Science.gov

Sample records for acid reacting substances

  1. Phagocytosis stimulates the release of a slow reacting substance in cultured macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Bretz, U.; Dewald, B.; Payne, T.; Schnyder, J.

    1980-01-01

    1 A slow-reacting substance (SRS) was released from non-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages during phagocytosis of zymosan particles, whereas no detectable SRS was produced by resting cells. 2 The macrophage SRS induced a delayed and slow contraction of the guinea-pig ileum but not of the chick rectum. 3 The myotonic activity was antagonized by low concentrations of FPL 55712 (sodium 7-[3-(4-acetyl-3-hydroxy-2-propylphenoxy)-2-hydroxypropoxy]-4-oxo-8-propyl-4H-1 -benzopyran-2 carboxylate) but was not affected by mepyramine or hyoscine, and was not associated with tachyphylaxis. 4 SRS release was increased by indomethacin and was abolished by the lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase inhibitor, BW755C (3-amino-1-[m-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]-2-pyrazoline). 5 Addition of exogenous arachidonic acid or cysteine enhanced SRS production. PMID:6110461

  2. IMMUNOLOGICAL RELEASE OF HISTAMINE AND SLOW REACTING SUBSTANCE OF ANAPHYLAXIS FROM HUMAN LUNG

    PubMed Central

    Kaliner, Michael; Orange, Robert P.; Austen, K. Frank

    1972-01-01

    The immunologic release of histamine and slow reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) from human lung tissue can be enhanced by stimulation with either alpha adrenergic agents (phenylephrine or norepinephrine in the presence of propranolol) or cholinergic agents (acetylcholine or Carbachol). The finding that atropine prevents cholinergic but not comparable alpha adrenergic enhancement is consistent with the view that cholinergic and alpha adrenergic agonists interact with separate receptor sites on the target cells involved in the immunologic release of chemical mediators. The consistent qualitative relationship between the antigen-induced release of mediators and the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) as measured by the isolation of 14C-labeled cyclic AMP after incorporation of adenine-14C into the tissues or by the cyclic AMP binding protein assay suggests that changes in the level of this cyclic nucleotide mediate adrenergic modulation of the release of histamine and SRS-A. The addition of 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP) produces an enhancement of the immunologic release of mediators while dibutyryl cyclic AMP is inhibitory. As cholinergic-induced enhancement was not associated with a measurable change in the levels of cyclic AMP, the possibility is suggested that cyclic GMP may be the intracellular mediator of cholinergic-induced enhancement of the immunologic release of histamine and SRS-A. PMID:4115132

  3. Do OH radicals react with organic substances in gamma-irradiated frozen cells of golden hamster embryo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Toru; Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Mochizuki, Shigehiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Watanabe, Masami

    Reactivity of OH radicals, produced by γ-irradiation, in golden hamster embryo (GHE) cells and in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solutions containing nuclei of the GHE cells was studied at 77 and 111 K by ESR spectroscopy. Since OH radicals do not diffuse in frozen cells at 77 K, they do not react with organic substances, such as protein and DNA, in the cells at 77 K. The efficiency of production and trapping of OH radicals at high concentration of organic substances in cells are the same as that at low concentration. Thus OH radicals produced near the organic substances do not react with them, being trapped at 77 K. When GHE cells or PBS-nuclei solutions are irradiated by γ-rays at 77 K and then warmed to 111 K, OH radicals decay fast, while the amounts of organic radicals remain constant at this temperature. These results indicate that OH radicals do not react with organic substances in γ-irradiated cells during warming of the irradiated cells. Therefore it was concluded that OH radicals are not the main reactive species responsible for biological effects in γ-irradiated frozen cells.

  4. Effect of reacted acidic monomer with calcium on bonding performance.

    PubMed

    Fujita, K; Ma, S; Aida, M; Maeda, T; Ikemi, T; Hirata, M; Nishiyama, N

    2011-05-01

    We determined the number of reacted and unreacted 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) molecules with calcium during the demineralization process of hydroxyapatite or dentin by 10-MDP-based one-step (Clearfil Tri-S Bond, TS) or two-step self-etch adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond Primer, SE). We then examined the effects of the number of reacted and/or unreacted 10-MDP molecules on the initial bond strength and bond durability of the resultant adhesive layer. The null hypotheses were that (1) the etching efficacy of tooth apatite by 10-MDP used in TS was the same as that in SE, and (2) the unreacted 10-MDP polymer included within the adhesive layer does not affect bond durability. Addition of hydroxyapatite or dentin to the TS and SE resulted in decreases in the NMR peak intensities for 10-MDP. The peak intensity for 10-MDP showed a greater reduction in SE than in TS, consistent with the observation that SE provided significantly higher initial mean bond strengths than TS. Further, the unreacted 10-MDP polymer within the adhesive layer did not decrease the mean bond strength, despite the application of 20,000x thermo-cycling.

  5. Sea salt particles react with organic acids in atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-10-01

    Sea salt, or sodium chloride (NaCl), particles lofted into the atmosphere by the motion of ocean waves affect atmospheric chemistry; these particles can undergo reactions with trace atmospheric gases and internal mixing with anthropogenic pollutants depositing on particle surface. Several studies have found that NaCl particles in the atmosphere are depleted in chloride and have attributed this to reactions with inorganic acids. However, reactions with inorganic acids do not fully account for the observed chloride depletion in some locations; it has been suggested that organic acids, likely of anthropogenic origin, may also play a role in chloride depletion, but results have been uncertain.

  6. Linoleic acid hydroperoxide reacts with hypochlorous acid, generating peroxyl radical intermediates and singlet molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Sayuri; Martinez, Glaucia R; Rettori, Daniel; Augusto, Ohara; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2006-01-10

    The reaction of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) with hydrogen peroxide is known to generate stoichiometric amounts of singlet molecular oxygen [O2 (1Deltag)]. This study shows that HOCl can also react with linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LAOOH), generating O2 (1Deltag) with a yield of 13 +/- 2% at physiological pH. Characteristic light emission at 1,270 nm, corresponding to O2 (1Deltag) monomolecular decay, was observed when HOCl was reacted with LAOOH or with liposomes containing phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxides, but not with cumene hydroperoxide or tert-butyl hydroperoxide. The generation of O2 (1Deltag) was confirmed by the acquisition of the spectrum of the light emitted in the near-infrared region showing a band with maximum intensity at 1,270 nm and by the observation of the enhancing effect of deuterium oxide and the quenching effect of sodium azide. Mechanistic studies using 18O-labeled linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LA18O18OH) showed that its reaction with HOCl yields 18O-labeled O2 (1Deltag) [18O2 (1Deltag)], demonstrating that the oxygen atoms in O2 (1Deltag) are derived from the hydroperoxide group. Direct analysis of radical intermediates in the reaction of LAOOH with HOCl by continuous-flow electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showed a doublet signal with a g-value of 2.014 and a hyperfine coupling constant from the alpha-hydrogen of a(H) = 4.3 G, indicating the formation of peroxyl radicals. Taken together, our results clearly demonstrate that HOCl reacts with biologically relevant lipid hydroperoxides, generating O2 (1Deltag). In addition, the detection of 18O2 (1Deltag) and peroxyl radicals strongly supports the involvement of a Russell mechanism in the generation of O2 (1Deltag).

  7. Differential effect of cyclo-oxygenase inhibition on antigen- and ionophore-induced release of slow reacting substance from fragmented guinea-pig lung.

    PubMed Central

    Krell, R. D.; Kusner, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) indomethacin and mefenamic acid, at concentrations ranging from 3 microM to 18 microM, enhanced antigen-induced slow reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) release from sensitized fragmented guinea-pig lung. In contrast, these agents had no effect on SRS-A release from nonsensitized guinea-pig lung induced by several concentrations of the calcium ionophore, A23187. Neither increasing preincubation time with the NSAID nor the use of sensitized tissue resulted in an enhancement of A23187-induced SRS-A release by indomethacin. NSAID did not alter histamine release by either stimulus. These results suggest that antigen and A23187 induce SRS-A release from different sources or by different mechanisms in guinea-pig lung. PMID:6434013

  8. Reacting to "Reacting"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houle, Amanda

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the author's experiences as a student participating in a general education program called "Reacting to the Past," in which college students play elaborate games set at pivotal moments in the past, their roles informed by great texts. She found that the experience of reenacting pivotal historical moments produced an intensely…

  9. Morphological changes of olivine grains reacted with amino acid solutions by impact process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Yuhei; Takase, Atsushi; Fukunaga, Nao; Sekine, Toshimori; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2016-10-01

    Early oceans on Earth might have contained certain amounts of biomolecules such as amino acids, and they were subjected to meteorite impacts, especially during the late heavy bombardment. We performed shock recovery experiments by using a propellant gun in order to simulate shock reactions among olivine as a representative meteorite component, water and biomolecules in oceans in the process of marine meteorite impacts. In the present study, recovered solid samples were analyzed by using X-ray powder diffraction method, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The analytical results on shocked products in the recovered sample showed (1) morphological changes of olivine to fiber- and bamboo shoot-like crystals, and to pulverized grains; and features of lumpy surfaces affected by hot water, (2) the formation of carbon-rich substances derived from amino acids, and (3) the incorporation of metals from container into samples. According to the present results, fine-grained olivine in meteorites might have morphologically changed and shock-induced chemical reactions might have been enhanced so that amino acids related to the origin of life may have transformed to carbon-rich substances by impacts.

  10. Morphological changes of olivine grains reacted with amino acid solutions by impact process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Yuhei; Takase, Atsushi; Fukunaga, Nao; Sekine, Toshimori; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    Early oceans on Earth might have contained certain amounts of biomolecules such as amino acids, and they were subjected to meteorite impacts, especially during the late heavy bombardment. We performed shock recovery experiments by using a propellant gun in order to simulate shock reactions among olivine as a representative meteorite component, water and biomolecules in oceans in the process of marine meteorite impacts. In the present study, recovered solid samples were analyzed by using X-ray powder diffraction method, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The analytical results on shocked products in the recovered sample showed (1) morphological changes of olivine to fiber- and bamboo shoot-like crystals, and to pulverized grains; and features of lumpy surfaces affected by hot water, (2) the formation of carbon-rich substances derived from amino acids, and (3) the incorporation of metals from container into samples. According to the present results, fine-grained olivine in meteorites might have morphologically changed and shock-induced chemical reactions might have been enhanced so that amino acids related to the origin of life may have transformed to carbon-rich substances by impacts.

  11. Synthesis of Nanocrystalline CdS Quantum Dots via Paraffin Liquid as Solvent and Oleic Acid as the Reacting Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjiang; Wang, Mingrui; Xie, Fei; Zhu, Sha; Zhao, Yue

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals have been widely used as fluorescent materials in chemical sensors, biotechnology, medical diagnostics, biological imaging and many other fields. Compared to the conventional organic fluorophores, the inorganic quantum dots (QDs) have many advantages, including broad absorption spectra, narrow emission spectra, good photostability and long fluorescent lifetime after excitation. Here, the high quality CdS QDs were synthesized directly from sulfur and CdO using the paraffin liquid as solvent and the oleic acid as the reacting media. The synthesized CdS QDs with a zinc blende (cubic) crystal structure were proved by X-ray diffraction. HRTEM observation revealed that the CdS QDs were uniform and the average grain size was about 4 nm. The optical properties of the CdS QDs were characterized by using photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometer and Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectrophotometer. The formation mechanism of CdS QDs in the paraffin liquid and oleic acid system was proposed.

  12. Biological activity of silylated amino acid containing substance P analogues.

    PubMed

    Cavelier, F; Marchand, D; Martinez, J; Sagan, S

    2004-03-01

    The need to replace natural amino acids in peptides with nonproteinogenic counterparts to obtain new medicinal agents has stimulated a great deal of innovation on synthetic methods. Here, we report the incorporation of non-natural silylated amino acids in substance P (SP), the binding affinity for the two hNK-1 binding sites and, the potency to stimulate phospholipase C (PLC) and adenylate cyclase of the resulting peptide. We also assess the improvement of their stability towards enzyme degradation. Altogether, we found that replacing glycine with silaproline (Sip) in position 9 of SP leads to a potent analogue exhibiting an increased resistance to angiotensin-converting enzyme hydrolysis.

  13. Boric acid as reference substance: pros, cons and standardization.

    PubMed

    Amorim, M J B; Natal-da-Luz, T; Sousa, J P; Loureiro, S; Becker, L; Römbke, J; Soares, A M V M

    2012-04-01

    Boric acid (BA) has been successfully used as reference substance in some standard test guidelines. Due to the fact that previously selected reference substances present a significant risk to human health and/or are banned for environmental reasons, BA is being discussed for broader adoption in OECD or ISO guidelines. To provide input on BA data and contribute to the discussion on its suitability as a reference substance, in the present study BA was tested with two standard soil organisms, Enchytraeus albidus and Folsomia candida, in terms of survival, reproduction and avoidance. Additionally, published data on other organisms was analysed to derive the most sensitive soil dwelling invertebrate (hazard concentration-HC5). Results showed that BA affected the tested organisms, being two times more toxic for collembolans (LC50 = 96; EC50 = 54 mg/kg) than for enchytraeids (LC50 = 325; EC50 = 104 mg/kg). No avoidance behaviour occurred despite the fact that BA affects earthworms. Actually, it is the recommended reference substance for the earthworm avoidance test. Clearly, the suitable performance of BA in one species should not be generalized to other species. Absolute toxicity is not an important criterion for the selection of a reference substance, but it has been proposed that effects should occur within a reasonable range, i.e. <1,000 mg/kg. We could confirm, compiling previous data that for most soil invertebrates, the EC50 is expected to be below 1,000 mg/kg. From these data it could be derived that the most sensitive soil dwelling invertebrate (HC5, 50%) is likely to be affected (EC10) at 28 (8-53) mg H(3)BO(3)/Kg, equivalent to 4.6 (1.4-8.7) mg boron/kg.

  14. Labile aggregation stimulating substance, free fatty acids, and platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, J M; White, J G; Krivit, W

    1976-01-01

    Labile aggregation stimulating substance (LASS), an intermediate produced during platelet biosynthesis of PGE2 and PGF2alpha, acts as a physiologic intercellular messenger to promote platelet aggregation and the release reaction. The activity is formed by intact cells after physiologic stimulation or can be generated from platelet membrane fractions after combination with arachidonate. In the present investigation, small amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids added to an incubation mixture of platelet microsomes and arachidonate were found to significantly inhibit subsequent platelet aggregation. Saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids in the same concentrations were without effect. However, in higher concentrations mono-unsaturated fatty acids were found to be inhibitory and stearic acid was found to enhance subsequent platelet aggregation. The inhibition caused by the polyunsaturated fatty acid, linoleate, was shown to be the result of an effect on the production of LASS through an interaction with the platelet enzyme responsible for conversion of arachidonate to LASS. In contrast, stearic acid was found to enhance platelet aggregation by acting on the platelets and not directly on LASS production. The results suggest that small changes in the fatty acid composition of platelet phospholipids could significantly influence platelet reactivity.

  15. [The substance of genetic information--nucleic acids].

    PubMed

    Brdička, R

    2012-01-01

    If we look at the history of our knowledge of nucleic acids, we would see in the distant past of 140 years Friedrich Miescher who had identified the acidic substance within the cell nucleus, which he called nuclein. About 70 years after his initial observation, this substance was connected with genetic information. This very substantial finding happened during the World War II. This was the impulse that research of nucleic acids received to speed up continuously growing mountain of information, which is more and more difficult to understand. Another eruption of new information about our genome was the result of ten years of intensive cooperation of many manufacturers divided into two competitive blocks which offered us knowledge of nucleotide sequence of all 46 DNA molecules. The year 2000 became the landmark marking the start of the postgenomic era. It did not mean that human genome was totally explored, but the cornerstone has been settled. Since then, we could concentrate our efforts on variability; use of the project of 1,000 genomes brought many important findings, eg. copy number variability (CNV) exceeds the single nucleotide polymophisms (SNP). Also intergenomic relationships, studies on function and pathways began to be much more understandable by elucidation of the genome primary structure. NGS as a tool also accelerated the epigenetic research. All this improved molecular diagnostics by discovering many new markers playing their role in disease and treatment and allowed us to enter the field of multifactorial illnesses including cancer. The progress in diagnostic technologies which has happened during the last decade forced our research teams to include other professions - eg. bioinformatics.

  16. Dissolution stoichiometry and adsorption of alkali and alkaline earth elements to the acid-reacted wollastonite surface at 25°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhixin; Walther, John V.

    1994-06-01

    The Ca 2+/H + exchange reaction on the wollastonite surface was investigated at 25°C with both short-term (<2.5 h) and long-term (>48 h) dissolution studies. In acidic solutions, the dissolution of wollastonite is nonstoichiometric with a greater release of Ca than Si relative to the wollastonite stoichiometry. Both short-term and long-term Ca 2+/H + exchange reaction stoichiometries are 0.5. Rapid desorption of Ca 2+ from the surface of untreated wollastonite caused a rise of the suspension pH to about 10 in a couple of minutes. Therefore, potentiometric titrations were performed with an acidreacted wollastonite where most surface detachable Ca 2+ had been removed. Addition of alkali and alkaline earth metal chloride solutions to the acid-reacted wollastonite suspension results in a pH decrease with K +> Na + > Ba 2+ > Mg 2+ > Ca 2+ in equal molal solutions. This suggests that the cations in these solutions are adsorbed to the wollastonite surface. Surface protonation properties of the acid-reacted wollastonite are found to be similar to those of microporous silica but with the point of zero salt effect (pzse) of 4.5-5.5 rather than the 3.0 of microporous silica. The surface protonation-deprotonation as a function of pH is modeled with a one-site double layer model which includes Na adsorption from the background electrolyte to reasonable accuracy. The adsorption of CrO 42-, MoO 42-, Ca 2+, Mg 2+, Ba 2+, and Na + from aqueous solutions to the acidreacted wollastonite/water interface was determined as a function of the pH and ionic strength of the solution. CrO 42- and MoO 42- were not adsorbed to the wollastonite surface at pH above 3. The extent of cation adsorption increases with increasing pH and decreases with increasing ionic strength. Ca 2+ adsorption depends on both the surface area of wollastonite and total amount of Ca 2+ in the suspension. For alkaline earth metals at the same concentration, the adsorption sequence is Ba 2+> Ca 2+> Mg 2+. At pH 8.5, the

  17. Vinylboronic Acids as Fast Reacting, Synthetically Accessible, and Stable Bioorthogonal Reactants in the Carboni–Lindsey Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Eising, Selma; Lelivelt, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bioorthogonal reactions are widely used for the chemical modification of biomolecules. The application of vinylboronic acids (VBAs) as non‐strained, synthetically accessible and water‐soluble reaction partners in a bioorthogonal inverse electron‐demand Diels–Alder (iEDDA) reaction with 3,6‐dipyridyl‐s‐tetrazines is described. Depending on the substituents, VBA derivatives give second‐order rate constants up to 27 m −1 s−1 in aqueous environments at room temperature, which is suitable for biological labeling applications. The VBAs are shown to be biocompatible, non‐toxic, and highly stable in aqueous media and cell lysate. Furthermore, VBAs can be used orthogonally to the strain‐promoted alkyne–azide cycloaddition for protein modification, making them attractive complements to the bioorthogonal molecular toolbox. PMID:27605057

  18. Structure and oxidation state of hemitite surfaces reacted with aqueous Fe(II) at acidic and neutral pH.

    SciTech Connect

    Catalano, J. G.; Fenter, P.; Park, C.; Zhang, Z.; Rosso, K. M.; Washington Univ.; PNNL

    2010-01-01

    Structural changes and surface oxidation state were examined following the reaction of hematite (0 0 1), (0 1 2), and (1 1 0) with aqueous Fe(II). X-ray reflectivity measurements indicated that Fe(II) induces changes in the structure of all three surfaces under both acidic (pH 3) and neutral (pH 7) conditions. The structural changes were generally independent of pH although the extent of surface transformation varied slightly between acidic and neutral conditions; no systematic trends with pH were observed. Induced changes on the (1 1 0) and (0 1 2) surfaces include the addition or removal of partial surface layers consistent with either growth or dissolution. In contrast, a <1 nm thick, discontinuous film formed on the (0 0 1) surface that appears to be epitaxial yet is not a perfect extension of the underlying hematite lattice, being either structurally defective, compositionally distinct, or nanoscale in size and highly relaxed. Resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity measurements determined that the surface concentration of Fe(II) present after reaction at pH 7 was below the detection limit of approximately 0.5-1 {micro}mol/m{sup 2} on all surfaces. These observations are consistent with Fe(II) oxidative adsorption, whereby adsorbed Fe(II) is oxidized by structural Fe(III) in the hematite lattice, with the extent of this reaction controlled by surface structure at the atomic scale. The observed surface transformations at pH 3 show that Fe(II) oxidatively adsorbs on hematite surfaces at pH values where little net adsorption occurs, based on historical macroscopic Fe(II) adsorption behavior on fine-grained hematite powders. This suggests that Fe(II) plays a catalytic role, in which an electron from an adsorbed Fe(II) migrates to and reduces a lattice Fe(III) cation elsewhere, which subsequently desorbs in a scenario with zero net reduction and zero net adsorption. Given the general pH-independence and substantial mass transfer involved, this electron and atom

  19. Structure and oxidation state of hematite surfaces reacted with aqueous Fe(II) at acidic and neutral pH

    SciTech Connect

    Catalano, Jeffrey G.; Fenter, Paul; Park, Changyong; Zhang, Zhan; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2010-03-01

    Structural changes and surface oxidation state were examined following the reaction of hematite (0 0 1), (0 1 2), and (1 1 0) with aqueous Fe(II). X-ray reflectivity measurements indicated that Fe(II) induces changes in the structure of all three surfaces under both acidic (pH 3) and neutral (pH 7) conditions. The structural changes were generally independent of pH although the extent of surface transformation varied slightly between acidic and neutral conditions; no systematic trends with pH were observed. Induced changes on the (1 1 0) and (0 1 2) surfaces include the addition or removal of partial surface layers consistent with either growth or dissolution. In contrast, a <1 nm thick, discontinuous film formed on the (0 0 1) surface that appears to be epitaxial yet is not a perfect extension of the underlying hematite lattice, being either structurally defective, compositionally distinct, or nanoscale in size and highly relaxed. Resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity measurements determined that the surface concentration of Fe(II) present after reaction at pH 7 was below the detection limit of approximately 0.5–1 μmol/m2 on all surfaces. These observations are consistent with Fe(II) oxidative adsorption, whereby adsorbed Fe(II) is oxidized by structural Fe(III) in the hematite lattice, with the extent of this reaction controlled by surface structure at the atomic scale. The observed surface transformations at pH 3 show that Fe(II) oxidatively adsorbs on hematite surfaces at pH values where little net adsorption occurs, based on historical macroscopic Fe(II) adsorption behavior on fine-grained hematite powders. This suggests that Fe(II) plays a catalytic role, in which an electron from an adsorbed Fe(II) migrates to and reduces a lattice Fe(III) cation elsewhere, which subsequently desorbs in a scenario with zero net reduction and zero net adsorption. Finally, given the general pH-independence and substantial mass transfer involved, this electron and

  20. A fungal catalase reacts selectively with the 13S fatty acid hydroperoxide products of the adjacent lipoxygenase gene and exhibits 13S-hydroperoxide-dependent peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Teder, Tarvi; Boeglin, William E; Schneider, Claus; Brash, Alan R

    2017-03-28

    The genome of the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum harbors six catalases, one of which has the sequence characteristics of a fatty acid peroxide-metabolizing catalase. We cloned and expressed this hemoprotein (designated as Fg-cat) along with its immediate neighbor, a 13S-lipoxygenase (cf. Brodhun et al., PloS One, e64919, 2013) that we considered might supply a fatty acid hydroperoxide substrate. Indeed, Fg-cat reacts abruptly with the 13S-hydroperoxide of linoleic acid (13S-HPODE) with an initial rate of 700-1300s(-1). By comparison there was no reaction with 9R- or 9S-HPODEs and extremely weak reaction with 13R-HPODE (~0.5% of the rate with 13S-HPODE). Although we considered Fg-cat as a candidate for the allene oxide synthase of the jasmonate pathway in fungi, the main product formed from 13S-HPODE was identified by UV, MS, and NMR as 9-oxo-10E-12,13-cis-epoxy-octadecenoic acid (with no traces of AOS activity). The corresponding analog is formed from the 13S-hydroperoxide of α-linolenic acid along with novel diepoxy-ketones and two C13 aldehyde derivatives, the reaction mechanisms of which are proposed. In a peroxidase assay monitoring the oxidation of ABTS, Fg-cat exhibited robust activity (kcat 550s(-1)) using the 13S-hydroperoxy-C18 fatty acids as the oxidizing co-substrate. There was no detectable peroxidase activity using the corresponding 9S-hydroperoxides, nor with t-butyl hydroperoxide, and very weak activity with H2O2 or cumene hydroperoxide at micromolar concentrations of Fg-cat. Fg-cat and the associated lipoxygenase gene are present together in fungal genera Fusarium, Metarhizium and Fonsecaea and appear to constitute a partnership for oxidations in fungal metabolism or defense.

  1. Cloning and expression of two distinct high-affinity receptors cross-reacting with acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, C A; Crumley, G; Bellot, F; Kaplow, J M; Searfoss, G; Ruta, M; Burgess, W H; Jaye, M; Schlessinger, J

    1990-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family consists of at least seven closely related polypeptide mitogens which exert their activities by binding and activation of specific cell surface receptors. Unanswered questions have been whether there are multiple FGF receptors and what factors determine binding specificity and biological response. We report the complete cDNA cloning of two human genes previously designated flg and bek. These genes encode two similar but distinct cell surface receptors comprised of an extracellular domain with three immunoglobulin-like regions, a single transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic portion containing a tyrosine kinase domain with a typical kinase insert. The expression of these two cDNAs in transfected NIH 3T3 cells led to the biosynthesis of proteins of 150 kd and 135 kd for flg and bek, respectively. Direct binding experiments with radiolabeled acidic FGF (aFGF) or basic FGF (bFGF), inhibition of binding with native growth factors, and Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated that bek and flg bind either aFGF or bFGF with dissociation constants of (2-15) x 10(-11) M. The high affinity binding of two distinct growth factors to each of two different receptors represents a unique double redundancy without precedence among polypeptide growth factor-receptor interactions. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1697263

  2. Aromatic Amino Acids and Related Substances: Chemistry, Biology, Medicine, and Application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On the occasion of the "Transdisciplinary International Conference on Aromatic Amino Acids and Related Substances," the organizing committee honors and thanks the expert participants from many areas of aromatic amino acid (AAA)3 research. In this transdisciplinary meeting, "aromatic paradigms" were ...

  3. STUDENT AWARD FINALIST: Plasma Acid: A Chemically and Physically Metastable Substance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shainsky, Natalie; Dobrynin, Danil; Ercan, Utku; Joshi, Suresh; Brooks, Ari; Ji, Haifeng; Fridman, Gregory; Cho, Young; Fridman, Alexander; Friedman, Gennady

    2011-10-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge applied to the surface of a liquid creates a chemically and physically metastable substance. The properties and lifetime of the substance depend on the treatment conditions such as gas atmosphere and liquid medium used, treatment dose, and other parameters. When deionized water is used, the metastable substance becomes a strong oxidizer. We show that direct exposure of deionized water to neutral and charged species produced in plasma creates a strong oxidizer and acidic substance in this water which, for the lack of a better term, we termed plasma acid. Plasma acid can remain stable for relatively long time and its oxidizing power may be linked to the significant lowering of its pH. We report experiments that demonstrate plasma acid's metastability. We also show that observed pH of as low as 2.0 cannot be completely accounted for by the production of nitric acid; and that the conjugate base derived from superoxide is at least partly responsible for both, lowering of the pH and increase in the oxidizing power of the solution.

  4. Characterization and diagenesis of strong-acid carboxyl groups in humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Brown, G.K.; Reddy, M.M.

    2003-01-01

    A small fraction of carboxylic acid functional groups in humic substances are exceptionally acidic with pKa values as low as 0.5. A review of acid-group theory eliminated most models and explanations for these exceptionally acidic carboxyl groups. These acidic carboxyl groups in Suwannee River fulvic acid were enriched by a 2-stage fractionation process and the fractions were characterized by elemental, molecular-weight, and titrimetric analyses, and by infrared and 13C- and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. An average structural model of the most acidic fraction derived from the characterization data indicated a high density of carboxyl groups clustered on oxygen-heterocycle alicyclic rings. Intramolecular H-bonding between adjacent carboxyl groups in these ring structures enhanced stabilization of the carboxylate anion which results in low pKa1 values. The standard, tetrahydrofuran tetracarboxylic acid, was shown to have similar acidity characteristics to the highly acidic fulvic acid fraction. The end products of 3 known diagenetic pathways for the formation of humic substances were shown to result in carboxyl groups clustered on oxygen-heterocycle alicyclic rings.

  5. Binding of bile acids by pastry products containing bioactive substances during in vitro digestion.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Górecka, Danuta; Szwengiel, Artur; Smoczyńska, Paulina; Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Komolka, Patrycja

    2015-03-01

    The modern day consumer tends to choose products with health enhancing properties, enriched in bioactive substances. One such bioactive food component is dietary fibre, which shows a number of physiological properties including the binding of bile acids. Dietary fibre should be contained in everyday, easily accessible food products. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine sorption capacities of primary bile acid (cholic acid - CA) and secondary bile acids (deoxycholic - DCA and lithocholic acids - LCA) by muffins (BM) and cookies (BC) with bioactive substances and control muffins (CM) and cookies (CC) in two sections of the in vitro gastrointestinal tract. Variations in gut flora were also analysed in the process of in vitro digestion of pastry products in a bioreactor. Enzymes: pepsin, pancreatin and bile salts: cholic acid, deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid were added to the culture. Faecal bacteria, isolated from human large intestine, were added in the section of large intestine. The influence of dietary fibre content in cookies and concentration of bile acids in two stages of digestion were analysed. Generally, pastry goods with bioactive substances were characterized by a higher content of total fibre compared with the control samples. These products also differ in the profile of dietary fibre fractions. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed that the bile acid profile after two stages of digestion depends on the quality and quantity of fibre. The bile acid profile after digestion of BM and BC forms one cluster, and with the CM and CC forms a separate cluster. High concentration of H (hemicellulose) is positively correlated with LCA (low binding effect) and negatively correlated with CA and DCA contents. The relative content of bile acids in the second stage of digestion was in some cases above the content in the control sample, particularly LCA. This means that the bacteria introduced in the 2nd stage of digestion synthesize the LCA.

  6. Semipreparative isolation of dehydrodiferulic and dehydrotriferulic acids as standard substances from maize bran.

    PubMed

    Bunzel, Mirko; Funk, Carola; Steinhart, Hans

    2004-09-01

    A method for the isolation of diferulic and triferulic acids in quantities and purity that comply with the requirements for their use as standard substances was developed. The procedure includes alkaline hydrolysis of destarched maize bran and ether extraction of liberated phenolic compounds. Following a first purification by liquid-liquid extraction Sephadex LH-20 chromatography is performed. This step is the core of the method and allows the separation of monomeric and dimeric/trimeric substances. A good pre-separation of di- and triferulic acids (purity in most cases >75%) is also achieved. Further separation and purification is carried out by semipreparative RP18-HPLC. Using this rapid, easy to handle, and moderately priced separation procedure it is possible to obtain approx. 41 mg 8-O-4'-diferulic acid, 27 mg 5-5'-diferulic acid, 12 mg 8-5'-diferulic acid (benzofuran form), 16 mg 8-5'-diferulic acid (open form), 11 mg 8-5'-diferulic acid (decarboxylated form), 7 mg 8-8'-diferulic acid (cyclic form), 5 mg 8-8'-diferulic acid (open form), and 10 mg 5-5',8'-O-4"-triferulic acid out of 20 g destarched maize bran. The incorporation of minor modifications allows a further upscaling of this procedure.

  7. Chemical reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mularz, Edward J.; Sockol, Peter M.

    1990-02-01

    Future aerospace propulsion concepts involve the combustion of liquid or gaseous fuels in a highly turbulent internal airstream. Accurate predictive computer codes which can simulate the fluid mechanics, chemistry, and turbulence-combustion interaction of these chemical reacting flows will be a new tool that is needed in the design of these future propulsion concepts. Experimental and code development research is being performed at LeRC to better understand chemical reacting flows with the long-term goal of establishing these reliable computer codes. Our approach to understand chemical reacting flows is to look at separate, more simple parts of this complex phenomenon as well as to study the full turbulent reacting flow process. As a result, we are engaged in research on the fluid mechanics associated with chemical reacting flows. We are also studying the chemistry of fuel-air combustion. Finally, we are investigating the phenomenon of turbulence-combustion interaction. Research, both experimental and analytical, is highlighted in each of these three major areas.

  8. Chemical reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, Edward J.; Sockol, Peter M.

    1990-01-01

    Future aerospace propulsion concepts involve the combustion of liquid or gaseous fuels in a highly turbulent internal airstream. Accurate predictive computer codes which can simulate the fluid mechanics, chemistry, and turbulence-combustion interaction of these chemical reacting flows will be a new tool that is needed in the design of these future propulsion concepts. Experimental and code development research is being performed at LeRC to better understand chemical reacting flows with the long-term goal of establishing these reliable computer codes. Our approach to understand chemical reacting flows is to look at separate, more simple parts of this complex phenomenon as well as to study the full turbulent reacting flow process. As a result, we are engaged in research on the fluid mechanics associated with chemical reacting flows. We are also studying the chemistry of fuel-air combustion. Finally, we are investigating the phenomenon of turbulence-combustion interaction. Research, both experimental and analytical, is highlighted in each of these three major areas.

  9. Chemical reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, Edward J.; Sockol, Peter M.

    1987-01-01

    Future aerospace propulsion concepts involve the combination of liquid or gaseous fuels in a highly turbulent internal air stream. Accurate predictive computer codes which can simulate the fluid mechanics, chemistry, and turbulence combustion interaction of these chemical reacting flows will be a new tool that is needed in the design of these future propulsion concepts. Experimental and code development research is being performed at Lewis to better understand chemical reacting flows with the long term goal of establishing these reliable computer codes. The approach to understanding chemical reacting flows is to look at separate simple parts of this complex phenomena as well as to study the full turbulent reacting flow process. As a result research on the fluid mechanics associated with chemical reacting flows was initiated. The chemistry of fuel-air combustion is also being studied. Finally, the phenomena of turbulence-combustion interaction is being investigated. This presentation will highlight research, both experimental and analytical, in each of these three major areas.

  10. [Effects of Algicidal Substance on Phaeocystis globosa and Its Fatty Acids by the Simulation Experiment].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiu-chan; Zhao, Ling; Yin, Ping-he; Tan, Shuo; Shu, Wan-jiao; Hou, Shao-ling

    2015-09-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of algicidal substance on Phaeocystis globosa (P. globosa) and its algal toxin-fatty acids, the changes of chlorophyll-a, pH, dissolved oxygen, permanganate index and N, P concentration were evaluated by the simulation experiment. Fatty acids composition in P. globosa was detected by GC-MS. After adding algicidal substance in simulative water with the volume ratio 1: 100, the levels of chlorophyll-a, pH and permanganate index were reduced, while the concentrations of dissolved oxygen and N, P were increased significantly within 14 days. Comparing with control group after 14 days, pH was reduced to 7. 51 from 8. 50, chlorophyll-a and permanganate index were reduced by 82. 3% (P < 0. 05) and 55. 2% (P < 0. 01), respectively. Dissolved oxygen was significantly increased by 29. 5% (P < 0. 05). The concentrations of NH4+ -N, NO2- -N, NO3- -N and PO(4)3- -P were respectively 0. 46, 1. 50 , 6. 24 and 1. 30 times higher than that in control group. 14 days after the addition of algicidal substance, the total fatty acids of P. globosa were reduced by 83. 4%. The major fatty acids C18:2, C16:0, and C18:1, were reduced by 100%, 97. 7% and 85. 4% (P <0. 01), respectively. Our results indicated that algicidal substance from Bacillus sp. BI can effectively inhibit the growth of P. globosa and reduce the concentration of algal toxin-fatty acid in the simulation experiment. This study provides a theoretical basis for ecological safety of algicidal substance form Bacillus sp. strain Bl.

  11. Nimbolide B and nimbic acid B, phytotoxic substances in neem leaves with allelopathic activity.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Salam, Md Abdus; Ohno, Osamu; Suenaga, Kiyotake

    2014-05-26

    Neem (Azadirachta indica) has been widely used as a traditional medicine and several bioactive compounds have been isolated from this species, but to date no potent allelopathic active substance has been reported. Therefore, we investigated possible allelopathic property and phytotoxic substances with allelopathic activity in neem. An aqueous methanol extract of neem leaves inhibited the growth of roots and shoots of cress, lettuce, alfalfa, timothy, crabgrass, ryegrass, barnyard grass and jungle rice. The extracts were then purified by several chromatographic runs while monitoring the inhibitory activity and two phytotoxic substances were isolated. The chemical structures of the two substances were determined by spectral data to correspond to novel compounds, nimbolide B (1) and nimbic acid B (2). Nimbolide B inhibited the growth of cress and barnyard grass at concentrations greater than 0.1‒3.0 μM. Nimbic acid B inhibited the growth of cress and barnyard grass at concentrations greater than 0.3-1.0 μM. These results suggest that nimbolide B and nimbic acid B may contribute to the allelopathic effects caused by neem leaves.

  12. Antitumor activity of palmitic acid found as a selective cytotoxic substance in a marine red alga.

    PubMed

    Harada, Hideki; Yamashita, Uki; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Fukushi, Eri; Kawabata, Jun; Kamei, Yuto

    2002-01-01

    In a previous report, we discussed an extract from a marine red alga, Amphiroa zonata, which shows selective cytotoxic activity to human leukemic cells, but no cytotoxicity to normal human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells in vitro. In this study, we identified palmitic acid, a selective cytotoxic substance from the marine algal extract, and investigated its biological activities. At concentrations ranging from 12.5 to 50 micrograms/ml, palmitic acid shows selective cytotoxicity to human leukemic cells, but no cytotoxicity to normal HDF cells. Furthermore, palmitic acid induces apoptosis in the human leukemic cell line MOLT-4 at 50 micrograms/ml. Palmitic acid also shows in vivo antitumor activity in mice. One molecular target of palmitic acid in tumor cells is DNA topoisomerase I, however, interestingly, it does not affect DNA topoisomerase II, suggesting that palmitic acid may be a lead compound of anticancer drugs.

  13. Computational reacting gas dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, S. H.

    1993-01-01

    In the study of high speed flows at high altitudes, such as that encountered by re-entry spacecrafts, the interaction of chemical reactions and other non-equilibrium processes in the flow field with the gas dynamics is crucial. Generally speaking, problems of this level of complexity must resort to numerical methods for solutions, using sophisticated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. The difficulties introduced by reacting gas dynamics can be classified into three distinct headings: (1) the usually inadequate knowledge of the reaction rate coefficients in the non-equilibrium reaction system; (2) the vastly larger number of unknowns involved in the computation and the expected stiffness of the equations; and (3) the interpretation of the detailed reacting CFD numerical results. The research performed accepts the premise that reacting flows of practical interest in the future will in general be too complex or 'untractable' for traditional analytical developments. The power of modern computers must be exploited. However, instead of focusing solely on the construction of numerical solutions of full-model equations, attention is also directed to the 'derivation' of the simplified model from the given full-model. In other words, the present research aims to utilize computations to do tasks which have traditionally been done by skilled theoreticians: to reduce an originally complex full-model system into an approximate but otherwise equivalent simplified model system. The tacit assumption is that once the appropriate simplified model is derived, the interpretation of the detailed numerical reacting CFD numerical results will become much easier. The approach of the research is called computational singular perturbation (CSP).

  14. A Simple Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances in Fried Fast Foods.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Alam; Ullah, Fareed

    2016-01-01

    A simple and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) as a marker for lipid peroxidation in fried fast foods. The method uses the reaction of malondialdehyde (MDA) and TBA in the glacial acetic acid medium. The method was precise, sensitive, and highly reproducible for quantitative determination of TBARS. The precision of extractions and analytical procedure was very high as compared to the reported methods. The method was used to determine the TBARS contents in the fried fast foods such as Shami kebab, samosa, fried bread, and potato chips. Shami kebab, samosa, and potato chips have higher amount of TBARS in glacial acetic acid-water extraction system than their corresponding pure glacial acetic acid and vice versa in fried bread samples. The method can successfully be used for the determination of TBARS in other food matrices, especially in quality control of food industries.

  15. Interaction of metal ions with acid sites of biosorbents peat moss and Vaucheria and model substances alginic and humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Crist, R.H.; Martin, J.R.; Crist, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    The interaction between added metal ions and acid sites of two biosorbents, peat moss and the alga Vaucheria, was studied. Results were interpreted in terms of two model substances, alginic acid, a copolymer of guluronic and mannuronic acids present in marine algae, and humic acid in peat moss. For peat moss and Vaucheria at pH 4--6, two protons were displaced per Cd sorbed, after correction for sorbed metals also displaced by the heavy metal. The frequent neglect of exchange of heavy metals for metals either sorbed on the native material or added for pH adjustment leads to erroneous conclusions about proton displacement stoichiometry. Proton displacement constants K{sub ex}{sup H} decreased logarithmically with pH and had similar slopes for alginic acid and biosorbents. This pH effect was interpreted as an electrostatic effect of increasing anionic charge making proton removal less favorable. The maximum number of exchangeable acid sites (capacity C{sub H}) decreased with pH for alginic acid but increased with pH for biosorbents. Consistent with titration behavior, this difference was explained in terms of more weak acid sites in the biosorbents.

  16. The contribution of humic substances to the acidity of colored natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oliver, B.G.; Thurman, E.M.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    An operationally defined carboxyl content of humic substances extracted from rivers, streams, lakes, wetlands, and groundwaters throughout the United States and Canada is reported. Despite the diversity of the samples, only small variations were observed in this humic carboxyl content. The dissociation behavior of two combined fulvic/humic acid extracts was studied and it was found that the dissociation of the humics varied in a predictable manner with pH. Using a carboxyl content of 10 ??eq/ mg humic organic carbon, and mass action quotient calculated from sample pH, the ionic balances of three highly colored Nova Scotia rivers were estimated. ?? 1983.

  17. Calcite crystal growth inhibition by humic substances with emphasis on hydrophobic acids from the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, A. R.; Reddy, M. M.; Aiken, G. R.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate minerals plays an integral role in the water chemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural waters, have been shown to reduce or inhibit calcite crystal growth in experiments. The purpose of this study is to quantify and understand the kinetic effects of hydrophobic organic acids isolated from the Florida Everglades and a fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, on the crystal growth of calcite (CaCO 3). Highly reproducible calcite growth experiments were performed in a sealed reactor at constant pH, temperature, supersaturation (Ω = 4.5), P CO2 (10 -3.5atm), and ionic strength (0.1 M) with various concentrations of organic acids. Higher plant-derived aquatic hydrophobic acids from the Everglades were more effective growth inhibitors than microbially derived fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell. Organic acid aromaticity correlated strongly with growth inhibition. Molecular weight and heteroatom content correlated well with growth inhibition, whereas carboxyl content and aliphatic nature did not.

  18. Calcite crystal growth inhibition by humic substances with emphasis on hydrophobic acids from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate minerals plays an integral role in the water chemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural waters, have been shown to reduce or inhibit calcite crystal growth in experiments. The purpose of this study is to quantify and understand the kinetic effects of hydrophobic organic acids isolated from the Florida Everglades and a fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, on the crystal growth of calcite (CaCO3). Highly reproducible calcite growth experiments were performed in a sealed reactor at constant pH, temperature, supersaturation (?? = 4.5), P(CO2) (10-3.5atm), and ionic strength (0.1 M) with various concentrations of organic acids. Higher plant-derived aquatic hydrophobic acids from the Everglades were more effective growth inhibitors than microbially derived fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell. Organic acid aromaticity correlated strongly with growth inhibition. Molecular weight and heteroatom content correlated well with growth inhibition, whereas carboxyl content and aliphatic nature did not. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  19. High acidity tolerance in lichens with fumarprotocetraric, perlatolic or thamnolic acids is correlated with low pKa1 values of these lichen substances.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Markus; Jürgens, Sascha-René; Huneck, Siegfried; Leuschner, Christoph

    2009-10-01

    The depsidone fumarprotocetraric acid as well as the depsides perlatolic and thamnolic acids are lichen secondary metabolites. Their first dissociation constants (pK(a1)) in methanol were determined to be 2.7 for perlatolic acid and 2.8 for fumarprotocetraric and thamnolic acids by UV spectroscopy. Lower pK(a1) values are, so far, not known from lichen substances. Several lichens producing at least one of these compounds are known for their outstanding tolerance to acidic air pollution. This is demonstrated by evaluating published pH preferences for central European lichens. The low pK(a1) values suggest that strong dissociation of the studied lichen substances is a prerequisite for the occurrence of lichens with these compounds on very acidic substrata, as protonated lichen substances of different chemical groups, but not their conjugated bases, are known to shuttle protons into the cytoplasm and thereby apparently damage lichens.

  20. Glyphosate detection with ammonium nitrate and humic acids as potential interfering substances by pulsed voltammetry technique.

    PubMed

    Martínez Gil, Pablo; Laguarda-Miro, Nicolas; Camino, Juan Soto; Peris, Rafael Masot

    2013-10-15

    Pulsed voltammetry has been used to detect and quantify glyphosate on buffered water in presence of ammonium nitrate and humic substances. Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide active ingredient in the world. It is a non-selective broad spectrum herbicide but some of its health and environmental effects are still being discussed. Nowadays, glyphosate pollution in water is being monitored but quantification techniques are slow and expensive. Glyphosate wastes are often detected in countryside water bodies where organic substances and fertilizers (commonly based on ammonium nitrate) may also be present. Glyphosate also forms complexes with humic acids so these compounds have also been taken into consideration. The objective of this research is to study the interference of these common pollutants in glyphosate measurements by pulsed voltammetry. The statistical treatment of the voltammetric data obtained lets us discriminate glyphosate from the other studied compounds and a mathematical model has been built to quantify glyphosate concentrations in a buffer despite the presence of humic substances and ammonium nitrate. In this model, the coefficient of determination (R(2)) is 0.977 and the RMSEP value is 2.96 × 10(-5) so the model is considered statistically valid.

  1. Modeling wet deposition of acid substances over the PRD region in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xingcheng; Fung, Jimmy Chi Hung; Wu, Dongwei

    2015-12-01

    The Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in southern China has suffered heavily from acid rain in the last 10 years due to the anthropogenic emission of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide. Several measurement-based studies about this issue have been conducted to analyze the chemical composition of precipitation in this area. However, no detailed, high resolution numerical simulation regarding this topic has ever been done in this region. In this study, the WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ system was applied to simulate the wet deposition of acid substances (SO42- and NO3-) in the PRD region from 2009 to 2011 with a resolution of 3 km. The simulation output agreed well with the observation data. Our results showed that Guangzhou was the city most affected by acid rain in this region. The ratio of non-sea-salt sulfate to nitrate indicated that the acid rain in this region belonged to the sulfate-nitrate mixed type. The source apportionment result suggests that point source and super regional source are the ones that contribute the pollutants most in the rain water over PRD Region. The sulfate and nitrate input to some reservoirs via wet deposition was also estimated based on the model simulation. Our results suggest that further cross-city cooperation and emission reduction are needed to further curb acid rain in this region.

  2. Chain Reacting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermi, Enrico; Leverett, Miles C.

    presence in the system of high temperatures and intense neutron densities causes an acceleration of any normal rate of corrosion, resulting in the physical deterioration of the uranium in the system. It is essential, then, that the circulating medium be of such a character as not to destroy the uranium bodies in the system. In the present case, the cooling medium is gaseous helium circulating in the active regions of the reactor, which has the advantage of minimizing the possible corrosion of the fissile material, since it is an inert gas, and the absorption of neutrons. However, other possible choices, affecting the determination of the multiplication factor, for the coolant gas (such as air, oxigen or water vapor) are discussed as well in terms of their "danger coefficients", defined in terms of the ratio of the weight of impurity per unit mass of uranium and based on the cross section for absorption of thermal neutrons of the various elements [Fermi (1942a)]. The discussion of some methods of cooling chain reacting piles was initiated in [Fermi (1942g)], but no reference published paper exists of the material presented here.

  3. Humic substances increase survival of freshwater shrimp Caridina sp. D to acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Holland, Aleicia; Duivenvoorden, Leo J; Kinnear, Susan H W

    2013-02-01

    Humic substances (HS) are known to decrease the toxicity of heavy metals to aquatic organisms, and it has been suggested that they can provide buffering protection in low pH conditions. Despite this, little is known about the ability for HS to increase survival to acid mine drainage (AMD). In this study, the ability of HS to increase survival of the freshwater shrimp (Caridina sp. D sensu Page et al. in Biol Lett 1:139-142, 2005) to acid mine drainage was investigated using test waters collected from the Mount Morgan open pit in Central Queensland with the addition of Aldrich humic acid (AHA). The AMD water from the Mount Morgan open pit is highly acidic (pH 2.67) as well as contaminated with heavy metals (1780 mg/L aluminum, 101 mg/L copper [Cu], 173 mg/L manganese, 51.8 mg/L zinc [Zn], and 51.8 mg/L iron). Freshwater shrimp were exposed to dilutions in the range of 0.5 % to 5 % AMD water with and without the addition of 10 or 20 mg/L AHA. In the absence of HS, all shrimp died in the 2.5 % AMD treatment. In contrast, addition of HS increased survival in the 2.5 % AMD treatment by ≤66 % as well as significantly decreased the concentration of dissolved Cu, cobalt, cadmium, and Zn. The decreased toxicity of AMD in the presence of HS is likely to be due to complexation and precipitation of heavy metals with the HS; it is also possible that HS caused changes to the physiological condition of the shrimp, thus increasing their survival. These results are valuable in contributing to an improved understanding of potential role of HS in ameliorating the toxicity of AMD environments.

  4. Characterization of limestone reacted with acid-mine drainage in a pulsed limestone bed treatment system at the Friendship Hill National Historical Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Sibrell, P.L.; Belkin, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    Armoring of limestone is a common cause of failure in limestone-based acid-mine drainage (AMD) treatment systems. Limestone is the least expensive material available for acid neutralization, but is not typically recommended for highly acidic, Fe-rich waters due to armoring with Fe(III) oxyhydroxide coatings. A new AMD treatment technology that uses CO2 in a pulsed limestone bed reactor minimizes armor formation and enhances limestone reaction with AMD. Limestone was characterized before and after treatment with constant flow and with the new pulsed limestone bed process using AMD from an inactive coal mine in Pennsylvania (pH = 2.9, Fe = 150 mg/l, acidity = 1000 mg/l CaCO3). In constant flow experiments, limestone is completely armored with reddish-colored ochre within 48 h of contact in a fluidized bed reactor. Effluent pH initially increased from the inflow pH of 2.9 to over 7, but then decreased to 6 during operation. Limestone removed from a pulsed bed pilot plant is a mixture of unarmored, rounded and etched limestone grains and partially armored limestone and refractory mineral grains (dolomite, pyrite). The ???30% of the residual grains in the pulsed flow reactor that are armored have thicker (50- to 100-??m), more aluminous coatings and lack the gypsum rind that develops in the constant flow experiment. Aluminium-rich zones developed in the interior parts of armor rims in both the constant flow and pulsed limestone bed experiments in response to pH changes at the solid/solution interface. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Effect of pH of the aqueous medium on the extraction of substances with different acid-base properties].

    PubMed

    Melent'ev, A B

    2003-01-01

    Experimental data are described in the paper, which demonstrate the possibility of a simultaneous extraction of acid and basic substances and of ampholytes from biological liquid for their subsequent gas-chromatography screening by means of a mass-selective detector.

  6. Nucleic-acid-programmed Ag-nanoclusters as a generic platform for visualization of latent fingerprints and exogenous substances.

    PubMed

    Ran, Xiang; Wang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Zhijun; Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-01-11

    We display a nucleic acid controlled AgNC platform for latent fingerprint visualization. The versatile emission of aptamer-modified AgNCs was regulated by the nearby DNA regions. Multi-color images for simultaneous visualization of fingerprints and exogenous components were successfully obtained. A quantitative detection strategy for exogenous substances in fingerprints was also established.

  7. A honey bee odorant receptor for the queen substance 9-oxo-2-decenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Kevin W; Nichols, Andrew S; Walden, Kimberly K O; Brockmann, Axel; Luetje, Charles W; Robertson, Hugh M

    2007-09-04

    By using a functional genomics approach, we have identified a honey bee [Apis mellifera (Am)] odorant receptor (Or) for the queen substance 9-oxo-2-decenoic acid (9-ODA). Honey bees live in large eusocial colonies in which a single queen is responsible for reproduction, several thousand sterile female worker bees complete a myriad of tasks to maintain the colony, and several hundred male drones exist only to mate. The "queen substance" [also termed the queen retinue pheromone (QRP)] is an eight-component pheromone that maintains the queen's dominance in the colony. The main component, 9-ODA, acts as a releaser pheromone by attracting workers to the queen and as a primer pheromone by physiologically inhibiting worker ovary development; it also acts as a sex pheromone, attracting drones during mating flights. However, the extent to which social and sexual chemical messages are shared remains unresolved. By using a custom chemosensory-specific microarray and qPCR, we identified four candidate sex pheromone Ors (AmOr10, -11, -18, and -170) from the honey bee genome based on their biased expression in drone antennae. We assayed the pheromone responsiveness of these receptors by using Xenopus oocytes and electrophysiology. AmOr11 responded specifically to 9-ODA (EC50=280+/-31 nM) and not to any of the other seven QRP components, other social pheromones, or floral odors. We did not observe any responses of the other three Ors to any of the eight QRP pheromone components, suggesting 9-ODA is the only QRP component that also acts as a long-distance sex pheromone.

  8. Effects of setting regulators on the efficiency of an inorganic acid based alkali-free accelerator reacting with a Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Maltese, C. . E-mail: Building.lab@mapei.it; Pistolesi, C.; Bravo, A.; Cella, F.; Cerulli, T.; Salvioni, D.

    2007-04-15

    Today, in the field of underground constructions, alkali-free accelerators are commonly employed, during tunnel excavation, to allow flash concrete setting. In this way, the cementitious sprayed material can firmly bond to the tunnel walls, controlling the convergence (the tendency of the section to squeeze). Their efficiency may be related to many parameters like: cement type, setting regulator, concrete composition, working temperature. Nevertheless, the influence of such factors on the accelerator performance has not been clarified yet. The accelerator efficacy is evaluated by real spraying test in job site or, when only laboratory equipment are available, by measuring the final setting times of cement systems admixed with the accelerator. Several alkali-free flash setting admixtures are available on the market. They can be divided into two main categories both containing aluminium sulphate complexes stabilized either by inorganic acids or by organic acids. In this paper, the influence of different setting regulators on the performances of an inorganic acid based alkali-free accelerator was analysed. Portland cement samples were obtained by mixing clinker with gypsum, {alpha}-hemihydrate, {beta}-hemihydrate or anhydrite. The setting regulator instantaneous dissolution rates were evaluated through conductivity measurements. The setting time of cement pastes with and without the accelerator was measured. It was found that the shorter the final setting time (therefore the more efficient is the accelerator) the lower the setting regulator instantaneous dissolution rate. In order to understand this phenomenon, a comparison was performed between accelerated cement paste samples containing the setting regulator with the highest ({beta}-hemihydrate) and the lowest instantaneous dissolution rate (anhydrite). The analytical work included morphological (Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy-Field Emission Gun - ESEM-FEG), crystal-chemical (X-Ray Powder Diffraction

  9. Insight into 2α-Chloro-2′(2′,6′)-(Di)Halogenopicropodophyllotoxins Reacting with Carboxylic Acids Mediated by BF3·Et2O

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lingling; Zhi, Xiaoyan; Che, Zhiping; Xu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Stereospecific nucleophilic substitution at the C-4α position of 2α-chloro-2′(2′,6′)-(di)halogenopicropodophyllotoxin derivatives with carboxylic acids mediated by BF3·Et2O was described. Interestingly, this stereoselective products were completely controlled by the reaction time. That is, if the reaction time was prolonged to 24.5–31 h, the resulting compounds were all transformed into the unusual C-ring aromatization products. Additionally, it demonstrated that BF3·Et2O and reaction temperature were the important factors for C-ring aromatization, and AlCl3 could be substituted for BF3·Et2O as a lewis acid for C-ring aromatization. Halogenation of E-ring of 2β-chloropodophyllotoxins with NCS or NBS also led to the same C-ring aromatization compounds. Especially compounds 5c, 6g and 7b exhibited insecticidal activity equal to that of toosendanin. PMID:26573374

  10. Insight into 2α-Chloro-2‧(2‧,6‧)-(Di)Halogenopicropodophyllotoxins Reacting with Carboxylic Acids Mediated by BF3·Et2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lingling; Zhi, Xiaoyan; Che, Zhiping; Xu, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Stereospecific nucleophilic substitution at the C-4α position of 2α-chloro-2‧(2‧,6‧)-(di)halogenopicropodophyllotoxin derivatives with carboxylic acids mediated by BF3·Et2O was described. Interestingly, this stereoselective products were completely controlled by the reaction time. That is, if the reaction time was prolonged to 24.5-31 h, the resulting compounds were all transformed into the unusual C-ring aromatization products. Additionally, it demonstrated that BF3·Et2O and reaction temperature were the important factors for C-ring aromatization, and AlCl3 could be substituted for BF3·Et2O as a lewis acid for C-ring aromatization. Halogenation of E-ring of 2β-chloropodophyllotoxins with NCS or NBS also led to the same C-ring aromatization compounds. Especially compounds 5c, 6g and 7b exhibited insecticidal activity equal to that of toosendanin.

  11. Characterization of a humic acid-like brown substance in airborne particulate matter and tentative identification of its origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Hitoshi; Ambe, Yoshinari

    A brown substance having the solubility characteristics of humic acid was extracted from airborne particulate matter sampled in a rural area of Japan. This brown substance contributed 0.6-3% of the total carbon in airborne particulate matter. This fraction also contained pollen protein in samples collected during the pollen season. Patterns of elution from gel permeation chromatography suggested a molecular weight range from 500 to 10,000, with a still higher upper limit for one sample. The infrared spectra were compared with those of humic acid from the local soil, extracts from dead leaves, smoke from burning plant matter, and soot from automotive exhaust, all possible sources of the brown substance. The closest similarity was with the extract smoke. This identification is strengthened by lack of correlation of the brown substance with aluminum, a tracer for soil content, and a value of K/Fe ratio in the associated particulate matter higher than any plausible source other than combustion. It is probable that the primary source of this brown, high molecular weight acidic materials is agricultural burning.

  12. Supersonic reacting internal flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip

    1989-01-01

    The national program to develop a trans-atmospheric vehicle has kindled a renewed interest in the modeling of supersonic reacting flows. A supersonic combustion ramjet, or scramjet, has been proposed to provide the propulsion system for this vehicle. The development of computational techniques for modeling supersonic reacting flow fields, and the application of these techniques to an increasingly difficult set of combustion problems are studied. Since the scramjet problem has been largely responsible for motivating this computational work, a brief history is given of hypersonic vehicles and their propulsion systems. A discussion is also given of some early modeling efforts applied to high speed reacting flows. Current activities to develop accurate and efficient algorithms and improved physical models for modeling supersonic combustion is then discussed. Some new problems where computer codes based on these algorithms and models are being applied are described.

  13. RESEMBLANCES BETWEEN THE ELECTROMOTOR VARIATIONS OF RHYTHMICALLY REACTING LIVING AND NON-LIVING SYSTEMS.

    PubMed

    Lillie, R S

    1929-09-20

    1. The electromotor variations of pure iron wires, arranged to react rhythmically with nitric acid, are recorded and described. 2. Resemblances between these variations and those of rhythmically reacting living tissues (especially the heart) are pointed out and discussed.

  14. Spatial separation of individual substances in effloresced crystals of ternary ammonium sulphate/dicarboxylic acid/water aerosols.

    PubMed

    Treuel, Lennart; Sandmann, Alice; Zellner, Reinhard

    2011-04-18

    This work examines the crystals resulting from the efflorescence of internally mixed aqueous aerosols comprising ammonium sulphate and different dicarboxylic acids. Most studies on the deliquescence of aerosols use previously effloresced aerosols in their experiments. However, during efflorescence a highly supersaturated solution crystallises in a kinetically controlled way unlike the case of thermodynamically controlled crystallisation. Herein the distribution of individual substances within the effloresced crystals is investigated using Raman scanning experiments. The data presented show an intriguingly complex behaviour of these ternary and quarternary aerosols. A spatial separation of substances in the crystals resulting from the efflorescence of previously internally mixed ternary salt/dicarboxylic acid/water aerosol droplets is demonstrated and mechanistic aspects are discussed.

  15. Facilitated transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles by humic substances in saturated porous media under acidic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruichang; Zhang, Haibo; Tu, Chen; Hu, Xuefeng; Li, Lianzhen; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The transport behavior of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs, 30 nm in diameter) was studied in well-defined porous media composed of clean quartz sand over a range of solution chemistry under acidic conditions. Transport of TiO2 NPs was dramatically enhanced by humic substances (HS) at acidic pH (4.0, 5.0 and 6.0), even at a low HS concentration of 0.5 mg L-1. Facilitated transport of TiO2 NPs was likely attributable to the increased stability of TiO2 NPs and repulsive interaction between TiO2 NPs and quartz sands due to the adsorbed HS. The mobility of TiO2 NPs was also increased with increasing pH from 4.0 to 6.0. Although transport of TiO2 NPs was insensitive to low ionic strength, it was significantly inhibited by high concentrations of NaCl and CaCl2. In addition, calculated Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energy indicated that high energy barriers were responsible for the high mobility of TiO2 NPs, while the secondary energy minimum could play an important role in the retention of TiO2 NPs at 100 mmol L-1 NaCl. Straining and gravitational settlement of larger TiO2 NPs aggregates at 1 mg L-1 HS, pH 5.0, and 2 mmol L-1 CaCl2 could be responsible for the significant retention even in the presence of high energy barriers. Moreover, more favorable interaction between approaching TiO2 NPs and TiO2 NPs that had been already deposited on the collector resulted in a ripening-shape breakthrough curve at 2 mmol L-1 CaCl2. Overall, a combination of mechanisms including DLVO-type force, straining, and physical filtration was involved in the retention of TiO2 NPs over the range of solution chemistry examined in this study.

  16. Does Copper Metal React with Acetic Acid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMeo, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity that promotes analytical thinking and problem solving. Gives students experience with important scientific processes that can be generalized to other new laboratory experiences. Provides students with the opportunity to hypothesize answers, control variables by designing an experiment, and make logical deductions based on…

  17. Dissipation Element Analysis of Reacting- and Non-Reacting Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, Dominik; Boschung, Jonas; Hennig, Fabian; Pitsch, Heinz

    2016-11-01

    Dissipation element analysis is a tried and tested method for analyzing scalar field in turbulent flows. Dissipation elements are defined as an ensemble of grid point whose gradient trajectories reach the same extremal points. Therefore, the scalar field can be compartmentalized in monotonous space filling regions. Dissipation elements can be described by two parameters, namely the Euclidean distance between their extremal points and their scalar difference in these points. The joint probability density function of these two parameters is expected to suffice for a statistical reconstruction of the scalar field. In addition, normalized dissipation element statistics show a remarkable invariance towards changes in Reynolds numbers. Dissipation element statistics of the passive scalar and the turbulent kinetic energy are compared for different flow configurations including reacting and non-reacting turbulent flows. Furthermore, the Reynolds number scaling of the dissipation element parameters is investigated.

  18. Alteration of fatty acid profile and nucleotide-related substances in post-mortem breast meat of α-lipoic acid-fed broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Y

    2016-08-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effects of α-lipoic acid supplementation on post-mortem changes in the fatty acid profile and concentrations of nucleotide-related substances, especially those of a taste-active compound, inosine 5'-monophosphate, in chicken meat. Mixed-sex broiler chicks aged 14 d were divided into three groups of 16 birds each and were fed on diets supplemented with α-lipoic acid at levels of 0, 100 or 200 mg/kg for 4 weeks. Blood and breast muscle samples were taken at 42 d of age under the fed condition and then after fasting for 18 h. The breast muscle obtained from fasted chickens was subsequently refrigerated at 2°C for one and 3 d. α-Lipoic acid supplementation did not affect any plasma metabolite concentration independently of feeding condition, while a slight increase in plasma glucose concentration was shown with both administration levels of α-lipoic acid. In early post-mortem breast muscle under the fed condition, α-lipoic acid had no effect on concentrations of fatty acids or nucleotides of ATP, ADP, and AMP. In post-mortem breast tissues obtained from fasted chickens, total fatty acid concentrations were markedly increased by α-lipoic acid feeding at 200 mg/kg irrespective of length of refrigeration. This effect was dependent on stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid. However, among fatty acids, the only predominantly increased unsaturated fatty acid was oleic acid. Dietary supplementation with α-lipoic acid at 200 mg/kg increased the inosine 5'-monophosphate concentration in breast meat and, in contrast, reduced the subsequent catabolites, inosine and xanthine, regardless of the length of refrigeration. Therefore, the present study suggests that α-lipoic acid administration altered the fatty acid profile and improved meat quality by increasing taste-active substances in the post-mortem meat obtained from fasted chickens.

  19. Humic substances of varying types increase survivorship of the freshwater shrimp Caridina sp. D to acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Holland, Aleicia; Duivenvoorden, Leo J; Kinnear, Susan H W

    2014-07-01

    Differences relating to the ability of various types of humic substances (HS) to influence toxicity of pollutants have been reported in the literature, but there still remains a gap in understanding whether various HS will have the same influence on the toxicity of acid mine drainage (AMD). This study investigated differences in the ability of Aldrich humic acid (AHA), Suwannee River humic acid and Suwannee River fulvic acid to decrease toxicity of AMD to the freshwater shrimp (Caridina sp. D). Toxicity tests were conducted over 96 h and used Mount Morgan open pit water as source of AMD and Dee River water as control/diluents. Concentrations of 0-4 % AMD at 0 mg/L HS, 10 mg/L AHA, 10 mg/L Suwannee River humic acid and 10 mg/L Suwannee River fulvic acid were used. Significantly higher survival of shrimp was recorded in the HS treatments compared with the treatment containing no HS. No significant differences were found among HS type. HS considerably increased LC50 values irrespective of type, from 1.29 (0 mg/L HS) to 2.12 % (AHA); 2.19 (Suwannee River humic acid) and 2.22 % (Suwannee River fulvic acid). These results support previous work that HS decrease the toxicity of AMD to freshwater organisms, but with the novel finding that this ability occurs irrespective of HS type. These results increase the stock of knowledge regarding HS and may contribute to a possible remediation option for AMD environments.

  20. Factors influencing inapplicability of cosolvency-induced model on organic acid sorption onto humic substance from methanol mixture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minhee; Kim, Juhee; Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Hyun, Seunghun

    2015-10-01

    Applicability of cosolvency model for describing the sorption of organic acids to humic substance was investigated by analyzing dataset of sorption (K m) and solubility (S m) of selected solutes (benzoic acid, 1-naphthoic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP)) as a function of pH(appCME) (apparent pH of liquid phase) and f c (methanol volume fractions). For all solutes, the K m decreased with f c with the K m reduction being less than the S m-based prediction. The slope of log K m-f c plot in the three organic carboxylic acids was well correlated with their cosolvency power, whereas the data of organic phenolic acid (2,4,6-TCP) was placed above the trend, indicating the different actions of functional groups. The occurrence of Ca(2+) bridge between carboxylate and negatively charged humic surface may explain this phenomenon. Normalizing the K m to the corresponding S m (α' = K m/S m) was not in unity over the pH(app)-f c range but decreased with f c, indicating a possible structural modification of sorption domain favoring extra sorption. For a given solute, the α' of neutral species was always greater than that of anionic species, showing that extra interaction will be likely at pH(app) acids by humic substance in methanol/water mixtures. Modification of humic structure and hydrophilic interaction (such as Ca(2+) bridge and same-charge repulsion) is considered a relevant process that possibly restricts the applicability of the cosolvency model.

  1. Distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls, phthalic acid esters, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorine substances in the Moscow River, Russia.

    PubMed

    Eremina, Natalia; Paschke, Albrecht; Mazlova, Elena A; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the levels of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), phthalic acid esters (PAE), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and organochlorine substances (OCP) in the Moscow River water. Some studies have reported the occurrence of these substances in the soil of the Moscow region; however, no study has yet established an overview for these compounds in the Moscow River water. In this study the Moscow River water contamination with PAEs, PAHs and OCPs was determined. Obtained results were associated with the resident area located on the river bank, and the possible contamination sources were considered. The obtained data were compared with the data on the contamination of the different world-wide rivers. This research indicates the further study necessity of the Moscow region to cover more contaminated sites and environmental compartments.

  2. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1995-01-01

    Although acid rain is fading as a political issue in the United States and funds for research in this area have largely disappeared, the acidity of rain in the Eastern United States has not changed significantly over the last decade, and it continues to be a serious environmental problem. Acid deposition (commonly called acid rain) is a term applied to all forms of atmospheric deposition of acidic substances - rain, snow, fog, acidic dry particulates, aerosols, and acid-forming gases. Water in the atmosphere reacts with certain atmospheric gases to become acidic. For example, water reacts with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to produce a solution with a pH of about 5.6. Gases that produce acids in the presence of water in the atmosphere include carbon dioxide (which converts to carbonic acid), oxides of sulfur and nitrogen (which convert to sulfuric and nitric acids}, and hydrogen chloride (which converts to hydrochloric acid). These acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere through natural processes, such as volcanic emissions, lightning, forest fires, and decay of organic matter. Accordingly, precipitation is slightly acidic, with a pH of 5.0 to 5.7 even in undeveloped areas. In industrialized areas, most of the acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. Major emitters of acid-producing gases include power plants, industrial operations, and motor vehicles. Acid-producing gases can be transported through the atmosphere for hundreds of miles before being converted to acids and deposited as acid rain. Because acids tend to build up in the atmosphere between storms, the most acidic rain falls at the beginning of a storm, and as the rain continues, the acids "wash out" of the atmosphere.

  3. Measurement in multiphase reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    A survey is presented of diagnostic techniques and measurements made in multiphase reacting flows. The special problems encountered by the presence of liquid droplets, soot and solid particles in high temperature chemically reacting turbulent environments are outlined. The principal measurement techniques that have been tested in spray flames are spark photography, laser anemometry, thermocouples and suction probes. Spark photography provides measurement of drop size, drop size distribution, drop velocity, and angle of flight. Photographs are analysed automatically by image analysers. Photographic techniques are reliable, inexpensive and proved. Laser anemometers have been developed for simultaneous measurement of velocity and size of individual particles in sprays under conditions of vaporization and combustion. Particle/gas velocity differentials, particle Reynolds numbers, local drag coefficients and direct measurement of vaporization rates can be made by laser anemometry. Gas temperature in sprays is determined by direct in situ measurement of time constants immediately prior to measurement with compensation and signal analysis by micro-processors. Gas concentration is measured by suction probes and gas phase chromatography. Measurements of particle size, particle velocity, gas temperature, and gas concentration made in airblast and pressure atomised liquid spray flames are presented.

  4. Evaluation and Management of Caustic Injuries from Ingestion of Acid or Alkaline Substances

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although the numbers have decreased compared with in the past, cases of patients who ingest caustic substances and visit the emergency room are not rare. However, well-summarized data about caustic injuries are insufficient. Therefore, in this article, I will discuss the etiologic causative agents, injury mechanism, and clinical characteristics, as well as the endoscopic evaluation of the degree of injury and proper management of the patient, in gastrointestinal caustic injury. PMID:25133115

  5. [Immunosuppressive acidic protein (IAP) in gynecologic malignant tumors and its relationship with other immunosuppressive substances and cell-mediated immunity].

    PubMed

    Takada, M

    1983-02-01

    We investigated the relationship between immunosuppressive acidic protein (IAP), an immunosuppressive substance determined in the body fluid from patients with cancer and the stages of cancer, and also its relationship with the progress of cancer during treatment and convalescence in 42 cases of ovary cancer, 47 cases of cancer of the uterine neck, 19 cases of cancer of the uterine body, and 5 cases of other of cancers. In addition, the relationship of IAP with other immunosuppressive substances and cell-mediated immunities was also investigated. The IAP level in the serum was not useful for early diagnosis of gynecologic malignant tumors, but it reflected on stages of cancer more accurately compared to levels of other immunosuppressive substances in the serum: alpha-antitripsine (alpha AT), alpha-glyco-protein (alpha AG), carcinoembrionic antigen (CEA), c-reactive protein (CRP), and serum ferritin (s-Fer), were useful as parameters showing progress of cancer during treatment and convalescence. The IAP level in the peritoneal fluid showed the same tendency. For the relationship with cell-mediated immunity, a stimulate index (SI) showed an inverse correlation from stage I; a T-cell count exhibited the same tendency; IgGFcR+ T-cell count showed a positive correlation in stage III; and ADCC exhibited an inverse correlation in stage III. However, immunosuppressive substances including IAP show high levels also in inflammatory diseases. Therefore, an appreciative value of IAP in the clinical area increases by being used for monitoring gynecologic cancer patients in combination with indicators of cell-mediated immunity, particularly, with SI.

  6. Surveying Students' Conceptual and Procedural Knowledge of Acid-Base Behavior of Substances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furio-Mas, Carles; Calatayud, Maria-Luisa; Barcenas, Sergio L.

    2007-01-01

    By the end of their high school studies, students should be able to understand macroscopic and sub-microscopic conceptualization of acid-base behavior and the relationship between these conceptual models. The aim of this article is to ascertain whether grade-12 students have sufficient background knowledge to explain the properties of acids,…

  7. Changes in /sup 3/H-substance P receptor binding in the rat brain after kainic acid lesion of the corpus striatum

    SciTech Connect

    Mantyh, P.W.; Hunt, S.P.

    1986-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the substantia nigra contains the highest concentration of substance P-like immunoreactivity (SPLI) in the brain. Paradoxically, it also appears to contain one of the lowest concentrations of substance P receptors in the brain. One possibility is that the massive amount of SPLI blocks the binding of the radioligand to the substance P receptor and/or down-regulates the number of substance P receptors present in this structure. Since greater than 95% of the SPLI within the substantia nigra originates from the corpus striatum, we have lesioned this area and measured the changes in substance P receptor concentration in the substantia nigra and other corpus striatal projection areas. A semiquantitative autoradiographic technique for measuring the binding of /sup 3/H-substance P to substance P receptors was used in conjunction with tritium-sensitive film. 3H-substance P binding was measured in both the corpus striatum and its projection areas after kainic acid lesion of the corpus striatum. At either 4 or 21 d after the lesion there was approximately a 90% loss of substance P receptors in the rostral striatum, a 74% loss in the globus pallidus, a 57% increase in receptor number in lamina I and II of the ipsilateral somatosensory cortex, and no apparent change in the number of receptors in the substantia nigra pars reticulata, superior colliculus, and central gray. These findings suggest that the low concentration of substance P receptors found within the substantia nigra is not due the massive SPLI innervation, since removal of greater than 95% of the SPLI had no measurable effect on the concentration of substance P receptors.

  8. Chemical characteristics and acidity of soluble organic substances from a northern hardwood forest floor, central Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, George F.; David, Mark B.

    1991-12-01

    Our understanding of the chemistry, structure, and reactions of organic substances in forest floor leachates is limited and incomplete. Therefore, we examined the organic and inorganic chemistry of forest floor leachates collected from a hardwood forest in central Maine over a two-year period (1987-1989), including detailed study of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Seasonal variations in NH 4+, NO 3-, K +, and total Al were believed due to organic matter decomposition and release. Leaching of other base cations closely followed that of NO 3-. Snowmelt resulted in NO 3- levels that decreased in time due to flushing of mineralization/nitrification by-products that had accumulated during the winter months. Total DOC ranged from 2228 to 7193 μmol L -1 with an average of 4835 μmol L -1. Monosaccharides and polyphenols constituted 3.9% (range of 3.4 to 4.4%) and 3.0% (2.2 to 3.7%) of the DOC, respectively, which suggests DOC may contain partially oxidized products that are possibly of a lignocellulose nature. Fractionation of the forest floor DOC indicated high organic acid contents (hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids) that averaged 92% of the total DOC. Organic acids were isolated and analyzed for elemental content (C, H, N, and S), and determination of UV absorptivity ( E 4/E 6) ratios, CuO oxidation products, FT-IR and 13C-NMR spectra, and acidity by potentiometric titration. Results from these analyses indicate the organic acids in the forest floor leachates are similar to fulvic acids. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids had average exchange acidities of 0.126 and 0.148 μeq μmol -1 C, respectively, and pKa, of 4.23 and 4.33. Their FT-IR and 13C-NMR spectra suggest they are primarily carboxylic acids, with aliphatic and aromatic structure. An organic charge contribution model was developed using titration data, DOC fractionation percentages, and the total DOC in the forest floor leachates. Application of the model to all solutions accounted for 97% of the charge

  9. Adhesive Properties and Acid-Forming Activity of Lactobacilli and Streptococci Under Inhibitory Substances, Such as Nitrates.

    PubMed

    Hakobyan, L; Harutyunyan, K; Harutyunyan, N; Melik-Andreasyan, G; Trchounian, A

    2016-06-01

    One of the main requirements for probiotics is their ability to survive during passage through gastrointestinal tract and to maintain their activity at different adverse conditions. The aim of the study was to look for the strains of lactobacilli and streptococci with high adhesive properties even affected by inhibitory substances, such as nitrates (NO3 (-)). To study the adhesion properties hemagglutination reaction of bacterial cells with red blood cells of different animals and humans was used. The acid formation ability of bacteria was determined by the method of titration after 7 days of incubation in the sterile milk. These properties were investigated at different concentrations of NO3 (-). The high concentration (mostly ≥2.0 %) NO3 (-) inhibited the growth of both lactobacilli and streptococci, but compared with streptococcal cultures lactobacilli, especially Lactobacillus acidophilus Ep 317/402, have shown more stability and higher adhesive properties. In addition, the concentrations of NO3 (-) of 0.5-2.0 % decreased the acid-forming activity of the strains, but even under these conditions they coagulated milk and, in comparison to control, formed low acidity in milk. Thus, the L. acidophilus Ep 317/402 with high adhesive properties has demonstrated a higher activity of NO3 (-) transformation.

  10. Determination of carnosine, anserine, homocarnosine, pentosidine and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances contents in meat from different animal species.

    PubMed

    Peiretti, Pier Giorgio; Medana, Claudio; Visentin, Sonja; Giancotti, Valeria; Zunino, Valentina; Meineri, Giorgia

    2011-06-15

    The aim of this research was to determine the content of the histidinic antioxidants, advanced glycation end products (pentosidine) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in the meat from different animal species. Carnosine, anserine, homocarnosine and pentosidine were quantified by HPLC/MS, while TBARS was determined by photometric measurements. The total CRCs (carnosine+anserine+homocarnosine) content was in the increasing order: beef

  11. Comparison of natural humic substances and synthetic ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and nitrilotriacetic acid as washing agents of a heavy metal-polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Mohsen; Hajabbasi, Mohammad A; Afyuni, Majid; Akbar, Samira; Jensen, Julie K; Holm, Peter E; Borggaard, Ole K

    2010-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and other synthetic polycarboxylic acids have been shown to possess substantial capacity as washing agents of heavy metal-polluted soils, but they are environmentally problematic. Therefore, a sample of natural soluble humic substances (HS) was tested as a possible substitute. The efficiency of HS to extract cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), and lead (Pb) from a strongly polluted calcareous urban soil was compared with that of EDTA and NTA. The influence of extractant concentration (25-100 mmol L(-1) C), solution/soil ratio (5-100 L kg(-1)), and single-step vs. multistep extraction on heavy metal removal from the soil was investigated. The extracted pools were assessed by sequential extraction. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and NTA extracted up to 86, 77, and 30% of total soil Cd, Cu, and Pb, respectively, whereas HS extracted 44, 53, and 4%. Extracted amounts of Cd, Cu, and Pb increased with increasing extractant concentration and solution/soil ratio in the range 5 to 100 L kg(-1). Single-step extraction removed about the same amounts of the three metals as multiple-step extraction. The metal-extracted pools of the soil depended on the metal and on the extractant. The overall conclusion is that soluble HS can replace synthetic EDTA and NTA as washing agents for Cd- and Cu-polluted soils, whereas HS is not a promising substitute of EDTA or NTA for cleaning Pb-polluted, calcareous soils.

  12. Influence of 2(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate on glucose and palmitate oxidation in human mononuclear leukocytes. Hydrazonopropionic acids, a new class of hypoglycaemic substances, VII.

    PubMed

    Haeckel, R; Fink, P C; Oellerich, M

    1987-09-01

    2-(3-Methyl-cinnamyl-hydrozono)-propionate stimulated glucose oxidation in human mononuclear leukocytes and the stimulation was similar to that by concanavalin A. Both substances must affect glucose metabolism at two sites, the first site being before the pyruvate dehydrogenase step because of the increase of lactate plus pyruvate concentration. The second site is related to pyruvate oxidation. The hydrazone inhibited the conversion of plamitate to CO2. This effect could have caused an activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, resulting from a decrease acetyl-CoA/CoA ratio. Concanavalin A did not influence fatty acid oxidation. Both substances did not affect the CO2 formation from acetate. Mononuclear leukocytes appear to be a suitable model for the investigation of the influence of hypoglycaemic substances on glucose and fatty acid metabolism in living human cells.

  13. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, A.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  14. Molecular weight, polydispersity, and spectroscopic properties of aquatic humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chin, Y.-P.; Aiken, G.; O'Loughlin, E.

    1994-01-01

    The number- and weight-averaged molecular weights of a number of aquatic fulvic acids, a commercial humic acid, and unfractionated organic matter from four natural water samples were measured by high-pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). Molecular weights determined in this manner compared favorably with those values reported in the literature. Both recent literature values and our data indicate that these substances are smaller and less polydisperse than previously believed. Moreover, the molecular weights of the organic matter from three of the four natural water samples compared favorably to the fulvic acid samples extracted from similar environments. Bulk spectroscopic properties of the fulvic substances such as molar absorptivity at 280 nm and the E4/E6 ratio were also measured. A strong correlation was observed between molar absorptivity, total aromaticity, and the weight average molecular weights of all the humic substances. This observation suggests that bulk spectroscopic properties can be used to quickly estimate the size of humic substances and their aromatic contents. Both parameters are important with respect to understanding humic substance mobility and their propensity to react with both organic and inorganic pollutants. ?? 1994 American Chemical Society.

  15. Hydrolysis of substance P in the presence of the osteosarcoma cell line SaOS-2: release of free amino acids.

    PubMed

    Cavazza, Antonella; Marini, Mario; Roda, L Giorgio; Tarantino, Umberto; Valenti, Angela

    2011-12-01

    The possible hydrolysis of substance P (Arg-Pro-Lys-Pro-Gln-Gln-Phe-Phe-Gly-Leu-Met) in presence of the osteoblastic cell line SaOS-2 was measured by capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass detection. The results obtained indicate that a very rapid disappearance of the intact undecapeptide was associated to a slower appearance of seven of its eight component amino acids. These results can be interpreted as indicating that an extremely fast hydrolysis of substance P by endopeptidases, which released peptidic by-products, was followed by a noticeably slower secondary degradation which released free amino acids. In decreasing quantitative importance, these phenomena appear to originate by the hydrolysis of the Pro(4)-Gln(5) bond, followed by C-terminal sequential degradation of the Arg(1)-Pro(4) tetrapeptide; by the hydrolysis of or Phe(7)-Phe(8) bond (or, possibly, of Gln(6)-Phe(7)) leading to release of free Phe and Gln; by hydrolysis of the Gly(9)-Leu(10) bond with subsequent release of Met and Leu. Results obtained appear to be compatible with the expression by SaOS-2 cells of enzymes already known to catalyze substance P hydrolysis, together with an apparent low efficiency of aminopeptidases. Because of the activity of C-terminal fragments on NK1 receptors, the delay between primary hydrolysis of substance P and secondary hydrolysis of its peptidic fragments indicated by the data shown implies a possible persistence of substance P physiological effects even after degradation of the intact peptide.

  16. Action of some bisquaternary derivatives of phthalic acids and related substances on neuromuscular transmission

    PubMed Central

    Danilov, A. F.; Kvitko, I. J.; Lavrentieva, V. V.; Michelson, M. J.; Porai-Koshits, B. A.; Rozhkova, E. K.; Shelkovnikov, S. A.

    1972-01-01

    1. All the bisquaternary derivatives of terephthalic acid with three methyl groups on each nitrogen atom (PK-107, PK-95, PK-97 and PK-126) were depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents. The most active was the compound PK-97, in which the two quaternary groups are separated by sixteen atoms and are about 20 Å (2 nm) apart. Activity was reduced many fold either by decreasing the separation to twelve atoms or by increasing it to eighteen atoms. It was also reduced several hundred fold when one trimethylammonium group in PK-97 was replaced by a hydrogen atom (as in PK-119). 2. The presence and position of the ester groups in these compounds is important; depolarizing activity is in most cases greatest when the ester groups are the same distance from the quaternary nitrogen atoms as in acetylcholine, that is, in carbolonium, sebacoyldicholine and PK-154. The monoquaternary analogues of carbolonium and sebacoyldicholine are appreciably active, having between about one-tenth to one-fifth of the activity of their bisquaternary analogues. 3. The relationships between the structure and activity of these compounds are discussed, particular consideration being given to the structure of the chain separating the quaternary groups and the arrangement of acetylcholine receptors on cells and of esterbinding groups within these receptors. PMID:4339387

  17. REACT: Alternatives to Critical Materials in Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: The 14 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s REACT Project, short for “Rare Earth Alternatives in Critical Technologies”, are developing cost-effective alternatives to rare earths, the naturally occurring minerals with unique magnetic properties that are used in electric vehicle (EV) motors and wind generators. The REACT projects will identify low-cost and abundant replacement materials for rare earths while encouraging existing technologies to use them more efficiently. These alternatives would facilitate the widespread use of EVs and wind power, drastically reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere.

  18. In Vitro Evaluation of Bacteriocin-Like Inhibitory Substances Produced by Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated During Traditional Sicilian Cheese Making

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Giusi; Fiorenza, Gerlando; Gaglio, Raimondo; Mancuso, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriocins are antimicrobial proteins produced by bacteria that inhibit the growth of other bacteria with a bactericidal or bacteriostatic mode of action. Many lactic acid bacteria (LAB) produce a high diversity of different bacteriocins. Bacteriocinogenic LAB are generally recognised as safe (GRAS) and useful to control the frequent development of pathogens and spoilage microorganisms. For this reason they are commonly used as starter cultures in food fermentations. In this study, the authors describe the results of a screening on 699 LAB isolated from wooden vat surfaces, raw milk and traditional Sicilian cheeses, for the production of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances, by comparing two alternative methods. The antagonistic activity of LAB and its proteinaceous nature were evaluated using the spot-on-the-lawn and the well-diffusion assay (WDA) and the sensitivity to proteolytic (proteinase K, protease B and trypsin), amylolytic (a-amylase) and lipolytic (lipase) enzymes. The indicator strains used were: Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis. A total of 223 strains (belonging to the species Enterococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Pediococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Leuconostoc spp. and Lactococcus lactis) were found to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes by using the spot-on-the-lawn method; only 37 of these were confirmed by using the WDA. The direct addition of bacteriocin-producing cultures into dairy products can be a more practical and economic option for the improvement of the safety and quality of the final product. PMID:27800430

  19. Vortex simulation of reacting shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    Issues involved in the vortex simulation of reacting shear flow are discussed. It is shown that maintaining accuracy in the vortex methods requires the application of elaborate vorticity-updating schemes as vortex elements are moved along particle trajectories when shear or a strong strain field is represented. Solutions using 2D and 3D methods are discussed to illustrate some of the most common instabilities encountered in nonreacting and reacting shear flows and to reveal the mechanisms by which the maturation of these instabilities enhance mixing and hence burning in a reacting flow. The transport element method is developed and its application to compute scalar mixing in a shear layer is reviewed. The method is then combined with the vortex method to solve the problem of nonuniform-density shear flow. The results of incompressible reacting flow models are used to examine reaction extinction due to the formation of localized regions of strong strains as instabilities grow into their nonlinear range.

  20. Reaction between drug substances and pharmaceutical excipients: formation of esters between cetirizine and polyols.

    PubMed

    Yu, He; Cornett, Claus; Larsen, Jesper; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2010-11-02

    Reactions between active drug substances and excipients are of interest in the drug formulation process and should also be considered in the following storage of final preparations. Some excipients react more readily with certain chemical groups in drug substances and in the present paper the ester formation between a drug substance having a carboxylic acid moiety and some polyols are described. The drug substance cetirizine was chosen as the model substance as it is already marketed and used as a common drug for treatment of allergic reactions. Among the marketed products are oral solutions and oral drops containing excipients like sorbitol and glycerol. It was found that the carboxylic acid cetirizine readily reacts with sorbitol and glycerol to form monoesters. At a temperature as low as 40 degrees C, more than 1% of the cetirizine content was transformed into a monoester within 1 week using concentrations similar to those used in marketed preparations. The kinetic studies of the reaction performed at 40, 60 and 80 degrees C also revealed that the esters were unstable and they degraded especially at higher temperatures. Analysis of two marketed preparations having expiry dates in 2011 showed content of the cetirizine esters corresponding to a range from 0.1 to 0.3% of the declared cetirizine content.

  1. Sources and haloacetic acid/trihalomethane formation potentials of aquatic humic substances in the Wakarusa River and Clinton Lake near Lawrence, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pomes, M.L.; Larive, C.K.; Thurman, E.M.; Green, W.R.; Orem, W.H.; Rostad, C.E.; Coplen, T.B.; Cutak, B.J.; Dixon, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Gram quantities of aquatic humic substances (AHS) were extracted from the Wakarusa River-Clinton Lake Reservoir system, near Lawrence, KS, to support nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experimental studies, report concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and AHS, define sources of the AHS, and determine if the AHS yield sufficient quantities of haloacetic acids (HAA5) and trihalomethanes (THM4) that exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) in drinking water. AHS from the Wakarusa River and Clinton Lake originated from riparian forest vegetation, reflected respective effects of soil organic matter and aquatic algal/bacterial sources, and bore evidence of biological degradation and photodegradation. AHS from the Wakarusa River showed the effect of terrestrial sources, whereas Clinton Lake humicacid also reflected aquatic algal/bacterial sources. Greater amounts of carbon attributable to tannin-derived chemical structures may correspond with higher HAA5 and THM4 yields for Clinton Lake fulvic acid. Prior to appreciable leaf-fall from deciduous trees, the combined (humic and fulvic acid) THM4 formation potentials for the Wakarusa River approached the proposed EPA THM4 Stage I MCL of 80 ??g/L, and the combined THM4 formation potential for Clinton Lake slightly exceeded the proposed THM4 Stage II MCL of 40 ??g/L. Finally, AHS from Clinton Lake could account for most (>70%) of the THM4 concentrations in finished water from the Clinton Lake Water Treatment Plant based on September 23, 1996, THM4 results.Gram quantities of aquatic humic substances (AHS) were extracted from the Wakarusa River-Clinton Lake Reservoir system, near Lawrence, KS, to support nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experimental studies, report concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and AHS, define sources of the AHS, and determine if the AHS yield sufficient quantities of haloacetic acids (HAA5) and trihalomethanes (THM4) that exceed U

  2. Inhibition of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on spinach and identification of antimicrobial substances produced by a commercial Lactic Acid Bacteria food safety intervention.

    PubMed

    Cálix-Lara, Thelma F; Rajendran, Mahitha; Talcott, Stephen T; Smith, Stephen B; Miller, Rhonda K; Castillo, Alejandro; Sturino, Joseph M; Taylor, T Matthew

    2014-04-01

    The microbiological safety of fresh produce is of concern for the U.S. food supply. Members of the Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) have been reported to antagonize pathogens by competing for nutrients and by secretion of substances with antimicrobial activity, including organic acids, peroxides, and antimicrobial polypeptides. The objectives of this research were to: (i) determine the capacity of a commercial LAB food antimicrobial to inhibit Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on spinach leaf surfaces, and (ii) identify antimicrobial substances produced in vitro by the LAB comprising the food antimicrobial. Pathogens were inoculated on freshly harvested spinach, followed by application of the LAB antimicrobial. Treated spinach was aerobically incubated up to 12 days at 7 °C and surviving pathogens enumerated via selective/differential plating. l-Lactic acid and a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) were detected and quantified from cell-free fermentates obtained from LAB-inoculated liquid microbiological medium. Application of 8.0 log10 CFU/g LAB produced significant (p < 0.05) reductions in E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella populations on spinach of 1.6 and 1.9 log10 CFU/g, respectively. It was concluded the LAB antimicrobial inhibited foodborne pathogens on spinach during refrigerated storage, likely the result of the production of metabolites with antimicrobial activity.

  3. Targeted toxicological screening for acidic, neutral and basic substances in postmortem and antemortem whole blood using simple protein precipitation and UPLC-HR-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Telving, Rasmus; Hasselstrøm, Jørgen Bo; Andreasen, Mette Findal

    2016-09-01

    A broad targeted screening method based on broadband collision-induced dissociation (bbCID) ultra-performance liquid chromatography high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-HR-TOF-MS) was developed and evaluated for toxicological screening of whole blood samples. The acidic, neutral and basic substances covered by the method were identified in postmortem and antemortem whole blood samples from forensic autopsy cases, clinical forensic cases and driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) cases by a reverse target database search. The screening method covered 467 substances. Validation was performed on spiked whole blood samples and authentic postmortem and antemortem whole blood samples. For most of the basic drugs, the established cut-off limits were very low, ranging from 0.25ng/g to 50ng/g. The established cut-off limits for most neutral and acidic drugs, were in the range from 50ng/g to 500ng/g. Sample preparation was performed using simple protein precipitation of 300μL of whole blood with acetonitrile and methanol. Ten microliters of the reconstituted extract were injected and separated within a 13.5min UPLC gradient reverse-phase run. Positive electrospray ionization (ESI) was used to generate the ions in the m/z range of 50-1000. Fragment ions were generated by bbCID. Identification was based on retention time, accurate mass, fragment ion(s) and isotopic pattern. A very sensitive broad toxicological screening method using positive electrospray ionization UPLC-HR-TOF-MS was achieved in one injection. This method covered basic substances, substances traditionally analyzed in negative ESI (e.g., salicylic acid), small highly polar substances such as beta- and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (BHB and GHB, respectively) and highly non-polar substances such as amiodarone. The new method was shown to combine high sensitivity with a very broad scope that has not previously been reported in toxicological whole blood screening when using only one injection.

  4. Turbulence characteristics of an axisymmetric reacting flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. D.; Stevenson, W. H.; Thompson, H. D.

    1984-01-01

    Turbulent sudden expansion flows are of significant theoretical and practical importance. Such flows have been the subject of extensive analytical and experimental study for decades, but many issues are still unresolved. Detailed information on reacting sudden expansion flows is very limited, since suitable measurement techniques have only been available in recent years. The present study of reacting flow in an axisymmetric sudden expansion was initiated under NASA support in December 1983. It is an extension of a reacting flow program which has been carried out with Air Force support under Contract F33615-81-K-2003. Since the present effort has just begun, results are not yet available. Therefore a brief overview of results from the Air Force program will be presented to indicate the basis for the work to be carried out.

  5. Direct simulation of compressible reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsot, Thierry J.

    1989-01-01

    A research program for direct numerical simulations of compressible reacting flows is described. Two main research subjects are proposed: the effect of pressure waves on turbulent combustion and the use of direct simulation methods to validate flamelet models for turbulent combustion. The interest of a compressible code to study turbulent combustion is emphasized through examples of reacting shear layer and combustion instabilities studies. The choice of experimental data to compare with direct simulation results is discussed. A tentative program is given and the computation cases to use are described as well as the code validation runs.

  6. Comparison of Mixing Calculations for Reacting and Non-Reacting Flows in a Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oechsle, V. L.; Mongia, H. C.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    A production 3-D elliptic flow code has been used to calculate non-reacting and reacting flow fields in an experimental mixing section relevant to a rich burn/quick mix/lean burn (RQL) combustion system. A number of test cases have been run to assess the effects of the variation in the number of orifices, mass flow ratio, and rich-zone equivalence ratio on the flow field and mixing rates. The calculated normalized temperature profiles for the non-reacting flow field agree qualitatively well with the normalized conserved variable isopleths for the reacting flow field indicating that non-reacting mixing experiments are appropriate for screening and ranking potential rapid mixing concepts. For a given set of jet momentum-flux ratio, mass flow ratio, and density ratio (J, MR, and DR), the reacting flow calculations show a reduced level of mixing compared to the non-reacting cases. In addition, the rich-zone equivalence ratio has noticeable effect on the mixing flow characteristics for reacting flows.

  7. A random distribution reacting mixing layer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    A methodology for simulation of molecular mixing and the resulting velocity and temperature fields has been developed. The ideas are applied to the flow conditions present in the NASA Lewis Planar Reacting Shear Layer (PRSL) facility, and results compared to experimental data. A gaussian transverse turbulent velocity distribution is used in conjunction with a linearly increasing time scale to describe the mixing of different regions of the flow. Equilibrium reaction calculations are then performed on the mix to arrive at a new species composition and temperature. Velocities are determined through summation of momentum contributions. The analysis indicates a combustion efficiency of the order of 80 percent for the reacting mixing layer, and a turbulent Schmidt number of 2/3. The success of the model is attributed to the simulation of large-scale transport of fluid. The favorable comparison shows that a relatively quick and simple PC calculation is capable of simulating the basic flow structure in the reacting and non-reacting shear layer present in the facility given basic assumptions about turbulence properties.

  8. Computation of Reacting Flows in Combustion Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Chen, K.-H.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop an efficient numerical algorithm with unstructured grids for the computation of three-dimensional chemical reacting flows that are known to occur in combustion components of propulsion systems. During the grant period (1996 to 1999), two companion codes have been developed and various numerical and physical models were implemented into the two codes.

  9. Tetracycline removal and effect on the formation and degradation of extracellular polymeric substances and volatile fatty acids in the process of hydrogen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Guangying; Hao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Jing; Liu, Rutao; Liu, Chunguang

    2016-07-01

    Many research indicate antibiotics show adverse effect on methane fermentation, while few research focus on their effect on hydrogen fermentation. The present study aimed to gain insight of the effect of antibiotics on hydrogen fermentation with waste sludge and corn straw as substrate. For this purpose, tetracycline, as a model, was investigated with regard to tetracycline removal, hydrogen production, interaction with extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) of substrate and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) on concentration and composition. Results show that tetracycline could be removed efficiently by hydrogen fermentation, and relative low-dose tetracycline (200mg/l) exposure affects little on hydrogen production. While tetracycline exposure could change hydrogen fermentation from butyric acid-type to propionic acid-type depending on tetracycline level. Based upon three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy and UV-vis tetracycline changed the component and content of EPSs, and static quenching was the main mechanism between EPSs with tetracycline.

  10. A coulometric method for determining substances that interfere with the measurement of water in oils and other chemicals by the Karl Fischer method.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Sam A; Paulsen, Jeffery; Park, Edward

    2002-12-01

    In order to fulfill a need to measure water in crude oils containing materials that interfere with the measurement of water by the Karl Fischer method, by reacting with iodine or iodide, a coulometric method has been developed and validated using 0.1 mol L(-1) Sodium thiosulfate as a calibrant. These interfering substances were measured in water-mass-equivalents, which were expressed as the mass of water that reacts with an equal mass of iodine in the Karl Fischer method. The SO(2)-free reagent that has been modified reacts quantitatively with sodium thiosulfate, cysteine and ascorbic acid but does not react with vinyl acetate. The level of interfering substances was measured in five transformer oils (including Reference Materials RM 8506 and RM 8507), a high and a low sulfur crude oil (Standard Reference Materials SRM 2721 and SRM 2722 respectively), a white oil, a high-vacuum oil and a high-viscosity base-stock oil. One oil contained less than 10 mg kg(-1) (water-mass-equivalents of interfering substances in oil) and two oils (RM 8507 and Drakeol 35) contained no measurable amount of interfering material (<0.2 mg kg(-1)). SRM 2271, a sour crude oil contained 834 mg kg(-1) (standard deviation (SD)=25 mg kg(-1)) (water-mass-equivalents of interfering substances in oil). Approximately 20% of this material was volatile and an additional 20% appeared to undergo some degradation (possibly oxidation) once the oil was exposed to air. These results indicate that this is a general method for measuring substances in oils that react with iodine and that it is capable of measuring in a variety of oils, using commercial instrumentation, interfering substances that inflate water measurements.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with murine teratocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, P N; Levinson, J R; Williams, V E; McDevitt, H O

    1979-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were produced in vitro by fusing mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from a rat immunized with the C3H mouse teratocarcinoma C86-S1. After the fusion two clones were chosen for further analysis. The first clone, 3C4-10, produced an antibody recognizing an antigen with a distribution restricted to teratocarcinoma cell lines, an endoderm cell line, and a neuroblastoma. The second clone, 4A1-9, produced an antibody that reacted with all cultured murine cells tested and adult brain. Neither antibody reacted with preimplantation embryos. The 3C4-10 antibody recognized an antigen associated with proteins. The apparent molecular weight of the 3C4-10 antigen was greater than 100,000. PMID:284353

  12. Spectral simulations of reacting turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, Patrick A.; Givi, Peyman

    1991-01-01

    Spectral methods for simulating flows are reviewed, emphasizing their recent applications to reacting flow problems. Various classifications of spectral methods and their convergence properties are described and the 'spectral element' method is presented, highlighting its flexibility in dealing with complex flow geometries. The applications considered include chemical reactions in homogeneous turbulence, temporally evolving mixing layers, variable-density simulations, nonequilibrium chemistry, and spatially evolving mixing layers.

  13. Numerical Methods For Chemically Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveque, R. J.; Yee, H. C.

    1990-01-01

    Issues related to numerical stability, accuracy, and resolution discussed. Technical memorandum presents issues in numerical solution of hyperbolic conservation laws containing "stiff" (relatively large and rapidly changing) source terms. Such equations often used to represent chemically reacting flows. Usually solved by finite-difference numerical methods. Source terms generally necessitate use of small time and/or space steps to obtain sufficient resolution, especially at discontinuities, where incorrect mathematical modeling results in unphysical solutions.

  14. A random distribution reacting mixing layer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Richard A.; Marek, C. John; Myrabo, Leik N.; Nagamatsu, Henry T.

    1994-01-01

    A methodology for simulation of molecular mixing, and the resulting velocity and temperature fields has been developed. The ideas are applied to the flow conditions present in the NASA Lewis Research Center Planar Reacting Shear Layer (PRSL) facility, and results compared to experimental data. A gaussian transverse turbulent velocity distribution is used in conjunction with a linearly increasing time scale to describe the mixing of different regions of the flow. Equilibrium reaction calculations are then performed on the mix to arrive at a new species composition and temperature. Velocities are determined through summation of momentum contributions. The analysis indicates a combustion efficiency of the order of 80 percent for the reacting mixing layer, and a turbulent Schmidt number of 2/3. The success of the model is attributed to the simulation of large-scale transport of fluid. The favorable comparison shows that a relatively quick and simple PC calculation is capable of simulating the basic flow structure in the reacting and nonreacting shear layer present in the facility given basic assumptions about turbulence properties.

  15. A constitutive theory of reacting electrolyte mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Reis, Martina; Wang, Yongqi; Bono Maurizio Sacchi Bassi, Adalberto

    2013-11-01

    A constitutive theory of reacting electrolyte mixtures is formulated. The intermolecular interactions among the constituents of the mixture are accounted for through additional freedom degrees to each constituent of the mixture. Balance equations for polar reacting continuum mixtures are accordingly formulated and a proper set of constitutive equations is derived with basis in the Müller-Liu formulation of the second law of thermodynamics. Moreover, the non-equilibrium and equilibrium responses of the reacting mixture are investigated in detail by emphasizing the inner and reactive structures of the medium. From the balance laws and constitutive relations, the effects of molecular structure of constituents upon the fluid flow are studied. It is also demonstrated that the local thermodynamic equilibrium state can be reached without imposing that the set of independent constitutive variables is time independent, neither spatially homogeneous nor null. The resulting constitutive relations presented throughout this work are of relevance to many practical applications, such as swelling of clays, developing of bio and polymeric membranes, and use of electrorheological fluids in industrial processes. The first author acknowledges financial support from National Counsel of Technological and Scientific Development (CNPq) and German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD).

  16. Numerical Prediction of Non-Reacting and Reacting Flow in a Model Gas Turbine Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davoudzadeh, Farhad; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2005-01-01

    The three-dimensional, viscous, turbulent, reacting and non-reacting flow characteristics of a model gas turbine combustor operating on air/methane are simulated via an unstructured and massively parallel Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code. This serves to demonstrate the capabilities of the code for design and analysis of real combustor engines. The effects of some design features of combustors are examined. In addition, the computed results are validated against experimental data.

  17. Humic substances enhance chlorothalonil phototransformation via photoreduction and energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Porras, Jazmín; Fernández, Jhon J; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A; Richard, Claire

    2014-02-18

    The photodegradation of chlorothalonil, a polychlorinated aromatic fungicide widely used in agriculture, was investigated under ultraviolet-visible irradiation in the presence and absence of different humic substances that significantly enhance the chlorothalonil phototransformation. On the basis of a kinetic model, an analytical study, the effect of scavengers, the chlorothalonil phosphorescence measurement, and varying irradiation conditions, it was possible to demonstrate that this accelerating effect is due to their capacity to reduce the chlorothalonil triplet state via H-donor reaction and to energy transfer from the triplet humic to ground state chlorothalonil. Energy transfer occurs at wavelengths below 450 nm and accounts for up to 30% of the reaction in deoxygenated medium upon irradiation with polychromatic light (300-450 nm). This process is more important with Elliott humic and fulvic acids and with humic acids extracted from natural carbonaceous material than with Nordic NOM and Pahokee peat humic acids. The obtained results are of high relevance to understanding the processes involved in chlorothalonil phototransformation and the photoreactivity of humic substances. Chlorothalonil is one of the rare molecules shown to react by energy transfer from excited humic substances.

  18. Direct numerical simulation of chemically reacting turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyauchi, Toshio; Tanahashi, Mamoru

    In this paper, we present two results of direct numerical simulation of chemically reacting flows. One is direct numerical simulation of chemically reacting two-dimensional mixing layer and the other is direct numerical simulation of chemically reacting compressible isotropic turbulence. As for the mixing layer, a low Mach number approximation was used to take into account the variable density effects on the flow fields and to clarify the effects of heat release and density difference of a mean flow. In the case of density difference, expansion and baroclinic torque has a negative contribution to the local vorticity transport in the high density side and a positive contribution in the low density side which results in an asymmetric vortical structure structure. Thes density difference suppresses the growth of mixing layer and causes the overshoot of mean velocity only in the high density side which coincides with an experimental result. Coupling effects of heat release and desnity difference are also investigated. As for the homogeneous turbulence, fully compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved to clarify the interaction between turbulence and chemical reaction in turbulent diffusion flame. The chemical reaction is suppressed by the increase of heat release because of the decrease of density and local Reynolds number. However, the decay of enstrophy with heat release is slower than that without heat release because of strong baroclinic torque which is generated near the reaction zone. Also, large amount of heat release causes increase in turbulent energy through the pressure dilatation term. The pressure dilatation term shows the periodic fluctuation which has an acoustic time scale. The fluctuation is enhanced by the heat release and travels in the turbulent field as pressure and dilatation waves.

  19. Process for reacting alcohols and olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.T.; Nevitt, T.D.

    1985-01-29

    A method for producing branched aliphatic hydrocarbons by reacting H/sub 2/ with a C/sub 1/-C/sub 6/ alcohol and/or a C/sub 2/-C/sub 6/ olefin in the presence of a cadmium component and a support which comprises an amorphous refractory inorganic oxide, a pillared smectite or vermiculite clay, a molecular sieve consisting essentially of unexchanged or cation-exchanged chabazite, clinoptilite, zeolite A, zeolite L, zeolite X, zeolite Y, ultrastable zeolite Y, or crystalline borosilicate molecular sieve, or a combination thereof.

  20. 75 FR 76756 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... substances: Drug Schedule Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid (2010) I Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I Methamphetamine... (7370), and Methamphetamine (1105) only, the company manufactures these controlled substances in...

  1. 76 FR 35243 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid (2010) I Amphetamine... controlled substances in bulk for distribution and sale to its customers for Amphetamine (1100). The...

  2. Computation of Reacting Flows in Combustion Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Chen, Kuo-Huey

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to develop an efficient three-dimensional computer code for chemically reacting flows. The main computer code developed is ALLSPD-3D. The ALLSPD-3D computer program is developed for the calculation of three-dimensional, chemically reacting flows with sprays. The ALL-SPD code employs a coupled, strongly implicit solution procedure for turbulent spray combustion flows. A stochastic droplet model and an efficient method for treatment of the spray source terms in the gas-phase equations are used to calculate the evaporating liquid sprays. The chemistry treatment in the code is general enough that an arbitrary number of reaction and species can be defined by the users. Also, it is written in generalized curvilinear coordinates with both multi-block and flexible internal blockage capabilities to handle complex geometries. In addition, for general industrial combustion applications, the code provides both dilution and transpiration cooling capabilities. The ALLSPD algorithm, which employs the preconditioning and eigenvalue rescaling techniques, is capable of providing efficient solution for flows with a wide range of Mach numbers. Although written for three-dimensional flows in general, the code can be used for two-dimensional and axisymmetric flow computations as well. The code is written in such a way that it can be run in various computer platforms (supercomputers, workstations and parallel processors) and the GUI (Graphical User Interface) should provide a user-friendly tool in setting up and running the code.

  3. Jet Mixing in a Reacting Cylindrical Crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, M. Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the mixing of air jets into the hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone. The mixing, as a result, occurs in a reacting environment with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from round orifices. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture without swirl to mixing modules consisting of 8, 9, 10, and 12 holes at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and a jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio of 2.5. Concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, and HC are obtained upstream, downstream, and within the orifice plane. O2 profiles indicate jet penetration while CO2, CO, and HC profiles depict the extent of reaction. Jet penetration is observed to be a function of the number of orifices and is found to affect the mixing in the reacting system. The results demonstrate that one module (the 12-hole) produces near-optimal penetration defined here as a jet penetration closest to the module half-radius, and hence the best uniform mixture at a plane one duct radius from the orifice leading edge.

  4. REAC/TS handles hot topics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    William R. Bibb, MD is the director of research and waste management at a unique facility that deals exclusively in radiation accidents-the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site(REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tenn. REAC/TS is housed in the 400-bed Oak Ridge Methodist Medical Center. It was instituted seven years ago to provide emergency care for more than 16,000 workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratories in the event of a nuclear accident. It has a medical staff of eight on call 24 hours a day. They are still waiting for their first accident patient. Nonetheless, the REAC/TS staff manages to keep occupied. The facility, which is operated by Oak Ridge Associated Universities for the Department of Energy, has become something of a teaching hospital, and the staff conducts classes on treating radiation-exposure accidents. The week-long courses are free and accommodate 30 health professionals at a time. In seven years of operation, the facility has graduated thousands of physicians, nurses, and paramedics.

  5. Nitrite fixation by humic substances: Nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance evidence for potential intermediates in chemodenitrification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Mikita, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Studies have suggested that NO2/-, produced during nitrification and denitrification, can become incorporated into soil organic matter and, in one of the processes associated with chemodenitrification, react with organic matter to form trace N gases, including N2O. To gain an understanding of the nitrosation chemistry on a molecular level, soil and aquatic humic substances were reacted with 15N-labeled NaNO2, and analyzed by liquid phase 15N and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) Pahokee peat and peat humic acid were also reacted with Na15NO2 and analyzed by solid-state 15N NMR. In Suwannee River, Armadale, and Laurentian fulvic acids, phenolic rings and activated methylene groups underwent nitrosation to form nitrosophenols (quinone monoximes) and ketoximes, respectively. The oximes underwent Beckmann rearrangements to 2??amides, and Beckmann fragmentations to nitriles. The nitriles in turn underwent hydrolysis to 1??amides. Peaks tentatively identified as imine, indophenol, or azoxybenzene nitrogens were clearly present in spectra of samples nitrosated at pH 6 but diminished at pH 3. The 15N NMR spectrum of the peat humic acid exhibited peaks corresponding with N-nitroso groups in addition to nitrosophenols, ketoximes, and secondary Beckmann reaction products. Formation of N-nitroso groups was more significant in the whole peat compared with the peat humic acid. Carbon-13 NMR analyses also indicated the occurrence of nitrosative demethoxylation in peat and soil humic acids. Reaction of 15N-NH3 fixated fulvic acid with unlabeled NO2/- resulted in nitrosative deamination of aminohydroquinone N, suggesting a previously unrecognized pathway for production of N2 gas in soils fertilized with NH3.Studies have suggested that NO2-, produced during nitrification and denitrification, can become incorporated into soil organic matter and, in one of the processes associated with chemodenitrification, react with organic

  6. Effect of biotin and pantothenic acid on performance and concentrations of avidin-binding substances in blood and milk of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gonzalo; Brown, Alston N; Teets, Christy L

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesized that pantothenic acid reduces the absorption of biotin in lactating dairy cows. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the plausible interaction between biotin and pantothenic acid on production performance and concentration of avidin-binding substances (ABS), an indicator of biotin concentration, in blood and milk of lactating dairy cows. Eight primiparous and 16 multiparous Holstein cows were assigned to 1 of 4 diet sequences in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design with 18-d periods. Cows were housed in a freestall barn and fed once daily (0730 h) by means of a Calan gate system (American Calan Inc., Northwood, NH). Treatments consisted of a control diet that contained no B-vitamins, a biotin diet that contained 0.87 mg of biotin per kilogram of dry matter (DM), a pantothenic acid diet that contained 21 mg of pantothenic acid per kilogram of DM, and a biotin plus pantothenic acid diet that contained 0.87 mg of biotin and 21 mg of calcium pantothenic acid per kilogram of DM. Four different concentrates were prepared in a commercial feed mill. These concentrates were mixed with corn silage and grass hay and delivered ad libitum as a total mixed ration. Biotin supplementation did not affect DM intake, milk yield, or milk fat, protein, lactose, and milk-urea-nitrogen concentrations. Fat, protein, and lactose yields were not affected by treatments. The fat-to-protein ratio was <1 and similar among all treatments. Biotin supplementation did not increase the concentration of ABS in plasma. The supplementation of pantothenic acid did not affect the concentration of ABS in plasma when either supplemented alone or in combination with biotin. Biotin supplementation increased the concentration of ABS in milk relative to control. Contrary to our hypothesis, the supplementation of pantothenic acid did not decrease the concentration of ABS in milk relative to the control. When cows were supplemented with both biotin and pantothenic acid, the

  7. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and substance P in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis: Effects of vagal stimulation on GAD immunoreactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Gibbs, M. A.; Mehler, W. R.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by means of its biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the neuropeptide substance P in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), and gelatinous nucleus (GEL). In addition, electrical stimulation was applied to the night vagus nerve at the cervical level to assess the effects on GAD-immunoreactivity (GAR-IR). GAD-IR terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. They showed pronounced density at the level of the ASP and gradual decrease towards the solitary complex. Nerve cells were not labelled in our preparations. Ultrastructural studies showed symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contracts between labelled terminals and non-immunoreactive dendrites, axons, or neurons. Some of the labelled terminals contained both clear- and dense-core vesicles. Our preliminary findings, after electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, revealed a bilateral decrease of GAD-IR that was particularly evident at the level of the ASP. SP-immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed varying densities in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. In our preparations, the lateral sub-division of the NTS showed the greatest accumulation. The ASP showed medium density of immunoreactive varicosities and terminals and the AP and GEL displayed scattered varicose axon terminals. The electron microscopy revealed that all immunoreactive terminals contained clear-core vesicles which make symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contact with unlabelled dendrites. It is suggested that the GABAergic terminals might correspond to vagal afferent projections and that GAD/GABA and substance P might be co-localized in the same terminal allowing the possibility of a regulated release of the transmitters in relation to demands.

  8. Theoretical kinetic computations in complex reacting systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1986-01-01

    Nasa Lewis' studies of complex reacting systems at high temperature are discussed. The changes which occur are the result of many different chemical reactions occurring at the same time. Both an experimental and a theoretical approach are needed to fully understand what happens in these systems. The latter approach is discussed. The differential equations which describe the chemical and thermodynamic changes are given. Their solution by numerical techniques using a detailed chemical mechanism is described. Several different comparisons of computed results with experimental measurements are also given. These include the computation of (1) species concentration profiles in batch and flow reactions, (2) rocket performance in nozzle expansions, and (3) pressure versus time profiles in hydrocarbon ignition processes. The examples illustrate the use of detailed kinetic computations to elucidate a chemical mechanism and to compute practical quantities such as rocket performance, ignition delay times, and ignition lengths in flow processes.

  9. Equilibrium properties of chemically reacting gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The equilibrium energy, enthalpy, entropy, specific heat at constant volume and constant pressure, and the equation of state of the gas are all derived for chemically reacting gas mixtures in terms of the compressibility, the mol fractions, the thermodynamic properties of the pure gas components, and the change in zero point energy due to reaction. Results are illustrated for a simple diatomic dissociation reaction and nitrogen is used as an example. Next, a gas mixture resulting from combined diatomic dissociation and atomic ionization reactions is treated and, again, nitrogen is used as an example. A short discussion is given of the additional complexities involved when precise solutions for high-temperature air are desired, including effects caused by NO produced in shuffle reactions and by other trace species formed from CO2, H2O and Ar found in normal air.

  10. Pdf - Transport equations for chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollmann, W.

    1989-01-01

    The closure problem for the transport equations for pdf and the characteristic functions of turbulent, chemically reacting flows is addressed. The properties of the linear and closed equations for the characteristic functional for Eulerian and Lagrangian variables are established, and the closure problem for the finite-dimensional case is discussed for pdf and characteristic functions. It is shown that the closure for the scalar dissipation term in the pdf equation developed by Dopazo (1979) and Kollmann et al. (1982) results in a single integral, in contrast to the pdf, where double integration is required. Some recent results using pdf methods obtained for turbulent flows with combustion, including effects of chemical nonequilibrium, are discussed.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  12. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.H.

    1993-12-01

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  13. Quick-Mixing Studies Under Reacting Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, May Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    The low-NO(x) emitting potential of rich-burn/quick-mix/lean-burn )RQL) combustion makes it an attractive option for engines of future stratospheric aircraft. Because NO(x) formation is exponentially dependent on temperature, the success of the RQL combustor depends on minimizing high temperature stoichiometric pocket formation in the quick-mixing section. An experiment was designed and built, and tests were performed to characterize reaction and mixing properties of jets issuing from round orifices into a hot, fuel-rich crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct. The reactor operates on propane and presents a uniform, non-swirling mixture to the mixing modules. Modules consisting of round orifice configurations of 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, and 18 holes were evaluated at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and jet-to-mainstream mass-flaw ratio of 2.5. Temperatures and concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, HC, and NO(x) were obtained upstream, down-stream, and within the orifice plane to determine jet penetration as well as reaction processes. Jet penetration was a function of the number of orifices and affected the mixing in the reacting system. Of the six configurations tested, the 14-hole module produced jet penetration close to the module half-radius and yielded the best mixing and most complete combustion at a plane one duct diameter from the orifice leading edge. The results reveal that substantial reaction and heat release occur in the jet mixing zone when the entering effluent is hot and rich, and that the experiment as designed will serve to explore satisfactorily jet mixing behavior under realistic reacting conditions in future studies.

  14. Computation of high-speed reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clutter, James Keith

    A computational study has been conducted for high-speed reacting flows relevant to munition problems, including shock-induced combustion and gun muzzle blast. The theoretical model considers inviscid and viscous flows, multi-species, finite rate chemical reaction schemes, and turbulence. Both the physical and numerical aspects are investigated to determine their impact on simulation accuracy. A range of hydrogen and oxygen reaction mechanisms are evaluated for the shock-induced combustion flow scenario. Characteristics of the mechanisms such as the induction time, heat release rate, and second explosion limit are found to impact the accuracy of the computation. On the numerical side, reaction source term treatments, including logarithmic weighting and scaling modifications, are investigated to determine their effectiveness in addressing numerical errors caused by disparate length scales between chemical reactions and fluid dynamics. It is demonstrated that these techniques can enhance solution accuracy. Computations of shock-induced combustion have also been performed using a κ-ɛ model to account for the turbulent transport of species and heat. An algebraic model of the temperature fluctuations has been used to estimate the impact of the turbulent effect on the chemical reaction source terms. The turbulence effects when represented with the current models are found to be minimal in the shock-induced combustion flow investigated in the present work. For the gun system simulations, computations for both a large caliber howitzer and small caliber firearms are carried out. A reduced kinetic scheme and an algebraic turbulence model are employed. The present approach, which accounts for the chemical reaction aspects of the gun muzzle blast problem, is found to improve the prediction of peak overpressures and can capture the effects produced by small caliber firearm sound suppressors. The present study has established the numerical and physical requirements for

  15. Substance use - LSD

    MedlinePlus

    Substance abuse - LSD; Drug abuse - LSD; Drug use - LSD; Lysergic acid diethylamide; Hallucinogen - LSD ... LSD is a mind-altering drug. This means it acts on your brain (central nervous system) and changes your mood, behavior, and the way you relate to ...

  16. Chlorpromazine oligomer is a potentially active substance that inhibits human D-amino acid oxidase, product of a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Iwana, Sanae; Kawazoe, Tomoya; Park, Hwan Ki; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Ono, Koji; Yorita, Kazuko; Sakai, Takashi; Kusumi, Takenori; Fukui, Kiyoshi

    2008-12-01

    D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), a potential risk factor for schizophrenia, has been proposed to be involved in the decreased glutamatergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia. Here we show the inhibitory effect of an antipsychotic drug, chlorpromazine, on human DAO, which is consistent with previous reports using porcine DAO, although human DAO was inhibited to a lesser degree (K(i) = 0.7 mM) than porcine DAO. Since chlorpromazine is known to induce phototoxic or photoallergic reactions and also to be transformed into various metabolites, we examined the effects of white light-irradiated chlorpromazine on the enzymatic activity. Analytical methods including high-resolution mass spectrometry revealed that irradiation triggered the oligomerization of chlorpromazine molecules. The oligomerized chlorpromazine showed a mixed type inhibition with inhibition constants of low micromolar range, indicative of enhanced inhibition. Taken together, these results suggest that oligomerized chlorpromazine could act as an active substance that might contribute to the therapeutic effects of this drug.

  17. [Content of biologically active substances--selenium, flavonoids, ascorbic acid and chlorophyllin of Allium ursinum L and Allium victorialis L].

    PubMed

    Golubkina, N A; Malankina, E L; Kosheleva, O V; Solov'eva, A I

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of selenium, flavonoids, chlorophyll and vitamin C by Allium ursinum L. and Allium victorialis L. are studied. Allium victorialis L. is shown to accumulate twice more selenium and flavonoids compared to Allium ursinum L. Increase of insolation elevates the concentration of the element, flavonoids and ascorbic acid in plants. Selenium concentration in Allium victorialis L. after selenium fertilization is higher compared to Allium ursinum L. The results indicate the significance of Allium victorialis L. as a source of natural antioxidants: selenium, flavonoids and ascorbic acid.

  18. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and volatile compounds in chicken breast meat infused with plant extracts and subjected to electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Rababah, T; Hettiarachchy, N S; Horax, R; Cho, M J; Davis, B; Dickson, J

    2006-06-01

    The effect of irradiation on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and volatile compounds in raw and cooked nonirradiated and irradiated chicken breast meat infused with green tea and grape seed extracts was investigated. Chicken breast meat was vacuum infused with green tea extract (3,000 ppm), grape seed extract (3,000 ppm), or their combination (at a total of 6,000 ppm), irradiated with an electron beam, and stored at 5 degrees C for 12 d. The targeted irradiation dosage was 3.0 kGy and the average absorbed dosage was 3.12 kGy. Values of TBARS and volatile compound contents of raw and cooked chicken meat were determined during the 12-d storage period. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances values ranged from 15.5 to 71.4 mg of malondialdehyde/kg for nonirradiated raw chicken and 17.3 to 80.1 mg of malondialdehyde/kg for irradiated raw chicken. Values for cooked chicken ranged from 31.4 to 386.2 and 38.4 to 504.1 mg of malondialdehyde/kg for nonirradiated and irradiated chicken, respectively. Irradiation increased TBARS and hexanal values of controls and meat infused with plant extracts. Hexanal had the highest intensity of volatiles followed by pentanal and other volatiles. Cooking the samples significantly (P < 0.05) increased the amounts of TBARS and volatiles. Addition of plant extracts decreased the amount of TBARS as well as hexanal and pentanal values. Although irradiation increases lipid oxidation, infusion of chicken meat with plant extracts could reduce lipid oxidation caused by irradiation.

  19. Periodic Precipitation Patterns during Coalescence of Reacting Sessile Droplets.

    PubMed

    Jehannin, Marie; Charton, Sophie; Karpitschka, Stefan; Zemb, Thomas; Möhwald, Helmuth; Riegler, Hans

    2015-10-27

    The coalescence behavior of two sessile drops that contain different chemical reactants (cerium nitrate and oxalic acid) and its impact on the formation of the solid precipitate (cerium oxalate) are investigated. With different liquids, the surface tension difference in the moment of drop-drop contact can induce a Marangoni flow. This flow can strongly influence the drop-drop coalescence behavior and thus, with reacting liquids, also the reaction and its products (through the liquid mixing). In our study we find three distinctly different coalescence behaviors ("barrier", "intermediate", "noncoalescence"), in contrast to only two behaviors that were observed in the case of nonreacting liquids. The amount of liquid mixing and thus the precipitation rate are very different for the three cases. The "intermediate" case, which exhibits the strongest mixing, has been studied in more detail. For high oxalic acid concentrations, mainly needle-like aggregates, and for low concentrations, mainly flower-like precipitate morphologies are obtained. In a transition range of the oxalic acid concentration, both morphologies can be produced. With the applied coalescence conditions, the different aggregate particles are arranged and fixed in a precipitate raft in a regular, periodic line pattern. This confirms the drop-drop coalescence configuration as a convection-reaction-diffusion system, which can have stationary as well as oscillatory behavior depending on the system parameters.

  20. Uncertainty quantification in reacting flow modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Le MaÒitre, Olivier P.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Knio, Omar M.; Ghanem, Roger Georges; Najm, Habib N.

    2003-10-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) in the computational modeling of physical systems is important for scientific investigation, engineering design, and model validation. In this work we develop techniques for UQ based on spectral and pseudo-spectral polynomial chaos (PC) expansions, and we apply these constructions in computations of reacting flow. We develop and compare both intrusive and non-intrusive spectral PC techniques. In the intrusive construction, the deterministic model equations are reformulated using Galerkin projection into a set of equations for the time evolution of the field variable PC expansion mode strengths. The mode strengths relate specific parametric uncertainties to their effects on model outputs. The non-intrusive construction uses sampling of many realizations of the original deterministic model, and projects the resulting statistics onto the PC modes, arriving at the PC expansions of the model outputs. We investigate and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, and identify their utility under different conditions. We also outline areas where ongoing and future research are needed to address challenges with both approaches.

  1. Comparison of reacting and non-reacting shear layers at a high subsonic Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.; Jones, R. A.; Smith, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The flow field in a hydrogen-fueled planar reacting shear layer was measured with an LDV system and is compared with a similar air to air case without combustion. Measurements were made with a speed ratio of 0.34 with the highspeed stream at Mach 0.71. They show that the shear layer with reaction grows faster than one without, and both cases are within the range of data scatter presented by the established database. The coupling between the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulence components inside the shear layer is slow, and reaction only increased it slightly. However, a more organized pattern of the Reynolds stress is present in the reacting shear layer, possibly as a result of larger scale structure formation in the layer associated with heat release.

  2. Sources, fates, toxicity, and risks of trifluoroacetic acid and its salts: Relevance to substances regulated under the Montreal and Kyoto Protocols.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Keith R; Velders, Guus J M; Wilson, Stephen R; Madronich, Sasha; Longstreth, Janice; Aucamp, Pieter J; Bornman, Janet F

    2016-01-01

    Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) is a breakdown product of several hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC), regulated under the Montreal Protocol (MP), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFC) used mainly as refrigerants. Trifluoroacetic acid is (1) produced naturally and synthetically, (2) used in the chemical industry, and (3) a potential environmental breakdown product of a large number (>1 million) chemicals, including pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and polymers. The contribution of these chemicals to global amounts of TFA is uncertain, in contrast to that from HCFC and HFC regulated under the MP. TFA salts are stable in the environment and accumulate in terminal sinks such as playas, salt lakes, and oceans, where the only process for loss of water is evaporation. Total contribution to existing amounts of TFA in the oceans as a result of the continued use of HCFCs, HFCs, and hydrofluoroolefines (HFOs) up to 2050 is estimated to be a small fraction (<7.5%) of the approximately 0.2 μg acid equivalents/L estimated to be present at the start of the millennium. As an acid or as a salt TFA is low to moderately toxic to a range of organisms. Based on current projections of future use of HCFCs and HFCs, the amount of TFA formed in the troposphere from substances regulated under the MP is too small to be a risk to the health of humans and environment. However, the formation of TFA derived from degradation of HCFC and HFC warrants continued attention, in part because of a long environmental lifetime and due many other potential but highly uncertain sources.

  3. Low Plasma Eicosapentaenoic Acid Levels are Associated with Elevated Trait Aggression and Impulsivity in Major Depressive Disorder with a History of Comorbid Substance Use Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Anne Mette; Lauritzen, Lotte; Galfalvy, Hanga C.; Cooper, Thomas B.; Oquendo, Maria A.; Grunebaum, Michael F.; Mann, J. John; Sublette, M. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with low levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), holding promise for new perspectives on disease etiology and treatment targets. As aggressive and impulsive behaviors are associated with low omega-3 PUFA levels in some clinical contexts, we investigated plasma PUFA relationships with trait aggression and impulsivity in patients with MDD. Medication-free MDD patients (n=48) and healthy volunteers (HV, n=35) were assessed with the Brown-Goodwin Aggression Inventory. A subset (MDD, n=39; HV, n=33) completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. Plasma PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), and arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) were quantified and ln-transformed to mitigate distributional skew. Ln-transformed PUFA (lnPUFA) levels were predictors in regression models, with aggression or impulsivity scores as outcomes, and cofactors of sex and diagnostic status (MDD with or without a history of substance use disorder [SUD], or HV). Interactions were tested between relevant PUFAs and diagnostic status. Additional analyses explored possible confounds of depression severity, self-reported childhood abuse history, and, in MDD patients, suicide attempt history. Among PUFA, lnEPA but not lnDHA predicted aggression (F1,76=12.493, p=0.001), and impulsivity (F1,65=5.598, p=0.021), with interactions between lnEPA and history of SUD for both aggression (F1,76=7.941, p=0.001) and impulsivity (F1,65=3.485, p=0.037). Results remained significant when adjusted for childhood abuse, depression severity, or history of suicide attempt. In conclusion, low EPA levels were associated with aggression and impulsivity only in patients with MDD and comorbid SUD, even though in most cases SUD was in full sustained remission. PMID:25017608

  4. Planarians require an intact brain to behaviorally react to cocaine, but not to react to nicotine.

    PubMed

    Pagán, O R; Deats, S; Baker, D; Montgomery, E; Wilk, G; Tenaglia, M; Semon, J

    2013-08-29

    Planarians possess a rudimentary brain with many features in common with vertebrate brains. They also display a remarkable capacity for tissue regeneration including the complete regeneration of the nervous system. Using the induction of planarian seizure-like movements (pSLMs) as a behavioral endpoint, we demonstrate that an intact nervous system is necessary for this organism to react to cocaine exposure, but not necessary to react to nicotine administration. Decapitated planarians (Girardia tigrina) display pSLMs indistinguishable from intact worms when exposed to nicotine, but cocaine-induced pSLMs are reduced by about 95% upon decapitation. Decapitated worms recover their normal sensitivity to cocaine within 5 days after head amputation. In worms where half of the brain was removed or partially dissected, the expression of cocaine-induced pSLMs was reduced by approximately 75%. Similar amputations at the level of the tail did not show a significant decrease to cocaine exposure. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first report that explores how regenerating planarians react to the exposure of cocaine.

  5. Emissions of the natural acidic substance in the acid rain region: Dimethyl sulfide and hydrogen sulfide in the region of Xiamen, China

    SciTech Connect

    Yubao Wang; Miaoqin Lu

    1996-12-31

    The global anthropogenic emissions of sulfur, mainly SO2, are relatively well studied for most of the industrialized world, and relatively little is known to date about natural sulfur emission sources, such as, coastal waters and wetland. The most important atmospheric sulfur compounds originating from biogeochemical sources are DMS and H{sub 2}S. Previous studies suggest that biogenic DMS is mainly emitted from oceanic phytoplankton species. The global emission of sulfur by this process was estimated to be 40 Tg S/year. Major sources of biogenic H{sub 2}S in the atmosphere are believed to be bacterial sulfate reduction in anoxic soils and degradation of organic matter. The mentioned reduced sulfur compounds are partially oxidation in the troposphere to SO{sub 2} and further to sulfur acid, another strong acid produced from DMS oxidation is methane sulphonic acid (CH{sub 3}S(O{sub 2})OH). These compounds are strong acid and will influence the pH of precipitation and will be the important impact in acid rain phenomena.

  6. Geochemical behaviour of palladium in soils and Pd/PdO model substances in the presence of the organic complexing agents L-methionine and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Zereini, Fathi; Wiseman, Clare L S; Vang, My; Albers, Peter; Schneider, Wolfgang; Schindl, Roland; Leopold, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Risk assessments of platinum group metal (PGE) emissions, notably those of platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd) and rhodium (Rh), have been mostly based on data regarding the metallic forms used in vehicular exhaust converters, known to be virtually biologically inert and immobile. To adequately assess the potential impacts of PGE, however, data on the chemical behaviour of these metals under ambient conditions post-emission is needed. Complexing agents with a high affinity for metals in the environment are hypothesized to contribute to an increased bioaccessibility of PGE. The purpose of this study is to examine the modulating effects of the organic complexing agents, L-methionine and citric acid, on the geochemical behavior of Pd in soils and model substances (Pd black and PdO). Batch experimental tests were conducted with soils and model substances to examine the impacts of the concentration of complexing agents, pH and length of extraction period on Pd solubility and its chemical transformation. Particle surface chemistry was examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) on samples treated with solutions under various conditions, including low and high O2 levels. Pd was observed to be more soluble in the presence of organic complexing agents, compared to Pt and Rh. Pd in soils was more readily solubilized with organic complexing agents compared to the model substances. After 7 days of extraction, L-methionine (0.1 M) treated soil and Pd black samples, for instance, had mean soluble Pd fractions of 12.4 ± 5.9% and 0.554 ± 0.024%, respectively. Surface chemistry analyses (XPS) confirmed the oxidation of metallic Pd surfaces when treated with organic complexing agents. The type of organic complexing agent used for experimental purposes was observed to be the most important factor influencing solubility, followed by solution pH and time of extraction. The results demonstrate that metallic Pd can be transformed into more bioaccessible species in the presence of

  7. Enhancement effect of pre-reacted glass on strength of glass-ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Monmaturapoj, Naruporn; Soodsawang, Wiwaporn; Tanodekaew, Siriporn

    2012-02-03

    In this paper, we report on the enhanced strength of glass ionomer cement (GIC) by using the process of pre acid-base reaction and spray drying in glass preparation. The pre acid-base reaction was induced by prior mixing of the glass powder with poly(alkenoic acid). The weight ratios of glass powder to poly(alkenoic acid) were varied to investigate the extent of the pre acid-base reaction of the glass. The effect of the spray drying process which produced spherical glass particles on cement strength was also studied and discussed. The results show that adding 2%-wt of poly(alkenoic acid) liquid in the pre-reacted step improved cement strength. GICs prepared using a mixture of pre-reacted glass with both spherical and irregular powders at 60:40 by weight exhibited the highest compressive strength at 138.64±7.73 MPa. It was concluded that glass ionomer cements containing pre-reacted glass with mixed glass morphology using both spherical and irregular forms are promising as restorative dental materials with improved mechanical properties and handling characteristics.

  8. Characterization of the International Humic Substances Society standard and reference fulvic and humic acids by solution state carbon-13 (13C) and hydrogen-1 (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Folan, Daniel W.; MacCarthy, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Standard and reference samples of the International Humic Substances Society have been characterized by solution state carbon-13 and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Samples included the Suwannee River, soil, and peat standard fulvic and humic acids, the Leonardite standard humic acid, the Nordic aquatic reference fulvic and humic acids, and the Summit Hill soil reference humic acid. Aqueous-solution carbon-13 NMR analyses included the measurement of spin-lattice relaxation times, measurement of nuclear Overhauser enhancement factors, measurement of quantitative carbon distributions, recording of attached proton test spectra, and recording of spectra under nonquantitative conditions. Distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer carbon-13 NMR spectra also were recorded on the Suwannee River fulvic acid in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide. Hydrogen-1 NMR spectra were recorded on sodium salts of the samples in deuterium oxide. The carbon aromaticities of the samples ranged from 0.24 for the Suwannee River fulvic acid to 0.58 for the Leonardite humic acid.

  9. A Validation Summary of the NCC Turbulent Reacting/non-reacting Spray Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.; Liu, N.-S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This pper provides a validation summary of the spray computations performed as a part of the NCC (National Combustion Code) development activity. NCC is being developed with the aim of advancing the current prediction tools used in the design of advanced technology combustors based on the multidimensional computational methods. The solution procedure combines the novelty of the application of the scalar Monte Carlo PDF (Probability Density Function) method to the modeling of turbulent spray flames with the ability to perform the computations on unstructured grids with parallel computing. The calculation procedure was applied to predict the flow properties of three different spray cases. One is a nonswirling unconfined reacting spray, the second is a nonswirling unconfined nonreacting spray, and the third is a confined swirl-stabilized spray flame. The comparisons involving both gas-phase and droplet velocities, droplet size distributions, and gas-phase temperatures show reasonable agreement with the available experimental data. The comparisons involve both the results obtained from the use of the Monte Carlo PDF method as well as those obtained from the conventional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solution. Detailed comparisons in the case of a reacting nonswirling spray clearly highlight the importance of chemistry/turbulence interactions in the modeling of reacting sprays. The results from the PDF and non-PDF methods were found to be markedly different and the PDF solution is closer to the reported experimental data. The PDF computations predict that most of the combustion occurs in a predominantly diffusion-flame environment. However, the non-PDF solution predicts incorrectly that the combustion occurs in a predominantly vaporization-controlled regime. The Monte Carlo temperature distribution shows that the functional form of the PDF for the temperature fluctuations varies substantially from point to point. The results also bring to the fore some of the

  10. A Course in Transport Phenomena in Multicomponent, Multiphase, Reacting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carbonell, R. G.; Whitaker, S.

    1978-01-01

    This course concentrates on a rigorous development of the multicomponent transport equations, boundary conditions at phase interfaces, and volume-averaged transport equations for multiphase reacting systems. (BB)

  11. β-Boswellic acid, a bioactive substance used in food supplements, inhibits protein synthesis by targeting the ribosomal machinery.

    PubMed

    Casapullo, A; Cassiano, C; Capolupo, A; Del Gaudio, F; Esposito, R; Tosco, A; Riccio, R; Monti, M C

    2016-09-01

    The Boswellia gum resin extracts have been used in traditional medicines because of their remarkable anti-inflammatory properties. Nowadays, these extracts are on the market as food supplements. β-Boswellic acid (βBA) is one of the main pentacyclic triterpene components, among the family of BAs, of the Boswellia gum resins. BAs have been broadly studied and are well known for their wide anti-inflammatory and potential anticancer properties. In this paper, a mass spectrometry-based chemoproteomic approach has been applied to characterize the whole βBA interacting profile. Among the large numbers of proteins fished out, proteasome, 14-3-3 and some ribosomal proteins were considered the most interesting targets strictly connected to the modulation of the cancer progression. In particular, because of their recent assessment as innovative chemotherapeutic targets, the ribosomal proteins were considered the most attractive βBA partners, and the biological role of their interaction with the natural compound has been evaluated. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Gas and drop behavior in reacting and non-reacting air-blast atomizer sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonell, Vincent G.; Samuelsen, Scott

    1991-01-01

    A detailed study of the two-phase flow produced by a gas-turbine air-blast atomizer is performed with the goal of identifying the interaction between the two phases for both nonreacting and reacting conditions. A two-component phase Doppler interferometry is utilized to characterize three flowfields produced by the atomizer: (1) the single-phase flow, (2) the two-phase nonreacting spray, and (3) the two-phase reacting spray. Measurements of the mean and fluctuating axial and azimuthal velocities for each phase are obtained. In addition, the droplet size distribution, volume flux, and concentration are measured. The results reveal the strong influence of the dispersed phase on the gas, and the influence of reaction on both the gas and the droplet field. The presence of the spray significantly alters the inlet condition of the atomizer. With this alteration quantified, it is possible to deduce that the inertia associated with the dispersed phase damps the fluctuating velocities of the gas. Reaction reduces the volume flux of the droplets, broadens the local volume distribution of the droplets in the region of the reaction zone, increases the axial velocities and radial spread of the gas, and increases the anisotropy in the region of the reaction zone.

  13. Gas and drop behavior in reacting and non-reacting air-blast atomizer sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonell, Vincent G.; Samuelsen, Scott

    1991-10-01

    A detailed study of the two-phase flow produced by a gas-turbine air-blast atomizer is performed with the goal of identifying the interaction between the two phases for both nonreacting and reacting conditions. A two-component phase Doppler interferometry is utilized to characterize three flowfields produced by the atomizer: (1) the single-phase flow, (2) the two-phase nonreacting spray, and (3) the two-phase reacting spray. Measurements of the mean and fluctuating axial and azimuthal velocities for each phase are obtained. In addition, the droplet size distribution, volume flux, and concentration are measured. The results reveal the strong influence of the dispersed phase on the gas, and the influence of reaction on both the gas and the droplet field. The presence of the spray significantly alters the inlet condition of the atomizer. With this alteration quantified, it is possible to deduce that the inertia associated with the dispersed phase damps the fluctuating velocities of the gas. Reaction reduces the volume flux of the droplets, broadens the local volume distribution of the droplets in the region of the reaction zone, increases the axial velocities and radial spread of the gas, and increases the anisotropy in the region of the reaction zone.

  14. Low plasma eicosapentaenoic acid levels are associated with elevated trait aggression and impulsivity in major depressive disorder with a history of comorbid substance use disorder.

    PubMed

    Beier, Anne Mette; Lauritzen, Lotte; Galfalvy, Hanga C; Cooper, Thomas B; Oquendo, Maria A; Grunebaum, Michael F; Mann, J John; Sublette, M Elizabeth

    2014-10-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with low levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), holding promise for new perspectives on disease etiology and treatment targets. As aggressive and impulsive behaviors are associated with low omega-3 PUFA levels in some clinical contexts, we investigated plasma PUFA relationships with trait aggression and impulsivity in patients with MDD. Medication-free MDD patients (n = 48) and healthy volunteers (HV, n = 35) were assessed with the Brown-Goodwin Aggression Inventory. A subset (MDD, n = 39; HV, n = 33) completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. Plasma PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), and arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) were quantified and ln-transformed to mitigate distributional skew. Ln-transformed PUFA (lnPUFA) levels were predictors in regression models, with aggression or impulsivity scores as outcomes, and cofactors of sex and diagnostic status (MDD with or without a history of substance use disorder [SUD], or HV). Interactions were tested between relevant PUFAs and diagnostic status. Additional analyses explored possible confounds of depression severity, self-reported childhood abuse history, and, in MDD patients, suicide attempt history. Among PUFA, lnEPA but not lnDHA predicted aggression (F1,76 = 12.493, p = 0.001), and impulsivity (F1,65 = 5.598, p = 0.021), with interactions between lnEPA and history of SUD for both aggression (F1,76 = 7.941, p = 0.001) and impulsivity (F1,65 = 3.485, p = 0.037). Results remained significant when adjusted for childhood abuse, depression severity, or history of suicide attempt. In conclusion, low EPA levels were associated with aggression and impulsivity only in patients with MDD and comorbid SUD, even though in most cases SUD was in full sustained remission.

  15. Turbulence measurement in a reacting and non-reacting shear layer at a high subsonic Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.; Jones, R. A.; Smith, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The results of two component velocity and turbulence measurements are presented which were obtained on a planar reacting shear layer burning hydrogen. Quantitative LDV and temperature measurements are presented with and without chemical reaction within the shear layer at a velocity ratio of 0.34 and a high speed Mach number of 0.7. The comparison showed that the reacting shear layer grew faster than that without reaction. Using a reduced width coordinate, the reacting and non-reacting profiles were very similar. The peak turbulence for both cases was 20 percent.

  16. Lactoferrin and transferrin fragments react with nitrite to form an inhibitor of Bacillus cereus spore outgrowth.

    PubMed Central

    Custer, M C; Hansen, J N

    1983-01-01

    Tryptone is a pancreatic digest of casein which contains a heterogeneous mixture of substances that react with nitrite when heated in the presence of sodium thioglycolate to form a bacteriostatic agent which inhibits outgrowth of Bacillus cereus T spores. The substances which are precursors to the bacteriostatic agent can be fractionated on the basis of molecular size and charge and have properties which indicate that they are fragments of lactoferrin, an iron-binding glycoprotein. The bacteriostatic agent could also be formed directly from purified lactoferrin after it had been subjected to proteolysis. Transferrin, an analogous iron-binding protein found in animal serum, also showed these same properties. This system may be a useful model for studies of the mechanism and site of nitrite bacteriostatic action. PMID:6405692

  17. Numerical Simulation of High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Taulbee, D. B.; Madnia, C. K.; Jaberi, F. A.; Colucci, P. J.; Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Adumitroaie, V.; James, S.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to develop and implement a new methodology for large eddy simulation of (LES) of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. (2) To develop algebraic turbulence closures for statistical description of chemically reacting turbulent flows.

  18. Instantaneous planar visualization of reacting supersonic flows using silane seeding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W.; Northam, G. B.

    1991-01-01

    A new visualization technique for reacting flows has been developed. This technique, which is suitable for supersonic combustion flows, has been demonstrated on a scramjet combustor model. In this application, gaseous silane (SiH4) was added to the primary hydrogen fuel. When the fuel reacted, so did the (SiH4), producing silica (SiO2) particles in situ. The particles were illuminated with a laser sheet formed from a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) beam and the Mie scattering signal was imaged. These planar images of the silica Mie scattering provided instantaneous 'maps' of combustion progress within the turbulent reacting flowfield.

  19. Effect of dietary Satureja khuzistanica powder on semen characteristics and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances concentration in testicular tissue of Iranian native breeder rooster

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, M. J.; Mohammadzadeh, S.; Kheradmand, A.; Alirezaei, M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of a paucity of information on the effect of Satureja khuzistanica in male chickens, this study was undertaken to determine the influence of dietary S. khuzistanica powder (SKP) on seminal characteristics and testes thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) content in Iranian native breeder rooster. Thirty-six 40-week-old roosters were randomly allotted to 3 equal groups and received either a basal diet without SKP (T1 or control), or a diet containing 20 g/kg (T2) and 40 g/kg (T3) of SKP for 8-week-long experimental period. Semen samples were obtained weekly by abdominal massage to evaluate the seminal characteristics. At the end of the eighth week 18 birds (6 birds per each group) were randomly slaughtered, and sample was taken from right testes for TBARS evaluation. Administration of SKP improved all semen traits, except for sperm concentration. Likewise, TBARS content in SKP treatments did not significantly differ from the control (P>0.05). Seminal volume, live sperm percentage and plasma membrane integrity percentage in SKP-treated groups were higher than the control. Conversely, abnormal sperm percentages reduced in SKP-treated groups (P<0.05). Plasma membrane integrity in experimental treatments was significantly higher than the control in 2nd, 3rd and 7th weeks. However, at 6th and 8th weeks only T3 treatment was significantly different from the control. Notably, there was an increase in total sperm concentration in SKP-treated groups in compared to the control birds. In conclusion, this study indicated that addition of SKP in rooster diet improves sperm quality and also reduces their sperm membrane lipid peroxidation, which may lead to higher fertilization rate. PMID:27175185

  20. Molecular size of aquatic humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Wershaw, R. L.; Malcolm, R.L.; Pinckney, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Aquatic humic substances, which account for 30 to 50% of the organic carbon in water, are a principal component of aquatic organic matter. The molecular size of aquatic humic substances, determined by small-angle X-ray scattering, varies from 4.7 to 33 A?? in their radius of gyration, corresponding to a molecular weight range of 500 to greater than 10,000. The aquatic fulvic acid fraction contains substances with molecular weights ranging from 500 to 2000 and is monodisperse, whereas the aquatic humic acid fraction contains substances with molecular weights ranging from 1000 to greater than 10,000 and is generally polydisperse. ?? 1982.

  1. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOEpatents

    Lundin, Ralph L.; Stewart, Delbert D.; Evans, Christopher J.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond.

  2. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOEpatents

    Lundin, R.L.; Stewart, D.D.; Evans, C.J.

    1992-04-14

    An apparatus is described for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond. 1 figs.

  3. Investigation of chemically-reacting supersonic internal flows. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chitsomboon, T.; Tiwari, S.N.

    1985-09-01

    This report covers work done on the research project, Analysis and Computation of Internal Flow Field in a Scramjet Engine. The governing equations of two-dimensional chemically-reacting flows are presented together with the global two-step chemistry model. The finite-difference algorithm used is illustrated and the method of circumventing the stiffness is discussed. The computer program developed is used to solve two model problems of a premixed chemically-reacting flow. The results obtained are physically reasonable.

  4. Numerical Simulation of High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Taulbee, D. B.; Madnia, C. K.; Jaberi, F. A.; Colucci, P. J.; Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Adumitroaie, V.; James, S.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to develop and implement a new methodology for large eddy simulation of (LES) of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. (2) To develop algebraic turbulence closures for statistical description of chemically reacting turbulent flows. We have just completed the third year of Phase III of this research. This is the Final Report of our activities on this research sponsored by the NASA LaRC.

  5. Quasi-explicit algebraic turbulence closures for compressible reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adumitroaie, Virgil

    A consistent and complete set of quasi-explicit algebraic closures for turbulent reacting flows is proposed as approximate solutions to the full second order moment equations. Quasi-explicit algebraic scalar flux models that are valid for three-dimensional turbulent flows are derived from a hierarchy of second-order moment closures. The mathematical procedure is based on the Cayley-Hamilton theorem and is an extension of the scheme developed by Taulbee (1992). Several closures for the pressure-scalar gradient correlations are considered and explicit algebraic relations are provided for the velocity-scalar correlations in both non-reacting and reacting flows. In the latter, the role of the Damkohler number is exhibited in isothermal turbulent flows with nonpremixed reactants. The relationship between these closures and traditional models based on the linear gradient diffusion approximation is theoretically established. The results of model predictions are assessed via comparison with available laboratory data in turbulent jet flows. The development of the quasi-explicit algebraic models for Reynolds stresses, temperature fluxes and reacting scalar fluxes is extended to high-speed turbulent reacting flows under a density weighted average formalism. New closures are proposed for the pressure-strain and the pressure-scalar gradient correlations. These accommodate compressibility corrections subject to the magnitude of the turbulent Mach number, the density gradient, the pressure gradient and the mean dilatation effects. Non-reacting and reacting flows with heat release are considered. In the latter, a second-order irreversible chemical reactions in turbulent flows with initially segregated reactants is considered. The models are tested in simple compressible free-shear flows. Comparisons are made between the full second order moment computations and the algebraic closure predictions. For a mixing layer, experimental data are used to validate the predicted results.

  6. Oviposition-Modifying Substances for Mosquitoes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    AD C: 2 OVIPOSITION -MODIFYING SUBSTANCES FOR MOSQUITOES Annual Summary Report YIH-SHEN HWANG * ’September 1, 1980 Supported by U.S. ARMY MEDICAL...NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED OVIPOSITION -MODIFYING SUBSTANCES...nd identify by block number) MOSQUITOES/ OVIPOSITION -ATTRACTANTS/ OVIPOSITION -REPELLENTS/ OVIPOSITION - MODIFYING-SUBSTANCES/CARBOXYLIC-ACIDS/OCTANOIC

  7. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  8. Experimental Vortex Identification and Characterization in Reacting Jets in Crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Vedanth; Emerson, Ben; Lieuwen, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    Reacting jets in crossflow (JICF) is an important canonical flow field in combustion problems where there is strong coupling between heat release and the evolution of vortical structures. We use vortex identification studies to experimentally characterize the spatial evolution of vortex dynamics in a reacting JICF. A vortex identification algorithm was designed to operate on particle image velocimetry (PIV) data and its raw Mie scattering images. The algorithm uses the velocity fields to obtain comparisons between the strain rate and the rotation rate. Additionally, the algorithm uses the raw Mie scattering data to identify regions where the high acceleration at vortex cores has centrifuged seeding particles out of the vortex cores. Together, these methods are used to estimate the vortex location and circulation. Analysis was done on 10 kHz PIV data from a reacting JICF experiment, and the resulting vortex trajectory, and growth rate statistics are presented. Results are compared between non-reacting JICF and reacting studies performed with different jet density ratios and different levels of acoustic forcing. We observed how the density ratio, the frequency and amplitude of the acoustic forcing affected the vortex characteristics and growth rate.

  9. Mechanism for Self-Reacted Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, Richard; Bucher, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    A mechanism has been designed to apply the loads (the stirring and the resection forces and torques) in self-reacted friction stir welding. This mechanism differs somewhat from mechanisms used in conventional friction stir welding, as described below. The tooling needed to apply the large reaction loads in conventional friction stir welding can be complex. Self-reacted friction stir welding has become popular in the solid-state welding community as a means of reducing the complexity of tooling and to reduce costs. The main problems inherent in self-reacted friction stir welding originate in the high stresses encountered by the pin-and-shoulder assembly that produces the weld. The design of the present mechanism solves the problems. The mechanism includes a redesigned pin-and-shoulder assembly. The welding torque is transmitted into the welding pin by a square pin that fits into a square bushing with set-screws. The opposite or back shoulder is held in place by a Woodruff key and high-strength nut on a threaded shaft. The Woodruff key reacts the torque, while the nut reacts the tensile load on the shaft.

  10. 78 FR 51210 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Chattem Chemicals, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

    ... Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Chattem Chemicals... manufacturer of the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid... Tapentadol (9780) II Fentanyl (9801) II The company plans to manufacture the listed controlled substances...

  11. Method for reacting nongaseous material with a gaseous reactant

    DOEpatents

    Lumpkin, Robert E.; Duraiswamy, Kandaswamy

    1979-03-27

    This invention relates to a new and novel method and apparatus for reacting nongaseous material with a gaseous reactant comprising introducing a first stream containing a nongaseous material into a reaction zone; simultaneously introducing a second stream containing a gaseous reactant into the reaction zone such that the gaseous reactant immediately contacts and reacts with the first stream thereby producing a gaseous product; forming a spiralling vortex within the reaction zone to cause substantial separation of gases, including the gaseous product, from the nongaseous material; forming and removing a third stream from the reaction zone containing the gaseous product which is substantially free of the nongaseous material before a major portion of the gaseous product can react with the nongaseous material; and forming and removing a fourth stream containing the nongaseous material from the reaction zone.

  12. A PDF closure model for compressible turbulent chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollmann, W.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research project was the analysis of single point closures based on probability density function (pdf) and characteristic functions and the development of a prediction method for the joint velocity-scalar pdf in turbulent reacting flows. Turbulent flows of boundary layer type and stagnation point flows with and without chemical reactions were be calculated as principal applications. Pdf methods for compressible reacting flows were developed and tested in comparison with available experimental data. The research work carried in this project was concentrated on the closure of pdf equations for incompressible and compressible turbulent flows with and without chemical reactions.

  13. REACT - A Third Generation Language For Autonomous Robot Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longley, Maxwell J.; Owens, John; Allen, Charles R.; Ratcliff, Karl

    1990-03-01

    REACT is a language under development at Newcastle for the programming of autonomous robot systems, which uses AI constructs and sensor information to respond to failures in assumptions about the real-world by replanning a task. This paper describes the important features of a REACT programmed robotic system, and the results of some initial studies made on defining an executive language using a concept called visiblity sets. Several examples from the language are then applied to specific examples e.g. a white line follower and a railway network controller. The applicability of visibility sets to autonomous robots is evaluated.

  14. Nonholonomic Hamiltonian method for molecular dynamics simulations of reacting shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Joseph; Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2017-01-01

    Conventional molecular dynamics simulations of reacting shocks employ a holonomic Hamiltonian formulation: the breaking and forming of covalent bonds is described by potential functions. In general the potential functions: (a) are algebraically complex, (b) must satisfy strict smoothness requirements, and (c) contain many fitted parameters. In recent research the authors have developed a new nonholonomic formulation of reacting molecular dynamics. In this formulation bond orders are determined by rate equations, and the bonding-debonding process need not be described by differentiable functions. This simplifies the representation of complex chemistry and reduces the number of fitted parameters.

  15. Investigation of chemically-reacting supersonic internal flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitsomboon, T.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    This report covers work done on the research project Analysis and Computation of Internal Flow Field in a Scramjet Engine. The work is supported by the NASA Langley Research Center (Computational Methods Branch of the High-Speed Aerodynamics Division) through research grant NAG1-423. The governing equations of two-dimensional chemically-reacting flows are presented together with the global two-step chemistry model. The finite-difference algorithm used is illustrated and the method of circumventing the stiffness is discussed. The computer program developed is used to solve two model problems of a premixed chemically-reacting flow. The results obtained are physically reasonable.

  16. Skin sensitization and possible groupings for 'read across' for rosin based substances.

    PubMed

    Illing, H P A; Malmfors, T; Rodenburg, L

    2009-08-01

    A series of chemically modified rosin resins have been tested for their potential to cause skin sensitization using the mouse LLNA. Where direct comparative evidence is available, the results of the mouse LLNA are consistent with previously obtained data using the GPMT. Reactions with sufficient fumaric acid or maleic anhydride lead to maleopimaric acid anhydride (an acid anhydride), and give a clear response of a strong sensitizer that definitely requires classification. This sensitization is probably immunologically distinct from that claimed for oxidized rosin. Esterification will deactivate acid anhydrides formed from reacting rosin with maleic anhydride or fumaric acid. However, with maleic anhydride, there remains material capable of inducing a marginal (but classifiable under current criteria) immune response after the rosin had been maleinated and esterified. If proposed potency criteria are used these substances would not be considered 'strong sensitizers'. This response may be a function of a greater solubility in vehicle of the esterified maleinated (or fumarated) rosin over directly esterified material. Solubility limitations in the case of gum rosin directly esterified with pentaerythritol mean that it is not classifiable. Decarboxylated rosin and the glycerol ester of tall oil rosin are adequately soluble, and are not classifiable according to EU criteria. Polymers formed from rosin are also not classifiable as sensitizers. These studies confirm the value of grouping substances for 'read across' and the groupings chosen under the US EPA High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program. They also confirm the difficulties involved in dealing scientifically when examining the problem of skin sensitization associated with rosin related substances whilst still meeting current EU regulatory criteria.

  17. Numerical Simulation of High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaberi, F. A.; Colucci, P. J.; James, S.; Givi, P.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in large eddy simulation (LES) methods for computational analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. We have just completed the first year of Phase 3 of this research.

  18. Direct simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalfe, Ralph W.; Mcmurtry, Patrick A.; Jou, Wen-Huei; Riley, James J.; Givi, Peyman

    1988-01-01

    The results of direct numerical simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers are presented. This is an extension of earlier work to a more detailed study of previous three dimensional simulations of cold reacting flows plus the development, validation, and use of codes to simulate chemically reacting shear layers with heat release. Additional analysis of earlier simulations showed good agreement with self similarity theory and laboratory data. Simulations with a two dimensional code including the effects of heat release showed that the rate of chemical product formation, the thickness of the mixing layer, and the amount of mass entrained into the layer all decrease with increasing rates of heat release. Subsequent three dimensional simulations showed similar behavior, in agreement with laboratory observations. Baroclinic torques and thermal expansion in the mixing layer were found to produce changes in the flame vortex structure that act to diffuse the pairing vortices, resulting in a net reduction in vorticity. Previously unexplained anomalies observed in the mean velocity profiles of reacting jets and mixing layers were shown to result from vorticity generation by baroclinic torques.

  19. Small molecular, macromolecular, and cellular chloramines react with thiocyanate to give the human defense factor hypothiocyanite.

    PubMed

    Xulu, Bheki A; Ashby, Michael T

    2010-03-09

    Thiocyanate reacts noncatalytically with myeloperoxidase-derived HOCl to produce hypothiocyanite (OSCN(-)), thereby potentially limiting the propensity of HOCl to inflict host tissue damage that can lead to inflammatory diseases. However, the efficiency with which SCN(-) captures HOCl in vivo depends on the concentration of SCN(-) relative to other chemical targets. In blood plasma, where the concentration of SCN(-) is relatively low, proteins may be the principal initial targets of HOCl, and chloramines are a significant product. Chloramines eventually decompose to irreversibly damage proteins. In the present study, we demonstrate that SCN(-) reacts efficiently with chloramines in small molecules, in proteins, and in Escherichia coli cells to give OSCN(-) and the parent amine. Remarkably, OSCN(-) reacts faster than SCN(-) with chloramines. These reactions of SCN(-) and OSCN(-) with chloramines may repair some of the damage that is inflicted on protein amines by HOCl. Our observations are further evidence for the importance of secondary reactions during the redox cascades that are associated with oxidative stress by hypohalous acids.

  20. Method of removing and detoxifying a phosphorus-based substance

    DOEpatents

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Steindler, M.J.

    1985-05-21

    A method of removing a phosphorus-based poisonous substance from water contaminated is presented. In addition, the toxicity of the phosphorus-based substance is also subsequently destroyed. A water-immiscible organic solvent is first immobilized on a supported liquid membrane before the contaminated water is contacted with one side of the supported liquid membrane to absorb the phosphorus-based substance in the organic solvent. The other side of the supported liquid membrane is contacted with a hydroxy-affording strong base to react with phosphorus-based solvated species to form a non-toxic product.

  1. A new screening method to detect water-soluble antioxidants: acetaminophen (Tylenol) and other phenols react as antioxidants and destroy peroxynitrite-based luminol-dependent chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, K; Sacks, M; Qazi, N

    1998-01-01

    This study is based on a simple chemical interaction of peroxynitrite (O = N-O-O-) and luminol, which produces blue light upon oxidation. Since peroxynitrite has a half-life of about 1 s, a drug known as linsidomine (SIN-1) is used as a peroxynitrite generator. Peroxynitrite can oxidize lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Upon the stimulation of inflammation and/or infection, macrophages and neutrophils can be induced to produce large amounts of peroxynitrite, which can oxidize phenols and sulphhydryl-containing compounds. Therefore, phenols and sulphhydryls eliminate peroxynitrite. This is an example of the Yin-Yang hypothesis e.g. oxidation-reduction. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) can inhibit fever and some types of pain without being a particularly effective anti-inflammatory. Since it is a phenol, it could act as a nitration target for peroxynitrite. Then peroxynitrite, the possible cause of pain and elevated temperature, might be destroyed in the reaction. Acetaminophen is a phenolic compound which produces a clear inhibitory dose-response curve with peroxynitrite in its range of clinical effectiveness. Whether acetaminophen actually works as we suggest is to be proven. Three different types of reaction could decrease the amount of peroxynitrite: (a) interference with base-catalysed opening of the SIN-1 molecule; (b) destruction of one or both substances needed to form it--superoxide and/or nitric oxide; when the SIN-1 degrades to superoxide and nitric oxide, the former may be destroyed by superoxide dismutase (SOD); (c) peroxynitrite may react directly with phenols (mono-, di-, tri- and tetraphenols), possibly by nitration. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid and 2-hydroxyestradiol (catechol estrogen) are potent inhibitors of luminol light emission. Epineprine, isoproterenol, pyrogallol, catechol and ascorbic acid (a classic antioxidant) are all inhibitors of luminol chemiluminescence. Isoproterenol, norepinephrine/and epinephrine first inhibit light but overall stimulate

  2. Density Weighted FDF Equations for Simulations of Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2011-01-01

    In this report, we briefly revisit the formulation of density weighted filtered density function (DW-FDF) for large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent reacting flows, which was proposed by Jaberi et al. (Jaberi, F.A., Colucci, P.J., James, S., Givi, P. and Pope, S.B., Filtered mass density function for Large-eddy simulation of turbulent reacting flows, J. Fluid Mech., vol. 401, pp. 85-121, 1999). At first, we proceed the traditional derivation of the DW-FDF equations by using the fine grained probability density function (FG-PDF), then we explore another way of constructing the DW-FDF equations by starting directly from the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. We observe that the terms which are unclosed in the traditional DW-FDF equations are now closed in the newly constructed DW-FDF equations. This significant difference and its practical impact on the computational simulations may deserve further studies.

  3. Hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian Vortex Model for Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royero, John; Ahmed, Kareem

    2016-11-01

    A hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian model for three dimensional large eddy simulations of turbulent reacting flows is presented. The method utilizes a Eulerian grid to resolve large scale flow features and the Lagrangian vortex element method to capture smaller subgrid scale effects and carry out reactions which are then communicated back to the Eulerian grid after a set number of Lagrangian time steps. Lagrangian influences are localized in order to reduce computational cost. The Lagrangian vortex method which utilizes the Helmholtz decomposition of the velocity into potential, expansive, and solenoidal components allows the separation of the various mechanisms contributing to vorticity including gas expansion, diffusion, external body forces and baroclinic torque and is coupled with the Eulerian solver allowing easier implementation in arbitrary reacting flows at a reduced computational cost compared to a pure Lagrangian solver.

  4. A model for reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.; Evans, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    To account for the turbulent temperature and species-concentration fluctuations, a model is presented on the effects of chemical reaction rates in computer analyses of turbulent reacting flows. The model results in two parameters which multiply the terms in the reaction-rate equations. For these two parameters, graphs are presented as functions of the mean values and intensity of the turbulent fluctuations of the temperature and species concentrations. These graphs will facilitate incorporation of the model into existing computer programs which describe turbulent reacting flows. When the model was used in a two-dimensional parabolic-flow computer code to predict the behavior of an experimental, supersonic hydrogen jet burning in air, some improvement in agreement with the experimental data was obtained in the far field in the region near the jet centerline. Recommendations are included for further improvement of the model and for additional comparisons with experimental data.

  5. Numerical investigation of chemically reacting flows in ramjet dump combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Kwang-Chung; Liu, Jong-Shang

    1989-01-01

    The time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations, including second-order turbulence model, are numerically integrated by using four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme to predict the steady-state supersonic flow structures in ramjet dump combustors. The formulation is derived for reacting flows with finite-rate chemistry. In the present study, it is firstly attempted to assess the accuracy of existing high-order turbulence model in supersonic flows. The comparison shows reasonable agreement between calculated and measured data in terms of velocity distributions. It is indicated that a modified constant C-mu for calculating turbulent eddy viscosity is needed in the supersonic flow regime and the adaptive meshing is preferred to capture the recirculation zone. In the reacting flow calculation, the results from a test case of hydrogen and air combustion at premixed conditon show that the rearward facing step is able to increase flow residence time and stabilize the flame in supersonic flows.

  6. Microgravity Diode Laser Spectroscopy Measurements in a Reacting Vortex Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shin-Juh; Dahm, Werner J. A.; Silver, Joel A.; Piltch, Nancy D.; VanderWal, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The technique of Diode Laser Spectroscopy (DLS) with wavelength modulation is utilized to measure the concentration of methane in reacting vortex rings under microgravity conditions. From the measured concentration of methane, other major species such as water, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen can be easily computed under the assumption of equilibrium chemistry with an iterative method called ITAC (Iterative Temperature with Assumed Chemistry). The conserved scalar approach in modelling the coupling between fluid dynamics and combustion is utilized to represent the unknown variables in terms of the mixture fraction and scalar dissipation rate in conjunction with ITAC. Post-processing of the DLS and the method used to compute the species concentration are discussed. From the flame luminosity results, ring circulation appears to increase the fuel consumption rate inside the reacting vortex ring and the flame height for cases with similar fuel volumes but different ring circulations. The concentrations of methane, water, and carbon dioxide agree well with available results from numerical simulations.

  7. Numerical modeling of turbulent supersonic reacting coaxial jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eklund, Dean R.; Hassan, H. A.; Drummond, J. Philip

    1989-01-01

    The paper considers the mixing and subsequent combustion within turbulent reacting shear layers. A computer program was developed to solve the axisymmetric Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical method integrates the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations using a finite volume approach while advancing the solution forward in time using a Runge-Kutta scheme. Three separate flowfields are investigated and it is found that no single turbulence model considered could accurately predict the degree of mixing for all three cases.

  8. Simulation of Compressible Multi-Phase Turbulent Reacting Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Technology, 160:119– 150, 2000. [32] W.-W. Kim, S. Menon, and H. C. Mongia . Large eddy simulations of a gas turbine combustor flow. Combustion Science and...structures and shock induced heating can trigger ignition, combustion and turbulent flame propagation. In this research, a new and an efficient...Simulation of Compressible Multi-Phase Turbulent Reacting Flows Suresh Menon and Franklin Génin Computational Combustion Laboratory School of Aerospace

  9. Numerical simulation of low Mach number reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Aspden, Andrew J.; Day, Marcus S.; Lijewski,Michael J.

    2007-06-20

    Using examples from active research areas in combustion andastrophysics, we demonstrate a computationally efficient numericalapproach for simulating multiscale low Mach number reacting flows. Themethod enables simulations that incorporate an unprecedented range oftemporal and spatial scales, while at the same time, allows an extremelyhigh degree of reaction fidelity. Sample applications demonstrate theefficiency of the approach with respect to a traditional time-explicitintegration method, and the utility of the methodology for studying theinteraction of turbulence with terrestrial and astrophysical flamestructures.

  10. Flow Field Effects on Nucleation in a Reacting Mixture Layer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    chemically reacting flows has been analysed by Fendell (1965) who considered the effect of the straining motion in a stagnation point flow on ignition...stagnation point diffusion flame ( Fendell , 1965, Linan, 1974). In the present study the effect of the strain rate or velocity gradient on nucleation kinetics...Symposium (International) on Corn- bustion, 799-810, Academic Press. Fendell , F. E. (1965). Ignition and extinction in combustion of initially unmixed

  11. Method of removing and detoxifying a phosphorus-based substance

    DOEpatents

    Vandegrift, George F.; Steindler, Martin J.

    1989-01-01

    A method of removing organic phosphorus-based poisonous substances from water contaminated therewith and of subsequently destroying the toxicity of the substance is disclosed. Initially, a water-immiscible organic is immobilized on a supported liquid membrane. Thereafter, the contaminated water is contacted with one side of the supported liquid membrane to selectively dissolve the phosphorus-based substance in the organic extractant. At the same time, the other side of the supported liquid membrane is contacted with a hydroxy-affording strong base to react the phosphorus-based substance dissolved by the organic extractant with a hydroxy ion. This forms a non-toxic reaction product in the base. The organic extractant can be a water-insoluble trialkyl amine, such as trilauryl amine. The phosphorus-based substance can be phosphoryl or a thiophosphoryl.

  12. Spatio-temporal Linear Stability Analysis of Multiple Reacting Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnumpuram Sebastian, Jacob; Emerson, Benjamin; Lieuwen, Tim

    2016-11-01

    Hydrodynamic stability of reacting shear flows plays a key role in controlling a variety of combustor behaviors, such as combustion instability, mixing and entrainment, and blowoff. A significant literature exists on the hydrodynamics of single bluff body flows, but not the multi-bluff body flows that are found in applications. The objective of this work was to compare the spatio-temporal stability of multiple reacting wakes and single reacting wakes, within the framework of linear stability theory. Spatio-temporal stability analyses are conducted on model velocity and density profiles, with key parameters being the density ratio across the flame, bluff body spacing, dimensionless shear, and asymmetry parameters (if the two wakes are dissimilar). The introduction of the additional bluff body can exert both a stabilizing and destabilizing effect on the combined two-wake system, depending on the spatial separation between the bluff bodies. Furthermore, while the most rapidly amplified mode of the single wake mode is the sinuous (asymmetric) one, in the two wake system, the most rapidly amplified mode can be either sinuous or varicose (symmetric), also depending on spatial separation.

  13. Acoustic imaging for diagnostics of chemically reacting systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.; Seshan, P.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of local diagnostics, in chemically reacting systems, with acoustic imaging is developed. The elements of acoustic imaging through ellipsoidal mirrors are theoretically discussed. In a general plan of the experimental program, the first system is chosen in these studies to be a simple open jet, non premixed turbulent flame. Methane is the fuel and enriched air is the oxidizer. This simple chemically reacting flow system is established at a Reynolds number (based on cold viscosity) of 50,000. A 1.5 m diameter high resolution acoustic mirror with an f-number of 0.75 is used to map the acoustic source zone along the axis of the flame. The results are presented as acoustic power spectra at various distances from the nozzle exit. It is seen that most of the reaction intensity is localized in a zone within 8 diameters from the exit. The bulk reactions (possibly around the periphery of the larger eddies) are evenly distributed along the length of the flame. Possibilities are seen for locally diagnosing single zones in a multiple cluster of reaction zones that occur frequently in practice. A brief outline is given of the future of this work which will be to apply this technique to chemically reacting flows not limited to combustion.

  14. Assessment of chemistry models for compressible reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, Simon; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2014-11-01

    Recent technological advances in propulsion and power devices and renewed interest in the development of next generation supersonic and hypersonic vehicles have increased the need for detailed understanding of turbulence-combustion interactions in compressible reacting flows. In numerical simulations of such flows, accurate modeling of the fuel chemistry is a critical component of capturing the relevant physics. Various chemical models are currently being used in reacting flow simulations. However, the differences between these models and their impacts on the fluid dynamics in the context of compressible flows are not well understood. In the present work, a numerical code is developed to solve the fully coupled compressible conservation equations for reacting flows. The finite volume code is based on the theoretical and numerical framework developed by Oefelein (Prog. Aero. Sci. 42 (2006) 2-37) and employs an all-Mach-number formulation with dual time-stepping and preconditioning. The numerical approach is tested on turbulent premixed flames at high Karlovitz numbers. Different chemical models of varying complexity and computational cost are used and their effects are compared.

  15. Chemical characterization of humic-like substances (HULIS) formed from a lignin-type precursor in model cloud water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffer, A.; Kiss, G.; Blazsó, M.; Gelencsér, A.

    2004-03-01

    A representative lignin-type component from biomass burning aerosol has been shown to react with OH radicals in model cloud water yielding colored organic species. In this paper we investigated the chemical properties of the complex reaction products formed from 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The reaction was followed by UV-VIS spectrophotometry, liquid chromatography, electrospray-mass spectrometry, thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and a thermal method. This paper provides experimental proofs that actually larger molecular weight species are formed in the aqueous phase by free radical oligomerization. The features observed by all analytical techniques closely resemble those found for natural humic acids and HULIS found in rural and biomass burning aerosol. Therefore such processes are assumed to produce the ubiquitous humic-like substances (HULIS) in atmospheric aerosol. Since these species show intense absorbance in the lower visible to UV range, they might also be important in atmospheric absorption of solar radiation.

  16. Determination of nitrite via reaction with pyridine-4-carboxylic acid hydrazide

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, K.K.; Tyagi, P.

    1985-06-01

    Nitrite is determined by its reaction with a measured but excessive amount of pyridine-4-carboxylic acid hydrazide in acid medium (when the two substances react in a 1:1 molar ratio) and evaluation of the surplus hydrazide by titration with chloramine-T in the presence of acidified potassium bromide, the end-point being shown by the decolorization of the methyl red indicator. Nitrate, copper(II), mercury(II), etc. are found not to interfere, and the determination of nitrite in the presence of diazotized aromatic amines is demonstrated. 11 references, 2 tables.

  17. Hydrolytic Amino Acids Employed as a Novel Organic Nitrogen Source for the Preparation of PGPF-Containing Bio-Organic Fertilizer for Plant Growth Promotion and Characterization of Substance Transformation during BOF Production

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chenglong; Ran, Wei; Yu, Guanghui; Zhang, Yingjun; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Opportunity costs seriously limit the large-scale production of bio-organic fertilizers (BOFs) both in China and internationally. This study addresses the utilization of amino acids resulting from the acidic hydrolysis of pig corpses as organic nitrogen sources to increase the density of TrichodermaharzianumT-E5 (a typical plant growth-promoting fungi, PGPF). This results in a novel, economical, highly efficient and environmentally friendly BOF product. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy combined with fluorescence regional integration (FRI) was employed to monitor compost maturity levels, while pot experiments were utilized to test the effects of this novel BOF on plant growth. An optimization experiment, based on response surface methodologies (RSMs), showed that a maximum T-E5 population (3.72 × 108 ITS copies g−1) was obtained from a mixture of 65.17% cattle manure compost (W/W), 19.33% maggot manure (W/W), 15.50% (V/W)hydrolytic amino acid solution and 4.69% (V/W) inoculum at 28.7°C after a 14 day secondary solid fermentation. Spectroscopy analysis revealed that the compost transformation process involved the degradation of protein-like substances and the formation of fulvic-like and humic-like substances. FRI parameters (PI, n, PII, n, PIII, n and PV, n) were used to characterize the degree of compost maturity. The BOF resulted in significantly higher increased chlorophyll content, shoot length, and shoot and root dry weights of three vegetables (cucumber, tomato and pepper) by 9.9%~22.4%, 22.9%~58.5%, 31.0%~84.9%, and 24.2%~34.1%, respectively. In summary, this study presents an operational means of increasing PGPF T-E5 populations in BOF to promote plant growth with a concomitant reduction in production cost. In addition, a BOF compost maturity assessment using fluorescence EEM spectroscopy and FRI ensured its safe field application. PMID:26974549

  18. Hydrolytic Amino Acids Employed as a Novel Organic Nitrogen Source for the Preparation of PGPF-Containing Bio-Organic Fertilizer for Plant Growth Promotion and Characterization of Substance Transformation during BOF Production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengge; Meng, Xiaohui; Feng, Chenglong; Ran, Wei; Yu, Guanghui; Zhang, Yingjun; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Opportunity costs seriously limit the large-scale production of bio-organic fertilizers (BOFs) both in China and internationally. This study addresses the utilization of amino acids resulting from the acidic hydrolysis of pig corpses as organic nitrogen sources to increase the density of TrichodermaharzianumT-E5 (a typical plant growth-promoting fungi, PGPF). This results in a novel, economical, highly efficient and environmentally friendly BOF product. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy combined with fluorescence regional integration (FRI) was employed to monitor compost maturity levels, while pot experiments were utilized to test the effects of this novel BOF on plant growth. An optimization experiment, based on response surface methodologies (RSMs), showed that a maximum T-E5 population (3.72 × 108 ITS copies g-1) was obtained from a mixture of 65.17% cattle manure compost (W/W), 19.33% maggot manure (W/W), 15.50% (V/W)hydrolytic amino acid solution and 4.69% (V/W) inoculum at 28.7°C after a 14 day secondary solid fermentation. Spectroscopy analysis revealed that the compost transformation process involved the degradation of protein-like substances and the formation of fulvic-like and humic-like substances. FRI parameters (PI, n, PII, n, PIII, n and PV, n) were used to characterize the degree of compost maturity. The BOF resulted in significantly higher increased chlorophyll content, shoot length, and shoot and root dry weights of three vegetables (cucumber, tomato and pepper) by 9.9%~22.4%, 22.9%~58.5%, 31.0%~84.9%, and 24.2%~34.1%, respectively. In summary, this study presents an operational means of increasing PGPF T-E5 populations in BOF to promote plant growth with a concomitant reduction in production cost. In addition, a BOF compost maturity assessment using fluorescence EEM spectroscopy and FRI ensured its safe field application.

  19. Substance use and multiculturalism.

    PubMed

    Adrian, M

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews intercultural variability of substance use behaviors, including availability of international statistics on consumption of alcohol and other drugs, as well as the use of drugs available locally only. Within a conceptual framework of intercultural relations, it considers the history of transcultural spread of substance use behaviors and possible reactions to the introduction of new drugs within a culture or jurisdiction, including illustrations of the "law of alien poisons." Although intercultural views of substance use have generally concentrated on majority groups' views of substance use in minority groups, minority and non-Western views of substance use need to be considered in the context of increasing international and intercultural communications that increase the rate at which substance use behaviors spread. Both Western and non-Western experiences with substance use and misuse must be taken into account so that better interventions can be developed to deal with addictions and other substance-related problems.

  20. Substance Abuse and Trauma.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Shannon; Suárez, Liza

    2016-10-01

    There is a strong, bidirectional link between substance abuse and traumatic experiences. Teens with cooccurring substance use disorders (SUDs) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have significant functional and psychosocial impairment. Common neurobiological foundations point to the reinforcing cycle of trauma symptoms, substance withdrawal, and substance use. Treatment of teens with these issues should include a systemic and integrated approach to both the SUD and the PTSD.

  1. 75 FR 53719 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... registered as a bulk manufacturer of Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid (GHB) (2010), a basic class of controlled substance listed in schedule I. The company plans to manufacture Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid (GHB) (2010)...

  2. Covalent binding of aniline to humic substances. 2. 15N NMR studies of nucleophilic addition reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pettigrew, P.J.; Goldenberg, W.S.; Weber, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Aromatic amines are known to undergo covalent binding with humic substances in the environment. Although previous studies have examined reaction conditions and proposed mechanisms, there has been no direct spectroscopic evidence for the covalent binding of the amines to the functional groups in humic substances. In order to further elucidate the reaction mechanisms, the Suwannee River and IHSS soil fulvic and humic acids were reacted with 15N-labeled aniline at pH 6 and analyzed using 15N NMR spectrometry. Aniline underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with the quinone and other carbonyl groups in the samples and became incorporated in the form of anilinohydroquinone, anilinoquinone, anilide, imine, and heterocyclic nitrogen, the latter comprising 50% or more of the bound amine. The anilide and anilinohydroquinone nitrogens were determined to be susceptible to chemical exchange by ammonia. In the case of Suwannee River fulvic acid, reaction under anoxic conditions and pretreatment with sodium borohydride or hydroxylamine prior to reaction under oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in the proportion of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen incorporated. The relative decrease in the incorporation of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen with respect to anilinoquinone nitrogen under anoxic conditions suggested that inter- or intramolecular redox reactions accompanied the nucleophilic addition reactions.

  3. Moment estimation for chemically reacting systems by extended Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Ruess, J; Milias-Argeitis, A; Summers, S; Lygeros, J

    2011-10-28

    In stochastic models of chemically reacting systems that contain bimolecular reactions, the dynamics of the moments of order up to n of the species populations do not form a closed system, in the sense that their time-derivatives depend on moments of order n + 1. To close the dynamics, the moments of order n + 1 are generally approximated by nonlinear functions of the lower order moments. If the molecule counts of some of the species have a high probability of becoming zero, such approximations may lead to imprecise results and stochastic simulation is the only viable alternative for system analysis. Stochastic simulation can produce exact realizations of chemically reacting systems, but tends to become computationally expensive, especially for stiff systems that involve reactions at different time scales. Further, in some systems, important stochastic events can be very rare and many simulations are necessary to obtain accurate estimates. The computational cost of stochastic simulation can then be prohibitively large. In this paper, we propose a novel method for estimating the moments of chemically reacting systems. The method is based on closing the moment dynamics by replacing the moments of order n + 1 by estimates calculated from a small number of stochastic simulation runs. The resulting stochastic system is then used in an extended Kalman filter, where estimates of the moments of order up to n, obtained from the same simulation, serve as outputs of the system. While the initial motivation for the method was improving over the performance of stochastic simulation and moment closure methods, we also demonstrate that it can be used in an experimental setting to estimate moments of species that cannot be measured directly from time course measurements of the moments of other species.

  4. ReACT Methodology Proof of Concept Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bri Rolston; Sarah Freeman

    2014-03-01

    The Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) funded INL Researchers to evaluate a novel process for assessing and mitigating cyber security risks. The proof of concept level of the method was tested in an industry environment. This case study, plus additional case studies will support the further development of the method into a tool to assist industry in securing their critical networks. This report provides an understanding of the process developed in the Response Analysis and Characterization Tool (ReACT) project. This report concludes with lessons learned and a roadmap for final development of these tools for use by industry.

  5. Preparative isolation of aquatic humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    A useful procedure has been developed which utilizes adsorption chromatography followed by size-exclusion chromatography, hydrogen saturation by ion exchange, and lypholization to obtain low-ash aqueous humic substances. The preparative concentration of aquatic humic substances is done by multiple reconcentration procedures even though initial concentrations of aqueous humus may be less than 25 ??g/L. The procedure yields concentration factors of 25 000 times for both humic and fulvic acid in water.

  6. Characterization of a metal-chelating substance in coffee.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Makiko; Sato, Naoko; Asakawa, Hiromi; Wen, Xu; Murata, Masatsune; Homma, Seiichi

    2005-01-01

    A metal-chelating substance in brewed coffee was separated and characterized by its chemical structure. This substance was a brown polymer. The contents of sugars, amino acids and phenolics in the substance were evaluated. This polymer contained small amounts of sugars and amino acids in its partial structure. After being decomposed by alkaline fusion, the decomposition products were identified by HPLC and GC-MS. Several phenolics were detected in the decomposed products. To characterize this substance, various types of model compounds were prepared by roasting chlorogenic acid, sucrose, and (or) protein with cellulose powder. Among these model compounds, the polymer-forming ability was highest in the model prepared from all four of materials, but the metal-chelating ability was the highest in the model prepared from chlorogenic acid and cellulose. These results suggest that this metal-chelating substance was a melanoidin-like polymer formed by the decomposition and polymerization of sugars, amino acids and phenolics.

  7. Inhibition of mitochondrial carnitine acylcarnitine translocase-mediated uptake of carnitine by 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate. Hydrazonopropionic acids, a new class of hypoglycaemic substances, VI.

    PubMed

    Beneking, M; Oellerich, M; Haeckel, R; Binder, L

    1987-08-01

    The rate of mitochondrial carnitine-carnitine exchange mediated by carnitine acylcarnitine translocase was measured by following the uptake of L-[methyl-14C]carnitine. It was demonstrated that the hypoglycaemic compound 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate causes a concentration-dependent decrease in the rate of the translocase-mediated transport of carnitine in guinea pig liver mitochondria. Apparent initial influx rates were decreased by 20% at 0.3 mmol/1 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate, 38% at 0.5 mmol/l, and 75% at 2.0 mmol/l of this compound. This finding may explain the previously observed inhibitory effects of this substance on long-chain fatty acid oxidation, ketone body production and gluconeogenesis.

  8. Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... to: What is Elder Abuse? Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse Substance abuse has been identified as the most frequently cited ... victim and/or the perpetrator who has the substance abuse problem. Substance abuse is believed to be a ...

  9. Sticky Tunes: How Do People React to Involuntary Musical Imagery?

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Victoria J.; Liikkanen, Lassi A.; Jakubowski, Kelly; Stewart, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of people experience involuntary musical imagery (INMI) or ‘earworms’; perceptions of spontaneous, repetitive musical sound in the absence of an external source. The majority of INMI episodes are not bothersome, while some cause disruption ranging from distraction to anxiety and distress. To date, little is known about how the majority of people react to INMI, in particular whether evaluation of the experience impacts on chosen response behaviours or if attempts at controlling INMI are successful or not. The present study classified 1046 reports of how people react to INMI episodes. Two laboratories in Finland and the UK conducted an identical qualitative analysis protocol on reports of INMI reactions and derived visual descriptive models of the outcomes using grounded theory techniques. Combined analysis carried out across the two studies confirmed that many INMI episodes were considered neutral or pleasant, with passive acceptance and enjoyment being among the most popular response behaviours. A significant number of people, however, reported on attempts to cope with unwanted INMI. The most popular and effective behaviours in response to INMI were seeking out the tune in question, and musical or verbal distraction. The outcomes of this study contribute to our understanding of the aetiology of INMI, in particular within the framework of memory theory, and present testable hypotheses for future research on successful INMI coping strategies. PMID:24497938

  10. Sticky tunes: how do people react to involuntary musical imagery?

    PubMed

    Williamson, Victoria J; Liikkanen, Lassi A; Jakubowski, Kelly; Stewart, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of people experience involuntary musical imagery (INMI) or 'earworms'; perceptions of spontaneous, repetitive musical sound in the absence of an external source. The majority of INMI episodes are not bothersome, while some cause disruption ranging from distraction to anxiety and distress. To date, little is known about how the majority of people react to INMI, in particular whether evaluation of the experience impacts on chosen response behaviours or if attempts at controlling INMI are successful or not. The present study classified 1046 reports of how people react to INMI episodes. Two laboratories in Finland and the UK conducted an identical qualitative analysis protocol on reports of INMI reactions and derived visual descriptive models of the outcomes using grounded theory techniques. Combined analysis carried out across the two studies confirmed that many INMI episodes were considered neutral or pleasant, with passive acceptance and enjoyment being among the most popular response behaviours. A significant number of people, however, reported on attempts to cope with unwanted INMI. The most popular and effective behaviours in response to INMI were seeking out the tune in question, and musical or verbal distraction. The outcomes of this study contribute to our understanding of the aetiology of INMI, in particular within the framework of memory theory, and present testable hypotheses for future research on successful INMI coping strategies.

  11. High speed turbulent reacting flows: DNS and LES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman

    1990-01-01

    Work on understanding the mechanisms of mixing and reaction in high speed turbulent reacting flows was continued. Efforts, in particular, were concentrated on taking advantage of modern computational methods to simulate high speed turbulent flows. In doing so, two methodologies were used: large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). In the work related with LES the objective is to study the behavior of the probability density functions (pdfs) of scalar properties within the subgrid in reacting turbulent flows. The data base obtained by DNS for a detailed study of the pdf characteristics within the subgrid was used. Simulations are performed for flows under various initializations to include the effects of compressibility on mixing and chemical reactions. In the work related with DNS, a two-dimensional temporally developing high speed mixing layer under the influence of a second-order non-equilibrium chemical reaction of the type A + B yields products + heat was considered. Simulations were performed with different magnitudes of the convective Mach numbers and with different chemical kinetic parameters for the purpose of examining the isolated effects of the compressibility and the heat released by the chemical reactions on the structure of the layer. A full compressible code was developed and utilized, so that the coupling between mixing and chemical reactions is captured in a realistic manner.

  12. Direct numerical simulation of reacting scalar mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruyn Kops, S. M.; Riley, J. J.; Kosály, G.

    2001-05-01

    Understanding the passive reaction of two chemical species in shear-free turbulence with order unity Schmidt number is important in atmospheric and turbulent combustion research. The canonical configuration considered here is the reacting scalar mixing layer; in this problem two initially separated species mix and react downstream of a turbulence generating grid in a wind tunnel. A conserved scalar in this flow is, with some restrictions, analogous to temperature in a thermal mixing layer, and considerable laboratory data are available on the latter. In this paper, results are reported from high resolution, direct numerical simulations in which the evolution of the conserved scalar field accurately matches that of the temperature field in existing laboratory experiments. Superimposed on the flow are passive, single-step reactions with a wide range of activation energies and stoichiometric ratios (r). The resulting data include species concentrations as a function of three spatial dimensions plus time, and statistical moments and spectra of all species. Several aspects of the flow are investigated here with the conclusions that (1) reactions in which r≠1 are more accurately modeled by frozen and equilibrium chemistry limits than are reactions in which r=1, (2) an existing definition of a reduced Damköhler number that includes temperature and stoichiometry effects is a useful measure of reaction rate, and (3) existing theoretical models for predicting the coherence and phase of fuel-oxidizer cross-spectra and the spectrum of the equilibrium fuel mass fraction when r=1 yield accurate predictions.

  13. Optical and Probe Diagnostics Applied to Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ticich, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    The general theme of the research my NASA colleague and I have planned is "Optical and probe diagnostics applied to reacting flows". We plan to explore three major threads during the fellowship period. The first interrogates the flame synthesis of carbon nanotubes using aerosol catalysts. Having demonstrated the viability of the technique for nanotube synthesis, we seek to understand the details of this reacting system which are important to its practical application. Laser light scattering will reveal changes in particle size at various heights above the burner. Analysis of the flame gas by mass spectroscopy will reveal the chemical composition of the mixture. Finally, absorption measurements will map the nanotube concentration within the flow. The second thread explores soot oxidation kinetics. Despite the impact of soot on engine performance, fire safety and pollution, models for its oxidation are inhibited by uncertainty in the values of the oxidation rate. We plan to employ both optical and microscopic measurements to refine this rate. Cavity ring-down absorption measurements of the carbonaceous aerosol can provide a measure of the mass concentration with time and, hence, an oxidation rate. Spectroscopic and direct probe measurements will provide the temperature of the system needed for subsequent modeling. These data will be benchmarked against changes in soot nanostructures as revealed by transmission electron microscopic images from directly sampled material.

  14. Assessment of Models of Chemically Reacting Granular Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Lathouwers, Danny

    2003-01-01

    A report presents an assessment of a general mathematical model of dense, chemically reacting granular flows like those in fluidized beds used to pyrolize biomass. The model incorporates submodels that have been described in several NASA Tech Briefs articles, including "Generalized Mathematical Model of Pyrolysis of Biomass" (NPO-20068) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 2 (February 1998), page 60; "Model of Pyrolysis of Biomass in a Fluidized-Bed Reactor" (NPO-20708), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 6 (June 2001), page 59; and "Model of Fluidized Bed Containing Reacting Solids and Gases" (NPO- 30163), which appears elsewhere in this issue. The model was used to perform computational simulations in a test case of pyrolysis in a reactor containing sand and biomass (i.e., plant material) particles through which passes a flow of hot nitrogen. The boundary conditions and other parameters were selected for the test case to enable assessment of the validity of some assumptions incorporated into submodels of granular stresses, granular thermal conductivity, and heating of particles. The results of the simulation are interpreted as partly affirming the assumptions in some respects and indicating the need for refinements of the assumptions and the affected submodels in other respects.

  15. Direct simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, J. J.; Metcalfe, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The report presents the results of direct numerical simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers. The work consists of two parts: (1) the development and testing of a spectral numerical computer code that treats the diffusion reaction equations; and (2) the simulation of a series of cases of chemical reactions occurring on mixing layers. The reaction considered is a binary, irreversible reaction with no heat release. The reacting species are nonpremixed. The results of the numerical tests indicate that the high accuracy of the spectral methods observed for rigid body rotation are also obtained when diffusion, reaction, and more complex flows are considered. In the simulations, the effects of vortex rollup and smaller scale turbulence on the overall reaction rates are investigated. The simulation results are found to be in approximate agreement with similarity theory. Comparisons of simulation results with certain modeling hypotheses indicate limitations in these hypotheses. The nondimensional product thickness computed from the simulations is compared with laboratory values and is found to be in reasonable agreement, especially since there are no adjustable constants in the method.

  16. Microgravity Diode Laser Spectroscopy Measurements in a Reacting Vortex Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shin-Juh; Dahm, Werner J. A.; Silver, Joel A.; Piltch, Nancy D.

    2001-01-01

    The technique of Diode Laser Spectroscopy (DLS) with wavelength modulation is utilized to measure the concentration of methane in reacting vortex rings under microgravity conditions. From the measured concentration of methane, other major species such as water, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen can be easily computed under the assumption of equilibrium chemistry with the method of Interactive Temperature with Assumed Chemistry (ITAC). The conserved scalar approach in modelling the coupling between fluid dynamics and combustion is utilized to represent the unknown variables in terms of the mixture fraction and scalar dissipation rate in conjunction with ITAC. Post-processing of the DLS measurements and the method of ITAC used in computing the species concentration are discussed. From the flame luminosity results, the increase in ring circulation appears to increase the fuel consumption rate inside the reacting vortex ring and the flame height for cases with similar fuel volumes. Preliminary results and application of ITAC show some potential capabilities of ITAC in DLS. The measured concentration of methane, and computed concentrations of water and carbon dioxide agree well with available results from numerical simulations.

  17. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    PubMed

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  18. MPSalsa 3D Simulations of Chemically Reacting Flows

    DOE Data Explorer

    Many important scientific and engineering applications require a detailed analysis of complex systems with coupled fluid flow, thermal energy transfer, mass transfer and nonequilibrium chemical reactions. Currently, computer simulations of these complex reacting flow problems are limited to idealized systems in one or two spatial dimensions when coupled with a detailed, fundamental chemistry model. The goal of our research is to develop, analyze and implement advanced MP numerical algorithms that will allow high resolution 3D simulations with an equal emphasis on fluid flow and chemical kinetics modeling. In our research, we focus on the development of new, fully coupled, implicit solution strategies that are based on robust MP iterative solution methods (copied from http://www.cs.sandia.gov/CRF/MPSalsa/). These simulations are needed for scientific and technical areas such as: combustion research for transportation, atmospheric chemistry modeling for pollution studies, chemically reacting flow models for analysis and control of manufacturing processes, surface catalytic reactors for methane to methanol conversion and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process modeling for production of advanced semiconductor materials (http://www.cs.sandia.gov/CRF/MPSalsa/).

    This project website provides six QuickTime videos of these simulations, along with a small image gallery and slideshow animations. A list of related publications and conference presentations is also made available.

  19. [Bioactive substance used for treatment and preventive maintenance of liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Tokaev, E S; Blokhina, N P; Nekrasov, E A

    2007-01-01

    In the present article the review of bioactive substances rendering beneficial effect on an organism at diseases of a liver is resulted. Action of such classes of bioactive substances as amino acids and their derivatives, vitamins, macro- and microelements, herbal bioactive substances, cytamins is described. Bioactive substances can be used in manufacture food supplements or foodstuffs of a medical and prophylactic feed.

  20. Colocalization and shared distribution of endomorphins with substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and the mu opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Greenwell, Thomas N; Martin-Schild, Sheryl; Inglis, Fiona M; Zadina, James E

    2007-07-10

    The endomorphins are endogenous opioids with high affinity and selectivity for the mu opioid receptor (MOR, MOR-1, MOP). Endomorphin-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH(2); EM1) and endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH(2); EM2) have been localized to many regions of the central nervous system (CNS), including those that regulate antinociception, autonomic function, and reward. Colocalization or shared distribution (overlap) of two neurotransmitters, or a transmitter and its cognate receptor, may imply an interaction of these elements in the regulation of functions mediated in that region. For example, previous evidence of colocalization of EM2 with substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and MOR in primary afferent neurons suggested an interaction of these peptides in pain modulation. We therefore investigated the colocalization of EM1 and EM2 with SP, CGRP, and MOR in other areas of the CNS. EM2 was colocalized with SP and CGRP in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and with SP, CGRP and MOR in the parabrachial nucleus. Several areas in which EM1 and EM2 showed extensive shared distributions, but no detectable colocalization with other signaling molecules, are also described.

  1. Lichen substances prevent lichens from nutrient deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Markus; Willenbruch, Karen; Leuschner, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    The dibenzofuran usnic acid, a widespread cortical secondary metabolite produced by lichen-forming fungi, was shown to promote the intracellular uptake of Cu(2+) in two epiphytic lichens, Evernia mesomorpha and Ramalina menziesii, from acidic, nutrient-poor bark. Higher Cu(2+) uptake in the former, which produces the depside divaricatic acid in addition to usnic acid, suggests that this depside promotes Cu(2+) uptake. Since Cu(2+) is one of the rarest micronutrients, promotion of Cu(2+) uptake by lichen substances may be crucial for the studied lichens to survive in their nutrient-poor habitats. In contrast, study of the uptake of other metals in E. mesomorpha revealed that the intracellular uptake of Mn(2+), which regularly exceeds potentially toxic concentrations in leachates of acidic tree bark, was partially inhibited by the lichen substances produced by this species. Inhibition of Mn(2+) uptake by lichen substances previously has been demonstrated in lichens. The uptake of Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mg(2+), and Zn(2+), which fail to reach toxic concentrations in acidic bark at unpolluted sites, although they are more common than Cu(2+), was not affected by lichen substances of E. mesomorpha.

  2. Hydrazonopropionic acids, a new class of hypoglycemic substances. 5. Inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis by 2-(3-methylcinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate in the rat and guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Haeckel, R; Oellerich, M; Schumann, G; Beneking, M

    1985-03-01

    2-(3-Methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate (MCHP) is a new compound which effectively lowers the blood glucose level in guinea pigs. 0.04 mmol/l MCHP inhibited glucose formation from lactate, pyruvate and alanine, but not from dihydroxyacetone in the perfused guinea pig liver. In the presence of both hexanoic acid and alanine, 0.04 mmol/l MCHP did not effect hepatic gluconeogenesis. Gluconeogenesis was probably reduced by an inhibition of the pyruvate carboxylase: The pattern of hepatic metabolite concentrations indicated a block between pyruvate and the triose phosphates. The intrahepatic concentration of acetyl-CoA was consistently decreased. The decrease of the acetyl-CoA concentration could be explained by an influence of MCHP on the fatty acid oxidations, which occurred at the carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT) step. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a medium chain fatty acid not requiring CPT reversed the inhibition of gluconeogenesis by MCHP. From all results reported it is concluded that transamination and oxidative phosphorylation were not effected to a degree relevant for the inhibition of gluconeogenesis by 0.04 mmol/l MCHP.

  3. Investigation of chemically reacting and radiating supersonic internal flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mani, M.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    The two-dimensional spatially elliptic Navier-Stokes equations are used to investigate the chemically reacting and radiating supersonic flow of the hydrogen-air system between two parallel plates and in a channel with a ten degree compression-expansion ramp at the lower boundary. The explicit unsplit finite-difference technique of MacCormack is used to advance the governing equations in time until convergence is achieved. The chemistry source term in the species equation is treated implicitly to alleviate the stiffness associated with fast reactions. The tangent slab approximation is employed in the radiative flux formation. Both pseudo-gray and nongray models are used to represent the absorption characteristics of the participating species. Results obtained for specific conditions indicate that the radiative interaction can have a significant influence on the flow field.

  4. Instrumentation development for study of Reynolds Analogy in reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deturris, Dianne J.

    1995-01-01

    Boundary layers in supersonic reacting flows are not well understood. Recently a technique has been developed which makes more extensive surface measurements practical, increasing the capability to understand the turbulent boundary layer. A significant advance in this understanding would be the formulation of an analytic relation between the transfer of momentum and the transfer of heat for this flow, similar to the Reynolds Analogy that exists for laminar flow. A gauge has been designed and built which allows a thorough experimental investigation of the relative effects of heat transfer and skin friction in the presence of combustion. Direct concurrent measurements made at the same location, combined with local flow conditions, enable a quantitative analysis to obtain a relation between the surface drag and wall heating, as well as identifying possible ways of reducing both.

  5. 3D Reacting Flow Analysis of LANTR Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Mark E. M.; Krivanek, Thomas M.; Hemminger, Joseph A.; Bulman, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents performance predictions for LANTR nozzles and the system implications for their use in a manned Mars mission. The LANTR concept is rocket thrust augmentation by injecting Oxygen into the nozzle to combust the Hydrogen exhaust of a Nuclear Thermal Rocket. The performance predictions are based on three-dimensional reacting flow simulations using VULCAN. These simulations explore a range of O2/H2 mixture ratios, injector configurations, and concepts. These performance predictions are used for a trade analysis within a system study for a manned Mars mission. Results indicate that the greatest benefit of LANTR will occur with In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). However, Hydrogen propellant volume reductions may allow greater margins for fitting tanks within the launch vehicle where packaging issues occur.

  6. Model of Fluidized Bed Containing Reacting Solids and Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Lathouwers, Danny

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed for describing the thermofluid dynamics of a dense, chemically reacting mixture of solid particles and gases. As used here, "dense" signifies having a large volume fraction of particles, as for example in a bubbling fluidized bed. The model is intended especially for application to fluidized beds that contain mixtures of carrier gases, biomass undergoing pyrolysis, and sand. So far, the design of fluidized beds and other gas/solid industrial processing equipment has been based on empirical correlations derived from laboratory- and pilot-scale units. The present mathematical model is a product of continuing efforts to develop a computational capability for optimizing the designs of fluidized beds and related equipment on the basis of first principles. Such a capability could eliminate the need for expensive, time-consuming predesign testing.

  7. Fast algorithm for calculating chemical kinetics in turbulent reacting flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.; Pratt, D. T.

    1986-01-01

    This paper addresses the need for a fast batch chemistry solver to perform the kinetics part of a split operator formulation of turbulent reacting flows, with special attention focused on the solution of the ordinary differential equations governing a homogeneous gas-phase chemical reaction. For this purpose, a two-part predictor-corrector algorithm which incorporates an exponentially fitted trapezoidal method was developed. The algorithm performs filtering of ill-posed initial conditions, automatic step-size selection, and automatic selection of Jacobi-Newton or Newton-Raphson iteration for convergence to achieve maximum computational efficiency while observing a prescribed error tolerance. The new algorithm, termed CREK1D (combustion reaction kinetics, one-dimensional), compared favorably with the code LSODE when tested on two representative problems drawn from combustion kinetics, and is faster than LSODE.

  8. REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registry: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Doran M. Christensen, DO, REAC /TS Associate Director and Staff Physician Becky Murdock, REAC/TS Registry and Health Physics Technician

    2012-12-12

    Over the past four years, REAC/TS has presented a number of case reports from its Radiation Accident Registry. Victims of radiological or nuclear incidents must meet certain dose criteria for an incident to be categorized as an “accident” and be included in the registry. Although the greatest numbers of “accidents” in the United States that have been entered into the registry involve radiation devices, the greater percentage of serious accidents have involved sealed sources of one kind or another. But if one looks at the kinds of accident scenarios that have resulted in extreme consequence, i.e., death, the greater share of deaths has occurred in medical settings.

  9. Vorticity Dynamics in Single and Multiple Swirling Reacting Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Travis; Aguilar, Michael; Emerson, Benjamin; Noble, David; Lieuwen, Tim

    2015-11-01

    This presentation describes an analysis of the unsteady flow structures in two multinozzle swirling jet configurations. This work is motivated by the problem of combustion instabilities in premixed flames, a major concern in the development of modern low NOx combustors. The objective is to compare the unsteady flow structures in these two configurations for two separate geometries and determine how certain parameters, primarily distance between jets, influence the flow dynamics. The analysis aims to differentiate between the flow dynamics of single nozzle and triple nozzle configurations. This study looks at how the vorticity in the shear layers of one reacting swirling jet can affect the dynamics of a nearby similar jet. The distance between the swirling jets is found to have an effect on the flow field in determining where swirling jets merge and on the dynamics upstream of the merging location. Graduate Student, School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA.

  10. Reacting chemistry at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Morgan, Thomas; Huwel, Lutz; Graham, William

    2016-09-01

    Plasma interaction with gas-liquid interfaces is becoming increasingly important in biological applications, chemical analysis and medicine. It introduces electrons, new ionic species and reactive species and contributes to chemical and electrical self-organization at the interface. To provide insight into the associated physics and chemistry at work in the evolution of the plasma in the air-water interface (AWI), a time-dependent one-dimensional modelling has been developed. The numerical simulation is used to solve the kinetic equations and help identify the important reaction mechanisms and describe the phenomena associated with hundreds of reacting pathways in gas-phase and liquid-phase AWI chemistry. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 16K04998.

  11. Repartitioning Strategies for Massively Parallel Simulation of Reacting Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciuneri, Patrick; Zheng, Angen; Givi, Peyman; Labrinidis, Alexandros; Chrysanthis, Panos

    2015-11-01

    The majority of parallel CFD simulators partition the domain into equal regions and assign the calculations for a particular region to a unique processor. This type of domain decomposition is vital to the efficiency of the solver. However, as the simulation develops, the workload among the partitions often become uneven (e.g. by adaptive mesh refinement, or chemically reacting regions) and a new partition should be considered. The process of repartitioning adjusts the current partition to evenly distribute the load again. We compare two repartitioning tools: Zoltan, an architecture-agnostic graph repartitioner developed at the Sandia National Laboratories; and Paragon, an architecture-aware graph repartitioner developed at the University of Pittsburgh. The comparative assessment is conducted via simulation of the Taylor-Green vortex flow with chemical reaction.

  12. Studies on nonequilibrium phenomena in supersonic chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Chandrasekhar, Rajnish

    1993-01-01

    This study deals with a systematic investigation of nonequilibrium processes in supersonic combustion. The two-dimensional, elliptic Navier-Stokes equations are used to investigate supersonic flows with nonequilibrium chemistry and thermodynamics, coupled with radiation, for hydrogen-air systems. The explicit, unsplit MacCormack finite-difference scheme is used to advance the governing equations in time, until convergence is achieved. For a basic understanding of the flow physics, premixed flows undergoing finite rate chemical reactions are investigated. Results obtained for specific conditions indicate that the radiative interactions vary substantially, depending on reactions involving HO2 and NO species, and that this can have a noticeable influence on the flowfield. The second part of this study deals with premixed reacting flows under thermal nonequilibrium conditions. Here, the critical problem is coupling of the vibrational relaxation process with the radiative heat transfer. The specific problem considered is a premixed expanding flow in a supersonic nozzle. Results indicate the presence of nonequilibrium conditions in the expansion region of the nozzle. This results in reduction of the radiative interactions in the flowfield. Next, the present study focuses on investigation of non-premixed flows under chemical nonequilibrium conditions. In this case, the main problem is the coupled turbulence-chemistry interaction. The resulting formulation is validated by comparison with experimental data on reacting supersonic coflowing jets. Results indicate that the effect of heat release is to lower the turbulent shear stress and the mean density. The last part of this study proposes a new theoretical formulation for the coupled turbulence-radiation interactions. Results obtained for the coflowing jets experiment indicate that the effect of turbulence is to enhance the radiative interactions.

  13. Substance use - inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    Substance abuse - inhalants; Drug abuse - inhalants; Drug use - inhalants; Glue - inhalants ... symptoms and may include: Strong cravings for the drug Having mood swings from feeling depressed to agitated ...

  14. Substance use - amphetamines

    MedlinePlus

    Substance abuse - amphetamines; Drug abuse - amphetamines; Drug use - amphetamines ... Amphetamine: goey, louee, speed, uppers, whiz Dextroamphetamine (ADHD medicine used illegally): dexies, kiddie-speed, pep pills, uppers; ...

  15. Optimizing antiplatelet therapy for the ACS patient: reacting to clinical trial data from the ISAR-REACT-2 studies.

    PubMed

    Steinhubl, Steven R

    2006-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, patients presenting with possible ACS are a heterogeneous population, and there is a choice of many potential combination antiplatelet therapies, with aspirin, thienopyridines (eg, clopidogrel), and glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa antagonists. The ISAR-REACT-2 trial investigated the optimal application of triple (aspirin 1 thienopyridine 1 GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor) versus dual (aspirin 1 thienopyridine) antiplatelet therapy for patients with ACS undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Abciximab was associated with a significant 25% relative reduction in risk for the 30-day combined endpoint of death, myocardial infarction, or urgent target vessel revascularization. All of this benefit was confined to the patients with elevated troponin levels. The data indicate that troponin can be used as a biomarker to identify patients most likely to benefit from the addition of a GP IIb/IIIa antagonist.

  16. Substance Abuse Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzolino, Robert

    This brochure outlines the substance abuse policy for students at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM/Pennsylvania). Noted are the dangers of substance abuse during the stressful time of medical training and later for the doctor and clients during professional practice. The policy's five goals are briefly stated. Described next…

  17. Substance Abuse. Policy Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Collaboration for Youth, Washington, DC.

    This paper presents the policy statement on substance abuse from the National Collaboration for Youth (NCY). The policy statement section lists programs and activities supported by the NCY. A section on background includes a statement of the issue of substance abuse. Areas examined in this section include alcohol abuse and drunk driving among…

  18. Presence by radioimmunoassay of a calcitonin-like substance in porcine pituitary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Catherwood, B.D.; Deftos, L.J.

    1980-06-01

    We studied acidic acetone extracts of whole porcine pituitary glands for the presence of immunoreactive calcitonin (CT) using a porcine CT (pCT) RIA which did not react with other known pituitary hormones. Four preparations of porcine pituitary extract contained immunoreactive CT. Three of these displayed inhibition of binding parallel to that of authentic pCT in the pCT RIA and contained a single peak of immunoreactivity similar to pCT when studied by two different gel filtration chromatography systems. One preparation of porcine pituitary extract showed nonparallelism in RIA dose-dilution experiments and multiple immunoreactive species both similar to and larger than pCT on gel filtration in 6 M guanidine HCl. The effect of the reduction of disulfide bonds, followed by carboxymethylation of sulfhydryl groups, on immunoreactivity and apparent molecular size was similar for the CT-like substance in porcine pituitary extract and for authentic pCT. Preliminary immunohistological studies showed cytoplasmic staining in cells of the porcine adenohypophysis. These results demonstrate that the porcine pituitary gland contains a substance which has some of the immunochemical and biochemical properties of thyroidal pCT.

  19. [Effect of additives on the amination of 2-oxoglutaric acid by gamma-radiation].

    PubMed

    Ema, K; Hikichi, T; Shinagawa, M

    1977-07-01

    The effect of added substances was studied on the yield of glutamic acid produced by gamma-ray irradiation of 2-oxoglutaric acid and ammonia in aqueous solution. The contents of amino acids in the irradiated solutions were determined with amino acids analyzer. Sodium nitrate, allyl alcohol or sodium formate was used as an added substance. The yield of glutamic acid significantly decreased by the addition of nitrate, and it was little affected by the addition of allyl alcohol. In the presence of formate the yield increased from G = 0.4 (2-oxoglutaric acid 0.05M and ammonium hydroxide 2M) to G = 1.1. As a result, it was found that hydrated electron contributes on the formation of glutamic acid, but hydroxyl radical does not. The yield showed a maximum at ca. 0.1 M ammonium hydroxide concentration. These facts indicate that NH2 radical does not contribute to the formation of glutamic acid. As a reaction mechanism, it can be explained that 2-oxoglutaric acid which had been reduced by hydrated electron reacts with ammonia.

  20. What do high school students say when they talk to their friends about substance use? Exploring the content of substance-use-specific communication with friends.

    PubMed

    Kam, Jennifer A; Krieger, Janice L; Basinger, Erin D; Figueroa-Caballero, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examined the content of adolescents' conversations with their friends about substance use, adolescents' reactions to such conversations, and reasons why some adolescents did not engage in such conversations. Based on 25 semistructured interviews with high school students, we identified three themes: informational, persuasive, and relational messages. Informational messages included discussing how many peers use substances and clarifying rumors about a friend's substance use. Persuasive messages involved direct anti-substance-use messages (e.g., warning), direct pro-substance-use messages (e.g., legalizing marijuana), indirect anti-substance-use messages (e.g., disliking their substance-use experience), and indirect pro-substance-use messages (e.g., intentions to use substances). Relational messages included joking about substance use and establishing code words for use. Adolescents reacted to their conversations in several ways, such as shock and increased relational closeness. When adolescents did not talk about substance use with their friend, they offered several reasons, including low response efficacy and fear of ruining the friendship.

  1. Influence of dissolved organic substances in groundwater on sorption behavior of americium and neptunium

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, S. Jr.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    Groundwaters typically contain dissolved organic carbon consisting largely of high molecular weight compounds of humic and fulvic acids. To evaluate whether these dissolved organic substances can enhance the tranport of radionuclides through the groundwater system, experiments were conducted to examine the sorption of americium and neptunium onto crushed basalt in the presence of dissolved humic- and fulvic-acid organic carbon introduced into synthetic groundwater. The partitioning experiments with synthetic groundwater show that increasing the concentration of either humic or fulvic acid in the water has a significant inhibiting effect on sorption of both americium and neptunium. At 22/sup 0/C, adsorption of these radionuclides, as measured by distribution ratios (the ratio of nuclide sorbed onto the solid to nuclide in solution at the end of the experiment), decreased by 25% to 50% by addition of as little as 1 mg/L dissolved organic carbon and by one to two orders of magnitude by addition of 100 to 200 mg/L dissolved organic carbon. Distribution ratios measured in solutions reacted at 90/sup 0/C similarly decreased with the addition of dissolved organic carbon but generally ranged from one to two orders of magnitude higher than those determined in the 22/sup 0/C experiment. These results suggest that organic carbon dissolved in deep groundwaters may significantly enhance the mobility of radionuclides of americium and neptunium. 23 references, 5 figures, 11 tables.

  2. Domain decomposition methods for the parallel computation of reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyes, David E.

    1988-01-01

    Domain decomposition is a natural route to parallel computing for partial differential equation solvers. Subdomains of which the original domain of definition is comprised are assigned to independent processors at the price of periodic coordination between processors to compute global parameters and maintain the requisite degree of continuity of the solution at the subdomain interfaces. In the domain-decomposed solution of steady multidimensional systems of PDEs by finite difference methods using a pseudo-transient version of Newton iteration, the only portion of the computation which generally stands in the way of efficient parallelization is the solution of the large, sparse linear systems arising at each Newton step. For some Jacobian matrices drawn from an actual two-dimensional reacting flow problem, comparisons are made between relaxation-based linear solvers and also preconditioned iterative methods of Conjugate Gradient and Chebyshev type, focusing attention on both iteration count and global inner product count. The generalized minimum residual method with block-ILU preconditioning is judged the best serial method among those considered, and parallel numerical experiments on the Encore Multimax demonstrate for it approximately 10-fold speedup on 16 processors.

  3. 9519 biotite granodiorite reacted in a temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, R.W.; Bayhurst, G.K.

    1980-10-01

    A biotite granodiorite from the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal system was reacted in a controlled temperature gradient with initially distilled water for 60d. Polished rock prisms were located in the gradient at 72, 119, 161, 209, 270, and 310/sup 0/C. Scanning electron microscope and microprobe analyses show the appearance of secondary phases: Ca-montmorillonite at 72/sup 0/C and 119/sup 0/C; zeolite, either stilbite or heulandite, at 161/sup 0/C; and another zeolite, thomsonite, at higher temperatures. Solution analyses show a steady state equilibrium exists between solution and overgrowths after about 2 weeks of reaction. The chemographic relations for the system are explored in some detail indicating the divariant assemblages may be placed in a reasonable sequence in intensive variable space. These relations predict high and low temperature effects not directly observed experimentally as well as relevant univariant equilibria. Solution chemistry indicates the Na-Ca-K geothermometer more adequately predicts temperature in this system than does the silica geothermometer.

  4. The Chilling Effect: How Do Researchers React to Controversy?

    PubMed Central

    Kempner, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    Background Can political controversy have a “chilling effect” on the production of new science? This is a timely concern, given how often American politicians are accused of undermining science for political purposes. Yet little is known about how scientists react to these kinds of controversies. Methods and Findings Drawing on interview (n = 30) and survey data (n = 82), this study examines the reactions of scientists whose National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded grants were implicated in a highly publicized political controversy. Critics charged that these grants were “a waste of taxpayer money.” The NIH defended each grant and no funding was rescinded. Nevertheless, this study finds that many of the scientists whose grants were criticized now engage in self-censorship. About half of the sample said that they now remove potentially controversial words from their grant and a quarter reported eliminating entire topics from their research agendas. Four researchers reportedly chose to move into more secure positions entirely, either outside academia or in jobs that guaranteed salaries. About 10% of the group reported that this controversy strengthened their commitment to complete their research and disseminate it widely. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that political controversies can shape what scientists choose to study. Debates about the politics of science usually focus on the direct suppression, distortion, and manipulation of scientific results. This study suggests that scholars must also examine how scientists may self-censor in response to political events. PMID:19018657

  5. Adjoint based sensitivity analysis of a reacting jet in crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sashittal, Palash; Sayadi, Taraneh; Schmid, Peter

    2016-11-01

    With current advances in computational resources, high fidelity simulations of reactive flows are increasingly being used as predictive tools in various industrial applications. In order to capture the combustion process accurately, detailed/reduced chemical mechanisms are employed, which in turn rely on various model parameters. Therefore, it would be of great interest to quantify the sensitivities of the predictions with respect to the introduced models. Due to the high dimensionality of the parameter space, methods such as finite differences which rely on multiple forward simulations prove to be very costly and adjoint based techniques are a suitable alternative. The complex nature of the governing equations, however, renders an efficient strategy in finding the adjoint equations a challenging task. In this study, we employ the modular approach of Fosas de Pando et al. (2012), to build a discrete adjoint framework applied to a reacting jet in crossflow. The developed framework is then used to extract the sensitivity of the integrated heat release with respect to the existing combustion parameters. Analyzing the sensitivities in the three-dimensional domain provides insight towards the specific regions of the flow that are more susceptible to the choice of the model.

  6. Teens impulsively react rather than retreat from threat.

    PubMed

    Dreyfuss, Michael; Caudle, Kristina; Drysdale, Andrew T; Johnston, Natalie E; Cohen, Alexandra O; Somerville, Leah H; Galván, Adriana; Tottenham, Nim; Hare, Todd A; Casey, B J

    2014-01-01

    There is a significant inflection in risk taking and criminal behavior during adolescence, but the basis for this increase remains largely unknown. An increased sensitivity to rewards has been suggested to explain these behaviors, yet juvenile offences often occur in emotionally charged situations of negative valence. How behavior is altered by changes in negative emotional processes during adolescence has received less attention than changes in positive emotional processes. The current study uses a measure of impulsivity in combination with cues that signal threat or safety to assess developmental changes in emotional responses to threat cues. We show that adolescents, especially males, impulsively react to threat cues relative to neutral ones more than adults or children, even when instructed not to respond. This adolescent-specific behavioral pattern is paralleled by enhanced activity in limbic cortical regions implicated in the detection and assignment of emotional value to inputs and in the subsequent regulation of responses to them when successfully suppressing impulsive responses to threat cues. In contrast, prefrontal control regions implicated in detecting and resolving competing responses show an adolescent-emergent pattern (i.e. greater activity in adolescents and adults relative to children) during successful suppression of a response regardless of emotion. Our findings suggest that adolescence is a period of heightened sensitivity to social and emotional cues that results in diminished regulation of behavior in their presence.

  7. Simulation of bubble growth and coalescence in reacting polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchisio, Daniele; Karimi, Mohsen

    2015-11-01

    This work concerns with the simulation of reacting polymer foams with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In these systems upon mixing of different ingredients polymerization starts and some gaseous compounds are produced, resulting in the formation of bubbles that growth and coalesce. As the foam expands, the polymerization proceeds resulting in an increase of the apparent viscosity. The evolution of the collective behavior of the bubbles within the polymer foam is tracked by solving a master kinetic equation, formulated in terms of the bubble size distribution. The rate with which individual bubbles grow is instead calculated by resolving the momentum and concentration boundary layers around the bubbles. Moreover, since it is useful to track the evolution of the interface between the foam and the surrounding air, a volume-of-fluid (VOF) model is adopted. The final computational model is implemented in the open-source CFD code openFOAM by making use of the compressibleInterFoam solver. The master kinetic equation is solved with a quadrature-based moment method (QBMM) directly implemented in openFOAM, whereas the bubble growth model is solved independently and ''called'' from the CFD code by using an unstructured database. Model predictions are validated against experimental data. This work was funded by the European Commission under the grant agreement number 604271 (Project acronym: MoDeNa; call identifier: FP7-NMP-2013-SMALL-7).

  8. Dynamic Load Balancing Strategies for Parallel Reacting Flow Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciuneri, Patrick; Meneses, Esteban; Givi, Peyman

    2014-11-01

    Load balancing in parallel computing aims at distributing the work as evenly as possible among the processors. This is a critical issue in the performance of parallel, time accurate, flow simulators. The constraint of time accuracy requires that all processes must be finished with their calculation for a given time step before any process can begin calculation of the next time step. Thus, an irregularly balanced compute load will result in idle time for many processes for each iteration and thus increased walltimes for calculations. Two existing, dynamic load balancing approaches are applied to the simplified case of a partially stirred reactor for methane combustion. The first is Zoltan, a parallel partitioning, load balancing, and data management library developed at the Sandia National Laboratories. The second is Charm++, which is its own machine independent parallel programming system developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The performance of these two approaches is compared, and the prospects for their application to full 3D, reacting flow solvers is assessed.

  9. Investigation of supersonic chemically reacting and radiating channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mani, Mortaza; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1988-01-01

    The 2-D time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations are used to investigate supersonic flows undergoing finite rate chemical reaction and radiation interaction for a hydrogen-air system. The explicit multistage finite volume technique of Jameson is used to advance the governing equations in time until convergence is achieved. The chemistry source term in the species equation is treated implicitly to alleviate the stiffness associated with fast reactions. The multidimensional radiative transfer equations for a nongray model are provided for a general configuration and then reduced for a planar geometry. Both pseudo-gray and nongray models are used to represent the absorption-emission characteristics of the participating species. The supersonic inviscid and viscous, nonreacting flows are solved by employing the finite volume technique of Jameson and the unsplit finite difference scheme of MacCormack. The specified problem considered is of the flow in a channel with a 10 deg compression-expansion ramp. The calculated results are compared with those of an upwind scheme. The problem of chemically reacting and radiating flows are solved for the flow of premixed hydrogen-air through a channel with parallel boundaries, and a channel with a compression corner. Results obtained for specific conditions indicate that the radiative interaction can have a significant influence on the entire flow field.

  10. Numerical Simulations of High-Speed Chemically Reacting Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ton, V. T.; Karagozin, A. R.; Marble, F. E.; Osher, S. J.; Engquist, B. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Essentially NonOscillatory (ENO) shock-capturing scheme for the solution of hyperbolic equations is extended to solve a system of coupled conservation equations governing two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible chemically reacting flow with full chemistry. The thermodynamic properties of the mixture are modeled accurately, and stiff kinetic terms are separated from the fluid motion by a fractional step algorithm. The methodology is used to study the concept of shock-induced mixing and combustion, a process by which the interaction of a shock wave with a jet of low-density hydrogen fuel enhances mixing through streamwise vorticity generation. Test cases with and without chemical reaction are explored here. Our results indicate that, in the temperature range examined, vorticity generation as well as the distribution of atomic species do not change significantly with the introduction of a chemical reaction and subsequent heat release. The actual diffusion of hydrogen is also relatively unaffected by the reaction process. This suggests that the fluid mechanics of this problem may be successfully decoupled from the combustion processes, and that computation of the mixing problem (without combustion chemistry) can elucidate much of the important physical features of the flow.

  11. Numerical Simulations of High-Speed Chemically Reacting Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ton, V. T.; Karagozian, A. R.; Marble, F. E.; Osher, S. J.; Engquist, B. E.

    1994-01-01

    The essentially nonoscillatory (ENO) shock-capturing scheme for the solution of hyperbolic equations is extended to solve a system of coupled conservation equations governing two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible chemically reacting flow with full chemistry. The thermodynamic properties of the mixture are modeled accurately, and stiff kinetic terms are separated from the fluid motion by a fractional step algorithm. The methodology is used to study the concept of shock-induced mixing and combustion, a process by which the interaction of a shock wave with a jet of low-density hydrogen fuel enhances mixing through streamwise vorticity generation. Test cases with and without chemical reaction are explored here. Our results indicate that, in the temperature range examined, vorticity generation as well as the distribution of atomic species do not change significantly with the introduction of a chemical reaction and subsequent heat release. The actual diffusion of hydrogen is also relatively unaffected by the reaction process. This suggests that the fluid mechanics of this problem may be successfully decoupled from the combustion processes, and that computation of the mixing problem (without combustion chemistry) can elucidate much of the important physical features of the flow.

  12. Numerical Investigation of a Statistically Stationary Turbulent Reacting Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overholt, Matthew R.; Pope, Stephen B.

    1997-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) has been very useful in the study of inert scalar mixing in turbulent flows, and has recently become feasible for studies of reacting scalars. We have formulated an accessible inhomogeneous nonpremixed turbulent reactive flow for investigating the effects of mixing on reaction and testing mixing models. The mixture fraction-progress variable approach is used with a model single-step reversible finite-rate thermochemistry, yielding non-trivial stationary solutions corresponding to stable reaction and allowing local extinction to occur. A mean gradient in the mixture fraction gives rise to stationarity without forcing, as well as a flame brush. A range of reaction zone thicknesses and Damkohler numbers are examined, yielding a broad spectrum of behavior, ranging from thick to thin flames, and from local extinction to near equilibrium. Based on this study results from full probability density function (PDF) simulations using the IEM and EMST mixing models are evaluated. Conditional moment closure (CMC) results are evaluated as well.

  13. Using S and Pb isotope ratios to trace leaching of toxic substances from an acid-impacted industrial-waste landfill (Pozdatky, Czech Republic).

    PubMed

    Novak, Martin; Pacherova, Petra; Erbanova, Lucie; Veron, Alain J; Buzek, Frantisek; Jackova, Ivana; Paces, Tomas; Rukavickova, Lenka; Blaha, Vladimir; Holecek, Jan

    2012-10-15

    Slightly elevated concentrations of toxic species in waters sampled in the surroundings of a leaky landfill may be both a sign of an approaching contaminant plume, or a result of water-rock interaction. Isotopes can be instrumental in distinguishing between anthropogenic and geogenic species in groundwater. We studied sulfur and lead isotope ratios at an abandoned industrial-waste landfill, located in a densely populated part of Central Europe. Stable isotope variability in space and time was used to follow the movement of a groundwater plume, contaminated with toxic metals (Cd, Cr, Be), in fractured granitoids. Toxic metals had been mobilized from industrial waste by a strong pulse of sulfuric acid, also deposited in the landfill. Both tracers exhibited a wide range of values (δ(34)S between +2.6 and +18.9‰; (206)Pb/(207)Pb between 1.16 and 1.39), which facilitated identification of mixing end-members, and made it possible to assess the sources of the studied species. In situ fractionations did not hinder source apportionment. Influx of contaminated groundwater was observed neither in irrigation wells in a nearby village, nor at distances greater than 300 m from the landfill. Combination of stable isotope tracers can be used as part of an early-warning system in landscapes affected by landfills.

  14. Squalene in hair--a natural reference substance for the improved interpretation of fatty acid ethyl ester concentrations with respect to alcohol misuse.

    PubMed

    Auwärter, V; Kiessling, B; Pragst, F

    2004-10-29

    Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) are incorporated into hair mainly from sebum. For this reason, the use of their concentration CFAEE as marker of excessive alcohol consumption is complicated by interindividual differences of the activity of the sebum glands and of elimination by hair care and hair cosmetics. Furthermore, an influence of the investigated hair length due to increasing accumulation from proximal to distal was found. Therefore, it was examined whether these sources of error can be avoided if in addition to CFAEE the relative FAEE concentrations CFAEE/CSQ related to squalene SQ as a natural reference compound were used for interpretation. Sebum contains about 10-20% SQ. A sensitive and reliable method for the determination of SQ in addition to FAEE from the same hair extracts by high performance liquid chromatography with photo diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) was developed. The concentrations of ethyl myristate, ethyl palmitate, ethyl oleate, ethyl stearate and squalene were determined and CFAEE/CSQ was calculated for 13 teetotallers, 16 social drinkers, 12 fatalities with excessive alcohol abuse at life time and 9 cases with unclear alcohol anamnesis. CSQ ranged from 0.02 to 1.97 microg/mg (mean 0.67 microg/mg). From the results follows that squalene enables a control of the lipid content of hair and a correction of CFAEE in cases with deviations from the usual lipid content in a similar way as creatinine in urine. Preliminary values of CFAEE/CSQ were suggested for the upper limit for teetotallers (< 0.6 ng/microg) and the lower limit for excessive alcohol abuse (> 1.5 ng/microg). However, the relative concentration CFAEE/CSQ cannot completely replace the absolute concentration CFAEE, and both should regularly be used for an improved interpretation with respect to alcohol abuse.

  15. Colloid formation in Hanford sediments reacted with simulated tank waste.

    PubMed

    Mashal, Kholoud; Harsh, James B; Flury, Markus; Felmy, Andrew R; Zhao, Hongting

    2004-11-01

    Solutions of high pH, ionic strength, and aluminum concentration have leaked into the subsurface from underground waste storage tanks atthe Hanford Reservation in Washington State. Here, we test the hypothesis that these waste solutions alter and dissolve the native minerals present in the sediments and that colloidal (diameter < 2 microm) feldspathoids form. We reacted Hanford sediments with simulated solutions representative of Hanford waste tanks. The solutions consisted of 1.4 or 2.8 mol/kg NaOH, 0.125 or 0.25 mol/kg NaAlO4, and 3.7 mol/kg NaNO3 and were contacted with the sediments for a period of 25 or 40 days at 50 degrees C. The colloidal size fraction was separated from the sediments and characterized in terms of mineralogy, morphology, chemical composition, and electrophoretic mobility. Upon reaction with tank waste solutions, native minerals released Si and other elements into the solution phase. This Si precipitated with the Al present in the waste solutions to form secondary minerals, identified as the feldspathoids cancrinite and sodalite. The solution phase was modeled with the chemical equilibrium model GMIN for solution speciation and saturation indices with respect to sodalite and cancrinite. The amount of colloidal material in the sediments increased upon reaction with waste solutions. At the natural pH found in Hanford sediments (pH 8) the newly formed minerals are negatively charged, similar to the unreacted colloidal material present in the sediments. The formation of colloidal material in Hanford sediments upon reaction with tank waste solutions is an important aspect to consider in the characterization of Hanford tank leaks and may affect the fate of hazardous radionuclides present in the tank waste.

  16. Colloid Formation in Hanford Sediments Reacted with Simulated Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Mashal, Kholoud; Harsh, James B.; Flury, Markus; Felmy, Andrew R.; Zhao, Hongting

    2004-11-01

    Solutions of high pH, ionic strength, and aluminum concentration have leaked into the subsurface from underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Reservation in Washington State. Here, we test the hypothesis that these waste solutions alter and dissolve the native minerals present in the sediments and that colloidal (diameter < 2 m) feldspathoids form. We reacted Hanford sediments with simulated solutions representative of Hanford waste tanks. The solutions consisted of 1.4 or 2.8 mol/kg NaOH, 0.125 or 0.25 mol/kg NaAlO4, and 3.7 mol/kg NaNO3 and were contacted with the sediments for a period of 25 or 40 days at 50 C. The colloidal size fraction was separated from the sediments and characterized in terms of mineralogy, morphology, chemical composition, and electrophoretic mobility. Upon reaction with tank waste solutions, native minerals released Si and other elements into the solution phase. This Si precipitated with the Al present in the waste solutions to form secondary minerals, identified as the feldspathoids cancrinite and sodalite. The solution phase was modeled with the chemical equilibrium model GMIN for solution speciation and saturation indices with respect to sodalite and cancrinite. The amount of colloidal material in the sediments increased upon reaction with waste solutions. At the natural pH found in Hanford sediments (pH 8) the newly formed minerals are negatively charged, similar to the unreacted colloidal material present in the sediments. The formation of colloidal material in Hanford sediments upon reaction with tank waste solutions is an important aspect to consider in the characterization of Hanford tank leaks and may affect the fate of hazardous radionuclides present in the tank waste.

  17. Linear models for sound from supersonic reacting mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chary, P. Shivakanth; Samanta, Arnab

    2016-12-01

    We perform a linearized reduced-order modeling of the aeroacoustic sound sources in supersonic reacting mixing layers to explore their sensitivities to some of the flow parameters in radiating sound. Specifically, we investigate the role of outer modes as the effective flow compressibility is raised, when some of these are expected to dominate over the traditional Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) -type central mode. Although the outer modes are known to be of lesser importance in the near-field mixing, how these radiate to the far-field is uncertain, on which we focus. On keeping the flow compressibility fixed, the outer modes are realized via biasing the respective mean densities of the fast (oxidizer) or slow (fuel) side. Here the mean flows are laminar solutions of two-dimensional compressible boundary layers with an imposed composite (turbulent) spreading rate, which we show to significantly alter the growth of instability waves by saturating them earlier, similar to in nonlinear calculations, achieved here via solving the linear parabolized stability equations. As the flow parameters are varied, instability of the slow modes is shown to be more sensitive to heat release, potentially exceeding equivalent central modes, as these modes yield relatively compact sound sources with lesser spreading of the mixing layer, when compared to the corresponding fast modes. In contrast, the radiated sound seems to be relatively unaffected when the mixture equivalence ratio is varied, except for a lean mixture which is shown to yield a pronounced effect on the slow mode radiation by reducing its modal growth.

  18. LES/RANS Simulation of a Supersonic Reacting Wall Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Jack R.; Boles, John A.; Baurle, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents results from large-eddy / Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (LES/RANS) simulations of the well-known Burrows-Kurkov supersonic reacting wall-jet experiment. Generally good agreement with experimental mole fraction, stagnation temperature, and Pitot pressure profiles is obtained for non-reactive mixing of the hydrogen jet with a non-vitiated air stream. A lifted flame, stabilized between 10 and 22 cm downstream of the hydrogen jet, is formed for hydrogen injected into a vitiated air stream. Flame stabilization occurs closer to the hydrogen injection location when a three-dimensional combustor geometry (with boundary layer development resolved on all walls) is considered. Volumetric expansion of the reactive shear layer is accompanied by the formation of large eddies which interact strongly with the reaction zone. Time averaged predictions of the reaction zone structure show an under-prediction of the peak water concentration and stagnation temperature, relative to experimental data and to results from a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes calculation. If the experimental data can be considered as being accurate, this result indicates that the present LES/RANS method does not correctly capture the cascade of turbulence scales that should be resolvable on the present mesh. Instead, energy is concentrated in the very largest scales, which provide an over-mixing effect that excessively cools and strains the flame. Predictions improve with the use of a low-dissipation version of the baseline piecewise parabolic advection scheme, which captures the formation of smaller-scale structures superimposed on larger structures of the order of the shear-layer width.

  19. 75 FR 62570 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration By Notice dated June... Administration (DEA) to be registered as a bulk manufacturer of Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid (2010), a basic class... the granting of registration as a bulk manufacturer of the basic class of controlled substance...

  20. A phosphorylation pattern-recognizing antibody specifically reacts to RNA polymerase II bound to exons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jungwon; Lee, Jong-Hyuk; Park, Sunyoung; Yoon, Soomin; Yoon, Aerin; Hwang, Do B; Lee, Hwa K; Kim, Min S; Lee, Yujean; Yang, Won J; Youn, Hong-Duk; Kim, Hyori; Chung, Junho

    2016-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II is an unusual series of repeated residues appended to the C-terminus of the largest subunit and serves as a flexible binding scaffold for numerous nuclear factors. The binding of these factors is determined by the phosphorylation patterns on the repeats in the domain. In this study, we generated a synthetic antibody library by replacing the third heavy chain complementarity-determining region of an anti-HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) antibody (trastuzumab) with artificial sequences of 7–18 amino-acid residues. From this library, antibodies were selected that were specific to serine phosphopeptides that represent typical phosphorylation patterns on the functional unit (YSPTSPS)2 of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD). Antibody clones pCTD-1stS2 and pCTD-2ndS2 showed specificity for peptides with phosphoserine at the second residues of the first or second heptamer repeat, respectively. Additional clones specifically reacted to peptides with phosphoserine at the fifth serine of the first repeat (pCTD-1stS5), the seventh residue of the first repeat and fifth residue of the second repeat (pCTD-S7S5) or the seventh residue of either the first or second repeat (pCTD-S7). All of these antibody clones successfully reacted to RNA polymerase II in immunoblot analysis. Interestingly, pCTD-2ndS2 precipitated predominately RNA polymerase II from the exonic regions of genes in genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analysis, which suggests that the phosphoserine at the second residue of the second repeat of the functional unit (YSPTSPS)2 is a mediator of exon definition. PMID:27857068

  1. Toxic substances handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junod, T. L.

    1979-01-01

    Handbook, published in conjunction with Toxic Substances Alert Program at NASA Lewis Research Center, profiles 187 toxic chemicals in their relatively pure states and include 27 known or suspected carcinogens.

  2. Substance use - marijuana

    MedlinePlus

    Substance abuse - marijuana; Drug abuse - marijuana; Drug use - marijuana; Cannabis; Grass; Hashish; Mary Jane; Pot; Weed ... several minutes. If you eat foods containing the drug as an ingredient, such as brownies, you may ...

  3. Substance use - phencyclidine (PCP)

    MedlinePlus

    PCP; Substance abuse - phencyclidine; Drug abuse - phencyclidine; Drug use - phencyclidine ... PCP is a mind-altering drug. This means it acts on your brain (central nervous system) and changes your mood, behavior, and the way you relate to ...

  4. Toxic substances alert program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junod, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    A toxicity profile is provided, of 187 toxic substances procured by NASA Lewis Research Center during a 3 1/2 year period, including 27 known or suspected carcinogens. The goal of the program is to assure that the center's health and safety personnel are aware of the procurement and use of toxic substances and to alert and inform the users of these materials as to the toxic characteristics and the control measures needed to ensure their safe use. The program also provides a continuing record of the toxic substances procured, who procured them, what other toxic substances the user has obtained in the past, and where similar materials have been used elsewhere at the center.

  5. Substance use during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Forray, Ariadna

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal substance use is a critical public health concern that is linked with several harmful maternal and fetal consequences. The most frequently used substance in pregnancy is tobacco, followed by alcohol, cannabis and other illicit substances. Unfortunately, polysubstance use in pregnancy is common, as well as psychiatric comorbidity, environmental stressors, and limited and disrupted parental care, all of which can compound deleterious maternal and fetal outcomes. There are few existing treatments for prenatal substance use and these mainly comprise behavioral and psychosocial interventions. Contingency management has been shown to be the most efficacious of these. The purpose of this review is to examine the recent literature on the prenatal use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, stimulants, and opioids, including the effects of these on maternal and fetal health and the current therapeutic options. PMID:27239283

  6. Supervision: Substance and Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellerman, Saul W.

    1976-01-01

    Argues that managerial style and substance are inextricably intertwined, illustrating the discussion with excerpts from an extensive study and job analysis of first-line supervisors in a food packaging plant. (JG)

  7. Responses of lipid membranes of taste sensor to astringent and pungent substances.

    PubMed

    Iiyama, S; Toko, K; Matsuno, T; Yamafuji, K

    1994-02-01

    Astringent substances and pungent substances were studied using a multichannel taste sensor with lipid membranes. The electric-potential pattern constructed of eight outputs from the membranes has information of taste quality and intensity. Pungent substances, such as capsaicin, piperine and allyl isothiocyanate, had no effect on the membrane potentials of the lipid membranes. On the other hand, astringent substances such as tannic acid, catechin, gallic acid and chlorogenic acid changed the potentials remarkably. A principal component analysis of the patterns in electric potential changes caused by the taste substances revealed the astringency is located between bitterness and sourness.

  8. Convective instability in a two-layer system of reacting fluids with concentration-dependent diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitova, E. V.; Bratsun, D. A.; Kostarev, K. G.; Mizev, A. I.; Mosheva, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    The development of convective instability in a two-layer system of miscible fluids placed in a narrow vertical gap has been studied theoretically and experimentally. The upper and lower layers are formed with aqueous solutions of acid and base, respectively. When the layers are brought into contact, the frontal neutralization reaction begins. We have found experimentally a new type of convective instability, which is characterized by the spatial localization and the periodicity of the structure observed for the first time in the miscible systems. We have tested a number of different acid-base systems and have found a similar patterning there. In our opinion, it may indicate that the discovered effect is of a general nature and should be taken into account in reaction-diffusion-convection problems as another tool with which the reaction can govern the movement of the reacting fluids. We have shown that, at least in one case (aqueous solutions of nitric acid and sodium hydroxide), a new type of instability called as the concentration-dependent diffusion convection is responsible for the onset of the fluid flow. It arises when the diffusion coefficients of species are different and depend on their concentrations. This type of instability can be attributed to a variety of double-diffusion convection. A mathematical model of the new phenomenon has been developed using the system of reaction-diffusion-convection equations written in the Hele-Shaw approximation. It is shown that the instability can be reproduced in the numerical experiment if only one takes into account the concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficients of the reagents. The dynamics of the base state, its linear stability and nonlinear development of the instability are presented. It is also shown that by varying the concentration of acid in the upper layer one can achieve the occurrence of chemo-convective solitary cell in the bulk of an almost immobile fluid. Good agreement between the

  9. Organic substances in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeson, Phillip E.

    1981-01-01

    This is the third of several compilations of briefing papers on water quality by the U.S. Geological Survey. Each briefing paper is prepared in a simple, nontechnical, easy-to-understand manner. This U.S. Geological Survey Circular contains papers on selected organic substances in water. Briefing papers are included on ' Why study organic substances in water. ', ' Taste and odor in water ', and ' Classification and fractionation of organic solutes in natural waters'. (USGS)

  10. PTSD and Substance Abuse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Substance use disorders (SUD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are...Appendix……………………………………………………………………………. 10-end INTRODUCTION Substance use disorders (SUD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD...International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies “Resilience After Trauma: From Surviving to Thriving” Annual Meeting 7-9 November 2013. Currently

  11. Analysis of acid-generating action of PAG in an EUV resist using acid-sensitive dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko; Biafore, John J.

    2013-03-01

    Researchers are currently examining various methods for determining the quantity of acid generated by a photoacid generator (PAG) and for analyzing acid-generating reactions using acid-sensitive dyes that react with acid and generate a color. Adding an acid-sensitive dye to the resist gives a clear grasp of the acid-generating action. The process involves applying a resist containing an acid-sensitive dye to a quartz substrate; exposing the substrate; and measuring and evaluating the absorbance of a chromogenic substance near 530 nm using a spectroscope. The method determines the rate constant for acid generation (Dill C parameter) during exposure based on the relationship between transmissivity at 530 nm and exposure dose. Using this method, we obtained and compared rate constants for acid generation (C parameters) as part of our study of dependence on the quantity of quencher in the EUV resist. Our results indicate a new model that accounts for the quencher concentration parameter would be useful in analyzing dependence on the quantity of quencher. This paper presents these findings, together with the results of studies of profile simulations using the quencher concentration parameter obtained in the experiments.

  12. Classroom Determination of Trace Organic Substances by Catalytic Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenck, Helmut; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes three trace determinations of organic substances utilizing a spectrophotometer. Provides procedures and absorbance wavelengths for determining acetonitrile, oxalic acid, and oxalic acid in human serum. Explores the role of acetonitrile and oxalic acid as catalysts in their respective reactions. (ML)

  13. 76 FR 36577 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid (2010) I Opium tincture (9630) II Opium, powdered (9639) II Opium, granulated (9640) II Tapentadol (9780) II The company...

  14. 76 FR 72976 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... substances: Drug Schedule Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid (2010) I Opium tincture (9630) II Opium, powdered (9639) II Opium, granulated (9640) II Tapentadol (9780) II The company plans to manufacture the...

  15. Discontinuous Galerkin method for multicomponent chemically reacting flows and combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yu; Ihme, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the development of a discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method for application to chemically reacting flows in subsonic and supersonic regimes under the consideration of variable thermo-viscous-diffusive transport properties, detailed and stiff reaction chemistry, and shock capturing. A hybrid-flux formulation is developed for treatment of the convective fluxes, combining a conservative Riemann-solver and an extended double-flux scheme. A computationally efficient splitting scheme is proposed, in which advection and diffusion operators are solved in the weak form, and the chemically stiff substep is advanced in the strong form using a time-implicit scheme. The discretization of the viscous-diffusive transport terms follows the second form of Bassi and Rebay, and the WENO-based limiter due to Zhong and Shu is extended to multicomponent systems. Boundary conditions are developed for subsonic and supersonic flow conditions, and the algorithm is coupled to thermochemical libraries to account for detailed reaction chemistry and complex transport. The resulting DG method is applied to a series of test cases of increasing physico-chemical complexity. Beginning with one- and two-dimensional multispecies advection and shock-fluid interaction problems, computational efficiency, convergence, and conservation properties are demonstrated. This study is followed by considering a series of detonation and supersonic combustion problems to investigate the convergence-rate and the shock-capturing capability in the presence of one- and multistep reaction chemistry. The DG algorithm is then applied to diffusion-controlled deflagration problems. By examining convergence properties for polynomial order and spatial resolution, and comparing these with second-order finite-volume solutions, it is shown that optimal convergence is achieved and that polynomial refinement provides advantages in better resolving the localized flame structure and complex flow-field features

  16. Modeling reacting gases and aftertreatment devices for internal combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depcik, Christopher David

    As more emphasis is placed worldwide on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, automobile manufacturers have to create more efficient engines. Simultaneously, legislative agencies want these engines to produce fewer problematic emissions such as nitrogen oxides and particulate matter. In response, newer combustion methods, like homogeneous charge compression ignition and fuel cells, are being researched alongside the old standard of efficiency, the compression ignition or diesel engine. These newer technologies present a number of benefits but still have significant challenges to overcome. As a result, renewed interest has risen in making diesel engines cleaner. The key to cleaning up the diesel engine is the placement of aftertreatment devices in the exhaust. These devices have shown great potential in reducing emission levels below regulatory levels while still allowing for increased fuel economy versus a gasoline engine. However, these devices are subject to many flow control issues. While experimental evaluation of these devices helps to understand these issues better, it is impossible to solve the problem through experimentation alone because of time and cost constraints. Because of this, accurate models are needed in conjunction with the experimental work. In this dissertation, the author examines the entire exhaust system including reacting gas dynamics and aftertreatment devices, and develops a complete numerical model for it. The author begins by analyzing the current one-dimensional gas-dynamics simulation models used for internal combustion engine simulations. It appears that more accurate and faster numerical method is available, in particular, those developed in aeronautical engineering, and the author successfully implements one for the exhaust system. The author then develops a comprehensive literature search to better understand the aftertreatment devices. A number of these devices require a secondary injection of fuel or reductant in the exhaust stream

  17. Detailed Studies on the Structure and Dynamics of Reacting Dusty Flows at Normal and Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Campbell, Charles S.

    1997-01-01

    Two-phase reacting flows are substantially less understood compared to gas phase flows. While extensive work has been done on sprays, less attention has been given to the details of dusty reacting flows. Dusty flows are of particular interest for a wide range of applications. Particles can be present in a gas intentionally or unintentionally, and they can be inert or reacting. Inert particles can be also present in an otherwise reacting gas flow, and that can lead to flame cooling and modification of the extinction limits of a combustible mixture. Reacting solid particles can release substantial amounts of heat upon oxidation, and can be used either for propulsion (e.g. Al, B, Mg) or power generation (coal). Furthermore, accidents can occur when a reacting dust accumulates in air and which, in the presence of an ignition source, can cause explosion. Such explosions can occur during lumber milling, in grain elevators, and in mine galleries.

  18. 40 CFR 721.3260 - Ethanediimidic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ethanediimidic acids. 721.3260 Section... Substances § 721.3260 Ethanediimidic acids. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as ethanediimidic acids (PMNs P-90-1472 and...

  19. 40 CFR 721.3260 - Ethanediimidic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ethanediimidic acids. 721.3260 Section... Substances § 721.3260 Ethanediimidic acids. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as ethanediimidic acids (PMNs P-90-1472 and...

  20. 40 CFR 721.3260 - Ethanediimidic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ethanediimidic acids. 721.3260 Section... Substances § 721.3260 Ethanediimidic acids. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as ethanediimidic acids (PMNs P-90-1472 and...

  1. 40 CFR 721.3260 - Ethanediimidic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethanediimidic acids. 721.3260 Section... Substances § 721.3260 Ethanediimidic acids. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as ethanediimidic acids (PMNs P-90-1472 and...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3260 - Ethanediimidic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ethanediimidic acids. 721.3260 Section... Substances § 721.3260 Ethanediimidic acids. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as ethanediimidic acids (PMNs P-90-1472 and...

  3. Photochemical aspects related to humic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Frimmel, F.H. )

    1994-01-01

    Dissolved humic substances (HS) show yellow color and relatively strong absorption in the UV range [a(254 nm) ca. 0.04 cm[sup [minus]1] for c(DOC) = 1 mg/L]. This is the basis for photochemical reactions in the photic zone of aquatic systems and in water treatment using IV sources. Even though understanding the mechanisms involved in the energy transfer and the resulting reactions is hampered by the poorly defined structure of HS, reliable information has been gathered on some typical aspects of their photochemistry. The luminescence of HS can be influenced and partly quenched by molecular interactions with other water constituents (e.g., heavy metals and organic micropollutants). The presence of oxygen may lead to the sensitized production of singlet oxygen (O[sub 2]), that can react specifically with substances containing diene structures or low valent sulfur. Because of the presence of these structures in HS, humic molecules will also react with the sensitized products. As a consequence, their biological, chemical, and physical properties are influenced. In addition, HS have a significant impact on the photochemical treatment of organic micropollutants in water. This has to be kept in mind when using photochemical steps for water treatment. The results from model experiments reflecting the conditions in surface water and in water treatment are given and discussed. In the presence of H[sub 2]O[sub 2], irradiation led to a transformation and partial degradation of HS. The rate of photochemical degradation of pesticides (e.g., atrazine) was decreased in the presence of HS. Fe and Mn quenched the luminescence. From this, a decrease of excited states of HS for sensitizing reactions can be deduced. The results suggest the manyfold and significant influences of HS on the photochemistry of aquatic systems. 66 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Instantaneous velocity field imaging instrument for supersonic reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. G.; Davis, S. J.; Kessler, W. J.; Legner, H. H.; Mcmanus, K. R.; Mulhall, P. A.; Parker, T. E.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    The technical tasks conducted to develop and demonstrate a new gas velocity measurement technique for high enthalpy reacting flows is described. The technique is based on Doppler-shifted Planar Laser-induced Fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of the OH radical. The imaging approach permits, in principle, single-shot measurements of the 2-D distribution of a single velocity component in the measurement plane, and is thus a technique of choice for applications in high enthalpy transient flow facilities. In contrast to previous work in this area, the present program demonstrated an approach which modified the diagnostic technique to function under the constraints of practical flow conditions of engineering interest, rather than vice-versa. In order to accomplish the experimental demonstrations, the state-of-the-art in PLIF diagnostic techniques was advanced in several ways. Each of these tasks is described in detail and is intended to serve as a reference in supporting the transition of this new capability to the fielded PLIF instruments now installed at several national test facilities. Among the new results of general interest in LlF-based flow diagnostics, a detailed set of the first measurements of the collisional broadening and shifting behavior of OH (1,0) band transitions in H7-air combustion environments is included. Such measurements are critical in the design of a successful strategy for PLIF velocity imaging; they also relate to accurate concentration and temperature measurements, particularly in compressible flow regimes. Furthermore, the results shed new light on the fundamental relationship between broadening and energy transfer collisions in OH A(sup 2)Sigma(+)v(sup ') = 1. The first single-pulse, spectrally-resolved measurements of the output of common pulsed dye lasers were also produced during the course of this effort. As with the OH broadening measurements, these data are a significant aspect of a successful velocity imaging strategy, and also have

  5. Injection of a reacting fluid into a fractured porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, L.; Thovert, J.; Mourzenko, V.; Adler, P. M.

    2010-12-01

    The quantitative description of the injection of a reacting fluid from a well into a fractured porous medium is a subject of high interest for CO2 sequestration. Ideally, one wishes to analyze the damages caused by the fluid to the well itself and to its immediate surroundings. In order to attain this goal, one has to solve a coupled system of equations. The first one describes the flow inside two structures, namely the porous medium and the fractures; basically, they are Darcy like equations for one or two phases. The second equations describe the transport of CO2 and the reactions which occur inside the two structures. In addition, one needs constitutive equations in order to predict evolution of these two structures; for instance, one needs an evolution law for permeability as a function of porosity. Three major steps are needed for the numerical solutions. First, an unstructured tetrahedral mesh of the fractures and of the porous matrix located in between is constructed; a particular attention should be paid to the well region since the casing has different properties than the surrounding porous medium. Second, the Darcy equations are discretized and solved, in a finite volume formulation; previous codes have been improved by the systematic use of triple control volumes. Third, the evolution of the solute concentration has to be calculated. This last point is the most difficult one if one wants to avoid numerical diffusion and also inaccurate transfers between the fractures and the media. Various schemes have been tried and the most efficient one is a non linear flux limiting scheme (FLS) of the Superbee type. Because of its importance, the results obtained with the various schemes will be illustrated and discussed. The FLS scheme has been developed for the triple control volume which is a major improvement with respect to the previous codes that were developed in our group. Various physical situations will be illustrated. The theoretical situation of transfer

  6. Waiting Time as a Barrier to Treatment Entry: Perceptions of Substance Users

    PubMed Central

    Redko, Cristina; Rapp, Richard C.; Carlson, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    Many substance users report that they experience multiple barriers that produce significant challenges to linking with treatment services. Being on a waiting list is frequently mentioned as a barrier, leading some people to give up on treatment and to continue using, while prompting others to view sobriety during the waiting period as proof they do not need treatment. This ethnographic study examines the views that 52 substance users have of the waiting time before treatment and the strategies they created to overcome it. Understanding how substance users react to waiting time itself and in relation to other barriers can lead to services that are effective in encouraging treatment linkage. PMID:18509514

  7. 40 CFR 721.10512 - Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10512 Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... fatty acid maleic acid amides (PMNs P-07-563 and P-07-564) are subject to reporting under this...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10512 - Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10512 Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... fatty acid maleic acid amides (PMNs P-07-563 and P-07-564) are subject to reporting under this...

  9. 77 FR 52367 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Euticals Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid (2010) I Amphetamine (1100) II Lisdexamfetamine (1205) II Methylphenidate.... With regards to Amphetamine (1100), the company plans to acquire the listed controlled substance...

  10. 77 FR 75671 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Euticals, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... Hydroxybutyric Acid (2010) I Amphetamine (1100) II Lisdexamfetamine (1205) II Methylphenidate (1724) II... amphetamine (1100), the company plans to acquire the listed controlled substance in bulk from a...

  11. Approaching Suspicious Substances Safely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    A mineral identification tool that was developed for NASA's Mars Rover Technology Development program is now serving as a powerful tool for U.S. law enforcement agencies and military personnel to identify suspicious liquid and solid substances. The tool can measure unknown substances through glass and plastic packaging materials with the RamanProbe(TradeMark) focused fiber-optic probe. The probe length can be extended up to 200 meters to enable users to analyze potentially dangerous substances at a safe distance. In many cases, the spectrometer and personnel are kept in a safe zone while the probe is positioned next to the sample being analyzed. Being able to identify chemicals in remote locations also saves users time and labor, since otherwise the samples would need to be collected, transported, and prepared prior to measurement in the laboratory.

  12. Effect of electron beam irradiation and storage at 5 degrees C on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and carbonyl contents in chicken breast meat infused with antioxidants and selected plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Rababah, Taha; Hettiarachchy, Navam; Horax, Ronny; Eswaranandam, Satchithanandam; Mauromoustakos, Andronikos; Dickson, James; Niebuhr, Steven

    2004-12-29

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of synthetic and natural antioxidants, green tea, commercial grape seed extracts/combinations, and TBHQ, with varying concentrations of lipid oxidation of nonirradiated and irradiated chicken breast meats stored at 5 degrees C for 12 days. Fresh boneless and skinless chicken breast meats were vacuum-infused with varying concentrations of antioxidants: green tea, grape seed extracts alone/in combination, and TBHQ. The irradiation dosage was 3.0 kGy. Carbonyl values of raw chicken meat and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values of raw and cooked chicken meat were determined for 0-12 days at 5 degrees C storage. TBARS values for 0-12 days of storage at 5 degrees C ranged from 1.21 to 7.3 and 1.22 to 8.51 mg malondialdehyde/100 g chicken for nonirradiated and irradiated raw chicken, respectively. TBARS values of cooked chicken ranged from 2.19 to 35.83 and 2.45 to 45.72 mg malondialdehyde/100 g chicken for nonirradiated and irradiated chicken, respectively. Irradiation increased TBARS values of both controls and plant extracts. The carbonyl content in meat lipid ranged from 1.7 to 2.9 and 1.7 to 4.41 micromol acetophenone/10 g of nonirradiated and irradiated chicken meat, respectively, and meat protein ranged from 1.4 to 2.07 and 1.41 to 2.72 micromol/10 g meat. Infusion of chicken meat with selected plant extracts is an effective method to minimize lipid oxidation and volatiles developments caused by irradiation.

  13. 78 FR 64017 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambrex Charles City, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambrex Charles City... the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid (2010) I... (9740) II Fentanyl (9801) II The company plans to manufacture the listed controlled substances in...

  14. Molecular aggregation of humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) form molecular aggregates in solution and on mineral surfaces. Elucidation of the mechanism of formation of these aggregates is important for an understanding of the interactions of HS in soils arid natural waters. The HS are formed mainly by enzymatic depolymerization and oxidation of plant biopolymers. These reactions transform the aromatic and lipid plant components into amphiphilic molecules, that is, molecules that consist of separate hydrophobic (nonpolar) and hydrophilic (polar) parts. The nonpolar parts of the molecules are composed of relatively unaltered segments of plant polymers and the polar parts of carboxylic acid groups. These amphiphiles form membrane-like aggregates on mineral surfaces and micelle-like aggregates in solution. The exterior surfaces of these aggregates are hydrophilic, and the interiors constitute separate hydrophobic liquid-like phases.

  15. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1989-12-05

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

  16. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1987-02-27

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and thence quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal. 1 fig.

  17. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1989-01-01

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

  18. Drug and Substance Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Drug and Substance Abuse Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  19. Substance Abuse and Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Amos, Ed.

    This book focuses on the identification of practical knowledge and skills needed for counseling individuals with substance abuse problems. It is a resource for practitioners, students, and faculty in school counseling, rehabilitation counseling, mental health counseling, school psychology, or social work in recognizing, preventing, and treating…

  20. Risks and Chemical Substances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumberg, Avrom A.

    1994-01-01

    Examines exposure to chemicals within the home and three important ways in which hazardous substances can be identified and evaluated. Suggests a rational picture of human health risks and contains an introductory discussion of reasons for exposure, epidemiology, cancer causes and patterns, animal testing, toxins, and risk. (LZ)

  1. Substance Use Prevention Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Judy

    This report outlines the Hillsborough County, Florida, Head Start Program's project to field test with young children and their families curricula that were designed to prevent alcohol and other drug problems. A national search conducted by means of computers, individual contacts, and other methods yielded information on 22 substance abuse…

  2. Adolescent Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, Craig R.; DeBlassie, Richard R.

    1985-01-01

    Cummings (1979), citing evidence from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, reports that one of every eleven adult Americans suffers from a severe addictive problem. Drug addiction is epidemic among teenagers; one of every six teenagers suffers from a severe addictive problem. This paper focuses on adolescent drug/substance abuse. (Author)

  3. Effects of 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate on fatty acid and glucose oxidation in the isolated rat diaphragm using 14C-labelled substrates. Hydrazonopropionic acids, a new class of hypoglycaemic substances, VIII.

    PubMed

    Binder, L; Oellerich, M; Haeckel, R; Beneking, M

    1988-12-01

    The influence of 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate on the utilization of various substrates in isolated rat hemidiaphragms was investigated in comparison with other hypoglycaemic compounds. The effect of 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate was concentration-dependent. At a concentration of 0.5 mmol/l 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate, glucose utilization increased from 0.276 +/- 0.043 mumol.g-1.l-1 to 0.894 +/- 0.303 mumol.g-1.l-1 (p less than 0.05). Pyruvate and lactate utilization were stimulated to a lesser extent, while acetate utilization remained nearly constant. At a concentration of 2 mmol/l 2-(3-methyl-cinnamyl-hydrazono)-propionate, the oxidation of palmitate decreased from 0.214 +/- 0.017 mumol.g-1.l-1 to 0.060 +/- 0.005 mumol.g-1.l-1, while the oxidation of octanoate was not decreased. These findings point to a stimulation of the glycolytic flux by inhibition of long-chain fatty acid oxidation.

  4. Modeling Multiphase Chemical Kinetics of OH Radical Reacting with Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arangio, Andrea; Slade, Jonathan H.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Knopf, Daniel A.; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2014-05-01

    Levoglucosan, abietic acid and nitroguaiacol are commonly used as molecular tracers of biomass burning in source apportionment. Recent studies have demonstrated the decay of levoglucosan when the particles were exposed to atmospherically relevant concentration of OH radicals [1-3]. However, multiphase chemical kinetics of OH radical reacting with such compounds has not fully understood. Here we apply the kinetic multi-layer model for gas-particle interactions (KM-GAP) [4] to experimental data of OH exposure to levoglucosan, abietic acid and nitroguaiacol [1]. KM-GAP resolves the following mass transport and chemical reactions explicitly: gas-phase diffusion, reversible surface adsorption, surface reaction, surface-bulk transport, bulk diffusion and reaction. The particle shrink due to the evaporation of volatile reaction products is also considered. The time- and concentration-dependence of reactive uptake coefficient of OH radicals were simulated by KM-GAP. The measured OH uptake coefficients were fitted by a Monte Carlo (MC) filtering coupled with a genetic algorithm (GA) to derive physicochemical parameters such as bulk diffusion coefficient, Henry's law coefficient and desorption lifetime of OH radicals. We assessed the relative contribution of surface and bulk reactions to the overall uptake of OH radicals. Chemical half-life and the evaporation time scale of these compounds are estimated in different scenarios (dry, humid and cloud processing conditions) and at different OH concentrations. REFERENCES [1] J. H. Slade, D. A. Knopf, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2013, 15, 5898. [2] S. H. Kessler, J. D. Smith, D.L. Che, D.R. Worsnop, K. R. Wilson, J. H. Kroll, Environ. Sci. Technol., 2010, 44, 7005. [3] C. J. Hennigan, A. P. Sullivan, J. L. Collett Jr, A. L. Robinson, Geophys. Res. Lett., 2010, 37, L09806. [4] M. Shiraiwa, C. Pfrang, T. Koop, U. Pöschl, Atmos. Chem. Phys, 2012, 12, 2777.

  5. Substance Abuse Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Valium, Serepax, Rohypnol, etc.) h. Hallucinogens (LSD, acid, mushrooms, PCP, Special K, etc.) i. Opioids (heroin, morphine, ... Valium, Serepax, Rohypnol, etc.) h. Hallucinogens (LSD, acid, mushrooms, PCP, Special K, etc.) i. Opioids (heroin, morphine, ...

  6. LES, DNS and RANS for the analysis of high-speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adumitroaie, V.; Colucci, P. J.; Taulbee, D. B.; Givi, P.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in large eddy simulation (LES), direct numerical simulation (DNS), and Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) methods for the computational analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. In the second phase of this work, covering the period 1 Aug. 1994 - 31 Jul. 1995, we have focused our efforts on two programs: (1) developments of explicit algebraic moment closures for statistical descriptions of compressible reacting flows and (2) development of Monte Carlo numerical methods for LES of chemically reacting flows.

  7. Direct numerical simulations of a reacting turbulent mixing layer by a pseudospectral-spectral element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, Patrick A.; Givi, Peyman

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the implementation of the spectral-element technique for simulating a chemically reacting, spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. Attention is given to experimental and numerical studies that have investigated the development, evolution, and mixing characteristics of shear flows. A mathematical formulation is presented of the physical configuration of the spatially developing reacting mixing layer, in conjunction with a detailed representation of the spectral-element method's application to the numerical simulation of mixing layers. Results from 2D and 3D calculations of chemically reacting mixing layers are given.

  8. Nonholonomic Hamiltonian method for meso-macroscale simulations of reacting shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangyup; Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2017-01-01

    The seamless integration of macroscale, mesoscale, and molecular scale models of reacting shock physics has been hindered by dramatic differences in the model formulation techniques normally used at different scales. In recent research the authors have developed the first unified discrete Hamiltonian approach to multiscale simulation of reacting shock physics. Unlike previous work, the formulation employs reacting themomechanical Hamiltonian formulations at all scales, including the continuum. Unlike previous work, the formulation employs a nonholonomic modeling approach. Example applications of the method include mesoscale simulations of hot spot formation and macroscale simulations of shock to detonation.

  9. Finite volume method for the calculation of compressible chemically reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Bussing, T.R.A.; Murman, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    Several efficient pseudo time techniques have been developed for calculating steady state chemically reacting flows. The techniques include the implicit treatment of the chemical source term, point implicit multiple grid accelerator and a constant CFL condition. It turns out that these methods can be viewed as ways of rescaling the equations in time such that all chemical and convective phenomena evolve at comparable pseudo time scales. Consequently the number of iterations needed to solve reacting problems is approximately the same as for non-reacting problems. The techniques are demonstrated for a simple dissociation model and a nontrivial H2 - Air combustion model.

  10. Toxic Substances Control Act

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  11. Toxic Substances in the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of toxic substances, examining pesticides and herbicides, heavy metals, industrial chemicals, and household substances. Includes a list of major toxic substances (indicating what they are, where they are found, and health concerns) and a student activity on how pesticides enter the food chain. (JN)

  12. Thermal And Spectroscopic Analyses Of Next Generation Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Solvent Contacted With 3, 8, And 16 Molar Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F. F.; Fink, S. D.

    2011-12-07

    A new solvent system referred to as Next Generation Solvent or NGS, has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the removal of cesium from alkaline solutions in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction process. The NGS is proposed for deployment at MCU{sup a} and at the Salt Waste Processing Facility. This work investigated the chemical compatibility between NGS and 16 M, 8 M, and 3 M nitric acid from contact that may occur in handling of analytical samples from MCU or, for 3 M acid, which may occur during contactor cleaning operations at MCU. This work shows that reactions occurred between NGS components and the high molarity nitric acid. Reaction rates are much faster in 8 M and 16 M nitric acid than in 3 M nitric acid. In the case of 16 M and 8 M nitric acid, the nitric acid reacts with the extractant to produce initially organo-nitrate species. The reaction also releases soluble fluorinated alcohols such as tetrafluoropropanol. With longer contact time, the modifier reacts to produce a tarry substance with evolved gases (NO{sub x} and possibly CO). Calorimetric analysis of the reaction product mixtures revealed that the organo-nitrates reaction products are not explosive and will not deflagrate.

  13. First report of perfluoroalkyl substances in South African Odonata.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Velesia; Bouwman, Hindrik; Kinoshita, Ayako; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2017-05-01

    Perfluorinated substances are global and ubiquitous pollutants. However, very little is known about these substances in invertebrates, and even less in terrestrial invertebrates in particular. We analysed adult male dragonflies from six sites in South Africa for perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), including perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), perfluro-n-undecanoic acid (PFUnA), perfluoro-n-dodecanoic acid (PFDoA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), and perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS). PFOS was detected in all individuals, with less quantifiable occurrences of the other substances. The dragonflies from the three northern sites located in farming areas had significantly lower ΣPFASs concentrations than the southern sites located closer to industrial areas (median ΣPFASs of 0.32 ng/g wm (wet mass) for North, and 9.3 ng/g wm for South). All substances except PFOS occurred at similar concentrations at all six sites when quantifiable, but PFOS dominated in the Southern sites. The highest median concentration was from Bloemhof Dam (ΣPFASs = 21 ng/g wm), which is known to be polluted by PFOS. Perfluorinated substances are not known to be manufactured in South Africa, therefore the residues detected are likely to have been derived from imported products. Odonata play a significant role in freshwater ecology. Any impacts on these aquatic and aerial predators are likely to have effects on aquatic and associated ecosystems. Further studies are required over a much larger geographic region and to investigate sources.

  14. LES, DNS and RANS for the analysis of high-speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in Large Eddy Simulation (LES), Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS), and Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) methods for the analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. In the first phase of this research, conducted within the past six months, focus was in three directions: RANS of turbulent reacting flows by Probability Density Function (PDF) methods, RANS of non-reacting turbulent flows by advanced turbulence closures, and LES of mixing dominated reacting flows by a dynamics subgrid closure. A summary of our efforts within the past six months of this research is provided in this semi-annual progress report.

  15. Ambulatory REACT: real-time seizure detection with a DSP microprocessor.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, Robert P; Faul, Stephen; Marnane, William P

    2010-01-01

    REACT (Real-Time EEG Analysis for event deteCTion) is a Support Vector Machine based technology which, in recent years, has been successfully applied to the problem of automated seizure detection in both adults and neonates. This paper describes the implementation of REACT on a commercial DSP microprocessor; the Analog Devices Blackfin®. The primary aim of this work is to develop a prototype system for use in ambulatory or in-ward automated EEG analysis. Furthermore, the complexity of the various stages of the REACT algorithm on the Blackfin processor is analysed; in particular the EEG feature extraction stages. This hardware profile is used to select a reduced, platform-aware feature set, in order to evaluate the seizure classification accuracy of a lower-complexity, lower-power REACT system.

  16. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Madnia, C. K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Frankel, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    The basic objective of this research is to extend the capabilities of Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) for the computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. In the efforts related to LES, we were primarily involved with assessing the performance of the various modern methods based on the Probability Density Function (PDF) methods for providing closures for treating the subgrid fluctuation correlations of scalar quantities in reacting turbulent flows. In the work on DNS, we concentrated on understanding some of the relevant physics of compressible reacting flows by means of statistical analysis of the data generated by DNS of such flows. In the research conducted in the second year of this program, our efforts focused on the modeling of homogeneous compressible turbulent flows by PDF methods, and on DNS of non-equilibrium reacting high speed mixing layers. Some preliminary work is also in progress on PDF modeling of shear flows, and also on LES of such flows.

  17. Effect of BCAA intake during endurance exercises on fatigue substances, muscle damage substances, and energy metabolism substances.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Kim, Seok-Hwan; Jeong, Woo-Seok; Lee, Ha-Yan

    2013-12-01

    The increase rate of utilization of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) by muscle is reduced to its plasma concentration during prolonged exercise leading to glycogen. BCAA supplementation would reduce the serum activities of intramuscular enzymes associated with muscle damage. To examine the effects of BCAA administration on fatigue substances (serotonin, ammonia and lactate), muscle damage substances (CK and LDH) and energy metabolism substances (FFA and glucose) after endurance exercise. Subjects (n = 26, college-aged males) were randomly divided into an experimental (n = 13, EXP) and a placebo (n = 13, CON) group. Subjects both EXP and CON performed a bout of cycle training (70% VO2max intensity) to exhaustion. Subject in the EXP were administrated BCAA (78ml/kg·w) prior to the bout of cycle exercise. Fatigue substances, muscle damage substances and energy metabolism substances were measured before ingesting BCAAs and placebos, 10 min before exercise, 30 min into exercise, immediately after exercise, and 30 min after exercise. Data were analyzed by two-way repeated measure ANCOVA, correlation and statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. The following results were obtained from this study; 1. In the change of fatigue substances : Serotonin in the EXP tended to decreased at the 10 min before exercise, 30 min into exercise, post exercise, and recovery 30 min. Serotonin in the CON was significantly greater than the EXP at the10 min before exercise and recovery 30. Ammonia in the EXP was increased at the 10 min before exercise, 30 min into exercise, and post exercise, but significantly decreased at the recovery 30min (p < 0.05). Ammonia in the CON was significantly lower than the EXP at the 10 min before exercise, 30 min into exercise, and post exercise (p < 0.05). Lactate in the EXP was significantly increased at the 30 min into exercise and significantly decreased at the post exercise and recovery 30 min. Lactate in the CON was significantly lower than the EXP

  18. Direct Reacting Anolyte-Catholyte Fuel Cell for Hybrid Energy Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-11

    401-832-5293. 20050719 026 Attorney Docket No. 82872 Customer No. 23523 DIRECT REACTING ANOLYTE -CATHOLYTE FUEL CELL FOR HYBRID ENERGY SOURCES TO ALL...PAUL A. NASSER, Esq. Reg. No. 53372 1 Attorney Docket No. 82872 2 3 DIRECT REACTING ANOLYTE -CATHOLYTE FUEL CELL 4 FOR HYBRID ENERGY SOURCES 5 6...14 The present invention relates generally to a fuel cell, and 15 more particularly to a fuel cell wherein both the anolyte and 16 the catholyte are

  19. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  20. Modification and Improvement of Software for Modeling Multidimensional Reacting Fuel Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    aQ IC FILE COPY WRDC-TR-89-2056 MODIFICATION AND IMPROVEMENT OF SOFTWARE FOR MODELING MULTIDIMENSIONAL REACTING FUEL FLOWS Dr. David E. Keyes Mr...Modeling Multidimensional Reacting Fuel Flows 12. PERSONAL AUITHOR(S Dr. David Keyes , Mr. Dennis Philbin, Dr. Mitchell Smoke I I& TYPt Of IMPORT 113b. TIME...al. [15], and Keyes and Smooke [16)). We assume that the fuel and the oxidizer obey a single overall irreversible reaction of the type Fuel (F

  1. A monoclonal antibody that specifically reacts with human embryonal carcinomas, spermatogonia and oocytes is able to induce human EC cell death.

    PubMed

    Nakano, T; Umezawa, A; Abe, H; Suzuki, N; Yamada, T; Nozawa, S; Hata, J

    1995-02-01

    We developed a mouse monoclonal antibody, 6E2 (IgG3), against a human embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell line, NCR-G3, that possesses totipotent differentiation capabilities. Culturing human EC cells in the presence of 6E2 causes their death. It has been shown that 6E2 kills EC cells dose dependently. In immunohistochemical examination with normal human germ cells, 6E2 reacted specifically with spermatogonia and oocytes. Among human germ cell tumor tissues on aceton-fixed frozen sections, 6E2 reacted with embryonal carcinomas, seminomas and dysgerminomas, but it did not react with choriocarcinomas or with yolk sac tumors. Consistently, in flow cytometric analysis of cultured human germ cell tumor cell lines, 6E2 reacted exclusively with EC cells including NCR-G3 cells. It was revealed, by preserving its antigenicity after treatment with periodic acid and tunicamycin and by radiolabeling cells followed by immunoprecipitation, that the molecule defined by 6E2 is a cell surface protein having a molecular weight of approximately 80 kDa. These data illustrate that the molecule defined by 6E2 links human germ cell tumors, especially embryonal carcinoma, seminoma and dysgerminoma, to their normal counterparts and that it may play a role in survival and proliferation of human EC cells.

  2. Selenious acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenious acid ; CASRN 7783 - 00 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  3. Benzoic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzoic acid ; CASRN 65 - 85 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  4. Formic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Formic acid ; CASRN 64 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  5. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  6. Phosphoric acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phosphoric acid ; CASRN 7664 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  7. Cacodylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cacodylic acid ; CASRN 75 - 60 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  8. BACTERICIDAL SUBSTANCE FROM STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS

    PubMed Central

    Dajani, Adnan S.; Gray, Ernest D.; Wannamaker, Lewis W.

    1970-01-01

    A bactericidal substance previously isolated from phage type 71 Slaphylococcus aureus has been further identified and characterized. Staphylococci belonging to phage type 71 produce the substance in higher titers than staphylococci lysed by other phages in group II in addition to phage 71. Other staphylococci do not produce the bactericidal substance. The bactericidal substance shares several of the properties of bacteriocins but differs from this group of antibiotic substances in some respects. A combination of ammonium sulfate fractionation and gel filtration on a Sephadex G-100 column resulted in considerable degree of purification of the bactericidal substance. The substance is a previously unrecognized product of S. aureus and is distinct from other extracellular products of this organism. PMID:5443199

  9. On the acid disulphate (pyrosulphate) of nitrosyle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wartel, M.; Heubel, J.

    1977-01-01

    Crystallized HS2O7NO was obtained by reacting excess NO2 gas with liquid HSO3Cl. Stable to a melting point of approximately 105 deg, this reacted with nitrates from about 25 deg and formed M2S2O7, with an acid disulphate intermediary. Excess NO2, whether liquid or gas, reacted with HS2O7NO to five (NO)2S2O7.

  10. Low Concentration Ozone Reacts with Plasmalogen Glycerophosphoethanolamine Lipids in Lung Surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Wynalda, Kelly M.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    Ozone is a common environmental toxicant to which individuals are exposed to on a daily basis. While biochemical endpoints such as increased mortality, decrements in pulmonary function and initiation of inflammatory processes are known, little is actually understood regarding the chemical mechanisms underlying changes in pulmonary health, especially for low concentrations of ozone. This study was undertaken to investigate ozone induced oxidation of endogenous lipids that are potentially exposed to environmental ozone within lung, specifically focusing on plasmalogen glycerophospholipids present in pulmonary surfactant. Sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods were developed to follow oxidation of diacyl and plasmalogen phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) phospholipids, and to identify and quantitate products generated by ozonolysis. Using a unilamellar vesicle system containing a 1:1 molar mixture of 1-O-octadec-1’-enyl-2-octadecenoyl-PE and 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-PC, these studies revealed the vinyl ether bond of plasmalogens was oxidized preferentially at low concentrations of ozone (100 ppb), when compared to olefinic bond oxidation on ω-9 of the fatty acyl chain in the same phospholipids. Major phospholipid products generated were identified as 1-formyl-2-octadecenoyl-PE and 1-hydroxy-2-octadecenoyl-PE. Heptadecanal and heptadecanoic acid production was also quantitated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and production was consistent with oxidation of the vinyl ether, at low concentrations of ozone. Analysis of murine lung surfactant from C57Bl/6 mice revealed several plasmalogen PE lipid species, encompassing ~38% of total PE species. Upon exposure of ozone (0 ppb, 100 ppb) to murine surfactant, plasmalogen PE molecular species preferentially reacted, as compared to diacyl PE molecular species. Lysophospholipids, pentadecanal, and nonanal were found to be the primary products of surfactant ozone oxidation. PMID:19916514

  11. 4-n-butylresorcinol, a depigmenting agent used in cosmetics, reacts with tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Jimenez, Antonio; Teruel-Puche, Jose Antonio; Ortiz-Ruiz, Carmen Vanessa; Berna, Jose; Tudela, Jose; Garcia-Canovas, Francisco

    2016-08-01

    4-n-Butylresorcinol (BR) is considered the most potent inhibitor of tyrosinase, which is why it is used in cosmetics as a depigmenting agent. However, this work demonstrates that BR is a substrate of this enzyme. The Em (met-tyrosinase) form is not active on BR, but Eox (oxy-tyrosinase) can act on this molecule, hydroxylating it to o-diphenol. In turn, this is oxidized to an o-quinone, which isomerizes to a red p-quinone. Thus, for tyrosinase to act on this compound, a mechanism to generate Eox in the medium is required, which can be achieved by means of hydrogen peroxide or ascorbic acid. A kinetic analysis of the proposed mechanism allows its kinetic characterization: catalytic constant kcatBR (8.49 ± 0.20 s(-1) ) and Michaelis-constant KMBR (60.26 ± 8.76 μM). These findings are compared with those for other monophenolic substrates of tyrosinase. Studies of BR docking to the Em form of the enzyme show that the hydroxyl group in C-1 position is oriented toward the copper atom A (CuA), as in it is L-tyrosine. As regards Eox , BR is oriented with the carbon in C-6 position ready to be hydroxylated. The reaction of BR originates o-quinones, which isomerize to p-quinones, which in turn, could react with thiol compounds, a finding that could have important implications for pharmacology and the cosmetic industry. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(8):663-672, 2016.

  12. Supersonic Flow of Chemically Reacting Gas-Particle Mixtures. Volume 2: RAMP - A Computer Code for Analysis of Chemically Reacting Gas-Particle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penny, M. M.; Smith, S. D.; Anderson, P. G.; Sulyma, P. R.; Pearson, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program written in conjunction with the numerical solution of the flow of chemically reacting gas-particle mixtures was documented. The solution to the set of governing equations was obtained by utilizing the method of characteristics. The equations cast in characteristic form were shown to be formally the same for ideal, frozen, chemical equilibrium and chemical non-equilibrium reacting gas mixtures. The characteristic directions for the gas-particle system are found to be the conventional gas Mach lines, the gas streamlines and the particle streamlines. The basic mesh construction for the flow solution is along streamlines and normals to the streamlines for axisymmetric or two-dimensional flow. The analysis gives detailed information of the supersonic flow and provides for a continuous solution of the nozzle and exhaust plume flow fields. Boundary conditions for the flow solution are either the nozzle wall or the exhaust plume boundary.

  13. Effect of soil invertebrates on the formation of humic substances under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouz, J.; Li, X.; Brune, A.; Pizl, V.; Abakumov, E. V.

    2011-08-01

    The complete polymerization of phenols and proteins (one of the processes involved in the formation of humic substances) was explained. It was shown that fly ( Bibio marci) larvae and earthworms ( Aporrectodea caliginosa) participate in the complete polymerization of phenols and proteins. In a laboratory experiment, invertebrates participated in the degradation of organic matter and the synthesis of humic substances, which was proved in experiments with 14C-labeled phenols and proteins. The same organic substances (phenols and proteins) without the impact of invertebrates were used as the control substances. The distributions of the 14C isotope in alkaline extracts separated by solubility in acids (humic and fulvic acids) was compared to those of the control substances. The portion of the 14C isotope in the humic acids in the excrements of Bibio marci was higher than that in the control substances. The content of 14C-labeled humic substances in the excrements of the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa exceeded the control values only in the experiment with proteins. When clay material was added to the organic substances, the portion of the 14C isotope in the humic acids increased in both experiments with phenols and proteins. When these substrates passed through the digestive tracts of the invertebrates, the polymerization of organic substances and the inclusion of proteins and phenols into humic acids occurred.

  14. [The substance experience, a history of LSD].

    PubMed

    Beck, François; Bonnet, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    This article reviews the recent knowledge on LSD stemming from various disciplines among which pharmacology, sociology and epidemiology. The d-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a particularly powerful hallucinogenic substance. It produces distortions and hearing, visual and tactile hallucinations. Rarely used (only 1.7% of people aged 15-64 years old have tried it in their lifetime), this very powerful drug generates a strong apprehension within the general population, but the ethnographical studies show that its image seems rather good among illicit drug users. This representation relies both on the proper effects of this substance and also on the history of LSD very closely linked to the counterculture characteristic of the years 1960-1970.

  15. 40 CFR 721.9630 - Polyfluorosulfonic acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polyfluorosulfonic acid salt. 721.9630... Substances § 721.9630 Polyfluorosulfonic acid salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as polyfluorosulfonic acid salt...

  16. 40 CFR 721.1930 - Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt. 721... Substances § 721.1930 Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9630 - Polyfluorosulfonic acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polyfluorosulfonic acid salt. 721.9630... Substances § 721.9630 Polyfluorosulfonic acid salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as polyfluorosulfonic acid salt...

  18. 40 CFR 721.1930 - Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt. 721... Substances § 721.1930 Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.3110 - Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic... Substances § 721.3110 Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polycarboxylic acid...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5310 - Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.5310 Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4215 - Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4215 Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4158 - Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4158 Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3110 - Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic... Substances § 721.3110 Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polycarboxylic acid...

  4. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1732 - Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.1732 Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4158 - Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4158 Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5310 - Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.5310 Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN...

  9. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl...

  10. 40 CFR 721.4215 - Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4215 Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester (PMN...

  11. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4158 - Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4158 Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10431 - Phosphoric acid esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid esters (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10431 Phosphoric acid esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as phosphoric acid esters (PMNs...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4215 - Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4215 Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4158 - Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4158 Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl...

  18. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4215 - Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4215 Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5310 - Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.5310 Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.5310 - Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.5310 Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3110 - Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic... Substances § 721.3110 Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polycarboxylic acid...

  3. 21 CFR 182.1087 - Sodium acid pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acid pyrophosphate. 182.1087 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1087 Sodium acid pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Sodium acid pyrophosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10691 - Fatty acid amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amide (generic). 721.10691... Substances § 721.10691 Fatty acid amide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amide (PMN P-13-267) is...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10320 - Fatty acid amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty acid amide (generic). 721.10320... Substances § 721.10320 Fatty acid amide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amide (PMN P-03-186) is...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10463 - Fatty acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amides (generic). 721.10463... Substances § 721.10463 Fatty acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amides (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10680 - Fatty acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amides (generic). 721.10680... Substances § 721.10680 Fatty acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as fatty acid amides (PMNs...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10320 - Fatty acid amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amide (generic). 721.10320... Substances § 721.10320 Fatty acid amide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amide (PMN P-03-186) is...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  10. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  11. 40 CFR 721.9630 - Polyfluorosulfonic acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polyfluorosulfonic acid salt. 721.9630... Substances § 721.9630 Polyfluorosulfonic acid salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as polyfluorosulfonic acid salt...

  12. 40 CFR 721.1930 - Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt. 721... Substances § 721.1930 Butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as butanoic acid, antimony (3=) salt (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9630 - Polyfluorosulfonic acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polyfluorosulfonic acid salt. 721.9630... Substances § 721.9630 Polyfluorosulfonic acid salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as polyfluorosulfonic acid salt...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10431 - Phosphoric acid esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphoric acid esters (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10431 Phosphoric acid esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as phosphoric acid esters (PMNs...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  16. 40 CFR 721.1680 - Substituted benzoic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted benzoic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1680 Substituted benzoic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted benzoic acid (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  18. 40 CFR 721.650 - 11-Aminoundecanoic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 11-Aminoundecanoic acid. 721.650... Substances § 721.650 11-Aminoundecanoic acid. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance 11-ami-no-un-de-ca-noic acid, CAS Number 2432-99-7, is subject...

  19. 40 CFR 721.1655 - Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1655 Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylbenzenesulfonic acid...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl...

  1. 40 CFR 721.1680 - Substituted benzoic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted benzoic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1680 Substituted benzoic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted benzoic acid (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3110 - Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic... Substances § 721.3110 Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polycarboxylic acid...

  3. 40 CFR 721.1655 - Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1655 Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylbenzenesulfonic acid...

  4. 40 CFR 721.1655 - Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1655 Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylbenzenesulfonic acid...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4215 - Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4215 Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4158 - Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4158 Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.1732 - Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.1732 Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester (PMN...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5310 - Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.5310 Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN...

  10. 40 CFR 721.650 - 11-Aminoundecanoic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 11-Aminoundecanoic acid. 721.650... Substances § 721.650 11-Aminoundecanoic acid. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance 11-ami-no-un-de-ca-noic acid, CAS Number 2432-99-7, is subject...

  11. 40 CFR 721.5385 - Octanoic acid, hydrazide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Octanoic acid, hydrazide. 721.5385... Substances § 721.5385 Octanoic acid, hydrazide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as octanoic acid, hydrazide (PMN P-92-1086) is subject...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10320 - Fatty acid amide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid amide (generic). 721.10320... Substances § 721.10320 Fatty acid amide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amide (PMN P-03-186) is...

  13. 40 CFR 721.1655 - Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1655 Alkylbenzenesulfonic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkylbenzenesulfonic acid...

  14. 40 CFR 721.1680 - Substituted benzoic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted benzoic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1680 Substituted benzoic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted benzoic acid (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.1680 - Substituted benzoic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted benzoic acid (generic... Substances § 721.1680 Substituted benzoic acid (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted benzoic acid (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.1732 - Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.1732 Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.1732 - Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.1732 Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester (PMN...

  18. 40 CFR 721.650 - 11-Aminoundecanoic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 11-Aminoundecanoic acid. 721.650... Substances § 721.650 11-Aminoundecanoic acid. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance 11-ami-no-un-de-ca-noic acid, CAS Number 2432-99-7, is subject...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9630 - Polyfluorosulfonic acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polyfluorosulfonic acid salt. 721.9630... Substances § 721.9630 Polyfluorosulfonic acid salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as polyfluorosulfonic acid salt...

  20. 40 CFR 721.650 - 11-Aminoundecanoic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 11-Aminoundecanoic acid. 721.650... Substances § 721.650 11-Aminoundecanoic acid. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance 11-ami-no-un-de-ca-noic acid, CAS Number 2432-99-7, is subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.1732 - Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.1732 Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10463 - Fatty acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid amides (generic). 721.10463... Substances § 721.10463 Fatty acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid amides (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.3110 - Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic... Substances § 721.3110 Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polycarboxylic acid...

  5. 40 CFR 721.2584 - Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. 721.2584... Substances § 721.2584 Dodecanoic acid, 12-amino-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dodecanoic acid, 12-amino- (PMN P-98-0823; CAS No....

  6. Substance abuse and child maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Wells, Kathryn

    2009-04-01

    Pediatricians and other medical providers caring for children need to be aware of the dynamics in the significant relationship between substance abuse and child maltreatment. A caregiver's use and abuse of alcohol, marijuana, heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine, and other drugs place the child at risk in multiple ways. Members of the medical community need to understand these risks because the medical community plays a unique and important role in identifying and caring for these children. Substance abuse includes the abuse of legal drugs as well as the use of illegal drugs. The abuse of legal substances may be just as detrimental to parental functioning as abuse of illicit substances. Many substance abusers are also polysubstance users and the compounded effect of the abuse of multiple substances may be difficult to measure. Often other interrelated social features, such as untreated mental illness, trauma history, and domestic violence, affect these families.

  7. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Frankel, S. H.; Adumitroaie, V.; Sabini, G.; Madnia, C. K.

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this research is to extend current capabilities of Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) for the computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. Our efforts in the first two years of this research have been concentrated on a priori investigations of single-point Probability Density Function (PDF) methods for providing subgrid closures in reacting turbulent flows. In the efforts initiated in the third year, our primary focus has been on performing actual LES by means of PDF methods. The approach is based on assumed PDF methods and we have performed extensive analysis of turbulent reacting flows by means of LES. This includes simulations of both three-dimensional (3D) isotropic compressible flows and two-dimensional reacting planar mixing layers. In addition to these LES analyses, some work is in progress to assess the extent of validity of our assumed PDF methods. This assessment is done by making detailed companions with recent laboratory data in predicting the rate of reactant conversion in parallel reacting shear flows. This report provides a summary of our achievements for the first six months of the third year of this program.

  8. Iodometric microdetermination of boric acid and borax separately or in a mixture.

    PubMed

    Saxena, R; Verma, R M

    1983-05-01

    Boric acid is determined by first treating it with mannitol and then with solid potassium iodate and potassium iodide. The iodine liberated is titrated with thiosulphate. Borax is determined by reacting it with a known and excessive volume of hydrochloric acid and determining the surplus acid by iodometry. From the amount of acid consumed, the quantity of borax is calculated. Mixtures of borax and boric acid are analysed by combination of the two methods. Borax is determined first, then the mannitol procedure is applied to a second sample and the total boric acid (original plus that produced in the borax-HCl reaction) is determined iodometrically. The boric acid content of the sample is obtained by difference. The procedures can be used for determining 0.01-0.1 mmole of these substances with an average deviation of 0.1-0.4%. The end-points obtained are sharper than those for potentiometric acid-base titrations. Furthermore, the procedures are applicable at much lower concentrations.

  9. Acid soldering flux poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in soldering fluxes are called hydrocarbons. They include: Ammonium chloride Rosin Hydrochloric acid Zinc ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ... Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ...

  10. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... acidemia? In ASA, the body can’t remove ammonia or a substance called argininosuccinic acid from the ... and children include: Breathing problems High levels of ammonia in the bloodIntense headache, especially after a high- ...

  11. Soldiering with Substance: Substance and Steroid Use among Military Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucher, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    The military provides a unique social environment given the organization and culture of the institution. Understanding substance use by those inside this institution provides insight into both the population as well as substance use in general. Using data collected from in-depth interviews, this article explores the nature and extent of substance…

  12. LES, DNS and RANS for the analysis of high-speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Taulbee, Dale B.; Adumitroaie, Virgil; Sabini, George J.; Shieh, Geoffrey S.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in large eddy simulation (LES), direct numerical simulation (DNS), and Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) methods for the computational analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. In the second phase of this work, covering the period 1 Sep. 1993 - 1 Sep. 1994, we have focused our efforts on two research problems: (1) developments of 'algebraic' moment closures for statistical descriptions of nonpremixed reacting systems, and (2) assessments of the Dirichlet frequency in presumed scalar probability density function (PDF) methods in stochastic description of turbulent reacting flows. This report provides a complete description of our efforts during this past year as supported by the NASA Langley Research Center under Grant NAG1-1122.

  13. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, Cyrus K.; Steinberger, Craig J.

    1990-01-01

    This research is involved with the implementation of advanced computational schemes based on large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing and its coupling with chemical reactions in compressible turbulent flows. In the efforts related to LES, a research program to extend the present capabilities of this method was initiated for the treatment of chemically reacting flows. In the DNS efforts, the focus is on detailed investigations of the effects of compressibility, heat release, and non-equilibrium kinetics modelings in high speed reacting flows. Emphasis was on the simulations of simple flows, namely homogeneous compressible flows, and temporally developing high speed mixing layers.

  14. Effects of Fusion Tack Welds on Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Pendleton, M. L.; Brooke, S. A.; Russell, C. K.

    2012-01-01

    In order to know whether fusion tack welds would affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir seam welds in 2195-T87 aluminum alloy, the fracture stresses of 144 tensile test coupons cut from 24 welded panels containing segments of friction stir welds were measured. Each of the panels was welded under unique processing conditions. A measure of the effect of the tack welds for each panel was devised. An analysis of the measures of the tack weld effect supported the hypothesis that fusion tack welds do not affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir welds to a 5% level of confidence.

  15. Seventh International Workshop on Microgravity Combustion and Chemically Reacting Systems. Rev. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacksteder, Kurt (Compiler)

    2003-01-01

    The Seventh International Workshop on Microgravity Combustion and Chemically Reacting Systems was planned for June 3-6, 2003, in Cleveland, Ohio, near the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The new name for the workshop is based on the decision to broaden our scope to encompass support for future space exploration through basic and applied research in reacting systems that in some cases may not look like combustion. The workshop has been lengthened to 4 days with focus sessions on spacecraft fire safety and exploration-related research. We believe that the microgravity combustion science community is almost uniquely positioned to make substantial contributions to this new effort.

  16. High-resolution OH LIF velocity measurement technique for high-speed reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klavuhn, K. G.; Gauba, G.; Mcdaniel, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique was developed for the quantitative study of velocity fields in steady, high-speed, reacting flows. A narrow-linewidth laser source was tuned through an isolated OH absorption line to measure the Doppler-shifted linecenter frequency relative to an iodine reference line. A counterpropagating beam approach was used to eliminate collisional impact shift effects. Pointwise measurements of velocity were made in a unique reacting underexpanded jet facility as an extensive calibration of the technique over a wide range of flow conditions. The extension of the technique to planar measurements is also discussed.

  17. Auto-Adjustable Tool for Self-Reacting and Conventional Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A friction stir welding dcvice that is configured to perform convention friction stir welding as well as self-reacting friction stir welding is described. A pin passes hrough an upper shoulder and can selectively attach 10 and detach from a lower shoulder in a preferred embodiment. A controller maintains thc discrete position of, and/or force applied by, the upper and lower shoulders during self-reacting friction stir welding, or maintains the pin at a desired depth and/or applied force during conventional friction stir welding.

  18. Two human antibodies reacting with different epitopes on integrin beta 3 of platelets and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jallu, V; Diaz-Ricart, M; Ordinas, A; Pico, M; Vezon, G; Nurden, A T

    1994-06-15

    Glanzmann's thrombasthenia is an inherited bleeding disorder that results from a deficit of glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa complexes in platelets. Patient (EBV) is an adult male with GP IIb-IIIa levels < 5% of normal values and a history of blood transfusions. Western-blot analysis revealed a strong IgG antibody to GP IIIa in his plasma. The determinants were localized to the minimum-sized fragment of GP IIIa (50 kDa) retained on chymotrypsin-treated platelets and were lost on reduction of disulphides. A female patient (AF), previously described by us [Jallu, V., Pico, M., Chevaleyre, J., Vezon, G., Kunicki, T.J. & Nurden, A.T. (1992) Hum. Antibod. Hybridomas 3, 93-106] developed her anti-GP-IIIa antibody during pregnancy. This antibody was poorly reactive with the 50-kDa proteolytic fragment, yet bound to 115-kDa and 60-kDa hydrolytic products of GP IIIa. Antibodies from both patients recognized the GP-IIIa-like protein of endothelial cells, thus confirming that they were directed against the integrin beta 3-subunit. The (EBV) antibody reacted strongly with GP IIb-IIIa in an antigen capture assay performed with each of a panel of four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing different epitopes on GP IIb-IIIa. In contrast, that from (AF) was specifically inhibited by AP-3, a murine mAb whose epitope is thought to be localized between amino acids 324-422 of GP IIIa. The residual GP IIb and GP IIIa contents of platelets from each patient were assessed in Western blotting using chemiluminescence detection. SZ-22, a murine mAb to the GP IIb heavy chain (140 kDa), located small amounts of a 130-kDa protein in (EBV) platelets. The anti-GP IIIa mAbs XII F9, P 37 and P 97 revealed trace amounts of protein with a relative mobility identical to that of GP IIIa in both (AF) and (EBV) platelets. This residual GP IIIa represented less than 0.5% of the amount in normal platelets. When, for each patient, plasma was tested in Western blotting against their own platelets

  19. Michigan Household Hazardous Substance Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senior, Janet; Stone Nancy

    Common household hazardous substances include cleansers, drain cleaners, automotive products, paints, solvents, and pesticides. This handbook was designed to serve as a resource for people frequently contacted by the public for information on household hazardous substances and wastes. Included in the handbook are: (1) an introduction to Michigan's…

  20. Adolescent Substance Abuse and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhawan, Anju; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Natasha, M. Phil.

    2007-01-01

    Adolescent substance abuse is a major public health concern. It is associated with an increased incidence of various psychiatric disorders like depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and conduct disorders and the relationship between mental and behavioral disorders and the substance use problems seems…

  1. Toxic Substances List. 1972 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Herbert E., Ed.; And Others

    The second edition of the Toxic Substances List, containing some 13,000 entries, is prepared annually by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in compliance with the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The purpose of the List is to identify all known toxic substances but not to quantitate the hazard. The List…

  2. Trazodone, meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (an hallucinogenic drug and trazodone metabolite), and the hallucinogen trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine cross-react with the EMIT®II ecstasy immunoassay in urine.

    PubMed

    Logan, Barry K; Costantino, Anthony G; Rieders, Eric F; Sanders, David

    2010-11-01

    A series of patients whose urine screened positive for 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) using a commercial enzyme immunoassay test (Ecstasy EMIT II assay), failed to confirm by substance-specific liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry tests for MDMA. Further evaluation of these urine specimens indicates that they were positive for trazodone and its metabolite meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP). Independent tests of standards showed significant crossreactivity on the Ecstasy EMIT II assay with trazodone, m-CPP, and the related recreational drug trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine (TFMPP). This is of further forensic significance because m-CPP is emerging as an illicit recreational drug in its own right or as an adulterant in illicit cocaine and MDMA. The hallucinogen benzylpiperazine was also assessed but found not to cross-react significantly with this assay. Patients taking trazodone may get false-positive results on the urine EMIT test for MDMA.

  3. 21 CFR 182.3109 - Thiodipropionic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thiodipropionic acid. 182.3109 Section 182.3109...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3109 Thiodipropionic acid. (a) Product. Thiodipropionic acid. (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as safe for use in food when the...

  4. 21 CFR 182.3089 - Sorbic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sorbic acid. 182.3089 Section 182.3089 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3089 Sorbic acid. (a) Product. Sorbic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  5. 21 CFR 182.1073 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Phosphoric acid. 182.1073 Section 182.1073 Food... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1073 Phosphoric acid. (a) Product. Phosphoric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  6. 21 CFR 182.1073 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phosphoric acid. 182.1073 Section 182.1073 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1073 Phosphoric acid. (a) Product. Phosphoric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  7. 21 CFR 182.8013 - Ascorbic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ascorbic acid. 182.8013 Section 182.8013 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8013 Ascorbic acid. (a) Product. Ascorbic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  8. 21 CFR 182.8013 - Ascorbic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ascorbic acid. 182.8013 Section 182.8013 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8013 Ascorbic acid. (a) Product. Ascorbic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  9. 21 CFR 182.3089 - Sorbic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sorbic acid. 182.3089 Section 182.3089 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3089 Sorbic acid. (a) Product. Sorbic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  10. 21 CFR 182.3089 - Sorbic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sorbic acid. 182.3089 Section 182.3089 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3089 Sorbic acid. (a) Product. Sorbic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  11. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized...

  12. 21 CFR 182.3089 - Sorbic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sorbic acid. 182.3089 Section 182.3089 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3089 Sorbic acid. (a) Product. Sorbic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  13. 21 CFR 182.1057 - Hydrochloric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrochloric acid. 182.1057 Section 182.1057 Food... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1057 Hydrochloric acid. (a) Product. Hydrochloric acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized...

  14. 21 CFR 182.8013 - Ascorbic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ascorbic acid. 182.8013 Section 182.8013 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8013 Ascorbic acid. (a) Product. Ascorbic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  15. 21 CFR 182.1073 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Phosphoric acid. 182.1073 Section 182.1073 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1073 Phosphoric acid. (a) Product. Phosphoric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  16. 21 CFR 182.8013 - Ascorbic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ascorbic acid. 182.8013 Section 182.8013 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8013 Ascorbic acid. (a) Product. Ascorbic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  17. 21 CFR 182.1073 - Phosphoric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Phosphoric acid. 182.1073 Section 182.1073 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1073 Phosphoric acid. (a) Product. Phosphoric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  18. 34 CFR 84.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Controlled substance. 84.610 Section 84.610 Education... (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 84.610 Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further...

  19. 36 CFR 1212.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Controlled substance. 1212.610... Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21 CFR 1308.11...

  20. 43 CFR 43.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Controlled substance. 43.610 Section 43... DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 43.610 Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21...

  1. 49 CFR 32.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Controlled substance. 32.610 Section 32.610... (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 32.610 Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further...

  2. 28 CFR 83.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Controlled substance. 83.610 Section 83...-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.610 Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and...

  3. [A monoclonal antibody against ragweed pollen cross-reacting with yellow dock pollen].

    PubMed

    Shen, H D; Chang, L Y; Gong, Y J; Chang, H N; Han, S H

    1985-11-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies with different specificity against the major allergenic components of ragweed pollen, we analyzed their cross-reactivity with two tree pollens, two grass pollens and five other weed pollens which are common in Taiwan by the immunoblot method. It was found that besides reacting with AgE and AgK of the ragweed pollen, the monoclonal antibody 48-5 also reacted with antigens of yellow dock pollen with molecular weights of 40K, 38K, 24K, and 21K. In a preliminary study, sera of two patients containing IgE antibodies to ragweed pollen antigens also reacted to the 40K component of the yellow dock pollen. Furthermore, from the results of allergenic skin testings on 109 patients with bronchial asthma, we found that of 22 patients who had a positive reaction to a crude extract of ragweed pollen, 18(81.8%) also reacted to the crude extract of yellow dock pollen. In conclusion, our results suggest that there exists a common allergenic determinant between pollens of ragweed and yellow dock. It may play an important role in the expression of the sensitivity of patients to these two kinds of pollens.

  4. Flu Plan: Colleges Struggle with How They Would React to a Pandemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guterman, Lila

    2005-01-01

    Administrators of various education schools have vowed to ready their institutions for the next major disaster of flu pandemic. While a few colleges with expertise or interest in the area are trying to determine how their campuses should react to a flu pandemic, most seem to be struggling with how to fit all the unknowns of such a crisis into…

  5. How Children Reacted to Televised Coverage of the Space Shuttle Disaster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, John C.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Explores the effects of live television coverage of the space shuttle Challenger disaster on school children. Finds that children tended to react according to gender stereotypes of impersonal regret versus personal involvement and respond with either a cognitive orientation or a social and emotional orientation. (MS)

  6. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Conceptual Change Texts in the REACT Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ültay, Neslihan; Durukan, Ümmü Gülsüm; Ültay, Eser

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of conceptual change text (CCT) in the REACT strategy for students' conceptions of solutions. A quasi-experimental method was used in the study. The study was carried out in the spring term of the 2012-2013 academic year with 61 freshmen students (aged 18-20 years) studying in the Elementary Education…

  7. Fluorescence probe for the convenient and sensitive detection of ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Yuta; Yamato, Mayumi; Yamada, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is an important antioxidant that plays an essential role in the biosynthesis of numerous bioactive substances. The detection of ascorbic acid has traditionally been achieved using high-performance liquid chromatography and absorption spectrophotometry assays. However, the development of fluorescence probes for this purpose is highly desired because they provide a much more convenient and highly sensitive technique for the detection of this material. OFF-ON-type fluorescent probes have been developed for the detection of non-fluorescent compounds. Photo-induced electron transfer and fluorescence resonance energy transfer are the two main fluorescence quenching mechanisms for the detection of ascorbic acid, and several fluorescence probes have been reported based on redox-responsive metals and quantum dots. Profluorescent nitroxide compounds have also been developed as non-metal organic fluorescence probes for ascorbic acid. These nitroxide systems have a stable unpaired electron and can therefore react with ascorbic acid and a strong fluorescence quencher. Furthermore, recent synthetic advances have allowed for the synthesis of α-substituted nitroxides with varying levels of reactivity towards ascorbic acid. In this review, we have discussed the design strategies used for the preparation of fluorescent probes for ascorbic acid, with particular emphasis on profluorescent nitroxides, which are unique radical-based redox-active fluorescent probes. PMID:26798193

  8. Acid Rain: A Selective Bibliography. Second Edition. Bibliography Series Twenty-One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Gertrudis, Comp.

    Acid rain is a term for rain, snow, or other precipitation produced from water vapor in the air reacting with emissions from automobiles, factories, power plants, and other oil and coal burning sources. When these chemical compounds, composed of sulfur oxide and nitrogen oxide, react with water vapor, the result is sulfuric acid and nitric acid.…

  9. 75 FR 69467 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ... Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration By Notice dated March... Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be registered as a bulk manufacturer of Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid (2010... named company is granted registration as a bulk manufacturer of the basic class of controlled...

  10. Gabapentin for the treatment of substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2013-12-01

    The amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Four placebo-controlled studies found the GABA analog drug gabapentin effective for treating alcohol dependence. Gabapentin may also be effective for treating alcohol withdrawal syndromes. One placebo-controlled pilot study found gabapentin beneficial for cannabis dependence, but several controlled studies found no benefit for cocaine or methamphetamine dependence. Whether gabapentin is effective for other substance use disorders is unknown.

  11. Derivatization and fluorescence detection of amino acids and peptides with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate on the surface of a solid adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Shangguan, D; Zhao, Y; Han, H; Zhao, R; Liu, G

    2001-05-01

    An approach that exploits the surface of a solid adsorbent is proposed for precolumn FMOC derivatization of amino acids and peptides. Amino acids (Ser, Glu, GABA, Val, Phe, Lys) and two neuropeptides (substance P and Leuenkephalin) were adsorbed on alkaline silica gel cartridges. After drying, they were reacted with 9-fluorenyl-methyl chloroformate (FMOC-Cl) in toluene. After washing off the excess FMOC-Cl with ethyl acetate, the derivatives were eluted with aqueous eluant. The eluates were separated and detected by means of HPLC with fluorescence detection. Compared with the traditional derivatization in the liquid phase, the extent of formation of byproducts of FMOC-Cl with water was greatly decreased, and the excess FMOC-Cl was eliminated completely.

  12. Accumulation of perfluoroalkyl substances in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Francisca; Nadal, Martí; Navarro-Ortega, Alícia; Fàbrega, Francesc; Domingo, José L; Barceló, Damià; Farré, Marinella

    2013-09-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are environmental pollutants with an important bioaccumulation potential. However, their metabolism and distribution in humans are not well studied. In this study, the concentrations of 21 PFASs were analyzed in 99 samples of autopsy tissues (brain, liver, lung, bone, and kidney) from subjects who had been living in Tarragona (Catalonia, Spain). The samples were analyzed by solvent extraction and online purification by turbulent flow and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The occurrence of PFASs was confirmed in all human tissues. Although PFASs accumulation followed particular trends depending on the specific tissue, some similarities were found. In kidney and lung, perfluorobutanoic acid was the most frequent compound, and at highest concentrations (median values: 263 and 807ng/g in kidney and lung, respectively). In liver and brain, perfluorohexanoic acid showed the maximum levels (median: 68.3 and 141ng/g, respectively), while perfluorooctanoic acid was the most contributively in bone (median: 20.9ng/g). Lung tissues accumulated the highest concentration of PFASs. However, perfluorooctane sulfonic acid and perfluorooctanoic acid were more prevalent in liver and bone, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the accumulation of different PFASs in samples of various human tissues from the same subjects is here reported for the very first time. The current results may be of high importance for the validation of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, which are being developed for humans. However, further studies on the distribution of the same compounds in the human body are still required.

  13. Growth Substances From Veratrum tenuipetalum 1

    PubMed Central

    Olney, H. Omar

    1968-01-01

    Young leaves and buds of Veratrum tenuipetalum yielded non-indolic growth accelerators and inhibitors in the acidic ether fraction. The titer of accelerators decreased while the inhibitors increased as leaves matured. This was also true when comparing extracts of immature and fruiting inflorescences. Indole 3-acetic acid was at no time detected in leaf, bud, and inflorescence extracts but indole 3-acetyl-aspartic acid was readily recovered from all of these. The alkaline ether fraction of leaf base meristems, buds, roots, and rhizomes was rich in crystalline and amorphous alkaloids and phenolic acids. Reducing the quantity of major substances through crystallization, precipitation, and filtration permitted thin film chromatographic separation of the minor alkaloids and phenolic acids in the presence of the major ones. The unchromatographed mixture, and also certain of the purified major and minor alkaloids studied, strongly inhibited growth in germinating oat and winter rye seeds. In addition, profound changes in morphology and cytology of the seminal roots resulted. DNA disappeared partially to completely from affected tissue in 2 day germinated seeds. Images PMID:5641187

  14. Current challenges and problems in the field of new psychoactive substances in Germany from a law enforcement perspective.

    PubMed

    Duffert, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, a range of so-called new psychoactive substances (NPS) have established themselves on the German recreational drug scene, causing increased concern. At the same time, a great number of Internet shops have come into existence offering these substances for sale online, ensuring a high level of availability. A number of these substances derived from pharmaceutical research which did not result in marketing authorization, presumably due to unfavourable properties. There are hardly any reliable data on long-term health damage, addictive potential, and other aspects of these scientifically unexplored substances. A number of fatal intoxications have also become known. As a rule, the mostly young consumers do not know what substance they are taking and in what concentration, thus exposing themselves to incalculable health risks and consequences. The punishability of the handling of NPS depends on the actual content: the Narcotic Drugs Act (BtMG) is applicable if a product contains narcotic drugs. If similarly effective substances are contained, which are not classified as narcotic drugs, the (penal) provisions of the Medicinal Products Act might be applicable, if the product has a pharmaceutical effect. Experience gained so far has shown that manufacturers of these intoxicating substances react immediately to inclusions in the German BtMG and put new substances on the market which are chemically similar to the known substances thus circumventing legislation. In view of the immense variety of NPS and the enormous profits derived from their sale, an end to this development is not in sight.

  15. The antioxidative substances in cacao liquor.

    PubMed

    Osakabe, N; Yamagishi, M; Sanbongi, C; Natsume, M; Takizawa, T; Osawa, T

    1998-04-01

    The antioxidative substances contained in cacao liquor, which is one of the major ingredients of chocolate, were separated by column chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. Three major compounds were purified and two of them were identified by 1H, 13C NMR and mass spectra as (-)-epicatechin (EC) and (+)-catechin (CA). Their antioxidative activity was measured by monitoring the peroxide value of linoleic acid and the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance values of erythrocyte ghost membranes and microsomes. EC and CA had strong antioxidative effects in all three methods, but one unidentified peak was found to be less effective. Additionally, we analyzed the polyphenol concentration of cacao liquor extractions produced in several countries. The total polyphenol concentration was 7.0 to 13.0%, catechin concentration was 0.31 to 0.49%, and epicatechin concentration was 0.35 to 1.68% in the extractions. It is believed that chocolate is stable against oxidative deterioration on account of the presence of these polyphenolic compounds, and it is also expected to have a protective role against lipid peroxidation in living systems.

  16. Formation of ursodeoxycholic acid from chenodeoxycholic acid by a 7 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-elaborating Eubacterium aerofaciens strain cocultured with 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-elaborating organisms.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, I A; Rochon, Y P; Hutchison, D M; Holdeman, L V

    1982-01-01

    A gram-positive, anaerobic, chain-forming, rod-shaped anaerobe (isolate G20-7) was isolated from normal human feces. This organism was identified by cellular morphology as well as fermentative and biochemical data as Eubacterium aerofaciens. When isolate G20-7 was grown in the presence of Bacteroides fragilis or Escherichia coli (or another 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase producer) and chenodeoxycholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid produced. Time course curves revealed that 3 alpha-hydroxy-7-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid produced by B. fragilis or E. coli or introduced into the medium as a pure substance was reduced by G20-7 specifically to ursodeoxycholic acid. The addition of glycine- and taurine-conjugated primary bile acids (chenodeoxycholic and cholic acids) and other bile acids to binary cultures of B. fragilis and G20-7 revealed that (i) both conjugates were hydrolyzed to give free bile acids, (ii) ursocholic acid (3 alpha, 7 beta, 12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholanoic acid) was produced when conjugated (or free) cholic acid was the substrate, and (iii) the epimerization reaction was at least partially reversible. Corroborating these observations, an NADP-dependent 7 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (reacting specifically with 7 beta-OH-groups) was demonstrated in cell-free preparations of isolate G20-7; production of the enzyme was optimal at between 12 and 18 h of growth. This enzyme, when measured in the oxidative direction, was active with ursodeoxycholic acid, ursocholic acid, and the taurine conjugate of ursodeoxycholic acid (but not with chenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic, or cholic acids) and displayed an optimal pH range of 9.8 to 10.2 Images PMID:6758698

  17. Differing Event-Related Patterns of Gamma-Band Power in Brain Waves of Fast- and Slow-Reacting Subjects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    Wilhelm Wundt proposed that there are two types of subjects in sim- ple RT experiments: fast-reacting subjects, who respond before they fully...quickly as possible to auditory stimuli. This result appears to confirm long-standing speculations of Wundt that fast- and slow-reacting subjects...accord with the hypothesis of Wundt and others that slower ("sensorial") responders wait to fully perceive a stimulus and then react to their perception

  18. How cysteine reacts with citral: an unexpected reaction of beta,beta-disubstituted acroleins with cysteine leading to hexahydro-1,4-thiazepines.

    PubMed

    Starkenmann, Christian; Brauchli, Robert; Maurer, Bruno

    2005-11-16

    The reaction of beta,beta-disubstituted acroleins [3-methyl-2-butenal (1), 3-methyl-2-hexenal (2), and citral (3)] with cysteine gave 1:2 adducts of a novel structural type, namely hexahydro-1,4-thiazepines. To the best of our knowledge, the spontaneous formation of a seven-membered heterocycle from the addition of cysteine to alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes is unprecedented. The adduct 6 obtained from citral, under acidic conditions, reacted further to give the new bicyclic compound 8.

  19. Toxic Substances; Biphenyl; Test Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This rule promulgates EPA’s decision to require manufacturers and processors to test biphenyl (CAS No: 92—52—4) for environmental effects and chemical fate under section 4(a) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

  20. Substances and Heart Rhythm Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... that trigger the heartbeat. Caffeine, Diet and Heart Arrhythmias Caffeine is the most common substance linked with abnormal heart rhythms ( arrhythmias ). Some people feel heart palpitations (fast heartbeats) when ...

  1. Substance Abuse in Rural Areas

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical appearance and grooming Association with known substance abusers Need for money and stealing money Persistent dishonesty ... can be done to discourage youth from using drugs and alcohol? Everyone can help educate children and ...

  2. Music, Substance Use, and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng-Jinn; Miller, Brenda A.; Grube, Joel W.; Waiters, Elizabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigated whether young people’s substance use and aggressive behaviors are related to their listening to music containing messages of substance use and violence. Method Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires and from a sample of community college students aged 15-25 (N = 1056; 43% male). A structural equation modeling method was used to simultaneously assess the associations between listening to various genres of music, alcohol use, illicit drug use, and aggressive behaviors, taking into account respondents’ age, gender, race/ethnicity, and level of sensation seeking. Results Listening to rap music was significantly and positively associated with alcohol use, problematic alcohol use, illicit drug use, and aggressive behaviors when all other variables were controlled. Additionally, alcohol and illicit drug use were positively associated with listening to musical genres of techno and reggae. Control variables such as sensation seeking, age, gender and race/ethnicity were significantly related to substance use and aggressive behaviors. Conclusion The findings suggest that young people’s substance use and aggressive behaviors may be related to their frequent exposure to music containing references to substance use and violence. Conversely, music listening preference may reflect some personal predispositions or lifestyle preferences. Alternatively, substance use, aggression and music preference are independent constructs, but share common “third factors.” PMID:16608146

  3. 40 CFR 721.3629 - Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids... Substances § 721.3629 Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as triethanolamine salts of...

  4. 40 CFR 721.7375 - Potassium salt of polyolefin acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Potassium salt of polyolefin acid. 721... Substances § 721.7375 Potassium salt of polyolefin acid. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a potassium salt of...

  5. 40 CFR 721.7375 - Potassium salt of polyolefin acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Potassium salt of polyolefin acid. 721... Substances § 721.7375 Potassium salt of polyolefin acid. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a potassium salt of...

  6. 40 CFR 721.3629 - Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids... Substances § 721.3629 Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as triethanolamine salts of...

  7. 40 CFR 721.3627 - Branched synthetic fatty acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Branched synthetic fatty acid. 721... Substances § 721.3627 Branched synthetic fatty acid. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a branched synthetic fatty...

  8. 40 CFR 721.3627 - Branched synthetic fatty acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Branched synthetic fatty acid. 721... Substances § 721.3627 Branched synthetic fatty acid. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a branched synthetic fatty...

  9. 40 CFR 721.3627 - Branched synthetic fatty acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Branched synthetic fatty acid. 721... Substances § 721.3627 Branched synthetic fatty acid. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a branched synthetic fatty...

  10. 40 CFR 721.3629 - Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids... Substances § 721.3629 Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as triethanolamine salts of...

  11. 40 CFR 721.3629 - Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids... Substances § 721.3629 Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as triethanolamine salts of...

  12. 40 CFR 721.7375 - Potassium salt of polyolefin acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Potassium salt of polyolefin acid. 721... Substances § 721.7375 Potassium salt of polyolefin acid. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a potassium salt of...

  13. 40 CFR 721.3629 - Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids... Substances § 721.3629 Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as triethanolamine salts of...

  14. 40 CFR 721.7375 - Potassium salt of polyolefin acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Potassium salt of polyolefin acid. 721... Substances § 721.7375 Potassium salt of polyolefin acid. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a potassium salt of...

  15. 40 CFR 721.7375 - Potassium salt of polyolefin acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Potassium salt of polyolefin acid. 721... Substances § 721.7375 Potassium salt of polyolefin acid. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a potassium salt of...

  16. 40 CFR 721.3627 - Branched synthetic fatty acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Branched synthetic fatty acid. 721... Substances § 721.3627 Branched synthetic fatty acid. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a branched synthetic fatty...

  17. 40 CFR 721.2270 - Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. 721... Substances § 721.2270 Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aliphatic dicarboxylic...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2270 - Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. 721... Substances § 721.2270 Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aliphatic dicarboxylic...

  19. 40 CFR 721.3627 - Branched synthetic fatty acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Branched synthetic fatty acid. 721... Substances § 721.3627 Branched synthetic fatty acid. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a branched synthetic fatty...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2270 - Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. 721... Substances § 721.2270 Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aliphatic dicarboxylic...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2270 - Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. 721... Substances § 721.2270 Aliphatic dicarboxylic acid salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aliphatic dicarboxylic...

  2. A two-dimensional numerical simulation of a supersonic, chemically reacting mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip

    1988-01-01

    Research has been undertaken to achieve an improved understanding of physical phenomena present when a supersonic flow undergoes chemical reaction. A detailed understanding of supersonic reacting flows is necessary to successfully develop advanced propulsion systems now planned for use late in this century and beyond. In order to explore such flows, a study was begun to create appropriate physical models for describing supersonic combustion, and to develop accurate and efficient numerical techniques for solving the governing equations that result from these models. From this work, two computer programs were written to study reacting flows. Both programs were constructed to consider the multicomponent diffusion and convection of important chemical species, the finite rate reaction of these species, and the resulting interaction of the fluid mechanics and the chemistry. The first program employed a finite difference scheme for integrating the governing equations, whereas the second used a hybrid Chebyshev pseudospectral technique for improved accuracy.

  3. Computation of H2/air reacting flowfields in drag-reduction external combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, H. T.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical simulation and analysis of the solution are presented for a laminar reacting flowfield of air and hydrogen in the case of external combustion employed to reduce base drag in hypersonic vehicles operating at transonic speeds. The flowfield consists of a transonic air stream at a Mach number of 1.26 and a sonic transverse hydrogen injection along a row of 26 orifices. Self-sustained combustion is computed over an expansion ramp downstream of the injection and a flameholder, using the recently developed RPLUS code. Measured data is available only for surface pressure distributions and is used for validation of the code in practical 3D reacting flowfields. Pressure comparison shows generally good agreements, and the main effects of combustion are also qualitatively consistent with experiment.

  4. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, C. K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Tsai, A.

    1991-01-01

    This research is involved with the implementations of advanced computational schemes based on large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing and its coupling with chemical reactions in compressible turbulent flows. In the efforts related to LES, a research program was initiated to extend the present capabilities of this method for the treatment of chemically reacting flows, whereas in the DNS efforts, focus was on detailed investigations of the effects of compressibility, heat release, and nonequilibrium kinetics modeling in high speed reacting flows. The efforts to date were primarily focussed on simulations of simple flows, namely, homogeneous compressible flows and temporally developing hign speed mixing layers. A summary of the accomplishments is provided.

  5. Reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach: The chemical reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Kustova, Elena V.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-12-09

    In this work chemically reacting mixtures of viscous flows are analyzed within the framework of Boltzmann equation. By applying a modified Chapman-Enskog method to the system of Boltzmann equations general expressions for the rates of chemical reactions and vibrational energy transitions are determined as functions of two thermodynamic forces: the velocity divergence and the affinity. As an application chemically reacting mixtures of N{sub 2} across a shock wave are studied, where the first lowest vibrational states are taken into account. Here we consider only the contributions from the first four single quantum vibrational-translational energy transitions. It is shown that the contribution to the chemical reaction rate related to the affinity is much larger than that of the velocity divergence.

  6. Data-parallel lower-upper relaxation method for reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candler, Graham V.; Wright, Michael J.; Mcdonald, Jeffrey D.

    1994-01-01

    The implicit lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel (LU-SGS) method of Yoon and Jameson is modified for use on massively parallel computers. The method has been implemented on the Thinking Machines CM-5 and the MasPar MP-1 and MP-2, where large percentages of the theoretical peak floating point performance are obtained. It is shown that the new data-parallel LU relaxation method has better convergence properties than the original method for two different inviscid compressible flow simulations. The convergence is also improved for five-species reacting air computations. The performance of the method on various partitions of the CM-5 and on the MasPar computers is discussed. The new method shows promise for the efficient simulation of very large perfect gas and reacting flows.

  7. Development of an Innovative Insulation for Nb3Sn Wind and React Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puigsegur, A.; Rondeaux, F.; Prouzet, E.; Samoogabalan, K.

    2004-06-01

    At the present time, Nb3Sn is the best superconductor candidate for the realization of high field magnets (>10-11 teslas). However its implementation remains delicate because of the great brittleness of material after the heat treatment necessary to form the Nb3Sn compounds. The conventional insulation for Nb3Sn wind & react coils requires performing, after the heat treatment, a vacuum resin impregnation, which adds to the cost and raises failure risk. We propose a one-step innovating ceramic insulation deposited directly on the un-reacted conducting cable. The conducting cable is wound according to conventional techniques and, after the heat treatment necessary to the form the Nb3Sn, we obtain a coil having a mechanical cohesion, while maintaining a proper conductor positioning and a suitable electric insulation. We will have studied the electric properties of superconducting cable isolated at the room temperature and at 4.2 K.

  8. Formation of a reacted layer at the barrierless Cu(WN )/Si interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, J. P.; Lin, C. H.

    2005-11-01

    This letter reports the formation of a reacted layer between Cu film and barrierless Si substrate during annealing. The Cu films with a minor WN phase are deposited by reactive cosputtering of Cu and W in an Ar /N2 mixture gas. After annealing at 530 °C for 1 h, a ˜200-nm-thick reacted layer formed at the Cu(WN )/Si interface acts as a barrier to protect the film from extensive interactions with Si. X-ray diffraction, focused ion beam, and transmission electron microscopy results confirm the presence of this layer and show this layer is mainly composed of Cu2WO4, Cu3Si, and Si2N2O. Leakage current and resistivity evaluations reveal the superior thermal reliability of Cu with a dilute amount of WN at the temperatures up to 530 °C, suggesting its potential application in the advanced barrierless metallization.

  9. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Madnia, C. K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Frankel, S. H.; Vidoni, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    The main objective is to extend the boundaries within which large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) can be applied in computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. In the efforts related to LES, we were concerned with developing reliable subgrid closures for modeling of the fluctuation correlations of scalar quantities in reacting turbulent flows. In the work on DNS, we focused our attention to further investigation of the effects of exothermicity in compressible turbulent flows. In our previous work, in the first year of this research, we have considered only 'simple' flows. Currently, we are in the process of extending our analyses for the purpose of modeling more practical flows of current interest at LaRC. A summary of our accomplishments during the third six months of the research is presented.

  10. 78 FR 18526 - Significant New Use Rules on Certain Chemical Substances; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... substance identified generically as aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (PMN P-12-276) a... amendment do? When promulgating the significant new uses for aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts, EPA... sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts; the Agency intended the respirator to be designated as N100....

  11. 78 FR 9397 - International Drug Scheduling; Convention on Psychotropic Substances; World Health Organization...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... Substances; World Health Organization Scheduling Recommendations for Gamma-hydroxybutyric Acid AGENCY: Food...), has notified the Secretary-General that it is of the opinion that Gamma- hydroxybutyric acid (GHB... control of y-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). The recommendation is that GHB be rescheduled from Schedule IV...

  12. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS IN THE ANALYSIS OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES FACTS AND ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humic substances, extracted as mixtures from soil and surface waters according to their solubility in acids and bases, are relatively high-molecular-mass polyelectrolytes containing aromatic, aliphatic and heterocyclic subunits. The degree of ionization of their phenolic and carb...

  13. Experimental Investigation on the Effects of Chemical Heat Release in the Reacting Turbulent Plane Shear Layer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    RD-Ai44 482 EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON THE EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL 1/2 HEAT RELEASE IN THE..(U) CALIFORNIA INST OF TECH PASADENA A K WIALLACE JAN 81...TITLE (end Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT 46 PERIOD COVERED Experimental Investigation on the Effects of Chemical Heat Release in the Reacting"Turbulent...Institute of Technology. 19. KEY 140ROS (Continue on reverse stdo of necesaray end identity by block number) Turbulence, combustion, shear layer, heat

  14. A seizure response dog: video recording of reacting behaviour during repetitive prolonged seizures.

    PubMed

    Di Vito, Lidia; Naldi, Ilaria; Mostacci, Barbara; Licchetta, Laura; Bisulli, Francesca; Tinuper, Paolo

    2010-06-01

    Seizure response and alerting behaviour may spontaneously develop in dogs living with children or adults with epilepsy. Some dogs can also be reliably trained to respond and anticipate seizures. We describe the case of a dog, not previously trained for assistance work, showing complex seizure response behaviour. This is the first release of a home video recording of a dog reacting to its owner's seizure.

  15. (U) Design Considerations for Obtaining Deep Release in Reacted Epon 828

    SciTech Connect

    Fredenburg, David A.; Lang, John Michael; Dattelbaum, Dana Mcgraw; Bennett, Langdon Stanford

    2016-03-16

    Our document summarizes results from one-dimensional calculations performed to investigate the release behavior of reacted Epon 828. Two design goals were set, (1) the product phase had to be achieved upon the initial shock loading, and (2) a deep release state could be achieved. Both transmission and front surface impact geometry were investigated. Moreover, the two design criteria were met with the front surface impact design employing a modi ed projectile.

  16. Phased Array Ultrasound: Initial Development of PAUT Inspection of Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rairigh, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of Phased Array Ultrasound (PAUT) as a non-destructive examination method for Self Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). PAUT is the only NDE method which has been shown to detect detrimental levels of Residual Oxide Defect (ROD), which can result in significant decrease in weld strength. The presentation reviews the PAUT process, and shows the results in comparison with x-ray radiography.

  17. Mechanism which reacts to the presence of oil and/or water

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.J.

    1990-01-02

    This patent describes a release mechanism which reacts to the presence of water at a temperature which is present in a quench oil tank. It comprises: a flour-polyacrylonitrile graft polymer composition as an absorbent material, the flour-polyacrylonitrile graft polymer composition being treated by being soaked in water and then subsequently dried; and, a multi-ply porous container for substantially enclosing the absorbent material.

  18. Heat Treatment Optimizations for Wind-and-React Bi-2212 Racetrack Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godeke, A.; Cheng, D. W.; Dietderich, D. R.; Mentink, M. G. T.; Prestemon, S. O.; Sabbi, G. L.

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is developing Wind-and-React (W&R) Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) accelerator magnet technology for insert coils, to surpass the intrinsic limitations of Nb-based magnets, and eventually develop hybrid systems that can approach 20 T dipole fields. The Bi-2212 technology is being developed in close collaboration with industry, and has been partly supported by the US Very High Field Superconducting Magnet Collaboration (VHFSMC). Steady improvements were made over the last several years, with coil HTS-SC08 reaching 2636 A, or about 85% of its witness sample critical current (Ic). Though this is still a factor 3 to 4 too low to be competitive with Nb-based materials, it is expected that the required Ic can be achieved through further conductor optimizations. Recent developments include the commissioning of infrastructure for the reaction of coils at LBNL. Earlier coils were fabricated and tested at LBNL, but were reacted at the wire manufacturer. We describe in detail the furnace calibrations and heat treatment optimizations that enable coil reactions at temperatures approaching 890°C with a homogeneity of ±1°C in a pure oxygen flow. We reacted two new coils at LBNL, and tested the performance of coil HTS-SC10 at 4.2 K in self-field using a superconducting transformer system. We find that its performance is consistent with witness samples, and comparable to coil HTS-SC08, which is an identical coil that was reacted at Oxford Instruments Superconductor Technology (OST), thereby validating the in-house reaction process

  19. Acid-base properties of humic substances from composted and thermally-dried sewage sludges and amended soils as determined by potentiometric titration and the NICA-Donnan model.

    PubMed

    Fernández, José M; Plaza, César; Senesi, Nicola; Polo, Alfredo

    2007-09-01

    The acid-base properties of humic acids (HAs) and fulvic acids (FAs) isolated from composted sewage sludge (CS), thermally-dried sewage sludge (TS), soils amended with either CS or TS at a rate of 80 t ha(-1)y(-1) for 3y and the corresponding unamended soil were investigated by use of potentiometric titrations. The non-ideal competitive adsorption (NICA)-Donnan model for a bimodal distribution of proton binding sites was fitted to titration data by use of a least-squares minimization method. The main fitting parameters of the NICA-Donnan model obtained for each HA and FA sample included site densities, median affinity constants and widths of affinity distributions for proton binding to low and high affinity sites, which were assumed to be, respectively, carboxylic- and phenolic-type groups. With respect to unamended soil HA and FA, the HAs and FAs from CS, and especially TS, were characterized by smaller acidic functional group contents, larger proton binding affinities of both carboxylic- and phenolic-type groups, and smaller heterogeneity of carboxylic and phenolic-type groups. Amendment with CS or TS led to a decrease of acidic functional group contents and a slight increase of proton binding affinities of carboxylic- and phenolic-type groups of soil HAs and FAs. These effects were more evident in the HA and FA fractions from CS-amended soil than in those from TS-amended soil.

  20. Generalized Chapman-Enskog continuum breakdown parameters for chemically reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan-Gopalan, Krishnan; Subramaniam, Sharanya; Stephani, Kelly A.

    2016-12-01

    The generalized Chapman-Enskog (GCE) method for rapid and slow thermochemical processes is employed to formulate a set of continuum breakdown parameters for chemically reacting flows. These GCE breakdown parameters are derived for one-temperature, two-temperature, and three-temperature models, through classification of the relevant thermochemical time scales relative to fast elastic collisional processes and slow flow processes associated with changes in macroscopic observables. Continuum breakdown mechanisms owing to multicomponent diffusion, thermal diffusion, normal and shear stresses, Fourier-type heat fluxes based on translational, rotational, and vibrational temperatures, bulk viscosity, and relaxation pressure are presented for chemically reacting flows. The GCE breakdown parameters, derived from rigorous kinetic theory, capture the proper physical mechanism leading to continuum breakdown. These breakdown parameters are used to analyze continuum breakdown in a Mach 24 reacting air flow over a sphere and continuum breakdown is observed in the shock and close to the sphere surface. The flow field near the sphere surface is found to be characterized by sharp species concentration gradients due to gas-phase and surface reactions. Chemical reactions thus lead indirectly to the distortion of the velocity distribution function (VDF), providing a pathway to continuum breakdown that is captured by the GCE specieswise diffusion breakdown parameter.

  1. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-05-15

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case.

  2. The boundary conditions for Bohr's law: when is reacting faster than acting?

    PubMed

    Pinto, Yaïr; Otten, Marte; Cohen, Michael A; Wolfe, Jeremy M; Horowitz, Todd S

    2011-02-01

    In gunfights in Western movies, the hero typically wins, even though the villain draws first. Niels Bohr (Gamow, The great physicists from Galileo to Einstein. Chapter: The law of quantum, 1988) suggested that this reflected a psychophysical law, rather than a dramatic conceit. He hypothesized that reacting is faster than acting. Welchman, Stanley, Schomers, Miall, and Bülthoff (Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences, 277, 1667-1674, 2010) provided empirical evidence supporting "Bohr's law," showing that the time to complete simple manual actions was shorter when reacting than when initiating an action. Here we probe the limits of this effect. In three experiments, participants performed a simple manual action, which could either be self-initiated or executed following an external visual trigger. Inter-button time was reliably faster when the action was externally triggered. However, the effect disappeared for the second step in a two-step action. Furthermore, the effect reversed when a choice between two actions had to be made. Reacting is faster than acting, but only for simple, ballistic actions.

  3. Computation of turbulent reacting flow in a solid-propellant ducted rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Y.; Chou, W.; Liu, S.

    1995-05-01

    A mathematical model for computation of turbulent reacting flows is developed under general curvilinear coordinate systems. An adaptive, streamline grid system is generated to deal with the complex flow structures in a multiple-inlet solid-propellant ducted rocket (SDR) combustor. General tensor representations of the k-epsilon and algebraic stress (ASM) turbulence models are derived in terms of contravariant velocity components, and modification caused by the effects of compressible turbulence is also included in the modeling. The clipped Gaussian probability density function is incorporated in the combustion model to account for fluctuations of properties. Validation of the above modeling is first examined by studying mixing and reacting characteristics in a confined coaxial-jet problem. This is followed by study of nonreacting and reacting SDR combustor flows. The results show that Gibson and Launder`s ASM incorporated with Sarkar`s modification for compressible turbulence effects based on the general curvilinear coordinate systems yields the most satisfactory prediction for this complicated SDR flowfield. 36 refs.

  4. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-05-01

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case.

  5. Calponin and caldesmon cellular domains in reacting microvessels following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, Christian W; Morgan, Noah C; Petrov, Theodor; Rafols, Jose A

    2006-05-01

    Calponin (Cp) and caldesmon (Cd) are actin-binding proteins involved in the regulation of smooth muscle (SM) tone during blood vessel contraction. While in vitro studies have reported modifications of these proteins during vessel contractility, their role in vivo remains unclear. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes disruption of cerebral microvascular tone, leading to sustained contractility in reacting microvessels and cerebral hypoperfusion. This study aimed to determine the spatial and temporal expressions of Cp and Cd in rat cerebral cortical and hippocampal microvessels post-TBI. Reacting microvessels were analyzed in control, 4, 24, and 48 h post-injury. Single and double immunocytochemical techniques together with semiquantitative analyses revealed a Cp upregulation in SM at all time frames post-TBI; with the protein migrating from SM cytosol to the vicinity of the cell membrane. Similarly, Cd immunoreactivity significantly increased in both SM and endothelial cells (En). However, while Cp and Cd in SM remained elevated, their levels in En returned to normal at 48 h post-TBI. The results suggest that Cp and Cd levels increase while compartmentalizing to specific subcellular domains. These changes are temporally associated with modifications in the cytoskeleton and contractile apparatus of SM and En during blood vessel contractility. Furthermore, these changes may underlie the state of sustained contractility and hypoperfusion observed in reacting microvessels after TBI.

  6. Comparing humic substance and protein compound effects on the bioaccumulation of perfluoroalkyl substances by Daphnia magna in water.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xinghui; Dai, Zhineng; Rabearisoa, Andry Harinaina; Zhao, Pujun; Jiang, Xiaoman

    2015-01-01

    The influence of humic substances and protein compounds on the bioaccumulation of six types of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in Daphnia magna was compared. The humic substances included humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA), the protein compounds included chicken egg albumin (albumin) and peptone, and the PFASs included perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid, perfluoroundecanoic acid, and perfluorododecanoic acid. Four concentrations (0, 1, 10, and 20 mg L(-1)) of the four dissolved organic matter (DOM) types were investigated. At the 1 mg L(-1) level, HA and albumin enhanced all tested PFAS bioaccumulation, whereas FA and peptone only enhanced the bioaccumulation of shorter-chain PFASs (PFOS, PFOA, and PFNA). However, all four DOM types decreased all tested PFAS bioaccumulation at the 20 mg L(-1) level, and the decreasing ratios of bioaccumulation factors caused by FA, HA, albumin, and peptone were 1-49%, 23-77%, 17-58%, and 8-56%, respectively compared with those without DOM. This is because DOM not only reduced the bioavailable concentrations and uptake rates of PFASs but also lowered the elimination rates of PFASs in D. magna, and these opposite effects would change with different DOM types and concentrations. Although the partition coefficients (L kg(-1)) of PFASs between HA and water (10(4.21)-10(4.98)) were much lower than those between albumin and water (10(4.92)-10(5.86)), their effects on PFAS bioaccumulation were comparable. This study suggests that although PFASs are a type of proteinophilic compounds, humic substances also have important effects on their bioavailability and bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms.

  7. Legacy and Emerging Perfluoroalkyl Substances Are ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Long-chain per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are being replaced by short-chain PFASs and fluorinated alternatives. For ten legacy PFASs and seven recently discovered perfluoroalkyl ether carboxylic acids (PFECAs), we report (1) their occurrence in the Cape Fear River (CFR) watershed, (2) their fate in water treatment processes, and (3) their adsorbability on powdered activated carbon (PAC). In the headwater region of the CFR basin, PFECAs were not detected in raw water of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP), but concentrations of legacy PFASs were high. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s lifetime health advisory level (70 ng/L) for perfluorooctanesulfonic acid and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was exceeded on 57 of 127 sampling days. In raw water of a DWTP downstream of a PFAS manufacturer, the mean concentration of perfluoro-2-propoxypropanoic acid (PFPrOPrA), a replacement for PFOA, was 631 ng/L (n = 37). Six other PFECAs were detected, with three exhibiting chromatographic peak areas up to 15 times that of PFPrOPrA. At this DWTP, PFECA removal by coagulation, ozonation, biofiltration, and disinfection was negligible. The adsorbability of PFASs on PAC increased with increasing chain length. Replacing one CF2 group with an ether oxygen decreased the affinity of PFASs for PAC, while replacing additional CF2 groups did not lead to further affinity changes. The USEPA’s recently completed Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule 3 (UCMR3) p

  8. Clonidine-specific antisera recognize an endogenous clonidine-displacing substance in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Meeley, M.P.; Towle, A.C.; Ernsberger, P.; Char, L.K.; McCauley, P.M.; Reis, D.J.

    1989-04-01

    An endogenous substance in brain, clonidine-displacing substance, binds to the same receptor populations as clonidine and is biologically active. Since receptor binding sites can be modeled by using specific antiligand antibodies, we tested the hypothesis that polyclonal antibodies raised in rat and rabbit against the clonidine analog p-aminoclonidine coupled to hemocyanin would recognize compounds structurally related to clonidine, including clonidine-displacing substance. Binding to anti-p-aminoclonidine antibodies was examined by using a competitive radioimmunoassay with tritiated p-aminoclonidine as the radioligand. Central vasodepressor agents that, like clonidine, are known to bind with high affinity to both imidazole sites and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in brain inhibited radioligand binding to anti-p-aminoclonidine antibodies. All of these agents contain imidazol(in)e and phenyl ring moieties as part of their chemical structures (e.g., oxymetazoline); a number of other compounds without one or both of these rings failed to cross-react with the antisera. Clonidine-displacing substance, partially purified from bovine brain, also inhibited specific radioligand binding to anti-p-aminoclonidine antibodies. The inhibition was dose dependent and high affinity (IC50, 4 Units). The endogenous substance had no effect on the apparent affinity of the antibodies for the radioligand, but blocked a specific number of binding sites. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that authentic clonidine-displacing substance, that which displaces tritiated p-aminoclonidine binding to membrane receptors, is recognized by anti-p-aminoclonidine antibodies.

  9. Agitated Depression in Substance Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Adam M.; Gelernter, Joel; Oslin, David; Anton, Raymond F.; Farrer, Lindsay A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Depression with psychomotor agitation (PMA; “agitated depression”) is a putative psychiatric phenotype that appears to associate with some forms of substance dependence. However, it is unclear whether such relationships extend across different substances and independent (I-MDE) versus substance-induced (SI-MDE) subtypes of major depressive episodes. Method We examined whether lifetime depression with (vs. without) PMA was associated with lifetime substance dependence across individuals with lifetime: (1) I-MDE only (n = 575); and (2) SI-MDE only (n = 1683). Data were pooled from several family and genetic studies of substance dependence in which participants received identical structured interviews to diagnose DSM-IV mental disorders. Results In I-MDE, PMA was significantly associated with alcohol, cocaine, opioid, other drug (hallucinogen, inhalant, speed-ball), and sedative dependence. After controlling for demographic and clinical co-factors, PMA's relationship to dependence on opioids, other drugs, and sedatives remained significant, but not its relationship to alcohol or cocaine. In SI-MDE, PMA was significantly associated with alcohol, cocaine, opioid, and other drug dependence. After adjusting for co-factors, associations remained significant for dependence on cocaine and opioids, but not alcohol or other drugs. Relationships between PMA and opioid dependence were stronger in I-MDE than SI-MDE. Depression subtype (I-MDE vs. SI-MDE) did not moderate relations between PMA and non-opioid forms of substance dependence. Conclusions Agitated depression associates with certain forms of substance dependence, particularly opioid dependence. MDE subtype did not alter most PMA-dependence associations, which suggests that the mechanisms underlying this comorbidity are complex and potentially bidirectional. PMID:21277711

  10. Juvenile justice and substance use.

    PubMed

    Chassin, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    Laurie Chassin focuses on the elevated prevalence of substance use disorders among young offenders in the juvenile justice system and on efforts by the justice system to provide treatment for these disorders. She emphasizes the importance of diagnosing and treating these disorders, which are linked both with continued offending and with a broad range of negative effects, such as smoking, risky sexual behavior, violence, and poor educational, occupational, and psychological outcomes. The high rates of substance use problems among young offenders, says Chassin, suggest a large need for treatment. Although young offenders are usually screened for substance use disorders, Chassin notes the need to improve screening methods and to ensure that screening takes place early enough to allow youths to be diverted out of the justice system into community-based programs when appropriate. Cautioning that no single treatment approach has been proven most effective, Chassin describes current standards of "best practices" in treating substance use disorders, examines the extent to which they are implemented in the juvenile justice system, and describes some promising models of care. She highlights several treatment challenges, including the need for better methods of engaging adolescents and their families in treatment and the need to better address environmental risk factors, such as family substance use and deviant peer networks, and co-occurring conditions, such as learning disabilities and other mental health disorders. Chassin advocates policies that encourage wider use of empirically validated therapies and of documented best practices for treating substance use disorders. High relapse rates among youths successfully treated for substance use disorders also point to a greater need for aftercare services and for managing these disorders as chronic illnesses characterized by relapse and remission. A shortage of aftercare services and a lack of service coordination in the

  11. The Responsive Environmental Assessment for Classroom Teaching (REACT): The Dimensionality of Student Perceptions of the Instructional Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Peter M.; Demers, Joseph A.; Christ, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    This study details the initial development of the Responsive Environmental Assessment for Classroom Teachers (REACT). REACT was developed as a questionnaire to evaluate student perceptions of the classroom teaching environment. Researchers engaged in an iterative process to develop, field test, and analyze student responses on 100 rating-scale…

  12. ARSENIC (III) METHYLATED SPECIES REACT WITH DNA DIRECTLY AND COULD BE PROXIMATED/ULTIMATE GENOTOXIC FORMS OF ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory


    ARSENIC(III) METHYLATED SPECIES REACT WITH DNA DIRECTL Y AND COULD BE PROXIMATE/ULTIMATE GENOTOXIC FORMS OF ARSENIC


    Arsenite and arsenate (iAs, inorganic arsenic) have been thought to act as genotoxicants without reacting directly with DNA; neither iAs nor As(V) m...

  13. The JFFMA assessment of flavoring substances structurally related to menthol and uniquely used in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mirokuji, Yoshiharu; Abe, Hajime; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Saito, Kenji; Sekiya, Fumiko; Hayashi, Shim-mo; Maruyama, Shinpei; Ono, Atsushi; Nakajima, Madoka; Degawa, Masakuni; Ozawa, Shogo; Shibutani, Makoto; Maitani, Tamio

    2014-02-01

    Using the procedure devised by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), we performed safety evaluations on four flavoring substances structurally related to menthol (L-menthyl 2-methylbutyrate, DL-menthyl octanoate, DL-menthyl palmitate, and DL-menthyl stearate) uniquely used in Japan. While no genotoxicity study data were available in the literature, all four substances had no chemical structural alerts predictive of genotoxicity. Moreover, they all four are esters consisting of menthol and simple carboxylic acids that were assumed to be immediately hydrolyzed after ingestion and metabolized into innocuous substances for excretion. As menthol and carboxylic acids have no known genotoxicity, it was judged that the JECFA procedure could be applied to these four substances. According to Cramer's classification, these substances were categorized as class I based on their chemical structures. The estimated daily intakes for all four substances were within the range of 1.54-4.71 μg/person/day and 60-1250 μg/person/day, using the methods of Maximized Survey-Derived Intake and Single Portion Exposure Technique, respectively, based on the annual usage data of 2001, 2005, and 2010 in Japan. As the daily intakes of these substances were below the threshold of concern applied to class I substances viz., 1800 μg/person/day, it was concluded that all four substances raise no safety concerns when used for flavoring foods under the currently estimated intake levels.

  14. 38 CFR 48.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Controlled substance. 48...) GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 48.610 Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of the...

  15. 38 CFR 48.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Controlled substance. 48...) GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 48.610 Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of the...

  16. 22 CFR 312.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Controlled substance. 312.610 Section 312.610 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 312.610 Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules...

  17. 22 CFR 312.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Controlled substance. 312.610 Section 312.610 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 312.610 Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules...

  18. 22 CFR 312.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Controlled substance. 312.610 Section 312.610 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 312.610 Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules...

  19. 22 CFR 312.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Controlled substance. 312.610 Section 312.610 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 312.610 Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules...

  20. 22 CFR 312.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Controlled substance. 312.610 Section 312.610 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 312.610 Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules...