater. This may have public health implications in the region.

  14. Influence of acid rain upon water plumbosolvency.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, M R

    1985-01-01

    The West of Scotland has had particular problems in the past associated with soft acidic water supplies and uptake of lead from domestic plumbing systems by such water. As a consequence of this, health problems related to overexposure to lead have been identified. The current debate on acidification of ground waters by acid rain is therefore particularly pertinent to this area. Studies have shown that even a modest decrease in pH will result in very substantial increase in plumbosolvency. This was found to be of particular importance in the city of Glasgow and town of Ayr, where prior to water treatment, pH values were 6.3 and 5.4, respectively, and where, consequentially, large numbers of homes did not comply with lead in water standards. Closed-loop lime-dosing systems were introduced in both Glasgow and Ayr to increase the pH with immediate decrease in the lead content of the water and, subsequently, blood lead concentrations of the subjects living in these areas. Such closed-loop systems will compensate for any acidity in water supplies, whether of natural origin or originating from acid rain precipitation. However, when such treatment has not been applied, any increase in water acidity due to acid rain which is, in many cases, already unacceptable. which is, in many cases, already unacceptable. PMID:4076078

  15. Influence of acid rain upon water plumbosolvency.

    PubMed

    Moore, M R

    1985-11-01

    The West of Scotland has had particular problems in the past associated with soft acidic water supplies and uptake of lead from domestic plumbing systems by such water. As a consequence of this, health problems related to overexposure to lead have been identified. The current debate on acidification of ground waters by acid rain is therefore particularly pertinent to this area. Studies have shown that even a modest decrease in pH will result in very substantial increase in plumbosolvency. This was found to be of particular importance in the city of Glasgow and town of Ayr, where prior to water treatment, pH values were 6.3 and 5.4, respectively, and where, consequentially, large numbers of homes did not comply with lead in water standards. Closed-loop lime-dosing systems were introduced in both Glasgow and Ayr to increase the pH with immediate decrease in the lead content of the water and, subsequently, blood lead concentrations of the subjects living in these areas. Such closed-loop systems will compensate for any acidity in water supplies, whether of natural origin or originating from acid rain precipitation. However, when such treatment has not been applied, any increase in water acidity due to acid rain which is, in many cases, already unacceptable. which is, in many cases, already unacceptable.

  16. Nature in the Classroom: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Charles

    1982-01-01

    As a lesson topic, acid rain is defined, its chemistry given, and its development since the 1950s described. The worldwide effects of acid rain are discussed along with the available technology for controlling the problem. (CM)

  17. Acid Rain: The Silent Environmental Threat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zmud, Mia

    1992-01-01

    Describes the silent environmental threat posed by acid rain. Caused mainly by manmade pollutants, acid rain damages water and trees, decreases visibility, corrodes monuments, and threatens public health. The article includes guidelines for action. (SM)

  18. An analysis of issues concerning acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    GAO examines the implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain and offers a series of observations on the following issues involved in the debate: to what extent has it been scientifically demonstrated that acid rain is resulting in damage to the environment. What are the causes of acid rain and where is it most prevalent. What alternatives exist for controlling acid rain and what are their economic effects.

  19. Acid rain control: the costs of compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Gilleland, D.S.; Swisher, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    This document is the proceedings from a conference sponsored by the Illinois Energy Resources Commission and the Coal Extraction and Utilization Research Center, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and held in Carbondale on March 18, 1984. Topics addressed include: the sources and impacts of acid rain, the problems inherent in modeling the impacts of acid rain legislation, the effects of acid rain legislation on the socio-economic sector, compliance costs, and the impact of acid rain legislation on related industries (railroads).

  20. Acid Rain: What We Must Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorham, Eville

    1983-01-01

    Addresses questions about the nature, source, and history of acid rain. In addition, discusses the questions: Why is acid rain a problem? Is acid rain getting worse? What is the threat of further problems? Concludes that it is time to act on the problem and recommends an appropriate course of action. (JN)

  1. Acid rain: a serious regional environmental problem.

    PubMed

    Likens, G E; Bormann, F H

    1974-06-14

    At present, acid rain or snow is falling on most of the northeastern United States. The annual acidity value averages about pH 4, but values between pH 2.1 and 5 have been recorded for individual storms. The acidity of precipitation in this region apparently increased about 20 years ago, and the increase may have been associated with the augmented use of natural gas and with the installation of particle-removal devices in tall smokestacks. Only some of the ecological and economic effects of this widespread introduction of strong acids into natural systems are known at present, but clearly they must be considered in proposals for new energy sources and in the development of air quality emission standards.

  2. Acid rain. Rhetoric and reality

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.

    1988-01-01

    The book examines the implications of recent scientific studies, and sets the political debate in the main 'polluting' countries--Britain and the United States--into its proper international context. It provides a wealth of U.S. data, including a history of the development of U.S. acid rain policy. The author presents a review of the evidence for damage and the statistics of change. Data is drawn from around the world, with particular emphasis on damage in Scandinavia and West Germany.

  3. Two groups challenge US acid rain efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    In its report, Acid Rain Invades Our National Parks, the National Parks and Conservation Association (NPCA) says acid rain is being detected at all 27 national park monitoring sites. In 1980, 87 national parks expressed concern in a NPCA survey over acid rain. Repolled in 1986, more than half of the respondents reported that no research on acid rain was under way. The NPCA report concludes that the alarm that was sounded in 1980 fell largely on deaf ears, and calls for the structural and scientific reorganization of the National Park Service. The National Audubon Society shares NPCA's dissatisfaction with federal efforts to tackle the problem of acid rain and has taken testing into its own hands. Through its Citizens Acid Rain Monitoring Network, Audubon volunteers have collected readings of acidity at 64 monitoring stations in 31 states since July.

  4. Analysis of issues concerning acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, C.A.

    1984-12-11

    Although science has largely determined that man-made emissions cause acid rain, there is uncertainty concerning the extent and timing of its anticipated effects. Thus, at the present time scientific information alone does not lead unequivocally to a conclusion on whether it is appropriate to begin control actions now or to await better understanding. Given this uncertainty, decisionmakers must weigh the risks of further, potentially avoidable environmental damage against the risks of economic impacts from acid rain control actions which may ultimately prove to be unwarranted. GAO examines the implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain and offers a series of observations on the following issues involved in the debate: To what extent has it been scientifically demonstrated that acid rain is resulting in damage to the environment. What are the causes of acid rain and where is it most prevalent. What alternatives exist for controlling acid rain and what are their economic effects. 5 figures, 20 tables.

  5. Acid rain said to threaten Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-29

    A report on April 25, 1988 by the Environmental Defense Fund blames acid rain for pollution of Chesapeake Bay. The nitrates in the rain are reported to account for 25% of the nitrogen load of the bay. This increases the acidity of the bay, thereby acting as a fertilizer to promote algal growth. It is postulated that acid rain contributes as much nitrogen to the bay as point sources, which include raw sewage and industrial plants.

  6. Acid rain information book. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    Acid rain is one of the most widely publicized environmental issues of the day. The potential consequences of increasingly widespread acid rain demand that this phenomenon be carefully evaluated. Reveiw of the literature shows a rapidly growing body of knowledge, but also reveals major gaps in understanding that need to be narrowed. This document discusses major aspects of the acid rain phenomenon, points out areas of uncertainty, and summarizes current and projected research by responsible government agencies and other concerned organizations.

  7. Comment on acid precipitation in historical perspective and effects of acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is presented of the history of the problem of acid rain. Lake and stream water are classified as sensitive to acid rain largely on the basis of buffering capacity of soils and geological substrate. Evidence for acid precipitation causing the acidification of lakes and streams on a regional basis is not conclusive. However, soil genesis and forest development can be acidifying processes in humid climates. Acid rain is increasing soil aluminum solubility and leaching to surface water in concentrations toxic to fish. Under natural conditions of podzolization, aluminum is mobilized in surface soils and subsequently retained by spodic subsoils. Whether acid rain appreciably accelerates aluminum leaching from soils is hypothetical. It is concluded from one report that acid precipitation is related to increases in the accumulation and spatial variations of forest floors, soil acidification, exchangeable aluminum, aluminum released from clay, and internal ecosystem H/sup +/ ion production. But, these conclusions are based on limited sampling. 28 references.

  8. Pollen selection under acid rain stress

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.

    1994-01-01

    To investigate whether acid rain stress induces pollen selection in nature, three different approaches were used, based on the assumption that the response of pollen grains to acid rain is controlled by an acid sensitive gene product. Germination of pollen from homozygous and heterozygous individuals under acid rain stress was examined to detect any differences in rate of germination between populations of homogeneous and heterogeneous pollen grains. In vitro and in vivo bulked segregant analysis using RAPDs was used to search for differences in DNA constitution between the survivors of acid rain stressed and non-acid rain stressed pollen populations in vitro and between the progenies of acid rain stressed and non-acid rain stressed populations during pollination, respectively. No evidence for the pollen selection under acid rain stress was obtained in any of the test systems. Inhibition of protein synthesis using cycloheximide led to significant reduction of tube elongation at 4 hr and had no effect on pollen germination at any time interval tested. Total proteins extracted from control and acid rain stressed pollen grain populations exhibited no differences. The reduction of corn pollen germination in vitro under acid rain stress was mainly due to pollen rupture. The present data indicates the reduction of pollen germination and tube growth under acid rain stress may be a physiological response rather than a genetic response. A simple, nontoxic, and effective method to separate germinated from ungerminated pollen grains has been developed using pollen from corn (Zea mays, L. cv. Pioneer 3747). The separated germinated pollen grains retained viability and continued tube growth when placed in culture medium.

  9. Acid Rain: Activities for Science Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Seven complete secondary/college level acid rain activities are provided. Activities include overview; background information and societal implications; major concepts; student objectives; vocabulary/material lists; procedures; instructional strategies; and questions/discussion and extension suggestions. Activities consider effects of acid rain on…

  10. Human Ecology: Acid Rain and Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    1983-01-01

    A connection between science and society can be seen in the human and ecological dimensions of one contemporary problem: acid rain. Introduces a human ecological theme and relationships between acid rain and public policy, considering scientific understanding and public awareness, scientific research and public policy, and national politics and…

  11. Effects of simulated sulfuric acid rain on crop plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, C.J.; Grothaus, L.C.; Perrigan, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    Since relatively little is known about the effects of acid precipitation on growth and productivity of crop plants, a crop survey was initiated to study effects of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ rain simulants on growth, yield, and quality of selected crops which were chosen to represent diverse taxonomic groups and crop products. Plants were grown in pots in field-exposure chambers and subjected to three H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ rain simulants (pH levels 4.0, 3.5, and 3.0) and to a control simulant (pH 5.6). Yield of approximately two-thirds of the crops surveyed was not affected by the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ rain treatments. Equal numbers of the remaining crops exhibited stimulatory and inhibitory yield responses at some H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ rain simulant pH levels. These results did not suggest that acid rain treatment either generally inhibited or stimulated crop productivity. Crop response depended on crop species and crop product. For example, while forage yield of alfalfa and timothy was stimulated at some acid rain pH levels, yield of the remaining forage legume and grass species was not generally affected by acid rain treatment. However, root and fruit crop species exhibited generalized responses (yield inhibition and stimulation, respectively) which appeared to be more closely associated with crop product than occurred for other crop product groupings. Effects on crop quality were also important. For instance, although yield of some horticultural leaf and fruit crops was either unaffected or stimulated by H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ rain treatment, marketability was adversely affected at low pH because of the presence of discoloration and/or lesions produced by H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ rain treatment. This preliminary study demonstrates considerable variability in crop response to acid rain.

  12. Acid Precipitation Awareness Curriculum Materials in the Life Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.

    1983-01-01

    Provides an outline of course content for acid precipitation and two acid rain activities (introduction to pH and effects of acid rain on an organism). Information for obtaining 20 additional activities as well as an information packet containing booklets, pamphlets, and articles are also provided. (JN)

  13. A meteorological potential forecast model for acid rain in Fujian Province, China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi Yong; Lin, Chang Cheng; Liu, Jing Xiong; Wu, De Hui; Lian, Dong Ying; Chen, Bin Bin

    2010-05-01

    Based on the acid rain and concurrent meteorological observational data during the past 10 years in Fujian Province, China, the dependence of distribution characteristics of acid rain on season, rain rate, weather pattern and dominant airflow in four regions of Fujian Province is analyzed. On the annual average, the acid rain frequency is the highest (above 40%) in the southern and mid-eastern regions, and the lowest (16.2%) in the western region. The acid rain occurs most frequently in spring and winter, and least frequent in summer. The acid rain frequency in general increases with the increase of precipitation. It also depend on the direction of dominant airflows at 850 hPa. In the mid-eastern region, more than 40% acid rains appear when the dominant wind directions are NW, W, SW, S and SE. In the southern region, high acid rain occurrence happens when the dominant wind directions are NW, W, SW and S. In the northern region, 41.8% acid rains occur when the southwesterly is pronounced. In the western region, the southwesterly is associated with a 17% acid rain rate. The examination of meteorological sounding conditions over Fuzhou, Xiamen and Shaowu cities shows that the acid rain frequency increases with increased inversion thickness. Based on the results above, a meteorological potential forecast model for acid rain is established and tested in 2007. The result is encouraging. The model provides an objective basis for the development of acid rain forecasting operation in the province.

  14. Study on the relationship between meteorological conditions and acid rain in mid-eastern Fujian.

    PubMed

    Lin, C C; Liu, J X; Cai, Y Y; Li, B L; Wang, Z L; Chen, B B

    2009-08-01

    Based on the acid rain observation data and the contemporaneous historical synoptic charts of Mid-Eastern Fujian during the period of 1991 to 2003, we analyzed the distribution characteristics of acid rain in different seasons, weather types, precipitation grades and wind directions. The results showed that the acid pollution in Mid-Eastern Fujian was still serious. In winter, the precipitation pH value was 4.79, and the acid rain frequency was 60.62% which was twice higher than that in summer. The pH value of warm shear-type precipitation at 850 hPa was 4.79. Nearly half of these precipitations had the problems of acid rain pollution. The acid rain frequency of the inverted trough type was only 26.11% which was the lowest one in all types. There was no marked difference of the acid rain distribution characteristics between ahead-of-trough and behind-the-trough. The precipitation pH values of the five grades were lower than 5.30 and the acid rain frequency changed as an inverted U shape with the increasing of the rainfall. The pH values of precipitations in the eight wind directions were generally below 5.20, and the acid rain frequencies were about 40%.

  15. Acid Monsoonal Rains in Nepal in August 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazis, C. A.; Best, B.; Johnson, J.; Pratt-Sitaula, B.; Hodges, D.; Johansen, A. M.; Upreti, B.

    2010-12-01

    Monsoonal rains between the months of May and September constitute approximately 80% of Nepal’s annual precipitation, controlling river discharge and flooding patterns, sustaining native vegetation and agriculture, and influencing physical and chemical weathering rates. Acid rain events, if common during the monsoon season, could have significant impact on regional ecosystems as well as chemical weathering rates and patterns. In this study, precipitation samples were collected in August 2008 and August 2009 from a site in the town of Bhulbhule on the Marsyandi River in north-central Nepal. These samples were analyzed for pH, conductivity, major ion chemistry and trace element chemistry. In 2008, daily samples were collected between August 12 and August 25. Of these fourteen samples, eleven were acid rain, with pH between 4.1 and 4.8. The remaining three, collected between August 14 and August 16 had pH vaules between 6.6 and 7.0. In 2009, samples were collected again between August 12 and August 25. During the first four days of this interval, samples were collected after each precipitation event and thereafter they were collected daily. In 2009, all but one sample collected had a pH above 6.1 and five samples had values above 8.0. The lowest pH measured was 5.5. Major ion chemistry reveals a number of differences between the 2008 precipitation samples and the 2009 samples. For example, 2009 samples have higher K and Cl concentrations and thus tend to have lower Ca/K and SO4/Cl ratios. When comparing the acid rain and non-acid rain samples collected in 2008, the most distinct difference is the presence of PO4 in measurable amounts (0.2 to 1.1 ppm) in the acid rain samples. In this poster we discuss these differences in major ion chemistry in terms of local and regional weather patterns and potential ion sources.

  16. Acid rain reduced in Eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, J.A.; Bowersox, V.C.; Grimm, J.W.

    2000-03-15

    Concentrations of sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) and free hydrogen ions (H{sup +}) in precipitation decreased from 10% to 25% over a large area of the Eastern US from 1995 through 1997 as compared to the previous 12-year (1983--1994) reference period. These decreases were unprecedented in magnitude and spatial extent. In contrast, nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) concentrations generally did not change over this period. The largest decreases in both H{sup +} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} concentrations, which nearly mimicked one another, occurred in and downwind of the Ohio River Valley, the same area where Title 4 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) set limitations on sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions from a large number of utility-owned coal-fired sources. Phase 1 of the CAAA required that these limitations be met by January 1, 1995. On the basis of their analysis of precipitation chemistry and emissions data, the authors conclude that significant declines in acid rain occurred in many parts of the Eastern US from 1995 through 1997 because of large reductions in SO{sub 2} emissions in this region and a corresponding reduction in SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} concentrations in precipitation.

  17. Acid rain and drinking water degradation.

    PubMed

    Middleton, P; Rhodes, S L

    1984-03-01

    Acid deposition-induced drinking water degradation is discussed with respect to the geographical extent of and the potential for dealing with possibly adverse human health impacts. Qualitative evidence from the northeastern United States and Sweden strongly suggests the existence of a linkage between these two environmental concerns. It is argued that water treatment and reduction of acid rain as solutions to the problem of water toxicity need closer evaluation. More research into the causal link is warranted since the addition of human health impacts to acid rain's environmental insults could have a significant bearing on discussions relating to acid rain controls.

  18. Acid Rain: A Teaching Focus for the Intermediate Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Renee B.; Adams, Neil D.

    1992-01-01

    The study of acid rain provides ample opportunities for active, interdisciplinary learning. This article describes 12 hands-on activities designed to expand students' understanding of acid rain. Background information on acid rain is included. (LB)

  19. Acid rain and pollen germination in corn.

    PubMed

    Wertheim, F S; Craker, L E

    1987-01-01

    The properties of an acid rain episode that could influence the germination of pollen in corn, Zea mays L., were evaluated by treating silks with a simulated acid rain and measuring the subsequent germination of pollen on the silks. The data indicated that acid rain creates an inhospitable environment for pollen germination on the silk surface. Reduced germination appeared directly related to the acidity of the rain, but not the sulphate concentration. Rinsing silks with a pH 5.6 rain after treatment with a pH 2.6 rain did not increase pollen germination above that on silks treated only with a pH 2.6 rain, suggesting the reduced germination was due to physical and/or chemical modifications of the silk surface and not to residual acid on the tissue. Pollen germination on silks was inhibited even when silk tissue was exposed to a simulated rain of pH 2.6 for <1.5min.

  20. Acid rain: Some preliminary results from global data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequeira, R.

    1981-02-01

    Preliminary results of an analysis of global precipitation data from WMO (World Meteorological Organization) stations suggest that even remote maritime baseline stations, far removed from major continents, could become predisposed to acid rain if there is a deficiency of non-marine calcium relative to non-marine sulfate. The regional stations show greater complexity than the baseline stations in their precipitation chemistry. The overall results of this analysis suggest that not all non-marine sulfate and nitrate in precipitation could be present as acid.

  1. Acid rain in Laos and Thailand.

    PubMed

    Halpern, M

    1996-09-01

    Acid rain has an impact on forestry and human health. Forest degradation was noticed in the early 90's in Laos, a country without polluting industries nor intense automobile traffic. Therefore, in 1993-1994, we collected rain in one location in Thailand (Bangkok) and 4 in Laos (Luang Prabang, Vientiane, Savannaketh, Pakse); measured pH in each sample and resistivity in 2 locations. We obtained sequential meteorological satellite pictures showing the far motion of clouds, their location and course, and ultimately rain over Indochina. We conclude that acid rain forms over Thailand and falls in Laos (Vientiane, Pakse). We also measured peak flows in large groups of children, adults both non-smokers and chronic heavy smokers, in all five locations. Except for a small number of individual variations, we could not correlate the presence of acid rain and deterioration of pulmonary function in these subjects. However, we recommend active measures to curb pollution both in Thailand and Laos.

  2. NAPAP Acid Rain Conference improves scientific consensus, discounts extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, Patricia M.

    While there is still debate concerning the causes and effects of acid rain, most scientists agree that extreme interpretations of the issue can now be eliminated. This is one conclusion drawn from a major international conference convened in February in Hilton Head, S.C., to examine and critique the findings of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), a 10-year federally sponsored research and assessment effort.When NAPAP was initiated in 1981, scientific opinion on acid rain was divided. The issue was viewed by some as a rapidly intensifying disaster requiring immediate remediation, and by others as a speculative hypothesis without sufficient substantiation. The NAPAP International Conference confirmed that most scientific opinion now lies well inside both of these two positions. The NAPAP work indicates that acid rain has damaged certain lakes and streams in the eastern United States and Canada, and that it contributes to decline of high-evaluation spruce-fir forests, materials degradation, and visibility impairment.

  3. Acid rain and our nation`s capital: A guide to effects on buildings and monuments

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, E.

    1997-03-01

    This booklet focuses on acid rain and its impact on our Nation`s capital. This booklet will define acid rain, explain what effects it has on marble and limestone buildings, and show, on a walking tour, some of the places in our Nation`s capital where you can see the impact of acid precipitation.

  4. Acid Rain: A Selective Bibliography. Second Edition. Bibliography Series Twenty-One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Gertrudis, Comp.

    Acid rain is a term for rain, snow, or other precipitation produced from water vapor in the air reacting with emissions from automobiles, factories, power plants, and other oil and coal burning sources. When these chemical compounds, composed of sulfur oxide and nitrogen oxide, react with water vapor, the result is sulfuric acid and nitric acid.…

  5. Effects of acid rain and sulfur dioxide on marble dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, P.F.; Reddy, M.M. ); Sherwood, S.I. )

    1994-01-01

    Acid precipitation and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) accelerate damage to carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. This study identified and quantified environmental damage to a sample of Vermont marble during storms and their preceding dry periods. Results from field experiments indicated the deposition of SO[sub 2] gas to the stone surface during dry periods and a twofold increase in marble dissolution during coincident episodes of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. The study is widely applicable to the analysis of carbonate-stone damage at locations affected by acid rain and air pollution.

  6. Effects of acid rain and sulfur dioxide on marble dissolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, Paul F.; Reddy, Michael M.; Sherwood, Susan I.

    1994-01-01

    Acid precipitation and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide (SO2) accelerate damage to carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. This study identified and quantified environmental damage to a sample of Vermont marble during storms and their preceding dry periods. Results from field experiments indicated the deposition of SO2 gas to the stone surface during dry periods and a twofold increase in marble dissolution during coincident episodes of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. The study is widely applicable to the analysis of carbonate-stone damage at locations affected by acid rain and air pollution.

  7. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the measurement and analysis of acid rain and acidification of areas by precipitation. Both global and regionalized areas of acid rain effects are examined. Control techniques applicable to the sources and causes are discussed. (Contains a minimum of 187 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Air pollution, acid rain and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mellanby, K.

    1988-01-01

    This book reports on the Watt Committee's working group on acid rain, which was set up in 1981. The authors consider the relationship between natural and the man-made factors and the effects of possible remedial strategies. In the first phase of the study, the group looked at the fate of airborne pollution, vegetation and soils, freshwater and remedial strategy. In this report, which contains the results of a further phase of study, these topics are included and have been brought up to date. The scope of the report is extended to include buildings and non-living materials. Consideration is given to the problem of acid rain and air pollution worldwide. Emphasis is placed on the United Kingdom. The main conclusion is that more research is necessary on some aspects of acid rain and air pollution, but that some of the reports widespread damage caused by acid rain cannot be confirmed.

  9. TECHNOLOGICAL OPTIONS FOR ACID RAIN CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Discussed are acid rain control options available to the electric utility industry. They include coal switching, flue gas desulfurization, and such emerging lower cost technologies as Limestone Injection Multistage Burners (LIMB) and Advanced Silicate (ADVACATE), both developed ...

  10. Materials degradation caused by acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Baboian, R.

    1986-01-01

    This book is the result of a symposium sponsored by the Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, Inc. at the 20th State-of-the-Art Symposium of the American Chemical Society, Arlington, Virginia, June 17-19, 1985. The papers represent the state of our knowledge about materials problems resulting from acid deposition as we understand it through the Federal assessment efforts. The book is a must for those interested in the progress of the ongoing National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program. The volume contains 29 separately authored papers in 5 sections: Measurement and Monitoring of Atmospheric Deposition (5 papers), Metallic Corrosion (9 papers), Masonry Deterioration (7 papers), Degradation of Organics (3 papers), and Economic Effects (5 papers). The papers are assembled in such a way as to introduce the reader to the scope and nature of the atmospheric deposition (acid rain) problem. For those interested in how man and his technology are affecting our environment, this collection of papers establishes what information is available to better understand how materials degrade differently in an ambient environment enriched in anthropogenic NO/sup 3 -/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, their precursors, and associated forms and ions. The papers weave a tale about a complex international and global problem of acidification that has potential to affect exposed building materials.

  11. [Analysis of acid rain characteristics of Lin'an Regional Background Station using long-term observation data].

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Quan; Ma, Hao; Mao, Yu-Ding; Feng, Tao

    2014-02-01

    Using long-term observation data of acid rain at Lin'an Regional Background Station (Lin'an RBS), this paper studied the interannual and monthly variations of acid rain, the reasons for the variations, and the relationships between acid rain and meteorological factors. The results showed that interannual variation of acid rain at Lin'an RBS had a general increasing trend in which there were two obvious intensifying processes and two distinct weakening processes, during the period ranging from 1985 to 2012. In last two decades, the monthly variation of acid rain at Lin'an RBS indicated that rain acidity and frequency of severe acid rain were increasing but the frequency of weak acid rain was decreasing when moving towards bilateral side months of July. Acid rain occurrence was affected by rainfall intensity, wind speed and wind direction. High frequency of severe acid rain and low frequency of weak acid rain were on days with drizzle, but high frequency of weak acid rain and low frequency of severe acid rain occurred on rainstorm days. With wind speed upgrading, the frequency of acid rain and the proportion of severe acid rain were declining, the pH value of precipitation was reducing too. Another character is that daily dominant wind direction of weak acid rain majorly converged in S-W section ,however that of severe acid rain was more likely distributed in N-E section. The monthly variation of acid rain at Lin'an RBS was mainly attributed to precipitation variation, the increasing and decreasing of monthly incoming wind from SSE-WSW and NWN-ENE sections of wind direction. The interannual variation of acid rain could be due to the effects of energy consumption raising and significant green policies conducted in Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Shanghai.

  12. [Analysis of acid rain characteristics of Lin'an Regional Background Station using long-term observation data].

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Quan; Ma, Hao; Mao, Yu-Ding; Feng, Tao

    2014-02-01

    Using long-term observation data of acid rain at Lin'an Regional Background Station (Lin'an RBS), this paper studied the interannual and monthly variations of acid rain, the reasons for the variations, and the relationships between acid rain and meteorological factors. The results showed that interannual variation of acid rain at Lin'an RBS had a general increasing trend in which there were two obvious intensifying processes and two distinct weakening processes, during the period ranging from 1985 to 2012. In last two decades, the monthly variation of acid rain at Lin'an RBS indicated that rain acidity and frequency of severe acid rain were increasing but the frequency of weak acid rain was decreasing when moving towards bilateral side months of July. Acid rain occurrence was affected by rainfall intensity, wind speed and wind direction. High frequency of severe acid rain and low frequency of weak acid rain were on days with drizzle, but high frequency of weak acid rain and low frequency of severe acid rain occurred on rainstorm days. With wind speed upgrading, the frequency of acid rain and the proportion of severe acid rain were declining, the pH value of precipitation was reducing too. Another character is that daily dominant wind direction of weak acid rain majorly converged in S-W section ,however that of severe acid rain was more likely distributed in N-E section. The monthly variation of acid rain at Lin'an RBS was mainly attributed to precipitation variation, the increasing and decreasing of monthly incoming wind from SSE-WSW and NWN-ENE sections of wind direction. The interannual variation of acid rain could be due to the effects of energy consumption raising and significant green policies conducted in Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Shanghai. PMID:24812937

  13. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  14. Capabilities for research on acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Manowitz, B.

    1981-05-01

    Acid rain studies at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are conducted within the Department of Energy and Environment, in the divisions of Atmospheric Sciences, Environmental Chemistry, Land and Freshwater Environmental Sciences, and Biomedical and Environmental Assessment of the National Center for the Analysis of Energy Systems. The capabilities and ongoing activities of each of these organizations which relate to the acid rain problem are summarized here.

  15. Acid Precipitation; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Rushing, J.W.; Hicks, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    This publication, Acid Precipitation (APC) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information on acid precipitation and closely related subjects, including wet and dry deposition, long-range transport, environmental effects, modeling, and socioeconomic factors. Information on the following subjects is included within the scope of this publication, but all subjects may not appear in each issue: Pollution sources and pollution control technology; atmospheric transport and chemistry; terrestrial transport and chemistry; aquatic transport and chemistry; biological effects; corrosive effects; and socioeconomics, policy, and legislation.

  16. Rain Profiling Algorithm for the TRMM Precipitation Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iguchi, Toshio; Kozu, Toshiaki; Meneghini, Robert; Okamoto, Kenichi

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an outline of the algorithm that estimates the instantaneous profiles of the true radar reflectivity factor and rainfall rate from the radar reflectivity profiles observed by the Precipitation Radar (PR) onboard the TRMM satellite. The major challenge of the algorithm lies in the correction of rain attenuation with the non-uniform beam filling effect. The algorithm was tested with synthetic data and the result is shown.

  17. Effects of acid rain on grapevines

    SciTech Connect

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Dee, R.J.; Kender, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines (Vitis labrusca, Bailey) were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to pH 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, eight additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid rain solutions at pH 2.75 and pH 3.25. With Concord in 1981, few foliar lesions on leaves were visible at pH 2.75. In contrast, many leaf lesions with decreased fruit soluble solids in the absence of acid rain leaf lesions at pH>2.5 remains unclear. Acute sprays (pH 2.75) at anthesis reduced pollen germination in four grape cultivars. However, fruit set was reduced in only one of these. Only the cultivars de Chaunac and Ives had reduced berry soluble solids with chronic weekly sprays at pH 2.75. Reduction in soluble solids was not associated with increased oxidant stipple (ozone injury) in Concord and de Chaunac cultivars, but this association was observed in Ives. There was no evidence that acid rain in combination with ozone increased oxidant stipple as occurs when ozone and SO/sub 2/ are combined. Grape yields were not influenced by acid rain treatments. There was no evidence that acid rain at ambient pH levels had negative effects on grape production or fruit quality.

  18. Effects of acid rain on grapevines

    SciTech Connect

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Dee, R.J.; Kender, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, 8 additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid rain solutions at pH 2.75 and 3.25. With Concord in 1981, few foliar lesions on leaves were visible at pH 2.75. In contrast, many leaf lesions with decreased fruit soluble solids were observed at pH 2.5 in 1980. The relationship between acid-rain and oxidant stipple, chlorosis, and soluble solids in the absence of acid rain leaf lesions at pH>2.5 remains unclear. Acute sprays (pH2.75) at anthesis reduced pollen germination in four grape cultivars. However, fruit set was reduced in only one of these. Grape yields were not influenced by acid rain treatments. There was no evidence that acid-rain at ambient pH levels had negative effects on grape production or fruit quality.

  19. Comment on comment on ''acid precipitation in historical perspective and effects of acid precipitation''

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, A.; Richter, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    The author criticizes the fact that some soil scientists have difficulties in accepting that lakes and stream waters have become acid due to acid rain, because the natural production of acidity in ecosystems is large compared to the contribution from acid rain. He points out that Richter concludes that many of the reported changes, where real, may well result from natural processes with relatively minor contributions from acid precipitation. The author also disagrees with Krug and Frink who recently suggested that SO/sub 4/ from acid rain is exchanged with organic anions originally present in the water, leaving pH essentially unchanged. The author rebuts Henriksen who he says appears to have misunderstood the intent of the original correspondence, which was not to document evidence but rather to assert two generalities; (1) adverse effects of acid deposition on ecosystems are commonly overstated, and (2) the biogeochemistry of ecosystems is easily oversimplified, and natural sources of acidity are often ignored.

  20. Acid rain and atmospheric chemistry at Allegheny Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, W.R.; Brachaczek, W.W.; Gorse, R.A. Jr.; Japar, S.M.; Norbeck, J.M.; Keeler, G.J.

    1987-07-01

    Rain chemistry was measured in August 1983 on Allegheny Mountain and Larel Hill in southwester Pennsylvania. The average composition approximated an H/sub 2/SO/sub 5//HNO/sub 3/ mixture with a volume-weighted average pH of 3.5 and an SO/sub 4//sup 2 -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ mole ratio of 1.8. There was very little undissociated (weak) acidity and very little S(IV). The acidic rains were associated with air masses traversing SO/sub 2/ source regions west of the sites; stagnation and intervening precipitation were important influences. The geographic scale for a halving of rain SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ concentration downwind of SO/sub 2/ sources was approx.440 km. Scavenging ratios were inferred for SO/sub 2/, aerosol SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and HNO/sub 3/. On average about half of the rain SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ resulted from scavenging of SO/sub 2/, the rest from scavenging of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. The rain H/sup +/ was attributed about 25% to HNO/sub 3/, 55% to scavenging of SO/sub 2/, and 20% to scavenging of aerosol acid SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. Cumulative deposition totals in rain were compared with deposition in fog and with dry deposition in the same experiment. A crude acid-deposition budget was calculated as follows: 47%, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in rain; 23%, SO/sub 2/ dry deposition without dew; 16%, HNO/sub 3/ in rain; 11%, HNO/sub 3/ dry deposition without dew; 2%, HNO/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in fog and dew; 0.5%, aerosol dry deposition without dew. 86 references, 4 figures, 8 tables.

  1. Acid rain and dry deposition of atmospheric pollutants: ORNL studies the effects

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, D.

    1984-01-01

    Acidic precipitation and atmospheric deposition may be involved in the decline of some forests and in the elevation of aluminum levels in streams. The research programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory which are focussed on acid rain are described. Some of the areas currently under scrutiny are: soil buffering capacity, the quantitative relationships between wet and dry deposition, the effects of acid rain on forest growth, forest canopy interactions with acid precipitation, the effects of acid rain on aquatic ecosystems, and innovations in pollution control technology.

  2. Occurrence of acid rain over Delhi.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, S; Khillare, P S

    2001-10-01

    Precipitation samples were collected as wet-fall only and primarily on event basis in Delhi during the monsoon period of 1995. Concentrations of major anions (SO4(2-), NO3- and Cl-) and cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ and K+) were determined. The pH of the rain water was found to be more than 5.6, showing alkalinity during the early phase of monsoon, but during the late phase of monsoon pH tendency was towards acidity due to lack of proper neutralization of acidic ions. Neutralization is not only due to the local process but also due to the pre-monsoon 'Andhi' which brings Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) containing Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ and K+ as well as the local emission of NH3. In the late monsoon the concentration of cations gets reduced because of heavy rainfall and relatively unfavourable condition for their transport from the adjoining areas, whereas the anion concentrations remain unchanged owing to their continuous emission.

  3. Acid rain and its ecological consequences.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anita; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2008-01-01

    Acidification of rain-water is identified as one of the most serious environmental problems of transboundary nature. Acid rain is mainly a mixture of sulphuric and nitric acids depending upon the relative quantities of oxides of sulphur and nitrogen emissions. Due to the interaction of these acids with other constituents of the atmosphere, protons are released causing increase in the soil acidity Lowering of soil pH mobilizes and leaches away nutrient cations and increases availability of toxic heavy metals. Such changes in the soil chemical characteristics reduce the soil fertility which ultimately causes the negative impact on growth and productivity of forest trees and crop plants. Acidification of water bodies causes large scale negative impact on aquatic organisms including fishes. Acidification has some indirect effects on human health also. Acid rain affects each and every components of ecosystem. Acid rain also damages man-made materials and structures. By reducing the emission of the precursors of acid rain and to some extent by liming, the problem of acidification of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem has been reduced during last two decades.

  4. Acid rain and its ecological consequences.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anita; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2008-01-01

    Acidification of rain-water is identified as one of the most serious environmental problems of transboundary nature. Acid rain is mainly a mixture of sulphuric and nitric acids depending upon the relative quantities of oxides of sulphur and nitrogen emissions. Due to the interaction of these acids with other constituents of the atmosphere, protons are released causing increase in the soil acidity Lowering of soil pH mobilizes and leaches away nutrient cations and increases availability of toxic heavy metals. Such changes in the soil chemical characteristics reduce the soil fertility which ultimately causes the negative impact on growth and productivity of forest trees and crop plants. Acidification of water bodies causes large scale negative impact on aquatic organisms including fishes. Acidification has some indirect effects on human health also. Acid rain affects each and every components of ecosystem. Acid rain also damages man-made materials and structures. By reducing the emission of the precursors of acid rain and to some extent by liming, the problem of acidification of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem has been reduced during last two decades. PMID:18831326

  5. Little is plain about acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Wantuck, M.M.

    1984-11-01

    Control of forest fires, which supplied alkaline ash to naturally acidic forest floors and neighboring lakes, may be part of the current acid rain problem. Researchers know that acid rain is not new, but they don't know how much sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) emissions from fossil fuels contributes or how far those emissions travel. The debate over Clean Air Act provisions surrounds this lack of certainty over the effectiveness of pollution regulations at a time when the administration seeks to reduce the government role and cost. Studies of the effects of acid rain on lakes, forests, and crops are inconclusive, making it difficult for Congress to legislate emission standards. Utility plants will be able to choose among coal cleaning, wet and dry scrubbing, and fluidized-bed combustion technologies if Congress reduces emission levels.

  6. Materials degradation caused by acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Baboian, R.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on acid rain. Topics considered at the symposium included acidification, wet deposition, dry deposition, the corrosion of metals, corrosion products, the weathering of steel, environmental effects, automotive corrosion, effects on indoor surfaces, the degradation of organics, effects on wood surfaces, effects on plants, the acid rain degradation of nylon, the legal aspects of materials damage, the economic features of materials degradation, the economic assessment of acid damage to building materials, and the application of a theory for the economic assessment of corrosion damage.

  7. Acid Rain Materials for Classroom Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Factor, Lance; Kooser, Robert G.

    This booklet contains three separate papers suitable for use in an advanced high school or college chemistry course. The first paper provides background information on acids and bases. The second paper provides additional background information, focusing on certain aspects of atmospheric chemistry as it relates to the acid rain problem. An attempt…

  8. Acid Rain: A Student's First Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, Beth Ann; And Others

    The purpose of this guide is to help students better understand the science, citizen action, and research issues that are part of the acid rain problem. The guide is designed for students in grades 4-8 and their teachers. Following an introduction, the first seven sections are informative in nature. They include: (1) "Observations about Acidity";…

  9. Acid rain: solving a transborder problem

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of air pollution drifting across the border into Canada and falling as acid rain is discussed. This acid rain is having a great variety of negative impacts on lakes, streams, groundwater, soil, building surfaces, and on forests and certain crops. Between seven and eight million tons of SO/sub 2/ falling on Canada every year, along with four million tons of No/sub x/. At least half of this amount originates from emissions released in the US. The US and Canada took the first step towards reducing the transborder flow of acid rain in 1980, with the signing of a Memorandum of Intent between the two governments. The agreement pledges both countries to negotiate an air pollution agreement. In the interim, the two countries are committed to an enforcement of existing rules and regulations, and to cooperate in studies aimed at gaining information needed to draft an effective agreement.

  10. Analysis of acid rain patterns in northeastern China using a decision tree method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuying; Jiang, Hong; Jin, Jiaxin; Xu, Xiaohua; Zhang, Qingxin

    2012-01-01

    Acid rain is a major regional-scale environmental problem in China. To control acid rain pollution and to protect the ecological environment, it is urgent to document acid rain patterns in various regions of China. Taking Liaoning Province as the study area, the present work focused on the spatial and temporal variations of acid rains in northeastern China. It presents a means for predicting the occurrence of acid rain using geographic position, terrain characteristics, routinely monitored meteorological factors and column concentrations of atmospheric SO 2 and NO 2. The analysis applies a decision tree approach to the foregoing observation data. Results showed that: (1) acid rain occurred at 17 stations among the 81 monitoring stations in Liaoning Province, with the frequency of acid rain from 0 to 84.38%; (2) summer had the most acid rain occurrences followed by spring and autumn, and the winter had the least; (3) the total accuracy for the simulation of precipitation pH (pH ≤ 4.5, 4.5 < pH ≤ 5.6, and pH > 5.6) was 98.04% using the decision tree method known as C5. The simulation results also indicated that the distance to coastline, elevation, wind direction, wind speed, rainfall amount, atmospheric pressure, and the precursors of acid rain all have a strong influence on the occurrence of acid rains in northeastern China.

  11. Acid rain and electric utilities 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This proceedings contains more than 100 technical presentations dealing with a variety of topics concerning the Title IV acid rain provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Some of the major topics addressed include: emerging environmental issues impacting electric utilities (proposed revisions to the ozone and particulate matter NAAQS), acid rain program overview, continuous emissions monitoring rule revisions, global climate change and CO{sub 2}, emissions data management, Clean Air Power Initiative and regional issues, compliance/designated representative, flow monitoring, emissions control technology, allowance and trading, emission reductions, NO{sub x} control issues, hazardous air pollutants, and CEMS advances.

  12. [Characteristics and the impact factors of acid rain in Fuzhou and Xiamen 1992-2012].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiu-Ping; Wang, Hong; Chen, Bin-Bin; Sui, Ping; Lin, Wen

    2014-10-01

    Based on the observed acid rain data, synoptic situations and mass concentrations of atmospheric pollutants data from 1992 to 2012, the temporal variation characteristics and the impact factors of acid rain were analyzed in Fuzhou and Xiamen. The results showed that acid rain and non-acid rain accounted for 38.1% and 61.9% respectively in Fuzhou, 40.6% and 59.4% respectively in Xiamen. The annual average pH was 4.1-5.5 in Fuzhou. Acid rain pollution alleviated after 2007 in Fuzhou, and alleviated after 2006 in Xiamen. Acid rain was more serious in winter and spring than in summer and autumn. Precipitation intensity could affect the acidity of rain. Acid rain was observed more serious in southeast, southwest, west and northwest wind in Fuzhou, and more serious in northeast, southwest, west and northwest wind in Xiamen. Acid rain was most severe under the condition of transformed surface cold high, while most light under the conditions of typhoon (intertropical convergence zone) and outside of typhoon (intertropical convergence zone). There was a negative correlation between the mass concentrations of atmospheric pollutants, such as SO2, NO2, PM10, and the pH of rain in Fuzhou.

  13. Acid rain: the impact of local sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spaite, P.; Esposito, M.P.; Szabo, M.F.; Devitt, T.W.

    1980-11-24

    It has been assumed that acid rain is predominantly a problem of long-range transport of pollutants from large fossil fuel combustion sources, namely coal-fired utilities. However, close examination of fuel use information and source emission characteristics in the Adirondacks, Florida, and California suggests that local oil burning and automotive sources may be major contributors to the occurrence of acid rain in these areas. This report describes the possible role of local combustion sources in the production of acid rain, discusses the implications of the findings, and their relevance to alternative control strategies for acid rain. Oil-fired boilers, especially the smaller commercial, industrial, and residential units, produce at least 3 to 10 times as much primary sulfate per unit of sulfur content as coal-fired units. Moreover, oil-fired units emit comparatively large quantities of catalytic compounds capable of rapidly converting still more sulfur oxide to sulfate in the atmosphere. Thus, in areas where large quantities of oil are burned, the direct impact from locally generated sulfates may equal or even exceed that produced by imported sulfates derived from distant coal-burning sources. Fuel consumption data show that large quantities of oil are being consumed in areas experiencing acid rain. Forty percent of the residual and 36 percent of the distillate oil burned in the United States is consumed in the eight-state area surrounding the Adirondacks. California is the next largest oil-consuming area and Florida is third. Nitric acid is responsible for about 30 percent of rainfall acidity in the Northeast and Florida, and for about 30 to 75 percent of the rainfall acidity in California.

  14. Streams in Catskill Mountains still susceptible to acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Douglas A.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Murdoch, Peter S.

    Precipitation in North America has become less acidic over the past 2 decades because of reduced power plant emissions and compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendments [Sirois, 19937rsqb;. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments were developed to reduce the acidity of sensitive surface waters, which are primarily in upland forested environments, where acidified waters and associated high aluminum concentrations are toxic to many species of aquatic flora and fauna [Schindler et al., 1989]. Our studies show that in spite of less acidic precipitation, the buffering capacity of streams in upland forests of the Catskill Mountains in southeastern New York has not increased in recent years. These data suggest that long-term leaching by acid rain has lowered exchangeable calcium ion concentrations in the soil in upland areas, where the underlying, slow-weathering bedrock provides an inadequate supply of cations to neutralize acidity.

  15. The urban perspectives of acid rain. Workshop summary

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.E.

    1993-06-04

    This report documents discussions held during a workshop an Urban Perspective of Acid Rain. The workshop was sponsored by the Office of the Director, National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). NAPAP anticipates giving increased emphasis to the benefits in urban areas of emissions reductions. The goal of this informal, exploratory workshop was to serve as a first step towards identifying pollutant monitoring, and research and assessment needs to help answer, from an urban perspective, the two key questions posed to NAPAP by Congress: (1) what are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of the acid rain control program, and (2) what reductions in deposition, rates are needed in order to prevent adverse effects? The workshop addressed research activities needed to respond to these questions. The discussions focused. sequentially, on data needs, data and model availability, and data and modeling gaps. The discussions concentrated on four areas of effects: human health, materials, urban forests, and visibility.

  16. A numerical study of the acid rain in northern Taiwan in winter season

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ching-Sen; Deng, Zen-Sing

    1996-12-31

    Two-thirds of the land mass of Taiwan island is covered by mountains. In winter precipitation could occur in northern Taiwan when the prevailing wind was from northeastern direction. In northern Taiwan the acid rain (pH value less than 5.0) in winter time could contribute about 30 rain in the whole year. A three-dimensional numerical model with terrain following coordinated system was used to simulate the precipitation system and the characteristics of acid rain. A smooth terrain was assumed in the model. A mean sounding was used to initialize the numerical model when acid rain occurred in northern Taiwan during winter time from 1991 to 1993. Investigations of the effect of pollutions from abroad on the acid rain in northern Taiwan in winter are considered for the future.

  17. Acid Rain Analysis by Standard Addition Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.

    1985-01-01

    The standard addition titration is a precise and rapid method for the determination of the acidity in rain or snow samples. The method requires use of a standard buret, a pH meter, and Gran's plot to determine the equivalence point. Experimental procedures used and typical results obtained are presented. (JN)

  18. Acid Rain: A Description of Bilingual Friesland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zondag, Koen

    1984-01-01

    Using acid rain as a metaphor, discusses the status of the Frisian language and culture as one which, though apparently thriving, is really threatened. Examines the sources of this threat, i.e., the education system, the church, mass communication and transportation, and the demise of the Frisian village community. (SED)

  19. Acid Rain: Resource Materials for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Provides listings of acid rain resource material groups under: (1) printed materials (pamphlets, books, articles); (2) audiovisuals (slide/tape presentations, tape, video-cassette); (3) miscellaneous (buttons, pocket lab, umbrella); (4) transparencies; (5) bibliographies; and (6) curriculum materials. Sources and prices (when applicable) are…

  20. Acid Rain. Teacher's Guide. LHS GEMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hocking, Colin; Barber, Jacqueline; Coonrod, Jan

    This teacher's guide presents a unit on acid rain and introduces hands-on activities for sixth through eighth grade students. In each unit, students act as real scientists and gather evidence by using science process skills such as observing, measuring and recording data, classifying, role playing, problem solving, critical thinking, synthesizing…

  1. Acid Rain Program CEM audit program

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, K.O.T.; Alexander, T.H.; Dupree, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    This presentation will give an overview of the Acid Rain Program CEM Audit Program: electronic and field audits. The presentation will include the reasons for audits, field audit types and levels the steps used in develop in the audit program and the audit procedures.

  2. TECHNOLOGICAL OPTIONS FOR ACID RAIN CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses technological options for acid rain control. Compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will require careful scrutiny of a number of issues before selecting control options to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions...

  3. Acid rain: chemistry and transport.

    PubMed

    Irwin, J G; Williams, M L

    1988-01-01

    This review describes the more important features of the emission, chemistry, transport and deposition of pollutants involved in acid deposition. Global emissions, both natural and man-made, of sulphur and nitrogen oxides are discussed and examples of spatial distributions and trends over the last century presented. The more significant chemical and physical processes involved in the transformation of the primary emissions into their acidic end products are described, including a summary of the approximate timescales of the processes involved. Measurements and modelled calculations of spatial and temporal patterns in the deposition of acidic pollutants by both wet and dry pathways are presented.

  4. Fraud in the acid rain debate

    SciTech Connect

    Bagge, C.

    1984-06-01

    Electric utility executives, according to the author, and millions of other Americans are the victims of a gigantic fraud being carried on in the name of controlling acid rain. This fraud, states the author, involves the distorted, dire image of acidity in nature being created by environmental groups, politicians and others - to gain public sympathy for their legislative goals. The alleged fraud involves the very nature of the legislation being promoted as a low-cost cure for acid rain. On the basis of scientific evidence to date there is no assurance it will reduce acidity by any appreciable amount, but on the other hand it most certainly will cost users of electricity hundreds of billions of dollars in new costs. What has already happened to the nuclear industry is also meant for coal.

  5. Acid clouds and precipitation in eastern Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamoto, C. T.; Parungo, F.; Reinking, R.; Pueschel, R.; Gerish, T.

    Rain and snow samples were collected at the eastern foothills of the Rocky Mountains and analyzed for chemical composition. Many precipitation samples had pH values considerably more acidic than the 5.6 value of pure water containing only an equilibrium amount of atmospheric CO 2. Clear and considerable dependencies of the acidity on seasonal synoptic scale weather patterns are demonstrated. Cloud water samples, collected by aircraft over eastern Colorado, also showed low pH values. The acidity of clouds was greatest near the city of Denver.

  6. Materials degradation caused by acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Baboian, R.

    1986-01-01

    Materials Degradation Caused by Acid Rain, based on a symposium sponsored by the American Chemical Society, presents a detailed analysis of the types of materials damages that may result from acid deposition, as well as techniques for evaluating the economic impact of these damages. The 29 chapters are organized into five sections. These sections include: Measurement and Monitoring of Atmospheric Deposition; Metallic Corrosion; Degradation of Organics; and Economic Effects.

  7. Acid rain on Acid soil: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Krug, E C; Frink, C R

    1983-08-01

    Acid rain is widely believed to be responsible for acidifying soil and water in areas of North America and northern Europe. However, factors commonly considered to make landscapes susceptible to acidification by acid rain are the same factors long known to strongly acidify soils through the natural processes of soil formation. Recovery from extreme and widespread careless land use has also occurred in regions undergoing acidification. There is evidence that acidification by acid rain is superimposed on long-term acidification induced by changes in land use and consequent vegetative succession. Thus, the interactions of acid rain, acid soil, and vegetation need to be carefully examined on a watershed basis in assessing benefits expected from proposed reductions in emissions of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen.

  8. Acid rain: Delays and management changes in the federal research program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program is to help resolve the scientific uncertainties associated with acid rain and determine if and how it should be controlled. It has yet to issue its first assessment report originally scheduled for release in 1985. NAPAP officials believe that, by 1990, their ongoing research program will provide sufficient new information about the causes and effects of acid rain to serve as the basis for policy recommendations.

  9. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program...

  10. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program...

  11. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program...

  12. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program...

  13. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program...

  14. Acid Rain in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Karen C.; Deviney, Frank A.; Olson, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Visitors to Shenandoah National Park (SNP) enjoy the animal and plant life and the scenery but may not realize how vulnerable these features are to various threats, such as invasion of exotic plants and insects, improper use of park resources by humans, and air and water pollution. The National Park Service strives to protect natural resources from such threats to ensure that the resources will be available for enjoyment now and in the future. Because SNP has limited influence over the air pollution that envelops the region, acidic deposition--commonly known as acid rain--is one of the more challenging threats facing park managers. With the help of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists, park managers can understand how acid rain interacts with ground- and surface-water resources, which enables them to explain why reductions in air pollution can help preserve park resources. Such understanding also provides essential insight into ecosystem processes, as managers strive to unravel and resolve other environmental problems that are interrelated to acid rain.

  15. The Acid Rain Program: Monitoring the future

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, B.J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a summary of the development of the Acid Rain Program`s approach to Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) and their use in the market based pollution control program of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The roles of the regulatory agencies are discussed and projections are put forward as to how the roles will evolve over time. In addition a discussion of the activities the regulated community is expected to focus on is presented. Finally, a discussion occurs about the requirements that new technologies and instrument providers and purchasers should keep in mind about the Acid Rain Program`s monitoring requirements as they attempt to bring new products into this market.

  16. Is acid rain impacting the Sudetic lakes?

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz, Elwira; Gasiorowski, Michał; Hercman, Helena

    2006-10-01

    The diatoms and Cladocera (Crustacea) remains from two lakes in the Sudets Mountains were analyzed to indicate an influence of acidification induced by anthropogenic factors during the last 150 years. The border area of the Czech Republic, Germany and Poland, the so-called "Black Triangle", has been strongly impacted by developed industry for several decades. The most visible effect of this process is the destruction of mountain forests in the region by acid rains. The diatom communities of Mały Staw and Wielki Staw show that acid rain has strongly affected water biota. Diatom-inferred pH reconstruction suggests major acidification during the last two decades. This process was controlled mainly by anthropogenic factors. Cladoceran records also presented changes of dominant taxa in this period and point to significant changes in living conditions. The discovery of a pH decrease during the last decade is contradictory to emissions data that suggest decrease in industrial pollution.

  17. Court date for EPA acid rain rule

    SciTech Connect

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-03-04

    In an acid rain rulemaking that appears headed straight for the courtroom, the Environmental Protection Agency this week announced new limits on emissions of nitrogen oxides from coal-fired power plants. The regulations, announced March 1, are expected to achieve a 1.8 million ton per year reduction in power plant NOx emissions, which are considered a major contributor to acid rain. The agency issued companion regulations last year to cut power plant discharges of sulfur dioxide, the other major acid rain pollutant. The NOx rulemaking elicited contradictory responses from utility industry officials. One point of contention involves the agency's definition of low-NOx burner technology, a key regulatory determination. If a utility installs EPA-defined low-NOx burner technology and still cannot meet the new NOx limits, it can apply for a less stringent [open quotes]alternative emission limit.[close quotes] The other issue likely to be raised by industry officials involves the January 1995 compliance deadline for utilities included in Phase I of the NOx program. While EPA will allow individual utilities to seek a deadline extension until April 1996 in the event of operational difficulties, the agency rejected the industry's request for an across-the-board extension.

  18. The major role of dust in explaining 1954--1993 acid rain trends

    SciTech Connect

    Stensland, G.J.

    1995-12-31

    Calcium and other base cation levels in air and precipitation from the 1950`s to the 1990`s can be as important as sulfate and other acidic species in understanding acid rain trends (or basic rain trends). Precipitation quality data, air quality data, and estimates of sources of dust emissions are used to address the issue of calcium trends in the atmosphere. The apparent downward trend for calcium in precipitation from the 1950`s to the 1970`s is suggested to be due mainly to a change in sample collection methods while the decrease since the mid-1970`s is due to a real decrease in atmospheric calcium dust levels in the atmosphere.

  19. State acid rain permitting programs: A report from EPA

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    States and EPA are laying the groundwork for state acid rain permitting in Phase 2 of the Acid Rain Program. Early indications suggest a high degree of state compliance with the acid rain permitting requirements of the Acid Rain Program. Phase 2 acid rain permitting forms have been revised and are available on EPA`s Technology Transfer Network. EPA has developed a policy and rationale concerning submission of Phase 2 permit applications, as well as suggested state timing and methodology regarding adoption of 40 CFR Part 76, the NO{sub x} regulation.

  20. Acid rain: commentary on controversial issues and observations on the role of fuel burning

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, M.F.; Esposito, M.P.; Spaite, P.W.

    1982-03-01

    Even though much information has been accumulated on the subject of acid precipitation, lack of knowledge in certain technical areas precludes an adequate understanding of (1) how serious the acid precipitation problem really is and (2) what effect controlling sources of acid precipitation precursors would have in reducing acidification. It is nevertheless possible to draw some broad conclusions regarding the problem and to ascertain the direction that the required further work should take. This report presents the results of an investigation of various issues associated with acid rain. The following topics are addressed: occurrence of acid precipitation; effects of acid precipitation; sources of acid precipitation; transport, transformation, and deposition of acid pollutants; and fuel trend analysis. Recommendations for further research are included. (DMC)

  1. `Scientific uncertainty` scuttles new acid rain standard

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, R.

    1995-10-01

    An EPA report to Congress due this month will report on the controversial question of whether the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) adequately protect sensitive areas of the United States from acid rain, and recommends against establishing a new `acid deposition standard` to protect sensitive areas of the United States from acid rain. Rebecca Renner reports on the scientific issues underlying that decision and the efforts of one state to overturn it. The report to Congress, required by the CAAA, asked the Agency to report on the feasibility of setting an acid deposition standard to protect sensitive areas. EPA missed the original 1993 deadline and is under court order to issue the final report by October 15. The draft report identifies the lakes and streams of the Appalachian mountains as sensitive resources that receive damaging concentrations of acidic deposition. Three areas where sensitive water resources have been well studied were selected as providing the best available data for modeling case studies: the Adirondacks; the mid-Appalachian region, including parts of Pennsylvania. West Virginia, Maryland, and Virginia; and the Southern Blue Ridge in Tennessee, North Carolina, and Georgia. Results are discussed. 6 refs.

  2. Maybe acid rain isn't the villain

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.M.

    1984-05-01

    The perceived harmful nature of acid rain and production mechanism for high lake and river acidity are criticised in context of proposed low US acid rain control federal expenditure. Views are based on a November, 1983 Hudson Institute study - A Perspective on Current Acid Rain Issues. High lake and river acidity is viewed as: often natural; generally due to local deficiencies in natural filtering and neutralizing media; not due to the minor acidity contributor - industrial pollution; and possibly partly due to successful, recent historical US and worldwide forest fire prevention. Acid rain forest damage is seen as a scientifically unsubstantiated and probably illusory threat.

  3. Precipitation Estimation using NEXRAD Over A Sparse Rain Gauge Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendon, S.; Vieux, B. E.; Pathak, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    Accurate radar rainfall predictions are necessary for making operational hydrologic decisions even when gauge correction is not available. Many standard Z-R relationships have been developed for estimating rainfall however, it has been found that seasonally and spatially specific Z-R relationships may lead to improved precipitation estimates. The purpose of this project is to derive and evaluate seasonally specific Z-R relationships for the Miami NEXRAD station for the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD). These derived Z-R relationships can be used to obtain rainfall predictions before the respective events cross over the gauge network and gauge corrections can be completed. This study encompasses the two distinct weather seasons that occur in the South Florida area as well as an intermediate period. The wet season occurs from June to September, the dry season November to April and the intermediate period which is the months of May and October. There were initially 44 candidate events covering a total of 20 days during the study period from 2007-2008. The data set for this study included the NEXRAD Level 2 reflectivity data for the selected events as well as the ground gauge data for the 280 plus rain gauges operated by SFWMD. The radar reflectivity was used to estimate the precipitation over the ground gauges using standard Z-R relationship, Z=300R1.4, and then compared these estimates to the measured gauge values. Using a Modified FIX Method, new derived Z-R relationships for each event were calculated. These derived Z-R relationships were then evaluated for each of the seasonal periods and seasonally specific Z-R relationships were found for the South Florida area. These seasonally specific Z-R relationships have been found to improve the accuracy of rainfall estimates over the South Florida area.

  4. Chilean coastal orographic precipitation experiment: A tale of two rain regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massmann, Adam K.

    The Chilean Coastal Orographic Precipitation Experiment Pilot Project (CCOPE-2015) was an exploratory field campaign to better understand the mechanisms of orographic precipitation enhancement in the Nahuelbuta Mountains of Southern Chile (38 deg. S.). Observations collected include: (1) surface rainfall from a network of 10 data logging rain gauges, (2) vertical precipitation profiles from a pair of K-band Micro Rain Radars, (3) rain drop size distributions from an optical disdrometer, (4) upstream wind and thermodynamic profiles from radiosonde launches, and (5) aerosol number concentration and size distribution measurements from a condensation particle counter and an ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer. An overview of observations collected during CCOPE-2015 is presented. The character of precipitation over the Nahuelbuta is contrasted between periods of ice-initiated and warm rain. Thirty-four percent of rainfall fell during warm rain periods, while fifty-two percent of rainfall fell during ice-initiated periods. Warm rain drop size distributions are characterized by many more and relatively smaller drops than ice-initiated drop size distributions. Both the portion and properties of ice-initiated and warm rainfall compare favorably with observations of coastal mountain rainfall at a similar latitude in California. Observations suggest that enhancement is stronger during warm rain periods, but uncertainty precludes declarations of significance. Additionally, the skill of satellite-based quantitative precipitation estimation is assessed for each rain regime. A cutting-edge NASA Global Precipitation Measurement mission algorithm severely underestimates orographic enhancement of precipitation in the Nahuelbuta mountains, but performs better in the lee and upwind of the mountains. Much of the error in estimating orographic rain is during warm rain periods, while performance is much improved during ice-initiated rain periods.

  5. Compliance report, 1997. Acid rain program

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The 1997 Compliance Report once again announces 100 percent compliance with the Acid Rain Program, now in its third year of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) compliance and its second year of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) compliance. Affected facilities continued to exceed the targets set for both pollutants by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The early reductions seen in 1995 and 1996 for SO{sub 2} continue, with affected utility units beating their 1997 target by 23 percent. The overcompliance with the NO{sub x} target also continues, achieving an average emission rate for Phase 1 units 16 percent below the compliance rate.

  6. Technological options for acid rain control

    SciTech Connect

    Princiotta, F.T.; Sedman, C.B.

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses technological options for acid rain control. Compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will require careful scrutiny of a number of issues before selecting control options to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. One key consideration is the effect of fuel switching or control technology upon the existing dust collector, with additional air toxics legislation looming ahead. A number of likely SO2 and NOx retrofit technologies and estimated costs are presented, along with results of retrofit case studies. New hybrid particulate controls are also being developed to meet future requirements.

  7. The greenhouse effect and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Traeger, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    The concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxides and chlorofluorocarbons is increasing in the earth's atmosphere. Increased concentrations of these trace gases could lead to global warming, increased acid rain and increased UV radiation on the earth's surface; however, the actual impacts are still uncertain and are also the subject of great debate. Application of clean'' energy sources such as geothermal are obviously desirable for decreasing these effects and improving our overall general environment. This paper briefly summarizes the global environment concerns, providing a backdrop for the following papers which describe the geothermal role in future environmental considerations. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The influence of dust events on precipitation acidity in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dan; Wang, Shigong; Xia, Junrong; Meng, Xiaoyan; Shang, Kezheng; Xie, Yueyu; Wang, Ruibin

    2013-11-01

    Acid rain and dust events are both serious environmental problems striking China nowadays. This study investigates the distribution and change of precipitation pH and discusses the influence of dust events on precipitation acidity qualitatively and quantitatively in China. Acid rain exhibits remarkable regionality with strong acidic in South China and the acidity gradually decreases from the South to the North. This distribution is decided not only by the concentration of SO2 in atmosphere but also has relationship to the occurrence of dust events. Comparing the monthly changes of precipitation pH in the semiarid region (which is influenced by dust events) with those in the humid region (which is acid rain areas), it is found that the variation trends are just opposite in the two regions and there is an obvious peak value of pH in spring in semiarid region which coincides with the increase of dust event days. Chemical analysis results of precipitation in Lanzhou (a semiarid city intruded by dust events frequently, especially in spring) indicate that the ratio of Ca2+ plus Mg2+ concentrations (indicators of soil dust) to the total cation concentrations is the highest in spring, and the Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations are 1.8 and 1.9 times higher in spring than in summer respectively. The acidity of precipitation can be restrained by dust events qualitatively by increasing alkaline materials in the atmosphere and precipitation. The analysis of daily dust events and precipitation data at 6 stations in Northwest China indicates that the pH of precipitation influenced by dust events is greater than the precipitation not influenced by dust events. The increase degrees are different between different stations and have lagging effects. The direct increases are from 0.03 to 0.91 for the precipitation pH. Dust events can promote the precipitation pH to a certain extent quantitatively.

  9. Potential human health effects of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Adverse human health effects, namely acute and chronic respiratory effects, can occur from the pre-deposition phase of the acid rain phenomenon due to inhalation of acidic particles and gases. State-of-the-art methodology to evaluate these effects is just now being applied to this question. The major post-deposition effect of the acid rain phenomenon is to acidify water, increasing solubility and subsequent human exposure to mercury, lead, cadmium, and aluminum. Acidification increases bioconversion of mercury to methylmercury, a highly toxic compound, which accumulates in fish, increasing the risk to toxicity in people who eat fish. Increase in water and soil content of lead and cadmium increases human exposure to these metals which become additive to other sources presently under regulatory control. The potential adverse health effects of increased human exposure to aluminum is not known at the present time. Deficiencies in the identification of the contribution of pre-deposition of air pollutants and post-deposition mobilization of toxic metals to the recognized potential health effects of the involved toxic substances is due to the fact that scientists have not addressed these specific questions. 113 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Acid neutralization of precipitation in Northern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuesi; Yu, Wenpeng; Pan, Yuepeng; Wu, Dan

    2012-02-01

    There is an increasing concern over the impact of human-related emissions on the acid precipitation in China. However, few measurements have been conducted so far to clarify the acid-neutralization of precipitation on a regional scale. Under a network of 10 sites across Northern China operated during a 3-year period from December 2007 to November 2010, a total of 1118 rain and snow samples were collected. Of this total, 28% was acid precipitation with pH < 5.6. Out of these acid samples, 53% were found heavily acidic with pH value below 5.0, indicating significantly high levels of acidification of precipitation. Most of the acidity of precipitation was caused by H2SO4 and HNO3, their relative contribution being 72% and 28%, respectively. However; the contribution of HNO3 to precipitation acidity will be enhanced due to the increasing NO(x) and stable SO2 emissions in future. Neutralization factors for K+, NH4+, Ca2+, Na+, and Mg2+ were estimated as 0.06, 0.71, 0.72, 0.15, and 0.13, respectively. The application of multiple regression analysis further quantified higher NH4+ and Ca2+ contribution to the neutralization process, but the dominant neutralizing agent varied from site to site. The neutralization was less pronounced in the rural than urban areas, probably due to different levels of alkaline species, which strongly buffered the acidity. Presence of high concentrations of basic ions was mainly responsible for high pH of precipitation with annual volume-weighted mean (VWM) values larger than 5.6 at several sites. It was estimated that in the absence of buffering ions, for the given concentration of SO4(2-) and NO3-, the annual VWM pH of precipitation would have been recorded around 3.5 across Northern China. This feature suggested that emissions of particles and gaseous NH3 played very important role in controlling the spatial variations of pH of precipitation in the target areas.

  11. Influence of simulated acidic rain on root-infecting fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    Influences of the acidity of simulated rain on root-infecting fungi were investigated. Effects of rain acidity on Phytophthora cinnamomi were studied. Propagule densities in soil depended upon the acidity (pH 5.6, 4.0, 3.2, or 2.4) of simulated rain and soil depth (1, 2, 4, or 8 cm). Lowest densities occurred in 1 to 2 cm soil layers exposed to rains at pH 3.2 or 2.4. Sporangium production on radicles of Lupinus angustifolius in Lakeland sand moistened with rain solution at pH 2.4 was 47% less than production with solution at pH 5.6. A linear response to solution acidity was exhibited. Infection of L. angustifolius roots by zoospores demonstrated a linear response to acidity of rain. Approximately 44% fewer lesions occurred on roots of seedlings exposed to rain at pH 2.4 than on roots of seedlings exposed to rain at pH 5.6. The acidity (pH 5.6, 4.0, 3.2, or 2.4) of repeated rains had no consistent effect on disease progress among L. augustifolius seedlings planted in infested soil. The formation of ectomycorrhizae on Pinus taeda seedlings exhibited a quadratic response to acidity of repeated rains. The percentage of short roots that were ectomycorrhizal was greatest among seedlings exposed to rains at pH 2.4 and least among seedlings exposed to rains at pH 4.0. The density of Macrophomina phaseolina propagules in Lakeland sand exposed to repeated rains at pH 2.4 was an average of 20% less than densities associated with rains at pH 5.6, 4.0, or 3.2.

  12. Response of soybean seed germination to cadmium and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting Ting; Wu, Peng; Wang, Li Hong; Zhou, Qing

    2011-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) pollution and acid rain are the main environmental issues, and they often occur in the same agricultural region. Nevertheless, up to now, little information on the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain action on crops were presented. Here, we investigated the combined effect of Cd(2+) and acid rain on the seed germination of soybean. The results indicated that the single treatment with the low level of Cd(2+) (0.18, 1.0, 3.0 mg L(-1)) or acid rain (pH ≥3.0) could not affect the seed germination of soybean, which was resulted in the increased activities of peroxidase and catalase. The single treatment with the high concentration of Cd(2+) (>6 mg L(-1)) or acid rain at pH 2.5 decreased the activities of peroxidase and catalase, damaged the cell membrane and then decreased the seed germination of soybean. Meanwhile, the same toxic effect was observed in the combined treatment with Cd(2+) and acid rain, and the combined treatment had more toxic effect than the single treatment with Cd(2+) or acid rain. Thus, the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain had more potential threat to the seed germination of soybean than the single pollution of Cd(2+) or acid rain.

  13. Response of soybean seed germination to cadmium and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting Ting; Wu, Peng; Wang, Li Hong; Zhou, Qing

    2011-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) pollution and acid rain are the main environmental issues, and they often occur in the same agricultural region. Nevertheless, up to now, little information on the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain action on crops were presented. Here, we investigated the combined effect of Cd(2+) and acid rain on the seed germination of soybean. The results indicated that the single treatment with the low level of Cd(2+) (0.18, 1.0, 3.0 mg L(-1)) or acid rain (pH ≥3.0) could not affect the seed germination of soybean, which was resulted in the increased activities of peroxidase and catalase. The single treatment with the high concentration of Cd(2+) (>6 mg L(-1)) or acid rain at pH 2.5 decreased the activities of peroxidase and catalase, damaged the cell membrane and then decreased the seed germination of soybean. Meanwhile, the same toxic effect was observed in the combined treatment with Cd(2+) and acid rain, and the combined treatment had more toxic effect than the single treatment with Cd(2+) or acid rain. Thus, the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain had more potential threat to the seed germination of soybean than the single pollution of Cd(2+) or acid rain. PMID:21479540

  14. The new automatic precipitation phase distinction algorithm for OceanRAIN data over the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdanowitz, Jörg; Klepp, Christian; Bakan, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The hitherto lack of surface precipitation data over the global ocean limits the capabilities to validate recent and future precipitation satellite retrievals. The first systematic ship-based surface precipitation data set OceanRAIN (Ocean Rain And Ice-phase precipitation measurement Network) aims at providing in-situ precipitation data through particle size distributions (PSDs) from optical disdrometers deployed on research vessels (RVs). From the RV Polarstern, OceanRAIN currently contains more than four years of 1-minute resolution precipitation data, which corresponds to more than 200,000 minutes of precipitation. The calculation of the precipitation rate requires to know the precipitation phase (PP) of the falling particles. We develop a novel algorithm to automatically retrieve the PP using OceanRAIN data and ancillary meteorological measurements from RVs. The main objective is to improve accuracy and efficiency of the current time-consuming manual method of discriminating liquid and solid precipitation particles. The new PP distinction algorithm is based on the relation of air temperature and relative humidity (T-rH) with respect to PP. For first-time usage over oceanic areas, the land-retrieved coefficients of this empirical relationship are adjusted to OceanRAIN data. The measured PSD supports determining the PP in certain cases where large snow aggregates exist at distinctly positive air temperatures. The classification, based on T-rH and PSD, is statistically exploited and weighed with respect to the current weather conditions to obtain an overall PP probability at 1-minute resolution. The new PP distinction algorithm agrees in more than 92% (94% excl. mixed-phase) of precipitating cases with the manually-determined PP in the RV Polarstern data. The PP distinction algorithm complements the valuable information of OceanRAIN surface precipitation over the ocean.

  15. Effects of acid precipitation on crops

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of acid rain on crop yield have been studied using field-grown and potted plants. Results have shown that the chemicals in acid rain can affect crop growth and yield at ambient concentrations. For many crops, the dose-response curve probably has at least one peak and crossover point from stimulatory to inhibitory response may depend on other environmental factors. Plant parts often are affected differently, suggesting that acid rain can change the allocation of energy within plants. Available experimental results are not transferable to agricultural situations. The characteristics of acid rain which have the greatest influence on crop yield have not been determined. Interactions between acid rain and other environmental factors have scarcely been studied. Before a believable assessment of the economic impact of acid rain on crops can be done, the mechanisms of response have to be studied and the predictive capability enhanced and validated.

  16. On the relationship between acid rain and cloud type.

    PubMed

    Cana-Cascallar, Luis C

    2002-03-01

    Spanish European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) stations were selected to relate acid rain episodes with the meteorological structure that caused the rainfall during a 5-year period. A principal component analysis (PCA) was used to determine the origin of major ions (SO4(2-), NO3-, Cl-, Ca2+, K+, Mg2+, and Na+) in the rainwater. In addition, the meteorological origin of the rain was identified. Previous works suggested a relationship between acid rain and storm convective clouds. However, statistical analyses of pH values show that only the short-lived convective phenomena may cause acid rain in Spain. In fact, rain generated by fronts and that related to long-lived convective systems is neutral or even slightly basic. Results suggest that the acid rain might be related to the meteorological time scale instead of to the cloud type.

  17. Adirondack tourism: perceived consequences of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, W.C.

    1984-03-01

    This report seeks to place in perspective the perceived effects of acid precipitation on the tourist industry in the Adirondacks. The 9375-square mile park is host to almost nine million tourists annually, not including seasonal residents. Since the park was established almost 100 years ago, there have been many changes in tourist characteristics, available recreational facilities, kinds of activities, accessibility of the area, and land use and resource management policies. The tourist industry has been influenced by both controllable and uncontrollable factors. At present the overwhelming majority of recreational opportunities and natural resources important to the Adirondack tourist industry are relatively unaffected by acid precipitation. Fishing, a significant component of the tourist industry, is the most vulnerable, but any presumed adverse economic effect has to be weighed against the location of the impacted waters, total Adirondack fishing habitat, substitution available, habitat usage, fisherman characteristics, resource management, and the declining importance of fishing as an Adirondack recreational attraction. Concern is expressed as to whether present minimal acidification impacts are the precursor of major future impacts on Adirondack terrestrial and aquatic environments, and ultimately tourism. Tourism in the Adirondacks is increasing, while many other regional employment sectors are declining. It is becoming a more stable multiseason industry. Its future growth and character will be affected by government, private organization, business community, and resident controversies regarding land use and resource management attitudes, policies, budgets, and regulations. The acid precipitation issue is only one of many related controversies. 65 references, 2 figures.

  18. Effect of an acid rain environment on limestone surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mossotti, V.G.; Lindsay, J.R.; Hochella, M.F. Jr.

    1987-11-01

    As part of a study to assess mineralogical alterations in building stone caused by acid rain, Salem limestone samples were exposed for one year in several urban and one rural environments. Samples exposed in the rural location were chemically indistinguishable from the freshly quarried limestone (control material). All samples collected from urban exposure sites developed gypsum stains on the grounding surfaces, where the stones were unwashed by precipitation. However, the bulk chemistry of the urban samples (not including the stain) was virtually identical to that of the control stone. Sulfur (in the form of sulfate) was disseminated over the calcite grain surfaces to a depth less than 10 nanometer in the freshly quarried limestone; an identical sulfate layer was found on the calcite grains after the 1-y exposure period. Mass balance calculations and sulfur isotope patterns indicate that the gypsum stain on the protected surfaces consists of adventitious sulfur. A model, involving the attack of SO/sub 2/ on dry calcite, was used to define the conditions for stain formation on dry, protected surfaces. This suggests that under arid conditions, once the surface has been saturated with gypsum, the quantity of stain deposited on an unwashed surface is independent of atmospheric SO/sub 2/ concentration. On rain-washed surfaces experiencing gas-solid attack during intermittent dry periods, the quantity of gypsum produced by a gas-solid reaction mechanism should strongly correlate with both the frequency of rain events and the atmospheric SO/sub 2/ level, provided that the rain events are frequent and clearly delimited by periods of dryness.

  19. Aluminum: A neurotoxic product of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.B.

    1994-07-01

    Two separate but converging concerns have resulted in an upsurge in research on aluminum ion in the past 15 years. Acid rain releases Al(III) from soils into fresh waters, where it is for the first time accessible to living organisms. Though long considered benign, Al(III) has recently been found to cause bone and neurological disorders, while its role in Alzheimer`s disease remains uncertain. The greater availability of Al(III), coupled with its demonstrated harmful effects, challenges chemists to describe its chemistry and biochemistry. Many interactions of Al(III) have been described, but several questions remain unsolved. A great deal of work not within the scope of this Account is described in several edited volumes. (This Account uses Al(III) as a generic term for the 3+ ion when a specific form is not indicated). 96 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Acid rain and transported air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book considers aspects of the air pollutant controversy. It discusses the following: the policy dilemma - including impact on terrestrial and aquatic eco-systems, effects on human health, diplomatic issues, and how control would benefit some industries and hurt others; scientific uncertainties about the extent and location of current damage, future damage, the origin of transported air pollutants, and the efficacy of current and proposed emissions control programs; how three major pollutants - sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxide, and reactive hydrocarbons - are distributed geographically; the effect of current legislation on acid rain and its distribution; how geographic and economic risks are dispersed throughout the United States; and other risks, such as potential damage to buildings and metals.

  1. European concern about acid rain is growing

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, D.A.

    1985-01-28

    The growing concern about acid rain in Europe with particular reference to West Germany, the UK and Scandinavia is discussed. Damage has occurred not only to trees but also to many historic buildings throughout Europe. The mechanism of acid deposition is outlined; monitoring systems have established correlations between transport of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from the UK and central Europe and increased acidity in lakes and rivers in Scandinavia. In November 1979 thirty four countries and the European Economic Community signed a convention on longrange transboundary air pollution; in 1983 Finland, Norway, and Sweden proposed that member countries of the so-called 30% Club should cut annual sulfur emissions 30% from their 1980 base emission levels, by 1993 at the latest. The UK and the US are conspicuous by their absence from the 30% Club. In the UK in particular it is argued that firm proof is lacking that sulfur dioxide is the prime factor in forest decline; nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons and ozone may be more critical factors.

  2. 40 CFR 75.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 75.3 Section 75.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING General § 75.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions....

  3. 40 CFR 75.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 75.3 Section 75.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING General § 75.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions....

  4. Elementary Acid Rain Kit, Interdisciplinary, Grades 4-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    An interdisciplinary approach for teaching about acid rain is offered in this curriculum guide for teachers of grades 4-8. Skill and concept areas of science, math, social studies, art, and the language arts are developed in 12 activities which focus on the acid rain problems. A matrix of the activities and subject areas indicates the coverage…

  5. Acid rain - A further look at the evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenstein, A.W.

    1986-03-01

    There is widespread belief that acid rain is damaging lakes and forests in eastern North America, and that the threat of further damage is severe enough to warrant prompt remedial action. The cause of acid rain, hence ecological damage, is popularly held to be the sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) created by the combustion of fossil fuels. This popular belief rests on a narrow selection of data, and is not substantiated by the broader body of knowledge which is available. Nevertheless, numerous bills have been introduced in Congress proposing large reductions in SO/sub 2/ emissions. For example, the first bill introduced in 1985 was S.52, ''The Acid Rain Control Act of 1985.'' It calls for reducing SO/sub 2/ emissions by 10 million tons annually. While the language of S.52 and similar bills is not specific on causes and effects of acid rain, the testimony before Congressional committees made it clear that the concerns focus on the actual or potential acidification of lakes and soils by acid rain, and actual or potential impacts of acid rain on fish, other aquatic life, trees, crops, and human health. This article assesses the merits of these contentions about acid rain by examining technical evidence that relates SO/sub 2/ emissions to the acidity of rain to actual or potential environmental impacts.

  6. 40 CFR 75.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 75.3 Section 75.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING General § 75.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions....

  7. 40 CFR 75.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 75.3 Section 75.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING General § 75.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions....

  8. 40 CFR 75.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 75.3 Section 75.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING General § 75.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions....

  9. Observations on lichens, granite rock outcrops and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Lichen sensitivity to the synergistic effects of acid rain and toxic metals in the Atlanta, Georgia area is discussed. The disappearance of lichens on Stone Mountain after the placement of a safety galvinized fence lead to the observations of possible acid rain effects on population dynamics of the lichen community.

  10. Acid rain compliance: The need for regulatory guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, B.D.

    1993-07-01

    This article presents a broad view of the need for regulatory guidance when confronting the problem of acid rain. The two major topics addressed are (1) Why is guidance needed and (2) What kind of guidance is needed. Discussion of rate and accounting treatment of allowances, acid rain compliance planning, and allowance trading and energy efficiency are included.

  11. Interactions between greenhouse gas policies and acid rain control strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, D.E.; Kane, R.L.; Mansueti, L.

    1997-12-31

    Conventional wisdom and much of the public policy debate have usually drawn a clean delineation between acid rain issues and global warming concerns. This traditional approach of evaluating one policy at a time is too simplistic to serve as a framework for electric utilities making major capital investment and fuel procurement decisions to comply with various environmental requirements. Potential Climate change regulation can affect acid rain compliance decisions, and acid rain compliance decisions will affect future GHG emissions. This paper explores two categories of linkages between these different environmental issues. First, the assumptions one makes regarding future climate change policies can have a profound impact on the economic attractiveness of various acid rain compliance strategies. Second, decisions regarding acid rain compliance strategy can have greenhouse gas implications that might prove more or less difficult to address in future climate change legislation.

  12. Visualization of soil-moisture change in response to precipitation within two rain gardens in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dumouchelle, Denise H.; Darner, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Stormwater runoff in urban areas is increasingly being managed by means of a variety of treaments that reduce or delay runoff and promote more natural infiltration. One such treatment is a rain garden, which is built to detain runoff and allow for water infiltration and uptake by plants.Water flow into or out of a rain garden can be readily monitored with a variety of tools; however, observing the movement of water within the rain garden is less straightforward. Soil-moisture probes in combination with an automated interpolation procedure were used to document the infiltration of water into two rain gardens in Ohio. Animations show changes in soil moisture in the rain gardens during two precipitation events. At both sites, the animations demonstrate underutilization of the rain gardens.

  13. A field test of the effect of acidic rain on ion balance in a woodland salamander

    SciTech Connect

    Frisbie, M.P.; Wyman, R.L. )

    1994-06-01

    Earlier laboratory studies demonstrated that red-backed salamanders, Plethodon cinereus, are susceptible to osmotic disruption by low pH substrates. In natural systems, however, acidic input from precipitation may be mediated by soils before it impacts salamanders. We tested the effect of acidic rain on sodium balance in salamanders by confining individuals in enclosure in two forest types (hemlock, beech) for 34 d. Enclosures received artificial rain of either pH 3 or 5 every 3-4 d. Soils inside enclosures in the hemlock forest were more acidic than those in the beech forest at the outset. At termination, [H[sup +

  14. Acid soil and acid rain, 2nd edition

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, I.R.

    1992-01-01

    This book examines the basic chemical processes involved in acidification in order to better assess their long-term effects on the status of soils, the health of plants and other living species that depend on them. It also discusses acidity, pH and protons their significance in bioenergetics and the consequent role of autotrophic organisms in acidifying ecosystems. This edition incorporates and integrates recent findings that render more explanations of the causes of the environmental impacts of acidity, especially in forests and lakes. Also explores current research into acid rain and soil in order to devise appropriate measures for their amelioration.

  15. Red herring in acid rain research

    SciTech Connect

    Havas, M.; Hutchinson, T.C.; Likens, G.E.

    1984-06-01

    Five common misconceptions, red herrings, regarding the effects of acid deposition on aquatic ecosystems are described in an attempt to clarify some of the confusion they have created. These misconceptions are the following: Bog lakes have been acidic for thousands of years; thus the acidification of lakes is not a recent phenomenon. The early methods for measuring pH are in error; therfore, no statements can be made regarding historical trends. Acidification of lakes and streams results from changed land use practices (forestry, agriculture, animal husbandry) and not acid deposition. The decrease in fish populations is caused by overfishing, disease, and water pollution, not acidification. Because lakes that receive identical rainfall can have considerable different pHs, regional lake acidification cannot be due to acid precipitation. It is easy to suggest a whole series of alternative, and often unlikely, explanations of the causes and consequences of acid deposition. These keep scientists busy for years assembling and examining data only to conclude that the explanation is not valid. These tactics cause, and perhaps are designed to cause, continuous delay in remedial action. They fail to take into account the large body of information that deals with the sources of the acid deposition and the seriousness of its effects.

  16. Temporal analysis of precipitation and rain spells in Argentinian centenary reference stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scardilli, Alvaro Santiago; Llano, María Paula; Vargas, Walter Mario

    2015-09-01

    Different rainfall parameters are analysed in the present work in order to describe precipitation in three Argentine reference stations. These locations represent their precipitation climate region through a centenary data record. The selected parameters are annual accumulated precipitation, number of days with precipitation and precipitation intensity. All three stations indicate a positive trend in the first two variables over the studied period; moreover, because of a proportional increase, the precipitation intensity parameter has no significant variability. From the analysis of these variables and applying statistical methods, a climatic jump is found in each station, around the 1950s. A second focus of this work is the analysis of rain spells. To this end, a cutoff value for each station is found and used so as to establish the relationship between the accumulated precipitation and the frequency of rain spells per year. The total number of rain spells follows an exponential decay function for their relative frequency, considering the number of days that constitutes them. Rain spell characterisation allows for the understanding of their contribution to precipitation, according with its duration.

  17. Rain Characteristics and Large-Scale Environments of Precipitation Objects with Extreme Rain Volumes from TRMM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Yaping; Lau, William K M.; Liu, Chuntao

    2013-01-01

    This study adopts a "precipitation object" approach by using 14 years of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Feature (PF) and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis data to study rainfall structure and environmental factors associated with extreme heavy rain events. Characteristics of instantaneous extreme volumetric PFs are examined and compared to those of intermediate and small systems. It is found that instantaneous PFs exhibit a much wider scale range compared to the daily gridded precipitation accumulation range. The top 1% of the rainiest PFs contribute over 55% of total rainfall and have 2 orders of rain volume magnitude greater than those of the median PFs. We find a threshold near the top 10% beyond which the PFs grow exponentially into larger, deeper, and colder rain systems. NCEP reanalyses show that midlevel relative humidity and total precipitable water increase steadily with increasingly larger PFs, along with a rapid increase of 500 hPa upward vertical velocity beyond the top 10%. This provides the necessary moisture convergence to amplify and sustain the extreme events. The rapid increase in vertical motion is associated with the release of convective available potential energy (CAPE) in mature systems, as is evident in the increase in CAPE of PFs up to 10% and the subsequent dropoff. The study illustrates distinct stages in the development of an extreme rainfall event including: (1) a systematic buildup in large-scale temperature and moisture, (2) a rapid change in rain structure, (3) explosive growth of the PF size, and (4) a release of CAPE before the demise of the event.

  18. Acid rain stimulation of Lake Michigan phytoplankton growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manny, Bruce A.; Fahnenstiel, G.L.; Gardner, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    Three laboratory experiments demonstrated that additions of rainwater to epilimnetic lake water collected in southeastern Lake Michigan stimulated chlorophyll a production more than did additions of reagent-grade water during incubations of 12 to 20 d. Chlorophyll a production did not begin until 3–5 d after the rain and lake water were mixed. The stimulation caused by additions of rain acidified to pH 3.0 was greater than that caused by additions of untreated rain (pH 4.0–4.5). Our results support the following hypotheses: (1) Acid rain stimulates the growth of phytoplankton in lake water; (2) phosphorus in rain appears to be the factor causing this stimulation. We conclude that acid rain may accelerate the growth of epilimnetic phytoplankton in Lake Michigan (and other similar lakes) during stratification when other sources of bioavailable phosphorus to the epilimnion are limited

  19. Survival probability of precipitations and rain attenuation in tropical and equatorial regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohebbi Nia, Masoud; Din, Jafri; Panagopoulos, Athanasios D.; Lam, Hong Yin

    2015-08-01

    This contribution presents a stochastic model useful for the generation of a long-term tropospheric rain attenuation time series for Earth space or a terrestrial radio link in tropical and equatorial heavy rain regions based on the well-known Cox-Ingersoll-Ross model previously employed in research in the fields of finance and economics. This model assumes typical gamma distribution for rain attenuation in heavy rain climatic regions and utilises the temporal dynamic of precipitation collected in equatorial Johor, Malaysia. Different formations of survival probability are also discussed. Furthermore, the correlation between these probabilities and the Markov process is determined, and information on the variance and autocorrelation function of rain events with respect to the particular characteristics of precipitation in this area is presented. The proposed technique proved to preserve the peculiarities of precipitation for an equatorial region and reproduce fairly good statistics of the rain attenuation correlation function that could help to improve the prediction of dynamic characteristics of rain fade events.

  20. LIMESTONE AND MARBLE DISSOLUTION BY ACID RAIN: AN ONSITE WEATHERING EXPERIMENT.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Sherwood, Susan I.; Doe, B.R.; ,

    1986-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe an experimental research program, conducted in conjunction with the National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), to quantify acid-rain damage to commercial and cultural carbonate-rock resources. Initial results of this experiment show that carbonate-rock dissolution and associated surface recession increase with increasing acid deposition to the rock surface. A statistically significant linear relation has been found between carbonate-rock surface-recession rate and hydrogen ion loading to the rock surface.

  1. [Spatiotemporal trends and the impact factors of acid rain in Anhui Province].

    PubMed

    Shi, Chun-E; Qiu, Ming-Yan; Zhang, Ai-Min; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Su; Wang, Zi-Fa

    2010-06-01

    The observational data of acid rain at seven stations in Anhui province operated by China Meteorological Administration (CMA), as well as the coal consumptions in Anhui and some surrounding provinces along with satellite measured tropospheric NO2 columns, were used to analyze the spatiotemporal trends of acid rain in Anhui and the potential reasons of the increasing occurrence frequency of acid rain. In addition, the technique of back-trajectory-cluster analysis was used to examine the impacts of transport patterns on the precipitation acidity in Anhui. The occurrence frequency shows the lowest in summer and the highest in autumn, with 3-year average pH < 5.6 during 2006-2008 at all stations, hereinto, pH values are between 5.0 and 4.5 in Hefei, Anqing, Maanshan and Bengbu. In spatial, acid rain were the most severe in southern to middle Anhui and mitigated to north. The distributions of pH were concentrative at Fuyang, Tongling and Huangshan, with more than 75% occurred between 6.00-7.50 (Fuyang), 5.00-6.00 (Tongling) and 5.00-6.50 (Huangshan); quite dispersive at other stations, with the maximum at 4.00-4.50 (Hefei and Anqing), 5.00-5.50 (Maanshan) and 5.50-6.00 (Bengbu). The occurrence frequencies of acid rain increased evidently at all stations comparing with those in the end of 1990s. The results of back-trajectories-cluster analysis show that the acid rain is closely related with the regional-range transport of acid rain precursors at each station. The air-masses from southeast and northeast, especially those passing through Jiangsu and Zhejiang, associated with the highest frequencies of acid rain with pH < 5.0, indicating that the industrial emissions in the economy developed areas of Yangtze Delta play key roles in acid rain in Anhui province. In addition, statistics shows that the occurrence frequency of acid rain in Hefei was highly correlated with the trends of the provincial coal consumptions in Anhui, Jiangsu and Zhejiang, also tropospheric NO2 column

  2. Overview of acid rain monitoring activities in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Wisniewski, J.; Kinsman, J.D.

    1982-06-01

    Acid rain is known to acidify natural waters, resulting in damage to fish and other components of the aquatic ecosystem, degradation of drinking water supplies, deterioration of man-made structures, erosion of soils and damage to forests and crops. Recent monitoring devices and 71 studies conducted or on-going in North America are surveyed. Tables are presented that describe the name or title of the study, the organization or agency that funds each study, the chemical parameters monitored, the geographic extent and location of the study, the time period of operation, the types of samples used, where samples are analyzed, and a contact for further information. The Aerochem metrics wet-dry collector is the most widely used instrument for collection of wet deposition and appears to be reliable in collecting precipitation samples for chemical analysis. Much of the wet deposition monitoring focuses on the between-year differences in precipitation acidity. No simple method for monitoring dry deposition is available on an experimental or commercial basis. The frequency of special events needs to be analyzed using existing climatological data. 32 references, 3 tables.

  3. Selenium speciation in acidic environmental samples: application to acid rain-soil interaction at Mount Etna volcano.

    PubMed

    Floor, Geerke H; Iglesías, Mònica; Román-Ross, Gabriela; Corvini, Philippe F X; Lenz, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Speciation plays a crucial role in elemental mobility. However, trace level selenium (Se) speciation analyses in aqueous samples from acidic environments are hampered due to adsorption of the analytes (i.e. selenate, selenite) on precipitates. Such solid phases can form during pH adaptation up till now necessary for chromatographic separation. Thermodynamic calculations in this study predicted that a pH<4 is needed to prevent precipitation of Al and Fe phases. Therefore, a speciation method with a low pH eluent that matches the natural sample pH of acid rain-soil interaction samples from Etna volcano was developed. With a mobile phase containing 20mM ammonium citrate at pH 3, selenate and selenite could be separated in different acidic media (spiked water, rain, soil leachates) in <10 min with a LOQ of 0.2 μg L(-1) using (78)Se for detection. Applying this speciation analysis to study acid rain-soil interaction using synthetic rain based on H(2)SO(4) and soil samples collected at the flanks of Etna volcano demonstrated the dominance of selenate over selenite in leachates from samples collected close to the volcanic craters. This suggests that competitive behavior with sulfate present in acid rain might be a key factor in Se mobilization. The developed speciation method can significantly contribute to understand Se cycling in acidic, Al/Fe rich environments.

  4. Acid Precipitation in the Pacific Northwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, John; Kozak, David

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the causes, sources, and problems associated with acid deposition in the Pacific Northwest. Includes a learning activity about acid rain, "Deadly Skies," which was adapted from the Project WILD Aquatic Supplement. (TW)

  5. Impact of acid rain and deposition on aquatic biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference which examined the biological effects of acid rain on aquatic ecosystems. Topics considered at the conference included acidic lakes, the effects of acidification on biomass, hydrology, the sensitivity of stream invertebrates to pH depression, automated biomonitoring, remote computer platforms with satellite data retrieval in acidified streams, toxicity test, and a simple method of measuring pH accurately in acid rain.

  6. Analysis of issues concerning acid rain. Report to the Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Although science has largely determined that man made emissions cause acid rain, there is uncertainty concerning the extent and timing of its anticipated effects. Thus, at the present time scientific information alone does not lead unequivocally to a conclusion on whether it is appropriate to begin control actions now or to avail better understanding. Given this uncertainty, decisionmakers must weight the risks of further, potentially avoidable environmental damage against the risks of economic impacts from acid rain control actions which may ultimately prove to be unwarranted. The implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain are examined.

  7. The case for immediate controls on acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Einbender, G.; Bakalian, A.; Wall, T.; Hoagland, P.; Kamlet, K.S.

    1982-01-01

    Acid rain is a serious environmental and human health problem affecting all parts of the United States, but particularly the East. Scientists have been researching the phenomenon of acid rain--its causes and effects--for the past two decades in Europe and North America. Their studies provide a strong scientific basis for concluding that legislative action to control the sources of acid rain is needed now. The growing magnitude of the problem and impact on human health, the environment, and the economy do not permit further delays.

  8. [Stress effects of simulant acid rain on three woody plants].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua; Liu, Xiaolin

    2002-09-01

    Osmanthus fragrana, Chimonanthus praecox and Prunus persica were used as materials to investigate the effect of simulant acid rain on chlorophyll (Chl) content, cell membrane permeability(L%), the content of proline (Pro) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in three woody plants with different resistance, and effects of the light and dark conditions on acid rain injury. The results showed that the change degree of four kinds of physiological and biochemical indexes for these woody plants was as sequence: Osmanthus fragrana > Chimonanthus praecox > Prunus persica. The change of chlorophyll content in these woody plants was not obviously when acid rain stress was influenced by the light and dark.

  9. Changes in orographic precipitation patterns caused by a shift from snow to rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelsky, Tamlin M.; Sobolowski, Stefan; Kapnick, Sarah B.; Barnes, Jason B.

    2012-09-01

    Climate warming will likely cause a shift from snow to rain in midlatitude mountains. Because rain falls faster than snow, it is not advected as far by prevailing winds before reaching the ground. A shift in precipitation phase thus may alter precipitation patterns. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional climate model at 27-9-3 km resolutions over the California Sierra Nevada, we conducted an idealized experiment consisting of a present climate control run and two additional simulations in which (a) fall speed for snow is similar to rain and (b) all precipitation is constrained to fall as liquid. Rather than simulating future climates directly, these perturbation experiments allow us to test the potential impacts of changing precipitation phase in isolation from other factors such as variable large-scale atmospheric circulation. Relative to the control, both perturbations result in a rain shadow deepened by ˜30-60%, with increased focusing of precipitation on the western Sierra Nevada slopes best resolved at ≤9 km resolutions. Our results suggest that altered precipitation phase associated with climate change will likely affect spatial distributions of water resources, floods, and landslides in the Sierra Nevada and similar midlatitude mountain ranges.

  10. Changes in orographic precipitation patterns caused by a shift from snow to rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelsky, T. M.; Sobolowski, S.; Kapnick, S. B.; Barnes, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Climate warming will likely cause a shift from snow to rain in midlatitude mountains. Because rain falls faster than snow, it is not advected as far by prevailing winds before reaching the ground. A shift in precipitation phase thus may alter precipitation patterns. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional climate model at 27-9-3 km resolutions over the California Sierra Nevada, we conducted an idealized experiment consisting of a present climate control run and two additional simulations in which (a) fall speed for snow is similar to rain and (b) all precipitation is constrained to fall as liquid. Rather than simulating future climates directly, these perturbation experiments allow us to test the potential impacts of changing precipitation phase in isolation from other factors such as variable large-scale atmospheric circulation. Relative to the control, both perturbations result in a rain shadow deepened by ~30-60%, with increased focusing of precipitation on the western Sierra Nevada slopes best resolved at ≤9 km resolutions. Our results suggest that altered precipitation phase associated with climate change will likely affect spatial distributions of water resources, floods, and landslides in the Sierra Nevada and similar midlatitude mountain ranges.

  11. Acid rain study: Do it again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    James Mahoney, newly appointed head of the Reagan administration's National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), got a writing assignment last week from Rep. James Scheuer (D-N.Y.) , a subcommittee chairman of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology (SST).At a hearing on April 27, 1988, Mahoney agreed to Scheuer's request that he rewrite by Labor Day the executive summary o f an interim report o n NAPAP's progress that was submitted to Congress during September 1987. The summary, written by Mahoney's predecessor, J. Laurence Kulp, was immediately criticized by scientists, legislators, and environmental groups as a distortion of facts and a whitewash of the scientific conclusions of the interim report. Kulp resigned within a week of the summary's release.

  12. X-band radar field campaign data analysis for orographic/warm-rain precipitation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcacchia, Leonardo; Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel; Gourley, Jonathan J.; Anagnostou, Marios N.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Bousquet, Olivier; Cheong, Boon-Leng; Maggioni, Viviana; Hong, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Accurate quantitative precipitation estimation over mountainous basins is of great importance because of their susceptibility to hazards such as flash floods, shallow landslides, and debris flows. It is usually hard to obtain reliable weather radar information in mountainous areas, due to difficulties connected to non-meteorological scattering and the elevation of the study sites. Such regions are particularly interested by orographic/warm-rain precipitation processes, characterized by no ice phase in the cloud and prevailing concentration of small drops in the drop size distribution. Field campaigns are able to provide complete and solid datasets in mountainous regions, thanks to mobile radars and the complementary information provided by rain gauges and disdrometers. This study analyzes datasets collected during the Hymex, IPHEX, and Colorado field campaigns in mountainous areas in Italy, France, North Carolina, and Colorado. Mobile X-band radars from the NOAA National Severe Storm Laboratory and the Advanced Radar Research Center at the University of Oklahoma are utilized. The X-band dual polarimetric radar data are corrected for attenuation through the SCOP algorithm, and evaluated against disdrometer and rain-gauge data. Warm-rain events are identified by looking at the Gorgucci, Cao-Zhang, and Kumjian-Ryzhkov parameter spaces relating polarimetric radar variables to precipitation development processes in the cloud and rain size distributions. A conceptual model for the vertical profile of precipitation and microphysical structure of the cloud is also derived, to be contrasted against other typical convective and stratiform profiles.

  13. Economic impact of acid rain. [New York; Wisconsin; Canada; Scandinavia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The environmental and economic impact of acid rain is documented for the eastern United States (New York, Wisconsin) and Canada and Scandinavia. Damage to lakes and other water resources, fisheries, forests and agriculture is emphasized.

  14. Fungal community composition in neotropical rain forests: the influence of tree diversity and precipitation.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Krista L; Fierer, Noah; Bateman, Carling; Treseder, Kathleen K; Turner, Benjamin L

    2012-05-01

    Plant diversity is considered one factor structuring soil fungal communities because the diversity of compounds in leaf litter might determine the extent of resource heterogeneity for decomposer communities. Lowland tropical rain forests have the highest plant diversity per area of any biome. Since fungi are responsible for much of the decomposition occurring in forest soils, understanding the factors that structure fungi in tropical forests may provide valuable insight for predicting changes in global carbon and nitrogen fluxes. To test the role of plant diversity in shaping fungal community structure and function, soil (0-20 cm) and leaf litter (O horizons) were collected from six established 1-ha forest census plots across a natural plant diversity gradient on the Isthmus of Panama. We used 454 pyrosequencing and phospholipid fatty acid analysis to evaluate correlations between microbial community composition, precipitation, soil nutrients, and plant richness. In soil, the number of fungal taxa increased significantly with increasing mean annual precipitation, but not with plant richness. There were no correlations between fungal communities in leaf litter and plant diversity or precipitation, and fungal communities were found to be compositionally distinct between soil and leaf litter. To directly test for effects of plant species richness on fungal diversity and function, we experimentally re-created litter diversity gradients in litter bags with 1, 25, and 50 species of litter. After 6 months, we found a significant effect of litter diversity on decomposition rate between one and 25 species of leaf litter. However, fungal richness did not track plant species richness. Although studies in a broader range of sites is required, these results suggest that precipitation may be a more important factor than plant diversity or soil nutrient status in structuring tropical forest soil fungal communities.

  15. Fungal community composition in neotropical rain forests: the influence of tree diversity and precipitation.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Krista L; Fierer, Noah; Bateman, Carling; Treseder, Kathleen K; Turner, Benjamin L

    2012-05-01

    Plant diversity is considered one factor structuring soil fungal communities because the diversity of compounds in leaf litter might determine the extent of resource heterogeneity for decomposer communities. Lowland tropical rain forests have the highest plant diversity per area of any biome. Since fungi are responsible for much of the decomposition occurring in forest soils, understanding the factors that structure fungi in tropical forests may provide valuable insight for predicting changes in global carbon and nitrogen fluxes. To test the role of plant diversity in shaping fungal community structure and function, soil (0-20 cm) and leaf litter (O horizons) were collected from six established 1-ha forest census plots across a natural plant diversity gradient on the Isthmus of Panama. We used 454 pyrosequencing and phospholipid fatty acid analysis to evaluate correlations between microbial community composition, precipitation, soil nutrients, and plant richness. In soil, the number of fungal taxa increased significantly with increasing mean annual precipitation, but not with plant richness. There were no correlations between fungal communities in leaf litter and plant diversity or precipitation, and fungal communities were found to be compositionally distinct between soil and leaf litter. To directly test for effects of plant species richness on fungal diversity and function, we experimentally re-created litter diversity gradients in litter bags with 1, 25, and 50 species of litter. After 6 months, we found a significant effect of litter diversity on decomposition rate between one and 25 species of leaf litter. However, fungal richness did not track plant species richness. Although studies in a broader range of sites is required, these results suggest that precipitation may be a more important factor than plant diversity or soil nutrient status in structuring tropical forest soil fungal communities. PMID:22080256

  16. Rain-season trends in precipitation and its' effect in different climate regions of China during 1961-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yanling; Achberger, Christine; Linderholm, Hans W.

    2013-04-01

    Rain-season trends in precipitation and its' effect in different climate regions of China during 1961-2008 Yanling Song, Christine Achberger, Hans W. Linderholm National Climate Centre, China Meteorological Administration, 100081, Beijing, China Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 460, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden Using high-quality precipitation data from 524 stations, the trends of a set of precipitation variables during the main rain season (May to September) were analyzed from 1961 to 2008 for different climate regions in China. Averaged over China, the results indicated an increase in total precipitation, where days with low precipitation were decreasing while precipitation intensity increased. However, different characteristics were displayed in different regions of China. In most temperate monsoon regions (north-eastern China), total precipitation and precipitation days showed decreasing trends, while positive tendencies in precipitation intensity were, noted for most stations. It is suggested that the decrease in rain-season precipitation is mainly related to fewer rain days and a change towards drier conditions in north-eastern China, and as a result, the available water resources have been negatively affected in the temperate monsoon regions. In most subtropical and tropical monsoon climate regions (south-eastern China), total precipitation and precipitation days (11-50mm, >50 mm) showed slightly positive trends. However, precipitation days (≤10mm) decreased in these regions. Changes towards wetter conditions in this area, together with more frequent heavy rainfall events causing floods, have a severe impact on the peoples' lives and socio-economic development. In general, the rain-season precipitation, precipitation days as well as rain-season precipitation intensity all had increased in the temperate continental and plateau/mountain regions of western China. This increase in rain-season precipitation has been favourable to pasture

  17. Localized Detection of Frozen Precipitation Events and the Rain/Snow Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Frozen precipitation in the mid-latitudes and semi-arid environments frequently serves a crucial role in the annual water budget. Often occurring along elevational gradients, the rain/snow transition (or, "snow line") in mountain systems determines the amount of water which enters the system slowly during melt phases as opposed to rain which immediately infiltrates or runs off to lower elevations. This in turn influences the location and composition of ecological communities such as conifer forests, as well as timing and nature of the entire mountain block annual hydrologic cycle. Characterization of the rain/snow transition is becoming a priority in mountainous semi-arid regions, as increasing human populations and repeated drought episodes combine to create water shortages. Atmospheric conditions (temperature and relative humidity) which signal the rain/snow transition have been described, but variability within the conditions window can create error in estimating true areal cover of frozen versus liquid precipitation. In populated, flood-prone regions, radar installations specifically tuned to the detection of the "bright band" transition elevation can be deployed; however these cannot be permanently installed at remote, solar-power-dependent climate stations or with fine geographical scale. Characterization of current trends in rain/snow transition can be made using automated weather stations placed along the elevational gradient fielding sensors for high-frequency (e.g. 1-10 minute) measurement of air temperature, relative humidity, liquid precipitation, and precipitation mass. Visual validation of precipitation modes detected through automated means is performed using time-series records from digital cameras placed at each station. Refinements of geographically-explicit relationships of atmospheric conditions to precipitation mode can be made over time, as well as detection of seasonally-anomalous but eco-hydrologically-significant frozen precipitation events

  18. Acid rain in the West: separating politics and environmental fact

    SciTech Connect

    Erbes, R.E.

    1985-05-16

    A review of findings of scientific studies characterizing the phenomenon of acidification of rainwater concludes, by separating out political considerations, that there is no acid rain emergency or crisis in the West. There are no data to indicate that acid rain is even a problem. Important regional differences distinguish the situation in the East from the West. These include physical differences in rain chemistry; in natural and man-made emissions densities; in the interactions among climate, soils, geology, vegetation, and other factors; and especially in relative proportions of utility versus other man-made and natural emissions. 1 table.

  19. Effects of simulated acid rain on fertility of litchi.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Dong-liang; Liu, Xing-hui; Guo, Su-zhi

    2005-01-01

    The regulatory role of calcium in fertility of pollen and pistil under simulated acid rain was investigated. The germination percentage of pollen treated with acid rain of pH 4.5 was 9.42% lower than that of control, and that of pH 3.5, pH 2.5 and pH 1.5 were 22.47%, 45.49% and 71.62%, respectively. Simultaneously, the injury character of pollen was obviously observed when flowers were treated with acid rain of pH 3.5. The difference in fruit setting rate between the female flower treated with acid rain of pH 4.0 and the control was significant at p < 0.05. Ca(NO3)2 of 0.2-0.4 mmol/L could promote pollen germination under the stress of acid rain. The beneficial function was reduced when calcium concentration surpassed 0.8 mmol/L. Spraying 2 mmol/L Ca(NO3)2 reduced the injury of acid rain to pistil and increased fruit-setting rate significantly. The physiological importance of calcium during pollen germination and pistil development was also discussed.

  20. Precipitation signal in pollen rain from tropical forests, South India.

    PubMed

    Barboni, D; Bonnefille, R

    2001-04-01

    We have analyzed the pollen content of 51 surface soil samples collected in tropical evergreen and deciduous forests from the Western Ghats of South India sampled along a west to east gradient of decreasing rainfall (between 11 degrees 30-13 degrees 20'N and 75 degrees 30-76 degrees 30'E). Values of mean annual precipitation (Pann, mm/yr) have been calculated at each of the 51 sampling sites from a great number of meteorological stations in South India, using a method of data interpolation based on artificial neural network. Interpolated values at the pollen sites of Pann range from 1200 to 5555mm/yr, while mean temperature of the coldest month (MTCO) remains >15 degrees C and humidity factor (AET/PET, the actual evapotranspiration to potential evapotranspiration ratio) remains also included between 65 and 72%.Results are presented in the form of percentage pollen diagrams where samples are arranged according to increasing values of annual precipitation. They indicate that the climatic signal of rainfall is clearly evidenced by distinct pollen associations. Numerical analyses show that annual precipitation is an important parameter explaining the modern distribution of pollen taxa in this region. Pollen taxa markers of high rainfall (Pann >2500mm/yr) are Mallotus type, Elaeocarpus, Syzygium type, Olea dioica, Gnetum ula, and Hopea type, associated with Ixora type and Caryota. Pollen taxa markers of low rainfall (Pann <2500mm/yr) are Melastomataceae/Combretaceae, Maytenus type, Lagerstroemia and Grewia. The proportions of evergreen taxa and of arboreal taxa vary according to rainfall values. Indeed, when rainfall is <2500mm/yr, percentage of arboreal pollen (AP) is <50% and proportion of evergreen taxa is <20%. When rainfall exceeds 2500mm/yr, AP values average 70%, and proportion of evergreen taxa increases from 60 to 90%. Moreover, a good correlation between precipitation and proportion of evergreen taxa (0.85) presumes that precipitation can be estimated from

  1. Rain use efficiency across a precipitation gradient on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanhe; Fang, Jingyun; Fay, Philip A.; Bell, Jesse E.; Ji, Chengjun

    2010-08-01

    Our knowledge of the relationship between vegetation rain use efficiency (RUE) and precipitation is critical for predicting potential responses of grassland ecosystems to changing precipitation regimes. However, a generalized pattern of RUE along the precipitation gradient is still unavailable. Here we examined RUE variations in both Tibetan and global grasslands across precipitation gradients, using actual measurements obtained from a regional survey and a global dataset. RUE in Tibetan grasslands exhibited a unimodal pattern across the precipitation gradient, with an increasing trend in dry alpine steppe and a decreasing trend in mesic alpine meadow. RUE in alpine steppe was lower than in alpine meadow, largely due to their differences in species richness, soil texture and soil carbon content. The RUE of Tibetan grasslands was lower than global grasslands but displayed a similar trend with precipitation, suggesting the generality of a unimodal RUE pattern across diverse grassland types across broad precipitation gradients.

  2. Air quality monitor and acid rain networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, H.

    1980-01-01

    The air quality monitor program which consists of two permanent air monitor stations (PAMS's) and four mobile shuttle pollutant air monitor stations (SPAMS's) is evaluated. The PAMS measures SO sub X, NO sub X particulates, CO, O3, and nonmethane hydrocarbons. The SPAMS measures O3, SO2, HCl, and particulates. The collection and analysis of data in the rain monitor program are discussed.

  3. Acid precipitation; an annotated bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiltshire, Denise A.; Evans, Margaret L.

    1984-01-01

    This collection of 1660 bibliographies references on the causes and environmental effects of acidic atmospheric deposition was compiled from computerized literature searches of earth-science and chemistry data bases. Categories of information are (1) atmospheric chemistry (gases and aerosols), (2) precipitation chemistry, (3) transport and deposition (wet and dry), (4) aquatic environments (biological and hydrological), (5) terrestrial environments, (6) effects on materials and structures, (7) air and precipitation monitoring and data collection, and (8) modeling studies. References date from the late 1800 's through December 1981. The bibliography includes short summaries of most documents. Omitted are unpublished manuscripts, publications in press, master 's theses and doctoral dissertations, newspaper articles, and book reviews. Coauthors and subject indexes are included. (USGS)

  4. A rain cell model. [precipitation induced microwave interference/attenuation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.

    1977-01-01

    Summer raincells in a marine temperate climate were monitored using radar, and the probability of raincell occurrence was described as a function of altitude, rain intensity and cell size. The study aimed at defining a cell model for communications engineers concerned with precipitation-induced interference or signal attenuation.

  5. A New Method to estimate Daily Tropical Cyclone Precipitation from the GHCND Rain Gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Quiring, S. M.; Guikema, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical Cyclone Precipitation (TCP) contributes a large portion of very extreme hydrological events. An accurate estimation of a long term TCP climatology is an essential to understand how it varies in the past and will change in the future. The Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCND) provides a global coverage of territorial surface daily weather observations with a reasonable spatial density. In this study, we will develop a new method to estimate the TCP from the GHCND daily rain observations and other TC Track information. We will focus on all historical storms impacted the North America Continent (from both the Atlantic and the Pacific Sides) in this study. The new method will consider major factors that influence the estimation accuracy, including the variations in spatial density of rain gauges, sizes and the forward speed of storms, and high wind speeds causing the underestimate of precipitation by the rain bucket. We will provide both the point estimation at the rain gauge and gridded product at 0.25 degree. The gridded product will be finally validated by the precipitation estimation from TRMM. We will make tests and tune this method to optimally fit the available historical observations, so it can be applied for other regions in the world in the future. Key Words: Tropical Cyclone, Precipitation, New Estimation Method

  6. A Student-Centered Field Project Comparing NEXRAD and Rain Gauge Precipitation Values in Mountainous Terrain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woltemade, Christopher J.; Stanitski-Martin, Diane

    2002-01-01

    Undergraduate students compared Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) estimates of storm total precipitation to measurements from a network of 20 rain gauges. Student researchers gained valuable experience in field data collection, global positioning systems (GPS), geographic information systems (GIS), Internet data access and downloading,…

  7. 40 CFR 72.31 - Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Information requirements for Acid Rain... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.31 Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications. A complete Acid Rain permit application shall include...

  8. 40 CFR 72.31 - Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information requirements for Acid Rain... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.31 Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications. A complete Acid Rain permit application shall include...

  9. Acid Rain: A Teacher's Guide. Activities for Grades 4 to 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This guide on acid rain for elementary and secondary students is divided into three study areas: (1) What Causes Acid Rain; (2) What Problems Acid Rain Has Created; (3) How You and Your Students Can Help Combat Acid Rain. Each section presents background information and a series of lessons pertaining to the section topic. Activities include…

  10. Acid Rain. Activities for Grades 4 to 12. A Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, David; Bryant, Jeannette

    This teacher's guide on acid rain is divided into three study areas to explain: (1) what causes acid rain; (2) what problems acid rain has created; and (3) what teachers and students can do to help combat acid rain. Instructions for activities within the study areas include suggested grade levels, objectives, materials needed, and directions for…

  11. 40 CFR 72.31 - Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Information requirements for Acid Rain... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.31 Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications. A complete Acid Rain permit application shall include...

  12. 40 CFR 72.31 - Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Information requirements for Acid Rain... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.31 Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications. A complete Acid Rain permit application shall include...

  13. 40 CFR 72.31 - Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Information requirements for Acid Rain... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.31 Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications. A complete Acid Rain permit application shall include...

  14. West Virginia trout streams: target for acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Gasper, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    West Virginia is greatly effected by the Ohio River Valley sources of sulfur because of the westerly winds. Estimates indicate that before 1930 the pH of precipitation was above 5.3, but now the average pH is 4.2. The effects of pollution on trout streams are discussed from two points of view. First, the streams have little ability to neutralize acid from any source, and they are very near (or below) the threshold of a trout's acid tolerance. Secondly, since stream nutrient levels are largely a product of drainage, the hypothesis is presented that if the air is cleaned up the trout streams will be lost. The increased acid activity is leaching from the soil the nutrients that are necessary to maintain the trout populations. Acid shock events are discussed in relation to water quality by acid rain. Present levels of acidity in precipitation threatens over 1/4 of West Virginia trout water with extinction.

  15. Effect of acid rain on the soil environment: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Rechcigl, J.E.; Sparks, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on acid rain, with emphasis on soils and leaching of soil elements. Several questions still exist concerning the effects of atmospheric acid deposition on soils: (1) does acid rain enhance mobilization of harmful heavy metals in soils which could leach into the groundwater; (2) does acid rain accelerate the kinetics of weathering of primary minerals and of secondary clay minerals in soils which would release large quantities of Al, Fe, and Si into the groundwater making it unfit for human consumption; and (3) do the beneficial effects of acid deposition outweigh the negative effects or vice versa. Literature pertaining to these questions is addressed in this review. 63 references.

  16. The Effects of Acid Rain on Forest Nutrient Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Dale W.; Turner, John; Kelly, J. M.

    1982-06-01

    The effects of acidic atmospheric inputs on forest nutrient status must be assessed within the context of natural, internal acid production by carbonic and organic acids as well as the nutrient inputs and drains by management practices such as harvesting, fire, and fertilization. In all cases the anion associated with acid inputs must be mobile in the soil if leaching is to occur; immobilization of anions can effectively prevent cation leaching. Soil acidification will occur only if the often substantial buffering capacity of the soil in question is exceeded by acid inputs and if cation weathering from primary minerals is insufficient to offset cation losses by leaching. Such circumstances are rare but certainly could occur in theory, at least, given sufficiently large acid inputs on poorly buffered soils. Soils most sensitive to change are thought to be those of moderately acid pH and low cation exchange capacity. Neither very acid soils nor neutral, highly buffered soils are sensitive to acidification by acid rain. Given extremely high acid inputs, acid rain can cause temporary increases in nitrogen mineralization and nitritication as well as Al mobilization in soils. While temporary increases in N availability can cause increased forest growth in N-deficient forests, increased Al availability can cause toxic reactions in tree roots. Little is known about tree Al toxicity levels as yet, however. It must be emphasized that assessment of acid rain effects is a problem of quantification. Given sufficiently high inputs on sensitive sites, negative effects of acid rain must occur, as is true of inputs of any substance, including H2O. Acid rain inputs of sufficient magnitude to cause acute effects, such as growth increase due to N mobilization or growth decrease due to Al mobilization, are apparently very rare under ambient field conditions. Long-term effects on forest nutrient status can be either beneficial or adverse, depending on site nutrient status, silvicultural

  17. Why Isn't My Rain as Acidic as Yours?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajicek, O. T.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses three topics that have been improperly applied to the acidic precipitation issue. They are: (1) use of the pH scale; (2) acidity; and (3) solution equilibria of strong and weak acids. Implications for instruction are considered. (JN)

  18. Monitoring Global Precipitation through UCI CHRS's RainMapper App on Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, P.; Huynh, P.; Braithwaite, D.; Hsu, K. L.; Sorooshian, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Water and Development Information for Arid Lands-a Global Network (G-WADI) Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks—Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS) GeoServer has been developed through a collaboration between the Center for Hydrometeorology and Remote Sensing (CHRS) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) and the UNESCO's International Hydrological Program (IHP). G-WADI PERSIANN-CCS GeoServer provides near real-time high resolution (0.04o, approx 4km) global (60oN - 60oS) satellite precipitation estimated by the PERSIANN-CCS algorithm developed by the scientists at CHRS. The G-WADI PERSIANN-CCS GeoServer utilizes the open-source MapServer software from the University of Minnesota to provide a user-friendly web-based mapping and visualization of satellite precipitation data. Recent efforts have been made by the scientists at CHRS to provide free on-the-go access to the PERSIANN-CCS precipitation data through an application named RainMapper for mobile devices. RainMapper provides visualization of global satellite precipitation of the most recent 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72-hour periods overlaid with various basemaps. RainMapper uses the Google maps application programing interface (API) and embedded global positioning system (GPS) access to better monitor the global precipitation data on mobile devices. Functionalities include using geographical searching with voice recognition technologies make it easy for the user to explore near real-time precipitation in a certain location. RainMapper also allows for conveniently sharing the precipitation information and visualizations with the public through social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. RainMapper is available for iOS and Android devices and can be downloaded (free) from the App Store and Google Play. The usefulness of RainMapper was demonstrated through an application in tracking the evolution of the recent Rammasun Typhoon over the

  19. Flying in the rain: hovering performance of Anna's hummingbirds under varied precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; Dudley, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Flight in rain represents a greater challenge for smaller animals because the relative effects of water loading and drop impact are greater at reduced scales given the increased ratios of surface area to mass. Nevertheless, it is well known that small volant taxa such as hummingbirds can continue foraging even in extreme precipitation. Here, we evaluated the effect of four rain intensities (i.e. zero, light, moderate and heavy) on the hovering performance of Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) under laboratory conditions. Light-to-moderate rain had only a marginal effect on flight kinematics; wingbeat frequency of individuals in moderate rain was reduced by 7 per cent relative to control conditions. By contrast, birds hovering in heavy rain adopted more horizontal body and tail positions, and also increased wingbeat frequency substantially, while reducing stroke amplitude when compared with control conditions. The ratio between peak forces produced by single drops on a wing and on a solid surface suggests that feathers can absorb associated impact forces by up to approximately 50 per cent. Remarkably, hummingbirds hovered well even under heavy precipitation (i.e. 270 mm h−1) with no apparent loss of control, although mechanical power output assuming perfect and zero storage of elastic energy was estimated to be about 9 and 57 per cent higher, respectively, compared with normal hovering. PMID:22810431

  20. Flying in the rain: hovering performance of Anna's hummingbirds under varied precipitation.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; Dudley, Robert

    2012-10-01

    Flight in rain represents a greater challenge for smaller animals because the relative effects of water loading and drop impact are greater at reduced scales given the increased ratios of surface area to mass. Nevertheless, it is well known that small volant taxa such as hummingbirds can continue foraging even in extreme precipitation. Here, we evaluated the effect of four rain intensities (i.e. zero, light, moderate and heavy) on the hovering performance of Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) under laboratory conditions. Light-to-moderate rain had only a marginal effect on flight kinematics; wingbeat frequency of individuals in moderate rain was reduced by 7 per cent relative to control conditions. By contrast, birds hovering in heavy rain adopted more horizontal body and tail positions, and also increased wingbeat frequency substantially, while reducing stroke amplitude when compared with control conditions. The ratio between peak forces produced by single drops on a wing and on a solid surface suggests that feathers can absorb associated impact forces by up to approximately 50 per cent. Remarkably, hummingbirds hovered well even under heavy precipitation (i.e. 270 mm h(-1)) with no apparent loss of control, although mechanical power output assuming perfect and zero storage of elastic energy was estimated to be about 9 and 57 per cent higher, respectively, compared with normal hovering.

  1. Using NEXRAD and Rain Gauge Precipitation Data for Hydrologic Calibration of SWAT in a Northeastern Watershed

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Sexton,; A. M. Sadeghi,; X. Zhang,; R. Srinivasan,; A. Shirmohammadi,

    2010-01-01

    The value of watershed-scale, hydrologic and water quality models to ecosystem management is increasingly evident as more programs adopt these tools to evaluate the effectiveness of different management scenarios and their impact on the environment. Quality of precipitation data is critical for appropriate application of watershed models. In small watersheds, where no dense rain gauge network is available, modelers are faced with a dilemma to choose between different data sets. In this study, we used the German Branch (GB) watershed (~50 km2), which is included in the USDA Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP), to examine the implications of using surface rain gauge and next-generation radar (NEXRAD) precipitation data sets on the performance of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The GB watershed is located in the Coastal Plain of Maryland on the eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay. Stream flow estimation results using surface rain gauge data seem to indicate the importance of using rain gauges within the same direction as the storm pattern with respect to the watershed. In the absence of a spatially representative network of rain gauges within the watershed, NEXRAD data produced good estimates of stream flow at the outlet of the watershed. Three NEXRAD datasets, including (1)*non-corrected (NC), (2) bias-corrected (BC), and (3) inverse distance weighted (IDW) corrected NEXRAD data, were produced. Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficients for daily stream flow simulation using these three NEXRAD data ranged from 0.46 to 0.58 during calibration and from 0.68 to 0.76 during validation. Overall, correcting NEXRAD with rain gauge data is promising to produce better hydrologic modeling results. Given the multiple precipitation datasets and corresponding simulations, we explored the combination of the multiple simulations using Bayesian model averaging.

  2. The regional costs and benefits of acid rain control

    SciTech Connect

    Berkman, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    Congress recently enacted acid rain control legislation as part of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments following a decade-long debate among disparate regional interests. Although Congress succeeded in drafting a law acceptable to all regions, the regional costs and benefits of the legislation remain uncertain. The research presented here attempts to estimate the regional costs and benefits and the economic impacts of acid rain controls. These estimates are made using a modeling system composed of econometric, linear programming and input-output models. The econometric and linear programming components describe markets for electricity and coal. The outputs of these components including capital investment, electricity demand, and coal production are taken as exogenous inputs by a multiregional input-output model. The input-output model produces estimates of changes in final demand, gross output, and employment. The utility linear programming model also predicts sulfur dioxide emissions (an acid-rain precursor). According to model simulations, the costs of acid rain control exceed the benefits for many regions including several regions customarily thought to be the major beneficiaries of acid rain control such as New England.

  3. [Relationship between simulated acid rain stress and leaf reflectance].

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-dong; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Shu-quan; Zhou, Guo-mo; Jiang, Zi-shan

    2010-01-01

    Acid rain is a worldwide environmental problem. Serious acid rain pollution in subtropical China has constituted a potential threat to the health of the local forest. In the present paper, the changing properties of the chlorophyll concentration and spectral reflectance at the visible wavelengths for the six subtropical broad-leaved tree species leaves under simulated acid rain (SAR) treatment with different pH levels were studied. With the increasing strength of the SAR, the chlorophyll concentrations of the experimental species under pH 2.5 and pH 4.0 treatment were higher than that under pH 5.6; the spectral reflectance at the visible wavelengths for pH 2.5 and pH 4.0 were lower than that for pH 5.6 in general; while there weren't significant differences between pH 2.5 and pH 4.0. After the treatment with different levels of SAR, the differences in spectral reflectance at the visible wavelengths mainly focused around the green peak and red edge on the reflectance curve. The subtropical broad-leaved tree species studied were relatively not sensitive to acid rain stresses; some stronger acid rain may accelerate the growth of the tree species used here to some extent.

  4. Acid Precipitation and the Forest Ecosystem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dochinger, Leon S.; Seliga, Thomas A.

    1975-01-01

    The First International Symposium on Acid Precipitation and the Forest Ecosystem dealt with the potential magnitude of the global effects of acid precipitation on aquatic ecosystems, forest soils, and forest vegetation. The problem is discussed in the light of atmospheric chemistry, transport, and precipitation. (Author/BT)

  5. Fifth annual Gatlinburg acid rain conference: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Olem, H.

    1988-10-01

    This document contains abstract of 24 papers presented at the conference. Topics included NAPAP assessment plans, precipitation chemistry sampling, dry deposition of sulfur and nitrogen, aquatic deposition, stream chemistry, mitigation methods, biological effects and various site characterization reports. (TEM)

  6. Field evaluation of an acid rain-drought stress interaction.

    PubMed

    Banwart, W L

    1988-01-01

    Various methods have been proposed to simulate natural field conditions for growing agricultural crops while controlling conditions to study specific environmental effects. This report briefly describes the use of moveable rain exclusion shelters (10.4 x 40.9 m) to study the results of the interaction of acid rain and drought stress on corn and soybean yields. The rain exclusion shelters are constructed of galvanized pipe framing and covered with polyethylene film. Movement is automated by a rain switch to protect crops from ambient rainfall and to treat them with simulated acid rain The facility simulates a real environment with respect to variables such as solar exposure, wind movement, dew formation, and insect exposure, while allowing careful control of moisture regimes. Soybeans and corn were treated with average rainfall amounts, and with one-half and one-quarter of these rainfall amounts (drought stress) at two levels of rainfall acidity, pH 5.6 and 3.0. While drought stress resulted in considerable yield reduction for Amsoy and Williams soybeans, no additional reduction in yield was observed with rainfall of pH 3.0, as compared to rainfall of approximately pH 5.6. Similar results were observed for one corn cultivar, Pioneer 3377. For one year of the study however, yield of B73 x Mo17 (corn) was reduced 3139 kg ha(-1) by the most severe drought, and an additional 1883 kg ha(-1) by acid rain of pH 3.0, as compared to the control (pH 5.6). Yield reduction from acidic rain was considerably less at full water rates, resulting in a significant pH by drought stress interaction. However, during the second year of the experiment, no pH effect or drought by pH interaction was observed for this cultivar. The reason for the difference in the two years was not identified.

  7. Acid rain control II. The promise of new technology

    SciTech Connect

    Gilleland, D.S.; Swisher, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on acid rain. Topics considered at the conference included the evolving science of acid deposition, natural acidity, the renovation of acid lakes and streams, the role of advanced coal cleaning technology in the reduction of sulfur dioxide emissions, fluidized-bed combustion, desulfurization using limestone, the Kilngas project, current technology for sulfur dioxide emission control, and coal liquefaction.

  8. Response of two cultivars of Triticum aestivum L. to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Agrawal, M

    1996-01-01

    The present experiment was aimed at assessing the impact of simulated acidic precipitation (SAR) on growth, biomass accumulation and yield of two cultivars of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), Malviya 206 and 234, varying in cuticular thickness and leaf area. Wheat cultivars were exposed to simulated rain acidified to pH 5.6 (control), 5.0, 4.5, 4.0 and 3.0 from 30 days of age, twice a week for five weeks. The plants received ambient precipitation of unknown acidity, as well as the acid rain treatments. Growth parameters such as shoot height, root length, and leaf area were reduced significantly in treated plants at different growth stages. Above and below-ground biomass also decreased significantly in the plants treated with acidic precipitation. Relative to control, the number of grains per plant and yield per m(2) declined significantly at all SAR treatments. The hypothesis that the variety with thinner cuticle and greater leaf area would be more susceptible to acidic precipitation was not supported by the present study.

  9. Effects of acid rain on soil humic compounds.

    PubMed

    Calace, N; Fiorentini, F; Petronio, B M; Pietroletti, M

    2001-06-21

    The modifications induced by acid rain on the solubility, molecular configuration and molecular weight distribution of humic (HA) and fulvic (FA) acids were studied. A natural soil was subjected to simulated acid rain until a soil pH of 4 was obtained; HA and FA acids were then extracted and characterised. The results obtained were compared both with those of natural soil and with those of a soil subjected to acid rain. Elute analysis indicates the continuous release of soluble organic compounds as a consequence of acid rain simulation, although no relationship was found with the process of soil acidification. The yields of HA and FA show that HA values are the same while FA amount is higher in the natural soil; in acid soils their water solubility increases. The molecular weight distribution shows that HA consist of a mixture of compounds of different molecular weights; they are molecules for the most part larger than 100 kDa and their distribution is not changed by soil acidification. FA can be considered to form a much more homogeneous system; in natural soil, the molecules are larger than 50 kDa, while in acidified soil they are for the most part smaller than 3 kDa.

  10. Effects of acid rain on soil humic compounds.

    PubMed

    Calace, N; Fiorentini, F; Petronio, B M; Pietroletti, M

    2001-06-21

    The modifications induced by acid rain on the solubility, molecular configuration and molecular weight distribution of humic (HA) and fulvic (FA) acids were studied. A natural soil was subjected to simulated acid rain until a soil pH of 4 was obtained; HA and FA acids were then extracted and characterised. The results obtained were compared both with those of natural soil and with those of a soil subjected to acid rain. Elute analysis indicates the continuous release of soluble organic compounds as a consequence of acid rain simulation, although no relationship was found with the process of soil acidification. The yields of HA and FA show that HA values are the same while FA amount is higher in the natural soil; in acid soils their water solubility increases. The molecular weight distribution shows that HA consist of a mixture of compounds of different molecular weights; they are molecules for the most part larger than 100 kDa and their distribution is not changed by soil acidification. FA can be considered to form a much more homogeneous system; in natural soil, the molecules are larger than 50 kDa, while in acidified soil they are for the most part smaller than 3 kDa. PMID:18968306

  11. Swedish scientists take acid-rain research to developing nations

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, T.

    1995-12-01

    In the realm of acid-rain research, Sweden looms large on the world stage. It is the country where scientists first proved more than 30 years ago that airborne chemicals could and did cross international boundaries to acidify lakes and forests far from where the pollution was generated. Now, Swedish scientists are leading an international effort to map acid-rain patterns in the developing countries of Asia, where new industrial activity seems to be recreating problems that European and North American policy makers have already taken steps to solve. Topics covered in this article include acid rain on the rise in Asia; visualizing and validating the data; funding as the key to steady research.

  12. Turbulence effects on warm-rain formation in precipitating shallow convection revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Axel; Onishi, Ryo

    2016-09-01

    Two different collection kernels which include turbulence effects on the collision rate of liquid droplets are used as a basis to develop a parameterization of the warm-rain processes autoconversion, accretion, and self-collection. The new parameterization is tested and validated with the help of a 1-D bin microphysics model. Large-eddy simulations of the rain formation in shallow cumulus clouds confirm previous results that turbulence effects can significantly enhance the development of rainwater in clouds and the occurrence and amount of surface precipitation. The detailed behavior differs significantly for the two turbulence models, revealing a considerable uncertainty in our understanding of such effects. In addition, the large-eddy simulations show a pronounced sensitivity to grid resolution, which suggests that besides the effect of sub-grid small-scale isotropic turbulence which is parameterized as part of the collection kernel also the larger turbulent eddies play an important role for the formation of rain in shallow clouds.

  13. Acid rain and electric utilities: Permits, allowances, monitoring and meteorology

    SciTech Connect

    Dayal, P.

    1995-12-31

    This conference was held January 23--25, 1995 in Tempe, Arizona. The purpose of the conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the environmental effects electric utilities have in relation to air pollution and acid rain. Attention is focused on many of the permitting and monitoring issues facing the electric utilities industry. Sulfur dioxide allowances, Title IV and Title V issues, Acid Rain Program implementation and Continuing Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) are some of the relevant topics covered in this proceedings. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  14. Observations of Precipitation Size and Fall Speed Characteristics within Coexisting Rain and Wet Snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuter, Sandra E.; Kingsmill, David E.; Nance, Louisa B.; Loeffler-Mang, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Ground-based measurements of particle size and fall speed distributions using a Particle Size and Velocity (PARSIVEL) disdrometer are compa red among samples obtained in mixed precipitation (rain and wet snow) and rain in the Oregon Cascade Mountains and in dry snow in the Rock y Mountains of Colorado. Coexisting rain and snow particles are distinguished using a classification method based on their size and fall sp eed properties. The bimodal distribution of the particles' joint fall speed-size characteristics at air temperatures from 0.5 to 0 C suggests that wet-snow particles quickly make a transition to rain once mel ting has progressed sufficiently. As air temperatures increase to 1.5 C, the reduction in the number of very large aggregates with a diame ter > 10 mm coincides with the appearance of rain particles larger than 6 mm. In this setting. very large raindrops appear to be the result of aggregates melting with minimal breakup rather than formation by c oalescence. In contrast to dry snow and rain, the fall speed for wet snow has a much weaker correlation between increasing size and increasing fall speed. Wet snow has a larger standard deviation of fall spee d (120%-230% relative to dry snow) for a given particle size. The ave rage fall speed for observed wet-snow particles with a diameter great er than or equal to 2.4 mm is 2 m/s with a standard deviation of 0.8 m/s. The large standard deviation is likely related to the coexistence of particles of similar physical size with different percentages of melting. These results suggest that different particle sizes are not required for aggregation since wet-snow particles of the same size can have different fall speeds. Given the large standard deviation of fa ll speeds in wet snow, the collision efficiency for wet snow is likely larger than that of dry snow. For particle sizes between 1 and 10 mm in diameter within mixed precipitation, rain constituted I % of the particles by volume within the isothermal layer

  15. The effects of acid rain on forest nutrient status

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Turner, J.; Kelly, J.M.

    1982-06-01

    The effects of acidic atmospheric inputs on forest nutrient status must be assessed within the context of natural, internal acid production by carbonic and organic acids as well as the nutrient inputs and drains by management practices such as harvesting, fire, and fertilization. Soil acidification will occur only if the often substantial buffering capacity of the soil in question is exceeded by acid inputs and if cation weathering from primary minerals is insufficient to offset cation losses by leaching. Such circumstances are rare but certainly could occur given sufficiently large acid inputs on poorly buffered soils. Soils most sensitive to change are thought to be those of moderately acid pH and low cation exchange capacity. Neither very acid soils nor neutral, highly buffered soils are sensitive to acidification by acid rain. Given extremely high acid inputs, acid rain can cause temporary increases in nitrogen mineralization and nitrification as well as Al mobilization in soils. While temporary increases in N availability can cause increased forest growth in N-deficient forests, increased Al availability can cause toxic reactions in tree roots. Given sufficiently high inputs on sensitive sites, negative effects of acid rain must occur, as is true of inputs of any substance, including H/sub 2/O. Acid rain inputs of sufficient magnitude to cause acute effects, such as growth increase due to N mobilization or growth decrease due to Al mobilization, are apparently very rare under ambient field conditions. Long-term effects on forest nutrient status can be either beneficial or adverse, depending on site nutrient status, silvicultural practices, and amount of atmospheric inputs. (JMT)

  16. Innovative role of statistics in acid rain performance testing

    SciTech Connect

    Warren-Hicks, W.; Etchison, T.; Lieberman, E.R.

    1995-12-31

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAAs) of 1990 mandated that affected electric utilities reduce sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions, the primary precursors of acidic deposition, and included an innovative market-based SO{sub 2} regulatory program. A central element of the Acid Rain Program is the requirement that affected utility units install CEMS. This paper describes how the Acid Rain Regulations incorporated statistical procedures in the performance tests for continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) and how statistical analysis was used to assess the appropriateness, stringency, and potential impact of various performance tests and standards that were considered for inclusion in the Acid Rain Regulations. Described here is the statistical analysis that was used to set a relative accuracy standard, establish the calculation procedures for filling in missing data when a monitor malfunctions, and evaluate the performance tests applied to petitions for alternative monitoring systems. The paper concludes that the statistical evaluations of proposed provisions of the Acid Rain Regulations resulted in the adoption of performance tests and standards that were scientifically substantiated, workable, and effective.

  17. Acid rain and its environmental effects: Recent scientific advances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.; Aherne, Julian; Gay, David A.; Lehmann, Christopher M.B.

    2016-01-01

    The term ‘acid rain’ refers to atmospheric deposition of acidic constituents that impact the earth as rain, snow, particulates, gases, and vapor. Acid rain was first recognized by Ducros (1845) and subsequently described by the English chemist Robert Angus Smith (Smith, 1852) whose pioneering studies linked the sources to industrial emissions and included early observations of deleterious environmental effects (Smith, 1872). Smith's work was largely forgotten until the mid-20th century when observations began to link air pollution to the deposition of atmospheric sulfate (SO42−) and other chemical constituents, first near the metal smelter at Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, and later at locations in Europe, North America, and Australia (Gorham, 1961). Our modern understanding of acid rain as an environmental problem caused largely by regional emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) stems from observations in the 1960s and early 1970s in Sweden by Svante Odén (Odén, 1976), and in North America by Gene Likens and colleagues (Likens and Bormann, 1974). These scientists and many who followed showed the link to emissions from coal-fired power plants and other industrial sources, and documented the environmental effects of acid rain such as the acidification of surface waters and toxic effects on vegetation, fish, and other biota.

  18. Impact of GMI rain rate on East Asian Multi-Satellite Integrated Precipitation Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B.; Shi, C.; Xie, P.

    2015-12-01

    During the last three years, the East Asian Multi-Satellite Integrated Precipitation (EMSIP) was developed at China Meteorological Administration (CMA) National Meteorological Information Center (NMIC), partially through cooperation with NOAA/CPC. IR TBB data from the FY-2 Geostationary satellite and PMW rain rate retrievals from FY-3B, TRMM, NOAA-18/19, METOP-A/B, and DMSP-F16/17/18 were integrated to produce high-resolution satellite precipitation estimates over East Asia. While the current version of the product relies on retrievals from TMI to inter-calibrate inputs from other platforms, work is underway to improve the quality of EMSIP using retrievals from the GMI. As an important step to infuse the GMI into our integration system, a comprehensive evaluation is performed for the precipitation retrievals from the GMI and the 8 other above mentioned PMW sensors with an emphasis on their performance on detecting and quantifying light rain and snowfall. PMW retrievals are compared against in situ measurements from a dense network of automatic rain gauges over China for a cold season month (January 2015). Impacts of infusing GMI precipitation retrievals into our integrated estimates are examined. Results showed improved capacity of the current version GMI retrievals in capturing light rain and snowfall than other sensors for the test period over China. The FAR score, however, is about the same as that for the TMI's. Partially due to the limited test period, only minor improvements are observed in the EMSIP through infusing GMI. Compared with CMORPH, the correlation of EMSIP and the GMI infused EMSIP is still a little lower over whole china, but sometimes over Tibet Plateau the correlation of EMSIP+GMI is higher than EMSIP and CMORPH.

  19. Isotopic equilibrium between precipitation and water vapor: evidence from continental rains in central Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, K.; Gerlein, C.; Kemeny, P. C.; Caylor, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    An accurate understanding of the relationships between the isotopic composition of liquid water and that of water vapor in the environment can help describe hydrologic processes across many scales. One such relationship is the isotopic equilibrium between falling raindrops and the surrounding vapor. The degree of equilibration is used to model the isotopic composition of precipitation in isotope-enable general circulation models and land-atmosphere exchange models. Although this equilibrium has been a topic of isotope hydrology research for more than four decades, few studies have included vapor measurements to validate modeling efforts. Recent advances in laser technology have allowed for in situ vapor measurements at high temporal resolution (e.g., >1 Hz). Here we present concomitant rain and vapor measurements for a series of 17 rain events during the 'Continental' rainy season (June through August) at Mpala Research Center in central Kenya. Rain samples (n=218) were collected at intervals of 2 to 35 minutes (median of 3 minutes) depending on the rain rate (0.4 to 10.5 mm/hr). The volume-weighted mean rain values for δ18O, δ2H and D-excess (δ2H - 8* δ18O) were 0.1 ‰, 10.7 ‰, and 10.1 ‰. These values are more enriched than the annual weighted means reported for the area (-2.2 ‰, -7.6 ‰, and 11.0 ‰, respectively). Vapor was measured continuously at ~2Hz (DLT-100, Los Gatos Research), with an inverted funnel intake 4m above the ground surface. The mean vapor isotopic composition during the rain events was -10.0 +/- 1.2 ‰ (1 σ) for δ18O and -73.9 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. The difference between the rain sample isotopic composition and that of liquid in isotopic equilibrium with the corresponding vapor at the ambient temperature was 0.8 +/- 2.2 ‰ for δ18O and 6.2 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. This disequilibrium was found to correlate with the natural log of rain rate (R2 of 0.26 for δ18O and 0.46 for δ2H), with lower rain rates having larger

  20. Impact of acid rain and deposition on aquatic biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Isom, B.; Dennis, S.; Bates, J.

    1986-01-01

    Since little information on acid rain effects on fish and other aquatic life exists, and what is available is often inconclusive, STP 928 presents quantitative and practical information. This volume is a collection of nine diverse, peer-reviewed papers. This book discusses lake/stream acidification processes and aquatic biological effects, such as stream and lake productivity, diversity, and measurement techniques.

  1. Acid rains`s dirty business: Stealing minerals from soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, J.

    1996-04-12

    This article describes the hidden environmental effects of acid rain - leaching of base mineral ions from the soil, often changing soil chemistry dramatically. The primary information comes from Ecosystem studies at Hubbard Brook of Likens and Buso. The article also discusses both other opinions and possible solutions.

  2. A Gaming Approach to the Acid Rain Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baba, Norio; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an educational microcomputer gaming system for dealing with the acid rain problem in Western Europe and discusses its objectives, rules, problems, and future perspectives. Usefulness of gaming as an operational aid in formulating appropriate energy policies worldwide is emphasized. (MBR)

  3. Effects of Acid rain on freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Schindler, D W

    1988-01-01

    Acid-vulnerable areas are more numerous and widespread than believed 7 years ago. Lakes and streams in acid-vulnerable areas of northeastern North America have suffered substantial declines in acid-neutralizing capacity, the worst cases resulting in biological damage. Many invertebrates are very sensitive to acidification, with some disappearing at pH values as high as 6.0. However, the recent rate of acidification of lakes is slower than once predicted, in part the result of decreases in sulfur oxide emissions. A discussion of some of the processes that have contributed to the acidification of lakes as well as those that have protected acid-sensitive freshwaters is presented. The author is in the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Freshwater Institute, 501 University Crescent, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N6, Canada.

  4. Effects of acid rain on freshwater ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, D.W.

    1988-01-08

    Acid-vulnerable areas are more numerous and widespread than believed 7 years ago. Lakes and streams in acid-vulnerable areas of northeastern North American have suffered substantial declines in acid-neutralizing capacity, the worst cases resulting in biological damage. Many invertebrates are very sensitive to acidification, with some disappearing at pH values as high as 6.0. However, the recent rate of acidification of lakes is slower than once predicted, in part the result of decreases in sulfur oxide emissions. A discussion of some of the processes that have contributed to the acidification of lakes as well as those that have protected acid-sensitive fresh waters is presented.

  5. 40 CFR 72.69 - Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.69 Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits. (a) After the close of the public comment period, the Administrator will issue or deny an Acid Rain permit. The Administrator will serve a copy of any Acid...

  6. 40 CFR 72.71 - Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.71 Acceptance of State Acid... State Acid Rain program meeting the requirements of §§ 72.72 and 72.73. (b) The Administrator...

  7. 40 CFR 72.71 - Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.71 Acceptance of State Acid... State Acid Rain program meeting the requirements of §§ 72.72 and 72.73. (b) The Administrator...

  8. 40 CFR 72.69 - Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.69 Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits. (a) After the close of the public comment period, the Administrator will issue or deny an Acid Rain permit. The Administrator will serve a copy of any Acid...

  9. 40 CFR 72.69 - Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.69 Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits. (a) After the close of the public comment period, the Administrator will issue or deny an Acid Rain permit. The Administrator will serve a copy of any Acid...

  10. 40 CFR 72.71 - Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.71 Acceptance of State Acid... State Acid Rain program meeting the requirements of §§ 72.72 and 72.73. (b) The Administrator...

  11. 40 CFR 72.69 - Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.69 Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits. (a) After the close of the public comment period, the Administrator will issue or deny an Acid Rain permit. The Administrator will serve a copy of any Acid...

  12. 40 CFR 72.69 - Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.69 Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits. (a) After the close of the public comment period, the Administrator will issue or deny an Acid Rain permit. The Administrator will serve a copy of any Acid...

  13. 40 CFR 72.71 - Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.71 Acceptance of State Acid... State Acid Rain program meeting the requirements of §§ 72.72 and 72.73. (b) The Administrator...

  14. 40 CFR 72.71 - Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acceptance of State Acid Rain programs... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.71 Acceptance of State Acid... State Acid Rain program meeting the requirements of §§ 72.72 and 72.73. (b) The Administrator...

  15. Study and Tests of Improved Rain Estimates from the TRMM Precipitation Radar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Franck; Amayenc, Paul; Oury, Stéphane; Testud, Jacques

    2001-11-01

    Rain rate R estimation from the 2A-25 profiling algorithm of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) is analyzed in two ways. Standard results from the operating version-5 algorithm are compared with those from the previous version 4. Also, various adjustments of the involved rain relationships in version 4 are explored, which leads to the proposal of two alternatives to the standard rain rate (Rstd-V4). The first one, (RN0), is based on N(0-scaled relations exploiting the concept of normalized -shaped drop size distributions; the second one, (RkR), relies on using constant R-k instead of constant R-Z relation as in the standard, where Z is reflectivity and k is attenuation coefficient. Error analysis points out a lower sensitivity of the alternative estimates to errors in radar calibration, or initial relations, than the standard. Results from a set of PR data, over ocean and land, show that the version-4 alternatives, and version-5 standard (Rstd-V5), produce more rain than the version-4 standard, which may correct for some reported underestimation. These approaches are tested via point-to-point comparisons of 3D PR-derived Z and R fields (versions 4 and 5) with `reference' fields derived from airborne dual-beam radar on board a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration P3-42 aircraft in Hurricanes Bonnie and Brett, for good cases of TRMM overpasses over the ocean. In the comparison domains, Bonnie is dominated by stratiform rain, and Brett includes convective and stratiform rain. In stratiform rain, the mean difference in Z, accounting for different frequencies and scanning geometries of both radars, lies within the uncertainty margin of residual errors in the radar calibrations. Also, the PR mean rain-rate estimates, RkR and Rstd-V5, agree fairly well with the P3 estimate, RP3, whereas Rstd-V4 and RN0 respectively underestimate and overestimate RP3. In convective rain (Brett case), the PR estimates of Z and R largely exceed

  16. Activity of earthworm in Latosol under simulated acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-En; Yu, Jiayu; Ouyang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Acid rain is still an issue of environmental concerns. This study investigated the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon earthworm activity from the Latosol (acidic red soil). Laboratory experiment was performed by leaching the soil columns grown with earthworms (Eisenia fetida) at the SAR pH levels ranged from 2.0 to 6.5 over a 34-day period. Results showed that earthworms tended to escape from the soil and eventually died for the SAR at pH = 2.0 as a result of acid toxicity. The catalase activity in the earthworms decreased with the SAR pH levels, whereas the superoxide dismutases activity in the earthworms showed a fluctuate pattern: decreasing from pH 6.5 to 5.0 and increasing from pH 5.0 to 4.0. Results implied that the growth of earthworms was retarded at the SAR pH ≤ 3.0.

  17. Acid rain research: a review and analysis of methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    The acidic deposition phenomena, when implicated as a factor potentially responsible for crop and forest yield losses and destruction of aquatic life, has gained increasing attention. The widespread fear that acid rain is having or may have devastating effects has prompted international debates and legislative proposals. An analysis of research on the effects of acid rain, however, reveals serious questions concerning the applicability and validity of conclusions of much of the work and thus conclusive estimations of impacts are lacking. In order to establish cause-effect relationships between rain acidity and the response of a receptor, controlled studies are necessary to verify observations in the field since there are many natural processes that produce and consume acidity and because numerous other environmental variables affect ecosystem response. Only when the response of an entire system is understood (i.e., interactions between plant, soil, soil microbes, and groundwater) can economic impacts be assessed and tolerance thresholds established for the wet deposition of acids. 14 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  18. Effect of simulated acid rain on nitrate and ammonium production in soils from three ecosystems of Camels Hump Mountain, Vermont

    SciTech Connect

    Like, D.E.; Klein, R.M.

    1985-11-01

    The authors removed intact soil columns from the Harwood (550 to 790 m), Transition (790 to 1050 m), and Conifer (1050 to 1160 m) ecological zones of Camels Hump Mountain, Vermont, treated them with simulated acid rain (pH 4.0) or nonacidic (pH 5.6) rain, and examined the percolates for ammonium and nitrate ions. Nitrification in soils from all three ecosystems was unaffected by acidic treatments, but mineralization was stimulated by acidic treatment of soil from the Transition Zone. Irrespective of treatment, Conifer Zone soils released less nitrate than did either Transition or Hardwood Zone soils. Soil columns from the Hardwood Zone were treated with acidic or nonacidic simulated rainfall supplemented with nitrate, ammonium, or both N sources. NO3-N in percolates increased when acidic simulated rain was supplemented with ammonium ion or both ammonium and nitrate ions. Efflux of NH4-N was unaffected by supplementing precipitation with either ammonium or nitrate ions.

  19. NAPAP releases interim assessment: New acid rain report elicits much criticism

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    This short article discusses the controversial report issued in September of 1987 by the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). The report downplays the effects of acid rain on forests, crops, and materials. Environmentalists have attacked the report as a political expression of the Reagan administration. McMillan, Canada's Minister of the Environment, charged that the conclusions were out of step with current scientific research and public demand for more action. NAPAP has seven task forces studying various aspects of the issue and officials from 12 different government agencies participate in the various committees and task forces.

  20. Acid Precipitation Learning Materials: Science, Environmental and Social Studies, Grades 6-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessler, Edward W.

    The major environmental problem of acid precipition is addressed through a series of activities contained in this guide for teachers of grades 6 through 12. Exercises are provided to help students learn science inquiry skills, facts, and concepts while focusing on the acid rain situation. Activities are organized by content areas. These include:…

  1. A Demonstration of Acid Rain and Lake Acidification: Wet Deposition of Sulfur Dioxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goss, Lisa M.

    2003-01-01

    Introduces a science demonstration on the dissolution of sulfuric oxide emphasizing the concept of acid rain which is an environmental problem. Demonstrates the acidification from acid rain on two lake environments, limestone and granite. Includes safety information. (YDS)

  2. Acid Rain Education and Its Implications for Curricular Development: A Teacher Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.; Germann, Paul

    1987-01-01

    Describes a survey which was designed to obtain information on acid rain education. Reviews results pertaining to instructional time, instructional topics, use of labs from a common resource guide, and preference of materials related to acid rain education. (ML)

  3. EFFECT OF AN ACID RAIN ENVIRONMENT ON LIMESTONE SURFACES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossotti, Victor G.; Lindsay, James R.; Hochella, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    Salem limestone samples were exposed to weathering for 1 y in several urban and one rural environments. Samples exposed in the rural location were chemically indistinguishable from the freshly quarried limestone, whereas all samples collected from urban exposure sites developed gypsum stains on the ground-facing surfaces where the stones were not washed by precipitation. The gas-solid reaction of SO//2 with calcite was selected for detailed consideration. It appears from the model that under arid conditions, the quantity of stain deposited on an unwashed surface is independent of atmospheric SO//2 concentration once the surface has been saturated with gypsum. Under wet conditions, surface sulfation and weight loss are probably dominated by mechanisms involving wet stone. However, if the rain events are frequent and delimited by periods of dryness, the quantity of gypsum produced by a gas-solid reaction mechanism should correlate with both the frequency of rain events and the atmospheric SO//2 level.

  4. Comparison of rain fractions over tropical and sub-tropical ocean obtained from precipitation retrieval algorithms for microwave sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, Satoshi; Shige, Shoichi; Manabe, Takeshi

    2010-12-01

    We compare the fractional occurrence of precipitation (rain fraction) over ocean derived using the Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation algorithm for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (GSMaP_AMSU) and the Microwave Surface and Precipitation Products System Day 2 rainfall algorithm (NOAA_AMSU) for the Kwajalein radar site and over tropical and subtropical ocean. The rain fractions of GSMaP_AMSU and NOAA_AMSU are lower than that of Kwajalein radar estimates because of failure to detect areas of light rain. Over tropical and subtropical ocean, the rain fraction of GSMaP_AMSU is closer to that obtained using a microwave imager (MWI) and little different from that of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Precipitation Radar (PR) data, whilethe rain fraction of NOAA_AMSU is much smaller than that obtained using MWI or PR data. In the case of the edge of the South Pacific Convergence Zone where the PR observes scattered shallow rain, while NOAA_AMSU fails to detect the scattered rain, GSMaP_AMSU detects the scattered rain through consideration of the scattering index, which is the difference in brightness temperature (Tb) between 89 and 150 GHz. Although the scattering index is designed on the basis that Tb decreases in response to scattering by precipitation at these frequencies and increases rapidly with frequency, there are emission and scattering regimes. Furthermore, the scattering index also responds to emission in light rain with a low concentration of cloud liquid water. As a result, the light rain pixel can be detected using the scattering index to take advantage of the emission signature from raindrops.

  5. A collaborative effort to model plant response to acidic rain

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J.; Irving, P.; Kuja, A.; Lee, J.; Shriner, D.; Troiano, J.; Perrigan, S.; Cullinan, V.

    1989-01-01

    Radish plants were exposed three times per week to simulated acidic rain at pH values of 2.6 to 5.4 over the course of four weeks in trials performed at Argonne, Illinois; Ithaca and Upton, New York; Corvallis, Oregon; Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and Toronto, Canada. Uniform genotype, soil media and planting techniques, treatment procedures, biological measurements, and experimental design were employed. Growth of plants differed among trials as a result of variation in greenhouse environmental conditions according to location and facilities. Larger plants underwent greater absolute but lower relative reductions in biomass after exposure to the higher levels of acidity. A generalized Mitscherlich function was used to model the effects of acidity of simulated rain on dry mass of hypocotyls using data from three laboratories that performed duplicate trials. The remaining data, from three other laboratories that performed only one trial each, were used to test the model. 14 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Possible influence of Arctic oscillation on precipitation along the East Asian rain belt during boreal spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jingxuan; Gong, Daoyi; Mao, Rui; Yang, Jing; Li, Sang

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the possible influence of the springtime Arctic oscillation (AO) on precipitation along the East Asian rain belt has been studied for the period of 1979 to 2014. To capture the features of the large-scale variability of the atmospheric circulation and precipitation, singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis was performed. The domain for precipitation is from 21.25 to 33.75° N and 111.25 to 133.25° E, and the 1000 hPa heights are from 20° N northward. Prior to analysis, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) signals were linearly fitted and subtracted from the variables of interest. The first paired modes explain 51.1 % of the total squared covariance. The spatial feature of the pressure mode is almost identical to that of the positive AO pattern, while the precipitation mode displays an overall less-than-normal anomaly along the rain belt. The AO indices are highly correlated with the time coefficients of the pressure mode at a value of 0.91, and for the time coefficients of the precipitation mode, the correlation is -0.44, both of which are significant at the 99 % level. The regional atmospheric circulation anomalies in association with the negative phase AO mode display consistent changes, including the anomalous southerly winds and vapor flux convergence in the lower troposphere over East Asia, the stronger East Asian westerly jet stream, and the enhanced ascending air motion between 20 and 30° N. There are two possible mechanisms linking the AO and East Asian circulation and precipitation, i.e., the wave-trains along the westerly jet stream from North Africa to the Middle East and East Asia and the dipole of an anti-cyclone and a cyclone over the North Pacific.

  7. Occurrence of acid precipitation on the West Coast of the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, C.F.; Rambo, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    Compilation of published and unpublished data shows acid precipitation to be more widespread in the Pacific coastal states than is generally recognized. Although information is scattered and discontinuous, precipitation is definitely acidic in the Los Angeles Basin and north-central California and in the Puget Sound region in Washington. Acid-rain occurrences were observed in western and eastern Oregon, but data are inadequate for regional generalization. New stations currently being established in Washington and Oregon, largely in response to the recently renewed activity of Mount St. Helens, will greatly facilitate assessment of precipitation acidity in the Northwest.

  8. The occurrence of acid precipitation on the west coast of the United States.

    PubMed

    Powers, C F; Rambo, D L

    1981-06-01

    Compilation of published and unpublished data shows acid precipitation to be more widespread in the Pacific coastal states than is generally recognized. Although information is scattered and discontinuous, precipitation is definitely acidic in the Los Angeles Basin and north-central california, and in the Puget Sound region in Washington. Acid rain occurrences have been observed in western and eastern Oregon, but data are inadequate for regional generalization. New stations currently being established in Washington and Oregon, largely in resposnse to the recently renewed activity of Mount St. Helens, will greatly facilitate assessment of precipitation acidity in the Northwest.

  9. Acid precipitation and embryonic mortality of spotted salamanders, Ambystoma maculatum.

    PubMed

    Pough, F H

    1976-04-01

    Spotted salamanders breed in temporary pools formed in early spring by melted snow and rain. Many of these pools reflect the low pH of precipitation in the northeastern United States. Egg mortality is low (less than 1 percent) in pools near neutrality, but high (greater than 60 percent) in pools more acid than pH 6. Developmental anomalies and the embryonic stage at which death occurs are the same in field situations as at corresponding pH's in laboratory experiments.

  10. Air pollution and acid rain in Chongqing City: The source and formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Xu

    1996-12-31

    Chongqing, the biggest city of Southwestern China, is suffered from air pollution and acid rain for a long time. Studies have shown that coal-burning results in pollution of sulfur dioxide and causes acid rain on a wide range in the area. Emission of sulfur dioxide has met by 0.8 million tons in Chongqing a year. Concentrations of sulfur dioxide in ambient air are above 0.20 mg/m{sup 3} during the recent thirty years. Results of precipitation monitoring show annual precipitation-weighted mean pH ranged from 3.91 to 4.70 and sulfate concentrations ranged from 8.71 mg/1 to 26.29 mg/1 in Chongqing for the past decades. The equivalent ratio of SO{sup 2-}{sub 4} / NO{sup -}{sub 3} in Chongqing (also in China) is higher than those in other countries. It is found that fog water is also acidified in Chongqing City and the concentrations of pollutants in fog water are much higher than those in rain.

  11. Simulated acid rain affects birch leaf endophyte populations.

    PubMed

    Helander, M L; Neuvonen, S; Sieber, T; Petrini, O

    1993-11-01

    Endophytes were frequently isolated from mountain birch (Betula pubescens var. tortuosa (Ledeb.) Nyman) leaves at a subarctic site where natural air pollution is low. We tested whether simulated acid rain had any influence on the occurrence of endophytes. Dry controls with only ambient rain and irrigated controls treated with spring water of pH 6 were compared with acid treatments at pH 3 and pH 4, prepared by adding both sulphuric and nitric acids. Treatments began in 1985 and leaf samples were taken twice during the summer of 1992. Leaves were surface sterilized, five leaf disks from each leaf placed on malt extract agar, and growing colonies were counted and identified. The most frequently isolated endophyte from birch leaves was a Fusicladium anamorph of Venturia sp. (88% of all the isolates in July and 75% of all the isolates in August), followed by a sterile mycelium and Melanconium sp. The number of endophytes isolated and the species number increased from July to August. Endophytes were most frequently isolated from the basal part of the midrib. The percentage of colonization by endophytes was similar in short and long shoots. More endophytes were isolated from leaves of branches taken at 1 m height than at 2 m height. The stronger acid rain treatment (pH 3) reduced by approximately 25% the number of isolated endophytes in August. Treatments did not have any effect on species composition of endophyte assemblages in birch leaves.

  12. Acid precipitation and human health: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, S.

    1989-08-01

    This report, written for environmental managers in electric utilities, reviews potential indirect human health effects of acid precipitation. Possible exposure routes and materials examined in this review include drinking water contamination (aluminum and mercury), corrosion of metals (lead, cadmium, arsenic, selenium, copper, and zinc) and asbestos from water piping, bioaccumulation of mercury and other metals in fish and game, and uptake of mobilized metals in crops. No direct effects (e.g., skin or eye irritation) of human exposure to acid precipitation have been identified, and air pollutant impacts on health are not included in this review, because these pollutants are acid precipitation precursors, not acid precipitation per se. The literature is summarized, presenting results from researchers' studies to support their conclusions. The review discusses potential acid precipitation impacts on metal levels in drinking water and food, summarizes the health effects of ingestion of these materials, and identifies areas of needed research. Metal-metal interactions in humans that may be related to acid precipitation are identified. Current research programs and planned assessments of the indirect human health effects of acid precipitation are summarized. 136 refs., 38 figs., 17 tabs

  13. Spatial characterization of acid rain stress in Canadian Shield lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanis, Fred J.

    1986-01-01

    A major concern of the acid rain problem is the cumulative ecosystem damage to lakes and forests. The number of lakes affected in northeastern United States and on the Canadian Shield is thought to be enormous. Seasonal changes in lake transparency are examined relative to annual acidic load. The relationship between variations in lake acidification and ecophysical units is being examined. Finally, the utility of Thematic Mapper (TM) based observations is being used to measure seasonal changes in the optical transparency in acid lakes.

  14. Spatial characterization of acid rain stress in Canadian Shield lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanis, Fred J.

    1986-01-01

    The acidification of lake waters from airborne pollutants is of continental proportions both in North America and Europe. A major concern of the acid rain problem is the cumulative ecosystem damage to lakes and forest. The number of lakes affected in northeastern United States and on the Canadian Shield is though to be enormous. The principle objective is to examine how seasonal changes in lake water transparency are related to annual acidic load. Further, the relationship between variations in lake acidification and ecophysical units is being examined. Finally, the utility of Thematic Mapper (TM) based observations to measure seasonal changes in the optical transparency in acid lakes is being investigated.

  15. Effect of simulated acid precipitation on algal fixation of nitrogen and carbon dioxide in forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.H.; Alexander, M.

    1983-01-01

    Three forest soils from areas exposed to acid precipitation were incubated for 21 days in the light to enhance the development of indigenous algae. The rates of nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction) in the light and dark were significantly less if the soils were treated with simulated rain at pH 3.5 than at pH 5.6. The inhibition increased with increasing amounts of simulated rain at pH 3.5. The fixation of CO/sub 2/ in the light was significantly less in the three soils following their exposure to simulated precipitation at pH 3.5 than to the same solutions at pH 5.6, and the extent of suppression rose with increasing amounts of synthetic rain. It is suggested that algae in terrestrial ecosystems may be especially susceptible to acid precipitation.

  16. Interactions of gaseous-pollutant and acid-rain effects

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    This research addresses the significance of individual and combined effects of gaseous pollutants and acid rain on plant growth and development. It is specifically structured to determine the importance of pollutant interactions at concentrations, combinations and exposure frequencies typical of the eastern regional environment. Laboratory, greenhouse, and field studies are designed to establish pollutant-concentration thresholds for damage from SO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, NO/sub x/, and acid rain. Research to date has determined visible-injury thresholds and growth-and-yield thresholds for a variety of cultivars of bean, wheat, radish, tomato, and loblolly pine. The thresholds vary within cultivars of a species and between species.

  17. Gas dilution system results and application to acid rain utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley-Souders, K.; Geib, R.; Dunn, C.

    1997-12-31

    In 1997, the United States EPA will remove restrictions preventing acid rain utilities from using gas dilution systems for calibration or linearity studies for continuous emissions monitoring, Test Method 205 in 40CFR51 requires that a gas dilution system must produce calibration gases whose measured values are within {+-}2% of predicted values. This paper presents the evaluation of the Environics/CalMat 2020 Dilution System for use in calibration studies. Internal studies show that concentrations generated by this unit are within {+-}0.5% of predicted values. Studies are being conducted by several acid rain utilities to evaluate the Environics/CalMat system using single minor component calibration standards. In addition, an internally generated study is being performed to demonstrate the system`s accuracy using a multi-component gas mixture. Data from these tests will be presented in the final version of the paper.

  18. Evaluation of the Acid Rain approach to monitor certification

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, B.J.

    1995-12-31

    November 15, 1990 saw the passage of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Within this law are the requirements for all electric utility units greater than 25 megawatts of generated electrical capacity to monitor SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO{sub 2}. This paper summarizes the Acid Rain Program`s approach to Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) certification testing requirements and their purpose in this market based pollution control program, created as a result of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. This paper presents a brief introduction to the theory behind the required tests. The author then presents summary evaluation of the certification test results for CEMS installed at the Phase 1 sources affected by the Acid Rain Program.

  19. New maps chart area vulnerable to acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Ember, L.

    1985-07-15

    In a continuing effort for acid rain control legislation, environmental groups have released maps developed by the Environmental Protection Agency that depict broad reaches of midwestern and northeastern lake areas susceptible to the scourge of acid rain. Even as the National Clean Air Fund, education and research wing of the National Clean Air Coalition, was making the maps public, EPA was distributing the same maps to scientists for comment. The environmentalists, however, felt that the Fourth of July holiday week, when many Americans were swimming and fishing their nation's lakes and streams, was an excellent time to make this alarming new information about the scope and magnitude of the problem available to the public.

  20. Ten-year study on acid precipitation nears conclusion

    SciTech Connect

    Olem, H. )

    1990-04-01

    Results from the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) are discussed. Final results are contained in 26 state of the science reports. Seven of the reports provide information on acid rain and aquatic ecosystems. They describe the current state of acidic surface waters, watershed processes affecting surface water chemistry, historical evidence for surface water acidification, methods for forecasting future changes, and the response of acidic surface water to liming. Six areas of the country were found to be of special interest: southwest Adirondacks, New England, forested areas of the mid-Atlantic highlands, the Atlantic coastal plain, the northern Florida highlands, parts of northeastern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Environmental effects, mitigation efforts and possible legislation are briefly discussed.

  1. CR@BaSO4: an acid rain-indicating material.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong-Wen; Xu, Xin-Hui

    2011-12-28

    The CR@BaSO(4) hybrid was synthesized, characterized and used as an acid rain-indicating (ARI) material. A painted ARI umbrella was discolored after exposure to simulated acid rain of pH 5 or less and returned to the initial color after the rain stopped. Such a functionalized material may make acid rain visual to remind people in real-time.

  2. Acid rain and transported air pollutants: implications for public policy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    Acid rain, ozone, and fine particles in the air are endangering US resources, but controlling these pollutants will be expensive. These air pollutants harm lakes and streams, lower crop yields, damage manmade materials, decrease visibility and pose a threat to forests and human health. The costs to control these pollutants include higher electricity rates, fewer jobs for high-sulfur coal miners and financial strain to utilities and industries. Acid rain and other transported air pollutants pose a special problem for policymakers: how to balance the concerns of those who bear the risk of damage with those who will pay for the control. Scientific uncertainty about many aspects of the problem complicates the decision of whether or when to control. Additional scientific research will not provide an unambiguous answer in the near future, nor will it ever resolve value conflicts. The report synthesizes what is known about pollutant emissions, movements, and effects, and estimates the risk of potential damages to resources. OTA focuses on the public policy implications of the acid rain problems and estimates the costs and potential effectiveness of various control options.

  3. Acidic precipitation: considerations for an air-quality standard

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.; Hendrey, G.R.; Stensland, G.J.; Johnson, D.W.; Francis, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    Acidic precipitation, wet or frozen deposition with a hydrogen ion concentration greatern than 2.5 ..mu..eq l/sup -1/ is a significant air pollution problem in the United States. The chief anions accounting for the hydrogen ions in rainfall are nitrate and sulfate. Agricultural systems are more likely to derive net nutritional benefits from increasing inputs of acidic rain than are forest systems when soils alone are considered. Agricultural soils may benefit because of the high N and S requirements of agricultural plants. Detrimental effects to forest soils may result if atmospheric H/sup +/ inputs significantly add to or exceed H/sup +/ production by soils. Acidification of fresh waters of southern Scandinavia, southwestern Scotland, southeastern Canada, and northeastern United States is caused by acid deposition. Areas of these regions in which this acidification occurs have in common, highly acidic precipitation with volume weighted mean annual H/sup +/ concentrations of 25 ..mu..eq l/sup -1/ or higher and slow weathering granitic or precambrian bedrock with thin soils deficient in minerals which would provide buffer capacity. Biological effects of acidification of fresh waters are detectable below pH 6.0. As lake and stream pH levels decrease below pH. 6.0, many species of plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates are progressively eliminated. Generally, fisheries are impacted below pH 5.0 and are completely destroyed below pH 4.8. There are few studies that document effects of acidic precipitation on terrestrial vegetation to establish an air quality standard. It must be demonstrated that current levels of precipitation acidity alone significantly injure terrestrial vegetation. In terms of documented damanges, current research indicates that establishing a standard for precipitation for the volume weighted annual H/sup +/ concentration at 25 ..mu..eq l/sup -1/ may protect the most sensitive areas from permanent lake acidification.

  4. [Effects of simulated acid rain on water physiological characteristics of Myrica rubra seedlings].

    PubMed

    Yaho, Zhao-bin; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Shu-quan; Lu, Mei-juan

    2011-08-01

    Taking the seedlings of typical subtropical economic tree species Myrica rubra in Zhejiang Province as test materials, a pot experiment was conducted to study their water physiological characteristics under effects of simulated acid rain (pH 2.5 and pH 4.0), with water (pH 5.6) as the control. Season, year, and acid rain all had significant effects on the photosynthetic rate (Pn). Among the treatments, the Pn had a greater difference in summer than in spring and autumn, and was higher in treatment acid rain (pH 4.0). Season, year, acid rain, and the interactions of season and year and of the three factors had significant effects on the stomata conductance (Gs), and also, the Gs had a greater difference among the treatments in summer than in spring and autumn. Acid rain had inhibitory effect on Gs. Season, year, acid rain, and the interactions of season and year and of season and acid rain affected the transpiration rate (Tr) significantly. Same as Pn and Gs, the Tr had a greater difference among the treatments in summer than in spring and autumn. Acid rain (pH 2.5) had the strongest inhibitory effect on Tr. Acid rain and the interactions of season and year and of season and acid rain had significant effects on the water use efficiency (WUE), and acid rain (pH 2.5) had definitely positive effect on the WUE.

  5. The missing piece in the acid-rain puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Powicki, C.R.

    1989-09-01

    This article discusses the role of geology in acid precipitation research and water quality. Knowledge of the composition and reactivity of the soil and bedrock through which acid precipitation flows is necessary to predict its effects on a body of water. Acidification not only has direct impacts, through water quality changes in water bodies, but also indirect long-term effects attributable to weathering rates. Once the capacity of the soil to buffer acidic loading is exceeded, sudden changes in soil chemistry may occur with dramatic effects on dependent biota.

  6. Acid Rain and Friendly Neighbors. The policy dispute between Canada and the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Schmandt, J.; Roderick, H.

    1986-01-01

    Acid Rain and Friendly Neighbors is a source book that summarizes the results of the various studies of acid rain and traces the issues historically. Contents: Part One: The Search for a Bilateral Agreement. Acid rain is different; The nature and effects of acid rain: a comparison of assessments; U.S.-Canadian negotiations on acid rain; Part Two: Domestic Policy Development. Canada's acid rain policy: federal and provincial roles; The U.S. policy response to acid rain; Environmental and economic interests in Canada and the United States; Part Three: Supportive Structures. The international joint commission: the role it might play; Lessons from the Great Lakes water quality agreements; Supporting structures for resolving environmental disputes among friendly neighbors.

  7. Testing geostatistical methods to combine radar and rain gauges for precipitation mapping in a mountainous region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdin, R.; Frei, C.; Sideris, I.; Kuensch, H.-R.

    2010-09-01

    There is an increasing demand for accurate mapping of precipitation at a spatial resolution of kilometers. Radar and rain gauges - the two main precipitation measurement systems - exhibit complementary strengths and weaknesses. Radar offers high spatial and temporal resolution but lacks accuracy of absolute values, whereas rain gauges provide accurate values at their specific point location but suffer from poor spatial representativeness. Methods of geostatistical mapping have been proposed to combine radar and rain gauge data for quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE). The aim is to combine the respective strengths and compensate for the respective weaknesses of the two observation platforms. Several studies have demonstrated the potential of these methods over topography of moderate complexity, but their performance remains unclear for high-mountain regions where rainfall patterns are complex, the representativeness of rain gauge measurements is limited and radar observations are obstructed. In this study we examine the potential and limitations of two frequently used geostatistical mapping methods for the territory of Switzerland, where the mountain chain of the Alps poses particular challenges to QPE. The two geostatistical methods explored are kriging with external drift (KED) using radar as drift variable and ordinary kriging of radar errors (OKRE). The radar data is a composite from three C-band radars using a constant Z-R relationship, advanced correction processings for visibility, ground clutter and beam shielding and a climatological bias adjustment. The rain gauge data originates from an automatic network with a typical inter-station distance of 25 km. Both combination methods are applied to a set of case examples representing typical rainfall situations in the Alps with their inherent challenges at daily and hourly time resolution. The quality of precipitation estimates is assessed by several skill scores calculated from cross validation errors at

  8. Evaluation of Optimal Reflectivity-Rain Rate (Z-R) Relationships for Improved Precipitation Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, A.; Teegavarapu, R. S.; Pathak, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    Use of appropriate reflectivity (Z)-rain rate(R) relationships is crucial for accurate estimation of precipitation amounts using radar. The spatial and temporal variability of several storm patterns combined with availability of several variants of Z-R relationships makes this task very difficult. This study evaluates the use of optimization models for optimizing the traditional Z-R functional relationships with constants and coefficients for different storm types and seasons. Optimization model formulations using nonlinear programming methods are investigated and developed in this study. The Z-R relationships will be evaluated for optimized coefficients and exponents based on train and test data. The train data will be used to develop the optimal values of coefficients and constants and the test data will be used for assessment. In order to evaluate the optimal relationships developed as a part of the study, reflectivity data collected from NCDC and rain gage data are analyzed for a region in South Florida. Exhaustive evaluation of Z-R relationships in improving precipitation estimates with and without optimization formulations will be attempted in this study.

  9. Effects of acidic precipitation on field crops

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.; Hendrey, G.R.; Lewin, K.F.; Gmur, N.F.

    1982-02-01

    The effects of acid rain on yields of field-grown soybeans has been investigated. Plants exposed to simulated rainfalls of pH 4.1, 3,3 and 2.7 had decreased seed yields of 10.6, 16.8 and 23.9% below yields of plants exposed to simulated rainfalls of pH 5.6. (ACR)

  10. Acid rain publications by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1979-1989

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Villella, Rita F.

    1989-01-01

    Pollution of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems has been a concern to society since the burning of fossil fuels began in the industrial revolution. In the past decade or so, this concern has been heightened by evidence that chemical transformation in the atmosphere of combustion by-products and subsequent long-range transport can cause environmental damage in remote areas. The extent of this damage and the rates of ecological recovery were largely unknown. "Acid rain" became the environmental issue of the 1980's. To address the increasing concerns of the public, in 1980 the Federal government initiated a 10-year interagency research program to develop information that could be used by the President and the Congress in making decisions for emission controls. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been an active participant in acid precipitation research. The Service provided support to a number of scientific conferences and forums, including the Action Seminar on Acid Precipitation held in Toronto, Canada, in 1979, an international symposium on Acidic Precipitation and Fishery Impacts in Northeastern North America in 1981, and a symposium on Acidic Precipitation and Atmospheric Deposition: A Western Perspective in 1982. These meetings as well as the growing involvement with the government's National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program placed the Service in the lead in research on the biological effects of acidic deposition. Research projects have encompassed water chemistry, aquatic invertebrates, amphibians, fish, and waterfowl. Water quality surveys have been conducted to help determine the extent of acid precipitation effects in the northeast, Middle Atlantic, and Rocky Mountain regions. In addition to lake and stream studies, research in wetland and some terrestrial habitats has also been conducted. Specific projects have addressed important sport species such as brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and striped bass (Morone

  11. Natural acidity of waters in podzolized soils and potential impacts from acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Stednick, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Nutrient movements through sites in southeast Alaska and Washington were documented to determine net changes in chemical composition of precipitation water as it passed through a forest soil and became stream-flow. These sites were not subject to acid precipitation (rainfall pH 5.8 to 7.2), yet soil water was acidified to 4.2 by natural organic acid-forming processes in the podzol soils. Organic acids precipitated in the subsoils, allowing a pH increase. Streamwater pH ranged from 6.5 to 7.2 indicating a natural buffering capacity that may exceed any additional acid input from acid rain. Precipitation composition was dominated by calcium, magnesium, sodium, and chloride due to the proximity of the ocean at the southeast Alaska site. Anionic constituents of the precipitation were dominated by bicarbonate at the Washington site. Soil podzolization processes concurrently increased solution color and iron concentrations in the litter and surface horizons leachates. The anion flux through the soil profile was dominated by chloride and sulfate at the southeast Alaska site, whereas at the Washington site anion flux appeared to be dominated by organic acids. Electroneutrality calculations indicated a cation deficit for the southeast Alaska site.

  12. Natural acidity of waters in podzolized soils and potential impacts from acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Stednick, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Nutrient movements through sites in southeast Alaska and Washington were documented to determine net changes in chemical composition of precipitation water as it passed through a forest soil and became stream flow. These sites were not subject to acid precipitation (rainfall pH 5.8 to 7.2), yet soil water was acidified to 4.2 by natural organic acid forming processes in the podzol soils. Organic acids precipitated in the subsoils, allowing a pH increase. Stream water pH ranged from 6.5 to 7.2 indicating a natural buffering capacity that may exceed any additional acid input from acid rain. Precipitation composition was dominated by magnesium, sodium, and chloride due to the proximity of the ocean at the southeast Alaska site. Anionic constituents of the precipitation were dominated by bicarbonate at the Washington site. Soil podzolization processes concurrently increased solution color and iron concentrations in the litter and surface horizons leachates. The anion flux through the soil profile was dominated by chloride and sulfate at the southwast Alaska site, whereas at the Washington site anion flux appeared to be dominated by organic acids. Electroneutrality calculations indicated a cation deficit for the southeast Alaska site. 10 references, 2 tables.

  13. Evidence linking large reductions in acid rain to sulfur emissions cuts in the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Bowersox, V.C.; Lynch, J.A.; Grimm, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    Concentrations of sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) and free acidity (H{sup +}) in precipitation decreased by 10 to 25 percent over large areas of the eastern US in 1995. These decreases were extraordinary in magnitude and spatial extent, compared to the 1983--1994 record of observations from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). In contrast, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium concentrations generally increased in 1995. What`s more, the H+ and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} declines were highly correlated (R{sup 2} = 0.72), indicating a reduction of acid rain. The largest concentration decreases in both ions occurred in and downwind of the Ohio River Valley. This is the same area where the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) set limits on SO{sub 2} emissions from 110 affected sources, 63 in states bordering the Ohio River Valley. Phase 1 of the CAAA required these limits be met by January 1, 1995. Indeed, sulfur dioxide emissions from Phase 1 sources dropped 40% in 1995 compared to 1994. This was a nearly 19% reduction in overall emissions in the 21 states with Phase 1 sources. Based on their analysis of emissions and NADP/NTN precipitation chemistry data, they infer that the substantial declines in acid rain in the eastern US in 1995 occurred because of large reductions in SO{sub 2} emissions in the same region.

  14. Collaborative effort to model plant response to acidic rain

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J.; Kuja, A.; Shriner, D.; Perrigan, S.; Irving, P.; Lee, J.; Troiano, J.; Cullinan, V.

    1988-06-01

    Radish plants were exposed three times per week to simulated acidic rain at pH values of 2.6 to 5.4 over the course of four weeks in trials performed at Argonne, Illinois; Ithaca and Upton, New York; Corvallis, Oregon; Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and Toronto, Canada. Uniform genotype, soil media and planting techniques, treatment procedures, biological measurements, and experimental design were employed. Growth of plants differed among trials as a result of variation in greenhouse environmental conditions according to location and facilities. Larger plants underwent greater absolute but lower relative reductions in biomass after exposure to the higher levels of acidity. A generalized Mitscherlich function was used to model the effects of acidity of simulated rain or dry mass of hypocotyls using data from three laboratories that performed duplicate trials. The remaining data, from three other laboratories that performed only one trial each, were used to test the model. When the laboratory by trial effect was removed, lack of fit to the Mitscherlich function was insignificant. Thus, a single mathematical model satisfactorily characterized the relationship between acidity and mean plant response.

  15. 1997 Canadian acid rain assessment. Volume 3: Aquatic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, D.S.

    1997-12-31

    This report is an assessment of information on the aquatic effects of acid rain, produced to act as technical support for development of an acid rain strategy. It first reviews the previous aquatic effects assessment of 1990 and aquatic effects monitoring and research conducted post-1990. It then presents and discusses results of research that proceeds from the knowledge base and status presented in the 1990 assessment. First, the chemical and biological changes observed in aquatic ecosystems since the early 1980s are assessed, including an analysis of the factors (such as declining acidic deposition) that influence the changes. Regional differences and hysteresis between acidification and recovery responses are also discussed. Second, interactions between the acidity stressor and other atmospherically based stressors such as climate change and contaminant deposition are considered. Third, the effectiveness of existing critical and target loads in protecting aquatic ecosystems is re-evaluated. Finally, the likely effect of full implementation of the planned sulphur dioxide controls in Canada and the United States on aquatic chemistry and biology is predicted using up-to-date modelling tools. Knowledge gaps are identified along with recommended actions to be implemented.

  16. Activity of earthworm in Latosol under simulated acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-En; Yu, Jiayu; Ouyang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Acid rain is still an issue of environmental concerns. This study investigated the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon earthworm activity from the Latosol (acidic red soil). Laboratory experiment was performed by leaching the soil columns grown with earthworms (Eisenia fetida) at the SAR pH levels ranged from 2.0 to 6.5 over a 34-day period. Results showed that earthworms tended to escape from the soil and eventually died for the SAR at pH = 2.0 as a result of acid toxicity. The catalase activity in the earthworms decreased with the SAR pH levels, whereas the superoxide dismutases activity in the earthworms showed a fluctuate pattern: decreasing from pH 6.5 to 5.0 and increasing from pH 5.0 to 4.0. Results implied that the growth of earthworms was retarded at the SAR pH ≤ 3.0. PMID:25351717

  17. Spatial characterization of acid rain stress in Canadian Shield Lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanis, Fred J.

    1987-01-01

    The acidification of lake waters from airborne pollution is of continental proportions both in North America and Europe. A major concern of the acid rain problem is the cumulative ecosystem damage to lakes and forest. The number of lakes affected in northeastern U.S. and on the Canadian Shield is though to be enormous. How seasonal changes in lake transparency are related to annual acidic load was examined. The relationship between variations in lake acidification and ecophysical units was also examined. The utility of Thematic Mapper based observations to measure seasonal changes in the optical transparency in acid lakes was investigated. The potential for this optical response is related to a number of local ecophysical factors with bedrock geology being, perhaps, the most important. Other factors include sulfate deposition, vegetative cover, and terrain drainage/relief. The area of southern Ontario contains a wide variety of geologies from the most acid rain sensitive granite quartzite types to the least sensitive limestone dolomite sediments. Annual sulfate deposition ranges from 1.0 to 4.0 grams/sq m.

  18. Foliar nutrient status of Pinus ponderosa exposed to ozone and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.D.; Houpis, J.L.J. )

    1991-05-01

    A direct effect of foliar exposure to acid rain may be increased leaching of nutrient elements. Ozone exposure, through degradation of the cuticle and cellular membranes, may also result in increased nutrient leaching. To test these hypotheses, the foliar concentrations of 13 nutrient elements were monitored for mature branches of three clones of Pinus ponderosa exposed to ozone and/or acid rain. The three clones represented three distinct levels of phenotypic vigor. Branches were exposed to charcoal filtered, ambient, or 2 x ambient concentrations of ozone and received no acid rain (NAP), pH 5.1 rain (5.1), or pH 3.0 (3.0) rain. Following 10 months of continuous ozone exposure and 3 months of weekly rain applications, the concentrations of P and Mg differed significantly among rain treatments with a ranking of: 5.1 < NAP < 3.0. The S concentration increased with rain application regardless of pH. For the clones of moderate and low vigor, the concentration of N decreased with increasing rain acidity. There was no evidence of significant ozone or ozone x acid rain response. Among the three families, high phenotypic vigor was associated with significantly greater concentrations of N, P, K, Mg, B and An. These results indicate generally negligible leaching as a result of exposure to acid rain and/or ozone for one growing season. Increases in foliar concentrations of S, Mg and P are possibly the result of evaporative surface deposition from the rain solution.

  19. Toxic effects of acid rain on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, G K

    1984-08-01

    The historical perspective as well as the nature and causes of acid precipitation are presented. The toxicological effects of acid precipitation on lakes, other water bodies, fish, and invertebrate fauna are reviewed. In addition, the effects of this phenomenon on soil productivity and forest growth are examined. It appears that grave toxic effects have been and are being experienced by aquatic systems, but there is little reliable evidence of economic damage to crops, natural vegetation, and soil and biological processes. There may be insidious long-term effects on terrestrial ecosystems, particularly in the more susceptible areas.

  20. Yield Responses of Field-Grown Soybeans Exposed to Simulated Acid Rain

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L. S.; Conway, C. A.; Lewin, K. F.

    1980-03-01

    An important area of interest is to determine the effects of acid precipitation on the yield of agronomic crops under field conditions. Experiments described herein were performed with field-grown soybeans at Brookhaven National Laboratory during the summer of 1979. A preliminary experiment was performed the preceding year at the same site to estimate the most appropriate plot design and statistical analyses. Soybeans were seeded to provide six Latin Squares. Five treatments (no rain, simulated rainfalls of pH levels of 4.0, 3.1, 2.7, and 2.3) replicated five times in each Latin Square were used to produce a total of 30 plots per treatment. These results show that additions of small amounts of simulated acid rain to soybeans decreased the number of pods per plant. This decrease in the number of pods per plant produced a small but significant decrease in seed mass. The decreases (3, 5 and 8% at simulated rain pH levels of 4.0, 3.1, and 2.7) were present in soybeans already exposed to rainfalls at Brookhaven National Laboratory with an average H+ concentration of about pH 4.0 over the period of this experiment.

  1. Effects of acid precipitation on Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, S.; Cheetham, R.D.

    1980-08-01

    Pollutants derived from fossil fuel combustion and precipitated from the atmosphere have substantially increased in the past decades. These materials, precipitated in such industrialized areas as southeastern Canada, have caused considerable alterations in aquatic ecosystems. Precipitation over most of the eastern United States is presently 10 to 500 times more acidic than is natural. Most affected aquatic ecosystems contain oligotrophic waters in regions of thin poorly buffered soils. Zooplankton are an important link in food chains of aquatic ecosystems and their disappearance or decline could drastically affect trophic relationships. Declines in zooplankton density in response to acid precipitation have been reported and short term survival of Daphnia pulex between pH 4.3 and 10.4; however, its potential for reproduction was limited to a fairly narrow range. Anderson (1944) noted the advantages of using daphnia as test organisms, and concluded that Daphnia magna was representative of other abundant zooplankton in sensitivity to toxic substances.

  2. Validation of satellite precipitation product GSMaP/NRT with ground rain gauges in Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, Kumiko; Ohta, Tetsu; Koike, Toshio

    2014-05-01

    The Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation Near Real Time data (GSMaP/NRT) is one of the satellite precipitation datasets which is produced by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency with time resolution of 1 hour and spatial resolution of 0.1 degrees. Since it is published approximately 4 hours after the observation, it is expected to contribute to the early warning of floods and water resource management in developing countries as well which have poor ground observation network. Our target area, Cambodia in the Indochina Peninsula, is one of such countries. However, there had been few ground rain gauges so that it had been impossible to validate GSMaP/NRT. Thus, the accuracy of GSMaP/NRT in this area had been unclear. One of the major characteristics of this area is that it has a vast lake area with water surface temperature of more than 30 degrees all year round. With this lake surface, it has been relieved that a unique local atmospheric circulation and its associated precipitation occur in this area. In order to validate the rainfall amount in this area, we rehabilitated and newly installed rain gauges. As a result, we have 34 automatic rain-gauges now and data is available from September 2009. Using this data as well as hourly rainfall amount from GSMaP/NRT and brightness temperature (TB) from Multi-functional Transport Satellite Infrared 1 channel (MTSAT/IR1), we analyzed the error tendency of the GSMaP/NRT product. The analysis showed that the relationship between rain gauges and GSMaP/NRT were very poor. Especially, strong rainfall events in full-monsoon season over land with 208K < TB < 253K and those in post-monsoon season over the lake with TB < 208K were very much underestimated by GSMaP/NRT. The results suggest that it is still difficult to use GSMaP/NRT data for hydrological applications to get soil moisture distribution and river discharge in this area, especially at small river basins. In addition, although many rainfall events were produced by GSMa

  3. [The influence of simulated acid rain on acidity and K+ leaching regulation of different soil layers].

    PubMed

    Wang, Daizhang; Jiang, Xin; Bian, Yongrong; Sun, Lei; Li, Rui; He, Jizheng

    2003-03-01

    The influence of simulated acid rain on acidity and K+ release of different soil layers of red soil from Jiangxi was investigated in the lab when surface soil was mixed with KCl. The results indicated that pH of leaching solution first decreased, then increased in the different soil layers, but pH at the beginning moment of leaching existed prominent differences and pH of leachate of pH 2.5 acid rain in A and AB layers again decreased during subsequent stage. There was a peak value of EC of leachate appearing at the beginning stage, it showed that nutrient ions in soil rapidly moved downwards into lower depth of profile. K+ concentration of effluent solution was related to acidity of acid rain and the pH2.5 value of acid rain accelerated K+ transportation downwards along profile. K+ release of A soil layer was divided into two moments which one was the rapid rate of K+ release process at the moment of beginning and then into the middle rate of release process. As to pH 4.5 value of acid rain, it also existed rapid and slow rate processes.

  4. California's fog is far more polluted than acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L.

    1982-11-01

    In the Los Angeles area, measurements reveal that the fog has a pH between 2.5 and 3. Near congested areas, the fog is consistenly acidic and is laden with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium ion, lead, copper, nickel, vanadium and aldehydes. Acid fog formation involves a conversion of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ to sulfuric and nitric acids. Unlike acid rain, acid fog remains suspended in the air for hours and is a threat to human health as well as vegetation and materials. Fog forms close to the ground where concentrations of pollutants are higher than they are further aloft. Acid fog seems to be related to ground-based pollution sources, particularly power plant and automobile emissions. Samples were collected in locations far from major pollution sources and used to test the composition and acidity of normal fog. The pH values ranged from 3, near Los Angeles, to 7, near Morro Bay. Mathematical models are used to explain changes in acidity over time and to indicate a cyclical pattern.

  5. Relationships between meteorological situations and acid rain in Spanish Basque country

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezcurra, A.; Casado, H.; Lacaux, J. P.; Garcia, C.

    With an automatic sequential precipitation collector, 52 rainy events were sampled at Vitoria (Spanish Basque country) in 1986. The chemical composition of each rainy event was studied and classified, using statistical techniques of multivariate data analysis (linear correlation + principal component analysis) and an automatic classification (length χ2) of the rainy events. These techniques enabled us to show, taking into account the influence of the meteorological conditions in which the precipitations formed, the presence, in Spanish Basque country, of acid rain episodes with an anthropogenic origin. These episodes are certainly reinforced by the trans-border transport from Southern France. Moreover, rainy episodes were shown to have a basic character due to a local source of terrigenous particles.

  6. Relationships among precipitation regime, nutrient availability, and carbon turnover in tropical rain forests.

    PubMed

    Posada, Juan M; Schuur, Edward A G

    2011-03-01

    The effect of high precipitation regime in tropical forests is poorly known despite indications of its potentially negative effects on nutrient availability and carbon (C) cycling. Our goal was to determine if there was an effect of high rainfall on nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) availability and indexes of C cycling in lowland tropical rain forests exposed to a broad range of mean annual precipitation (MAP). We predicted that C turnover time would increase with MAP while the availability of N and P would decrease. We studied seven Neotropical lowland forests covering a MAP range between 2,700 and 9,500 mm. We used radiocarbon (∆(14)C) from the atmosphere and respired from soil organic matter to estimate residence time of C in plants and soils. We also used C, N, and P concentrations and the stable isotope ratio of N (δ(15)N) in live and dead plant tissues and in soils as proxies for nutrient availability. Negative δ(15)N values indicated that the wettest forests had N cycles that did not exhibit isotope-fractionating losses and were potentially N-limited. Element ratios (N:P and C:P) in senescent leaves, litter, and live roots showed that P resorption increased considerably with MAP, which points towards increasing P-limitation under high MAP regimes. Soil C content increased with MAP but C turnover time only showed a weak relationship with MAP, probably due to variations in soil parent material and age along the MAP gradient. In contrast, comparing C turnover directly to nutrient availability showed strong relationships between C turnover time, N availability (δ(15)N), and P availability (N:P) in senescent leaves and litter. Thus, an effect of MAP on carbon cycling appeared to be indirectly mediated by nutrient availability. Our results suggest that soil nutrient availability plays a central role in the dynamic of C cycling in tropical rain forests.

  7. Effects of watering and simulated acid rain on quantity of phyllosphere fungi of birch leaves.

    PubMed

    Helander, M L; Rantio-Lehtimäki, A

    1990-01-01

    The effects of simulated acid rain on the population of birch phyllosphere fungi and species/genera/group composition of fungi on birch leaves were investigated in a field study in the subarctic region of northern Finland. The acid rain treatments consisted of a mixture of H2SO4 and HNO3 with a mass ratio of 2.86∶1 (S∶N) with acidities of pH 4 (A4) and pH 3 (A3). Dry control (DC) plots received only natural precipitation; irrigated control (IC) plots received spring water (pH 6) in a volume equal to the acid treatment plots. Treatments began in 1985. Culturing of the fungi inhabiting the birch leaves was performed five times during the summer of 1988. The number of fungal colonies was significantly decreased on one of five sampling dates in the pH 4 treatment and on three of five sampling dates in the pH 3 treatment. Irrigation with spring water did not have a significant effect. The acid rain treatments affected the microflora of the upper branches (at a height of 2 m) and of the lower branches (at a height of 0.5 m) equally. The lower branches had significantly more fungi than the upper ones on three of five sampling dates. The number of phyllosphere fungi isolated from birch leaves was greater in late summer than in early summer. The most abundant taxon (∼80%) wasAureobasidium pullulons, followed byHormonema sp. and zygomycetes.

  8. Effect of simulated acid rain on the mutualism between tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) and an endophytic fungus (Acremonium coenophialum)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheplick, G.P. )

    1993-03-01

    Biotic interactions between plants and microorganisms have the potential to be affected by acidic precipitation. I examined the effect of simulated sulfuric acid rain on the mutualism between a perennial forage grass (Festuca arundinacea) and a fungal endophyte (Acremonium coenophialum). Acid water was supplied as mists sprayed onto leaf surfaces or as water added to the soil for two groups in a greenhouse: one group had high levels of endophyte infection, while the other was predominantly noninfected. Control plants received distilled water (pH 6), while others received sulfuric acid water at pH 4.5 or pH 3. Plants were harvested after 4, 6, 8, and 23 wk. Leaf endophyte infection intensity as measured by hyphal counts was not affected by acid water treatment. Root mass and root: shoot ratios generally decreased with increasing acidity of both foliar sprays and soil water, but shoot mass was mostly not affected. There was a significant pH x infection interaction for plants exposed to acidic foliar sprays for 4 wk; root and shoot mass decreased with acidity, but only for infected plants. It was found that acid rain may be deleterious to tall fescue growth at specific stages of development, but biomass production in response to acid rain is not likely to be influenced by fungal endophytes within mature plants. 55 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Effects of temporal variations in the acidity of rain on crop response to acidic deposition (Task Force Project)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Irving, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    The variation of rainfall pH from one event to another may have important biological consequences in several respects. A few rainfall events, or even only one, at low pH values may be more damaging than the same total hydrogen ion deposition spread out over a larger number of events with higher pH values. The variation of rainfall pH within events may also affect biological response. For example, during the early stages of an event, acid precipitation may be less effective in damaging vegetation since the water falling on the plant surfaces is continually being washed off by the subsequent rain. On the other hand, that rainwater which falls during the very last stages of an event remains on the vegetation until it evaporates. Since the concentration of contaminants remaining in solution on the leaves in these circumstances steadily increasing during evaporation, this particular rain may have a significantly greater effect. Of course, there is also a third hypothesis to the effect that it is primarily the total hydrogen ion deposition received by plant surfaces over a long period of time (conceivably, over an entire growing season) which is the most important parameter due to the cumulative stress imposed on the plant tissue over the entire period of exposure. The proposed experiments will determine which of these hypotheses best represents the response of a particular, economically-important crop species to the impact of more realistically programmed, acid rain simulant treatments. Design of the experiments is discussed.

  10. Acid rain: china, United States, and a remote area.

    PubMed

    Galloway, J N; Dianwu, Z; Jiling, X; Likens, G E

    1987-06-19

    The composition of precipitation in China is highly influenced by fossil fuel combustion and agricultural and cultural practices. Compared to the eastern United States, precipitation in China generally has higher concentrations of sulfate, ammonium, and calcium. Wet deposition rates of sulfur in China are 7 to 130 times higher than those in a remote area in the Southern Hemisphere. In many areas of the world, significant ecological changes have occurred in ecosystems that have acid deposition rates substantially less than those currently existing in China.

  11. Sulfuric acid rain effects on crop yield and foliar injury. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.J.; Neely, G.E.; Perrigan, S.C.

    1980-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the relative sensitivity of major U.S. crops to sulfuric acid rain. Plants were grown under controlled environmental conditions and exposed to simulated acid rain of three sulfuric acid concentrations (pH 3.0, 3.5, 4.0) or to a control rain (pH 5.7). Injury to foliage and effects on yield were common responses to acid rain. However, foliar injury was not a good indicator of effects on yield.

  12. 76 FR 71559 - Acid Rain Program: Notice of Annual Adjustment Factors for Excess Emissions Penalty

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... AGENCY Acid Rain Program: Notice of Annual Adjustment Factors for Excess Emissions Penalty AGENCY.... SUMMARY: The Acid Rain Program under title IV of the Clean Air Act provides for automatic excess emissions penalties in dollars per ton of excess emissions for sources that do not meet their annual Acid...

  13. 78 FR 64496 - Acid Rain Program: Notice of Annual Adjustment Factors for Excess Emissions Penalty

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... AGENCY Acid Rain Program: Notice of Annual Adjustment Factors for Excess Emissions Penalty AGENCY.... SUMMARY: The Acid Rain Program under title IV of the Clean Air Act provides for automatic excess emissions penalties in dollars per ton of excess emissions for sources that do not meet their annual Acid...

  14. Biologically produced acid precipitable polymeric lignin

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Don L.; Pometto, III, Anthony L.

    1984-01-01

    A water soluble, acid precipitable polymeric degraded lignin (APPL), having a molecular weight of at least 12,000 daltons, and comprising, by percentage of total weight, at least three times the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid groups present in native lignin. The APPL may be modified by chemical oxidation and reduction to increase its phenolic hydroxyl content and reduce the number of its antioxidant inhibitory side chains, thereby improving antioxidant properties.

  15. Evaluation of candidate rain gages for upgrading precipitation measurement tools for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) was established in 1977 to investigate atmospheric deposition and its effects on the environment. Since its establishment, precipitation records have been obtained at all NADP sites using a gage developed approximately 50 years ago-the Belfort 5-780 mechanical rain gage. In 1998 and 1999, a study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate four recently developed, technologically advanced rain gages as possible replacement candidates for the mechanical gage currently (2002) in use by the NADP. The gage types evaluated were the Belfort 3200, Geonor T-200, ETI Noah II, and the OTT PLUVIO. The Belfort 5-780 was included in the study to compare the performance of the rain gage currently (2002) used by NADP to the performance of the more recently developed gages. As a reference gage, the NovaLynx Model 260-2510 National Weather Service type stick gage also was included in the study. Two individual gages of each type were included in the study to evaluate precision between gages of the same type. A two-phase evaluation was completed. Phase I consisted of indoor bench tests with known amounts of simulated rainfall applied in 20 individual tests. Phase II consisted of outdoor testing by collecting precipitation during a 26-week period near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The ETI Noah II, OTT PLUVIO, and NovaLynx stick gages consistently recorded depths more commensurate with the amounts of applied simulated rainfall in Phase I testing than the Geonor T-200, Belfort 5-780, and Belfort 3200 gages. Gages where both the median difference between the measured and applied simulated rainfall and the interquartile range of all of their measured minus applied simulated rainfall differences were small (less than or equal to 0.01 inch) were judged to have performed very well in Phase I testing. The median and interquartile-range values were 0.01 inch or less for each of the ETI Noah II gages, OTT PLUVIO gages, and NovaLynx stick

  16. Acid-rain fallout threatens subsidies for utilities that convert to coal

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, L.

    1980-05-03

    The Carter administration's $10 billion scheme to subsidize utility coal conversion has been challenged by the Enironmental Protection Agency (EPA) because the EPA feels it may worsen the acid-rain problem. The process of acid precipitation formation and its relationship to power-plant emissions is poorly understood, but increasing acidification of lakes and streams has destroyed the ecosystems of many lakes and streams and may be affecting soil, crops, forests, and drinking water. Carter's oil-backout program could add as much as 384,000 tons of sulfur dioxide emissions each year. At the same time the 107 power plant conversions would save 400,000 barrels of oil a day by 1985. New plants must meet EPA's new-source performance standards, but converted plants must meet only state ambient air quality standards. The Clean Air Act may worsen the acid-rain problem because it does not address long-range transport. Debate continues over the economics of Federal subsidies and grants to cover coal conversion. (DCK)

  17. [Yesterday, today, tomorrow. A retrospective look at the acid rain problem].

    PubMed

    Buijsman, Ed

    2008-01-01

    Last century, at the end of the seventies, Europe was startled by a serious environmental problem: acid rain. Acid rain was held responsible for the decline of fishes in Scandinavian lakes. Later, it was suggested that acid rain could lead to forest dieback over vast areas of Europe. Forests in the Netherlands could be at great risk, as well. It was clear to everyone what it was all about, for 'rain' means water falling from the atmosphere and the meaning of 'acid' was evident, too. Acid rain caused much commotion in the eighties but, since then, it has faded into the background. Why is it, that there is so little attention paid to acid rain these days? Maybe the acid rain problem was a hype; with an exaggerated reaction to a problem that was, in fact, insignificant. This article aims to reconstruct the history of one of the most prominent environmental problems of the twentieth century. The article describes the origin of the acid rain problem in the 1960s and describes the scientific research that was carried out to develop a better understanding of the problem from an atmospheric chemical point of view. Subsequently, it treats the rise of public awareness in the seventies. The article subsequently focuses on the situation in the Netherlands. The initial research into forest health showed alarming results. This led to widespread concern within The Netherlands, which, once more, urged the government to come into action. Some measures to reduce air-polluting emissions were already taken in the early 1980s. However, these were meant, mainly, to improve local air quality. As the eighties progressed, acid rain provided an additional argument for reducing air pollution. This article presents the consequences of the emission reductions for the acidity of acid rain, and it discusses--in brief--the acid rain problem in light of current scientific knowledge. Finally, it answers the question of why forests did not die. PMID:22586759

  18. [Yesterday, today, tomorrow. A retrospective look at the acid rain problem].

    PubMed

    Buijsman, Ed

    2008-01-01

    Last century, at the end of the seventies, Europe was startled by a serious environmental problem: acid rain. Acid rain was held responsible for the decline of fishes in Scandinavian lakes. Later, it was suggested that acid rain could lead to forest dieback over vast areas of Europe. Forests in the Netherlands could be at great risk, as well. It was clear to everyone what it was all about, for 'rain' means water falling from the atmosphere and the meaning of 'acid' was evident, too. Acid rain caused much commotion in the eighties but, since then, it has faded into the background. Why is it, that there is so little attention paid to acid rain these days? Maybe the acid rain problem was a hype; with an exaggerated reaction to a problem that was, in fact, insignificant. This article aims to reconstruct the history of one of the most prominent environmental problems of the twentieth century. The article describes the origin of the acid rain problem in the 1960s and describes the scientific research that was carried out to develop a better understanding of the problem from an atmospheric chemical point of view. Subsequently, it treats the rise of public awareness in the seventies. The article subsequently focuses on the situation in the Netherlands. The initial research into forest health showed alarming results. This led to widespread concern within The Netherlands, which, once more, urged the government to come into action. Some measures to reduce air-polluting emissions were already taken in the early 1980s. However, these were meant, mainly, to improve local air quality. As the eighties progressed, acid rain provided an additional argument for reducing air pollution. This article presents the consequences of the emission reductions for the acidity of acid rain, and it discusses--in brief--the acid rain problem in light of current scientific knowledge. Finally, it answers the question of why forests did not die.

  19. Acid rain at Kennedy Space Center, Florida - Recent observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, B. C.

    1981-01-01

    During the period July, 1977 to September, 1979, rainfall was collected in the vicinity of the Kennedy Space Center and subjected to appropriate chemical analysis for purposes of characterization of general composition and acidity. Results obtained form the basis for future comparisons, should significant alteration of the chemical composition of rain occur during the space shuttle era. Acidity extremes calculated on a monthly basis from event samples collected from five sites within a 200 sq km area varied from pH 5.1 in November, 1977, and April, 1978 to pH 4.3 in July, 1978 and July, 1979. Weighted average pH for the entire period was 4.55. Acidity was due to the presence of sulfuric and nitric acids. The mole ratio of excess SO4(-2):NO3(-) was typically greater than one. Monthly weighted average Cl(-) concentrations ranged from 20-240 micromoles/liter. The Cl(-):Na(+) ratio was slightly lower than that present in sea water.

  20. Comparing and assessing acid rain-sensitive ponds.

    PubMed

    Hagar, W G; Crosby, B A; Stallsmith, B W

    2000-05-29

    Changes in pH and temperature were monitored in two freshwater ponds in Southeastern Massachusetts from 1990 to 1993 using a remote-sensing system that collected data on a continuous basis. The sensing system included a combination electrode, pH meter and portable computer powered by a marine battery. Temperature and pH information from the pH meter were acquired every 10 min and stored in the computer. The two ponds, located within 2 km of one another, have a different average pH and sensitivity to acid precipitation. Maquan Pond has an average pH of 6.0 and an alkalinity of 7.4 mg/l, while Furnace Pond has an average pH of 6.9 and alkalinity of 14.9 mg/l. The pH of both ponds varied seasonally and showed diel changes due to the photosynthetic and respiratory activity of aquatic organisms. Precipitation events did not change the pH of Furnace Pond. Maquan Pond on the other hand, did exhibit changes in surface water pH due to specific acidic precipitation events. During certain rainstorms, the pH of Maquan surface waters dropped to values as low as pH 4. In addition to the transient changes in pH, the acid-sensitive pond also exhibited differences in planktonic distribution patterns.

  1. Changes in poultry litter toxicity with simulated acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G.; Krishnamurthy, S. )

    1991-01-01

    The Delmarva Peninsula on the Eastern Shore of Maryland ranks 4th in the nation in poultry production and generates 9,500 metric tons of poultry manure/litter per day. The poultry litter contains many macro and micro nutrients and is an excellent source of fertilizer. The litter also contains antibiotics, heavy metals, hormones and many microorganisms. Land application of this litter has been the only means of its utilization and disposal. With rainfall, surface water run-off (leachate), from land on which litter has been applied, reaches the Cheasapeake Bay from this region. This leachate with its high organic and inorganic salt contents and high biochemical oxygen demand can severely disrupt the aquatic life and cause fish kills. The objective of this research was to study the effect of simulated acid rain (pH 3, 4 and 5) on the toxicity of poultry litter extracts.

  2. Occurrence of acid rain in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Summer 1981. The role of the catalytic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.W.; Ghane, H.

    1982-01-01

    Between June and October 1981, acid rain falling in Baton Rouge, LA was studied. The acidity of the rain ranged for pH 3.9 to pH 5.8. Preliminary data showed that rain associated with thermal cumulo nimbus tended to be more acidic, but rain associated with active cold fronts were less acid. This may relate to dispersion and dilution of the acid aerosols by the cold front. It is proposed that exhaust from automobiles fitted with catalytic converters is a substantial contributor to the acid rain problem, and that their net value to the abatement of pollution must be questioned, particularly in regions of the country where smog is not a problem. (JMT)

  3. Acidic and alkaline precipitation in the Cilician Basin, north-eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, T; Saydam, A C

    2000-05-15

    Samples from precipitation events collected at Erdemli during February 1996-June 1997 were analyzed to determine their particulate aluminium content, in addition to pH and conductivity measurements. Backward air mass trajectories corresponding to the rainy days were analyzed to determine potential source regions of acidic and alkaline constituents transported to the Cilician Basin. Approximately 28% of the rain samples were found to be acidic and the trajectories associated with half of the acid precipitation events were from the Mediterranean Basin and the Balkan Peninsula, while the other half were from the Anatolian mainland and local sources. Rain samples were found to be alkaline (58%), with their trajectories originating from North Africa and the Middle East. As a result of its CaCO3 content, mineral dust from these arid regions significantly increased the pH of rainwater.

  4. Effects of simulated acid rain and (+/-)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) propanoic acid on selected crops.

    PubMed

    Larsen, B R

    1985-10-01

    The effect of foliar-applicated (+/-)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propanoic acid (2,4-DP) under simultaneous influence of simulated acid rain at pH levels of 3.3, 4.3, and 5.6 was examined for young plants of white mustard, rape, cress, lettuce, radish, carrot, oat, and barley grown in climate chambers. After 1-2 weeks with daily showers plants received a single foliar application of 2,4-DP in aqueous solution (500 microliter; 0.25-50.0 mg X liter-1). After a post-treatment period of 2-3 weeks with daily showers the plants were sampled. 2,4-DP at 5 mg X liter-1 or higher concentrations caused various symptoms for the dicotyledons. Monocotyledons and carrot remained unaffected. The application of acid rain at pH 3.3 produced morphological changes, increased the symptoms from 2,4-DP, and reduced the dry weight and the leaf to stem ratio. Cress exposed only to acid rain showed necrotic spots and chlorosis at pH 3.3. By decreasing pH taller plants with smaller leaves were observed. The combined effect of acid rain and 2,4-DP was additive rather than synergistic.

  5. Sex Differences in Environmental Concern and Knowledge: The Case of Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arcury, Thomas A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Presents results of a telephone survey of 516 adults which focused on sex differences in concern and knowledge about one environmental issue, acid rain. The findings contradict predictions that women are more concerned about environmental issues: if there is a sex difference, men are found to be more concerned and knowledgeable about acid rain.…

  6. Response of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chanjuan; Ge, Yuqing; Su, Lei; Bu, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the adaptation of plants to acid rain is important to find feasible approaches to alleviate such damage to plants. We studied effects of acid rain on plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate during stress and recovery periods. Simulated acid rain at pH 5.5 did not affect plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription in leaves treated with acid rain at pH 3.5 was increased to maintain ion homeostasis by transporting excessive H(+) out of cells. Then intracellular H(+) was close to the control after a 5-day recovery, alleviating damage on membrane and sustaining photosynthetic efficiency and growth. Simulated acid rain at pH 2.5 inhibited plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity by decreasing the expression of H(+)-ATPase at transcription level, resulting in membrane damage and abnormal intracellular H(+), and reduction in photosynthetic efficiency and relative growth rate. After a 5-day recovery, all parameters in leaves treated with pH 2.5 acid rain show alleviated damage, implying that the increased plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and its high expression were involved in repairing process in acid rain-stressed plants. Our study suggests that plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase can play a role in adaptation to acid rain for rice seedlings.

  7. Acid Rain: A Resource Guide for Classroom, Laboratory, Field, and Debate Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoss, Frederick W.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a partially annotated bibliography of journals and book chapters which deal with acid rain. Includes selections which provide background information, ideas for introducing acid rain into science or social studies curricula, inventories of audio-visual aids, and non-print media to supplement classroom, laboratory, and field instruction.…

  8. Acid Rain: Federal Policy Action 1983-1985. A Guide to Government Documents and Commercial Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovenburg, Susan, Comp.

    The problems associated with acid rain as well as strategies on what to do and how to do it are addressed in this resource guide. The first section identifies and describes the U.S. agencies and congressional committees which play a role in acid rain research, legislation, and regulation. Actions already taken by the executive and legislative…

  9. Response of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chanjuan; Ge, Yuqing; Su, Lei; Bu, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the adaptation of plants to acid rain is important to find feasible approaches to alleviate such damage to plants. We studied effects of acid rain on plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate during stress and recovery periods. Simulated acid rain at pH 5.5 did not affect plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription in leaves treated with acid rain at pH 3.5 was increased to maintain ion homeostasis by transporting excessive H(+) out of cells. Then intracellular H(+) was close to the control after a 5-day recovery, alleviating damage on membrane and sustaining photosynthetic efficiency and growth. Simulated acid rain at pH 2.5 inhibited plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity by decreasing the expression of H(+)-ATPase at transcription level, resulting in membrane damage and abnormal intracellular H(+), and reduction in photosynthetic efficiency and relative growth rate. After a 5-day recovery, all parameters in leaves treated with pH 2.5 acid rain show alleviated damage, implying that the increased plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and its high expression were involved in repairing process in acid rain-stressed plants. Our study suggests that plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase can play a role in adaptation to acid rain for rice seedlings. PMID:25087500

  10. STATE ACID RAIN RESEARCH AND SCREENING SYSTEM - VERSION 1.0 USER'S MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user's manual that describes Version 1.0 of EPA's STate Acid Rain Research and Screening System (STARRSS), developed to assist utility regulatory commissions in reviewing utility acid rain compliance plans. It is a screening tool that is based on scenario analysis...

  11. Comparative proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in β-aminobutyric acid enhanced Arabidopsis thaliana tolerance to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingwu; Jiang, Xinwu; Shi, Wuliang; Chen, Juan; Pei, Zhenming; Zheng, Hailei

    2011-05-01

    Acid rain is a worldwide environmental issue that has seriously destroyed forest ecosystems. As a highly effective and broad-spectrum plant resistance-inducing agent, β-aminobutyric acid could elevate the tolerance of Arabidopsis when subjected to simulated acid rain. Using comparative proteomic strategies, we analyzed 203 significantly varied proteins of which 175 proteins were identified responding to β-aminobutyric acid in the absence and presence of simulated acid rain. They could be divided into ten groups according to their biological functions. Among them, the majority was cell rescue, development and defense-related proteins, followed by transcription, protein synthesis, folding, modification and destination-associated proteins. Our conclusion is β-aminobutyric acid can lead to a large-scale primary metabolism change and simultaneously activate antioxidant system and salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid signaling pathways. In addition, β-aminobutyric acid can reinforce physical barriers to defend simulated acid rain stress.

  12. Interactive effects of cadmium and acid rain on photosynthetic light reaction in soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaoguo; Wang, Lihong; Chen, Minmin; Wang, Lei; Liang, Chanjuan; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2012-05-01

    Interactive effects of cadmium (Cd(2+)) and acid rain on photosynthetic light reaction in soybean seedlings were investigated under hydroponic conditions. Single treatment with Cd(2+) or acid rain and the combined treatment decreased the content of chlorophyll, Hill reaction rate, the activity of Mg(2+)-ATPase, maximal photochemical efficiency and maximal quantum yield, increased initial fluorescence and damaged the chloroplast structure in soybean seedlings. In the combined treatment, the change in the photosynthetic parameters and the damage of chloroplast structure were stronger than those of any single pollution. Meanwhile, Cd(2+) and acid rain had the interactive effects on the test indices in soybean seedlings. The results indicated that the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain aggravated the toxic effect of the single pollution of Cd(2+) or acid rain on the photosynthetic parameters due to the serious damage to the chloroplast structure.

  13. Energy technology and emissions control for acid rain abatement in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    After more than ten years of research, acid rain is a sufficiently serious problem in North America to warrant control action. The acid rain problem has become a threat to the Asian continent as well. Emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides are already high and announces plans for increases in coal use by countries in the region imply a major increase in emissions in the future. This will inevitably lead to greater incidence of acid rain and probably significant environmental damage in some locations. The purpose of this paper is to examine some of the issues relating to acid-rain-control technology in Asia and to suggest ways to include technology options in integrated simulation models of acid rain in Asia. 14 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs. (FL)

  14. [Effects of simulated acid rain on chloroplast activity in Dimorcarpus longana Lour. cv. wulongling leaves].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Dongliang; Liu, Xinghui

    2002-12-01

    A decreased content of chlorophyll (Chl) and carotenoid (Car) was found in the Dimorcarpus longana Lour. cv. wulongling leaves when treated with < pH 3.5 acid rain. The decline of Chl content was caused by the reduction of Chla, while Chlb was less sensitive to the acid rain, which resulted in a decrease of Chla/Chlb ratio. The content of Car and the ratio of Chla to Chlb reduced with the duration of stress time. The injury of acid rain to photosynthetic pigments was intensified by illumination. The activities of photoreduction, photophosphorylation and H(+)-ATPase activity decreased with the reduction of pH value under the simulated acid rain. Therefore, the injury of electron transport chain and the uncoupling of photophosphorylation might lead to the ineffective absorption, transportation and transformation of light energy. In our study, the process of photophosphorylation was more sensitive to acid rain than that of photoreduction.

  15. Acid rain draft study released: No environmental emergency found

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, M.

    1990-10-11

    This article discusses the findings released in the draft study of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Some areas where acidic deposition and related air pollution is evident include 10 percent of eastern lakes and streams, visibility reduction throughout the eastern US and large metropolitan areas of the West, erosion and corrosion damage to stone and metal structures and cultural resources, and a reduction in cold tolerance of red spruce trees at high elevations. Human health effects have not been clearly demonstrated. The report tied sulfur dioxide emissions to regions of high acidic deposition. The problem is characterized as not an environmental emergency but a long term problem that should be addressed with minimum impact on other environmental goals and with efficient use of the nations economic and energy resources.

  16. Determining During-Storm Precipitation Phase and the Rain/Snow Transition Elevation in a Mountain Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, D. G.; Winstral, A. H.; Reba, M. L.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Kumar, M.

    2012-12-01

    Determining precipitation phase is required to properly correct precipitation gage data for wind effects, to determine the hydrologic response to a precipitation event, and for hydrologic modeling when rain will be treated differently snow. In this paper we present a comparison of several methods for determining precipitation phase using 12 years of hourly precipitation, weather and snow data from a long-term measurement site at Reynolds Mtn. East (RME), a headwater catchment within the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW), in the Owyhee Mountains of Idaho, USA. Methods are based on thresholds of 1) air temperature (Ta) at 0°C, 2) dual Ta threshold -1°C to +3°C, 3) dewpoint temperature (Td) 0°C, and 4) wet bulb temperature (Tw) 0°C. The comparison shows that at the RME Grove site, the dual threshold approach predicts too much snow, while Ta, Td and Tw are generally similar, predicting over the 12 year-period equivalent snow volume and indicating that during storms at this location the cloud level is at or close to the surface. In an effort to test the methods across an elevation range during a large mixed-phase storm we present an analysis of measured and estimated precipitation phase along a transect of seven measurement sites across 380 m of elevation within the rain/snow transition zone. We use data from a 1.8 km2 drainage, (1488-1868 m), within the RCEW, collected during a large precipitation event that occurred in late December 2005. The event began as snow at all elevations and over the course of 4 hours transitioned to rain at the lowest through highest elevations. Using 15-minute measurements of precipitation, changes in snow depth (zs), Ta, Td and Tw, we show that in this mountain basin, when the cloud-level is near the surface precipitation phase is linked to the during-storm humidity. By measuring humidity along an elevation gradient during the storm we are able to reliably estimate precipitation phase and effectively track the elevation of

  17. Effects of simulated acid rain on glucose mineralization and some physicochemical properties of forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Strayer, R.F.; Alexander, M.

    1981-10-01

    To study the effects of acid rain, samples of forest soils were exposed to a continuous application of 100 cm of simulated acid rain (pH 3.2-4.1) at 5 cm/hour, or to intermittent 1-hour applications of 5 cm of simulated acid rain three times per week for 7 weeks. The major effects of the simulated acid rain were localized at the top of the soil and included lower pH values and glucose mineralization rates, and higher exchangeable Al and total and exchange acidity. The acidity penetrated further in the more acid soils. The mineralization of /sup 14/C-glucose was measured at concentrations of 1.5-54 ..mu..g glucose/g of soil. Glucose mineralization in the test soils (pH values of 4.4-7.1) was inhibited by the continuous exposure to simulated acid rain at pH 3.2 but not a pH 4.1. The extent of inhibition depended on the soil and the initial glucose concentration. Exposure of one soil to 7 weeks of intermittent applications of simulated acid rain at pH 3.2 reduced the mineralization rate at the three glucose concentrations tested. These data suggest that acid rain may have a significant impact on microbial activity.

  18. Growth response of Pinus ponderosa seedlings and mature tree branches to acid rain and ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.D.; Houpis, J.L.J.; Helms, J.A.

    1994-10-01

    Forests of the central and southern Sierra Nevada in California have been subjected to chronic damage by ozone and other atmospheric pollutants for the past several decades. Until recently, pollutant exposure of northern Sierra Nevada forests has been mild but increasing population and changes in land use throughout the Sacramento Valley and Sierra Nevada foothills may lead to increased pollutant damage in these forests. Although, better documented in other regions of the United States, little is known regarding the potential for acidic precipitation damage to Sierra Nevada forests. Only recently have studies directed towards understanding the potential interactive effects of ozone and acidic precipitation been undertaken. A key issue in resolving potential regional impacts of pollutants on forests is the extent to which research results can be scaled across genotypes and life-stages. Most of the pollution research to date has been performed using seedlings with varying degrees of genetic control. It is important to determine if the results obtained in such studies can be extrapolated to mature trees and to different genetic sources. In this paper, we present results from a one-year study examining the interactive effects of foliar exposure to acidic rain and ozone on the growth of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), a conifer known to be sensitive to ozone. The response to pollutants is characterized for both seedlings and mature tree branches of three genotypes grown in a common environment.

  19. Studies of the effect of simulated acid rain on the ecological equilibrium of the soil system.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Z; Angiel, M; Bieńkowski, P; Dowgiałło, A; Focht, U

    1996-05-01

    Introduction to the problem of environmental pollution caused by acid depositions. Presentation of principles of the six-year field experiment with simulated acid rain. Short characteristics of particular parts of the series of papers.

  20. Combined effects of lanthanum (III) chloride and acid rain on photosynthetic parameters in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Wang, Wen; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) pollution and acid rain are environmental issues, and their deleterious effects on plants attract worldwide attention. These two issues exist simultaneously in many regions, especially in some rice-growing areas. However, little is known about the combined effects of REEs and acid rain on plants. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum chloride (LaCl3), one type of REE salt, and acid rain on photosynthesis in rice were investigated. We showed that the combined treatment of 81.6 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 4.5 increased net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatic conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), Hill reaction activity (HRA), apparent quantum yield (AQY) and carboxylation efficiency (CE) in rice. The combined treatment of 81.6 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 3.5 began to behave toxic effects on photosynthesis (decreasing Pn, Gs, HRA, AQY and CE, and increasing Ci), and the maximally toxic effects were observed in the combined treatment of 2449.0 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 2.5. Moreover, the combined effects of LaCl3 and acid rain on photosynthesis in rice depended on the growth stage of rice, with the maximal effects occurring at the booting stage. Furthermore, the combined treatment of high-concentration LaCl3 and low-pH acid rain had more serious effects on photosynthesis in rice than LaCl3 or acid rain treatment alone. Finally, the combined effect of LaCl3 and acid rain on Pn in rice resulted from the changes in stomatic (Gs, Ci) and non-stomatic (HRA, AQY and CE) factors.

  1. Combined effects of lanthanum (III) chloride and acid rain on photosynthetic parameters in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Wang, Wen; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) pollution and acid rain are environmental issues, and their deleterious effects on plants attract worldwide attention. These two issues exist simultaneously in many regions, especially in some rice-growing areas. However, little is known about the combined effects of REEs and acid rain on plants. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum chloride (LaCl3), one type of REE salt, and acid rain on photosynthesis in rice were investigated. We showed that the combined treatment of 81.6 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 4.5 increased net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatic conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), Hill reaction activity (HRA), apparent quantum yield (AQY) and carboxylation efficiency (CE) in rice. The combined treatment of 81.6 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 3.5 began to behave toxic effects on photosynthesis (decreasing Pn, Gs, HRA, AQY and CE, and increasing Ci), and the maximally toxic effects were observed in the combined treatment of 2449.0 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 2.5. Moreover, the combined effects of LaCl3 and acid rain on photosynthesis in rice depended on the growth stage of rice, with the maximal effects occurring at the booting stage. Furthermore, the combined treatment of high-concentration LaCl3 and low-pH acid rain had more serious effects on photosynthesis in rice than LaCl3 or acid rain treatment alone. Finally, the combined effect of LaCl3 and acid rain on Pn in rice resulted from the changes in stomatic (Gs, Ci) and non-stomatic (HRA, AQY and CE) factors. PMID:25048927

  2. Acid Precipitation: A current awareness bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, P.S.

    1988-01-01

    Acid Precipition (APC) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information on acid precipation and closely related subjects, including wet and dry deposition, long-range transport, environmental effects, modeling, and socioeconomic factors. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Data Base (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or goverment-to-government agreements.

  3. [Relationships between soil moisture and needle-fall in Masson pine forests in acid rain region of Chongqing, Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Hao; Wang, Yan-Hui; Li, Zhen-Hua; Yu, Peng-Tao; Xiong, Wei; Hao, Jia; Duan, Jian

    2012-10-01

    From March 2009 to November 2011, an investigation was conducted on the spatiotemporal variation of soil moisture and its effects on the needle-fall in Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forests in acid rain region of Chongqing, Southeast China, with the corresponding soil moisture thresholds determined. No matter the annual precipitation was abundant, normal or less than average, the seasonal variation of soil moisture in the forests could be obviously divided into four periods, i.e., sufficient (before May), descending (from June to July), drought (from August to September), and recovering (from October to November). With increasing soil depth, the soil moisture content increased after an initial decrease, but the difference of the soil moisture content among different soil layers decreased with decreasing annual precipitation. The amount of monthly needle-fall in the forests in growth season was significantly correlated with the water storage in root zone (0-60 cm soil layer), especially in the main root zone (20-50 cm soil layer). Soil field capacity (or capillary porosity) and 82% of field capacity (or 80% of capillary porosity) were the main soil moisture thresholds affecting the litter-fall. It was suggested that in acid rain region, Masson pine forest was easily to suffer from water deficit stress, especially in dry-summer period. The water deficit stress, together with already existed acid rain stress, would further threaten the health of the Masson forest.

  4. [Relationships between soil moisture and needle-fall in Masson pine forests in acid rain region of Chongqing, Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Hao; Wang, Yan-Hui; Li, Zhen-Hua; Yu, Peng-Tao; Xiong, Wei; Hao, Jia; Duan, Jian

    2012-10-01

    From March 2009 to November 2011, an investigation was conducted on the spatiotemporal variation of soil moisture and its effects on the needle-fall in Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forests in acid rain region of Chongqing, Southeast China, with the corresponding soil moisture thresholds determined. No matter the annual precipitation was abundant, normal or less than average, the seasonal variation of soil moisture in the forests could be obviously divided into four periods, i.e., sufficient (before May), descending (from June to July), drought (from August to September), and recovering (from October to November). With increasing soil depth, the soil moisture content increased after an initial decrease, but the difference of the soil moisture content among different soil layers decreased with decreasing annual precipitation. The amount of monthly needle-fall in the forests in growth season was significantly correlated with the water storage in root zone (0-60 cm soil layer), especially in the main root zone (20-50 cm soil layer). Soil field capacity (or capillary porosity) and 82% of field capacity (or 80% of capillary porosity) were the main soil moisture thresholds affecting the litter-fall. It was suggested that in acid rain region, Masson pine forest was easily to suffer from water deficit stress, especially in dry-summer period. The water deficit stress, together with already existed acid rain stress, would further threaten the health of the Masson forest. PMID:23359920

  5. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the causes, effects, sources, and controls of acid precipitation and acidification. Techniques and technology for measurement and analysis of acid precipitation are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. A numerical simulation of the distribution of acid precipitation in Chongqing area of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xiao'en; Jia, Xinyuan; Yuan, Suzhen; Luo, Qiren; Chen, Silong; Xu, Yu

    1987-09-01

    A numerical model for the study of the regional acid precipitation is developed. The model consists of five parts: the distribution patterns of SO2 concentration, the mesoscale flow fields, the parameterization of SO2 transformation into SO{4/-}, the parameterization of precipitation scavenging process, and the relationship between SO2 content in precipitation and ground level concentration of SO2 in the air. The distribution of SO2, SO{2/-} and pH for all precipitations in Chongqing area during the period of July to October 1982 are simulated with the model. A comparison of the simulated results with experimental data shows that high SO2 concentration centres correspond to low pH centres. The source of the acid rain in Chongqing area is local air pollution which is due to the lower effective stack height, low wind velocity in the area, basin topography, and the use of coal with high sulphur content. The mechanism for the formation of the acid precipitation here may be different from that in the United States of America and the Western Europe, where acid rain appears in the area far from pollution source.

  7. Chemical composition and seasonal variation of acid deposition in Guangzhou, South China: comparison with precipitation in other major Chinese cities.

    PubMed

    Huang, De-Yin; Xu, Yi-Gang; Peng, Ping'an; Zhang, Hui-Huang; Lan, Jiang-Bo

    2009-01-01

    With the aim of understanding the origin of acid rains in South China, we analyzed rainwaters collected from Guangzhou, China, between March 2005 and February 2006. The pH of rainwater collected during the monitoring period varied from 4.22 to 5.87; acid rain represented about 94% of total precipitation during this period. The rainwater was characterized by high concentrations of SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-), Ca(2+), and NH(4)(+). SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-), the main precursors of acid rain, were related to the combustion of coal and fertilizer use/traffic emissions, respectively. Ca(2+) and NH(4)(+) act as neutralizers of acid, accounting for the decoupling between high SO(4)(2-) concentrations and relatively high pH in the Guangzhou precipitation. The acid rain in Guangzhou is most pronounced during spring and summer. A comparison with acid precipitation in other Chinese cities reveals a decreasing neutralization capacity from north to south, probably related to the role and origin of alkaline bases in precipitation. PMID:18801606

  8. Chemical composition and seasonal variation of acid deposition in Guangzhou, South China: comparison with precipitation in other major Chinese cities.

    PubMed

    Huang, De-Yin; Xu, Yi-Gang; Peng, Ping'an; Zhang, Hui-Huang; Lan, Jiang-Bo

    2009-01-01

    With the aim of understanding the origin of acid rains in South China, we analyzed rainwaters collected from Guangzhou, China, between March 2005 and February 2006. The pH of rainwater collected during the monitoring period varied from 4.22 to 5.87; acid rain represented about 94% of total precipitation during this period. The rainwater was characterized by high concentrations of SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-), Ca(2+), and NH(4)(+). SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-), the main precursors of acid rain, were related to the combustion of coal and fertilizer use/traffic emissions, respectively. Ca(2+) and NH(4)(+) act as neutralizers of acid, accounting for the decoupling between high SO(4)(2-) concentrations and relatively high pH in the Guangzhou precipitation. The acid rain in Guangzhou is most pronounced during spring and summer. A comparison with acid precipitation in other Chinese cities reveals a decreasing neutralization capacity from north to south, probably related to the role and origin of alkaline bases in precipitation.

  9. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This project addresses the acid mist that is formed by condensation of sulfuric acid vapor in flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers. An acid mist can be formed whenever the flue gas temperature approaches the prevailing acid dew point. This commonly occurs when the gas is subjected to rapid adiabatic cooling in a wet scrubber system for flue gas desulfurization. Acid mists can also sometimes result from unexpected temperature excursions caused by air inleakage, load cycling, and start-up operations. A wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) is the best control option for acid mist. The mist would blind a fabric filter and attach glass fiber fabrics. A wet ESP is required because the acid would quickly corrode the plates in a conventional dry ESP. The wet ESP also offers the advantages of no rapping reentrainment and no sensitivity to fly ash resistivity. Therefore, this program has been structured around the use of a compact, wet ESP to control acid mist emissions. Progress to date is discussed. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This project addresses the acid mist that is formed by condensation of sulfuric acid vapor in flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers. An acid mist can be formed whenever the flue gas temperature approaches the prevailing acid dew point. This commonly occurs when the gas is subjected to rapid adiabatic cooling in a wet scrubber system for flue gas desulfurization. Acid mists can also sometimes result from unexpected temperature excursions caused by air inleakage, load cycling, and start-up operations. A wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) is the best control option for acid mist. The mist would blind a fabric filter and attack glass fiber fabrics. A wet ESP is required because the acid would quickly corrode the plates in a conventional dry ESP. The wet ESP also offers the advantages of no rapping reentrainment and no sensitivity to fly ash resistivity. Therefore, this program has been structured around the use of a compact, wet ESP to control acid mist emissions. 7 refs.

  11. [Concentrations and acidity contributions of acetate and formate in precipitation at 14 stations of China].

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-huan; Xu, Xiao-bin; Yu, Xiao-lan; Tang, Jie

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the concentrations of organic acids in precipitation in China and their contributions to the total acidity of precipitation, samples were taken at 14 stations of regional representativeness in 2007 and analyzed for acetate and formate using ion chromatography. In this paper, data of acetate and formate in precipitation at 14 stations are presented, wet depositions of these organic acids are calculated, and contributions of them to the total free acidity (TFA) of precipitation are estimated. Based on the measurements, the mean concentrations of formate at different stations were in the range of 0.96-3.43 micromol/L, and those of acetate in the range of 0-5.13 micromol/L, close to the levels at remote sites in other countries and at the lower ends of concentration ranges from previous measurements in China. Comparisons indicate that the concentrations of the organic acids at remote sites are lower than those at sites in the vicinity of urban areas. The annual wet depositions of formate and acetate were estimated to be in the ranges of 0.38-4.18 mmol/(m2 x a) and 0.06-5.87 mmol/(m2 x a), respectively, with larger depositions in southern China and smaller depositions in northern China. The relative contributions of the two organic acids to the TFA of precipitation were estimated to be in the range of 0.02%-51.6%, with an overall average of 2.95%. This suggests that although acid rain in China is mainly caused by emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides, organic acids can significantly contribute to the acidification of precipitation in some regions and during some periods, hence need to be included in observational studies of acid rain.

  12. Effects and mechanism of acid rain on plant chloroplast ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingwen; Hu, Huiqing; Li, Yueli; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-09-01

    Acid rain can directly or indirectly affect plant physiological functions, especially photosynthesis. The enzyme ATP synthase is the key in photosynthetic energy conversion, and thus, it affects plant photosynthesis. To clarify the mechanism by which acid rain affects photosynthesis, we studied the effects of acid rain on plant growth, photosynthesis, chloroplast ATP synthase activity and gene expression, chloroplast ultrastructure, intracellular H(+) level, and water content of rice seedlings. Acid rain at pH 4.5 remained the chloroplast structure unchanged but increased the expression of six chloroplast ATP synthase subunits, promoted chloroplast ATP synthase activity, and increased photosynthesis and plant growth. Acid rain at pH 4.0 or less decreased leaf water content, destroyed chloroplast structure, inhibited the expression of six chloroplast ATP synthase subunits, decreased chloroplast ATP synthase activity, and reduced photosynthesis and plant growth. In conclusion, acid rain affected the chloroplast ultrastructure, chloroplast ATPase transcription and activity, and P n by changing the acidity in the cells, and thus influencing the plant growth and development. Finally, the effects of simulated acid rain on the test indices were found to be dose-dependent. PMID:27278067

  13. Effects and mechanism of acid rain on plant chloroplast ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingwen; Hu, Huiqing; Li, Yueli; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-09-01

    Acid rain can directly or indirectly affect plant physiological functions, especially photosynthesis. The enzyme ATP synthase is the key in photosynthetic energy conversion, and thus, it affects plant photosynthesis. To clarify the mechanism by which acid rain affects photosynthesis, we studied the effects of acid rain on plant growth, photosynthesis, chloroplast ATP synthase activity and gene expression, chloroplast ultrastructure, intracellular H(+) level, and water content of rice seedlings. Acid rain at pH 4.5 remained the chloroplast structure unchanged but increased the expression of six chloroplast ATP synthase subunits, promoted chloroplast ATP synthase activity, and increased photosynthesis and plant growth. Acid rain at pH 4.0 or less decreased leaf water content, destroyed chloroplast structure, inhibited the expression of six chloroplast ATP synthase subunits, decreased chloroplast ATP synthase activity, and reduced photosynthesis and plant growth. In conclusion, acid rain affected the chloroplast ultrastructure, chloroplast ATPase transcription and activity, and P n by changing the acidity in the cells, and thus influencing the plant growth and development. Finally, the effects of simulated acid rain on the test indices were found to be dose-dependent.

  14. Simulation of TRMM Microwave Imager Brightness Temperature using Precipitation Radar Reflectivity for Convective and Stratiform Rain Areas over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Iacovazzi, R., Jr.; Yoo, J.-M.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Rain is highly variable in space and time. In order to measure rainfall over global land with satellites, we need observations with very high spatial resolution and frequency in time. On board the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, the Precipitation Radar (PR) and Microwave Imager (TMI) are flown together for the purpose of estimating rain rate. The basic method to estimate rain from PR has been developed over the past several decades. On the other hand, the TMI method of rain estimation is still in the state development, particularly over land. The objective of this technical memorandum is to develop a theoretical framework that helps relate the observations made by these two instruments. The principle result of this study is that in order to match the PR observations with the TMI observations in convective rain areas, a mixed layer of graupel and supercooled water drops above the freezing level is needed. On the other hand, to match these observations in the stratiform region, a layer of snowflakes with appropriate densities above the freezing level, and a melting layer below the freezing level, are needed. This understanding can lead to a robust rainfall estimation technique from the microwave radiometer observations.

  15. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the wet and dry precipitation of acid, and the resultant acidification of land and water. Topics include composition, causes, effects, sources, measurements, and controls of acid precipitation. Some attention is focused upon the worldwide geographical distribution of acid precipitation and acidification. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the research of acid precipitation, and the resultant acidification of land and water. Topics include composition, causes, effects, sources, measurements, and controls of acid precipitation. Worldwide geographical distribution of acid precipitation and acidification are covered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Acid precipitation. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the research of acid precipitation, and the resultant acidification of land and water. Topics include composition, causes, effects, sources, measurements, and controls of acid precipitation. Worldwide geographical distribution of acid precipitation and acidification are covered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Health risks from acid rain: a Canadian perspective.

    PubMed

    Franklin, C A; Burnett, R T; Paolini, R J; Raizenne, M E

    1985-11-01

    Acidic deposition, commonly referred to as acid rain, is causing serious environmental damage in eastern Canada. The revenues from forest products, tourism and sport fishing are estimated to account for about 8% of the gross national product. The impact on human health is not as clearcut and a multi-department program on the Long-Range Transport of Airborne Pollutants (LRTAP) was approved by the federal government in June 1980. The objectives of the LRTAP program are to reduce wet sulfate deposition to less than 20 kg/ha per year in order to protect moderately sensitive areas. This will require a 50% reduction in Canadian SO2 emissions east of the Saskatchewan/Manitoba border and concomitant reductions in the eastern U.S.A. The objectives of the health sector of the program are to assess the risk to health posed by airborne pollutants which are subjected to long-range transport and to monitor the influence of abatement programs. Two major epidemiology studies were undertaken in 1983, one in which the health effects related to acute exposure to transported air pollutants were studied in asthmatic and nonasthmatic children, and another in which the effects of chronic exposure to these pollutants were studied in school children living in towns with high and low levels of pollutants. Preliminary analysis of the data do not indicate major health effects, but definitive conclusions must await final analysis. Studies on the indirect effects of acid deposition on water quality have shown that acidified lake water left standing in the plumbing system can adversely affect water quality and that federally set guidelines for copper and lead are exceeded. Flushing of the system before using the water rectifies the situation. Additional studies are planned to further delineate the magnitude of the health effects of acidified lake water.

  19. Health risks from acid rain: a Canadian perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, C A; Burnett, R T; Paolini, R J; Raizenne, M E

    1985-01-01

    Acidic deposition, commonly referred to as acid rain, is causing serious environmental damage in eastern Canada. The revenues from forest products, tourism and sport fishing are estimated to account for about 8% of the gross national product. The impact on human health is not as clearcut and a multi-department program on the Long-Range Transport of Airborne Pollutants (LRTAP) was approved by the federal government in June 1980. The objectives of the LRTAP program are to reduce wet sulfate deposition to less than 20 kg/ha per year in order to protect moderately sensitive areas. This will require a 50% reduction in Canadian SO2 emissions east of the Saskatchewan/Manitoba border and concomitant reductions in the eastern U.S.A. The objectives of the health sector of the program are to assess the risk to health posed by airborne pollutants which are subjected to long-range transport and to monitor the influence of abatement programs. Two major epidemiology studies were undertaken in 1983, one in which the health effects related to acute exposure to transported air pollutants were studied in asthmatic and nonasthmatic children, and another in which the effects of chronic exposure to these pollutants were studied in school children living in towns with high and low levels of pollutants. Preliminary analysis of the data do not indicate major health effects, but definitive conclusions must await final analysis. Studies on the indirect effects of acid deposition on water quality have shown that acidified lake water left standing in the plumbing system can adversely affect water quality and that federally set guidelines for copper and lead are exceeded. Flushing of the system before using the water rectifies the situation. Additional studies are planned to further delineate the magnitude of the health effects of acidified lake water. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. PMID:4076081

  20. Comparison Of Quantitative Precipitation Estimates Derived From Rain Gauge And Radar Derived Algorithms For Operational Flash Flood Support.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, D. P.; Kodama, K.

    2014-12-01

    To provide continuous flash flood situational awareness and to better differentiate severity of ongoing individual precipitation events, the National Weather Service Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (RDHM) is being implemented over Hawaii and Alaska. In the implementation process of RDHM, three gridded precipitation analyses are used as forcing. The first analysis is a radar only precipitation estimate derived from WSR-88D digital hybrid reflectivity, a Z-R relationship and aggregated into an hourly ¼ HRAP grid. The second analysis is derived from a rain gauge network and interpolated into an hourly ¼ HRAP grid using PRISM climatology. The third analysis is derived from a rain gauge network where rain gauges are assigned static pre-determined weights to derive a uniform mean areal precipitation that is applied over a catchment on a ¼ HRAP grid. To assess the effect of different QPE analyses on the accuracy of RDHM simulations and to potentially identify a preferred analysis for operational use, each QPE was used to force RDHM to simulate stream flow for 20 USGS peak flow events. An evaluation of the RDHM simulations was focused on peak flow magnitude, peak flow timing, and event volume accuracy to be most relevant for operational use. Results showed RDHM simulations based on the observed rain gauge amounts were more accurate in simulating peak flow magnitude and event volume relative to the radar derived analysis. However this result was not consistent for all 20 events nor was it consistent for a few of the rainfall events where an annual peak flow was recorded at more than one USGS gage. Implications of this indicate that a more robust QPE forcing with the inclusion of uncertainty derived from the three analyses may provide a better input for simulating extreme peak flow events.

  1. Sulfur and associated elements and acidity in continental and marine rain from north Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shigeru; Darzi, Michael; Winchester, John W.

    1980-08-01

    Rainwater was sampled for every rainfall occurrence between November 7, 1978, and January 26, 1979, in Tallahassee, Florida, a generally unpolluted area in the southeastern United States, about 50 km north of the Gulf of Mexico. The elemental composition was determined for 12 elements, S, K, Ca, V, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr, and Pb, by proton-induced X ray emission from 4 ml aliquots of 38 different rain samples. The elemental composition of the rain was found to be different for rain associated with northerly and southerly air flow regimes. In north air flow rain, originating from more polluted northern areas, concentrations of Pb, S, and Fe were higher and strong correlations of Br, Ca, and Fe with Pb were observed. Thus the north air flow rain exhibits polluted and continental characteristics. On the other hand, most elemental concentrations were lower in south air flow rain originating in the Gulf of Mexico, and strong correlations between elements such as S, K, Ca, and Br, but not with Pb, were observed. These results indicated a strong influence by sea spray. The north and south air flow rains also differed significantly in their acidity. In northern rain the average pH was 4.4 with a minimum of 3.7, whereas in southern rain the average pH was 5.3 with a minimum of 4.6. A strong correlation between pH and logarithmic sulfur concentration was observed in northern rain but not in southern rain. This suggests that most of the sulfur in northern rain is sulfuric acid transported from pollution sources, whereas southern rain includes much neutralized seawater sulfate.

  2. Characterization and Evaluation of Acid Rain in East Central Florida from 1978 to 1995 and Evaluation of Some Chromatographic/Spectroscopic Results from Leachate Samples from CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Brooks C.

    1996-01-01

    The results of monitoring the chemical composition of rain in east-central Florida have shown that the rain is moderately acid. The measured acidity of rain is less than that observed in other regions of the U. S., however, it does suggest that the level of acidity is substantial. The annual chemical composition of rain at UCF and at KSC has shown moderate variability. Extreme daily and monthly variations are observed, however these variations are not addressed here. The total ionic composition of rain collected at FL99 is greater than that for rain collected at UCF, however this can be accounted for by site proximity to the ocean with the accompanying marine influence. Difference in acidity data collected from the UCF and FL99 sites which are separated by 50 km may be due in part to the differences that have been observed between laboratory and field pH measurements. Trend assessment for precipitation composition requires evaluation of data that covers some minimum time period. In fact, the subdivision of the multi-year UCF record into individual 10 year records as described above can lead to the conclusion that a significant increase, a significant decrease or no trend exists for acidity depending upon the time period chosen for evaluation. Trend evaluation has also been accomplished by linear and nonlinear regression analysis using monthly volume weighted average concentrations and deposition using the UCF data set and some of the Florida NADP data set.

  3. Combined effects of lead and acid rain on photosynthesis in soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Lihong; Liao, Chenyu; Fan, Caixia; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    To explore how lead (Pb) and acid rain simultaneously affect plants, the combined effects of Pb and acid rain on the chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence reaction, Hill reaction rate, and Mg(2+)-ATPase activity in soybean seedlings were investigated. The results indicated that, when soybean seedlings were treated with Pb or acid rain alone, the chlorophyll content, Hill reaction rate, Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, and maximal photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)) were decreased, while the initial fluorescence (F 0) and maximum quantum yield (Y) were increased, compared with those of the control. The combined treatment with Pb and acid rain decreased the chlorophyll content, Hill reaction rate, Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, F(v)/F(m), and Y and increased F 0 in soybean seedlings. Under the combined treatment with Pb and acid rain, the two factors showed additive effects on the chlorophyll content in soybean seedlings and exhibited antagonistic effects on the Hill reaction rate. Under the combined treatment with high-concentration Pb and acid rain, the two factors exhibited synergistic effects on the Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, F 0, F v/F m, as well as Y. In summary, the inhibition of the photosynthetic process is an important physiological basis for the simultaneous actions of Pb and acid rain in soybean seedlings.

  4. Effect of simulated acid rain on nitrification and nitrogen mineralization in forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Strayer, R.F.; Lin, C.J.; Alexander, M.

    1981-01-01

    To determine the possible microbiological changes in soil resulting from acid rain, columns containing samples of forest soils were leached with either a continuous application of 100cm of simulated acid rain (pH3.2-4.1) at 5 cm/hour or an intermittent 1.5-hour application of 1.2 cm of simulated acid rain twice weekly for 19 weeks. The upper 1.0- to 1.5-cm portions of soil from treated columns were used to determine the changes in inorganic N levels in the soil. Nitrification of added ammonium (NH4(+)) was inhibited following continuous exposure of soil to simulated acid rain of pH 4.1-3.2. The extent of the inhibition was directly related to the acidity of the simulated rain solutions. The production of inorganic N in the absence of added NH(+) was either stimulated or unaffected following continuous treatment of soils with pH 3.2 simulated acid rain. The addition of nitrapyrine, an inhibitor of autotrophic nitrification, caused a decrease in nitrification in water-treated soil but had little effect on nitrification in soil treated with pH 3.2 simulated acid rain.

  5. Combined effects of lead and acid rain on photosynthesis in soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Lihong; Liao, Chenyu; Fan, Caixia; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    To explore how lead (Pb) and acid rain simultaneously affect plants, the combined effects of Pb and acid rain on the chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence reaction, Hill reaction rate, and Mg(2+)-ATPase activity in soybean seedlings were investigated. The results indicated that, when soybean seedlings were treated with Pb or acid rain alone, the chlorophyll content, Hill reaction rate, Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, and maximal photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)) were decreased, while the initial fluorescence (F 0) and maximum quantum yield (Y) were increased, compared with those of the control. The combined treatment with Pb and acid rain decreased the chlorophyll content, Hill reaction rate, Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, F(v)/F(m), and Y and increased F 0 in soybean seedlings. Under the combined treatment with Pb and acid rain, the two factors showed additive effects on the chlorophyll content in soybean seedlings and exhibited antagonistic effects on the Hill reaction rate. Under the combined treatment with high-concentration Pb and acid rain, the two factors exhibited synergistic effects on the Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, F 0, F v/F m, as well as Y. In summary, the inhibition of the photosynthetic process is an important physiological basis for the simultaneous actions of Pb and acid rain in soybean seedlings. PMID:25069575

  6. Air pollution, acid rain, and the future of forests

    SciTech Connect

    Postel, S.

    1984-01-01

    The biosphere is not infinitely resilient. What is happening in the industrial world's fields and forests are signs that fossil-fuel combustion has ecological limits, and that exceeding them exacts a price. Unless energy and environmental strategies begin to reflect this, today's threats are bound to become tomorrow's catastrophes. Given the rapidity with which the forest destruction has unfolded, the relevant question is no longer whether proof of damage from air pollutants or acid rain is irrefutable, but whether the forests are sufficiently threatened to warrant action. Undoubtedly, German foresters would answer with an unequivocal yes. But the real test is whether nations so far spared severe losses will muster the political will to take action to avoid them. By encouraging energy efficiency, recycling, and the development of renewable energy sources, and by burning coal cleanly and only when necessary, nations will help protect their forests, crops, lakes, and people for generations. The connections are real, and so are the consequences of ignoring them.

  7. Air pollution, acid rain, and the future of forests. Part 3. Counting the costs

    SciTech Connect

    Postel, S.

    1984-09-01

    Economic losses are predicted due to the effects of acid rain on forests in Europe and the United States. Growth declines and tree damage on forest lands intensively managed for marketable timber are described. Forest industries which produce paper and other forest products which consume large amounts of energy are said to be reluctant to support acid rain control measures. Few studies have examined the effects of acid deposition combined with intensive forestry practices.

  8. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, R.S.

    1989-11-01

    Southern Research Institute is developing a compact, wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) to control acid mist missions from high-sulfur coal combustion. The WESP is being developed as a retrofit technology for existing coal-fired power plants, particularly those equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers. Acid mist emissions can be a significant problem at these facilities because the sulfuric acid vapor in the flue gas is converted to a very fine mist that is not collected in the scrubber system. Conventional mist eliminators are not adequate in this application due to the very fine size of the mist droplets. The potential for corrosion also makes it difficult to use a fabric filter or a conventional, dry ESP in this application. Therefore, this research project has been structured around the development of a compact WESP that could be retrofit on top of an existing scrubber or within an existing flue gas duct. This paper describes the development and testing of a prototype WESP for the utility acid mist application. Testing was conducted with combustion of sulfur-doped gas to simulate the acid mist alone, and with a combination of coal and sulfur-doped gas to simulate the mixture of acid mist and fly ash downstream from a scrubber. The performance of the WESP test unit was modeled using two different cylindrical-geometry computer models: a current-seeking'' model and a current-specific'' model. 8 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. 1997 Canadian acid rain assessment. Volume 4: The effects on Canada`s forests

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, P.

    1997-12-31

    This report reviews the state of acid rain assessment related to Canadian forests as it has progressed since the last assessment carried out in 1990. The assessment also highlights key policy issues and the uncertainties associated with addressing them. Sections of the report cover the following: Acid rain and current forest decline in coastal birch, sugar maple, and high elevation forests; the effects of acid rain on tree physiology and soil chemistry; results of forest health monitoring in national, North American, Ontario, and Quebec networks; the critical loads or levels of acid deposition, with reference to case studies; and international involvement in acid rain research and abatement. Finally, research and information needs are identified.

  10. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, R.S.

    1991-04-01

    This report deals with the second part (Phase 2) of a two-phased study of the control of acid mist emissions using a compact, wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP). The goal of the study was to determine the degree of acid mist control that could be achieved when a compact WESP was used to replace or augment the mist eliminators in a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Phase 1 of the study examined the electrical operation of a lab-scale WESP collecting an acid mist from a coal combustion pilot plant equipped with a spray chamber. The results of this study were used to develop and validate a computer model of the WESP. In Phase 2, measurements were made at two utility scrubber installations to determine the loadings of acid mist, fly ash, and scrubber carryover. These measurements were used as input to the computer model to project the performance of retrofitted WESPs at both of the utility test sites. Phase 1 results showed that excellent electrical operating conditions could be achieved, but very high loadings of acid mist or the fine fly ash tended to degrade electrical operation because of space charge suppression of the corona current. Measurements made at the utility sites under Phase 2 showed that acid mist accounted for 40 to 57% of the total particulate mass, while fly ash and scrubber solids accounted for 40 to 55% and 1.0 to 3.4%. Impactor samples from both test sites showed an increase in acid content with decreasing particle size. 9 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs.

  11. Initial performance of the rain retrieval algorithm for the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar on the GPM core satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Toshio; Seto, Shinta; Awaka, Jun; Meneghini, Robert; Kubota, Takuji; Chandra, V. Chandra; Yoshida, Naofumi; Urita, Shinji; Kwiatkowski, John; Hanado, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    The GPM core satellite is scheduled to be launched on February 28, 2014. This paper will report results of the early performance test of the Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the GPM core satellite in orbit. The DPR, which was developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), consists of two radars: Ku-band precipitation radar (KuPR, 13.6 GHz) and Ka-band radar (KaPR, 35.5 GHz). KuPR is very similar to TRMM/PR, but its sensitivity is better than PR. The higher sensitivity is realized by the increase of the transmitting power and the increase of the independent samples. A technique of variable pulse repetition frequency (PRF) is used to optimize the sampling window for precipitation echoes and the number of independent samples. KaPR has a high sensitivity mode in order to detect light rain and some snow, which are predominant in high latitudes. The beams of KuPR and KaPR can be matched by adjusting the phase offset to each element of the phased array antenna in the across-track direction and the transmitting time offset between the two radars in the along-track direction. Beam matching is essential for the use of the dual-frequency algorithm to retrieve accurate rainfall rates. The hardware performance of DPR will be checked immediately after the launch. In addition to the basic characteristics of the radar such as the transmitting power, sensitivity, and resolutions, other characteristics peculiar to the DPR such as beam matching will be tested. The performance of the DPR algorithm will be evaluated by comparing the level 2 products with the corresponding TRMM/PR data in statistical ways. Such statistics include not only the radar reflectivity and rain rate histograms, but also precipitation detectability and rain classification.

  12. Precipitation regime shift enhanced the rain pulse effect on soil respiration in a semi-arid steppe.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liming; Chen, Shiping; Xia, Jianyang; Luo, Yiqi

    2014-01-01

    The effect of resource pulses, such as rainfall events, on soil respiration plays an important role in controlling grassland carbon balance, but how shifts in long-term precipitation regime regulate rain pulse effect on soil respiration is still unclear. We first quantified the influence of rainfall event on soil respiration based on a two-year (2006 and 2009) continuously measured soil respiration data set in a temperate steppe in northern China. In 2006 and 2009, soil carbon release induced by rainfall events contributed about 44.5% (83.3 g C m(-2)) and 39.6% (61.7 g C m(-2)) to the growing-season total soil respiration, respectively. The pulse effect of rainfall event on soil respiration can be accurately predicted by a water status index (WSI), which is the product of rainfall event size and the ratio between antecedent soil temperature to moisture at the depth of 10 cm (r2 = 0.92, P<0.001) through the growing season. It indicates the pulse effect can be enhanced by not only larger individual rainfall event, but also higher soil temperature/moisture ratio which is usually associated with longer dry spells. We then analyzed a long-term (1953-2009) precipitation record in the experimental area. We found both the extreme heavy rainfall events (>40 mm per event) and the long dry-spells (>5 days) during the growing seasons increased from 1953-2009. It suggests the shift in precipitation regime has increased the contribution of rain pulse effect to growing-season total soil respiration in this region. These findings highlight the importance of incorporating precipitation regime shift and its impacts on the rain pulse effect into the future predictions of grassland carbon cycle under climate change.

  13. Precipitation Regime Shift Enhanced the Rain Pulse Effect on Soil Respiration in a Semi-Arid Steppe

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Liming; Chen, Shiping; Xia, Jianyang; Luo, Yiqi

    2014-01-01

    The effect of resource pulses, such as rainfall events, on soil respiration plays an important role in controlling grassland carbon balance, but how shifts in long-term precipitation regime regulate rain pulse effect on soil respiration is still unclear. We first quantified the influence of rainfall event on soil respiration based on a two-year (2006 and 2009) continuously measured soil respiration data set in a temperate steppe in northern China. In 2006 and 2009, soil carbon release induced by rainfall events contributed about 44.5% (83.3 g C m−2) and 39.6% (61.7 g C m−2) to the growing-season total soil respiration, respectively. The pulse effect of rainfall event on soil respiration can be accurately predicted by a water status index (WSI), which is the product of rainfall event size and the ratio between antecedent soil temperature to moisture at the depth of 10 cm (r2 = 0.92, P<0.001) through the growing season. It indicates the pulse effect can be enhanced by not only larger individual rainfall event, but also higher soil temperature/moisture ratio which is usually associated with longer dry spells. We then analyzed a long-term (1953–2009) precipitation record in the experimental area. We found both the extreme heavy rainfall events (>40 mm per event) and the long dry-spells (>5 days) during the growing seasons increased from 1953–2009. It suggests the shift in precipitation regime has increased the contribution of rain pulse effect to growing-season total soil respiration in this region. These findings highlight the importance of incorporating precipitation regime shift and its impacts on the rain pulse effect into the future predictions of grassland carbon cycle under climate change. PMID:25093573

  14. Evaluation of High-Resolution Precipitation Estimates from Satellites during July 2012 Beijing Flood Event Using Dense Rain Gauge Observations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Liu, Huijuan; You, Yalei; Mullens, Esther; Hu, Junjun; Yuan, Ye; Huang, Mengyu; He, Li; Luo, Yongming; Zeng, Xingji; Tang, Guoqiang; Hong, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Satellite-based precipitation estimates products, CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS, were evaluated with a dense rain gauge network over Beijing and adjacent regions for an extremely heavy precipitation event on July 21 2012. CMORPH and PEERSIANN-CSS misplaced the region of greatest rainfall accumulation, and failed to capture the spatial pattern of precipitation, evidenced by a low spatial correlation coefficient (CC). CMORPH overestimated the daily accumulated rainfall by 22.84% while PERSIANN-CCS underestimated by 72.75%. In the rainfall center, both CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS failed to capture the temporal variation of the rainfall, and underestimated rainfall amounts by 43.43% and 87.26%, respectively. Based on our results, caution should be exercised when using CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS as input for monitoring and forecasting floods in Beijing urban areas, and the potential for landslides in the mountainous zones west and north of Beijing. PMID:24691358

  15. Evaluation of high-resolution precipitation estimates from satellites during July 2012 Beijing flood event using dense rain gauge observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Liu, Huijuan; You, Yalei; Mullens, Esther; Hu, Junjun; Yuan, Ye; Huang, Mengyu; He, Li; Luo, Yongming; Zeng, Xingji; Tang, Guoqiang; Hong, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Satellite-based precipitation estimates products, CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS, were evaluated with a dense rain gauge network over Beijing and adjacent regions for an extremely heavy precipitation event on July 21 2012. CMORPH and PEERSIANN-CSS misplaced the region of greatest rainfall accumulation, and failed to capture the spatial pattern of precipitation, evidenced by a low spatial correlation coefficient (CC). CMORPH overestimated the daily accumulated rainfall by 22.84% while PERSIANN-CCS underestimated by 72.75%. In the rainfall center, both CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS failed to capture the temporal variation of the rainfall, and underestimated rainfall amounts by 43.43% and 87.26%, respectively. Based on our results, caution should be exercised when using CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS as input for monitoring and forecasting floods in Beijing urban areas, and the potential for landslides in the mountainous zones west and north of Beijing.

  16. Evaluation of high-resolution precipitation estimates from satellites during July 2012 Beijing flood event using dense rain gauge observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Liu, Huijuan; You, Yalei; Mullens, Esther; Hu, Junjun; Yuan, Ye; Huang, Mengyu; He, Li; Luo, Yongming; Zeng, Xingji; Tang, Guoqiang; Hong, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Satellite-based precipitation estimates products, CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS, were evaluated with a dense rain gauge network over Beijing and adjacent regions for an extremely heavy precipitation event on July 21 2012. CMORPH and PEERSIANN-CSS misplaced the region of greatest rainfall accumulation, and failed to capture the spatial pattern of precipitation, evidenced by a low spatial correlation coefficient (CC). CMORPH overestimated the daily accumulated rainfall by 22.84% while PERSIANN-CCS underestimated by 72.75%. In the rainfall center, both CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS failed to capture the temporal variation of the rainfall, and underestimated rainfall amounts by 43.43% and 87.26%, respectively. Based on our results, caution should be exercised when using CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS as input for monitoring and forecasting floods in Beijing urban areas, and the potential for landslides in the mountainous zones west and north of Beijing. PMID:24691358

  17. Environmental Externalities in Electric Power Markets: Acid Rain, Urban Ozone, and Climate Change

    EIA Publications

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the emissions resulting from the generation of electricity by utilities and their role in contributing to the environmental problems of acid rain, urban ozone, and climate change.

  18. Analysis of Natural Buffer Systems and the Impact of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, David C.; Yoder, Claude H.; Higgs, Andrew T.; Obley, Matt L.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Leber, Phyllis A.

    2005-01-01

    The environmental significance of acid rain on water systems of different buffer capacities is discussed. The most prevalent natural buffer system is created by the equilibrium between carbonate ions and carbon dioxide.

  19. [Effects of acid rain stress on Eleocarpus glabripetalus seedlings leaf chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics and growth].

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiu-Min; Yu, Shu-Quan; Jiang, Hong; Liu, Mei-Hu

    2010-06-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the Eleocarpus glabripetalus seedlings leaf chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics and growth in different seasons under simulated acid rain stress (heavy, pH = 2. 5; moderate, pH = 4.0; and control, pH = 5.6). In the same treatments, the leaf relative chlorophyll content (SPAD), maximum PS II photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)), actual PSII photochemical quantum yield (phi(PS II)), plant height, and stem diameter in different seasons were all in the order of October > July > April > January. In the same seasons, all the parameters were in the order of heavy acid rain > moderate acid rain > control. The interactions between different acid rain stress and seasons showed significant effects on the SPAD, F(v)/F(m), plant height, and stem diameter, but lesser effects on phi(PS II), qp and qN.

  20. Supporting document for the Canada-wide acid rain strategy for post-2000

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-01-01

    This report presents background and other information on the Canada-Wide Acid Rain Strategy for Post-2000, which puts in place a framework for addressing the remaining acid rain problem in eastern Canada, for ensuring that new acid rain problems do not occur elsewhere in Canada, and for ensuring that Canada meets its international commitments on acid rain. Background information is included on the first and second Sulphur Protocols of 1985 and 1994, the 1991 Canada-United States Air Quality Agreement, and progress to date in meeting emission targets. Key features of the strategy are then presented with respect to such matters as sulphur dioxide emission reductions, pollution prevention, and research. Finally, the positions of members of the multi-stakeholder task group who developed the supporting documentation for the strategy are outlined.

  1. From the Fur Trade to Acid Rain: A Study of Canadian Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winans, Linda

    1988-01-01

    Presents a teaching module for upper elementary students that devotes eight class periods of study to Canadian resources. Includes study of the Canadian fur trade, fishing industry, forestry, and the problems caused by acid rain. Includes the unit evaluation. (DB)

  2. Effect of simulated acid rain on nitrification and nitrogen mineralization in forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Strayer, R.F.; Lin, C.J.; Alexander, M.

    1981-10-01

    To determine the possible microbiological changes in soil resulting from acid rain, columns containing samples of forest soils were leached with either a continuous application of 100 cm of simulated acid rain (pH 3.2-4.1) at 5 cm/hour or an intermittent 1.5-hour application of 1.2 cm of simulated acid rain twice weekly for 19 weeks. The upper 1.0- to 1.5-cm portions of soil from treated columns were used to determine the changes in inorganic N levels in the soil. Nitrification of added ammonium (NH/sub 4//sup +/) was inhibited following continuous exposure of soil to simulated acid rain of pH 4.1-3.2. The extent of the inhibition was directly related to the acidity of the simulated rain solutions. The production of inorganic N in the absence of added NH/sub 4//sup +/ was either stimulated or unaffected following continuous treatment of soils with pH 3.2 simulated acid rain. The addition of nitrapyrin (2-chloro-6-(trichloromethyl)pyridine), an inhibitor of autotrophic nitrification, caused a decrease in nitrification in water-treated soil but had little effect on nitrification in soil treated with pH 3.2 simulated acid rain. Intermittent applications of simulated acid rain (pH 3.5-4.1) for 19 weeks partially inhibited nitrate (NO/sub 3//sup -/) production in soil amended with NH/sub 4//sup +/ following the exposure period, but NO/sub 3//sup -/ production in unamended soil was either unaffected or stimulated.

  3. [Effects of acid rain on nitrogen content in the water body of Wenzhou Sanyang wetland].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiufeng; He, Wenshan; Lu, Jianjian

    2005-02-01

    In order to understand the effects of acid rain on the nitrogen (N) content in the water body of Wenzhou Sanyang wetland, this paper measured the concentrations of different N forms in the wetland, of which, NH4+-N was 2.90-10.75 mg x L(-1), average in 5.38 mg x L(-1); NO3(-)-N was 0.16-0.44 mg x L(-1), average in 0.31 mg x L(-1); and total was 34.04-63.20 mg x L(-1), average in 55.75 mg x L(-1). The pH value was 6.1-6.5, average in 6.4. The measurement of the N input from precipitation in the past two years and its proportion to the existed N in the water body of the wetland showed that the input of NH4+-N, NO3(-)-N and total N was 2.48 x 10(4)-2.86 x 10(4) kg, 2.87-4.96 x 10(4) kg and 5.35 x 10(4)-7.82 x 10(4) kg, and its proportion was 56-64%, 11.21-19.38 times and 12%-17%, respectively. The N amount directly to the wetland water body was 0.72 x 10(4)-0.84 x 10(4) kg, 0.83 x 10(4)-1.44 x 10(4) kg and 1.55 x 10(4)-2.27 x 10(4), and its proportion was 16%-19%, 3.24-5.63 times and 3%-5%. The results indicated that acid rain was one of the main sources of pollutant nitrogen which aggravated the water pollution of the Sanyang wetland.

  4. Acid rain: effects on arachidonic acid metabolism in perfused and ventilated guinea-pig lung.

    PubMed

    Preziosi, P; Ciabattoni, G

    1987-11-01

    Isolated, perfused and ventilated guinea-pig lungs were exposed for 10 min to acid (sulphuric + nitric acid) aerosol mimicking acid rain at pH 4.5 or 2.5, as well as to a control distilled water aerosol (pH 6.0-6.5). Lung perfusing solution was recovered and thromboxane (TX) B2 and leukotriene (LT) B4 were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) techniques. In a series of experiments TXB2 release averaged 0.43 +/- 0.18 (+/- SD) ng/min during exposure to distilled water aerosol and increased to 0.70 +/- 0.30 ng/min during exposure to acid aerosol at pH 4.5 (P less than 0.05). In a second series of experiments TXB2 release was 0.46 +/- 0.18 ng/min and increased to 1.07 +/- 0.51 ng/min (P less than 0.01) after acid aerosol at pH 2.5. In both cases LTB4 release, reflecting lipoxygenase activity, was unchanged. LTC4 levels were not measurable under basal conditions as well as after exposure to acid aerosol. A pneumoconstriction was also observed, being more pronounced after acid aerosol at pH 2.5. Individual sulphuric and nitric acid aerosol component solutions at pH 2.5 evoked TXB2 and airway resistance changes corresponding to those observed with the mixed acid aerosol. LTB4 was not modified. Acid rain inhalation may directly stimulate pathways leading to the bronchoconstrictor and pro-aggregating TXA2 synthesis in isolated guinea-pig lung, without affecting the lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism.

  5. Integrated Title V/acid rain permits: Transitioning through initial permit issuance and reopenings

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, C.

    1995-12-31

    Titles IV and V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (Act or CAA) created two new stationary source permitting programs, one specific to acid rain (Title IV), and a second for operating permits in general (Title V). The Phase 2 portion of the acid rain program was designed to be implemented through the Title V operating permit program, thereby subjecting all Phase 2 acid rain sources to the requirements of Title V. Permits issued pursuant to Phase 2 of the acid rain program will be viewed as a self-contained portion of the Title V operating permit and will be governed by regulations promulgated under both Title IV and Title V. The requirements imposed by Title IV may not always be consistent with the broader operating permit program requirements of Title V, and when inconsistency occurs, the acid rain requirements will take precedence. This nonalignment will perhaps be most apparent during two stages of initial permitting: (1) the transition period following Title V program approval when permit application, issuance, and effective dates differ between the two programs, and (2) at the point when acid rain permits must be reopened to incorporate Phase 2 NO{sub x} requirements. This paper explores strategies for streamlining implementation of the two programs with particular focus on these two coordination issues.

  6. A comparison of NEXRAD WSR-88D rain estimates with gauge measurements for high and low reflectivity gradient precipitation events.

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrowski, P.; Kelly, D. S.; Klazura, G. E.; Thomale, J. M.

    1999-04-14

    Rain gauge measurements were compared with radar-estimated storm total precipitation for 43 rain events that occurred at ten locations. Gauge-to-radar ratios (G/R) were computed for each case. The G/R ratio is strongly related to precipitation type, with the mean G/R slightly less than 1.00 for high-reflectivity gradient cases and greater than 2.00 (factor of 2 radar underestimation) for low-reflectivity gradient cases. both precipitation types indicated radar underestimate at the nearest ranges. However, the high-reflectivity gradient cases indicated radar overestimation at further ranges, while the low-reflectivity gradient cases indicated significant radar underestimation at all ranges. Occurrences of radar overestimates may have been related to high reflectivity returns from melting ice, bright-band effects in stratiform systems and hail from convective systems. Bright-band effects probably were responsible for improving the radar underestimates in the second range interval (50-99.9 km) for the low-reflectivity gradient cases. Other possibilities for radar overestimates are anomalous propagation (AP) of the radar beam. Smith, et al. (1996) concluded that bright band and AP lead to systematic overestimate of rainfall at intermediate ranges.

  7. Transport and fate of acid rains out of North America. Final report, April 14, 1982-April 13, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Knap, A.H.

    1983-06-01

    A program to determine the transport of acid rain has been undertaken at Bermuda. The results indicate that precipitation at Bermuda is acidified to a pH of 4.8 over a one-year period with a seasonal component of greater acidity (pH 4.4) corresponding to back trajectories of the North American air mass. A detailed study of the composition of Bermuda rainwater compared to a North American coastal site has been carried out as well as a shipboard collection program between eastern North America and Bermuda. The results indicate that the strong acid acidity is due to long-range transport of the North American air mass.

  8. RAINS-ASIA: An assessment model for acid deposition in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, R.J.; Ramankutty, R.; Shah, J.J.

    1997-08-31

    Asia`s rapid economic growth has fueled a growing appetite for commercial energy, which is satisfied by fossil fuels that emit pollutants. These pollutants are oxidized and transported into the atmosphere, creating acidic depositions known as acid rain that can damage foliage, soils, and surface waters. At current energy consumption growth rates, by the year 2000 sulfur dioxide emissions from Asia will surpass the emissions of North America and Europe combined. RAINS-ASIA is an assessment tool developed by the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, and donors to study the implications of alternative energy development strategies for air pollution and acid rain and to help identify cost-effective abatement methods. This report provides an overview of the model and some results of analyses that have been conducted as part of the RAINS-ASIA program.

  9. Effects of pretreatment with simulated acid rain on the severity of dogwood anthracnose

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, K.O.; Berrang, P.; Mavity, E.

    1996-06-01

    The effects of simulated acid rain on dogwood anthracnose severity were evaluated in a series of greenhouse and field experiments over a 4-year period. In 1990 and 1991, Cornus florida seedlings received 10 weekly foliar applications of simulated rain adjusted to pH 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, and 5.5. They were then placed under mature dogwoods naturally infected with Discula destructive. In both years, the percent leaf area infected increased significantly as the pH of the simulated rain solution decreased. In 1992 and 1993, seedlings were wrapped in plastic bags below the root collar to permit separate application of simulated acid rain (pH 2.5) or normal rain (pH 5.5) to the foliage or the growing medium or both. Application of pH 2.5 rain to the growing medium increased disease severity. Foliar applications alone did not increase disease. These results suggest that changes in nutrient availability, rather than foliar damage, are responsible for the increase in anthracnose severity in dogwoods pretreated with simulated acid rain. 41 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. [Effects of simulated acid rain on decomposition of soil organic carbon and crop straw].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-Zhu; Huang, Yao; Yang, Xin-Zhong

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the organic carbon decomposition in different acidity soils, a 40-day incubation test was conducted with the paddy soils of pH 5.48, 6.70 and 8.18. The soils were amended with 0 and 15 g x kg(-1) of rice straw, adjusted to the moisture content of 400 g x kg(-1) air-dried soil by using simulated rain of pH 6.0, 4.5, and 3.0, and incubated at 20 degrees C. The results showed that straw, acid rain, and soil co-affected the CO2 emission from soil system. The amendment of straw increased the soil CO2 emission rate significantly. Acid rain had no significant effects on soil organic carbon decomposition, but significantly affected the straw decomposition in soil. When treated with pH 3.0 acid rain, the amount of decomposed straw over 40-day incubation in acid (pH 5.48) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils was 8% higher, while that in neutral soil (pH 6.70) was 15% lower, compared to the treatment of pH 6.0 rain. In the treatment of pH 3.0 acid rain, the decomposition rate of soil organic C in acid (pH 5.48) soil was 43% and 50% (P < 0.05) higher than that in neutral (pH 6.70) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils, while the decomposition rate of straw in neutral soil was 17% and 16% (P < 0.05) lower than that in acid and alkaline soils, respectively.

  11. [Effects of simulated acid rain on decomposition of soil organic carbon and crop straw].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-Zhu; Huang, Yao; Yang, Xin-Zhong

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the organic carbon decomposition in different acidity soils, a 40-day incubation test was conducted with the paddy soils of pH 5.48, 6.70 and 8.18. The soils were amended with 0 and 15 g x kg(-1) of rice straw, adjusted to the moisture content of 400 g x kg(-1) air-dried soil by using simulated rain of pH 6.0, 4.5, and 3.0, and incubated at 20 degrees C. The results showed that straw, acid rain, and soil co-affected the CO2 emission from soil system. The amendment of straw increased the soil CO2 emission rate significantly. Acid rain had no significant effects on soil organic carbon decomposition, but significantly affected the straw decomposition in soil. When treated with pH 3.0 acid rain, the amount of decomposed straw over 40-day incubation in acid (pH 5.48) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils was 8% higher, while that in neutral soil (pH 6.70) was 15% lower, compared to the treatment of pH 6.0 rain. In the treatment of pH 3.0 acid rain, the decomposition rate of soil organic C in acid (pH 5.48) soil was 43% and 50% (P < 0.05) higher than that in neutral (pH 6.70) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils, while the decomposition rate of straw in neutral soil was 17% and 16% (P < 0.05) lower than that in acid and alkaline soils, respectively. PMID:19459394

  12. Simulated acid-rain effects on yield response of two corn cultivars

    SciTech Connect

    Banwart, W.L.; Porter, P.M.; Hasset, J.J.; Walker, W.M.

    1988-01-01

    Acid rain is a documented phenomenon over much of the eastern and midwestern United States, including major portions of the Corn Belt. However, few studies report the effect of acid rain on yield of corn (Zea mays L.). Field experiments were conducted in 1983 and 1984 on a Flanagan silt loam (fine, montmorillonitic, mesic Aquic Argiudoll) soil at Urbana, IL. Two corn cultivars (Pioneer 3377 and B73 X Mo17) were protected from ambient rain by two automated movable rain exclusion shelters and were exposed to one of six simulated rain acidities ranging from pH 5.6 to 3.0. Analysis of the effect of rainfall pH on grain yield showed no significant linear or quadratic trend (alpha = 0.10) for either cultivar in individual years or with both years combined. Comparisons among treatments for both cultivars showed rain simulants with no added acid (pH 5.6) resulted in grain yields that were not significantly different from the average grain yields of the other five pH treatments. These results imply that under normal environmental conditions and agronomic practices, rainfall at its present levels of acidity has little if any effect on corn yields.

  13. [Effects of simulated acid rain on leaf photosynthate, growth, and yield of wheat].

    PubMed

    Mai, Bo-Rui; Zheng, You-Fei; Liang, Jun; Liu, Xia; Li, Lu; Zhong, Yan-Chuan

    2008-10-01

    With winter wheat variety Yamgmai 12 as test object, a field experiment was conducted to study the stress of simulated acid rain on its growth and development. The results showed that simulated acid rain had considerable effect on wheat growth and yield. When the pH of acid rain was < or = 3.5, the growth of leaf area as well as the mass of fresh leaf per unit area declined greatly, and the yield was significantly lower than CK. When pH was < or = 2.5, the plant height was obviously lowered, and the visible injury on leaf surface was observed. Under acid rain stress, the contents of leaf chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and carotenoid, especially chlorophyll a, decreased obviously. Acid rain also suppressed the synthesis of soluble sugar and reduced sugar, and the suppression was stronger at pH < or = 3.5, and became much stronger with increasing acidity. The total free amino acid and soluble protein contents in leaves decreased with increasing acidity, and were significantly lower than CK when the pH was < or = 3.5 and < or = 4.5, respectively.

  14. Carbon fluxes in an acid rain impacted boreal headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Anne; Hintze, Simone; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; van Geldern, Robert; Barth, Johannes A. C.

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial carbon export via inland aquatic systems is a key process in the budget of the global carbon cycle. This includes loss of carbon to the atmosphere via gas evasion from rivers or reservoirs as well as carbon fixation in freshwater sediments. Headwater streams are the first endmembers of the transition of carbon between soils, groundwater and surface waters and the atmosphere. In order to quantify these processes the experimental catchment Uhlirska (1.78 km2) located in the northern Czech Republic was studied. Dissolved inorganic, dissolved organic and particulate organic carbon (DIC, DOC, POC) concentrations and isotopes were analyzed in ground-, soil -and stream waters between 2014 and 2015. In addition, carbon dioxide degassing was quantified via a stable isotope modelling approach. Results show a discharge-weighted total carbon export of 31.99 g C m-2 yr-1 of which CO2 degassing accounts 79 %. Carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of DIC, DOC, and POC (in ‰ VPDB) ranged from -26.6 to -12.4 ‰ from -29.4 to -22.7 ‰ and from -30.6 to -26.6 ‰ respectively. The mean values for DIC are -21.8 ±3.8 ‰ -23.6 ±0.9 ‰ and -19.5 ±3.0 ‰ for soil, shallow ground and surface water compartments. For DOC, these compartments have mean values of -27.1 ±0.3 ‰ -27.0 ±0.8 ‰ and -27.4 ±0.7 ‰Ṁean POC value of shallow groundwaters and surface waters are -28.8 ±0.8 ‰ and -29.3 ±0.5 ‰ respectively. These isotope ranges indicate little turnover of organic material and predominant silicate weathering. The degassing of CO2 caused an enrichment of the δ13C-DIC values of up to 6.8 ‰ between a catchment gauge and the catchment outlet over a distance of 866 m. In addition, the Uhlirska catchment has only negligible natural sources of sulphate, yet SO42- accounts for 21 % of major stream water ions. This is most likely a remainder from acid rain impacts in the area.

  15. Carbon fluxes in an acid rain impacted boreal headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Anne; Hintze, Simone; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; van Geldern, Robert; Barth, Johannes A. C.

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial carbon export via inland aquatic systems is a key process in the budget of the global carbon cycle. This includes loss of carbon to the atmosphere via gas evasion from rivers or reservoirs as well as carbon fixation in freshwater sediments. Headwater streams are the first endmembers of the transition of carbon between soils, groundwater and surface waters and the atmosphere. In order to quantify these processes the experimental catchment Uhlirska (1.78 km2) located in the northern Czech Republic was studied. Dissolved inorganic, dissolved organic and particulate organic carbon (DIC, DOC, POC) concentrations and isotopes were analyzed in ground-, soil -and stream waters between 2014 and 2015. In addition, carbon dioxide degassing was quantified via a stable isotope modelling approach. Results show a discharge-weighted total carbon export of 31.99 g C m‑2 yr‑1 of which CO2 degassing accounts 79 %. Carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of DIC, DOC, and POC (in ‰ VPDB) ranged from -26.6 to -12.4 ‰ from -29.4 to -22.7 ‰ and from -30.6 to -26.6 ‰ respectively. The mean values for DIC are -21.8 ±3.8 ‰ -23.6 ±0.9 ‰ and -19.5 ±3.0 ‰ for soil, shallow ground and surface water compartments. For DOC, these compartments have mean values of -27.1 ±0.3 ‰ -27.0 ±0.8 ‰ and -27.4 ±0.7 ‰Ṁean POC value of shallow groundwaters and surface waters are -28.8 ±0.8 ‰ and -29.3 ±0.5 ‰ respectively. These isotope ranges indicate little turnover of organic material and predominant silicate weathering. The degassing of CO2 caused an enrichment of the δ13C-DIC values of up to 6.8 ‰ between a catchment gauge and the catchment outlet over a distance of 866 m. In addition, the Uhlirska catchment has only negligible natural sources of sulphate, yet SO42‑ accounts for 21 % of major stream water ions. This is most likely a remainder from acid rain impacts in the area.

  16. A Simulation of the Interaction of Acid Rain with Soil Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Amber L.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Leber, Phyllis A.; Yoder, Claude H.

    2004-01-01

    The atmospheric issue of acid rains is subjected to a five-part laboratory experiment by concentrating on the chemistry of the infiltration process of acid rainwater through soils. This procedure of quantitative scrutiny helps students realize the efficacy of soil minerals in the consumption of surplus acidity in rainwater.

  17. Effects of acid precipitation on cation transport in New Hampshire forest soils. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Cronan, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    This report describes the results of our investigation of the effects of regional acid precipitation on forest soils and watershed biogeochemistry in New England. The report provides descriptions of the following research findings: (1) acid precipitation may cause increased aluminum mobilization and leaching from soils to sensitive aquatic systems; (2) acid deposition may shift the historic carbonic acid/organic acid leaching regime in forest soils to one dominated by atmospheric H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/; (3) acid precipitation may accelerate nutrient cation leaching from forest soils and may pose a particular threat to the potassium resources of northeastern forested ecosystems; (4) while acid rain may pass through some coniferous canopies without being neutralized, similar inputs of acid rainfall to hardwood canopies may be neutralized significantly by Bronsted base leaching and by leaf surface ion exchange mechanisms; and (5) progressive acid dissolution of soils in the laboratory may provide an important tool for predicting the patterns of aluminum leaching from soils exposed to acid deposition.

  18. Acid rain, storm period chemistry and their potential impact on stream communities in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Peart, M R

    2000-07-01

    Hong Kong experiences acid deposition, however, little is known about the potential impact upon aquatic ecosystems. In a small drainage basin observations reveal that despite acid rain runoff, both baseflow and stormflow, was close to neutral in terms of pH. During storm events chemical analysis reveals that calcium (Ca) concentrations tended to rise. It also appears that the input of acid rain may increase aluminium (Al) levels in the stream. Due to the increased levels of Ca and only slight changes in pH acid deposition may not be generating problems in this stream. The presence of mayflies reported elsewhere may further support the results of the chemical study.

  19. Losses of biota from American aquatic communities due to acid rain.

    PubMed

    Schindler, D W; Kasian, S E; Hesslein, R H

    1989-07-01

    Models based on chemical survey data and geochemical assumptions were calibrated for areas where rates of acidification are known, then used to predict the declines in alkalinity and pH of lakes in the eastern and midwestern U.S.A. These results were combined with known acid tolerances of different taxonomic groups to estimate the extent of damage caused by acid rain to biological assemblages.An average of over 50% of the species in some taxonomic groups have probably been eliminated from lakes in the Adirondacks, Poconos-Catskills and southern New England. Moderate damage to biotic communities was predicted for lakes in central New England, and north-central Wisconsin. Damage predicted in Maine, upper Michigan, northeastern Minnesota and the remainder of the upper Great Lakes region was slight. Crustaceans, molluscs, leeches and insects were among the most severely affected groups. Among fishes, species of minnows (Cyprindae) were depleted in the most heavily acidified regions, with some declines in salmonid and centrarchid species.Predicted damage to individual lakes in all areas was highly variable. In areas receiving highly acidic deposition, 100% of the species in acid-sensitive taxonomic groups were eliminated in some lakes, while damage to other lakes was predicted to be slight.Estimated damage varied from lake to lake within each subregion, based on chemical characteristics. The most heavily damaged lakes in the Adirondacks and Pocono-Catskills have probably lost all species of molluscs, leeches and crustaceans. On the other hand, lakes of the Midwest showed either slight increases or decreases in the richness of predicted biotic communities.The possible ranges of original sulfate concentrations in lakes and the proportion of sulfuric acid in precipitation that liberated base cations from catchments were confined to relatively narrow limits by the model.

  20. [Acidic components of precipitation: humid deposition of S, N and Cl compounds].

    PubMed

    Fernández Patier, R; Esteban Lefler, M

    1989-01-01

    Precipitation samples have been gathered using recipients that differentiate the dry deposition of the humidity in three stations in Spain: one urban (Madrid) and two at base levels (San Pablo de los Montes and Granada). The study is centred on the components of an acid character, for which significant special variations of the sulphate and nitrate concentrations have been obtained. The levels, highest in Madrid and lowest in San Pablo, show the influence of the emitting focal points. A study of the seasonal variations in San Pablo show that the concentrations in summer are more than double than those in winter, probably due to the intervention of the photochemical formation processes of these contaminants. Also studies of humidity deposition are carried out, from which one can observe greater monthly values that are greater in Madrid than in other stations, in spite of having less rainfall. Likewise, episodes of "acid rain" and "red rain" are commented on.

  1. [Effects of simulated acid rain on Quercus glauca seedlings photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Shu-quan; Jiang, Fu-wei; Yin, Xiu-min; Lu, Mei-juan

    2009-09-01

    Taking the seedlings of Quercus glauca, a dominant evergreen broadleaf tree species in subtropical area, as test materials, this paper studied their photosynthesis, chlorophyll fluorescence, and chlorophyll content under effects of simulated acid rain with pH 2.5, 4.0, and 5.6 (CK). After 2-year acid rain stress, the net photosynthetic rate of Q. glauca increased significantly with decreasing pH of acid rain. The acid rain with pH 2.5 and 4.0 increased the stomatal conductance and transpiration rate, and the effect was more significant under pH 2.5. The intercellular CO2 concentration decreased in the order of pH 2.5 > pH 5.6 > pH 4.0. The maximum photosynthetic rate, light compensation point, light saturation point, and dark respiration rate were significantly higher under pH 2.5 and 4.0 than under pH 5.6, while the apparent quantum yield was not sensitive to acid rain stress. The maximal photochemical efficiency of PS II and the potential activity of PS II under pH 2.5 and 4.0 were significantly higher than those under pH 5.6. The relative chlorophyll content was in the order of pH 2.5 > pH 5.6 > pH 4.0, and there was a significant difference between pH 2.5 and 4.0. All the results suggested that the photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence of Q. glauca increased under the effects of acid rain with pH 2.5 and 4.0, and the acid rain with pH 2.5 had more obvious effects.

  2. [Release of Si, Al and Fe in red soil under simulated acid rain].

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Song, Cun-yi; Li, Fa-sheng

    2007-10-01

    bstract:A laboratory leaching experiment on simulated acid rain was carried out using soil columns. The release of Si, Al and Fe from soils and pH values of eluates were investigated. The results showed that under the given leaching volume, the release amounts of cations were influenced by the pH value of simulated acid rain, while their response to acid rain was different. Acid rain led to Si release, nearly none of Fe. Within the range from pH 3.0 to 5.6, a little Al release but mass Al only release at the pH below 3.0, both Si and Al had a declining release ability with the undergoing eluviation. At pH 2.5, the release amounts of Si and Al, especially Al, increased significantly with the strengthened weathering process of soil mineral. With an increase of the leaching amount of acid rain, the release of Si and Al increased, but acceleration of Si was slower than Al which was slower and slower. When the soil pH falling down to a certain grade, there are negative correlation between pH and both Al and DOC concentration of eluate. released, but most of Al derived from the aluminosilicates dissolved. Acid deposition can result in solid-phase alumino-organics broken and Al released, but most of Al derived from the aluminosilicates dissolved.

  3. Effects of acid precipitation on reproduction in alpine plant species. [Erythronium grandiflorum; Aquilegia caerulea

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, M.A.; Hille-Salgueiro, M.; Musselman, R.C. Dept. of Agriculture, Fort Collins, CO )

    1990-01-01

    A series of experiments were designed to determine the impact of acid rain on plant reproductive processes, a critical component of a species life history. Research was carried out in herbaceous alpine communities at the USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) Forest Service Glacier Lakes Ecosystem Experiments Site in the Snowy Mts. of Wyoming. A range of species were surveyed to monitor the sensitivity of pollen to acidification during germination and growth, and all species demonstrated reduced in vitro pollen germination in acidified media. Field pollinations were carried out in Erythronium grandiflorum and Aquilegia caerulea to determine the reproductive success of plants exposed to simulated ambient precipitation (pH 5.6) or simulated acid precipitation (pH 3.6) prior to pollination. In Erythronium, no differences were observed in seed set and seed weight of fruits resulting from the two pollination treatments. In Aquilegia, fruits resulting from the acid spray treatment produced fewer seeds and lighter seeds.

  4. Design and performance of an acidic precipitation delivery system for field investigations with plants.

    PubMed

    Lauver, T L; Laurence, J A; Kohut, R J

    1990-01-01

    An acidic precipitation delivery system is described that was designed and constructed for use in a field investigation of the response of red spruce saplings (Picea rubens Sarg.) to the interactive stresses of ozone and acid rain. The system utilizes hydraulic, solid-cone spray nozzles to produce simulated rainfall with droplet size distributions approximating natural rain events, which are of low intensity, i.e., about 1-1.5 cm hr(-1), and are relatively uniform in distribution of volume over a 2.4 m diameter plot. Three different pH treatments (3.1, 4.1, 5.1) were dispensed randomly to each of three treatment subplots located in twelve open-top field chambers and three ambient control chambers. Storage capacity of the system permitted a 2.3 hr rain event. Construction materials used were chosen for resistance to the corrosive nature of the rain simulant, stability to ambient UV radiation, and resistance to penetration by sunlight. Simulated events were not synchronized to ambient events, but were scheduled to prevent moisture deficits.

  5. Acid rain phenomenon in niger delta region of Nigeria: economic, biodiversity, and public health concern.

    PubMed

    Nduka, J K C; Orisakwe, O E; Ezenweke, L O; Ezenwa, T E; Chendo, M N; Ezeabasili, N G

    2008-01-01

    Rain samples were collected from Warri and Port Harcourt, two major oil-producing cities of Nigeria in April-June, July-August, and September-October 2005 and 2006. Awka, a "non-oil" city was used as control. Samples were collected from three points, using clean plastic basins fastened to a table, 2 m above ground level and 115 m away from tall buildings and trees. Water samples were filtered and acidity determined using digital pH meter. The results show that the rain samples were acidic. The pH values for the 2 years under study show that the rainfall in Warri was more acidic than that of Port Harcourt. Oil exploration and other anthropogenic sources may be responsible for the acid rain in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria.

  6. Acid deposition in Maryland: Implications of the results of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuro, J.; Bowmann, M.; Ross, J.; Blundell, C.; Price, R.

    1991-07-01

    Acid deposition, commonly referred to as 'acid rain,' is a major global environmental concern. Acid deposition has reportedly resulted in damage to aquatic, terrestrial, and physical resources and has potentially adverse effects on human health. A component of the Maryland acid deposition program is the preparation of an annual report that summarizes yearly activities and costs of ongoing acid deposition research and monitoring programs.

  7. Effects of simulated acid rain on germination, seedling growth and oxidative metabolism of recalcitrant-seeded Trichilia dregeana grown in its natural seed bank.

    PubMed

    Ramlall, Chandika; Varghese, Boby; Ramdhani, Syd; Pammenter, Norman W; Bhatt, Arvind; Berjak, Patricia; Sershen

    2015-01-01

    Increased air pollution in a number of developing African countries, together with the reports of vegetation damage typically associated with acid precipitation in commercial forests in South Africa, has raised concerns over the potential impacts of acid rain on natural vegetation in these countries. Recalcitrant (i.e. desiccation sensitive) seeds of many indigenous African species, e.g. must germinate shortly after shedding and hence, may not be able to avoid exposure to acid rain in polluted areas. This study investigated the effects of simulated acid rain (rainwater with pH adjusted to pH 3.0 and 4.5 with 70:30, H2 SO4 :HNO3 ) on germination, seedling growth and oxidative metabolism in a recalcitrant-seeded African tree species Trichilia dregeana Sond., growing in its natural seed bank. The results suggest that acid rain did not compromise T. dregeana seed germination and seedling establishment significantly, relative to the control (non-acidified rainwater). However, pH 3.0 treated seedlings exhibited signs of stress typically associated with acid rain: leaf tip necrosis, abnormal bilobed leaf tips, leaf necrotic spots and chlorosis, reduced leaf chlorophyll concentration, increased stomatal density and indications of oxidative stress. This may explain why total and root biomass of pH 3.0 treated seedlings were significantly lower than the control. Acid rain also induced changes in the species composition and relative abundance of the different life forms emerging from T. dregeana's natural seed bank and in this way could indirectly impact on T. dregeana seedling establishment success.

  8. Effects of simulated acid rain on germination, seedling growth and oxidative metabolism of recalcitrant-seeded Trichilia dregeana grown in its natural seed bank.

    PubMed

    Ramlall, Chandika; Varghese, Boby; Ramdhani, Syd; Pammenter, Norman W; Bhatt, Arvind; Berjak, Patricia; Sershen

    2015-01-01

    Increased air pollution in a number of developing African countries, together with the reports of vegetation damage typically associated with acid precipitation in commercial forests in South Africa, has raised concerns over the potential impacts of acid rain on natural vegetation in these countries. Recalcitrant (i.e. desiccation sensitive) seeds of many indigenous African species, e.g. must germinate shortly after shedding and hence, may not be able to avoid exposure to acid rain in polluted areas. This study investigated the effects of simulated acid rain (rainwater with pH adjusted to pH 3.0 and 4.5 with 70:30, H2 SO4 :HNO3 ) on germination, seedling growth and oxidative metabolism in a recalcitrant-seeded African tree species Trichilia dregeana Sond., growing in its natural seed bank. The results suggest that acid rain did not compromise T. dregeana seed germination and seedling establishment significantly, relative to the control (non-acidified rainwater). However, pH 3.0 treated seedlings exhibited signs of stress typically associated with acid rain: leaf tip necrosis, abnormal bilobed leaf tips, leaf necrotic spots and chlorosis, reduced leaf chlorophyll concentration, increased stomatal density and indications of oxidative stress. This may explain why total and root biomass of pH 3.0 treated seedlings were significantly lower than the control. Acid rain also induced changes in the species composition and relative abundance of the different life forms emerging from T. dregeana's natural seed bank and in this way could indirectly impact on T. dregeana seedling establishment success. PMID:24835442

  9. Soil-calcium depletion linked to acid rain and forest growth in the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Huntington, T.G.

    1999-01-01

    Since the discovery of acid rain in the 1970's, scientists have been concerned that deposition of acids could cause depletion of calcium in forest soils. Research in the 1980's showed that the amount of calcium in forest soils is controlled by several factors that are difficult to measure. Further research in the 1990's, including several studies by the U.S. Geological Survey, has shown that (1) calcium in forest soils has decreased at locations in the northeastern and southeastern U.S., and (2) acid rain and forest growth (uptake of calcium from the soil by roots) are both factors contributing to calcium depletion.

  10. Federal-provincial agreements for the Eastern Canada Acid Rain Program: Annual report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This report on the Eastern Canada Acid Rain Program compares the previous year`s emissions of sulphur dioxide in the 7 easternmost provinces to the emission targets in the program. The objective is to cap sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions until the year 2000. Coupled with the US Acid Rain Program it is intended to protect sensitive ecosystems from acid deposition. This report discusses emissions for the latest year, concerns, and steps to be taken. Statistical tables give emissions by province and industry, with information for some major air pollution sources in mineral extraction or electric power generation.

  11. Effects of simulated acid rain on growth rate in a spruce-living spider.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, B; Johnsson, J

    1989-01-01

    Growing juveniles of the spruce-living spider Pityohyphantes phrygianus were sprayed with water of different acidity--pH approximately 7 (control), 4.0 (acid rain) and 2.2-in a 2.5-month laboratory experiment. The growth rates did not differ between control and pH 4.0, while there was a significant growth reduction at pH 2.2. A low mortality occurred only in the pH 2.2 group. P. phrygianus seems to be resistant against acid rain although negative long-term effects cannot be ruled out.

  12. Effects of air pollution and acid rain on agriculture: an annotated bibliography. Staff report

    SciTech Connect

    Barse, J.R.; Ferguson, W.; Whetzel, V.

    1985-10-01

    Ozone and sulfur dioxide-gaseous air pollutants--can reduce the yields of key agricultural crops such as soybeans, corn, wheat, citrus fruit, cotton, and peanuts by interfering with plant photosynthesis. In general, the greater the pollutant concentration, the greater the yield reduction. Based on this biological evidence, economists are now estimating dollar impacts of ozone pollution on agriculture. By contrast, evidence on the biological impacts of acid rain on crops, soils, and forests is much less clear, often ambiguous. Some acid rain impacts can be favorable, because rainfall acids contain nitrogen and sulfur--major plant nutrients.

  13. Effects and mechanisms of the combined pollution of lanthanum and acid rain on the root phenotype of soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaoguo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2013-09-01

    Rare earth pollution and acid rain pollution are both important environmental issues worldwide. In regions which simultaneously occur, the combined pollution of rare earth and acid rain becomes a new environmental issue, and the relevant research is rarely reported. Accordingly, we investigated the combined effects and mechanisms of lanthanum ion (La(3+)) and acid rain on the root phenotype of soybean seedlings. The combined pollution of low-concentration La(3+) and acid rain exerted deleterious effects on the phenotype and growth of roots, which were aggravated by the combined pollution of high-concentration La(3+) and acid rain. The deleterious effects of the combined pollution were stronger than those of single La(3+) or acid rain pollution. These stronger deleterious effects on the root phenotype and growth of roots were due to the increased disturbance of absorption and utilization of mineral nutrients in roots.

  14. Effects and mechanisms of the combined pollution of lanthanum and acid rain on the root phenotype of soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaoguo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2013-09-01

    Rare earth pollution and acid rain pollution are both important environmental issues worldwide. In regions which simultaneously occur, the combined pollution of rare earth and acid rain becomes a new environmental issue, and the relevant research is rarely reported. Accordingly, we investigated the combined effects and mechanisms of lanthanum ion (La(3+)) and acid rain on the root phenotype of soybean seedlings. The combined pollution of low-concentration La(3+) and acid rain exerted deleterious effects on the phenotype and growth of roots, which were aggravated by the combined pollution of high-concentration La(3+) and acid rain. The deleterious effects of the combined pollution were stronger than those of single La(3+) or acid rain pollution. These stronger deleterious effects on the root phenotype and growth of roots were due to the increased disturbance of absorption and utilization of mineral nutrients in roots. PMID:23726884

  15. Prolonged acid rain facilitates soil organic carbon accumulation in a mature forest in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianping; Liang, Guohua; Hui, Dafeng; Deng, Qi; Xiong, Xin; Qiu, Qingyan; Liu, Juxiu; Chu, Guowei; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-02-15

    With the continuing increase in anthropogenic activities, acid rain remains a serious environmental threat, especially in the fast developing areas such as southern China. To detect how prolonged deposition of acid rain would influence soil organic carbon accumulation in mature subtropical forests, we conducted a field experiment with simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments in a monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest at Dinghushan National Nature Reserve in southern China. Four levels of SAR treatments were set by irrigating plants with water of different pH values: CK (the control, local lake water, pH ≈ 4.5), T1 (water pH=4.0), T2 (water pH=3.5), and T3 (water pH=3.0). Results showed reduced pH measurements in the topsoil exposed to simulated acid rains due to soil acidification. Soil respiration, soil microbial biomass and litter decomposition rates were significantly decreased by the SAR treatments. As a result, T3 treatment significantly increased the total organic carbon by 24.5% in the topsoil compared to the control. Furthermore, surface soil became more stable as more recalcitrant organic matter was generated under the SAR treatments. Our results suggest that prolonged acid rain exposure may have the potential to facilitate soil organic carbon accumulation in the subtropical forest in southern China. PMID:26657252

  16. Prolonged acid rain facilitates soil organic carbon accumulation in a mature forest in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianping; Liang, Guohua; Hui, Dafeng; Deng, Qi; Xiong, Xin; Qiu, Qingyan; Liu, Juxiu; Chu, Guowei; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-02-15

    With the continuing increase in anthropogenic activities, acid rain remains a serious environmental threat, especially in the fast developing areas such as southern China. To detect how prolonged deposition of acid rain would influence soil organic carbon accumulation in mature subtropical forests, we conducted a field experiment with simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments in a monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest at Dinghushan National Nature Reserve in southern China. Four levels of SAR treatments were set by irrigating plants with water of different pH values: CK (the control, local lake water, pH ≈ 4.5), T1 (water pH=4.0), T2 (water pH=3.5), and T3 (water pH=3.0). Results showed reduced pH measurements in the topsoil exposed to simulated acid rains due to soil acidification. Soil respiration, soil microbial biomass and litter decomposition rates were significantly decreased by the SAR treatments. As a result, T3 treatment significantly increased the total organic carbon by 24.5% in the topsoil compared to the control. Furthermore, surface soil became more stable as more recalcitrant organic matter was generated under the SAR treatments. Our results suggest that prolonged acid rain exposure may have the potential to facilitate soil organic carbon accumulation in the subtropical forest in southern China.

  17. Antioxidant responses to simulated acid rain and heavy metal deposition in birch seedlings.

    PubMed

    Koricheva, J; Roy, S; Vranjic, J A; Haukioja, E; Hughes, P R; Hänninen, O

    1997-01-01

    This study measured the responses of different anti-oxidants in 2-year-old birch (Betula pendula Roth) seedlings subjected to simulated acid rain (pH 4.0) and heavy metals (Cu/Ni), applied alone or in combination for 2 months. The applied concentrations of pollutants did not significantly affect seedling biomass or total glutathione levels. Acid rain alone increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity both in leaves and roots, while heavy metals alone inhibited SOD activity in roots. Both acid rain and heavy metals applied singly increased ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) activities in leaves but decreased activities in roots. In contrast, acid rain and heavy metal treatments increased glutathione reductase (GR) activity in roots but not in leaves. Spraying birch seedlings with a mixture of acid rain and heavy metals increased SOD, APX and GPX activities in leaves and GR activity in roots. However, the effects of mixed pollutants on enzyme activities usually were less than the summed effects of individual pollutants. Enzyme responses also depended on where pollutants were applied: spraying pollutants onto the shoots initiated higher responses in SOD, APX and GPX than did application to the soil surface, while the opposite was true for GR.

  18. Air pollution, acid rain, and the future of forests. Part 6. Looking beyond the forest

    SciTech Connect

    Postel, S.

    1984-12-01

    The emerging threat to the world's forests clearly raises the potential economic and ecological consequences of acid rain and air pollution. Because acid rain, ozone, and the buildup of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are problems with a common origin, they can also have common solutions. Yet most existing and proposed strategies address isolated issues, rather than strive for the integrated solutions that are needed. Placing desulfurizing scrubbers on smokestacks, for example, will reduce sulfur dioxide and thereby control acid rain. But this technology will do nothing to help crops suffering from ozone, nothing to ensure that rain two decades from now will not be just as acidic from nitrogen oxides, and nothing to slow the rate at which carbon dioxide is increasing in the atmosphere. Technological controls for specific pollutants must be part of any plan to reduce emissions substantially in the immediate future. Yet funds are limited, and the time available for reversing these threatening trends grows ever shorter. These problems of common origin must be tackled simultaneously and at their core. Using energy more efficiently, recycling more paper and metals, and generating more power from alternative energy sources are rarely considered in strategies to reduce air pollution or acid rain. Yet they are among the most effective and least costly ways that exist.

  19. Application of a LRT model to acid rain control in China.

    PubMed

    Hao, J; Duan, L; Zhou, X; Fu, L

    2001-09-01

    For further control of acid rain and SO2 pollution in China, acid rain control zones and sulfur dioxide pollution control zones were designated where acid rain or serious SO2 pollution occurs or may occur. In this study, sulfur deposition in east China was computed through a policy-oriented, two-dimensional Eulerian model for long-range transport and deposition of SO2 and SO4(2-). The model predictions were in accordance with the wet deposition monitored. Results show that concentrations of SO2 and SO4(2-) are higher in north China than those in the south, and high deposition of sulfur occurs in most areas of North China, in the lower reaches of the Changjiang (Yangtze) River and around Chongqing and Guiyang in southwest China. Total emission of SO2 from the modeling region (from 19 degrees N to 42 degrees N, and from 104 degrees E to 124 degrees E) was about 20 million tons in 1995. The model predicts that 48% of this deposits within the region as dry deposition, 38% deposits as wet deposition, and only about 14% was transported out of the region. The modeling results of sulfur deposition were directly applied in designating acid rain control zones in China, and the emission-deposition relationship derived was also used to formulate middle- and long-range planning programs for regional acid rain control in China.

  20. Effect of acid rain on building material of the El Tajín archaeological zone in Veracruz, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bravo A, H; Soto A, R; Sosa E, R; Sánchez A, P; Alarcón J, A L; Kahl, J; Ruíz B, J

    2006-11-01

    Three limestone slabs (approx. 20 cm2 each) were extracted from the El Tajin archaeological zone in Veracruz, Mexico. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed three components: calcite (81.2%), quartz (17.9%) and feldspar (0.9%). Calcite content by x-ray diffraction analysis was slightly higher than that determined by chemical reaction between the limestone sample and nitric acid. The latter analysis, carried out in triplicate, yielded a calcite content of 77.1%. Mean water absorption, density and porosity of the limestone samples were also determined. Dissolution of limestone samples was investigated using an experimental rainfall simulation chamber, in which the stone samples were irrigated with artificial rain matching the pH and the ionic composition with 40 rainfall samples collected at El Tajin from August 18, 2002, to April 9, 2003. According to calcium and bicarbonate net concentrations found in the effluent of the chamber, a chemical mechanism by which limestone at El Tajin is dissolved by acid rain is proposed. A model used to investigate the air transport pathways corresponding to precipitation events at El Tajin shows that air parcels come mainly from the Gulf of Mexico, although no directional preference is evident for acidic vs. non-acidic events. PMID:16621211

  1. Effect of acid rain on building material of the El Tajín archaeological zone in Veracruz, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bravo A, H; Soto A, R; Sosa E, R; Sánchez A, P; Alarcón J, A L; Kahl, J; Ruíz B, J

    2006-11-01

    Three limestone slabs (approx. 20 cm2 each) were extracted from the El Tajin archaeological zone in Veracruz, Mexico. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed three components: calcite (81.2%), quartz (17.9%) and feldspar (0.9%). Calcite content by x-ray diffraction analysis was slightly higher than that determined by chemical reaction between the limestone sample and nitric acid. The latter analysis, carried out in triplicate, yielded a calcite content of 77.1%. Mean water absorption, density and porosity of the limestone samples were also determined. Dissolution of limestone samples was investigated using an experimental rainfall simulation chamber, in which the stone samples were irrigated with artificial rain matching the pH and the ionic composition with 40 rainfall samples collected at El Tajin from August 18, 2002, to April 9, 2003. According to calcium and bicarbonate net concentrations found in the effluent of the chamber, a chemical mechanism by which limestone at El Tajin is dissolved by acid rain is proposed. A model used to investigate the air transport pathways corresponding to precipitation events at El Tajin shows that air parcels come mainly from the Gulf of Mexico, although no directional preference is evident for acidic vs. non-acidic events.

  2. Evaluation of high-resolution satellite precipitation estimates over southern South America using a dense rain gauge network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salio, Paola; Hobouchian, María Paula; García Skabar, Yanina; Vila, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Six different satellite rainfall estimates are evaluated for a 24-hour accumulation period at 12 UTC with a 0.25 degree resolution. The rain gauge data are obtained from a dense inter-institutional station network for December 1, 2008 to November 30, 2010 over South America. The evaluated satellite rainfall products are the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42 V6, V7 and RT, the NOAA/Climate Prediction Center Morphing technique (CMORPH), Hydroestimator (HYDRO) and the Combined Scheme algorithm (CoSch). The validation and intercomparison of these products are focused on southern South America. The performance improves in the "blended" estimates by including microwave observations and surface observations in the adjustments, i.e., 3B42 V6, V7 and CoSch; however, large overestimations are detectable in CMORPH, principally for extreme values over plains areas. The estimates based on parameters associated with infrared images only (HYDRO) underestimate precipitation south of 20° S and tend to overestimate the warm precipitation to the north. The inclusion of observed precipitation data is convenient from monthly (3B42 V7 and V6) to daily scales (CoSch) and improves the estimates. The estimates that include microwave observations show a strong tendency to overestimate extreme values of precipitation over 70 mm. This effect is strongly evident in northern and central Argentina and southern Brazil. A deeper assessment is necessary, particularly over the Central Andes, where effects of topography principally associated with solid precipitation correspond to the persistence of majorly overestimated precipitation.

  3. 40 CFR 74.3 - Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements. 74.3 Section 74.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Background and Summary § 74.3 Relationship to the Acid...

  4. 40 CFR 74.3 - Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements. 74.3 Section 74.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Background and Summary § 74.3 Relationship to the Acid...

  5. 40 CFR 74.3 - Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements. 74.3 Section 74.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Background and Summary § 74.3 Relationship to the Acid...

  6. 40 CFR 74.3 - Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements. 74.3 Section 74.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Background and Summary § 74.3 Relationship to the Acid...

  7. Is There Scientific Consensus on Acid Rain? -- Excerpts from Six Governmental Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Education Report and Newsletter, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Compiles a series of direct quotations from six governmental reports that reflect a scientific consensus on major aspects of acid deposition. Presents the statements in a question and answer format. Also reviews the sources, extent, and effects of acid rain. (ML)

  8. 40 CFR 74.3 - Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Relationship to the Acid Rain program requirements. 74.3 Section 74.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Background and Summary § 74.3 Relationship to the Acid...

  9. A Demonstration of Acid Rain and Lake Acidification: Wet Deposition of Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Lisa M.

    2003-01-01

    A demonstration showing acid rain and lake acidification is described. In this demonstration, SO2 gas is generated in a large graduated cylinder and then dissolved in water droplets from a simple spray bottle. The droplets carry the acid into simulated lakes, one of which includes solid CaCO3 to mimic limestone's natural buffering capacity.

  10. Arabidopsis leaf necrosis caused by simulated acid rain is related to the salicylic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngmi; Park, Jongbum; Im, Kyunghoan; Kim, Kiyoon; Lee, Jungwoo; Lee, Kyungyeoll; Park, Jung-An; Lee, Taek-Kyun; Park, Dae-Sup; Yang, Joo-Sung; Kim, Donggiun; Lee, Sukchan

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis leaves treated with simulated acid rain (SiAR) showed phenotypes similar to necrotic lesions caused by biotic stresses like Pseudomonad infiltration. Exposure of Arabidopsis to SiAR resulted in the up-regulation of genes known to be induced by the salicylic acid (SA)-mediated pathogen resistance response. The expression of enhanced disease susceptibility (EDS), nonexpressor of PR (NPR) and pathogen-related 1 (PR1), all of which are involved in the salicylic acid signaling pathway, were increased after SiAR exposure. However, vegetative storage protein (VSP), a member of the jasmonic acid pathway did not show a significant change in transcript level. SiAR treatment of transgenic plants expressing salicylate hydroxylase (Nah-G), which prevents the accumulation of salicylic acid, underwent more extensive necrosis than wild-type plants, indicating that the signaling pathway activated by SiAR may overlap with the SA-dependent, systemic acquired resistance pathway. Both Col-0 and Nah-G plants showed sensitivity to SiAR and sulfuric SiAR (S-SiAR) by developing necrotic lesions. Neither Col-0 plants nor Nah-G plants showed sensitivity to nitric SiAR (N-SiAR). These results suggest that SiAR activates at least the salicylic acid pathway and activation of this pathway is sensitive to sulfuric acid.

  11. Effects of acid rain, alone and in combination with gaseous pollutants, on growth and yield of crop plants

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, D.S.; Johnston, J.W. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Greenhouse, growth chamber, and field experiments were conducted to determine the response of crop plants to levels of acidity in simulated rain. The major objectives were: to determine the levels of acidity in rain that alter crop productivity; to evaluate varietal differences in crop response; and to determine the response of crop plants to the combined stress of acid rain and gaseous pollutants, primarily ozone. Results showed additive effects rather than synergistic ones.

  12. Alteration of limestone surfaces in an acid rain environment by gas-solid reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Mossotti, V.G.; Lindsay, J.R.; Hochella, M.F. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    As part of a study to assess mineralogical alterations in building stone due to acid rain, Salem Limestone was exposed in the form of briquettes for one year in several urban and one rural environment. Samples exposed in the rural location were found to be chemically indistinguishable from the freshly quarried limestone (control material). In marked contrast, all samples collected from urban exposure sites developed gypsum stains on the ground-facing surfaces where the stones were unwashed by precipitation. However, the bulk chemistry of the urban samples (not including the stain) was virtually identical to the that of the control stone. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed the presence of sulfur (in the form of sulfate) disseminated over the calcite grain surfaces to a depth less than 10 nm in the freshly quarried limestone; XPS showed an identical sulfate layer on the calcite grains after the one year exposure period. Mass balance calculations and sulfur isotope patterns indicate that the gypsum stain on the protected surfaces consists of adventitious sulfur. The authors found no evidence of nitrate attack on any of the limestone surfaces.

  13. Merging Radar Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPEs) from the High-resolution NEXRAD Reanalysis over CONUS with Rain-gauge Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, O. P.; Nelson, B. R.; Stevens, S. E.; Nickl, E.; Seo, D. J.; Kim, B.; Zhang, J.; Qi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (Nexrad) network over the Continental United States (CONUS) is completed for the period covering from 2002 to 2011. While this constitutes a unique opportunity to study precipitation processes at higher resolution than conventionally possible (1-km, 5-min), the long-term radar-only product needs to be merged with in-situ information in order to be suitable for hydrological, meteorological and climatological applications. The radar-gauge merging is performed by using rain gauge information at daily (Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily: GHCN-D), hourly (Hydrometeorological Automated Data System: HADS), and 5-min (Automated Surface Observing Systems: ASOS; Climate Reference Network: CRN) resolution. The challenges related to incorporating differing resolution and quality networks to generate long-term large-scale gridded estimates of precipitation are enormous. In that perspective, we are implementing techniques for merging the rain gauge datasets and the radar-only estimates such as Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Simple Kriging (SK), Ordinary Kriging (OK), and Conditional Bias-Penalized Kriging (CBPK). An evaluation of the different radar-gauge merging techniques is presented and we provide an estimate of uncertainty for the gridded estimates. In addition, comparisons with a suite of lower resolution QPEs derived from ground based radar measurements (Stage IV) are provided in order to give a detailed picture of the improvements and remaining challenges.

  14. Simulated acid rain alters litter decomposition and enhances the allelopathic potential of the invasive plant Wedelia trilobata (Creeping Daisy)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive species and acid rain cause global environmental problems. Limited information exists, however, concerning the effects of acid rain on the invasiveness of these plants. For example, creeping daisy, an invasive exotic allelopathic weed, has caused great damage in southern China where acid ra...

  15. Effects of simulated sulfuric acid rain on yield, growth, and foliar injury of several crops

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.J.; Neely, G.E.; Perrigan, S.C.; Grothaus, L.C.

    1980-10-01

    This study was designed to reveal patterns of response of major United States crops to sulfuric acid rain. Potted plants were grown in field chambers and exposed to simulated sulfuric acid rain (pH 3.0, 3.5 or 4.0) or to a control rain (pH 5.6). At harvest, the weights of the marketable portion, total aboveground portion and roots were determined for 28 crops. Of these, marketable yield production was inhibited for 5 crops (radish, beet, carrot, mustard greens, broccoli), stimulated for 6 crops (tomato, green pepper, strawberry, alfalfa, orchardgrass, timothy), and ambiguously affected for 1 crop (potato). In addition, stem and leaf production of sweet corn was stimulated. Visible injury of tomatoes might have decreased their marketability. No statistically significant effects on yield were observed for the other 15 crops. The results suggest that the likelihood of yield being affected by acid rain depends on the part of the plant utilized, as well as on species. Effects on the aboveground portions of crops and on roots are also presented. Plants were regularly examined for foliar injury associated with acid rain. Of the 35 cultivars examined, the foliage of 31 was injured at pH 3.0, 28 at pH 3.5, and 5 at pH 4.0. Foliar injury was not generally related to effects on yield. However, foilar injury of swiss chard, mustard greens and spinach was severe enough to adversely affect marketability.

  16. Acid rain: what we know, what we did, what we will do.

    PubMed

    Scott, W

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the involvement of the Canadian province of Ontario in the acid rain issue. Ontario is a major producer of acid gas emissions and suffers significant environmental consequences because of acid rain. The province's substantial contribution to the scientific understanding of acid rain is summarized with emphasis on the extent and origins of the deposition it receives, the impact on the aquatic environment, and the impact on the terrestrial environment. This paper discusses the history of the government's success at reducing acid gas emissions through the 1970's when legislators set out to enhance local or "ambient" air quality, the first legislation to require SO2 reductions from companies already in compliance with ambient air quality legislation, and the current Countdown Acid Rain program which reduces SO2 emission limits by 67%. The process used to establish the tough new limits while reasonably anticipating the development of SO2 control technologies is detailed along with the specific requirements of the major emitters controlled by the regulations. Projections confirm that while the Countdown reductions will bring about significant reductions in deposition, adequate environmental protection in Canada cannot be achieved without some comparable U.S. acid gas abatement effort.

  17. Effects of acid rain on mycorrhizal infection and N cycling in forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Stroo, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    Increasing the acidity of simulated rain from pH 5.6 to 3.0 reduced the number of mycorrhizal roots on white pine seedlings by 20% after 16 weeks of exposure. Mycorrhizal infection of red oaks was 25% less at a rain pH of 3.5 than at pH 5.6. Simulated acid rain also caused increases in the N contents, net photosynthesis, and growth of seedlings, as well as decreases in root:shoot ratios and in the concentration of sucrose in the roots. To measure the effects of acid rain on N mineralization, nitrification, and total inorganic N, columns containing samples from the surface horizons of 12 forest soils were exposed to simulated rain at 3 times ambient deposition rates for 16 weeks. The effects on N mineralization varied between soils, with the greatest inhibitions being observed in soils with low organic matter contents. The apparent protection by organic matter was associated with an increase in short-term buffering capacity. The average amount of N mineralized after exposure was not significantly affected by rain pH. Similarly, nitrification was inhibited during exposure to simulated rain at pH 3.5, but was unaffected after exposure. Enrichments from an acid forest soil failed to show the presence of autotrophic nitrifiers, and the effects of temperature and selective inhibitors indicated that fungi were primarily responsible for nitrification in this soil. A fungus capable of heterotrophic nitrification at pH 4.0 was isolated and identified as Absidia cylindrospora Hagem.

  18. Acid rain program: CEMS submission instructions for monitoring plans, certification test notifications, and quarterly reports

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-12

    The Acid Rain Program regulations require all affected utility units to continuously measure, record and report SO2, NOx, volumetric flow data and CO2 emissions. All affected units also must continuously measure and record opacity, and must report opacity exceedances to the appropriate State or Local Agency. To ensure that your CEMS and fuel flowmeters are performing at an acceptable level, and providing quality assured data, you are required under 40 CFR 75.53, 75.62 (a) to submit a monitoring plan and certification test data for acid rain CEM certificaton. The purpose of this handbook is to help you fulfill your requirements under the Acid Rain Program. This handbook will walk you through the necessary steps for gaining CEMS certification, including filling out and mailing the proper forms, administering the required tests, and applying for certification and sending in electronic data to EPA.

  19. [Distribution of heavy metals in PM10 and its release in the simulated acid rain].

    PubMed

    Feng, Xi-dan; Dang, Zhi; Wang, Huan-xiang; Lu, Yan-bo; Lü, Xan-wen; Huang, Wei-lin

    2006-12-01

    The distribution of heavy metals in inhalable particulate matter (PM10), which were collected in Foshan during December of 2004, was characterized by scanning electron microscope-X-ray energy dispersive analysis technique (SEM-EDS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The releases of Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd were also examined for their potential releases in simulated acid rain, which were quantified with batch reactors. The results showed that the daily average concentration of PM10 was 0.19 mg/m(3), about 79% higher than the secondary standard of China. The relatively contents of Zn and Pb in PM10 were much higher than Cd and Zn, whereas the releasing rates of Cd and Zn in simulated acid rain were greater than that of Cu and Pb. The releasing rates of heavy metals from PM10 were increased as the pH of the acid rain decreased.

  20. Cation ratios in Cladonia portentosa as indices of precipitation acidity in the British Isles.

    PubMed

    Hyvärinen, M; Crittenden, P D

    1996-03-01

    The relationship between rainfall chemistry and the concentrations of potassium, calcium and magnesium in the apices (top 5 mm) of the cushion-forming; lichen Cladonia portentosa (Dufour) Coem was investigated. Lichen samples, together with underlying topsoil, were collected from heathlands in close proximity to rain gauges in the UK Acid Deposition Monitoring Network, located in rural areas of the British Isles, which provide wet deposition data based on weekly bulk samples. The ratios K(+) : Mg(2+) and extracellular Mg(2+) : intracellular Mg(2+) in the lichen apices were strongly correlated with H(+) concentration in precipitation. It is suggested that shifts in these ratios occur owing to enhanced displacement of extracellular Mg(2+) by elevated H(+) concentration in acid rain. By contrast, there was no indication of any relationship between total acid deposition and lichen chemistry. The concentration of Mg(2+) in the lichen was weakly correlated with that in soil, whereas lichen Ca(2+) content was not correlated with either precipitation or soil chemistry. It is concluded that these ratios describing changes in lichen Mg(2+) content provide good biomarkers for wet-deposited acidity.

  1. [Combined injured effects of acid rain and lanthanum on growth of soybean seedling].

    PubMed

    Liang, Chan-juan; Pan, Dan-yun; Xu, Qiu-rong; Zhou, Qing

    2010-07-01

    Combined effects of acid rain and lanthanum on growth of soybean seedling (Glycine max) and its inherent mechanism were studied in this paper. Compared with treatments by simulated acid rain (pH 3.0, 3.5, 4.5) or rare earth La(III) (60, 100 and 300 mg x L(-1)), the decrease degree of growth parameters in combined treatments was higher, indicating that there were a synergistic effects between acid rain and La. Moreover,the inhibition effects of acid rain and La(III) were more obvious when pH value of acid rain was lower or the concentration of La(III) was higher. The changes of photosynthetic parameters were similar to those of growth, but the decrease degree of each parameter was not same in the same treatment group. The decrease degree of optimal PSII photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) and chlorophyll content (Chl) were 9.35%-22.75% and 9.14%-24.53%, respectively, lower than that of photosynthetic rate Pn (22.78%-84.7%), Hill reaction rate (15.52%-73.38%) and Mg2+ -ATPase activity (14.51%-71.54%), showing that the sensitivity of photosynthetic parameters to the combined factors was different. Furthermore, relative analysis showed that the change of Pn were mainly affected by Hill reaction rate and Mg2+ -ATPase activity, and was less influenced by Chl and Fv/Fm. It indicates that the effect of acid rain and La on each reaction in photosynthesis was different, and the inhibition of combined treatments on photosynthesis in plants was one of the main factors affecting growth of plant.

  2. An Integrated Approach (TRMM, MODIS, AVHRR, and Rain Gauge) for Assessment of Precipitation in Arid Areas: A Case Study from the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milewski, A.; Sultan, M.; Becker, R.; Abdeldayem, A. W.

    2005-05-01

    Water shortages are major obstacles to sustainable development and a cause for poverty in arid and semiarid countries. In these domains often the case, the appropriate systems (precipitation networks) that are needed to estimate precipitation on a regional scale are absent. We developed an integrated methodology to address this problem using data sets that are available on a global scale. We developed an integrated approach to improve estimates of renewable water resources. The approach utilizes the following data sets (1) TRMM-3B42V6 to extract 3-hourly precipitation data, (2) daily AVHRR data for soil moisture and NDVI measurements, (3) METEOSAT-7 for monitoring cloud movement, and (4) rain gauge data for ground truthing. Our approach entails identifying rain storm events from TRMM data. Following the identification of the events, we verify the individual events by examining the cloud patterns, examining the temporal variations in NDVI and soil moisture, and through comparisons with rain gauge data. For the year 1998, we examined in a GIS environment the following: TRMM scenes (2920 scenes), AVHRR data (365 scenes), METEOSAT (8760 scenes), and available rain gauge data. Findings indicate: (1) A general correspondence between TRMM data and rain gauge data, (2) A progressive increase in NDVI measurements following precipitation (peak after ~10 days), and (3) instantaneous increase in soil moisture. A similar (yet with a more restricted data set) exercise was conducted in year 1994, where a major flood occurred.

  3. Effects of simulated acid rain on pollen physiology and ultrastructure in the apple.

    PubMed

    Bellani, L M; Rinallo, C; Muccifora, S; Gori, P

    1997-01-01

    Viability, germination and tube length were investigated in pollen grains of field-grown 'Summerred' apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh) exposed to deionized water, rainfall or simulated acid rain at pH 5.6, 4.0 and 3.0. Pollen viability and germination significantly decreased with lower values of pH and with increasing number of treatments. The effects of pH 5.6 and natural rainfall were not significant. Electron microscope investigation of vegetative pollen cells of plants exposed to acid rain at pH 4.0 and 3.0 showed modified features in mitochondria, plastids and endoplasmic reticulum.

  4. Effects of acid rain on forest nutrient status

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Turner, J.; Kelly, J.M.

    1982-06-01

    The paper presents an extensive literature review that deals with the assessment of the effects of acidic atmospheric inputs on forest nutrient status within the context of natural, internal acid production by carbonic and organic acids as well as the nutrient inputs and drains by management practices such as harvesting, fire and fertilization. 123 refs.

  5. Comparison between weather radar and rain gauges data of precipitations that triggered debris flows in the Dolomites (North Eastern Italian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Martino; Gregoretti, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    High intensity and short duration (usually 15-30 minutes) rainfalls are able to generate sudden and abundant runoff in rocky cliffs that can entrain large quantities of sediments and originate debris flow phenomena. A rain gauge network has been set up in two different areas of Dolomites (North Eastern Italian Alps) far each other about 15 km: Fiames (Cortina d'Ampezzo) and Rovina di Cancia (Borca di Cadore). The first network is composed of 9 rain gauges in an area of 1 km2, while the second is composed of 6 rain gauges in an area of 2 km2. In both the areas, the rain gauges are positioned both upstream and downstream the initiation areas of the occurring debris flows. Another single rain gauge is positioned close to the initiation area of Rudavoi debris flow (Auronzo di Cadore) and is far about 5 km from the Fiames rain gauges network. All the rain gauges sample precipitation depth at 5 minutes intervals. In the years 2009-2015 records of rainfalls that triggered 22 debris flows were taken. In most cases, the recorded rainfalls show an higher variability both along distance (200-500 m) and along altitude (200-600 m). Precipitation data recorded by the rain gauges are then compared with those estimated by means of a C-Band weather radar about 70 km away from there, to verify the possible interchangeability of the two measurement systems. Rainfall depths estimated by radar are provided with the temporal interval of the rain gauges (5 minutes) but with a different spatial scale (500 x 500 m raster resolution). To avoid the observation scale gap between the different techniques, in addition to standard comparisons between point gauge and radar rainfall measures, mean areal precipitations were derived from rain gauge network and compared with radar data. Results seem to demonstrate that radar tends to underestimate precipitation evaluated from rain gauges network, both on different measurement scales and on mean spatial data. On average, underestimation regards both

  6. TRMM Precipitation Radar and Microwave Imager Observations of Convective and Stratiform Rain Over Land and Their Theoretical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Iacovazzi, R., Jr.; Yoo, J.-M.; Weinman, J. A.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations of brightness temperature, Tb made over land regions by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) radiometer have been analyzed along with the nearly simultaneous measurements of the vertical profiles of reflectivity factor, Z, made by the Precipitation Radar (PR) onboard the TRMM satellite. This analysis is performed to explore the interrelationship between the TMI and PR data in areas that are covered predominantly by convective or stratiform rain. In particular, we have compared on a scale of 20 km, average vertical profiles of Z with the averages of Tbs in the 19, 37 and 85 GHz channels. Generally, we find from these data that as Z increases, Tbs in the three channels decrease due to extinction. In order to explain physically the relationship between the Tb and Z observations, we have performed radiative transfer simulations utilizing vertical profiles of hydrometeors applicable to convective and stratiform rain regions. These profiles are constructed taking guidance from the Z observations of PR and recent LDR and ZDR measurements made by land-based polarimetric radars.

  7. Combined effects of simulated acid rain and lanthanum chloride on chloroplast structure and functional elements in rice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-05-01

    Acid rain and rare earth element (REE) pollution exist simultaneously in many agricultural regions. However, how REE pollution and acid rain affect plant growth in combination remains largely unknown. In this study, the combined effects of simulated acid rain and lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) on chloroplast morphology, chloroplast ultrastructure, functional element contents, chlorophyll content, and the net photosynthetic rate (P n) in rice (Oryza sativa) were investigated by simulating acid rain and rare earth pollution. Under the combined treatment of simulated acid rain at pH 4.5 and 0.08 mM LaCl3, the chloroplast membrane was smooth, proteins on this membrane were uniform, chloroplast structure was integrated, and the thylakoids were orderly arranged, and simulated acid rain and LaCl3 exhibited a mild antagonistic effect; the Mg, Ca, Mn contents, the chlorophyll content, and the P n increased under this combined treatment, with a synergistic effect of simulated acid rain and LaCl3. Under other combined treatments of simulated acid rain and LaCl3, the chloroplast membrane surface was uneven, a clear "hole" was observed on the surface of chloroplasts, and the thylakoids were dissolved and loose; and the P n and contents of functional elements (P, Mg, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mo) and chlorophyll decreased. Under these combined treatments, simulated acid rain and LaCl3 exhibited a synergistic effect. Based on the above results, a model of the combined effects of simulated acid rain and LaCl3 on plant photosynthesis was established in order to reveal the combined effects on plant photosynthesis, especially on the photosynthetic organelle-chloroplast. Our results would provide some references for further understanding the mechanism of the combined effects of simulated acid rain and LaCl3 on plant photosynthesis. PMID:26815371

  8. Combined effects of simulated acid rain and lanthanum chloride on chloroplast structure and functional elements in rice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-05-01

    Acid rain and rare earth element (REE) pollution exist simultaneously in many agricultural regions. However, how REE pollution and acid rain affect plant growth in combination remains largely unknown. In this study, the combined effects of simulated acid rain and lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) on chloroplast morphology, chloroplast ultrastructure, functional element contents, chlorophyll content, and the net photosynthetic rate (P n) in rice (Oryza sativa) were investigated by simulating acid rain and rare earth pollution. Under the combined treatment of simulated acid rain at pH 4.5 and 0.08 mM LaCl3, the chloroplast membrane was smooth, proteins on this membrane were uniform, chloroplast structure was integrated, and the thylakoids were orderly arranged, and simulated acid rain and LaCl3 exhibited a mild antagonistic effect; the Mg, Ca, Mn contents, the chlorophyll content, and the P n increased under this combined treatment, with a synergistic effect of simulated acid rain and LaCl3. Under other combined treatments of simulated acid rain and LaCl3, the chloroplast membrane surface was uneven, a clear "hole" was observed on the surface of chloroplasts, and the thylakoids were dissolved and loose; and the P n and contents of functional elements (P, Mg, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mo) and chlorophyll decreased. Under these combined treatments, simulated acid rain and LaCl3 exhibited a synergistic effect. Based on the above results, a model of the combined effects of simulated acid rain and LaCl3 on plant photosynthesis was established in order to reveal the combined effects on plant photosynthesis, especially on the photosynthetic organelle-chloroplast. Our results would provide some references for further understanding the mechanism of the combined effects of simulated acid rain and LaCl3 on plant photosynthesis.

  9. Antioxidant response of soybean seedlings to joint stress of lanthanum and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chanjuan; Wang, Weimin

    2013-11-01

    Excess of rare earth elements in soil can be a serious environmental stress on plants, in particular when acid rain coexists. To understand how such a stress affects plants, we studied antioxidant response of soybean leaves and roots exposed to lanthanum (0.06, 0.18, and 0.85 mmol L(-1)) under acid rain conditions (pH 4.5 and 3.0). We found that low concentration of La3+ (0.06 mmol L(-1)) did not affect the activity of antioxidant enzymes (catalase and peroxidase) whereas high concentration of La3+ (≥0.18 mmol L(-1)) did. Compared to treatment with acid rain (pH 4.5 and pH 3.0) or La3+ alone, joint stress of La3+ and acid rain affected more severely the activity of catalase and peroxidase, and induced more H2O2 accumulation and lipid peroxidation. When treated with high level of La3+ (0.85 mmol L(-1)) alone or with acid rain (pH 4.5 and 3.0), roots were more affected than leaves regarding the inhibition of antioxidant enzymes, physiological function, and growth. The severity of oxidative damage and inhibition of growth caused by the joint stress associated positively with La3+ concentration and soil acidity. These results will help us understand plant response to joint stress, recognize the adverse environmental impact of rare earth elements in acidic soil, and develop measures to eliminate damage caused by such joint stress.

  10. Antioxidant response of soybean seedlings to joint stress of lanthanum and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chanjuan; Wang, Weimin

    2013-11-01

    Excess of rare earth elements in soil can be a serious environmental stress on plants, in particular when acid rain coexists. To understand how such a stress affects plants, we studied antioxidant response of soybean leaves and roots exposed to lanthanum (0.06, 0.18, and 0.85 mmol L(-1)) under acid rain conditions (pH 4.5 and 3.0). We found that low concentration of La3+ (0.06 mmol L(-1)) did not affect the activity of antioxidant enzymes (catalase and peroxidase) whereas high concentration of La3+ (≥0.18 mmol L(-1)) did. Compared to treatment with acid rain (pH 4.5 and pH 3.0) or La3+ alone, joint stress of La3+ and acid rain affected more severely the activity of catalase and peroxidase, and induced more H2O2 accumulation and lipid peroxidation. When treated with high level of La3+ (0.85 mmol L(-1)) alone or with acid rain (pH 4.5 and 3.0), roots were more affected than leaves regarding the inhibition of antioxidant enzymes, physiological function, and growth. The severity of oxidative damage and inhibition of growth caused by the joint stress associated positively with La3+ concentration and soil acidity. These results will help us understand plant response to joint stress, recognize the adverse environmental impact of rare earth elements in acidic soil, and develop measures to eliminate damage caused by such joint stress. PMID:23653318

  11. Leaching of lignite ash by rain and acid rain. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, R.A.

    1981-08-25

    Samples of lignite ash were obtained from the start-up operations of the San Miguel Electric Cooperative Power Station at Jourdanton, Texas. Fly ash and bottoms ash were subjected to the conditions of a worst case analysis by refluxing with demineralized water in order to determine the maximum concentrations of hazardous inorganic pollutants which could be leached from the ash samples. The leachate was analyzed for cadmium, cobalt, copper, lead, manganese, nickle, silver, and zinc. Effects of varying the pH of the leaching water upon the concentrations of these species in the leachate were also assessed. For the fly ash, the concentrations of cadmium, cobalt, lead, nickel, and silver in the fly ash leachate were lower than the detection limits of the analyticl technique at all pH values. Zinc was detectable at all pH levels studied, and copper and manganese were detected at the most acidic pH levels. Results from the bottoms ash leaching experiments were quite different from those obtained from the leaching of fly ash with regards to pH effects, total dissolved solids, and metals in the leachate. At all pH values utilized, the concentrations of cadmium, cobalt, copper, lead, and silver in the bottoms ash leachate were below the detection limits of the analytical technique. Cobalt, manganese, nickel, and zinc were detected at most pH values. The results indicate that the exhaustive leaching of the fly and bottoms ash from the combustion of Texas lignite does produce concentrations of some hazardous inorganic constituents which are in the range of hundredths to tenths of a part per million.

  12. Trend analysis of weekly acid rain data, 1978-83

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schertz, Terry L.; Hirsch, Robert M.

    1985-01-01

    There are 19 stations in the National Atmospheric Deposition Program which operated over the period 1978-83 and were subsequently incorporated into the National Trends Network in 1983. The precipitation chemistry data for these stations for this period were analyzed for trend, spatial correlation, seasonality, and relationship to precipitation volume. The intent of the analysis was to provide insights on the sources of variation in precipitation chemistry and to attempt to ascertain what statistical procedures may be most useful for ongoing analysis of the National Trends Network data. The Seasonal Kendall test was used for detection of trends in raw concentrations of dissolved constituents, pH and specific conductance, and residuals of these parameters from regression analysis. Forty-one percent of the trends detected in the raw concentrations were downtrends, 4 percent were uptrends, and 55 percent showed no trends at a = 0.2. At a more restrictive significance level of a = 0.05, 24 percent of the trends detected were downtrends, 2 percent were uptrends, and 74 percent showed no trends. The two constituents of greatest interest in terms of human generated emissions and environmental effects, sulfate and nitrate, showed only downtrends, and sulfate showed the largest decreases in concentration per year of all the ions tested.

  13. Potential health implications for acid precipitation, corrosion, and metals contamination of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, W E; DeWalle, D R

    1985-11-01

    Potential health effects of drinking water quality changes caused by acid precipitation are presented. Several different types of water supply are discussed and their roles in modifying acid rain impacts on drinking water are explained. Sources of metals contamination in surface water supplies are enumerated. The authors present some results from their research into acid rain impacts on roof-catchment cisterns, small surface water supplies, and lead mobilization in acid soils. A good correlation was obtained between cistern water corrosivity as measured by the Ryznar Index (RI) values and standing tapwater copper concentrations. However, lead concentrations in tapwater did not correlate well with cistern water RI. A modified linear regression model that accounted for Ryznar Index change during storage in vinyl-lined cisterns was used to predict the Ryznar Index value at a copper concentration of 1000 micrograms/L. The predicted RI was greater than the RI of precipitation with a pH of 5.3, indicating that anthropogenically acidified precipitation may result in cistern tapwater copper concentrations in excess of the 1000 micrograms/L suggested drinking water limit. Good correlations between tapwater Ryznar Index and tapwater copper and lead concentrations were not obtained for the small surface water supply. Aluminum concentrations in reservoir water were similar to those in stream source water. Limited data were also presented that indicated lead was present in acid forest soil leachate and streams draining such soils in relatively small concentrations. Where appropriate, recommendations for future research are included with the discussions of research results.

  14. Potential health implications for acid precipitation, corrosion, and metals contamination of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, W E; DeWalle, D R

    1985-11-01

    Potential health effects of drinking water quality changes caused by acid precipitation are presented. Several different types of water supply are discussed and their roles in modifying acid rain impacts on drinking water are explained. Sources of metals contamination in surface water supplies are enumerated. The authors present some results from their research into acid rain impacts on roof-catchment cisterns, small surface water supplies, and lead mobilization in acid soils. A good correlation was obtained between cistern water corrosivity as measured by the Ryznar Index (RI) values and standing tapwater copper concentrations. However, lead concentrations in tapwater did not correlate well with cistern water RI. A modified linear regression model that accounted for Ryznar Index change during storage in vinyl-lined cisterns was used to predict the Ryznar Index value at a copper concentration of 1000 micrograms/L. The predicted RI was greater than the RI of precipitation with a pH of 5.3, indicating that anthropogenically acidified precipitation may result in cistern tapwater copper concentrations in excess of the 1000 micrograms/L suggested drinking water limit. Good correlations between tapwater Ryznar Index and tapwater copper and lead concentrations were not obtained for the small surface water supply. Aluminum concentrations in reservoir water were similar to those in stream source water. Limited data were also presented that indicated lead was present in acid forest soil leachate and streams draining such soils in relatively small concentrations. Where appropriate, recommendations for future research are included with the discussions of research results. PMID:4076096

  15. Alterations in cytosol free calcium in horseradish roots simultaneously exposed to lanthanum(III) and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Anhua; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-04-01

    The extensive use of rare earth elements (REEs) has increased their environmental levels. REE pollution concomitant with acid rain in many agricultural regions can affect crop growth. Cytosol free calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play an important role in almost all cellular activities. However, no data have been reported regarding the role of cytosol free Ca(2+) in plant roots simultaneously exposed to REE and acid rain. In this study, the effects of exposures to lanthanum(III) and acid rain, independently and in combination, on cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, root activity, metal contents, biomass, cytosol pH and La contents in horseradish roots were investigated. The simultaneous exposures to La(III) and acid rain increased or decreased the cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, depending on the concentration of La(III), and these effects were more evident than independent exposure to La(III) or acid rain. In combined exposures, cytosol free Ca(2+) played an important role in the regulation of root activity, metal contents and biomass. These roles were closely related to La(III) dose, acid rain strength and treatment mode (independent exposure or simultaneous exposure). A low concentration of La(III) (20 mg L(-1)) could alleviate the adverse effects on the roots caused by acid rain, and the combined exposures at higher concentrations of La(III) and acid rain had synergic effects on the roots. PMID:26720810

  16. Alterations in cytosol free calcium in horseradish roots simultaneously exposed to lanthanum(III) and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Anhua; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-04-01

    The extensive use of rare earth elements (REEs) has increased their environmental levels. REE pollution concomitant with acid rain in many agricultural regions can affect crop growth. Cytosol free calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play an important role in almost all cellular activities. However, no data have been reported regarding the role of cytosol free Ca(2+) in plant roots simultaneously exposed to REE and acid rain. In this study, the effects of exposures to lanthanum(III) and acid rain, independently and in combination, on cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, root activity, metal contents, biomass, cytosol pH and La contents in horseradish roots were investigated. The simultaneous exposures to La(III) and acid rain increased or decreased the cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, depending on the concentration of La(III), and these effects were more evident than independent exposure to La(III) or acid rain. In combined exposures, cytosol free Ca(2+) played an important role in the regulation of root activity, metal contents and biomass. These roles were closely related to La(III) dose, acid rain strength and treatment mode (independent exposure or simultaneous exposure). A low concentration of La(III) (20 mg L(-1)) could alleviate the adverse effects on the roots caused by acid rain, and the combined exposures at higher concentrations of La(III) and acid rain had synergic effects on the roots.

  17. Acid Rain Advisory Committee meeting. Held on March 20-22, 1991. Permits and technology issue papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    Index: (Permits and Technology Subcommittee Papers): Permits and Technologies Conference Call Minutes January 22, 1991; Subcommittee Meeting Minutes; January 28, 1991; Principles for Acid Rain Permits; Fact Sheet: Reduced Utilization; Topics Covered in Acid Rain Permit Regulations; and Primer on the Clean Water Act Permit Program.

  18. Acid rain damage to carbonate stone: a quantitative assessment based on the aqueous geochemistry of rainfall runoff from stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    An onsite experimental procedure was used to identify and quantify acid rain damage to carbonate stone, based on the change in rain runoff chemical composition. Onsite data obtained during the summer and fall of 1984 at three locations in the northeastern United States indicate that carbonate stone surface recession is related to acid deposition. -from Author

  19. Learning about Acid Rain: A Teacher's Guide for Grades 6 through 8. EPA 430-F-08-002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Acid rain is a complex environmental problem which affects the United States and many other countries around the world. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was established in 1970 to address environmental issues, such as acid rain. Through its programs, EPA works to protect human health and the environment in the United States…

  20. Atmospheric deposition and canopy exchange of anions and cations in two plantation forests under acid rain influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Weijun; Ren, Huili; Darrel Jenerette, G.; Hui, Dafeng; Ren, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition as a widely concerned environmental problem in China has been less studied in plantation forests compared to urban and secondary forests, albeit they constitute 1/3 of the total forested areas of the country. We measured the rainwater amount and chemistry outside and beneath the canopies of two widely distributed plantations (Acacia mangium and Dimocarpus longan) in the severe acid rain influenced Pearl River Delta region of southeastern China for two years. Our results showed that the frequency of acid rain was 96% on the basis of pH value <5.6. The volume-weighted mean (vwm) pH was 4.62 and higher in the dry (Oct.-Mar.) than in the wet (Apr.-Sep.) seasons. The major acidic anion was sulfate with vwm concentration of 140 μeq l-1 and annual deposition flux of 110.3 kg ha-1 yr-1. The major neutralizing cations were calcium (94.8 μeq l-1 and 28 kg ha-1 yr-1) and ammonium (41.2 μeq l-1 and 11.7 kg ha-1 yr-1). Over 95% of these major acidic anions and neutralizing cations were derived from anthropogenic and terrestrial sources as a result of industrial, agricultural and forestry activities. Plantation canopy had marked impacts on rainwater chemistry, with the measured anion and cation concentrations being significantly enriched in throughfall (TF) and stemflow (SF) rainwater by 1.4 (for NO) to 20-fold (for K+) compared to those in bulk precipitation (BP). Dry deposition generally contributed about 13-22% of the total deposition while canopy leaching mainly occurred for K+ (>88%) and NH (10-38%). The two tree species showed distinct impacts on rainfall redistribution and rainwater chemistry due to their differences in canopy architecture and leaf/bark texture, suggesting that species-specific effects should not be overlooked while assessing the acid deposition in forested areas.

  1. Effects of simulated acid rain on the allelopathic potential of invasive weed Wedelia trilobata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acid rain continues to pose a major threat to natural ecosystems in rapidly-developing industrialized regions such as southern China. Despite the significant environmental impact of this phenomenon, relatively little is known concerning its effects on important aspects of ecosystem dynamics such as ...

  2. Student Teacher Understanding of the Greenhouse Effect, Ozone Layer Depletion, and Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dove, Jane

    1996-01-01

    Describes the results of a survey designed to ascertain details of student teachers' knowledge and misconceptions about the greenhouse effect, acid rain, and ozone layer depletion. Results indicate familiarity with the issues but little understanding of the concepts involved and many commonly held misconceptions. (JRH)

  3. The Influence of a Collaborative Learning Environment on Primary Students' Conceptions about Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinopoulos, Dimitrios; Stavridou, Heleni

    2002-01-01

    Investigates primary students' conceptions of acid rain formation and its consequences to people and the environment before and after a 10-hour constructivist teaching intervention. Reports improvement in conceptions of physical and chemical phenomena among the experimental group participants. (Contains 23 references.) (Author/YDS)

  4. Analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of acid rain electronic data reports

    SciTech Connect

    Schott, J.

    1997-12-31

    Entergy Corporation is a Phase II utility with a fossil generation base composed primarily of natural gas and low sulfur coal. This paper presents an analysis of a large Phase II utility`s continuous emissions monitoring data reported to EPA under Title IV Acid Rain. Electric utilities currently report hourly emissions of NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, fuel use, and generation through electronic data reports to EPA. This paper describes strengths and weaknesses of the data reported to EPA as determined through an analysis of 1995 data. Emissions reported by this company under acid rain for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} are very different from emissions reported to state agencies for annual emission inventory purposes in past years and will represent a significant break with historic trends. A comparison of emissions has been made of 1995 emissions reported under Electronic Data Reports to the emissions that would have been reported using emission factors and fuel data in past years. In addition, the paper examines the impacts of 40 CFR Part 75 Acid Rain requirements such as missing data substitution and monitor bias adjustments. Measurement system errors including stack flow measurement and false NO{sub x}Lb/MMBtu readings at very low loads are discussed. This paper describes the implications for public policy, compliance, emissions inventories, and business decisions of Part 75 acid rain monitoring and reporting requirements.

  5. The Fugitive Literature of Acid Rain: Making Use of Nonconventional Information Sources in a Vertical File.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovenburg, Susan L.; Stoss, Frederick W.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of vertical file collections for nonconventional literature, and describes the classification scheme used for fugitive literature by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse at the Center for Environmental Information. An annotated list of organizations and examples of titles they offer is provided. (8 notes with…

  6. Environmental Policy-Making and Their Impacts in the Case of Acid Rain Abatement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehmer-Christiansen, Sonja

    1992-01-01

    Great Britain and Germany accepted European Community acid rain reduction directives. Discusses the differences in the amount of reduction required from each country, the strategies adopted to attain those reductions, and the levels of emission reductions already achieved.(52 references) (MDH)

  7. Chemistry For Kids: Pre-Chemistry Acid Rain Activities for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    1985-01-01

    Presents two activities on acid rain for students in intermediate grades. Materials needed and procedures used are included. Also describes "chemical magic" shows performed by high school students for sixth-grade students in seven elementary schools in Altus, Oklahoma. (JN)

  8. A Fresh Look at the Benefits and Costs of the US Acid Rain Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Acid Rain Program (Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments) has achieved substantial reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from power plants in the United States. We compare new estimates of the benefits and costs of Title IV to th...

  9. Acid rain compliance and coordination of state and federal utility regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nordhaus, R.R.

    1993-07-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) impose new controls on emissions by electric utilities of the two major precursors of acid rain: sulfur dioxide and oxides of nitrogen. Utilities, and the utility holding company systems and power pools of which they are members, will be subject to extensive and costly compliance obligations under the new stature. Most of these utilities, utility systems, and power pools are regulated by more than one utility regulatory authority. Utility regulators will need to coordinate their policies for ratemaking and for review of acid rain compliance strategies if least-cost solutions are to be implemented without imposing on rate payers and utility shareholders the costs and risks of inconsistent regulatory determinations. This article outlines the scope of the coordination problem and spells out possible approaches that utility regulators may take in dealing with it. Topics covered include the following: the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments; acid rain (SO2); acid rain (NOx); costs of compliance; implications for utility regulation - federal and state utility regulatory framework; potential jurisdictional conflicts under existing state/federal utility regulatory scheme - single utility, holding companies, power pools; Utility regulatory issues under the 1990 amendments - planning conflicts, operational conflicts; methods for dealing with potential jurisdictional conflicts; coordination mechanisms - informal consultation, rulemaking,coordination of adjudicatory proceedings, FERC rate filings.

  10. Rain Gauges Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quantitative description of precipitation processes in climate models, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility deployed rain gauges located near disdrometers (DISD and VDIS data streams). This handbook deals specifically with the rain gauges that make the observations for the RAIN data stream. Other precipitation observations are made by the surface meteorology instrument suite (i.e., MET data stream).

  11. CoCoRaHS (Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network) -- Sharing Precipitation Data and Climate Research Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reges, H. W.; Doesken, N. J.; Cifelli, R. C.; Turner, J. S.

    2005-12-01

    CoCoRaHS is an informal science education project supported by NSF where volunteers of all ages and varied backgrounds measure and report rain, hail and snowfall on a daily basis. The network is currently operating in six states with several others hoping to join soon. The data collected support many research and resource-monitoring activities and are used by many scientists, resource managers and businesses. But the success of the volunteer program hinges on keeping volunteers interested and engaged. Portraying precipitation data in spatial and temporal ways so that volunteers learn along with scientists about storm patterns, variability and impacts is the goal of the program. Examples of how CoCoRaHS precipitation data are collected, verified, archived, analyzed, and displayed will be presented and ideas for future display and communication will be described. There are many possibilities for improving data and analyses to help volunteers better comprehend the significance and applications of the research results they are contributing to. CoCoRaHS makes use of descriptive monthly e-mail updates to keep all participants informed about recent findings as well as an interactive Web page: www.cocorahs.org.

  12. Sulfate in acid rain data - do the patterns make sense?

    SciTech Connect

    Stensland, G.J.

    1997-12-31

    A high quality national record of precipitation chemistry is being collected through the operation of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). This network began in 1978 with less than 20 sites and by the mid 1980`s had grown to about 200 sites which is about the number of sites currently in operation. Lynch et al. have been reporting time trend results for this data, with their most recent analysis showing that sulfate in NADP/NTN decreased dramatically in 1995 which agrees with the substantial decrease in sulfur dioxide emissions. The various network data available before NADP/NTN have been reported to have a variety of problems, especially related to the effect on pH of the elevated levels of base cations. The sulfate and nitrate data may be more useable. This paper reassesses the sulfate data available from the Junge network to see if these data can be used to extend the comparison of sulfate in precipitation and sulfur dioxide emissions back to the mid 1950`s.

  13. The politics of markets: The acid rain control policy in the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments

    SciTech Connect

    Kete, N.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis is a review and critique of the development of the acid rain control policy codified as Title IV of the Clean Air Act. The amendments include provisions to address acid rain-air pollution that has been transformed and transported over long distances. Title IV also embodies the first large scale adoption of market principles and economic incentives in the cause of environmental protection. The acid rain control amendments are being hailed as a break with past environmental protection practice and are being offered as a model for further regulatory reform. The thesis looks at the roots of the acid rain policy and considers the set of legal, social, and economic relations embedded in the policy which define the nature of its legal controls over pollution and its inverse, environmental quality. It explores whether the creation of the emissions allowance trading system changes the social relationships that prevailed under the pre-amended Clean Air Act. It responds to and rebuts the concerns of some critics that the policy represents an alienation of the public's right to clean air. A review of the acid rain policymaking process provides a recent and concrete example of the two central concerns inherent in public policy: the making of decisions that establish institutional arrangements, or structures, that both constrain and liberate individual action at the operational level; and the search for the boundary between autonomous behavior and collective decision making. The policy responds to regulatory reform recommendations concerned with improving the effectiveness, accountability, and cost-effectiveness of environmental protection. As a model for future policymaking, the policy goes beyond and encompasses more than the welfare economics ideal of static economic efficiency and the [open quotes]free market environmentalism[close quotes] emphasis on private property and common law.

  14. Effects of simulated acid rain on yield response of two soybean cultivars

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, P.M.; Banwart, W.L.; Hassett, J.J.; Finke, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted for 3 yrs. to determine the effects of simulated acid rain on seed yield of two soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cultivars, 'Amsoy 71' and 'Williams 82'. Plants were treated biweekly with simulated rain of pH 5.6, 4.6, 4.2, 3.8, 3.4, and 3.0. For Amsoy 71 there was a linear decrease in yield with increasing rainfall acidity for 1 of 3 yrs but no significant effects for the other two. Thus, acid rain appears to reduce the yield of some soybean cultivars slightly, but this effect is not consistent from year to year. Amsoy 71 and Williams 82 soybean treated with the most-acidic rain, pH 3.0, resulted in average yields for the 3 yrs of the study of approximately 3% and 4% lower than the average yields for the other treatments, respectively. However, calculations from the response functions developed have shown that, at current levels of rainfall acidities, the effects on yield are very small. With an increase in rainfall acidity of 50% in Illinois, the predicted yield decrease for Amsoy 71 and Williams 82 soybean would be less than 1%. Similarly, the expected increase in yield of these cultivars would be 1% or less if acidity in the rainfall were reduced by 50%. While there may be beneficial effects of reduced S and N oxide emissions, these results suggest the resultant lower rainfall acidities are not likely to produce noticeable changes in soybean yields.

  15. Spatial characterization of acid rain stress in Canadian Shield Lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanis, F. J.; Marshall, E. M.

    1989-01-01

    The lake acidification in Northern Ontario was investigated using LANDSAT TM to sense lake volume reflectance and also to provide important vegetation and terrain characteristics. The purpose of this project was to determine the ability of LANDSAT to assess water quality characteristics associated with lake acidification. Results demonstrate that a remote sensor can discriminate lake clarity based upon reflection. The basic hypothesis is that seasonal and multi-year changes in lake optical transparency are indicative of sensitivity to acidic deposition. In many acid-sensitive lakes optical transparency is controlled by the amount of dissolved organic carbon present. Seasonal changes in the optical transparency of lakes can potentially provide an indication of the stress due to acid deposition and loading.

  16. Neutralization of soil aerosol and its impact on the distribution of acid rain over east Asia: Observations and model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zifa; Akimoto, Hajime; Uno, Itsushi

    2002-10-01

    A comprehensive Air Quality Prediction Modeling System is applied to simulate the pH values in precipitation and to investigate neutralization by soil aerosols and their influence on the distribution of acid rain over east Asia. A modified deflation module is designed to provide explicit information on the soil aerosol loading. Numerical simulation was performed for 1 year, from 15 December 1998 to 31 December 1999. Wet deposition monitoring data at 17 sites of the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in east Asia in addition to State Environmental Protection Agency data were used to evaluate the model, and a reasonable agreement was obtained. Observed evidence clearly shows that in northern China acid deposition is heavily influenced and buffered by natural soil dust from desert and semiarid areas. The observed mean rainwater pH value in northern China is the highest, between 6.0 and 7.2, while in southern China, where many areas severely impacted by acid precipitation are located, the pH value is much lower, between 3.5 and 5. In Japan the mean pH value is 4.7, significantly higher than that in southern China, while in South Korea the pH value is intermediate between those in northern China and Japan. The model is capable of reproducing this geographical distribution of rainwater pH over east Asia. The simulation results for 1999 demonstrated strong neutralization of precipitation by soil aerosols over northeast Asia, and the distribution pattern of acid rain was also altered. The annual mean pH values in northern China and Korea show a remarkable increase of 0.8-2.5, while the increase in mean pH values over southern China and Japan are less than 0.1. The neutralization effects vary by season, with the greatest influence in spring, when pH values increased by 0.1-0.4 in Japan, 0.5-1.5 in Korea, and more than 2 in northern China.

  17. Response of citrus and other selected plant species to simulated HCL - acid rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, W. M.; Heagle, A. S.

    1980-01-01

    Mature valencia orange trees were sprayed with hydrochloric acid solutions (pH 7.8, 2.0, 1.0, and 0.5) in the field at the full bloom stage and at one month after fruit set. Potted valencia orange and dwarf citrus trees, four species of plants native to Merritt Island, and four agronomic species were exposed to various pH levels of simulated acid rain under controlled conditions. The acid rain was generated from dilutions of hydrochloric acid solutions or by passing water through an exhaust generated by burning solid rocket fuel. The plants were injured severely at pH levels below 1.0, but showed only slight injury at pH levels of 2.0 and above. Threshold injury levels were between 2.0 and 3.0 pH. The sensitivity of the different plant species to acid solutions was similar. Foliar injury symptoms were representative of acid rain including necrosis of young tissue, isolated necrotic spots or patches, and leaf abscission. Mature valencia orange trees sprayed with concentrations of 1.0 pH and 0.5 pH in the field had reduced fruit yields for two harvests after the treatment. All experimental trees were back to full productivity by the third harvest after treatment.

  18. [Effects of simulated acid rain on physiological and biochemical characters of eggplant, the host plant of Tetranychus cinnabarinus].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianping; Wang, Jinjun; Zhao, Zhimo; Chen, Yang; Dou, Wei

    2005-03-01

    In a series of laboratory trials, this paper studied the responses of eggplant (Solanum melongena), the host plant of carmine spider mite Tetranychus cinnabarinus, to different pH values simulated acid rain. The results showed that with the increasing acidity of simulated acid rain, the CAT activity and the contents of P and soluble protein in egg plant leaves increased significantly first, reaching the highest at pH 4.0 or 3.0, and then decreased; while the POD activity and soluble sugar content were in adverse. The reduced sugar content and SOD activity of eggplant leaves increased, but the pH value decreased with increasing acidity of acid rain. Acid rain had no effect on leaf water content. Among the test indices, leaf POD was most insensitive to the acid rain, followed by leaf pH, SOD and CAT, while the others were very sensitive. Weak acid rain (pH > 4.0) promoted the protective ability of eggplant leaf and its growth, and the growth of T. cinnabarinus was also promoted because of the changed contents of soluble sugar, P and soluble protein in eggplant leaves being more favorable to its eating; while strong acid rain (pH < 3.0) inhibited the growth of both host plant and mite.

  19. Variability of raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity-rain rate relations in extreme Mediterranean precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uijlenhoet, R.; Hazenberg, P.; Yu, N.; Boudevillain, B.; Delrieu, G.

    2010-12-01

    In radar hydrology the relationship between the reflectivity factor (Z) and the rainfall intensity (R) is generally assumed to follow a power law of which the parameters change both in space and time and depend on the drop size distribution (DSD). Based on disdrometer data, this study tries to improve our understanding of the temporal variability of the power-law relationship between Z and R using the scaling law formalism for the raindrop size distribution. In particular, this study focuses on the inter-event variability of Z-R coefficients and associated DSD-parameters and their relationship to the type of precipitation. This is crucial for developing improved quantitative precipitation estimation algorithms for extreme, flash-flood triggering rainfall. Within the DSD scaling-law framework a new normalized parameter estimation method is presented, which calculates significantly faster than the original method and leads to bulk event estimates of the DSD-parameters and associated Z-R coefficients. Based on a 2.5-year disdrometer dataset collected in the Cevennes-Vivarais region in the South of France, comprising a total of 70 events, it is shown that the quality of the resulting Z-R relationships obtained by the new method compares well to two standard least-squares fitting techniques. A major benefit of the new implementation, as compared to such purely statistical methods, is that it also provides information concerning the intrinsic properties of the DSD. For each of the 70 events this study also estimates the convective activity based on a threshold technique. Results show that convective events generally tend to have smaller Z-R exponents, which is expected to result from an increased amount of drop interaction. For stratiform events, a much larger range in exponents is obtained, which is expected to depend on differences in meteorological origin (snow vs. ice). For the types of precipitation events observed in the Cevennes region, for a given value of the

  20. [Effect of acid rain, copper, and atrazine on soil hydrolase activity].

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangshen; Xu, Dongmei; Li, Kebin; Liu, Weiping

    2004-01-01

    The effects of acid rain, Cu2+ and atrazine on the activities of soil urease, invertase and acid phosphatase were studied by means of orthogonal test. The results showed that the inhibition rate was H+ > Cu2+, and atrazine had no significant influence on urease and intertase. Interaction analysis revealed that Cu x atrazine exhibited synergism on soil acid phosphatase activity, Cu x H had antagonism on soil invertase and urease, but atrazine x H had no interaction within the investigated concentration range. Among the three enzymes, soil acid phosphatase was the most sensitive one to the contaminations.