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Sample records for acid reaction-diffusion system

  1. Breathing spiral waves in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenstein, Igal; Muñuzuri, Alberto P.; Yang, Lingfa; Dolnik, Milos; Zhabotinsky, Anatol M.; Epstein, Irving R.

    2008-08-01

    Breathing spiral waves are observed in the oscillatory chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system. The breathing develops within established patterns of multiple spiral waves after the concentration of polyvinyl alcohol in the feeding chamber of a continuously fed, unstirred reactor is increased. The breathing period is determined by the period of bulk oscillations in the feeding chamber. Similar behavior is obtained in the Lengyel-Epstein model of this system, where small amplitude parametric forcing of spiral waves near the spiral wave frequency leads to the formation of breathing spiral waves in which the period of breathing is equal to the period of forcing.

  2. Turing pattern formation in the chlorine dioxide-iodine- malonic acid reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setayeshgar, Sima

    The formation of localized structures in the chlorine dioxide-idodine-malonic acid (CDIMA) reaction-diffusion system is investigated numerically using a realistic model of this system. We analyze the one-dimensional patterns formed along the gradients imposed by boundary feeds, and study their linear stability to symmetry- breaking perturbations (the Turing instability) in the plane transverse to these gradients. We establish that an often-invoked simple local linear analysis which neglects longitudinal diffusion is inappropriate for predicting the linear stability of these patterns. Using a fully nonuniform analysis, we investigate the structure of the patterns formed along the gradients and their stability to transverse Turing pattern formation as a function of the values of two control parameters: the malonic acid feed concentration and the size of the reactor in the dimension along the gradients. The results from this investigation are compared with existing experimental results. We also verify that the two-variable reduction of the chemical model employed in the linear stability analysis is justified. Finally, we present numerical solution of the CDIMA system in two dimensions which is in qualitative agreement with experiments. This result also confirms our linear stability analysis, while demonstrating the feasibility of numerical exploration of realistic chemical models.

  3. Galerkin analysis of light-induced patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pushpita; Sen, Shrabani; Riaz, Syed Shahed; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2009-05-01

    The photosensitive chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system has been an experimental paradigm for the study of Turing pattern over the last several years. When subjected to illumination of varied intensity by visible light the patterns undergo changes from spots to stripes, vice versa, and their mixture. We carry out a nonlinear analysis of the underlying model in terms of a Galerkin scheme with finite number of modes to explore the nature of the stability and existence of various modes responsible for the type and crossover of the light-induced patterns.

  4. Parametric spatiotemporal oscillation in reaction-diffusion systems.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2016-03-01

    We consider a reaction-diffusion system in a homogeneous stable steady state. On perturbation by a time-dependent sinusoidal forcing of a suitable scaling parameter the system exhibits parametric spatiotemporal instability beyond a critical threshold frequency. We have formulated a general scheme to calculate the threshold condition for oscillation and the range of unstable spatial modes lying within a V-shaped region reminiscent of Arnold's tongue. Full numerical simulations show that depending on the specificity of nonlinearity of the models, the instability may result in time-periodic stationary patterns in the form of standing clusters or spatially localized breathing patterns with characteristic wavelengths. Our theoretical analysis of the parametric oscillation in reaction-diffusion system is corroborated by full numerical simulation of two well-known chemical dynamical models: chlorite-iodine-malonic acid and Briggs-Rauscher reactions.

  5. Parametric spatiotemporal oscillation in reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2016-03-01

    We consider a reaction-diffusion system in a homogeneous stable steady state. On perturbation by a time-dependent sinusoidal forcing of a suitable scaling parameter the system exhibits parametric spatiotemporal instability beyond a critical threshold frequency. We have formulated a general scheme to calculate the threshold condition for oscillation and the range of unstable spatial modes lying within a V-shaped region reminiscent of Arnold's tongue. Full numerical simulations show that depending on the specificity of nonlinearity of the models, the instability may result in time-periodic stationary patterns in the form of standing clusters or spatially localized breathing patterns with characteristic wavelengths. Our theoretical analysis of the parametric oscillation in reaction-diffusion system is corroborated by full numerical simulation of two well-known chemical dynamical models: chlorite-iodine-malonic acid and Briggs-Rauscher reactions.

  6. Wave Phenomena in Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbock, Oliver; Engel, Harald

    2013-12-01

    Pattern formation in excitable and oscillatory reaction-diffusion systems provides intriguing examples for the emergence of macroscopic order from molecular reaction events and Brownian motion. Here we review recent results on several aspects of excitation waves including anomalous dispersion, vortex pinning, and three-dimensional scroll waves. Anomalies in the speed-wavelength dependence of pulse trains include nonmonotonic behavior, bistability, and velocity gaps. We further report on the hysteresis effects during the pinning-depinning transition of twodimensional spiral waves. The pinning of three-dimensional scroll waves shows even richer dynamic complexity, partly due to the possibility of geometric and topological mismatches between the unexcitable, pinning heterogeneities and the one-dimensional rotation backbone of the vortex. As examples we present results on the pinning of scroll rings to spherical, C-shaped, and genus-2-type heterogeneities. We also review the main results of several experimental studies employing the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction and briefly discuss the biomedical relevance of this research especially in the context of cardiology.

  7. Design and control of patterns in reaction-diffusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vanag, Vladimir K.; Epstein, Irving R.

    2008-06-15

    We discuss the design of reaction-diffusion systems that display a variety of spatiotemporal patterns. We also consider how these patterns may be controlled by external perturbation, typically using photochemistry or temperature. Systems treated include the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid and chlorine dioxide-malonic acid-iodine reactions, and the BZ-AOT system, i.e., the BZ reaction in a water-in-oil reverse microemulsion stabilized by the surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)

  8. Multifold Increases in Turing Pattern Wavelength in the Chlorine Dioxide-Iodine-Malonic Acid Reaction-Diffusion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskins, Delora K.; Pruc, Emily E.; Epstein, Irving R.; Dolnik, Milos

    2016-07-01

    Turing patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction were modified through additions of sodium halide salt solutions. The range of wavelengths obtained is several times larger than in the previously reported literature. Pattern wavelength was observed to significantly increase with sodium bromide or sodium chloride. A transition to a uniform state was found at high halide concentrations. The observed experimental results are qualitatively well reproduced in numerical simulations with the Lengyel-Epstein model with an additional chemically realistic kinetic term to account for the added halide and an adjustment of the activator diffusion rate to allow for interhalogen formation.

  9. Multifold Increases in Turing Pattern Wavelength in the Chlorine Dioxide-Iodine-Malonic Acid Reaction-Diffusion System.

    PubMed

    Gaskins, Delora K; Pruc, Emily E; Epstein, Irving R; Dolnik, Milos

    2016-07-29

    Turing patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction were modified through additions of sodium halide salt solutions. The range of wavelengths obtained is several times larger than in the previously reported literature. Pattern wavelength was observed to significantly increase with sodium bromide or sodium chloride. A transition to a uniform state was found at high halide concentrations. The observed experimental results are qualitatively well reproduced in numerical simulations with the Lengyel-Epstein model with an additional chemically realistic kinetic term to account for the added halide and an adjustment of the activator diffusion rate to allow for interhalogen formation.

  10. Rare event statistics in reaction-diffusion systems.

    PubMed

    Elgart, Vlad; Kamenev, Alex

    2004-10-01

    We present an efficient method to calculate probabilities of large deviations from the typical behavior (rare events) in reaction-diffusion systems. This method is based on a semiclassical treatment of an underlying "quantum" Hamiltonian, encoding the system's evolution. To this end, we formulate the corresponding canonical dynamical system and investigate its phase portrait. This method is presented for a number of pedagogical examples.

  11. Instability of turing patterns in reaction-diffusion-ODE systems.

    PubMed

    Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Karch, Grzegorz; Suzuki, Kanako

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of the pattern formation phenomenon in reaction-diffusion equations coupled with ordinary differential equations. Such systems of equations arise, for example, from modeling of interactions between cellular processes such as cell growth, differentiation or transformation and diffusing signaling factors. We focus on stability analysis of solutions of a prototype model consisting of a single reaction-diffusion equation coupled to an ordinary differential equation. We show that such systems are very different from classical reaction-diffusion models. They exhibit diffusion-driven instability (turing instability) under a condition of autocatalysis of non-diffusing component. However, the same mechanism which destabilizes constant solutions of such models, destabilizes also all continuous spatially heterogeneous stationary solutions, and consequently, there exist no stable Turing patterns in such reaction-diffusion-ODE systems. We provide a rigorous result on the nonlinear instability, which involves the analysis of a continuous spectrum of a linear operator induced by the lack of diffusion in the destabilizing equation. These results are extended to discontinuous patterns for a class of nonlinearities.

  12. Wavefront Propagation for Reaction-Diffusion Systems of PDE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    scaled reaction- diffusion system: C C 1 (u)in R n X (O,cc)uk = cdkAu + - fn u = gk on Rn x 40k Here the constants dk (15kSm), and the functions n m m...m) 3 is a bounded, smooth subset of R n . Under these assumptions there exists a unique smooth solution u€ of the PDE (1.1) , with C u > 0 in Rn x...the Kolmogorov-Petrovskii- Piskunov nonlinearity, discussed in (6]. Our main result, Theorem 1, asserts that under hypotheses (FI) - (F5) uC (x,t

  13. A Discrete Model to Study Reaction-Diffusion-Mechanics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Louis D.; Nash, Martyn P.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM) model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD) processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material). Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects. PMID:21804911

  14. A discrete model to study reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    PubMed

    Weise, Louis D; Nash, Martyn P; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM) model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD) processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material). Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects.

  15. Segmented waves in a reaction-diffusion-convection system.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Federico; Budroni, Marcello A; Marchettini, Nadia; Carballido-Landeira, Jorge

    2012-09-01

    The interaction of traveling waves, with both Marangoni and buoyancy driven flows, can generate an extraordinary rich array of patterns ranging from stationary structures to chaotic waves. However, the inherent complexity of reaction-diffusion-convection (RDC) systems makes the explanation of the patterning mechanisms very difficult, both numerically and experimentally. In this paper, we describe the appearance of segmented waves in a shallow layer of an excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky solution. The segmentation process was found to be dependent both on the depth of the solution and on the excitability of the reaction. We caught the essential features of the system through a RDC model, where the chemical waves were coupled both with surface and bulk fluid motions and we found that by varying the excitability of the reaction, and in turn the wavelength of the chemical fronts, it is possible to create a sort of hydrodynamic resonance structures (corridors), which are responsible for the segmentation process.

  16. Hopping transport in hostile reaction-diffusion systems.

    PubMed

    Missel, Andrew R; Dahmen, Karin A

    2009-02-01

    We investigate transport in a disordered reaction-diffusion model consisting of particles which are allowed to diffuse, compete with one another (2A-->A) , give birth in small areas called "oases" (A-->2A) , and die in the "desert" outside the oases (A-->0) . This model has previously been used to study bacterial populations in the laboratory and is related to a model of plankton populations in the oceans. We first consider the nature of transport between two oases: In the limit of high growth rate, this is effectively a first passage process, and we are able to determine the first passage time probability density function in the limit of large oasis separation. This result is then used along with the theory of hopping conduction in doped semiconductors to estimate the time taken by a population to cross a large system.

  17. Shaping wave patterns in reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löber, Jakob; Martens, Steffen; Engel, Harald

    2014-12-01

    We present a method to control the two-dimensional shape of traveling wave solutions to reaction-diffusion systems, such as, interfaces and excitation pulses. Control signals that realize a pregiven wave shape are determined analytically from nonlinear evolution equation for isoconcentration lines as the perturbed nonlinear phase diffusion equation or the perturbed linear eikonal equation. While the control enforces a desired wave shape perpendicular to the local propagation direction, the wave profile along the propagation direction itself remains almost unaffected. Provided that the one-dimensional wave profile of all state variables and its propagation velocity can be measured experimentally, and the diffusion coefficients of the reacting species are given, the new approach can be applied even if the underlying nonlinear reaction kinetics are unknown.

  18. A fast solver for systems of reaction-diffusion equations.

    SciTech Connect

    Garbey, M.; Kaper, H. G.; Romanyukha, N.

    2001-04-20

    In this paper we present a fast algorithm for the numerical solution of systems of reaction-diffusion equations, {partial_derivative}{sub t} u + a {center_dot} {del}u = {Delta}u + f(x,t,u), and x element of {Omega} contained in R{sup 3}, t > 0. Here, u is a vector-valued function, u triple bond u(x,t) element of R{sup m} is large, and the corresponding system of ODEs, {partial_derivative}{sub t}u = F(x,t,u), is stiff. Typical examples arise in air pollution studies, where a is the given wind field and the nonlinear function F models the atmospheric chemistry. The time integration of Eq. (1) is best handled by the method of characteristics. The problem is thus reduced to designing for the reaction-diffusion part a fast solver that has good stability properties for the given time step and does not require the computation of the full Jacobi matrix. An operator-splitting technique, even a high-order one, combining a fast nonlinear ODE solver with an efficient solver for the diffusion operator is less effective when the reaction term is stiff. In fact, the classical Strang splitting method may underperform a first-order source splitting method. The algorithm we propose in this paper uses an a posteriori filtering technique to stabilize the computation of the diffusion term. The algorithm parallelizes well, because the solution of the large system of ODEs is done pointwise; however, the integration of the chemistry may lead to load-balancing problems. The Tchebycheff acceleration technique proposed in offers an alternative that complements the approach presented here. To facilitate the presentation, we limit the discussion to domains {Omega} that either admit a regular discretization grid or decompose into subdomains that admit regular discretization grids. We describe the algorithm for one-dimensional domains in Section 2 and for multidimensional domains in Section 3. Section 4 briefly outlines future work.

  19. Reaction -Diffusion Systems in Intracellular Molecular Transport and Control

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Siowling; Byrska, Marta; Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana

    2013-01-01

    Chemical reactions make cells work only if the participating chemicals are delivered to desired locations in a timely and precise fashion. While most research to date has focused on the so-called active-transport mechanisms, “passive” diffusion is often equally rapid and is always energetically less costly. Capitalizing on these advantages, cells have developed sophisticated reaction-diffusion (RD) systems that control a wide range of cellular functions – from chemotaxis and cell division, through signaling cascades and oscillations, to cell motility. Despite their apparent diversity, these systems share many common features and are “wired” according to “generic” motifs involving non-linear kinetics, autocatalysis, and feedback loops. Understanding the operation of these complex (bio)chemical systems requires the analysis of pertinent transport-kinetic equations or, at least on a qualitative level, of the characteristic times describing constituent sub-processes. Therefore, in reviewing the manifestations of cellular RD, we also attempt to familiarize the reader with the basic theory of these processes. PMID:20518023

  20. Dichotomous-noise-induced pattern formation in a reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debojyoti; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2013-06-01

    We consider a generic reaction-diffusion system in which one of the parameters is subjected to dichotomous noise by controlling the flow of one of the reacting species in a continuous-flow-stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) -membrane reactor. The linear stability analysis in an extended phase space is carried out by invoking Furutzu-Novikov procedure for exponentially correlated multiplicative noise to derive the instability condition in the plane of the noise parameters (correlation time and strength of the noise). We demonstrate that depending on the correlation time an optimal strength of noise governs the self-organization. Our theoretical analysis is corroborated by numerical simulations on pattern formation in a chlorine-dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system.

  1. Distributed order reaction-diffusion systems associated with Caputo derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, R. K.; Mathai, A. M.; Haubold, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of the solution of an unified fractional reaction-diffusion equation of distributed order associated with the Caputo derivatives as the time-derivative and Riesz-Feller fractional derivative as the space-derivative. The solution is derived by the application of the joint Laplace and Fourier transforms in compact and closed form in terms of the H-function. The results derived are of general nature and include the results investigated earlier by other authors, notably by Mainardi et al. ["The fundamental solution of the space-time fractional diffusion equation," Fractional Calculus Appl. Anal. 4, 153-202 (2001); Mainardi et al. "Fox H-functions in fractional diffusion," J. Comput. Appl. Math. 178, 321-331 (2005)] for the fundamental solution of the space-time fractional equation, including Haubold et al. ["Solutions of reaction-diffusion equations in terms of the H-function," Bull. Astron. Soc. India 35, 681-689 (2007)] and Saxena et al. ["Fractional reaction-diffusion equations," Astrophys. Space Sci. 305, 289-296 (2006a)] for fractional reaction-diffusion equations. The advantage of using the Riesz-Feller derivative lies in the fact that the solution of the fractional reaction-diffusion equation, containing this derivative, includes the fundamental solution for space-time fractional diffusion, which itself is a generalization of fractional diffusion, space-time fraction diffusion, and time-fractional diffusion, see Schneider and Wyss ["Fractional diffusion and wave equations," J. Math. Phys. 30, 134-144 (1989)]. These specialized types of diffusion can be interpreted as spatial probability density functions evolving in time and are expressible in terms of the H-function in compact forms. The convergence conditions for the double series occurring in the solutions are investigated. It is interesting to observe that the double series comes out to be a special case of the Srivastava-Daoust hypergeometric function of two variables

  2. Perturbations and dynamics of reaction-diffusion systems with mass conservation.

    PubMed

    Kuwamura, Masataka; Morita, Yoshihisa

    2015-07-01

    In some reaction-diffusion systems where the total mass of their components is conserved, solutions with initial values near a homogeneous equilibrium converge to a simple localized pattern (spike) after exhibiting Turing-like patterns near the equilibrium for appropriate diffusion coefficients. In this study, we investigate the perturbed reaction-diffusion systems of such conserved systems. We show that a reaction-diffusion model with a globally stable homogeneous equilibrium can exhibit large amplitude Turing-like patterns in the transient dynamics. Moreover, we propose a three-component model, which exhibits an alternating repetition of spatially (almost) homogeneous oscillations and large amplitude Turing-like patterns.

  3. A Simple Demonstration of Convective Effects on Reaction-Diffusion Systems: A Burning Cigarette.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pojman, John A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a demonstration that provides an introduction to nonequilibrium reaction-diffusion systems and the coupling of hydrodynamics to chemical reactions. Experiments that demonstrate autocatalytic behavior that are effected by gravity and convection are included. (KR)

  4. An Integration Factor Method for Stochastic and Stiff Reaction-Diffusion Systems.

    PubMed

    Ta, Catherine; Wang, Dongyong; Nie, Qing

    2015-08-15

    Stochastic effects are often present in the biochemical systems involving reactions and diffusions. When the reactions are stiff, existing numerical methods for stochastic reaction diffusion equations require either very small time steps for any explicit schemes or solving large nonlinear systems at each time step for the implicit schemes. Here we present a class of semi-implicit integration factor methods that treat the diffusion term exactly and reaction implicitly for a system of stochastic reaction-diffusion equations. Our linear stability analysis shows the advantage of such methods for both small and large amplitudes of noise. Direct use of the method to solving several linear and nonlinear stochastic reaction-diffusion equations demonstrates good accuracy, efficiency, and stability properties. This new class of methods, which are easy to implement, will have broader applications in solving stochastic reaction-diffusion equations arising from models in biology and physical sciences.

  5. Stability of position control of traveling waves in reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löber, Jakob

    2014-06-01

    We consider the stability of position control of traveling waves in reaction-diffusion systems as proposed in Löber and Engel [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 148305 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.148305]. Instead of analyzing the controlled reaction-diffusion system, stability is studied on the reduced level of the equation of motion for the position over time of perturbed traveling waves. We find an interval of perturbations of initial conditions for which position control is stable. This interval can be interpreted as a localized region where traveling waves are susceptible to perturbations. For stationary solutions of reaction-diffusion systems with reflection symmetry, this region does not exist. Analytical results are in qualitative agreement with numerical simulations of the controlled Schlögl model.

  6. Nuclemeter: A Reaction-Diffusion Based Method for Quantifying Nucleic Acids Undergoing Enzymatic Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changchun; Sadik, Mohamed M.; Mauk, Michael G.; Edelstein, Paul H.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Gross, Robert; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Real-time amplification and quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences plays a major role in medical and biotechnological applications. In the case of infectious diseases, such as HIV, quantification of the pathogen-load in patient specimens is critical to assess disease progression and effectiveness of drug therapy. Typically, nucleic acid quantification requires expensive instruments, such as real-time PCR machines, which are not appropriate for on-site use and for low-resource settings. This paper describes a simple, low-cost, reaction-diffusion based method for end-point quantification of target nucleic acids undergoing enzymatic amplification. The number of target molecules is inferred from the position of the reaction-diffusion front, analogous to reading temperature in a mercury thermometer. The method was tested for HIV viral load monitoring and performed on par with conventional benchtop methods. The proposed method is suitable for nucleic acid quantification at point of care, compatible with multiplexing and high-throughput processing, and can function instrument-free. PMID:25477046

  7. Solitary travelling auto-waves in fractional reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datsko, Bohdan; Gafiychuk, Vasyl; Podlubny, Igor

    2015-06-01

    In this article we study properties of solitary auto-waves in nonlinear fractional reaction-diffusion systems. As an example, the generalised FitzHugh-Nagumo model with time-fractional derivatives is considered. By a linear stability analysis and computer simulation it is shown that the order of the fractional derivative can substantially change the properties of solitary auto-waves and significantly enrich nonlinear system dynamics. The main properties of solitary travelling wave solutions, including the shape of the waves, the domain of their existence, as well as the parameters of their propagation in fractional reaction-diffusion systems, are investigated.

  8. Scaling of morphogenetic patterns in reaction-diffusion systems.

    PubMed

    Rasolonjanahary, Manan'Iarivo; Vasiev, Bakhtier

    2016-09-07

    Development of multicellular organisms is commonly associated with the response of individual cells to concentrations of chemical substances called morphogens. Concentration fields of morphogens form a basis for biological patterning and ensure its properties including ability to scale with the size of the organism. While mechanisms underlying the formation of morphogen gradients are reasonably well understood, little is known about processes responsible for their scaling. Here, we perform a formal analysis of scaling for chemical patterns forming in continuous systems. We introduce a quantity representing the sensitivity of systems to changes in their size and use it to analyse scaling properties of patterns forming in a few different systems. Particularly, we consider how scaling properties of morphogen gradients forming in diffusion-decay systems depend on boundary conditions and how the scaling can be improved by passive modulation of morphogens or active transport in the system. We also analyse scaling of morphogenetic signal caused by two opposing gradients and consider scaling properties of patterns forming in activator-inhibitor systems. We conclude with a few possible mechanisms which allow scaling of morphogenetic patterns.

  9. Shadow Systems and Attractors in Reaction-Diffusion Equations,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    the shadow system of (1.1), (1.2), we mean the system au/at = DIAu + f(u,¢) (1.3) dt/dt = In1-1 fn g(u(,x), )dx in (I with the boundary condition (1.4...r,O . The functions ut,%t arc supposed t(-) belong to the spaces C(q-rOJX, . C(-r,0],YAa) . The shadow s5 stem is 8u 8t = DIAu + f(ut.z t ) in 0 dz...au/an = 0 , aw/an = 0 in &a We are going to consider this equation as a perturbation of the system au/at = DIAu + f(u,z) (2.4) dz/dt = In ŕ f g(u,z)dx

  10. Optimal Stretching in Advection-Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevins, Thomas D.; Kelley, Douglas H.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate growth of the excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in chaotic, time-varying flows. In slow flows, reacted regions tend to lie near vortex edges, whereas fast flows restrict reacted regions to vortex cores. We show that reacted regions travel toward vortex centers faster as flow speed increases, but nonreactive scalars do not. For either slow or fast flows, reaction is promoted by the same optimal range of the local advective stretching, but stronger stretching causes reaction blowout and can hinder reaction from spreading. We hypothesize that optimal stretching and blowout occur in many advection-diffusion-reaction systems, perhaps creating ecological niches for phytoplankton in the ocean.

  11. Optimal Stretching in Advection-Reaction-Diffusion Systems.

    PubMed

    Nevins, Thomas D; Kelley, Douglas H

    2016-10-14

    We investigate growth of the excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in chaotic, time-varying flows. In slow flows, reacted regions tend to lie near vortex edges, whereas fast flows restrict reacted regions to vortex cores. We show that reacted regions travel toward vortex centers faster as flow speed increases, but nonreactive scalars do not. For either slow or fast flows, reaction is promoted by the same optimal range of the local advective stretching, but stronger stretching causes reaction blowout and can hinder reaction from spreading. We hypothesize that optimal stretching and blowout occur in many advection-diffusion-reaction systems, perhaps creating ecological niches for phytoplankton in the ocean.

  12. Nonlinear stability in reaction-diffusion systems via optimal Lyapunov functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, S.; Mulone, G.; Trovato, M.

    2008-06-01

    We define optimal Lyapunov functions to study nonlinear stability of constant solutions to reaction-diffusion systems. A computable and finite radius of attraction for the initial data is obtained. Applications are given to the well-known Brusselator model and a three-species model for the spatial spread of rabies among foxes.

  13. Robustness of spatial patterns in buffered reaction-diffusion systems and its reciprocity with phase plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Tetsuhiro S.; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2017-03-01

    The robustness of spatial patterns against perturbations is an indispensable property of developmental processes for organisms, which need to adapt to changing environments. Although specific mechanisms for this robustness have been extensively investigated, little is known about a general mechanism for achieving robustness in reaction-diffusion systems. Here, we propose a buffered reaction-diffusion system, in which active states of chemicals mediated by buffer molecules contribute to reactions, and demonstrate that robustness of the pattern wavelength is achieved by the dynamics of the buffer molecule. This robustness is analytically explained as a result of the scaling properties of the buffered system, which also lead to a reciprocal relationship between the wavelength's robustness and the plasticity of the spatial phase upon external perturbations. Finally, we explore the relevance of this reciprocity to biological systems.

  14. Modelling and simulating reaction-diffusion systems using coloured Petri nets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Blätke, Mary-Ann; Heiner, Monika; Yang, Ming

    2014-10-01

    Reaction-diffusion systems often play an important role in systems biology when developmental processes are involved. Traditional methods of modelling and simulating such systems require substantial prior knowledge of mathematics and/or simulation algorithms. Such skills may impose a challenge for biologists, when they are not equally well-trained in mathematics and computer science. Coloured Petri nets as a high-level and graphical language offer an attractive alternative, which is easily approachable. In this paper, we investigate a coloured Petri net framework integrating deterministic, stochastic and hybrid modelling formalisms and corresponding simulation algorithms for the modelling and simulation of reaction-diffusion processes that may be closely coupled with signalling pathways, metabolic reactions and/or gene expression. Such systems often manifest multiscaleness in time, space and/or concentration. We introduce our approach by means of some basic diffusion scenarios, and test it against an established case study, the Brusselator model.

  15. Nuclemeter: A Reaction-Diffusion Column for Quantifying Nucleic Acids Undergoing Enzymatic Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, Haim; Liu, Changchun; Killawala, Chitvan; Sadik, Mohamed; Mauk, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Real-time amplification and quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences plays a major role in many medical and biotechnological applications. In the case of infectious diseases, quantification of the pathogen-load in patient specimens is critical to assessing disease progression, effectiveness of drug therapy, and emergence of drug-resistance. Typically, nucleic acid quantification requires sophisticated and expensive instruments, such as real-time PCR machines, which are not appropriate for on-site use and for low resource settings. We describe a simple, low-cost, reactiondiffusion based method for end-point quantification of target nucleic acids undergoing enzymatic amplification. The number of target molecules is inferred from the position of the reaction-diffusion front, analogous to reading temperature in a mercury thermometer. We model the process with the Fisher Kolmogoroff Petrovskii Piscounoff (FKPP) Equation and compare theoretical predictions with experimental observations. The proposed method is suitable for nucleic acid quantification at the point of care, compatible with multiplexing and high-throughput processing, and can function instrument-free. C.L. was supported by NIH/NIAID K25AI099160; M.S. was supported by the Pennsylvania Ben Franklin Technology Development Authority; C.K. and H.B. were funded, in part, by NIH/NIAID 1R41AI104418-01A1.

  16. Primal-mixed formulations for reaction-diffusion systems on deforming domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Baier, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    We propose a finite element formulation for a coupled elasticity-reaction-diffusion system written in a fully Lagrangian form and governing the spatio-temporal interaction of species inside an elastic, or hyper-elastic body. A primal weak formulation is the baseline model for the reaction-diffusion system written in the deformed domain, and a finite element method with piecewise linear approximations is employed for its spatial discretization. On the other hand, the strain is introduced as mixed variable in the equations of elastodynamics, which in turn acts as coupling field needed to update the diffusion tensor of the modified reaction-diffusion system written in a deformed domain. The discrete mechanical problem yields a mixed finite element scheme based on row-wise Raviart-Thomas elements for stresses, Brezzi-Douglas-Marini elements for displacements, and piecewise constant pressure approximations. The application of the present framework in the study of several coupled biological systems on deforming geometries in two and three spatial dimensions is discussed, and some illustrative examples are provided and extensively analyzed.

  17. Generalized monotone method and numerical approach for coupled reaction diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowmya, M.; Vatsala, Aghalaya S.

    2017-01-01

    Study of coupled reaction diffusion systems are very useful in various branches of science and engineering. In this paper, we provide a methodology to construct the solution for the coupled reaction diffusion systems, with initial and boundary conditions, where the forcing function is the sum of an increasing and decreasing function. It is known that the generalized monotone method coupled with coupled lower and upper solutions yield monotone sequences which converges uniformly and monotonically to coupled minimal and maximal solutions. In addition, the interval of existence is guaranteed by the lower and upper solutions, which are relatively easy to compute. Using the lower and upper solutions as the initial approximation, we develop a method to compute the sequence of coupled lower and upper solutions on the interval or on the desired interval of existence. Further, if the uniqueness conditions are satisfied, the coupled minimal and maximal solutions converge to the unique solution of the reaction diffusion systems. We will provide some numerical results as an application of our numerical methodology.

  18. An adaptive tau-leaping method for stochastic simulations of reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, Jill M. A.; Ilie, Silvana

    2016-03-01

    Stochastic modelling is critical for studying many biochemical processes in a cell, in particular when some reacting species have low population numbers. For many such cellular processes the spatial distribution of the molecular species plays a key role. The evolution of spatially heterogeneous biochemical systems with some species in low amounts is accurately described by the mesoscopic model of the Reaction-Diffusion Master Equation. The Inhomogeneous Stochastic Simulation Algorithm provides an exact strategy to numerically solve this model, but it is computationally very expensive on realistic applications. We propose a novel adaptive time-stepping scheme for the tau-leaping method for approximating the solution of the Reaction-Diffusion Master Equation. This technique combines effective strategies for variable time-stepping with path preservation to reduce the computational cost, while maintaining the desired accuracy. The numerical tests on various examples arising in applications show the improved efficiency achieved by the new adaptive method.

  19. A simplified reaction-diffusion system of chemically amplified resist process modeling for OPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yongfa; Jeongb, Moon-Gyu; Ser, Junghoon; Lee, Sung-Woo; Suh, Chunsuk; Koo, Kyo-Il; Lee, Sooryong; Su, Irene; Zavyalova, Lena; Falch, Brad; Huang, Jason; Schmoeller, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    As semiconductor manufacturing moves to 32nm and 22nm technology nodes with 193nm water immersion lithography, the demand for more accurate OPC modeling is unprecedented to accommodate the diminishing process margin. Among all the challenges, modeling the process of Chemically Amplified Resist (CAR) is a difficult and critical one to overcome. The difficulty lies in the fact that it is an extremely complex physical and chemical process. Although there are well-studied CAR process models, those are usually developed for TCAD rigorous lithography simulators, making them unsuitable for OPC simulation tasks in view of their full-chip capability at an acceptable turn-around time. In our recent endeavors, a simplified reaction-diffusion model capable of full-chip simulation was investigated for simulating the Post-Exposure-Bake (PEB) step in a CAR process. This model uses aerial image intensity and background base concentration as inputs along with a small number of parameters to account for the diffusion and quenching of acid and base in the resist film. It is appropriate for OPC models with regards to speed, accuracy and experimental tuning. Based on wafer measurement data, the parameters can be regressed to optimize model prediction accuracy. This method has been tested to model numerous CAR processes with wafer measurement data sets. Model residual of 1nm RMS and superior resist edge contour predictions have been observed. Analysis has shown that the so-obtained resist models are separable from the effects of optical system, i.e., the calibrated resist model with one illumination condition can be carried to a process with different illumination conditions. It is shown that the simplified CAR system has great potential of being applicable to full-chip OPC simulation.

  20. Stability of Turing-Type Patterns in a Reaction-Diffusion System with an External Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glimm, Tilmann; Zhang, Jianying; Shen, Yun-Qiu

    We investigate the stability of Turing-type patterns in one spatial dimension in a system of reaction-diffusion equations with a term depending linearly on the spatial position. The system is a generic model of two interacting chemical species where production rates are dependent on a linear external gradient. This is motivated by mathematical models in developmental biology. In a previous paper, we found analytic approximations of Turing-like steady state patterns. In the present article, we derive conditions for the stability of these patterns and show bifurcation diagrams in two small parameters related to the slope of the external gradient and the ratio of the diffusion coefficients.

  1. Simulations of pattern dynamics for reaction-diffusion systems via SIMULINK

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Investigation of the nonlinear pattern dynamics of a reaction-diffusion system almost always requires numerical solution of the system’s set of defining differential equations. Traditionally, this would be done by selecting an appropriate differential equation solver from a library of such solvers, then writing computer codes (in a programming language such as C or Matlab) to access the selected solver and display the integrated results as a function of space and time. This “code-based” approach is flexible and powerful, but requires a certain level of programming sophistication. A modern alternative is to use a graphical programming interface such as Simulink to construct a data-flow diagram by assembling and linking appropriate code blocks drawn from a library. The result is a visual representation of the inter-relationships between the state variables whose output can be made completely equivalent to the code-based solution. Results As a tutorial introduction, we first demonstrate application of the Simulink data-flow technique to the classical van der Pol nonlinear oscillator, and compare Matlab and Simulink coding approaches to solving the van der Pol ordinary differential equations. We then show how to introduce space (in one and two dimensions) by solving numerically the partial differential equations for two different reaction-diffusion systems: the well-known Brusselator chemical reactor, and a continuum model for a two-dimensional sheet of human cortex whose neurons are linked by both chemical and electrical (diffusive) synapses. We compare the relative performances of the Matlab and Simulink implementations. Conclusions The pattern simulations by Simulink are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Compared with traditional coding approaches, the Simulink block-diagram paradigm reduces the time and programming burden required to implement a solution for reaction-diffusion systems of equations. Construction of the block

  2. Noisy-flow-induced instability in a reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Shibashis; Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2016-12-01

    We consider a generic reaction-diffusion-advection system where the flow velocity of the advection term is subjected to dichotomous noise with zero mean and Ornstein-Zernike correlation. A general condition for noisy-flow-induced instability is derived in the flow velocity-correlation rate parameter plane. Full numerical simulations on Gierer-Meinhardt model with activator-inhibitor kinetics have been performed to show how noisy differential flow can lead to symmetry breaking of a homogeneous stable state in the presence of noise resulting in traveling waves.

  3. Square Turing patterns in reaction-diffusion systems with coupled layers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jing; Wang, Hongli E-mail: qi@pku.edu.cn; Ouyang, Qi E-mail: qi@pku.edu.cn

    2014-06-15

    Square Turing patterns are usually unstable in reaction-diffusion systems and are rarely observed in corresponding experiments and simulations. We report here an example of spontaneous formation of square Turing patterns with the Lengyel-Epstein model of two coupled layers. The squares are found to be a result of the resonance between two supercritical Turing modes with an appropriate ratio. Besides, the spatiotemporal resonance of Turing modes resembles to the mode-locking phenomenon. Analysis of the general amplitude equations for square patterns reveals that the fixed point corresponding to square Turing patterns is stationary when the parameters adopt appropriate values.

  4. STEPS: Modeling and Simulating Complex Reaction-Diffusion Systems with Python.

    PubMed

    Wils, Stefan; De Schutter, Erik

    2009-01-01

    We describe how the use of the Python language improved the user interface of the program STEPS. STEPS is a simulation platform for modeling and stochastic simulation of coupled reaction-diffusion systems with complex 3-dimensional boundary conditions. Setting up such models is a complicated process that consists of many phases. Initial versions of STEPS relied on a static input format that did not cleanly separate these phases, limiting modelers in how they could control the simulation and becoming increasingly complex as new features and new simulation algorithms were added. We solved all of these problems by tightly integrating STEPS with Python, using SWIG to expose our existing simulation code.

  5. Statistical mechanics of transport in disordered lattices and reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalay, Ziya

    This thesis is the report of a study of several different problems in statistical physics. The first two are about random walks in a disordered lattice, with applications to a biological system, the third is about reaction-diffusion systems, particularly the phenomena of front propagation and pattern formation, and the last is about a special kind of evolving complex networks, the addition-deletion network. The motivation for the first of the two random walk investigations is provided by the diffusion of molecules in cell membranes. A mathematical model is constructed in order to predict molecular diffusion phenomena relating to the so-called compartmentalized view of the cell membrane. The theoretical results are compared with experimental observations available in the literature. The second random walk part in the thesis contains contributions to the analysis of transport in disordered systems via effective medium theory. Calculation of time-dependent transport quantities are presented along with discussion of effects of finite system size, significance of long-range memory functions, and consequences of correlated disorder. The investigation of reaction-diffusion systems that deals with front propagation is concerned with providing a method of studying transient dynamics in such systems whereas the study of pattern formation focuses on determining necessary conditions for such patterns to arise in situations wherein sub- and super-diffusion are present in addition to simple diffusion. In the network study, results are reported on cluster size distribution in addition-deletion networks, on the basis of both numerical and analytic investigations.

  6. A general mechanism for “inexact” phase differences in reaction-diffusion-advection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satnoianu, Razvan A.; Menzinger, Michael

    2002-11-01

    ‘Inexact’ phase differences that may take any value in the range [0, π], between the chemical morphogens diffusing in an embryo, have been proposed [M.A. Russell, Dev. Biol. 108 (1985) 269] to improve the positional information theory [L. Wolpert, J. Theor. Biol. 25 (1969) 1] by encoding this information with higher resolution than that provided by other mechanisms. Reaction-diffusion systems, including Turing systems, show only ‘exact’ phase differences 0 and/or π. We demonstrate here that inexact phase differences arise naturally in reactive flows described by reaction-diffusion-advection equations and illustrate them by the stationary waves in open flows (flow- and diffusion-distributed structures FDS [R.A. Satnoianu, M. Menzinger, Phys. Rev. E 62 (2000) 113; R.A. Satnoianu, P.K. Maini, M. Menzinger, Physica D 160 (2001) 79] and travelling waves in differential-induced flow systems (DIFI) [A.B. Rovinsky, M. Menzinger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70 (1993) 778; R.A. Satnoianu, J.H. Merkin, S.K. Scott, Physica D 124 (1998) 345]. The ability of cells in a developing organism to read phase differences in addition to morphogen concentrations would endow them with a robust mechanism for producing segmentation patterns that is richer, shows higher spatial resolution and is more stable than Turing's and Wolpert's positional information mechanisms.

  7. Spatiotemporal patterns in reaction-diffusion system and in a vibrated granular bed

    SciTech Connect

    Swinney, H.L.; Lee, K.J.; McCormick, W.D.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments on a quasi-two-dimensional reaction-diffusion system reveal transitions from a uniform state to stationary hexagonal, striped, and rhombic spatial patterns. For other reactor conditions lamellae and self-replicating spot patterns are observed. These patterns form in continuously fed thin gel reactors that can be maintained indefinitely in well-defined nonequilibrium states. Reaction-diffusion models with two chemical species yield patterns similar to those observed in the experiments. Pattern formation is also being examined in vertically oscillated thin granular layers (typically 3-30 particle diameters deep). For small acceleration amplitudes, a granular layer is flat, but above a well-defined critical acceleration amplitude, spatial patterns spontaneously form. Disordered time-dependent granular patterns are observed as well as regular patterns of squares, stripes, and hexagons. A one-dimensional model consisting of a completely inelastic ball colliding with a sinusoidally oscillating platform provides a semi-quantitative description of most of the observed bifurcations between the different spatiotemporal regimes.

  8. Transition to Spatio-Temporal Chaos with Increasing Length in the Reaction-Diffusion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trail, Collin; Tomlin, Brett; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard J.

    2003-11-01

    Calculations based up the Reaction-Diffusion model (H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14), 1235 (1991).have proven to be suggestive for a wide variety of pattern forming systems, including Taylor-Couette flow with hourglass geometry(Richard J. Wiener et al), Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997).. Seeking insight to guide experimental investigations, we extend these calculations. Previous calculations indicated that in smaller systems, only temporal chaos, located in a small region, would be observed, while in longer systems instabilities would form over a wide region. Our simulations explore this transition from purely temporal chaos to spatio-temporal chaos as the length of the system is increased.

  9. From the Cover: Segmented spiral waves in a reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanag, Vladimir K.; Epstein, Irving R.

    2003-12-01

    Pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems is often invoked as a mechanism for biological morphogenesis. Patterns in chemical systems typically occur either as propagating waves or as stationary, spatially periodic, Turing structures. The spiral and concentric (target) waves found to date in spatially extended chemical or physical systems are smooth and continuous; only living systems, such as seashells, lichens, pine cones, or flowers, have been shown to demonstrate segmentation of these patterns. Here, we report observations of segmented spiral and target waves in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction dispersed in water nanodroplets of a water-in-oil microemulsion. These highly ordered chemical patterns, consisting of short wave segments regularly separated by gaps, form a link between Turing and trigger wave patterns and narrow the disparity between chemistry and biology. They exhibit aspects of such fundamental biological behavior as self-replication of structural elements and preservation of morphology during evolutionary development from a simpler precursor to a more complex structure.

  10. Specific external forcing of spatiotemporal dynamics in reaction-diffusion systems.

    PubMed

    Lebiedz, Dirk; Brandt-Pollmann, Ulrich

    2005-06-01

    Self-organization behavior and in particular pattern forming spatiotemporal dynamics play an important role in far from equilibrium chemical and biochemical systems. Specific external forcing and control of self-organizing processes might be of great benefit in various applications ranging from technical systems to modern biomedical research. We demonstrate that in a cellular chemotaxis system modeled by one-dimensional reaction-diffusion equations particular forms of spatiotemporal dynamics can be induced and stabilized by controlling spatially distributed influx patterns of a chemical species as a function of time. In our model study we show that a propagating wave with certain shape and velocity and static symmetrical and asymmetrical patterns can be forced and manipulated by numerically computing open-loop optimal influx controls.

  11. Numerical Study of Two-Dimensional Reaction-Diffusion Brusselator System by Differential Quadrature Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, R. C.; Jiwari, Ram

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a rapid, convergent and accurate differential quadrature method (DQM) is employed for numerical study of a two-dimensional reaction-diffusion Brusselator system. In the Brusselator system the reaction terms arise from the mathematical modeling of chemical systems such as in enzymatic reactions, and in plasma and laser physics in multiple coupling between modes. By employing DQM, accurate results can be obtained using fewer grid points in spatial domain for a large value of T = 50. We also found that Chebyshev-Gauss-Lobatto grid points give excellent results in comparison to other grid points such as uniform grid points. Three examples are solved to illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the DQM. Convergence and stability of the method is also examined.

  12. Global existence and asymptotic stability of equilibria to reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rong-Nian; Tang, Zhong Wei

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we study weakly coupled reaction-diffusion systems in unbounded domains of {\\bb R}^2 or {\\bb R}^3 , where the reaction terms are sums of quasimonotone nondecreasing and nonincreasing functions. Such systems are more complicated than those in many previous publications and little is known about them. A comparison principle and global existence, and boundedness theorems for solutions to these systems are established. Sufficient conditions on the nonlinearities, ensuring the positively Ljapunov stability of the zero solution with respect to H2-perturbations, are also obtained. As samples of applications, these results are applied to an autocatalytic chemical model and a concrete problem, whose nonlinearities are nonquasimonotone. Our results are novel. In particular, we present a solution to an open problem posed by Escher and Yin (2005 J. Nonlinear Anal. Theory Methods Appl. 60 1065-84).

  13. Oscillatory pulses and wave trains in a bistable reaction-diffusion system with cross diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemskov, Evgeny P.; Tsyganov, Mikhail A.; Horsthemke, Werner

    2017-01-01

    We study waves with exponentially decaying oscillatory tails in a reaction-diffusion system with linear cross diffusion. To be specific, we consider a piecewise linear approximation of the FitzHugh-Nagumo model, also known as the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol model. We focus on two types of traveling waves, namely solitary pulses that correspond to a homoclinic solution, and sequences of pulses or wave trains, i.e., a periodic solution. The effect of cross diffusion on wave profiles and speed of propagation is analyzed. We find the intriguing result that both pulses and wave trains occur in the bistable cross-diffusive FitzHugh-Nagumo system, whereas only fronts exist in the standard bistable system without cross diffusion.

  14. Resonance in an ensemble of excitable reaction-diffusion systems under spatially periodic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuai; Yao, Chenggui; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhao, Qi

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the resonance collective behavior in an ensemble of excitable reaction-diffusion systems subjected to the weak signal and spatially periodic force. It is demonstrated that the resonance behavior is optimized by intermediate values of the spatial force's amplitude and frequency, which is termed spatially periodic-force-induced resonance. Moreover, we study that how the diffusion coefficient and modulation period influence the response of the system to the external weak signal, and present the mechanism of this resonance phenomenon. These findings show that spatially periodic force as intrinsic diversity might have a constructive role and shed light on our understanding of the collective behaviors of nonlinear systems driven by spatially periodic force in response to the weak signal.

  15. Oscillatory pulses and wave trains in a bistable reaction-diffusion system with cross diffusion.

    PubMed

    Zemskov, Evgeny P; Tsyganov, Mikhail A; Horsthemke, Werner

    2017-01-01

    We study waves with exponentially decaying oscillatory tails in a reaction-diffusion system with linear cross diffusion. To be specific, we consider a piecewise linear approximation of the FitzHugh-Nagumo model, also known as the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol model. We focus on two types of traveling waves, namely solitary pulses that correspond to a homoclinic solution, and sequences of pulses or wave trains, i.e., a periodic solution. The effect of cross diffusion on wave profiles and speed of propagation is analyzed. We find the intriguing result that both pulses and wave trains occur in the bistable cross-diffusive FitzHugh-Nagumo system, whereas only fronts exist in the standard bistable system without cross diffusion.

  16. An observer for an occluded reaction-diffusion system with spatially varying parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Sean; Bollt, Erik M.

    2017-03-01

    Spatially dependent parameters of a two-component chaotic reaction-diffusion partial differential equation (PDE) model describing ocean ecology are observed by sampling a single species. We estimate the model parameters and the other species in the system by autosynchronization, where quantities of interest are evolved according to misfit between model and observations, to only partially observed data. Our motivating example comes from oceanic ecology as viewed by remote sensing data, but where noisy occluded data are realized in the form of cloud cover. We demonstrate a method to learn a large-scale coupled synchronizing system that represents the spatio-temporal dynamics and apply a network approach to analyze manifold stability.

  17. An ADI extrapolated Crank-Nicolson orthogonal spline collocation method for nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Ryan I.; Fairweather, Graeme

    2012-08-01

    An alternating direction implicit (ADI) orthogonal spline collocation (OSC) method is described for the approximate solution of a class of nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems. Its efficacy is demonstrated on the solution of well-known examples of such systems, specifically the Brusselator, Gray-Scott, Gierer-Meinhardt and Schnakenberg models, and comparisons are made with other numerical techniques considered in the literature. The new ADI method is based on an extrapolated Crank-Nicolson OSC method and is algebraically linear. It is efficient, requiring at each time level only O(N) operations where N is the number of unknowns. Moreover, it is shown to produce approximations which are of optimal global accuracy in various norms, and to possess superconvergence properties.

  18. Hybrid stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems with slow and fast dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Strehl, Robert; Ilie, Silvana

    2015-12-21

    In this paper, we present a novel hybrid method to simulate discrete stochastic reaction-diffusion models arising in biochemical signaling pathways. We study moderately stiff systems, for which we can partition each reaction or diffusion channel into either a slow or fast subset, based on its propensity. Numerical approaches missing this distinction are often limited with respect to computational run time or approximation quality. We design an approximate scheme that remedies these pitfalls by using a new blending strategy of the well-established inhomogeneous stochastic simulation algorithm and the tau-leaping simulation method. The advantages of our hybrid simulation algorithm are demonstrated on three benchmarking systems, with special focus on approximation accuracy and efficiency.

  19. Accelerated stochastic and hybrid methods for spatial simulations of reaction diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossinelli, Diego; Bayati, Basil; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2008-01-01

    Spatial distributions characterize the evolution of reaction-diffusion models of several physical, chemical, and biological systems. We present two novel algorithms for the efficient simulation of these models: Spatial τ-Leaping ( Sτ-Leaping), employing a unified acceleration of the stochastic simulation of reaction and diffusion, and Hybrid τ-Leaping ( Hτ-Leaping), combining a deterministic diffusion approximation with a τ-Leaping acceleration of the stochastic reactions. The algorithms are validated by solving Fisher's equation and used to explore the role of the number of particles in pattern formation. The results indicate that the present algorithms have a nearly constant time complexity with respect to the number of events (reaction and diffusion), unlike the exact stochastic simulation algorithm which scales linearly.

  20. Numerical method using cubic B-spline for a strongly coupled reaction-diffusion system.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Muhammad; Majid, Ahmad Abd; Md Ismail, Ahmad Izani; Rashid, Abdur

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a numerical method for the solution of a strongly coupled reaction-diffusion system, with suitable initial and Neumann boundary conditions, by using cubic B-spline collocation scheme on a uniform grid is presented. The scheme is based on the usual finite difference scheme to discretize the time derivative while cubic B-spline is used as an interpolation function in the space dimension. The scheme is shown to be unconditionally stable using the von Neumann method. The accuracy of the proposed scheme is demonstrated by applying it on a test problem. The performance of this scheme is shown by computing L∞ and L2 error norms for different time levels. The numerical results are found to be in good agreement with known exact solutions.

  1. Pattern formation of a reaction-diffusion system with self-consistent flow in the amoeboid organism Physarum plasmodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroyasu; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Ito, Masami

    1999-01-01

    The amoeboid organism, the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum, moves by forming a spatiotemporal pattern of contraction oscillators. This biological system can be regarded as a reaction-diffusion system with spatial interaction via active flow of protoplasmic sol in the cell. We present a reaction-diffusion system with self-consistent flow on the basis of the physiological evidence that the flow is determined by contraction patterns in the plasmodium. Such a coupling of reaction, diffusion, and advection is characteristic of biological systems, and is expected to be related to control mechanisms of amoeboid behavior. Using weakly nonlinear analysis, we show that the envelope dynamics obeys the complex Ginzburg-Landau (CGL) equation when a bifurcation occurs at finite wave number. The flow term affects the nonlinear term of the CGL equation through the critical wave number squared. A physiological role of pattern formation with the flow is discussed.

  2. A Lagrangian particle method for reaction-diffusion systems on deforming surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bergdorf, Michael; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    Reaction-diffusion processes on complex deforming surfaces are fundamental to a number of biological processes ranging from embryonic development to cancer tumor growth and angiogenesis. The simulation of these processes using continuum reaction-diffusion models requires computational methods capable of accurately tracking the geometric deformations and discretizing on them the governing equations. We employ a Lagrangian level-set formulation to capture the deformation of the geometry and use an embedding formulation and an adaptive particle method to discretize both the level-set equations and the corresponding reaction-diffusion. We validate the proposed method and discuss its advantages and drawbacks through simulations of reaction-diffusion equations on complex and deforming geometries.

  3. Bifurcation of Singular Solutions in Reversible Systems and Applications to Reaction-Diffusion Equations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    bifurcation of trajectories connecting saddle points from stationary solutions is studied. As an application, reaction-diffusion models in one space...to reaction- diffusion models are discussed. We obtain solutions, which may be considered *one-dimensional analogues of the patterns of concentric...Oscillating sina,!ar solutions connected with Hopf bifurcations We consider a general chemical reaction model given by an equation 2au _2u (6.1) =F( ,u) + D

  4. Deriving reaction-diffusion models in ecology from interacting particle systems.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, R S; Cosner, C

    2004-02-01

    We use a scaling procedure based on averaging Poisson distributed random variables to derive population level models from local models of interactions between individuals. The procedure is suggested by using the idea of hydrodynamic limits to derive reaction-diffusion models for population interactions from interacting particle systems. The scaling procedure is formal in the sense that we do not address the issue of proving that it converges; instead we focus on methods for computing the results of the scaling or deriving properties of rescaled systems. To that end we treat the scaling procedure as a transform, in analogy with the Laplace or Fourier transform, and derive operational formulas to aid in the computation of rescaled systems or the derivation of their properties. Since the limiting procedure is adapted from work by Durrett and Levin, we refer to the transform as the Durrett-Levin transform. We examine the effects of rescaling in various standard models, including Lotka-Volterra models, Holling type predator-prey models, and ratio-dependent models. The effects of scaling are mostly quantitative in models with smooth interaction terms, but ratio-dependent models are profoundly affected by the scaling. The scaling transforms ratio-dependent terms that are singular at the origin into smooth terms. Removing the singularity at the origin eliminates some of the unique dynamics that can arise in ratio-dependent models.

  5. Parallel solutions for voxel-based simulations of reaction-diffusion systems.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Daniele; Pasquale, Giulia; Clematis, Andrea; Maj, Carlo; Mosca, Ettore; Milanesi, Luciano; Merelli, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness of the pivotal role of noise in biochemical processes and of the effect of molecular crowding on the dynamics of biochemical systems. This necessity has given rise to a strong need for suitable and sophisticated algorithms for the simulation of biological phenomena taking into account both spatial effects and noise. However, the high computational effort characterizing simulation approaches, coupled with the necessity to simulate the models several times to achieve statistically relevant information on the model behaviours, makes such kind of algorithms very time-consuming for studying real systems. So far, different parallelization approaches have been deployed to reduce the computational time required to simulate the temporal dynamics of biochemical systems using stochastic algorithms. In this work we discuss these aspects for the spatial TAU-leaping in crowded compartments (STAUCC) simulator, a voxel-based method for the stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion processes which relies on the Sτ-DPP algorithm. In particular we present how the characteristics of the algorithm can be exploited for an effective parallelization on the present heterogeneous HPC architectures.

  6. Drift and breakup of spiral waves in reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    PubMed

    Panfilov, A V; Keldermann, R H; Nash, M P

    2007-05-08

    Rotating spiral waves organize excitation in various biological, physical, and chemical systems. They underpin a variety of important phenomena, such as cardiac arrhythmias, morphogenesis processes, and spatial patterns in chemical reactions. Important insights into spiral wave dynamics have been obtained from theoretical studies of the reaction-diffusion (RD) partial differential equations. However, most of these studies have ignored the fact that spiral wave rotation is often accompanied by substantial deformations of the medium. Here, we show that joint consideration of the RD equations with the equations of continuum mechanics for tissue deformations (RD-mechanics systems), yield important effects on spiral wave dynamics. We show that deformation can induce the breakup of spiral waves into complex spatiotemporal patterns. We also show that mechanics leads to spiral wave drift throughout the medium approaching dynamical attractors, which are determined by the parameters of the model and the size of the medium. We study mechanisms of these effects and discuss their applicability to the theory of cardiac arrhythmias. Overall, we demonstrate the importance of RD-mechanics systems for mathematics applied to life sciences.

  7. Spatially adaptive stochastic numerical methods for intrinsic fluctuations in reaction-diffusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Atzberger, Paul J.

    2010-05-01

    Stochastic partial differential equations are introduced for the continuum concentration fields of reaction-diffusion systems. The stochastic partial differential equations account for fluctuations arising from the finite number of molecules which diffusively migrate and react. Spatially adaptive stochastic numerical methods are developed for approximation of the stochastic partial differential equations. The methods allow for adaptive meshes with multiple levels of resolution, Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, and domains having geometries with curved boundaries. A key issue addressed by the methods is the formulation of consistent discretizations for the stochastic driving fields at coarse-refined interfaces of the mesh and at boundaries. Methods are also introduced for the efficient generation of the required stochastic driving fields on such meshes. As a demonstration of the methods, investigations are made of the role of fluctuations in a biological model for microorganism direction sensing based on concentration gradients. Also investigated, a mechanism for spatial pattern formation induced by fluctuations. The discretization approaches introduced for SPDEs have the potential to be widely applicable in the development of numerical methods for the study of spatially extended stochastic systems.

  8. Influence of diffusion on the stability of equilibria in a reaction-diffusion system modeling cholera dynamic.

    PubMed

    Capone, Florinda; De Cataldis, Valentina; De Luca, Roberta

    2015-11-01

    A reaction-diffusion system modeling cholera epidemic in a non-homogeneously mixed population is introduced. The interaction between population and toxigenic Vibrio cholerae concentration in contaminated water has been taken into account. The existence of biologically meaningful equilibria is investigated together with their linear and nonlinear stability. Using the data collected during the Haiti cholera epidemic, a numerical simulation is performed.

  9. Numerical simulation and analysis of complex patterns in a two-layer coupled reaction diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Zheng; Bai, Zhan-Guo; Li, Yan; He, Ya-Feng; Zhao, Kun

    2015-04-01

    The resonance interaction between two modes is investigated using a two-layer coupled Brusselator model. When two different wavelength modes satisfy resonance conditions, new modes will appear, and a variety of superlattice patterns can be obtained in a short wavelength mode subsystem. We find that even though the wavenumbers of two Turing modes are fixed, the parameter changes have influences on wave intensity and pattern selection. When a hexagon pattern occurs in the short wavelength mode layer and a stripe pattern appears in the long wavelength mode layer, the Hopf instability may happen in a nonlinearly coupled model, and twinkling-eye hexagon and travelling hexagon patterns will be obtained. The symmetries of patterns resulting from the coupled modes may be different from those of their parents, such as the cluster hexagon pattern and square pattern. With the increase of perturbation and coupling intensity, the nonlinear system will convert between a static pattern and a dynamic pattern when the Turing instability and Hopf instability happen in the nonlinear system. Besides the wavenumber ratio and intensity ratio of the two different wavelength Turing modes, perturbation and coupling intensity play an important role in the pattern formation and selection. According to the simulation results, we find that two modes with different symmetries can also be in the spatial resonance under certain conditions, and complex patterns appear in the two-layer coupled reaction diffusion systems. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11247242), the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51201057), and the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. A2014208171).

  10. Interface proliferation and the growth of labyrinths in a reaction-diffusion system

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.E.; Muraki, D.J.; Petrich, D.M. |

    1996-04-01

    In the bistable regime of the FitzHugh-Nagumo model of reaction-diffusion systems, spatially homogeneous patterns may be nonlinearly unstable to the formation of compact {open_quote}{open_quote}localized states.{close_quote}{close_quote} The formation of space-filling patterns from instabilities of such structures in the context of a nonlocal contour dynamics model for the evolution of boundaries between high and low concentrations of the activator. An earlier heuristic derivation [D. M. Petrich and R. E. Goldstein, Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 72}, 1120 (1994)] is made more systematic by an asymptotic analysis appropriate to the limits of fast inhibition, sharp activator interfaces, and small asymmetry in the bistable minima. The resulting contour dynamics is temporally local, with the normal component of the velocity involving a local contribution linear in the interface curvature and a nonlocal component having the form of a screened Biot-Savart interaction. The amplitude of the nonlocal interaction is set by the activator-inhibitor coupling and controls the {open_quote}{open_quote}lateral inhibition{close_quote}{close_quote} responsible for the destabilization of localized structures such as spots and stripes, and the repulsion of nearby interfaces in the later stages of those instabilities. The phenomenology of pattern formation exhibited by the contour dynamics is consistent with that seen by Lee, McCormick, Ouyang, and Swinney in experiments on the iodide-ferrocyanide-sulfite reaction in a gel reactor. Extensive numerical studies of the underlying partial differential equations are presented and compared in detail with the contour dynamics. The similarity of these phenomena (and their mathematical description) with those observed in amphiphilic monolayers, type I superconductors in the intermediate state, and magnetic fluids in Hele-Shaw geometry are emphasized. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. Stochastic simulation of the spatio-temporal dynamics of reaction-diffusion systems: the case for the bicoid gradient.

    PubMed

    Lecca, Paola; Ihekwaba, Adaoha E C; Dematté, Lorenzo; Priami, Corrado

    2010-11-23

    Reaction-diffusion systems are mathematical models that describe how the concentrations of substances distributed in space change under the influence of local chemical reactions, and diffusion which causes the substances to spread out in space. The classical representation of a reaction-diffusion system is given by semi-linear parabolic partial differential equations, whose solution predicts how diffusion causes the concentration field to change with time. This change is proportional to the diffusion coefficient. If the solute moves in a homogeneous system in thermal equilibrium, the diffusion coefficients are constants that do not depend on the local concentration of solvent and solute. However, in nonhomogeneous and structured media the assumption of constant intracellular diffusion coefficient is not necessarily valid, and, consequently, the diffusion coefficient is a function of the local concentration of solvent and solutes. In this paper we propose a stochastic model of reaction-diffusion systems, in which the diffusion coefficients are function of the local concentration, viscosity and frictional forces. We then describe the software tool Redi (REaction-DIffusion simulator) which we have developed in order to implement this model into a Gillespie-like stochastic simulation algorithm. Finally, we show the ability of our model implemented in the Redi tool to reproduce the observed gradient of the bicoid protein in the Drosophila Melanogaster embryo. With Redi, we were able to simulate with an accuracy of 1% the experimental spatio-temporal dynamics of the bicoid protein, as recorded in time-lapse experiments obtained by direct measurements of transgenic bicoidenhanced green fluorescent protein.

  12. Cluster geometry and survival probability in systems driven by reaction diffusion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windus, Alastair; Jensen, Henrik J.

    2008-11-01

    We consider a reaction-diffusion model incorporating the reactions A→phi, A→2A and 2A→3A. Depending on the relative rates for sexual and asexual reproduction of the quantity A, the model exhibits either a continuous or first-order absorbing phase transition to an extinct state. A tricritical point separates the two phase lines. While we comment on this critical behaviour, the main focus of the paper is on the geometry of the population clusters that form. We observe the different cluster structures that arise at criticality for the three different types of critical behaviour and show that there exists a linear relationship for the survival probability against initial cluster size at the tricritical point only.

  13. A fractional model of a dynamical Brusselator reaction-diffusion system arising in triple collision and enzymatic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jagdev; Rashidi, M. M.; Kumar, Devendra; Swroop, Ram

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we study a dynamical Brusselator reaction-diffusion system arising in triple collision and enzymatic reactions with time fractional Caputo derivative. The present article involves a more generalized effective approach, proposed for the Brusselator system say q-homotopy analysis transform method (q-HATM), providing the family of series solutions with nonlocal generalized effects. The convergence of the q-HATM series solution is adjusted and controlled by auxiliary parameter ℏ and asymptotic parameter n. The numerical results are demonstrated graphically. The outcomes of the study show that the q-HATM is computationally very effective and accurate to analyze nonlinear fractional differential equations.

  14. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in reaction-diffusion systems inside Hele-Shaw cell modified by the action of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Casado, Gustavo; Tofaletti, Lorena; Müller, Darío; D'Onofrio, Alejandro

    2007-03-01

    The influence of temperature in the buoyancy driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability of reaction-diffusion fronts is investigated experimentally in Hele-Shaw cells. The acid autocatalysis of chlorite-tetrathionate reaction coupled to molecular diffusion yields exothermic planar reaction-diffusion fronts separating two miscible reactant and product solutions. The resulting chemical front moves downwards invading the fresh reactants, leaving the products of the reaction behind it. The density of the product solution is higher than the reactant solution; hence, the traveling front is buoyantly unstable and develops density fingers in time (Rayleigh-Taylor instability) when the products are above the reactants. The kinetic constant of a chemical reaction varies due to thermal effects. This may stabilize the exothermic descending front when temperature is increased, so that the mixing zone decreases, modifying the fingering patterns, until it almost disappears. The authors study the influence of the temperature variation on the instability pattern figure observed in the chlorite-tetrathionate reaction for long times, corresponding to the nonlinear regime.

  15. Computer-simulated bone architecture in a simple bone-remodeling model based on a reaction-diffusion system.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Ken-ichi; Wada, Yoshitaka; Takahashi, Akiyuki; Kikuchi, Masanori

    2005-01-01

    Bone is a complex system with functions including those of adaptation and repair. To understand how bone cells can create a structure adapted to the mechanical environment, we propose a simple bone remodeling model based on a reaction-diffusion system influenced by mechanical stress. Two-dimensional bone models were created and subjected to mechanical loads. The conventional finite element method (FEM) was used to calculate stress distribution. A stress-reactive reaction-diffusion model was constructed and used to simulate bone remodeling under mechanical loads. When an external mechanical stress was applied, stimulated bone formation and subsequent activation of bone resorption produced an efficient adaptation of the internal shape of the model bone to a given stress, and demonstrated major structures of trabecular bone seen in the human femoral neck. The degree of adaptation could be controlled by modulating the diffusion constants of hypothetical local factors. We also tried to demonstrate the deformation of bone structure during osteoporosis by the modulation of a parameter affecting the balance between formation and resorption. This simple model gives us an insight into how bone cells can create an architecture adapted to environmental stress, and will serve as a useful tool to understand both physiological and pathological states of bone based on structural information.

  16. A geometric approach in the study of traveling waves for some classes of non-monotone reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenzhang

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we further extend a recently developed method to investigate the existence of traveling waves solutions and their minimum wave speed for non-monotone reaction-diffusion systems. Our approach consists of two steps. First we develop a geometrical shooting argument, with the aid of the theorem of homotopy invariance on the fundamental group, to obtain the positive semi-traveling wave solutions for a large class of reaction-diffusion systems, including the models of predator-prey interaction (for both predator-independent/dependent functional responses), the models of combustion, Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction, SI-type of disease transmission, and the model of biological flow reactor in chemostat. Next, we apply the results obtained from the first step to some models, such as the Beddinton-DeAngelis model and the model of biolocal flow reactor, to show the convergence of these semi-traveling wave solutions to an interior equilibrium point by the construction of a Lyapunov-type function, or the convergence of semi-traveling waves to another boundary equilibrium point by the further analysis of the asymptotical behavior of semi-traveling wave solutions.

  17. New Mechanism of Spiral Wave Initiation in a Reaction-Diffusion-Mechanics System

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Louis D.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    Spiral wave initiation in the heart muscle is a mechanism for the onset of dangerous cardiac arrhythmias. A standard protocol for spiral wave initiation is the application of a stimulus in the refractory tail of a propagating excitation wave, a region that we call the “classical vulnerable zone.” Previous studies of vulnerability to spiral wave initiation did not take the influence of deformation into account, which has been shown to have a substantial effect on the excitation process of cardiomyocytes via the mechano-electrical feedback phenomenon. In this work we study the effect of deformation on the vulnerability of excitable media in a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM) model. The dRDM model combines FitzHugh-Nagumo type equations for cardiac excitation with a discrete mechanical description of a finite-elastic isotropic material (Seth material) to model cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and stretch activated depolarizing current. We show that deformation alters the “classical,” and forms a new vulnerable zone at longer coupling intervals. This mechanically caused vulnerable zone results in a new mechanism of spiral wave initiation, where unidirectional conduction block and rotation directions of the consequently initiated spiral waves are opposite compared to the mechanism of spiral wave initiation due to the “classical vulnerable zone.” We show that this new mechanism of spiral wave initiation can naturally occur in situations that involve wave fronts with curvature, and discuss its relation to supernormal excitability of cardiac tissue. The concept of mechanically induced vulnerability may lead to a better understanding about the onset of dangerous heart arrhythmias via mechano-electrical feedback. PMID:22114667

  18. Simulations of the Reaction-Diffusion System demonstrating the Transition from Purely Temporal to Spatio-Temporal Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Thomas; Hou, Yu; Trail, Collin; Wiener, Richard

    2004-11-01

    The Reaction-Diffusion model (H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14), 1235 (1991).has been applied to a wide variety of pattern forming systems. It correctly predicted a period doubling cascade to chaos in Taylor-Couette flow with hourglass geometry(Richard J. Wiener et al), Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997).. We have conducted a series of such simulations, varying the length of the system. This has enabled us to study the transition from a purely temporal chaos of the formation of new pairs of Taylor Vortices at a single location, to a spatio-temporal chaos of formation across a range of locations. Application to anticipated experiments will be discussed.

  19. Pattern formation in a two-component reaction-diffusion system with delayed processes on a network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Julien; Asllani, Malbor; Fanelli, Duccio; Lauwens, Ben; Carletti, Timoteo

    2016-11-01

    Reaction-diffusion systems with time-delay defined on complex networks have been studied in the framework of the emergence of Turing instabilities. The use of the Lambert W-function allowed us to get explicit analytic conditions for the onset of patterns as a function of the main involved parameters, the time-delay, the network topology and the diffusion coefficients. Depending on these parameters, the analysis predicts whether the system will evolve towards a stationary Turing pattern or rather to a wave pattern associated to a Hopf bifurcation. The possible outcomes of the linear analysis overcome the respective limitations of the single-species case with delay, and that of the classical activator-inhibitor variant without delay. Numerical results gained from the Mimura-Murray model support the theoretical approach.

  20. A singular reaction-diffusion system modelling prey-predator interactions: Invasion and co-extinction waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducrot, A.; Langlais, M.

    We consider a singular reaction-diffusion system arising in modelling prey-predator interactions in a fragile environment. Since the underlying ODEs system exhibits a complex dynamics including possible finite time quenching, one first provides a suitable notion of global travelling wave weak solution. Then our study focusses on the existence of travelling waves solutions for predator invasion in such environments. We devise a regularized problem to prove the existence of travelling wave solutions for predator invasion followed by a possible co-extinction tail for both species. Under suitable assumptions on the diffusion coefficients and on species growth rates we show that travelling wave solutions are actually positive on a half line and identically zero elsewhere, such a property arising for every admissible wave speeds.

  1. Reaction-Diffusion Model Simulations relevant to Modified Taylor-Couette Flow in Systems of Varying Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halmstad, Andrew; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard

    2006-11-01

    Previously, we have observed a period-doubling cascade to chaos in Modified Taylor-Couette Flow with Hourglass Geometry. Such behavior had been predicted by The Reaction-Diffusion model simulations. The chaotic formation of Taylor-Vortex pair formation was restricted to a very narrow band about the waist of the hourglass. It was suggested that with increasing lengths of systems, the chaotic region would expand. We present a battery of simulations to determine the variation of the size of the chaotic region with length, seeking the transition to spatio- temporal chaos. Richard J. Wiener et al, Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997). H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14, 1235 (1991).

  2. Modeling the role of diffusion coefficients on Turing instability in a reaction-diffusion prey-predator system.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, B; Bhattacharyya, R

    2006-02-01

    The paper is concerned with the effect of variable dispersal rates on Turing instability of a non-Lotka-Volterra reaction-diffusion system. In ecological applications, the dispersal rates of different species tends to oscillate in time. This oscillation is modeled by temporal variation in the diffusion coefficient with large as well as small periodicity. The case of large periodicity is analyzed using the theory of Floquet multipliers and that of the small periodicity by using Hill's equation. The effect of such variation on the resulting Turing space is studied. A comparative analysis of the Turing spaces with constant diffusivity and variable diffusivities is performed. Numerical simulations are carried out to support analytical findings.

  3. Robust feed-back control of travelling waves in a class of reaction diffusion distributed biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, Carlos; García, Míriam R.; Banga, Julio R.; Alonso, Antonio A.

    2008-09-01

    Reaction-Diffusion (RD) mechanisms can describe many biological phenomena such as neuron firing in the brain, the heartbeat, cellular organization activities or even biological disorders such as fibrillation. The FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) model is a particular case of RD systems. It is able to capture the key features of many biological processes and since it is relatively simple it has been widely employed during recent years. Some examples of its predictive capabilities include the representation of the normal behavior of some physiological phenomena, related to a travelling plane wave, as well as biological disorders associated with spiral or irregular fronts. The objective of this work is to design a control law that is able to stabilize complex behaviors (travelling plane wave) in biological systems using the FHN model as a case study. Since, in biological systems there usually exists a lack of detailed information on the system structure, our control law will be designed to be robust, i.e., it must be able to reach the predefined reference regardless the presence of structural uncertainties. To this purpose, we will extend some classical results on the finite-dimensional robust control theory to RD systems by means of order reduction techniques, in particular the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition method.

  4. Annular ballast resistor: Symmetry breaking, pinning, and coarsening in a globally constrained reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerson, Baruch; Tsori, Yoav

    1998-01-01

    The wire ballast resistor (BR) is one of the simplest physical systems that exhibit bistability and pattern formation. An annular BR is suggested as a simple two-dimensional extension of the wire BR. The nonuniformity of the electric current density in the annular BR leads to translational symmetry breaking in the temperature domain dynamics. As a result, the steady-state position of the domain wall is ``pinned'' and the system exhibits coarsening. The two-phase steady-state relaxation towards it and coarsening in the annular BR are investigated analytically and numerically.

  5. The multinomial simulation algorithm for discrete stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampoudi, Sotiria; Gillespie, Dan T.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2009-03-01

    The Inhomogeneous Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (ISSA) is a variant of the stochastic simulation algorithm in which the spatially inhomogeneous volume of the system is divided into homogeneous subvolumes, and the chemical reactions in those subvolumes are augmented by diffusive transfers of molecules between adjacent subvolumes. The ISSA can be prohibitively slow when the system is such that diffusive transfers occur much more frequently than chemical reactions. In this paper we present the Multinomial Simulation Algorithm (MSA), which is designed to, on the one hand, outperform the ISSA when diffusive transfer events outnumber reaction events, and on the other, to handle small reactant populations with greater accuracy than deterministic-stochastic hybrid algorithms. The MSA treats reactions in the usual ISSA fashion, but uses appropriately conditioned binomial random variables for representing the net numbers of molecules diffusing from any given subvolume to a neighbor within a prescribed distance. Simulation results illustrate the benefits of the algorithm.

  6. Striped pattern selection by advective reaction-diffusion systems: Resilience of banded vegetation on slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siero, E.; Doelman, A.; Eppinga, M. B.; Rademacher, J. D. M.; Rietkerk, M.; Siteur, K.

    2015-03-01

    For water-limited arid ecosystems, where water distribution and infiltration play a vital role, various models have been set up to explain vegetation patterning. On sloped terrains, vegetation aligned in bands has been observed ubiquitously. In this paper, we consider the appearance, stability, and bifurcations of 2D striped or banded patterns in an arid ecosystem model. We numerically show that the resilience of the vegetation bands is larger on steeper slopes by computing the stability regions (Busse balloons) of striped patterns with respect to 1D and transverse 2D perturbations. This is corroborated by numerical simulations with a slowly decreasing water input parameter. Here, long wavelength striped patterns are unstable against transverse perturbations, which we also rigorously prove on flat ground through an Evans function approach. In addition, we prove a "Squire theorem" for a class of two-component reaction-advection-diffusion systems that includes our model, showing that the onset of pattern formation in 2D is due to 1D instabilities in the direction of advection, which naturally leads to striped patterns.

  7. Measurement of large spiral and target waves in chemical reaction-diffusion-advection systems: turbulent diffusion enhances pattern formation.

    PubMed

    von Kameke, A; Huhn, F; Muñuzuri, A P; Pérez-Muñuzuri, V

    2013-02-22

    In the absence of advection, reaction-diffusion systems are able to organize into spatiotemporal patterns, in particular spiral and target waves. Whenever advection is present that can be parametrized in terms of effective or turbulent diffusion D(*), these patterns should be attainable on a much greater, boosted length scale. However, so far, experimental evidence of these boosted patterns in a turbulent flow was lacking. Here, we report the first experimental observation of boosted target and spiral patterns in an excitable chemical reaction in a quasi-two-dimensional turbulent flow. The wave patterns observed are ~50 times larger than in the case of molecular diffusion only. We vary the turbulent diffusion coefficient D(*) of the flow and find that the fundamental Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piskunov equation, v(f) proportional sqrt[D(*)], for the asymptotic speed of a reactive wave remains valid. However, not all measures of the boosted wave scale with D(*) as expected from molecular diffusion, since the wave fronts turn out to be highly filamentous.

  8. Unstable trigger waves induce various intricate dynamic regimes in a reaction-diffusion system of blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Lobanova, E S; Ataullakhanov, F I

    2003-09-26

    In this work we demonstrate that the unstable trigger waves, connecting stable and unstable spatially uniform steady states, can create intricate dynamic regimes in one-dimensional three-component reaction-diffusion model describing blood clotting. Among the most interesting regimes are the composite and replicating waves running at a constant velocity. The front part of the running composite wave remains constant, while its rear part oscillates in a complex manner. The rear part of the running replicating wave periodically gives rise to new daughter waves, which propagate in the direction opposite the parent wave. The domain of these intricate regimes in parameter space lies in the region of monostability near the region of bistability.

  9. Chaotic flow and the finite-time Lyapunov exponent: Competitive autocatalytic reactions in advection-reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Schlick, Conor P.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate chaotic advection and diffusion in competitive autocatalytic reactions. To study this subject, we use a computationally efficient method for solving advection-reaction-diffusion equations for periodic flows using a mapping method with operator splitting. In competitive autocatalytic reactions, there are two species, B and C, which both react autocatalytically with species A (A +B -->2B and A +C -->2C). If there is initially a small amount of spatially localized B and C and a large amount of A, all three species will be advected by the velocity field, diffuse, and react until A is completely consumed and only B and C remain. We find that the small scale interactions associated with the chaotic velocity field, specifically the local finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs), can accurately predict the final average concentrations of B and C after the reaction is complete. The species, B or C, that starts in the region with the larger FTLE has, with high probability, the larger average concentration at the end of the reaction. If species B and C start in regions having similar FTLEs, their average concentrations at the end of the reaction will also be similar. Funded by NSF Grant CMMI-1000469.

  10. The transition from pH waves to iodine waves in the iodate/sulfite/thiosulfate reaction-diffusion system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qingyu; Xie, Rongyong

    2008-06-02

    Nonlinear spatial temporal behavior of the iodate/thiosulfate/sulfite reaction is investigated both in a stirred and spatially extended media. In accord with the temporal dynamics in the homogeneous media, both propagating fronts and target patterns are achieved in the spatially extended medium. On increasing the iodate concentration the system evolves from exhibiting propagating fronts to circular waves and then shows target patterns and finally the iodine waves. Influences of concentrations of sulfite, thiosulfate and acid on the reaction kinetics and pattern formation are also investigated systematically, and transitions from pH waves to iodine waves can be achieved via adjusting the concentration of the three species. The propagation velocities of pH and iodine waves are understood with the quadratic and cubic autocatalysis of proton and iodide respectively.

  11. Bifurcations and asymptotic behavior of positive steady-states of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Wonlyul

    2016-12-01

    The current paper presents a better understanding of a diffusive enzyme-catalyzed system arising from glycolysis, describing a biochemical reaction in which a substrate is converted into a product with positive feedback and into a branched sink. Through theoretical analysis of the given partial differential system, the existence and nonexistence of nonconstant positive steady states are studied. Moreover, the global bifurcation structure and asymptotic behavior of the solutions are revealed. Our mathematical approach is based on bifurcation theory, index theory, and various elliptic estimates.

  12. Transition from spiral waves to defect-mediated turbulence induced by gradient effects in a reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunxia; Zhang, Hong; Ouyang, Qi; Hu, Bambi; Gunaratne, Gemunu H.

    2003-09-01

    The transition from spiral waves to defect-mediated turbulence was studied in a spatial open reactor using Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. The experimental results show a new mechanism of the transition from spirals to spatiotemporal chaos, in which the gradient effects in the three-dimensional system are essential. The transition scenario consists of two stages: first, the effects of gradients in the third dimension cause a splitting of the spiral tip and a deletion of certain wave segments, generating new wave sources; second, the waves sent by the new wave sources undergo a backfire instability, and the back waves are laterally unstable. As a result, defects are automatically generated and fill all over the system. The result of numerical simulation using the FitzHugh-Nagumo model essentially agrees with the experimental observation.

  13. Crossover from nonclassical to classical chemical kinetics in an initially separated A + B<-->C reaction-diffusion system with arbitrary diffusion constants.

    PubMed

    Sinder, M; Pelleg, J

    2000-05-01

    The asymptotic long-time properties of the reaction front formed in a reversible reaction-diffusion process A + B<-->C with initially separated reactants are investigated. The case of arbitrary nonzero values of the diffusion constants DA, DB, DC of the components A, B, C and the initial concentrations a0 and b0 of A and B is considered. The system is studied in the limit of g-->0, where g is the backward reaction rate constant. In accordance with previous work, the dynamics of the reaction front is described as a crossover between the "irreversible" regime at times t < g-1 and the "reversible" regime at times t > g-1. It is shown that through this crossover the macroscopic properties of the reaction front, such as the global rate of C production, the motion of the reaction zone center, and the concentration profiles of the components outside the reaction front, are unchanged. The concentration profiles of the components inside the reaction zone are described by quasistatic equations. The results of the theoretical consideration are confirmed by computing the mean-field kinetics equations.

  14. Physarum machines: encapsulating reaction-diffusion to compute spanning tree.

    PubMed

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2007-12-01

    The Physarum machine is a biological computing device, which employs plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum as an unconventional computing substrate. A reaction-diffusion computer is a chemical computing device that computes by propagating diffusive or excitation wave fronts. Reaction-diffusion computers, despite being computationally universal machines, are unable to construct certain classes of proximity graphs without the assistance of an external computing device. I demonstrate that the problem can be solved if the reaction-diffusion system is enclosed in a membrane with few 'growth points', sites guiding the pattern propagation. Experimental approximation of spanning trees by P. polycephalum slime mold demonstrates the feasibility of the approach. Findings provided advance theory of reaction-diffusion computation by enriching it with ideas of slime mold computation.

  15. A Lattice Boltzmann Model for Oscillating Reaction-Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Romo, Suemi; Ibañez-Orozco, Oscar; Sosa-Herrera, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    A computational algorithm based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is proposed to model reaction-diffusion systems. In this paper, we focus on how nonlinear chemical oscillators like Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) and the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid (CIMA) reactions can be modeled by LBM and provide with new insight into the nature and applications of oscillating reactions. We use Gaussian pulse initial concentrations of sulfuric acid in different places of a bidimensional reactor and nondiffusive boundary walls. We clearly show how these systems evolve to a chaotic attractor and produce specific pattern images that are portrayed in the reactions trajectory to the corresponding chaotic attractor and can be used in robotic control.

  16. Analysis of Coupled Reaction-Diffusion Equations for RNA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Hohn, Maryann E; Li, Bo; Yang, Weihua

    2015-05-01

    We consider a system of coupled reaction-diffusion equations that models the interaction between multiple types of chemical species, particularly the interaction between one messenger RNA and different types of non-coding microRNAs in biological cells. We construct various modeling systems with different levels of complexity for the reaction, nonlinear diffusion, and coupled reaction and diffusion of the RNA interactions, respectively, with the most complex one being the full coupled reaction-diffusion equations. The simplest system consists of ordinary differential equations (ODE) modeling the chemical reaction. We present a derivation of this system using the chemical master equation and the mean-field approximation, and prove the existence, uniqueness, and linear stability of equilibrium solution of the ODE system. Next, we consider a single, nonlinear diffusion equation for one species that results from the slow diffusion of the others. Using variational techniques, we prove the existence and uniqueness of solution to a boundary-value problem of this nonlinear diffusion equation. Finally, we consider the full system of reaction-diffusion equations, both steady-state and time-dependent. We use the monotone method to construct iteratively upper and lower solutions and show that their respective limits are solutions to the reaction-diffusion system. For the time-dependent system of reaction-diffusion equations, we obtain the existence and uniqueness of global solutions. We also obtain some asymptotic properties of such solutions.

  17. Analysis of Coupled Reaction-Diffusion Equations for RNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hohn, Maryann E.; Li, Bo; Yang, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    We consider a system of coupled reaction-diffusion equations that models the interaction between multiple types of chemical species, particularly the interaction between one messenger RNA and different types of non-coding microRNAs in biological cells. We construct various modeling systems with different levels of complexity for the reaction, nonlinear diffusion, and coupled reaction and diffusion of the RNA interactions, respectively, with the most complex one being the full coupled reaction-diffusion equations. The simplest system consists of ordinary differential equations (ODE) modeling the chemical reaction. We present a derivation of this system using the chemical master equation and the mean-field approximation, and prove the existence, uniqueness, and linear stability of equilibrium solution of the ODE system. Next, we consider a single, nonlinear diffusion equation for one species that results from the slow diffusion of the others. Using variational techniques, we prove the existence and uniqueness of solution to a boundary-value problem of this nonlinear diffusion equation. Finally, we consider the full system of reaction-diffusion equations, both steady-state and time-dependent. We use the monotone method to construct iteratively upper and lower solutions and show that their respective limits are solutions to the reaction-diffusion system. For the time-dependent system of reaction-diffusion equations, we obtain the existence and uniqueness of global solutions. We also obtain some asymptotic properties of such solutions. PMID:25601722

  18. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Otero, Alejandro; Khikhlukha, Danila; Solano-Altamirano, J. M.; Dormido, Raquel; Duro, Natividad

    2016-01-01

    Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD) system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presented is compared with a conventional approach for locating laser spots, and the experimental results indicate that RD-based computation generates reliable and precise solutions. These results confirm the flexibility of the new computational paradigm based on RD systems for addressing problems that can be reduced to a set of geometric operations. PMID:26938537

  19. Laser Spot Detection Based on Reaction Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Otero, Alejandro; Khikhlukha, Danila; Solano-Altamirano, J M; Dormido, Raquel; Duro, Natividad

    2016-03-01

    Center-location of a laser spot is a problem of interest when the laser is used for processing and performing measurements. Measurement quality depends on correctly determining the location of the laser spot. Hence, improving and proposing algorithms for the correct location of the spots are fundamental issues in laser-based measurements. In this paper we introduce a Reaction Diffusion (RD) system as the main computational framework for robustly finding laser spot centers. The method presented is compared with a conventional approach for locating laser spots, and the experimental results indicate that RD-based computation generates reliable and precise solutions. These results confirm the flexibility of the new computational paradigm based on RD systems for addressing problems that can be reduced to a set of geometric operations.

  20. Diffusive instabilities in hyperbolic reaction-diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Zemskov, Evgeny P; Horsthemke, Werner

    2016-03-01

    We investigate two-variable reaction-diffusion systems of the hyperbolic type. A linear stability analysis is performed, and the conditions for diffusion-driven instabilities are derived. Two basic types of eigenvalues, real and complex, are described. Dispersion curves for both types of eigenvalues are plotted and their behavior is analyzed. The real case is related to the Turing instability, and the complex one corresponds to the wave instability. We emphasize the interesting feature that the wave instability in the hyperbolic equations occurs in two-variable systems, whereas in the parabolic case one needs three reaction-diffusion equations.

  1. Simple computation of reaction-diffusion processes on point clouds.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Colin B; Merriman, Barry; Ruuth, Steven J

    2013-06-04

    The study of reaction-diffusion processes is much more complicated on general curved surfaces than on standard Cartesian coordinate spaces. Here we show how to formulate and solve systems of reaction-diffusion equations on surfaces in an extremely simple way, using only the standard Cartesian form of differential operators, and a discrete unorganized point set to represent the surface. Our method decouples surface geometry from the underlying differential operators. As a consequence, it becomes possible to formulate and solve rather general reaction-diffusion equations on general surfaces without having to consider the complexities of differential geometry or sophisticated numerical analysis. To illustrate the generality of the method, computations for surface diffusion, pattern formation, excitable media, and bulk-surface coupling are provided for a variety of complex point cloud surfaces.

  2. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Nonlinear Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Del Razo, Mauricio; Pan, Wenxiao; Qian, Hong; Lin, Guang

    2014-05-30

    The currently existing theory of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is based on the linear fluctuation theory originally developed by Einstein, Onsager, Lax, and others as a phenomenological approach to equilibrium fluctuations in bulk solutions. For mesoscopic reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear chemical reactions among a small number of molecules, a situation often encountered in single-cell biochemistry, it is expected that FCS time correlation functions of a reaction-diffusion system can deviate from the classic results of Elson and Magde [Biopolymers (1974) 13:1-27]. We first discuss this nonlinear effect for reaction systems without diffusion. For nonlinear stochastic reaction-diffusion systems there are no closed solutions; therefore, stochastic Monte-Carlo simulations are carried out. We show that the deviation is small for a simple bimolecular reaction; the most significant deviations occur when the number of molecules is small and of the same order. Extending Delbrück-Gillespie’s theory for stochastic nonlinear reactions with rapidly stirring to reaction-diffusion systems provides a mesoscopic model for chemical and biochemical reactions at nanometric and mesoscopic level such as a single biological cell.

  3. Multiresolution stochastic simulations of reaction-diffusion processes.

    PubMed

    Bayati, Basil; Chatelain, Philippe; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2008-10-21

    Stochastic simulations of reaction-diffusion processes are used extensively for the modeling of complex systems in areas ranging from biology and social sciences to ecosystems and materials processing. These processes often exhibit disparate scales that render their simulation prohibitive even for massive computational resources. The problem is resolved by introducing a novel stochastic multiresolution method that enables the efficient simulation of reaction-diffusion processes as modeled by many-particle systems. The proposed method quantifies and efficiently handles the associated stiffness in simulating the system dynamics and its computational efficiency and accuracy are demonstrated in simulations of a model problem described by the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. The method is general and can be applied to other many-particle models of physical processes.

  4. Programming reaction-diffusion: From theory to micro- and nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Christopher James

    Nature often uses reaction-diffusion(RD) as a means of making structures and materials of unique properties or morphologies on scales from macro- (e.g., stripes in zebras, tigers, and seashells, and formations in trees, agates, and rocks) to microscopic (e.g., cellular growth, chemotaxis and biological waves). However, reaction-diffusion phenomena have not yet been applied in modern materials science and micro-/nanotechnology. In this context, RD systems are particularly promising for micropatterning of surfaces. Unlike conventional micropatterning techniques that modify the properties of the substrate only at the locations to which a modifying agent - be it a chemical or radiation - is delivered, RD can, in principle, evolve chemicals delivered onto a surface into structures of characteristic dimensions significantly smaller than those of the original pattern. In this Dissertation, I describe how reaction-diffusions are programmed and executed via a new micropatterning technique called Wet Stamping to (i) transform microscopic patterns of chemicals delivered onto thin films of dry gelatin into regular arrays of lines of submicrometer thicknesses, multicolor arrays on the micrometer scale, or three-dimensional microstructured surfaces; (ii) modify the properties of a surface by precisely delivering an oxidant to change hydrophilicity or deliver silanes or thiols to build a self-assembling monolayer; or (iii) cut into a metal, glass, or crystal surface by delivery of an etchant to form binary and curvilinear three-dimensional microstructures. This technique has allowed for a fundamental understanding and control of reaction-diffusion processes down to the nanoscale. In addition, this platform has allowed for the development of a range of applications on the micro- and nanoscale, including microlenses, microfluidic devices, and templates for studying cell motility and cancer metastasis.

  5. Reaction-diffusion processes and metapopulation models on duplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Qi; Du, Fang; Yu, Li; Chen, Guanrong

    2013-03-01

    Reaction-diffusion processes, used to model various spatially distributed dynamics such as epidemics, have been studied mostly on regular lattices or complex networks with simplex links that are identical and invariant in transferring different kinds of particles. However, in many self-organized systems, different particles may have their own private channels to keep their purities. Such division of links often significantly influences the underlying reaction-diffusion dynamics and thus needs to be carefully investigated. This article studies a special reaction-diffusion process, named susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) dynamics, given by the reaction steps β→α and α+β→2β, on duplex networks where links are classified into two groups: α and β links used to transfer α and β particles, which, along with the corresponding nodes, consist of an α subnetwork and a β subnetwork, respectively. It is found that the critical point of particle density to sustain reaction activity is independent of the network topology if there is no correlation between the degree sequences of the two subnetworks, and this critical value is suppressed or extended if the two degree sequences are positively or negatively correlated, respectively. Based on the obtained results, it is predicted that epidemic spreading may be promoted on positive correlated traffic networks but may be suppressed on networks with modules composed of different types of diffusion links.

  6. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    SciTech Connect

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-19

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model, and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is on the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  7. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation.

    PubMed

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach, in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is of the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  8. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    DOE PAGES

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-19

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model, and show inmore » two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is on the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.« less

  9. Reaction-diffusion waves of blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Galochkina, Tatiana; Bouchnita, Anass; Kurbatova, Polina; Volpert, Vitaly

    2017-03-24

    One of the main characteristics of blood coagulation is the speed of clot growth. In the current work we consider a mathematical model of the coagulation cascade and study existence, stability and speed of propagation of the reaction-diffusion waves of blood coagulation. We also develop a simplified one-equation model that reflects the main features of the thrombin wave propagation. For this equation we estimate the wave speed analytically. The resulting formulas provide a good approximation for the speed of wave propagation in a more complex model as well as for the experimental data.

  10. Reaction-diffusion in the NEURON simulator.

    PubMed

    McDougal, Robert A; Hines, Michael L; Lytton, William W

    2013-01-01

    In order to support research on the role of cell biological principles (genomics, proteomics, signaling cascades and reaction dynamics) on the dynamics of neuronal response in health and disease, NEURON's Reaction-Diffusion (rxd) module in Python provides specification and simulation for these dynamics, coupled with the electrophysiological dynamics of the cell membrane. Arithmetic operations on species and parameters are overloaded, allowing arbitrary reaction formulas to be specified using Python syntax. These expressions are then transparently compiled into bytecode that uses NumPy for fast vectorized calculations. At each time step, rxd combines NEURON's integrators with SciPy's sparse linear algebra library.

  11. Reaction-diffusion in the NEURON simulator

    PubMed Central

    McDougal, Robert A.; Hines, Michael L.; Lytton, William W.

    2013-01-01

    In order to support research on the role of cell biological principles (genomics, proteomics, signaling cascades and reaction dynamics) on the dynamics of neuronal response in health and disease, NEURON's Reaction-Diffusion (rxd) module in Python provides specification and simulation for these dynamics, coupled with the electrophysiological dynamics of the cell membrane. Arithmetic operations on species and parameters are overloaded, allowing arbitrary reaction formulas to be specified using Python syntax. These expressions are then transparently compiled into bytecode that uses NumPy for fast vectorized calculations. At each time step, rxd combines NEURON's integrators with SciPy's sparse linear algebra library. PMID:24298253

  12. Exact solutions for logistic reaction-diffusion equations in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbridge, P.; Bradshaw-Hajek, B. H.

    2016-08-01

    Reaction-diffusion equations with a nonlinear source have been widely used to model various systems, with particular application to biology. Here, we provide a solution technique for these types of equations in N-dimensions. The nonclassical symmetry method leads to a single relationship between the nonlinear diffusion coefficient and the nonlinear reaction term; the subsequent solutions for the Kirchhoff variable are exponential in time (either growth or decay) and satisfy the linear Helmholtz equation in space. Example solutions are given in two dimensions for particular parameter sets for both quadratic and cubic reaction terms.

  13. Reaction-diffusion optoelectronics based on dispersed semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. V.; Gradova, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    Since many dispersed semiconductors are capable of light energy conversion and possess photocatalytic and luminescent properties, and any discreet light-sensitive medium can be applied for the positional-sensitive light flux registration (similar to pixels and voxels in semiconductor-based image recording), the use of chemically active dispersed semiconductors allows to perform a direct signal / image registration based on light-sensitive reaction-diffusion redox systems without conventional CCD / CMOS devices. The image capturing in this case will correspond to the formation of the metastable dissipative structures in the active medium, with their morphological properties determined by the flux gradient and provided by the corresponding dispersed semiconductor medium sensitivity.

  14. Global solutions to a class of multi-species reaction-diffusion systems with cross-diffusions arising in population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Zijuan; Fu, Shengmao

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, an n-species strongly coupled cooperating diffusive system is considered in a bounded smooth domain, subject to homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions. Employing the method of energy estimates, we obtain some conditions on the diffusion matrix and inter-specific cooperatives to ensure the global existence and uniform boundedness of a nonnegative solution. The globally asymptotical stability of the constant positive steady state is also discussed. As a consequence, all the results hold true for multi-species Lotka-Volterra type competition model and prey-predator model.

  15. Controlling Turbulence in Reaction Diffusion Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    and M. S. Abdelmonem, 1997: The analytic inversion of any finite symmetric tridiagonal matrix , J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 30, 2889-2893. 5 ... matrix A is tridiagonal or cyclic tridiagonal with a dominant diagonal---i.e. the CML employs diffusive nearest neighbor coupling---then symbols...function of onto each site, and by if A an NN × coupling matrix , then the map lattice can be written as ( )tt xHx rr =+1 , where FAH o= . Models

  16. Target Patterns in Reaction-Diffusion Systems,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    new variable xd, the diffusion matrix in (1.1) is just DM and the velocities Vph and v,, in (4.20) and (4.21) are multiplied by C-I/2, Finally except...the (ksr)-’ / factors in (4.4), (4.19), (5.1), and (5.2) are absent in one dimension. However, the analysis for three dimensions hinges on whether (4.2

  17. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics

    DOE PAGES

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2015-02-23

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In thismore » paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. Finally, we show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results.« less

  18. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2015-02-23

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In this paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. Finally, we show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results.

  19. Pointwise asymptotic behavior of modulated periodic reaction-diffusion waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Soyeun

    By working with the periodic resolvent kernel and the Bloch-decomposition, we establish pointwise bounds for the Green function of the linearized equation associated with spatially periodic traveling waves of a system of reaction-diffusion equations. With our linearized estimates together with a nonlinear iteration scheme developed by Johnson-Zumbrun, we obtain Lp-behavior (p⩾1) of a nonlinear solution to a perturbation equation of a reaction-diffusion equation with respect to initial data in L1∩H2 recovering and slightly sharpening results obtained by Schneider using weighted energy and renormalization techniques. We obtain also pointwise nonlinear estimates with respect to two different initial perturbations |u0|⩽E0e/M, |⩽E0 and |u0|⩽E0(1, r>2, |⩽E0 respectively, E0>0 sufficiently small and M>1 sufficiently large, showing that behavior is that of a heat kernel. These pointwise bounds have not been obtained elsewhere, and do not appear to be accessible by previous techniques.

  20. Reaction rates for reaction-diffusion kinetics on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2017-02-01

    The reaction-diffusion master equation is a stochastic model often utilized in the study of biochemical reaction networks in living cells. It is applied when the spatial distribution of molecules is important to the dynamics of the system. A viable approach to resolve the complex geometry of cells accurately is to discretize space with an unstructured mesh. Diffusion is modeled as discrete jumps between nodes on the mesh, and the diffusion jump rates can be obtained through a discretization of the diffusion equation on the mesh. Reactions can occur when molecules occupy the same voxel. In this paper, we develop a method for computing accurate reaction rates between molecules occupying the same voxel in an unstructured mesh. For large voxels, these rates are known to be well approximated by the reaction rates derived by Collins and Kimball, but as the mesh is refined, no analytical expression for the rates exists. We reduce the problem of computing accurate reaction rates to a pure preprocessing step, depending only on the mesh and not on the model parameters, and we devise an efficient numerical scheme to estimate them to high accuracy. We show in several numerical examples that as we refine the mesh, the results obtained with the reaction-diffusion master equation approach those of a more fine-grained Smoluchowski particle-tracking model.

  1. Instabilities and patterns in coupled reaction-diffusion layers.

    PubMed

    Catllá, Anne J; McNamara, Amelia; Topaz, Chad M

    2012-02-01

    We study instabilities and pattern formation in reaction-diffusion layers that are diffusively coupled. For two-layer systems of identical two-component reactions, we analyze the stability of homogeneous steady states by exploiting the block symmetric structure of the linear problem. There are eight possible primary bifurcation scenarios, including a Turing-Turing bifurcation that involves two disparate length scales whose ratio may be tuned via the interlayer coupling. For systems of n-component layers and nonidentical layers, the linear problem's block form allows approximate decomposition into lower-dimensional linear problems if the coupling is sufficiently weak. As an example, we apply these results to a two-layer Brusselator system. The competing length scales engineered within the linear problem are readily apparent in numerical simulations of the full system. Selecting a sqrt[2]:1 length-scale ratio produces an unusual steady square pattern.

  2. Chemical computing with reaction-diffusion processes.

    PubMed

    Gorecki, J; Gizynski, K; Guzowski, J; Gorecka, J N; Garstecki, P; Gruenert, G; Dittrich, P

    2015-07-28

    Chemical reactions are responsible for information processing in living organisms. It is believed that the basic features of biological computing activity are reflected by a reaction-diffusion medium. We illustrate the ideas of chemical information processing considering the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction and its photosensitive variant. The computational universality of information processing is demonstrated. For different methods of information coding constructions of the simplest signal processing devices are described. The function performed by a particular device is determined by the geometrical structure of oscillatory (or of excitable) and non-excitable regions of the medium. In a living organism, the brain is created as a self-grown structure of interacting nonlinear elements and reaches its functionality as the result of learning. We discuss whether such a strategy can be adopted for generation of chemical information processing devices. Recent studies have shown that lipid-covered droplets containing solution of reagents of BZ reaction can be transported by a flowing oil. Therefore, structures of droplets can be spontaneously formed at specific non-equilibrium conditions, for example forced by flows in a microfluidic reactor. We describe how to introduce information to a droplet structure, track the information flow inside it and optimize medium evolution to achieve the maximum reliability. Applications of droplet structures for classification tasks are discussed.

  3. Structural control of reaction-diffusion networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Qi; Du, Fang; Dong, Hui; Yu, Li; Chen, Guanrong

    2011-09-01

    Recent studies revealed that reaction-diffusion (RD) dynamics can be significantly influenced by the structure of the underlying network. In this paper, a framework is established to study a closely related problem, i.e., to control the proportion of active particles in an RD process by adjusting the structure of the underlying diffusion network. Both distributed and centralized rewiring and reweighting control schemes are proposed for unweighted and weighted networks, respectively. Simulations show that the proportion of active particles can indeed be controlled to a certain extent even when the distributed control mechanism is totally random, while quite high precision can be achieved by centralized control schemes. More interestingly, it is found that the reactants in heterogeneous networks have wider controllable ranges than those in homogeneous networks with similar numbers of nodes and links, if only the weights of links are changed with a fixed bound. Therefore, it is believed that heterogeneous networks fit the changeable environment better, which provides another explanation for some common observations on many heterogeneous real-world networks.

  4. Mathematical properties of models of the reaction-diffusion type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccaria, M.; Soliani, G.

    Nonlinear systems of the reaction-diffusion (RD) type, including Gierer-Meinhardt models of autocatalysis, are studied using Lie algebras coming from their prolongation structure. Depending on the form of the functions of the fields characterizing the reactions among them, we consider both quadratic and cubic RD equations. On the basis of the prolongation algebra associated with a given RD model, we distinguish the model as a completely linearizable or a partially linearizable system. In this classification a crucial role is played by the relative sign of the diffusion coefficients, which strongly influence the properties of the system. In correspondence to the above situations, different algebraic characterizations, together with exact and approximate solutions, are found. Interesting examples are the quadratic RD model, which admits an exact solution in terms of the elliptic Weierstrass function, and the cubic Gierer-Meinhardt model, whose prolongation algebra leads to the similitude group in the plane.

  5. [Traveling waves in a piecewise-linear reaction-diffusion model of excitable medium].

    PubMed

    Zemskov, E P; Loskutov, A Iu

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional autowaves (traveling waves) in excitable medium described by a piecewise-linear reaction-diffusion system have been investigated. Two main types of waves have been considered: a single impulse and a periodic sequence of impulses (wave trains). In a two-component system, oscillations appear due to the presence of the second component in the reaction-diffusion system. In a one-component system, oscillations appear owing to external periodic excitation (forcing). Using semianalytical solutions for the wave profile, the shape and velocity of autowaves have been found. It is shown that the dispersion relation for oscillating sequences of impulses has an anomalous character.

  6. Cox process representation and inference for stochastic reaction-diffusion processes.

    PubMed

    Schnoerr, David; Grima, Ramon; Sanguinetti, Guido

    2016-05-25

    Complex behaviour in many systems arises from the stochastic interactions of spatially distributed particles or agents. Stochastic reaction-diffusion processes are widely used to model such behaviour in disciplines ranging from biology to the social sciences, yet they are notoriously difficult to simulate and calibrate to observational data. Here we use ideas from statistical physics and machine learning to provide a solution to the inverse problem of learning a stochastic reaction-diffusion process from data. Our solution relies on a non-trivial connection between stochastic reaction-diffusion processes and spatio-temporal Cox processes, a well-studied class of models from computational statistics. This connection leads to an efficient and flexible algorithm for parameter inference and model selection. Our approach shows excellent accuracy on numeric and real data examples from systems biology and epidemiology. Our work provides both insights into spatio-temporal stochastic systems, and a practical solution to a long-standing problem in computational modelling.

  7. Cox process representation and inference for stochastic reaction-diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnoerr, David; Grima, Ramon; Sanguinetti, Guido

    2016-05-01

    Complex behaviour in many systems arises from the stochastic interactions of spatially distributed particles or agents. Stochastic reaction-diffusion processes are widely used to model such behaviour in disciplines ranging from biology to the social sciences, yet they are notoriously difficult to simulate and calibrate to observational data. Here we use ideas from statistical physics and machine learning to provide a solution to the inverse problem of learning a stochastic reaction-diffusion process from data. Our solution relies on a non-trivial connection between stochastic reaction-diffusion processes and spatio-temporal Cox processes, a well-studied class of models from computational statistics. This connection leads to an efficient and flexible algorithm for parameter inference and model selection. Our approach shows excellent accuracy on numeric and real data examples from systems biology and epidemiology. Our work provides both insights into spatio-temporal stochastic systems, and a practical solution to a long-standing problem in computational modelling.

  8. Guiding brine shrimp through mazes by solving reaction diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Krishma; Fenton, Flavio

    Excitable systems driven by reaction diffusion equations have been shown to not only find solutions to mazes but to also to find the shortest path between the beginning and the end of the maze. In this talk we describe how we can use the Fitzhugh-Nagumo model, a generic model for excitable media, to solve a maze by varying the basin of attraction of its two fixed points. We demonstrate how two dimensional mazes are solved numerically using a Java Applet and then accelerated to run in real time by using graphic processors (GPUs). An application of this work is shown by guiding phototactic brine shrimp through a maze solved by the algorithm. Once the path is obtained, an Arduino directs the shrimp through the maze using lights from LEDs placed at the floor of the Maze. This method running in real time could be eventually used for guiding robots and cars through traffic.

  9. Spatially Periodic Domain Structure in Coupled Reaction--Diffusion Equations for Segment Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu

    2012-02-01

    Segment formation is an important process of pattern formation in the developing vertebrate embryo. The mechanism of such pattern formation is considered to be different from that of Turing instability. We propose reaction--diffusion equations generating traveling pulses and coupled reaction--diffusion equations for two genes that generate a domain structure. Next, we construct a synthetic model for segment formation by combining the coupled reaction--diffusion equations. A spatially periodic domain structure is found in the numerical simulation of the model equation. It is shown that the wavelength of the spatially periodic pattern and the proportion of the sizes of the anterior and posterior domains in each segment can be controlled by adjusting some system parameters.

  10. Field theory of propagating reaction-diffusion fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero, C.

    2004-10-01

    The problem of velocity selection of reaction-diffusion fronts has been widely investigated. While the mean-field limit results are well known theoretically, there is a lack of analytic progress in those cases in which fluctuations are to be taken into account. Here, we construct an analytic theory connecting the first principles of the reaction-diffusion process to an effective equation of motion via field-theoretic arguments, and we arrive at results already confirmed by numerical simulations.

  11. Reaction diffusion Voronoi diagrams: from sensors data to computing.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Otero, Alejandro; Faigl, Jan; Dormido, Raquel; Duro, Natividad

    2015-05-29

    In this paper, a new method to solve computational problems using reaction diffusion (RD) systems is presented. The novelty relies on the use of a model configuration that tailors its spatiotemporal dynamics to develop Voronoi diagrams (VD) as a part of the system's natural evolution. The proposed framework is deployed in a solution of related robotic problems, where the generalized VD are used to identify topological places in a grid map of the environment that is created from sensor measurements. The ability of the RD-based computation to integrate external information, like a grid map representing the environment in the model computational grid, permits a direct integration of sensor data into the model dynamics. The experimental results indicate that this method exhibits significantly less sensitivity to noisy data than the standard algorithms for determining VD in a grid. In addition, previous drawbacks of the computational algorithms based on RD models, like the generation of volatile solutions by means of excitable waves, are now overcome by final stable states.

  12. A reaction-diffusion model for long bones growth.

    PubMed

    Garzón-Alvarado, D A; García-Aznar, J M; Doblaré, M

    2009-10-01

    Bone development is characterized by differentiation and growth of chondrocytes from the proliferation zone to the hypertrophying one. These two cellular processes are controlled by a complex signalling regulatory loop between different biochemical signals, whose production depends on the current cell density, constituting a coupled cell-chemical system. In this work, a mathematical model of the process of early bone growth is presented, extending and generalizing other earlier approaches on the same topic. A reaction-diffusion regulatory loop between two chemical factors: parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) and Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is hypothesized, where PTHrP is activated by Ihh and inhibits Ihh production. Chondrocytes proliferation and hypertrophy are described by means of population equations being both regulated by the PTHrP and Ihh concentrations. In the initial stage of bone growth, these two cellular proceses are considered to be directionally dependent, modelling the well known column cell formation, characteristic of endochondral ossification. This coupled set of equations is solved within a finite element framework, getting an estimation of the chondrocytes spatial distribution, growth of the diaphysis and formation of the epiphysis of a long bone. The results obtained are qualitatively similar to the actual physiological ones and quantitatively close to some available experimental data. Finally, this extended approach allows finding important relations between the model parameters to get stability of the physiological process and getting additional insight on the spatial and directional distribution of cells and paracrine factors.

  13. Stochastic reaction-diffusion algorithms for macromolecular crowding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturrock, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Compartment-based (lattice-based) reaction-diffusion algorithms are often used for studying complex stochastic spatio-temporal processes inside cells. In this paper the influence of macromolecular crowding on stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations is investigated. Reaction-diffusion processes are considered on two different kinds of compartmental lattice, a cubic lattice and a hexagonal close packed lattice, and solved using two different algorithms, the stochastic simulation algorithm and the spatiocyte algorithm (Arjunan and Tomita 2010 Syst. Synth. Biol. 4, 35-53). Obstacles (modelling macromolecular crowding) are shown to have substantial effects on the mean squared displacement and average number of molecules in the domain but the nature of these effects is dependent on the choice of lattice, with the cubic lattice being more susceptible to the effects of the obstacles. Finally, improvements for both algorithms are presented.

  14. Adaptive mesh refinement for stochastic reaction-diffusion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bayati, Basil; Chatelain, Philippe; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2011-01-01

    We present an algorithm for adaptive mesh refinement applied to mesoscopic stochastic simulations of spatially evolving reaction-diffusion processes. The transition rates for the diffusion process are derived on adaptive, locally refined structured meshes. Convergence of the diffusion process is presented and the fluctuations of the stochastic process are verified. Furthermore, a refinement criterion is proposed for the evolution of the adaptive mesh. The method is validated in simulations of reaction-diffusion processes as described by the Fisher-Kolmogorov and Gray-Scott equations.

  15. Time-delayed reaction-diffusion fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isern, Neus; Fort, Joaquim

    2009-11-01

    A time-delayed second-order approximation for the front speed in reaction-dispersion systems was obtained by Fort and Méndez [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 867 (1999)]. Here we show that taking proper care of the effect of the time delay on the reactive process yields a different evolution equation and, therefore, an alternate equation for the front speed. We apply the new equation to the Neolithic transition. For this application the new equation yields speeds about 10% slower than the previous one.

  16. Effects of spatial and temporal noise on a cubic-autocatalytic reaction-diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Jean-Sébastien; Hochberg, David; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2017-03-01

    We characterize the influence that external noise, with both spatial and temporal correlations, has on the scale dependence of the reaction parameters of a cubic autocatalytic reaction diffusion (CARD) system. Interpreting the CARD model as a primitive reaction scheme for a living system, the results indicate that power-law correlations in environmental fluctuations can either decrease or increase the rates of nutrient decay and the rate of autocatalysis (replication) on small spatial and temporal scales.

  17. The spatiotemporal master equation: Approximation of reaction-diffusion dynamics via Markov state modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Stefanie; Schütte, Christof

    2016-12-01

    Accurate modeling and numerical simulation of reaction kinetics is a topic of steady interest. We consider the spatiotemporal chemical master equation (ST-CME) as a model for stochastic reaction-diffusion systems that exhibit properties of metastability. The space of motion is decomposed into metastable compartments, and diffusive motion is approximated by jumps between these compartments. Treating these jumps as first-order reactions, simulation of the resulting stochastic system is possible by the Gillespie method. We present the theory of Markov state models as a theoretical foundation of this intuitive approach. By means of Markov state modeling, both the number and shape of compartments and the transition rates between them can be determined. We consider the ST-CME for two reaction-diffusion systems and compare it to more detailed models. Moreover, a rigorous formal justification of the ST-CME by Galerkin projection methods is presented.

  18. Parallel STEPS: Large Scale Stochastic Spatial Reaction-Diffusion Simulation with High Performance Computers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiliang; De Schutter, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Stochastic, spatial reaction-diffusion simulations have been widely used in systems biology and computational neuroscience. However, the increasing scale and complexity of models and morphologies have exceeded the capacity of any serial implementation. This led to the development of parallel solutions that benefit from the boost in performance of modern supercomputers. In this paper, we describe an MPI-based, parallel operator-splitting implementation for stochastic spatial reaction-diffusion simulations with irregular tetrahedral meshes. The performance of our implementation is first examined and analyzed with simulations of a simple model. We then demonstrate its application to real-world research by simulating the reaction-diffusion components of a published calcium burst model in both Purkinje neuron sub-branch and full dendrite morphologies. Simulation results indicate that our implementation is capable of achieving super-linear speedup for balanced loading simulations with reasonable molecule density and mesh quality. In the best scenario, a parallel simulation with 2,000 processes runs more than 3,600 times faster than its serial SSA counterpart, and achieves more than 20-fold speedup relative to parallel simulation with 100 processes. In a more realistic scenario with dynamic calcium influx and data recording, the parallel simulation with 1,000 processes and no load balancing is still 500 times faster than the conventional serial SSA simulation.

  19. Parallel STEPS: Large Scale Stochastic Spatial Reaction-Diffusion Simulation with High Performance Computers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiliang; De Schutter, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Stochastic, spatial reaction-diffusion simulations have been widely used in systems biology and computational neuroscience. However, the increasing scale and complexity of models and morphologies have exceeded the capacity of any serial implementation. This led to the development of parallel solutions that benefit from the boost in performance of modern supercomputers. In this paper, we describe an MPI-based, parallel operator-splitting implementation for stochastic spatial reaction-diffusion simulations with irregular tetrahedral meshes. The performance of our implementation is first examined and analyzed with simulations of a simple model. We then demonstrate its application to real-world research by simulating the reaction-diffusion components of a published calcium burst model in both Purkinje neuron sub-branch and full dendrite morphologies. Simulation results indicate that our implementation is capable of achieving super-linear speedup for balanced loading simulations with reasonable molecule density and mesh quality. In the best scenario, a parallel simulation with 2,000 processes runs more than 3,600 times faster than its serial SSA counterpart, and achieves more than 20-fold speedup relative to parallel simulation with 100 processes. In a more realistic scenario with dynamic calcium influx and data recording, the parallel simulation with 1,000 processes and no load balancing is still 500 times faster than the conventional serial SSA simulation. PMID:28239346

  20. Dynamics of reaction-diffusion patterns controlled by asymmetric nonlocal coupling as a limiting case of differential advection.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Julien; Alonso, Sergio; Bär, Markus; Schöll, Eckehard

    2014-05-01

    A one-component bistable reaction-diffusion system with asymmetric nonlocal coupling is derived as a limiting case of a two-component activator-inhibitor reaction-diffusion model with differential advection. The effects of asymmetric nonlocal couplings in such a bistable reaction-diffusion system are then compared to the previously studied case of a system with symmetric nonlocal coupling. We carry out a linear stability analysis of the spatially homogeneous steady states of the model and numerical simulations of the model to show how the asymmetric nonlocal coupling controls and alters the steady states and the front dynamics in the system. In a second step, a third fast reaction-diffusion equation is included which induces the formation of more complex patterns. A linear stability analysis predicts traveling waves for asymmetric nonlocal coupling, in contrast to a stationary Turing patterns for a system with symmetric nonlocal coupling. These findings are verified by direct numerical integration of the full equations with nonlocal coupling.

  1. Reaction-diffusion-branching models of stock price fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei-Han; Tian, Guang-Shan

    Several models of stock trading (Bak et al., Physica A 246 (1997) 430.) are analyzed in analogy with one-dimensional, two-species reaction-diffusion-branching processes. Using heuristic and scaling arguments, we show that the short-time market price variation is subdiffusive with a Hurst exponent H=1/4. Biased diffusion towards the market price and blind-eyed copying lead to crossovers to the empirically observed random-walk behavior ( H=1/2) at long times. The calculated crossover forms and diffusion constants are shown to agree well with simulation data.

  2. Reaction-diffusion patterns: From observations in halogene chemistry to a test for implication in mitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulos, E.; Hunding, A.; Boissonade, J.; de Kepper, P.

    Since the seminal paper "The chemical basis of morphogenesis" by Alan Turing, the temporal and spatial self-organization phenomena produced in chemically reacting and diffusing systems are often thought as paradigms for biological development. The basic theoretical principles on which the development of stationary concentration patterns (Turing structures) rely on are briefly presented. We review different aspects of our contribution to the experimental observation of reaction-diffusion patterns in iodine-oxychlorine systems. The experimental techniques are emphasized. Phase diagrams gathering different standing and travelling patterns are presented, analyzed and modeled. A special attention is also given to some peculiar pattern growth dynamics (spot division, finger splitting).

  3. A Reaction-Diffusion Model of ROS-Induced ROS Release in a Mitochondrial Network

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lufang; Aon, Miguel A.; Almas, Tabish; Cortassa, Sonia; Winslow, Raimond L.; O'Rourke, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Loss of mitochondrial function is a fundamental determinant of cell injury and death. In heart cells under metabolic stress, we have previously described how the abrupt collapse or oscillation of the mitochondrial energy state is synchronized across the mitochondrial network by local interactions dependent upon reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we develop a mathematical model of ROS-induced ROS release (RIRR) based on reaction-diffusion (RD-RIRR) in one- and two-dimensional mitochondrial networks. The nodes of the RD-RIRR network are comprised of models of individual mitochondria that include a mechanism of ROS-dependent oscillation based on the interplay between ROS production, transport, and scavenging; and incorporating the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and Ca2+ handling. Local mitochondrial interaction is mediated by superoxide (O2 .−) diffusion and the O2 .−-dependent activation of an inner membrane anion channel (IMAC). In a 2D network composed of 500 mitochondria, model simulations reveal ΔΨm depolarization waves similar to those observed when isolated guinea pig cardiomyocytes are subjected to a localized laser-flash or antioxidant depletion. The sensitivity of the propagation rate of the depolarization wave to O2.− diffusion, production, and scavenging in the reaction-diffusion model is similar to that observed experimentally. In addition, we present novel experimental evidence, obtained in permeabilized cardiomyocytes, confirming that ΔΨm depolarization is mediated specifically by O2 .−. The present work demonstrates that the observed emergent macroscopic properties of the mitochondrial network can be reproduced in a reaction-diffusion model of RIRR. Moreover, the findings have uncovered a novel aspect of the synchronization mechanism, which is that clusters of mitochondria that are oscillating can entrain mitochondria that would otherwise display stable dynamics. The work identifies the fundamental mechanisms

  4. Turing patterns in a reaction-diffusion model with the Degn-Harrison reaction scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shanbing; Wu, Jianhua; Dong, Yaying

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we consider a reaction-diffusion model with Degn-Harrison reaction scheme. Some fundamental analytic properties of nonconstant positive solutions are first investigated. We next study the stability of constant steady-state solution to both ODE and PDE models. Our result also indicates that if either the size of the reactor or the effective diffusion rate is large enough, then the system does not admit nonconstant positive solutions. Finally, we establish the global structure of steady-state bifurcations from simple eigenvalues by bifurcation theory and the local structure of the steady-state bifurcations from double eigenvalues by the techniques of space decomposition and implicit function theorem.

  5. On a free boundary problem for a reaction-diffusion-advection logistic model in heterogeneous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monobe, Harunori; Wu, Chang-Hong

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate a reaction-diffusion-advection equation with a free boundary which models the spreading of an invasive species in one-dimensional heterogeneous environments. We assume that the species has a tendency to move upward along the resource gradient in addition to random dispersal, and the spreading mechanism of species is determined by a Stefan-type condition. Investigating the sign of the principal eigenvalue of the associated linearized eigenvalue problem, under certain conditions we obtain the sharp criteria for spreading and vanishing via system parameters. Also, we establish the long-time behavior of the solution and the asymptotic spreading speed. Finally, some biological implications are discussed.

  6. Exact Solutions of Coupled Multispecies Linear Reaction-Diffusion Equations on a Uniformly Growing Domain.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Matthew J; Sharp, Jesse A; Morrow, Liam C; Baker, Ruth E

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic development involves diffusion and proliferation of cells, as well as diffusion and reaction of molecules, within growing tissues. Mathematical models of these processes often involve reaction-diffusion equations on growing domains that have been primarily studied using approximate numerical solutions. Recently, we have shown how to obtain an exact solution to a single, uncoupled, linear reaction-diffusion equation on a growing domain, 0 < x < L(t), where L(t) is the domain length. The present work is an extension of our previous study, and we illustrate how to solve a system of coupled reaction-diffusion equations on a growing domain. This system of equations can be used to study the spatial and temporal distributions of different generations of cells within a population that diffuses and proliferates within a growing tissue. The exact solution is obtained by applying an uncoupling transformation, and the uncoupled equations are solved separately before applying the inverse uncoupling transformation to give the coupled solution. We present several example calculations to illustrate different types of behaviour. The first example calculation corresponds to a situation where the initially-confined population diffuses sufficiently slowly that it is unable to reach the moving boundary at x = L(t). In contrast, the second example calculation corresponds to a situation where the initially-confined population is able to overcome the domain growth and reach the moving boundary at x = L(t). In its basic format, the uncoupling transformation at first appears to be restricted to deal only with the case where each generation of cells has a distinct proliferation rate. However, we also demonstrate how the uncoupling transformation can be used when each generation has the same proliferation rate by evaluating the exact solutions as an appropriate limit.

  7. Breakdown of the reaction-diffusion master equation with nonelementary rates.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen; Grima, Ramon

    2016-05-01

    The chemical master equation (CME) is the exact mathematical formulation of chemical reactions occurring in a dilute and well-mixed volume. The reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a stochastic description of reaction-diffusion processes on a spatial lattice, assuming well mixing only on the length scale of the lattice. It is clear that, for the sake of consistency, the solution of the RDME of a chemical system should converge to the solution of the CME of the same system in the limit of fast diffusion: Indeed, this has been tacitly assumed in most literature concerning the RDME. We show that, in the limit of fast diffusion, the RDME indeed converges to a master equation but not necessarily the CME. We introduce a class of propensity functions, such that if the RDME has propensities exclusively of this class, then the RDME converges to the CME of the same system, whereas if the RDME has propensities not in this class, then convergence is not guaranteed. These are revealed to be elementary and nonelementary propensities, respectively. We also show that independent of the type of propensity, the RDME converges to the CME in the simultaneous limit of fast diffusion and large volumes. We illustrate our results with some simple example systems and argue that the RDME cannot generally be an accurate description of systems with nonelementary rates.

  8. Studies of the accuracy of time integration methods for reaction-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropp, David L.; Shadid, John N.; Ober, Curtis C.

    2004-03-01

    In this study we present numerical experiments of time integration methods applied to systems of reaction-diffusion equations. Our main interest is in evaluating the relative accuracy and asymptotic order of accuracy of the methods on problems which exhibit an approximate balance between the competing component time scales. Nearly balanced systems can produce a significant coupling of the physical mechanisms and introduce a slow dynamical time scale of interest. These problems provide a challenging test for this evaluation and tend to reveal subtle differences between the various methods. The methods we consider include first- and second-order semi-implicit, fully implicit, and operator-splitting techniques. The test problems include a prototype propagating nonlinear reaction-diffusion wave, a non-equilibrium radiation-diffusion system, a Brusselator chemical dynamics system and a blow-up example. In this evaluation we demonstrate a "split personality" for the operator-splitting methods that we consider. While operator-splitting methods often obtain very good accuracy, they can also manifest a serious degradation in accuracy due to stability problems.

  9. Cellular Automata for Spatiotemporal Pattern Formation from Reaction-Diffusion Partial Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Shousuke; Yamazaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Ultradiscrete equations are derived from a set of reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, and cellular automaton rules are obtained on the basis of the ultradiscrete equations. Some rules reproduce the dynamical properties of the original reaction-diffusion equations, namely, bistability and pulse annihilation. Furthermore, other rules bring about soliton-like preservation and periodic pulse generation with a pacemaker, which are not obtained from the original reaction-diffusion equations.

  10. A deterministic particle method for one-dimensional reaction-diffusion equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascagni, Michael

    1995-01-01

    We derive a deterministic particle method for the solution of nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations in one spatial dimension. This deterministic method is an analog of a Monte Carlo method for the solution of these problems that has been previously investigated by the author. The deterministic method leads to the consideration of a system of ordinary differential equations for the positions of suitably defined particles. We then consider the time explicit and implicit methods for this system of ordinary differential equations and we study a Picard and Newton iteration for the solution of the implicit system. Next we solve numerically this system and study the discretization error both analytically and numerically. Numerical computation shows that this deterministic method is automatically adaptive to large gradients in the solution.

  11. Numerical bifurcation diagram for the two-dimensional boundary-fed chlorine-dioxide-iodine-malonic-acid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setayeshgar, S.; Cross, M. C.

    1999-04-01

    We present a numerical solution of the chlorine-dioxide-iodine-malonic-acid reaction-diffusion system in two dimensions in a boundary-fed system using a realistic model. The bifurcation diagram for the transition from nonsymmetry-breaking structures along boundary feed gradients to transverse symmetry-breaking patterns in a single layer is numerically determined. We find this transition to be discontinuous. We make a connection with earlier results and discuss prospects for future work.

  12. A Reaction-Diffusion Model of Cholinergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Lansdell, Benjamin; Ford, Kevin; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Prior to receiving visual stimuli, spontaneous, correlated activity in the retina, called retinal waves, drives activity-dependent developmental programs. Early-stage waves mediated by acetylcholine (ACh) manifest as slow, spreading bursts of action potentials. They are believed to be initiated by the spontaneous firing of Starburst Amacrine Cells (SACs), whose dense, recurrent connectivity then propagates this activity laterally. Their inter-wave interval and shifting wave boundaries are the result of the slow after-hyperpolarization of the SACs creating an evolving mosaic of recruitable and refractory cells, which can and cannot participate in waves, respectively. Recent evidence suggests that cholinergic waves may be modulated by the extracellular concentration of ACh. Here, we construct a simplified, biophysically consistent, reaction-diffusion model of cholinergic retinal waves capable of recapitulating wave dynamics observed in mice retina recordings. The dense, recurrent connectivity of SACs is modeled through local, excitatory coupling occurring via the volume release and diffusion of ACh. In addition to simulation, we are thus able to use non-linear wave theory to connect wave features to underlying physiological parameters, making the model useful in determining appropriate pharmacological manipulations to experimentally produce waves of a prescribed spatiotemporal character. The model is used to determine how ACh mediated connectivity may modulate wave activity, and how parameters such as the spontaneous activation rate and sAHP refractory period contribute to critical wave size variability. PMID:25474327

  13. Reaction Diffusion Modeling of Calcium Dynamics with Realistic ER Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Means, Shawn; Smith, Alexander J.; Shepherd, Jason; Shadid, John; Fowler, John; Wojcikiewicz, Richard J. H.; Mazel, Tomas; Smith, Gregory D.; Wilson, Bridget S.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a finite-element model of mast cell calcium dynamics that incorporates the endoplasmic reticulum's complex geometry. The model is built upon a three-dimensional reconstruction of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) from an electron tomographic tilt series. Tetrahedral meshes provide volumetric representations of the ER lumen, ER membrane, cytoplasm, and plasma membrane. The reaction-diffusion model simultaneously tracks changes in cytoplasmic and ER intraluminal calcium concentrations and includes luminal and cytoplasmic protein buffers. Transport fluxes via PMCA, SERCA, ER leakage, and Type II IP3 receptors are also represented. Unique features of the model include stochastic behavior of IP3 receptor calcium channels and comparisons of channel open times when diffusely distributed or aggregated in clusters on the ER surface. Simulations show that IP3R channels in close proximity modulate activity of their neighbors through local Ca2+ feedback effects. Cytoplasmic calcium levels rise higher, and ER luminal calcium concentrations drop lower, after IP3-mediated release from receptors in the diffuse configuration. Simulation results also suggest that the buffering capacity of the ER, and not restricted diffusion, is the predominant factor influencing average luminal calcium concentrations. PMID:16617072

  14. Spatiotemporal patterns in a reaction-diffusion model with the Degn-Harrison reaction scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Rui; Yi, Feng-qi; Zhao, Xiao-qiang

    Spatial and temporal patterns generated in ecological and chemical systems have become a central object of research in recent decades. In this work, we are concerned with a reaction-diffusion model with the Degn-Harrison reaction scheme, which accounts for the qualitative feature of the respiratory process in a Klebsiella aerogenes bacterial culture. We study the global stability of the constant steady state, existence and nonexistence of nonconstant steady states as well as the Hopf and steady state bifurcations. In particular, our results show the existence of Turing patterns and inhomogeneous periodic oscillatory patterns while the system parameters are all spatially homogeneous. These results also exhibit the critical role of the system parameters in leading to the formation of spatiotemporal patterns.

  15. Taylor-Couette Flow with Hourglass Geometry of Varying Lengths Simulated by Reaction-Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunjie; Halmstad, Andrew; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard

    2008-11-01

    Previously, we have observed chaotic formation of Taylor-Vortex pairs in Modified Taylor- Couette Flow with Hourglass Geometry. In the experiment, the chaotic formation in a shorter system has been restricted to a narrow band about the waist of the hourglass. Such behavior has been modeled by The Reaction-Diffusion equation, which has been previously studied, by Riecke and Paap. Their calculation suggested that quadrupling length of the system would lead to spatial chaos in the vortex formation. We present a careful recreation of this result and consider an intermediate length. We demonstrate that doubling the length should be sufficient to observe spatially chaotic behavior. Richard J. Wiener et al, Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997). H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14, 1235 (1991).

  16. Hybrid approaches for multiple-species stochastic reaction-diffusion models.

    PubMed

    Spill, Fabian; Guerrero, Pilar; Alarcon, Tomas; Maini, Philip K; Byrne, Helen

    2015-10-15

    Reaction-diffusion models are used to describe systems in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry, ecology and biology. The fundamental quantities in such models are individual entities such as atoms and molecules, bacteria, cells or animals, which move and/or react in a stochastic manner. If the number of entities is large, accounting for each individual is inefficient, and often partial differential equation (PDE) models are used in which the stochastic behaviour of individuals is replaced by a description of the averaged, or mean behaviour of the system. In some situations the number of individuals is large in certain regions and small in others. In such cases, a stochastic model may be inefficient in one region, and a PDE model inaccurate in another. To overcome this problem, we develop a scheme which couples a stochastic reaction-diffusion system in one part of the domain with its mean field analogue, i.e. a discretised PDE model, in the other part of the domain. The interface in between the two domains occupies exactly one lattice site and is chosen such that the mean field description is still accurate there. In this way errors due to the flux between the domains are small. Our scheme can account for multiple dynamic interfaces separating multiple stochastic and deterministic domains, and the coupling between the domains conserves the total number of particles. The method preserves stochastic features such as extinction not observable in the mean field description, and is significantly faster to simulate on a computer than the pure stochastic model.

  17. Hybrid approaches for multiple-species stochastic reaction-diffusion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spill, Fabian; Guerrero, Pilar; Alarcon, Tomas; Maini, Philip K.; Byrne, Helen

    2015-10-01

    Reaction-diffusion models are used to describe systems in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry, ecology and biology. The fundamental quantities in such models are individual entities such as atoms and molecules, bacteria, cells or animals, which move and/or react in a stochastic manner. If the number of entities is large, accounting for each individual is inefficient, and often partial differential equation (PDE) models are used in which the stochastic behaviour of individuals is replaced by a description of the averaged, or mean behaviour of the system. In some situations the number of individuals is large in certain regions and small in others. In such cases, a stochastic model may be inefficient in one region, and a PDE model inaccurate in another. To overcome this problem, we develop a scheme which couples a stochastic reaction-diffusion system in one part of the domain with its mean field analogue, i.e. a discretised PDE model, in the other part of the domain. The interface in between the two domains occupies exactly one lattice site and is chosen such that the mean field description is still accurate there. In this way errors due to the flux between the domains are small. Our scheme can account for multiple dynamic interfaces separating multiple stochastic and deterministic domains, and the coupling between the domains conserves the total number of particles. The method preserves stochastic features such as extinction not observable in the mean field description, and is significantly faster to simulate on a computer than the pure stochastic model.

  18. Scalable implicit methods for reaction-diffusion equations in two and three space dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Veronese, S.V.; Othmer, H.G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the implementation of a solver for systems of semi-linear parabolic partial differential equations in two and three space dimensions. The solver is based on a parallel implementation of a non-linear Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) scheme which uses a Cartesian grid in space and an implicit time-stepping algorithm. Various reordering strategies for the linearized equations are used to reduce the stride and improve the overall effectiveness of the parallel implementation. We have successfully used this solver for large-scale reaction-diffusion problems in computational biology and medicine in which the desired solution is a traveling wave that may contain rapid transitions. A number of examples that illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the method are given here; the theoretical analysis will be presented.

  19. Reaction-diffusion theory in the presence of an attractive harmonic potential.

    PubMed

    Spendier, K; Sugaya, S; Kenkre, V M

    2013-12-01

    Problems involving the capture of a moving entity by a trap occur in a variety of physical situations, the moving entity being an electron, an excitation, an atom, a molecule, a biological object such as a receptor cluster, a cell, or even an animal such as a mouse carrying an epidemic. Theoretical considerations have almost always assumed that the particle motion is translationally invariant. We study here the case when that assumption is relaxed, in that the particle is additionally subjected to a harmonic potential. This tethering to a center modifies the reaction-diffusion phenomenon. Using a Smoluchowski equation to describe the system, we carry out a study which is explicit in one dimension but can be easily extended for arbitrary dimensions. Interesting features emerge depending on the relative location of the trap, the attractive center, and the initial placement of the diffusing particle.

  20. Spread of infectious diseases in a hyperbolic reaction-diffusion susceptible-infected-removed model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbera, Elvira; Consolo, Giancarlo; Valenti, Giovanna

    2013-11-01

    A one-dimensional hyperbolic reaction-diffusion model of epidemics is developed to describe the dynamics of diseases spread occurring in an environment where three kinds of individuals mutually interact: the susceptibles, the infectives, and the removed. It is assumed that the disease is transmitted from the infected population to the susceptible one according to a nonlinear convex incidence rate. The model, based upon the framework of extended thermodynamics, removes the unphysical feature of instantaneous diffusive effects, which is typical of parabolic models. Linear stability analyses are performed to study the nature of the equilibrium states against uniform and nonuniform perturbations. Emphasis is given to the occurrence of Hopf and Turing bifurcations, which break the temporal and the spatial symmetry of the system, respectively. The existence of traveling wave solutions connecting two steady states is also discussed. The governing equations are also integrated numerically to validate the analytical results and to characterize the spatiotemporal evolution of diseases.

  1. Reaction-diffusion models describing a two-lane traffic flow

    PubMed

    Fouladvand

    2000-11-01

    A unidirectional two-lane road is approximated by a set of two parallel closed one-dimensional chains. Two types of cars, i.e., slow and fast ones are considered in the system. Based on the Nagel-Schreckenberg model of traffic flow [K. Nagel and M. Schreckenberg, J. Phys. 2, 2221 (1992)], a set of reaction-diffusion processes is introduced to simulate the behavior of the cars. Fast cars can pass the slow ones using the passing lane. We write and solve the mean-field rate equations for the density of slow and fast cars, respectively. We also investigate the properties of the model through computer simulations and obtain the fundamental diagrams. A comparison between our results and the v(max)=2 version of the Nagel-Schreckenberg model is made.

  2. Robustness of the Critical Behaviour in a Discrete Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatès, Nazim; Berry, Hugues

    We study the steady states of a reaction-diffusion medium modelled by a stochastic 2D cellular automaton. We consider the Greenberg-Hastings model where noise and topological irregularities of the grid are taken into account. The decrease of the probability of excitation changes qualitatively the behaviour of the system from an "active" to an "extinct" steady state. Simulations show that this change occurs near a critical threshold; it is identified as a nonequilibrium phase transition which belongs to the directed percolation universality class. We test the robustness of the phenomenon by introducing persistent defects in the topology : directed percolation behaviour is conserved. Using experimental and analytical tools, we suggest that the critical threshold varies as the inverse of the average number of neighbours per cell.

  3. Dynamical Behavior of Delayed Reaction-Diffusion Hopfield Neural Networks Driven by Infinite Dimensional Wiener Processes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao; Wang, Linshan; Wang, Yangfan; Wang, Ruili

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we focus on the long time behavior of the mild solution to delayed reaction-diffusion Hopfield neural networks (DRDHNNs) driven by infinite dimensional Wiener processes. We analyze the existence, uniqueness, and stability of this system under the local Lipschitz function by constructing an appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii function and utilizing the semigroup theory. Some easy-to-test criteria affecting the well-posedness and stability of the networks, such as infinite dimensional noise and diffusion effect, are obtained. The criteria can be used as theoretic guidance to stabilize DRDHNNs in practical applications when infinite dimensional noise is taken into consideration. Meanwhile, considering the fact that the standard Brownian motion is a special case of infinite dimensional Wiener process, we undertake an analysis of the local Lipschitz condition, which has a wider range than the global Lipschitz condition. Two samples are given to examine the availability of the results in this paper. Simulations are also given using the MATLAB.

  4. The Conley index along heteroclinic trajectories of reaction-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jänig, A.

    It is well known that hyperbolic equilibria of reaction-diffusion equations have the homotopy Conley index of a pointed sphere, the dimension of which is the Morse index of the equilibrium. A similar result concerning the homotopy Conley index along heteroclinic solutions of ordinary differential equations under the assumption that the respective stable and unstable manifolds intersect transversally, is due to McCord. This result has recently been generalized by Dancer to some reaction-diffusion equations by using finite-dimensional approximations. We extend McCord's result to reaction-diffusion equations. Additionally, an error in the original proof is corrected.

  5. Lattice Microbes: high-performance stochastic simulation method for the reaction-diffusion master equation

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Elijah; Stone, John E.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2013-01-01

    Spatial stochastic simulation is a valuable technique for studying reactions in biological systems. With the availability of high-performance computing, the method is poised to allow integration of data from structural, single-molecule, and biochemical studies into coherent computational models of cells. Here we introduce the Lattice Microbes software package for simulating such cell models on high-performance computing systems. The software performs either well-stirred or spatially resolved stochastic simulations with approximated cytoplasmic crowding in a fast and efficient manner. Our new algorithm efficiently samples the reaction-diffusion master equation using NVIDIA GPUs and is shown to be two orders of magnitude faster than exact sampling for large systems while maintaining an accuracy of ∼0.1%. Display of cell models and animation of reaction trajectories involving millions of molecules is facilitated using a plug-in to the popular VMD visualization platform. The Lattice Microbes software is open source and available for download at http://www.scs.illinois.edu/schulten/lm. PMID:23007888

  6. Scaling and crossover dynamics in the hyperbolic reaction-diffusion equations of initially separated components.

    PubMed

    Abi Mansour, Andrew; Al Ghoul, Mazen

    2011-08-01

    In this paper we investigate the dynamics of front propagation in the family of reactions (nA + mB (k)→ C) with initially segregated reactants in one dimension using hyperbolic reaction-diffusion equations with the mean-field approximation for the reaction rate. This leads to different dynamics than those predicted by their parabolic counterpart. Using perturbation techniques, we focus on the initial and intermediate temporal behavior of the center and width of the front and derive the different time scaling exponents. While the solution of the parabolic system yields a short time scaling as t(1/2) for the front center, width, and global reaction rate, the hyperbolic system exhibits linear scaling for those quantities. Moreover, those scaling laws are shown to be independent of the stoichiometric coefficients n and m. The perturbation results are compared with the full numerical solutions of the hyperbolic equations. The crossover time at which the hyperbolic regime crosses over to the parabolic regime is also studied. Conditions for static and moving fronts are also derived and numerically validated.

  7. tiReaction Diffusion Voronoi Diagrams: From Sensors Data to Computing

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Otero, Alejandro; Faigl, Jan; Dormido, Raquel; Duro, Natividad

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new method to solve computational problems using reaction diffusion (RD) systems is presented. The novelty relies on the use of a model configuration that tailors its spatiotemporal dynamics to develop Voronoi diagrams (VD) as a part of the system's natural evolution. The proposed framework is deployed in a solution of related robotic problems, where the generalized VD are used to identify topological places in a grid map of the environment that is created from sensor measurements. The ability of the RD-based computation to integrate external information, like a grid map representing the environment in the model computational grid, permits a direct integration of sensor data into the model dynamics. The experimental results indicate that this method exhibits significantly less sensitivity to noisy data than the standard algorithms for determining VD in a grid. In addition, previous drawbacks of the computational algorithms based on RD models, like the generation of volatile solutions by means of excitable waves, are now overcome by final stable states. PMID:26035349

  8. Modelling the effect of temperature on the range expansion of species by reaction-diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Richter, Otto; Moenickes, Sylvia; Suhling, Frank

    2012-02-01

    The spatial dynamics of range expansion is studied in dependence of temperature. The main elements population dynamics, competition and dispersal are combined in a coherent approach based on a system of coupled partial differential equations of the reaction-diffusion type. The nonlinear reaction terms comprise population dynamic models with temperature dependent reproduction rates subject to an Allee effect and mutual competition. The effect of temperature on travelling wave solutions is investigated for a one dimensional model version. One main result is the importance of the Allee effect for the crossing of regions with unsuitable habitats. The nonlinearities of the interaction terms give rise to a richness of spatio-temporal dynamic patterns. In two dimensions, the resulting non-linear initial boundary value problems are solved over geometries of heterogeneous landscapes. Geo referenced model parameters such as mean temperature and elevation are imported into the finite element tool COMSOL Multiphysics from a geographical information system. The model is applied to the range expansion of species at the scale of middle Europe.

  9. Modelling Population Dynamics in Realistic Landscapes with Linear Elements: A Mechanistic-Statistical Reaction-Diffusion Approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We propose and develop a general approach based on reaction-diffusion equations for modelling a species dynamics in a realistic two-dimensional (2D) landscape crossed by linear one-dimensional (1D) corridors, such as roads, hedgerows or rivers. Our approach is based on a hybrid “2D/1D model”, i.e, a system of 2D and 1D reaction-diffusion equations with homogeneous coefficients, in which each equation describes the population dynamics in a given 2D or 1D element of the landscape. Using the example of the range expansion of the tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus in France and its main highways as 1D corridors, we show that the model can be fitted to realistic observation data. We develop a mechanistic-statistical approach, based on the coupling between a model of population dynamics and a probabilistic model of the observation process. This allows us to bridge the gap between the data (3 levels of infestation, at the scale of a French department) and the output of the model (population densities at each point of the landscape), and to estimate the model parameter values using a maximum-likelihood approach. Using classical model comparison criteria, we obtain a better fit and a better predictive power with the 2D/1D model than with a standard homogeneous reaction-diffusion model. This shows the potential importance of taking into account the effect of the corridors (highways in the present case) on species dynamics. With regard to the particular case of A. albopictus, the conclusion that highways played an important role in species range expansion in mainland France is consistent with recent findings from the literature. PMID:26986201

  10. A two or three compartments hyperbolic reaction-diffusion model for the aquatic food chain.

    PubMed

    Barbera, Elvira; Consolo, Giancarlo; Valenti, Giovanna

    2015-06-01

    Two hyperbolic reaction-diffusion models are built up in the framework of Extended Thermodynamics in order to describe the spatio-temporal interactions occurring in a two or three compartments aquatic food chain. The first model focuses on the dynamics between phytoplankton and zooplankton, whereas the second one accounts also for the nutrient. In these models, infections and influence of illumination on photosynthesis are neglected. It is assumed that the zooplankton predation follows a Holling type-III functional response, while the zooplankton mortality is linear. Owing to the hyperbolic structure of our equations, the wave processes occur at finite velocity, so that the paradox of instantaneous diffusion of biological quantities, typical of parabolic systems, is consequently removed. The character of steady states and travelling waves, together with the occurrence of Hopf bifurcations, is then discussed through linear stability analysis. The governing equations are also integrated numerically to validate the analytical results herein obtained and to extract additional information on the population dynamics.

  11. Local error estimates for adaptive simulation of the Reaction-Diffusion Master Equation via operator splitting.

    PubMed

    Hellander, Andreas; Lawson, Michael J; Drawert, Brian; Petzold, Linda

    2014-06-01

    The efficiency of exact simulation methods for the reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is severely limited by the large number of diffusion events if the mesh is fine or if diffusion constants are large. Furthermore, inherent properties of exact kinetic-Monte Carlo simulation methods limit the efficiency of parallel implementations. Several approximate and hybrid methods have appeared that enable more efficient simulation of the RDME. A common feature to most of them is that they rely on splitting the system into its reaction and diffusion parts and updating them sequentially over a discrete timestep. This use of operator splitting enables more efficient simulation but it comes at the price of a temporal discretization error that depends on the size of the timestep. So far, existing methods have not attempted to estimate or control this error in a systematic manner. This makes the solvers hard to use for practitioners since they must guess an appropriate timestep. It also makes the solvers potentially less efficient than if the timesteps are adapted to control the error. Here, we derive estimates of the local error and propose a strategy to adaptively select the timestep when the RDME is simulated via a first order operator splitting. While the strategy is general and applicable to a wide range of approximate and hybrid methods, we exemplify it here by extending a previously published approximate method, the Diffusive Finite-State Projection (DFSP) method, to incorporate temporal adaptivity.

  12. A Turing Reaction-Diffusion Model for Human Cortical Folding Patterns and Cortical Pattern Malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurdal, Monica K.; Striegel, Deborah A.

    2011-11-01

    Modeling and understanding cortical folding pattern formation is important for quantifying cortical development. We present a biomathematical model for cortical folding pattern formation in the human brain and apply this model to study diseases involving cortical pattern malformations associated with neural migration disorders. Polymicrogyria is a cortical malformation disease resulting in an excessive number of small gyri. Our mathematical model uses a Turing reaction-diffusion system to model cortical folding. The lateral ventricle (LV) and ventricular zone (VZ) of the brain are critical components in the formation of cortical patterning. In early cortical development the shape of the LV can be modeled with a prolate spheroid and the VZ with a prolate spheroid surface. We use our model to study how global cortex characteristics, such as size and shape of the LV, affect cortical pattern formation. We demonstrate increasing domain scale can increase the number of gyri and sulci formed. Changes in LV shape can account for sulcus directionality. By incorporating LV size and shape, our model is able to elucidate which parameters can lead to excessive cortical folding.

  13. Reaction-diffusion waves in neuronal tissue and the window of cortical excitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlem, M. A.; Müller, S. C.

    2004-07-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a dynamic wave phenomenon occurring in all gray matter regions of the central nervous systems (CNS). It is characterized by a sudden breakdown of neuronal activity and accompanied by a massive influx and efflux of ions across the membrane of neurons. The retina is a constituent of the CNS in which one can easily observe the dynamic behavior of the SD wave fronts, because SD changes the optical properties of the tissue. There is ample evidence that SD belongs to the self-organization processes due to the coupling of reaction with diffusion in excitable medium. It is assumed that the occurrence of SD is associated with some neurological symptoms of migraine with aura. A frequently reported aura symptom is a traveling visual blind region (scotoma) with a preceding figure of scintillating line segments. The characteristic form and development of the scotoma suggests that the underlying phenomenon is a wave propagating through the primary visual cortex, most likely the cortical spreading depression. In this article we discuss similarities between SD waves and the migraine aura on the basis of properties of reaction-diffusion waves known from other excitable media. In particular, the propagation velocities, the shape and the dynamics of the waves are compared with each other. We find that the assumption of the neuronal tissue to be in a state of only weak excitability explains some properties of the migraine aura, such as the confined appearance and its propagation with a stable velocity.

  14. Bifurcation analysis of brown tide by reaction-diffusion equation using finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Mutsuto; Ding, Yan

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, we analyze the bifurcation of a biodynamics system in a two-dimensional domain by virtue of reaction-diffusion equations. The discretization method in space is the finite element method. The computational algorithm for an eigenspectrum is described in detail. On the basis of an analysis of eigenspectra according to Helmholtz`s equation, the discrete spectra in regards to the physical variables are numerically obtained in two-dimensional space. In order to investigate this mathematical model in regards to its practical use, we analyzed the stability of two cases, i.e., hydranth regeneration in the marine hydroid Tubularia and a brown tide in a harbor in Japan. By evaluating the stability according to the linearized stability definition, the critical parameters for outbreaks of brown tide can be theoretically determined. In addition, results for the linear combination of eigenspectrum coincide with the distribution of the observed brown tide. Its periodic characteristic was also verified. 10 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Dissipation and displacement of hotspots in reaction-diffusion models of crime.

    PubMed

    Short, Martin B; Brantingham, P Jeffrey; Bertozzi, Andrea L; Tita, George E

    2010-03-02

    The mechanisms driving the nucleation, spread, and dissipation of crime hotspots are poorly understood. As a consequence, the ability of law enforcement agencies to use mapped crime patterns to design crime prevention strategies is severely hampered. We also lack robust expectations about how different policing interventions should impact crime. Here we present a mathematical framework based on reaction-diffusion partial differential equations for studying the dynamics of crime hotspots. The system of equations is based on empirical evidence for how offenders move and mix with potential victims or targets. Analysis shows that crime hotspots form when the enhanced risk of repeat crimes diffuses locally, but not so far as to bind distant crime together. Crime hotspots may form as either supercritical or subcritical bifurcations, the latter the result of large spikes in crime that override linearly stable, uniform crime distributions. Our mathematical methods show that subcritical crime hotspots may be permanently eradicated with police suppression, whereas supercritical hotspots are displaced following a characteristic spatial pattern. Our results thus provide a mechanistic explanation for recent failures to observe crime displacement in experimental field tests of hotspot policing.

  16. Synchronization criteria for generalized reaction-diffusion neural networks via periodically intermittent control.

    PubMed

    Gan, Qintao; Lv, Tianshi; Fu, Zhenhua

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the synchronization problem for a class of generalized neural networks with time-varying delays and reaction-diffusion terms is investigated concerning Neumann boundary conditions in terms of p-norm. The proposed generalized neural networks model includes reaction-diffusion local field neural networks and reaction-diffusion static neural networks as its special cases. By establishing a new inequality, some simple and useful conditions are obtained analytically to guarantee the global exponential synchronization of the addressed neural networks under the periodically intermittent control. According to the theoretical results, the influences of diffusion coefficients, diffusion space, and control rate on synchronization are analyzed. Finally, the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methods are shown by simulation examples, and by choosing different diffusion coefficients, diffusion spaces, and control rates, different controlled synchronization states can be obtained.

  17. WNT and DKK Determine Hair Follicle Spacing Through a Reaction-Diffusion Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sick, Stefanie; Reinker, Stefan; Timmer, Jens; Schlake, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    Mathematical reaction-diffusion models have been suggested to describe formation of animal pigmentation patterns and distribution of epidermal appendages. However, the crucial signals and in vivo mechanisms are still elusive. Here we identify WNT and its inhibitor DKK as primary determinants of murine hair follicle spacing, using a combined experimental and computational modeling approach. Transgenic DKK overexpression reduces overall appendage density. Moderate suppression of endogenous WNT signaling forces follicles to form clusters during an otherwise normal morphogenetic program. These results confirm predictions of a WNT/DKK-specific mathematical model and provide in vivo corroboration of the reaction-diffusion mechanism for epidermal appendage formation.

  18. Evolving Localizations in Reaction-Diffusion Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew; Bull, Larry; Collet, Pierre; Sapin, Emmanuel

    We consider hexagonal cellular automata with immediate cell neighbourhood and three cell-states. Every cell calculates its next state depending on the integral representation of states in its neighbourhood, i.e., how many neighbours are in each one state. We employ evolutionary algorithms to breed local transition functions that support mobile localizations (gliders), and characterize sets of the functions selected in terms of quasi-chemical systems. Analysis of the set of functions evolved allows to speculate that mobile localizations are likely to emerge in the quasi-chemical systems with limited diffusion of one reagent, a small number of molecules are required for amplification of travelling localizations, and reactions leading to stationary localizations involve relatively equal amount of quasi-chemical species. Techniques developed can be applied in cascading signals in nature-inspired spatially extended computing devices, and phenomenological studies and classification of non-linear discrete systems.

  19. Real-time nonlinear feedback control of pattern formation in (bio)chemical reaction-diffusion processes: a model study.

    PubMed

    Brandt-Pollmann, U; Lebiedz, D; Diehl, M; Sager, S; Schlöder, J

    2005-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies related to manipulation of pattern formation in self-organizing reaction-diffusion processes by appropriate control stimuli become increasingly important both in chemical engineering and cellular biochemistry. In a model study, we demonstrate here exemplarily the application of an efficient nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) algorithm to real-time optimal feedback control of pattern formation in a bacterial chemotaxis system modeled by nonlinear partial differential equations. The corresponding drift-diffusion model type is representative for many (bio)chemical systems involving nonlinear reaction dynamics and nonlinear diffusion. We show how the computed optimal feedback control strategy exploits the system inherent physical property of wave propagation to achieve desired control aims. We discuss various applications of our approach to optimal control of spatiotemporal dynamics.

  20. Real-time nonlinear feedback control of pattern formation in (bio)chemical reaction-diffusion processes: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt-Pollmann, U.; Lebiedz, D.; Diehl, M.; Sager, S.; Schlöder, J.

    2005-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies related to manipulation of pattern formation in self-organizing reaction-diffusion processes by appropriate control stimuli become increasingly important both in chemical engineering and cellular biochemistry. In a model study, we demonstrate here exemplarily the application of an efficient nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) algorithm to real-time optimal feedback control of pattern formation in a bacterial chemotaxis system modeled by nonlinear partial differential equations. The corresponding drift-diffusion model type is representative for many (bio)chemical systems involving nonlinear reaction dynamics and nonlinear diffusion. We show how the computed optimal feedback control strategy exploits the system inherent physical property of wave propagation to achieve desired control aims. We discuss various applications of our approach to optimal control of spatiotemporal dynamics.

  1. Reaction-diffusion constraints in living tissue: effectiveness factors in skeletal muscle design.

    PubMed

    Dasika, S K; Kinsey, S T; Locke, B R

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to analyze the effects of intracellular diffusion of O(2) and high-energy phosphate metabolites on aerobic energy metabolism in skeletal muscle. We tested the hypotheses that in a range of muscle fibers from different species (1) aerobic metabolism was not diffusion limited and (2) that fibers had a combination of rate and fiber size that placed them at the brink of substantial diffusion limitation. A simplified chemical reaction rate law for mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation was developed utilizing a published detailed model of isolated mitochondrial function. This rate law was then used as a boundary condition in a reaction-diffusion model that was further simplified using the volume averaging method and solved to determine the rates of oxidative phosphorylation as functions of the volume fraction of mitochondria, the size of the muscle cell, and the amount of oxygen delivered by the capillaries. The effectiveness factor, which is the ratio of reaction rate in the system with finite rates of diffusion to those in the absence of any diffusion limitations, defined the regions where intracellular diffusion of metabolites and O(2) may limit aerobic metabolism in both very small, highly oxidative fibers as well as in larger fibers with lower aerobic capacity. Comparison of model analysis with experimental data revealed that none of the fibers was strongly limited by diffusion, as expected. However, while some fibers were near substantial diffusion limitation, most were well within the domain of reaction control of aerobic metabolic rate. This may constitute a safety factor in muscle that provides a level of protection from diffusion constraints under conditions such as hypoxia.

  2. Analyzing critical propagation in a reaction-diffusion-advection model using unstable slow waves.

    PubMed

    Kneer, Frederike; Obermayer, Klaus; Dahlem, Markus A

    2015-02-01

    The effect of advection on the propagation and in particular on the critical minimal speed of traveling waves in a reaction-diffusion model is studied. Previous theoretical studies estimated this effect on the velocity of stable fast waves and predicted the existence of a critical advection strength below which propagating waves are not supported anymore. In this paper, an analytical expression for the advection-velocity relation of the unstable slow wave is derived. In addition, the critical advection strength is calculated taking into account the unstable slow wave solution. We also analyze a two-variable reaction-diffusion-advection model numerically in a wide parameter range. Due to the new control parameter (advection) we can find stable wave propagation in the otherwise non-excitable parameter regime, if the advection strength exceeds a critical value. Comparing theoretical predictions to numerical results, we find that they are in good agreement. Theory provides an explanation for the observed behaviour.

  3. Effect of mixing on reaction-diffusion kinetics for protein hydrogel-based microchips.

    PubMed

    Zubtsov, D A; Ivanov, S M; Rubina, A Yu; Dementieva, E I; Chechetkin, V R; Zasedatelev, A S

    2006-03-09

    Protein hydrogel-based microchips are being developed for high-throughput evaluation of the concentrations and activities of various proteins. To shorten the time of analysis, the reaction-diffusion kinetics on gel microchips should be accelerated. Here we present the results of the experimental and theoretical analysis of the reaction-diffusion kinetics enforced by mixing with peristaltic pump. The experiments were carried out on gel-based protein microchips with immobilized antibodies under the conditions utilized for on-chip immunoassay. The dependence of fluorescence signals at saturation and corresponding saturation times on the concentrations of immobilized antibodies and antigen in solution proved to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions. It is shown that the enhancement of transport with peristaltic pump results in more than five-fold acceleration of binding kinetics. Our results suggest useful criteria for the optimal conditions for assays on gel microchips to balance high sensitivity and rapid fluorescence saturation kinetics.

  4. Long-term behavior of reaction-diffusion equations with nonlocal boundary conditions on rough domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Ciprian G.; Warma, Mahamadi

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the long term behavior in terms of finite dimensional global and exponential attractors, as time goes to infinity, of solutions to a semilinear reaction-diffusion equation on non-smooth domains subject to nonlocal Robin boundary conditions, characterized by the presence of fractional diffusion on the boundary. Our results are of general character and apply to a large class of irregular domains, including domains whose boundary is Hölder continuous and domains which have fractal-like geometry. In addition to recovering most of the existing results on existence, regularity, uniqueness, stability, attractor existence, and dimension, for the well-known reaction-diffusion equation in smooth domains, the framework we develop also makes possible a number of new results for all diffusion models in other non-smooth settings.

  5. Fourier spectral method for higher order space fractional reaction-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindza, Edson; Owolabi, Kolade M.

    2016-11-01

    Evolution equations containing fractional derivatives can provide suitable mathematical models for describing important physical phenomena. In this paper, we propose a fast and accurate method for numerical solutions of space fractional reaction-diffusion equations. The proposed method is based on an exponential integrator scheme in time and the Fourier spectral method in space. The main advantages of this method are that it yields a fully diagonal representation of the fractional operator, with increased accuracy and efficiency, and a completely straightforward extension to high spatial dimensions. Although, in general, it is not obvious what role a high fractional derivative can play and how to make use of arbitrarily high-order fractional derivatives, we introduce them to describe fractional hyper-diffusions in reaction diffusion. The scheme justified by a number of computational experiments, this includes two and three dimensional partial differential equations. Numerical experiments are provided to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  6. Fokas method for a multi-domain linear reaction-diffusion equation with discontinuous diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asvestas, M.; Sifalakis, A. G.; Papadopoulou, E. P.; Saridakis, Y. G.

    2014-03-01

    Motivated by proliferation-diffusion mathematical models for studying highly diffusive brain tumors, that also take into account the heterogeneity of the brain tissue, in the present work we consider a multi-domain linear reaction-diffusion equation with a discontinuous diffusion coefficient. For the solution of the problem at hand we implement Fokas transform method by directly following, and extending in this way, our recent work for a white-gray-white matter brain model pertaining to high grade gliomas. Fokas's novel approach for the solution of linear PDE problems, yields novel integral representations of the solution in the complex plane that, for appropriately chosen integration contours, decay exponentially fast and converge uniformly at the boundaries. Combining these method-inherent advantages with simple numerical quadrature rules, we produce an efficient method, with fast decaying error properties, for the solution of the discontinuous reaction-diffusion problem.

  7. Reaction-diffusion-advection approach to spatially localized treadmilling aggregates of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochelis, Arik; Bar-On, Tomer; Gov, Nir S.

    2016-04-01

    Unconventional myosins belong to a class of molecular motors that walk processively inside cellular protrusions towards the tips, on top of actin filament. Surprisingly, in addition, they also form retrograde moving self-organized aggregates. The qualitative properties of these aggregates are recapitulated by a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model and admit two distinct families of modes: traveling waves and pulse trains. Unlike the traveling waves that are generated by a linear instability, pulses are nonlinear structures that propagate on top of linearly stable uniform backgrounds. Asymptotic analysis of isolated pulses via a simplified reaction-diffusion-advection variant on large periodic domains, allows to draw qualitative trends for pulse properties, such as the amplitude, width, and propagation speed. The results agree well with numerical integrations and are related to available empirical observations.

  8. Notch-mediated lateral inhibition regulates proneural wave propagation when combined with EGF-mediated reaction diffusion.

    PubMed

    Sato, Makoto; Yasugi, Tetsuo; Minami, Yoshiaki; Miura, Takashi; Nagayama, Masaharu

    2016-08-30

    Notch-mediated lateral inhibition regulates binary cell fate choice, resulting in salt and pepper patterns during various developmental processes. However, how Notch signaling behaves in combination with other signaling systems remains elusive. The wave of differentiation in the Drosophila visual center or "proneural wave" accompanies Notch activity that is propagated without the formation of a salt and pepper pattern, implying that Notch does not form a feedback loop of lateral inhibition during this process. However, mathematical modeling and genetic analysis clearly showed that Notch-mediated lateral inhibition is implemented within the proneural wave. Because partial reduction in EGF signaling causes the formation of the salt and pepper pattern, it is most likely that EGF diffusion cancels salt and pepper pattern formation in silico and in vivo. Moreover, the combination of Notch-mediated lateral inhibition and EGF-mediated reaction diffusion enables a function of Notch signaling that regulates propagation of the wave of differentiation.

  9. Delay-induced Turing-like waves for one-species reaction-diffusion model on a network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Julien; Carletti, Timoteo; Asllani, Malbor; Fanelli, Duccio

    2015-09-01

    A one-species time-delay reaction-diffusion system defined on a complex network is studied. Traveling waves are predicted to occur following a symmetry-breaking instability of a homogeneous stationary stable solution, subject to an external nonhomogeneous perturbation. These are generalized Turing-like waves that materialize in a single-species populations dynamics model, as the unexpected byproduct of the imposed delay in the diffusion part. Sufficient conditions for the onset of the instability are mathematically provided by performing a linear stability analysis adapted to time-delayed differential equations. The method here developed exploits the properties of the Lambert W-function. The prediction of the theory are confirmed by direct numerical simulation carried out for a modified version of the classical Fisher model, defined on a Watts-Strogatz network and with the inclusion of the delay.

  10. Notch-mediated lateral inhibition regulates proneural wave propagation when combined with EGF-mediated reaction diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Makoto; Yasugi, Tetsuo; Minami, Yoshiaki; Miura, Takashi; Nagayama, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Notch-mediated lateral inhibition regulates binary cell fate choice, resulting in salt and pepper patterns during various developmental processes. However, how Notch signaling behaves in combination with other signaling systems remains elusive. The wave of differentiation in the Drosophila visual center or “proneural wave” accompanies Notch activity that is propagated without the formation of a salt and pepper pattern, implying that Notch does not form a feedback loop of lateral inhibition during this process. However, mathematical modeling and genetic analysis clearly showed that Notch-mediated lateral inhibition is implemented within the proneural wave. Because partial reduction in EGF signaling causes the formation of the salt and pepper pattern, it is most likely that EGF diffusion cancels salt and pepper pattern formation in silico and in vivo. Moreover, the combination of Notch-mediated lateral inhibition and EGF-mediated reaction diffusion enables a function of Notch signaling that regulates propagation of the wave of differentiation. PMID:27535937

  11. An inverse problem formulation for parameter estimation of a reaction-diffusion model of low grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Amir; Mang, Andreas; Biros, George

    2015-01-01

    We present a numerical scheme for solving a parameter estimation problem for a model of low-grade glioma growth. Our goal is to estimate the spatial distribution of tumor concentration, as well as the magnitude of anisotropic tumor diffusion. We use a constrained optimization formulation with a reaction-diffusion model that results in a system of nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). In our formulation, we estimate the parameters using partially observed, noisy tumor concentration data at two different time instances, along with white matter fiber directions derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The optimization problem is solved with a Gauss-Newton reduced space algorithm. We present the formulation and outline the numerical algorithms for solving the resulting equations. We test the method using synthetic dataset and compute the reconstruction error for different noise levels and detection thresholds for monofocal and multifocal test cases. PMID:25963601

  12. Use of hybrid discrete cellular models for identification of macroscopic nutrient loss in reaction-diffusion models of tissues.

    PubMed

    Aristotelous, Andreas C; Haider, Mansoor A

    2014-08-01

    Macroscopic models accounting for cellular effects in natural or engineered tissues may involve unknown constitutive terms that are highly dependent on interactions at the scale of individual cells. Hybrid discrete models, which represent cells individually, were used to develop and apply techniques for modeling diffusive nutrient transport and cellular uptake to identify a nonlinear nutrient loss term in a macroscopic reaction-diffusion model of the system. Flexible and robust numerical methods were used, based on discontinuous Galerkin finite elements in space and a Crank-Nicolson temporal discretization. Scales were bridged via averaging operations over a complete set of subdomains yielding data for identification of a macroscopic nutrient loss term that was accurately captured via a fifth-order polynomial. Accuracy of the identified macroscopic model was demonstrated by direct, quantitative comparisons of the tissue and cellular scale models in terms of three error norms computed on a mesoscale mesh.

  13. Size-controlled synthesis of Cu2O nanoparticles via reaction-diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badr, Layla; Epstein, Irving R.

    2017-02-01

    Copper (I) oxide nanoparticles are synthesized by a simple reaction-diffusion process involving Cu+ ions and sodium hydroxide in gelatin. The mean diameter and the size dispersion of the nanoparticles can be controlled by two experimental parameters, the percent of gelatin in the medium and the hydroxide ion concentration. UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are used to analyze the size, morphology, and chemical composition of the nanoparticles generated.

  14. Limiting behavior of non-autonomous stochastic reaction-diffusion equations on thin domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dingshi; Wang, Bixiang; Wang, Xiaohu

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with the limiting behavior of stochastic reaction-diffusion equations driven by multiplicative noise and deterministic non-autonomous terms defined on thin domains. We first prove the existence, uniqueness and periodicity of pullback tempered random attractors for the equations in an (n + 1)-dimensional narrow domain, and then establish the upper semicontinuity of these attractors when a family of (n + 1)-dimensional thin domains collapses onto an n-dimensional domain.

  15. Contribution to an effective design method for stationary reaction-diffusion patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Szalai, István; Horváth, Judit; De Kepper, Patrick

    2015-06-15

    The British mathematician Alan Turing predicted, in his seminal 1952 publication, that stationary reaction-diffusion patterns could spontaneously develop in reacting chemical or biochemical solutions. The first two clear experimental demonstrations of such a phenomenon were not made before the early 1990s when the design of new chemical oscillatory reactions and appropriate open spatial chemical reactors had been invented. Yet, the number of pattern producing reactions had not grown until 2009 when we developed an operational design method, which takes into account the feeding conditions and other specificities of real open spatial reactors. Since then, on the basis of this method, five additional reactions were shown to produce stationary reaction-diffusion patterns. To gain a clearer view on where our methodical approach on the patterning capacity of a reaction stands, numerical studies in conditions that mimic true open spatial reactors were made. In these numerical experiments, we explored the patterning capacity of Rabai's model for pH driven Landolt type reactions as a function of experimentally attainable parameters that control the main time and length scales. Because of the straightforward reversible binding of protons to carboxylate carrying polymer chains, this class of reaction is at the base of the chemistry leading to most of the stationary reaction-diffusion patterns presently observed. We compare our model predictions with experimental observations and comment on agreements and differences.

  16. Contribution to an effective design method for stationary reaction-diffusion patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalai, István; Horváth, Judit; De Kepper, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    The British mathematician Alan Turing predicted, in his seminal 1952 publication, that stationary reaction-diffusion patterns could spontaneously develop in reacting chemical or biochemical solutions. The first two clear experimental demonstrations of such a phenomenon were not made before the early 1990s when the design of new chemical oscillatory reactions and appropriate open spatial chemical reactors had been invented. Yet, the number of pattern producing reactions had not grown until 2009 when we developed an operational design method, which takes into account the feeding conditions and other specificities of real open spatial reactors. Since then, on the basis of this method, five additional reactions were shown to produce stationary reaction-diffusion patterns. To gain a clearer view on where our methodical approach on the patterning capacity of a reaction stands, numerical studies in conditions that mimic true open spatial reactors were made. In these numerical experiments, we explored the patterning capacity of Rabai's model for pH driven Landolt type reactions as a function of experimentally attainable parameters that control the main time and length scales. Because of the straightforward reversible binding of protons to carboxylate carrying polymer chains, this class of reaction is at the base of the chemistry leading to most of the stationary reaction-diffusion patterns presently observed. We compare our model predictions with experimental observations and comment on agreements and differences.

  17. A Luenberger observer for reaction-diffusion models with front position data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, Annabelle; Chapelle, Dominique; Moireau, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    We propose a Luenberger observer for reaction-diffusion models with propagating front features, and for data associated with the location of the front over time. Such models are considered in various application fields, such as electrophysiology, wild-land fire propagation and tumor growth modeling. Drawing our inspiration from image processing methods, we start by proposing an observer for the eikonal-curvature equation that can be derived from the reaction-diffusion model by an asymptotic expansion. We then carry over this observer to the underlying reaction-diffusion equation by an ;inverse asymptotic analysis;, and we show that the associated correction in the dynamics has a stabilizing effect for the linearized estimation error. We also discuss the extension to joint state-parameter estimation by using the earlier-proposed ROUKF strategy. We then illustrate and assess our proposed observer method with test problems pertaining to electrophysiology modeling, including with a realistic model of cardiac atria. Our numerical trials show that state estimation is directly very effective with the proposed Luenberger observer, while specific strategies are needed to accurately perform parameter estimation - as is usual with Kalman filtering used in a nonlinear setting - and we demonstrate two such successful strategies.

  18. Simplified approach for calculating moments of action for linear reaction-diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Ellery, Adam J; Simpson, Matthew J; McCue, Scott W; Baker, Ruth E

    2013-11-01

    The mean action time is the mean of a probability density function that can be interpreted as a critical time, which is a finite estimate of the time taken for the transient solution of a reaction-diffusion equation to effectively reach steady state. For high-variance distributions, the mean action time underapproximates the critical time since it neglects to account for the spread about the mean. We can improve our estimate of the critical time by calculating the higher moments of the probability density function, called the moments of action, which provide additional information regarding the spread about the mean. Existing methods for calculating the nth moment of action require the solution of n nonhomogeneous boundary value problems which can be difficult and tedious to solve exactly. Here we present a simplified approach using Laplace transforms which allows us to calculate the nth moment of action without solving this family of boundary value problems and also without solving for the transient solution of the underlying reaction-diffusion problem. We demonstrate the generality of our method by calculating exact expressions for the moments of action for three problems from the biophysics literature. While the first problem we consider can be solved using existing methods, the second problem, which is readily solved using our approach, is intractable using previous techniques. The third problem illustrates how the Laplace transform approach can be used to study coupled linear reaction-diffusion equations.

  19. Trainable Nonlinear Reaction Diffusion: A Flexible Framework for Fast and Effective Image Restoration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjin; Pock, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Image restoration is a long-standing problem in low-level computer vision with many interesting applications. We describe a flexible learning framework based on the concept of nonlinear reaction diffusion models for various image restoration problems. By embodying recent improvements in nonlinear diffusion models, we propose a dynamic nonlinear reaction diffusion model with time-dependent parameters (i.e., linear filters and influence functions). In contrast to previous nonlinear diffusion models, all the parameters, including the filters and the influence functions, are simultaneously learned from training data through a loss based approach. We call this approach TNRD - Trainable Nonlinear Reaction Diffusion. The TNRD approach is applicable for a variety of image restoration tasks by incorporating appropriate reaction force. We demonstrate its capabilities with three representative applications, Gaussian image denoising, single image super resolution and JPEG deblocking. Experiments show that our trained nonlinear diffusion models largely benefit from the training of the parameters and finally lead to the best reported performance on common test datasets for the tested applications. Our trained models preserve the structural simplicity of diffusion models and take only a small number of diffusion steps, thus are highly efficient. Moreover, they are also well-suited for parallel computation on GPUs, which makes the inference procedure extremely fast.

  20. Solutions of fractional reaction-diffusion equations in terms of the H-function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubold, H. J.; Mathai, A. M.; Saxena, R. K.

    2007-12-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of the solution of an unified fractional reaction-diffusion equation associated with the Caputo derivative as the time-derivative and Riesz-Feller fractional derivative as the space-derivative. The solution is derived by the application of the Laplace and Fourier transforms in closed form in terms of the H-function. The results derived are of general nature and include the results investigated earlier by many authors, notably by Mainardi et al. (2001, 2005) for the fundamental solution of the space-time fractional diffusion equation, and Saxena et al. (2006a, b) for fractional reaction-diffusion equations. The advantage of using Riesz-Feller derivative lies in the fact that the solution of the fractional reaction-diffusion equation containing this derivative includes the fundamental solution for space-time fractional diffusion, which itself is a generalization of neutral fractional diffusion, space-fractional diffusion, and time-fractional diffusion. These specialized types of diffusion can be interpreted as spatial probability density functions evolving in time and are expressible in terms of the H-functions in compact form.

  1. An Adaptive Method of Lines with Error Control for Parabolic Equations of the Reaction-Diffusion Type.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    space discretization error . 1. I 3 1. INTRODUCTION Reaction- diffusion processes occur in many branches of biology and physical chemistry. Examples...to model reaction- diffusion phenomena. The primary goal of this adaptive method is to keep a particular norm of the space discretization error less...AD-A142 253 AN ADAPTIVE MET6 OFD LNES WITH ERROR CONTROL FOR 1 INST FOR PHYSICAL SCIENCE AND TECH. I BABUSKAAAO C7 EA OH S UMR AN UNVC EEP R

  2. Positional information and reaction-diffusion: two big ideas in developmental biology combine.

    PubMed

    Green, Jeremy B A; Sharpe, James

    2015-04-01

    One of the most fundamental questions in biology is that of biological pattern: how do the structures and shapes of organisms arise? Undoubtedly, the two most influential ideas in this area are those of Alan Turing's 'reaction-diffusion' and Lewis Wolpert's 'positional information'. Much has been written about these two concepts but some confusion still remains, in particular about the relationship between them. Here, we address this relationship and propose a scheme of three distinct ways in which these two ideas work together to shape biological form.

  3. Reaction-diffusion analysis for one-step plasma etching and bonding of microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rosso, Michel; Steijn, Volkert van; Smet, Louis C. P. M. de; Sudhoelter, Ernst J. R.; Kreutzer, Michiel T.; Kleijn, Chris R.

    2011-04-25

    A self-similar reaction front develops in reactive ion etching when the ions penetrate channels of shallow height h. This relates to the patterning of microchannels using a single-step etching and bonding, as described by Rhee et al. [Lab Chip 5, 102 (2005)]. Experimentally, we report that the front location scales as x{sub f{approx}}ht{sup 1/2} and the width is time-invariant and scales as {delta}{approx}h. Mean-field reaction-diffusion theory and Knudsen diffusion give a semiquantitative understanding of these observations and allow optimization of etching times in relation to bonding requirements.

  4. Analysis of discrete reaction-diffusion equations for autocatalysis and continuum diffusion equations for transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chi-Jen

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we analyze both the spatiotemporal behavior of: (A) non-linear “reaction” models utilizing (discrete) reaction-diffusion equations; and (B) spatial transport problems on surfaces and in nanopores utilizing the relevant (continuum) diffusion or Fokker-Planck equations. Thus, there are some common themes in these studies, as they all involve partial differential equations or their discrete analogues which incorporate a description of diffusion-type processes. However, there are also some qualitative differences, as shall be discussed below.

  5. On the Long Time Simulation of Reaction-Diffusion Equations with Delay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengjian

    2014-01-01

    For a consistent numerical method to be practically useful, it is widely accepted that it must preserve the asymptotic stability of the original continuous problem. However, in this study, we show that it may lead to unreliable numerical solutions in long time simulation even if a classical numerical method gives a larger stability region than that of the original continuous problem. Some numerical experiments on the reaction-diffusion equations with delay are presented to confirm our findings. Finally, some open problems on the subject are proposed. PMID:24672296

  6. Asymptotic analysis of reaction-diffusion-advection problems: Fronts with periodic motion and blow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedov, Nikolay

    2017-02-01

    This is an extended variant of the paper presented at MURPHYS-HSFS 2016 conference in Barcelona. We discuss further development of the asymptotic method of differential inequalities to investigate existence and stability of sharp internal layers (fronts) for nonlinear singularly perturbed periodic parabolic problems and initial boundary value problems with blow-up of fronts for reaction-diffusion-advection equations. In particular, we consider periodic solutions with internal layer in the case of balanced reaction. For the initial boundary value problems we prove the existence of fronts and give their asymptotic approximation including the new case of blowing-up fronts. This case we illustrate by the generalised Burgers equation.

  7. 3D choroid neovascularization growth prediction based on reaction-diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shuxia; Chen, Xinjian; Shi, Fei; Xiang, Dehui; Zhu, Weifang; Chen, Haoyu

    2016-03-01

    Choroid neovascularization (CNV) is a kind of pathology from the choroid and CNV-related disease is one important cause of vision loss. It is desirable to predict the CNV growth rate so that appropriate treatment can be planned. In this paper, we seek to find a method to predict the growth of CNV based on 3D longitudinal Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images. A reaction-diffusion model is proposed for prediction. The method consists of four phases: pre-processing, meshing, CNV growth modeling and prediction. We not only apply the reaction-diffusion model to the disease region, but also take the surrounding tissues into consideration including outer retinal layer, inner retinal layer and choroid layer. The diffusion in these tissues is considered as isotropic. The finite-element-method (FEM) is used to solve the partial differential equations (PDE) in the diffusion model. The curve of CNV growth with treatment are fitted and then we can predict the CNV status in a future time point. The preliminary results demonstrated that our proposed method is accurate and the validity and feasibility of our model is obvious.

  8. Reaction-diffusion finite element model of lateral line primordium migration to explore cell leadership.

    PubMed

    Allena, R; Maini, P K

    2014-12-01

    Collective cell migration plays a fundamental role in many biological phenomena such as immune response, embryogenesis and tumorigenesis. In the present work, we propose a reaction-diffusion finite element model of the lateral line primordium migration in zebrafish. The population is modelled as a continuum with embedded discrete motile cells, which are assumed to be viscoelastic and able to undergo large deformations. The Wnt/ß-catenin-FGF and cxcr4b-cxcr7b signalling pathways inside the cohort regulating the migration are described through coupled reaction-diffusion equations. The coupling between mechanics and the molecular scenario occurs in two ways. Firstly, the intensity of the protrusion-contraction movement of the cells depends on the cxcr4b concentration. Secondly, the intra-synchronization between the active deformations and the adhesion forces inside each cell is triggered by the cxcr4b-cxcr7b polarity. This influences the inter-synchronization between the cells and results in two main modes of migration: uncoordinated and coordinated. The main objectives of the work were (i) to validate our assumptions with respect to the experimental observations and (ii) to decipher the mechanical conditions leading to efficient migration of the primordium. To achieve the second goal, we will specifically focus on the role of the leader cells and their position inside the population.

  9. Kinetics of intercalation of fluorescent probes in magnesium-aluminium layered double hydroxide within a multiscale reaction-diffusion framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, Daniel; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2016-11-01

    We report the synthesis of magnesium-aluminium layered double hydroxide (LDH) using a reaction-diffusion framework (RDF) that exploits the multiscale coupling of molecular diffusion with chemical reactions, nucleation and growth of crystals. In an RDF, the hydroxide anions are allowed to diffuse into an organic gel matrix containing the salt mixture needed for the precipitation of the LDH. The chemical structure and composition of the synthesized magnesium-aluminium LDHs are determined using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermo-gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR), Fourier transform infrared and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. This novel technique also allows the investigation of the mechanism of intercalation of some fluorescent probes, such as the neutral three-dimensional rhodamine B (RhB) and the negatively charged two-dimensional 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (HPTS), using in situ steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. The incorporation of these organic dyes inside the interlayer region of the LDH is confirmed via fluorescence microscopy, solid-state lifetime, SSNMR and PXRD. The activation energies of intercalation of the corresponding molecules (RhB and HPTS) are computed and exhibit dependence on the geometry of the involved probe (two or three dimensions), the charge of the fluorescent molecule (anionic, cationic or neutral) and the cationic ratio of the corresponding LDH. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'.

  10. Simulation of reaction diffusion processes over biologically relevant size and time scales using multi-GPU workstations.

    PubMed

    Hallock, Michael J; Stone, John E; Roberts, Elijah; Fry, Corey; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2014-05-01

    Simulation of in vivo cellular processes with the reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a computationally expensive task. Our previous software enabled simulation of inhomogeneous biochemical systems for small bacteria over long time scales using the MPD-RDME method on a single GPU. Simulations of larger eukaryotic systems exceed the on-board memory capacity of individual GPUs, and long time simulations of modest-sized cells such as yeast are impractical on a single GPU. We present a new multi-GPU parallel implementation of the MPD-RDME method based on a spatial decomposition approach that supports dynamic load balancing for workstations containing GPUs of varying performance and memory capacity. We take advantage of high-performance features of CUDA for peer-to-peer GPU memory transfers and evaluate the performance of our algorithms on state-of-the-art GPU devices. We present parallel e ciency and performance results for simulations using multiple GPUs as system size, particle counts, and number of reactions grow. We also demonstrate multi-GPU performance in simulations of the Min protein system in E. coli. Moreover, our multi-GPU decomposition and load balancing approach can be generalized to other lattice-based problems.

  11. Simulation of reaction diffusion processes over biologically relevant size and time scales using multi-GPU workstations

    PubMed Central

    Hallock, Michael J.; Stone, John E.; Roberts, Elijah; Fry, Corey; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of in vivo cellular processes with the reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a computationally expensive task. Our previous software enabled simulation of inhomogeneous biochemical systems for small bacteria over long time scales using the MPD-RDME method on a single GPU. Simulations of larger eukaryotic systems exceed the on-board memory capacity of individual GPUs, and long time simulations of modest-sized cells such as yeast are impractical on a single GPU. We present a new multi-GPU parallel implementation of the MPD-RDME method based on a spatial decomposition approach that supports dynamic load balancing for workstations containing GPUs of varying performance and memory capacity. We take advantage of high-performance features of CUDA for peer-to-peer GPU memory transfers and evaluate the performance of our algorithms on state-of-the-art GPU devices. We present parallel e ciency and performance results for simulations using multiple GPUs as system size, particle counts, and number of reactions grow. We also demonstrate multi-GPU performance in simulations of the Min protein system in E. coli. Moreover, our multi-GPU decomposition and load balancing approach can be generalized to other lattice-based problems. PMID:24882911

  12. Importance of the Voronoi domain partition for position-jump reaction-diffusion processes on nonuniform rectilinear lattices.

    PubMed

    Yates, Christian A; Baker, Ruth E

    2013-11-01

    Position-jump processes are used for the mathematical modeling of spatially extended chemical and biological systems with increasing frequency. A large subset of the literature concerning such processes is concerned with modeling the effect of stochasticity on reaction-diffusion systems. Traditionally, computational domains have been divided into regular voxels. Molecules are assumed well mixed within each of these voxels and are allowed to react with other molecules within the same voxel or to jump to neighboring voxels with predefined transition rates. For a variety of reasons implementing position-jump processes on irregular grids is becoming increasingly important. However, it is not immediately clear what form an appropriate irregular partition of the domain should take if it is to allow the derivation of mean molecular concentrations that agree with a given partial differential equation for molecular concentrations. It has been demonstrated, in one dimension, that the Voronoi domain partition is the appropriate method with which to divide the computational domain. In this Brief Report, we investigate theoretically the propriety of the Voronoi domain partition as an appropriate method to partition domains for position-jump models in higher dimensions. We also provide simulations of diffusion processes in two dimensions in order to corroborate our results.

  13. Reaction-diffusion-like formalism for plastic neural networks reveals dissipative solitons at criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grytskyy, Dmytro; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2016-06-01

    Self-organized structures in networks with spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP) are likely to play a central role for information processing in the brain. In the present study we derive a reaction-diffusion-like formalism for plastic feed-forward networks of nonlinear rate-based model neurons with a correlation sensitive learning rule inspired by and being qualitatively similar to STDP. After obtaining equations that describe the change of the spatial shape of the signal from layer to layer, we derive a criterion for the nonlinearity necessary to obtain stable dynamics for arbitrary input. We classify the possible scenarios of signal evolution and find that close to the transition to the unstable regime metastable solutions appear. The form of these dissipative solitons is determined analytically and the evolution and interaction of several such coexistent objects is investigated.

  14. Slowing Allee effect versus accelerating heavy tails in monostable reaction diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, Matthieu

    2017-02-01

    We focus on the spreading properties of solutions of monostable reaction-diffusion equations. Initial data are assumed to have heavy tails, which tends to accelerate the invasion phenomenon. On the other hand, the nonlinearity involves a weak Allee effect, which tends to slow down the process. We study the balance between the two effects. For algebraic tails, we prove the exact separation between ‘no acceleration’ and ’acceleration’. This implies in particular that, for tails exponentially unbounded but lighter than algebraic, acceleration never occurs in the presence of an Allee effect. This is in sharp contrast with the KPP situation [20]. When algebraic tails lead to acceleration despite the Allee effect, we also give an accurate estimate of the position of the level sets.

  15. Reaction-diffusion-like formalism for plastic neural networks reveals dissipative solitons at criticality.

    PubMed

    Grytskyy, Dmytro; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2016-06-01

    Self-organized structures in networks with spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP) are likely to play a central role for information processing in the brain. In the present study we derive a reaction-diffusion-like formalism for plastic feed-forward networks of nonlinear rate-based model neurons with a correlation sensitive learning rule inspired by and being qualitatively similar to STDP. After obtaining equations that describe the change of the spatial shape of the signal from layer to layer, we derive a criterion for the nonlinearity necessary to obtain stable dynamics for arbitrary input. We classify the possible scenarios of signal evolution and find that close to the transition to the unstable regime metastable solutions appear. The form of these dissipative solitons is determined analytically and the evolution and interaction of several such coexistent objects is investigated.

  16. Numerical methods for one-dimensional reaction-diffusion equations arising in combustion theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos, J. I.

    1987-01-01

    A review of numerical methods for one-dimensional reaction-diffusion equations arising in combustion theory is presented. The methods reviewed include explicit, implicit, quasi-linearization, time linearization, operator-splitting, random walk and finite-element techniques and methods of lines. Adaptive and nonadaptive procedures are also reviewed. These techniques are applied first to solve two model problems which have exact traveling wave solutions with which the numerical results can be compared. This comparison is performed in terms of both the wave profile and computed wave speed. It is shown that the computed wave speed is not a good indicator of the accuracy of a particular method. A fourth-order time-linearized, Hermitian compact operator technique is found to be the most accurate method for a variety of time and space sizes.

  17. Synchronization of Coupled Reaction-Diffusion Neural Networks With Directed Topology via an Adaptive Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Sheng, Yin; Zeng, Zhigang

    2017-03-15

    This paper investigates the synchronization issue of coupled reaction-diffusion neural networks with directed topology via an adaptive approach. Due to the complexity of the network structure and the presence of space variables, it is difficult to design proper adaptive strategies on coupling weights to accomplish the synchronous goal. Under the assumptions of two kinds of special network structures, that is, directed spanning path and directed spanning tree, some novel edge-based adaptive laws, which utilized the local information of node dynamics fully are designed on the coupling weights for reaching synchronization. By constructing appropriate energy function, and utilizing some analytical techniques, several sufficient conditions are given. Finally, some simulation examples are given to verify the effectiveness of the obtained theoretical results.

  18. An image-driven parameter estimation problem for a reaction-diffusion glioma growth model with mass effects

    PubMed Central

    Hogea, Cosmina; Davatzikos, Christos; Biros, George

    2010-01-01

    We present a framework for modeling gliomas growth and their mechanical impact on the surrounding brain tissue (the so-called, mass-effect). We employ an Eulerian continuum approach that results in a strongly coupled system of nonlinear Partial Differential Equations (PDEs): a reaction-diffusion model for the tumor growth and a piecewise linearly elastic material for the background tissue. To estimate unknown model parameters and enable patient-specific simulations we formulate and solve a PDE-constrained optimization problem. Our two main goals are the following: (1) to improve the deformable registration from images of brain tumor patients to a common stereotactic space, thereby assisting in the construction of statistical anatomical atlases; and (2) to develop predictive capabilities for glioma growth, after the model parameters are estimated for a given patient. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt in the literature to introduce an adjoint-based, PDE-constrained optimization formulation in the context of image-driven modeling spatio-temporal tumor evolution. In this paper, we present the formulation, and the solution method and we conduct 1D numerical experiments for preliminary evaluation of the overall formulation/methodology. PMID:18026731

  19. Modified Taylor-Couette Flow in Multiply-Waisted Hourglass Geometries Simulations based upon Reaction-Diffusion Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Thomas; Hou, Yu; Kowalski, Adam; Wiener, Richard

    2006-05-01

    The Reaction-Diffusion model predicted a period doubling cascade to chaos in a situation analagous Taylor- Couette flow with hourglass geometry. This cascade to chaos was discovered in the actual fluid flow experiments. We model Taylor-Couette flow in a cylindrical geometry with multiple waists of super-critical flow connected by regions of barely super-critical flow by corresponding Reaction-Diffusion models. We compare our results to the findings of an ongoing experimental program. H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14, 1235 (1991). Richard J. Wiener et al, Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997).

  20. Finite-Time Stability Analysis of Reaction-Diffusion Genetic Regulatory Networks with Time-Varying Delays.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaofei; Zhang, Xian; Wu, Ligang; Shi, Michael

    2016-04-11

    This paper is concerned with the finite-time stability problem of the delayed genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) with reaction-diffusion terms under Dirichlet boundary conditions. By constructing a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional including quad- slope integrations, we establish delay-dependent finite-time stabil- ity criteria by employing the Wirtinger-type integral inequality, Gronwall inequality, convex technique, and reciprocally convex technique. In addition, the obtained criteria are also reaction- diffusion-dependent. Finally, a numerical example is provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  1. Implications of the Turing completeness of reaction-diffusion models, informed by GPGPU simulations on an XBox 360: cardiac arrhythmias, re-entry and the Halting problem.

    PubMed

    Scarle, Simon

    2009-08-01

    In the arsenal of tools that a computational modeller can bring to bare on the study of cardiac arrhythmias, the most widely used and arguably the most successful is that of an excitable medium, a special case of a reaction-diffusion model. These are used to simulate the internal chemical reactions of a cardiac cell and the diffusion of their membrane voltages. Via a number of different methodologies it has previously been shown that reaction-diffusion systems are at multiple levels Turing complete. That is, they are capable of computation in the same manner as a universal Turing machine. However, all such computational systems are subject to a limitation known as the Halting problem. By constructing a universal logic gate using a cardiac cell model, we highlight how the Halting problem therefore could limit what it is possible to predict about cardiac tissue, arrhythmias and re-entry. All simulations for this work were carried out on the GPU of an XBox 360 development console, and we also highlight the great gains in computational power and efficiency produced by such general purpose processing on a GPU for cardiac simulations.

  2. On the Hybrid of Fourier Transform and Adomian Decomposition Method for the Solution of Nonlinear Cauchy Problems of the Reaction-Diffusion Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourazar, Salman; Nazari-Golshan, Akbar; Yıldırım, Ahmet; Nourazar, Maryam

    2012-07-01

    The physical science importance of the Cauchy problem of the reaction-diffusion equation appears in the modelling of a wide variety of nonlinear systems in physics, chemistry, ecology, biology, and engineering. A hybrid of Fourier transform and Adomian decomposition method (FTADM) is developed for solving the nonlinear non-homogeneous partial differential equations of the Cauchy problem of reaction-diffusion. The results of the FTADM and the ADM are compared with the exact solution. The comparison reveals that for the same components of the recursive sequences, the errors associated with the FTADM are much lesser than those of the ADM. We show that as time increases the results of the FTADM approaches 1 with only six recursive terms. This is in agreement with the physical property of the density-dependent nonlinear diffusion of the Cauchy problem which is also in agreement with the exact solution. The monotonic and very rapid convergence of the results of the FTADM towards the exact solution is shown to be much faster than that of the ADM

  3. Systematic derivation of reaction-diffusion equations with distributed delays and relations to fractional reaction-diffusion equations and hyperbolic transport equations: application to the theory of Neolithic transition.

    PubMed

    Vlad, Marcel Ovidiu; Ross, John

    2002-12-01

    We introduce a general method for the systematic derivation of nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations with distributed delays. We study the interactions among different types of moving individuals (atoms, molecules, quasiparticles, biological organisms, etc). The motion of each species is described by the continuous time random walk theory, analyzed in the literature for transport problems, whereas the interactions among the species are described by a set of transformation rates, which are nonlinear functions of the local concentrations of the different types of individuals. We use the time interval between two jumps (the transition time) as an additional state variable and obtain a set of evolution equations, which are local in time. In order to make a connection with the transport models used in the literature, we make transformations which eliminate the transition time and derive a set of nonlocal equations which are nonlinear generalizations of the so-called generalized master equations. The method leads under different specified conditions to various types of nonlocal transport equations including a nonlinear generalization of fractional diffusion equations, hyperbolic reaction-diffusion equations, and delay-differential reaction-diffusion equations. Thus in the analysis of a given problem we can fit to the data the type of reaction-diffusion equation and the corresponding physical and kinetic parameters. The method is illustrated, as a test case, by the study of the neolithic transition. We introduce a set of assumptions which makes it possible to describe the transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture economics by a differential delay reaction-diffusion equation for the population density. We derive a delay evolution equation for the rate of advance of agriculture, which illustrates an application of our analysis.

  4. Computation and visualization of spreading depression based on reaction-diffusion equation with recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hongxia; Chen, Shangbin; Zeng, Shuai; Zeng, Shaoqun; Liu, Qian; Luo, Qingming

    2008-12-01

    Spreading depression (SD) shows as propagating suppression of electrical activity, which relates with migraine and focal cerebral ischaemia. The putative mechanism of SD is the reaction-diffusion hypothesis involving potassium ions. In part inspired by optical imaging of two SD waves collision, we aimed to show the merged and large wavefront but not annihilation during collision by experimental and computational study. This paper modified Reggia et al established bistable equation with recovery to compute and visualize SD. Firstly, the media tissue of SD was assumed as one-dimensional continuum. The Crank-Nicholson method was used to solve the modified equations with recovery term. Then, the computation results were extended to two-dimensional space by symmetry. One individual SD was visualized as a concentric wave initiating from the stimulation point. The mergence but not annihilation of two colliding waves of SD was demonstrated. In addition, the dynamics of SD depending on the parameters was studied and presented. The results allied SD with the emerging concepts of volume transmission. This work not only supplied a paradigm to compute and visualize SD but also became a tool to explore the mechanisms of SD.

  5. Local traps as nanoscale reaction-diffusion probes: B clustering in c-Si

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, B. J.; Cowern, N. E. B.; Ahn, C.; Vandervorst, W.; Gwilliam, R.; Berkum, J. G. M. van

    2014-12-01

    A series of B implantation experiments into initially amorphized and not fully recrystallized Si, i.e., into an existing a/c-Si bi-layer material, have been conducted. We varied B dose, energy, and temperature during implantation process itself. Significant B migration has been observed within c-Si part near the a/c-interface and near the end-of-range region before any activation annealing. We propose a general concept of local trapping sites as experimental probes of nanoscale reaction-diffusion processes. Here, the a/c-Si interface acts as a trap, and the process itself is explored as the migration and clustering of mobile BI point defects in nearby c-Si during implantation at temperatures from 77 to 573 K. We find that at room temperature—even at B concentrations as high as 1.6 atomic %, the key B-B pairing step requires diffusion lengths of several nm owing to a small, ∼0.1 eV, pairing energy barrier. Thus, in nanostructures doped by ion implantation, the implant distribution can be strongly influenced by thermal migration to nearby impurities, defects, and interfaces.

  6. A higher order accurate solution decomposition scheme for a singularly perturbed parabolic reaction-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, G. I.; Shishkina, L. P.

    2015-03-01

    An initial-boundary value problem is considered for a singularly perturbed parabolic reaction-diffusion equation. For this problem, a technique is developed for constructing higher order accurate difference schemes that converge ɛ-uniformly in the maximum norm (where ɛ is the perturbation parameter multiplying the highest order derivative, ɛ ∈ (0, 1]). A solution decomposition scheme is described in which the grid subproblems for the regular and singular solution components are considered on uniform meshes. The Richardson technique is used to construct a higher order accurate solution decomposition scheme whose solution converges ɛ-uniformly in the maximum norm at a rate of [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.], where N + 1 and N 0 + 1 are the numbers of nodes in uniform meshes in x and t, respectively. Also, a new numerical-analytical Richardson scheme for the solution decomposition method is developed. Relying on the approach proposed, improved difference schemes can be constructed by applying the solution decomposition method and the Richardson extrapolation method when the number of embedded grids is more than two. These schemes converge ɛ-uniformly with an order close to the sixth in x and equal to the third in t.

  7. A Richardson scheme of the decomposition method for solving singularly perturbed parabolic reaction-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, G. I.; Shishkina, L. P.

    2010-12-01

    For the one-dimensional singularly perturbed parabolic reaction-diffusion equation with a perturbation parameter ɛ, where ɛ ∈ (0, 1], the grid approximation of the Dirichlet problem on a rectangular domain in the ( x, t)-plane is examined. For small ɛ, a parabolic boundary layer emerges in a neighborhood of the lateral part of the boundary of this domain. A new approach to the construction of ɛ-uniformly converging difference schemes of higher accuracy is developed for initial boundary value problems. The asymptotic construction technique is used to design the base decomposition scheme within which the regular and singular components of the grid solution are solutions to grid subproblems defined on uniform grids. The base scheme converges ɛ-uniformly in the maximum norm at the rate of O( N -2ln2 N + N {0/-1}), where N + 1 and N 0 + 1 are the numbers of nodes in the space and time meshes, respectively. An application of the Richardson extrapolation technique to the base scheme yields a higher order scheme called the Richardson decomposition scheme. This higher order scheme convergesɛ-uniformly at the rate of O( N -4ln4 N + N {0/-2}). For fixed values of the parameter, the convergence rate is O( N -4 + N {0/-2}).

  8. Reaction diffusion model of the enzymatic erosion of insoluble fibrillar matrices.

    PubMed Central

    Tzafriri, Abraham R; Bercovier, Michel; Parnas, Hanna

    2002-01-01

    Predicting the time course of in vivo biodegradation is a key issue in the design of an increasing number of biomedical applications such as sutures, tissue analogs and drug-delivery devices. The design of such biodegradable devices is hampered by the absence of quantitative models for the enzymatic erosion of solid protein matrices. In this work, we derive and simulate a reaction diffusion model for the enzymatic erosion of fibrillar gels that successfully reproduces the main qualitative features of this process. A key aspect of the proposed model is the incorporation of steric hindrance into the standard Michaelis-Menten scheme for enzyme kinetics. In the limit of instantaneous diffusion, the model equations are analogous to the standard equations for enzymatic degradation in solution. Invoking this analogy, the total quasi-steady-state approximation is used to derive approximate analytical solutions that are valid for a wide range of in vitro conditions. Using these analytical approximations, an experimental-theoretical method is derived to unambiguously estimate all the kinetic model parameters. Moreover, the analytical approximations correctly describe the characteristic hyperbolic dependence of the erosion rate on enzyme concentration and the zero-order erosion of thin fibers. For definiteness, the analysis of published experimental results of enzymatic degradation of fibrillar collagen is demonstrated, and the role of diffusion in these experiments is elucidated. PMID:12124264

  9. Revisited reaction-diffusion model of thermal desorption spectroscopy experiments on hydrogen retention in material

    SciTech Connect

    Guterl, Jerome Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2015-07-28

    Desorption phase of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) experiments performed on tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion relevant conditions is analyzed using a reaction-diffusion model describing hydrogen retention in material bulk. Two regimes of hydrogen desorption are identified depending on whether hydrogen trapping rate is faster than hydrogen diffusion rate in material during TDS experiments. In both regimes, a majority of hydrogen released from material defects is immediately outgassed instead of diffusing deeply in material bulk when the evolution of hydrogen concentration in material is quasi-static, which is the case during TDS experiments performed with tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion related conditions. In this context, analytical expressions of the hydrogen outgassing flux as a function of the material temperature are obtained with sufficient accuracy to describe main features of thermal desorption spectra (TDSP). These expressions are then used to highlight how characteristic temperatures of TDSP depend on hydrogen retention parameters, such as trap concentration or activation energy of detrapping processes. The use of Arrhenius plots to characterize retention processes is then revisited when hydrogen trapping takes place during TDS experiments. Retention processes are also characterized using the shape of desorption peaks in TDSP, and it is shown that diffusion of hydrogen in material during TDS experiment can induce long desorption tails visible aside desorption peaks at high temperature in TDSP. These desorption tails can be used to estimate activation energy of diffusion of hydrogen in material.

  10. A reaction-diffusion model for migmatization in high-grade metamorphic terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Amiya; Roy, Manas Kumar; Mandal, Nibir; Misra, Santanu

    2016-04-01

    Migmatitic rocks evolve through a complex interaction of metamorphism, anatectic melting and solid-state chemical mixing of two principal components: leucosome (quartzofeldspathic materials- L) and melanosome (ferromagnesian materials- M). Melt segregation and their migration are central to generate the features commonly observed in migmatitic rocks. Such L-M interaction leads to melt transport often maintaining a sharp interface between the two units. Existing theoretical and experimental models predicts melt segregation to occur under the combined effects of gravity-driven flow, local stress drop, convection, and advection. However, the efficiency of these processes in large scale transport of melts is largely uncertain. The present study theorizes the migmatization process, treating interactions of the two components (L and M) in the framework of prey-predator dynamics. We propose a reaction-diffusion (RD) model to explore the micro-scale attributes to explain various migmatitic structures observed in the Chotonagpur Granite Gneissic Complex, India. Our simulation couples the L-M phases to a pinning field, accounting linear and non-linear interactions in the diffusion process. The RD model shows that migration of the L-phase into M-phase produces a simple, planar to a complex, multi-ordered geometrical pattern at their interfaces, depending upon the contrast in diffusion coefficients (D) and the pinning factor (W). Furthermore, our models suggest that the linear and the non-linear coupling between L and M phases are critical for the formation of migmatitic structures.

  11. Convergence of methods for coupling of microscopic and mesoscopic reaction-diffusion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegg, Mark B.; Hellander, Stefan; Erban, Radek

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, three multiscale methods for coupling of mesoscopic (compartment-based) and microscopic (molecular-based) stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations are investigated. Two of the three methods that will be discussed in detail have been previously reported in the literature; the two-regime method (TRM) and the compartment-placement method (CPM). The third method that is introduced and analysed in this paper is called the ghost cell method (GCM), since it works by constructing a "ghost cell" in which molecules can disappear and jump into the compartment-based simulation. Presented is a comparison of sources of error. The convergent properties of this error are studied as the time step Δt (for updating the molecular-based part of the model) approaches zero. It is found that the error behaviour depends on another fundamental computational parameter h, the compartment size in the mesoscopic part of the model. Two important limiting cases, which appear in applications, are considered: Δt → 0 and h is fixed; Δt → 0 and h → 0 such that √{ Δt } / h is fixed. The error for previously developed approaches (the TRM and CPM) converges to zero only in the limiting case (ii), but not in case (i). It is shown that the error of the GCM converges in the limiting case (i). Thus the GCM is superior to previous coupling techniques if the mesoscopic description is much coarser than the microscopic part of the model.

  12. A nonlocal and periodic reaction-diffusion-advection model of a single phytoplankton species.

    PubMed

    Peng, Rui; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we are concerned with a nonlocal reaction-diffusion-advection model which describes the evolution of a single phytoplankton species in a eutrophic vertical water column where the species relies solely on light for its metabolism. The new feature of our modeling equation lies in that the incident light intensity and the death rate are assumed to be time periodic with a common period. We first establish a threshold type result on the global dynamics of this model in terms of the basic reproduction number R0. Then we derive various characterizations of R0 with respect to the vertical turbulent diffusion rate, the sinking or buoyant rate and the water column depth, respectively, which in turn give rather precise conditions to determine whether the phytoplankton persist or become extinct. Our theoretical results not only extend the existing ones for the time-independent case, but also reveal new interesting effects of the modeling parameters and the time-periodic heterogeneous environment on persistence and extinction of the phytoplankton species, and thereby suggest important implications for phytoplankton growth control.

  13. Tumor Growth Prediction with Reaction-Diffusion and Hyperelastic Biomechanical Model by Physiological Data Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ken C. L.; Summers, Ronald M.; Kebebew, Electron; Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    The goal of tumor growth prediction is to model the tumor growth process, which can be achieved by physiological modeling and model personalization from clinical measurements. Although image-driven frameworks have been proposed with promising results, several issues such as infinitesimal strain assumptions, complicated personalization procedures, and the lack of functional information, may limit their prediction accuracy. In view of these issues, we propose a framework for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor growth prediction, which comprises a FEM-based tumor growth model with coupled reaction-diffusion equation and nonlinear biomechanics. Physiological data fusion of structural and functional images is used to improve the subject-specificity of model personalization, and a derivative-free global optimization algorithm is adopted to facilitate the complicated model and accommodate flexible choices of objective functions. With this flexibility, we propose an objective function accounting for both the tumor volume difference and the root-mean-squared error of intracellular volume fractions. Experiments were performed on synthetic and clinical data to verify the parameter estimation capability and the prediction performance. Comparisons of using different biomechanical models and objective functions were also performed. From the experimental results of eight patient data sets, the average recall, precision, Dice coefficient, and relative volume difference between predicted and measured tumor volumes were 84.5±6.9%, 85.8±8.2%, 84.6±1.7%, and 14.2±8.4%, respectively. PMID:25962846

  14. A reaction-diffusion model of the Darien Gap Sterile Insect Release Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, John G.

    2015-05-01

    The Sterile Insect Release Method (SIRM) is used as a biological control for invasive insect species. SIRM involves introducing large quantities of sterilized male insects into a wild population of invading insects. A fertile/sterile mating produces offspring that are not viable and the wild insect population will eventually be eradicated. A U.S. government program maintains a permanent sterile fly barrier zone in the Darien Gap between Panama and Columbia to control the screwworm fly (Cochliomyia Hominivorax), an insect that feeds off of living tissue in mammals and has devastating effects on livestock. This barrier zone is maintained by regular releases of massive quantities of sterilized male screwworm flies from aircraft. We analyze a reaction-diffusion model of the Darien Gap barrier zone. Simulations of the model equations yield two types of spatially inhomogeneous steady-state solutions representing a sterile fly barrier that does not prevent invasion and a barrier that does prevent invasion. We investigate steady-state solutions using both phase plane methods and monotone iteration methods and describe how barrier width and the sterile fly release rate affects steady-state behavior.

  15. Local traps as nanoscale reaction-diffusion probes: B clustering in c-Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, B. J.; Cowern, N. E. B.; Ahn, C.; Vandervorst, W.; Gwilliam, R.; van Berkum, J. G. M.

    2014-12-01

    A series of B implantation experiments into initially amorphized and not fully recrystallized Si, i.e., into an existing a/c-Si bi-layer material, have been conducted. We varied B dose, energy, and temperature during implantation process itself. Significant B migration has been observed within c-Si part near the a/c-interface and near the end-of-range region before any activation annealing. We propose a general concept of local trapping sites as experimental probes of nanoscale reaction-diffusion processes. Here, the a/c-Si interface acts as a trap, and the process itself is explored as the migration and clustering of mobile BI point defects in nearby c-Si during implantation at temperatures from 77 to 573 K. We find that at room temperature—even at B concentrations as high as 1.6 atomic %, the key B-B pairing step requires diffusion lengths of several nm owing to a small, ˜0.1 eV, pairing energy barrier. Thus, in nanostructures doped by ion implantation, the implant distribution can be strongly influenced by thermal migration to nearby impurities, defects, and interfaces.

  16. Bifurcation analysis of a delay reaction-diffusion malware propagation model with feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linhe; Zhao, Hongyong; Wang, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    With the rapid development of network information technology, information networks security has become a very critical issue in our work and daily life. This paper attempts to develop a delay reaction-diffusion model with a state feedback controller to describe the process of malware propagation in mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSNs). By analyzing the stability and Hopf bifurcation, we show that the state feedback method can successfully be used to control unstable steady states or periodic oscillations. Moreover, formulas for determining the properties of the bifurcating periodic oscillations are derived by applying the normal form method and center manifold theorem. Finally, we conduct extensive simulations on large-scale MWSNs to evaluate the proposed model. Numerical evidences show that the linear term of the controller is enough to delay the onset of the Hopf bifurcation and the properties of the bifurcation can be regulated to achieve some desirable behaviors by choosing the appropriate higher terms of the controller. Furthermore, we obtain that the spatial-temporal dynamic characteristics of malware propagation are closely related to the rate constant for nodes leaving the infective class for recovered class and the mobile behavior of nodes.

  17. Influence of temperature on linear stability in buoyancy-driven fingering of reaction-diffusion fronts.

    PubMed

    Levitán, D; D'Onofrio, A

    2012-09-01

    A vertical Hele-Shaw cell was used to study the influence of temperature on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities on reaction-diffusion fronts. The propagation of the chemical front can thus be observed, and experimental results can be obtained via image treatment. A chemical front produced by the coupling between molecular diffusion and the auto-catalysis of the chlorite-tetrathionate reaction, descends through the cell, consuming the reactants below while the product is formed above. Buoyancy-driven instabilities are formed due to the density difference between reactants and products, and the front takes a fingering pattern, whose growth rate has temperature dependence. In this study, the effect of temperature on the linear regime of the instability (that is, when the effects of such instability start to appear) was analyzed. To measure the instability, Fourier transform analysis is performed, in order to obtain the different wave numbers and their power as a function of time. Thus, the growth rate for each wave number and the most unstable wave number is obtained for each of the temperatures under study. Based on repeated experiments, a decrease in the growth rate for the most unstable wave number can be observed with the increase of temperature.

  18. Lie symmetry properties of nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations with gradient-dependent diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniha, Roman; King, John R.; Kovalenko, Sergii

    2016-07-01

    Complete descriptions of the Lie symmetries of a class of nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations with gradient-dependent diffusivity in one and two space dimensions are obtained. A surprisingly rich set of Lie symmetry algebras depending on the form of diffusivity and source (sink) in the equations is derived. It is established that there exists a subclass in 1-D space admitting an infinite-dimensional Lie algebra of invariance so that it is linearisable. A special power-law diffusivity with a fixed exponent, which leads to wider Lie invariance of the equations in question in 2-D space, is also derived. However, it is shown that the diffusion equation without a source term (which often arises in applications and is sometimes called the Perona-Malik equation) possesses no rich variety of Lie symmetries depending on the form of gradient-dependent diffusivity. The results of the Lie symmetry classification for the reduction to lower dimensionality, and a search for exact solutions of the nonlinear 2-D equation with power-law diffusivity, also are included.

  19. Computational solutions of unified fractional reaction-diffusion equations with composite fractional time derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, R. K.; Mathai, A. M.; Haubold, H. J.

    2015-10-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of the computational solutions of an unified fractional reaction-diffusion equation, which is obtained from the standard diffusion equation by replacing the time derivative of first order by the generalized fractional time-derivative defined by Hilfer (2000), the space derivative of second order by the Riesz-Feller fractional derivative and adding the function ϕ (x, t) which is a nonlinear function governing reaction. The solution is derived by the application of the Laplace and Fourier transforms in a compact and closed form in terms of the H-function. The main result obtained in this paper provides an elegant extension of the fundamental solution for the space-time fractional diffusion equation obtained earlier by Mainardi et al. (2001, 2005) and a result very recently given by Tomovski et al. (2011). Computational representation of the fundamental solution is also obtained explicitly. Fractional order moments of the distribution are deduced. At the end, mild extensions of the derived results associated with a finite number of Riesz-Feller space fractional derivatives are also discussed.

  20. Traveling waves in a coupled reaction-diffusion and difference model of hematopoiesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adimy, M.; Chekroun, A.; Kazmierczak, B.

    2017-04-01

    The formation and development of blood cells is a very complex process, called hematopoiesis. This process involves a small population of cells called hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). The HSCs are undifferentiated cells, located in the bone marrow before they become mature blood cells and enter the blood stream. They have a unique ability to produce either similar cells (self-renewal), or cells engaged in one of different lineages of blood cells: red blood cells, white cells and platelets (differentiation). The HSCs can be either in a proliferating or in a quiescent phase. In this paper, we distinguish between dividing cells that enter directly to the quiescent phase and dividing cells that return to the proliferating phase to divide again. We propose a mathematical model describing the dynamics of HSC population, taking into account their spatial distribution. The resulting model is a coupled reaction-diffusion equation and difference equation with delay. We study the existence of monotone traveling wave fronts and the asymptotic speed of spread.

  1. Patchy reaction-diffusion and population abundance: the relative importance of habitat amount and arrangement.

    PubMed

    Flather, Curtis H; Bevers, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A discrete reaction-diffusion model was used to estimate long-term equilibrium populations of a hypothetical species inhabiting patchy landscapes to examine the relative importance of habitat amount and arrangement in explaining population size. When examined over a broad range of habitat amounts and arrangements, population size was largely determined by a pure amount effect (proportion of habitat in the landscape accounted for >96% of the total variation compared to <1% for the arrangement main effect). However, population response deviated from a pure amount effect as coverage was reduced below 30%-50%. That deviation coincided with a persistence threshold as indicated by a rapid decline in the probability of landscapes supporting viable populations. When we partitioned experimental landscapes into sets of "above" and "below" persistence threshold, habitat arrangement became an important factor in explaining population size below threshold conditions. Regression analysis on below-threshold landscapes using explicit measures of landscape structure (after removing the covariation with habitat amount) indicated that arrangement variables accounted for 33%-39% of the variation in population size, compared to 27%-49% for habitat amount. Thus, habitat arrangement effects became important when species persistence became uncertain due to dispersal mortality.

  2. Crawling and turning in a minimal reaction-diffusion cell motility model: Coupling cell shape and biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Camley, Brian A; Zhao, Yanxiang; Li, Bo; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2017-01-01

    We study a minimal model of a crawling eukaryotic cell with a chemical polarity controlled by a reaction-diffusion mechanism describing Rho GTPase dynamics. The size, shape, and speed of the cell emerge from the combination of the chemical polarity, which controls the locations where actin polymerization occurs, and the physical properties of the cell, including its membrane tension. We find in our model both highly persistent trajectories, in which the cell crawls in a straight line, and turning trajectories, where the cell transitions from crawling in a line to crawling in a circle. We discuss the controlling variables for this turning instability and argue that turning arises from a coupling between the reaction-diffusion mechanism and the shape of the cell. This emphasizes the surprising features that can arise from simple links between cell mechanics and biochemistry. Our results suggest that similar instabilities may be present in a broad class of biochemical descriptions of cell polarity.

  3. Crawling and turning in a minimal reaction-diffusion cell motility model: Coupling cell shape and biochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camley, Brian A.; Zhao, Yanxiang; Li, Bo; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2017-01-01

    We study a minimal model of a crawling eukaryotic cell with a chemical polarity controlled by a reaction-diffusion mechanism describing Rho GTPase dynamics. The size, shape, and speed of the cell emerge from the combination of the chemical polarity, which controls the locations where actin polymerization occurs, and the physical properties of the cell, including its membrane tension. We find in our model both highly persistent trajectories, in which the cell crawls in a straight line, and turning trajectories, where the cell transitions from crawling in a line to crawling in a circle. We discuss the controlling variables for this turning instability and argue that turning arises from a coupling between the reaction-diffusion mechanism and the shape of the cell. This emphasizes the surprising features that can arise from simple links between cell mechanics and biochemistry. Our results suggest that similar instabilities may be present in a broad class of biochemical descriptions of cell polarity.

  4. Finite-scale singularity in the renormalization group flow of a reaction-diffusion system.

    PubMed

    Gredat, Damien; Chaté, Hugues; Delamotte, Bertrand; Dornic, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    We study the nonequilibrium critical behavior of the pair contact process with diffusion (PCPD) by means of nonperturbative functional renormalization group techniques. We show that usual perturbation theory fails because the effective potential develops a nonanalyticity at a finite length scale: Perturbatively forbidden terms are dynamically generated and the flow can be continued once they are taken into account. Our results suggest that the critical behavior of PCPD can be either in the directed percolation or in a different (conjugated) universality class.

  5. Reaction-diffusion systems in natural sciences and new technology transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, André A.

    2012-12-01

    Diffusion mechanisms in natural sciences and innovation management involve partial differential equations (PDEs). This is due to their spatio-temporal dimensions. Functional semi-discretized PDEs (with lattice spatial structures or time delays) may be even more adapted to real world problems. In the modeling process, PDEs can also formalize behaviors, such as the logistic growth of populations with migration, and the adopters’ dynamics of new products in innovation models. In biology, these events are related to variations in the environment, population densities and overcrowding, migration and spreading of humans, animals, plants and other cells and organisms. In chemical reactions, molecules of different species interact locally and diffuse. In the management of new technologies, the diffusion processes of innovations in the marketplace (e.g., the mobile phone) are a major subject. These innovation diffusion models refer mainly to epidemic models. This contribution introduces that modeling process by using PDEs and reviews the essential features of the dynamics and control in biological, chemical and new technology transfer. This paper is essentially user-oriented with basic nonlinear evolution equations, delay PDEs, several analytical and numerical methods for solving, different solutions, and with the use of mathematical packages, notebooks and codes. The computations are carried out by using the software Wolfram Mathematica®7, and C++ codes.

  6. On the Existence of a Free Boundary for a Class of Reaction-Diffusion Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    I. Diaz. "Soluciones con soporte compacto para alguno. problemas semilineales". Collect. Math. 30 (1979), 141-179. -26- [121 J. I. Diaz. Tecnica de...supersoluciones locales para problemas estacionarios no lineales: applicacion al estudio de flujoe subsonicos. Memory of the Real Academia de Ciencias

  7. The time dependent propensity function for acceleration of spatial stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jin; Wu, Sheng; Li, Hong; Petzold, Linda R.

    2014-10-01

    The inhomogeneous stochastic simulation algorithm (ISSA) is a fundamental method for spatial stochastic simulation. However, when diffusion events occur more frequently than reaction events, simulating the diffusion events by ISSA is quite costly. To reduce this cost, we propose to use the time dependent propensity function in each step. In this way we can avoid simulating individual diffusion events, and use the time interval between two adjacent reaction events as the simulation stepsize. We demonstrate that the new algorithm can achieve orders of magnitude efficiency gains over widely-used exact algorithms, scales well with increasing grid resolution, and maintains a high level of accuracy.

  8. The Time Dependent Propensity Function for Acceleration of Spatial Stochastic Simulation of Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng; Li, Hong; Petzold, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    The inhomogeneous stochastic simulation algorithm (ISSA) is a fundamental method for spatial stochastic simulation. However, when diffusion events occur more frequently than reaction events, simulating the diffusion events by ISSA is quite costly. To reduce this cost, we propose to use the time dependent propensity function in each step. In this way we can avoid simulating individual diffusion events, and use the time interval between two adjacent reaction events as the simulation stepsize. We demonstrate that the new algorithm can achieve orders of magnitude efficiency gains over widely-used exact algorithms, scales well with increasing grid resolution, and maintains a high level of accuracy. PMID:26609185

  9. GPU accelerated solver for nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems. Application to the electrophysiology problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena, Andres; Ferrero, Jose M.; Rodriguez Matas, Jose F.

    2015-11-01

    Solving the electric activity of the heart possess a big challenge, not only because of the structural complexities inherent to the heart tissue, but also because of the complex electric behaviour of the cardiac cells. The multi-scale nature of the electrophysiology problem makes difficult its numerical solution, requiring temporal and spatial resolutions of 0.1 ms and 0.2 mm respectively for accurate simulations, leading to models with millions degrees of freedom that need to be solved for thousand time steps. Solution of this problem requires the use of algorithms with higher level of parallelism in multi-core platforms. In this regard the newer programmable graphic processing units (GPU) has become a valid alternative due to their tremendous computational horsepower. This paper presents results obtained with a novel electrophysiology simulation software entirely developed in Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). The software implements fully explicit and semi-implicit solvers for the monodomain model, using operator splitting. Performance is compared with classical multi-core MPI based solvers operating on dedicated high-performance computer clusters. Results obtained with the GPU based solver show enormous potential for this technology with accelerations over 50 × for three-dimensional problems.

  10. Analysis of reaction-diffusion systems for flame capturing in type IA supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhyglo, Andriy V.

    2009-06-01

    We present a study of numerical behavior of a thickened flame used in Flame Capturing (FC, Khokhlov (1995)) for tracking thin physical flames in deflagration simulations. This technique, used extensively in astrophysics, utilizes artificial flame variable to evolve flame region, width of which is resolved in simulations, with physically motivated propagation speed. We develop a steady-state procedure for calibrating flame model used in FC, and test it against analytical results. Original flame model is properly calibrated with taking matter expansion into consideration and keeping artificial flame width at predetermined value regardless of expansion. We observe numerical noises generated by original realization of the technique. Alternative artificial burning rates are discussed, which produce acceptably quiet flames (relative dispersion in propagation speed within 0.1% at physically interesting ratios of fuel and ash densities). Two new quiet models are calibrated to yield required "flame" speed and width, and further studied in 2D and 3D setting. Landau-Darrieus type instabilities of the flames are observed. One model also shows significantly anisotropic propagation speed on the grid, both effects increasingly pronounced at larger matter expansion as a result of burning; these 2D/3D effects make that model unacceptable for use in type Ia supernova simulations at fuel densities below about 100 tons per cubic centimeter. Another model, first presented here, looks promising for use in flame capturing at fuel to ash density ratio of order 3 and below, the interval of most interest for astrophysical applications. No model was found to significantly inhibit LD instability development at larger expansions without increasing flame width. The model we propose, "Model B", yields flames completely localized within a region 6 cells wide at any expansion. We study Markstein effect (speed of the flame dependence on its curvature) for flame models described, through direct numerical simulations and through quasi- steady technique developed. By comparing results obtained by the 2 approaches we demonstrate that Markstein effect dominates instability effects on curved flame speed for Model B in 2D simulations for fuel to ash density of about 2.5 and below. We find critical wavelength of LD instability by direct simulations of perturbed nearly planar flames; these agree with analytical predictions with Markstein number values found in this work. We conclude that the behavior of model B is well understood, and optimal for FC applications among all flame models proposed to date.

  11. Reaction diffusion in the nickel-chromium-aluminum and cobalt-chromium-aluminum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of MCrAl coating-substrate interdiffusion on oxidation life and the general mutliphase, multicomponent diffusion problem were examined. Semi-infinite diffusion couples that had sources representing coatings and sinks representing gas turbine alloys were annealed at 1,000, 1,095, 1,150, or 1,205 C for as long as 500 hours. The source and sink aluminum and chromium contents and the base metal (cobalt or nickel) determined the parabolic diffusion rate constants of the couples and predicted finite coating lives. The beta source strength concept provided a method (1) for correlating beta recession rate constants with composition; (2) for determining reliable average total, diffusion, and constitutional activation energies; and (3) for calculating interdiffusion coefficients.

  12. Manifolds and front propagation barriers in advection-reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Tom

    2015-03-01

    We present experiments on the propagation of reaction fronts in laminar, vortex-dominated flows. The fronts are produced by the excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky chemical reaction. The flows studied are driven by magnetohydrodynamic forcing techniques and are composed of a single vortex, chains or arrays of vortices, or spatially-disordered flows. In all of these cases, one-way barriers appear that either inhibit front propagation or, in some cases, pin the reactions fronts. We analyze this behavior with a recent theory of burning invariant manifolds (BIMs) that are a generalization of the theory of invariant manifolds developed in the past to characterize chaotic mixing and transport of passive impurities. We demonstrate that the BIMs are responsible for the reaction barriers observed experimentally, and we discuss the applicability of this BIM formalism to a range of flows: time-independent, time-periodic and time-aperiodic. Supported by NSF Grants DMR-1004744, DMR-1361881 and PHY-1156964.

  13. Predicting in vivo glioma growth with the reaction diffusion equation constrained by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormuth, David A., II; Weis, Jared A.; Barnes, Stephanie L.; Miga, Michael I.; Rericha, Erin C.; Quaranta, Vito; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-07-01

    Reaction-diffusion models have been widely used to model glioma growth. However, it has not been shown how accurately this model can predict future tumor status using model parameters (i.e., tumor cell diffusion and proliferation) estimated from quantitative in vivo imaging data. To this end, we used in silico studies to develop the methods needed to accurately estimate tumor specific reaction-diffusion model parameters, and then tested the accuracy with which these parameters can predict future growth. The analogous study was then performed in a murine model of glioma growth. The parameter estimation approach was tested using an in silico tumor ‘grown’ for ten days as dictated by the reaction-diffusion equation. Parameters were estimated from early time points and used to predict subsequent growth. Prediction accuracy was assessed at global (total volume and Dice value) and local (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC) levels. Guided by the in silico study, rats (n = 9) with C6 gliomas, imaged with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, were used to evaluate the model’s accuracy for predicting in vivo tumor growth. The in silico study resulted in low global (tumor volume error <8.8%, Dice >0.92) and local (CCC values >0.80) level errors for predictions up to six days into the future. The in vivo study showed higher global (tumor volume error >11.7%, Dice <0.81) and higher local (CCC <0.33) level errors over the same time period. The in silico study shows that model parameters can be accurately estimated and used to accurately predict future tumor growth at both the global and local scale. However, the poor predictive accuracy in the experimental study suggests the reaction-diffusion equation is an incomplete description of in vivo C6 glioma biology and may require further modeling of intra-tumor interactions including segmentation of (for example) proliferative and necrotic regions.

  14. Kinematic reduction of reaction-diffusion fronts with multiplicative noise: derivation of stochastic sharp-interface equations.

    PubMed

    Rocco, A; Ramírez-Piscina, L; Casademunt, J

    2002-05-01

    We study the dynamics of generic reaction-diffusion fronts, including pulses and chemical waves, in the presence of multiplicative noise. We discuss the connection between the reaction-diffusion Langevin-like field equations and the kinematic (eikonal) description in terms of a stochastic moving-boundary or sharp-interface approximation. We find that the effective noise is additive and we relate its strength to the noise parameters in the original field equations, to first order in noise strength, but including a partial resummation to all orders which captures the singular dependence on the microscopic cutoff associated with the spatial correlation of the noise. This dependence is essential for a quantitative and qualitative understanding of fluctuating fronts, affecting both scaling properties and nonuniversal quantities. Our results predict phenomena such as the shift of the transition point between the pushed and pulled regimes of front propagation, in terms of the noise parameters, and the corresponding transition to a non-Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class. We assess the quantitative validity of the results in several examples including equilibrium fluctuations and kinetic roughening. We also predict and observe a noise-induced pushed-pulled transition. The analytical predictions are successfully tested against rigorous results and show excellent agreement with numerical simulations of reaction-diffusion field equations with multiplicative noise.

  15. Exact solutions of linear reaction-diffusion processes on a uniformly growing domain: criteria for successful colonization.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Many processes during embryonic development involve transport and reaction of molecules, or transport and proliferation of cells, within growing tissues. Mathematical models of such processes usually take the form of a reaction-diffusion partial differential equation (PDE) on a growing domain. Previous analyses of such models have mainly involved solving the PDEs numerically. Here, we present a framework for calculating the exact solution of a linear reaction-diffusion PDE on a growing domain. We derive an exact solution for a general class of one-dimensional linear reaction-diffusion process on 0

  16. Nucleic acid based logical systems.

    PubMed

    Han, Da; Kang, Huaizhi; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Cuichen; Zhou, Cuisong; You, Mingxu; Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2014-05-12

    Researchers increasingly visualize a significant role for artificial biochemical logical systems in biological engineering, much like digital logic circuits in electrical engineering. Those logical systems could be utilized as a type of servomechanism to control nanodevices in vitro, monitor chemical reactions in situ, or regulate gene expression in vivo. Nucleic acids (NA), as carriers of genetic information with well-regulated and predictable structures, are promising materials for the design and engineering of biochemical circuits. A number of logical devices based on nucleic acids (NA) have been designed to handle various processes for technological or biotechnological purposes. This article focuses on the most recent and important developments in NA-based logical devices and their evolution from in vitro, through cellular, even towards in vivo biological applications.

  17. Boric Acid Reclamation System (BARS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kniazewycz, B.G.; Markind, J.

    1986-03-01

    KLM Technologies' personnel have identified a Boric Acid Reclamation System (BARS) utilizing reverse osmosis and ultrafiltration to produce a recyclable grade of otherwise waste boric acid at PWRs, thus reducing a major source of low-level radwaste. The design of a prototype BARS as a compact volume reduction system was the result of KLM's Phase 1 Program, and based upon a preliminary feasibility program, which assessed the applicability of membrane technology to refurbish and recycle waste boric acid from floor and equipment drain streams. The analysis of the overall program indicated a substantial savings regarding off-site disposal costs. Today's economic scenario indicates that optimization of volume reduction operation procedures could significantly reduce waste management costs, especially where burial penalties have become more severe. As a reaction to the economic burden imposed by final disposal, many nuclear plants are currently modifying their design and operating philosophies concerning liquid radwaste processing systems to meet stricter environmental regulations, and to derive potential economic benefits by reducing the ever-increasing volumes of wastes that are produced. To effect these changes, innovative practices in waste management and more efficient processing technologies are being successfully implemented.

  18. ReaDDy--a software for particle-based reaction-diffusion dynamics in crowded cellular environments.

    PubMed

    Schöneberg, Johannes; Noé, Frank

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the software package ReaDDy for simulation of detailed spatiotemporal mechanisms of dynamical processes in the cell, based on reaction-diffusion dynamics with particle resolution. In contrast to other particle-based reaction kinetics programs, ReaDDy supports particle interaction potentials. This permits effects such as space exclusion, molecular crowding and aggregation to be modeled. The biomolecules simulated can be represented as a sphere, or as a more complex geometry such as a domain structure or polymer chain. ReaDDy bridges the gap between small-scale but highly detailed molecular dynamics or Brownian dynamics simulations and large-scale but little-detailed reaction kinetics simulations. ReaDDy has a modular design that enables the exchange of the computing core by efficient platform-specific implementations or dynamical models that are different from Brownian dynamics.

  19. Sharp thresholds between finite spread and uniform convergence for a reaction-diffusion equation with oscillating initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giletti, Thomas; Hamel, François

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the large-time dynamics of solutions of multi-dimensional reaction-diffusion equations with ignition type nonlinearities. We consider solutions which are in some sense locally persistent at large time and initial data which asymptotically oscillate around the ignition threshold. We show that, as time goes to infinity, any solution either converges uniformly in space to a constant state, or spreads with a finite speed uniformly in all directions. Furthermore, the transition between these two behaviors is sharp with respect to the period vector of the asymptotic profile of the initial data. We also show the convergence to planar fronts when the initial data are asymptotically periodic in one direction.

  20. A Radial Basis Function (RBF)-Finite Difference (FD) Method for Diffusion and Reaction-Diffusion Equations on Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Varun; Wright, Grady B; Kirby, Robert M; Fogelson, Aaron L

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a method based on Radial Basis Function (RBF)-generated Finite Differences (FD) for numerically solving diffusion and reaction-diffusion equations (PDEs) on closed surfaces embedded in ℝ (d) . Our method uses a method-of-lines formulation, in which surface derivatives that appear in the PDEs are approximated locally using RBF interpolation. The method requires only scattered nodes representing the surface and normal vectors at those scattered nodes. All computations use only extrinsic coordinates, thereby avoiding coordinate distortions and singularities. We also present an optimization procedure that allows for the stabilization of the discrete differential operators generated by our RBF-FD method by selecting shape parameters for each stencil that correspond to a global target condition number. We show the convergence of our method on two surfaces for different stencil sizes, and present applications to nonlinear PDEs simulated both on implicit/parametric surfaces and more general surfaces represented by point clouds.

  1. ReaDDy - A Software for Particle-Based Reaction-Diffusion Dynamics in Crowded Cellular Environments

    PubMed Central

    Schöneberg, Johannes; Noé, Frank

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the software package ReaDDy for simulation of detailed spatiotemporal mechanisms of dynamical processes in the cell, based on reaction-diffusion dynamics with particle resolution. In contrast to other particle-based reaction kinetics programs, ReaDDy supports particle interaction potentials. This permits effects such as space exclusion, molecular crowding and aggregation to be modeled. The biomolecules simulated can be represented as a sphere, or as a more complex geometry such as a domain structure or polymer chain. ReaDDy bridges the gap between small-scale but highly detailed molecular dynamics or Brownian dynamics simulations and large-scale but little-detailed reaction kinetics simulations. ReaDDy has a modular design that enables the exchange of the computing core by efficient platform-specific implementations or dynamical models that are different from Brownian dynamics. PMID:24040218

  2. One-Dimensional Reaction-Diffusion Simulation of Cu Migration in Polycrystalline CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Da; Akis, Richard; Brinkman, Daniel; Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian; Vasileska, Dragica; Ringhofer, Christain

    2014-06-13

    In this work, we report on developing 1D reaction-diffusion solver to understand the kinetics of p-type doping formation in CdTe absorbers and to shine some light on underlying causes of metastabilities observed in CdTe PV devices. Evolution of intrinsic and Cu-related defects in CdTe solar cell has been studied in time-space domain self-consistently with free carrier transport and Poisson equation. Resulting device performance was simulated as a function of Cu diffusion anneal time showing pronounced effect the evolution of associated acceptor and donor states can cause on device characteristics. Although 1D simulation has intrinsic limitations when applied to poly-crystalline films, the results suggest strong potential of the approach in better understanding of the performance and metastabilities of CdTe photovoltaic device.

  3. A mechanically coupled reaction-diffusion model for predicting the response of breast tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Jared A.; Miga, Michael I.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Li, Xia; Bapsi Chakravarthy, A.; Abramson, Vandana; Farley, Jaime; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2013-09-01

    There is currently a paucity of reliable techniques for predicting the response of breast tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The standard approach is to monitor gross changes in tumor size as measured by physical exam and/or conventional imaging, but these methods generally do not show whether a tumor is responding until the patient has received many treatment cycles. One promising approach to address this clinical need is to integrate quantitative in vivo imaging data into biomathematical models of tumor growth in order to predict eventual response based on early measurements during therapy. In this work, we illustrate a novel biomechanical mathematical modeling approach in which contrast enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging data acquired before and after the first cycle of neoadjuvant therapy are used to calibrate a patient-specific response model which subsequently is used to predict patient outcome at the conclusion of therapy. We present a modification of the reaction-diffusion tumor growth model whereby mechanical coupling to the surrounding tissue stiffness is incorporated via restricted cell diffusion. We use simulations and experimental data to illustrate how incorporating tissue mechanical properties leads to qualitatively and quantitatively different tumor growth patterns than when such properties are ignored. We apply the approach to patient data in a preliminary dataset of eight patients exhibiting a varying degree of responsiveness to neoadjuvant therapy, and we show that the mechanically coupled reaction-diffusion tumor growth model, when projected forward, more accurately predicts residual tumor burden at the conclusion of therapy than the non-mechanically coupled model. The mechanically coupled model predictions exhibit a significant correlation with data observations (PCC = 0.84, p < 0.01), and show a statistically significant >4 fold reduction in model/data error (p = 0.02) as compared to the non-mechanically coupled model.

  4. Coarsening of step bunches in step flow growth: a reaction-diffusion model and its travelling wave solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Cameron R.

    2004-03-01

    We consider a model of the Frank impurity mechanism in step flow growth based on reaction-diffusion equations. The equations, based on the BCF model of crystal growth, are designed to capture the physics of both the diffusion of adatoms, and the appearance of impurities on the crystal surface following the model proposed by Frank. The model was originally considered by Kandel and Weeks [Physica D 66 (1993) 78; Phys. Rev. B 49 (1994) 5554; Phys. Rev. B 52 (1995) 2154]. The model is a fundamentally two-dimensional one. It exhibits quick formation of step bunches, followed by a much longer period of coarsening, in the direction lateral to the step flow direction. Using tools from the theory of reaction-diffusion equations we are able to reduce the complicated pattern formation of the model to a simple dynamical picture. In most regions, step bunches form quickly, and these step bunches are equilibrium solutions of the equations. As the step bunches form, transitions form between different step bunches. These transitions are travelling wave solutions of the equations. These travelling waves govern the coarsening process. The spatial patterns coarsen as the different travelling waves march across the surface of the crystal and encounter and annihilate each other. By classifying the equilibrium states and travelling waves of the equations we can collapse the number of travelling waves to a small reduced set. This reduction of the dynamics to travelling waves from a small set of equivalent classes, is the basis of a simple reduced model which, despite its simplicity, can capture in entirety the coarsening process arising from the original equations. Using this reduced model, we can investigate large scale nature of the coarsening process, and behaviour of the coarsening process, and reconsider some of the issues raised by Kandel and Weeks in their original analysis.

  5. Eukaryotic cell locomotion depends on the propagation of self-organized reaction-diffusion waves and oscillations of actin filament assembly.

    PubMed

    Vicker, Michael G

    2002-04-15

    Actin filament (F-actin) assembly kinetics determines the locomotion and shape of crawling eukaryotic cells, but the nature of these kinetics and their determining reactions are unclear. Live BHK21 fibroblasts, mouse melanoma cells, and Dictyostelium amoebae, locomoting on glass and expressing Green Fluorescent Protein-actin fusion proteins, were examined by confocal microscopy. The cells demonstrated three-dimensional bands of F-actin, which propagated throughout the cytoplasm at rates usually ranging between 2 and 5 microm/min in each cell type and produced lamellipodia or pseudopodia at the cell boundary. F-actin's dynamic behavior and supramolecular spatial patterns resembled in detail self-organized chemical waves in dissipative, physico-chemical systems. On this basis, the present observations provide the first evidence of self-organized, and probably autocatalytic, chemical reaction-diffusion waves of reversible actin filament assembly in vertebrate cells and a comprehensive record of wave and locomotory dynamics in vegetative-stage Dictyostelium cells. The intensity and frequency of F-actin wavefronts determine locomotory cell projections and the rotating oscillatory waves, which structure the cell surface. F-actin assembly waves thus provide a fundamental, deterministic, and nonlinear mechanism of cell locomotion and shape, which complements mechanisms based exclusively on stochastic molecular reaction kinetics.

  6. Modeling Morphogenesis with Reaction-Diffusion Equations Using Galerkin Spectral Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Professor Reza Malek-Madani Associate Professor Sonia Garcia 1. Introduction: Modeling Morphogenesis In the context of embryology , morphogenesis is...appreciate the rich pattern formation capabilities of these models. As a general rule , the variability of the initial and boundary conditions as well as...random like chaotic systems, but are intricately structured. However, the eventual organization of a system will not immediately follow from the rules of

  7. Current fluctuations in a particle-nonconserving reaction-diffusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkaman, Pegah; Jafarpour, Farhad H.

    2013-01-01

    We have considered a one-dimensional coagulation-decoagulation system of classical particles on a finite lattice with reflecting boundaries. It is known that the system undergoes a phase transition from a high-density to a low-density phase. Using a matrix product approach we have obtained an exact expression for the average entropy production rate of the system in the thermodynamic limit. We have also performed a large-deviation analysis for fluctuations of entropy production rate and particle current. It turns out that the characteristics of the kink in the large deviation function can be used to spot the phase transition point. We have found that for very weak driving field (when the system approaches its equilibrium) and also for very strong driving field (when the system is in the low-density phase) the large deviation function for fluctuations of entropy production rate is almost parabolic, while in the high-density phase it prominently deviates from Gaussian behavior. The validity of the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation relation for the large deviation function for particle current is also verified.

  8. Current fluctuations in a particle-nonconserving reaction-diffusion process.

    PubMed

    Torkaman, Pegah; Jafarpour, Farhad H

    2013-01-01

    We have considered a one-dimensional coagulation-decoagulation system of classical particles on a finite lattice with reflecting boundaries. It is known that the system undergoes a phase transition from a high-density to a low-density phase. Using a matrix product approach we have obtained an exact expression for the average entropy production rate of the system in the thermodynamic limit. We have also performed a large-deviation analysis for fluctuations of entropy production rate and particle current. It turns out that the characteristics of the kink in the large deviation function can be used to spot the phase transition point. We have found that for very weak driving field (when the system approaches its equilibrium) and also for very strong driving field (when the system is in the low-density phase) the large deviation function for fluctuations of entropy production rate is almost parabolic, while in the high-density phase it prominently deviates from Gaussian behavior. The validity of the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation relation for the large deviation function for particle current is also verified.

  9. Phase transitions in a reaction-diffusion model on a line with boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Khorrami, Mohammad Aghamohammadi, Amir

    2014-03-15

    A one-dimensional model on a line of length L is investigated, which involves particle diffusion as well as single particle annihilation. There are also creation and annihilation at the boundaries. The static and dynamical behaviors of the system are studied. It is seen that the system could exhibit a dynamical phase transition. For small drift velocities, the relaxation time does not depend on the absorption rates at the boundaries. This is the fast phase. For large velocities, the smaller of the absorption rates at boundaries enter the relaxation rate and makes it longer. This is the slow phase. Finally, the effect of a random particle creation in the bulk is also investigated.

  10. Finite-difference schemes for reaction-diffusion equations modeling predator-prey interactions in MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Garvie, Marcus R

    2007-04-01

    We present two finite-difference algorithms for studying the dynamics of spatially extended predator-prey interactions with the Holling type II functional response and logistic growth of the prey. The algorithms are stable and convergent provided the time step is below a (non-restrictive) critical value. This is advantageous as it is well-known that the dynamics of approximations of differential equations (DEs) can differ significantly from that of the underlying DEs themselves. This is particularly important for the spatially extended systems that are studied in this paper as they display a wide spectrum of ecologically relevant behavior, including chaos. Furthermore, there are implementational advantages of the methods. For example, due to the structure of the resulting linear systems, standard direct, and iterative solvers are guaranteed to converge. We also present the results of numerical experiments in one and two space dimensions and illustrate the simplicity of the numerical methods with short programs MATLAB: . Users can download, edit, and run the codes from http://www.uoguelph.ca/~mgarvie/, to investigate the key dynamical properties of spatially extended predator-prey interactions.

  11. Neutrality condition and response law for nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations, with application to population genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlad, Marcel Ovidiu; Moran, Federico; Tsuchiya, Masa; Cavalli-Sforza, L. Luca; Oefner, Peter J.; Ross, John

    2002-06-01

    We study a general class of nonlinear macroscopic evolution equations with ``transport'' and ``reaction'' terms which describe the dynamics of a species of moving individuals (atoms, molecules, quasiparticles, organisms, etc.). We consider that two types of individuals exist, ``not marked'' and ``marked,'' respectively. We assume that the concentrations of both types of individuals are measurable and that they obey a neutrality condition, that is, the kinetic and transport properties of the ``not marked'' and ``marked'' individuals are identical. We suggest a response experiment, which consists in varying the fraction of ``marked'' individuals with the preservation of total fluxes, and show that the response of the system can be represented by a linear superposition law even though the underlying dynamics of the system is in general highly nonlinear. The linear response law is valid even for large perturbations and is not the result of a linearization procedure but rather a necessary consequence of the neutrality condition. First, we apply the response theorem to chemical kinetics, where the ``marked species'' is a molecule labeled with a radioactive isotope and there is no kinetic isotope effect. The susceptibility function of the response law can be related to the reaction mechanism of the process. Secondly we study the geographical distribution of the nonrecurrent, nonreversible neutral mutations of the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome from human populations and show that the fraction of mutants at a given point in space and time obeys a linear response law of the type introduced in this paper. The theory may be used for evaluating the geographic position and the moment in time where and when a mutation originated.

  12. A Refined Reaction-Diffusion Model of Tau-Microtubule Dynamics and Its Application in FDAP Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Igaev, Maxim; Janning, Dennis; Sündermann, Frederik; Niewidok, Benedikt; Brandt, Roland; Junge, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence decay after photoactivation (FDAP) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) are well established approaches for studying the interaction of the microtubule (MT)-associated protein tau with MTs in neuronal cells. Previous interpretations of FDAP/FRAP data have revealed dwell times of tau on MTs in the range of several seconds. However, this is difficult to reconcile with a dwell time recently measured by single-molecule analysis in neuronal processes that was shorter by two orders of magnitude. Questioning the validity of previously used phenomenological interpretations of FDAP/FRAP data, we have generalized the standard two-state reaction-diffusion equations by 1), accounting for the parallel and discrete arrangement of MTs in cell processes (i.e., homogeneous versus heterogeneous distribution of tau-binding sites); and 2), explicitly considering both active (diffusion upon MTs) and passive (piggybacking upon MTs at rates of slow axonal transport) motion of bound tau. For some idealized cases, analytical solutions were derived. By comparing them with the full numerical solution and Monte Carlo simulations, the respective validity domains were mapped. Interpretation of our FDAP data (from processes of neuronally differentiated PC12 cells) in light of the heterogeneous formalism yielded independent estimates for the association (∼2 ms) and dwell (∼100 ms) times of tau to/on a single MT rather than in an MT array. The dwell time was shorter by orders of magnitude than that in a previous report where a homogeneous topology of MTs was assumed. We found that the diffusion of bound tau was negligible in vivo, in contrast to an earlier report that tau diffuses along the MT lattice in vitro. Methodologically, our results demonstrate that the heterogeneity of binding sites cannot be ignored when dealing with reaction-diffusion of cytoskeleton-associated proteins. Physiologically, the results reveal the behavior of tau in cellular processes

  13. 21 CFR 862.1450 - Lactic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....1450 Lactic acid test system. (a) Identification. A lactic acid test system is a device intended to measure lactic acid in whole blood and plasma. Lactic acid measurements that evaluate the acid-base status... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactic acid test system. 862.1450 Section...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1450 - Lactic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....1450 Lactic acid test system. (a) Identification. A lactic acid test system is a device intended to measure lactic acid in whole blood and plasma. Lactic acid measurements that evaluate the acid-base status... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lactic acid test system. 862.1450 Section...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1450 - Lactic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....1450 Lactic acid test system. (a) Identification. A lactic acid test system is a device intended to measure lactic acid in whole blood and plasma. Lactic acid measurements that evaluate the acid-base status... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactic acid test system. 862.1450 Section...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1450 - Lactic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lactic acid test system. 862.1450 Section 862.1450....1450 Lactic acid test system. (a) Identification. A lactic acid test system is a device intended to measure lactic acid in whole blood and plasma. Lactic acid measurements that evaluate the acid-base...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1450 - Lactic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lactic acid test system. 862.1450 Section 862.1450....1450 Lactic acid test system. (a) Identification. A lactic acid test system is a device intended to measure lactic acid in whole blood and plasma. Lactic acid measurements that evaluate the acid-base...

  18. Spreading of infection in a two species reaction-diffusion process in networks.

    PubMed

    Korosoglou, Paschalis; Kittas, Aristotelis; Argyrakis, Panos

    2010-12-01

    We study the dynamics of the infection of a two mobile species reaction from a single infected agent in a population of healthy agents. Historically, the main focus for infection propagation has been through spreading phenomena, where a random location of the system is initially infected and then propagates by successfully infecting its neighbor sites. Here both the infected and healthy agents are mobile, performing classical random walks. This may be a more realistic picture to such epidemiological models, such as the spread of a virus in communication networks of routers, where data travel in packets, the communication time of stations in ad hoc mobile networks, information spreading (such as rumor spreading) in social networks, etc. We monitor the density of healthy particles ρ(t), which we find in all cases to be an exponential function in the long-time limit in two-dimensional and three-dimensional lattices and Erdős-Rényi (ER) and scale-free (SF) networks. We also investigate the scaling of the crossover time t(c) from short- to long-time exponential behavior, which we find to be a power law in lattices and ER networks. This crossover is shown to be absent in SF networks, where we reveal the role of the connectivity of the network in the infection process. We compare this behavior to ER networks and lattices and highlight the significance of various connectivity patterns, as well as the important differences of this process in the various underlying geometries, revealing a more complex behavior of ρ(t).

  19. Propagation Behaviors of an Acid Wavefront Through a Microchannel Junction.

    PubMed

    Nabika, Hideki; Hasegawa, Takahiko; Unoura, Kei

    2015-07-30

    Waves in reaction-diffusion systems yield a wealth of dynamic self-assembling phenomena in nature. Recent studies have been devoted to utilizing these active waves in conjunction with microscale technology. To provide a compass for controlling reaction-diffusion waves in microspaces, we have investigated the propagation behavior of one specific variety of the reaction-diffusion wave: an acid wave that utilizes an autocatalytic proton-production reaction. Furthermore, the acid wave that we have investigated occurs in a microchannel with a junction connecting circular and straight regions. The obtained results were compared with a neutralization wave that involves only a neutralization reaction. The acid wave was ignited by the addition of the appropriate amount of H2SO4 into the circular region that was filled with a substrate solution, where proton-consuming and proton-producing reactions followed a rapid neutralization reaction. At this stage, the wave penetrated and propagated into the channel region. Comparison between the acid and the neutralization waves clarified that the acid wave required a minimum threshold of H2SO4 concentration in order to be ignited and that the propagation of the acid wave was temporarily delayed because of the presence of intermediate chemical reaction steps. Furthermore, the propagation dynamics was found to be tuned through the configuration of the microchannel. The importance of microchannel configuration, especially for systems with a junction connecting different shapes, is discussed in terms of Fick's law and in terms of the proton flux from the circular to the straight regions.

  20. A Splitting Scheme for Solving Reaction-Diffusion Equations Modeling Dislocation Dynamics in Materials Subjected to Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontes, J.; Walgraef, D.; Christov, C. I.

    2010-11-01

    Strain localization and dislocation pattern formation are typical features of plastic deformation in metals and alloys. Glide and climb dislocation motion along with accompanying production/annihilation processes of dislocations lead to the occurrence of instabilities of initially uniform dislocation distributions. These instabilities result into the development of various types of dislocation micro-structures, such as dislocation cells, slip and kink bands, persistent slip bands, labyrinth structures, etc., depending on the externally applied loading and the intrinsic lattice constraints. The Walgraef-Aifantis (WA) (Walgraef and Aifanits, J. Appl. Phys., 58, 668, 1985) model is an example of a reaction-diffusion model of coupled nonlinear equations which describe 0 formation of forest (immobile) and gliding (mobile) dislocation densities in the presence of cyclic loading. This paper discuss two versions of the WA model and focus on a finite difference, second order in time 1-Nicolson semi-implicit scheme, with internal iterations at each time step and a spatial splitting using the Stabilizing, Correction (Christov and Pontes, Mathematical and Computer Modelling, 35, 87, 2002) for solving the model evolution equations in two dimensions. The results of two simulations are presented. More complete results will appear in a forthcoming paper.

  1. Reaction-diffusion waves of actin filament polymerization/depolymerization in Dictyostelium pseudopodium extension and cell locomotion.

    PubMed

    Vicker, M G

    2000-04-14

    Cell surface movements and the intracellular spatial patterns and dynamics of actin filament (F-actin) were investigated in living and formalin-fixed cells of Dictyostelium discoideum by confocal microscopy. Excitation waves of F-actin assembly developed and propagated several micrometers at up to 26 microm/min in cells which had been intracellularly loaded with fluorescently labeled actin monomer. Wave propagation and extinction corresponded with the initiation and attenuation of pseudopodium extension and cell advance, respectively. The identification of chemical waves was supported by the ring, sphere, spiral and scroll wave patterns, which were observed in the extensions of fixed cells stained with phalloidin-rhodamine, and by the similar, asymmetrical [F-actin] distribution in wavefronts in living and fixed cells. These F-actin patterns and dynamics in Dictyostelium provide evidence for a new supramolecular state of actin, which propagates as a self-organized, reaction-diffusion wave of reversible F-actin assembly and affects pseudopodium extension. Actin's properties of oscillation and self-organization might also fundamentally determine the nature of the eukaryotic cell's reactions of adaptation, timing and signal response.

  2. Obtaining new composite biomaterials by means of mineralization of methacrylate hydrogels using the reaction-diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Yousof; González-Sánchez, M Isabel; Hawkins, Karl; Rubio-Retama, Jorge; Valero, Edelmira; Perni, Stefano; Prokopovich, Polina; López-Cabarcos, Enrique

    2014-09-01

    The present paper describes the synthesis and characterization of a new polymeric biomaterial mineralized with calcium phosphate using the reaction-diffusion method. The scaffold of this biomaterial was a hydrogel constituted by biocompatible polyethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMEM) and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEM), which were cross-linked with N-N'-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS). The cross-linking content of the hydrogels was varied from 0.25% to 15% (w/w). The gels were used as matrix where two reactants (Na2HPO4 and CaCl2) diffused from both ends of the gel and upon encountering produced calcium phosphate crystals that precipitated within the polymer matrix forming bands. The shape of the crystals was tuned by modifying the matrix porosity in such a way that when the polymer matrix was slightly reticulated the diffusion reaction produced round calcium phosphate microcrystals, whilst when the polymer matrix was highly reticulated the reaction yielded flat calcium phosphate crystals. Selected area electron diffraction performed on the nanocrystals that constitute the microcrystals showed that they were formed by Brushite (CaHPO4.2H2O). This new composite material could be useful in medical and dentistry applications such as bone regeneration, bone repair or tissue engineering.

  3. A mechanically coupled reaction-diffusion model that incorporates intra-tumoural heterogeneity to predict in vivo glioma growth.

    PubMed

    Hormuth, David A; Weis, Jared A; Barnes, Stephanie L; Miga, Michael I; Rericha, Erin C; Quaranta, Vito; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2017-03-01

    While gliomas have been extensively modelled with a reaction-diffusion (RD) type equation it is most likely an oversimplification. In this study, three mathematical models of glioma growth are developed and systematically investigated to establish a framework for accurate prediction of changes in tumour volume as well as intra-tumoural heterogeneity. Tumour cell movement was described by coupling movement to tissue stress, leading to a mechanically coupled (MC) RD model. Intra-tumour heterogeneity was described by including a voxel-specific carrying capacity (CC) to the RD model. The MC and CC models were also combined in a third model. To evaluate these models, rats (n = 14) with C6 gliomas were imaged with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging over 10 days to estimate tumour cellularity. Model parameters were estimated from the first three imaging time points and then used to predict tumour growth at the remaining time points which were then directly compared to experimental data. The results in this work demonstrate that mechanical-biological effects are a necessary component of brain tissue tumour modelling efforts. The results are suggestive that a variable tissue carrying capacity is a needed model component to capture tumour heterogeneity. Lastly, the results advocate the need for additional effort towards capturing tumour-to-tissue infiltration.

  4. Sulfuric acid thermoelectrochemical system and method

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, Frank A.

    1989-01-01

    A thermoelectrochemical system in which an electrical current is generated between a cathode immersed in a concentrated sulfuric acid solution and an anode immersed in an aqueous buffer solution of sodium bisulfate and sodium sulfate. Reactants consumed at the electrodes during the electrochemical reaction are thermochemically regenerated and recycled to the electrodes to provide continuous operation of the system.

  5. Micro-electro-mechanical systems phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Sopchak, David A.; Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Kotovsky, Jack; Graff, Robert T.

    2010-12-21

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell system comprising a porous electrolyte support, a phosphoric acid electrolyte in the porous electrolyte support, a cathode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte, and an anode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  6. Micro-electro-mechanical systems phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Sopchak, David A.; Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Kotovsky, Jack; Graff, Robert T.

    2010-08-17

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell system comprising a porous electrolyte support, a phosphoric acid electrolyte in the porous electrolyte support, a cathode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte, and an anode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  7. Acid sensing by the Drosophila olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Ai, Minrong; Min, Soohong; Grosjean, Yael; Leblanc, Charlotte; Bell, Rati; Benton, Richard; Suh, Greg S B

    2010-12-02

    The odour of acids has a distinct quality that is perceived as sharp, pungent and often irritating. How acidity is sensed and translated into an appropriate behavioural response is poorly understood. Here we describe a functionally segregated population of olfactory sensory neurons in the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, that are highly selective for acidity. These olfactory sensory neurons express IR64a, a member of the recently identified ionotropic receptor (IR) family of putative olfactory receptors. In vivo calcium imaging showed that IR64a+ neurons projecting to the DC4 glomerulus in the antennal lobe are specifically activated by acids. Flies in which the function of IR64a+ neurons or the IR64a gene is disrupted had defects in acid-evoked physiological and behavioural responses, but their responses to non-acidic odorants remained unaffected. Furthermore, artificial stimulation of IR64a+ neurons elicited avoidance responses. Taken together, these results identify cellular and molecular substrates for acid detection in the Drosophila olfactory system and support a labelled-line mode of acidity coding at the periphery.

  8. 21 CFR 862.1295 - Folic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Folic acid test system. 862.1295 Section 862.1295....1295 Folic acid test system. (a) Identification. A folic acid test system is a device intended to measure the vitamin folic acid in plasma and serum. Folic acid measurements are used in the diagnosis...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1290 - Fatty acids test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fatty acids test system. 862.1290 Section 862.1290....1290 Fatty acids test system. (a) Identification. A fatty acids test system is a device intended to measure fatty acids in plasma and serum. Measurements of fatty acids are used in the diagnosis...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1295 - Folic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Folic acid test system. 862.1295 Section 862.1295....1295 Folic acid test system. (a) Identification. A folic acid test system is a device intended to measure the vitamin folic acid in plasma and serum. Folic acid measurements are used in the diagnosis...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1290 - Fatty acids test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fatty acids test system. 862.1290 Section 862.1290....1290 Fatty acids test system. (a) Identification. A fatty acids test system is a device intended to measure fatty acids in plasma and serum. Measurements of fatty acids are used in the diagnosis...

  12. Predicting the Response of Breast Cancer to Neoadjuvant Therapy Using a Mechanically Coupled Reaction-Diffusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Jared A.; Miga, Michael I.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Li, Xia; Abramson, Vandana; Chakravarthy, A. Bapsi; Pendyala, Praveen; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    While there is considerable data on the use of mathematical modeling to describe tumor growth and response to therapy, previous approaches are often not of the form that can be easily applied to clinical data to generate testable predictions in individual patients. Thus, there is a clear need to develop and apply clinically-relevant oncological models that are amenable to available patient data and yet retain the most salient features of response prediction. In this study we show how a biomechanical model of tumor growth can be initialized and constrained by serial patient-specific magnetic resonance imaging data, obtained at two time points early in the course of therapy (before initiation and following one cycle of therapy), to predict the response for individual patients with breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant therapy. Using our mechanics coupled modeling approach, we are able to predict, after the first cycle of therapy, breast cancer patients that would eventually achieve a complete pathological response and those who would not, with receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC) of 0.87, sensitivity of 92%, and specificity of 84%. Our approach significantly outperformed the AUCs achieved by standard (i.e., not mechanically coupled)reaction-diffusion predictive modeling (0.75), simple analysis of the tumor cellularity estimated from imaging data (0.73), and the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST; 0.71). Thus, we show the potential for mathematical model prediction for use as a prognostic indicator of response to therapy. The work indicates the considerable promise of image-driven biophysical modeling for predictive frameworks within therapeutic applications. PMID:26333809

  13. 21 CFR 862.1795 - Vanilmandelic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vanilmandelic acid test system. 862.1795 Section... Systems § 862.1795 Vanilmandelic acid test system. (a) Identification. A vanilmandelic acid test system is a device intended to measure vanilmandelic acid in urine. Measurements of vanilmandelic...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1795 - Vanilmandelic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vanilmandelic acid test system. 862.1795 Section... Systems § 862.1795 Vanilmandelic acid test system. (a) Identification. A vanilmandelic acid test system is a device intended to measure vanilmandelic acid in urine. Measurements of vanilmandelic...

  15. Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis: A Systemic Metabolic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Moe, Orson W.

    2014-01-01

    Uric acid nephrolithiasis is characteristically a manifestation of a systemic metabolic disorder. It has a prevalence of about 10% among all stone formers, the third most common type of kidney stone in the industrialized world. Uric acid stones form primarily due to an unduly acid urine; less deciding factors are hyperuricosuria and a low urine volume. The vast majority of uric acid stone formers have the metabolic syndrome, and not infrequently, clinical gout is present as well. A universal finding is a low baseline urine pH plus insufficient production of urinary ammonium buffer. Persons with gastrointestinal disorders, in particular chronic diarrhea or ostomies, and patients with malignancies with a large tumor mass and high cell turnover comprise a less common but nevertheless important subset. Pure uric acid stones are radiolucent but well visualized on renal ultrasound. A 24 h urine collection for stone risk analysis provides essential insight into the pathophysiology of stone formation and may guide therapy. Management includes a liberal fluid intake and dietary modification. Potassium citrate to alkalinize the urine to a goal pH between 6 and 6.5 is essential, as undissociated uric acid deprotonates into its much more soluble urate form. PMID:25045326

  16. Acid mine water aeration and treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Ackman, Terry E.; Place, John M.

    1987-01-01

    An in-line system is provided for treating acid mine drainage which basically comprises the combination of a jet pump (or pumps) and a static mixer. The jet pump entrains air into the acid waste water using a Venturi effect so as to provide aeration of the waste water while further aeration is provided by the helical vanes of the static mixer. A neutralizing agent is injected into the suction chamber of the jet pump and the static mixer is formed by plural sections offset by 90 degrees.

  17. 21 CFR 862.1655 - Pyruvic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pyruvic acid test system. 862.1655 Section 862....1655 Pyruvic acid test system. (a) Identification. A pyruvic acid test system is a device intended to measure pyruvic acid (an intermediate compound in the metabolism of carbohydrate) in plasma....

  18. 21 CFR 862.1095 - Ascorbic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ascorbic acid test system. 862.1095 Section 862....1095 Ascorbic acid test system. (a) Identification. An ascorbic acid test system is a device intended to measure the level of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in plasma, serum, and urine. Ascorbic...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775....1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to measure uric acid in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775....1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to measure uric acid in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1655 - Pyruvic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pyruvic acid test system. 862.1655 Section 862....1655 Pyruvic acid test system. (a) Identification. A pyruvic acid test system is a device intended to measure pyruvic acid (an intermediate compound in the metabolism of carbohydrate) in plasma....

  2. 21 CFR 862.1095 - Ascorbic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ascorbic acid test system. 862.1095 Section 862....1095 Ascorbic acid test system. (a) Identification. An ascorbic acid test system is a device intended to measure the level of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in plasma, serum, and urine. Ascorbic...

  3. Stationary Vortex Loops Induced by Filament Interaction and Local Pinning in a Chemical Reaction-Diffusion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Zulma A.; Steinbock, Oliver

    2012-08-01

    Scroll rings are three-dimensional excitation waves rotating around one-dimensional filament loops. In experiments with the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction we show that the collapse of these loops can be stopped by local pinning to only two unexcitable heterogeneities. The resulting vortices rotate around stationary but curved filaments. The absence of filament motion can be explained by repulsive interaction that counteracts the expected curvature-induced motion. The shape and key dependencies of the stationary filaments are well described by a curvature-flow model with additive interaction velocities that rapidly decrease with filament distance.

  4. 21 CFR 862.1509 - Methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to identify methylmalonic acid in urine. The identification of methylmalonic acid in urine is used in the diagnosis and treatment...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to...

  8. Acid preservation systems for food products

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberio, J. E.; Cirigiano, M. C.

    1984-10-16

    Fumaric acid is used in combination with critical amounts of acetic acid to preserve acid containing food products from microbiological spoilage in the absence of or at reduced levels of chemical preservative.

  9. Hydroxybenzoic acid isomers and the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Today we are beginning to understand how phytochemicals can influence metabolism, cellular signaling and gene expression. The hydroxybenzoic acids are related to salicylic acid and salicin, the first compounds isolated that have a pharmacological activity. In this review we examine how a number of hydroxyphenolics have the potential to ameliorate cardiovascular problems related to aging such as hypertension, atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia. The compounds focused upon include 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (Pyrocatechuic acid), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (Gentisic acid), 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (Protocatechuic acid), 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (α-Resorcylic acid) and 3-monohydroxybenzoic acid. The latter two compounds activate the hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors with a consequence there is a reduction in adipocyte lipolysis with potential improvements of blood lipid profiles. Several of the other compounds can activate the Nrf2 signaling pathway that increases the expression of antioxidant enzymes, thereby decreasing oxidative stress and associated problems such as endothelial dysfunction that leads to hypertension as well as decreasing generalized inflammation that can lead to problems such as atherosclerosis. It has been known for many years that increased consumption of fruits and vegetables promotes health. We are beginning to understand how specific phytochemicals are responsible for such therapeutic effects. Hippocrates’ dictum of ‘Let food be your medicine and medicine your food’ can now be experimentally tested and the results of such experiments will enhance the ability of nutritionists to devise specific health-promoting diets. PMID:24943896

  10. A computational method for the coupled solution of reaction-diffusion equations on evolving domains and manifolds: Application to a model of cell migration and chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, G.; Mackenzie, J. A.; Nolan, M.; Insall, R. H.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we devise a moving mesh finite element method for the approximate solution of coupled bulk-surface reaction-diffusion equations on an evolving two dimensional domain. Fundamental to the success of the method is the robust generation of bulk and surface meshes. For this purpose, we use a novel moving mesh partial differential equation (MMPDE) approach. The developed method is applied to model problems with known analytical solutions; these experiments indicate second-order spatial and temporal accuracy. Coupled bulk-surface problems occur frequently in many areas; in particular, in the modelling of eukaryotic cell migration and chemotaxis. We apply the method to a model of the two-way interaction of a migrating cell in a chemotactic field, where the bulk region corresponds to the extracellular region and the surface to the cell membrane.

  11. F-actin assembly in Dictyostelium cell locomotion and shape oscillations propagates as a self-organized reaction-diffusion wave.

    PubMed

    Vicker, Michael G

    2002-01-02

    The crawling locomotion and shape of eukaryotic cells have been associated with the stochastic molecular dynamics of actin and its protein regulators, chiefly Arp2/3 and Rho family GTPases, in making a cytoskeleton meshwork within cell extensions. However, the cell's actin-dependent oscillatory shape and extension dynamics may also yield insights into locomotory mechanisms. Confocal observations of live Dictyostelium cells, expressing a green fluorescent protein-actin fusion protein, demonstrate oscillating supramolecular patterns of filamentous actin throughout the cell, which generate pseudopodia at the cell edge. The distinctively dissipative spatio-temporal behavior of these structures provides strong evidence that reversible actin filament assembly propagates as a self-organized, chemical reaction-diffusion wave.

  12. 21 CFR 862.1509 - Methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1509 Section 862.1509 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Test Systems § 862.1509 Methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification....

  13. High order accurate, one-sided finite-difference approximations to concentration gradients at the boundaries, for the simulation of electrochemical reaction-diffusion problems in one-dimensional space geometry.

    PubMed

    Bieniasz, L K

    2003-07-01

    Accurate calculation of concentration gradients at the boundaries is crucial in electrochemical kinetic simulations, owing to the frequent occurrence of gradient-dependent boundary conditions, and the importance of the gradient-dependent electric current. By using the information about higher spatial derivatives of the concentrations, contained in the time-dependent, kinetic reaction-diffusion partial differential equation(s) in one-dimensional space geometry, under appropriate assumptions it is possible to increase the accuracy orders of the conventional, one-sided n-point finite-difference formulae for the concentration gradients at the boundaries, without increasing n. In this way a new class of high order accurate gradient approximations is derived, and tested in simulations of potential-step chronoamperometric and current-step chronopotentiometric transients for the Reinert-Berg system. The new formulae possess advantages over the conventional gradient approximations. For example, they allow one to obtain a third order accuracy by using two space points only, or fourth order accuracy by using three points, and yet they yield smaller errors than the conventional four-point, or five-point formulae, respectively. Needing fewer points, for approximating the gradients with a given accuracy, simplifies also the solution of the linear algebraic equations arising from the application of implicit time integration schemes.

  14. Amino acid isotopic analysis in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new approach to stable isotopic analysis—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino acids (glutamic acid and phenylalanine). CSIA has recently been used to generate trophic position estimates among anima...

  15. Regulation of the plasma amino acid profile by leucine via the system L amino acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Hongmin; Nakamura, Koichi; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Kadota, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuya; Kondo, Yusuke; Xu, Minjun; Shimomura, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of amino acids reflect the intracellular amino acid pool in mammals. However, the regulatory mechanism requires clarification. In this study, we examined the effect of leucine administration on plasma amino acid profiles in mice with and without the treatment of 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) or rapamycin as an inhibitor of system L or mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, respectively. The elevation of plasma leucine concentration after leucine administration was associated with a significant decrease in the plasma concentrations of isoleucine, valine, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine; BCH treatment almost completely blocked the leucine-induced decrease in plasma amino acid concentrations. Rapamycin treatment had much less effects on the actions of leucine than BCH treatment. These results suggest that leucine regulates the plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine, and that system L amino acid transporters are involved in the leucine action.

  16. Thoron-tartaric acid systems for spectrophotometric determination of thorium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.; Fletcher, M.H.

    1956-01-01

    Thoron is commonly used for the spectrophotometric determination of thorium. An undesirable feature of its use is its high sensitivity to zirconium. This study describes the use of tartaric acid as a masking reagent for zirconium. Three tartaric acid-thoron systems, developed for the determination of thorium, differ with respect to the concentrations of thoron and tartaric acid. Mesotartaric acid, used in one of the systems, is most effective in masking zirconium. The behavior of rarer elements, usually associated with thorium ores, is determined in two systems, and a dilution method is described for the direct determination of thorium in monazite concentrates.

  17. Tested Demonstrations: Color Oscillations in the Formic Acid-Nitric Acid-Sulfuric Acid System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raw, C. J. G.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Presented are procedures for demonstrating the production of color oscillations when nitric acid is added to a formic acid/concentrated sulfuric acid mixture. Because of safety considerations, "Super-8" home movie of the color changes was found to be satisfactory for demonstration purposes. (JN)

  18. The diffusive finite state projection algorithm for efficient simulation of the stochastic reaction-diffusion master equation

    PubMed Central

    Drawert, Brian; Lawson, Michael J.; Petzold, Linda; Khammash, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a computational framework for accurate and efficient simulation of stochastic spatially inhomogeneous biochemical systems. The new computational method employs a fractional step hybrid strategy. A novel formulation of the finite state projection (FSP) method, called the diffusive FSP method, is introduced for the efficient and accurate simulation of diffusive transport. Reactions are handled by the stochastic simulation algorithm. PMID:20170209

  19. The influence of receptor-mediated interactions on reaction-diffusion mechanisms of cellular self-organisation.

    PubMed

    Klika, Václav; Baker, Ruth E; Headon, Denis; Gaffney, Eamonn A

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms governing and regulating self-organisation in the developing embryo is a key challenge that has puzzled and fascinated scientists for decades. Since its conception in 1952 the Turing model has been a paradigm for pattern formation, motivating numerous theoretical and experimental studies, though its verification at the molecular level in biological systems has remained elusive. In this work, we consider the influence of receptor-mediated dynamics within the framework of Turing models, showing how non-diffusing species impact the conditions for the emergence of self-organisation. We illustrate our results within the framework of hair follicle pre-patterning, showing how receptor interaction structures can be constrained by the requirement for patterning, without the need for detailed knowledge of the network dynamics. Finally, in the light of our results, we discuss the ability of such systems to pattern outside the classical limits of the Turing model, and the inherent dangers involved in model reduction.

  20. Continuous-flow free acid monitoring method and system

    DOEpatents

    Strain, James E.; Ross, Harley H.

    1981-01-01

    A free acid monitoring method and apparatus is provided for continuously measuring the excess acid present in a process stream. The disclosed monitoring system and method is based on the relationship of the partial pressure ratio of water and acid in equilibrium with an acid solution at constant temperature. A portion of the process stream is pumped into and flows through the monitor under the influence of gravity and back to the process stream. A continuous flowing sample is vaporized at a constant temperature and the vapor is subsequently condensed. Conductivity measurements of the condensate produces a nonlinear response function from which the free acid molarity of the sample process stream is determined.

  1. Continuous-flow free acid monitoring method and system

    DOEpatents

    Strain, J.E.; Ross, H.H.

    1980-01-11

    A free acid monitoring method and apparatus is provided for continuously measuring the excess acid present in a process stream. The disclosed monitoring system and method is based on the relationship of the partial pressure ratio of water and acid in equilibrium with an acid solution at constant temperature. A portion of the process stream is pumped into and flows through the monitor under the influence of gravity and back to the process stream. A continuous flowing sample is vaporized at a constant temperature and the vapor is subsequently condensed. Conductivity measurements of the condensate produces a nonlinear response function from which the free acid molarity of the sample process stream is determined.

  2. Nucleic acid detection system and method for detecting influenza

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Hong; Song, Jian

    2015-03-17

    The invention provides a rapid, sensitive and specific nucleic acid detection system which utilizes isothermal nucleic acid amplification in combination with a lateral flow chromatographic device, or DNA dipstick, for DNA-hybridization detection. The system of the invention requires no complex instrumentation or electronic hardware, and provides a low cost nucleic acid detection system suitable for highly sensitive pathogen detection. Hybridization to single-stranded DNA amplification products using the system of the invention provides a sensitive and specific means by which assays can be multiplexed for the detection of multiple target sequences.

  3. Evolutionary systems biology of amino acid biosynthetic cost in yeast.

    PubMed

    Barton, Michael D; Delneri, Daniela; Oliver, Stephen G; Rattray, Magnus; Bergman, Casey M

    2010-08-17

    Every protein has a biosynthetic cost to the cell based on the synthesis of its constituent amino acids. In order to optimise growth and reproduction, natural selection is expected, where possible, to favour the use of proteins whose constituents are cheaper to produce, as reduced biosynthetic cost may confer a fitness advantage to the organism. Quantifying the cost of amino acid biosynthesis presents challenges, since energetic requirements may change across different cellular and environmental conditions. We developed a systems biology approach to estimate the cost of amino acid synthesis based on genome-scale metabolic models and investigated the effects of the cost of amino acid synthesis on Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression and protein evolution. First, we used our two new and six previously reported measures of amino acid cost in conjunction with codon usage bias, tRNA gene number and atomic composition to identify which of these factors best predict transcript and protein levels. Second, we compared amino acid cost with rates of amino acid substitution across four species in the genus Saccharomyces. Regardless of which cost measure is used, amino acid biosynthetic cost is weakly associated with transcript and protein levels. In contrast, we find that biosynthetic cost and amino acid substitution rates show a negative correlation, but for only a subset of cost measures. In the economy of the yeast cell, we find that the cost of amino acid synthesis plays a limited role in shaping transcript and protein expression levels compared to that of translational optimisation. Biosynthetic cost does, however, appear to affect rates of amino acid evolution in Saccharomyces, suggesting that expensive amino acids may only be used when they have specific structural or functional roles in protein sequences. However, as there appears to be no single currency to compute the cost of amino acid synthesis across all cellular and environmental conditions, we conclude that

  4. Amino acid auxotrophy as a system of immunological control nodes.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J

    2016-02-01

    Cells of the immune system are auxotrophs for most amino acids, including several nonessential ones. Arginine and tryptophan are used within the regulatory immune networks to control proliferation and function through pathways that actively deplete the amino acid from the microenvironment or that create regulatory molecules such as nitric oxide or kynurenines. How immune cells integrate information about essential amino acid supplies and then transfer these signals to growth and activation pathways remains unclear but has potential for pathway discovery about amino sensing. In applied research, strategies to harness amino acid auxotrophy so as to block cancerous lymphocyte growth have been attempted for decades with limited success. Emerging insights about amino acid metabolism may lead to new strategies in clinical medicine whereby both amino acid auxotrophy and the immunoregulatory pathways controlled by amino acids can be manipulated.

  5. System for agitating the acid in a lead-acid battery

    DOEpatents

    Weintraub, Alvin; MacCormack, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    A system and method for agitating the acid in a large lead-sulfuric acid storage battery of the calcium type. An air-lift is utilized to provide the agitation. The air fed to the air-lift is humidified prior to being delivered to the air-lift.

  6. Improved approximations of the solution and derivatives to a singularly perturbed reaction-diffusion equation based on the solution decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, G. I.; Shishkina, L. P.

    2011-06-01

    In the case of the Dirichlet problem for a singularly perturbed ordinary differential reaction-diffusion equation, a new approach is used to the construction of finite difference schemes such that their solutions and their normalized first- and second-order derivatives converge in the maximum norm uniformly with respect to a perturbation parameter ɛ ∈(0, 1]; the normalized derivatives are ɛ-uniformly bounded. The key idea of this approach to the construction of ɛ-uniformly convergent finite difference schemes is the use of uniform grids for solving grid subproblems for the regular and singular components of the grid solution. Based on the asymptotic construction technique, a scheme of the solution decomposition method is constructed such that its solution and its normalized first- and second-order derivatives converge ɛ-uniformly at the rate of O( N -2ln2 N), where N + 1 is the number of points in the uniform grids. Using the Richardson technique, an improved scheme of the solution decomposition method is constructed such that its solution and its normalized first and second derivatives converge ɛ-uniformly in the maximum norm at the same rate of O( N -4ln4 N).

  7. A radial basis function (RBF) finite difference method for the simulation of reaction-diffusion equations on stationary platelets within the augmented forcing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Varun; Wright, Grady B.; Fogelson, Aaron L.; Kirby, Robert M.

    2014-05-01

    We present a computational method for solving the coupled problem of chemical transport in a fluid (blood) with binding/unbinding of the chemical to/from cellular (platelet) surfaces in contact with the fluid, and with transport of the chemical on the cellular surfaces. The overall framework is the Augmented Forcing Point Method (AFM) (\\emph{L. Yao and A.L. Fogelson, Simulations of chemical transport and reaction in a suspension of cells I: An augmented forcing point method for the stationary case, IJNMF (2012) 69, 1736-52.}) for solving fluid-phase transport in a region outside of a collection of cells suspended in the fluid. We introduce a novel Radial Basis Function-Finite Difference (RBF-FD) method to solve reaction-diffusion equations on the surface of each of a collection of 2D stationary platelets suspended in blood. Parametric RBFs are used to represent the geometry of the platelets and give accurate geometric information needed for the RBF-FD method. Symmetric Hermite-RBF interpolants are used for enforcing the boundary conditions on the fluid-phase chemical concentration, and their use removes a significant limitation of the original AFM. The efficacy of the new methods are shown through a series of numerical experiments; in particular, second order convergence for the coupled problem is demonstrated.

  8. 300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This section provides a description of the Hanford Site, identifies the proposed method of 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS) closure, and briefly summarizes the contents of each chapter of this plan.

  9. Amino acid synthesis in a supercritical carbon dioxide - water system.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-06-15

    Mars is a CO(2)-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO(2)-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO(2)/liquid H(2)O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life's origin.

  10. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin. PMID:19582225

  11. Acid-base homeostasis in the human system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Acid-base regulation is a cooperative phenomena in vivo with body fluids, extracellular and intracellular buffers, lungs, and kidneys all playing important roles. The present account is much too brief to be considered a review of present knowledge of these regulatory systems, and should be viewed, instead, as a guide to the elements necessary to construct a simple model of the mutual interactions of the acid-base regulatory systems of the body.

  12. Shaken and Stirred: A Combined Reaction-Diffusion and Random Rate Model for the Temporal Evolution and Earthquake-induced Hydrodynamics of Silicate Mineral Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evaristo, J. A.; Willenbring, J.

    2013-12-01

    The time dependency of silicate mineral weathering has been explored in the literature in terms of processes and features that are intrinsic and extrinsic to the mineral [1]. However, although the advent of sophisticated reactive transport models has allowed for coupling increasingly complex reaction and transport processes [2,3], a simple and fundamental understanding of the temporal evolution of weathering is lacking. Here, we propose that a purely deterministic approach may not be sufficient given the inherent differences in reactivity over space and time. Therefore, we explore how a combined reaction-diffusion and random rate model - informed by a stochastic distribution of weathering rates K (T-1) - might be able to explain not only the temporal evolution but also the hydrodynamics of weathering during earthquakes; the latter being purportedly described by time-dependent property permeability (L2). Preliminary model results show that (1) an increase in dimensionless quantity βrp, where β is the diffusion length (L-1) and rp is the distance between pores (L), leads to a decrease in minimum reaction rate with time from the relation Kmin ∝ e-βrp/rp ; (2) at a given porosity, a time-dependent decrease in reactivity arises as permeability decreases due to decreasing pore size (and therefore increasing rp), which in turn may be related to the time-dependent feedback between dissolution and precipitation; (3) while permeability is lower in older soils, transient stresses as during earthquakes [4], may induce more efficient "declogging" of pores in these soils than in younger soils due to higher hydrodynamic viscous shear stress, thereby, resulting in a coseismic change in stream discharge Q; and (4) subsequent weathering beyond t~Kmin-1 exhibits a fall in rates, marking the cessation of logarithmic decay possibly due to dissolution-precipitation feedback. [1] White and Brantley (2003), Chem. Geol. 202, 479. [2] Lichtner P.C. (1996), Mineralogical Society of

  13. D-Amino Acids in the Nervous and Endocrine Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kiriyama, Yoshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important components for peptides and proteins and act as signal transmitters. Only L-amino acids have been considered necessary in mammals, including humans. However, diverse D-amino acids, such as D-serine, D-aspartate, D-alanine, and D-cysteine, are found in mammals. Physiological roles of these D-amino acids not only in the nervous system but also in the endocrine system are being gradually revealed. N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are associated with learning and memory. D-Serine, D-aspartate, and D-alanine can all bind to NMDA receptors. H2S generated from D-cysteine reduces disulfide bonds in receptors and potentiates their activity. Aberrant receptor activity is related to diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), such as Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and schizophrenia. Furthermore, D-amino acids are detected in parts of the endocrine system, such as the pineal gland, hypothalamus, pituitary gland, pancreas, adrenal gland, and testis. D-Aspartate is being investigated for the regulation of hormone release from various endocrine organs. Here we focused on recent findings regarding the synthesis and physiological functions of D-amino acids in the nervous and endocrine systems. PMID:28053803

  14. Spatial distribution and dose-response relationship for different operation modes in a reaction-diffusion model of the MAPK cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi; Yi, Ming; Liu, Yan

    2011-10-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade plays a critical role in the control of cell growth. Deregulation of this pathway contributes to the development of many cancers. To better understand its signal transduction, we constructed a reaction-diffusion model for the MAPK pathway. We modeled the three layers of phosphorylation-dephosphorylation reactions and diffusion processes from the cell membrane to the nucleus. Based on different types of feedback in the MAPK cascade, four operation modes are introduced. For each of the four modes, spatial distributions and dose-response curves of active kinases (i.e. ppMAPK) are explored by numerical simulation. The effects of propagation length, diffusion coefficient and feedback strength on the pathway dynamics are investigated. We found that intrinsic bistability in the MAPK cascade can generate a traveling wave of ppMAPK with constant amplitude when the propagation length is short. ppMAPK in this mode of intrinsic bistability decays more slowly than it does in all other modes as the propagation length increases. Moreover, we examined the global and local responses to Ras-GTP of these four modes, and demonstrated how the shapes of these dose-response curves change as the propagation length increases. Also, we found that larger diffusion constant gives a higher response level on the zero-order regime and makes the ppMAPK profiles flatter under strong Ras-GTP stimulus. Furthermore, we observed that spatial responses of ppMAPK are more sensitive to negative feedback than to positive feedback in the broader signal range. Finally, we showed how oscillatory signals pass through the kinase cascade, and found that high frequency signals are damped faster than low frequency ones.

  15. Expert systems help design cementing and acidizing jobs

    SciTech Connect

    Onan, D.D.; Kulakofsky, D.; Van Domelen, M.S.; Ford, W.G.F. )

    1993-04-19

    Knowledge-based expert information systems can help train less-experienced designers and orient seasoned designers at new locations. These systems are playing an increased role in completion and production operations. Expert systems help: design treatments based on an accumulation of knowledge from experts; provide technical information and guidelines on the proper use of additives; and serve as a training tool for less-experienced personnel. The paper describes expert systems design; practical applications; and details about a cement job and acidizing.

  16. Microbial Nucleic Acid Sensing in Oral and Systemic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Crump, K E; Sahingur, S E

    2016-01-01

    One challenge in studying chronic infectious and inflammatory disorders is understanding how host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), specifically toll-like receptors (TLRs), sense and respond to pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns, their communication with each other and different components of the immune system, and their role in propagating inflammatory stages of disease. The discovery of innate immune activation through nucleic acid recognition by intracellular PRRs such as endosomal TLRs (TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9) and cytoplasmic proteins (absent in melanoma 2 and DNA-dependent activator of interferon regulatory factor) opened a new paradigm: Nucleic acid sensing is now implicated in multiple immune and inflammatory conditions (e.g., atherosclerosis, cancer), viral (e.g., human papillomavirus, herpes virus) and bacterial (e.g., Helicobacter pylori, pneumonia) diseases, and autoimmune disorders (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis). Clinical investigations reveal the overexpression of specific nucleic acid sensors in diseased tissues. In vivo animal models show enhanced disease progression associated with receptor activation. The involvement of nucleic acid sensors in various systemic conditions is further supported by studies reporting receptor knockout mice being either protected from or prone to disease. TLR9-mediated inflammation is also implicated in periodontal diseases. Considering that persistent inflammation in the oral cavity is associated with systemic diseases and that oral microbial DNA is isolated at distal sites, nucleic acid sensing may potentially be a link between oral and systemic diseases. In this review, we discuss recent advances in how intracellular PRRs respond to microbial nucleic acids and emerging views on the role of nucleic acid sensors in various systemic diseases. We also highlight new information on the role of intracellular PRRs in the pathogenesis of oral diseases including periodontitis

  17. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gastric acidity test system. 862.1320 Section 862.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1295 - Folic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Folic acid test system. 862.1295 Section 862.1295 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1295 - Folic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Folic acid test system. 862.1295 Section 862.1295 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1290 - Fatty acids test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fatty acids test system. 862.1290 Section 862.1290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1290 - Fatty acids test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fatty acids test system. 862.1290 Section 862.1290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1295 - Folic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Folic acid test system. 862.1295 Section 862.1295 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1095 - Ascorbic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ascorbic acid test system. 862.1095 Section 862.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1290 - Fatty acids test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fatty acids test system. 862.1290 Section 862.1290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1095 - Ascorbic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ascorbic acid test system. 862.1095 Section 862.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1095 - Ascorbic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ascorbic acid test system. 862.1095 Section 862.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gastric acidity test system. 862.1320 Section 862.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gastric acidity test system. 862.1320 Section 862.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gastric acidity test system. 862.1320 Section 862.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastric acidity test system. 862.1320 Section 862.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1655 - Pyruvic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pyruvic acid test system. 862.1655 Section 862.1655 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1655 - Pyruvic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pyruvic acid test system. 862.1655 Section 862.1655 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  13. Jasmonic acid and salicylic acid activate a common defense system in rice

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, Daisuke; Seo, Shigemi; Yamada, Shoko; Kano, Akihito; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Shishido, Hodaka; Miyoshi, Seika; Taniguchi, Shiduku; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) play important roles in plant defense systems. JA and SA signaling pathways interact antagonistically in dicotyledonous plants, but, the status of crosstalk between JA and SA signaling is unknown in monocots. Our rice microarray analysis showed that more than half of the genes upregulated by the SA analog BTH are also upregulated by JA, suggesting that a major portion of the SA-upregulated genes are regulated by JA-dependent signaling in rice. A common defense system that is activated by both JA and SA is thus proposed which plays an important role in pathogen defense responses in rice. PMID:23518581

  14. Phase diagram of a system of adipic, glutaric, and sebacic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolyado, A. V.; Alenova, S. M.; Garkushin, I. K.

    2016-06-01

    Adipic acid-glutaric acid, glutaric acid-sebacic acid, and adipic acid-sebacic acid binary systems are studied, along with an adipic acid-glutaric acid-sebacic acid ternary system. It is shown all of these systems are eutectic. Phase equilibria for the diagram elements of the binary systems and the ternary system are described. It is concluded that the above low-melting compounds can be recommended for use as working bodies in heat accumulators, and for preparing electrolytes used in the thin-layer anodic oxidation of aluminum alloys.

  15. Gas dilution system results and application to acid rain utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley-Souders, K.; Geib, R.; Dunn, C.

    1997-12-31

    In 1997, the United States EPA will remove restrictions preventing acid rain utilities from using gas dilution systems for calibration or linearity studies for continuous emissions monitoring, Test Method 205 in 40CFR51 requires that a gas dilution system must produce calibration gases whose measured values are within {+-}2% of predicted values. This paper presents the evaluation of the Environics/CalMat 2020 Dilution System for use in calibration studies. Internal studies show that concentrations generated by this unit are within {+-}0.5% of predicted values. Studies are being conducted by several acid rain utilities to evaluate the Environics/CalMat system using single minor component calibration standards. In addition, an internally generated study is being performed to demonstrate the system`s accuracy using a multi-component gas mixture. Data from these tests will be presented in the final version of the paper.

  16. 300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    LUKE, S.N.

    1999-05-17

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOERL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion includes closure plan documentation submitted for individual, treatment, storage, and/or disposal units undergoing closure, such as the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Whenever appropriate, 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. This 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System Closure Plan (Revision 2) includes a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Part A, Form 3. Information provided in this closure plan is current as of April 1999.

  17. Status of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, M.; Prokopius, P. R.; Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    A review of the current commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system development efforts is presented. In both the electric utility and on-site integrated energy system applications, reducing cost and increasing reliability are important. The barrier to the attainment of these goals has been materials. The differences in approach among the three major participants are their technological features, including electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, fuel selection and system design philosophy.

  18. Homogeneous vs. heterogeneous nucleation in water-dicarboxylic acid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hienola, A. I.; Vehkamäki, H.; Riipinen, I.; Kulmala, M.

    2009-03-01

    Binary heterogeneous nucleation of water-succinic/glutaric/malonic/adipic acid on nanometer-sized particles is investigated within the frame of classical heterogeneous nucleation theory. Homogeneous nucleation is also included for comparison. It is found that the nucleation probabilities depend on the contact angle and on the size of the seed particles. New thermodynamical properties, such as saturation vapor pressure, density and surface tension for all the dicarboxylic acid aqueous solutions are included in the calculations. While the new surface tension and density formulations do not bring any significant difference in the computed nucleation rate for homogeneous nucleation for succinic and glutaric acids, the use of the newly derived equations for the vapor pressure decrease the acid concentrations in gas phase by 3 orders of magnitude. According to our calculations, the binary heterogeneous nucleation of succinic acid-water and glutaric acid-water - although it requires a 3-4 orders of magnitude lower vapor concentrations than the homogeneous nucleation - cannot take place under atmospheric conditions. On the other hand binary homogeneous nucleation of adipic acid-water systems might be possible under conditions occuring in upper boundary layer. However, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between the surface and the molecules of the nucleating vapor should be considered in the future.

  19. Benefits and risks of folic acid to the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, E

    2002-01-01

    During three decades of neurological practice I have witnessed a remarkable change in attitudes to the benefits and risks of folic acid therapy in nervous system disorders. In the 1960s all that was known and taught was that folic acid was harmful to the nervous system, especially in precipitating or exacerbating the neurological complications of vitamin B12 deficiency. So deeply held was this view that the possibility of neuropsychological benefits from this vitamin was initially viewed with considerable scepticism.1 PMID:11971038

  20. Lead/acid batteries in systems to improve power quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P.; Butler, P.; Nerbun, W.

    Increasing dependence on computer technology is driving needs for extremely high-quality power to prevent loss of information, material, and workers' time that represent billions of dollars annually. This cost has motivated commercial and Federal research and development of energy storage systems that detect and respond to power-quality failures in milliseconds. Electrochemical batteries are among the storage media under investigation for these systems. Battery energy storage systems that employ either flooded lead/acid or valve-regulated lead/acid battery technologies are becoming commercially available to capture a share of this emerging market. Cooperative research and development between the US Department of Energy and private industry have led to installations of lead/acid-based battery energy storage systems to improve power quality at utility and industrial sites and commercial development of fully integrated, modular battery energy storage system products for power quality. One such system by AC Battery Corporation, called the PQ2000, is installed at a test site at Pacific Gas and Electric Company (San Ramon, CA, USA) and at a customer site at Oglethorpe Power Corporation (Tucker, GA, USA). The PQ2000 employs off-the-shelf power electronics in an integrated methodology to control the factors that affect the performance and service life of production-model, low-maintenance, flooded lead/acid batteries. This system, and other members of this first generation of lead/acid-based energy storage systems, will need to compete vigorously for a share of an expanding, yet very aggressive, power quality market.

  1. Phorbic Acid Biosynthesis in the Latex Vessel System of Euphorbia

    PubMed Central

    Nordal, Arnold; Benson, A. A.

    1969-01-01

    Evidence is presented that phorbic acid is formed in the latex producing cell system, rather than in photosynthetic or chlorophyll-free tissues of Euphorbia resinifera Berg. When a branch of the plant was kept first in a 14CO2 atmosphere with 12 hr light-dark periods for 2 days and then left under natural conditions in the air outside for at least 2 to 3 days, radioactive phorbic acid was found in the latex. Phorbic acid synthesis appeared to be independent of the photosynthetic and respiratory activities of the plant. Besides phorbic acid 2 other major radioactive compounds were recognized in the latex, a glycoside or oligosaccharide, and a lipid belonging to the group of triterpenoid compounds characteristic of the latex in several species of Euphorbia. Images PMID:16657036

  2. The influence of dietary docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid on central nervous system polyunsaturated fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Brenna, J Thomas; Diau, Guan-Yeu

    2007-01-01

    Numerous studies on perinatal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid nutrition have clarified the influence of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) on central nervous system PUFA concentrations. In humans, omnivorous primates, and piglets, DHA and ARA plasma and red blood cells concentrations rise with dietary preformed DHA and ARA. Brain and retina DHA are responsive to diet while ARA is not. DHA is at highest concentration in cells and tissues associated with high energy consumption, consistent with high DHA levels in mitochondria and synaptosomes. DHA is a substrate for docosanoids, signaling compounds of intense current interest. The high concentration in tissues with high rates of oxidative metabolism may be explained by a critical role related to oxidative metabolism.

  3. The Influence of Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid and Arachidonic Acid on Central Nervous System Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Brenna, J. Thomas; Diau, Guan-Yeu

    2007-01-01

    Numerous studies on perinatal long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid nutrition have clarified the influence of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) on central nervous system PUFA concentrations. In humans, omnivorous primates, and piglets, DHA and ARA plasma and red blood cells concentrations rise with dietary preformed DHA and ARA. Brain and retina DHA are responsive to diet while ARA is not. DHA is at highest concentration cells and tissues associated with high energy consumption, consistent with high DHA levels in mitochondria and synaptosomes. DHA is a substrate for docosanoids, signaling compounds of intense current interest. The high concentration in tissues with high rates of oxidative metabolism may be explained by a critical role related to oxidative metabolism. PMID:18023566

  4. Study of Self Assembly Systems Formed by Malic Acid and Alkyloxy Benzoic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, Vellalapalayam Nallagounder; Madhu Mohan, Mathukumalli Lakshmi Narayana

    2010-12-01

    Self assembly systems formed by malic acid and alkyloxy benzoic acids are characterized. The ferroelectric ingredient malic acid formed double hydrogen bond with p-n-alkyloxy benzoic acids. Various hydrogen bonded complexes have been synthesized with malic acid and pentyl to dodecyloxy benzoic acid, respectively. Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) studies confirm the hydrogen bond formation. Polarizing optical microscopic (POM) studies revealed the textural information while the transition and enthalpy values are calculated from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies. A phase diagram has been constructed from the POMand DSC studies. A new smectic ordering, smectic X*, has been identified which exhibits a finger print type texture. This phase has been characterized by POM, DSC, helix, and tilt angle studies. The transition from traditional cholesteric to smectic X* phase is observed to be first order. The tilt angle data in this phase has been fitted to a power law and the temperature variation of the tilt angle follows mean field theory predictions. The results of FTIR, POM, DSC, tilt angle, and helicoidal studies are discussed.

  5. Difference between Chitosan Hydrogels via Alkaline and Acidic Solvent Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jingyi; Wang, Zhengke; Hu, Qiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) has generated considerable interest for its desirable properties and wide applications. Hydrogel has been proven to be a major and vital form in the applications of CS materials. Among various types of CS hydrogels, physical cross-linked CS hydrogels are popular, because they avoided the potential toxicity and sacrifice of intrinsic properties caused by cross-linking or reinforcements. Alkaline solvent system and acidic solvent system are two important solvent systems for the preparation of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, and also lay the foundations of CS hydrogel-based materials in many aspects. As members of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, gel material via alkaline solvent system showed significant differences from that via acidic solvent system, but the reasons behind are still unexplored. In the present work, we studied the difference between CS hydrogel via alkaline system and acidic system, in terms of gelation process, hydrogel structure and mechanical property. In-situ/pseudo in-situ studies were carried out, including fluorescent imaging of gelation process, which provided dynamic visualization. Finally, the reasons behind the differences were explained, accompanied by the discussion about design strategy based on gelation behavior of the two systems. PMID:27786262

  6. Difference between Chitosan Hydrogels via Alkaline and Acidic Solvent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Jingyi; Wang, Zhengke; Hu, Qiaoling

    2016-10-01

    Chitosan (CS) has generated considerable interest for its desirable properties and wide applications. Hydrogel has been proven to be a major and vital form in the applications of CS materials. Among various types of CS hydrogels, physical cross-linked CS hydrogels are popular, because they avoided the potential toxicity and sacrifice of intrinsic properties caused by cross-linking or reinforcements. Alkaline solvent system and acidic solvent system are two important solvent systems for the preparation of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, and also lay the foundations of CS hydrogel-based materials in many aspects. As members of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, gel material via alkaline solvent system showed significant differences from that via acidic solvent system, but the reasons behind are still unexplored. In the present work, we studied the difference between CS hydrogel via alkaline system and acidic system, in terms of gelation process, hydrogel structure and mechanical property. In-situ/pseudo in-situ studies were carried out, including fluorescent imaging of gelation process, which provided dynamic visualization. Finally, the reasons behind the differences were explained, accompanied by the discussion about design strategy based on gelation behavior of the two systems.

  7. A continuous acetic acid system for polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of gliadins and other prolamines.

    PubMed

    Clements, R L

    1988-02-01

    A polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis system buffered by acetic acid alone was developed for electrophoresis of prolamines. When applied to gliadin electrophoresis, the acetic acid system produces more bands than does a conventional aluminum lactate-lactic acid system (using 12% acrylamide gels). The acetic acid system is relatively simple, requiring a single buffer component that is universally available in high purity.

  8. 21 CFR 862.3580 - Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3580 Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system. (a) Identification. A lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system is a device intended to measure lysergic acid diethylamide,...

  9. 21 CFR 862.3580 - Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3580 Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system. (a) Identification. A lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system is a device intended to measure lysergic acid diethylamide,...

  10. 21 CFR 862.3580 - Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3580 Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system. (a) Identification. A lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system is a device intended to measure lysergic acid diethylamide,...

  11. 21 CFR 862.3580 - Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3580 Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system. (a) Identification. A lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system is a device intended to measure lysergic acid diethylamide,...

  12. 21 CFR 862.3580 - Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3580 Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system. (a) Identification. A lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) test system is a device intended to measure lysergic acid diethylamide,...

  13. High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2006-04-20

    This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

  14. 21 CFR 862.1305 - Formiminoglutamic acid (FIGLU) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Formiminoglutamic acid (FIGLU) test system. 862.1305 Section 862.1305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1305 - Formiminoglutamic acid (FIGLU) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Formiminoglutamic acid (FIGLU) test system. 862.1305 Section 862.1305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  16. Dynamic Buffer Capacity in Acid-Base Systems.

    PubMed

    Michałowska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna M; Michałowski, Tadeusz

    The generalized concept of 'dynamic' buffer capacity βV is related to electrolytic systems of different complexity where acid-base equilibria are involved. The resulting formulas are presented in a uniform and consistent form. The detailed calculations are related to two Britton-Robinson buffers, taken as examples.

  17. Binary nucleation in acid-water systems. II. Sulfuric acid-water and a comparison with methanesulfonic acid-water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyslouzil, B. E.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Flagan, R. C.; Okuyama, K.

    1991-05-01

    This work presents a systematic investigation of binary nucleation rates for sulfuric acid and water and the effect of temperature on these rates at isothermal, subsaturated conditions. The results from nucleation rate measurements for the sulfuric acid (H2SO4) -water system are discussed and compared to those previously presented for methanesulfonic acid (MSA)-water [B. E. Wyslouzil, J. H. Seinfeld, R. C. Flagan, and K. Okuyama, J. Chem. Phys. (submitted)]. Experiments were conducted at relative humidities (Rh) ranging from 0.006acidities (Ra) in the range of 0.04acid molecules in the critical nucleus for both the H2SO4 -water and MSA-water systems.

  18. Amino acid transport by prosthecae of Asticcacaulis biprosthecum: evidence for a broad-range transport system.

    PubMed

    Tam, E; Pate, J L

    1985-10-01

    Prosthecae purified from cells of Asticcaulis biprosthecum possess active transport systems that transport all 20 amino acids tested. Using ascorbate-reduced phenazine methosulphate in the presence of oxygen, all 20 amino acids are accumulated against a concentration gradient by isolated prosthecae. Results of experiments testing the inhibition of transport of one amino acid by another, and of experiments testing the exchange of exogenous amino acids with those preloaded in prosthecae, along with characteristics of mutants defective in amino acid transport, suggest the presence in prosthecae of three amino acid transport systems. One, the general or G system, transports at least 18 of the 20 amino acids tested. Another system, referred to as the proline or P system, transports seven amino acids (including proline) that are also transported by the G system. The third system transports only glutamate and aspartate, and is referred to as the acidic amino acid transport system or A system.

  19. The oxidation of linoleic acid in the Udenfriend's system.

    PubMed

    Wakizaka, A; Imai, Y

    1974-11-01

    The autocatalytic oxidation of linoleate was observed in the incubation mixture containing ferrous ion and ascorbic acid as the catalysts (Undenfriend's system). The rate of oxidation of linoleate was estimated wither by the TBA method, iodometry or by the measurement of the absorbance at 235 nm. Reaction products were analyzed by TLC, GLC and UV-, IR-, NMR- and mass spectrometries. The main oxidized products were assumed to have one oxygen atom at the position of carbon 9 or 13 of linoleate or two oxygen atoms at the both positions of the original acid. The conjugated double bond was formed at carbon 10 and 12 of the carbon chain of linoleate.

  20. Dietary docosahexaenoic acid but not arachidonic acid influences central nervous system fatty acid status in baboon neonates.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Andrea T; Brenna, J Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The influence of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) and arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) on infant central nervous system (CNS) composition has implications for neural development, including vision, cognition, and motor function. We consider here combined results of three published studies of DHA/AA-containing formulas and breastfeeding to evaluate the CNS tissue response of baboon neonates with varied concentration and duration of DHA/AA consumption [G.Y. Diau, A.T. Hsieh, E.A. Sarkadi-Nagy, V. Wijendran, P.W. Nathanielsz, J.T. Brenna, The influence of long chain polyunsaturate supplementation on docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid in baboon neonate central nervous system, BMC Med. 3 (2005) 11; A.T. Hsieh, J.C. Anthony, D.A. Diersen-Schade, et al., The influence of moderate and high dietary long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) on baboon neonate tissue fatty acids, Pediatr. Res. 61 (2007) 537-45; E. Sarkadi-Nagy, V. Wijendran, G.Y. Diau, et al., The influence of prematurity and long chain polyunsaturate supplementation in 4-week adjusted age baboon neonate brain and related tissues, Pediatr. Res. 54 (2003) 244-252]. A total of 43 neonates born spontaneously at term, or preterm by Cesarean section, consumed diets with DHA-AA (%w/w) at several levels: none (0,0), moderate (0.3, 0.6), or high (>0.6, 0.67 or 1.2). CNS fatty acids were analyzed at 4 and 12 weeks postpartum for term baboons and 7.5 weeks for preterm neonates. CNS DHA was consistently greater by 5-30% in neonates consuming DHA and nearer 30% for cortex. In contrast, CNS AA was unaffected by dietary AA and decreased in all structures with age. Dietary DHA consistently supports greater CNS DHA and maintenance of cortex DHA concentration with feeding duration, while CNS AA is not related to dietary supply. These data on structure-specific LCPUFA accretion may provide insight into neural mechanisms responsible for suboptimal functional outcomes in infants consuming diets that do not

  1. Advancing polymeric delivery systems amidst a nucleic acid therapy renaissance

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Paul A.; Pun, Suzie H.; Reineke, Theresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid therapeutics are attracting renewed interest due to recent clinical advances and product approvals. Most leading programs use chemical conjugates, or viral vectors in the case of gene therapy, while several use no delivery system at all. Polymer systems, which have been at the periphery of this renaissance, often involve greater molecular complexity than competing approaches, which must be justified by their advantages. Advanced analytical methods, along with biological tools for characterizing biotransformation and intracellular trafficking, are increasingly being applied to nucleic acid delivery systems including those based on polymers. These frontiers of investigation create the opportunity for an era where highly defined polymer compositions are optimized based on mechanistic insights in a way that has not been previously possible, offering the prospect of greater differentiation from alternatives. This will require integrated collaboration between polymer scientists and those from other disciplines. PMID:24683504

  2. Skin delivery of ferulic acid from different vesicular systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Liu, Xiangli; Fahr, Alfred

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present research is to evaluate the skin delivery capabilities of different vesicular systems, including conventional liposomes (CL), Tween 80-based deformable liposomes (DL), invasomes (INS) and ethosomes bearing ferulic acid (FA) being an antioxidant exhibiting a wide range of therapeutic effects against various diseases. All of the test formulations were characterized for particle size distribution, zeta-potential, vesicular shape and surface morphology, in vitro human skin permeation and skin deposition. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) defined that all of liposomal vesicles were almost spherical, displaying unilamellar structures with low polydispersity (PDI < 0.2) and nanometric size range (z-average no more than 150 nm). In addition, all the vesicular systems except conventional liposomes were negatively charged to a certain extent. In vitro skin permeation and skin deposition experiments demonstrated that the permeation profile of ferulic acid through human stratum corneum epidermis membrane (SCE) and the drug deposition in skin were both improved significantly using these vesicular liposomal systems. Permeation and skin deposition enhancing effect was highlighted by the ethosomal system containing 18.0 mg/ml of ferulic acid with an significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced skin flux (267.8 +/- 16.77 microg/cm2/h) and skin drug deposition (51.67 +/- 1.94 microg/cm2), which was 75 times and 7.3 times higher than those of ferulic acid from saturated PBS (pH 7.4) solution, respectively. This study demonstrated that ethosomes are promising vesicular carriers for delivering ferulic acid into or across the skin.

  3. A fully automatic system for acid-base coulometric titrations

    PubMed Central

    Cladera, A.; Caro, A.; Estela, J. M.; Cerdà, V.

    1990-01-01

    An automatic system for acid-base titrations by electrogeneration of H+ and OH- ions, with potentiometric end-point detection, was developed. The system includes a PC-compatible computer for instrumental control, data acquisition and processing, which allows up to 13 samples to be analysed sequentially with no human intervention. The system performance was tested on the titration of standard solutions, which it carried out with low errors and RSD. It was subsequently applied to the analysis of various samples of environmental and nutritional interest, specifically waters, soft drinks and wines. PMID:18925283

  4. Commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Warshay, M.; Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    A review of the current commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development efforts is presented. In both the electric utility and on-site integrated energy system applications, reducing cost and increasing reliability are the technology drivers at this time. The longstanding barrier to the attainment of these goals, which manifests itself in a number of ways, has been materials. The differences in approach among the three major participants (United Technologies Corporation (UTC), Westinghouse Electric Corporation/Energy Research Corporation (ERC), and Engelhard Industries) and their unique technological features, including electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, fuel selection and system design philosophy are discussed.

  5. IR-UV photochemistry of protein-nucleic acid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kozub, J.; Edwards, G.

    1995-12-31

    UV light has often been used to induce the formation of covalent bonds between DNA (or RNA) and tightly-bound protein molecules. However, the internal photoreactions of nucleic acids and proteins limit the yield and complicate the analysis of intermolecular crosslinks. In an ongoing search for improved reaction specificity or new photoreactions in these systems, we have employed UV photons from a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser and mid-IR photons from the Vanderbilt FEL. Having crosslinked several protein-nucleic acid systems with nanosecond UV laser pulses, we are currently studying the effect of various IR wavelengths on a model system (gene 32 protein and poly[dT]). We have found that irradiation with sufficiently intense FEL macropulses creates an altered form of gene 32 protein which was not observed with UV-only irradiation. The electrophoretic nobility of the product is consistent with the formation of a specific protein-protein crosslink. No evidence of the non-specific protein damage typically induced by UV light is found. The yield of the new photoproduct is apparently enhanced by exposure to FEL macropulses which are synchronized with UV laser pulses. With ideal exposure parameters, the two-color reaction effectively competes with UV-only reactions. Experiments designed to determine the reaction mechanism and to demonstrate FEL-induced reactions in other protein-nucleic acid systems are currently underway.

  6. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which serve as scientific paradigms. Moreover, functional and comparative metagenomic studies are taking off and provide a wealth of insight in the activity of lactic acid bacteria used in a variety of applications, ranging from starters in complex fermentations to their marketing as probiotics. In this new era of high throughput analysis, biology has become big science. Hence, there is a need to systematically store the generated information, apply this in an intelligent way, and provide modalities for constructing self-learning systems that can be used for future improvements. This review addresses these systems solutions with a state of the art overview of the present paradigms that relate to the use of lactic acid bacteria in industrial applications. Moreover, an outlook is presented of the future developments that include the transition into practice as well as the use of lactic acid bacteria in synthetic biology and other next generation applications. PMID:21995776

  7. Developing nucleic acid-based electrical detection systems

    PubMed Central

    Gabig-Ciminska, Magdalena

    2006-01-01

    Development of nucleic acid-based detection systems is the main focus of many research groups and high technology companies. The enormous work done in this field is particularly due to the broad versatility and variety of these sensing devices. From optical to electrical systems, from label-dependent to label-free approaches, from single to multi-analyte and array formats, this wide range of possibilities makes the research field very diversified and competitive. New challenges and requirements for an ideal detector suitable for nucleic acid analysis include high sensitivity and high specificity protocol that can be completed in a relatively short time offering at the same time low detection limit. Moreover, systems that can be miniaturized and automated present a significant advantage over conventional technology, especially if detection is needed in the field. Electrical system technology for nucleic acid-based detection is an enabling mode for making miniaturized to micro- and nanometer scale bio-monitoring devices via the fusion of modern micro- and nanofabrication technology and molecular biotechnology. The electrical biosensors that rely on the conversion of the Watson-Crick base-pair recognition event into a useful electrical signal are advancing rapidly, and recently are receiving much attention as a valuable tool for microbial pathogen detection. Pathogens may pose a serious threat to humans, animal and plants, thus their detection and analysis is a significant element of public health. Although different conventional methods for detection of pathogenic microorganisms and their toxins exist and are currently being applied, improvements of molecular-based detection methodologies have changed these traditional detection techniques and introduced a new era of rapid, miniaturized and automated electrical chip detection technologies into pathogen identification sector. In this review some developments and current directions in nucleic acid-based electrical

  8. Superabsorbent biphasic system based on poly(lactic acid) and poly(acrylic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartore, Luciana; Pandini, Stefano; Baldi, Francesco; Bignotti, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    In this research work, biocomposites based on crosslinked particles of poly(acrylic acid), commonly used as superabsorbent polymer (SAP), and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) were developed to elucidate the role of the filler (i.e., polymeric crosslinked particles) on the overall physico-mechanical behavior and to obtain superabsorbent thermoplastic products. Samples prepared by melt-blending of components in different ratios showed a biphasic system with a regular distribution of particles, with diameter ranging from 5 to 10 μm, within the PLLA polymeric matrix. The polymeric biphasic system, coded PLASA i.e. superabsorbent poly(lactic acid), showed excellent swelling properties, demonstrating that cross-linked particles retain their superabsorbent ability, as in their free counterparts, even if distributed in a thermoplastic polymeric matrix. The thermal characteristics of the biocomposites evidence enhanced thermal stability in comparison with neat PLLA and also mechanical properties are markedly modified by addition of crosslinked particles which induce regular stiffening effect. Furthermore, in aqueous environments the particles swell and are leached from PLLA matrix generating very high porosity. These new open-pore PLLA foams, produced in absence of organic solvents and chemical foaming agents, with good physico-mechanical properties appear very promising for several applications, for instance in tissue engineering for scaffold production.

  9. [Linoleic acid and the immune system. Controversies about lipid emulsions].

    PubMed

    García de Lorenzo, A; Culebras, J M

    1992-01-01

    The selection of a given lipidic function for nutritional backup requires not only knowledge of the metabolism of the different existing lipidic emulsions and of their specific therapeutic indications, but also of their contraindications and controversies because, apart from their calorific value, the contribution of liposoluble vitamins and their function in preventing essential fatty acid deficiencies, we know that they are powerful metabolic modulators. This in associated with the fact that manipulation of dietary lipids (enteral or parenteral) can affect and modulate the response to the disease, attack or infection by improving or impairing the different immune functions. This review is focused on the scientific publications which have examined the varying effects of lipidic emulsions, in quantity and in quality (particularly linoleic acid) on the immune system, on the fatty acid composition of the cellular membranes and on the production of and prostaglandins and leukotrienes. An update is given of the known interrelation between lipids and immunity, with appraisal of triglycerides and long-medium -- and short-chain fatty acids, mixtures of medium -- and long-chain triglycerides, the proportions between infinity-3/infinity-6, and structured lipids.

  10. System for portable nucleic acid testing in low resource settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hsiang-Wei; Roskos, Kristina; Hickerson, Anna I.; Carey, Thomas; Niemz, Angelika

    2013-03-01

    Our overall goal is to enable timely diagnosis of infectious diseases through nucleic acid testing at the point-of-care and in low resource settings, via a compact system that integrates nucleic acid sample preparation, isothermal DNA amplification, and nucleic acid lateral flow (NALF) detection. We herein present an interim milestone, the design of the amplification and detection subsystem, and the characterization of thermal and fluidic control and assay execution within this system. Using an earlier prototype of the amplification and detection unit, comprised of a disposable cartridge containing flexible pouches, passive valves, and electrolysis-driven pumps, in conjunction with a small heater, we have demonstrated successful execution of an established and clinically validated isothermal loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) reaction targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) DNA, coupled to NALF detection. The refined design presented herein incorporates miniaturized and integrated electrolytic pumps, novel passive valves, overall design changes to facilitate integration with an upstream sample preparation unit, and a refined instrument design that automates pumping, heating, and timing. Nucleic acid amplification occurs in a two-layer pouch that facilitates fluid handling and appropriate thermal control. The disposable cartridge is manufactured using low-cost and scalable techniques and forms a closed system to prevent workplace contamination by amplicons. In a parallel effort, we are developing a sample preparation unit based on similar design principles, which performs mechanical lysis of mycobacteria and DNA extraction from liquefied and disinfected sputum. Our next step is to combine sample preparation, amplification, and detection in a final integrated cartridge and device, to enable fully automated sample-in to answer-out diagnosis of active tuberculosis in primary care facilities of low-resource and high-burden countries.

  11. 21 CFR 862.1390 - 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system... Test Systems § 862.1390 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system. (a) Identification. A 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system is a device intended to measure 5-hydroxyindole acetic...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1390 - 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system... Test Systems § 862.1390 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system. (a) Identification. A 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system is a device intended to measure 5-hydroxyindole acetic...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1390 - 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system... Test Systems § 862.1390 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system. (a) Identification. A 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system is a device intended to measure 5-hydroxyindole acetic...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1390 - 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system... Test Systems § 862.1390 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system. (a) Identification. A 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system is a device intended to measure 5-hydroxyindole acetic...

  15. Activation of the Glutamic Acid-Dependent Acid Resistance System in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Leads to Increase of the Fatty Acid Biotransformation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Ji-Min; Kim, Ji-Won; Song, Ji-Won; Blank, Lars M.; Park, Jin-Byung

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of carboxylic acids including fatty acids from biomass is central in envisaged biorefinery concepts. The productivities are often, however, low due to product toxicity that hamper whole-cell biocatalyst performance. Here, we have investigated factors that influence the tolerance of Escherichia coli to medium chain carboxylic acid (i.e., n-heptanoic acid)-induced stress. The metabolic and genomic responses of E. coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655 grown in the presence of n-heptanoic acid indicated that the GadA/B-based glutamic acid-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system might be critical for cellular tolerance. The GDAR system, which is responsible for scavenging intracellular protons by catalyzing decarboxylation of glutamic acid, was inactive in E. coli BL21(DE3). Activation of the GDAR system in this strain by overexpressing the rcsB and dsrA genes, of which the gene products are involved in the activation of GadE and RpoS, respectively, resulted in acid tolerance not only to HCl but also to n-heptanoic acid. Furthermore, activation of the GDAR system allowed the recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) expressing the alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus and the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida to reach 60% greater product concentration in the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (i.e., 12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (1)) into n-heptanoic acid (5) and 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (4). This study may contribute to engineering E. coli-based biocatalysts for the production of carboxylic acids from renewable biomass. PMID:27681369

  16. Activation of the Glutamic Acid-Dependent Acid Resistance System in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Leads to Increase of the Fatty Acid Biotransformation Activity.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ji-Min; Kim, Ji-Won; Song, Ji-Won; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

    The biosynthesis of carboxylic acids including fatty acids from biomass is central in envisaged biorefinery concepts. The productivities are often, however, low due to product toxicity that hamper whole-cell biocatalyst performance. Here, we have investigated factors that influence the tolerance of Escherichia coli to medium chain carboxylic acid (i.e., n-heptanoic acid)-induced stress. The metabolic and genomic responses of E. coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655 grown in the presence of n-heptanoic acid indicated that the GadA/B-based glutamic acid-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system might be critical for cellular tolerance. The GDAR system, which is responsible for scavenging intracellular protons by catalyzing decarboxylation of glutamic acid, was inactive in E. coli BL21(DE3). Activation of the GDAR system in this strain by overexpressing the rcsB and dsrA genes, of which the gene products are involved in the activation of GadE and RpoS, respectively, resulted in acid tolerance not only to HCl but also to n-heptanoic acid. Furthermore, activation of the GDAR system allowed the recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) expressing the alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus and the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida to reach 60% greater product concentration in the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (i.e., 12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (1)) into n-heptanoic acid (5) and 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (4). This study may contribute to engineering E. coli-based biocatalysts for the production of carboxylic acids from renewable biomass.

  17. Low- and high-affinity transport systems for citric acid in the yeast Candida utilis.

    PubMed Central

    Cássio, F; Leáo, C

    1991-01-01

    Citric acid-grown cells of the yeast Candida utilis induced two transport systems for citric acid, presumably a proton symport and a facilitated diffusion system for the charged and the undissociated forms of the acid, respectively. Both systems could be observed simultaneously when the transport was measured at 25 degrees C with labelled citric acid at pH 3.5 with the following kinetic parameters: for the low-affinity system, Vmax, 1.14 nmol of undissociated citric acid s-1 mg (dry weight) of cells-1, and Km, 0.59 mM undissociated acid; for the high-affinity system, Vmax, 0.38 nmol of citrate s-1 mg (dry weight) of cells-1, and Km, 0.056 mM citrate. At high pH values (above 5.0), the low-affinity system was absent or not measurable. The two transport systems exhibited different substrate specificities. Isocitric acid was a competitive inhibitor of citric acid for the high-affinity system, suggesting that these tricarboxylic acids used the same transport system, while aconitic, tricarballylic, trimesic, and hemimellitic acids were not competitive inhibitors. With respect to the low-affinity system, isocitric acid, L-lactic acid, and L-malic acid were competitive inhibitors, suggesting that all of these mono-, di-, and tricarboxylic acids used the same low-affinity transport system. The two transport systems were repressed by glucose, and as a consequence diauxic growth was observed. Both systems were inducible, and not only citric acid but also lactic acid and malic acid may induce those transport systems. The induction of both systems was not dependent on the relative concentration of the anionic form(s) and of undissociated citric acid in the culture medium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1664712

  18. Systemic regulation of soybean nodulation by acidic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Han; Gresshoff, Peter M; Ferguson, Brett J

    2012-12-01

    Mechanisms inhibiting legume nodulation by low soil pH, although highly prevalent and economically significant, are poorly understood. We addressed this in soybean (Glycine max) using a combination of physiological and genetic approaches. Split-root and grafting studies using an autoregulation-of-nodulation-deficient mutant line, altered in the autoregulation-of-nodulation receptor kinase GmNARK, determined that a systemic, shoot-controlled, and GmNARK-dependent mechanism was critical for facilitating the inhibitory effect. Acid inhibition was independent of aluminum ion concentration and occurred early in nodule development, between 12 and 96 h post inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Biological effects were confirmed by measuring transcript numbers of known early nodulation genes. Transcripts decreased on both sides of split-root systems, where only one side was subjected to low-pH conditions. Our findings enhance the present understanding of the innate mechanisms regulating legume nodulation control under acidic conditions, which could benefit future attempts in agriculture to improve nodule development and biological nitrogen fixation in acid-stressed soils.

  19. Availability: A Metric for Nucleic Acid Strand Displacement Systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    DNA strand displacement systems have transformative potential in synthetic biology. While powerful examples have been reported in DNA nanotechnology, such systems are plagued by leakage, which limits network stability, sensitivity, and scalability. An approach to mitigate leakage in DNA nanotechnology, which is applicable to synthetic biology, is to introduce mismatches to complementary fuel sequences at key locations. However, this method overlooks nuances in the secondary structure of the fuel and substrate that impact the leakage reaction kinetics in strand displacement systems. In an effort to quantify the impact of secondary structure on leakage, we introduce the concepts of availability and mutual availability and demonstrate their utility for network analysis. Our approach exposes vulnerable locations on the substrate and quantifies the secondary structure of fuel strands. Using these concepts, a 4-fold reduction in leakage has been achieved. The result is a rational design process that efficiently suppresses leakage and provides new insight into dynamic nucleic acid networks. PMID:26875531

  20. Results of electric-vehicle propulsion system performance on three lead-acid battery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewashinka, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Three types of state of the art 6 V lead acid batteries were tested. The cycle life of lead acid batteries as a function of the electric vehicle propulsion system design was determined. Cycle life, degradation rate and failure modes with different battery types (baseline versus state of the art tubular and thin plate batteries) were compared. The effects of testing strings of three versus six series connected batteries on overall performance were investigated. All three types do not seem to have an economically feasible battery system for the propulsion systems. The tubular plate batteries on the load leveled profile attained 235 cycles with no signs of degradation and minimal capacity loss.

  1. Results of electric-vehicle propulsion system performance on three lead-acid battery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewashinka, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Three types of state of the art 6 V lead acid batteries were tested. The cycle life of lead acid batteries as a function of the electric vehicle propulsion system design was determined. Cycle life, degradation rate and failure modes with different battery types (baseline versus state of the art tubular and thin plate batteries were compared. The effects of testing strings of three versus six series connected batteries on overall performance were investigated. All three types do not seem to have an economically feasible battery system for the propulsion systems. The tubular plate batteries on the load leveled profile attained 235 cycles with no signs of degradation and minimal capacity loss.

  2. Bioluminescence regenerative cycle (BRC) system for nucleic acid quantification assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassibi, Arjang; Lee, Thomas H.; Davis, Ronald W.; Pourmand, Nader

    2003-07-01

    A new label-free methodology for nucleic acid quantification has been developed where the number of pyrophosphate molecules (PPi) released during polymerization of the target nucleic acid is counted and correlated to DNA copy number. The technique uses the enzymatic complex of ATP-sulfurylase and firefly luciferase to generate photons from PPi. An enzymatic unity gain positive feedback is also implemented to regenerate the photon generation process and compensate any decay in light intensity by self regulation. Due to this positive feedback, the total number of photons generated by the bioluminescence regenerative cycle (BRC) can potentially be orders of magnitude higher than typical chemiluminescent processes. A system level kinetic model that incorporates the effects of contaminations and detector noise was used to show that the photon generation process is in fact steady and also proportional to the nucleic acid quantity. Here we show that BRC is capable of detecting quantities of DNA as low as 1 amol (10-18 mole) in 40μlit aqueous solutions, and this enzymatic assay has a controllable dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude. The sensitivity of this technology, due to the excess number of photons generated by the regenerative cycle, is not constrained by detector performance, but rather by possible PPi or ATP (adenosine triphosphate) contamination, or background bioluminescence of the enzymatic complex.

  3. Oleic acid stimulates system A amino acid transport in primary human trophoblast cells mediated by toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Lager, Susanne; Gaccioli, Francesca; Ramirez, Vanessa I; Jones, Helen N; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2013-03-01

    Obese women have an increased risk to deliver large babies. However, the mechanisms underlying fetal overgrowth in these pregnancies are not well understood. Obese pregnant women typically have elevated circulating lipid levels. We tested the hypothesis that fatty acids stimulate placental amino acid transport, mediated via toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways. Circulating NEFA levels and placental TLR4 expression were assessed in women with varying prepregnancy body mass index (BMI). The effects of oleic acid on system A and system L amino acid transport, and on the activation of the mTOR (4EBP1, S6K1, rpS6), TLR4 (IĸB, JNK, p38 MAPK), and STAT3 signaling pathways were determined in cultured primary human trophoblast cells. Maternal circulating NEFAs (n = 33), but not placental TLR4 mRNA expression (n = 16), correlated positively with BMI (P < 0.05). Oleic acid increased trophoblast JNK and STAT3 phosphorylation (P < 0.05), whereas mTOR activity was unaffected. Furthermore, oleic acid doubled trophoblast system A activity (P < 0.05), without affecting system L activity. siRNA-mediated silencing of TLR4 expression prevented the stimulatory effect of oleic acid on system A activity. Our data suggest that maternal fatty acids can increase placental nutrient transport via TLR4, thereby potentially affecting fetal growth.

  4. Kinetics of browning and correlations between browning degree and pyrazine compounds in l-ascorbic acid/acidic amino acid model systems.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ai-Nong; Zhou, Yong-Yan; Yang, Yi-Ni

    2017-04-15

    The kinetics of browning and the correlation between browning products (BPs) and pyrazine compounds were investigated by heating equimolar l-ascorbic acid (ASA)/acidic amino acids under weak alkaline conditions at 120-150°C for 10-120min. The formations of BPs and pyrazine compounds from the reaction were monitored by UV-vis and SPME-GC-FID, respectively. The formation of BPs in both ASA/l-glutamic acid and ASA/l-aspartic acid model reaction systems followed zero order reaction kinetics with activation energies (Ea) of 90.13 and 93.38kJ/mol, respectively. ASA/l-aspartic acid browned at a slightly higher rate than ASA/l-glutamic acid. The total concentration of pyrazine compounds was highly and positively correlated with that of BPs. Based on the observed kinetic data, the formation mechanisms of BPs and pyrazine compounds were proposed.

  5. 21 CFR 862.1187 - Conjugated sulfolithocholic acid (SLCG) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1187 Conjugated sulfolithocholic acid (SLCG) test system. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 862.1187 - Conjugated sulfolithocholic acid (SLCG) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1187 Conjugated sulfolithocholic acid (SLCG) test system. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 862.1187 - Conjugated sulfolithocholic acid (SLCG) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1187 Conjugated sulfolithocholic acid (SLCG) test system. (a) Identification....

  8. 21 CFR 862.1187 - Conjugated sulfolithocholic acid (SLCG) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1187 Conjugated sulfolithocholic acid (SLCG) test system. (a) Identification....

  9. 21 CFR 862.1187 - Conjugated sulfolithocholic acid (SLCG) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1187 Conjugated sulfolithocholic acid (SLCG) test system. (a) Identification....

  10. Target Turing patterns and growth dynamics in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction.

    PubMed

    Preska Steinberg, Asher; Epstein, Irving R; Dolnik, Milos

    2014-04-03

    We study the growth dynamics of Turing patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system in response to perturbations with visible light. We describe several mechanisms by which Turing patterns reappear after they are suppressed by illumination with a disc-shaped geometry. We observe that under specific conditions the patterns reorganize from a random configuration of spots and stripes to a set of ordered, concentric rings, which we refer to as target Turing patterns. These patterns closely resemble the unit cells of the Turing hexagonal superlattices known as black eye patterns. However, these target Turing patterns are not part of a larger superlattice structure, and they usually have a larger number of concentric rings. Numerical simulations support the experimental findings.

  11. Kinetics of DNA Strand Displacement Systems with Locked Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Olson, Xiaoping; Kotani, Shohei; Yurke, Bernard; Graugnard, Elton; Hughes, William L

    2017-03-30

    Locked nucleic acids (LNAs) are conformationally restricted RNA nucleotides. Their increased thermal stability and selectivity toward their complements make them well-suited for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Although the structural and thermodynamic properties of LNA-LNA, LNA-RNA, and LNA-DNA hybridizations are known, the kinetic effects of incorporating LNA nucleotides into DNA strand displacement systems are not. Here, we thoroughly studied the strand displacement kinetics as a function of the number and position of LNA nucleotides in DNA oligonucleotides. When compared to that of an all-DNA control, with an identical sequence, the leakage rate constant was reduced more than 50-fold, to an undetectable level, and the invasion rate was preserved for a hybrid DNA/LNA system. The total performance enhancement ratio also increased more than 70-fold when calculating the ratio of the invading rate to the leakage rate constants for a hybrid system. The rational substitution of LNA nucleotides for DNA nucleotides preserves sequence space while improving the signal-to-noise ratio of strand displacement systems. Hybrid DNA/LNA systems offer great potential for high-performance chemical reaction networks that include catalyzed hairpin assemblies, hairpin chain reactions, motors, walkers, and seesaw gates.

  12. Graphene Oxide-Gallic Acid Nanodelivery System for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dorniani, Dena; Saifullah, Bullo; Barahuie, Farahnaz; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Hussein, Mohd Zobir Bin; Fakurazi, Sharida; Twyman, Lance J

    2016-12-01

    Despite the technological advancement in the biomedical science, cancer remains a life-threatening disease. In this study, we designed an anticancer nanodelivery system using graphene oxide (GO) as nanocarrier for an active anticancer agent gallic acid (GA). The successful formation nanocomposite (GOGA) was characterized using XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, Raman, and UV/Vis spectroscopy. The release study shows that the release of GA from the designed anticancer nanocomposite (GOGA) occurs in a sustained manner in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution at pH 7.4. In in vitro biological studies, normal fibroblast (3T3) and liver cancer cells (HepG2) were treated with different concentrations of GO, GOGA, and GA for 72 h. The GOGA nanocomposite showed the inhibitory effect to cancer cell growth without affecting normal cell growth. The results of this research are highly encouraging to go further for in vivo studies.

  13. Graphene Oxide-Gallic Acid Nanodelivery System for Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorniani, Dena; Saifullah, Bullo; Barahuie, Farahnaz; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Hussein, Mohd Zobir Bin; Fakurazi, Sharida; Twyman, Lance J.

    2016-11-01

    Despite the technological advancement in the biomedical science, cancer remains a life-threatening disease. In this study, we designed an anticancer nanodelivery system using graphene oxide (GO) as nanocarrier for an active anticancer agent gallic acid (GA). The successful formation nanocomposite (GOGA) was characterized using XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, Raman, and UV/Vis spectroscopy. The release study shows that the release of GA from the designed anticancer nanocomposite (GOGA) occurs in a sustained manner in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution at pH 7.4. In in vitro biological studies, normal fibroblast (3T3) and liver cancer cells (HepG2) were treated with different concentrations of GO, GOGA, and GA for 72 h. The GOGA nanocomposite showed the inhibitory effect to cancer cell growth without affecting normal cell growth. The results of this research are highly encouraging to go further for in vivo studies.

  14. Energy recovery method and system for combined sulphuric acid and phosphoric acid manufacturing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, G. M.; Orlando, J. V.

    1985-01-22

    In conventional processes for manufacturing phosphoric acid, sulphuric acid is reacted with phosphate rock to produce weak phosphoric acid which is concentrated using steam from the associated sulphuric acid manufacturing operation. Low grade heat from the absorbers and drier of the sulphuric acid manufacturing plant has been wasted. According to the invention waste heat from the drier and one or more absorbers of the sulphuric acid manufacturing plant is used in all the evaporators of the phosphoric acid plant. The evaporators all operate at low pressures and their heaters are arranged in series, to enable the heat to be used at the relatively low temperatures available. The valuable steam is thus freed for other uses.

  15. Genotype, production system and sex effects on fatty acid composition of meat from goat kids.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Mustafa; Demirel, Gulcan; Yakan, Akın; Ekiz, Bülent; Tölü, Cemil; Savaş, Türker

    2015-02-01

    Two trials were performed to assess the meat fatty acid profile of goat kids from different genotypes, production systems and sex. In the first trial, genotype effect was determined in 24 suckling male kids from Turkish Saanen, Maltese and Gokceada breeds. In the second trial, male and female Gokceada Goat kids were used to compare the effect of extensive and semi-intensive production systems on fatty acid composition of meat. Significant genotype effect was observed in the percentages of myristic acid (C14:0), palmitic acid (C16:0), oleic acid (C18:1 n-9), linolenic acid (C18:3 n-3), arachidonic acid (C20:4 n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 n-3), despite no differences on the ratios of polyunsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids (PUFA/SFA) and n-6/n-3 (P > 0.05). The effect of production system had also significant effects on fatty acids, but sex only influenced significantly stearic acid (C18:0), C18:1 n-9 and C18:3 n-3 fatty acids and total PUFA level and PUFA/SFA ratio. This study confirms that dairy breeds are prone to produce higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids in their muscle. Meanwhile, meat from Gokceada goat kids, which is one of the indigenous breeds in Turkey, had similar PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 ratios to Turkish Saanen and Maltase.

  16. Combined cycle phosphoric acid fuel cell electric power system

    SciTech Connect

    Mollot, D.J.; Micheli, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    By arranging two or more electric power generation cycles in series, combined cycle systems are able to produce electric power more efficiently than conventional single cycle plants. The high fuel to electricity conversion efficiency results in lower plant operating costs, better environmental performance, and in some cases even lower capital costs. Despite these advantages, combined cycle systems for the 1 - 10 megawatt (MW) industrial market are rare. This paper presents a low noise, low (oxides of nitrogen) NOx, combined cycle alternative for the small industrial user. By combining a commercially available phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) with a low-temperature Rankine cycle (similar to those used in geothermal applications), electric conversion efficiencies between 45 and 47 percent are predicted. While the simple cycle PAFC is competitive on a cost of energy basis with gas turbines and diesel generators in the 1 to 2 MW market, the combined cycle PAFC is competitive, on a cost of energy basis, with simple cycle diesel generators in the 4 to 25 MW market. In addition, the efficiency and low-temperature operation of the combined cycle PAFC results in a significant reduction in carbon dioxide emissions with NO{sub x} concentration on the order of 1 parts per million (per weight) (ppmw).

  17. Coamorphous Loratadine-Citric Acid System with Enhanced Physical Stability and Bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Chang, Ruimiao; Zhao, Yanan; Zhang, Jiye; Zhang, Ting; Fu, Qiang; Chang, Chun; Zeng, Aiguo

    2017-02-21

    Coamorphous systems using citric acid as a small molecular excipient were studied for improving physical stability and bioavailability of loratadine, a BCS class II drug with low water solubility and high permeability. Coamorphous loratadine-citric acid systems were prepared by solvent evaporation technique and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Solid-state analysis proofed that coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system (1:1) was amorphous and homogeneous, had a higher T g over amorphous loratadine, and the intermolecular hydrogen bond interactions between loratadine and citric acid exist. The solubility and dissolution of coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system (1:1) were found to be significantly greater than those of crystalline and amorphous form. The pharmacokinetic study in rats proved that coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system (1:1) could significantly improve absorption and bioavailability of loratadine. Coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system (1:1) showed excellently physical stability over a period of 3 months at 25°C under 0% RH and 25°C under 60% RH conditions. The improved stability of coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system (1:1) could be related to an elevated T g over amorphous form and the intermolecular hydrogen bond interactions between loratadine and citric acid. These studies demonstrate that the developed coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system might be a promising oral formulation for improving solubility and bioavailability of loratadine.

  18. Phase equilibria and distribution constants of metal ions in diantipyryl alkane-organic acid-hydrochloric acid-water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtev, M. I.; Popova, O. N.; Yuminova, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    The ability of antipyrine and its derivatives (diantipyryl alkanes) to form separating systems in the presence of salicylic (sulfosalicylic) acid and hydrochloric acid and water is studied. The optimum volume of the organic phase, the composition of complexes, and the mechanism for the distribution of metal ions are determined, depending on the concentrations of the main components and the salting-out agent. The complex distribution and extraction constants are calculated.

  19. Spatially dependent parameter estimation and nonlinear data assimilation by autosynchronization of a system of partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Sean; Bollt, Erik M.

    2013-09-01

    Given multiple images that describe chaotic reaction-diffusion dynamics, parameters of a partial differential equation (PDE) model are estimated using autosynchronization, where parameters are controlled by synchronization of the model to the observed data. A two-component system of predator-prey reaction-diffusion PDEs is used with spatially dependent parameters to benchmark the methods described. Applications to modeling the ecological habitat of marine plankton blooms by nonlinear data assimilation through remote sensing are discussed.

  20. Spatially dependent parameter estimation and nonlinear data assimilation by autosynchronization of a system of partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Sean; Bollt, Erik M

    2013-09-01

    Given multiple images that describe chaotic reaction-diffusion dynamics, parameters of a partial differential equation (PDE) model are estimated using autosynchronization, where parameters are controlled by synchronization of the model to the observed data. A two-component system of predator-prey reaction-diffusion PDEs is used with spatially dependent parameters to benchmark the methods described. Applications to modeling the ecological habitat of marine plankton blooms by nonlinear data assimilation through remote sensing are discussed.

  1. Convective instability in a two-layer system of reacting fluids with concentration-dependent diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitova, E. V.; Bratsun, D. A.; Kostarev, K. G.; Mizev, A. I.; Mosheva, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    The development of convective instability in a two-layer system of miscible fluids placed in a narrow vertical gap has been studied theoretically and experimentally. The upper and lower layers are formed with aqueous solutions of acid and base, respectively. When the layers are brought into contact, the frontal neutralization reaction begins. We have found experimentally a new type of convective instability, which is characterized by the spatial localization and the periodicity of the structure observed for the first time in the miscible systems. We have tested a number of different acid-base systems and have found a similar patterning there. In our opinion, it may indicate that the discovered effect is of a general nature and should be taken into account in reaction-diffusion-convection problems as another tool with which the reaction can govern the movement of the reacting fluids. We have shown that, at least in one case (aqueous solutions of nitric acid and sodium hydroxide), a new type of instability called as the concentration-dependent diffusion convection is responsible for the onset of the fluid flow. It arises when the diffusion coefficients of species are different and depend on their concentrations. This type of instability can be attributed to a variety of double-diffusion convection. A mathematical model of the new phenomenon has been developed using the system of reaction-diffusion-convection equations written in the Hele-Shaw approximation. It is shown that the instability can be reproduced in the numerical experiment if only one takes into account the concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficients of the reagents. The dynamics of the base state, its linear stability and nonlinear development of the instability are presented. It is also shown that by varying the concentration of acid in the upper layer one can achieve the occurrence of chemo-convective solitary cell in the bulk of an almost immobile fluid. Good agreement between the

  2. STANDARDIZING TERMINOLOGY FOR ESTIMATING THE DIET-DEPENDENT NET ACID LOAD TO THE METABOLIC SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contemporary Western diets contain acid precursors in excess of base precursors, yielding a daily systemic net acid load of varying amounts, depending on the specific composition of the diet. Increasing evidence suggests that differences in daily net acid load, resulting predominantly from differen...

  3. Enhanced succinic acid production under acidic conditions by introduction of glutamate decarboxylase system in E. coli AFP111.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mingke; Li, Xiaozhan; Guo, Shunfeng; Lemma, Wubliker Dessie; Zhang, Wenming; Ma, Jiangfeng; Jia, Honghua; Wu, Hao; Jiang, Min; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2017-04-01

    Biological synthesis of succinic acid at low pH values was favored since it not only decreased investment cost but also simplified downstream purification process. In this study, the feasibility of using glutamate decarboxylase system to improve succinic acid production of Escherichia coli AFP111, a succinate-producing candidate with mutations in pfl, ldhA, and ptsG, under acidic conditions was investigated. By overexpressing gadBC operon in AFP111, a recombinant named as BA201 (AFP111/pMD19T-gadBC) was constructed. Fermentation at pH 5.6 showed that 30 g L(-1) glucose was consumed and 26.58 g L(-1) succinic acid was produced by BA201, which was 1.22- and 1.32-fold higher than that by the control BA200 (AFP111/pMD19T) containing the empty vector. Analysis of intracellular enzymes activities and ATP concentrations revealed that the activities of key enzymes involved in glucose uptake and products synthesis and intracellular ATP levels were all increased after overexpression of gadBC which were benefit for cell metabolism under weak acidic conditions. To further improve the succinic acid titer by recombinant BA201 at pH 5.6, the extracellular glutamate concentration was optimized and the final succinic acid titer increased 20.4% to 32.01 g L(-1). Besides, the fermentation time was prolonged by repetitive fermentation and additional 15.78 g L(-1) succinic acid was produced by recovering cells into fresh medium. The results here demonstrated a potential strategy of overexpressing gadBC for increased succinic acid production of E. coli AFP111 under weak acidic conditions.

  4. Sialic Acids in the Brain: Gangliosides and Polysialic Acid in Nervous System Development, Stability, Disease, and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Hildebrandt, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Every cell in nature carries a rich surface coat of glycans, its glycocalyx, which constitutes the cell's interface with its environment. In eukaryotes, the glycocalyx is composed of glycolipids, glycoproteins, and proteoglycans, the compositions of which vary among different tissues and cell types. Many of the linear and branched glycans on cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids of vertebrates are terminated with sialic acids, nine-carbon sugars with a carboxylic acid, a glycerol side-chain, and an N-acyl group that, along with their display at the outmost end of cell surface glycans, provide for varied molecular interactions. Among their functions, sialic acids regulate cell-cell interactions, modulate the activities of their glycoprotein and glycolipid scaffolds as well as other cell surface molecules, and are receptors for pathogens and toxins. In the brain, two families of sialoglycans are of particular interest: gangliosides and polysialic acid. Gangliosides, sialylated glycosphingolipids, are the most abundant sialoglycans of nerve cells. Mouse genetic studies and human disorders of ganglioside metabolism implicate gangliosides in axon-myelin interactions, axon stability, axon regeneration, and the modulation of nerve cell excitability. Polysialic acid is a unique homopolymer that reaches >90 sialic acid residues attached to select glycoproteins, especially the neural cell adhesion molecule in the brain. Molecular, cellular, and genetic studies implicate polysialic acid in the control of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, intermolecular interactions at cell surfaces, and interactions with other molecules in the cellular environment. Polysialic acid is essential for appropriate brain development, and polymorphisms in the human genes responsible for polysialic acid biosynthesis are associated with psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, autism, and bipolar disorder. Polysialic acid also appears to play a role in adult brain plasticity

  5. The evolution to localized and front solutions in a non-Lipschitz reaction-diffusion Cauchy problem with trivial initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J. C.; Needham, D. J.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we establish the existence of spatially inhomogeneous classical self-similar solutions to a non-Lipschitz semi-linear parabolic Cauchy problem with trivial initial data. Specifically we consider bounded solutions to an associated two-dimensional non-Lipschitz non-autonomous dynamical system, for which, we establish the existence of a two-parameter family of homoclinic connections on the origin, and a heteroclinic connection between two equilibrium points. Additionally, we obtain bounds and estimates on the rate of convergence of the homoclinic connections to the origin.

  6. Tungstate sulfuric acid (TSA)/KMnO4 as a novel heterogeneous system for rapid deoximation.

    PubMed

    Karami, Bahador; Montazerozohori, Morteza

    2006-09-28

    Neat chlorosulfonic acid reacts with anhydrous sodium tungstate to give tungstate sulfuric acid (TSA), a new dibasic inorganic solid acid in which two sulfuric acid molecules connect to a tungstate moiety via a covalent bond. A variety of oximes were oxidized to their parent carbonyl compounds under mild conditions with excellent yields in short times by a heterogeneous wet TSA/KMnO4 in dichloromethane system.

  7. Effect of fatty acids on self-assembly of soybean lecithin systems.

    PubMed

    Godoy, C A; Valiente, M; Pons, R; Montalvo, G

    2015-07-01

    With the increasing interest in natural formulations for drug administration and functional foods, it is desirable a good knowledge of the phase behavior of lecithin/fatty acid formulations. Phase structure and properties of ternary lecithin/fatty acids/water systems are studied at 37°C, making emphasis in regions with relatively low water and fatty acid content. The effect of fatty acid saturation degree on the phase microstructure is studied by comparing a fully saturated (palmitic acid, C16:0), monounsaturated (oleic acid, C18:1), and diunsaturated (linoleic acid, C18:2) fatty acids. Phase determinations are based on a combination of polarized light microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering measurements. Interestingly, unsaturated (oleic acid and linoleic acid) fatty acid destabilizes the lamellar bilayer. Slight differences are observed between the phase diagrams produced by the unsaturated ones: small lamellar, medium cubic and large hexagonal regions. A narrow isotropic fluid region also appears on the lecithin-fatty acid axis, up to 8wt% water. In contrast, a marked difference in phase microsctructure was observed between unsaturated and saturated systems in which the cubic and isotropic fluid phases are not formed. These differences are, probably, a consequence of the high Krafft point of the C16 saturated chains that imply rather rigid chains. However, unsaturated fatty acids result in more flexible tails. The frequent presence of, at least, one unsaturated chain in phospholipids makes it very likely a better mixing situation than in the case of more rigid chains. This swelling potential favors the formation of reverse hexagonal, cubic, and micellar phases. Both unsaturated fatty acid systems evolve by aging, with a reduction of the extension of reverse hexagonal phase and migration of the cubic phase to lower fatty acid and water contents. The kinetic stability of the systems seems to be controlled by the unsaturation of fatty acids.

  8. Influence of pasture-based feeding systems on fatty acids, organic acids and volatile organic flavour compounds in yoghurt.

    PubMed

    Akbaridoust, Ghazal; Plozza, Tim; Trenerry, V Craige; Wales, William J; Auldist, Martin J; Ajlouni, Said

    2015-08-01

    The influence of different pasture-based feeding systems on fatty acids, organic acids and volatile organic flavour compounds in yoghurt was studied. Pasture is the main source of nutrients for dairy cows in many parts of the world, including southeast Australia. Milk and milk products produced in these systems are known to contain a number of compounds with positive effects on human health. In the current study, 260 cows were fed supplementary grain and forage according to one of 3 different systems; Control (a traditional pasture based diet offered to the cows during milking and in paddock), PMR1 (a partial mixed ration which contained the same supplement as Control but was offered to the cows as a partial mixed ration on a feedpad), PMR 2 (a differently formulated partial mixed ration compared to Control and PMR1 which was offered to the cows on a feedpad). Most of the yoghurt fatty acids were influenced by feeding systems; however, those effects were minor on organic acids. The differences in feeding systems did not lead to the formation of different volatile organic flavour compounds in yoghurt. Yet, it did influence the relative abundance of these components.

  9. DimaSense™: A Novel Nucleic Acid Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, A.

    2011-05-18

    sensors. These sensors operate with very low concentrations of target, can utilize standard instrumentation, produce detection results rapidly, and are robust enough to function in the presence of many competing genetic targets. Many current genetic target detection products/approaches/technologies rely upon methods (such as qPCR) which are more complicated, cumbersome, and costly to perform, and are not well suited to point-of-care diagnostic applications. Several clinical diagnostic applications, particularly point-of-care (POC) diagnostics for infectious diseases, are possible and appear to be a good fit for the technology. In addition, the advent of personalized medicine will create opportunities for molecular diagnostic companies with the capabilities of rapidly and quantitatively detecting nucleic acid sequences. The global POC market was {approx}$7.7B in 2010, with a recent annual growth rate of {approx}7%. A specific disease or disease-class diagnostic would need to be identified before a more meaningful sub-market value could be stated. Additional validation of the technology to show that it displays appropriate performance parameters for a commercial application on 'real world' samples is required for true commercial readiness. In addition, optimization of sensor design parameters, to effect a 10-fold increase in sensitivity, may be required to produce a commercially ready sensor system. These validation and sensor design optimization are estimated to require 3-4 months and {approx}$75k. For an unregulated product to give this sensor system a distinct competitive advantage, 2-3 years of product development and $1.5-3M are likely required. For regulated markets, time to market (through clinic) and cost would depend upon the product.

  10. Systemic distribution and speciation of diphenylarsinic acid fed to rats

    SciTech Connect

    Naranmandura, Hua Suzuki, Noriyuki; Takano, Juniti; McKnight-Whitford, Tony; Ogra, Yasumitsu; Suzuki, Kazuo T.; Le, X. Chris

    2009-06-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is an environmental degradation product of diphenylarsine chloride or diphenylarsine cyanide, which were chemical warfare agents produced by Japan during the World War II. DPAA is now considered a dangerous environmental pollutant in Kamisu, Japan, where it is suspected of inducing health effects that include articulation disorders (cerebellar ataxia of the extremities and trunk), involuntary movements (myoclonus and tremor), and sleep disorders. In order to elucidate the toxic mechanism of DPAA, we focused on the distribution and metabolism of DPAA in rats. Systemic distribution of DPAA was determined by administering DPAA orally to rats at a single dose of 5.0 mg As/kg body weight, followed by speciation analysis of selected organs and body fluids. Most of the total arsenic burden was recovered in the urine (23% of the dose) and feces (27%), with the distribution in most other organs/tissues being less than 1%. However, compared with the typical distribution of inorganic dietary arsenic, DPAA administration resulted in elevated levels in the brain, testes and pancreas. In contrast to urine, in which DPAA was found mostly in its unmodified form, the tissues and organs contained arsenic that was mostly bound to non-soluble and soluble high molecular weight proteins. These bound arsenic species could be converted back to DPAA after oxidation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, suggesting that the DPAA bound to proteins had been reduced within the body and was in a trivalent oxidation state. Furthermore, we also detected two unknown arsenic metabolites in rat urine, which were assumed to be hydroxylated arsenic metabolites.

  11. Analysis of Natural Buffer Systems and the Impact of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, David C.; Yoder, Claude H.; Higgs, Andrew T.; Obley, Matt L.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Leber, Phyllis A.

    2005-01-01

    The environmental significance of acid rain on water systems of different buffer capacities is discussed. The most prevalent natural buffer system is created by the equilibrium between carbonate ions and carbon dioxide.

  12. Phase diagrams and water activities of aqueous dicarboxylic acid systems of atmospheric importance.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Keith D; Friesen, Katherine; Bothe, Jameson R; Palet, Benjamin

    2008-11-20

    We have studied liquid/solid phase diagrams and water activities of the dicarboxylic acid/water binary systems for maleic, dl-malic, glutaric, and succinc acids using differential scanning calorimetry, infrared (IR) spectroscopy of thin films, and conductivity analysis of saturated solutions. For each binary system we report the measurements of the ice melting envelope, the acid dissolution envelope, and the ice/acid eutectic temperature and composition. Water activities have been determined by using the freezing point depression of ice. Additionally, an irreversible solid/solid phase transition for maleic acid was observed in both DSC and IR studies likely due to the conversion of a meta-stable crystal form of maleic acid to its most stable crystal form. In general we find good agreement with literature values for temperature-dependent acid solubilities.

  13. Using Acid Number as a Leading Indicator of Refrigeration and Air Conditioning System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Cartlidge; Hans Schellhase

    2003-07-31

    This report summarizes a literature review to assess the acidity characteristics of the older mineral oil and newer polyolester (POE) refrigeration systems as well as to evaluate acid measuring techniques used in other non-aqueous systems which may be applicable for refrigeration systems. Failure in the older chlorofluorocarbon/hydrochlorofluorocarbon (CFC/HCFC) / mineral oil systems was primarily due to thermal degradation of the refrigerant which resulted in the formation of hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids. These are strong mineral acids, which can, over time, severely corrode the system metals and lead to the formation of copper plating on iron surfaces. The oil lubricants used in the older systems were relatively stable and were not prone to hydrolytic degradation due to the low solubility of water in oil. The refrigerants in the newer hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)/POE systems are much more thermally stable than the older CFC/HCFC refrigerants and mineral acid formation is negligible. However, acidity is produced in the new systems by hydrolytic decomposition of the POE lubricants with water to produce the parent organic acids and alcohols used to prepare the POE. The individual acids can therefore vary but they are generally C5 to C9 carboxylic acids. Organic acids are much weaker and far less corrosive to metals than the mineral acids from the older systems but they can, over long time periods, react with metals to form carboxylic metal salts. The salts tend to accumulate in narrow areas such as capillary tubes, particularly if residual hydrocarbon processing chemicals are present in the system, which can lead to plugging. The rate of acid production from POEs varies on a number of factors including chemical structure, moisture levels, temperature, acid concentration and metals. The hydrolysis rate of reaction can be reduced by using driers to reduce the free water concentration and by using scavenging chemicals which react with the system acids. Total acid

  14. Organic acids enhanced decoloration of azo dye in gas phase surface discharge plasma system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-01-25

    A gas phase surface discharge plasma combined with organic acids system was developed to enhance active species mass transfer and dye-containing wastewater treatment efficacy, with Acid Orange II (AO7) as the model pollutant. The effects of discharge voltage and various organic acid additives (acetic acid, lactic acid and nonoic acid) on AO7 decoloration efficiency were evaluated. The experimental results showed that an AO7 decoloration efficiency of approximately 69.0% was obtained within 4 min of discharge plasma treatment without organic acid addition, which was improved to 82.8%, 83.5% and 88.6% within the same treatment time with the addition of acetic acid, lactic acid and nonoic acid, respectively. The enhancement effects on AO7 decoloration efficiency could be attributed to the decrease in aqueous surface tension, improvement in bubble distribution and shape, and increase in ozone equivalent concentration. The AO7 wastewater was biodegradable after discharge plasma treatment with the addition of organic acid. AO7 decomposition intermediates were analyzed by UV-vis spectrometry and GC-MS; 2-naphthol, 1,4-benzoquinone, phthalic anhydride, coumarin, 1,2-naphthoquinone, and 2-formyl-benzoic acid were detected. A possible pathway for AO7 decomposition in this system was proposed.

  15. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz [Livermore, CA

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  16. 21 CFR 862.1655 - Pyruvic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... measure pyruvic acid (an intermediate compound in the metabolism of carbohydrate) in plasma. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the evaluation of electrolyte metabolism and in the diagnosis...

  17. Materials characterization of phosphoric acid fuel cell system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesh, Srinivasan

    1986-01-01

    The component materials used in the fabrication of phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC) must have mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical stability to withstand the moderately high temperature (200 C) and pressure (500 kPa) and highly oxidizing nature of phosphoric acid. This study discusses the chemical and structural stability, performance and corrosion data on certain catalysts, catalyst supports, and electrode support materials used in PAFC applications.

  18. [Association of fatty acid metabolism with systemic inflammatory response in chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Denisenko, Y K; Novgorodtseva, T P; Zhukova, N V; Antonuk, M V; Lobanova, E G; Kalinina, E P

    2016-03-01

    We examined composition of plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NFAs), erythrocyte fatty acids, levels of eicosanoids in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with different type of the inflammatory response. The results of our study show that asthma and COPD in remission are associated with changes in the composition NFAs of plasma, FA of erythrocytes, level eicosanoid despite the difference in the regulation of immunological mechanisms of systemic inflammation. These changes are characterized by excessive production of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) and cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolites (thromboxane B2, leukotriene B4) and deficiency of their functional antagonist, eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3). The recognized association between altered fatty acid composition and disorders of the immune mechanisms of regulation of systemic inflammation in COPD and asthma demonstrated the important role of fatty acids and their metabolites in persistence of inflammatory processes in diseases of the respiratory system in the condition of remission.

  19. The acid-base resistant zone in three dentin bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Go; Nikaido, Toru; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2009-11-01

    An acid-base resistant zone has been found to exist after acid-base challenge adjacent to the hybrid layer using SEM. The aim of this study was to examine the acid-base resistant zone using three different bonding systems. Dentin disks were applied with three different bonding systems, and then a resin composite was light-cured to make dentin disk sandwiches. After acid-base challenge, the polished surfaces were observed using SEM. For both one- and two-step self-etching primer systems, an acid-base resistant zone was clearly observed adjacent to the hybrid layer - but with differing appearances. For the wet bonding system, the presence of an acid-base resistant zone was unclear. This was because the self-etching primer systems etched the dentin surface mildly, such that the remaining mineral phase of dentin and the bonding agent yielded clear acid-base resistant zones. In conclusion, the acid-base resistant zone was clearly observed when self-etching primer systems were used, but not so for the wet bonding system.

  20. Adipic acid-enhanced limestone flue gas desulfurization system commercial demonstration. [Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Hargrove, O.W. Jr.; Colley, J.D.; Mobley, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    A full-scale demonstration carried out at Springfield, Mo City Utilities Southwest Power Plant in 1980-1981 on adipic acid enhanced limestone flue gas desulfurization system is reported. The major process findings during the demonstration are discussed. It is found that adipic acid is a viable means for improving SO/sub 2/ removal in scrubbers which are limited from a dissolved alkalinity standpoint. Dibasic acid (a mixture of glutaric, adipic, and succinic acids) is a technically viable alternative to adipic acid. 6 refs.

  1. An amino acid depleted cell-free protein synthesis system for the incorporation of non-canonical amino acid analogs into proteins.

    PubMed

    Singh-Blom, Amrita; Hughes, Randall A; Ellington, Andrew D

    2014-05-20

    Residue-specific incorporation of non-canonical amino acids into proteins is usually performed in vivo using amino acid auxotrophic strains and replacing the natural amino acid with an unnatural amino acid analog. Herein, we present an efficient amino acid depleted cell-free protein synthesis system that can be used to study residue-specific replacement of a natural amino acid by an unnatural amino acid analog. This system combines a simple methodology and high protein expression titers with a high-efficiency analog substitution into a target protein. To demonstrate the productivity and efficacy of a cell-free synthesis system for residue-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in vitro, we use this system to show that 5-fluorotryptophan and 6-fluorotryptophan substituted streptavidin retain the ability to bind biotin despite protein-wide replacement of a natural amino acid for the amino acid analog. We envisage this amino acid depleted cell-free synthesis system being an economical and convenient format for the high-throughput screening of a myriad of amino acid analogs with a variety of protein targets for the study and functional characterization of proteins substituted with unnatural amino acids when compared to the currently employed in vivo methodologies.

  2. A novel enzyme-based acidizing system: Matrix acidizing and drilling fluid damage removal

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.E.; McKay, D.M.; Moses, V.

    1995-12-31

    A novel acidizing process is used to increase the permeability of carbonate rock cores in the laboratory and to remove drilling fluid damage from cores and wafers. Field results show the benefits of the technology as applied both to injector and producer wells.

  3. Reaction-Diffusion Patterns in Structured Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Irving

    I will look at pattern formation in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) oscillating chemical reaction in media that are structured at length scales ranging from ten nanometers to a few centimeters. A reverse microemulsion consisting of nanometer diameter droplets of water containing the reactants dispersed in oil allows the physical structure (size, spacing) of the droplets and their chemical composition to be controlled independently, enabling one to generate a remarkable variety of stationary and moving patterns, including Turing structures, ordinary and antispirals, packet waves and spatiotemporal chaos. One- and two-dimensional arrays of aqueous droplets in oil generated by microfluidic techniques have diameters of the order of 100 micrometers and produce a different array of patterns that can be precisely controlled with light. In particular, circular arrays of droplets provide a testing ground for some of Turing's ideas about morphogenesis. By attaching the BZ catalyst to a polymer that shrinks and swells in response to changes in the redox state of the catalyst, one can construct gel materials that transduce chemical changes to mechanical motion, a phenomenon modeled with considerable success by the Balazs group. If time permits, I will also discuss the BZ reaction in coupled macroscopic flow reactors that mimic small neural networks.

  4. Reaction-diffusion basis of retroviral infectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, S. Kashif

    2016-11-01

    Retrovirus particle (virion) infectivity requires diffusion and clustering of multiple transmembrane envelope proteins (Env3) on the virion exterior, yet is triggered by protease-dependent degradation of a partially occluding, membrane-bound Gag polyprotein lattice on the virion interior. The physical mechanism underlying such coupling is unclear and only indirectly accessible via experiment. Modelling stands to provide insight but the required spatio-temporal range far exceeds current accessibility by all-atom or even coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. Nor do such approaches account for chemical reactions, while conversely, reaction kinetics approaches handle neither diffusion nor clustering. Here, a recently developed multiscale approach is considered that applies an ultra-coarse-graining scheme to treat entire proteins at near-single particle resolution, but which also couples chemical reactions with diffusion and interactions. A model is developed of Env3 molecules embedded in a truncated Gag lattice composed of membrane-bound matrix proteins linked to capsid subunits, with freely diffusing protease molecules. Simulations suggest that in the presence of Gag but in the absence of lateral lattice-forming interactions, Env3 diffuses comparably to Gag-absent Env3. Initial immobility of Env3 is conferred through lateral caging by matrix trimers vertically coupled to the underlying hexameric capsid layer. Gag cleavage by protease vertically decouples the matrix and capsid layers, induces both matrix and Env3 diffusion, and permits Env3 clustering. Spreading across the entire membrane surface reduces crowding, in turn, enhancing the effect and promoting infectivity. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'.

  5. Trotter products and reaction-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Emil

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study a class of generalized diffusion-reaction equations of the form , where A is a pseudodifferential operator which generates a Feller semigroup. Using the Trotter product formula we give a corresponding discrete time integro-difference equation for numerical solutions.

  6. The solubilization of fatty acids in systems based on block copolymers and nonionic surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirgorodskaya, A. B.; Yatskevich, E. I.; Zakharova, L. Ya.

    2010-12-01

    The solubilizing action of micellar, microemulsion, and polymer-colloid systems formed on the basis of biologically compatible amphiphilic polymers and nonionic surfactants on capric, lauric, palmitic, and stearic acids was characterized quantitatively. Systems based on micelle forming oxyethyl compounds increased the solubility of fatty acids by more than an order of magnitude. Acid molecules incorporated into micelles increased their size and caused structural changes. Solubilization was accompanied by complete or partial destruction of intrinsic acid associates and an increase in their p K a by 1.5-2 units compared with water.

  7. Thermal phase diagram of acetamide-benzoic acid and benzoic acid-phthalimide binary systems for solar thermal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rohitash; Kumar, Ravindra; Dixit, Ambesh

    2016-05-01

    Thermal properties of Acetamide (AM) - Benzoic acid (BA) and Benzoic acid (BA) - Phthalimide (PM) binary eutectic systems are theoretically calculated using thermodynamic principles. We found that the binary systems of AM-BA at 67.6 : 32.4 molar ratio, BA-PM at 89.7 : 10.3 molar ratio form eutectic mixtures with melting temperatures ~ 54.5 °C and 114.3 °C respectively. Calculated latent heat of fusion for these eutectic mixtures are 191 kJ/kg and 146.5 kJ/kg respectively. These melting temperatures and heat of fusions of these eutectic mixtures make them suitable for thermal energy storage applications in solar water heating and solar cooking systems.

  8. Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 promotes systemic acquired resistance via azelaic acid and its precursor 9-oxo nonanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Finni; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kanawati, Basem; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Knappe, Claudia; Wenig, Marion; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parker, Jane E; Schwab, Wilfried; Vlot, A Corina

    2014-11-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of inducible disease resistance that depends on salicylic acid and its upstream regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). Although local Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses activated by the Pseudomonas syringae effector protein AvrRpm1 are intact in eds1 mutant plants, SAR signal generation is abolished. Here, the SAR-specific phenotype of the eds1 mutant is utilized to identify metabolites that contribute to SAR. To this end, SAR bioassay-assisted fractionation of extracts from the wild type compared with eds1 mutant plants that conditionally express AvrRpm1 was performed. Using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, systemic immunity was associated with the accumulation of 60 metabolites, including the putative SAR signal azelaic acid (AzA) and its precursors 9-hydroperoxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) and 9-oxo nonanoic acid (ONA). Exogenous ONA induced SAR in systemic untreated leaves when applied at a 4-fold lower concentration than AzA. The data suggest that in planta oxidation of ONA to AzA might be partially responsible for this response and provide further evidence that AzA mobilizes Arabidopsis immunity in a concentration-dependent manner. The AzA fragmentation product pimelic acid did not induce SAR. The results link the C9 lipid peroxidation products ONA and AzA with systemic rather than local resistance and suggest that EDS1 directly or indirectly promotes the accumulation of ONA, AzA, or one or more of their common precursors possibly by activating one or more pathways that either result in the release of these compounds from galactolipids or promote lipid peroxidation.

  9. Boundary of Phase Co-existence in Docosahexaenoic Acid System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lor, Chai; Hirst, Linda S.

    2011-11-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is a highly polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) that exhibits six double bonds in the hydrocarbon tail. It induces phase separation of the membrane into liquid order and liquid disorder in mixtures containing other lipids with more saturation and cholesterol. With the utilization of atomic force microscopy, phase co-existence is observed in lipid mixtures containing DHA on a single supported lipid bilayer. The boundary of phase co-existence with decreasing DHA concentration is explored. The elastic force, thickness, and roughness of the different phases are investigated.

  10. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 90. Hydroxybenzoic Acid Derivatives in Binary, Ternary, and Multicomponent Systems. Part I. Hydroxybenzoic Acids, Hydroxybenzoates, and Hydroxybenzoic Acid Salts in Water and Aqueous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Rensuke; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Königsberger, Erich; Königsberger, Lan-Chi

    2011-03-01

    The solubility data for well-defined binary, ternary, and multicomponent systems of solid-liquid type are reviewed. One component, which is 2-, 3-, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids, 4-hydroxybenzoate alkyl esters (parabens), or hydroxybenzoic acid salts, is in the solid state at room temperature and another component is liquid water, meaning that all of the systems are aqueous solutions. The ternary or multicomponent systems include organic substances of various classes (hydrocarbons of several structural types, halogenated hydrocarbons, alcohols, acids, ethers, esters, amides, and surfactants) or inorganic substances. Systems reported in the primary literature from 1898 through 2000 are compiled. For seven systems, sufficient binary data for hydroxybenzoic acids or parabens in water are available to allow critical evaluation. Almost all data are expressed as mass and mole fractions as well as the originally reported units, while some data are expressed as molar concentration.

  11. Microbial activity inhibition in chilled mackerel (Scomber scombrus) by employment of an organic acid-icing system.

    PubMed

    Sanjuás-Rey, Minia; Gallardo, José M; Barros-Velázquez, Jorge; Aubourg, Santiago P

    2012-05-01

    The present study concerns Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus) traded as a chilled product. The study was aimed to investigate the effect of including a mixture of organic acids (citric, ascorbic, and lactic) in the icing medium employed during the fish chilled storage. To this end and according to preliminary trials results, an aqueous solution including 0.050% (w/v) of each acid was employed as icing medium; its effect on the microbial activity development in mackerel muscle was monitored for up to 13 d of chilled storage and compared to a counterpart-fish batch kept under traditional water ice considered as control. Results indicated a lower bacterial growth in mackerel muscle subjected to storage in the organic acid-icing system by comparison with control fish. Thus, statistically-significant (P < 0.05) differences between both batches for all 6 microbial groups investigated (aerobes, anaerobes, psychrotrophes, Enterobacteriaceae, lipolytics, and proteolytics) and for 2 chemical indices related to microbial activity development (total volatile bases and trimethylamine) were obtained. The surface wash caused by the melting of the ice during storage and the subsequent antimicrobial effect of such acids on skin microflora of the fish can be invoked as the main reasons for the limited bacterial growth found in the corresponding mackerel muscle.

  12. Co-oxidation of the sulfur-containing amino acids in an autoxidizing lipid system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, G.A.; Dollar, A.M.

    1963-01-01

    Oxidation of the sulfur amino acids by autoxidizing lipids was studied in a model system consisting of an amino acid dispersed in cold-pressed, molecularly distilled menhaden oil (20–80% w/w). Under all conditions investigated, cysteine was oxidized completely to cystine. Preliminary results suggest that at 110°C the oxidation follows first-order kinetics for at least the first 8 hr. A specific reaction rate constant of 0.25 per hour was calculated. When fatty acids were added to the system, cystine was oxidized to its thiosulfinate ester. When the fatty acid-cystine ratio was 1:2, oxidation of cystine was a maximum. No oxidation of cystine occurred unless either a fatty acid, volatile organic acid, or ethanol was added. Under the conditions investigated, methionine was not oxidized to either its sulfoxide or its sulfone.

  13. System for NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid.

  14. Disinfection of water in recirculating aquaculture systems with peracetic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA) has become a favoured alternative to chlorination in the disinfection of municipal waste water in recent years. It is also commonly used in the food industry as a disinfectant. Based on PAA concentration, the disulfide linkage in enzymes and proteins of microorganisms can be bro...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1509 - Methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 862.1509 Section 862.1509 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.... The identification of methylmalonic acid in urine is used in the diagnosis and treatment of methylmalonic aciduria, a heritable metabolic disorder which, if untreated, may cause mental retardation....

  16. 21 CFR 862.1509 - Methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... 862.1509 Section 862.1509 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.... The identification of methylmalonic acid in urine is used in the diagnosis and treatment of methylmalonic aciduria, a heritable metabolic disorder which, if untreated, may cause mental retardation....

  17. 21 CFR 862.1509 - Methylmalonic acid (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... 862.1509 Section 862.1509 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.... The identification of methylmalonic acid in urine is used in the diagnosis and treatment of methylmalonic aciduria, a heritable metabolic disorder which, if untreated, may cause mental retardation....

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF SRB TREATMENT SYSTEMS FOR ACID MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in the development of sulfate- reducing bacteria (SRB) technology to treat acid mine drainage (AMD), Bench-scale testing, field demonstrations, and engineered applications of SRBs for the treatment of AMD will be presented...

  19. System for NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, R.A.

    1989-01-24

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid. 1 fig.

  20. Properties of an Inducible C4-Dicarboxylic Acid Transport System in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Ghei, Om. K.; Kay, William W.

    1973-01-01

    The transport of the tricarboxylic acid cycle C4-dicarboxylic acids was studied in both the wild-type strain and tricarboxylic acid cycle mutants of Bacillus subtilis. Active transport of malate, fumarate, and succinate was found to be inducible by these dicarboxylic acids or by precursors to them, whereas glucose or closely related metabolites catabolite-repressed their uptake. l-Malate was found to be the best dicarboxylic acid transport inducer in succinic dehydrogenase, fumarase, and malic dehydrogenase mutants. Succinate and fumarate are accumulated over 100-fold in succinic dehydrogenase and fumarase mutants, respectively, whereas mutants lacking malate dehydrogenase were unable to accumulate significant quantities of the C4-dicarboxylic acids. The stereospecificity of this transport system was studied from a comparison of the rates of competitive inhibition of both succinate uptake and efflux in a succinate dehydrogenase mutant by utilizing thirty dicarboxylic acid analogues. The system was specific for the C4-dicarboxylic acids of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, neither citrate nor α-ketoglutarate were effective competitive inhibitors. Of a wide variety of metabolic inhibitors tested, inhibiors of oxidative phosphorylation and of the formation of proton gradients were the most potent inhibitors of transport. From the kinetics of dicarboxylic acid transport (Km approximately 10−4 M for succinate or fumarate in succinic acid dehydrogenase and fumarase mutants) and from the competitive inhibition studies, it was concluded that an inducible dicarboxylic acid transport system mediates the entry of malate, fumarate, or succinate into B. subtilis. Mutants devoid of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase were shown to accumulate both α-ketoglutarate and glutamate, and these metabolites subsequently inhibited the transport of all the C4-dicarboxylic acids, suggesting a regulatory role. Images PMID:4633350

  1. Comparative analysis of ascorbic acid in human milk and infant formula using varied milk delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Jimi; Rogers, Kristy; Brewer, Paul; Dickton, Darby; Pardini, Ron

    2008-01-01

    Background The expression of human milk for later use is on the rise. Bottle systems are used to deliver the expressed milk. Research has shown that storage of both human milk and artificial baby milk, or infant formula, leads to a loss of ascorbic acid (commonly called Vitamin C). As milk is removed from the bottle during feeding and replaced by ambient air, it is unknown if loss of ascorbic acid occurs during the course of a feeding. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the milk delivery system on levels of ascorbic acid in human milk and infant formula. The objectives are to 1) determine changes in ascorbic acid concentration during a 20 minute "feed," 2) determine if there is a difference in ascorbic acid concentration between delivery systems, and 3) evaluate if any differences are of clinical importance. Methods Commonly available bottles were used for comparison of bottle delivery systems. Mature human milk was standardized to 42 mg/L of ascorbic acid. Infant formula with iron and infant formula with docosahexanoic acid were used for the formula samples. Each sample was analyzed for ascorbic acid concentration at baseline (0), 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes. Each collection of samples was completed in triplicate. Samples were analyzed for ascorbic acid using normal-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Results Ascorbic acid concentration declined in all bottle systems during testing, Differences between the bottle systems were noted. Ascorbic acid concentrations declined to less than 40% of recommended daily intake for infants in 4 of the bottles systems at the 20 minute sampling. Conclusion The bottle systems used in this study had measurable decreases in the mean concentration of ascorbic acid. More research is needed to determine if the observed decreases are related to lower plasma ascorbic acid concentration in infants exclusively bottle fed. The decrease of ascorbic acid concentration observed in both human milk and infant

  2. Gibberellic acid production by free and immobilized cells in different culture systems.

    PubMed

    Durán-Páramo, Enrique; Molina-Jiménez, Héctor; Brito-Arias, Marco A; Robles-Martínez, Fabián

    2004-01-01

    Gibberellic acid production was studied in different fermentation systems. Free and immobilized cells of Gibberella fujikuroi cultures in shake-flask, stirred and fixed-bed reactors were evaluated for the production of gibberellic acid (GA3). Gibberellic acid production with free cells cultured in a stirred reactor reached 0.206 g/L and a yield of 0.078 g of GA3/g biomass.

  3. Reprocessing system with nuclide separation based on chromatography in hydrochloric acid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsuya; Tachibana, Yu; Koyama, Shi-ichi

    2013-07-01

    We have proposed the reprocessing system with nuclide separation processes based on the chromatographic technique in the hydrochloric acid solution system. Our proposed system consists of the dissolution process, the reprocessing process, the minor actinide separation process, and nuclide separation processes. In the reprocessing and separation processes, the pyridine resin is used as a main separation media. It was confirmed that the dissolution in the hydrochloric acid solution is easily achieved by the plasma voloxidation and by the addition of oxygen peroxide into the hydrochloric acid solution.

  4. Removal of an acid fume system contaminated with perchlorates located within hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, K.E.; Henslee, S.P.; Vroman, W.R.; Krsul, J.R.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Knighton, G.C.

    1992-09-01

    An add scrubbing system located within the confines of a highly radioactive hot cell at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was remotely removed. The acid scrubbing system was routinely used for the dissolution of irradiated reactor fuel samples and structural materials. Perchloric acid was one of the acids used in the dissolution process and remained in the system with its inherent risks. Personnel could not enter the hot cell to perform the dismantling of the acid scabbing system due to the high radiation field and the explosion potential associated with the perchlorates. A robot was designed and built at ANL-W and used to dismantle the system without the need for personnel entry into the hot cell. The robot was also used for size reduction of removed components and loading of the removed components into waste containers.

  5. Acid and alkali doped PBI electrolyte in electrochemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Baozhong

    In this work the conductivity of blank PBI membrane, acid doped PBI and alkaline doped PBI was systematically studied. A new methodology for sorption kinetics study in electrolyte solution has been established by monitoring the conductivity change during the sorption process. The model of the doping process and mechanism of conductivity are proposed. The performance of PBI (doped under optimum conditions) in fuel cell as PEM was evaluated. The experimental results show that the blank PBI in acid solution is an ionic insulator. It clarified the long time confusion in this area. The acid doped PBI membrane is an ionic conductor. The conductivity increases with the concentration of the acid solution. In high concentration acid solution, the conductivity increases with the type of acid in the order: H2SO 4 > H3PO4 > HClO4 > HNO3 > HCl. The kinetics of the doping process was studied, by a continuous method. The ionic conductivity mechanism was established. The PBI membranes doped with H2SO4 and H3PO4 exhibit better performance than NafionRTM. The doped FBI has more resistance to CO poison. 3% CO in H2 has little effect on the H3PO 4 doped PBI membrane at 185°C. The conductivity of the alkali doped PBI membrane changes with the concentration of the alkaline solution and the type of the alkalis. The conductivity has a maximum in KOH and NaOH solution. The maximum conductivity in KOH is higher than in NaOH and LiOH. It is about 5 times of that of NafionRTM in alkaline solution. The two-step sorption process in alkaline solution was observed. The first step is the permeation process of the alkalis in the PBI membrane. The permeation is the results of diffusion and interaction. It is concluded that the permeation process is controlled by the rate of interaction between the alkali and PBI molecule. The second step is the relaxation process in the membrane. This step contributes more to the conductivity for the membrane than the first step. The ionic conductivity mechanism

  6. Systems metabolic engineering design: Fatty acid production as an emerging case study

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Ting Wei; Chowdhury, Anupam; Maranas, Costas D; Shanks, Jacqueline V

    2014-01-01

    Increasing demand for petroleum has stimulated industry to develop sustainable production of chemicals and biofuels using microbial cell factories. Fatty acids of chain lengths from C6 to C16 are propitious intermediates for the catalytic synthesis of industrial chemicals and diesel-like biofuels. The abundance of genetic information available for Escherichia coli and specifically, fatty acid metabolism in E. coli, supports this bacterium as a promising host for engineering a biocatalyst for the microbial production of fatty acids. Recent successes rooted in different features of systems metabolic engineering in the strain design of high-yielding medium chain fatty acid producing E. coli strains provide an emerging case study of design methods for effective strain design. Classical metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches enabled different and distinct design paths towards a high-yielding strain. Here we highlight a rational strain design process in systems biology, an integrated computational and experimental approach for carboxylic acid production, as an alternative method. Additional challenges inherent in achieving an optimal strain for commercialization of medium chain-length fatty acids will likely require a collection of strategies from systems metabolic engineering. Not only will the continued advancement in systems metabolic engineering result in these highly productive strains more quickly, this knowledge will extend more rapidly the carboxylic acid platform to the microbial production of carboxylic acids with alternate chain-lengths and functionalities. PMID:24481660

  7. STATE ACID RAIN RESEARCH AND SCREENING SYSTEM - VERSION 1.0 USER'S MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user's manual that describes Version 1.0 of EPA's STate Acid Rain Research and Screening System (STARRSS), developed to assist utility regulatory commissions in reviewing utility acid rain compliance plans. It is a screening tool that is based on scenario analysis...

  8. Utilization of a bipolar lead acid battery for the advanced launch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, William O.; Vidas, Robin; Miles, Ronald; Eckles, Steven

    1991-01-01

    The development of a battery comprised of bipolar lead acid modules is discussed. The battery is designed to satisfy the requirements of the Advanced Launch System (ALS). The battery will have the following design features: (1) conventional lead acid chemistry; (2) thin electrode/active materials; (3) a thin separator; (4) sealed construction (gas recombinant); and (5) welded plastic frames for the external seal.

  9. Disinfection of water in recirculating aquaculture systems with peracetic acid (PAA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The disinfection behaviour of peracetic acid (PAA) in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) was investigated. Peracetic acid is a strong oxidizing agent found in various concentrations in different products. Three Wofasteril PAA products (E400 (c), Lspecical; AC 150) were tested in vitro for the...

  10. The role of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Mäki-Petäjä, K; Cheriyan, J; McEniery, C; Wilkinson, I B

    2015-07-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) play an important role in cardioprotective mechanisms. These include regulating vascular tone, modulating inflammatory responses, improving cardiomyocyte function and reducing ischaemic damage, resulting in attenuation of animal models of cardiovascular risk factors. This review discusses the current knowledge on the role of EETs in endothelium-dependent control of vascular tone in the healthy and in subjects with cardiovascular risk factors, and considers the pharmacological potential of targeting this pathway.

  11. Thoron-meso-tartaric acid system for determination of thorium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, M.H.; Grimaldi, F.S.; Jenkins, L.B.

    1957-01-01

    In the spectrophotometric determination of thorium with thoron, mesotartaric acid is used as a masking reagent for zirconium. The effects of different experimental variables such as the concentrations of the reagents, time, and temperature, and the behavior of 35 ions which might be present in thorium ores are discussed. A dilution procedure is given for the direct determination of thorium in zircon (ZrSiO4) that is also generally applicable to other materials.

  12. Citric Acid-Modified Fenton's Reaction for the Oxidation of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Soil Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-03-15

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in-situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} relative to iron catalysts (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} < 1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelations in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  13. Micro-Detection System for Determination of the Biotic or Abiotic Origin of Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, Jeffrey L.; Betts, Bruce (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The research involved the development of a breadboard version of a spacecraft based system for the detection of amino acid chirality (handedness) on solar system bodies. The design concept has three distinct components: a sublimation chamber for the release of amino acids from an acquired sample; a microchip based capillary electrophoresis (CE) chip for the separation of amino acids and their enantiomers; and a fluorescent based detection system. In addition, we have investigated the use of a microfluidics system for the extraction of amino acids in samples in which sublimation has proven to be problematic. This is a joint project carried out at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), University of California at San Diego; the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena; and the Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley.

  14. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids modulate large-scale systems organization in the rhesus macaque brain.

    PubMed

    Grayson, David S; Kroenke, Christopher D; Neuringer, Martha; Fair, Damien A

    2014-02-05

    Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for healthy brain and retinal development and have been implicated in a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. This study used resting-state functional connectivity MRI to define the large-scale organization of the rhesus macaque brain and changes associated with differences in lifetime ω-3 fatty acid intake. Monkeys fed docosahexaenoic acid, the long-chain ω-3 fatty acid abundant in neural membranes, had cortical modular organization resembling the healthy human brain. In contrast, those with low levels of dietary ω-3 fatty acids had decreased functional connectivity within the early visual pathway and throughout higher-order associational cortex and showed impairment of distributed cortical networks. Our findings illustrate the similarity in modular cortical organization between the healthy human and macaque brain and support the notion that ω-3 fatty acids play a crucial role in developing and/or maintaining distributed, large-scale brain systems, including those essential for normal cognitive function.

  15. 21 CFR 862.1055 - Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Newborn screening test system for amino acids... screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. (a) Identification. A newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1055 - Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Newborn screening test system for amino acids... screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. (a) Identification. A newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1055 - Newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Newborn screening test system for amino acids... screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using tandem mass spectrometry. (a) Identification. A newborn screening test system for amino acids, free carnitine, and acylcarnitines using...

  18. Salicylic acid and jasmonic acid are essential for systemic resistance against tobacco mosaic virus in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Xi, De-Hui; Yuan, Shu; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2014-06-01

    Systemic resistance is induced by pathogens and confers protection against a broad range of pathogens. Recent studies have indicated that salicylic acid (SA) derivative methyl salicylate (MeSA) serves as a long-distance phloem-mobile systemic resistance signal in tobacco, Arabidopsis, and potato. However, other experiments indicate that jasmonic acid (JA) is a critical mobile signal. Here, we present evidence suggesting both MeSA and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) are essential for systemic resistance against Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), possibly acting as the initiating signals for systemic resistance. Foliar application of JA followed by SA triggered the strongest systemic resistance against TMV. Furthermore, we use a virus-induced gene-silencing-based genetics approach to investigate the function of JA and SA biosynthesis or signaling genes in systemic response against TMV infection. Silencing of SA or JA biosynthetic and signaling genes in Nicotiana benthamiana plants increased susceptibility to TMV. Genetic experiments also proved the irreplaceable roles of MeSA and MeJA in systemic resistance response. Systemic resistance was compromised when SA methyl transferase or JA carboxyl methyltransferase, which are required for MeSA and MeJA formation, respectively, were silenced. Moreover, high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that JA and MeJA accumulated in phloem exudates of leaves at early stages and SA and MeSA accumulated at later stages, after TMV infection. Our data also indicated that JA and MeJA could regulate MeSA and SA production. Taken together, our results demonstrate that (Me)JA and (Me)SA are required for systemic resistance response against TMV.

  19. Partition coefficients for acetic, propionic, and butyric acids in a crude oil/water system

    SciTech Connect

    Reinsel, M.A.; Borkowski, J.J.; Sears, J.T. . National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Biofilm Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    The effects of pH, temperature, and organic acid concentration on the partition coefficients for short-chain organic acids were measured in a crude oil/water system. Acetic, propionic, and butyric acids, as probable substrates for microbial souring of oil reservoirs, were used in conjunction with two types of crude oil. Temperatures of 35--75 C, pH values of 4.0--7.0, and acid concentrations of 10--1,000 mg/L were studied. Initial naturally occurring levels of organic acids in the crude oils were also determined. pH had by far the largest effect on the partition coefficient for all three organic acids for both types oil. At conditions normally seen in an oil reservoir (pH 5--7), the great percentage (85+%) of these acids were dissolved in the aqueous phase. The log of the partition coefficient K increased approximately linearly with the number of carbon atoms in the acid. It was seen that organic acids are readily available carbon sources for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) at normal reservoir conditions, and that crude oil may provide a source of organic acids in a low-pH, water-flooded reservoir.

  20. Docosahexaenoic acid and cognitive function: Is the link mediated by the autonomic nervous system?

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Kathleen M.; Colombo, John; Carlson, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid is a long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid that is found in large quantity in the brain and which has repeatedly been observed to be related in positive ways to both cognitive function and cardiovascular health. The mechanisms through which docosahexaenoic acid affects cognition are not well understood, but in this article, we propose a hypothesis that integrates the positive effects of docosahexaenoic acid in the cognitive and cardiovascular realms through the autonomic nervous system. The autonomic nervous system is known to regulate vital functions such as heart rate and respiration, and has also been linked to basic cognitive components related to arousal and attention. We review the literature from this perspective, and delineate the predictions generated by the hypothesis. In addition, we provide new data showing a link between docosahexaenoic acid and fetal heart rate that is consistent with the hypothesis. PMID:18930644

  1. Nanofiltration, bipolar electrodialysis and reactive extraction hybrid system for separation of fumaric acid from fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, Krystyna; Staszak, Katarzyna; Woźniak-Budych, Marta Joanna; Regel-Rosocka, Magdalena; Adamczak, Michalina; Wiśniewski, Maciej; Staniewski, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    A novel approach based on a hybrid system allowing nanofiltration, bipolar electrodialysis and reactive extraction, was proposed to remove fumaric acid from fermentation broth left after bioconversion of glycerol. The fumaric salts can be concentrated in the nanofiltration process to a high yield (80-95% depending on pressure), fumaric acid can be selectively separated from other fermentation components, as well as sodium fumarate can be conversed into the acid form in bipolar electrodialysis process (stack consists of bipolar and anion-exchange membranes). Reactive extraction with quaternary ammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) or alkylphosphine oxides (Cyanex 923) solutions (yield between 60% and 98%) was applied as the final step for fumaric acid recovery from aqueous streams after the membrane techniques. The hybrid system permitting nanofiltration, bipolar electrodialysis and reactive extraction was found effective for recovery of fumaric acid from the fermentation broth.

  2. The reduction process of phytic acid silver ion system: A pulse radiolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ravi; Mukherjee, Tulsi

    2007-05-01

    Reduction of silver ion in a silver-phytic acid (1:1 ratio) system has been studied using pulse radiolysis technique. Time-resolved transformation of the intermediates, Ag +→Ag 0→Ag 2+→Ag 32+, has been clearly observed in the reduction of silver-phytic acid (1:1) system. The effect of phytic acid on the formation and decay of initial silver clusters has been also studied. The surface plasmon absorption band of stable silver nanoparticle (410 nm) and dynamic light scattering technique has been used to characterize the nanoparticles and measure the average size ( Rav=100 nm).

  3. System and process for capture of acid gasses at elevated pressure from gaseous process streams

    SciTech Connect

    Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Linehan, John C.; Rainbolt, James E.; Bearden, Mark D.; Zheng, Feng

    2016-09-06

    A system, method, and material that enables the pressure-activated reversible chemical capture of acid gasses such as CO.sub.2 from gas volumes such as streams, flows or any other volume. Once the acid gas is chemically captured, the resulting product typically a zwitterionic salt, can be subjected to a reduced pressure whereupon the resulting product will release the captures acid gas and the capture material will be regenerated. The invention includes this process as well as the materials and systems for carrying out and enabling this process.

  4. Acetic Acid Production by an Electrodialysis Fermentation Method with a Computerized Control System

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Yoshiyuki; Iwahara, Masayoshi; Hongo, Motoyoshi

    1988-01-01

    In acetic acid fermentation by Acetobacter aceti, the acetic acid produced inhibits the production of acetic acid by this microorganism. To alleviate this inhibitory effect, we developed an electrodialysis fermentation method such that acetic acid is continuously removed from the broth. The fermentation unit has a computerized system for the control of the pH and the concentration of ethanol in the fermentation broth. The electrodialysis fermentation system resulted in improved cell growth and higher productivity over an extended period; the productivity exceeded that from non-pH-controlled fermentation. During electrodialysis fermentation in our system, 97.6 g of acetic acid was produced from 86.0 g of ethanol; the amount of acetic acid was about 2.4 times greater than that produced by non-pH-controlled fermentation (40.1 g of acetic acid produced from 33.8 g of ethanol). Maximum productivity of electrodialysis fermentation in our system was 2.13 g/h, a rate which was 1.35 times higher than that of non-pH-controlled fermentation (1.58 g/h). PMID:16347520

  5. Kinetics of color development of melanoidins formed from fructose/amino acid model systems.

    PubMed

    Echavarría, A P; Pagán, J; Ibarz, A

    2014-03-01

    The formation of soluble melanoidins from a single combination of sugar (fructose) and amino acid model systems were evaluated kinetically. The selected amino acids, commonly found in apple juice and highly reactive in the Maillard reaction, were asparagine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. The effect of these reagents and the treatment at different temperatures (50 , 85 , and 100 ) during 96 h on the color intensity of the melanoidin formed was measured by absorbance at different wavelengths (280, 325, 405, and 420 nm). The absorbance of the melanoidin formed from all model systems was located on the wavelength of 405 nm, that is, the area of the visible spectrum close to the UV region. The color of the melanoidins was directly measured using the CIELAB color space system. A first-order kinetic model was applied to the evolution of the ΔE * (color difference) and L * (lightness) of the color. The fructose/aspartic acid model system values of a * (redness) and b * (yellowness) were found in the brown-red zone. Therefore, the color development of the melanoidins was influenced by the type of amino acid and temperature. Especially, it is thought that the a * and b * values can be used to explain the differences among the amino acids in the color development of melanoidins.

  6. Micro-Detection System for Determination of the Biotic or Abiotic Origin of Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The research carried out under this PIDDP involves the development of a breadboard version of a spacecraft-based system for the detection of amino acid chirality (molecular handedness) on solar system bodies. Chirality provides an unambiguous way of distinguishing between abiotic and biotic origins since only one mirror-image form is used in the functional molecules of life. Recent advances in a variety of nano-fabrication technologies have resulted in concepts for enabling miniaturized chemical and biological analytical systems. These are complete application-specific systems that integrate fluid micro handling systems for extracting and reacting target molecules, micro-separation technologies for enhanced sensitivity and resolution, and advanced detection technologies. This effort makes use of a relatively new technology that shows demonstrated promise for spacecraft-based amino acid analysis: microchip-based capillary electrophoresis (muCE). The muCE system is capable of analyzing the type of amino acids present as well as the relative amounts of their mirror image forms. The system we developed will be able to chirally resolve all of the major amino acids found in extraterrestrial material (Gly, Ala, Val, Pro, Asp, Glu, a-aminoisobutyric acid, and isovaline) at sub-part-per-billion levels. The _CE analysis requires that the amino acids be extracted from the sample and derivatized for either optical or electrochemical detection. In our implementation, the amino acids are released from the sample by sublimation and prepared for muCE analysis using a microfluidic circuit. In addition, we have investigated the use of a microfluidic circuit for the release of amino acids from samples in which sublimation has proven to be problematic.

  7. Pipecolic Acid Orchestrates Plant Systemic Acquired Resistance and Defense Priming via Salicylic Acid-Dependent and -Independent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bernsdorff, Friederike; Döring, Anne-Christin; Gruner, Katrin; Schuck, Stefan; Bräutigam, Andrea; Zeier, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relationships of the two immune-regulatory plant metabolites, salicylic acid (SA) and pipecolic acid (Pip), in the establishment of plant systemic acquired resistance (SAR), SAR-associated defense priming, and basal immunity. Using SA-deficient sid2, Pip-deficient ald1, and sid2 ald1 plants deficient in both SA and Pip, we show that SA and Pip act both independently from each other and synergistically in Arabidopsis thaliana basal immunity to Pseudomonas syringae. Transcriptome analyses reveal that SAR establishment in Arabidopsis is characterized by a strong transcriptional response systemically induced in the foliage that prepares plants for future pathogen attack by preactivating multiple stages of defense signaling and that SA accumulation upon SAR activation leads to the downregulation of photosynthesis and attenuated jasmonate responses systemically within the plant. Whereas systemic Pip elevations are indispensable for SAR and necessary for virtually the whole transcriptional SAR response, a moderate but significant SA-independent component of SAR activation and SAR gene expression is revealed. During SAR, Pip orchestrates SA-dependent and SA-independent priming of pathogen responses in a FLAVIN-DEPENDENT-MONOOXYGENASE1 (FMO1)-dependent manner. We conclude that a Pip/FMO1 signaling module acts as an indispensable switch for the activation of SAR and associated defense priming events and that SA amplifies Pip-triggered responses to different degrees in the distal tissue of SAR-activated plants. PMID:26672068

  8. Third system for neutral amino acid transport in a marine pseudomonad.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, S M; Hildebrandt, V A; Lee, T

    1977-01-01

    Uptake of leucine by the marine pseudomonad B-16 is an energy-dependent, concentrative process. Respiratory inhibitors, uncouplers, and sulfhydryl reagents block transport. The uptake of leucine is Na+ dependent, although the relationship between the rate of leucine uptake and Na+ concentration depends, to some extent, on the ionic strength of the suspending assay medium and the manner in which cells are washed prior to assay. Leucine transport can be separated into at least two systems: a low-affinity system with an apparent Km of 1.3 X 10(-5) M, and a high-affinity system with an apparent Km of 1.9 X 10(-7) M. The high-affinity system shows a specificity unusual for bacterial systems in that both aromatic and aliphatic amino acids inhibit leucine transport, provided that they have hydrophobic side chains of a length greater than that of two carbon atoms. The system exhibits strict stereospecificity for the L form. Phenylalanine inhibition was investigated in more detail. The Ki for inhibition of leucine transport by phenylalanine is about 1.4 X 10(-7) M. Phenylalanine itself is transported by an energy-dependent process whose specificity is the same as the high-affinity leucine transport system, as is expected if both amino acids share the same transport system. Studies with protoplasts indicate that a periplasmic binding protein is not an essential part of this transport system. Fein and MacLeod (J. Bacteriol. 124:1177-1190, 1975) reported two neutral amino acid transport systems in strain B-16: the DAG system, serving glycine, D-alanine, D-serine, and alpha-aminoisobutyric acid; and the LIV system, serving L-leucine, L-isoleucine, L-valine, and L-alanine. The high-affinity system reported here is a third neutral amino acid transport system in this marine pseudomonad. We propose the name "LIV-II" system. PMID:856786

  9. Commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Warshay, M.; Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    Reducing cost and increasing reliability were the technology drivers in both the electric utility and on-site integrated energy system applications. The longstanding barrier to the attainment of these goals was materials. Differences in approaches and their technological features, including electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, fuel selection, and system design philosophy were discussed.

  10. Organic Acids as Hetrotrophic Energy Sources in Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windman, T. O.; Zolotova, N.; Shock, E.

    2004-12-01

    Many thermophilic microbes are heterotrophs, but little is known about the organic compounds present in hydrothermal ecosystems. More is known about what these organisms will metabolize in lab experiments than what they do metabolize in nature. In an effort to bridge this gap, we have begun to incorporate organic analyses into ongoing research on Yellowstone hydrothermal ecosystems. After filtering at least a liter of hot spring water to minimize contamination, samples were collected into sixty-milliliter serum vials containing ultra-pure phosphoric acid, sodium hydroxide, or benzalkonium chloride. Approximately 80 sites were sampled spanning temperatures from 60 to 90°C and pH values from 2 to 9. Analytical data for organic acid anions (including formate, acetate, lactate, and succinate) were obtained by ion chromatography. Preliminary results indicate that concentrations of organic acids anions range from 5 to 300 ppb. These results can be used with other field and lab data (sulfate, sulfide, nitrate, ammonia, bicarbonate, pH, hydrogen) in thermodynamic calculations to evaluate the amounts of energy available in heterotrophic reactions. Preliminary results of such calculations show that sulfate reduction to sulfide coupled to succinate oxidation to bicarbonate yields about 6 kcal per mole of electrons transferred. When formate oxidation to bicarbonate or hydrogen oxidation to water is coupled to sulfate reduction there is less energy available by approximately a factor of two. A comparison with nitrate reduction to ammonia involving succinate and/or formate oxidation reveals several similarities. Using formate to reduce nitrate can yield about as much energy as nitrate reduction with hydrogen (typically 12 to 14 kcal per mole of electrons transferred), but using succinate can yield more than twice as much energy. In fact, reduction of nitrate with succinate can provide more energy than any of the inorganic nitrate reduction reactions involving sulfur, iron

  11. Prediction of liquid-liquid equilibrium for systems of vegetable oils, fatty acids, and ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, E.; Monnerat, S.; Stragevitch, L.; Pina, C.G.; Goncalves, C.B.; Meirelles, A.J.A.

    1999-12-01

    Group interaction parameters for the UNIFAC and ASOG models were specially adjusted for predicting liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) for systems of vegetable oils, fatty acids, and ethanol at temperatures ranging from 20 to 45 C. Experimental liquid-liquid equilibrium data for systems of triolein, oleic acid, and ethanol and of triolein, stearic acid, and ethanol were measured and utilized in the adjustment. The average percent deviation between experimental and calculated compositions was 0.79% and 0.52% for the UNIFAC and ASOG models, respectively. The prediction of liquid-liquid equilibrium for systems of vegetable oils, fatty acids, and ethanol was quite successful, with an average deviation of 1.31% and 1.32% for the UNIFAC and ASOG models, respectively.

  12. Solid/liquid phase diagram of the ammonium sulfate/succinic acid/water system.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Christian S; Beyer, Keith D

    2015-05-14

    We have studied the low-temperature phase diagram and water activities of the ammonium sulfate/succinic acid/water system using differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy of thin films. Using the results from our experiments, we have mapped the solid/liquid ternary phase diagram, determined the water activities based on the freezing point depression, and determined the ice/succinic acid phase boundary as well as the ternary eutectic composition and temperature. We also compared our results to the predictions of the extended AIM aerosol thermodynamics model (E-AIM) and found good agreement for the ice melting points in the ice primary phase field of this system; however, differences were found with respect to succinic acid solubility temperatures. We also compared the results of this study with those of previous studies that we have published on ammonium sulfate/dicarboxylic acid/water systems.

  13. The thoron-tartaric acid systems for the spectrophotometric determination of thorium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.; Fletcher, Mary H.

    1955-01-01

    Thoron is popularly used for the spectrophotometric determination of thorium.  An undesirable feature of its use is the high sensitivity of the reagent toward zirconium. This study describes the use of tartaric acid as a masking reagent for zirconium. Three tartaric acid-thoron systems, developed for the determination of thorium, differ with respect to the concentrations of thoron and tartaric acid. Mesotataric acid, used in one of the systems, is found to be most effective in masking zirconium. The behavior of various rarer elements, usually found associated with thorium ores, is determined in two of the systems, and a dilution method is described for the direct determination of thorium in monazite concentrates.

  14. [Fluorescein transport and antioxidant systems in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae under acid stress].

    PubMed

    Abrat, O B; Semchyshyn, H M; Miedzobrodski, J; Lushchak, V I

    2008-01-01

    The influence of acetic acid induced stress on the activity of fluorescein extrusion system and cell survival in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied. It was shown that acetic acid caused the inhibition of fluorescein efflux from the cells of both parental strain and its derivative defective in the transcriptional factor War1 which regulates the system of acetate efflux from the cell. The stress induced by 200 mM CH3COOH decreased almost 10 times the survival of strains deficient in the regulatory proteins War1 and Yap1 as compared with respective wild strains. However, pretreatment of the yeast by sublethal concentrations of hydrogen peroxide resulted in the increased resistance to acid stress. Thus it may be supposed that several systems exist which are responsible for acetate extrusion from the yeast cells. Regulatory proteins War1 and Yap1 are involved in the yeast adaptation to the stress induced by acetic acid.

  15. An automatic system for acidity determination based on sequential injection titration and the monosegmented flow approach.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Joanna; Wójtowicz, Marzena; Gawenda, Nadzieja; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2011-06-15

    An automatic sequential injection system, combining monosegmented flow analysis, sequential injection analysis and sequential injection titration is proposed for acidity determination. The system enables controllable sample dilution and generation of standards of required concentration in a monosegmented sequential injection manner, sequential injection titration of the prepared solutions, data collecting, and handling. It has been tested on spectrophotometric determination of acetic, citric and phosphoric acids with sodium hydroxide used as a titrant and phenolphthalein or thymolphthalein (in the case of phosphoric acid determination) as indicators. Accuracy better than |4.4|% (RE) and repeatability better than 2.9% (RSD) have been obtained. It has been applied to the determination of total acidity in vinegars and various soft drinks. The system provides low sample (less than 0.3 mL) consumption. On average, analysis of a sample takes several minutes.

  16. Drug delivery systems based on nucleic acid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jan Willem; Zhang, Feng; Herrmann, Andreas

    2013-12-10

    The field of DNA nanotechnology has progressed rapidly in recent years and hence a large variety of 1D-, 2D- and 3D DNA nanostructures with various sizes, geometries and shapes is readily accessible. DNA-based nanoobjects are fabricated by straight forward design and self-assembly processes allowing the exact positioning of functional moieties and the integration of other materials. At the same time some of these nanosystems are characterized by a low toxicity profile. As a consequence, the use of these architectures in a biomedical context has been explored. In this review the progress and possibilities of pristine nucleic acid nanostructures and DNA hybrid materials for drug delivery will be discussed. For the latter class of structures, a distinction is made between carriers with an inorganic core composed of gold or silica and amphiphilic DNA block copolymers that exhibit a soft hydrophobic interior.

  17. Acidity field of soils as ion-exchange systems and the diagnostics of genetic soil horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokotov, Yu. A.; Sukhacheva, E. Yu.; Aparin, B. F.

    2014-12-01

    For the comprehensive description of the acidity of a two-phase ion-exchange system, we should analyze two curves of the ionite titration by a strong base in water and salt solutions and find the quantitative relationships between the corresponding pH characteristics. An idea of the three-dimensional field of acidity of ion-exchange systems (the phase space of the soil acidity characteristics) and its three two-dimensional projections is suggested. For soils, three interrelated characteristics—the pH values of the salt and water extracts and the degree of base saturation—can serve as spatial coordinates for the acidity field. Representation of factual data in this field makes it possible to compare and analyze the acidity characteristics of different soils and soil horizons and to determine their specific features. Differentiation of the field into separate volumes allows one to present the data in a discrete form. We have studied the distribution patterns of the groups of soil horizons from Leningrad oblast and other regions of northwestern Russia in the acidity field. The studied samples are grouped in different partially overlapping areas of the projections of the acidity field. The results of this grouping attest to the correctness of the modern classification of Russian soils. A notion of the characteristic soil area in the acidity field is suggested; it can be applied to all the soils with a leaching soil water regime.

  18. A novel sialic acid utilization and uptake system in the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sumita; Douglas, C W Ian; Stafford, Graham P

    2010-05-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a key contributor to periodontitis, but little is known of its virulence mechanisms. In this study we have investigated the role of sialic acid in biofilm growth of this periodontal pathogen. Our data show that biofilm growth of T. forsythia is stimulated by sialic acid, glycolyl sialic acid, and sialyllactose, all three of which are common sugar moieties on a range of important host glycoproteins. We have also established that growth on sialyllactose is dependent on the sialidase of T. forsythia since the sialidase inhibitor oseltamivir suppresses growth on sialyllactose. The genome of T. forsythia contains a sialic acid utilization locus, which also encodes a putative inner membrane sialic acid permease (NanT), and we have shown this is functional when it is expressed in Escherichia coli. This genomic locus also contains a putatively novel TonB-dependent outer membrane sialic acid transport system (TF0033-TF0034). In complementation studies using an Escherichia coli strain devoid of its outer membrane sialic acid transporters, the cloning and expression of the TF0033-TF0034 genes enabled an E. coli nanR nanC ompR strain to utilize sialic acid as the sole carbon and energy source. We have thus identified a novel sialic acid uptake system that couples an inner membrane permease with a TonB-dependent outer membrane transporter, and we propose to rename these novel sialic acid uptake genes nanO and nanU, respectively. Taken together, these data indicate that sialic acid is a key growth factor for this little-characterized oral pathogen and may be key to its physiology in vivo.

  19. The Loss Of Macrophage Fatty Acid Oxidation Does Not Potentiate Systemic Metabolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hurtado, Elsie; Lee, Jieun; Choi, Joseph; Selen Alpergin, Ebru S; Collins, Samuel L; Horton, Maureen R; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2017-02-21

    Fatty acid oxidation in macrophages has been suggested to play a causative role in high-fat diet-induced metabolic dysfunction, particularly in the etiology of adipose driven insulin resistance. To understand the contribution of macrophage fatty acid oxidation directly to metabolic dysfunction in high-fat diet-induced obesity, we generated mice with a myeloid-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2 Mϕ-KO), an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation. While fatty acid oxidation was clearly induced upon IL-4 stimulation, fatty acid oxidation deficient CPT2 Mϕ-KO bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) displayed canonical markers of M2 polarization following IL-4 stimulation in vitro. In addition, loss of macrophage fatty acid oxidation in vivo did not alter the progression of high-fat diet induced obesity, inflammation, macrophage polarization, oxidative stress, or glucose intolerance. These data suggest that although alternatively activated macrophages up-regulate fatty acid oxidation, fatty acid oxidation is dispensable for macrophage polarization and high-fat diet-induced metabolic dysfunction. Macrophage fatty acid oxidation likely plays a correlative rather than causative role in systemic metabolic dysfunction.

  20. Effects of natural phenolic acids on the skeletal system of ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Folwarczna, Joanna; Zych, Maria; Burczyk, Jan; Trzeciak, Hanna; Trzeciak, Henryk I

    2009-12-01

    Recent reports indicate the possibility of antiresorptive and/or bone formation increasing activity of natural phenolic acids, commonly present in plants which are normally consumed in the diet. The effects of 4 natural phenolic acids (ferulic, caffeic, P-coumaric or chlorogenic, 10 mg/kg P. O. daily for 4 weeks) on the skeletal system of ovariectomized (estrogen-deficient) rats were investigated. Bone mass, mineral and calcium content, macrometric and histomorphometric parameters, and mechanical properties were examined. Phenolic acids differentially affected the skeletal system of rats with osteoporotic changes induced by the ovariectomy. Caffeic acid decreased bone mass, whereas P-coumaric acid increased the bone mass/body mass ratio and bone mineral mass/body mass ratio in the long bones, in comparison with the ovariectomized control rats. The phenolic acids improved some bone histomorphometric parameters, impaired by estrogen deficiency. However, they did not increase the ratio of bone mineral mass to bone mass, decreased by estrogen deficiency, and did not significantly affect bone mechanical properties. In conclusion, different natural phenolic acids exert differential effects on the skeletal system of ovariectomized rats, both favourable and deleterious.