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Sample records for acid receptor gamma

  1. A third human retinoic acid receptor, hRAR-. gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Krust, A.; Kastner, Ph.; Petkovich, M.; Zelent, A.; Chambon, P. )

    1989-07-01

    Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are retinoic acid (RA)-inducible enhancer factors belonging to the superfamily of steroid/thyroid nuclear receptors. The authors have previously characterized two human RAR (hRAR-{alpha} and hRAR-{beta}) cDNAs and have recently cloned their murine cognates (mRAR-{alpha} and mRAR-{beta}) together with a third RAR (mRAR-{gamma}) whose RNA was detected predominantly in skin, a well-known target for RA. mRAR-{gamma} cDNA was used here to clone its human counterpart (hRAR-{gamma}) from a T47D breast cancer cell cDNA library. Using a transient transfection assay in HeLa cells and a reporter gene harboring a synthetic RA responsive element, they demonstrate that hRAR-{gamma} cDNA indeed encodes a RA-inducible transcriptional trans-activator. Interestingly, comparisons of the amino acid sequences of all six human and mouse RARs indicate that the interspecies conservation of a given member of the RAR subfamily (either {alpha}, {beta}, or {gamma}) is much higher than the conservation of all three receptors within a given species. These observations indicate that RAR-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} may perform specific functions. They show also that hRAR-{gamma} RNA is the predominant RAR RNA species in human skin, which suggests that hRAR-{gamma} mediates some of the retinoid effects in this tissue.

  2. Possible intermolecular interaction between quinolones and biphenylacetic acid inhibits gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor sites.

    PubMed

    Akahane, K; Kimura, Y; Tsutomi, Y; Hayakawa, I

    1994-10-01

    The combination of some new quinolone antibacterial agents with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA), a metabolite of fenbufen, is known to specifically induce functional blockade of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. The mechanisms of these drug interactions were further examined. Scatchard analysis of [3H]muscimol binding to rat brain plasma membranes in the presence of enoxacin and BPAA revealed that a significant decrease in the number of muscimol binding sites was produced without affecting the affinity of binding to the receptors. In the presence of norfloxacin, BPAA inhibited muscimol binding the most potently of the six BPAA-related compounds tested. Fenbufen and 9,10-dihydro-gamma-oxo-2-phenanthrenebutyric acid also inhibited the binding, and 4-biphenylcarboxylic acid and methyl 4-biphenylacetate inhibited it slightly, but 3-benzoylpropionic acid exhibited no competitive inhibition. Accordingly, hybrid molecules of norfloxacin and BPAA were synthesized for stereochemical analysis of these drug interactions. A hybrid with a -CONH(CH2)3- chain between norfloxacin and BPAA (flexible structure) inhibited muscimol binding, and intracisternal injection of this hybrid caused clonic convulsions in mice more potently than the combination of norfloxacin and BPAA did. In contrast, a hybrid linked by -CONH- (stretched structure) showed almost no such inhibitory effect. 1H NMR analysis indicated the presence of intramolecular attraction at the quinoline ring of the hybrid exhibiting the antagonistic activity. These results suggest the possibility that quinolones and BPAA interact with the GABA receptor at nearby sites and that the binding affinity of quinolones to the GABA receptors is largely enhanced by the intermolecular interaction with BPAA. PMID:7840564

  3. Possible intermolecular interaction between quinolones and biphenylacetic acid inhibits gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor sites.

    PubMed Central

    Akahane, K; Kimura, Y; Tsutomi, Y; Hayakawa, I

    1994-01-01

    The combination of some new quinolone antibacterial agents with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA), a metabolite of fenbufen, is known to specifically induce functional blockade of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. The mechanisms of these drug interactions were further examined. Scatchard analysis of [3H]muscimol binding to rat brain plasma membranes in the presence of enoxacin and BPAA revealed that a significant decrease in the number of muscimol binding sites was produced without affecting the affinity of binding to the receptors. In the presence of norfloxacin, BPAA inhibited muscimol binding the most potently of the six BPAA-related compounds tested. Fenbufen and 9,10-dihydro-gamma-oxo-2-phenanthrenebutyric acid also inhibited the binding, and 4-biphenylcarboxylic acid and methyl 4-biphenylacetate inhibited it slightly, but 3-benzoylpropionic acid exhibited no competitive inhibition. Accordingly, hybrid molecules of norfloxacin and BPAA were synthesized for stereochemical analysis of these drug interactions. A hybrid with a -CONH(CH2)3- chain between norfloxacin and BPAA (flexible structure) inhibited muscimol binding, and intracisternal injection of this hybrid caused clonic convulsions in mice more potently than the combination of norfloxacin and BPAA did. In contrast, a hybrid linked by -CONH- (stretched structure) showed almost no such inhibitory effect. 1H NMR analysis indicated the presence of intramolecular attraction at the quinoline ring of the hybrid exhibiting the antagonistic activity. These results suggest the possibility that quinolones and BPAA interact with the GABA receptor at nearby sites and that the binding affinity of quinolones to the GABA receptors is largely enhanced by the intermolecular interaction with BPAA. PMID:7840564

  4. Binding characteristics of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid as a weak but selective GABAB receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Mathivet, P; Bernasconi, R; De Barry, J; Marescaux, C; Bittiger, H

    1997-02-19

    The aim of this study was to reexamine the concept that gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a weak but selective agonist at gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptors, using binding experiments with several radioligands. Ki values of GHB were similar (approximately equal to 100 microM) in three agonist radioligand assays for GABAB receptors, [3H]baclofen (beta-para-chlorophenyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid), [3H]CGP 27492 (3-aminopropyl-phosphinic acid) and [3H]GABA, in the presence of the GABAA receptor agonist isoguvacine with rat cortical, cerebellar and hippocampal membranes. In competition experiments between GHB and the GABAB receptor antagonist, [3H]CGP 54626 (3-N [1-{(S)-3,4-dichlorophenyl}-ethylamino]-2-(S)-hydroxypropyl cyclo-hexylmethyl phosphinic acid), the IC50 values were significantly increased with 300 microM of 5'-guanyl-imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p), which suggested that guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) modulate GHB binding on GABAB receptors. The inhibition by GHB of [3H]CGP 27492 binding in cortical membranes was not altered in the presence of 0.3 or 3 mM of the two GHB dehydrogenase inhibitors, valproate and ethosuximide. Thus, GHB is not reconverted into GABA by GHB dehydrogenase. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrated that GHB is an endogenous weak but selective agonist at GABAB receptors. PMID:9083788

  5. Chronic caffeine or theophylline exposure reduces gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor site interactions.

    PubMed

    Roca, D J; Schiller, G D; Farb, D H

    1988-05-01

    Methylxanthines, such as caffeine and theophylline, are adenosine receptor antagonists that exert dramatic effects upon the behavior of vertebrate animals by increasing attentiveness, anxiety, and convulsive activity. Benzodiazepines, such as flunitrazepam, generally exert behavioral effects that are opposite to those of methylxanthines. We report the finding that chronic exposure of embryonic brain neurons to caffeine or theophylline reduces the ability of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to potentiate the binding of [3H]flunitrazepam to the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor. This theophylline-induced "uncoupling" of GABA- and benzodiazepine-binding site allosteric interactions is blocked by chloroadenosine, an adenosine receptor agonist, indicating that the chronic effects of theophylline are mediated by a site that resembles an adenosine receptor. We speculate that adverse central nervous system effects of long-term exposure to methylxanthines such as in caffeine-containing beverages or theophylline-containing medications may be exerted by a cell-mediated modification of the GABAA receptor. PMID:2835648

  6. Felbamate is a subunit selective modulator of recombinant gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Simeone, Timothy A; Otto, James F; Wilcox, Karen S; White, H Steve

    2006-12-15

    Felbamate (2-phenyl-1,3-propanediol dicarbamate) is clinically available for the treatment of refractory epileptic seizures, and is known to modulate several ion channels including gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors. To determine felbamate subunit selectivity for GABA(A) receptors we expressed 15 different GABA(A) receptor combinations in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Felbamate positively modulated GABA-currents of alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S), alpha(1)beta(3)gamma(2S), alpha(2)beta(2)gamma(2S) and alpha(2)beta(3)gamma(2S), whereas felbamate was either ineffective or negatively modulated the other 11 receptor combinations. Regional distributions of GABA(A) receptor subunits suggest that felbamate may differentially modulate distinct inhibitory circuits, a possibility that may have relevance to felbamate efficacy in refractory epilepsies. PMID:17056029

  7. Targeted disruption of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) and RAR gamma results in receptor-specific alterations in retinoic acid-mediated differentiation and retinoic acid metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, J F; Lufkin, T; Achkar, C C; Taneja, R; Chambon, P; Gudas, L J

    1995-01-01

    F9 embryonic teratocarcinoma stem cells differentiate into an epithelial cell type called extraembryonic endoderm when treated with retinoic acid (RA), a derivative of retinol (vitamin A). This differentiation is presumably mediated through the actions of retinoid receptors, the RARs and RXRs. To delineate the functions of each of the different retinoid receptors in this model system, we have generated F9 cell lines in which both copies of either the RAR alpha gene or the RAR gamma gene are disrupted by homologous recombination. The absence of RAR alpha is associated with a reduction in the RA-induced expression of both the CRABP-II and Hoxb-1 (formerly 2.9) genes. The absence of RAR gamma is associated with a loss of the RA-inducible expression of the Hoxa-1 (formerly Hox-1.6), Hoxa-3 (formerly Hox-1.5), laminin B1, collagen IV (alpha 1), GATA-4, and BMP-2 genes. Furthermore, the loss of RAR gamma is associated with a reduction in the metabolism of all-trans-RA to more polar derivatives, while the loss of RAR alpha is associated with an increase in metabolism of RA relative to wild-type F9 cells. Thus, each of these RARs exhibits some specificity with respect to the regulation of differentiation-specific gene expression. These results provide an explanation for the expression of multiple RAR types within one cell type and suggest that each RAR has specific functions. PMID:7823950

  8. Molecular size of the gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor purified from mammalian cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Mamalaki, C; Barnard, E A; Stephenson, F A

    1989-01-01

    The hydrodynamic behaviour of both the soluble and purified gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor of bovine or rat cerebral cortex has been investigated in solution in Triton X-100 or in 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulphonate (CHAPS). In all the hydrodynamic separations made, it was found that the binding activities for GABA, benzodiazepine, and (where detectable) t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate comigrated. Conditions were established for gel exclusion chromatography and for sucrose density gradient velocity sedimentation that maintain the GABAA receptor in a nonaggregated form. Using these conditions, the molecular weight of the bovine GABAA receptor in the above-mentioned detergents was calculated using the H2O/2H2O method. A value of Mr 230,000-240,000 was calculated for the bovine pure GABAA receptor purified in sodium deoxycholate/Triton X-100 media. A value of Mr 284,000-290,000 was calculated for the nonaggregated bovine or rat cortex receptor in CHAPS, but the Stokes radius is smaller in the latter than in the former medium and the detergent binding in CHAPS is underestimated. Thus the deduced Mr, 240,000, is the best estimate by this method. PMID:2535707

  9. Experimental absence seizures: potential role of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid and GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, R; Lauber, J; Marescaux, C; Vergnes, M; Martin, P; Rubio, V; Leonhardt, T; Reymann, N; Bittiger, H

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated whether the pathogenesis of spontaneous generalized non-convulsive seizures in rats with genetic absence epilepsy is due to an increase in the brain levels of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) or in the rate of its synthesis. Concentrations of GHB or of its precursor gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) were measured with a new GC/MS technique which allows the simultaneous assessment of GHB and GBL. The rate of GHB synthesis was estimated from the increase in GHB levels after inhibition of its catabolism with valproate. The results of this study do not indicate significant differences in GHB or GBL levels, or in their rates of synthesis in rats showing spike-and-wave discharges (SWD) as compared to rats without SWD. Binding data indicate that GHB, but not GBL, has a selective, although weak affinity for GABAB receptors (IC50 = 150 microM). Similar IC50 values were observed in membranes prepared from rats showing SWD and from control rats. The average GHB brain levels of 2.12 +/- 0.23 nmol/g measured in the cortex and of 4.28 +/- 0.90 nmol/g in the thalamus are much lower than the concentrations necessary to occupy a major part of the GABAB receptors. It is unlikely that local accumulations of GHB reach concentrations 30-70-fold higher than the average brain levels. After injection of 3.5 mmol/kg GBL, a dose sufficient to induce SWD, brain concentrations reach 240 +/- 31 nmol/g (Snead, 1991) and GHB could thus stimulate the GABAB receptor. Like the selective and potent GABAB receptor agonist R(-)-baclofen, GHB causes a dose-related decrease in cerebellar cGMP. This decrease and the increase in SWD caused by R(-)-baclofen were completely blocked by the selective and potent GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348, whereas only the increase in the duration of SWD induced by GHB was totally antagonized by CGP 35348. The decrease in cerebellar cGMP levels elicited by GHB was only partially antagonized by CGP 35348. These findings suggest that all effects of R

  10. GABAB receptor-mediated activation of astrocytes by gamma-hydroxybutyric acid

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Timothy; Chen, Lixin; Emri, Zsuzsa; Pirttimaki, Tiina; Errington, Adam C.; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Parri, H. Rheinallt

    2014-01-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolite gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) shows a variety of behavioural effects when administered to animals and humans, including reward/addiction properties and absence seizures. At the cellular level, these actions of GHB are mediated by activation of neuronal GABAB receptors (GABABRs) where it acts as a weak agonist. Because astrocytes respond to endogenous and exogenously applied GABA by activation of both GABAA and GABABRs, here we investigated the action of GHB on astrocytes on the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the ventrobasal (VB) thalamic nucleus, two brain areas involved in the reward and proepileptic action of GHB, respectively, and compared it with that of the potent GABABR agonist baclofen. We found that GHB and baclofen elicited dose-dependent (ED50: 1.6 mM and 1.3 µM, respectively) transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ in VTA and VB astrocytes of young mice and rats, which were accounted for by activation of their GABABRs and mediated by Ca2+ release from intracellular store release. In contrast, prolonged GHB and baclofen exposure caused a reduction in spontaneous astrocyte activity and glutamate release from VTA astrocytes. These findings have key (patho)physiological implications for our understanding of the addictive and proepileptic actions of GHB. PMID:25225100

  11. Potentiation of Gamma Aminobutyric Acid Receptors (GABAAR) by Ethanol: How Are Inhibitory Receptors Affected?

    PubMed Central

    Förstera, Benjamin; Castro, Patricio A.; Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Aguayo, Luis G.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the understanding of ethanol actions on the type A γ-aminobutyric acid chloride channel (GABAAR), a member of the pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs). However, the mechanism by which ethanol potentiates the complex is still not fully understood and a number of publications have shown contradictory results. Thus many questions still remain unresolved requiring further studies for a better comprehension of this effect. The present review concentrates on the involvement of GABAAR in the acute actions of ethanol and specifically focuses on the immediate, direct or indirect, synaptic and extra-synaptic modulatory effects. To elaborate on the immediate, direct modulation of GABAAR by acute ethanol exposure, electrophysiological studies investigating the importance of different subunits, and data from receptor mutants will be examined. We will also discuss the nature of the putative binding sites for ethanol based on structural data obtained from other members of the pLGICs family. Finally, we will briefly highlight the glycine gated chloride channel (GlyR), another member of the pLGIC family, as a suitable target for the development of new pharmacological tools. PMID:27199667

  12. Gamma-Aminobutyric acid and benzodiazepine receptors in the kindling model of epilepsy: a quantitative radiohistochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, C.; Pedersen, H.B.; McNamara, J.O.

    1985-10-01

    Quantitative radiohistochemistry was utilized to study alterations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and benzodiazepine receptors in the kindling model of epilepsy. The radioligands used for GABA and benzodiazepine receptors were (TH) muscimol and (TH)flunitrazepam, respectively. GABA receptor binding was increased by 22% in fascia dentata of the hippocampal formation but not in neocortex or substantia nigra of kindled rats. Within fascia dentata, GABA receptor binding was increased to an equivalent extent in stratum granulosum and throughout stratum moleculare; no increase was found in dentate hilus or stratum lacunosummoleculare or stratum radiatum of CA1. The increased binding was present at 24 hr but not at 28 days after the last kindled seizure. The direction, anatomic distribution, and time course of the increased GABA receptor binding were paralleled by increased benzodiazepine receptor binding. The anatomic distribution of the increased GABA receptor binding is consistent with a localization to somata and dendritic trees of dentate granule cells. The authors suggest that increased GABA and benzodiazepine receptor binding may contribute to enhanced inhibition of dentate granule cells demonstrated electrophysiologically in kindled animals.

  13. An arylaminopyridazine derivative of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a selective and competitive antagonist at the GABAA receptor site.

    PubMed Central

    Chambon, J P; Feltz, P; Heaulme, M; Restle, S; Schlichter, R; Biziere, K; Wermuth, C G

    1985-01-01

    In view of finding a new gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor ligand we synthesized an arylaminopyridazine derivative of GABA, SR 95103 [2-(carboxy-3'-propyl)-3-amino-4-methyl-6-phenylpyridazinium chloride]. SR 95103 displaced [3H]GABA from rat brain membranes with an apparent Ki of 2.2 microM and a Hill number near 1.0. SR 95103 (1-100 microM) antagonized the GABA-mediated enhancement of [3H]diazepam binding in a concentration-dependent manner without affecting [3H]diazepam binding per se. SR 95103 competitively antagonized GABA-induced membrane depolarization in rat spinal ganglia. In all these experiments, the potency of SR 95103 was close to that of bicuculline. SR 95103 (100 microM) did not interact with a variety of central receptors--in particular the GABAB, the strychnine, and the glutamate receptors--did not inhibit Na+-dependent synaptosomal GABA uptake, and did not affect GABA-transaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase activities. Intraperitoneally administered SR 95103 elicited clonicotonic seizures in mice (ED50 = 180 mg/kg). On the basis of these results it is postulated that St 95103 is a competitive antagonist of GABA at the GABAA receptor site. In addition to being an interesting lead structure for the search of GABA ligands, SR 95103 could also be a useful tool to investigate GABA receptor subtypes because it is freely soluble in water and chemically stable. Images PMID:2984669

  14. Role of a gamma-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor mutation in the evolution and spread of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera resistance to cyclodiene insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An alanine to serine amino acid substitution within the Rdl subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor confers resistance to cyclodiene insecticides in many species. The corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is a damaging pest of cultivated corn that was partially controlled by ...

  15. 4-Hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid, a potent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} agonist alleviates the symptoms of DSS-induced colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Keiko; Ninomiya, Yuichi; Iseki, Mioko; Nakachi, Yutaka; Kanesaki-Yatsuka, Yukiko; Yamanoue, Yu; Itoh, Toshimasa; Nishii, Yasuho; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2008-03-14

    (5E,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)-4-Hydroxy-5,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexaenoic acid (4-OHDHA) is a potential agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and antidiabetic agent as has been previously reported. As PPAR{gamma} agonists may also have anti-inflammatory functions, in this study, we investigated whether 4-OHDHA has an inhibitory effect on expression of inflammatory genes in vitro and whether 4-OHDHA could relieve the symptoms of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis in a murine model of inflammatory bowel disease. 4-OHDHA inhibited production of nitric oxide and expression of a subset of inflammatory genes including inducible nitric oxide synthase (Nos2/iNOS) and interleukin 6 (Il6) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. In addition, 4-OHDHA-treated mice when compared to control mice not receiving treatment recovered better from the weight loss caused by DSS-induced colitis. Changes in disease activity index (DAI) of 4-OHDHA-treated mice were also more favorable than for control mice and were comparable with mice treated with a typical anti-inflammatory-drug, 5-aminosalichylic acid (5-ASA). These results suggest that 4-OHDHA has potentially clinically useful anti-inflammatory effects mediated by suppression of inflammatory gene expression.

  16. Affective and cognitive effects of global deletion of alpha3-containing gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptors.

    PubMed

    Fiorelli, Roberto; Rudolph, Uwe; Straub, Carolin J; Feldon, Joram; Yee, Benjamin K

    2008-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors characterized by the presence of the alpha3 subunit are the major GABAA receptor subtype expressed in brain stem monoaminergic nuclei. These alpha3-GABAA receptors are therefore in a unique position to regulate monoaminergic functions. To characterize the functional properties of alpha3-GABAA receptors, we present a preliminary assessment of the expression of affective and cognitive behaviour in male mice with a targeted deletion of the Gabra3 gene encoding the alpha3 subunit [alpha3 knockout (KO) mice] on a C57BL/6Jx129X1/SvJ F1 hybrid genetic background. The alpha3 KO mice did not exhibit any gross change of anxiety-like behaviour or spontaneous locomotor behaviour. In the Porsolt forced swim test for potential antidepressant activity, alpha3 KO mice exhibited reduced floating and enhanced swimming behaviour relative to wild-type controls. Performance on a two-choice sucrose preference test, however, revealed no evidence for an increase in sucrose preference in the alpha3 KO mice that would have substantiated a potential phenotype for depression-related behaviour. In contrast, a suggestion of an enhanced negative contrast effect was revealed in a one-bottle sucrose consumption test across different sucrose concentrations. These affective phenotypes were accompanied by alterations in the balance between conditioned responding to the discrete conditioned stimulus and to the context, and a suggestion of faster extinction, in the Pavlovian conditioned freezing paradigm. Spatial learning in the water maze reference memory test, however, was largely unchanged in the alpha3 KO mice, except for a trend of preservation during reversal learning. The novel phenotypes following global deletion of the GABAA receptor alpha3 subunit identified here provided relevant insights, in addition to our earlier study, into the potential behavioural relevance of this specific receptor subtypes in the modulation of both affective and cognitive

  17. Isohumulones, bitter acids derived from hops, activate both peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and gamma and reduce insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Hiroaki; Ikeshima, Emiko; Shiraki, Maho; Kanaya, Tomoka; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Odai, Hideharu; Tsuboyama-Kasaoka, Nobuyo; Ezaki, Osamu; Oikawa, Shinichi; Kondo, Keiji

    2004-08-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are dietary lipid sensors that regulate fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism. The hypolipidemic effects of fibrate drugs and the therapeutic benefits of the thiazolidinedione drugs are due to their activation of PPARalpha and -gamma, respectively. In this study, isohumulones, the bitter compounds derived from hops that are present in beer, were found to activate PPARalpha and -gamma in transient co-transfection studies. Among the three major isohumulone homologs, isohumulone and isocohumulone were found to activate PPARalpha and -gamma. Diabetic KK-Ay mice that were treated with isohumulones (isohumulone and isocohumulone) showed reduced plasma glucose, triglyceride, and free fatty acid levels (65.3, 62.6, and 73.1%, respectively, for isohumulone); similar reductions were found following treatment with the thiazolidinedione drug, pioglitazone. Isohumulone treatment did not result in significant body weight gain, although pioglitazone treatment did increase body weight (10.6% increase versus control group). C57BL/6N mice fed a high fat diet that were treated with isohumulones showed improved glucose tolerance and reduced insulin resistance. Furthermore, these animals showed increased liver fatty acid oxidation and a decrease in size and an increase in apoptosis of their hypertrophic adipocytes. A double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study for studying the effect of isohumulones on diabetes suggested that isohumulones significantly decreased blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels after 8 weeks (by 10.1 and 6.4%, respectively, versus week 0). These results suggest that isohumulones can improve insulin sensitivity in high fat diet-fed mice with insulin resistance and in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:15178687

  18. Binding of [3H]-muscimol, a potent gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor agonist, to membranes of the bovine retina.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, N. N.

    1980-01-01

    1 The binding of [3H]-muscimol, a potent gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor agonist, to crude membrane preparations of bovine retina was studied, using a filtration method to isolate membrane-bound ligand. 2 Specific binding was found to be saturable and occurred at two binding sites with affinity constants of 4.3 nM and 38.2 nM. 3 Binding was sodium-independent, enhanced by both freezing and Triton X-100 treatment but abolished with sodium laurylsulphate. 4 The binding sites demonstrated a high degree of pharmacological specificity, GABA being a potent displacer of [3H]-muscimol. 5 A higher degree of [3H]-muscimol binding was associated with subcellular fractions enriched with photoreceptor synaptosomes rather than with fractions enriched with conventional synaptosomes. PMID:7470740

  19. First molecular genotyping of A302S mutation in the gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor in Aedes albopictus from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Low, V L; Vinnie-Siow, W Y; Lim Y, A L; Tan, T K; Leong, C S; Chen, C D; Azidah, A A; Sofian-Azirun, M

    2015-09-01

    Given the lack of molecular evidence in altered target-site insecticide resistance mechanism in Aedes albopictus (Skuse) worldwide, the present study aims to detect the presence of A302S mutation in the gene encoding the gamma aminobutyric acid receptor resistant to dieldrin (Rdl) in Ae. albopictus for the first time from its native range of South East Asia, namely Malaysia. World Health Organization (WHO) adult susceptibility bioassay indicated a relatively low level of dieldrin resistance (two-fold) in Ae. albopictus from Petaling Jaya, Selangor. However, PCR-RFLP and direct sequencing methods revealed the presence of the A302S mutation with the predomination of heterozygous genotype (40 out of 82 individuals), followed by the resistant genotype with 11 individuals. This study represents the first field evolved instance of A302S mutation in Malaysian insect species. PMID:26695218

  20. Importance of the gamma-aminobutyric acid(B) receptor C-termini for G-protein coupling.

    PubMed

    Grünewald, Sylvia; Schupp, Bettina J; Ikeda, Stephen R; Kuner, Rohini; Steigerwald, Frank; Kornau, Hans-Christian; Köhr, Georg

    2002-05-01

    Functional gamma-aminobutyric acid(B) (GABA(B)) receptors assemble from two subunits, GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2).) This heteromerization, which involves a C-terminal coiled-coil interaction, ensures efficient surface trafficking and agonist-dependent G-protein activation. In the present study, we took a closer look at the implications of the intracellular C termini of GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2)) for G-protein coupling. We generated a series of C-terminal mutants of GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2)) and tested them for physical interaction, surface trafficking, coupling to adenylyl cyclase, and G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells as well as on endogenous calcium channels in sympathetic neurons of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG). We found that the C-terminal interaction contributes only partly to the heterodimeric assembly of the subunits, indicating the presence of an additional interaction site. The described endoplasmic reticulum retention signal within the C terminus of GABA(B(1)) functioned only in the context of specific amino acids, which constitute part of the GABA(B(1)) coiled-coil sequence. This finding may provide a link between the retention signal and its shielding by the coiled coil of GABA(B(2).) In HEK293 cells, we observed that the two well-known GABA(B) receptor antagonists [S-(R*,R*)]-[3-[[1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]amino]-2-hydroxypropyl](cyclohexylmethyl) phosphinic acid (CGP54626) and (+)-(2S)-5,5-dimethyl-2-morpholineacetic acid (SCH50911) CGP54626 and SCH50911 function as inverse agonists. The C termini of GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2)) strongly influenced agonist-independent G-protein coupling, although they were not necessary for agonist-dependent G-protein coupling. The C-terminal GABA(B) receptor mutants described here demonstrate that the active receptor conformation is stabilized by the coiled-coil interaction. Thus, the C-terminal conformation of the GABA(B) receptor may determine its

  1. Dual orexin receptor antagonists show distinct effects on locomotor performance, ethanol interaction and sleep architecture relative to gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor modulators

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Andres D.; Gotter, Anthony L.; Fox, Steven V.; Tannenbaum, Pamela L.; Yao, Lihang; Tye, Spencer J.; McDonald, Terrence; Brunner, Joseph; Garson, Susan L.; Reiss, Duane R.; Kuduk, Scott D.; Coleman, Paul J.; Uslaner, Jason M.; Hodgson, Robert; Browne, Susan E.; Renger, John J.; Winrow, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs) are a potential treatment for insomnia that function by blocking both the orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors. The objective of the current study was to further confirm the impact of therapeutic mechanisms targeting insomnia on locomotor coordination and ethanol interaction using DORAs and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-A receptor modulators of distinct chemical structure and pharmacological properties in the context of sleep-promoting potential. The current study compared rat motor co-ordination after administration of DORAs, DORA-12 and almorexant, and GABA-A receptor modulators, zolpidem, eszopiclone, and diazepam, alone or each in combination with ethanol. Motor performance was assessed by measuring time spent walking on a rotarod apparatus. Zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam [0.3–30 mg/kg administered orally (PO)] impaired rotarod performance in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, all three GABA-A receptor modulators potentiated ethanol- (0.25–1.5 g/kg) induced impairment on the rotarod. By contrast, neither DORA-12 (10–100 mg/kg, PO) nor almorexant (30–300 mg/kg, PO) impaired motor performance alone or in combination with ethanol. In addition, distinct differences in sleep architecture were observed between ethanol, GABA-A receptor modulators (zolpidem, eszopiclone, and diazepam) and DORA-12 in electroencephalogram studies in rats. These findings provide further evidence that orexin receptor antagonists have an improved motor side-effect profile compared with currently available sleep-promoting agents based on preclinical data and strengthen the rationale for further evaluation of these agents in clinical development. PMID:24399926

  2. Molecular recognition of nitrated fatty acids by PPAR[gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Jifeng; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Martynowski, Dariusz; Garcia-Barrio, Minerva T.; Kovach, Amanda; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Baker, Paul R.S.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Chen, Y. Eugene; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) regulates metabolic homeostasis and adipocyte differentiation, and it is activated by oxidized and nitrated fatty acids. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPAR{gamma} ligand binding domain bound to nitrated linoleic acid, a potent endogenous ligand of PPAR{gamma}. Structural and functional studies of receptor-ligand interactions reveal the molecular basis of PPAR{gamma} discrimination of various naturally occurring fatty acid derivatives.

  3. PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES AND THE GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID (ALPHA) RECEPTOR COMPLEX: MOTOR ACTIVITY AND THE ACOUSTIC STARTLE RESPONSE IN THE RAT (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two behavioral tests, locomotor activity and the acoustic startle response (ASR), were utilized to test for dose-addition of cismethrin, a Type I, or deltamethrin, a Type II pyrethroid, with compounds active to the gamma-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor complex (picrotoxin, musc...

  4. Retinoic acid receptor gamma-induced misregulation of chondrogenesis in the murine limb bud in vitro.

    PubMed

    Galdones, Eugene; Hales, Barbara F

    2008-11-01

    Vitamin A derivatives modulate gene expression through retinoic acid and rexinoid receptor (RAR/RXR) heterodimers and are indispensable for limb development. Of particular interest, RARgamma is highly expressed in cartilage, a target affected following retinoid-induced limb insult. The goal of this study was to examine how selective activation of RARgamma affects limb development. Forelimbs from E12.5 CD-1 mice were cultured for 6 days in the presence of all-trans RA (pan-RAR agonist; 0.1 or 1.0 microM) or BMS-189961 (BMS961, RARgamma-selective agonist; 0.01 or 0.1 microM) and limb morphology assessed. Untreated limbs developed normal cartilage elements whereas pan-RAR or RARgamma agonist-treated limbs exhibited reductive effects on chondrogenesis. Retinoid activity was assessed using RAREbeta2 (retinoic acid response element beta2)-lacZ reporter limbs; after 3 h of treatment, both drugs increased retinoid activity proximally. To elucidate the expression profiles of a subset of genes important for development, limbs were cultured for 3 h and cRNA hybridized to osteogenesis-focused microarrays. Two genes, matrix GLA protein (Mgp; chondrogenesis inhibitor) and growth differentiation factor-10 (Gdf10/Bmp3b) were induced by RA and BMS-189961. Real-time PCR was done to validate our results and whole mount in situ hybridizations against Mgp and Gdf10 localized their upregulation to areas of cartilage and programmed cell death, respectively. Thus, our results illustrate the importance of RARgamma in mediating the retinoid-induced upregulation of Mgp and Gdf10; determining their roles in chondrogenesis and cell death will help further unravel mechanisms underlying retinoid teratogenicity. PMID:18703560

  5. Association of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid A Receptor α2 Gene (GABRA2) with Alcohol Use Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dawei; Sulovari, Arvis; Cheng, Chao; Zhao, Hongyu; Kranzler, Henry R; Gelernter, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in mammalian brain. GABA receptor are involved in a number of complex disorders, including substance abuse. No variants of the commonly studied GABA receptor genes that have been associated with substance dependence have been determined to be functional or pathogenic. To reconcile the conflicting associations with substance dependence traits, we performed a meta-analysis of variants in the GABAA receptor genes (GABRB2, GABRA6, GABRA1, and GABRG2 on chromosome 5q and GABRA2 on chromosome 4p12) using genotype data from 4739 cases of alcohol, opioid, or methamphetamine dependence and 4924 controls. Then, we combined the data from candidate gene association studies in the literature with two alcohol dependence (AD) samples, including 1691 cases and 1712 controls from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE), and 2644 cases and 494 controls from our own study. Using a Bonferroni-corrected threshold of 0.007, we found strong associations between GABRA2 and AD (P=9 × 10−6 and odds ratio (OR) 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.27 (1.15, 1.4) for rs567926, P=4 × 10−5 and OR=1.21 (1.1, 1.32) for rs279858), and between GABRG2 and both dependence on alcohol and dependence on heroin (P=0.0005 and OR=1.22 (1.09, 1.37) for rs211014). Significant association was also observed between GABRA6 rs3219151 and AD. The GABRA2 rs279858 association was observed in the SAGE data sets with a combined P of 9 × 10−6 (OR=1.17 (1.09, 1.26)). When all of these data sets, including our samples, were meta-analyzed, associations of both GABRA2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms remained (for rs567926, P=7 × 10−5 (OR=1.18 (1.09, 1.29)) in all the studies, and P=8 × 10−6 (OR=1.25 (1.13, 1.38)) in subjects of European ancestry and for rs279858, P=5 × 10−6 (OR=1.18 (1.1, 1.26)) in subjects of European ancestry. Findings from this extensive meta-analysis of five GABAA receptor genes and substance abuse support

  6. Association of gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor α2 gene (GABRA2) with alcohol use disorder.

    PubMed

    Li, Dawei; Sulovari, Arvis; Cheng, Chao; Zhao, Hongyu; Kranzler, Henry R; Gelernter, Joel

    2014-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in mammalian brain. GABA receptor are involved in a number of complex disorders, including substance abuse. No variants of the commonly studied GABA receptor genes that have been associated with substance dependence have been determined to be functional or pathogenic. To reconcile the conflicting associations with substance dependence traits, we performed a meta-analysis of variants in the GABAA receptor genes (GABRB2, GABRA6, GABRA1, and GABRG2 on chromosome 5q and GABRA2 on chromosome 4p12) using genotype data from 4739 cases of alcohol, opioid, or methamphetamine dependence and 4924 controls. Then, we combined the data from candidate gene association studies in the literature with two alcohol dependence (AD) samples, including 1691 cases and 1712 controls from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE), and 2644 cases and 494 controls from our own study. Using a Bonferroni-corrected threshold of 0.007, we found strong associations between GABRA2 and AD (P=9 × 10(-6) and odds ratio (OR) 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.27 (1.15, 1.4) for rs567926, P=4 × 10(-5) and OR=1.21 (1.1, 1.32) for rs279858), and between GABRG2 and both dependence on alcohol and dependence on heroin (P=0.0005 and OR=1.22 (1.09, 1.37) for rs211014). Significant association was also observed between GABRA6 rs3219151 and AD. The GABRA2 rs279858 association was observed in the SAGE data sets with a combined P of 9 × 10(-6) (OR=1.17 (1.09, 1.26)). When all of these data sets, including our samples, were meta-analyzed, associations of both GABRA2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms remained (for rs567926, P=7 × 10(-5) (OR=1.18 (1.09, 1.29)) in all the studies, and P=8 × 10(-6) (OR=1.25 (1.13, 1.38)) in subjects of European ancestry and for rs279858, P=5 × 10(-6) (OR=1.18 (1.1, 1.26)) in subjects of European ancestry. Findings from this extensive meta-analysis of five GABAA receptor genes and substance abuse support

  7. Point mutations of the alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) receptor affecting modulation of the channel by ligands of the benzodiazepine binding site.

    PubMed

    Buhr, A; Baur, R; Malherbe, P; Sigel, E

    1996-06-01

    Clinically relevant benzodiazepines allosterically stimulate neurotransmitter-evoked chloride currents at the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A(GABAA) receptor. Rat wild-type or mutated alpha 1, beta 2, and gamma 2S subunits were coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes and investigated with electrophysiological techniques. Point mutations in two subunits were identified that affect the response of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced currents by benzodiazepines. Mutation of one of three amino acid residues to alanine (alpha Tyr161 and alpha Thr206) or leucine (gamma Phe77) resulted in a approximately 3-fold increase in potentiation by diazepam. The response to zolpidem was increased in two mutant channels containing the mutated alpha subunit but was nearly absent in channels containing the mutated gamma subunit. In the former cases, methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM) acted as a negative allosteric modulator of the channel, much stronger than in the wild-type channel, whereas there was no significant difference to the wild-type channel in the latter case. Thus, the mutant gamma subunit has different functional consequences for the various types of ligand of the benzodiazepine binding site. All three amino acid residues, alpha Tyr161, alpha Thr206, and gamma Phe77, are close or identical to homologous residues that are implicated in GABA binding. If the residues binding the channel agonist GABA are located at subunit interfaces, the residues influencing the benzodiazepine effects must also be located at subunit interfaces. PMID:8649346

  8. Possible association between the gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptor 1 (GABBR1) gene and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Zai, Gwyneth; King, Nicole; Wong, Gregory W H; Barr, Cathy L; Kennedy, James L

    2005-05-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder with a genetic component. The major inhibitory GABA-(gamma-aminobutyric acid) ergic system may be involved. The GABA type B receptor 1 (GABBR1) gene has been localized to 6p21.3, a region linked to SCZ. We therefore investigated five polymorphisms (A-7265G, C10497G, Ser-491-Ser-T1473C, Phe-659-Phe-T1977C, and 3'-UTR A33795G substitutions) in the GABBR1 gene in a sample of 101 DSM-IV SCZ probands and their families, 150 unrelated affected individuals matched with 150 healthy controls, using the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) and case-control analysis. We did not observe biased transmission of alleles in any of the polymorphisms individually and haplotypes within the gene to SCZ probands. However, a weak significant difference was observed in the A-7265G polymorphism between the allelic frequency (chi2 = 4.310, P = 0.038) and a trend was observed between the genotype frequency (chi2 = 4.970, 2 df, P = 0.083) of SCZ individuals and controls. Further investigations of the role of GABBR1 in SCZ are warranted. PMID:15820424

  9. Phenotypic consequences of deletion of the {gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, or {beta}{sub 3} subunit of the type A {gamma}-aminobutyric acid receptor in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Culia, C.T.; Stubbs, L.J.; Montgomery, C.S.; Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M.

    1994-03-29

    Three genes (Gabrg3, Gabra5, and Gabrb3) encoding the {gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, and {beta}{sub 3} subunits of the type A {gamma}-aminobutyric acid receptor, respectively, are known to map near the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in mouse chromosome 7. This region shares homology with a segment of human chromosome 15 that is implicated in Angelman syndrome, an inherited neurobehavioral disorder. By mapping Gabrg3-Gabra5-Gabrb3-telomere. Like Gabrb3, neither the Gabra5 nor Gabrg3 gene is functionally imprinted in adult mouse brain. Mice deleted for all three subunits die at birth with a cleft palate, although there are rare survivors ({approximately} 5%) that do not have a cleft palate but do exhibit a neurological abnormality characterized by tremor, jerky gait, and runtiness. The authors have previously suggested that deficiency of the {beta}{sub 3} subunit may be responsible for the clefting defect. Most notably, however, in this report they describe mice carrying two overlapping, complementing p deletions that fail to express the {gamma}{sub 3} transcript, as well as mice from another line that express neither the {gamma}{sub 3} nor {alpha}{sub 5} transcripts. Surprisingly, mice from both of these lines are phenotypically normal and do not exhibit any of the neurological symptoms characteristic of the rare survivors that are deleted for all three ({gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, and {beta}{sub 3}) subunits. These mice therefore provide a whole-organism type A {gamma}-aminobutyric-acid receptor background that is devoid of any receptor subtypes that normally contain the {gamma}{sub 3} and/or {alpha}{sub 5} subunits. The absence of an overt neurological phenotype in mice lacking the {gamma}{sub 3} and/or {alpha}{sub 5} subunits also suggests that mutations in these genes are unlikely to provide useful animal models for Angelman syndrome in humans.

  10. Alpha-thujone (the active component of absinthe): gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor modulation and metabolic detoxification.

    PubMed

    Höld, K M; Sirisoma, N S; Ikeda, T; Narahashi, T; Casida, J E

    2000-04-11

    Alpha-thujone is the toxic agent in absinthe, a liqueur popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries that has adverse health effects. It is also the active ingredient of wormwood oil and some other herbal medicines and is reported to have antinociceptive, insecticidal, and anthelmintic activity. This study elucidates the mechanism of alpha-thujone neurotoxicity and identifies its major metabolites and their role in the poisoning process. Four observations establish that alpha-thujone is a modulator of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor. First, the poisoning signs (and their alleviation by diazepam and phenobarbital) in mice are similar to those of the classical antagonist picrotoxinin. Second, a strain of Drosophila specifically resistant to chloride channel blockers is also tolerant to alpha-thujone. Third, alpha-thujone is a competitive inhibitor of [(3)H]ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate binding to mouse brain membranes. Most definitively, GABA-induced peak currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons are suppressed by alpha-thujone with complete reversal after washout. alpha-Thujone is quickly metabolized in vitro by mouse liver microsomes with NADPH (cytochrome P450) forming 7-hydroxy-alpha-thujone as the major product plus five minor ones (4-hydroxy-alpha-thujone, 4-hydroxy-beta-thujone, two other hydroxythujones, and 7,8-dehydro-alpha-thujone), several of which also are detected in the brain of mice treated i.p. with alpha-thujone. The major 7-hydroxy metabolite attains much higher brain levels than alpha-thujone but is less toxic to mice and Drosophila and less potent in the binding assay. The other metabolites assayed are also detoxification products. Thus, alpha-thujone in absinthe and herbal medicines is a rapid-acting and readily detoxified modulator of the GABA-gated chloride channel. PMID:10725394

  11. Cloning of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rho 1 cDNA: a GABA receptor subunit highly expressed in the retina.

    PubMed Central

    Cutting, G R; Lu, L; O'Hara, B F; Kasch, L M; Montrose-Rafizadeh, C; Donovan, D M; Shimada, S; Antonarakis, S E; Guggino, W B; Uhl, G R

    1991-01-01

    Type A gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors are a family of ligand-gated chloride channels that are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the nervous system. Molecular cloning has revealed diversity in the subunits that compose this heterooligomeric receptor, but each previously elucidated subunit displays amino acid similarity in conserved structural elements. We have used these highly conserved regions to identify additional members of this family by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One PCR product was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a human retina cDNA library. The mature protein predicted from this cDNA sequence in 458 amino acids long and displays between 30 and 38% amino acid similarity to the previously identified GABAA subunits. This gene is expressed primarily in the retina but transcripts are also detected in the brain, lung, and thymus. Injection of Xenopus oocytes with RNA transcribed in vitro produces a GABA-responsive chloride conductance and expression of the cDNA in COS cells yields GABA-displaceable muscimol binding. These features are consistent with our identification of a GABA subunit, GABA rho 1, with prominent retinal expression that increases the diversity and tissue specificity of this ligand-gated ion-channel receptor family. Images PMID:1849271

  12. Uncoupling of gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptors from GTP-binding proteins by N-ethylmaleimide: effect of N-ethylmaleimide on purified GTP-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, T.; Ogasawara, N.

    1986-03-01

    Treatment of membranes from bovine cerebral cortex with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) resulted in inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABAB receptors. The binding curve for increasing concentrations of agonist was shifted to the right by NEM treatment. Guanine nucleotide had little effect on the binding of GABA to NEM-treated membranes. The addition of purified GTP-binding proteins, which were the substrates of islet-activating protein (IAP), pertussis toxin, to the NEM-treated membranes caused a shift of the binding curve to the left, suggesting modification of GTP-binding proteins rather than receptors by NEM. The effect of NEM on two purified GTP-binding proteins, Gi (composed of three subunits with molecular weight of alpha, 41,000; beta, 35,000; gamma, 10,000) and Go (alpha, 39,000; beta, 35,000; gamma, 10,000) was studied. NEM did not significantly change guanosine 5'-(3-O-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S) binding and GTPase activity of these two proteins. NEM-treated Gi and Go were not ADP-ribosylated by IAP and did not increase GABA binding to NEM-treated membranes. When alpha and beta gamma subunits were treated with NEM and then mixed with nontreated alpha and beta gamma to form Gi or Go, respectively, both oligomers with NEM-treated alpha-subunits lost their abilities to be IAP substrates and to couple to receptors. Results indicate that NEM uncoupled GTP-binding proteins from receptors by modifying alpha-subunits of GTP-binding proteins, and the site seemed to be on or near the site of ADP-ribosylation by IAP. When alpha and beta gamma subunits were treated with NEM and then mixed to form Gi or Go, GTP gamma S binding in the absence of Mg2+ and GTPase activity were changed, although they were not affected when oligomers were treated with NEM. Results suggest the existence of another sulfhydryl group which is protected from NEM by the association of subunits.

  13. Dihydropyrimidinone positive modulation of delta-subunit-containing gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors, including an epilepsy-linked mutant variant.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ryan W; Mabry, John; Polisar, Jason G; Eagen, Kyle P; Ganem, Bruce; Hess, George P

    2010-06-15

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA(A) receptors) are ligand-gated chloride channels that play a central role in signal transmission within the mammalian central nervous system. Compounds that modulate specific GABA(A) receptor subtypes containing the delta-subunit are scarce but would be valuable research tools and starting points for potential therapeutic agents. Here we report a class of dihydropyrimidinone (DHPM) heterocycles that preferentially potentiate peak currents of recombinant GABA(A) receptor subtypes containing the delta-subunit expressed in HEK293T cells. Using the three-component Biginelli reaction, 13 DHPMs with structural features similar to those of the barbiturate phenobarbital were synthesized; one DHPM used (monastrol) is commercially available. An up to approximately 3-fold increase in the current from recombinant alpha1beta2delta receptors was observed with the DHPM compound JM-II-43A or monastrol when co-applied with saturating GABA concentrations, similar to the current potentiation observed with the nonselective potentiating compounds phenobarbital and tracazolate. No agonist activity was observed for the DHPMs at the concentrations tested. A kinetic model was used in conjunction with dose-dependent measurements to calculate apparent dissociation constant values for JM-II-43A (400 muM) and monastrol (200 microM) at saturating GABA concentrations. We examined recombinant receptors composed of combinations of subunits alpha1, alpha4, alpha5, alpha6, beta2, beta3, gamma2L, and delta with JM-II-43A to demonstrate the preference for potentiation of delta-subunit-containing receptors. Lastly, reduced currents from receptors containing the mutated delta(E177A) subunit, described by Dibbens et al. [(2004) Hum. Mol. Genet. 13, 1315-1319] as a heritable susceptibility allele for generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, are also potentiated by these DHPMs. PMID:20450160

  14. Identification of clathrin heavy chain as a direct interaction partner for the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor associated protein.

    PubMed

    Mohrlüder, Jeannine; Hoffmann, Yvonne; Stangler, Thomas; Hänel, Karen; Willbold, Dieter

    2007-12-18

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAA receptors) are the major sites of GABA-mediated fast synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Variation of the cell surface receptor count is postulated to be of importance in modulating inhibitory synaptic transmission. The GABAA receptor associated protein (GABARAP) is a ubiquitin-like modifier, implicated in GABAA receptor clustering, trafficking, and turnover. GABARAP pull-down experiments with brain lysate identified clathrin heavy chain to be GABARAP-associated. Phage display screening of a randomized peptide library for GABARAP ligands yielded a sequence motif which characterizes the peptide binding specificity of GABARAP. Sequence database searches with this motif revealed clathrin heavy chain as a protein containing the identified sequence motif within its residues 510-522, supporting the result of the pull-down experiments. Calreticulin, which was identified recently as a GABARAP ligand, contains a very similar sequence motif. We demonstrate that calreticulin indeed competes with clathrin heavy chain for GABARAP binding. Finally, employing nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we mapped the GABARAP residues responsible for binding to clathrin. The hereby mapped GABARAP regions overlap very well with the homologue residues in yeast Atg8 that were recently shown to be important for autophagy. Together with the knowledge that GABARAP and clathrin are known to be involved in GABAA receptor trafficking within the cell, this strongly suggests a clear physiological relevance of the direct interaction of GABARAP with clathrin heavy chain. PMID:18027972

  15. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing affects trafficking of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Chammiran; Wahlstedt, Helene; Ohlson, Johan; Björk, Petra; Ohman, Marie

    2011-01-21

    Recoding by adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing plays an important role in diversifying proteins involved in neurotransmission. We have previously shown that the Gabra-3 transcript, coding for the α3 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor is edited in mouse, causing an isoleucine to methionine (I/M) change. Here we show that this editing event is evolutionarily conserved from human to chicken. Analyzing recombinant GABA(A) receptor subunits expressed in HEK293 cells, our results suggest that editing at the I/M site in α3 has functional consequences on receptor expression. We demonstrate that I/M editing reduces the cell surface and the total number of α3 subunits. The reduction in cell surface levels is independent of the subunit combination as it is observed for α3 in combination with either the β2 or the β3 subunit. Further, an amino acid substitution at the corresponding I/M site in the α1 subunit has a similar effect on cell surface presentation, indicating the importance of this site for receptor trafficking. We show that the I/M editing during brain development is inversely related to the α3 protein abundance. Our results suggest that editing controls trafficking of α3-containing receptors and may therefore facilitate the switch of subunit compositions during development as well as the subcellular distribution of α subunits in the adult brain. PMID:21030585

  16. Stimulation of proximal tubular cell apoptosis by albumin-bound fatty acids mediated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma.

    PubMed

    Arici, Mustafa; Chana, Ravinder; Lewington, Andrew; Brown, Jez; Brunskill, Nigel John

    2003-01-01

    In nephrotic syndrome, large quantities of albumin enter the kidney tubule. This albumin carries with it a heavy load of fatty acids to which the proximal tubule cells are exposed at high concentration. It is postulated that exposure to fatty acids in this way is injurious to proximal tubule cells. This study has examined the ability of fatty acids to interact with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) in primary cultures of human proximal tubule cells. Luciferase reporter assays in transiently transfected human proximal tubule cells were used to show that albumin bound fatty acids and other agonists activate PPARgamma in a dose-dependent manner. One of the consequences of this activation is apoptosis of the cells as determined by changes in cell morphology, evidence of PARP cleavage, and appearance of DNA laddering. Overexpression of PPARgamma in these cells also results in enhanced apoptosis. Both fatty acid-induced PPAR activation and apoptosis in these cells can be blocked by PPAR response element decoy oligonucleotides. Activation of PPARgamma by the specific agonist PGJ(2) is associated with inhibition of cell proliferation, whereas activation by albumin bound fatty acids is accompanied by increased proliferation. However, the net balance of apoptosis/proliferation favors deletion of cells. These results implicate albumin-bound fatty acids as important mediators of tubular injury in nephrosis and provide fresh impetus for pursuit of lipid-lowering strategies in proteinuric renal disease. PMID:12506134

  17. In Silico Prediction of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Type-A Receptors Using Novel Machine-Learning-Based SVM and GBDT Approaches.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhijun; Huang, Yong; Yue, Xiaodong; Lu, Huijuan; Xuan, Ping; Ju, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors (GABAARs) belong to multisubunit membrane spanning ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) which act as the principal mediators of rapid inhibitory synaptic transmission in the human brain. Therefore, the category prediction of GABAARs just from the protein amino acid sequence would be very helpful for the recognition and research of novel receptors. Based on the proteins' physicochemical properties, amino acids composition and position, a GABAAR classifier was first constructed using a 188-dimensional (188D) algorithm at 90% cd-hit identity and compared with pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and ProtrWeb web-based algorithms for human GABAAR proteins. Then, four classifiers including gradient boosting decision tree (GBDT), random forest (RF), a library for support vector machine (libSVM), and k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) were compared on the dataset at cd-hit 40% low identity. This work obtained the highest correctly classified rate at 96.8% and the highest specificity at 99.29%. But the values of sensitivity, accuracy, and Matthew's correlation coefficient were a little lower than those of PseAAC and ProtrWeb; GBDT and libSVM can make a little better performance than RF and k-NN at the second dataset. In conclusion, a GABAAR classifier was successfully constructed using only the protein sequence information. PMID:27579307

  18. In Silico Prediction of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Type-A Receptors Using Novel Machine-Learning-Based SVM and GBDT Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Ju, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors (GABAARs) belong to multisubunit membrane spanning ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) which act as the principal mediators of rapid inhibitory synaptic transmission in the human brain. Therefore, the category prediction of GABAARs just from the protein amino acid sequence would be very helpful for the recognition and research of novel receptors. Based on the proteins' physicochemical properties, amino acids composition and position, a GABAAR classifier was first constructed using a 188-dimensional (188D) algorithm at 90% cd-hit identity and compared with pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and ProtrWeb web-based algorithms for human GABAAR proteins. Then, four classifiers including gradient boosting decision tree (GBDT), random forest (RF), a library for support vector machine (libSVM), and k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) were compared on the dataset at cd-hit 40% low identity. This work obtained the highest correctly classified rate at 96.8% and the highest specificity at 99.29%. But the values of sensitivity, accuracy, and Matthew's correlation coefficient were a little lower than those of PseAAC and ProtrWeb; GBDT and libSVM can make a little better performance than RF and k-NN at the second dataset. In conclusion, a GABAAR classifier was successfully constructed using only the protein sequence information. PMID:27579307

  19. Expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors on neoplastic growth and prediction of prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult mammalian brain, but exerts physiologic effects other than that on neurotransmitter in non-neuronal peripheral tissues and organs. GABA may affect cancer growth through activation GABA receptors. We investigated the gene expression of GABA receptors in tissue of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) and non-cancerous tissues, and found that the gene expression of GABA receptor phenotypes was correlated with tumorigenesis and clinical prognosis. Methods Sixty-one snap-frozen human samples of NSCLC tissues and paired non-cancerous tissues (5cm away from tumor) were analyzed. Gene expression of GABA receptors was detected by Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Survival times in relation to the expression of GABA receptor phenotypes were analyzed. Human NSCLC cell lines H1299, A549, H520, H460 and human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B were used to determine the phenotypes of GABA inhibitory effects on cancer cell growth. The effects of exogenous administration of GABA on H1299 cell growth were examined. Results The gene expressions were significantly higher in NSCLC tissues than in the paired non-cancerous tissues for GABAA receptor subunit α3 (GABRA3, P = 0.030); for GABAA receptor subunit epsilon (GABRE, P = 0.036); and GABAB receptor subunit 2 (GABBR2, P = 0.005). Kaplan-Meier curves showed that patients with high expression of GABBR2 gene and low expression of GABRA3 gene had a better prognosis (P < 0.05). The administration of GABA resulted in suppressed proliferation of NSCLC cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The use of the GABA receptor antagonist CGP35348 could reverse the inhibitory effect. Conclusions The pattern of GABA receptor gene phenotype expression may be involved in the regulation of tumorigenesis. A high expression of GABBR2 with a low expression of GABRA3 may predict a better outcome. The treatment with GABA

  20. Influence of thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone receptors in the generation of cerebellar gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic interneurons from precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Jimena; Cuadrado, Maria; Morte, Beatriz; Bernal, Juan

    2007-12-01

    Thyroid hormones have important actions in the developing central nervous system. We describe here a novel action of thyroid hormone and its nuclear receptors on maturation of cerebellar gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons from their precursor cells. In rats, the density of GABAergic terminals in the cerebellum was decreased by hypothyroidism, as shown by immunohistochemistry for the GABA transporter GAT-1. This was due, at least partially, to a decreased number of GABAergic cells, because the number of Golgi II cells in the internal granular layer was decreased. GABAergic interneurons in the cerebellum differentiate from precursors expressing the Pax-2 transcription factor, generated in the subventricular zone of the embryonic fourth ventricle from where they migrate to the cerebellum. Hypothyroidism caused both decreased proliferation and delayed differentiation of precursors, with the net effect being an accumulation of immature cells during the neonatal period. The contribution of thyroid hormone receptors was studied by treating hypothyroid rats with T(3) or with the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) beta-selective agonist GC-1. Whereas treatment with T(3) reduced the number of precursors to control levels, GC-1 had only a partial effect, indicating that both TRalpha1 and TRbeta mediate the actions of T(3). Deletion of TRalpha1 in mice decreased cerebellar GAT-1 expression and Pax-2 precursor cell proliferation. It is concluded that thyroid hormone, acting through the nuclear receptors, has a major role in the proliferation and further differentiation of the Pax-2 precursors of cerebellar GABAergic cells. PMID:17761765

  1. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced currents of skate Muller (glial) cells are mediated by neuronal-like GABAA receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Malchow, R P; Qian, H H; Ripps, H

    1989-01-01

    Radial glia (Muller cells) of the vertebrate retina appear to be intimately involved in regulating the actions of amino acid neurotransmitters. One of the amino acids thought to be important in mediating retinal information flow is gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The findings of this study indicate that enzymatically isolated skate Muller cells are depolarized by GABA and the GABAA agonist muscimol and that the actions of these agents are reduced by bicuculline and picrotoxin. Membrane currents induced by GABA under voltage clamp were dose dependent, were associated with an increase in membrane conductance, and showed marked desensitization when the concentration of GABA exceeded 2.5 microM. The responses had a reversal potential close to that calculated for chloride, indicating that the currents were generated by ions passing through channels. These data support the view that skate Muller cells possess functional GABAA receptors. The presence of such receptors on retinal glia may have important implications for the role of Muller cells in maintaining the constancy of the extracellular milieu, for neuron-glia interactions within the retina, and for theories concerning the generation of the electroretinogram. Images PMID:2567001

  2. Relationship between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma Gene and Fatty Acid Composition in Korean Native Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jea-young; Ha, Jae-jung; Park, Yong-soo; Yi, Jun-koo; Lee, Seunguk; Mun, Seyoung; Han, Kyudong; Kim, J.-J.; Kim, Hyun-Ji; Oh, Dong-yep

    2016-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) gene plays an important role in the biosynthesis process controlled by a number of fatty acid transcription factors. This study investigates the relationships between 130 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PPARγ gene and the fatty acid composition of muscle fat in the commercial population of Korean native cattle. We identified 38 SNPs and verified relationships between 3 SNPs (g.1159-71208 A>G, g.42555-29812 G>A, and g.72362 G>T) and the fatty acid composition of commercial Korean native cattle (n = 513). Cattle with the AA genotype of g.1159-71208 A>G and the GG genotype of g.42555-29812 G>A and g.72362 G>T had higher levels of monounsaturated fatty acids and carcass traits (p<0.05). The results revealed that the 3 identified SNPs in the PPARγ gene affected fatty acid composition and carcass traits, suggesting that these 3 SNPs may improve the flavor and quality of beef in commercial Korean native cattle. PMID:26732443

  3. Relationship between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma Gene and Fatty Acid Composition in Korean Native Cattle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jea-Young; Ha, Jae-Jung; Park, Yong-Soo; Yi, Jun-Koo; Lee, Seunguk; Mun, Seyoung; Han, Kyudong; Kim, J-J; Kim, Hyun-Ji; Oh, Dong-Yep

    2016-02-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) gene plays an important role in the biosynthesis process controlled by a number of fatty acid transcription factors. This study investigates the relationships between 130 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PPARγ gene and the fatty acid composition of muscle fat in the commercial population of Korean native cattle. We identified 38 SNPs and verified relationships between 3 SNPs (g.1159-71208 A>G, g.42555-29812 G>A, and g.72362 G>T) and the fatty acid composition of commercial Korean native cattle (n = 513). Cattle with the AA genotype of g.1159-71208 A>G and the GG genotype of g.42555-29812 G>A and g.72362 G>T had higher levels of monounsaturated fatty acids and carcass traits (p<0.05). The results revealed that the 3 identified SNPs in the PPARγ gene affected fatty acid composition and carcass traits, suggesting that these 3 SNPs may improve the flavor and quality of beef in commercial Korean native cattle. PMID:26732443

  4. Endogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor active neurosteroids and the sedative/hypnotic action of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB): a study in GHB-S (sensitive) and GHB-R (resistant) rat lines.

    PubMed

    Barbaccia, Maria Luisa; Carai, Mauro A M; Colombo, Giancarlo; Lobina, Carla; Purdy, Robert H; Gessa, Gian Luigi

    2005-07-01

    In the rat brain, gamma-hydroxybutyric-acid (GHB) increases the concentrations of 3alpha-hydroxy,5alpha-pregnan-20-one (allopregnanolone, 3alpha,5alpha-THP) and 3alpha,21-dihydroxy,5alpha-pregnan-20-one (allotetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone/3alpha,5alphaTHDOC), two neurosteroids acting as positive allosteric modulators of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptors. This study was aimed at assessing whether neurosteroids play a role in GHB-induced loss of righting reflex (LORR). Basal and GHB-stimulated brain concentrations of endogenous 3alpha,5alpha-THP and 3alpha,5alpha-THDOC were analyzed in two rat lines, GHB-sensitive (GHB-S) and GHB-resistant (GHB-R), selectively bred for opposite sensitivity to GHB-induced sedation/hypnosis. Basal neurosteroid concentrations were similar in brain cortex of the two rat lines. However, in male GHB-S rats, administration of GHB (1000 mg/kg, i.p., 30 min) increased brain cortical concentrations of 3alpha,5alpha-THP and 3alpha,5alpha-THDOC 7- and 2.5-fold, respectively, whilst male GHB-R animals displayed only a 4- and 2-fold increase, respectively. In GHB-S rats this increase lasted up to 90 min and declined 180 min following GHB administration, a time course that matches LORR onset and duration. In contrast, in GHB-R rats, which failed to show GHB-induced LORR, brain cortical 3alpha,5alpha-THP and 3alpha,5alpha-THDOC had returned to control values within 90 min. At onset of LORR, a similar increase in brain cortical levels of 3alpha,5alpha-THP and 3alpha,5alpha-THDOC (2-3-fold) was observed in GHB-S female rats and in the few female GHB-R rats that lost the righting reflex after GHB administration, but not in female GHB-R rats failing to show LORR. Sub-hypnotic doses (7.5 and 12.5 mg/kg, i.p.) of pregnanolone, administered 10 min before GHB, dose-dependently facilitated the expression of GHB-induced LORR in GHB-R male rats. These results suggest that the GHB-induced increases of brain 3alpha,5alpha-THP and 3alpha,5alpha

  5. Human α1β3γ2L gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors: High-level production and purification in a functional state

    PubMed Central

    Dostalova, Zuzana; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Liu, Aiping; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Yinghui; Desai, Rooma; Forman, Stuart A; Miller, Keith W

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) are the most important inhibitory chloride ion channels in the central nervous system and are major targets for a wide variety of drugs. The subunit compositions of GABAARs determine their function and pharmacological profile. GABAARs are heteropentamers of subunits, and (α1)2(β3)2(γ2L)1 is a common subtype. Biochemical and biophysical studies of GABAARs require larger quantities of receptors of defined subunit composition than are currently available. We previously reported high-level production of active human α1β3 GABAAR using tetracycline-inducible stable HEK293 cells. Here we extend the strategy to receptors containing three different subunits. We constructed a stable tetracycline-inducible HEK293-TetR cell line expressing human (N)–FLAG–α1β3γ2L–(C)–(GGS)3GK–1D4 GABAAR. These cells achieved expression levels of 70–90 pmol [3H]muscimol binding sites/15-cm plate at a specific activity of 15–30 pmol/mg of membrane protein. Incorporation of the γ2 subunit was confirmed by the ratio of [3H]flunitrazepam to [3H]muscimol binding sites and sensitivity of GABA-induced currents to benzodiazepines and zinc. The α1β3γ2L GABAARs were solubilized in dodecyl-d-maltoside, purified by anti-FLAG affinity chromatography and reconstituted in CHAPS/asolectin at an overall yield of ∼30%. Typical purifications yielded 1.0–1.5 nmoles of [3H]muscimol binding sites/60 plates. Receptors with similar properties could be purified by 1D4 affinity chromatography with lower overall yield. The composition of the purified, reconstituted receptors was confirmed by ligand binding, Western blot, and proteomics. Allosteric interactions between etomidate and [3H]muscimol binding were maintained in the purified state. PMID:24288268

  6. Neuronal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors undergo cognate ligand chaperoning in the endoplasmic reticulum by endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Eshaq, Randa S.; Meshul, Charles K.; Moore, Cynthia; Hood, Rebecca L.; Leidenheimer, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Dysfunction of these receptors is associated with various psychiatric/neurological disorders and drugs targeting this receptor are widely used therapeutic agents. Both the efficacy and plasticity of GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission depends on the number of surface GABAA receptors. An understudied aspect of receptor cell surface expression is the post-translational regulation of receptor biogenesis within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously shown that exogenous GABA can act as a ligand chaperone of recombinant GABAA receptors in the early secretory pathway leading us to now investigate whether endogenous GABA facilitates the biogenesis of GABAA receptors in primary cerebral cortical cultures. In immunofluorescence labeling experiments, we have determined that neurons expressing surface GABAA receptors contain both GABA and its degradative enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T). Treatment of neurons with GABA-T inhibitors, a treatment known to increase intracellular GABA levels, decreases the interaction of the receptor with the ER quality control protein calnexin, concomittantly increasing receptor forward-trafficking and plasma membrane insertion. The effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction is not due to the activation of surface GABAA or GABAB receptors. Consistent with our hypothesis that GABA acts as a cognate ligand chaperone in the ER, immunogold-labeling of rodent brain slices reveals the presence of GABA within the rough ER. The density of this labeling is similar to that present in mitochondria, the organelle in which GABA is degraded. Lastly, the effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction was prevented by pretreatment with a GABA transporter inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that endogenous GABA acts in the rough ER as a cognate ligand chaperone to facilitate the biogenesis of neuronal GABAA receptors. PMID

  7. Decreased Phosphorylated Protein Kinase B (Akt) in Individuals with Autism Associated with High Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Low Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA)

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway could contribute to the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders. In this study, phosphorylated Akt concentration was measured in 37 autistic children and 12, gender and age similar neurotypical, controls using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Akt levels were compared to biomarkers known to be associated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and c-Met (hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor) pathways and severity levels of 19 autism-related symptoms. We found phosphorylated Akt levels significantly lower in autistic children and low Akt levels correlated with high EGFR and HGF and low gamma-aminobutyric acid, but not other biomarkers. Low Akt levels also correlated significantly with increased severity of receptive language, conversational language, hypotonia, rocking and pacing, and stimming, These results suggest a relationship between decreased phosphorylated Akt and selected symptom severity in autistic children and support the suggestion that the AKT pathways may be associated with the etiology of autism. PMID:26508828

  8. Cloning, Expression Analysis, and Molecular Modeling of the Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor Alpha2 Subunit Gene from the Common Cutworm, Spodoptera litura

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Hongliang; Gao, Lu; Hu, Zhen; Liu, Haiyuan; Zhong, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Intensive research on the molecule structures of the gamma-nminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor in agricultural pests has great significance to the mechanism investigation, resistance prevention, and molecular design of novel pesticides. The GABA receptor a2 (SlGABARα2) subunit gene in Spodoptera litura (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was cloned using the technologies of reverse transcription PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The gemonic DNA sequence of SlGABARα2 has 5164 bp with 8 exons and 7 introns that were in accordance with the GT-AG splicing formula. The complete mRNA sequence of SlGABARα2 was 1965 bp, with an open reading frame of 1500 bp encoding a protein of 499 amino acids. The GABA receptor is highly conserved among insects. The conserved regions include several N-glycosylation, Oglycosylation, and phosphorylation sites, as well as 4 transmembrane domains. The identities that SlGABARα2 shared with the GABA receptor a2 subunit of Spodoptera exigua, Heliothis virescens, Chilo suppressalis, Plutella xylostella, Bombyx mori ranged from 99.2% to 87.2% at the amino acid level. The comparative 3-dimensional model of SlGABARα2 showed that its tertiary structure was composed of 4 major α-helixes located at the 4 putative transmembrane domains on one side, with some β-sheets and 1 small α-helix on the other side. SlGABARα2 may be attached to the membrane by 4 α-helixes that bind ions in other conserved domains to transport them through the membrane. The results of quantitative real time PCR demonstrated that SlGABARα2 was expressed in all developmental stages of S. litura. The relative expression level of SlGABARα2 was the lowest in eggs and increased with larval growth, while it declined slightly in pupae and reached the peak in adults. The expressions of SlGABARα2 in larvae varied among different tissues; it was extremely high in the brain but was low in the midgut, epicuticle, Malpighian tube, and fat body. PMID:23909412

  9. Cloning, expression analysis, and molecular modeling of the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor alpha2 subunit gene from the common cutworm, Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hongliang; Gao, Lu; Hu, Zhen; Liu, Haiyuan; Zhong, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Intensive research on the molecule structures of the gamma-nminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor in agricultural pests has great significance to the mechanism investigation, resistance prevention, and molecular design of novel pesticides. The GABA receptor a2 (SlGABARα2) subunit gene in Spodoptera litura (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was cloned using the technologies of reverse transcription PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The gemonic DNA sequence of SlGABARα2 has 5164 bp with 8 exons and 7 introns that were in accordance with the GT-AG splicing formula. The complete mRNA sequence of SlGABARα2 was 1965 bp, with an open reading frame of 1500 bp encoding a protein of 499 amino acids. The GABA receptor is highly conserved among insects. The conserved regions include several N-glycosylation, Oglycosylation, and phosphorylation sites, as well as 4 transmembrane domains. The identities that SlGABARα2 shared with the GABA receptor a2 subunit of Spodoptera exigua, Heliothis virescens, Chilo suppressalis, Plutella xylostella, Bombyx mori ranged from 99.2% to 87.2% at the amino acid level. The comparative 3-dimensional model of SlGABARα2 showed that its tertiary structure was composed of 4 major α-helixes located at the 4 putative transmembrane domains on one side, with some β-sheets and 1 small α-helix on the other side. SlGABARα2 may be attached to the membrane by 4 α-helixes that bind ions in other conserved domains to transport them through the membrane. The results of quantitative real time PCR demonstrated that SlGABARα2 was expressed in all developmental stages of S. litura. The relative expression level of SlGABARα2 was the lowest in eggs and increased with larval growth, while it declined slightly in pupae and reached the peak in adults. The expressions of SlGABARα2 in larvae varied among different tissues; it was extremely high in the brain but was low in the midgut, epicuticle, Malpighian tube, and fat body. PMID:23909412

  10. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. )

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  11. Differences in the negative allosteric modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors elicited by 4'-chlorodiazepam and by a beta-carboline-3-carboxylate ester: a study with natural and reconstituted receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Puia, G; Santi, M R; Vicini, S; Pritchett, D B; Seeburg, P H; Costa, E

    1989-01-01

    Cl- currents elicited by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) application were recorded with the whole-cell tight-seal technique from voltage-clamped cortical neurons of neonatal rats in primary culture. The peripheral benzodiazepine recognition site ligand 4'-chlorodiazepam [Ro 5-4864; 7-chloro-1,3-dihydro-1-methyl-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-2H-[1,4]-benzodiazep in-2- one] inhibited the GABA-generated currents in a dose-dependent manner. Also, a beta-carboline (DMCM; 6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate methyl ester), acting as a negative allosteric modulator of GABAA receptors, reduced the intensity of GABA-generated currents with similar efficacy but greater potency. Flumazenil (Ro 15-1788; 8-fluro-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo-[1,5-a] [1,4]-benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate ethyl ester) antagonized DMCM inhibition but not that elicited by 4'-chlorodiazepam. The isoquinoline carboxamide PK 11195, an antagonist of 4'-chlorodiazepam effects in other systems, failed to antagonize the action of 4'-chlorodiazepam. The transient expression of various molecular forms of GABAA receptors in the human embryonic kidney cell line 293 allowed a study of the minimal structural requirements for the inhibition of GABA-induced Cl- currents by bicuculline, picrotoxin, 4'-chlorodiazepam, and DMCM. GABA-elicited Cl- currents in cells coexpressing alpha 1 and beta 1 subunits of GABAA receptors were inhibited by bicuculline and picrotoxin, but not by DMCM or 4'-chlorodiazepam. Conversely, the GABA currents in cells coexpressing alpha 1 beta 1 and gamma 2 subunits were inhibited by bicuculline, picrotoxin, 4'-chlorodiazepam, and DMCM. Since the Cl- currents generated by GABA in some molecular forms of GABAA receptors are inhibited by bicuculline and picrotoxin only, 4'-chlorodiazepam cannot be acting isosterically with picrotoxin. PMID:2476816

  12. Possible role of the gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor system in the timing of the proestrous luteinizing hormone surge in rats.

    PubMed

    Mitsushima, D; Jinnai, K; Kimura, F

    1997-05-01

    To examine the role of the gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor-mediated system in the timing of the proestrous LH surge, we observed the free running activity rhythm and the timing of the LH surge simultaneously in blinded cycling female rats. Blood samples were obtained from unanesthetized freely moving rats through an intraatrial cannula. Five hours after the activity offset on the day of proestrus, bicuculline methiodide (BIC; 50 mg/kg x h) or saline was infused i.v. for 3 h into the freely moving rats. In the BIC group, the peak time of the surge occurred at 7.9 +/- 0.2 h after the activity offset, with a significant advance compared to the peak time in the saline group (i.e. 9.9 +/- 0.4 h), but neither BIC nor saline induced a significant phase shift in the circadian activity rhythm. We found that the infusion of BIC on the subjective morning of the proestrous day dissociates the timing of the LH surge from the circadian activity rhythm in rats. PMID:9112391

  13. The A2'N mutation of the RDL gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor conferring fipronil resistance in Laodelphax striatellus (Hemiptera: Delphacidae).

    PubMed

    Nakao, Toshifumi; Kawase, Ayumi; Kinoshita, Ayako; Abe, Reiko; Hama, Masako; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Hirase, Kangetsu

    2011-04-01

    The planthopper Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) is a serious insect pest of rice, Oryza sativa L., and has developed resistance to fipronil in Japan. Sequence analysis of L. striatellus RDL gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor subunit (LS-RDL) genes from a fipronil-resistant population and a fipronil-susceptible strain identified the A2'N mutation (index number for M2 membrane-spanning region), that was previously implicated in fipronil resistance in the planthopper Sogatella furcifera (Horváth) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae). Nineteen of 21 fipronil-resistant L. striatellus individuals were genotyped as heterozygous for the A2'N mutation, suggesting that this mutation is associated with fipronil resistance and that most fipronil-resistant L. striatellus express wild-type and A2'N mutant LS-RDL simultaneously. To confirm the role of the A2'N mutation of LS-RDL, Drosophila Mel-2 cells were transfected with wild-type and A2'N mutant LS-RDL genes, either individually or together. A membrane potential assay showed that fipronil had no inhibitory effect at 10 microM on cells transfected with the A2'N mutant LS-RDL gene with or without the wild-type LS-RDL gene. By contrast, the IC50 value of fipronil for wild-type LS-RDL homomers was 14 nM. These results suggest that the A2'N mutation of the RDL GABA receptor subunit confers fipronil resistance in L. striatellus as well as S. furcifera. PMID:21510217

  14. Propofol-Induced Electroencephalographic Seizures in Neonatal Rats: The Role of Corticosteroids and Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Type A Receptor-Mediated Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Jesse; Zhu, Wanting; Perez-Downes, Julio; Tan, Sijie; Xu, Changqing; Seubert, Christoph; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Martynyuk, Anatoly

    2014-01-01

    Background An imbalance between excitation and inhibition in the developing central nervous system may result in a pathophysiological outcome. We investigated he mechanistic roles of endocrine activity and gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR)-mediated excitation in electroencephalographic seizures caused by the GABAAR-selective anesthetic propofol in neonatal rats. Methods Postnatal day 4–6 Sprague Dawley rats underwent a minor surgical procedure to implant electrodes to measure electroencephalographic activity for 1 h before and 1 h after intraperitoneal administration of propofol (40 mg kg−1). Various treatments were administered 15 min before administration of propofol. Results Episodes of electroencephalographic seizures and persistent low-amplitude spikes occurred during propofol anesthesia. Multifold increases in serum levels of corticosterone (t(10) = −5.062; P= 0.0005) and aldosterone (t(10) = −5.069; P= 0.0005) were detected 1 h after propofol administration in animals that underwent experimental manipulations identical to those used to study electroencephalographic activity. Pretreatment with bumetanide, the Na+–K+–2Cl– co-transporter inhibitor, which diminishes GABAAR-mediated excitation, eliminated both seizure and spike electroencephalographic activities caused by propofol. Mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptor antagonists, RU 28318 and RU486, depressed electroencephalographic seizures but did not affect the spike electroencephalographic effects of propofol. Etomidate, at a dose sufficient to induce loss of righting reflex, was weak at increasing serum corticosteroid levels and eliciting electroencephalographic seizures. Etomidate given to corticosterone-pretreated rat pups further increased the total duration of electroencephalographic seizures caused by administration of exogenous corticosterone (t(21) = −2.512, P = 0.0203). Conclusions Propofol increases systemic corticosteroid levels in neonatal rats, which along

  15. ACTIVATION OF MOUSE AND HUMAN PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTORS (PPAR ALPHA, GAMMA, BETA DELTA) BY PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID (PFOA) AND PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluates the potential for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), using a transient transfection cell assay. Cos-1 cells were cultured in DMEM with fetal bovine serum (FBS) in ...

  16. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and benzodiazepine receptor changes induced by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle.

    PubMed

    Pan, H S; Penney, J B; Young, A B

    1985-11-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to ascertain alterations in [3H]muscimol, [3H]flunitrazepam (FLU), [3H]naloxone, [3H]D-alanine-D-leucine-enkephalin (DADL), and [3H]spiroperidol binding in basal ganglia 1 week, 4 weeks, and 5 months after unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) in the rat. At 1 and 4 weeks following lesions, [3H]spiroperidol binding increased 33% in striatum. At 5 months, [3H]spiroperidol was only nonsignificantly increased above control. At 1 week, [3H]muscimol binding decreased 39% in ipsilateral globus pallidus (GP), but increased 41% and 11% in entopeduncular nucleus (EPN) and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), respectively. At 4 weeks, [3H]muscimol binding was reduced 19% in striatum and 44% in GP and remained enhanced by 32% in both EPN and SNr. These changes in [3H]muscimol binding persisted at 5 months. [3H]FLU binding was altered in the same direction as [3H]muscimol binding; however, changes were slower in onset and became significant (and remained so) only at 4 weeks after lesions. Decreases in [3H]naloxone and [3H]DADL binding were seen in striatum, GP, EPN, and SNr. Scatchard analyses revealed that only receptor numbers were altered. This study provides biochemical evidence for differential regulation of striatal GABAergic output to GP and EPN/SNr. PMID:2995585

  17. Transmembrane topology, subcellular distribution and turnover of the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodizaepine receptor in chick brain cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were performed utilizing trypsinization of the GABA/BZD-R in intact cells to determine (1) the subcellular distribution of membrane-associated GABA/BZD-Rs and (2) aspects of the transmembrane topology of the BZD-R. Additionally, R07-0213, a positively charged benzodiazepine, was used to distinguish between cell surface and intracellular BZD-Rs. Following trypsin treatment of intact cells a cleaved receptor fragment of M{sub r} = 24,000 (xRF24) is generated. It remains anchored in the plasma membrane and not only retains the ability to bind ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepan reversibly and irreversibly but also retains the ability to be modulated by GABA. xRF24 is not observed following trypsinization of saponin-treated cells or cell homogenates, indicating that it has a cytoplasmic domain as well as a cell surface domain, as expected for a transmembrane fragment of the BZD-R. By utilizing ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam as an irreversible photoaffinity label, BZD-R turnover was also investigated.

  18. Identification of potent and selective retinoic acid receptor gamma (RARγ) antagonists for the treatment of osteoarthritis pain using structure based drug design.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Norman E; Bleisch, Thomas J; Jones, Scott A; Richardson, Timothy I; Doti, Robert A; Wang, Yong; Stout, Stephanie L; Durst, Gregory L; Chambers, Mark G; Oskins, Jennifer L; Lin, Chaohua; Adams, Lisa A; Page, Todd J; Barr, Robert J; Zink, Richard W; Osborne, Harold; Montrose-Rafizadeh, Chahrzad; Norman, Bryan H

    2016-07-15

    A series of triaryl pyrazoles were identified as potent pan antagonists for the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) α, β and γ. X-ray crystallography and structure-based drug design were used to improve selectivity for RARγ by targeting residue differences in the ligand binding pockets of these receptors. This resulted in the discovery of novel antagonists which maintained RARγ potency but were greater than 500-fold selective versus RARα and RARβ. The potent and selective RARγ antagonist LY2955303 demonstrated good pharmacokinetic properties and was efficacious in the MIA model of osteoarthritis-like joint pain. This compound demonstrated an improved margin to RARα-mediated adverse effects. PMID:27261179

  19. A retinoic acid receptor-specific element controls the retinoic acid receptor-beta promoter.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, B; Lehmann, J M; Zhang, X K; Hermann, T; Husmann, M; Graupner, G; Pfahl, M

    1990-11-01

    The morphogen retinoic acid (RA) regulates gene transcription by interacting with specific nuclear receptors that recognize DNA sequences near responsive promoters. While much has recently been learned about the nuclear receptor proteins, little is known about the genes that are directly regulated by RA and their cis-acting response elements recognized by these receptors. Here we have analyzed the RA receptor-beta (RAR beta) gene promoter that is controlled by RA. We find that a RA-responsive element (RARE) is located adjacent to the TATA box. The RARE shows a direct repeat symmetry which is essential for its function. While thyroid hormone-responsive elements can also function as RAR response elements, we show here that this RARE is activated by endogenous RARs and RAR beta, but cannot be regulated by thyroid hormone receptors and other known nuclear receptors. In addition, we find that RAR gamma is a poor activator of this RARE. However, the response element is bound with high affinity by both RAR beta and RAR gamma as well as by thyroid hormone receptors. Thus, interaction between specific response elements and receptors is insufficient for gene activation. PMID:2177841

  20. Oligomerization of L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. R. Jr; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Unlike glutamic acid, L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid does not oligomerize efficiently when treated with carbonyldiimidazole in aqueous solution. However, divalent ions such as Mg2+ catalyze the reaction, and lead to the formation of oligomers in good yield. In the presence of hydroxylapatite, L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid oligomerizes efficiently in a reaction that proceeds in the absence of divalent ions but is further catalyzed when they are present. After 'feeding' 50 times with activated amino acid in the presence of the Mg2+ ion, oligomers longer than the 20-mer could be detected. The effect of hydroxylapatite on peptide elongation is very sensitive to the nature of the activated amino acid and the acceptor peptide. Glutamic acid oligomerizes more efficiently than L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid on hydroxylapatite and adds more efficiently to decaglutamic acid in solution. One might, therefore, expect that glutamic acid would add more efficiently than L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid to decaglutamic acid on hydroxylapatite. The contrary is true--the addition of L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid is substantially more efficient. This suggests that oligomerization on the surface of hydroxylapatite depends on the detailed match between the structure of the surface of the mineral and the structure of the oligomer.

  1. Concordance between isolated cleft palate in mice and alterations within a region including the gene encoding the [beta][sub 3] subunit of the type A [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Culiat, C.T.; Stubbs, L.; Nicholls, R.D.; Montgomery, C.S.; Russell, L.B.; Johnson, D.K. ); Rinchik, E.M. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville )

    1993-06-01

    Genetic and molecular analyses of a number of radiation-induced deletion mutations of the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in mouse chromosome 7 have identified a specific interval on the genetic map associated with a neonatally lethal mutation that results in cleft palate. This interval, closely linked and distal to p, and bracketed by the genes encoding the [alpha][sub 5] and [beta][sub 3] subunits of the type A [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor (Gabra5 and Gabrb3, respectively), contains a gene(s) (cp1; cleft palate 1) necessary for normal palate development. The cp1 interval extends from the distal breakpoint of the prenatally lethal p[sup 83FBFo] deletion to the Gabrb3 locus. Among 20 p deletions tested, there was complete concordance between alterations at the Gabrb3 transcription unit and inability to complement the cleft-palate defect. These mapping data, along with previously described in vivo and in vitro teratological effects of [gamma]-aminobutyric acid or its agonists on palate development, suggest the possibility that a particular type A [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor that includes the [beta][sub 3] subunit may be necessary for normal palate development. The placement of the cp1 gene within a defined segment of the larger D15S12h (p)-D15S9h-1 interval in the mouse suggests that the highly homologous region of the human genome, 15q11-q13, be evaluated for a role(s) in human fetal facial development. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. DNA Methylation at the Neonatal State and at the Time of Diagnosis: Preliminary Support for an Association with the Estrogen Receptor 1, Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor 1, and Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Female Adolescent Patients with OCD

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Judith Becker; Hansen, Christine Søholm; Starnawska, Anna; Mattheisen, Manuel; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hollegaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder. Non-genetic factors and their interaction with genes have attracted increasing attention. Epigenetics is regarded an important interface between environmental signals and activation/repression of genomic responses. Epigenetic mechanisms have not previously been examined in OCD in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of selected genes in blood spots from neonates later diagnosed with OCD and in the same children/adolescents at the time of diagnosis compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Furthermore, we wanted to characterize the association of the differential methylation profiles with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome. Dried and new blood spot samples were obtained from 21 female children/adolescents with verified OCD and 12 female controls. The differential methylation was analyzed using a linear model and the correlation with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome was analyzed using the Pearson correlation. We evaluated selected Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip probes within and up to 100,000 bp up- and downstream of 14 genes previously associated with OCD (SLC1A1, SLC25A12, GABBR1, GAD1, DLGAP1, MOG, BDNF, OLIG2, NTRK2 and 3, ESR1, SL6A4, TPH2, and COMT). The study found no significantly differential methylation. However, preliminary support for a difference was found for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor 1 (cg10234998, cg17099072) in blood samples at birth and for the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) (cg10939667), the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) (cg16650906), and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (cg14080521) in blood samples at the time of diagnosis. Preliminary support for an association was observed between the methylation profiles of GABBR1 and MOG and baseline severity, treatment effect, and responder status; and between the methylation profile of ESR1 and baseline

  3. DNA Methylation at the Neonatal State and at the Time of Diagnosis: Preliminary Support for an Association with the Estrogen Receptor 1, Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor 1, and Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Female Adolescent Patients with OCD.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Judith Becker; Hansen, Christine Søholm; Starnawska, Anna; Mattheisen, Manuel; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hollegaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder. Non-genetic factors and their interaction with genes have attracted increasing attention. Epigenetics is regarded an important interface between environmental signals and activation/repression of genomic responses. Epigenetic mechanisms have not previously been examined in OCD in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of selected genes in blood spots from neonates later diagnosed with OCD and in the same children/adolescents at the time of diagnosis compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Furthermore, we wanted to characterize the association of the differential methylation profiles with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome. Dried and new blood spot samples were obtained from 21 female children/adolescents with verified OCD and 12 female controls. The differential methylation was analyzed using a linear model and the correlation with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome was analyzed using the Pearson correlation. We evaluated selected Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip probes within and up to 100,000 bp up- and downstream of 14 genes previously associated with OCD (SLC1A1, SLC25A12, GABBR1, GAD1, DLGAP1, MOG, BDNF, OLIG2, NTRK2 and 3, ESR1, SL6A4, TPH2, and COMT). The study found no significantly differential methylation. However, preliminary support for a difference was found for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor 1 (cg10234998, cg17099072) in blood samples at birth and for the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) (cg10939667), the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) (cg16650906), and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (cg14080521) in blood samples at the time of diagnosis. Preliminary support for an association was observed between the methylation profiles of GABBR1 and MOG and baseline severity, treatment effect, and responder status; and between the methylation profile of ESR1 and baseline

  4. High-resolution mapping of the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit [beta]3 and [alpha]5 gene cluster on chromosome 15q11-q13, and localization of breakpoints in two Angelman syndrome patients

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnett, D.; Wagstaff, J.; Woolf, E. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Glatt, K. ); Kirkness, E.J. )Lalande, M. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Boston, MA )

    1993-06-01

    The [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA[sub A]) receptors are a family of ligand-gated chloride channels constituting the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the nervous system. In order to determine the genomic organization of the GABA[sub A] receptor [beta]3 subunit gene (GABRB3) and [alpha]5 subunit gene (GABRA5) in chromosome 15q11-q13, the authors have constructed a high-resolution physical map using the combined techniques of field-inversion gel electrophoresis and phage genomic library screening. This map, which covers nearly 1.0 Mb, shows that GABRB3 and GABRA5 are separated by less than 100 kb and are arranged in a head-to-head configuration. GABRB3 encompasses approximately 250 kb, while GABRA5 is contained within 70 kb. This difference in size is due in large part to an intron of 150 kb within GABRB3. The authors have also identified seven putative CpG islands within a 600-kb interval. Chromosomal rearrangement breakpoints -- in one Angelman syndrome (AS) patient with an unbalanced translocation and in another patient with a submicroscopic deletion -- are located within the large GABRB3 intron. These findings will facilitate chromosomal walking strategies for cloning the regions disrupted by the DNA rearrangements in these AS patients and will be valuable for mapping new genes to the AS chromosomal region. 64 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Antagonistic properties of a natural product - Bicuculline with the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor: Studied through electrostatic potential mapping, electronic and vibrational spectra using ab initio and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Jain, Sudha; Asthana, B. P.

    2011-12-01

    (+)-Bicuculline (hereinafter referred to as bicuculline), a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid is of current interest as an antagonist of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Its inhibitor properties have been studied through molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) mapping of this molecule and GABA receptor. The hot site on the potential surface of bicuculline, which is also isosteric with GABA receptor, has been used to interpret the inhibitor property. A systematic quantum chemical study of the possible conformations, their relative stabilities, FT-Raman, FT-IR and UV-vis spectroscopic analysis of bicuculline has been reported. The optimized geometries, wavenumber and intensity of the vibrational bands of all the conformers of bicuculline have been calculated using ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP functional and 6-311G(d,p) basis set. Mulliken atomic charges, HOMO-LUMO gap Δ E, ionization potential, dipole moments and total energy have also been obtained for the optimized geometries of both the molecules. TD-DFT method is used to calculate the electronic absorption parameters in gas phase as well as in solvent environment using integral equation formalism-polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM) employing 6-31G basis set and the results thus obtained are compared with the UV absorption spectra. The combination of experimental and calculated results provides an insight into the structural and vibrational spectroscopic properties of bicuculline.

  6. Uptake of gamma-valerolactone--detection of gamma-hydroxyvaleric acid in human urine samples.

    PubMed

    Andresen-Streichert, H; Jungen, H; Gehl, A; Müller, A; Iwersen-Bergmann, S

    2013-05-01

    Gamma-valerolactone (GVL) is reported to be a substance that can be used as a legal substitute for gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), which is currently a controlled substance in several countries. Unlike gamma-butyrolactone and 1,4-butanediol, GVL is not metabolized to GHB, which causes the effects after uptake of these two chemicals. In the case of GVL, the lactone ring is split to gamma-hydroxyvaleric acid (GHV or 4-methyl-GHB) by a lactonase. Because of its affinity for the GHB receptor, GHV reveals similar effects to GHB, although it is less potent. Intoxications with GVL, or its use as a date rape drug, are conceivable. Despite these facts, there are no publications in the literature regarding detections of GHV in human samples. This study reports three cases, including five urine samples, in which GHV could be detected in concentrations between 3 and 5.8 mg/L. In one of these cases, a drug-facilitated sexual assault (DFSA) was assumed; four of these samples were from two people suspected of abusing GHB. The results indicate that GVL is used as an alternative to GHB and its precursors and should be taken seriously. GVL or GHV should be included in toxicological analysis, particularly in DFSA cases. More information is needed regarding the pharmacokinetics of GVL/GHV for the meaningful interpretation of positive or negative results. PMID:23486087

  7. Isothiouronium compounds as gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, R. D.; Dickenson, H. W.; Hiern, B. P.; Johnston, G. A.; Kazlauskas, R.

    1986-01-01

    Analogues of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) incorporating an isothiouronium salt as a replacement for a protonated amino functional group have been investigated for activity on: GABA receptors in the guinea-pig ileum; [3H]-GABA and [3H]-diazepam binding to rat brain membranes; and GABA uptake and transamination. For the homologous series of omega-isothiouronium alkanoic acids, maximum GABA-mimetic activity was found at 3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]propanoic acid. Introduction of unsaturation into this compound gave two isomeric conformationally restricted analogues. The trans isomer was inactive at GABA receptors while the cis compound ((Z)-3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]prop-2-enoic acid (ZAPA)) was more potent than muscimol and GABA as a GABA agonist with respect to low affinity GABA receptor sites. Both isomers were moderately potent at inhibiting the uptake of [3H]-GABA into rat brain slices. Comparison of possible conformations of the two unsaturated isomers by interactive computer graphics modelling and comparison with muscimol has led to a plausible active conformation of ZAPA, which may be a selective and potent agonist for low affinity GABA binding sites. PMID:3015310

  8. Characterization of the human platelet Fc sub. gamma. receptor

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.

    1988-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is often associated with immune complex disease and may in part be due to the interaction of circulating (IgG) immune complexes with an Fc{sub {gamma}} receptor on the platelet surface. Characterization of the immune complex-platelet interaction should provide for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of immune thrombocytpenia. To this end, a ligand binding assay, employing {sup 125}I-IgG trimer, was established. Receptor expression was determined by measuring the saturable binding of radiolabeled trimer to platelets at equilibrium. Normal human platelets were observed to express 8559 {plus minus} 852 binding sites for IgG trimer with a Kd of 12.5 {plus minus} 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} M. Binding of IgG trimer to human platelets was blocked following preincubation of the cells with an anti-Fc{sub {gamma}}RII monoclonal antibody. Furthermore, this binding was ionic-strength dependent but was unaffected by the presence of Mg{sup ++} or cytochalasin B. Platelet Fc{sub {gamma}} receptor modulation was examined by assessing the effects of various physiologic and pharmacologic on the ability of platelets to bind IgG trimer. Platelet Fc{sub {gamma}} receptor expression was not affected by thrombin, ADP, or {gamma}-interferon. However, in 7/12 normal donors, treatment of platelets with dexamethasone resulted in a decrease in the number of Fc{sub {gamma}} receptors expressed.

  9. Fatty acids, eicosanoids and PPAR gamma.

    PubMed

    Marion-Letellier, Rachel; Savoye, Guillaume; Ghosh, Subrata

    2016-08-15

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) belongs to the family of nuclear nuclear receptors and is mainly expressed in adipose tissue, hematopoietic cells and the large intestine. Contrary to other nuclear receptors that mainly bind a single specific ligand, there are numerous natural PPARγ ligands, in particular fatty acids or their derivatives called eicosanoids. PPARγ have pleiotropic functions: (i) glucose and lipid metabolism regulation, (ii) anti-inflammatory properties, (iii) oxidative stress inhibition, (iv) improvement of endothelial function. Its role has been mainly studied by the use synthetic agonists. In this review, we will focus on the effects of PPARγ mediated through fatty acids and how these have beneficial health properties. PMID:26632493

  10. The human [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit [beta]3 and [alpha]5 gene cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13 is rich in highly polymorphic (CA)[sub n] repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Glatt, K.; Lalande, M. ); Sinnett, D. )

    1994-01-01

    The [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA[sub A]) receptor [beta]33 (GABRB3) and [alpha]5 (GABRA5) subunit genes have been localized to the Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome region of chromosome 15q11-q13. GABRB3, which encompasses 250 kb, is located 100 kb proximal of GABRA5, with the two genes arranged in head-to-head transcriptional orientation. In screening 135 kb of cloned DNA within a 260-kb interval extending from within GABRB3 to the 5[prime] end of GABRA5, 10 new (CA), repeats have been identified. Five of these have been analyzed in detail and found to be highly polymorphic, with the polymorphism information content (PIC) ranging from 0.7 to 0.85 and with heterozygosities of 67 to 94%. In the clones from GABRB3/GABRA5 region, therefore, the frequency of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 is 1 per 27 kb. Previous estimates of the density of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 in the human genome have been approximately 10-fold lower. The GABRB3/GABRA5 region appears, therefore, to be enriched for highly informative (CA)[sub n]. This set of closely spaced, short tandem repeat polymorphisms will be useful in the molecular analyses of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and in high-resolution studies of genetic recombination within this region. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Effects of quercetin on the sleep-wake cycle in rats: involvement of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor type A in regulation of rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Kambe, Daiji; Kotani, Makiko; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Kaku, Shinsuke; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Honda, Kazuki

    2010-05-12

    The bioflavonoid quercetin is widely found in plants and exerts a large number of biological activities such as anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of quercetin on the sleep-wake cycle has not been investigated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of quercetin on sleep-wake regulation. Intraperitoneal administration of quercetin (200mg/kg) significantly increased non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep during dark period in rats, while it significantly decreased REM sleep. The decrease in REM sleep induced by quercetin was blocked by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of bicuculline, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist. In contrast, the increase in non-REM sleep induced by quercetin was not affected by i.c.v. injection of bicuculline. Therefore, the present results suggest that quercetin alters the sleep-wake cycle partly through activation of GABA(A) receptors. PMID:20303338

  12. Nuclear receptors in bile acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y. L.

    2013-01-01

    Bile acids are signaling molecules that activate nuclear receptors, such as farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and vitamin D receptor, and play a critical role in the regulation of lipid, glucose, energy, and drug metabolism. These xenobiotic/endobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors regulate phase I oxidation, phase II conjugation, and phase III transport in bile acid and drug metabolism in the digestive system. Integration of bile acid metabolism with drug metabolism controls absorption, transport, and metabolism of nutrients and drugs to maintain metabolic homeostasis and also protects against liver injury, inflammation, and related metabolic diseases, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile-acid–based drugs targeting nuclear receptors are in clinical trials for treating cholestatic liver diseases and fatty liver disease. PMID:23330546

  13. Presynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid responses in the olfactory cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Pickles, H G

    1979-01-01

    1. Potential changes were recorded from the lateral olfactory tract in slices of rat olfactory cortex in vitro at room temperature. 2. Superfused gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) usually produced dose-related depolarization of the lateral olfactory tract. Muscimol and 3-aminopropanesulphonic acid appeared more potent depolarizing agents than GABA, and glycine and taurine appeared less potent. Carbachol and glutamate were virtually ineffective. 3. The GABA responses were at least partially Cl- dependent. 4. (+)-Bicuculline and higher concentrations of strychnine antagonized the GABA but not the glycine-induced depolarizations. Paradoxically, responses to high doses of GABA were sometimes potentiated by both bicuculline and strychnine. 5. It is suggested that GABA receptors could occur as widely on nerve terminals as they do postsynaptically in the CNS, where GABA could be involved in the modulation of transmitter output. PMID:760898

  14. 2-Cyano-3,12-dioxoolean-1,9-dien-28-oic acid and related compounds inhibit growth of colon cancer cells through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Papineni, Sabitha; Konopleva, Marina; Andreef, Michael; Samudio, Ismael; Safe, Stephen

    2005-07-01

    2-Cyano-3,12-dioxoolean-1,9-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO) and the corresponding methyl (CDDO-Me) and imidazole (CDDO-Im) esters induce peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma)-dependent transactivation in SW-480 colon cancer cells, and these responses were inhibited by small inhibitory RNA for PPARgamma. Moreover, in a mammalian two-hybrid assay using the PPARgamma(2)-VP16 fusion plasmid and GAL4-coactivator/corepressor chimeras and a construct (pGAL4) containing five tandem GAL4 response elements, CDDO, CDDO-Me, and CDDO-IM induce transactivation and PPARgamma interaction with multiple coactivators. A major difference among the three PPARgamma agonists was the higher activity of CDDO-Im to induce PPARgamma interactions with the corepressor SMRT. CDDO, CDDO-Me, and CDDO-Im inhibited SW-480, HCT-116, and HT-29 colon cancer cell proliferation at low concentrations and induced cell death at higher concentrations. Growth inhibition at lower concentrations correlated with induction of the tumor suppressor gene caveolin-1 which is known to inhibit colon cancer cell growth. Induction of caveolin-1 by CDDO, CDDO-Me, and CDDO-Im was inhibited by the PPARgamma antagonist N-(4'-aminopyridyl-2-chloro-5-nitrobenzamide (T007), whereas higher doses induced apoptosis [poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage], which was not inhibited by T007. These results illustrate that CDDO-, CDDO-Me, and CDDO-Im induce both PPARgamma-dependent and -independent responses in colon cancer cells, and activation of these pathways are separable and concentration-dependent for all three compounds. PMID:15798084

  15. A peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist and other constituents from Chromolaena odorata.

    PubMed

    Dat, Nguyen Tien; Lee, Kyeong; Hong, Young-Soo; Kim, Young Ho; Minh, Chau Van; Lee, Jung Joon

    2009-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are key regulators of lipid and glucose metabolism and have become important therapeutic targets for various diseases. The phytochemical investigation of the chloroform-soluble extract of Chromolaena odorata led to the isolation of a PPAR-gamma agonist, (9 S,13 R)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (1), together with 12 other compounds. The structures of chromomoric acid G (2), a new dehydrogenated derivative of 1, and chromolanone (3) were elucidated based on spectroscopic methods. Compound 1 showed a significant effect on PPAR-gamma activation in comparison with rosiglitazone. However, compound 2 was inactive, suggesting that the dehydrogenation of the prostaglandin-like structure in 1 abrogates its PPAR-gamma agonistic activity. PMID:19242902

  16. Acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Acidosis is a noxious condition associated with inflammation, ischaemia or defective acid containment. As a consequence, acid sensing has evolved as an important property of afferent neurons with unmyelinated and thinly myelinated nerve fibres. Protons evoke multiple currents in primary afferent neurons, which are carried by several acid-sensitive ion channels. Among these, acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) ion channels have been most thoroughly studied. ASICs survey moderate decreases in extracellular pH, whereas TRPV1 is activated only by severe acidosis resulting in pH values below 6. Two-pore-domain K(+) (K(2P)) channels are differentially regulated by small deviations of extra- or intracellular pH from physiological levels. Other acid-sensitive channels include TRPV4, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPP2 (PKD2L1), ionotropic purinoceptors (P2X), inward rectifier K(+) channels, voltage-activated K(+) channels, L-type Ca(2+) channels, hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated channels, gap junction channels, and Cl(-) channels. In addition, acid-sensitive G protein coupled receptors have also been identified. Most of these molecular acid sensors are expressed by primary sensory neurons, although to different degrees and in various combinations. Emerging evidence indicates that many of the acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors play a role in acid sensing, acid-induced pain and acid-evoked feedback regulation of homeostatic reactions. The existence and apparent redundancy of multiple pH surveillance systems attests to the concept that acid-base regulation is a vital issue for cell and tissue homeostasis. Since upregulation and overactivity of acid sensors appear to contribute to various forms of chronic pain, acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors are considered as targets for novel analgesic drugs. This approach will only be successful if the pathological implications of acid sensors can be differentiated

  17. Acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Acidosis is a noxious condition associated with inflammation, ischaemia or defective acid containment. As a consequence, acid sensing has evolved as an important property of afferent neurons with unmyelinated and thinly myelinated nerve fibres. Protons evoke multiple currents in primary afferent neurons, which are carried by several acid-sensitive ion channels. Among these, acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) ion channels have been most thoroughly studied. ASICs survey moderate decreases in extracellular pH whereas TRPV1 is activated only by severe acidosis resulting in pH values below 6. Two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channels are differentially regulated by small deviations of extra- or intracellular pH from physiological levels. Other acid-sensitive channels comprise TRPV4, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPP2 (PKD2L1), ionotropic purinoceptors (P2X), inward rectifier K+ channels, voltage-activated K+ channels, L-type Ca2+ channels, hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, gap junction channels, and Cl− channels. In addition, acid-sensitive G protein-coupled receptors have also been identified. Most of these molecular acid sensors are expressed by primary sensory neurons, although to different degrees and in various combinations. Emerging evidence indicates that many of the acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors play a role in acid sensing, acid-induced pain and acid-evoked feedback regulation of homeostatic reactions. The existence and apparent redundancy of multiple pH surveillance systems attests to the concept that acid-base regulation is a vital issue for cell and tissue homeostasis. Since upregulation and overactivity of acid sensors appear to contribute to various forms of chronic pain, acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors are considered as targets for novel analgesic drugs. This approach will only be successful if the pathological implications of acid sensors can be differentiated

  18. Mouse muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gamma subunit: cDNA sequence and gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L; LaPolla, R J; Davidson, N

    1986-01-01

    Clones coding for the mouse nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) gamma subunit precursor have been selected from a cDNA library derived from a mouse myogenic cell line and sequenced. The deduced protein sequence consists of a signal peptide of 22 amino acid residues and a mature gamma subunit of 497 amino acid residues. There is a high degree of sequence conservation between this mouse sequence and published human and calf AChR gamma subunits and, after allowing for functional amino acid substitutions, also to the more distantly related chicken and Torpedo AChR gamma subunits. The degree of sequence conservation is especially high in the four putative hydrophobic membrane spanning regions, supporting the assignment of these domains. RNA blot hybridization showed that the mRNA level of the gamma subunit increases by 30 fold or more upon differentiation of the two mouse myogenic cell lines, BC3H-1 and C2C12, suggesting that the primary controls for changes in gene expression during differentiation are at the level of transcription. One cDNA clone was found to correspond to a partially processed nuclear transcript containing two as yet unspliced intervening sequences. Images PMID:3010242

  19. Cloning of murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA: expression in human cells mediates high-affinity binding but is not sufficient to confer sensitivity to murine interferon gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Hemmi, S; Peghini, P; Metzler, M; Merlin, G; Dembic, Z; Aguet, M

    1989-01-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding the murine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) receptor was isolated from a lambda gt11 library using a human IFN-gamma receptor cDNA probe. The deduced amino acid sequence of the murine IFN-gamma receptor shows approximately 53% homology to its human counterpart but no homology to other known proteins. Murine IFN-gamma receptor cDNA was expressed in human HEp-2 cells, which do not bind murine IFN-gamma and are insensitive to its action. Transfectants displayed the same binding properties as mouse cells. The biological responsiveness of such transfectants to various biological effects of both human and murine IFN-gamma was investigated, including modulation of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II antigen expression, inhibition of cell growth, and antiviral activity. Like parental HEp-2 cells, these transfectants responded only to human, but not to murine, IFN-gamma. Inversely, mouse L929 cells transfected with human IFN-gamma receptor cDNA were insensitive to human IFN-gamma. These results confirm and extend previous findings, suggesting that species-specific cofactors are needed for IFN-gamma-mediated signal transduction. Images PMID:2532365

  20. Ligands for the Nuclear Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Sascha

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors, which represent a primary class of drug targets. The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a key player in various biological processes. PPARγ is widely known as the target protein of the thiazolidinediones for treating type 2 diabetes. Moreover, PPARγ ligands can induce anti-inflammatory and potentially additional beneficial effects. Recent mechanistic insights of PPARγ modulation give hope the next generation of efficient PPARγ-based drugs with fewer side effects can be developed. Furthermore, chemical approaches that make use of synergistic action of combinatorial ligands are promising alternatives for providing tailored medicine. Lessons learned from fine-tuning the action of PPARγ can provide avenues for efficient molecular intervention via many other nuclear receptors to combat common diseases. PMID:26435213

  1. Binding interactions of convulsant and anticonvulsant gamma-butyrolactones and gamma-thiobutyrolactones with the picrotoxin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, K.D.; McKeon, A.C.; Covey, D.F.; Ferrendelli, J.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Alkyl-substituted gamma-butyrolactones (GBLs) and gamma-thiobutyrolactones (TBLs) are neuroactive chemicals. beta-Substituted compounds are convulsant, whereas alpha-alkyl substituted GBLs and TBLs are anticonvulsant. The structural similarities between beta-alkyl GBLs and the convulsant picrotoxinin suggested that alkyl substituted GBLs and TBLs act at the picrotoxin receptor. To test this hypothesis we examined the interactions of convulsant and anticonvulsant GBLs and TBLs with the picrotoxin, benzodiazepine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding sites of the GABA receptor complex. All of these convulsants and anticonvulsants studied competitively displaced 35S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (35S-TBPS), a ligand that binds to the picrotoxin receptor. This inhibition of 35S-TBPS binding was not blocked by the GABA antagonist bicuculline methobromide. The convulsant GBLs and TBLs also partially inhibited (3H)muscimol binding to the GABA site and (3H)flunitrazepam binding to the benzodiazepine site, but they did so at concentrations substantially greater than those that inhibited 35S-TBPS binding. The anticonvulsant GBLs and TBLs had no effect on either (3H)muscimol or (3H)flunitrazepam binding. In contrast to the GBLs and TBLs, pentobarbital inhibited TBPS binding in a manner that was blocked by bicuculline methobromide, and it enhanced both (3H)flunitrazepam and (3H)muscimol binding. Both ethosuximide and tetramethylsuccinimide, neuroactive compounds structurally similar to GBLs, competitively displaced 35S-TBPS from the picrotoxin receptor and both compounds were weak inhibitors of (3H) muscimol binding. In addition, ethosuximide also partially diminished (3H)flunitrazepam binding. These data demonstrate that the site of action of alkyl-substituted GBLs and TBLs is different from that of GABA, barbiturates and benzodiazepines.

  2. Modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid-mediated inhibitory synaptic currents in dissociated cortical cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Vicini, S; Alho, H; Costa, E; Mienville, J M; Santi, M R; Vaccarino, F M

    1986-01-01

    Inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid-mediated synaptic currents were studied in dissociated primary cultures of neonatal rat cortex with the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Immunocytochemical staining of the cultures showed the presence of a large number of glutamic acid decarboxylase-containing neurons, and electrical stimulation of randomly selected neurons produced in many cases chloride-mediated and bicuculline-sensitive inhibitory synaptic currents in postsynaptic cells. The amplitude and decay time of the inhibitory synaptic currents were increased by flunitrazepam and decreased by the beta-carboline derivative methyl 6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate, two high-affinity ligands for the allosteric regulatory sites of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors. The imidazobenzodiazepine Ro 15-1788, another high-affinity ligand of the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor regulatory sites that has negligible intrinsic activity, blocked the action of flunitrazepam and beta-carboline. However, Ro 15-1788 also increased the decay rate of the inhibitory synaptic currents. This might suggest that an endogenous ligand for the benzodiazepine-beta-carboline binding site is operative in gamma-aminobutyric acid-mediated synaptic transmission. Images PMID:3097650

  3. Topological dispositions of lysine. alpha. 380 and lysine. gamma. 486 in the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.P. )

    1991-04-23

    The locations have been determined, with respect to the plasma membrane, of lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 in the {alpha} subunit and the {gamma} subunit, respectively, of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. Immunoadsorbents were constructed that recognize the carboxy terminus of the peptide GVKYIAE released by proteolytic digestion from positions 378-384 in the amino acid sequence of the {alpha} subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and the carboxy terminus of the peptide KYVP released by proteolytic digestion from positions 486-489 in the amino acid sequence of the {gamma} subunit. They were used to isolate these peptides from proteolytic digests of polypeptides from the acetylcholine receptor. Sealed vesicles containing the native acetylcholine receptor were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium ({sup 3}H)-borohydride. The effect of saponin on the incorporation of pyridoxamine phosphate into lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 from the acetylcholine receptor in these vesicles was assessed with the immunoadsorbents. The conclusions that follow from these results are that lysine {alpha}380 is on the inside surface of a vesicle and lysine {gamma}486 is on the outside surface. Because a majority (85%) of the total binding sites for {alpha}-bungarotoxin bind the toxin in the absence of saponin, the majority of the vesicles are right side out with the inside of the vesicle corresponding to the cytoplasmic surface and the outside of the vesicle corresponding to the extracytoplasmic, synaptic surface. Because lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 lie on opposite sides of the membrane, a membrane-spanning segment must be located between the two positions occupied by these two amino acids in the common sequence of a polypeptide of the acetylcholine receptor.

  4. Gamma delta T cell receptor gene expression by muscle-infiltrating lymphocytes in the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed Central

    O'Hanlon, T P; Messersmith, W A; Dalakas, M C; Plotz, P H; Miller, F W

    1995-01-01

    Autoreactive alpha beta T cells have been implicated as playing a primary pathogenic role in a group of diseases characterized by chronic muscle inflammation known as the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM). gamma delta T cells, a distinct and enigmatic class of T cells, play a less certain role in a variety of human autoimmune diseases including the IIM. In an attempt to understand the significance of gamma delta T cells in the IIM, we utilized a sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique to evaluate gamma delta T cell receptor (TCR) gene expression in 45 muscle biopsies obtained from 42 IIM patients (17 polymyositis, 12 dermatomyositis, and 13 inclusion body myositis). gamma delta TCR gene expression was not detected in 36 specimens, the majority of muscle biopsies surveyed. gamma delta TCR gene expression by muscle-infiltrating lymphocytes was detected among nine clinically heterogeneous patients. We further analysed the junctional sequence composition of the V gamma 3 and V delta 1 transcripts, whose expression was prominent among gamma delta positive patients. DNA sequence analysis of V gamma 3 amplification products from two patients revealed the presence of several productively rearranged transcripts with amino acid sequence similarities within the V gamma 3-N-J gamma junctional domain. No amino acid sequence similarities were evident within the V delta-N-D delta-N-J delta region of V delta 1 transcripts amplified from four patients, although a distinct and dominant clonotype was detected from each patient. Our cumulative data suggest that unlike alpha beta T cells, gamma delta T cells do not play a prominent pathologic role in the IIM. In fact, the sporadic nature of gamma delta TCR gene expression detected among these patients implies that gamma delta T cell infiltration, when it occurs, is a secondary event perhaps resulting from non-specific inflammatory processes. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7774065

  5. Discovery of Azetidinone Acids as Conformationally-Constrained Dual PPARalpha/gamma Agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Devasthale, P; Farrelly, D; Gu, L; Harrity, T; Cap, M; Chu, C; Kunselman, L; Morgan, N; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    A novel class of azetidinone acid-derived dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists has been synthesized for the treatment of diabetes and dyslipidemia. The preferred stereochemistry in this series for binding and functional agonist activity against both PPARa and PPAR? receptors was shown to be 3S,4S. Synthesis, in vitro and in vivo activities of compounds in this series are described. A high-yielding method for N-arylation of azetidinone esters is also described.

  6. Synergistic activation of retinoic acid (RA)-responsive genes and induction of embryonal carcinoma cell differentiation by an RA receptor {alpha} (RAR{alpha})-, RAR{beta}-, or RAR{gamma}-selective ligand in combination with retinoid Z receptor-specific ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, B.; Taneja, R.; Chambon, P.

    1995-12-01

    This research indicates thatn retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-retinoid X receptor (RXR) heterodimers activate transcription of RA-responsive genes and induce cell differentiation of P19 and F9 cells in a ligand-dependent manner. 43 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Developmental expression of retinoic acid receptors (RARs)

    PubMed Central

    Dollé, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Here, I review the developmental expression features of genes encoding the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the 'retinoid X' or rexinoid receptors (RXRs). The first detailed expression studies were performed in the mouse over two decades ago, following the cloning of the murine Rar genes. These studies revealed complex expression features at all stages of post-implantation development, one receptor gene (Rara) showing widespread expression, the two others (Rarb and Rarg) with highly regionalized and/or cell type-specific expression in both neural and non-neural tissues. Rxr genes also have either widespread (Rxra, Rxrb), or highly-restricted (Rxrg) expression patterns. Studies performed in zebrafish and Xenopus demonstrated expression of Rar and Rxr genes (both maternal and zygotic), at early pre-gastrulation stages. The eventual characterization of specific enzymes involved in the synthesis of retinoic acid (retinol/retinaldehyde dehydrogenases), or the triggering of its catabolism (CYP26 cytochrome P450s), all of them showing differential expression patterns, led to a clearer understanding of the phenomenons regulated by retinoic acid signaling during development. Functional studies involving targeted gene disruptions in the mouse, and additional approaches such as dominant negative receptor expression in other models, have pinpointed the specific, versus partly redundant, roles of the RARs and RXRs in many developing organ systems. These pleiotropic roles are summarized hereafter in relationship to the receptors’ expression patterns. PMID:19471585

  8. Interactions of methoxyacetic acid with androgen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Gargi; Hurst, Christopher H.; Waxman, David J.

    2009-07-15

    Endocrine disruptive compounds (EDC) alter hormone-stimulated, nuclear receptor-dependent physiological and developmental processes by a variety of mechanisms. One recently identified mode of endocrine disruption is through hormone sensitization, where the EDC modulates intracellular signaling pathways that control nuclear receptor function, thereby regulating receptor transcriptional activity indirectly. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA), the primary, active metabolite of the industrial solvent ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and a testicular toxicant, belongs to this EDC class. Modulation of nuclear receptor activity by MAA could contribute to the testicular toxicity associated with MAA exposure. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of MAA on the transcriptional activity of several nuclear receptors including the androgen receptor (AR), which plays a pivotal role in the development and maturation of spermatocytes. AR transcriptional activity is shown to be increased by MAA through a tyrosine kinase signaling pathway that involves PI3-kinase. In a combinatorial setting with AR antagonists, MAA potentiated the AR response without significantly altering the EC{sub 50} for androgen responsiveness, partially alleviating the antagonistic effect of the anti-androgens. Finally, MAA treatment of TM3 mouse testicular Leydig cells markedly increased the expression of Cyp17a1 and Shbg while suppressing Igfbp3 expression by {approx} 90%. Deregulation of these genes may alter androgen synthesis and action in a manner that contributes to MAA-induced testicular toxicity.

  9. EFFECT OF LEAD ON GAMMA AMINO BUTYRIC ACID SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project studies the inhibitory effect of lead on the enzymatic activity of brain glutamic amino acid decarboxylase (GADC). The enzyme is responsible for the catalytic formation of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) inhibitory neurons which is believed to be involved with the tra...

  10. Carbonic anhydrase III regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}2

    SciTech Connect

    Mitterberger, Maria C.; Kim, Geumsoo; Rostek, Ursula; Levine, Rodney L.; Zwerschke, Werner

    2012-05-01

    Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII) is an isoenzyme of the CA family. Because of its low specific anhydrase activity, physiological functions in addition to hydrating CO{sub 2} have been proposed. CAIII expression is highly induced in adipogenesis and CAIII is the most abundant protein in adipose tissues. The function of CAIII in both preadipocytes and adipocytes is however unknown. In the present study we demonstrate that adipogenesis is greatly increased in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from CAIII knockout (KO) mice, as demonstrated by a greater than 10-fold increase in the induction of fatty acid-binding protein-4 (FABP4) and increased triglyceride formation in CAIII{sup -/-} MEFs compared with CAIII{sup +/+} cells. To address the underlying mechanism, we investigated the expression of the two adipogenic key regulators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-{alpha}. We found a considerable (approximately 1000-fold) increase in the PPAR{gamma}2 expression in the CAIII{sup -/-} MEFs. Furthermore, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous CAIII in NIH 3T3-L1 preadipocytes resulted in a significant increase in the induction of PPAR{gamma}2 and FABP4. When both CAIII and PPAR{gamma}2 were knocked down, FABP4 was not induced. We conclude that down-regulation of CAIII in preadipocytes enhances adipogenesis and that CAIII is a regulator of adipogenic differentiation which acts at the level of PPAR{gamma}2 gene expression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discover a novel function of Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that CAIII is a regulator of adipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that CAIII acts at the level of PPAR{gamma}2 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our data contribute to a better understanding of the role of CAIII in fat tissue.

  11. Electrophysiological evidence for acidic, basic, and neutral amino acid olfactory receptor sites in the catfish.

    PubMed

    Caprio, J; Byrd, R P

    1984-09-01

    Electrophysiological experiments indicate that olfactory receptors of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, contain different receptor sites for the acidic (A), basic (B), and neutral amino acids; further, at least two partially interacting neutral sites exist, one for the hydrophilic neutral amino acids containing short side chains (SCN), and the second for the hydrophobic amino acids containing long side chains (LCN). The extent of cross-adaptation was determined by comparing the electro-olfactogram (EOG) responses to 20 "test" amino acids during continuous bathing of the olfactory mucosa with water only (control) to those during each of the eight "adapting" amino acid regimes. Both the adapting and test amino acids were adjusted in concentrations to provide approximately equal response magnitudes in the unadapted state. Under all eight adapting regimes, the test EOG responses were reduced from those obtained in the unadapted state, but substantial quantitative differences resulted, depending upon the molecular structure of the adapting stimulus. Analyses of the patterns of EOG responses to the test stimuli identified and characterized the respective "transduction processes," a term used to describe membrane events initiated by a particular subset of amino acid stimuli that are intricately linked to the origin of the olfactory receptor potential. Only when the stimulus compounds interact with different transduction processes are the stimuli assumed to bind to different membrane "sites." Four relatively independent L-alpha-amino acid transduction processes (and thus at least four binding sites) identified in this report include: (a) the A process for aspartic and glutamic acids; (b) the B process for arginine and lysine; (c) the SCN process for glycine, alanine, serine, glutamine, and possibly cysteine; (d) the LCN process for methionine, ethionine, valine, norvaline, leucine, norleucine, glutamic acid-gamma-methyl ester, histidine, phenylalanine, and also

  12. Steroid receptor coactivator 1 links the steroid and interferon gamma response pathways.

    PubMed

    Tzortzakaki, Eleni; Spilianakis, Charalambos; Zika, Eleni; Kretsovali, Androniki; Papamatheakis, Joseph

    2003-12-01

    We show here that steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1) is a coactivator of MHC class II genes that stimulates their interferon gamma (IFNgamma) and class II transactivator (CIITA)-mediated expression. SRC-1 interacts physically with the N-terminal activation domain of CIITA through two regions: one central [extending from amino acids (aa) 360-839] that contains the nuclear receptors binding region and one C-terminal (aa 1138-1441) that contains the activation domain 2. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we show that SRC-1 recruitment on the class II promoter is enhanced upon IFNgamma stimulation. Most importantly, SRC-1 relieves the inhibitory action of estrogens on the IFNgamma-mediated induction of class II genes in transient transfection assays. We provide evidence that inhibition by estradiol is due to multiple events such as slightly reduced recruitment of CIITA and SRC-1 and severely inhibited assembly of the preinitiation complex. PMID:12933903

  13. Molecular identification of duck and quail common cytokine receptor gamma chain genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common cytokine receptor gamma chain family cytokines play crucial roles in the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. Unlike mammals, chickens possess two different gamma chains transcripts. To determine if this difference is present in other avian species, gamma chain cDNA and genomic...

  14. Evolution of retinoic acid receptors and retinoic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Schubert, Michael; Laudet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a vitamin A-derived morphogen controlling important developmental processes in vertebrates, and more generally in chordates, including axial patterning and tissue formation and differentiation. In the embryo, endogenous RA levels are controlled by RA synthesizing and degrading enzymes and the RA signal is transduced by two retinoid receptors: the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and the retinoid X receptor (RXR). Both RAR and RXR are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors and mainly act as heterodimers to activate the transcription of target genes in the presence of their ligand, all-trans RA. This signaling pathway was long thought to be a chordate innovation, however, recent findings of gene homologs involved in RA signaling in the genomes of a wide variety of non-chordate animals, including ambulacrarians (sea urchins and acorn worms) and lophotrochozoans (annelids and mollusks), challenged this traditional view and suggested that the RA signaling pathway might have a more ancient evolutionary origin than previously thought. In this chapter, we discuss the evolutionary history of the RA signaling pathway, and more particularly of the RARs, which might have experienced independent gene losses and duplications in different animal lineages. In sum, the available data reveal novel insights into the origin of the RA signaling pathway as well as into the evolutionary history of the RARs. PMID:24962881

  15. Ligand-induced IFN gamma receptor tyrosine phosphorylation couples the receptor to its signal transduction system (p91).

    PubMed Central

    Greenlund, A C; Farrar, M A; Viviano, B L; Schreiber, R D

    1994-01-01

    Herein we report that interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) induces the rapid and reversible tyrosine phosphorylation of the IFN gamma receptor. Using a panel of receptor intracellular domain mutants, we show that a membrane-proximal LPKS sequence (residues 266-269) is required for ligand-induced tyrosine kinase activation and/or kinase-receptor association and biological responsiveness, and a functionally critical membrane-distal tyrosine residue (Y440) is a target of the activated enzyme. The biological significance of Y440 phosphorylation was demonstrated by showing that a receptor-derived nonapeptide corresponding to receptor residues 436-444 and containing phosphorylated Y440 bound specifically to p91, blocked p91 phosphorylation and inhibited the generation of an active p91-containing transcription factor complex. In contrast, nonphosphorylated wild-type, phosphorylated mutant, or phosphorylated irrelevant peptides did not. Moreover, the phosphorylated Y440-containing peptide did not interact with a related but distinct latent transcription factor (p113) which is activatible by IFN alpha but not IFN gamma. These results thus document the specific and inducible association of p91 with the phosphorylated IFN gamma receptor and thereby elucidate the mechanism by which ligand couples the IFN gamma receptor to its signal transduction system. Images PMID:8156998

  16. Human locus coeruleus neurons express the GABA(A) receptor gamma2 subunit gene and produce benzodiazepine binding.

    PubMed

    Hellsten, Kati S; Sinkkonen, Saku T; Hyde, Thomas M; Kleinman, Joel E; Särkioja, Terttu; Maksimow, Anu; Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Korpi, Esa R

    2010-06-21

    Noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus project throughout the cerebral cortex and multiple subcortical structures. Alterations in the locus coeruleus firing are associated with vigilance states and with fear and anxiety disorders. Brain ionotropic type A receptors for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) serve as targets for anxiolytic and sedative drugs, and play an essential regulatory role in the locus coeruleus. GABA(A) receptors are composed of a variable array of subunits forming heteropentameric chloride channels with different pharmacological properties. The gamma2 subunit is essential for the formation of the binding site for benzodiazepines, allosteric modulators of GABA(A) receptors that are clinically often used as sedatives/hypnotics and anxiolytics. There are contradictory reports in regard to the gamma2 subunit's expression and participation in the functional GABA(A) receptors in the mammalian locus coeruleus. We report here that the gamma2 subunit is transcribed and participates in the assembly of functional GABA(A) receptors in the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neuromelanin-containing neurons within postmortem human locus coeruleus as demonstrated by in situ hybridization with specific gamma2 subunit oligonucleotides and autoradiographic assay for flumazenil-sensitive [(3)H]Ro 15-4513 binding to benzodiazepine sites. These sites were also sensitive to the alpha1 subunit-preferring agonist zolpidem. Our data suggest a species difference in the expression profiles of the alpha1 and gamma2 subunits in the locus coeruleus, with the sedation-related benzodiazepine sites being more important in man than rodents. This may explain the repeated failures in the transition of novel drugs with a promising neuropharmacological profile in rodents to human clinical usage, due to intolerable sedative effects. PMID:20417252

  17. The activation mechanism of alpha1beta2gamma2S and alpha3beta3gamma2S GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Angelo; Harrison, Neil L

    2010-01-01

    The alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha3beta3gamma2 are two isoforms of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor that are widely distributed in the brain. Both are found at synapses, for example in the thalamus, where they mediate distinctly different inhibitory postsynaptic current profiles, particularly with respect to decay time. The two isoforms were expressed in HEK293 cells, and single-channel activity was recorded from outside-out patches. The kinetic characteristics of both isoforms were investigated by analyzing single-channel currents over a wide range of GABA concentrations. Alpha1beta2gamma2 channels exhibited briefer active periods than alpha3beta3gamma2 channels over the entire range of agonist concentrations and had lower intraburst open probabilities at subsaturating concentrations. Activation mechanisms were constructed by fitting postulated schemes to data recorded at saturating and subsaturating GABA concentrations simultaneously. Reaction mechanisms were ranked according to log-likelihood values and how accurately they simulated ensemble currents. The highest ranked mechanism for both channels consisted of two sequential binding steps, followed by three conducting and three nonconducting configurations. The equilibrium dissociation constant for GABA at alpha3beta3gamma2 channels was approximately 2.6 microM compared with approximately 19 microM for alpha1beta2gamma2 channels, suggesting that GABA binds to the alpha3beta3gamma2 channels with higher affinity. A notable feature of the mechanism was that two consecutive doubly liganded shut states preceded all three open configurations. The lifetime of the third shut state was briefer for the alpha3beta3gamma2 channels. The longer active periods, higher affinity, and preference for conducting states are consistent with the slower decay of inhibitory currents at synapses that contain alpha3beta3gamma2 channels. The reaction mechanism we describe here may also be appropriate for the analysis of other

  18. Purification and characterization of the human interferon-. gamma. receptor from placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, J.; Sheehan, K.C.F.; Chance, C.; Thomas, M.L.; Schreiber, R.D. )

    1988-07-01

    Purification of the human interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) receptor was facilitated by identification of human placenta as a large-scale receptor source. When analyzed in radioligand binding experiments, intact placental membranes and detergent-solubilized membrane proteins expressed 1.3 and 5.9 {times} 10{sup 12} receptors per mg of protein, respectively, values that were 13-163 times greater than that observed for U937 membranes. Two protocols were followed to purify the IFN-{gamma} receptor from octyl glucoside-solubilized membranes: (i) sequential affinity chromatography over wheat germ agglutinin- and INF-{gamma}-Sepharose and (ii) affinity chromatography over columns containing receptor-specific monoclonal antibody and wheat germ agglutinin. Both procedures resulted in fully active preparations that were 70-90% pure. Purified receptor migrated as a single molecular species of 90 kDa either when analyzed on silver-stained NaDodSO{sub 4}/polyacrylamide gels or when subjected to electrophoretic transfer blot analysis using a labeled IFN-{gamma} receptor-specific monoclonal antibody. The identity of the 90-kDa component as the receptor was confirmed by demonstrating its ability to specifically bind {sup 125}I-labeled IFN-{gamma} following NaDodSO{sub 4}/PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose. The ligand binding site, the epitope for the receptor-specific monoclonal antibody, and all of the N-linked carbohydrate could be localized to the 55-kDa domain of the molecule.

  19. Kaempferol is an estrogen-related receptor alpha and gamma inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjian; Fang, Fang; Huang, Zhiyan; Wang, Yanfei; Wong, Chiwai

    2009-02-18

    Kaempferol is a dietary flavonoid that is thought to function as a selective estrogen receptor modulator. In this study, we established that kaempferol also functions as an inverse agonist for estrogen-related receptors alpha and gamma (ERRalpha and ERRgamma). We demonstrated that kaempferol binds to ERRalpha and ERRgamma and blocks their interaction with coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha). Kaempferol also suppressed the expressions of ERR-target genes pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 and 4 (PDK2 and PDK4). This evidence suggests that kaempferol may exert some of its biological effect through both estrogen receptors and estrogen-related receptors. PMID:19171140

  20. Formation of biologically relevant carboxylic acids during the gamma irradiation of acetic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1976-01-01

    Irradiation of aqueous solutions of acetic acid with gamma rays produced several carboxylic acids in small yield. Their identification was based on the technique of gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry. Some of these acids are Krebs Cycle intermediates. Their simultaneous formation in experiments simulating the primitive conditions on the earth suggests that metabolic pathways may have had their origin in prebiotic chemical processes.

  1. Revealing a steroid receptor ligand as a unique PPAR[gamma] agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shengchen; Han, Ying; Shi, Yuzhe; Rong, Hui; Zheng, Songyang; Jin, Shikan; Lin, Shu-Yong; Lin, Sheng-Cai; Li, Yong

    2012-06-28

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) regulates metabolic homeostasis and is a molecular target for anti-diabetic drugs. We report here the identification of a steroid receptor ligand, RU-486, as an unexpected PPAR{gamma} agonist, thereby uncovering a novel signaling route for this steroid drug. Similar to rosiglitazone, RU-486 modulates the expression of key PPAR{gamma} target genes and promotes adipocyte differentiation, but with a lower adipogenic activity. Structural and functional studies of receptor-ligand interactions reveal the molecular basis for a unique binding mode for RU-486 in the PPAR{gamma} ligand-binding pocket with distinctive properties and epitopes, providing the molecular mechanisms for the discrimination of RU-486 from thiazolidinediones (TZDs) drugs. Our findings together indicate that steroid compounds may represent an alternative approach for designing non-TZD PPAR{gamma} ligands in the treatment of insulin resistance.

  2. Dopamine D3 Receptors Inhibit Hippocampal Gamma Oscillations by Disturbing CA3 Pyramidal Cell Firing Synchrony.

    PubMed

    Lemercier, Clément E; Schulz, Steffen B; Heidmann, Karin E; Kovács, Richard; Gerevich, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    Cortical gamma oscillations are associated with cognitive processes and are altered in several neuropsychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Since dopamine D3 receptors are possible targets in treatment of these conditions, it is of great importance to understand their role in modulation of gamma oscillations. The effect of D3 receptors on gamma oscillations and the underlying cellular mechanisms were investigated by extracellular local field potential and simultaneous intracellular sharp micro-electrode recordings in the CA3 region of the hippocampus in vitro. D3 receptors decreased the power and broadened the bandwidth of gamma oscillations induced by acetylcholine or kainate. Blockade of the D3 receptors resulted in faster synchronization of the oscillations, suggesting that endogenous dopamine in the hippocampus slows down the dynamics of gamma oscillations by activation of D3 receptors. Investigating the underlying cellular mechanisms for these effects showed that D3 receptor activation decreased the rate of action potentials (APs) during gamma oscillations and reduced the precision of the AP phase coupling to the gamma cycle in CA3 pyramidal cells. The results may offer an explanation how selective activation of D3 receptors may impair cognition and how, in converse, D3 antagonists may exert pro-cognitive and antipsychotic effects. PMID:26779018

  3. Dopamine D3 Receptors Inhibit Hippocampal Gamma Oscillations by Disturbing CA3 Pyramidal Cell Firing Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Lemercier, Clément E.; Schulz, Steffen B.; Heidmann, Karin E.; Kovács, Richard; Gerevich, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Cortical gamma oscillations are associated with cognitive processes and are altered in several neuropsychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. Since dopamine D3 receptors are possible targets in treatment of these conditions, it is of great importance to understand their role in modulation of gamma oscillations. The effect of D3 receptors on gamma oscillations and the underlying cellular mechanisms were investigated by extracellular local field potential and simultaneous intracellular sharp micro-electrode recordings in the CA3 region of the hippocampus in vitro. D3 receptors decreased the power and broadened the bandwidth of gamma oscillations induced by acetylcholine or kainate. Blockade of the D3 receptors resulted in faster synchronization of the oscillations, suggesting that endogenous dopamine in the hippocampus slows down the dynamics of gamma oscillations by activation of D3 receptors. Investigating the underlying cellular mechanisms for these effects showed that D3 receptor activation decreased the rate of action potentials (APs) during gamma oscillations and reduced the precision of the AP phase coupling to the gamma cycle in CA3 pyramidal cells. The results may offer an explanation how selective activation of D3 receptors may impair cognition and how, in converse, D3 antagonists may exert pro-cognitive and antipsychotic effects. PMID:26779018

  4. IP receptor-dependent activation of PPAR{gamma} by stable prostacyclin analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Falcetti, Emilia; Flavell, David M.; Staels, Bart; Tinker, Andrew; Haworth, Sheila G.; Clapp, Lucie H. . E-mail: l.clapp@ucl.ac.uk

    2007-09-07

    Stable prostacyclin analogues can signal through cell surface IP receptors or by ligand binding to nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). So far these agents have been reported to activate PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{delta} but not PPAR{gamma}. Given PPAR{gamma} agonists and prostacyclin analogues both inhibit cell proliferation, we postulated that the IP receptor might elicit PPAR{gamma} activation. Using a dual luciferase reporter gene assay in HEK-293 cells stably expressing the IP receptor or empty vector, we found that prostacyclin analogues only activated PPAR{gamma} in the presence of the IP receptor. Moreover, the novel IP receptor antagonist, RO1138452, but not inhibitors of the cyclic AMP pathway, prevented activation. Likewise, the anti-proliferative effects of treprostinil observed in IP receptor expressing cells, were partially inhibited by the PPAR{gamma} antagonist, GW9662. We conclude that PPAR{gamma} is activated through the IP receptor via a cyclic AMP-independent mechanism and contributes to the anti-growth effects of prostacyclin analogues.

  5. Nutritional Signaling via Free Fatty Acid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Junki; Hasegawa, Sae; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Nakajima, Akira; Kimura, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when demand for energy arises. Dysfunction of energy balance by excess food intake leads to metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFAs) provided by dietary fat are not only important nutrients, but also contribute key physiological functions via FFA receptor (FFAR)-mediated signaling molecules, which depend on FFAs' carbon chain length and the ligand specificity of the receptors. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs are critical for metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and contribute to energy homeostasis. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 and GPR120 improved glucose metabolism and systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the anti-inflammation and energy metabolism effects of short chain FAs have been linked to the activation of GPR41 and GPR43. In this review, we summarize recent progress in research on FFAs and their physiological roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. PMID:27023530

  6. Nutritional Signaling via Free Fatty Acid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Junki; Hasegawa, Sae; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Nakajima, Akira; Kimura, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when demand for energy arises. Dysfunction of energy balance by excess food intake leads to metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFAs) provided by dietary fat are not only important nutrients, but also contribute key physiological functions via FFA receptor (FFAR)-mediated signaling molecules, which depend on FFAs’ carbon chain length and the ligand specificity of the receptors. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs are critical for metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and contribute to energy homeostasis. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 and GPR120 improved glucose metabolism and systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the anti-inflammation and energy metabolism effects of short chain FAs have been linked to the activation of GPR41 and GPR43. In this review, we summarize recent progress in research on FFAs and their physiological roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. PMID:27023530

  7. gamma-Aminobutyric acid uptake inhibition and anticonvulsant activity of nipecotic acid esters.

    PubMed

    Crider, A M; Wood, J D; Tschappat, K D; Hinko, C N; Seibert, K

    1984-11-01

    n-Alkyl esters of nipecotic acid were prepared by Fischer esterification, and the esters were evaluated against bicuculline-induced seizures in mice. Evaluation of the alkyl esters for inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake into mouse whole brain mini-slices revealed that the order of potency was proportional to chain length. The octyl ester inhibited gamma-aminobutyric acid and beta-alanine uptakes by apparently nonspecific mechanisms. A variety of phenyl esters of nipecotic acid were also synthesized utilizing either dicyclohexylcarbodiimide or 1,1'-carbonyldiimidazole as the condensing agent. Most of the phenyl esters were potent inhibitors of gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake. The uptake inhibition appeared to involve specific and nonspecific (detergent-like) mechanisms. The m-nitrophenyl and p-nitrophenyl esters were particularly potent against bicuculline-induced seizures in mice. PMID:6520765

  8. Enhancement of arachidonic acid signaling pathway by nicotinic acid receptor HM74A

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuting . E-mail: ytang@prdus.jnj.com; Zhou, Lubing; Gunnet, Joseph W.; Wines, Pamela G.; Cryan, Ellen V.; Demarest, Keith T.

    2006-06-23

    HM74A is a G protein-coupled receptor for nicotinic acid (niacin), which has been used clinically to treat dyslipidemia for decades. The molecular mechanisms whereby niacin exerts its pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In addition, the most common side effect in niacin therapy is skin flushing that is caused by prostaglandin release, suggesting that the phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2})/arachidonic acid (AA) pathway is involved. Various eicosanoids have been shown to activate peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) that play a diverse array of roles in lipid metabolism. To further elucidate the potential roles of HM74A in mediating the therapeutic effects and/or side effects of niacin, we sought to explore the signaling events upon HM74A activation. Here we demonstrated that HM74A synergistically enhanced UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner in A431 cells. Activation of HM74A also led to Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization and enhanced bradykinin-promoted Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization through Gi protein. While HM74A increased ERK1/2 activation by the bradykinin receptor, it had no effects on UTP-promoted ERK1/2 activation.Furthermore, UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release was significantly decreased in the presence of both MAPK kinase inhibitor PD 098059 and PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. However, the synergistic effects of HM74A were not dramatically affected by co-treatment with both inhibitors, indicating the cross-talk occurred at the receptor level. Finally, stimulation of A431 cells transiently transfected with PPRE-luciferase with AA significantly induced luciferase activity, mimicking the effects of PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that alteration of AA signaling pathway can regulate gene expression via endogenous PPARs.

  9. Odorant receptors activated by amino acids in sensory neurons of the channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, T T; Caprio, J

    1993-12-01

    Odorant receptors activated by amino acids were investigated with patch-clamp techniques in olfactory receptor neurons of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. The L-isomers of alanine, norvaline, arginine, and glutamate, known to act predominantly on different olfactory receptor sites, activated nondesensitizing inward currents with amplitudes of -2.5 to -280 pA in olfactory neurons voltage-clamped at membrane potentials of -72 or -82 mV. Different amino acids were shown to induce responses in the same sensory neurons; however, the amplitude and the kinetics of the observed whole cell currents differed among the stimuli and may therefore reflect activation of different amino acid receptor types or combinations of receptor types in these cells. Amino acid-induced currents appeared to have diverse voltage dependence and could also be classified according to the amplitude of the spontaneous channel fluctuations underlying the macroscopic currents. A mean single-channel conductance (gamma) of 360 fS was estimated from small noise whole-cell currents evoked by arginine within the same olfactory neuron in which a mean gamma value of 23.6 pS was estimated from 'large noise' response to norvaline. Quiescent olfactory neurons fired bursts of action potentials in response to either amino acid stimulation or application of 8-Br-cyclic GMP (100 microM), and voltage-gated channels underlying generation of action potentials were similar in these neurons. However, in whole-cell voltage-clamp, 8-Br-cyclic GMP evoked large rectangular current pulses, and single-channel conductances of 275, 220, and 110 pS were obtained from the discrete current levels. These results suggest that in addition to the cyclic nucleotide-gated transduction channels, olfactory neurons of the channel catfish possess a variety of odor receptors coupled to different types of transduction channels. PMID:8133240

  10. Pharmacology of bile acid receptors: Evolution of bile acids from simple detergents to complex signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Copple, Bryan L; Li, Tiangang

    2016-02-01

    For many years, bile acids were thought to only function as detergents which solubilize fats and facilitate the uptake of fat-soluble vitamins in the intestine. Many early observations; however, demonstrated that bile acids regulate more complex processes, such as bile acids synthesis and immune cell function through activation of signal transduction pathways. These studies were the first to suggest that receptors may exist for bile acids. Ultimately, seminal studies by many investigators led to the discovery of several bile acid-activated receptors including the farnesoid X receptor, the vitamin D receptor, the pregnane X receptor, TGR5, α5 β1 integrin, and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2. Several of these receptors are expressed outside of the gastrointestinal system, indicating that bile acids may have diverse functions throughout the body. Characterization of the functions of these receptors over the last two decades has identified many important roles for these receptors in regulation of bile acid synthesis, transport, and detoxification; regulation of glucose utilization; regulation of fatty acid synthesis and oxidation; regulation of immune cell function; regulation of energy expenditure; and regulation of neural processes such as gastric motility. Through these many functions, bile acids regulate many aspects of digestion ranging from uptake of essential vitamins to proper utilization of nutrients. Accordingly, within a short time period, bile acids moved beyond simple detergents and into the realm of complex signaling molecules. Because of the important processes that bile acids regulate through activation of receptors, drugs that target these receptors are under development for the treatment of several diseases, including cholestatic liver disease and metabolic syndrome. In this review, we will describe the various bile acid receptors, the signal transduction pathways activated by these receptors, and briefly discuss the physiological processes that

  11. Biochemical signal transmitted by Fc gamma receptors: phospholipase A2 activity of Fc gamma 2b receptor of murine macrophage cell line P388D1.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, T; Saito-Taki, T; Sadasivan, R; Nitta, T

    1982-01-01

    The detergent lysate of the P388D1 macrophage cell line was subjected to affinity chromatography on two different media, Sepharose coupled to heat-aggregated human IgG (IgG-Sepharose) and Sepharose coupled to the phosphatidylcholine analog rac-1-(9-carboxyl)nonyl-2-hexadecylglycero-3-phosphocholine (PC-Sepharose). Both IgG- and phosphatidylcholine-binding proteins were further purified by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration and isoelectric focusing in the presence of 6 M urea. The isolated IgG-binding proteins specifically bound to IgG2a, but not to IgG2b, whereas the isolated phosphatidylcholine-binding proteins specifically bound to IgG2b but not to IgG2a. Phosphatidylcholine-binding proteins possessed a typical phospholipase A2 activity (phosphatide 2-acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.4), which was maximal (10 mumol/min per mg of protein) at pH 9.5, depended on Ca2+, and was specific for cleavage of fatty acid from the C-2 position of the glycerol backbone of phosphatidylcholine. The noted enzymatic activity was augmented 4-fold by preincubating phosphatidylcholine-binding proteins with heat-aggregated murine IgG2b but not with IgG2a. IgG-binding proteins, on the other hand, are devoid of any detectable phospholipase A2 activity. Thus, the functional significance of Fc gamma 2b receptor of P388D1 macrophage cell line would be the generation of phospholipase A2 activity at the cell surface upon specific binding to Fc gamma 2b fragment. PMID:6804944

  12. Intracerebroventricular responses to neuropeptide gamma in the conscious rat: characterization of its receptor with selective antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Picard, P.; Couture, R.

    1996-01-01

    1. The cardiovascular and behavioural effects elicited by the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of neuropeptide gamma (NP gamma) in the conscious rat were assessed before and 5 min after i.c.v. pretreatment with antagonists selective for NK1 (RP 67,580), NK2 (SR 48,968) and NK3 (R 820) receptors. In addition, the central effects of NP gamma before and after desensitization of the NK1 and NK2 receptors with high doses of substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) were compared. 2. Intracerebroventricular injection of NP gamma (10-780 pmol) evoked dose- and time-dependent increases in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), face washing, head scratching, grooming and wet-dog shake behaviours. Similar injection of vehicle or 1 pmol NP gamma had no significant effect on those parameters. 3. The cardiovascular and behavioural responses elicited by NP gamma (25 pmol) were significantly and dose-dependently reduced by pretreatment with 650 pmol and 6.5 nmol of SR 48,968. No inhibition of NP gamma responses was observed when 6.5 nmol of RP 67,580 was used in a similar study. Moreover, the prior co-administration of SR 48,968 (6.5 nmol) and RP 67,580 (6.5 nmol) with or without R 820 (6.5 nmol) did not reduce further the central effects of NP gamma and significant residual responses (30-50%) remained. 4. No tachyphylaxis to NP gamma-induced cardiovascular and behavioural changes was observed when two consecutive injections of 25 pmol NP gamma were given 24 h apart. 5. Simultaneous NK1 and NK2 receptor desensitization reduced significantly central effects mediated by 25 pmol NP gamma. However, significant residual responses persisted as seen after pretreatment with SR 48,968. 6. The results suggest that the central effects of NP gamma are mediated partly by NK2 receptors and by another putative tachykinin receptor subtype (NP gamma receptor?) that appears to be different from NK1 and NK3 receptors. PMID:8789375

  13. Allosteric modulation of retinal GABA receptors by ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Calero, Cecilia I.; Vickers, Evan; Moraga Cid, Gustavo; Aguayo, Luis G.; von Gersdorff, Henrique; Calvo, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA and GABAC) belong to the cys-loop receptor family of ligand-gated ion channels. GABAC receptors are highly expressed in the retina, mainly localized at the axon terminals of bipolar cells. Ascorbic acid, an endogenous redox agent, modulates the function of diverse proteins, and basal levels of ascorbic acid in the retina are very high. However, the effect of ascorbic acid on retinal GABA receptors has not been studied. Here we show that the function of GABAC and GABAA receptors is regulated by ascorbic acid. Patch-clamp recordings from bipolar cell terminals in goldfish retinal slices revealed that GABAC receptor-mediated currents activated by tonic background levels of extracellular GABA, and GABAC currents elicited by local GABA puffs, are both significantly enhanced by ascorbic acid. In addition, a significant rundown of GABA-puff evoked currents was observed in the absence of ascorbic acid. GABA-evoked Cl- currents mediated by homomeric ρ1 GABAC receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were also potentiated by ascorbic acid in a concentration-dependent, stereospecific, reversible, and voltage-independent manner. Studies involving the chemical modification of sulfhydryl groups showed that the two cys-loop cysteines and histidine 141, all located in the ρ1 subunit extracellular domain, each play a key role in the modulation of GABAC receptors by ascorbic acid. Additionally, we show that retinal GABAA IPSCs and heterologously expressed GABAA receptor currents are similarly augmented by ascorbic acid. Our results suggest that ascorbic acid may act as an endogenous agent capable of potentiating GABAergic neurotransmission in the CNS. PMID:21715633

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma overexpression suppresses proliferation of human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Haniu, Hisao

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined the correlation between PPAR{gamma} expression and cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} overexpression reduces cell viability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show the synergistic effect of cell growth inhibition by a PPAR{gamma} agonist. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) plays an important role in the differentiation of intestinal cells and tissues. Our previous reports indicate that PPAR{gamma} is expressed at considerable levels in human colon cancer cells. This suggests that PPAR{gamma} expression may be an important factor for cell growth regulation in colon cancer. In this study, we investigated PPAR{gamma} expression in 4 human colon cancer cell lines, HT-29, LOVO, DLD-1, and Caco-2. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot analysis revealed that the relative levels of PPAR{gamma} mRNA and protein in these cells were in the order HT-29 > LOVO > Caco-2 > DLD-1. We also found that PPAR{gamma} overexpression promoted cell growth inhibition in PPAR{gamma} lower-expressing cell lines (Caco-2 and DLD-1), but not in higher-expressing cells (HT-29 and LOVO). We observed a correlation between the level of PPAR{gamma} expression and the cells' sensitivity for proliferation.

  15. gamma-Glutamyl amino acids. Transport and conversion to 5-oxoproline in the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, R.J.; Meister, A.

    1985-06-25

    Transport of gamma-glutamyl amino acids, a step in the proposed glutathione-gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase-mediated amino acid transport pathway, was examined in mouse kidney. The transport of gamma-glutamyl amino acids was demonstrated in vitro in studies on kidney slices. Transport was followed by measuring uptake of /sup 35/S after incubation of the slices in media containing gamma-glutamyl methionine (/sup 35/S)sulfone. The experimental complication associated with extracellular conversion of the gamma-glutamyl amino acid to amino acid and uptake of the latter by slices was overcome by using 5-oxoproline formation (catalyzed by intracellular gamma-glutamyl-cyclotransferase) as an indicator of gamma-glutamyl amino acid transport. This method was also successfully applied to studies on transport of gamma-glutamyl amino acids in vivo. Transport of gamma-glutamyl amino acids in vitro and in vivo is inhibited by several inhibitors of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and also by high extracellular levels of glutathione. This seems to explain urinary excretion of gamma-glutamylcystine by humans with gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase deficiency and by mice treated with inhibitors of this enzyme. Mice depleted of glutathione by treatment with buthionine sulfoximine (which inhibits glutathione synthesis) or by treatment with 2,6-dimethyl-2,5-heptadiene-4-one (which effectively interacts with tissue glutathione) exhibited significantly less transport of gamma-glutamyl amino acids than did untreated controls. The findings suggest that intracellular glutathione functions in transport of gamma-glutamyl amino acids. Evidence was also obtained for transport of gamma-glutamyl gamma-glutamylphenylalanine into kidney slices.

  16. Retinoic acid affects the expression of nuclear retinoic acid receptors in tissues of retinol-deficient rats.

    PubMed Central

    Haq, R; Pfahl, M; Chytil, F

    1991-01-01

    The multitude of biological effects of the vitamin A metabolite, retinoic acid, are mediated by nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs), which are members of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. RAR-alpha, -beta, and -gamma are encoded by three genes from which multiple isoforms can be generated. Recent studies suggest that the expression of at least some RAR isoforms can be regulated by retinoic acid in certain cell lines. Here we examined regulation of RAR expression in the adult animal. RARs were analyzed by Northern blots from lung, liver, and testes of retinol-deficient rats. Retinol deficiency caused a 65-70% decrease in the mRNA levels of lung and liver RAR-beta, whereas no change was observed in RAR-alpha and -gamma mRNA levels in these organs. In the testes of retinol-deficient animals, two transcripts, RAR-alpha 1 (3.7 kb) and RAR-alpha 2 (2.8 kb), were detected as compared with one RAR-alpha 1 (3.7 kb) transcript in retinol-sufficient testes. When retinol-deficient rats were orally administered 1 dose of retinoic acid (100 micrograms per rat), lung RAR-beta mRNA levels started to increase after 1 hr and reached a 16-fold higher level after 4 hr; after 4 hr these retinoic acid-fed rats also showed a 7-fold increase in liver RAR-beta mRNA levels as compared with levels in the retinol-deficient rats. In contrast, liver, lung, and testes RAR-alpha transcripts remained either unchanged or showed only a slight increase in response to retinoic acid. RAR-gamma was constitutively expressed in lung, and its mRNA levels were induced 2-fold by retinoic acid. These results show tissue diversity in the rapid induction of RAR-beta and RAR-gamma by retinoic acid in the adult animal and suggest distinct roles for the various receptor isoforms in the control of the retinoid response. Images PMID:1654565

  17. Adiponectin, a downstream target gene of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, controls hepatitis B virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sarah; Jung, Jaesung; Kim, Taeyeung; Park, Sun; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin

    2011-01-20

    In this study, HepG2-hepatitis B virus (HBV)-stable cells that did not overexpress HBx and HBx-deficient mutant-transfected cells were analyzed for their expression of HBV-induced, upregulated adipogenic and lipogenic genes. The mRNAs of CCAAT enhancer binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), adiponectin, liver X receptor {alpha} (LXR{alpha}), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were expressed at higher levels in HepG2-HBV and lamivudine-treated stable cells and HBx-deficient mutant-transfected cells than in the HepG2 cells. Lamivudine treatment reduced the mRNA levels of PPAR{gamma} and C/EBP{alpha}. Conversely, HBV replication was upregulated by adiponectin and PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone treatments and was downregulated by adiponectin siRNAs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that HBV replication and/or protein expression, even in the absence of HBx, upregulated adipogenic or lipogenic genes, and that the control of adiponectin might prove useful as a therapeutic modality for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B.

  18. The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma negatively regulates BMP2-induced osteoblast differentiation and bone formation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Byung-Chul; Lee, Yong-Soo; Park, Yun-Yong; Bae, In-Ho; Kim, Don-Kyu; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hong-Ran; Kim, Sun-Hun; Franceschi, Renny T; Koh, Jeong-Tae; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2009-05-22

    Estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma/ERR3/NR3B3) is a member of the orphan nuclear receptor with important functions in development and homeostasis. Recently it has been reported that ERRalpha is involved in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. In the present study we examined the role of ERRgamma in osteoblast differentiation. Here, we showed that ERRgamma is expressed in osteoblast progenitors and primary osteoblasts, and its expression is increased temporarily by BMP2. Overexpression of ERRgamma reduced BMP2-induced alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin production as well as calcified nodule formation, whereas inhibition of ERRgamma expression significantly enhanced BMP2-induced osteogenic differentiation and mineralization, suggesting that endogenous ERRgamma plays an important role in osteoblast differentiation. In addition, ERRgamma significantly repressed Runx2 transactivity on osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein promoters. We also observed that ERRgamma physically interacts with Runx2 in vitro and in vivo and competes with p300 to repress Runx2 transactivity. Notably, intramuscular injection of ERRgamma strongly inhibited BMP2-induced ectopic bone formation in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that ERRgamma is a novel negative regulator of osteoblast differentiation and bone formation via its regulation of Runx2 transactivity. PMID:19324883

  19. Comparative analyses of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Shoichi; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Kagawa, Nao; Katoh, Kazutaka

    2015-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator that activates G protein-coupled LPA receptors to exert fundamental cellular functions. Six LPA receptor genes have been identified in vertebrates and are classified into two subfamilies, the endothelial differentiation genes (edg) and the non-edg family. Studies using genetically engineered mice, frogs, and zebrafish have demonstrated that LPA receptor-mediated signaling has biological, developmental, and pathophysiological functions. Computational analyses have also identified several amino acids (aa) critical for LPA recognition by human LPA receptors. This review focuses on the evolutionary aspects of LPA receptor-mediated signaling by comparing the aa sequences of vertebrate LPA receptors and LPA-producing enzymes; it also summarizes the LPA receptor-dependent effects commonly observed in mouse, frog, and fish. PMID:25732591

  20. T cell receptor gamma and delta rearrangements in hematologic malignancies. Relationship to lymphoid differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Griesinger, F; Greenberg, J M; Kersey, J H

    1989-01-01

    We have studied recombinatorial events of the T cell receptor delta and gamma chain genes in hematopoietic malignancies and related these to normal stages of lymphoid differentiation. T cell receptor delta gene recombinatorial events were found in 91% of acute T cell lymphoblastic leukemia, 68% of non-T, non-B lymphoid precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 80% of mixed lineage acute leukemias. Mature B-lineage leukemias and acute nonlymphocytic leukemias retained the T-cell receptor delta gene in the germline configuration. The incidence of T cell receptor gamma and delta was particularly high in CD10+CD19+ non-T, non-B lymphoid precursor ALL. In lymphoid precursor ALL, T cell receptor delta was frequently rearranged while T cell receptor gamma was in the germline configuration. This suggests that TCR delta rearrangements may precede TCR gamma rearrangements in lymphoid ontogeny. In T-ALL, only concordant T cell receptor delta and gamma rearrangements were observed. Several distinct rearrangements were defined using a panel of restriction enzymes. Most of the rearrangements observed in T-ALL represented joining events of J delta 1 to upstream regions. In contrast, the majority of rearrangements in lymphoid precursor ALL most likely represented D-D or V-D rearrangements, which have been found to be early recombinatorial events of the TCR delta locus. We next analyzed TCR delta rearrangements in five CD3+TCR gamma/delta+ ALL and cell lines. One T-ALL, which demonstrated a different staining pattern with monoclonal antibodies against the products of the TCR gamma/delta genes than the PEER cell line, rearranges J delta 1 to a currently unidentified variable region. Images PMID:2547833

  1. Identification of estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma as a direct transcriptional target of angiogenin.

    PubMed

    Ang, Jian; Sheng, Jinghao; Lai, Kairan; Wei, Saisai; Gao, Xiangwei

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear translocation of angiogenin (ANG) is essential for the proliferation of its target cells. ANG promotes rRNA synthesis, while whether it regulates mRNA transcription remains unknown. Using the chromatin immunoprecipitation method, we have identified 12 ANG-binding sequences. One of these sequences lies in the estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) gene which we designated as ANG-Binding Sequence within ERRγ (ABSE). ABSE exhibited ANG-dependent repressor activity in the luciferase reporter system. Down-regulation of ANG increased ERRγ expression, and active gene marker level at the ABSE region. The expression levels of ERRγ targets genes, p21(WAF/CIP) and p27(KIP1), and the occupation of ERRγ on their promoter regions were increased in ANG-deficient cells accordingly. Furthermore, knockdown of ERRγ promoted the proliferation rate in ANG-deficient breast cancer cells. Finally, immunohistochemistry staining showed negative correlation between ANG and ERRγ in breast cancer tissue. Altogether, our study provides evidence that nuclear ANG directly binds to the ABSE of ERRγ gene and inhibits ERRγ transcription to promote breast cancer cell proliferation. PMID:23977052

  2. Identification of Estrogen Receptor-Related Receptor Gamma as a Direct Transcriptional Target of Angiogenin

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Jian; Sheng, Jinghao; Lai, Kairan; Wei, Saisai; Gao, Xiangwei

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear translocation of angiogenin (ANG) is essential for the proliferation of its target cells. ANG promotes rRNA synthesis, while whether it regulates mRNA transcription remains unknown. Using the chromatin immunoprecipitation method, we have identified 12 ANG-binding sequences. One of these sequences lies in the estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) gene which we designated as ANG-Binding Sequence within ERRγ (ABSE). ABSE exhibited ANG-dependent repressor activity in the luciferase reporter system. Down-regulation of ANG increased ERRγ expression, and active gene marker level at the ABSE region. The expression levels of ERRγ targets genes, p21WAF/CIP and p27KIP1, and the occupation of ERRγ on their promoter regions were increased in ANG-deficient cells accordingly. Furthermore, knockdown of ERRγ promoted the proliferation rate in ANG-deficient breast cancer cells. Finally, immunohistochemistry staining showed negative correlation between ANG and ERRγ in breast cancer tissue. Altogether, our study provides evidence that nuclear ANG directly binds to the ABSE of ERRγ gene and inhibits ERRγ transcription to promote breast cancer cell proliferation. PMID:23977052

  3. Mutations in the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Potter, Carol J.; Xiao, Rui; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Kang Ho; Shneider, Benjamin L.; Picarsic, Jennifer L.; Jacobson, Theodora A.; Zhang, Jing; He, Weimin; Liu, Pengfei; Knisely, A. S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lupski, James R.; Plon, Sharon E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Yang, Yaping; Washington, Gabriel C.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Berquist, William E.; Kambham, Neeraja; Singh, Ravinder J.; Xia, Fan; Enns, Gregory M.; Moore, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring prompt diagnosis. Mutations in several different genes can cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, but known genes cannot account for all familial cases. Here we report four individuals from two unrelated families with neonatal cholestasis and mutations in NR1H4, which encodes the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a bile acid-activated nuclear hormone receptor that regulates bile acid metabolism. Clinical features of severe, persistent NR1H4-related cholestasis include neonatal onset with rapid progression to end-stage liver disease, vitamin K-independent coagulopathy, low-to-normal serum gamma-glutamyl transferase activity, elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein and undetectable liver bile salt export pump (ABCB11) expression. Our findings demonstrate a pivotal function for FXR in bile acid homeostasis and liver protection. PMID:26888176

  4. Acid rain: the relationship between sources and receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Acid Rain: The Relationship Between Sources and Receptors consists of a collection of papers and discussions from the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse. The conference, held in December 1986, was supported by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Gas Research Institute, and the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP).

  5. [Thiazolidinediones in type 2 diabetes. Role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma)].

    PubMed

    Dubois, M; Vantyghem, M-C; Schoonjans, K; Pattou, F

    2002-12-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) form a new class of oral antidiabetic agents. They improve insulin sensitivity and reduce glycemia, lipidemia and insulinemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Their mechanism is original, since they activate the nuclear receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPARgamma), altering the expression of genes involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Stimulating PPARgamma improves insulin sensitivity via several mechanisms: 1) it raises the expression of GLUT4 glucose transporter; 2) it regulates release of adipocyte-derived signaling factors that affect insulin sensitivity in muscle, and 3) it contributes to a turn-over in adipose tissue, inducing the production of smaller, more insulin sensitive adipocytes. TZDs also affect free fatty acids (FFA) lipotoxicity on islets, improving pancreatic B-cell function. In addition, triglycerides and FFA levels are lowered by TZDs. Two TZDs, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, have recently obtained the European commercial licence, but their use is restricted to the association with metformin or sulfonylureas. At the moment, they are indicated in type 2 diabetes but could be of interest in a broader array of diseases related to insulin resistance. As for side effects, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone may cause increased plasma volume, edema and dose-related weight gain. TZDs offer an attractive option in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, though it may be too soon to determine if they prevent vascular complications, as do other oral antidiabetic agents. An important issue for the future will be to assess the influence of weight gain in the long time. PMID:12527853

  6. Modulation of adipogenesis-related gene expression by estrogen-related receptor gamma during adipocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Mayumi; Ijichi, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Takeda, Satoru; Inoue, Satoshi

    2009-02-01

    Estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma) is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates cellular energy metabolism by modulating gene expression involved in oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue and heart. However, the physiological role of ERRgamma in adipogenesis and the development of white adipose tissue has not been well studied. Here we show that ERRgamma was up-regulated in murine mesenchyme-derived cells, especially in ST2 and C3H10T1/2 cells, at mRNA levels under the adipogenic differentiation condition including the inducer of cAMP, glucocorticoid, and insulin. The up-regulation of ERRgamma mRNA was also observed in inguinal white adipose and brown adipose tissues of mice fed a high-fat diet. Gene knockdown by ERRgamma-specific siRNA results in mRNA down-regulation of adipogenic marker genes including fatty acid binding protein 4, PPARgamma, and PGC-1beta in a preadipocyte cell line 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and mesenchymal ST2 and C3H10T1/2 cells in the adipogenesis medium. In contrast, stable expression of ERRgamma in 3T3-L1 cells resulted in up-regulation of these adipogenic marker genes under the adipogenic condition. These results suggest that ERRgamma positively regulate the adipocyte differentiation with modulating the expression of various adipogenesis-related genes. PMID:18809516

  7. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} as a regulator of lung inflammation and repair.

    PubMed

    Standiford, Theodore J; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G; Reddy, Raju C

    2005-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily that regulate the expression of genes involved in a variety of biological processes, including lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Members of the PPAR family-in particular, PPAR-gamma-have more recently been shown to broadly regulate inflammatory and reparative responses. PPAR-gamma is expressed in both alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, and the ligand-dependent activation of this receptor results in suppression of leukocyte effector responses, including cytokine production, the elaboration of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and migratory responses. In addition to antiinflammatory effects, PPAR-gamma regulates diverse processes in lung stromal/parenchymal cells, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Studies examining in vivo effects of PPAR-gamma have produced complex and at times conflicting results. However, evidence to date generally suggests that PPAR-gamma functions to dampen inflammation and injury in various animal models of acute lung injury. PPAR-gamma may also play an important role in other inflammatory/immune lung diseases, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, allergic airway inflammation, and cancer. The role of PPAR-gamma in human lung diseases, including acute lung injury, requires further study. PMID:16222042

  8. Gamma aminobutyric acid radioreceptor-assay a possible biomarker for human exposure to certain agrochemicals.

    PubMed

    Saleh, M A; Abou Zied, M; el-Baroty, G; Abdel-Reheim, E; Abdel-Rahman, F; Wallace, C; el-Sebae, A H; Blancato, J N

    1993-12-01

    Cyclodiene insecticides, hexachlorocyclohexanes, pyrethroids, bicyclophosphates, the bicycloorthocarboxylate insecticides and some of their metabolites and environmental degradation products are central nervous system toxicants with high specific binding affinity to the chloride channel of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-ionophore sites. [35S] tertiary-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) with specific activity higher than 60 Ci/mmole has a high binding affinity to the same sites and is now commercially available and can be used to label the GABAA receptor for the development of a radioreceptor assay technique. The GABA receptor was prepared by ultra centrifugation and dialysis of brain homogenates of either cow, goat, rat or catfish. The receptor was then labeled with [35S] TBPS and the assay was conducted by measuring the displacement of radioactivity following incubation with samples containing the analytes. A radioreceptor assay protocol was developed to measure the amount of the alpha-endosulfan in blood samples. The assay was extremely sensitive, and can detect 0.2 nM of endosulfan at a level equivalent to 0.08 ppb or 8 x 10(-11) gm of endosulfan in each ml of the blood samples. PMID:8270763

  9. The orphan nuclear receptor DAX-1 acts as a novel transcriptional corepressor of PPAR{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Gwang Sik; Lee, Gha Young; Nedumaran, Balachandar; Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, Kyung Tae; Park, Sang Chul; Lee, Young Chul; Kim, Jae Bum Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2008-05-30

    DAX-1 is an atypical nuclear receptor (NR) which functions primarily as a transcriptional corepressor of other NRs via heterodimerization. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {gamma} is a ligand-dependent NR which performs a key function in adipogenesis. In this study, we evaluated a novel cross-talk mechanism between DAX-1 and PPAR{gamma}. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that DAX-1 inhibits the transactivity of PPAR{gamma} in a dose-dependent manner. DAX-1 directly competed with the PPAR{gamma} coactivator (PGC)-1{alpha} for binding to PPAR{gamma}. Endogenous levels of DAX-1 were significantly lower in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes as compared to preadipocytes. Using a retroviral expression system, we demonstrated that DAX-1 overexpression downregulates the expression of PPAR{gamma} target genes, resulting in an attenuation of adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. Our results suggest that DAX-1 acts as a corepressor of PPAR{gamma} and performs a potential function in the regulation of PPAR{gamma}-mediated cellular differentiation.

  10. Gamma-linolenic acid, Dihommo-gamma linolenic, Eicosanoids and Inflammatory Processes.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, Susan; Rahbar, Elaheh; Chilton, Floyd H

    2016-08-15

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, 18:3n-6) is an omega-6 (n-6), 18 carbon (18C-) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) found in human milk and several botanical seed oils and is typically consumed as part of a dietary supplement. While there have been numerous in vitro and in vivo animal models which illustrate that GLA-supplemented diets attenuate inflammatory responses, clinical studies utilizing GLA or GLA in combination with omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs have been much less conclusive. A central premise of this review is that there are critical metabolic and genetic factors that affect the conversion of GLA to dihommo-gamma linolenic acid (DGLA, 20:3n-6) and arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6), which consequently affects the balance of DGLA- and AA- derived metabolites. As a result, these factors impact the clinical effectiveness of GLA or GLA/(n-3) PUFA supplementations in treating inflammatory conditions. Specifically, these factors include: 1) the capacity for different human cells and tissues to convert GLA to DGLA and AA and to metabolize DGLA and AA to bioactive metabolites; 2) the opposing effects of DGLA and AA metabolites on inflammatory processes and diseases; and 3) the impact of genetic variations within the fatty acid desaturase (FADS) gene cluster, in particular, on AA/DGLA ratios and bioactive metabolites. We postulate that these factors influence the heterogeneity of results observed in GLA supplement-based clinical trials and suggest that "one-size fits all" approaches utilizing PUFA-based supplements may no longer be appropriate for the prevention and treatment of complex human diseases. PMID:27083549

  11. Homology modeling of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABA receptor channels and Surflex-docking of fipronil.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jin; Ju, Xiu-Lian; Chen, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Gen-Yan

    2009-09-01

    To further explore the mechanism of selective binding of the representative gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABARs) noncompetitive antagonist (NCA) fipronil to insect over mammalian GABARs, three-dimensional models of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABAR were generated by homology modeling, using the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) of Torpedo marmorata as a template. Fipronil was docked into the putative binding site of the human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 receptors by Surflex-docking, and the calculated docking energies are in agreement with experimental results. The GABA receptor antagonist fipronil exhibited higher potency with house fly beta 3 GABAR than with human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 GABAR. Furthermore, analyses of Surflex-docking suggest that the H-bond interaction of fipronil with Ala2 and Thr6 in the second transmembrane segment (TM2) of these GABARs plays a relatively important role in ligand selective binding. The different subunit assemblies of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABARs may result in differential selectivity for fipronil. PMID:19238461

  12. A Boronic Acid Porphyrin Receptor for Ginsenoside Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Hargrove, Amanda E.; Reyes, Ryan N.; Riddington, Ian; Anslyn, Eric V.; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    Ginsenoside detection was pursued through the design of a porphyrin receptor containing two boronic acid units. This receptor was found to undergo different degrees of fluorescence quenching with five ginsenoside guests and an acylated derivative. The trends in the 1:1 binding constants, as well as ESI-HRMS analysis, support a binding mode in which the ginsenoside sugar units are bound to the boronic acid groups while the steroid core and porphyrin ring participate in hydrophobic interactions. PMID:20860384

  13. Alpha-Lipoic acid increases energy expenditure by enhancing adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha signaling in the skeletal muscle of aged mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with aging and diabetes, which decreases respiratory capacity and increases reactive oxygen species. Lipoic acid (LA) possesses antioxidative and antidiabetic properties. Metabolic action of LA is mediated by activation of adenosine monophospha...

  14. {gamma}-aminobutyric acid{sub A} (GABA{sub A}) receptor regulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation in rat hippocampus in high doses of Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE)-induced impairment of spatial memory

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Gang; Zhang Wenbin; Zhang Yun; Chen Yaoming; Liu Mingchao; Yao Ting; Yang Yanxia; Zhao Fang; Li Jingxia; Huang Chuanshu; Luo Wenjing Chen Jingyuan

    2009-04-15

    Experimental and occupational exposure to Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) has been reported to induce neurotoxicological and neurobehavioral effects, such as headache, nausea, dizziness, and disorientation, etc. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in MTBE-induced neurotoxicity are still not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of MTBE on spatial memory and the expression and function of GABA{sub A} receptor in the hippocampus. Our results demonstrated that intraventricular injection of MTBE impaired the performance of the rats in a Morris water maze task, and significantly increased the expression of GABA{sub A} receptor {alpha}1 subunit in the hippocampus. The phosphorylation of ERK1/2 decreased after the MTBE injection. Furthermore, the decreased ability of learning and the reduction of phosphorylated ERK1/2 level of the MTBE-treated rats was partly reversed by bicuculline injected 30 min before the training. These results suggested that MTBE exposure could result in impaired spatial memory. GABA{sub A} receptor may play an important role in the MTBE-induced impairment of learning and memory by regulating the phosphorylation of ERK in the hippocampus.

  15. Effects of Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid on Inhibition and Excitation in Rat Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Kuhn, Cynthia M.; Wilson, Wilkie A.; Lewis, Darrell V.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism by which the sedative and amnestic recreational drug gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) acts is controversial. Some studies indicate that it acts at its unique receptor, while others demonstrate effects mediated through the GABAB receptor. We examined the effect of GHB on evoked GABAA receptor mediated mono- and polysynaptic IPSCs as well as on NMDA and AMPA mediated EPSCs in layers II/III pyramidal cells of the frontal cortex of rat brain. One millimolar (mM) GHB suppressed monosynaptic IPSCs by 20%, whereas polysynaptic IPSCs were reduced by 56%. GHB (1mM) also produced a significant suppression of NMDA-mediated EPSCs by 53% compared to 27% suppression of AMPA-mediated EPSCs. All effects of GHB on IPSCs and EPSCs were reversed by the specific GABAB antagonist CGP62349, but not by the GHB receptor antagonist NCS 382. Consistent with a presynaptic site of action, GHB reduced the frequency but not the amplitude of AMPA receptor mediated mEPSCs and had no effect on postsynaptic currents evoked by direct application of NMDA. Finally, even though GHB appeared to be acting at presynaptic GABAB receptors, GHB and the GABAB agonist baclofen appeared to have opposite potencies for depression of NMDA vs AMPA mediated EPSCs. GHB showed a preference for depressing NMDA responses while baclofen more potently suppressed AMPA responses. The suppression of NMDA more than AMPA responses by GHB at intoxicating doses may make it attractive as a recreational drug and may explain why GHB is abused and baclofen is not. PMID:17904295

  16. Novel regulation of p38gamma by dopamine D2 receptors during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Conrad, P W; Millhorn, D E; Beitner-Johnson, D

    2000-07-01

    The p38 signalling pathway is part of the MAPK superfamily and is activated by various stressors. Our previous results have shown that two p38 isoforms, p38alpha and p38gamma, are activated by hypoxia in the neural-like PC12 cell line. PC12 cells also synthesize and secrete catecholamines, including dopamine, in response to hypoxia. We have now used this system to study the interaction between D2-dopamine receptor signalling and the p38 stress-activated protein kinases. Our results show that two D2 receptor antagonists, butaclamol and sulpiride, enhance hypoxia-induced phosphorylation of p38gamma, but not p38. This effect persists in protein kinase A (PKA)-deficient PC12 cells, demonstrating that p38gamma modulation by the D2 receptor is independent of the cAMP/PKA signalling system. We further show that removal of extracellular calcium blocks the hypoxia-induced increase in p38gamma activity. These results are the first to demonstrate that p38gamma can be regulated by the D2 receptor and calcium following hypoxic exposure. PMID:10989281

  17. Mice Deficient in Interferon-Gamma or Interferon-Gamma Receptor 1 Have Distinct Inflammatory Responses to Acute Viral Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Young; Schultz, Kimberly L. W.; Griffin, Diane E.

    2013-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-gamma is an important component of the immune response to viral infections that can have a role both in controlling virus replication and inducing inflammatory damage. To determine the role of IFN-gamma in fatal alphavirus encephalitis, we have compared the responses of wild type C57BL/6 (WTB6) mice with mice deficient in either IFN-gamma (GKO) or the alpha-chain of the IFN-gamma receptor (GRKO) after intranasal infection with a neuroadapted strain of sindbis virus. Mortalities of GKO and GRKO mice were similar to WTB6 mice. Both GKO and GRKO mice had delayed virus clearance from the brain and spinal cord, more infiltrating perforin+ cells and lower levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 mRNAs than WTB6 mice. However, inflammation was more intense in GRKO mice than WTB6 or GKO mice with more infiltrating CD3+ T cells, greater expression of major histocompatibility complex-II and higher levels of interleukin-17A mRNA. Fibroblasts from GRKO embryos did not develop an antiviral response after treatment with IFN-gamma, but showed increases in TNF-alpha, IL-6, CXCL9 and CXCL10 mRNAs although these increases developed more slowly and were less intense than those of WTB6 fibroblasts. These data indicate that both GKO and GRKO mice fail to develop an IFN-gamma-mediated antiviral response, but differ in regulation of the inflammatory response to infection. Therefore, GKO and GRKO cannot be considered equivalent when assessing the role of IFN-gamma in CNS viral infections. PMID:24204622

  18. Gamma amino butyric acid accumulation in medicinal plants without stress

    PubMed Central

    Anju, P.; Moothedath, Ismail; Rema Shree, Azhimala Bhaskaranpillai

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) is an important ubiquitous four carbon nonprotein amino acid with an amino group attached to gamma carbon instead of beta carbon. It exists in different organisms including bacteria, plants, and animals and plays a crucial role in humans by regulating neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system. It is directly responsible for the regulation of muscle tone and also effective in lowering stress, blood pressure, and hypertension. Aim and Objective: The aim of the study was to develop the fingerprint profile of selected medicinally and economically important plants having central nervous system (CNS) activity and to determine the quantity of GABA in the selected plants grown under natural conditions without any added stress. Materials and Methods: The high-performance thin layer chromatography analysis was performed on precoated silica gel plate 60F–254 plate (20 cm × 10 cm) in the form of bands with width 8 mm using Hamilton syringe (100 μl) using n-butanol, acetic acid, and water in the proportion 5:2:2 as mobile phase in a CAMAG chamber which was previously saturated for 30 min. CAMAG TLC scanner 3 was used for the densitometric scanning at 550 nm. Specific marker compounds were used for the quantification. Results and Conclusion: Among the screened medicinal plants, Zingiber officinale and Solanum torvum were found to have GABA. The percentage of GABA present in Z. officinale and S. torvum were found to be 0.0114% and 0.0119%, respectively. The present work confirmed that among the selected CNS active medicinal plants, only two plants contain GABA. We found a negative correlation with plant having CNS activity and accumulation of GABA. The GABA shunt is a conserved pathway in eukaryotes and prokaryotes but, although the role of GABA as a neurotransmitter in mammals is clearly established, its role in plants is still vague. PMID:25861139

  19. Increased brain uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid in a rabbit model of hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, M.L.; Mullen, K.D.; Scholz, B.; Fenstermacher, J.D.; Jones, E.A. )

    1990-03-01

    Transfer of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid across the normal blood-brain barrier is minimal. One prerequisite for gamma-aminobutyric acid in plasma contributing to the neural inhibition of hepatic encephalopathy would be that increased transfer of gamma-aminobutyric acid across the blood-brain barrier occurs in liver failure. The aim of the present study was to determine if brain gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake is increased in rabbits with stage II-III (precoma) hepatic encephalopathy due to galactosamine-induced fulminant hepatic failure. A modification of the Oldendorf intracarotid artery-injection technique was applied. (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid, (14C) butanol, and 113mIn-labeled serum protein (transferrin) were injected simultaneously 4 s before decapitation. The ipsilateral brain uptake index of gamma-aminobutyric acid was determined from measurements of the 3 isotopes in 5 brain regions. Uncorrected or simple brain uptake indices of (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid and (113mIn) transferrin were calculated using (14C) butanol as the highly extracted reference compound. The (113mIn) transferrin data were also used to correct the brain uptake index of (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid for intravascular retention of (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid. The methodology adopted minimized problems attributable to rapid (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolism, and slow brain washout and recirculation of the radiolabeled tracers. Both the uncorrected and corrected brain uptake indices of gamma-aminobutyric acid as well as the simple brain uptake index of transferrin were significantly increased in both stage II and III hepatic encephalopathy in all brain regions studied. Moreover, these brain uptake indices were significantly greater in stage III hepatic encephalopathy than in stage II hepatic encephalopathy.

  20. Different agonist- and antagonist-induced conformational changes in retinoic acid receptors analyzed by protease mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Keidel, S; LeMotte, P; Apfel, C

    1994-01-01

    The pleiotropic effects of retinoic acid on cell differentiation and proliferation are mediated by two subfamilies of nuclear receptors, the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the retinoid X receptors (RXRs). Recently the synthetic retinoid Ro 41-5253 was identified as a selective RAR alpha antagonist. As demonstrated by gel retardation assays, Ro 41-5253 and two related new RAR alpha antagonists do not influence RAR alpha/RXR alpha heterodimerization and DNA binding. In a limited trypsin digestion assay, complexation of RAR alpha with retinoic acid or several other agonistic retinoids altered the degradation of the receptor such that a 30-kDa proteolytic fragment became resistant to proteolysis. This suggests a ligand-induced conformational change, which may be necessary for the interaction of the DNA-bound RAR alpha/RXR alpha heterodimer with other transcription factors. Our results demonstrate that antagonists compete with agonists for binding to RAR alpha and may induce a different structural alteration, suggested by the tryptic resistance of a shorter 25-kDa protein fragment in the digestion assay. This RAR alpha conformation seems to allow RAR alpha/RXR alpha binding to DNA but not the subsequent transactivation of target genes. Protease mapping with C-terminally truncated receptors revealed that the proposed conformational changes mainly occur in the DE regions of RAR alpha. Complexation of RAR beta, RAR gamma, and RXR alpha, as well as the vitamin D3 receptor, with their natural ligands resulted in a similar resistance of fragments to proteolytic digestion. This could mean that ligand-induced conformational changes are a general feature in the hormonal activation of vitamin D3 and retinoid receptors. Images PMID:8264595

  1. Fatty acid activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR).

    PubMed

    Bocos, C; Göttlicher, M; Gearing, K; Banner, C; Enmark, E; Teboul, M; Crickmore, A; Gustafsson, J A

    1995-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferators such as clofibric acid, nafenopin, and WY-14,643 have been shown to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), a member of the steroid nuclear receptor superfamily. We have cloned the cDNA from rat that is homologous to that from mouse, which encodes a 97% similar protein. To search for physiologically occurring activators, we established a transcriptional transactivation assay by stably expressing in CHO cells a chimera of rat PPAR and the human glucocorticoid receptor that activates expression of the placental alkaline phosphatase reporter gene under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter. 150 microM concentrations of arachidonic or linoleic acid but not of dehydroepiandrosterone, cholesterol, or 25-hydroxy-cholesterol, activated the receptor chimera. In addition, saturated fatty acids induced the reporter gene. Shortening the chain length to n = 6 or introduction of an omega-terminal carboxylic group abolished the activation potential of the fatty acid. To test whether a common PPAR binding metabolite might be formed from free fatty acids we tested the effects of differentially beta-oxidizable fatty acids and inhibitors of fatty acid metabolism. The peroxisomal proliferation-inducing, non-beta-oxidizable, tetradecylthioacetic acid activated PPAR to the same extent as the strong peroxisomal proliferator WY-14,643, whereas the homologous beta-oxidizable tetradecylthiopropionic acid was only as potent as a non-substituted fatty acid. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors, radical scavengers or cytochrome P450 inhibitors did not affect activation of PPAR. In conclusion, beta-oxidation is apparently not required for the formation of the PPAR-activating molecule and this moiety might be a fatty acid, its ester with CoA, or a further derivative of the activated fatty acid prior to beta-oxidation of the acyl-CoA ester. PMID:7626496

  2. G-protein-coupled receptors for neurotransmitter amino acids: C-terminal tails, crowded signalosomes.

    PubMed Central

    El Far, Oussama; Betz, Heinrich

    2002-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a superfamily of highly diverse integral membrane proteins that transduce external signals to different subcellular compartments, including nuclei, via trimeric G-proteins. By differential activation of diffusible G(alpha) and membrane-bound G(beta)gamma subunits, GPCRs might act on both cytoplasmic/intracellular and plasma-membrane-bound effector systems. The coupling efficiency and the plasma membrane localization of GPCRs are regulated by a variety of interacting proteins. In this review, we discuss recently disclosed protein interactions found with the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail regions of two types of presynaptic neurotransmitter receptors, the group III metabotropic glutamate receptors and the gamma-aminobutyric acid type-B receptors (GABA(B)Rs). Calmodulin binding to mGluR7 and other group III mGluRs may provide a Ca(2+)-dependent switch for unidirectional (G(alpha)) versus bidirectional (G(alpha) and G(beta)gamma) signalling to downstream effector proteins. In addition, clustering of mGluR7 by PICK1 (protein interacting with C-kinase 1), a polyspecific PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg1/ZO-1) domain containing synaptic organizer protein, sheds light on how higher-order receptor complexes with regulatory enzymes (or 'signalosomes') could be formed. The interaction of GABA(B)Rs with the adaptor protein 14-3-3 and the transcription factor ATF4 (activating transcription factor 4) suggests novel regulatory pathways for G-protein signalling, cytoskeletal reorganization and nuclear gene expression: processes that may all contribute to synaptic plasticity. PMID:12006104

  3. [Disseminated BCG disease revealing a partial deficiency in receptor 1 interferon gamma].

    PubMed

    Antonietti, J; Retornaz, K; Bernasconi, A; Laporte, R-J; Minodier, P; Bustamante, J-C; Dubus, J-C

    2015-09-01

    We report on a case of disseminated BCGitis with an unusual presentation in a 4-month-old infant revealing a syndrome of Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacteria due to a partial dominant mutation of the interferon gamma receptor 1 gene. PMID:26251056

  4. Interferon Gamma Receptor: The Beginning of the Journey

    PubMed Central

    Blouin, Cédric M.; Lamaze, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Our view of endocytosis and membrane trafficking of transmembrane receptors has dramatically changed over the last 20 years. Several new endocytic routes have been discovered and mechanistically characterized in mammalian cells. Long considered as a passive means to terminate signaling through down-regulation of the number of activated receptors at the plasma membrane, it is now established that receptor endocytosis and endosomal sorting can be directly linked to the regulation of intracellular signaling pathways. The functional links between membrane trafficking of interferon receptors and JAK/STAT signaling have recently begun to be unraveled. These studies raise the exciting possibility that a certain level of signal specificity can be achieved through endocytosis and selective localization of the activated complexes within cellular membranes. The ongoing development of high-resolution cell imaging techniques with better spatial and temporal resolution gives new means of deciphering the inherent complexity of membrane trafficking and signaling. This should help to better comprehend the molecular mechanisms by which endocytosis and endosomal sorting of interferon receptors can orchestrate signaling selectivity within the JAK/STAT pathway that can be activated by as many as 60 different cytokines, growth factors, and hormones. PMID:24027571

  5. T-cell receptor gamma--delta lymphocytes and Eimeria vermiformis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, M E; Hesketh, P; Rothwell, L; Gramzinski, R A

    1996-01-01

    The role of T-cell receptor gamma--delta T lymphocytes in coccidiosis was examined by determining the course of infection with Eimeria vermiformis in BALB/c mice depleted of gamma--delta lymphocytes by treatment with GL3 monoclonal antibody. The replication of the parasite in primary infections was not greatly, or consistently, affected by this treatment, and there was no correlation between the extent of depletion of small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and the number of oocysts produced. The resistance of immunized mice to challenge was not compromised by depletion of intraintestinal epithelial lymphocytes when their depletion was effected at the time of primary infection and/or administration of the challenge inoculum. Thus, T-cell receptor gamma--delta T lymphocytes do not appear to be crucial to the establishment, or the control, of primary infection with E. vermiformis and are not principal mediators of the solid immunity to challenge that this infection induces. PMID:8890252

  6. Bile acid derivatives as ligands of the farnesoid x receptor: molecular determinants for bile acid binding and receptor modulation.

    PubMed

    Gioiello, Antimo; Cerra, Bruno; Mostarda, Serena; Guercini, Chiara; Pellicciari, Roberto; Macchiarulo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are a peculiar class of steroidal compounds that never cease to amaze. From being simple detergents with a primary role in aiding the absorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins, bile acids are now widely considered as crucial hormones endowed with genomic and non-genomic functions that are mediated by their interaction with several proteins including the nuclear receptor Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR). Taking advantages of the peculiar properties of bile acids in interacting with the FXR receptor, several biliary derivatives have been synthesized and tested as FXR ligands. The availability of these compounds has contributed to characterize the receptor from a structural, patho-physiological and therapeutic standpoint. Among these, obeticholic acid is a first-in-class FXR agonist that is demonstrating hepatoprotective effects upon FXR activation in patients with liver diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. This review provides an historical overview of the rationale behind the discovery of obeticholic acid and chemical tools generated to depict the molecular features and bio-pharmacological relevance of the FXR receptor, as well as to summarize structure-activity relationships of bile acid-based FXR ligands so far reported. PMID:25388535

  7. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma loaded dental implant improves osteogenesis of rat mandible.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Govinda; Lee, Young-Hee; Yi, Ho-Keun

    2015-04-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) has been known for their anti-inflammatory effects. But the application of this molecule in implant-induced inflammation has not been clearly studied yet. Here, we determined in vivo anti-inflammatory and osteogenic effects of PPARγ coated dental implant in the rat mandible. We used chitosan gold nanoparticles (Ch-GNPs) as a non viral vector to carry PPARγ plasmid DNA. Ch-GNPs were conjugated with PPARγ plasmid DNA through a coacervation process. Conjugation was cast over titanium (Ti) implants (4.5 × 0.8 mm) by dipping, and implants were installed in rat mandibles. One, 2, 3, and 6 weeks post-implantation, mandibles were examined by microcomputed tomography (µCT), immunohistochemistry, hematoxylin & eosin, and tartrate resistance acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. In vivo Ch-GNPs/PPARγcoated implants were associated with inhibition of implant induced inflammatory molecules interleukin-1β and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and enhanced expression of osteogenic molecules like bone morphogenetic protein 2 and 7 (BMP-2/-7) by up-regulating anti-oxidant molecules heme oxygenase-1. µCT demonstrated that PPARγ overexpression increased the density and volume of newly formed bone surrounding the implants compared to control (n = 4; p < 0.05). Also, PPARγ reduced the number of TRAP positive cells. These results support the view that PPARγ overexpression diminishes inflammation and enhances osteogenesis around the dental implants. Thus, implant coated with anti-inflammatory molecules could have a significant utilization for the preparation of new biomaterials and may serve as prosthetic materials in patients suffering from inflammatory bone disease. PMID:24962969

  8. [Interactions between dopamine receptor and NMDA/type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Ying; Wei, Ting-Jia; Weng, Jing-Jin; Qin, Jiang-Yuan; Huang, Xi; Su, Ji-Ping

    2016-04-25

    Type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAAR) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are the major inhibitory and excitatory receptors in the central nervous system, respectively. Co-expression of the receptors in the synapse may lead to functional influence between receptors, namely receptor interaction. The interactions between GABAAR and NMDAR can be either positive or negative. However, the mechanisms of interaction between the two receptors remain poorly understood, and potential mechanisms include (1) through a second messenger; (2) by receptors trafficking; (3) by direct interaction; (4) by a third receptor-mediation. Dopamine is the most abundant catecholamine neurotransmitter in the brain, and its receptors, dopamine receptors (DR) can activate multiple signaling pathways. Earlier studies on the interaction between DR and GABAAR/NMDAR have shown some underlying mechanisms, suggesting that DR could mediate the interaction between GABAAR and NMDAR. This paper summarized some recent progresses in the studies of the interaction between DR and NMDAR/GABAAR, providing a further understanding on the interaction between NMDAR and GABAAR mediated by DR. PMID:27108906

  9. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid as hypnotic. Clinical and pharmacokinetic evaluation of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid as hypnotic in man.

    PubMed

    Hoes, M J; Vree, T B; Guelen, P J

    1980-01-01

    Gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid (GOH) was administered to three groups of four patients in 50, 75 or 100 mg/kg dose respectively, and sleep effects were scored, by sleep observation and questionnaire; GOH plasma levels were determined at 75-100 mg/kg, saliva and urine excretion at 100 mg/kg. Sleep induction was rapid and irresistible, subjects awoke at plasma levels of 90 micrograms/ml; sleep scores were good for 75 mg/kg, excellent for 100 mg/kg, notably on mood. For 75 or 100 mg/kg GOH had virtually disappeared from the blood eight hours after intake; twelve hours after intake no more GOH was detectable in urine; no correlation between plasma- and saliva levels was found. Plasma levels for 100 mg/kg dose were not at an anaesthetic level. So, GOH is a safe and good hypnotic at 75 or 100 mg/kg in clinical use. PMID:7449723

  10. How efficacious are 5-HT1B/D receptor ligands: an answer from GTP gamma S binding studies with stably transfected C6-glial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, P J; Tardif, S; Palmier, C; Wurch, T; Colpaert, F C

    1997-01-01

    The intrinsic activity of a series of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) receptor ligands was analysed at recombinant h5-HT1B and h5-HT1D receptor sites using a [35S]GTP gamma S binding assay and membrane preparations of stably transfected C6-glial cell lines. Compounds either stimulated or inhibited [35S]GTP gamma S binding to a membrane preparation containing either h5-HT1B or h5-HT1D receptors. The potencies observed for most of the compounds at the h5-HT1B receptor subtype correlated with their potencies measured by inhibition of stimulated cAMP formation on intact cells. Apparent agonist potencies in the [35S]GTP gamma S binding assay to C6-glial/h5-HT1D membranes were, with the exception of 2-[5-[3-(4-methylsulphonylamino)benzyl-1 2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]-1H-indol-3-yl] ethanamine (L694247), 5- to 13-times lower than in the cAMP assay on intact cells. This suggests that receptor coupling in the h5-HT1D membrane preparation is less efficient than that in the intact cell. It further appeared that 6-times more h5-HT1D than h5-HT1B binding sites were required to attain a similar, maximal (73%), 5-HT-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding response: Hence, the h5-HT1B receptor in C6-glial cell membranes could be more efficiently coupled, even though some compounds more readily displayed intrinsic activity at h5-HT1D receptor sites [e.g. dihydroergotamine and (2'-methyl-4'-(5-methyl[1,2,4]oxadiazol-3-yl)biphenyl-4-carboxylic acid [4-methoxy-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)phenyl]amide (GR127935)]. Efficacy differences were apparent for most of the compounds (sumatriptan, zolmitriptan, rizatriptan, N-methyl-3-[pyrrolidin-2(R)-ylmethyl]-1H-indol-5-ylmethyl sulfonamide (CP122638), dihydroergotamine, naratriptan and GR127935) that stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding compared to the native agonist 5-HT. The observed maximal responses were different for the h5-HT1B and h5-HT1D receptor subtypes. Few compounds behaved as full agonists: L694247, zolmitriptan and sumatriptan did so at

  11. Development of Gamma-Emitting Receptor Binding Radiopharmace

    SciTech Connect

    Reba, Richard

    2003-02-20

    The long-term objective is to develop blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeable m2-selective (relative to m1, m3, and m4) receptor-binding radiotracers and utilize these radiotracers for quantifying receptor concentrations obtained from PET or SPECT images of human brain. In initial studies, we concluded that the lipophilicity and high affinity prevented (R,S)-I-QNB from reaching a flow-independent and receptor-dependent state in a reasonable time. Thus, it was clear that (R,S)-I-QNB should be modified. Therefore, during the last portion of this funded research, we proposed that more polar heterocycles should help accomplish that. Since reports of others concluded that radiobromination and radiofluorination of the unactivated phenyl ring is not feasible (Newkome et al,,1982), we, therefore, explored during this grant period a series of analogues of (R)-QNB in which one or both of the six-membered phenyl rings is replaced by a five-membered thienyl (Boulay et al., 1995), or furyl ring. The chemistry specific aims were to synthesize novel compounds designed to be m2-selective mAChR ligands capable of penetrating into the CNS, and develop methods for efficient radiolabeling of promising m2-selective muscarinic ligands. The pharmacology specific aims were to determine the affinity and subtype-selectivity of the novel compounds using competition binding studies with membranes from cells that express each of the five muscarinic receptor subtypes, to determine the ability of the promising non-radioactive compounds and radiolabeled novel compounds to cross the BBB, to determine the biodistribution, in-vivo pharmacokinetics, and in-vitm kinetics of promising m2-selective radioligands and to determine the distribution of receptors for the novel m2-selective radioligands using quantitative autoradiography of rat brain, and compare this distribution to the distribution of known m2-selective compounds.

  12. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. II - Five carbon acyclic primary beta-, gamma-, and delta-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Yuen, G. U.

    1985-01-01

    The five-carbon acyclic primary beta, gamma, and delta amino alkanoic acids of the Murchison meteorite are studied using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion exchange chromatography. The chromatograms reveal that alpha is the most abundant monoamino alkanoic acid followed by gamma and beta, and an exponential increase in the amount of amino acid is observed as the carbon number increases in the homologous series. The influence of frictional heating, spontaneous thermal decomposition, and radiation of the synthesis of amino acids is examined. The data obtained support an amino acid synthesis process involving random combination of single-carbon precursors.

  13. Gamma interferon receptor defect presenting as recurrent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Balasubramanian; Amperayani, Sumanth; Dhanalakshmi, K; Padmanaban, Swathi

    2014-07-01

    Failure of response to therapy in childhood tuberculosis may be due to resistance, paradoxical response or immunodeficiency. Interferon-γ (IFNγ) plays a major role during host defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). An 8-y-old boy presented with fever, hepatosplenomegaly and parotid abscess. He had been earlier treated for BCG adenitis in infancy and at 5 y for TB osteomyelitis of iliac bone and recovered. Investigations confirmed disseminated Mycobacterium Avium Intracellulare infection. He was investigated for immunodeficiency because of recurrent mycobacterial disease and a partial defect of γ-interferon receptor was identified. He required a 2 y course of therapy with a 7 drug regimen and recovered. The authors report this case because of its rarity and to highlight the need to consider γ-interferon receptor defect in the presence of recurrent tuberculosis (TB) and also review the options for therapy. PMID:23681833

  14. Bile acid receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liyun; Bambha, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    With the high prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and other features of the metabolic syndrome in United States, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has inevitably become a very prevalent chronic liver disease and is now emerging as one of the leading indications for liver transplantation. Insulin resistance and derangement of lipid metabolism, accompanied by activation of the pro-inflammatory response and fibrogenesis, are essential pathways in the development of the more clinically significant form of NAFLD, known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Recent advances in the functional characterization of bile acid receptors, such as farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (TGR) 5, have provided further insight in the pathophysiology of NASH and have led to the development of potential therapeutic targets for NAFLD and NASH. Beyond maintaining bile acid metabolism, FXR and TGR5 also regulate lipid metabolism, maintain glucose homeostasis, increase energy expenditure, and ameliorate hepatic inflammation. These intriguing features have been exploited to develop bile acid analogues to target pathways in NAFLD and NASH pathogenesis. This review provides a brief overview of the pathogenesis of NAFLD and NASH, and then delves into the biological functions of bile acid receptors, particularly with respect to NASH pathogenesis, with a description of the associated experimental data, and, finally, we discuss the prospects of bile acid analogues in the treatment of NAFLD and NASH. PMID:26668692

  15. Roles for gamma-aminobutyric acid in the development of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, Kristy M.; Stratton, Matthew S.; Tobet, Stuart A.

    2010-01-01

    The development of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) involves several factors that work together to establish a cell group that regulates neuroendocrine functions and behaviors. A number of molecular markers were noted within the developing PVN, including estrogen receptors (ER), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). By contrast, immunoreactive gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was found in cells and fibers surrounding the PVN. Two animal models were used to test the hypothesis that GABA works through GABAA and GABAB receptors to influence the development of the PVN. Treatment with bicuculline to decrease GABAA receptor signaling from embryonic day (E)10 to 17 resulted in fewer cells containing immunoreactive (ir)-ERα in the region of the PVN versus control. GABABR1 receptor subunit knockout mice were used to examine the PVN at P0 without GABAB signaling. In female but not male GABABR1 subunit knockout mice, the positions of cells containing ir-ERα shifted from medial to lateral compared to wildtype controls, while the total number of ir-ERα containing cells was unchanged. In E17 knockout mice, ir-nNOS cells and fibers were spread over a greater area. There was also a significant decrease in ir-BDNF in the knockout mice in a region dependent manner. Changes in cell position and protein expression subsequent to disruption of GABA signaling may be due, in part, to changes in nNOS and BDNF signaling. Based on the current study, the PVN can be added as another site where GABA exerts morphogenetic actions in development. PMID:20506472

  16. Cell death is induced by ciglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) agonist, independently of PPAR{gamma} in human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung Woo; Kim, Dae Seong; Kim, Hye Ryung; Kim, Hye Jin; Yang, Jin Mo; Ryu, Somi; Noh, Yoo Hun; Lee, Soo Hyun; Son, Meong Hi; Jung, Hye Lim; Yoo, Keon Hee; Koo, Hong Hoe; Sung, Ki Woong

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Greater than 30 {mu}M ciglitazone induces cell death in glioma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death by ciglitazone is independent of PPAR{gamma} in glioma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CGZ induces cell death by the loss of MMP via decreased Akt. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) regulates multiple signaling pathways, and its agonists induce apoptosis in various cancer cells. However, their role in cell death is unclear. In this study, the relationship between ciglitazone (CGZ) and PPAR{gamma} in CGZ-induced cell death was examined. At concentrations of greater than 30 {mu}M, CGZ, a synthetic PPAR{gamma} agonist, activated caspase-3 and induced apoptosis in T98G cells. Treatment of T98G cells with less than 30 {mu}M CGZ effectively induced cell death after pretreatment with 30 {mu}M of the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662, although GW9662 alone did not induce cell death. This cell death was also observed when cells were co-treated with CGZ and GW9662, but was not observed when cells were treated with CGZ prior to GW9662. In cells in which PPAR{gamma} was down-regulated cells by siRNA, lower concentrations of CGZ (<30 {mu}M) were sufficient to induce cell death, although higher concentrations of CGZ ( Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 30 {mu}M) were required to induce cell death in control T98G cells, indicating that CGZ effectively induces cell death in T98G cells independently of PPAR{gamma}. Treatment with GW9662 followed by CGZ resulted in a down-regulation of Akt activity and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), which was accompanied by a decrease in Bcl-2 expression and an increase in Bid cleavage. These data suggest that CGZ is capable of inducing apoptotic cell death independently of PPAR{gamma} in glioma cells, by down-regulating Akt activity and inducing MMP collapse.

  17. Influence of the chemical composition on gamma ray attenuation by fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bhandal, G S; Singh, K

    1992-04-01

    The dependence of gamma ray attenuation on the chemical composition of fatty acids is investigated in the energy range from 10(-3) to 10(5) MeV. The mass attenuation coefficients (muF) and effective atomic numbers (Zeff) have been calculated for 27 different fatty acids. They show appreciable variation with the chemical composition of fatty acids in the region of gamma ray energies from 10(-3) to 10(5) MeV. PMID:1314792

  18. Gamma-aminobutyric acid esters. 1. Synthesis, brain uptake, and pharmacological studies of aliphatic and steroid esters of gamma-aminobutyric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shashoua, V.E.; Jacob, J.N.; Ridge, R.; Campbell, A.; Baldessarini, R.J.

    1984-05-01

    Labeled and unlabeled aliphatic and steroid esters of gamma-amino(U-/sup 14/C)butyric acid (GABA) were synthesized and tested for their capacity to penetrate the blood-brain barrier and for evidence of central neuropharmacological activity in rodents. The uptake of the labeled 9,12,15-octadecatrienyl (linolenyl), 3-cholesteryl, 1-butyl, and the 9-fluoro-11 beta,17-dihydroxy-16 alpha-methyl-3,20-dioxopregna -1,4-dien-21-yl (dexamethasone) esters of GABA into mouse brain increased 2-, 25-, 74-, and 81-fold over GABA, respectively. The cholesteryl ester of GABA depressed the general motor activity of mice and rats in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the 1-butyl, linolenyl, and dexamethasone esters were inactive by this test. Studies of the rates of hydrolysis, GABA receptor binding capacity, and octanol/water partition coefficients indicated that pharmacological activity of the esters after entry into the central nervous system (CNS) was dependent on their capacity to release GABA by enzymatic hydrolysis and their lipid solubility.

  19. SH2 domains prevent tyrosine dephosphorylation of the EGF receptor: identification of Tyr992 as the high-affinity binding site for SH2 domains of phospholipase C gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Rotin, D; Margolis, B; Mohammadi, M; Daly, R J; Daum, G; Li, N; Fischer, E H; Burgess, W H; Ullrich, A; Schlessinger, J

    1992-01-01

    Several cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases contain a conserved, non-catalytic stretch of approximately 100 amino acids called the src homology 2 (SH2) domain, and a region of approximately 50 amino acids called the SH3 domain. SH2/SH3 domains are also found in several other proteins, including phospholipase C-gamma (PLC gamma). Recent studies indicate that SH2 domains promote association between autophosphorylated growth factor receptors such as the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and signal transducing molecules such as PLC gamma. Because SH2 domains bind specifically to protein sequences containing phosphotyrosine, we examined their capacity to prevent tyrosine dephosphorylation of the EGF and other receptors with tyrosine kinase activity. For this purpose, various SH2/SH3 constructs of PLC gamma were expressed in Escherichia coli as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins. Our results show that purified SH2 domains of PLC gamma are able to prevent tyrosine dephosphorylation of the EGF receptor and other receptors with tyrosine activity. The inhibition of tyrosine dephosphorylation paralleled the capacity of various SH2-containing constructs to bind to the EGF receptor, suggesting that the tyrosine phosphatase and the SH2 domain compete for the same tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the carboxy-terminal tail of the EGF receptor. Analysis of the phosphorylation sites protected from dephosphorylation by PLC gamma-SH2 revealed substantial inhibition of dephosphorylation of Tyr992 at 1 microM SH2. This indicates that Tyr992 and its flanking sequence is the high-affinity binding site for SH2 domains of PLC gamma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1537335

  20. Expression of estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma) in human skin.

    PubMed

    Krahn-Bertil, Elodie; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Andre, Valérie; Orly, Isabelle; Kanitakis, Jean; Rousselle, Patricia; Damour, Odile

    2008-01-01

    Skin is a non-classical target for estrogens. Despite evidence showing that estrogen receptors (ER) are expressed in skin, there are still extensive gaps in our understanding of how estrogens exert their action in non-reproductive tissues. Estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma), an orphan member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, shows a strong sequence homology with estrogen receptor alpha but it does not bind estradiol. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate the expression of ERRgamma in adult human skin. ERRgamma mRNA was detected in the keratinocytes and fibroblasts of 8 female donor skins using RT-PCR. The presence of the protein was confirmed using immunohistochemistry on 11 adult human skins and Western Blotting on monolayer-cultures of fibroblasts and keratinocytes from respectively 4 and 2 donors. This study shows that ERRgamma is expressed in human skin and could intervene in a potentially new estrogen signaling pathway in the skin. PMID:18573717

  1. 2-Cycloalkyl phenoxyacetic acid CRTh2 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sandham, David A; Aldcroft, Clive; Baettig, Urs; Barker, Lucy; Beer, David; Bhalay, Gurdip; Brown, Zarin; Dubois, Gerald; Budd, David; Bidlake, Louise; Campbell, Emma; Cox, Brian; Everatt, Brian; Harrison, David; Leblanc, Catherine J; Manini, Jodie; Profit, Rachael; Stringer, Rowan; Thompson, Katy S; Turner, Katharine L; Tweed, Morris F; Walker, Christoph; Watson, Simon J; Whitebread, Steven; Willis, Jennifer; Williams, Gareth; Wilson, Caroline

    2007-08-01

    High throughput screening identified a phenoxyacetic acid scaffold as a novel CRTh2 receptor antagonist chemotype, which could be optimised to furnish a compound with functional potency for inhibition of human eosinophil shape change and oral bioavailability in the rat. PMID:17531480

  2. Fc gamma receptor IIa (CD32) polymorphism in fulminant meningococcal septic shock in children.

    PubMed

    Bredius, R G; Derkx, B H; Fijen, C A; de Wit, T P; de Haas, M; Weening, R S; van de Winkel, J G; Out, T A

    1994-10-01

    Antibodies are essential in host defense against Neisseria meningitidis. Therefore, interactions among IgG and Fc receptors (Fc gamma R) on phagocytes may be crucial. Genetic polymorphic forms of Fc gamma RIIa (CD32) express different functional activities. In a retrospective study, Fc gamma R polymorphisms were determined in 25 children who survived fulminant meningococcal septic shock: 11 had Fc gamma RIIa-R/R131, the poor IgG2-binding allotype, which is a significantly more frequent rate than found in a healthy white population (44% vs. 23%; P = .028; odds ratio = 2.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-6.53). The relevance of this finding was further supported by the fact that neutrophils with the Fc gamma RIIa-R/R131 allotype phagocytized N. meningitidis opsonized with polyclonal IgG2 antibodies less effectively than did IIa-H/H131 neutrophils. Our findings suggest an important role for anti-N. meningitidis IgG2 and the Fc gamma RIIa polymorphism in host defense against systemic meningococcal infections. PMID:7930726

  3. Functions of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARγ) in Gynecologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ping; Zhang, Yuquan; Huang, Yan; Yang, Yingli; Jiang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a member of a class of nuclear hormone receptors intimately involved in the regulation of expression of myriad genes that regulate energy metabolism, cell differentiation, apoptosis, and inflammation. Although originally discovered as a pivotal regulator of adipocyte differentiation, the roles that PPARγ plays in gynecological disorders are still unknown. There are a number of studies on the functions of PPARγ and its agonists in gynecological disorders. In this mini-review, we provide a brief summary of the advances in recent years. PMID:25987855

  4. [Effect of gamma-linolenic acid on microsomal oxidation in the rat liver following gamma-irradiation].

    PubMed

    Zavodnik, L B; Sushko, L I; Tarasov, Iu A; Ignatenko, K V; Chumachenko, S S; Ovchinnikov, V A; Brzosko, V; Buko, V U

    2001-01-01

    The antioxidant and radioprotector properties of gamma-linolenic acid isolated from the seeds of Borago officialis were studied on rats gamma-irradiated to a dose of 1 Gy. The irradiation caused an increase in the content of malonaldehyde in microsomal liver fraction and disturbed the metabolism of xenobiotics. The administration of gamma-linolenic acid in the form of a commercial drug Neoglandin (daily dose, 150 mg/kg, p.o.; over 1, 3, or 7 days after irradiation reduced the level of lipid peroxidation (for all treatment schedules), normalized the activity of NADPH-oxidase, NADH-oxidase, and NADPH-reductase, and increased the content of cytochromes P-450 and b5 as compared to bothirradiated and control animals. PMID:11589114

  5. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role.

  6. Direct identification of the calcium-binding amino acid, gamma-carboxyglutamate, in mineralized tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Hauschka, P V; Lian, J B; Gallop, P M

    1975-01-01

    A direct approach has been developed for quantitative identification of the calcium-binding amino acid, gamma-carboxyglutamate, in proteins. This should be advantageous for the study of numerous systems where specific roles for the binding of calcium or other divalent cations are suspected. Investigation of mineralized tissue, where calcium-binding proteins are implicated in the mineralization process, revealed that gamma-carboxyglutamate was present in proteins solubilized from chicken bone with neutral aqueous ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. This was established by direct isolation of the amino acid from alkaline hydrolysates and its quantitative conversion to glutamic acid by decarboxylation in 0.05 M HCl at 100 degrees. The kinetics of decarboxylation and chromatographic behavior are identical to those of gamma-carboxyglutamate from human prothrombin. After resolution of the soluble bone proteins by phosphate gradient elution from hydroxyapatite, gamma-carboxyglutamate was found to be concentrated primarily in one BaSO4-adsorbable anionic protein species; bone collagen was devoid of the amino acid. In view of the recently discovered requirement of vitamin K for generation of calcium binding sites (gamma-carboxyglutamate) by gamma-carboxylation of specific glutamic acid residues in prothrombin, our findings may implicate vitamin K metabolism in normal bone development and suggest a role for the gamma-carboxyglutamate-rich protein in regulation of calcium salt deposition in mineralized tissues. PMID:1060074

  7. Unstimulated human CD4 lymphocytes express a cytoplasmic immature form of the common cytokine receptor gamma-chain.

    PubMed

    Bani, L; Pasquier, V; Kryworuchko, M; Salamero, J; Thèze, J

    2001-07-01

    As a component of various cytokine receptors, common cytokine receptor gamma-chain (gamma(c)) is essential in the development of the immune system and plays an important role in different stages of inflammatory and immune responses. Here we establish that resting CD4 T cells and the Jurkat CD4 T cell line do not express the mature form of gamma(c) (64 kDa) recognized by mAb Tugh4. However, these cells constitutively transcribe the corresponding gamma(c) gene. This apparent paradox was solved by the demonstration that polyclonal anti-gamma(c) Abs detected endoglycosidase-H-sensitive immature forms of gamma(c) (54-58 kDa) expressed by quiescent CD4 T lymphocytes and Jurkat cells. Immature gamma(c) is characterized as an intracellular component localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Pulse-chase analysis shows that the immature gamma(c) is rapidly degraded after synthesis. After activation of CD4 T lymphocytes, and as seen in the CD4 T cell line Kit 225, the endoglycosidase-H-resistant mature form of gamma(c) is detectable at the cell surface and in the endosomal compartment. For the first time, our results demonstrate that a cytokine receptor chain may be constitutively produced as an immature form. Furthermore, this supports the notion that expression of the functional form of gamma(c) may require intracellular interactions with lineage- or subset-specific molecular partners. PMID:11418669

  8. A potential new metabolite of gamma-hydroxybutyrate: sulfonated gamma-hydroxybutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Stephanie; Stachel, Nicole; Skopp, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    Detection of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) became crucial in many clinical and forensic settings due to its increasing use for recreational purposes and drug-facilitated sexual assault. Its narrow window of detection of about 3-12 h in urine represents a major problem. Analogous to ethyl glucuronide, the recently identified GHB-glucuronide exhibits a longer window of detection than the parent drug. It appeared reasonable that a sulfonated metabolite of GHB (GHB-SUL) will also be formed. Due to the lack of an appropriate standard, GHB was incubated with a human liver cytosolic fraction to produce GHB-SUL. Following development of a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay to measure GHB and GHB-SUL, authentic urine samples (n = 5) were tested for GHB-SUL. These investigations revealed detectable signals of both GHB and GHB-SUL, strongly indicating that GHB is not only glucuronidated but also sulfonated. Given that sulfonated metabolites generally have longer half-life times than the corresponding free drugs, GHB-SUL may serve as a biomarker of GHB misuse along with its glucuronide. PMID:26210636

  9. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases. PMID:26579439

  10. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-03-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases. PMID:26579439

  11. Protein kinase activity associated with Fc. gamma. /sub 2a/ receptor of a murine macrophage like cell line, P388D/sub 1/

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Y.; Suzuki, T.

    1987-12-15

    The properties of protein kinase activity associated with Fc receptor specific for IgG/sub 2a/(Fc..gamma../sub 2a/R) of a murine macrophage like cell line, P388D/sub 1/, were investigated. IgG/sub 2a/-binding protein isolated from the detergent lysate of P388D/sub 1/ cells by affinity chromatography of IgG-Sepharose was found to contain four distinct proteins of M/sub r/ 50,000, 43,000, 37,000, and 17,000, which could be autophosphorylated upon incubation with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. The autophosphorylation of Fc..gamma../sub 2a/ receptor complex ceased when exogenous phosphate acceptors (casein or histone) were added in the reaction mixture. Phosphorylation of casein catalyzed by Fc..gamma../sub 2a/ receptor complex was dependent on casein concentration, increased with time or temperature, was dependent on the concentration of ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/, and was maximum at pH near 8. Casein phosphorylation was significantly inhibited by a high concentration of Mn/sup 2 +/ or KCl or by a small amount of heparin and was enhanced about 2-fold by protamine. Casein kinase activity associated with Fc..gamma../sub 2a/ receptor used ATP as substrate with an apparent K/sub m/ of 2 ..mu..M as well as GTP with an apparent K/sub m/ of 10 ..mu..M. Prior heating (60/sup 0/C for 15 min) or treatment with protease (trypsin or Pronase) of Fc..gamma../sub 2a/ receptor complex almost totally abolished casein kinase activity. Thin-layer chromatography of a partial acid hydrolysate of the phosphorylated casein showed that the site of phosphorylation is at a seryl residue. These results suggest that Fc..gamma../sub 2//sub a/ receptor forms a molecule complex with protein kinase, whose characteristics resemble those of type II casein kinase but are different from those of cyclic nucleotide dependent protein kinase or from those of C protein kinase.

  12. Novel primary thymic defect with T lymphocytes expressing gamma delta T cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Geisler, C; Pallesen, G; Platz, P; Odum, N; Dickmeiss, E; Ryder, L P; Svejgaard, A; Plesner, T; Larsen, J K; Koch, C

    1989-07-01

    Flow cytometric analysis of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a six year old girl with a primary cellular immune deficiency showed a normal fraction of CD3 positive T cells. Most (70%) of the CD3 positive cells, however, expressed the gamma delta and not the alpha beta T cell receptor. Immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that most of the gamma delta T cell receptors existed as disulphide-linked heterodimers. Proliferative responses to mitogens were severely reduced, but specific antibody responses after vaccination could be detected. A thymic biopsy specimen showed severe abnormalities of both the thymic lymphoid and epithelial component with abortive medullary differentiation and almost an entire lack of Hassall's corpuscles. This patient represents a case of primary immune deficiency syndrome not previously described. Thymic deficiency associated with a high proportion of T cells expressing the gamma delta T cell receptor has been described in nude mice, and it is suggested that the immune deficiency of this patient may represent a human analogue. PMID:2527256

  13. Crosslinking of surface antibodies and Fc sub. gamma. receptors: Theory and application

    SciTech Connect

    Wofsy, C.; Goldstein, B. Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1991-03-15

    In an immune response, the crosslinking of surface immunoglobulin (sIg) on B cells by multiply-bound ligand activates a range of cell responses, culminating in the production of antibody-secreting cells. However, when the crosslinking agent is itself an antibody, B cell activation is inhibited. Solution antibody (IgG) can bind simultaneously to sIg and to another cell surface receptor, Fc{sub {gamma}}R, co-crosslinking' the distinct receptors. Experiments point to co-crosslinking as the inhibitory signal. It is not clear how co-crosslinking inhibits B cell stimulation. The authors construct and analyze a mathematical model aimed at clarifying the nature and mechanisms of action of the separate cell signals controlling B cell responses to antibodies. Basophils and mast cells respond to the crosslinking of cell surface antibody by releasing histamine. Like B cells, basophils also express FC{sub {gamma}}R. They use their model to analyze new data on the effect of antibody-induced co-crosslinking of the two types of receptor on this family of cells. Predictions of the model indicate that an observed difference between the response patterns induced by antibodies and by antibody fragments that cannot bind to FC{sub {gamma}}R can be explained if co-crosslinking is neither inhibitory nor stimulatory in this system.

  14. White tea extract induces apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cells: the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} and 15-lipoxygenases.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jenny T; Nie, Wen-Xian; Tsu, I-Hsien; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Rao, Jian Yu; Lu, Qing-Yi; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Go, Vay Liang W; Serio, Kenneth J

    2010-09-01

    Emerging preclinical data suggests that tea possess anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic properties. We therefore hypothesize that white tea extract (WTE) is capable of favorably modulating apoptosis, a mechanism associated with lung tumorigenesis. We examined the effects of physiologically relevant doses of WTE on the induction of apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines A549 (adenocarcinoma) and H520 (squamous cell carcinoma) cells. We further characterized the molecular mechanisms responsible for WTE-induced apoptosis, including the induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) and the 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX) signaling pathways. We found that WTE was effective in inducing apoptosis in both A549 and H520 cells, and inhibition of PPAR-gamma with GW9662 partially reversed WTE-induced apoptosis. We further show that WTE increased PPAR-gamma activation and mRNA expression, concomitantly increased 15(S)-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid release, and upregulated 15-LOX-1 and 15-LOX-2 mRNA expression by A549 cells. Inhibition of 15-LOX with nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NGDA), as well as caffeic acid, abrogated WTE-induced PPAR-gamma activation and upregulation of PPAR-gamma mRNA expression in A549 cells. WTE also induced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A mRNA expression and activated caspase-3. Inhibition of caspase-3 abrogated WTE-induced apoptosis. Our findings indicate that WTE is capable of inducing apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines. The induction of apoptosis seems to be mediated, in part, through the upregulation of the PPAR-gamma and 15-LOX signaling pathways, with enhanced activation of caspase-3. Our findings support the future investigation of WTE as an antineoplastic and chemopreventive agent for lung cancer. PMID:20668019

  15. Role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and gamma in gastric ulcer: An overview of experimental evidences.

    PubMed

    Saha, Lekha

    2015-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Three subtypes, PPARα, PPARβ/δ, and PPARγ, have been identified so far. PPARα is expressed in the liver, kidney, small intestine, heart, and muscle, where it activates the fatty acid catabolism and control lipoprotein assembly in response to long-chain unsaturated fatty acids, eicosanoids, and hypolipidemic drugs (e.g., fenofibrate). PPARβ/δ is more broadly expressed and is implicated in fatty acid oxidation, keratinocyte differentiation, wound healing, and macrophage response to very low density lipoprotein metabolism. This isoform has been implicated in transcriptional-repression functions and has been shown to repress the activity of PPARα or PPARγ target genes. PPARγ1 and γ2 are generated from a single-gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma by differential promoter usage and alternative splicing. PPARγ1 is expressed in colon, immune system (e.g., monocytes and macrophages), and other tissues where it participates in the modulation of inflammation, cell proliferation, and differentiation. PPARs regulate gene expression through distinct mechanisms: Ligand-dependent transactivation, ligand-independent repression, and ligand-dependent transrepression. Studies in animals have demonstrated the gastric antisecretory activity of PPARα agonists like ciprofibrate, bezafibrate and clofibrate. Study by Pathak et al also demonstrated the effect of PPARα agonist, bezafibrate, on gastric secretion and gastric cytoprotection in various gastric ulcer models in rats. The majority of the experimental studies is on pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, which are PPARγ activators. In all the studies, both the PPARγ activators showed protection against the gastric ulcer and also accelerate the ulcer healing in gastric ulcer model in rats. Therefore, PPARα and PPARγ may be a target for gastric ulcer therapy

  16. Role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and gamma in gastric ulcer: An overview of experimental evidences

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Lekha

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Three subtypes, PPARα, PPARβ/δ, and PPARγ, have been identified so far. PPARα is expressed in the liver, kidney, small intestine, heart, and muscle, where it activates the fatty acid catabolism and control lipoprotein assembly in response to long-chain unsaturated fatty acids, eicosanoids, and hypolipidemic drugs (e.g., fenofibrate). PPARβ/δ is more broadly expressed and is implicated in fatty acid oxidation, keratinocyte differentiation, wound healing, and macrophage response to very low density lipoprotein metabolism. This isoform has been implicated in transcriptional-repression functions and has been shown to repress the activity of PPARα or PPARγ target genes. PPARγ1 and γ2 are generated from a single-gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma by differential promoter usage and alternative splicing. PPARγ1 is expressed in colon, immune system (e.g., monocytes and macrophages), and other tissues where it participates in the modulation of inflammation, cell proliferation, and differentiation. PPARs regulate gene expression through distinct mechanisms: Ligand-dependent transactivation, ligand-independent repression, and ligand-dependent transrepression. Studies in animals have demonstrated the gastric antisecretory activity of PPARα agonists like ciprofibrate, bezafibrate and clofibrate. Study by Pathak et al also demonstrated the effect of PPARα agonist, bezafibrate, on gastric secretion and gastric cytoprotection in various gastric ulcer models in rats. The majority of the experimental studies is on pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, which are PPARγ activators. In all the studies, both the PPARγ activators showed protection against the gastric ulcer and also accelerate the ulcer healing in gastric ulcer model in rats. Therefore, PPARα and PPARγ may be a target for gastric ulcer therapy

  17. Effect of STI-571 (imatinib mesylate) in combination with retinoic acid and {gamma}-irradiation on viability of neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roessler, Jochen . E-mail: jochen.roessler@uniklinik-freiburg.de; Zambrzycka, Izabella; Lagodny, Jeanette; Kontny, Udo; Niemeyer, Charlotte Marie

    2006-04-21

    Neuroblastoma (NB) expresses the tyrosine kinase receptors c-Kit, PDGFR-{alpha} and -{beta}-targets for STI-571.We investigated a possible combination therapy of STI-571 with retinoic acid (RA) and {gamma}-irradiation on NB cell viability in vitro. Expression of tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligands was examined in 6 NB cell lines by RT-PCR and FACS. The effect on cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Cell viability of all 6 NB cell lines was significantly inhibited after treatment with 20 {mu}M STI-571 for 72 h, two cell lines responding already to 10 {mu}M. Cell lines responded irrespective of their mRNA status or cell surface expression of c-Kit, PDGFR-{alpha} and -{beta}. Co-incubation with 9-cis RA sensitized cells to the inhibitory effects of STI-571. However, pre-treatment with 9-cis RA resulted in resistance of NB cell lines to STI-571 and {gamma}-irradiation. Treatment of NB with STI-571 in combination with 9-cis RA might be a therapeutic strategy for patients in consolidation therapy who have completed {gamma}-irradiation therapy.

  18. Production of interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor-alpha by human T-cell clones expressing different forms of the gamma delta receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Christmas, S E; Meager, A

    1990-01-01

    Panels of human T-cell clones bearing the gamma delta T-cell receptor (TcR) were obtained from peripheral blood and decidual tissue and maintained in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2). TcR V gamma and V delta gene expression was determined in 40 TcR delta 1+ clones using the gamma delta T-cell subset markers Ti gamma A and delta TCS1, in conjunction with Southern blot analysis using TcR J gamma and J delta probes. gamma delta T-cell clones, together with control alpha beta T-cell clones derived from the same lymphocyte populations, were stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and their ability to produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) tested using specific ELISA. Many clones representative of the major peripheral V gamma 9/V delta 2J1 subset produced high amounts of both cytokines and mean levels were not significantly different from those produced by alpha beta T-cell clones. Panels of clones expressing V gamma 9 and V delta 2J1 produced significantly higher levels of TNF-alpha than clones not expressing V delta 2J1 and those expressing V delta 1J1. There was no relationship between levels of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha produced by individual gamma delta T-cell clones and also no relationship between their non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxic activity and levels of either cytokine. There was a significant tendency for gamma delta T-cell clones to produce more TNF-alpha than IFN-gamma in comparison to alpha beta T-cell clones. The significance of these findings is discussed in the light of the reported differences in distribution in vivo of V delta 1J1+ and V delta 2J1+ cells. Images Figure 1 PMID:2126252

  19. A tyrosine-phosphorylated carboxy-terminal peptide of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (Flg) is a binding site for the SH2 domain of phospholipase C-gamma 1.

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, M; Honegger, A M; Rotin, D; Fischer, R; Bellot, F; Li, W; Dionne, C A; Jaye, M; Rubinstein, M; Schlessinger, J

    1991-01-01

    Phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-gamma) is a substrate of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR; encoded by the flg gene) and other receptors with tyrosine kinase activity. It has been demonstrated that the src homology region 2 (SH2 domain) of PLC-gamma and of other signalling molecules such as GTPase-activating protein and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-associated p85 direct their binding toward tyrosine-autophosphorylated regions of the epidermal growth factor or platelet-derived growth factor receptor. In this report, we describe the identification of Tyr-766 as an autophosphorylation site of flg-encoded FGFR by direct sequencing of a tyrosine-phosphorylated tryptic peptide isolated from the cytoplasmic domain of FGFR expressed in Escherichia coli. The same phosphopeptide was found in wild-type FGFR phosphorylated either in vitro or in living cells. Like other growth factor receptors, tyrosine-phosphorylated wild-type FGFR or its cytoplasmic domain becomes associated with intact PLC-gamma or with a fusion protein containing the SH2 domain of PLC-gamma. To delineate the site of association, we have examined the capacity of a 28-amino-acid tryptic peptide containing phosphorylated Tyr-766 to bind to various constructs containing SH2 and other domains of PLC-gamma. It is demonstrated that the tyrosine-phosphorylated peptide binds specifically to the SH2 domain but not to the SH3 domain or other regions of PLC-gamma. Hence, Tyr-766 and its flanking sequences represent a major binding site in FGFR for PLC-gamma. Alignment of the amino acid sequences surrounding Tyr-766 with corresponding regions of other FGFRs revealed conserved tyrosine residues in all known members of the FGFR family. We propose that homologous tyrosine-phosphorylated regions in other FGFRs also function as binding sites for PLC-gamma and therefore are involved in coupling to phosphatidylinositol breakdown. Images PMID:1656221

  20. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) induces cognitive deficits and affects GABAB receptors and IGF-1 receptors in male rats.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jenny; Grönbladh, Alfhild; Hallberg, Mathias

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, the abuse of the club drug gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has become increasingly popular among adolescents. The drug induces euphoria but can also result in sedation, anaesthesia as well as short-term amnesia. In addition, the abuse of GHB causes cognitive impairments and the mechanism by which GHB induces these impairments is not clarified. The present study investigates the impact of GHB treatment on spatial learning and memory using a water maze (WM) test in rats. Furthermore, the behavioural data is combined with an autoradiographic analysis of the GABAB and the IGF-1 receptor systems. The results demonstrate that the animals administered with GHB display an impaired performance in the WM test as compared to controls. In addition, significant alterations in GABAB and IGF-1 receptor density as well as GABAB receptor functionality, were observed in several brain regions associated with cognitive functions e.g. hippocampus. To conclude, our findings suggest that GHB treatment can affect spatial learning and memory, and that this outcome at least to some extent is likely to involve both GABAB and IGF-1 receptors. PMID:24786330

  1. Bio-derived poly(gamma-glutamic acid) nanogels as controlled anticancer drug delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee Ho; Cho, Mi Young; Hong, Ji Hyeon; Poo, Haryoung; Sung, Moon-Hee; Lim, Yong Taik

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a novel type of polymer nanogel loaded with anticancer drug based on bio-derived poly(gamma- glutamic acid) (gamma-PGA). gamma-PGA is a highly anionic polymer that is synthesized naturally by microbial species, most prominently in various bacilli, and has been shown to have excellent biocompatibility. Thiolated gamma-PGA was synthesized by covalent coupling between the carboxyl groups of gamma-PGA and the primary amine group of cysteamine. Doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded gamma-PGA nanogels were fabricated using the following steps: (1) an ionic nanocomplex was formed between thiolated gamma-PGA as the negative charge component, and Dox as the positive charge component; (2) addition of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) induced hydrogen-bond interactions between thiol groups of thiolated gamma-PGA and hydroxyl groups of PEG, resulting in the nanocomplex; and (3) disulfide crosslinked gamma-PGA nanogels were fabricated by ultrasonication. The average size and surface charge of Dox-loaded disulfide cross-linked gamma-PGA nanogels in aqueous solution were 136.3 +/- 37.6 nm and -32.5 +/- 5.3 mV, respectively. The loading amount of Dox was approximately 38.7 microgram per mg of gamma-PGA nanogel. The Dox-loaded disulfide cross-linked gamma-PGA nanogels showed controlled drug release behavior in the presence of reducing agents, glutathione (GSH) (1- 10 mM). Through fluorescence microscopy and FACS, the cellular uptake of gamma-PGA nanogels into breast cancer cells (MCF-7) was analyzed. The cytotoxic effect was evaluated using the MTT assay and was determined to be dependent on both the concentration and treatment time of gamma-PGA nanogels. The bio-derived gamma-PGA nanogels are expected to be a well-designed delivery carrier for controlled drug delivery applications. PMID:23221543

  2. Seizure control by decanoic acid through direct AMPA receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pishan; Augustin, Katrin; Boddum, Kim; Williams, Sophie; Sun, Min; Terschak, John A; Hardege, Jörg D; Chen, Philip E; Walker, Matthew C; Williams, Robin S B

    2016-02-01

    The medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet is an established treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy that increases plasma levels of decanoic acid and ketones. Recently, decanoic acid has been shown to provide seizure control in vivo, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we show that decanoic acid, but not the ketones β-hydroxybutryate or acetone, shows antiseizure activity in two acute ex vivo rat hippocampal slice models of epileptiform activity. To search for a mechanism of decanoic acid, we show it has a strong inhibitory effect on excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurotransmission in hippocampal slices. Using heterologous expression of excitatory ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA subunits in Xenopus oocytes, we show that this effect is through direct AMPA receptor inhibition, a target shared by a recently introduced epilepsy treatment perampanel. Decanoic acid acts as a non-competitive antagonist at therapeutically relevant concentrations, in a voltage- and subunit-dependent manner, and this is sufficient to explain its antiseizure effects. This inhibitory effect is likely to be caused by binding to sites on the M3 helix of the AMPA-GluA2 transmembrane domain; independent from the binding site of perampanel. Together our results indicate that the direct inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission by decanoic acid in the brain contributes to the anti-convulsant effect of the medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet. PMID:26608744

  3. Seizure control by decanoic acid through direct AMPA receptor inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pishan; Augustin, Katrin; Boddum, Kim; Williams, Sophie; Sun, Min; Terschak, John A.; Hardege, Jörg D.; Chen, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    See Rogawski (doi:10.1093/awv369) for a scientific commentary on this article.  The medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet is an established treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy that increases plasma levels of decanoic acid and ketones. Recently, decanoic acid has been shown to provide seizure control in vivo, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we show that decanoic acid, but not the ketones β-hydroxybutryate or acetone, shows antiseizure activity in two acute ex vivo rat hippocampal slice models of epileptiform activity. To search for a mechanism of decanoic acid, we show it has a strong inhibitory effect on excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurotransmission in hippocampal slices. Using heterologous expression of excitatory ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA subunits in Xenopus oocytes, we show that this effect is through direct AMPA receptor inhibition, a target shared by a recently introduced epilepsy treatment perampanel. Decanoic acid acts as a non-competitive antagonist at therapeutically relevant concentrations, in a voltage- and subunit-dependent manner, and this is sufficient to explain its antiseizure effects. This inhibitory effect is likely to be caused by binding to sites on the M3 helix of the AMPA-GluA2 transmembrane domain; independent from the binding site of perampanel. Together our results indicate that the direct inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission by decanoic acid in the brain contributes to the anti-convulsant effect of the medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet. PMID:26608744

  4. Gamma butyrolactone poisoning and its similarities to gamma hydroxybutyric acid: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Rambourg-Schepens, M O; Buffet, M; Durak, C; Mathieu-Nolf, M

    1997-08-01

    Clinical experience with toxicity induced by products containing gamma butyrolactone is limited. We report here 2 cases of gamma butyrolactone poisoning with a nail polish remover labelled "acetone-free". Rapid onset of coma, respiratory depression and bradycardia occurred in both patients. After supportive care, they fully recovered within a few hours. PMID:9251175

  5. Extracellular expression of glutamate decarboxylase B in Escherichia coli to improve gamma-aminobutyric acid production.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Anqi; Hu, Xiaoqing; Li, Ye; Chen, Cheng; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2016-12-01

    Escherichia coli overexpressing glutamate decarboxylase GadB can produce gamma-aminobutyric acid with addition of monosodium glutamate. The yield and productivity of gamma-aminobutyric acid might be significantly improved if the overexpressed GadB in E. coli cells can be excreted outside, where it can directly transforms monosodium glutamate to gamma-aminobutyric acid. In this study, GadB was fused to signal peptides TorA or PelB, respectively, and overexpressed in E. coli BL21(DE3). It was found that TorA could facilitate GadB secretion much better than PelB. Conditions for GadB secretion and gamma-aminobutyric acid production were optimized in E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET20b-torA-gadB, leading the secretion of more than half of the overexpressed GadB. Fed-batch fermentation for GadB expression and gamma-aminobutyric acid production of BL21(DE3)/pET20b-torA-gadB was sequentially performed in one fermenter; 264.4 and 313.1 g/L gamma-aminobutyric acid were obtained with addition of monosodium glutamate after 36 and 72 h, respectively. PMID:27549808

  6. A synthetic antagonist for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma inhibits adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wright, H M; Clish, C B; Mikami, T; Hauser, S; Yanagi, K; Hiramatsu, R; Serhan, C N; Spiegelman, B M

    2000-01-21

    While searching for natural ligands for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma, we identified a synthetic compound that binds to this receptor. Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) is a ligand for PPARgamma with a K(d(app)) of 100 microM. This compound has no apparent ability to activate the transcriptional activity of PPARgamma; however, BADGE can antagonize the ability of agonist ligands such as rosiglitazone to activate the transcriptional and adipogenic action of this receptor. BADGE also specifically blocks the ability of natural adipogenic cell lines such as 3T3-L1 and 3T3-F442A cells to undergo hormone-mediated cell differentiation. These results provide the first pharmacological evidence that PPARgamma activity is required for the hormonally induced differentiation of adipogenic cells. PMID:10636887

  7. Ligand regulation of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors: implications for development of novel therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Solt, Laura A.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review In the late 1980s, the cloning of several nuclear receptors led to the intense search and isolation of new members of this superfamily. Despite their identification, many of these receptors were dubbed ‘orphan’ receptors, as their physiological ligands remained unknown. Recent reports have presented evidence for one family of orphan receptors, the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors (RORs), in several pathologies, including osteoporosis, several autoimmune diseases, asthma, cancer, diabetes and obesity. The present review summarizes the studies identifying ligands for the RORs and evaluates their role as targets for potential therapeutics. Recent findings Significant progress was made in the initial identification of ligands for the RORs when X-ray crystallographic studies identified several molecules within the ligand-binding pockets of RORα and RORβ. Recently, we identified endogenous and synthetic ligands for RORα and RORγ, thereby solidifying their function as ligand-dependent transcription factors. Summary Recent studies have established roles for the RORs in physiological development and the advent of disease. Identification of ligands for the RORs, both endogenous and synthetic, has established these receptors as attractive new therapeutic targets for the treatment of ROR-related diseases. PMID:20463469

  8. The Long and Winding Road to Gamma-Amino-Butyric Acid as Neurotransmitter.

    PubMed

    Avoli, Massimo; Krnjević, Krešimir

    2016-03-01

    This review centers on the discoveries made during more than six decades of neuroscience research on the role of gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) as neurotransmitter. In doing so, special emphasis is directed to the significant involvement of Canadian scientists in these advances. Starting with the early studies that established GABA as an inhibitory neurotransmitter at central synapses, we summarize the results pointing at the GABA receptor as a drug target as well as more recent evidence showing that GABAA receptor signaling plays a surprisingly active role in neuronal network synchronization, both during development and in the adult brain. Finally, we briefly address the involvement of GABA in neurological conditions that encompass epileptic disorders and mental retardation. RESUMÉ: Le chemin long et sinueux pour que le GABA soit reconnu comme un neurotransmetteur. Cette revue est axée sur les découvertes réalisées durant plus de six décennies de recherche en neurosciences sur l'acide gamma-aminobutyrique (GABA) comme neurotransmetteur. À cet effet, nous mettons une emphase particulière sur le rôle significatif de chercheurs canadiens dans ce domaine de recherche. En prenant comme point de départ les premières études qui ont établi que le GABA était un neurotransmetteur au niveau de synapses centrales, nous faisons le sommaire des résultats identifiant le récepteur GABA comme étant une cible thérapeutique ainsi que des données plus récentes montrant que la signalisation du récepteur GABAA joue, de façon surprenante, un rôle actif dans la synchronisation du réseau neuronal, tant au cours du développement que dans le cerveau adulte. Finalement, nous traitons brièvement du rôle de GABA dans les maladies neurologiques incluant les troubles épileptiques et l'arriération mentale. PMID:26763167

  9. A bivariate pseudo Gamma distribution with application to acid rain data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilz, J.; Mohsin, M.; Gebhardt, A.

    2012-04-01

    Univariate and bivariate Gamma distributions are extensively used for statistical modeling in climatology. In this paper, a bivariate pseudo Gamma distribution is used to model the proportion of acidity and major ions in rain. The model parameters of the bivariate pseudo Gamma distribution are estimated by the maximum likelihood method. The plots of the distribution of the proportions are compared to the histograms of the observed data of the proportions of acidity and major ions in rain. The fitted pdf appears to follow the general pattern in the histograms closely.

  10. Anti-inflammatory effects of the hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Graff, Emily C; Fang, Han; Wanders, Desiree; Judd, Robert L

    2016-02-01

    The hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors (HCA1-3) are a family of G-protein-coupled receptors that are critical for sensing endogenous intermediates of metabolism. All three receptors are predominantly expressed on adipocytes and mediate anti-lipolytic effects. In addition to adipocytes, HCA2 is highly expressed on immune cells, including macrophages, monocytes, neutrophils and dermal dendritic cells, among other cell types. The endogenous ligand for HCA2 is beta-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB), a ketone body produced by the liver through β-oxidation when an individual is in a negative energy balance. Recent studies demonstrate that HCA2 mediates profound anti-inflammatory effects in a variety of tissues, indicating that HCA2 may be an important therapeutic target for treating inflammatory disease processes. This review summarizes the roles of HCA2 on inflammation in a number of tissues and clinical states. PMID:26773933

  11. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor (LPAR) modulators: The current pharmacological toolbox.

    PubMed

    Llona-Minguez, Sabin; Ghassemian, Artin; Helleday, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Lysophosphatidic acids (LPA) are key lipid-signalling molecules that regulate a remarkably diverse set of cellular events, such as motility, chemotaxis, cell cycle progression, viability, and wound healing. The physiological and pathophysiological consequences of LPA signalling are evident and misregulation of LPA signalling can lead to pathologies like cancer, atherosclerosis, ischaemia, and fibrosis. LPA exerts its biological actions mainly through several types of G protein-coupled receptors, some of which display opposing or redundant effects. For this reason, selective LPA receptor small-molecule ligands can shine light on LPA biology and present an exciting opportunity for drug discovery endeavours. This review provides insights into the detailed chemical nature and pharmacological profile of the small-molecules thus far developed as LPA receptor modulators, as well as information on the preparation of key pharmaceuticals. This summary will facilitate future research efforts and nurture collaboration between chemists and biologists working in this emerging field. PMID:25704399

  12. Crystal Structure of Antagonist Bound Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Roth, Christopher B.; Terakado, Masahiko; Kurata, Haruto; Omi, Rie; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Warshaviak, Dora; Nakade, Shinji; Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo; Mileni, Mauro; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Griffith, Mark T.; Rodgers, Caroline; Han, Gye Won; Velasquez, Jeffrey; Chun, Jerold; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lipid biology continues to emerge as an area of significant therapeutic interest, particularly as the result of an enhanced understanding of the wealth of signaling molecules with diverse physiological properties. This growth in knowledge is epitomized by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which functions through interactions with six cognate G protein-coupled receptors. Herein we present three crystal structures of LPA1 in complex with antagonist tool compounds selected and designed through structural and stability analysis. Structural analysis combined with molecular dynamics identified a basis for ligand access to the LPA1 binding pocket from the extracellular space contrasting with the proposed access for the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor. Characteristics of the LPA1 binding pocket raise the possibility of promiscuous ligand recognition of phosphorylated endocannabinoids. Cell-based assays confirmed this hypothesis, linking the distinct receptor systems through metabolically related ligands with potential functional and therapeutic implications for treatment of disease. PMID:26091040

  13. Nuclear bile acid signaling through the farnesoid X receptor.

    PubMed

    Mazuy, Claire; Helleboid, Audrey; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are amphipathic molecules produced from cholesterol by the liver. Expelled from the gallbladder upon meal ingestion, BAs serve as fat solubilizers in the intestine. BAs are reabsorbed in the ileum and return via the portal vein to the liver where, together with nutrients, they provide signals to coordinate metabolic responses. BAs act on energy and metabolic homeostasis through the activation of membrane and nuclear receptors, among which the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is an important regulator of several metabolic pathways. Highly expressed in the liver and the small intestine, FXR contributes to BA effects on metabolism, inflammation and cell cycle control. The pharmacological modulation of its activity has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for liver and metabolic diseases. This review highlights recent advances regarding the mechanisms by which the BA sensor FXR contributes to global signaling effects of BAs, and how FXR activity may be regulated by nutrient-sensitive signaling pathways. PMID:25511198

  14. A comparison of gamma-aminobutyric acid and the semi-rigid analogues 4-aminotetrolic acid, 4-aminocrotonic acid and imidazole-4-acetic acid on the isolated superior cervical ganglion of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bowery, N G; Jones, G P

    1976-01-01

    1 The rat superior cervical ganglion possesses receptors for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This can be demonstrated in vitro by recording the changes in ganglionic surface potential which occur after the addition of GABA to the bathing solution. 2 The action of three conformationally-restricted analogues of GABA namely 4-aminotetrolic acid (4-ATA), trans 4-aminocrotonic acid (4-ACA) and imidazole-4-acetic acid (IAA) have been examined for activity at this peripheral receptor. 3 All three analogues depolarized the ganglion in a manner similar to GABA. Their actions were transient and were 'occluded' by GABA; also the dose-response curve in each case was parallel to that of GABA. Molar potencies relative to GABA (= 1) were 4-ACA = 1.48, IAA = 0.100, 4-ATA = 0.0028. 4 The action of each analogue could be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline and tetramethylenedisulphotetramine at doses which had relatively little effect on responses to the cholinomimetic carbachol. 5 4-ACA and IAA (1 mM) significantly reduced the ganglionic accumulation of [3H]-GABA (0.2 muM) by 88% and 58% respectively whereas 4-ATA (1 mM), caused no significant reduction in [3H]-GABA accumulation. PMID:1260178

  15. Identification of COUP-TFII Orphan Nuclear Receptor as a Retinoic Acid-Activated Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Schoen W; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Zhou, X Edward; Kretschman, Jennifer E; Reynolds, Ross; Vonrhein, Clemens; Xu, Yong; Wang, Liliang; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFI and II) make up the most conserved subfamily of nuclear receptors that play key roles in angiogenesis, neuronal development, organogenesis, cell fate determination, and metabolic homeostasis. Although the biological functions of COUP-TFs have been studied extensively, little is known of their structural features or aspects of ligand regulation. Here we report the ligand-free 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of the human COUP-TFII ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals an autorepressed conformation of the receptor, where helix {alpha}10 is bent into the ligand-binding pocket and the activation function-2 helix is folded into the cofactor binding site, thus preventing the recruitment of coactivators. In contrast, in multiple cell lines, COUP-TFII exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, and ligand binding, substantially reduce the COUP-TFII transcriptional activity. Importantly, retinoid acids are able to promote COUP-TFII to recruit coactivators and activate a COUP-TF reporter construct. Although the concentration needed is higher than the physiological levels of retinoic acids, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, in which ligands activate the receptor by releasing it from the autorepressed conformation.

  16. Induction of renal cytochrome P450 arachidonic acid epoxygenase activity by dietary gamma-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhigang; Ng, Valerie Y; Su, Ping; Engler, Marguerite M; Engler, Mary B; Huang, Yong; Lin, Emil; Kroetz, Deanna L

    2006-05-01

    Dietary gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), a omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid found in borage oil (BOR), lowers systolic blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). GLA is converted into arachidonic acid (AA) by elongation and desaturation steps. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) are cytochrome P450 (P450)-derived AA eicosanoids with important roles in regulating blood pressure. This study tested the hypothesis that the blood pressure-lowering effect of a GLA-enriched diet involves alteration of P450-catalyzed AA metabolism. Microsomes and RNA were isolated from the renal cortex of male SHRs fed a basal fat-free diet for 5 weeks to which 11% by weight of sesame oil (SES) or BOR was added. There was a 2.6- to 3.5-fold increase in P450 epoxygenase activity in renal microsomes isolated from the BOR-fed SHRs compared with the SES-fed rats. Epoxygenase activity accounted for 58% of the total AA metabolism in the BOR-treated kidney microsomes compared with 33% in the SES-treated rats. More importantly, renal 14,15- and 8,9-EET levels increased 1.6- to 2.5-fold after dietary BOR treatment. The increase in EET formation is consistent with increases in CYP2C23, CYP2C11, and CYP2J protein levels. There were no differences in the level of renal P450 epoxygenase mRNA between the SES- and BOR-treated rats. Enhanced synthesis of the vasodilatory EETs and decreased formation of the vasoconstrictive 20-HETE suggests that changes in P450-mediated AA metabolism may contribute, at least in part, to the blood pressure-lowering effect of a BOR-enriched diet. PMID:16421287

  17. Human Fc(gamma) receptors for differentiation in throat cultures of group C "Streptococcus equisimilis" and group C "Streptococcus milleri".

    PubMed

    Lebrun, L; Guibert, M; Wallet, P; de Maneville, M M; Pillot, J

    1986-11-01

    The biochemical characteristics and the presence of human Fc(gamma) receptors of 52 throat isolates of group C beta-hemolytic streptococci were examined. Among these isolates, 38 were identified as "Streptococcus milleri" and 14 were identified as "Streptococcus equisimilis." The differentiation of group C "S. equisimilis" from "S. milleri" with identical group antigens was easy to perform by the measurement of the size of the hemolytic zone on a sheep blood agar plate in an anaerobic atmosphere and by biochemical tests (Voges-Proskauer test). A clear-cut criterion for differentiation was noted among these isolates, i.e., the presence of Fc(gamma) receptors. "S. equisimilis," which are generally associated with pharyngitis, possess human Fc(gamma) receptors, while "S. milleri", which are generally isolated from healthy persons, have no such receptors. PMID:3771760

  18. Characterization of the antiabsence effects of SCH 50911, a GABA-B receptor antagonist, in the lethargic mouse, gamma-hydroxybutyrate, and pentylenetetrazole models.

    PubMed

    Hosford, D A; Wang, Y; Liu, C C; Snead, O C

    1995-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptor antagonists suppress absence seizures in animal models. (+)-5,5-Dimethyl-2-morpholineacetic acid, hydrochloride (SCH 50911) is a new GABAB antagonist that is structurally dissimilar to previously studied GABAB antagonists such as 3-aminopropyl-diethoxymethyl-phosphinic acid (CGP 35348), 3-aminopropyl-n-butyl-phosphinic acid (CGP 36742) or 3-aminopropyl-cyclohexylmethyl-phosphinic acid (CGP 46381). In this study we measured the antiabsence effects of SCH 50911 in three animal models: the lethargic (lh/lh) mutant mouse, which has spontaneous absence seizures; and two rat models in which absence seizures were induced by administration of either gamma-hydroxybutyrate or pentylenetetrazole. SCH 50911 abolished seizures in all three models in a dose-dependent fashion (ID100 = 8-170 mumol/kg). In each model SCH 50911 was more potent (ID50 = 2-22 mumol/kg) than the following antiabsence compounds: the GABAB antagonist CGP 35348 (ID50 = 210-890 mumol/kg); ethosuximide (ID50 < or = 142-1240 mumol/kg); trimethadione (ID50 = 520-1100 mumol/kg); and valproic acid (ID50 = 900-2360 mumol/kg). SCH 50911 was equipotent with the GABAB antagonist CGP 46381 (ID50 = 20 mumol/kg) in the lh/lh mouse model. These findings suggest that antiabsence activity may be a defining feature of GABAB receptor antagonists and provide a rationale for pursuing clinical trials of GABAB receptor antagonists in human patients with absence seizures. PMID:7562514

  19. Evaluation of radiological data of some saturated fatty acids using gamma ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, Prashant S.; Pawar, Pravina P.; Palani Selvam, T.

    2016-02-01

    Radiological parameters such as mass attenuation coefficients (μm), total attenuation cross section (σtot), molar extinction coefficient (ε), mass energy absorption coefficient (μen/ρ) and effective electronic cross section (σt, el) of saturated fatty acids, namely butyric acid (C4H8O2), caproic acid (C6H12O2), enanthic acid (C7H14O2), caprylic acid (C8H16O2), pelargonic acid (C9H18O2) and valeric acid (C5H10O2) were measured using NaI(Tl)-based gamma spectrometry. Radioactive sources used in the study are 57Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, 54Mn, 60Co and 22Na. Gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set up was used in the study. The measured data were compared against Win-XCOM-based data. The agreement is within 1%.

  20. Selective potentiation of alpha 1 glycine receptors by ginkgolic acid

    PubMed Central

    Maleeva, Galyna; Buldakova, Svetlana; Bregestovski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) belong to the superfamily of pentameric cys-loop receptor-operated channels and are involved in numerous physiological functions, including movement, vision, and pain. In search for compounds performing subunit-specific modulation of GlyRs we studied action of ginkgolic acid, an abundant Ginkgo biloba product. Using patch-clamp recordings, we analyzed the effects of ginkgolic acid in concentrations from 30 nM to 25 μM on α1–α3 and α1/β, α2/β configurations of GlyR and on GABAARs expressed in cultured CHO-K1 cells and mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells. Ginkgolic acid caused an increase in the amplitude of currents mediated by homomeric α1 and heteromeric α1/β GlyRs and provoked a left-shift of the concentration-dependent curves for glycine. Even at high concentrations (10–25 μM) ginkgolic acid was not able to augment ionic currents mediated by α2, α2/β, and α3 GlyRs, or by GABAAR consisting of α1/β2/γ2 subunits. Mutation of three residues (T59A/A261G/A303S) in the α2 GlyR subunit to the corresponding ones from the α1 converted the action of ginkgolic acid to potentiation with a distinct decrease in EC50 for glycine, suggesting an important role for these residues in modulation by ginkgolic acid. Our results suggest that ginkgolic acid is a novel selective enhancer of α1 GlyRs. PMID:26578878

  1. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid inhibits IFN-gamma-induced STAT tyrosine phosphorylation in rat brain astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sae-Bom; Ji, Kyung-Ae; You, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jae-Hong; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-Hye

    2005-03-11

    The Janus kinase (JAK) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) signal cascades are major pathways that mediate the inflammatory functions of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), an important pro-inflammatory cytokine. Therefore, regulation of JAK/STAT signaling should modulate IFN-gamma-mediated inflammation. In this study, we found that nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a well-known lipoxygenase (LO) inhibitor, suppressed IFN-gamma-induced inflammatory responses in brain astrocytes. In the presence of NDGA, interferon regulatory factor-1 expression was significantly reduced. Expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 mRNA in response to IFN-gamma was significantly suppressed in the presence of NDGA, as was tyrosine-phosphorylation of JAK and STAT. However, the 5-LO products, leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) and leukotriene C(4), were not detected in cells treated with IFN-gamma, indicating that the effect of NDGA seemed to be independent of 5-LO inhibition. In addition, two other 5-LO inhibitors (Rev5901 and AA861) did not mimic the effect of NDGA, and the 5-LO metabolites, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and LTB(4), were unable to reverse NDGA-driven suppression of STAT activation or affect basal STAT phosphorylation. Taken together, these results suggest that NDGA regulates IFN-gamma-mediated inflammation through mechanisms unrelated to the inhibition of 5-LO. PMID:15694390

  2. Structural and Biochemical Basis for the Binding Selectivity of Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor [gamma] to PGC-1[alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong; Kovach, Amanda; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Martynowski, Dariusz; Xu, H. Eric

    2008-07-23

    The functional interaction between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and its coactivator PGC-1{alpha} is crucial for the normal physiology of PPAR{gamma} and its pharmacological response to antidiabetic treatment with rosiglitazone. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPAR{gamma} ligand-binding domain bound to rosiglitazone and to a large PGC-1{alpha} fragment that contains two LXXLL-related motifs. The structure reveals critical contacts mediated through the first LXXLL motif of PGC-1{alpha} and the PPAR{gamma} coactivator binding site. Through a combination of biochemical and structural studies, we demonstrate that the first LXXLL motif is the most potent among all nuclear receptor coactivator motifs tested, and only this motif of the two LXXLL-related motifs in PGC-1{alpha} is capable of binding to PPAR{gamma}. Our studies reveal that the strong interaction of PGC-1{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} is mediated through both hydrophobic and specific polar interactions. Mutations within the context of the full-length PGC-1{alpha} indicate that the first PGC-1{alpha} motif is necessary and sufficient for PGC-1{alpha} to coactivate PPAR{gamma} in the presence or absence of rosiglitazone. These results provide a molecular basis for specific recruitment and functional interplay between PPAR{gamma} and PGC-1{alpha} in glucose homeostasis and adipocyte differentiation.

  3. GC-MS Analysis of [gamma]-Hydroxybutyric Acid Analogs: A Forensic Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henck, Colin; Nally, Luke

    2007-01-01

    An upper-division forensic chemistry experiment is described. It involves using glycolic acid and sodium glycolate as analogs of [gamma]-hydroxybutyric acid and its sodium salt. The experiment shows the use of silylation in GC-MS analysis and gives students the opportunity to work with a commonly used silylating reagent,…

  4. Radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions by gamma ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Wenbao; He, Yanquan; Ling, Yongsheng; Hei, Daqian; Shan, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jiatong

    2015-04-01

    The radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid under gamma ray irradiation was investigated. Degradation experiments were performed with 100 mL sealed Pyrex glass vessels loaded with 80 mL of cyclohexanebutyric acid solutions at various initial concentrations of 10, 20, and 40 mg L-1. The absorbed doses were controlled at 0, 0.65, 1.95, 3.25, 6.5, 9.75, and 13 kGy. The results showed that gamma ray irradiation could effectively degrade cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions. The removal rate of cyclohexanebutyric acid increased significantly with the increase of absorbed dose and the decrease of its initial concentration. At the same time, the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was as effective as that of cyclohexanebutyric acid. The kinetic studies showed that the degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid followed pseudo first-order reaction. Above all, the proposed mechanism obtained when NaNO2, NaNO3 and tert-butanol were added showed that the •OH radical played a major role in the gamma degradation process of cyclohexanebutyric acid, while •H and eaq- played a minor role in the gamma degradation process. The degradation products were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) during cyclohexanebutyric acid degradation.

  5. Combined Treatment With Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) Gamma Ligands and Gamma Radiation Induces Apoptosis by PPARγ-Independent Up-Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Deoxyribonucleic Acid Damage Signals in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Eun Jong; Im, Chang-Nim; Park, Seon Hwa; Moon, Eun-Yi; Hong, Sung Hee

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate possible radiosensitizing activities of the well-known peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ ligand ciglitazone and novel PPARγ ligands CAY10415 and CAY10506 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity was assessed using a clonogenic cell survival assay. To investigate the mechanism underlying PPARγ ligand-induced radiosensitization, the subdiploid cellular DNA fraction was analyzed by flow cytometry. Activation of the caspase pathway by combined PPARγ ligands and γ-radiation treatment was detected by immunoblot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and flow cytometry. Results: The 3 PPARγ ligands induced cell death and ROS generation in a PPARγ-independent manner, enhanced γ-radiation–induced apoptosis and caspase-3–mediated poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage in vitro. The combined PPARγ ligand/γ-radiation treatment triggered caspase-8 activation, and this initiator caspase played an important role in the combination-induced apoptosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ ligands may enhance the γ-radiation-induced DNA damage response, possibly by increasing γ-H2AX expression. Moreover, the combination treatment significantly increased ROS generation, and the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine inhibited the combined treatment-induced ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Conclusions: Taken together, these results indicated that the combined treatment of PPARγ ligands and γ-radiation synergistically induced DNA damage and apoptosis, which was regulated by ROS.

  6. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hashizaki, Hikari; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPAR{alpha} in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPAR{alpha} using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPAR{alpha} by GW7647, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPAR{gamma}, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPAR{gamma} is activated. On the other hand, PPAR{alpha} activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Moreover, PPAR{alpha} activation increased the production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPAR{alpha} stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected

  7. Novel retinoic acid receptor ligands in Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, B; Bolado, J; Derguini, F; Craig, A G; Moreno, T A; Chakravarti, D; Heyman, R A; Buck, J; Evans, R M

    1996-01-01

    Retinoids are a large family of natural and synthetic compounds related to vitamin A that have pleiotropic effects on body physiology, reproduction, immunity, and embryonic development. The diverse activities of retinoids are primarily mediated by two families of nuclear retinoic acid receptors, the RARs and RXRs. Retinoic acids are thought to be the only natural ligands for these receptors and are widely assumed to be the active principle of vitamin A. However, during an unbiased, bioactivity-guided fractionation of Xenopus embryos, we were unable to detect significant levels of all-trans or 9-cis retinoic acids. Instead, we found that the major bioactive retinoid in the Xenopus egg and early embryo is 4-oxoretinaldehyde, which is capable of binding to and transactivating RARs. In addition to its inherent activity, 4-oxoretinaldehyde appears to be a metabolic precursor of two other RAR ligands, 4-oxoretinoic acid and 4-oxoretinol. The remarkable increase in activity of retinaldehyde and retinol as a consequence of 4-oxo derivatization suggests that this metabolic step could serve a critical regulatory function during embryogenesis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8643496

  8. Simultaneous and selective production of levan and poly(gamma-glutamic acid) by Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ing-Lung; Yu, Yun-Ti

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis(natto) Takahashi, used to prepare the fermented soybean product natto, was grown in a basal medium containing 5% (w/w) sucrose and 1.5% (w/w) L-glutamate and produced 58% (w/w) poly(gamma-glutamic acid) and 42% (w/w) levan simultaneously. After 21 h, 40-50 mg levan ml-1 had been produced in medium containing 20% (w/w) sucrose but without L-glutamate. In medium containing L-glutamic acid but without sucrose, mainly poly(gamma-glutamic acid) was produced. PMID:15703872

  9. Effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid on neurally mediated contraction of guinea pig trachealis smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Tamaoki, J; Graf, P D; Nadel, J A

    1987-10-01

    To determine whether gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) affects the contractile properties of airway smooth muscle and, if so, what the mechanism of action is, the authors studied guinea pig tracheal rings under isometric conditions in vitro. GABA and related substances, baclofen and muscimol, had no effect on the resting tension but reversibly depressed contractions induced by electrical field stimulation in a dose-dependent fashion, IC50 values (mean +/- S.E.) being 5.6 +/- 1.4 X 10(-6) M, 6.8 +/- 0.9 X 10(-6) M and 8.5 +/- 1.5 X 10(-5) M, respectively. In contrast, GABA did not alter the response to exogenous acetylcholine or the nonadrenergic noncholinergic inhibitory component. Pretreatment of tissues with bicuculline antagonized the inhibitory effect of GABA as well as that of baclofen. This inhibitory effect was not modified by propranolol, phentolamine, hemicholinium-3 or naloxone, but it was blocked by the Cl channel blocker furosemide and by the substitution of external Cl. These results suggest that GABA decreases the contractile response of airway smooth muscle to cholinergic nerve stimulation by inhibiting the evoked release of acetylcholine and that this effect is exerted by activating Cl-dependent, bicuculline-sensitive GABA receptors. PMID:3668869

  10. Adenosine inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid release from slices of rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Hollins, C.; Stone, T. W.

    1980-01-01

    1 The effect of purine compounds on the potassium-evoked release of 14C-labelled gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been studied in 400 micrometers slices of rat cerebral cortex in vitro. 2 Adenosine and adenosine 5' monophosphate (AMP) inhibited the release of GABA at 10(-5) to 10(-3) M. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) produced a significant inhibition of release only at 10(-3) M. 3 Theophylline 10(-4) or 10(-3) M reduced the inhibitory effect of adenosine, but did not change basal release of GABA. 4 Dipyridamole 10(-5) M itself reduced evoked GABA release, but did not prevent the inhibitory effect of adenosine, implying that adenosine was acting at an extracellularly directed receptor. 5 Calcium removal or antagonism by verapamil reduced the evoked release of GABA, but adenosine did not produce any further reduction of the calcium-independent release. This may indicate that the inhibitory effect of adenosine on GABA release results from interference with calcium influx or availability within the terminals. PMID:7378648

  11. Up-regulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter I mediates ethanol sensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, J-H; Ma, Y-H; Yang, N; Mei, Z-T; Zhang, M-H; Fei, J; Guo, L-H

    2004-01-01

    Ethanol is among the most widely abused drugs in the world. Chronic ethanol consumption leads to ethanol tolerance and addiction, and impairs learning and memory. Na+/Cl- dependent GABA transporters play an important role in controlling the concentration of GABA in the synaptic cleft, and thus they control the intensity and duration of synaptic transmission of GABA. It has been suggested that GABAergic system is involved in ethanol consumption, tolerance and addiction, because chronic ethanol consumption alters the expression of GABAA receptors and drugs on GABA receptors affect ethanol actions. The results of the present study reveal that that activity of GABA transporters in mouse brain after 15-min acute ethanol injection or after chronic ethanol consumption is increased. Moreover, mice pre-injected with a competitive or a noncompetitive antagonist of gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter subtype 1 (GAT1) showed high sensitivity to the sedative/hypnotic effects of ethanol. In contrast, transgenic mice overexpressing GAT1 displayed low sensitivity to ethanol, as shown by the righting reflex test. Mice overexpressing GAT1 survived a lethal dose of ethanol (9 g/kg, i.p.) longer, maintained locomotor activity longer after a sub-lethal dose (1.75 g/kg, i.p.) and exhibited a higher median lethal dose than wild-type littermates. These results suggest that GAT1 plays an important role in sensitivity to ethanol, and might be a therapeutic target for alcoholism prevention and treatment. Acute and chronic ethanol administration resulted in the increase of GABA transporter function. Use of GAT1 selective inhibitors and GAT1 overexpressing mice thus demonstrate that GAT1 should be an important protein mediating sensitivity to ethanol in mice. PMID:14751274

  12. Identification of a T-cell-specific transcriptional enhancer located 3' of C gamma 1 in the murine T-cell receptor gamma locus.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, D M; Hsiang, Y H; Goldman, J P; Raulet, D H

    1991-01-01

    A transcriptional enhancer element has been localized 3 kilobases 3' of the murine T-cell receptor C gamma 1 locus using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene construct. As a monomer the enhancer functions only in PEER gamma delta cells and Jurkat alpha beta cells of the T-cell lines tested. However, a tetramer of the enhancer functions in virtually all T-cell lines tested, including alpha beta T-cell lines, but not in other cell types. These results suggest that elements other than the enhancer are responsible for the failure of rearranged C gamma 1 genes to be expressed in alpha beta T cells. The enhancer has been localized to a 200-base-pair Rsa I restriction fragment, which contains sequence motifs similar to those found in the other T-cell receptor enhancers but not in the immunoglobulin enhancers. Images PMID:1992471

  13. 5-Hydroxytryptamine1A receptor-activation hyperpolarizes pyramidal cells and suppresses hippocampal gamma oscillations via Kir3 channel activation

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, April; McBain, Chris J; Fisahn, André

    2014-01-01

    Rhythmic cortical neuronal oscillations in the gamma frequency band (30–80 Hz, gamma oscillations) have been associated with cognitive processes such as sensory perception and integration, attention, learning, and memory. Gamma oscillations are disrupted in disorders for which cognitive deficits are hallmark symptoms such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. In vitro, various neurotransmitters have been found to modulate gamma oscillations. Serotonin (5-HT) has long been known to be important for both behavioural and cognitive functions such as learning and memory. Multiple 5-HT receptor subtypes are expressed in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and high doses of 5-HT reduce the power of induced gamma oscillations. Hypothesizing that 5-HT may have cell- and receptor subtype-specific modulatory effects, we investigated the receptor subtypes, cell types and cellular mechanisms engaged by 5-HT in the modulation of gamma oscillations in mice and rats. We found that 5-HT decreases the power of kainate-induced hippocampal gamma oscillations in both species via the 5-HT1A receptor subtype. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings demonstrated that this decrease was caused by a hyperpolarization of CA3 pyramidal cells and a reduction of their firing frequency, but not by alteration of inhibitory neurotransmission. Finally, our results show that the effect on pyramidal cells is mediated via the G protein-coupled receptor inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir3. Our findings suggest this novel cellular mechanism as a potential target for therapies that are aimed at alleviating cognitive decline by helping the brain to maintain or re-establish normal gamma oscillation levels in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25107925

  14. Expression of Fc gamma and complement receptors in monocytes of X-linked agammaglobulinaemia and common variable immunodeficiency patients.

    PubMed

    Amoras, A L B; da Silva, M T N; Zollner, R L; Kanegane, H; Miyawaki, T; Vilela, M M S

    2007-12-01

    Recently we reported that monocyte phagocytosis and chemotaxis are impaired in X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVI) patients. Few data exist on the in vivo expression of receptors for the constant region of immunoglobulin (IgG) (Fc gammaR) and complement receptors (CR) in these patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of Fc gammaR and CR on monocytes from XLA and CVI patients and compare it to that of healthy controls. Whole blood samples were obtained from 10 patients with XLA, 12 with CVI and 18 healthy controls. Monocyte phenotype was determined by flow cytometry with gating on CD14+ cells. Surface expression of Fc gammaRI (CD64), Fc gammaRII (CD32) and Fc gammaRIII (CD16), CR1 (CD35) and CR3 (CD11b and CD18) was measured by determination of the proportion of CD14+ cells positive for each receptor and by receptor density. Compared to controls, a significantly higher percentage of CD16 and CD35+ monocytes from XLA (P = 0.002 and P = 0.007, respectively) were observed. The relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) expression of Fc gammaRII (CD32) and Fc gammaRIII (CD16) were significantly lower on CVI monocytes compared to controls (P = 0.001 and P = 0.035, respectively). XLA patients, who have a reduction of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), showed normal or increased percentages of monocytes expressing Fc gamma and complement receptors. CVI patients, who have normal expression of Btk, showed reduced expression of CD16 and CD32 on monocytes. Inefficient chemotaxis and phagocytosis, reported previously in XLA patients, could be due to defects of cytoplasmatic transduction mechanisms. PMID:17900300

  15. Phorbol ester and interferon-gamma modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors on human amniotic (WISH) cells.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Y; Jaken, S; Komoriya, A; Zoon, K C

    1989-04-15

    In this study we report that pretreatment of human amniotic (WISH) cells with interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) in the presence of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) resulted in the down-modulation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors with respect to both receptor number and affinity. Scatchard analysis of EGF binding in the absence of both IFN-gamma and TPA indicated biphasic binding whereas addition of TPA resulted in the loss of the higher affinity class of sites. Pretreatment with IFN-gamma for 24 h enhanced the TPA-induced inhibition of EGF binding whereas IFN-gamma alone had no effect on binding. Protein kinase C (Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent enzyme) was examined as a possible mediator of IFN-induced EGF-receptor modulation; pretreatment of cells with IFN-gamma affected neither the binding of [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate to membrane or cytosolic fractions nor the protein kinase C activity, suggesting that IFN-gamma pretreatment did not result in translocation or activation of protein kinase C. PMID:2495278

  16. Estrogen-related receptor gamma modulates energy metabolism target genes in human trophoblast.

    PubMed

    Poidatz, D; Dos Santos, E; Brulé, A; De Mazancourt, P; Dieudonné, M N

    2012-09-01

    Placenta growth and functions depend on correct trophoblast migration, proliferation, and differentiation. The placenta has a critical role in gas and nutrient transport. To accomplish these numerous functions, the placenta depends on a highly efficient energy metabolism control. Recent studies showed that the orphan nuclear receptor Estrogen-Related Receptor gamma (ERRγ) is highly expressed in human placentas. As ERRγ has been described as a major energy metabolism regulator, we investigated ERRγ expression and putative roles on energy homeostasis in human trophoblast from first trimester placentas. First, we showed that ERRγ expression level increased during pregnancy and that ERRγ was more abundant in villous than in extravillous trophoblasts. We also observed that ERRγ expression increased during trophoblast differentiation. Second, we demonstrated that mitochondrial biogenesis and expression of some energy metabolism target genes decreased when ERRγ expression was impaired. Altogether, these results suggest that ERRγ could be implicated in the energy metabolism regulation of human trophoblasts. PMID:22763271

  17. Wakayama Symposium: Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-gamma (PPARγ) and Meibomian Gland Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jester, James V.; Brown, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Recently we have shown that mouse and human meibomian glands undergo specific age-related changes, including decreased acinar cell proliferation, acinar atrophy, and altered peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) localization from cytoplasmic-vesicular/nuclear in young mice and humans to nuclear in old mice and humans. Since PPARγ is a lipid-sensitive, nuclear receptor implicated in regulating adipocyte and sebocyte differentiation and lipogenesis, our findings suggest that PPARγ may be involved in modulating meibomian gland differentiation during aging. Based on these findings, we propose that aging of the meibomian gland results in downregulation of PPARγ, leading to decreased meibocyte differentiation and lipid synthesis, gland atrophy, and a hyposecretory meibomian gland dysfunction. PMID:23084144

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma signaling in human sperm physiology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Li; Xian, Hua; Cao, Jing-Chen; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Chen, Miao-Miao; Qian, Yi; Jiang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a member of the PPARs, which are transcription factors of the steroid receptor superfamily. PPARγ acts as an important molecule for regulating energy homeostasis, modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and is reciprocally regulated by HPG. In the human, PPARγ protein is highly expressed in ejaculated spermatozoa, implying a possible role of PPARγ signaling in regulating sperm energy dissipation. PPARγ protein is also expressed in Sertoli cells and germ cells (spermatocytes). Its activation can be induced during capacitation and the acrosome reaction. This mini-review will focus on how PPARγ signaling may affect fertility and sperm quality and the potential reversibility of these adverse effects. PMID:25851655

  19. Receptor for protons: First observations on Acid Sensing Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Krishtal, Oleg

    2015-07-01

    The history of ASICs began in 1980 with unexpected observation. The concept of highly selective Na(+) current gated by specific receptors for protons was not easily accepted. It took 16 years to get these receptor/channels cloned and start a new stage in their investigation. "The receptor for protons" became ASIC comprising under this name a family of receptor/channels ubiquitous for mammalian nervous system, both peripheral and central. The role of ASICs as putative nociceptors was suggested almost immediately after their discovery. This role subsequently was proven in many forms of pain-related phenomena. Many other functions of ASICs have been also found or primed for speculations both in physiology and in disease. Despite the width of field and strength of efforts, numerous basic questions are to be answered before we understand how the local changes in pH in the nervous tissue transform into electric and messenger signaling via ASICs as transducers. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'. PMID:25582296

  20. Gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions. [prebiotic significance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Graff, R. L.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1980-01-01

    The gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions was studied under initially oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions in an attempt to determine the possible interconversion of malic acid into other carboxylic acids, specifically those associated with Krebs cycle. The effect of dose on product formation of the system was investigated. Gas-liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry was used as the principal means of identification of the nonvolatile products. Thin layer chromatography and direct probe mass spectroscopy were also employed. The findings show that a variety of carboxylic acids are formed, with malonic and succinic acids in greatest abundance. These products have all been identified as being formed in the gamma-irradiation of acetic acid, suggesting a common intermediary. Since these molecules fit into a metabolic cycle, it is strongly suggestive that prebiotic pathways provided the basis for biological systems.

  1. Cortical and subcortical gamma amino acid butyric acid deficits in anxiety and stress disorders: Clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and stress disorders are a major public health issue. However, their pathophysiology is still unclear. The gamma amino acid butyric acid (GABA) neurochemical system has been strongly implicated in their pathogenesis and treatment by numerous preclinical and clinical studies, the most recent of which have been highlighted and critical review in this paper. Changes in cortical GABA appear related to normal personality styles and responses to stress. While there is accumulating animal and human neuroimaging evidence of cortical and subcortical GABA deficits across a number of anxiety conditions, a clear pattern of findings in specific brain regions for a given disorder is yet to emerge. Neuropsychiatric conditions with anxiety as a clinical feature may have GABA deficits as an underlying feature. Different classes of anxiolytic therapies support GABA function, and this may be an area in which newer GABA neuroimaging techniques could soon offer more personalized therapy. Novel GABAergic pharmacotherapies in development offer potential improvements over current therapies in reducing sedative and physiologic dependency effects, while offering rapid anxiolysis. PMID:27014597

  2. Cortical and subcortical gamma amino acid butyric acid deficits in anxiety and stress disorders: Clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Andrew W

    2016-03-22

    Anxiety and stress disorders are a major public health issue. However, their pathophysiology is still unclear. The gamma amino acid butyric acid (GABA) neurochemical system has been strongly implicated in their pathogenesis and treatment by numerous preclinical and clinical studies, the most recent of which have been highlighted and critical review in this paper. Changes in cortical GABA appear related to normal personality styles and responses to stress. While there is accumulating animal and human neuroimaging evidence of cortical and subcortical GABA deficits across a number of anxiety conditions, a clear pattern of findings in specific brain regions for a given disorder is yet to emerge. Neuropsychiatric conditions with anxiety as a clinical feature may have GABA deficits as an underlying feature. Different classes of anxiolytic therapies support GABA function, and this may be an area in which newer GABA neuroimaging techniques could soon offer more personalized therapy. Novel GABAergic pharmacotherapies in development offer potential improvements over current therapies in reducing sedative and physiologic dependency effects, while offering rapid anxiolysis. PMID:27014597

  3. A functional assay to measure postsynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acidB responses in cultured spinal cord neurons: Heterologous regulation of the same K+ channel

    SciTech Connect

    Kamatchi, G.L.; Ticku, M.K. )

    1991-02-01

    The stimulation of postsynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptors leads to slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials due to the influx of K(+)-ions. This was studied biochemically, in vitro in mammalian cultured spinal cord neurons by using 86Rb as a substitute for K+. (-)-Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, produced a concentration-dependent increase in the 86Rb-influx. This effect was stereospecific and blocked by GABAB receptor antagonists like CGP 35 348 (3-aminopropyl-diethoxymethyl-phosphonic acid) and phaclofen. Apart from the GABAB receptors, both adenosine via adenosine1 receptors and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) via 5-HT1 alpha agonists also increased the 86Rb-influx. These agonists failed to show any additivity between them when they were combined in their maximal concentration. In addition, their effect was antagonized specifically by their respective antagonists without influencing the others. These findings suggest the presence of GABAB, adenosine1 and 5-HT1 alpha receptors in the cultured spinal cord neurons, which exhibit a heterologous regulation of the same K(+)-channel. The effect of these agonists were antagonized by phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, an activator of protein kinase C, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. This suggests that these agonists by acting on their own receptors converge on the same K(+)-channel through the Gi/Go proteins. In summary, we have developed a biochemical functional assay for studying and characterizing GABAB synaptic pharmacology in vitro, using spinal cord neurons.

  4. Control of Cytokine Production by Human Fc Gamma Receptors: Implications for Pathogen Defense and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Vogelpoel, Lisa T. C.; Baeten, Dominique L. P.; de Jong, Esther C.; den Dunnen, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Control of cytokine production by immune cells is pivotal for counteracting infections via orchestration of local and systemic inflammation. Although their contribution has long been underexposed, it has recently become clear that human Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs), which are receptors for the Fc region of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies, play a critical role in this process by controlling tissue- and pathogen-specific cytokine production. Whereas individual stimulation of FcγRs does not evoke cytokine production, FcγRs cell-type specifically interact with various other receptors for selective amplification or inhibition of particular cytokines, thereby tailoring cytokine responses to the immunological context. The physiological function of FcγR-mediated control of cytokine production is to counteract infections with various classes of pathogens. Upon IgG opsonization, pathogens are simultaneously recognized by FcγRs as well as by various pathogen-sensing receptors, leading to the induction of pathogen class-specific immune responses. However, when erroneously activated, the same mechanism also contributes to the development of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In this review, we discuss control of cytokine production as a novel function of FcγRs in human innate immune cells in the context of homeostasis, infection, and autoimmunity and address the possibilities for future therapeutic exploitation. PMID:25759693

  5. The gamma-aminobutyric acid shunt contributes to closing the tricarboxylic acid cycle in Synechocystis sp PCC 6803

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, W; Brune, D; Vermaas, WFJ

    2014-07-16

    A traditional 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is missing in the cyanobacterial tricarboxylic acid cycle. To determine pathways that convert 2-oxoglutarate into succinate in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a series of mutant strains, Delta sll1981, Delta slr0370, Delta slr1022 and combinations thereof, deficient in 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase (Sll1981), succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (Slr0370), and/or in gamma-aminobutyrate metabolism (Slr1022) were constructed. Like in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, N-acetylornithine aminotransferase, encoded by slr1022, was shown to also function as gamma-aminobutyrate aminotransferase, catalysing gamma-aminobutyrate conversion to succinic semialdehyde. As succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase converts succinic semialdehyde to succinate, an intact gamma-aminobutyrate shunt is present in Synechocystis. The Delta sll1981 strain, lacking 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase, exhibited a succinate level that was 60% of that in wild type. However, the succinate level in the Delta slr1022 and Delta slr0370 strains and the Delta sll1981/Delta slr1022 and Delta sll1981/Delta slr0370 double mutants was reduced to 20-40% of that in wild type, suggesting that the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt has a larger impact on metabolite flux to succinate than the pathway via 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase. C-13-stable isotope analysis indicated that the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt catalysed conversion of glutamate to succinate. Independent of the 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase bypass, the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt is a major contributor to flux from 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate to succinate in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  6. Protein tyrosine kinase activity is essential for Fc gamma receptor-mediated intracellular killing of Staphylococcus aureus by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, L; Nibbering, P H; Zomerdijk, T P; van Furth, R

    1994-01-01

    Our previous study revealed that the intracellular killing of Staphylococcus aureus by human monocytes after cross-linking Fc gamma receptor I (Fc gamma RI) or Fc gamma RII is a phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent process. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity plays a role in the Fc gamma R-mediated intracellular killing of bacteria and activation of PLC in these cells. The results showed that phagocytosis of bacteria by monocytes was not affected by the PTK inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin-47. The intracellular killing of S. aureus by monocytes after cross-linking Fc gamma RII or Fc gamma RII with anti-Fc gamma R monoclonal antibody and a bridging antibody or with human immunoglobulin G (IgG) was inhibited by these compounds in a dose-dependent fashion. The production of O2- by monocytes after stimulation with IgG or IgG-opsonized S. aureus was almost completely blocked by the PTK inhibitor. These results indicate that inhibition of PTK impairs the oxygen-dependent bactericidal mechanisms of monocytes. Genistein and tyrphostin-47, which do not affect the enzymatic activity of purified PLC, prevented activation of PLC after cross-linking Fc gamma RI or Fc gamma RII, measured as an increase in the intracellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate concentration. Cross-linking Fc gamma RI or Fc gamma RII induced rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in monocytes, one of which was identified as PLC-gamma 1, and the phosphorylation could be completely blocked by PTK inhibitors, leading to the conclusion that activation of PLC after cross-linking Fc gamma R in monocytes is regulated by PTK activity. Together, these results demonstrate that PTK activity is essential for the activation of PLC which is involved in the Fc gamma R-mediated intracellular killing of S. aureus by human monocytes. Images PMID:7927687

  7. Expression of bile acid receptor TGR5 in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weibiao; Tian, Wei; Hong, Jie; Li, Dan; Tavares, Rosemarie; Noble, Lelia; Moss, Steven F; Resnick, Murray B

    2013-02-15

    Bile reflux is a risk factor in the development of intestinal metaplasia in the stomach and is believed to function as an initiator of gastric carcinogenesis. However, whether the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor TGR5 is expressed in this tumor is not known. In this study, we determined the expression of TGR5 in gastric adenocarcinoma and examined the role of TGR5 in cell proliferation. Strong TGR5 staining was present in 12% of cases of intestinal metaplasia but in no cases of normal gastric epithelium (P < 0.01). Moderate to strong TGR5 membranous and cytoplasmic staining was present in 52% of the intestinal but in only 25% of the diffuse subtype of adenocarcinomas (P < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier univariate survival analysis revealed that moderate to strong TGR5 staining was associated with decreased patient survival (P < 0.05). Treatment with taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA, a bile acid) significantly increased thymidine incorporation in the AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cell line, suggesting that bile acids may increase cell proliferation. This increase was significantly decreased by knockdown of TGR5 with TGR5 small-interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, overexpression of TGR5 significantly enhanced TDCA-induced increases in thymidine incorporation. TGR5 is coupled with G(q)α and Gα(i-3) proteins. TDCA-induced increase in thymidine incorporation was significantly decreased by knockdown of G(q)α and Gα(i-3) with their siRNAs. We conclude that TGR5 is overexpressed in most gastric intestinal-type adenocarcinomas, and moderate to strong TGR5 staining is associated with decreased patient survival in all gastric adenocarcinomas. Bile acids increase cell proliferation via activation of TGR5 receptors and G(q)α and Gα(i-3) proteins. PMID:23238937

  8. The genuine ligand of a jasmonic acid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Daoxin

    2010-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA), its metabolites, such as the methyl ester or amino acid conjugates as well as its precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA) are lipid-derived signals. JA, OPDA and JA-amino acid conjugates are known to function as signals in plant stress responses and development. More recently, formation of JA-amino acid conjugates and high biological activity of JA-Isoleucine (JA-Ile) were found to be essential in JA signaling. A breakthrough was the identification of JAZ proteins which interact with the F-box protein COI1 if JA-Ile is bound. This interaction leads to proteasomal degradation of JAZs being negative regulators of JA-induced transcription. Surprisingly, a distinct stereoisomer of JA-Ile, the (+)-7-iso-JA-Ile [(3R,7S) form] is most active. Coronatine, a bacterial phytotoxine with an identical stereochemistry at the cyclopentanone ring, has a similar bioactivity. This was explained by the recent identification of COI1 as the JA receptor and accords well with molecular modeling studies. Whereas over the last two decades JA was quantified to describe any JA dependent process, now we have to take into account a distinct stereoisomer of JA-Ile. Until recently a quantitative analysis of (+)-7-iso-JA-Ile was missing presumable due to its equilibration to (−)-JA-Ile. Now such an analysis was achieved. These aspects will be discussed based on our new knowledge on JA perception and signaling. PMID:20404483

  9. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Solanky, Bhavana S.; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A. E.; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.; Miller, David H.; Thompson, Alan J.; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is thought to be the major cause of ongoing, irreversible disability in progressive stages of multiple sclerosis. Gamma-aminobutyric acid is the principle inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. The aims of this study were to investigate if gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (i) are abnormal in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis compared with healthy controls; and (ii) correlate with physical and cognitive performance in this patient population. Thirty patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and 17 healthy control subjects underwent single-voxel MEGA-PRESS (MEscher-GArwood Point RESolved Spectroscopy) magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T, to quantify gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the prefrontal cortex, right hippocampus and left sensorimotor cortex. All subjects were assessed clinically and underwent a cognitive assessment. Multiple linear regression models were used to compare differences in gamma-aminobutyric acid concentrations between patients and controls adjusting for age, gender and tissue fractions within each spectroscopic voxel. Regression was used to examine the relationships between the cognitive function and physical disability scores specific for these regions with gamma-aminobuytric acid levels, adjusting for age, gender, and total N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamine-glutamate complex levels. When compared with controls, patients performed significantly worse on all motor and sensory tests, and were cognitively impaired in processing speed and verbal memory. Patients had significantly lower gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the hippocampus (adjusted difference = −0.403 mM, 95% confidence intervals −0.792, −0.014, P = 0.043) and sensorimotor cortex (adjusted difference = −0.385 mM, 95% confidence intervals −0.667, −0.104, P = 0.009) compared with controls. In patients, reduced motor function in the right upper and lower limb was associated with lower gamma-aminobutyric acid

  10. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cawley, Niamh; Solanky, Bhavana S; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A E; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Miller, David H; Thompson, Alan J; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-09-01

    Neurodegeneration is thought to be the major cause of ongoing, irreversible disability in progressive stages of multiple sclerosis. Gamma-aminobutyric acid is the principle inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. The aims of this study were to investigate if gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (i) are abnormal in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis compared with healthy controls; and (ii) correlate with physical and cognitive performance in this patient population. Thirty patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and 17 healthy control subjects underwent single-voxel MEGA-PRESS (MEscher-GArwood Point RESolved Spectroscopy) magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T, to quantify gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the prefrontal cortex, right hippocampus and left sensorimotor cortex. All subjects were assessed clinically and underwent a cognitive assessment. Multiple linear regression models were used to compare differences in gamma-aminobutyric acid concentrations between patients and controls adjusting for age, gender and tissue fractions within each spectroscopic voxel. Regression was used to examine the relationships between the cognitive function and physical disability scores specific for these regions with gamma-aminobuytric acid levels, adjusting for age, gender, and total N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamine-glutamate complex levels. When compared with controls, patients performed significantly worse on all motor and sensory tests, and were cognitively impaired in processing speed and verbal memory. Patients had significantly lower gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the hippocampus (adjusted difference = -0.403 mM, 95% confidence intervals -0.792, -0.014, P = 0.043) and sensorimotor cortex (adjusted difference = -0.385 mM, 95% confidence intervals -0.667, -0.104, P = 0.009) compared with controls. In patients, reduced motor function in the right upper and lower limb was associated with lower gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration in the

  11. Impact evaluation of α-lipoic acid in gamma-irradiated erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouky, Omar S.; Selim, Nabila S.; Elbakrawy, Eman M.; Rezk, Rezk A.

    2011-03-01

    This work is intended to study in vitro the ability of lipoic acid to protect erythrocytes against the oxidative damage resulting from exposure to gamma radiation through measurement of their rheological properties and to study the effects of detergent on their membrane solubility and permeability. Different doses of gamma radiation were applied: the most recommended and applied dose (25 Gy), and two higher doses, namely 50 and 100 Gy. The effect of addition of lipoic acid as well as its effect as a radioprotector was tested. The obtained results show changes in structural integrity of the erythrocyte cell membrane components as a result of oxidative damage due to gamma radiation that could be improved by pre-treatment with the antioxidant lipoic acid.

  12. A GC-ECD method for estimation of free and bound amino acids, gamma-aminobutyric acid, salicylic acid, and acetyl salicylic acid from Solanum lycopersicum (L.).

    PubMed

    Meher, Hari Charan; Gajbhiye, Vijay T; Singh, Ghanendra

    2011-01-01

    A gas chromatograph with electron capture detection method for estimation of selected metabolites--amino acids (free and bound), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), salicylic acid (SA), and acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) from tomato--is reported. The method is based on nitrophenylation of the metabolites by 1-fluoro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene under aqueous alkaline conditions to form dinitophenyl derivatives. The derivatives were stable under the operating conditions of GC. Analysis of bound amino acids comprised perchloric acid precipitation of protein, alkylation (carboxymethylation) with iodoacetic acid, vapor-phase hydrolysis, and derivatization with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in that order. The metabolites were resolved in 35 min, using a temperature-programmed run. The method is rapid, sensitive, and precise. It easily measured the typical amino acids (aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, alanine, leucine, lysine, and phenylalanine) used for identification and quantification of a protein, resolved amino acids of the same mass (leucine and isoleucine), satisfactorily measured sulfur amino acid (methionine, cystine, and cysteine), and quantified GABA, SA, and ASA, as well. The developed method was validated for specificity, linearity, and precision. It has been applied and recommended for estimation of 25 metabolites from Solanum lycopersicum (L.). PMID:21391500

  13. Estrogen-related receptor gamma is a key regulator of muscle mitochondrial activity and oxidative capacity.

    PubMed

    Rangwala, Shamina M; Wang, Xiaomei; Calvo, Jennifer A; Lindsley, Loren; Zhang, Yunyu; Deyneko, Galina; Beaulieu, Valerie; Gao, Jiaping; Turner, Gordon; Markovits, Judit

    2010-07-16

    Estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma) regulates the perinatal switch to oxidative metabolism in the myocardium. We wanted to understand the significance of induction of ERRgamma expression in skeletal muscle by exercise. Muscle-specific VP16ERRgamma transgenic mice demonstrated an increase in exercise capacity, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and enlarged mitochondria despite lower muscle weights. Furthermore, peak oxidative capacity was higher in the transgenics as compared with control littermates. In contrast, mice lacking one copy of ERRgamma exhibited decreased exercise capacity and muscle mitochondrial function. Interestingly, we observed that increased ERRgamma in muscle generates a gene expression profile that closely overlays that of red oxidative fiber-type muscle. We further demonstrated that a small molecule agonist of ERRbeta/gamma can increase mitochondrial function in mouse myotubes. Our data indicate that ERRgamma plays an important role in causing a shift toward slow twitch muscle type and, concomitantly, a greater capacity for endurance exercise. Thus, the activation of this nuclear receptor provides a potential node for therapeutic intervention for diseases such as obesity, which is associated with reduced oxidative metabolism and a lower type I fiber content in skeletal muscle. PMID:20418374

  14. Novel time-dependent vascular actions of {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, Saoirse E. . E-mail: Saoirse.o'sullivan@nottingham.ac.uk; Tarling, Elizabeth J.; Bennett, Andrew J.; Kendall, David A.; Randall, Michael D.

    2005-11-25

    Cannabinoids have widespread effects on the cardiovascular system, only some of which are mediated via G-protein-coupled cell surface receptors. The active ingredient of cannabis, {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), causes acute vasorelaxation in various arteries. Here we show for the first time that THC also causes slowly developing vasorelaxation through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma (PPAR{gamma}). In vitro, THC (10 {mu}M) caused time-dependent vasorelaxation of rat isolated arteries. Time-dependent vasorelaxation to THC was similar to that produced by the PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone and was inhibited by the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 (1 {mu}M), but not the cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist AM251 (1 {mu}M). Time-dependent vasorelaxation to THC requires an intact endothelium, nitric oxide, production of hydrogen peroxide, and de novo protein synthesis. In transactivation assays in cultured HEK293 cells, THC-activated PPAR{gamma}, transiently expressed in combination with retinoid X receptor {alpha} and a luciferase reporter gene, in a concentration-dependent manner (100 nM-10 {mu}M). In vitro incubation with THC (1 or 10 {mu}M, 8 days) stimulated adipocyte differentiation in cultured 3T3L1 cells, a well-accepted property of PPAR{gamma} ligands. The present results provide strong evidence that THC is a PPAR{gamma} ligand, stimulation of which causes time-dependent vasorelaxation, implying some of the pleiotropic effects of cannabis may be mediated by nuclear receptors.

  15. Comparison of gamma-aminobutyric acid effects in different parts of the cat ileum.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N; Itzev, D; Milanov, P

    1999-02-26

    The effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and those of a GABA(A) (muscimol) and a GABA(B) (baclofen) receptor agonists were determined on the spontaneous activity of longitudinally or circularly oriented preparations (segments) isolated from terminal, proximal and distal parts of the cat ileum. GABA applied at 1 microM to 2 mM caused dose-dependent biphasic changes (relaxation and contraction) in spontaneous activity of the longitudinal and circular layers in the terminal and distal parts of the cat ileum and monophasic changes (contraction) in the proximal part. The potency of GABA to elicit relaxant and/or contractile effects in different parts of the ileum showed a proximal-to-terminal increasing pattern. In the longitudinal layer of the distal and terminal ileum, muscimol (100 microM) mimicked the relaxation phase of the GABA effect, while baclofen (100 microM) simulated the contractile phase. Bicuculline, atropine and tetrodotoxin abolished GABA- and muscimol-induced relaxation and suppressed, but failed to prevent GABA- and baclofen-induced contractions. In addition, 2-hydroxysaclofen antagonized the baclofen-induced contractile effect, reduced the GABA-induced contractile phase but failed to prevent GABA- and muscimol-induced relaxation. In the circular layer of the same regions, muscimol mimicked the biphasic GABA effects, while baclofen was without effect. Bicuculline, atropine and tetrodotoxin completely prevented the GABA- and muscimol effects, while 2-hydroxysaclofen failed to antagonize them. In the longitudinal and circular layers of the proximal ileum, muscimol (100 microM) exerted a 'GABA-like' transient contractile effect, while baclofen (100 microM) did not elicit any response. Bicuculline, atropine and tetrodotoxin antagonized the GABA- and muscimol-induced contractile responses of longitudinal and circular layers, while 2-hydroxysaclofen was ineffective. The results suggested that the inhibitory and/or excitatory action of GABA on

  16. The repertoire of olfactory C family G protein-coupled receptors in zebrafish: candidate chemosensory receptors for amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Alioto, Tyler S; Ngai, John

    2006-01-01

    Background Vertebrate odorant receptors comprise at least three types of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): the OR, V1R, and V2R/V2R-like receptors, the latter group belonging to the C family of GPCRs. These receptor families are thought to receive chemosensory information from a wide spectrum of odorant and pheromonal cues that influence critical animal behaviors such as feeding, reproduction and other social interactions. Results Using genome database mining and other informatics approaches, we identified and characterized the repertoire of 54 intact "V2R-like" olfactory C family GPCRs in the zebrafish. Phylogenetic analysis – which also included a set of 34 C family GPCRs from fugu – places the fish olfactory receptors in three major groups, which are related to but clearly distinct from other C family GPCRs, including the calcium sensing receptor, metabotropic glutamate receptors, GABA-B receptor, T1R taste receptors, and the major group of V2R vomeronasal receptor families. Interestingly, an analysis of sequence conservation and selective pressure in the zebrafish receptors revealed the retention of a conserved sequence motif previously shown to be required for ligand binding in other amino acid receptors. Conclusion Based on our findings, we propose that the repertoire of zebrafish olfactory C family GPCRs has evolved to allow the detection and discrimination of a spectrum of amino acid and/or amino acid-based compounds, which are potent olfactory cues in fish. Furthermore, as the major groups of fish receptors and mammalian V2R receptors appear to have diverged significantly from a common ancestral gene(s), these receptors likely mediate chemosensation of different classes of chemical structures by their respective organisms. PMID:17156446

  17. BILE ACIDS REGULATE THE ONTOGENIC EXPRESSION OF ILEAL BILE ACID BINDING PROTEIN IN THE RAT VIA THE FARNESOID X RECEPTOR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the rat, an increase in ileal bile acid binding protein (IBABP) expression occurs during the third postnatal week. In vitro studies suggest that bile acids (BAs) increase IBABP transcription by activating the BA receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Thus, we investigated the role of BAs on the on...

  18. Safety and tolerability of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in the treatment of alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Beghè, F; Carpanini, M T

    2000-04-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) has been in clinical use in Italy since 1991 for treatment of alcohol dependence. Results of phase III and phase IV studies have shown that the drug is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and in reducing alcohol consumption and alcohol craving. Pharmacosurveillance indicates that abuse of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid is a limited phenomenon in clinical settings when the drug is dispensed under strict medical surveillance and entrusted to a referring familiar member of the patient. PMID:10869863

  19. Pharmacological activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptors regulates erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Ho, Ya-Hsuan; Chiang, Jui-Chung; Li, Meng-Wei; Lin, Shi-Hung; Chen, Wei-Min; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Yu-Nung; Yang, Ya-Jan; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lu, Jenher; Huang, Chang-Jen; Tigyi, Gabor; Yao, Chao-Ling; Lee, Hsinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a growth factor-like phospholipid, regulates numerous physiological functions, including cell proliferation and differentiation. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that LPA activates erythropoiesis by activating the LPA 3 receptor subtype (LPA3) under erythropoietin (EPO) induction. In the present study, we applied a pharmacological approach to further elucidate the functions of LPA receptors during red blood cell (RBC) differentiation. In K562 human erythroleukemia cells, knockdown of LPA2 enhanced erythropoiesis, whereas knockdown of LPA3 inhibited RBC differentiation. In CD34+ human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) and K526 cells, the LPA3 agonist 1-oleoyl-2-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothionate (2S-OMPT) promoted erythropoiesis, whereas the LPA2 agonist dodecyl monophosphate (DMP) and the nonlipid specific agonist GRI977143 (GRI) suppressed this process. In zebrafish embryos, hemoglobin expression was significantly increased by 2S-OMPT treatment but was inhibited by GRI. Furthermore, GRI treatment decreased, whereas 2S-OMPT treatment increased RBC counts and amount of hemoglobin level in adult BALB/c mice. These results indicate that LPA2 and LPA3 play opposing roles during RBC differentiation. The pharmacological activation of LPA receptor subtypes represent a novel strategies for augmenting or inhibiting erythropoiesis. PMID:27244685

  20. Pharmacological activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptors regulates erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Ho, Ya-Hsuan; Chiang, Jui-Chung; Li, Meng-Wei; Lin, Shi-Hung; Chen, Wei-Min; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Yu-Nung; Yang, Ya-Jan; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lu, Jenher; Huang, Chang-Jen; Tigyi, Gabor; Yao, Chao-Ling; Lee, Hsinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a growth factor-like phospholipid, regulates numerous physiological functions, including cell proliferation and differentiation. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that LPA activates erythropoiesis by activating the LPA 3 receptor subtype (LPA3) under erythropoietin (EPO) induction. In the present study, we applied a pharmacological approach to further elucidate the functions of LPA receptors during red blood cell (RBC) differentiation. In K562 human erythroleukemia cells, knockdown of LPA2 enhanced erythropoiesis, whereas knockdown of LPA3 inhibited RBC differentiation. In CD34(+) human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) and K526 cells, the LPA3 agonist 1-oleoyl-2-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothionate (2S-OMPT) promoted erythropoiesis, whereas the LPA2 agonist dodecyl monophosphate (DMP) and the nonlipid specific agonist GRI977143 (GRI) suppressed this process. In zebrafish embryos, hemoglobin expression was significantly increased by 2S-OMPT treatment but was inhibited by GRI. Furthermore, GRI treatment decreased, whereas 2S-OMPT treatment increased RBC counts and amount of hemoglobin level in adult BALB/c mice. These results indicate that LPA2 and LPA3 play opposing roles during RBC differentiation. The pharmacological activation of LPA receptor subtypes represent a novel strategies for augmenting or inhibiting erythropoiesis. PMID:27244685

  1. Deciphering the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Modica, Salvatore; Gadaleta, Raffaella M.; Moschetta, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Originally called retinoid X receptor interacting protein 14 (RIP14), the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) was renamed after the ability of its rat form to bind supra-physiological concentrations of farnesol. In 1999 FXR was de-orphanized since primary bile acids were identified as natural ligands. Strongly expressed in the liver and intestine, FXR has been shown to be the master transcriptional regulator of several entero-hepatic metabolic pathways with relevance to the pathophysiology of conditions such as cholestasis, fatty liver disease, cholesterol gallstone disease, intestinal inflammation and tumors. Furthermore, given the importance of FXR in the gut-liver axis feedbacks regulating lipid and glucose homeostasis, FXR modulation appears to have great input in diseases such as metabolic syndrome and diabetes. Exciting results from several cellular and animal models have provided the impetus to develop synthetic FXR ligands as novel pharmacological agents. Fourteen years from its discovery, FXR has gone from bench to bedside; a novel nuclear receptor ligand is going into clinical use. PMID:21383957

  2. Interaction of the C-terminal acidic domain of the insulin receptor with histone modulates the receptor kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Alengrin, F; Van Obberghen, E

    1995-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the insulin receptor domain 1270-1280, an acid-rich sequence located in the receptor C-terminus. Antipeptide IgG raised against this sequence were obtained and used to analyze their effect on receptor function. Antipeptide IgG inhibited receptor autophosphorylation at Tyr1146, Tyr1150 and Tyr1151. These sites are known to be key modulators of the receptor activity. Autophosphorylation at other sites may also have been inhibited. The antipeptide antibody decreased the receptor kinase activity measured with poly(Glu80Tyr20) and a synthetic peptide corresponding to the proreceptor sequence 1142-1158. We provide evidence that the effect of the antibody on substrate phosphorylation may result from the control of the phosphorylation level of the receptor. Concerning the action of the antipeptide IgG on the receptor kinase activity, histone did not behave similarly to poly(Glu80Tyr20). The antibody recognizing sequence 1270-1280 competed with histone for an overlapping binding site. Histone also modulated insulin receptor autophosphorylation, supporting the idea that interference with domain 1270-1280 alters the receptor kinase. Our data suggest that the acidic region including residues 1270-1280 of the insulin receptor C-terminus is involved in the following events: (a) receptor binding with histone, an exogenous substrate of the receptor kinase, and (b) the regulation of receptor autophosphorylation and kinase activity. Based on these observations, we would like to propose that this insulin receptor domain could interact with cellular proteins modulating the receptor kinase. PMID:7744039

  3. Increased numbers of T lymphocytes with gamma delta-positive antigen receptors in a subgroup of individuals with pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Balbi, B; Moller, D R; Kirby, M; Holroyd, K J; Crystal, R G

    1990-01-01

    Individuals with sarcoidosis were evaluated for preferential usage of T cells with the gamma delta-positive (+) type of T cell antigen receptor. Compared with normal subjects (n = 19), the group with sarcoidosis had increased numbers of CD3+ alpha beta-negative (-) T cells in the blood (normal, 58 +/- 12 cells/microliters; sarcoid, 192 +/- 45 cells/microliters, P less than 0.05) and in the epithelial lining fluid of the lung (normal, 78 14 cells/microliters; sarcoid, 240 +/- 60 cells/microliters, P less than 0.04) and a concomitant elevated number of blood and lung CD3+ gamma delta+ T cells, owing to a striking increase in the number of CD3+ gamma delta+ T cells in a subgroup (7 of 20) of sarcoid individuals. The elevated numbers of sarcoid blood gamma delta+ T lymphocytes were mostly Ti gamma A+ and delta TCS1-, a pattern also seen in normal individuals, consistent with the majority of gamma delta+ T cells expressing one gamma-chain variable region, V gamma 9. The observation of an increase in the total gamma delta+ T cell numbers in a sarcoid subgroup suggests that various specific stimuli may trigger the expansion of different T cell subpopulations within different groups of individuals with sarcoidosis. Images PMID:2110187

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist rosiglitazone attenuates postincisional pain by regulating macrophage polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa-Moriyama, Maiko; Ohnou, Tetsuya; Godai, Kohei; Kurimoto, Tae; Nakama, Mayo; Kanmura, Yuichi

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone attenuated postincisional pain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone alters macrophage polarization to F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages at the incisional sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transplantation of rosiglitazone-treated macrophages produced analgesic effects. -- Abstract: Acute inflammation triggered by macrophage infiltration to injured tissue promotes wound repair and may induce pain hypersensitivity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR){gamma} signaling is known to regulate heterogeneity of macrophages, which are often referred to as classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages have considerable antimicrobial activity and produce a wide variety of proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, M2 macrophages are involved in anti-inflammatory and homeostatic functions linked to wound healing and tissue repair. Although it has been suggested that PPAR{gamma} agonists attenuate pain hypersensitivity, the molecular mechanism of macrophage-mediated effects of PPAR{gamma} signaling on pain development has not been explored. In this study, we investigated the link between the phenotype switching of macrophage polarization induced by PPAR{gamma} signaling and the development of acute pain hypersensitivity. Local administration of rosiglitazone significantly ameliorated hypersensitivity to heat and mechanical stimuli, and paw swelling. Consistent with the down-regulation of nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) phosphorylation by rosiglitazone at the incisional sites, the number of F4/80{sup +}iNOS{sup +} M1 macrophages was decreased whereas numbers of F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages were increased in rosiglitazone-treated incisional sites 24 h after the procedure. In addition, gene induction of anti-inflammatory M2-macrophage-associated markers such as arginase1, FIZZ1 and interleukin (IL)-10 were significantly increased, whereas

  5. Molecular basis for amino acid sensing by family C G-protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wellendorph, P; Bräuner-Osborne, H

    2009-01-01

    Family C of human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is constituted by eight metabotropic glutamate receptors, two γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB1–2) subunits forming the heterodimeric GABAB receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor, three taste1 receptors (T1R1–3), a promiscuous L-α-amino acid receptor G-protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) and seven orphan receptors. Aside from the orphan receptors, the family C GPCRs are dimeric receptors characterized by a large extracellular Venus flytrap domain which bind the endogenous agonists. Except from the GABAB1–2 and T1R2–3 receptor, all receptors are either activated or positively modulated by amino acids. In this review, we outline mutational, biophysical and structural studies which have elucidated the interaction of the amino acids with the Venus flytrap domains, molecular mechanisms of receptor selectivity and the initial steps in receptor activation. PMID:19298394

  6. Retinoic acid receptors: from molecular mechanisms to cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    di Masi, Alessandra; Leboffe, Loris; De Marinis, Elisabetta; Pagano, Francesca; Cicconi, Laura; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Nervi, Clara

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the major bioactive metabolite of retinol or vitamin A, induces a spectrum of pleiotropic effects in cell growth and differentiation that are relevant for embryonic development and adult physiology. The RA activity is mediated primarily by members of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) subfamily, namely RARα, RARβ and RARγ, which belong to the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. RARs form heterodimers with members of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) subfamily and act as ligand-regulated transcription factors through binding specific RA response elements (RAREs) located in target genes promoters. RARs also have non-genomic effects and activate kinase signaling pathways, which fine-tune the transcription of the RA target genes. The disruption of RA signaling pathways is thought to underlie the etiology of a number of hematological and non-hematological malignancies, including leukemias, skin cancer, head/neck cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, renal cell carcinoma, pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, glioblastoma and neuroblastoma. Of note, RA and its derivatives (retinoids) are employed as potential chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents because of their differentiation, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant effects. In humans, retinoids reverse premalignant epithelial lesions, induce the differentiation of myeloid normal and leukemic cells, and prevent lung, liver, and breast cancer. Here, we provide an overview of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that regulate the RA and retinoid signaling pathways. Moreover, mechanisms through which deregulation of RA signaling pathways ultimately impact on cancer are examined. Finally, the therapeutic effects of retinoids are reported. PMID:25543955

  7. Leveraging abscisic acid receptors for efficient water use in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenyu; Liu, Jinghui; Tischer, Stefanie V.; Christmann, Alexander; Windisch, Wilhelm; Schnyder, Hans; Grill, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth requires the influx of atmospheric CO2 through stomatal pores, and this carbon uptake for photosynthesis is inherently associated with a large efflux of water vapor. Under water deficit, plants reduce transpiration and are able to improve carbon for water exchange leading to higher water use efficiency (WUE). Whether increased WUE can be achieved without trade-offs in plant growth is debated. The signals mediating the WUE response under water deficit are not fully elucidated but involve the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is perceived by a family of related receptors known to mediate acclimation responses and to reduce transpiration. We now show that enhanced stimulation of ABA signaling via distinct ABA receptors can result in plants constitutively growing at high WUE in the model species Arabidopsis. WUE was assessed by three independent approaches involving gravimetric analyses, 13C discrimination studies of shoots and derived cellulose fractions, and by gas exchange measurements of whole plants and individual leaves. Plants expressing the ABA receptors RCAR6/PYL12 combined up to 40% increased WUE with high growth rates, i.e., are water productive. Water productivity was associated with maintenance of net carbon assimilation by compensatory increases of leaf CO2 gradients, thereby sustaining biomass acquisition. Leaf surface temperatures and growth potentials of plants growing under well-watered conditions were found to be reliable indicators for water productivity. The study shows that ABA receptors can be explored to generate more plant biomass per water transpired, which is a prime goal for a more sustainable water use in agriculture. PMID:27247417

  8. Leveraging abscisic acid receptors for efficient water use in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Liu, Jinghui; Tischer, Stefanie V; Christmann, Alexander; Windisch, Wilhelm; Schnyder, Hans; Grill, Erwin

    2016-06-14

    Plant growth requires the influx of atmospheric CO2 through stomatal pores, and this carbon uptake for photosynthesis is inherently associated with a large efflux of water vapor. Under water deficit, plants reduce transpiration and are able to improve carbon for water exchange leading to higher water use efficiency (WUE). Whether increased WUE can be achieved without trade-offs in plant growth is debated. The signals mediating the WUE response under water deficit are not fully elucidated but involve the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is perceived by a family of related receptors known to mediate acclimation responses and to reduce transpiration. We now show that enhanced stimulation of ABA signaling via distinct ABA receptors can result in plants constitutively growing at high WUE in the model species Arabidopsis WUE was assessed by three independent approaches involving gravimetric analyses, (13)C discrimination studies of shoots and derived cellulose fractions, and by gas exchange measurements of whole plants and individual leaves. Plants expressing the ABA receptors RCAR6/PYL12 combined up to 40% increased WUE with high growth rates, i.e., are water productive. Water productivity was associated with maintenance of net carbon assimilation by compensatory increases of leaf CO2 gradients, thereby sustaining biomass acquisition. Leaf surface temperatures and growth potentials of plants growing under well-watered conditions were found to be reliable indicators for water productivity. The study shows that ABA receptors can be explored to generate more plant biomass per water transpired, which is a prime goal for a more sustainable water use in agriculture. PMID:27247417

  9. Polo-like kinase 2 gene expression is regulated by the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma).

    PubMed

    Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, Seok-Ho; Kim, Yong Joo; Kim, Sun Yee; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Seung Bum; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2007-10-12

    Estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma) is a member of the nuclear receptor family of transcriptional activators. To date, the target genes and physiological functions of ERRgamma are not well understood. In the current study, we identify that Plk2 is a novel target of ERRgamma. Northern blot analysis showed that overexpression of ERRgamma induced Plk2 expression in cancer cell lines. ERRgamma activated the Plk2 gene promoter, and deletion and mutational analysis of the Plk2 promoter revealed that the ERRgamma-response region is located between nucleotides (nt) -2327 and -2229 and -441 and -432 (relative to the transcriptional start site at +1). Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis demonstrated that ERRgamma binds directly to the Plk2 promoter. Overexpression of ERRgamma in the presence of the mitotic inhibitor nocodazole significantly decreased apoptosis, and induced S-phase cell cycle progression through the induction of Plk2 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrated that Plk2 is a novel target of ERRgamma, and suggest that this interaction is crucial for cancer cell proliferation. PMID:17706602

  10. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) modulates hypothalamic Trh regulation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kouidhi, Soumaya; Seugnet, Isabelle; Decherf, Stéphanie; Guissouma, Hajer; Elgaaied, Amel Benammar; Demeneix, Barbara; Clerget-Froidevaux, Marie-Stéphanie

    2010-04-12

    Thyroid hormone receptor (TR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) co-regulate numerous peripheral metabolic responses. To examine potential crosstalk between PPARgamma and TRbeta in the hypothalamus, thyrotropin-releasing hormone (Trh) regulation in the newborn mouse hypothalamus was followed. QPCR showed PPARgamma to be expressed in the hypothalamus at this developmental stage. Intracerebral injection of PPARgamma agonists modified transcription from a TRH-luc construct introduced into the hypothalamus and increased serum thyroxine levels. Furthermore, shRNA-based in vivo PPARgamma knockdown amplified T(3)-independent transcription and PPARgamma overexpression dose-dependently abrogated T(3)-dependent Trh repression. Overexpression of retinoid X receptor-alpha (RXRalpha), the common heterodimeric partner of PPARgamma and TRbeta, rescued PPARgamma abrogation of T(3)-dependent repression. Thus, competition for RXR could represent one mechanism underlying this hypothalamic crosstalk between PPARgamma and TRbeta. These demonstrations of PPARgamma effects on hypothalamic Trh transcription in vivo consolidate the role of the TRH neuron as a central integrator of energy homeostasis. PMID:19900503

  11. Enhanced Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Brahmchetna; Yuan, Zhihong; Joo, Myungsoo; Zughaier, Susu M; Goldberg, Joanna B; Arbiser, Jack L; Hart, C Michael; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2016-07-01

    The pathogenic profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is related to its ability to secrete a variety of virulence factors. Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism wherein small diffusible molecules, specifically acyl-homoserine lactones, are produced by P. aeruginosa to promote virulence. We show here that macrophage clearance of P. aeruginosa (PAO1) is enhanced by activation of the nuclear hormone receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Macrophages treated with a PPARγ agonist (pioglitazone) showed enhanced phagocytosis and bacterial killing of PAO1. It is known that PAO1 QS molecules are inactivated by PON-2. QS molecules are also known to inhibit activation of PPARγ by competitively binding PPARγ receptors. In accord with this observation, we found that infection of macrophages with PAO1 inhibited expression of PPARγ and PON-2. Mechanistically, we show that PPARγ induces macrophage paraoxonase 2 (PON-2), an enzyme that degrades QS molecules produced by P. aeruginosa Gene silencing studies confirmed that enhanced clearance of PAO1 in macrophages by PPARγ is PON-2 dependent. Further, we show that PPARγ agonists also enhance clearance of P. aeruginosa from lungs of mice infected with PAO1. Together, these data demonstrate that P. aeruginosa impairs the ability of host cells to mount an immune response by inhibiting PPARγ through secretion of QS molecules. These studies define a novel mechanism by which PPARγ contributes to the host immunoprotective effects during bacterial infection and suggest a role for PPARγ immunotherapy for P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:27091928

  12. Variance analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents from melanotropes of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Borst, J G; Kits, K S; Bier, M

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the variance in the decay of large spontaneous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in melanotropes of Xenopus laevis to obtain information about the number of GABAA receptor channels that bind GABA during the IPSCs. The average decay of the IPSCs is well described by the sum of two exponential functions. This suggests that a three-state Markov model is sufficient to describe the decay phase, with one of the three states being an absorbing state, entered when GABA dissociates from the GABAA receptor. We have compared the variance in the decay of large spontaneous IPSCs with the variance calculated for two different three-state models: a model with one open state, one closed state, and one absorbing state (I), and a model with two open states and one absorbing state (II). The data were better described by the more efficient model II. This suggests that the efficacy of GABA at synaptic GABAA receptor channels is high and that only a small number of channels are involved in generating the GABA-ergic IPSCs. PMID:7918986

  13. Increase in the Bmax of gamma-aminobutyric acid-A recognition sites in brain regions of mice receiving diazepam.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, P; Guidotti, A; Costa, E

    1984-01-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors were characterized in vivo by studying ex vivo the binding of [3H]muscimol to cerebellum, cortex, hippocampus, and corpus striatum of mice receiving intravenous injections of tracer doses of high-specific-activity (approximately equal to 30 Ci/mmol) [3H]muscimol. This ligand binds with high affinity (apparent Kd, 2-3 X 10(-9) M) to a single population of binding sites (apparent Bmax, 250-180 fmol per 10 mg of protein). Pharmacological studies using drugs that selectively bind to GABAA or GABAB receptors suggest that [3H]muscimol specifically labels a GABAA recognition site. Moreover, diazepam (1.5 mumol/kg, i.p.) increases the Bmax but fails to change the affinity of [3H]muscimol binding to different brain areas. This diazepam-elicited increase in Bmax is blocked in mice receiving the diazepam antagonist Ro 15-1788 (ethyl-8-fluoro-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5a]-[1,4] benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate). Since the diazepam-induced increase of [3H]muscimol binding is paralleled by a significant potentiation of the inhibitory effect of muscimol on locomotor activity, it is proposed that the facilitatory action on GABAergic transmission elicited in vivo by diazepam is mediated by an increase in the Bmax of the binding sites of GABAA receptors. Images PMID:6326115

  14. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with prostaglandin E1 precursors cis-linoleic acid and gamma-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Hansen, T M; Lerche, A; Kassis, V; Lorenzen, I; Søndergaard, J

    1983-01-01

    20 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were treated for 12 weeks with the prostaglandin E1 precursors cis-linoleic acid and gamma-linolenic acid in the form of primrose evening oil (Efamol) and the co-factors zinc, ascorbic acid, niacin, and pyridoxin (Efavit). There was a slight fall in skin reactivity to UV light during the treatment, but no effect on plasma or urine concentrations of PGE1, cAMP or cGMP. There was no effect of the treatment on ESR, P-fibrinogen, number of tender joints, number of swollen joints, the duration of morning stiffness, or on the patient's estimation of pain. PMID:6304871

  15. Adsorption of benzoic acid on [alpha]-alumina and [gamma]-boehmite

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, L. . Dept. of Geology and Geotechnical Engineering); Blokhus, A.M. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-08-01

    The adsorption of benzoic acid (BzCOOH) on [alpha]-alumina ([alpha]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) and [gamma]-boehmite ([gamma]-AlOOH) from the aqueous phase has been studied. The adsorption experiments were carried out in 0 and 0.1 M NaCl solutions, with pH adjusted to 4 or 6. For both [alpha]-alumina and [gamma]-boehmite, increasing ionic strength decreases the maximum adsorption. Increasing the pH to 6 at the same ionic strength also reduces the maximum adsorption markedly. This suggests that both the anion and the corresponding acid participate in the adsorption process. The results show that benzoic acid has a greater affinity for [alpha]-alumina than for [gamma]-boehmite. Under the same experimental conditions (0.1 M NaCl, pH 4) the maximum adsorption capacities are 5.0 and 1.5 [mu]mol/m[sup 2] for [alpha]-alumina and [gamma]-boehmite, respectively. This difference in adsorption capacities is probably due to the mineralogical difference. These results illustrate the importance of knowing the mineralogical composition of the solid phase.

  16. Thyroid hormone receptor can modulate retinoic acid-mediated axis formation in frog embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Banker, D E; Eisenman, R N

    1993-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor acts as a hormone-dependent transcriptional transactivator and as a transcriptional repressor in the absence of thyroid hormone. Specifically, thyroid hormone receptor can repress retinoic acid-induced gene expression through interactions with retinoic acid receptor. (Retinoic acid is a potent teratogen in the frog Xenopus laevis, acting at early embryonic stages to interfere with the formation of anterior structures. Endogenous retinoic acid is thought to act in normal anterior-posterior axis formation.) We have previously shown that thyroid hormone receptor RNA (alpha isotype) is expressed and polysome-associated during Xenopus embryogenesis preceding thyroid gland maturation and endogenous thyroid hormone production (D. E. Banker, J. Bigler, and R. N. Eisenman, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5079-5089, 1991). To determine whether thyroid hormone receptor might influence the effects of retinoic acid in early frog development, we have examined the results of ectopic thyroid hormone receptor expression on retinoic acid teratogenesis. We demonstrate that microinjections of full-length thyroid hormone receptor RNA protect injected embryos from retinoic acid teratogenesis. DNA binding is apparently essential to this protective function, as truncated thyroid hormone receptors, lacking DNA-binding domains but including hormone-binding and dimerization domains, do not protect from retinoic acid. We have shown that microinjections of these dominant-interfering thyroid hormone receptors, as well as anti-thyroid hormone receptor antibodies, increase retinoic acid teratogenesis in injected embryos, presumably by inactivating endogenous thyroid hormone receptor. This finding suggests that endogenous thyroid hormone receptors may act to limit retinoic acid sensitivity. On the other hand, after thyroid hormone treatment, ectopic thyroid hormone receptor mediates teratogenesis that is indistinguishable from the dorsoanterior deficiencies produced in retinoic acid

  17. Increased epidermal growth factor receptor gene expression by gamma-interferon in a human breast carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Hamburger, A. W.; Pinnamaneni, G. D.

    1991-01-01

    The interferons are a group of naturally occurring proteins that inhibit the growth of tumours in vivo and many transformed cell lines in vitro. The mechanisms of action of interferon, however, remain unclear. The IFN induced inhibition of growth of many epithelial cancer cell lines is associated with changes in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) binding or expression. Therefore, we examined the effect of IFN treatment on the expression of EGFR in a human breast carcinoma cell line, MDA 468. We have found the IFN-gamma inhibited, in a dose dependent fashion, the growth of MDA 468 cells. IFN decreased cell surface binding of 125I-EGF to EGFR by changing receptor number rather than affinity. However, total cellular receptor protein, as measured by immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibodies, was increased in IFN-treated cells. The half-life of the metabolically labelled receptor was unchanged by treatment with IFN. Increased amounts of EGFR mRNA were observed in MDA 468 cells treated with IFN-gamma for 3 days. The levels of mRNA increased with time in culture, reaching a peak of four times control values after 5 days of treatment. This effect was observable with as little as 10 U ml-1 of IFN-gamma. Treatment of the cells with Actinomycin D to inhibit new RNA synthesis suggested that the stability of EGFR mRNA was not enhanced in IFN-gamma treated cells. The increase in receptor mRNA induced by IFN was not inhibited by cycloheximide. These data suggest IFN-gamma can increase expression of EGFR mRNA and protein in MDA 468 cells. Increased expression of EGFR mRNA and protein by IFN-gamma is associated with inhibition of cell growth. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1906727

  18. OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic- and hydroxycinnamic acids and formation of aromatic products—A gamma radiolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmel, Birgit; Swoboda, Friederike; Solar, Sonja; Reznicek, Gottfried

    2010-12-01

    The OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic acids (HBA), hydroxycinnamic acids (HCiA) and methoxylated derivatives, as well as of chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid was studied by gamma radiolysis in aerated aqueous solutions. Primary aromatic products resulting from an OH-radical attachment to the ring (hydroxylation), to the position occupied by the methoxyl group (replacement -OCH 3 by -OH) as well as to the propenoic acid side chain of the cinnamic acids (benzaldehyde formations) were analysed by HPLC-UV and LC-ESI-MS. A comparison of the extent of these processes is given for 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, isovanillic acid, syringic acid, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, and rosmarinic acid. For all cinnamic acids and derivatives benzaldehydes were significant oxidation products. With the release of caffeic acid from chlorogenic acid the cleavage of a phenolic glycoside could be demonstrated. Reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  19. Bile Acid-Activated Receptors, Intestinal Microbiota, and the Treatment of Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Fiorucci, Stefano; Distrutti, Eleonora

    2015-11-01

    The composition of the bile acid pool is a function of the microbial metabolism of bile acids in the intestine. Perturbations of the microbiota shape the bile acid pool and modulate the activity of bile acid-activated receptors (BARs) even beyond the gastrointestinal tract, triggering various metabolic axes and altering host metabolism. Bile acids, in turn, can also regulate the composition of the gut microbiome at the highest taxonomic levels. Primary bile acids from the host are preferential ligands for the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), while secondary bile acids from the microbiota are ligands for G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1). In this review, we examine the role of bile acid signaling in the regulation of intestinal microbiota and how changes in bile acid composition affect human metabolism. Bile acids may offer novel therapeutic modalities in inflammation, obesity, and diabetes. PMID:26481828

  20. Estrogen-related receptor gamma regulates dopaminergic neuronal phenotype by activating GSK3β/NFAT signaling in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Juhee; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Choi, Hyun Jin

    2015-05-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) is highly expressed in the nervous system during embryogenesis and in adult brains, but its physiological role in neuronal development remains unknown. In this study, we evaluated the relevance of ERRγ in regulating dopaminergic (DAergic) phenotype and the corresponding signaling pathway. We used retinoic acid (RA) to differentiate human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. RA induced neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y cells with an increase in DAergic neuron-like properties, including up-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter, and vesicular monoamine transporter 2. ERRγ, but not ERRα, was up-regulated by RA, and participated in RA effect on SH-SY5Y cells. ERRγ over-expression enhanced mature DAergic neuronal phenotype with neurite outgrowth as with RA treatment; and RA-induced increase in DAergic phenotype was attenuated by silencing ERRγ expression. ERRγ appears to have a crucial role in morphological and functional regulation of cells that is selective for DAergic neurons. Polo-like kinase 2 was up-regulated in ERRγ-over-expressing SH-SY5Y cells, which was involved in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and resulting downstream activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells. The likely involvement of ERRγ in regulating the DAergic neuronal phenotype makes this orphan nuclear receptor a novel target for understanding DAergic neuronal differentiation. We propose the relevance of estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) in regulating dopaminergic neuronal phenotype: ERRγ is up-regulated by retinoic acid in SH-SY5Y cells, and enhances dopaminergic phenotypes and induces neurite outgrowth; Polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta/nuclear factor of activated T cells (GSK3β/NFAT) signaling are responsible for the ERRγ effect. Our findings provide the first insights into the role of ERRγ in the brain, as a novel approach toward understanding

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma ligands inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Eucker, Jan; Sterz, Jan; Krebbel, Holger; Zavrski, Ivana; Kaiser, Martin; Zang, Chuanbing; Heider, Ulrike; Jakob, Christian; Elstner, Elena; Sezer, Orhan

    2006-08-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, a nuclear receptor and transcription factor, and its natural and synthetic ligands have become a focus of novel approaches to induction of apoptosis in solid tumors and hematologic malignancies, including malignant B-lineage cells. The effect on mantle cell lymphoma, a subtype with dismal prognosis, has not yet been analyzed. We investigated the effect of 15-deoxy-delta-12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), pioglitazone (PGZ) or rosiglitazone (RGZ) on human mantle cell lymphoma cell lines (GRANTA-519, Hbl-2 and JeKo-1). Mantle cell lymphoma cell lines exhibited a high expression of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma protein in Western blot analysis. MTT assays revealed anti-proliferative effects induced by both 15d-PGJ2, the natural activator of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, and PGZ and RGZ, synthetic Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma ligands, in a dose-dependent manner. At a dose of 50 micromol/l, 15d-PGJ2 induced growth inhibition in all cell lines. The anti-proliferative effect of PGZ and RGZ was slightly lower. Induction of apoptosis was indicated by annexin V staining. At a dose of 50 micromol/l, 15d-PGJ2 led to apoptosis in all cell lines (87-99%) after 48 h of incubation. Again, the apoptotic effect with thiazolidinediones was slightly lower at the same dose level. This is the first study evaluating Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma expression and its therapeutic implications in human mantle cell lymphoma cells. Thiazolidinediones comprise anti-lymphoma activity in vitro and should be further explored for the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma. PMID:16926626

  2. EMBO Retinoids 2011: mechanisms, biology and pathology of signaling by retinoic acid and retinoic acid receptors

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Neil J.

    2012-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is one of the principal active metabolites of vitamin A (retinol) which mediates a spectrum of critical physiological and developmental processes. Transcriptional regulation by RA is mediated primarily by members of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) subfamily of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. NRs bind specific genomic DNA sequence motifs and engage coregulators and components of the basal transcription machinery to effect transcriptional regulation at target gene promoters. Disruption of signaling by retinoic acid is thought to underlie the etiology of a number of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases including breast cancer and haematological malignancies. A meeting of international researchers in retinoid signaling was convened in Strasbourg in September 2011 under the auspices of the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO). Retinoids 2011 encompassed myriad mechanistic, biological and pathological aspects of these hormones and their cognate receptors, as well as setting these advances in the context of wider current questions on signaling by members of the NR superfamily. PMID:22438793

  3. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in 1918 Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Changes Receptor Binding Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Laurel; Stevens, James; Zamarin, Dmitriy; Wilson, Ian A.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Basler, Christopher F.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.; Palese, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The receptor binding specificity of influenza viruses may be important for host restriction of human and avian viruses. Here, we show that the hemagglutinin (HA) of the virus that caused the 1918 influenza pandemic has strain-specific differences in its receptor binding specificity. The A/South Carolina/1/18 HA preferentially binds the α2,6 sialic acid (human) cellular receptor, whereas the A/New York/1/18 HA, which differs by only one amino acid, binds both the α2,6 and the α2,3 sialic acid (avian) cellular receptors. Compared to the conserved consensus sequence in the receptor binding site of avian HAs, only a single amino acid at position 190 was changed in the A/New York/1/18 HA. Mutation of this single amino acid back to the avian consensus resulted in a preference for the avian receptor. PMID:16103207

  4. Regulation of macrophage alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    LaMarre, J; Wolf, B B; Kittler, E L; Quesenberry, P J; Gonias, S L

    1993-01-01

    alpha 2-Macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (alpha 2M-R/LRP) is a broad specificity receptor that may function in lipoprotein metabolism, proteinase regulation, and growth factor regulation. In this study, we demonstrated that alpha 2M-R/LRP expression in macrophages can be markedly decreased by LPS and by IFN-gamma. Regulation of alpha 2M-R/LRP in RAW 264.7 cells was demonstrated at the mRNA, antigen, and receptor-function levels. In receptor-function studies, the decrease in alpha 2M-R/LRP expression was detected as a 90% decrease in the Bmax or maximum receptor binding capacity for activated alpha 2M after treatment with LPS or IFN-gamma. Western blot analysis of whole cell lysates demonstrated significant loss of alpha 2M-R/LRP heavy-chain. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA revealed a marked decrease in alpha 2M-R/LRP mRNA after treatment with LPS (79% decrease) or IFN-gamma (70% decrease). Other cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta-1, and interleukin-6 did not regulate alpha 2M-R/LRP. The ability of LPS and IFN-gamma to regulate alpha 2M-R/LRP was confirmed in experiments with primary cultures of murine bone marrow macrophages. These studies demonstrate that macrophage alpha 2M-R/LRP is subject to significant downregulation by physiologically significant cytokines and signaling macromolecules. Images PMID:7680664

  5. A validated method for gas chromatographic analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tall fescue herbage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in animals that is also found in plants and has been associated with plant responses to stress. A simple and relatively rapid method of GABA separation and quantification was developed from a commercially available kit for serum amino...

  6. Solute-enhanced production of gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from aqueous solutions of levulinic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Dumesic, James A; Wettstein, Stephanie G; Alonso, David Martin; Gurbuz, Elif Ispir

    2015-02-24

    A method to produce levulinic acid (LA) and gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from biomass-derived cellulose or lignocellulose by selective extraction of LA using GVL and optionally converting the LA so isolated into GVL, with no purifications steps required to yield the GVL.

  7. Expression of gastric antisecretory and prostaglandin E receptor binding activity of misoprostol by misoprostol free acid.

    PubMed

    Tsai, B S; Kessler, L K; Stolzenbach, J; Schoenhard, G; Bauer, R F

    1991-05-01

    In enriched canine parietal cell preparations, misoprostol, an analog of prostaglandin E1 methyl ester, was rapidly deesterified to misoprostol free acid. Under this circumstance, misoprostol and misoprostol free acid exhibited equal antisecretory potency against histamine-stimulated acid secretion and bound equally well to prostaglandin E receptors. When the deesterification of misoprostol was inhibited by paraoxon, an esterase inhibitor, the antisecretory and receptor binding activity of misoprostol was markedly reduced, with potency much less than misoprostol free acid. These results indicate that misoprostol free acid is the active biological form of misoprostol that binds to prostaglandin E receptors and mediates the antisecretory action of misoprostol. PMID:1850690

  8. Transcriptional activity of interferon gamma and two subunits of its receptor as molecular markers of myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Smolik, Sławomir; Domal-Kwiatkowska, Dorota; Nowalany-Kozielska, Ewa; Wojnicz, Romuald; Swiatowska, Longina; Ludmiła, Weglarz

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines have an important role in the pathogenesis of myocarditis, but still little is known about the importance of interferon gamma (IFNg) in this disease. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of the initial transcriptional activity of IFNg and two subunits of its receptor as measured with the use of QRT-PCR and SYBRGreen chemistry in the group of 63 patients with clinically confirmed myocarditis who were treated with statin or immunosupressive therapy. The initial values of IFNg and the ratio of IFNgRb/IFNgRa were statistically different in the analyzed group of patients. The prognostic value of IFNg and IFNgRb/IFNgRa was determined by logistic regression analysis. PMID:19172849

  9. Two cis-DNA elements involved in myeloid-cell-specific expression and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) activation of the human high-affinity Fc gamma receptor gene: a novel IFN regulatory mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Perez, C; Wietzerbin, J; Benech, P D

    1993-01-01

    The human high-affinity receptor for the constant region of immunoglobulin G (human Fc gamma R1) is encoded by two mRNAs induced selectively by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and expressed in cells of myeloid lineage. The cis-DNA element (GRR) previously found to confer IFN-gamma responsiveness to this gene acts as an inducible enhancer and is the target of an IFN-gamma-activated factor(s) (GIRE-BP) in cells of different origins. Although the GRR motif is not related to the DNA elements involved in the regulation of other IFN-stimulated genes, GIRE-BP binding depends on the IFN-gamma-dependent activation of the 91-kDa protein known to be one of the factors of a transcriptional complex activated by IFN-alpha. Deletions of the Fc gamma R1 promoter allowed us to identify a 25-bp element, downstream from the GRR motif, conferring cell-type-specific expression. This element, called MATE (myeloid activating transcription element), is the DNA target for constitutive factors forming two complexes, MATE-BP1 and MATE-BP2. In accordance with the functional analysis, MATE-BP binding activities were detected in extracts prepared from myeloid cell lines such as THP-1, HL-60, and U-937 but not in HeLa cell extracts. The MATE motif is present not only in the promoter of other Fc receptor genes but also in several promoters of genes whose expression is restricted to monocytic cells. Our results suggest that human Fc gamma R1 gene expression in myeloid cells is initiated by the interaction of IFN-gamma-activated factors with cell-type-specific factors through their binding to the GRR and MATE motifs. Images PMID:8455606

  10. Obeticholic acid, a synthetic bile acid agonist of the farnesoid X receptor, attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Peggy P; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-02-01

    Bile acids are ligands for the nuclear hormone receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). The bile acid-FXR interaction regulates bile acid synthesis, transport, and cholesterol metabolism. Recently, bile acid-FXR regulation has been reported to play an integral role in both hepatic and intestinal inflammation, and in atherosclerosis. In this study, we found that FXR knockout mice had more disease severity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Obeticholic acid (6α-ethyl-chenodeoxycholic acid, 6-ECDCA), a synthetic FXR agonist, is an orally available drug that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as alcoholic hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and primary biliary cirrhosis. When we treated mice exhibiting established EAE with 6-ECDCA, or the natural FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), clinical disease was ameliorated by (i) suppressing lymphocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine production; (ii) reducing CD4(+) T cells and CD19(+) B cell populations and their expression of negative checkpoint regulators programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1), programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA); (iii) increasing CD8(+) T cells and PD1, PDl-1, and BTLA expression; and (iv) reducing VLA-4 expression in both the T- and B-cell populations. Moreover, adoptive transfer of 6-ECDCA- or CDCA-treated donor cells failed to transfer disease in naive recipients. Thus, we show that FXR functions as a negative regulator in neuroinflammation and we highlight that FXR agonists represent a potential previously unidentified therapy for MS. PMID:26811456

  11. Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} agonists inhibit the release of proinflammatory cytokines from RSV-infected epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Ralf . E-mail: ralf.arnold@medizin.uni-magdeburg.de; Koenig, Wolfgang

    2006-03-15

    The epithelial cells of the airways are the target cells for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and the site of the majority of the inflammation associated with the disease. Recently, peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, we investigated the role of PPAR{gamma} agonists (15d-PGJ{sub 2}, ciglitazone and troglitazone) on the synthesis of RSV-induced cytokine release from RSV-infected human lung epithelial cells (A549). We observed that all PPAR{gamma} ligands inhibited dose-dependently the release of TNF-{alpha}, GM-CSF, IL-1{alpha}, IL-6 and the chemokines CXCL8 (IL-8) and CCL5 (RANTES) from RSV-infected A549 cells. Concomitantly, the PPAR{gamma} ligands diminished the cellular amount of mRNA encoding for IL-6, CXCL8 and CCL5 and the RSV-induced binding activity of the transcription factors NF-{kappa}B (p65/p50) and AP-1 (c-fos), respectively. Our data presented herein suggest a potential application of PPAR{gamma} ligands in the anti-inflammatory treatment of RSV infection.

  12. Regulation of vitamin D receptor expression by retinoic acid receptor alpha in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Marchwicka, Aleksandra; Cebrat, Małgorzata; Łaszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Śnieżewski, Łukasz; Brown, Geoffrey; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2016-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by an accumulation of malignant immature myeloid precursors. A very promising way to treat AML is differentiation therapy using either all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D), or the use of both these differentiation-inducing agents. However, the effect of combination treatment varies in different AML cell lines, and this is due to ATRA either down- or up-regulating transcription of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in the cells examined. The mechanism of transcriptional regulation of VDR in response to ATRA has not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) is responsible for regulating VDR transcription in AML cells. We have shown that a VDR transcriptional variant, originating in exon 1a, is regulated by RARα agonists in AML cells. Moreover, in cells with a high basal level of RARα protein, the VDR gene is transcriptionally repressed as long as RARα agonist is absent. In these cells down-regulation of the level of RARα leads to increased expression of VDR. We consider that our findings provide a mechanistic background to explain the different outcomes from treating AML cell lines with a combination of ATRA and 1,25D. PMID:26969398

  13. Long-term exercise increases the DNA binding activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in rat adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Petridou, Anatoli; Tsalouhidou, Sofia; Tsalis, George; Schulz, Thorsten; Michna, Horst; Mougios, Vassilis

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of 8 weeks of voluntary wheel running on the gene expression, at the protein level, of 2 enzymes involved in lipogenesis (fatty acid synthase [FAS] and diacylglycerol acyl transferase 1), 2 proteins involved in lipolysis (hormone-sensitive lipase [HSL] and perilipin), and 3 transcription factors mediating the induction of genes involved in lipid metabolism (the alpha, gamma, and delta members of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, or PPAR, family) in rat liver, gastrocnemius muscle, epididymal fat, and subcutaneous fat. Proteins were measured through Western blot analysis in the tissues of 11 trained and 14 untrained rats. The trained rats had lower FAS in the liver; higher FAS, HSL, and perilipin in epididymal fat; and higher HSL in subcutaneous fat. In addition, the trained rats had higher total protein concentrations in both fat depots. No significant differences in the liver, muscle, or adipose tissue PPAR contents were found between groups. However, the DNA binding activity of PPARgamma, measured through an enzyme immunoassay-based method, was higher in both fat depots of the trained rats. Our findings suggest that long-term wheel running had significant effects on the concentrations of proteins playing key roles in lipogenesis and lipolysis in rat liver and adipose tissue. These effects may be due to PPAR activation rather than induction, rendering the transcriptional regulation of target genes more economical and flexible. The activation of PPARgamma with exercise may mediate its beneficial effect on insulin sensitivity. PMID:17618946

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 and acyl-CoA synthetase 5 polymorphisms influence diet response.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Kristi B; Dent, Robert; Langefeld, Carl D; Cox, Miranda; Williams, Kathryn; Carrick, Kevin M; Stuart, Joan S; Sundseth, Scott S; Harper, Mary-Ellen; McPherson, Ruth; Tesson, Frédérique

    2007-05-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) and its response gene, Acyl CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5), which has an important role in fatty acid metabolism, may affect weight loss in response to caloric restriction. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether these genes were involved in the interindividual response to dietary treatment. Genotypic/phenotypic comparisons were made between selected obese women from the quintiles losing the most (diet responsive, n = 74) and the quintiles losing the least (diet-resistant, n = 67) weight in the first 6 weeks of a 900-kcal formula diet. Two common PPARgamma single nucleotide polymorphisms, Pro(12)Ala and C1431T, and eight polymorphisms across the ACSL5 gene were selected for single locus and haplotypic association analyses. The PPARgamma Pro(12)Ala single nucleotide polymorphism was associated with diet resistance (odds ratio = 3.48, 95% confidence interval = 1.41 to 8.56, p = 0.03), and the rs2419621, located in the 5'untranslated region of the ACSL5 gene, displayed the strongest association with diet response (odds ratio = 3.45, 95% confidence interval = 1.61 to 7.69, p = 0.001). Skeletal muscle ACSL5 mRNA expression was significantly lower in carriers of the wildtype compared with the variant rs2419621 allele (p = 0.03). Our results suggest a link between PPARgamma2 and ACSL5 genotype and diet responsiveness. PMID:17495181

  15. Tulane virus recognizes sialic acids as cellular receptors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming; Wei, Chao; Huang, Pengwei; Fan, Qiang; Quigley, Christina; Xia, Ming; Fang, Hao; Zhang, Xufu; Zhong, Weiming; Klassen, John S; Jiang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery that human noroviruses (huNoVs) recognize sialic acids (SAs) in addition to histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) pointed to a new direction in studying virus-host interactions during calicivirus infection. HuNoVs remain difficult to study due to the lack of an effective cell culture model. In this study, we demonstrated that Tulane virus (TV), a cultivable primate calicivirus, also recognizes SAs in addition to the previously known TV-HBGA interactions. Evidence supporting this discovery includes that TV virions bound synthetic sialoglycoconjugates (SGCs) and that treatment of TV permissive LLC-MK2 cells with either neuraminidases or SA-binding lectins inhibited TV infectivity. In addition, we found that Maackia amurensis leukoagglutinin (MAL), a lectin that recognizes the α-2,3 linked SAs, bound LLC-MK2 cells, as well as TV, by which MAL promoted TV infectivity in cell culture. Our findings further highlight TV as a valuable surrogate for huNoVs, particularly in studying virus-host interactions that may involve two host carbohydrate receptors or co-receptors for infection. PMID:26146020

  16. Involvement of protein kinase D in Fc gamma-receptor activation of the NADPH oxidase in neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson-Moncada, Jan K; Lopez-Lluch, Guillermo; Segal, Anthony W; Dekker, Lodewijk V

    2002-01-01

    Protein kinases involved in the activation of the NADPH oxidase by Fc gamma receptors in neutrophils were studied. Of three different protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, Gö 6976 inhibited the NADPH oxidase completely, whereas bisindolylmaleimide I and Ro 31-8220 caused a 70-80% inhibition. Thus a Gö 6976-sensitive, bisindolylmaleimide I/Ro 31-8220-insensitive component contributes to NADPH oxidase activation induced by Fc gamma receptors. Down-regulation of PKC isotypes resulted in inhibition of Fc gamma-receptor-activated NADPH oxidase, but a down-regulation-insensitive component was still present. This component was sensitive to Gö 6976, but insensitive to Ro 31-8220. It has been shown previously that protein kinase D/PKC-mu (PKD) shows this same pharmacology in vitro. We show that PKD is present in neutrophils and that, in contrast with PKC isotypes, PKD is not down-regulated. Therefore PKD may participate in NADPH oxidase activation. To obtain direct evidence for this we adopted an antisense approach. Antisense PKD inhibited NADPH oxidase induced by Fc gamma-receptor stimulation by 50% and the Ro 31-8220-insensitive component in the activation was inhibited by antisense PKD. In vitro kinase assays showed that PKD is activated by presenting IgG-opsonized particles to neutrophils. Furthermore, PKD localizes to the area of particle intake in the cell and phosphorylates two of the three cytosolic components of the NADPH oxidase, p40(phox) and p47(phox). Taken together, these data indicate that Fc gamma receptors engage PKD in the regulation of the NADPH oxidase. PMID:11903052

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of phenoxyacetic acid derivatives as novel free fatty acid receptor 1 agonists.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuekun; Zhao, Tianxiao; Yang, Baowei; Li, Zheng; Cui, Jian; Dai, Yuxuan; Qiu, Qianqian; Qiang, Hao; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1) is a new potential drug target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes because of its role in amplifying glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cell. In the present studies, we identified phenoxyacetic acid derivative (18b) as a potent FFA1 agonist (EC50=62.3 nM) based on the structure of phenylpropanoic acid derivative 4p. Moreover, compound 18b could significantly improve oral glucose tolerance in ICR mice and dose-dependently reduced glucose levels in type 2 diabetic C57BL/6 mice without observation of hypoglycemic side effect. Additionally, compound 18b exhibited acceptable PK profiles. In summary, compound 18b with ideal PK profiles exhibited good activity in vitro and in vivo, and might be a promising drug candidate for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:25481394

  18. FPEX gamma-Radiolysis in the Presence of Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    mincher

    2007-09-01

    Abstract: The solvent formulation known as FPEX (Fission Product Extraction) contains calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) for Cs extraction; 4,4’,(5’)-di-(t-butyldicyclohexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) for Sr extraction; 1-(2,2,3,3,-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB) modifier and trioctylamine (TOA) to aid in Cs stripping, all in Isopar L diluent. This formulation has favorable extraction efficiency for Cs and Sr from acidic solution, and was investigated here for ?-radiation stability. When FPEX was irradiated in contact with aqueous nitric acid, extraction efficiency decreased only slightly when irradiated to absorbed doses as high as 200 kGy. The color of the organic phase changed to a deep yellow-orange, and several new peaks related to radiolysis of the Cs-7SB modifier were detected by GC-ECD analysis. This had little effect on solvent extraction distribution ratios. Possible reasons for this unexpected robustness under conditions of high radiation and acidity are discussed.

  19. Identification of the orphan GPCR, P2Y(10) receptor as the sphingosine-1-phosphate and lysophosphatidic acid receptor.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masanori; Shiraishi, Akira; Tabata, Kenichi; Fujita, Norihisa

    2008-07-11

    Phylogenetic analysis of transmembrane regions of GPCRs using PHYLIP indicated that the orphan receptor P2Y(10) receptor was classified into the cluster consisting nucleotide and lipid receptors. Based on the results, we studied the abilities of nucleotides and lipids to activate the P2Y(10) receptors. As a result, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) evoked intracellular Ca(2+) increases in the CHO cells stably expressing the P2Y(10) fused with a G(16alpha) protein. These Ca(2+) responses were inhibited by S1P receptor and LPA receptor antagonists. The introduction of siRNA designed for P2Y(10) receptor into the P2Y(10)-CHO cells effectively blocked both S1P- and LPA-induced Ca(2+) increases. RT-PCR analysis showed that the mouse P2Y(10) was expressed in reproductive organs, brain, lung and skeletal muscle, suggesting the receptor plays physiological roles throughout the whole body. In conclusion, the P2Y(10) receptor is the first receptor identified as a dual lysophospholipid receptor. PMID:18466763

  20. Degradation of 3-chloro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid in biological treated effluent by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Libing; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-02-01

    Gamma irradiation-induced degradation of a chlorinated aromatic compound, 3-chloro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid (CHBA) in biological treated effluent was studied and the results were compared with those obtained in deionized water. Gamma irradiation led to a complete decomposition of CHBA and a partial mineralization in the treated effluent. The removal of CHBA followed the pseudo first-order reaction kinetic model and the rate constant in the treated effluent was 1.7-3.5 times lower than that in deionized water. The CHBA degradation rate was higher at acidic condition than at neutral and alkaline conditions. The radiolytic yield, G-value for CHBA degradation was lower in the treated effluent, which decreased with increase in absorbed doses and increased with increase in initial concentrations of CHBA. The degradation mechanism of CHBA using gamma irradiation was proposed through the oxidation by -OH and reduction by eaq- and H- radicals. As exposed to gamma irradiation, dechlorination takes place rapidly and combines with the oxidation and cleavage of the aromatic ring, producing chloride ions, small carboxylic acids, acetaldehyde and other intermediates into the solution.

  1. Estrogen-related receptor gamma induces cardiac hypertrophy by activating GATA4.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Duk-Hwa; Eom, Gwang Hyeon; Kee, Hae Jin; Nam, Yoon Seok; Cho, Young Kuk; Kim, Don-Kyu; Koo, Ja Young; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Nam, Kwang-Il; Kim, Kyung Keun; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Seung Bum; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Kook, Hyun

    2013-12-01

    Estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) is an orphan nuclear receptor that has biological roles mainly in metabolism and that controls metabolic switching in perinatal heart. In adult heart diseases, however, the functional roles of ERRγ have not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the role of ERRγ in cardiac hypertrophy. The functional roles of ERRγ in the development of cardiac hypertrophy were examined in primary cultured cardiomyocytes and in animal models. ERRγ expression was increased in hearts from human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients and in both cellular and animal models of cardiac hypertrophy. Transgenic overexpression in mouse heart as well as forced expression of ERRγ in cardiomyocytes induced hypertrophic phenotypes. Knock-down of ERRγ blocked agonist-induced hypertrophic phenotypes. ERRγ bound directly to the proximal ERR-responsive element in the GATA4 promoter in a sequence-specific manner and thereby induced transcription. ERRγ-induced hypertrophy was blocked by inhibition of GATA4. GSK-5182, an inverse agonist of ERRγ, completely blocked cardiac hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes. It also prevented aortic banding-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in mouse heart. These findings demonstrate a novel ERRγ/GATA4 signal cascade in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and suggest GSK-5182 as a possible therapeutic. PMID:24083978

  2. Ligation of Fc gamma receptor IIB inhibits antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kuan Rong; Zhang, Summer Li-Xin; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Chan, Ying Kai; Chow, Angelia; Lim, Angeline Pei Chiew; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hanson, Brendon J; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2011-07-26

    The interaction of antibodies, dengue virus (DENV), and monocytes can result in either immunity or enhanced virus infection. These opposing outcomes of dengue antibodies have hampered dengue vaccine development. Recent studies have shown that antibodies neutralize DENV by either preventing virus attachment to cellular receptors or inhibiting viral fusion intracellularly. However, whether the antibody blocks attachment or fusion, the resulting immune complexes are expected to be phagocytosed by Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells and cleared from circulation. This suggests that only antibodies that are able to block fusion intracellularly would be able to neutralize DENV upon FcγR-mediated uptake by monocytes whereas other antibodies would have resulted in enhancement of DENV replication. Using convalescent sera from dengue patients, we observed that neutralization of the homologous serotypes occurred despite FcγR-mediated uptake. However, FcγR-mediated uptake appeared to be inhibited when neutralized heterologous DENV serotypes were used instead. We demonstrate that this inhibition occurred through the formation of viral aggregates by antibodies in a concentration-dependent manner. Aggregation of viruses enabled antibodies to cross-link the inhibitory FcγRIIB, which is expressed at low levels but which inhibits FcγR-mediated phagocytosis and hence prevents antibody-dependent enhancement of DENV infection in monocytes. PMID:21746897

  3. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists as insulin sensitizers: from the discovery to recent progress.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nobuo; Momose, Yu

    2008-01-01

    An epidemic of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes and obesity is undermining the health of people living in industrialized societies. There is an urgent need to develop innovative therapeutics. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is one of the ligand-activated transcription factors in the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and a pivotal regulator of glucose and lipid homeostasis. The discovery of PPARgamma as a target of multimodal insulin sensitizers, represented by thiazolidinediones (TZDs), has attracted remarkable scientific interest and had a great impact on the pharmaceutical industry. With the clinical success of the PPARgamma agonists, pioglitazone (Actos) and rosiglitazone (Avandia), development of novel and potent insulin-sensitizing agents with diverse clinical profiles has been accelerated. Currently, a number of PPARgamma agonists from different chemical classes and with varying pharmacological profiles are being developed. Despite quite a few obstacles to the development of PPAR-related drugs, PPARgamma-targeted agents still hold promise. There are new concepts and encouraging evidence emerging that suggest this class can yield improved anti-diabetic agents. This review covers the discovery of TZDs, provides an overview of PPARgamma including the significance of PPARgamma as a drug target, describes the current status of a wide variety of novel PPARgamma ligands including PPAR dual and pan agonists and selective PPARgamma modulators (SPPARgammaMs), and highlights new approaches for identifying agents targeting PPARgamma in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:19075761

  4. [Variety of symptoms after drug use of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB)].

    PubMed

    Galldiks, N; Kadow, I; Bechdolf, A; Fink, G R; Klosterkötter, J; Kuhn, J

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB, "liquid ecstasy") and its legal prodrugs gamma-butyrolactone and 1,4-butanediol are gaining importance as recreational drugs in Germany. Because of the wide availability of GHB and its prodrugs physicians are increasingly being confronted with cases of intoxication. The effect of GHB intoxication is comparable with those of alcohol and/or benzodiazepines. Likewise, symptoms of withdrawal may occur. In this review, we summarise current data regarding the history, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the drug as well as the relevant symptoms of intoxication or withdrawal as they pertain to neurology and psychiatry. PMID:21154180

  5. Electrophysiological characterization, solubilization and purification of the Tityus gamma toxin receptor associated with the gating component of the Na+ channel from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Barhanin, J; Pauron, D; Lombet, A; Norman, R I; Vijverberg, H P; Giglio, J R; Lazdunski, M

    1983-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies with neuroblastoma cells have shown that toxin gamma from the venom of the scorpion Tityus serrulatus is a new toxin specific for the gating system of the Na+ channel. The procedure which solubilizes the tetrodotoxin receptor from rat brain also solubilizes the Tityus gamma toxin receptor. Binding experiments on the solubilized receptor with a radioiodinated derivative of Tityus gamma toxin have shown: (i) that the TiTx gamma-receptor complex is very stable with a dissociation constant of 8.6 X 10(-12) M and a very slow dissociation (T 1/2 = 15 h); (ii) that the toxin recognizes a class of sites with a 1:1 stoichiometry with those for tetrodotoxin (Bmax = 1.3 pmol/mg protein). The radioiodinated Tityus gamma-receptor complex has been substantially purified by ion-exchange chromatography, lectin affinity chromatography and sucrose gradient sedimentation. A ratio of one Tityus gamma toxin binding site per tetrodotoxin binding site was found throughout the purification. The purified material exhibited a sedimentation coefficient of 10.4S and had an apparent mol. wt. of 270 000 on SDS-gel electrophoresis. No other polypeptide chains were demonstrated to be associated with this large protein in the Tityus gamma receptor. The main conclusion is that the tetrodotoxin binding site associated with the selectivity filter of the Na+ channel and the Tityus gamma toxin binding site associated with the gating component are probably carried by the same polypeptide chain. PMID:6315420

  6. Gamma oscillations in V1 are correlated with GABAA receptor density: A multi-modal MEG and Flumazenil-PET study

    PubMed Central

    Kujala, Jan; Jung, Julien; Bouvard, Sandrine; Lecaignard, Françoise; Lothe, Amélie; Bouet, Romain; Ciumas, Carolina; Ryvlin, Philippe; Jerbi, Karim

    2015-01-01

    High-frequency oscillations in the gamma-band reflect rhythmic synchronization of spike timing in active neural networks. The modulation of gamma oscillations is a widely established mechanism in a variety of neurobiological processes, yet its neurochemical basis is not fully understood. Modeling, in-vitro and in-vivo animal studies suggest that gamma oscillation properties depend on GABAergic inhibition. In humans, search for evidence linking total GABA concentration to gamma oscillations has led to promising -but also to partly diverging- observations. Here, we provide the first evidence of a direct relationship between the density of GABAA receptors and gamma oscillatory gamma responses in human primary visual cortex (V1). By combining Flumazenil-PET (to measure resting-levels of GABAA receptor density) and MEG (to measure visually-induced gamma oscillations), we found that GABAA receptor densities correlated positively with the frequency and negatively with amplitude of visually-induced gamma oscillations in V1. Our findings demonstrate that gamma-band response profiles of primary visual cortex across healthy individuals are shaped by GABAA-receptor-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission. These results bridge the gap with in-vitro and animal studies and may have future clinical implications given that altered GABAergic function, including dysregulation of GABAA receptors, has been related to psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and depression. PMID:26572733

  7. The Gamma Interferon Receptor Is Required for the Protective Pulmonary Inflammatory Response to Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gwo-Hsiao; McDonald, Roderick A.; Wells, Jason C.; Huffnagle, Gary B.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Toews, Galen B.

    2005-01-01

    Mice with a null deletion mutation in the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) receptor gene were used to study the role of IFN-γ responsiveness during experimental pulmonary cryptococcosis. Cryptococcus neoformans was inoculated intratracheally into mice lacking the IFN-γ receptor gene (IFN-γR−/−) and into control mice (IFN-γR+/+). The numbers of CFU in lung, spleen, and brain were determined to assess clearance; cytokines produced by lung leukocytes were measured, and survival curves were generated. In the present study, we demonstrate the following points. (i) IFN-γR−/− mice are markedly more susceptible to C. neoformans infection than IFN-γR+/+ mice. (ii) In the absence of IFN-γ signaling, pulmonary CFU continue to increase over the course of infection, and the infection disseminates to the brain. (iii) In the absence of IFN-γ receptor, recruitment of inflammatory cells in response to pulmonary cryptococcal infection is not impaired. (iv) At week 5 postinfection, IFN-γR−/− mice have recruited greater numbers of leukocytes into their lungs, with neutrophils, eosinophils, and lymphocytes accounting for this cellular increase. (v) IFN-γ signaling is required for the development of a T1 over a T2 immune response in the lung following cryptococcal infection. These results indicate that in the absence of IFN- γ responsiveness, even though the recruitment of pulmonary inflammatory cells is not impaired and the secretion of IFN-γ is not affected, IFN-γR−/− mice do not have the ability to resolve the cryptococcal infection. In conclusion, our data suggest that proper functional IFN-γ signaling, possibly through a mechanism which inhibits the potentially disease-promoting T2 response, is required for mice to confine the cryptococcal infection. PMID:15731080

  8. Gamma-L-glutamyl-L-aspartate, interacting with NMDA receptors, affects appetitive visual discrimination tasks in mice.

    PubMed

    Melan, C; De Barry, J; Ungerer, A

    1991-05-01

    gamma-L-glutamyl-L-aspartate (gamma-LGLA), which interacts with NMDA receptors, has been shown to impair retention of an active avoidance task in mice. Here, we specified the behavioral effects of gamma-LGLA on acquisition and retention of appetitive nondelayed visual discrimination tasks. Three experiments were conducted: the peptide (0.25 and 2.5 microM/kg/25 ml. ip) was administered 3 min after each of the first six sessions of either original learning, reversal 1 or reversal 3. gamma-LGLA affected acquisition of the original task and of the first reversal, as revealed by an absence of improvement on initial sessions and an increased number of sessions to reach criterion fixed at 7 of 10 correct choices on three consecutive sessions. This deficit did not result from an action of the peptide on position habits (repetition of spatial choices) nor on motivational processes, suggesting a specific interference of gamma-LGLA with acquisition and memorization of the visual rule. In contrast, gamma-LGLA had no effect on acquisition of the third reversal, in which the positively reinforced visual stimulus was identical to that used on the first reversal. These results show that the behavioral deficits of gamma-LGLA, which had previously been demonstrated in an aversive task, can be generalized to appetitive tasks based on acquisition of a new rule. PMID:1829354

  9. Convulsant and subconvulsant doses of norfloxacin in the presence and absence of biphenylacetic acid alter extracellular hippocampal glutamate but not gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Smolders, I; Gousseau, C; Marchand, S; Couet, W; Ebinger, G; Michotte, Y

    2002-02-01

    Fluoroquinolones are antibiotics with central excitatory side effects. These adverse effects presumably result from inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABA(A) receptors. This GABA antagonistic effect is greatly potentiated by the active metabolite of fenbufen, biphenylacetic acid (BPAA). Nevertheless, it remains questionable whether GABA receptor antagonism alone can explain the convulsant activity potentials of these antimicrobial agents. The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible effects of norfloxacin, both in the absence and in the presence of BPAA, on the extracellular hippocampal levels of GABA and glutamate, the main central inhibitory and excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters, respectively. This in vivo microdialysis approach with conscious rats allows monitoring of behavioral alterations and concomitant transmitter modulation in the hippocampus. Peroral administration of 100 mg of BPAA per kg of body weight had no effect on behavior and did not significantly alter extracellular GABA or glutamate concentrations. Intravenous perfusion of 300 mg of norfloxacin per kg did not change the rat's behavior or the concomitant neurotransmitter levels in about half of the experiments, while the remaining animals exhibited severe seizures. These norfloxacin-induced convulsions did not affect extracellular hippocampal GABA levels but were accompanied by enhanced glutamate concentrations. Half of the rats receiving both 100 mg of BPAA per kg and 50 mg of norfloxacin per kg displayed lethal seizures, while the remaining animals showed no seizure-related behavior. In the latter subgroup, again no significant alterations in extracellular GABA levels were observed, but glutamate overflow remained significantly elevated for at least 3 h. In conclusion, norfloxacin exerts convulsant activity in rats, accompanied by elevations of extracellular hippocampal glutamate levels but not GABA levels, even in the presence of BPAA. PMID:11796360

  10. Impaired peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma function through mutation of a conserved salt bridge (R425C) in familial partial lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Jeninga, Ellen H; van Beekum, Olivier; van Dijk, Aalt D J; Hamers, Nicole; Hendriks-Stegeman, Brenda I; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Berger, Ruud; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2007-05-01

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma plays a key role in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism in adipocytes by regulating their differentiation, maintenance, and function. A heterozygous mutation in the PPARG gene, which changes an arginine residue at position 425 into a cysteine (R425C), has been reported in a patient with familial partial lipodystrophy subtype 3 (FPLD3). The strong conservation of arginine 425 among nuclear receptors that heterodimerize with retinoic acid X receptor prompted us to investigate the functional consequences of the R425C mutation on PPARgamma function. Here we show that this mutant displayed strongly reduced transcriptional activity compared with wild-type PPARgamma, irrespective of cell type, promoter context, or ligand, whereas transrepression of nuclear factor-kappaB activity remained largely intact. Our data indicate that the reduced transcriptional activity of PPARgamma R425C is not caused by impaired corepressor release, but due to reduced dimerization with retinoic acid X receptor alpha in combination with reduced ligand binding and subsequent coactivator binding. As a consequence of these molecular defects, the R425C mutant was less effective in inducing adipocyte differentiation. PPARgamma R425C did not inhibit its wild-type counterpart in a dominant-negative manner, suggesting a haploinsufficiency mechanism in at least some FPLD3 patients. Using molecular dynamics simulations, substitution of R425 with cysteine is predicted to cause the formation of an alternative salt bridge. This structural change provides a likely explanation of how mutation of a single conserved residue in a patient with FPLD3 can disrupt the function of the adipogenic transcription factor PPARgamma on multiple levels. PMID:17312272

  11. Structure of the parathyroid hormone receptor C terminus bound to the G-protein dimer Gbeta1gamma2.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christopher A; Kimple, Adam J; Giguère, Patrick M; Siderovski, David P

    2008-07-01

    A critical role of the Gbetagamma dimer in heterotrimeric G-protein signaling is to facilitate the engagement and activation of the Galpha subunit by cell-surface G-protein-coupled receptors. However, high-resolution structural information of the connectivity between receptor and the Gbetagamma dimer has not previously been available. Here, we describe the structural determinants of Gbeta1gamma2 in complex with a C-terminal region of the parathyroid hormone receptor-1 (PTH1R) as obtained by X-ray crystallography. The structure reveals that several critical residues within PTH1R contact only Gbeta residues located within the outer edge of WD1- and WD7-repeat segments of the Gbeta toroid structure. These regions encompass a predicted membrane-facing region of Gbeta thought to be oriented in a fashion that is accessible to the membrane-spanning receptor. Mutation of key receptor contact residues on Gbeta1 leads to a selective loss of function in receptor/heterotrimer coupling while preserving Gbeta1gamma2 activation of the effector phospholipase-C beta. PMID:18611381

  12. Effect of gamma-linolenic acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramchurren, N.; Karmali, R.A. )

    1991-03-15

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and its sequential metabolite, dihomogamma-linolenic acid (DHLA) have been reported to influence growth of neoplastic cells in culture. The pure forms of these fatty acids have not been tested in vivo. The authors have studied the effect of GLA and DHLA on mammary tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a) anthracene (DMBA) (7.5 mg/rat) in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats received either 0.15 g of GLA or DHLA or corn oil (CO) orally, twice weekly for a period of 12 weeks. All three groups of rats were maintained on a diet containing 5% (w/w) corn oil as fat. Tumor incidence and multiplicity were recorded. The group receiving 0.15 g Co had higher tumor yields than those receiving GLA or DHLA. At the end of the experiment, tumor incidence was the lowest in the group receiving DHLA. Tumor multiplicity was consistently lowest with GLA. Fatty acid composition of mammary tissue and liver reflected that of fatty acid treatment. These results suggest that oral administration of GLA or DHLA retards the development of DMBA-induced mammary tumors in rats receiving a diet containing 5% (w/w) corn oil.

  13. Obeticholic acid, a synthetic bile acid agonist of the farnesoid X receptor, attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Peggy P.; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids are ligands for the nuclear hormone receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). The bile acid–FXR interaction regulates bile acid synthesis, transport, and cholesterol metabolism. Recently, bile acid–FXR regulation has been reported to play an integral role in both hepatic and intestinal inflammation, and in atherosclerosis. In this study, we found that FXR knockout mice had more disease severity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Obeticholic acid (6α-ethyl-chenodeoxycholic acid, 6-ECDCA), a synthetic FXR agonist, is an orally available drug that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as alcoholic hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and primary biliary cirrhosis. When we treated mice exhibiting established EAE with 6-ECDCA, or the natural FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), clinical disease was ameliorated by (i) suppressing lymphocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine production; (ii) reducing CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cell populations and their expression of negative checkpoint regulators programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1), programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA); (iii) increasing CD8+ T cells and PD1, PDl-1, and BTLA expression; and (iv) reducing VLA-4 expression in both the T- and B-cell populations. Moreover, adoptive transfer of 6-ECDCA– or CDCA-treated donor cells failed to transfer disease in naive recipients. Thus, we show that FXR functions as a negative regulator in neuroinflammation and we highlight that FXR agonists represent a potential previously unidentified therapy for MS. PMID:26811456

  14. [Current knowledge on gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) and 1 ,4-butanediol (1,4-BD)].

    PubMed

    Dematteis, Maurice; Pennel, Lucie; Mallaret, Michel

    2012-05-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an old anaesthetic drug which was misused in the 80-90's as an anabolic agent (bodybuilding), recreational drug (drunkenness, euphoric, disinhibiting and aphrodisiac effects) and as a date rape drug (disinhibiting, hypnotic and amnesic effects). Its use in the general population is low, and mainly concerns gay population in nightclubs and young people in parties. The intoxications, above all with alcohol combination, can be severe, with coma and breathing depression, or even fatal. Chronic use leads to psychic and physical dependence; withdrawal syndrome can be severe, with agitation and delirium. In 1999, GHB classification as a narcotic resulted in the increased use of GHB prodrugs gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) and 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BD), which were easily commercially available as solvent and cleaning products. Like GHB, they have a narrow window of use, and share similar toxicity. Their increased cases of recreational use and of severe drug intoxication, abuse and dependence, led the French Ministry of Health in 2011 to prohibit their sale and transfer to the public. PMID:22730800

  15. Monitoring of the interconversion of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) to gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Tasnim; Brewster, Victoria L; Edwards, Howell G M; Hargreaves, Michael D; Jilani, Shelina K; Scowen, Ian J

    2013-08-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a drug-of-abuse that has recently become associated with drug-facilitated sexual assault, known as date rape. For this reason the drug is commonly found 'spiked' in alcoholic beverages. When GHB is in solution it may undergo conversion into the corresponding lactone, Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL). Studies have been carried out to determine the detection limits of GHB and GBL in various solutions by Raman spectroscopy and to monitor the interconversion of GHB and GBL in solution with different pH conditions and temperature. In this study, a portable Raman spectrometer was used to study the interconversion of GHB and GBL in water and ethanol solutions as a function of pH, time, and temperature. The aim of this was to determine the optimum pH range for conversion in order to relate this to the pH ranges that the drug is likely to be subjected to, first in spiked beverages and secondly after ingestion in the digestive system. The aim was also to identify a timescale for this conversion in relation to possible scenarios, for example if GHB takes a number of hours to convert to GBL, it is likely for the beverage to be ingested before esterification can take place. GHB and GBL were then spiked into a selection of beverages of known pH in order to study the stability of GHB and GBL in real systems. PMID:23225646

  16. The presence of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) in alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Simon; Burgess, Victoria

    2005-07-16

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and its precursor gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) are regularly implicated in instances of surreptitious drug administration, particularly in beverages (so-called "spiked drinks"). In order to assist in the interpretation of cases where analysis of the actual beverage is required, over 50 beverages purchased in the UK were analysed for the presence of GHB and GBL. It was found that naturally occurring GHB and GBL were detected in those beverages involving the fermentation of white and particularly red grapes. No GHB or GBL was detected in other drinks such as beer, juice, spirits or liqueurs. GHB/GBL was detected in red wine vermouth (8.2 mg/L), sherry (9.7 mg/L), port (GBL), red wine (4.1-21.4 mg/L) and white wine (<3-9.6 mg/L). The presence of GHB/GBL did not appear to be influenced by the alcohol content or the pH of the beverage. In addition, the concentration in wines did not appear to be related to the geographical origin of the grape type. This is believed to be the first published data concerning the endogenous presence of GHB and GBL in the beverages described. PMID:15939164

  17. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate reduces mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation via GABA B receptor activation in mouse frontal cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiuhai; Mody, Istvan

    2003-10-24

    gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) naturally occurs in the brain, but its exogenous administration induces profound effects on the central nervous system in animals and humans. The intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying its actions remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of GHB on the activation (phosphorylation) of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAP kinases), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), were investigated. Acute administration of GHB (500 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) induced a fast and long lasting inhibition of MAP kinase phosphorylation in both frontal cortex and hippocampus. The reduced MAP kinase phosphorylation was observed in the CA1 and CA3 areas but not in the dentate gyrus. Pretreatment with the specific gamma-aminobutyric acid, type B (GABAB), receptor antagonist CGP56999A (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) prevented the action of GHB, and the effect of GHB was mimicked by baclofen, a selective GABAB receptor agonist, whereas the high affinity GHB receptor antagonist NCS-382 (200 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) had no effect on GHB-inhibited MAP kinase phosphorylation. Moreover, the GHB dehydrogenase inhibitor valproate (500 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), which inhibits the conversion of GHB into GABA, failed to block the effect of GHB on MAP kinase phosphorylation. Altogether, these data suggest that GHB, administered in vivo, reduces MAP kinase phosphorylation via a direct activation of GABAB receptors by GHB. In contrast, GHB (10 mm for 15 min) was found ineffective on MAP kinase phosphorylation in brain slices, indicating important differences in the conditions required for the second messenger activating action of GHB. PMID:12923192

  18. Crosstalk between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in human breast cancer cells: PPAR{gamma} binds to VDR and inhibits 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} mediated transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Alimirah, Fatouma; Peng, Xinjian; Yuan, Liang; Mehta, Rajeshwari R.; Knethen, Andreas von; Choubey, Divaker; Mehta, Rajendra G.

    2012-11-15

    Heterodimerization and cross-talk between nuclear hormone receptors often occurs. For example, estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) physically binds to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and inhibits its transcriptional activity. The interaction between PPAR{gamma} and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) however, is unknown. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms linking PPAR{gamma} and VDR signaling, and for the first time we show that PPAR{gamma} physically associates with VDR in human breast cancer cells. We found that overexpression of PPAR{gamma} decreased 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D{sub 3}) mediated transcriptional activity of the vitamin D target gene, CYP24A1, by 49% and the activity of VDRE-luc, a vitamin D responsive reporter, by 75% in T47D human breast cancer cells. Deletion mutation experiments illustrated that helices 1 and 4 of PPAR{gamma}'s hinge and ligand binding domains, respectively, governed this suppressive function. Additionally, abrogation of PPAR{gamma}'s AF2 domain attenuated its repressive action on 1,25D{sub 3} transactivation, indicating that this domain is integral in inhibiting VDR signaling. PPAR{gamma} was also found to compete with VDR for their binding partner retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR{alpha}). Overexpression of RXR{alpha} blocked PPAR{gamma}'s suppressive effect on 1,25D{sub 3} action, enhancing VDR signaling. In conclusion, these observations uncover molecular mechanisms connecting the PPAR{gamma} and VDR pathways. -- Highlights: PPAR{gamma}'s role on 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} transcriptional activity is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} physically binds to VDR and inhibits 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma}'s hinge and ligand binding domains are important for this inhibitory effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} competes with VDR for the availability of their binding partner, RXR{alpha}.

  19. Direct activation of GABAA receptors by substances in the organic acid fraction of Japanese sake.

    PubMed

    Izu, Hanae; Shigemori, Kensuke; Eguchi, Masaya; Kawane, Shuhei; Fujii, Shouko; Kitamura, Yuji; Aoshima, Hitoshi; Yamada, Yasue

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the effect of substances present in Japanese sake on the response of ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Sake was fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography. The fraction containing organic acids (OA fraction) showed agonist activities on the GABAA receptor. OA fractions from sake were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS). Of the 64 compounds identified, 13 compounds showed GABAA receptor agonist activities. Especially, l-lactic acid showed high agonist activity and its EC50 value was 37μM. Intraperitoneal injections of l-lactic acid, gluconic acid, and pyruvic acid (10, 10, and 5mg/kg BW, respectively), which showed agonistic activity on the GABAA receptor, led to significant anxiolytic effects during an elevated plus-maze test in mice. PMID:27507485

  20. Miniature and evoked inhibitory junctional currents and gamma-aminobutyric acid-activated current noise in locust muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Cull-Candy, S G

    1986-01-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) current noise and inhibitory junctional currents (i.j.c.s) have been examined to give properties of the GABA receptor and its associated synaptic channel. Various procedures were used to identify muscle bundles receiving inhibitory innervation. In normal bathing medium the decay time constant of the i.j.c. was tau i.j.c. = 7.6 +/- 0.7 ms (clamp potential, Vm = -80 mV; temperature, T = 21 degrees C). Most muscle fibres were sensitive to ionophoretically applied GABA, irrespective of the presence of inhibitory innervation. GABA current noise obtained at junctional sites gave spectra which were fitted usually with a single Lorentzian component, or occasionally with the sum of two Lorentzians. The conductance of the single inhibitory channel was, gamma (GABA) = 21.6 +/- 0.9 pS (Vm = -80 mV; T = 21 degrees C). The mean 'burst length' of the openings produced by a single receptor activation was tau noise = 4.0 +/- 0.8 ms, at Vm = -80 mV. This decreased exponentially with hyperpolarization. On average tau i.j.c. exceeded tau noise although good agreement was found in some fibres. I.j.c.s were examined in greater detail after excitatory synaptic receptors had been desensitized with 10(-3) M-L-glutamate to abolish all excitatory synaptic activity. Their decay time constant was tau i.j.c. = 7.2 +/- 0.4 ms, and their rise time was 3.3 +/- 0.12 ms, at Vm = -80 mV. An e-fold decrease in tau i.j.c. resulted from a 103 +/- 7.9 mV hyperpolarization; time to peak showed a smaller dependence on Vm. The mean size of the inhibitory quantal event (i.e. response to a single transmitter packet) was estimated from fluctuations in i.j.c. amplitude. Mean quantal content of the i.j.c. was about 30 at normal levels of release. Mean amplitude of the directly measured miniature i.j.c. = 0.65 +/- 0.08 nA at Vm = -80 mV (V eq approximately equal to -40 mV). The amplitude of the quantal event showed a non-linear dependence on Vm. The burst length of the inhibitory

  1. Farnesoid X receptor, the bile acid sensing nuclear receptor, in liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guodong; L. Guo, Grace

    2015-01-01

    The liver is unique in regenerative potential, which could recover the lost mass and function after injury from ischemia and resection. The underlying molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration have been extensively studied in the past using the partial hepatectomy (PH) model in rodents, where 2/3 PH is carried out by removing two lobes. The whole process of liver regeneration is complicated, orchestrated event involving a network of connected interactions, which still remain fully elusive. Bile acids (BAs) are ligands of farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor of ligand-activated transcription factor. FXR has been shown to be highly involved in liver regeneration. BAs and FXR not only interact with each other but also regulate various downstream targets independently during liver regeneration. Moreover, recent findings suggest that tissue-specific FXR also contributes to liver regeneration significantly. These novel findings suggest that FXR has much broader role than regulating BA, cholesterol, lipid and glucose metabolism. Therefore, these researches highlight FXR as an important pharmaceutical target for potential use of FXR ligands to regulate liver regeneration in clinic. This review focuses on the roles of BAs and FXR in liver regeneration and the current underlying molecular mechanisms which contribute to liver regeneration. PMID:26579433

  2. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) Receptor 5 Inhibits B Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling and Antibody Response1

    PubMed Central

    Shotts, Kristin; Donovan, Erin E.; Strauch, Pamela; Pujanauski, Lindsey M.; Victorino, Francisco; Al-Shami, Amin; Fujiwara, Yuko; Tigyi, Gabor; Oravecz, Tamas; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids have emerged as biologically important chemoattractants capable of directing lymphocyte development, trafficking and localization. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a major lysophospholipid found systemically and whose levels are elevated in certain pathological settings such as cancer and infections. Here, we demonstrate that BCR signal transduction by mature murine B cells is inhibited upon LPA engagement of the LPA5 (GPR92) receptor via a Gα12/13 – Arhgef1 pathway. The inhibition of BCR signaling by LPA5 manifests by impaired intracellular calcium store release and most likely by interfering with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activity. We further show that LPA5 also limits antigen-specific induction of CD69 and CD86 expression and that LPA5-deficient B cells display enhanced antibody responses. Thus, these data show that LPA5 negatively regulates BCR signaling, B cell activation and immune response. Our findings extend the influence of lysophospholipids on immune function and suggest that alterations in LPA levels likely influence adaptive humoral immunity. PMID:24890721

  3. Synthesis of theanine from glutamic acid gamma-methyl ester and ethylamine catalyzed by Escherichia coli having gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Zheng, Qing-Zhong; Jiao, Qing-Cai; Liu, Jun-Zhong; Zhao, Gen-Hai

    2010-08-01

    Glutamic acid gamma-methyl ester (GAME) was used as substrate for theanine synthesis catalyzed by Escherichia coli cells possessing gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity. The yield was about 1.2-fold higher than with glutamine as substrate. The reaction was optimal at pH 10 and 45 degrees C, and the optimal substrate ratio of GAME to ethylamine was 1:10 (mol/mol). With GAME at 100 mmol, 95 mmol theanine was obtained after 8 h. PMID:20383735

  4. A novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha/gamma agonist, BPR1H0101, inhibits topoisomerase II catalytic activity in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yu-Hsun; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang; Chitlimalla, Santhosh Kumar; Pan, Wen-Yu; Kuo, Ching-Chuan; Tsai, Yuan-Chin; Lin, Wen-Hsing; Chuang, Shuang-En; Chang, Jang-Yang

    2008-02-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists are used clinically for treating diabetes mellitus and cancer. 2-Methyl-2[(1-{3-phenyl-7-propylbenzol[d]isoxazol-6-yl}oxy)propyl]-1H-4-indolyl) oxy]propanoic acid (BPR1H0101) is a novel synthetic indole-based compound, discovered through research to identify new PPARgamma agonists, and it acts as a dual agonist for PPARgamma and PPARalpha. Isobologram analysis demonstrated that BPR1H0101 is capable of antagonistic interaction with the topoisomerase (topo) II poison, VP16. A study of its mechanism showed that BPR1H0101 could inhibit the catalytic activity of topo II in vitro, but did not produce detectable topo II-mediated DNA strand breaks in human oral cancer KB cells. Furthermore, BPR1H0101 could inhibit VP16-induced topo II-mediated DNA cleavage and ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated phosphorylation in KB cells. The results suggest that BPR1H0101 can interfere with the topo II reaction by inhibiting catalytic activity before the formation of the intermediate cleavable complex; consequently, it can impede VP16-induced topo II-mediated DNA cleavage and cell death. This is the first identified PPARalpha/gamma agonist that can serve as a topo II catalytic inhibitor, to interfere with VP16-induced cell death. The result might have relevance to the clinical use of the PPARalpha/gamma agonist in combination chemotherapy. PMID:18176111

  5. Antioxidant activities of fucoidan degraded by gamma irradiation and acidic hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sangyong; Choi, Jong-il; Park, Hyun

    2015-04-01

    Low molecular weight fucoidan, prepared by radical degradation using gamma ray was investigated for its antioxidant activities with different assay methods. As the molecular weight of fucoidan decreased with a higher absorbed dose, ferric-reducing antioxidant power values increased, but β-carotene bleaching inhibition did not change significantly. The antioxidant activity of acid-degraded fucoidan was also examined to investigate the effect of different degradation methods. At the same molecular weight, fucoidan degraded by gamma irradiation showed higher 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity than that observed with the acidic method. This result reveals that in addition to molecular weight, the degradation method affects the antioxidant activity of fucoidan.

  6. Natural product agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ): a review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limei; Waltenberger, Birgit; Pferschy-Wenzig, Eva-Maria; Blunder, Martina; Liu, Xin; Malainer, Clemens; Blazevic, Tina; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Heiss, Elke H.; Schuster, Daniela; Kopp, Brigitte; Bauer, Rudolf; Stuppner, Hermann; Dirsch, Verena M.; Atanasov, Atanas G.

    2014-01-01

    Agonists of the nuclear receptor PPARγ are therapeutically used to combat hyperglycaemia associated with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. In spite of being effective in normalization of blood glucose levels, the currently used PPARγ agonists from the thiazolidinedione type have serious side effects, making the discovery of novel ligands highly relevant. Natural products have proven historically to be a promising pool of structures for drug discovery, and a significant research effort has recently been undertaken to explore the PPARγ-activating potential of a wide range of natural products originating from traditionally used medicinal plants or dietary sources. The majority of identified compounds are selective PPARγ modulators (SPPARMs), transactivating the expression of PPARγ-dependent reporter genes as partial agonists. Those natural PPARγ ligands have different binding modes to the receptor in comparison to the full thiazolidinedione agonists, and on some occasions activate in addition PPARα (e.g. genistein, biochanin A, sargaquinoic acid, sargahydroquinoic acid, resveratrol, amorphastilbol) or the PPARγ-dimer partner retinoid X receptor (RXR; e.g. the neolignans magnolol and honokiol). A number of in vivo studies suggest that some of the natural product activators of PPARγ (e.g. honokiol, amorfrutin 1, amorfrutin B, amorphastilbol) improve metabolic parameters in diabetic animal models, partly with reduced side effects in comparison to full thiazolidinedione agonists. The bioactivity pattern as well as the dietary use of several of the identified active compounds and plant extracts warrants future research regarding their therapeutic potential and the possibility to modulate PPARγ activation by dietary interventions or food supplements. PMID:25083916

  7. Dopamine, cognitive function, and gamma oscillations: role of D4 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Furth, Katrina E.; Mastwal, Surjeet; Wang, Kuan H.; Buonanno, Andres; Vullhorst, Detlef

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in individuals with schizophrenia (SCZ) are considered core symptoms of this disorder, and can manifest at the prodromal stage. Antipsychotics ameliorate positive symptoms but only modestly improve cognitive symptoms. The lack of treatments that improve cognitive abilities currently represents a major obstacle in developing more effective therapeutic strategies for this debilitating disorder. While D4 receptor (D4R)-specific antagonists are ineffective in the treatment of positive symptoms, animal studies suggest that D4R drugs can improve cognitive deficits. Moreover, recent work from our group suggests that D4Rs synergize with the neuregulin/ErbB4 signaling pathway, genetically identified as risk factors for SCZ, in parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons to modulate gamma oscillations. These high-frequency network oscillations correlate with attention and increase during cognitive tasks in healthy subjects, and this correlation is attenuated in affected individuals. This finding, along with other observations indicating impaired GABAergic function, has led to the idea that abnormal neural activity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in individuals with SCZ reflects a perturbation in the balance of excitation and inhibition. Here we review the current state of knowledge of D4R functions in the PFC and hippocampus, two major brain areas implicated in SCZ. Special emphasis is given to studies focusing on the potential role of D4Rs in modulating GABAergic transmission and to an emerging concept of a close synergistic relationship between dopamine/D4R and neuregulin/ErbB4 signaling pathways that tunes the activity of PV interneurons to regulate gamma frequency network oscillations and potentially cognitive processes. PMID:23847468

  8. The GTPase-activating protein of Ras suppresses platelet-derived growth factor beta receptor signaling by silencing phospholipase C-gamma 1.

    PubMed Central

    Valius, M; Secrist, J P; Kazlauskas, A

    1995-01-01

    The beta receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (beta PDGFR) is activated by binding of PDGF and undergoes phosphorylation at multiple tyrosine residues. The tyrosine-phosphorylated receptor associates with numerous SH2-domain-containing proteins which include phospholipase C-gamma 1 (PLC gamma), the GTPase-activating protein of Ras (GAP), the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), the phosphotyrosine phosphatase Syp, and several other proteins. Our previous studies indicated that PI3K and PLC gamma were required for relay of the mitogenic signal of beta PDGFR, whereas GAP and Syp did not appear to be required for this response. In this study, we further investigated the role of GAP and Syp in mitogenic signaling by beta PDGFR. Focusing on the PLC gamma-dependent branch of beta PDGFR signaling, we constructed a series of mutant beta PDGFRs that contained the binding sites for pairs of the receptor-associated proteins: PLC gamma and PI3K, PLC gamma and GAP, or PLC gamma and Syp. Characterization of these mutants showed that while all receptors were catalytically active and bound similar amounts of PLC gamma, they differed dramatically in their ability to initiate DNA synthesis. This signaling deficiency related to an inability to efficiently tyrosine phosphorylate and activate PLC gamma. Surprisingly, the crippled receptor was the one that recruited PLC gamma and GAP. Thus, GAP functions to suppress signal relay by the beta PDGFR, and it does so by silencing PLC gamma. These findings demonstrate that the biological response to PDGF depends not only on the ability of the beta PDGFR to recruit signal relay enzymes but also on the blend of these receptor-associated proteins. PMID:7760802

  9. Fatty acid profile of gamma-irradiated and cooked African oil bean seed (Pentaclethra macrophylla Benth).

    PubMed

    Olotu, Ifeoluwa; Enujiugha, Victor; Obadina, Adewale; Owolabi, Kikelomo

    2014-11-01

    The safety and shelf-life of food products can be, respectively, ensured and extended with important food-processing technologies such as irradiation. The joint effect of cooking and 10 kGy gamma irradiation on the fatty acid composition of the oil of Pentaclethra macrophylla Benth was evaluated. Oils from the raw seed, cooked seeds, irradiated seeds (10 kGy), cooked, and irradiated seeds (10 kGy) were extracted and analyzed for their fatty acid content. An omega-6-fatty acid (linoleic acid) was the principal unsaturated fatty acid in the bean seed oil (24.6%). Cooking significantly (P < 0.05) increased Erucic acid by 3.3% and Linolenic acid by 23.0%. Combined treatment significantly (P < 0.05) increased C18:2, C6:0, C20:2, C18:3, C20:3, C24:0, and C22:6 being linoleic, caproic, eicosadienoic, linolenic, eicosatrienoic, ligoceric, and docosahexaenoic acid, respectively, and this increase made the oil sample to have the highest total fatty acid content (154.9%), unsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratio (109.6), and unsaturated fatty acid content (153.9%). 10 kGy irradiation induces the formation of C20:5 (eicosapentaenoic), while cooking induced the formation of C20:4 (arachidic acid), C22:6 (Heneicosanoic acid), and C22:2 (docosadienoic acid). Combined 10 kGy cooking and irradiation increased the susceptibility of the oil of the African oil bean to rancidity. PMID:25493197

  10. [The changes of expression and Fc-gamma-receptor's polypeptide composition of fetal small intestine enterocytes in Bos primigenius taurus L].

    PubMed

    Masiuk, D M; Nedzvets'kyĭ, V S; Tsvilikhovs'kyĭ, M I; Nerush, P O

    2008-01-01

    The expression and polypeptide composition of Fc-gamma-receptors of enterocytes from Bos primigenius taurus L. intestine at 3-, 5-, 7-, 9- month of fetal development was investigated. The results of immunobloting show similar composition of Fc-gamma-receptors extracted from apical and basolateral membranes. The proteins that bind IgG after PAAG electrophoresis and transferring on nitrocellulose were observed as 120, 87, 72 and 43 kDa polypeptide line. The changes of each polypeptide contents were related to the changes of total content of Fc-gamma-receptor proteins. The rise in concentration of Fc-gamma-receptors on apical membrane was observed from 3-rd to 7-th month of fetal development. Maximal concentration of these proteins was detected on enterocytes at 7-th month of fetal development. Fc-gamma-receptors content on basolateral side was higher than on apical side. The presence of Fc-gamma-receptors on enterocyte's membrane indicates on active recycling of these receptors on plasma membrane and reflects early development of immune system in Bos primigenius taurus L. fetus. PMID:18416181

  11. Amino acid conjugates of lithocholic acid as antagonists of the EphA2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Incerti, Matteo; Tognolini, Massimiliano; Russo, Simonetta; Pala, Daniele; Giorgio, Carmine; Hassan-Mohamed, Iftiin; Noberini, Roberta; Pasquale, Elena B.; Vicini, Paola; Piersanti, Silvia; Rivara, Silvia; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Mor, Marco; Lodola, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    The Eph receptor–ephrin system is an emerging target for the development of novel antiangiogenetic agents. We recently identified lithocholic acid (LCA) as a small molecule able to block EphA2-dependent signals in cancer cells, suggesting that its (5β)-cholan-24-oic acid scaffold can be used as a template to design a new generation of improved EphA2 antagonists. Here, we report the design and synthesis of an extended set of LCA derivatives obtained by conjugation of its carboxyl group with different α-amino acids. Structure-activity relationships indicate that the presence of a lipophilic amino acid side chain is fundamental to achieve good potencies. The L-Trp derivative (20, PCM126) was the most potent antagonist of the series disrupting EphA2-ephrinA1 interaction and blocking EphA2 phosphorylation in prostate cancer cells at low μM concentrations, thus being significantly more potent than LCA. Compound 20 is among the most potent small molecule antagonists of the EphA2 receptor. PMID:23489211

  12. Characterization of DNA Binding and Retinoic Acid Binding Properties of Retinoic Acid Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Na; Schule, Roland; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Evans, Ronald M.

    1991-05-01

    High-level expression of the full-length human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) α and the DNA binding domain of the RAR in Escherichia coli was achieved by using a T7 RNA polymerase-directed expression system. After induction, full-length RAR protein was produced at an estimated level of 20% of the total bacterial proteins. Both intact RAR molecules and the DNA binding domain bind to the cognate DNA response element with high specificity in the absence of retinoic acid. However, this binding is enhanced to a great extent upon the addition of eukaryotic cell extracts. The factor responsible for this enhancement is heat-sensitive and forms a complex with RAR that binds to DNA and exhibits a distinct migration pattern in the gel-mobility-shift assay. The interaction site of the factor with RAR is localized in the 70-amino acid DNA binding region of RAR. The hormone binding ability of the RARα protein was assayed by a charcoal absorption assay and the RAR protein was found to bind to retinoic acid with a K_d of 2.1 x 10-10 M.

  13. Evaluation of High-Throughput Genomic Assays for the Fc Gamma Receptor Locus.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Chantal E; Iriyama, Chisako; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J J; Nagelkerke, Sietse Q; Hussain, Khiyam; Ganderton, Rosalind; Lee, Charlotte; Machado, Lee R; Hollox, Edward J; Parker, Helen; Latham, Kate V; Kuijpers, Taco W; Potter, Kathleen N; Coupland, Sarah E; Davies, Andrew; Stackpole, Michael; Oates, Melanie; Pettitt, Andrew R; Glennie, Martin J; Cragg, Mark S; Strefford, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has been revolutionised by the use monoclonal antibodies (mAb) that function through their interaction with Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs). The low-affinity FcγR genes are highly homologous, map to a complex locus at 1p23 and harbour single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number variation (CNV) that can impact on receptor function and response to therapeutic mAbs. This complexity can hinder accurate characterisation of the locus. We therefore evaluated and optimised a suite of assays for the genomic analysis of the FcγR locus amenable to peripheral blood mononuclear cells and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material that can be employed in a high-throughput manner. Assessment of TaqMan genotyping for FCGR2A-131H/R, FCGR3A-158F/V and FCGR2B-232I/T SNPs demonstrated the need for additional methods to discriminate genotypes for the FCGR3A-158F/V and FCGR2B-232I/T SNPs due to sequence homology and CNV in the region. A multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay provided high quality SNP and CNV data in PBMC cases, but there was greater data variability in FFPE material in a manner that was predicted by the BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR protocol. In conclusion, we have evaluated a suite of assays for the genomic analysis of the FcγR locus that are scalable for application in large clinical trials of mAb therapy. These assays will ultimately help establish the importance of FcγR genetics in predicting response to antibody therapeutics. PMID:26545243

  14. Evaluation of High-Throughput Genomic Assays for the Fc Gamma Receptor Locus

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Chantal E.; Iriyama, Chisako; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J. J.; Nagelkerke, Sietse Q.; Hussain, Khiyam; Ganderton, Rosalind; Lee, Charlotte; Machado, Lee R.; Hollox, Edward J.; Parker, Helen; Latham, Kate V.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Potter, Kathleen N.; Coupland, Sarah E.; Davies, Andrew; Stackpole, Michael; Oates, Melanie; Pettitt, Andrew R.; Glennie, Martin J.; Cragg, Mark S.; Strefford, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has been revolutionised by the use monoclonal antibodies (mAb) that function through their interaction with Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs). The low-affinity FcγR genes are highly homologous, map to a complex locus at 1p23 and harbour single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number variation (CNV) that can impact on receptor function and response to therapeutic mAbs. This complexity can hinder accurate characterisation of the locus. We therefore evaluated and optimised a suite of assays for the genomic analysis of the FcγR locus amenable to peripheral blood mononuclear cells and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material that can be employed in a high-throughput manner. Assessment of TaqMan genotyping for FCGR2A-131H/R, FCGR3A-158F/V and FCGR2B-232I/T SNPs demonstrated the need for additional methods to discriminate genotypes for the FCGR3A-158F/V and FCGR2B-232I/T SNPs due to sequence homology and CNV in the region. A multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay provided high quality SNP and CNV data in PBMC cases, but there was greater data variability in FFPE material in a manner that was predicted by the BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR protocol. In conclusion, we have evaluated a suite of assays for the genomic analysis of the FcγR locus that are scalable for application in large clinical trials of mAb therapy. These assays will ultimately help establish the importance of FcγR genetics in predicting response to antibody therapeutics. PMID:26545243

  15. Polymorphic AAAG repeat length in estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) and risk of breast cancer in Iranian women.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Padideh; Hematti, Simin; Safari, Foruzan; Tavassoli, Manoochehr

    2013-11-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) alpha, beta, and gamma are orphan nuclear receptors that modulate the estrogen signaling pathway and play roles in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. To determine the association between breast cancer risk and alleles of the tetranucleotide repeat (AAAG)n in the intron of ERRγ gene, a case-control study of 200 breast cancer patients and 200 controls was performed in Iranian women. Our results demonstrate that women with short AAAG repeat are at higher risk of breast cancer (OR 7). This result suggests a possible involvement of polymorphic AAAG repeat of ERRγ gene in regulating its expression. PMID:24125170

  16. Structural basis and functions of abscisic acid receptors PYLs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing L.; Jiang, Lun; Xin, Qi; Liu, Yang; Tan, Jian X.; Chen, Zhong Z.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a key role in many developmental processes and responses to adaptive stresses in plants. Recently, a new family of nucleocytoplasmic PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYLs) has been identified as bona fide ABA receptors. PYLs together with protein phosphatases type-2C (PP2Cs), Snf1 (Sucrose-non-fermentation 1)-related kinases subfamily 2 (SnRK2s) and downstream substrates constitute the core ABA signaling network. Generally, PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s kinases by physical interaction and direct dephosphorylation. Upon ABA binding, PYLs change their conformations and then contact and inhibit PP2Cs, thus activating SnRK2s. Here, we reviewed the recent progress in research regarding the structures of the core signaling pathways of ABA, including the (+)-ABA, (−)-ABA and ABA analogs pyrabactin as well as 6AS perception by PYLs, SnRK2s mimicking PYLs in binding PP2Cs. PYLs inhibited PP2Cs in both the presence and absence of ABA and activated SnRK2s. The present review elucidates multiple ABA signal perception and transduction by PYLs, which might shed light on how to design small chemical compounds for improving plant performance in the future. PMID:25745428

  17. Constitutive Smad signaling and Smad-dependent collagen gene expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Asish K Wei, Jun; Wu, Minghua; Varga, John

    2008-09-19

    Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}), a potent inducer of collagen synthesis, is implicated in pathological fibrosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}) is a nuclear hormone receptor that regulates adipogenesis and numerous other biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that collagen gene expression was markedly elevated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking PPAR-{gamma} compared to heterozygous control MEFs. Treatment with the PPAR-{gamma} ligand 15d-PGJ{sub 2} failed to down-regulate collagen gene expression in PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs, whereas reconstitution of these cells with ectopic PPAR-{gamma} resulted in their normalization. Compared to control MEFs, PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs displayed elevated levels of the Type I TGF-{beta} receptor (T{beta}RI), and secreted more TGF-{beta}1 into the media. Furthermore, PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs showed constitutive phosphorylation of cellular Smad2 and Smad3, even in the absence of exogenous TGF-{beta}, which was abrogated by the ALK5 inhibitor SB431542. Constitutive Smad2/3 phosphorylation in PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs was associated with Smad3 binding to its cognate DNA recognition sequences, and interaction with coactivator p300 previously implicated in TGF-{beta} responses. Taken together, these results indicate that loss of PPAR-{gamma} in MEFs is associated with upregulation of collagen synthesis, and activation of intracellular Smad signal transduction, due, at least in part, to autocrine TGF-{beta} stimulation.

  18. Action of Natural Abscisic Acid Precursors and Catabolites on Abscisic Acid Receptor Complexes1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kepka, Michal; Benson, Chantel L.; Gonugunta, Vijay K.; Nelson, Ken M.; Christmann, Alexander; Grill, Erwin; Abrams, Suzanne R.

    2011-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates stress responses and controls numerous aspects of plant growth and development. Biosynthetic precursors and catabolites of ABA have been shown to trigger ABA responses in physiological assays, but it is not clear whether these are intrinsically active or whether they are converted into ABA in planta. In this study, we analyzed the effect of ABA precursors, conjugates, and catabolites on hormone signaling in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The compounds were also tested in vitro for their ability to regulate the phosphatase moiety of ABA receptor complexes consisting of the protein phosphatase 2C ABI2 and the coreceptors RCAR1/PYL9, RCAR3/PYL8, and RCAR11/PYR1. Using mutants defective in ABA biosynthesis, we show that the physiological activity associated with ABA precursors derives predominantly from their bioconversion to ABA. The ABA glucose ester conjugate, which is the most widespread storage form of ABA, showed weak ABA-like activity in germination assays and in triggering ABA signaling in protoplasts. The ABA conjugate and precursors showed negligible activity as a regulatory ligand of the ABI2/RCAR receptor complexes. The majority of ABA catabolites were inactive in our assays. To analyze the chemically unstable 8′- and 9′-hydroxylated ABA catabolites, we used stable tetralone derivatives of these compounds, which did trigger selective ABA responses. ABA synthetic analogs exhibited differential activity as regulatory ligands of different ABA receptor complexes in vitro. The data show that ABA precursors, catabolites, and conjugates have limited intrinsic bioactivity and that both natural and synthetic ABA-related compounds can be used to probe the structural requirements of ABA ligand-receptor interactions. PMID:21976481

  19. Induction of human adiponectin gene transcription by telmisartan, angiotensin receptor blocker, independently on PPAR-{gamma} activation

    SciTech Connect

    Moriuchi, Akie ||. E-mail: f1195@cc.nagasaki-u-ac.jp; Shimamura, Mika; Kita, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Hironaga; Satoh, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Tsuyoshi; Fujishima, Keiichiro; Fukushima, Keiko |; Hayakawa, Takao; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Nagayama, Yuji; Kawasaki, Eiji

    2007-05-18

    Adiponectin, an adipose tissue-specific plasma protein, has been shown to ameliorate insulin resistance and inhibit the process of atherosclerosis. Recently, several reports have stated that angiotensin type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), increase adiponectin plasma level, and ameliorate insulin resistance. Telmisartan, a subclass of ARBs, has been shown to be a partial agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{gamma}, and to increase the plasma adiponectin level. However, the transcriptional regulation of the human adiponectin gene by telmisartan has not been determined yet. To elucidate the effect of telmisartan on adiponectin, the stimulatory regulation of human adiponectin gene by telmisartan was investigated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, utilizing adenovirus-mediated luciferase reporter gene-transferring technique. This study indicates that telmisartan may stimulate adiponectin transcription independent of PPAR-{gamma}.

  20. Interaction of mechanisms involving epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, adenosine receptors, and metabotropic glutamate receptors in neurovascular coupling in rat whisker barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanrong; Liu, Xiaoguang; Gebremedhin, Debebe; Falck, John R; Harder, David R; Koehler, Raymond C

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine, astrocyte metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) have been implicated in neurovascular coupling. Although A2A and A2B receptors mediate cerebral vasodilation to adenosine, the role of each receptor in the cerebral blood flow (CBF) response to neural activation remains to be fully elucidated. In addition, adenosine can amplify astrocyte calcium, which may increase arachidonic acid metabolites such as EETs. The interaction of these pathways was investigated by determining if combined treatment with antagonists exerted an additive inhibitory effect on the CBF response. During whisker stimulation of anesthetized rats, the increase in cortical CBF was reduced by approximately half after individual administration of A2B, mGluR and EET antagonists and EET synthesis inhibitors. Combining treatment of either a mGluR antagonist, an EET antagonist, or an EET synthesis inhibitor with an A2B receptor antagonist did not produce an additional decrement in the CBF response. Likewise, the CBF response also remained reduced by ~50% when an EET antagonist was combined with an mGluR antagonist or an mGluR antagonist plus an A2B receptor antagonist. In contrast, A2A and A3 receptor antagonists had no effect on the CBF response to whisker stimulation. We conclude that (1) adenosine A2B receptors, rather than A2A or A3 receptors, play a significant role in coupling cortical CBF to neuronal activity, and (2) the adenosine A2B receptor, mGluR, and EETs signaling pathways are not functionally additive, consistent with the possibility of astrocytic mGluR and adenosine A2B receptor linkage to the synthesis and release of vasodilatory EETs. PMID:17519974

  1. Reduction in Dietary Omega-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Eicosapentaenoic Acid plus Docosahexaenoic Acid Ratio Minimizes Atherosclerotic Lesion Formation and Inflammatory Response in the LDL Receptor Null Mouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary very long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been associated with reduced CVD risk. LDL receptor null mice (LDLr-/-) were used to assess different dietary ratios of omega-6 PUFA to eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid (omega-6:EPA+DHA) on atherogenesis and infl...

  2. Letter: Iatrogenic lipomatosis: a rare manifestation of treatment with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist.

    PubMed

    Femia, Alisa; Klein, Peter A

    2010-01-01

    Lipomas are common benign neoplasms of adipose tissue. Lipomatosis, the progressive appearance of multiple lipomas, is most often associated with specific congenital, familial, or idiopathic syndromes. In one reported case, the development of multiple lipomas occurred as a result of treatment with rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonist. We report a second case of lipomatosis occurring as a result of treatment with a PPAR gamma agonist. This case occurred in a 77-year-old woman who developed multiple lipomas two years after beginning treatment with pioglitazone, a PPAR gamma agonist. Histopathologic examination confirmed these lesions to be lipomas. Within four weeks of discontinuation of pioglitazone, regression of the lipomas began. We describe a case of PPAR agonist-induced lipoma formation, review relevant literature, and provide a molecular mechanism for this side effect. PMID:20409422

  3. Hrs recognizes a hydrophobic amino acid cluster in cytokine receptors during ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting.

    PubMed

    Amano, Yuji; Yamashita, Yuki; Kojima, Katsuhiko; Yoshino, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Takeshita, Toshikazu

    2011-04-29

    Hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a component of the ESCRT-0 protein complex that captures ubiquitylated cargo proteins and sorts them to the lysosomal pathway. Although Hrs acts as a key transporter for ubiquitin-dependent endosomal sorting, we previously reported that Hrs is also involved in ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting of interleukin-2 receptor β (IL-2Rβ). Here, we show direct interactions between bacterially expressed Hrs and interleukin-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα), indicating that their binding is not required for ubiquitylation of the receptors, similar to the case for IL-2Rβ. Examinations of the Hrs binding regions of the receptors reveal that a hydrophobic amino acid cluster in both IL-2Rβ and IL-4Rα is essential for the binding. Whereas the wild-type receptors are delivered to LAMP1-positive late endosomes, mutant receptors lacking the hydrophobic amino acid cluster are sorted to lysobisphosphatidic acid-positive late endosomes rather than LAMP1-positive late endosomes. We also show that the degradation of these mutant receptors is attenuated. Accordingly, Hrs functions during ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting of the receptors by recognizing the hydrophobic amino acid cluster. These findings suggest the existence of a group of cargo proteins that have this hydrophobic amino acid cluster as a ubiquitin-independent sorting signal. PMID:21362618

  4. Identification of novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) agonists using molecular modeling method.

    PubMed

    Gee, Veronica M W; Wong, Fiona S L; Ramachandran, Lalitha; Sethi, Gautam; Kumar, Alan Prem; Yap, Chun Wei

    2014-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) plays a critical role in lipid and glucose homeostasis. It is the target of many drug discovery studies, because of its role in various disease states including diabetes and cancer. Thiazolidinediones, a synthetic class of agents that work by activation of PPARγ, have been used extensively as insulin-sensitizers for the management of type 2 diabetes. In this study, a combination of QSAR and docking methods were utilised to perform virtual screening of more than 25 million compounds in the ZINC library. The QSAR model was developed using 1,517 compounds and it identified 42,378 potential PPARγ agonists from the ZINC library, and 10,000 of these were selected for docking with PPARγ based on their diversity. Several steps were used to refine the docking results, and finally 30 potentially highly active ligands were identified. Four compounds were subsequently tested for their in vitro activity, and one compound was found to have a K i values of <5 μM. PMID:25168706

  5. Sequence and diversity of rabbit T-cell receptor gamma chain genes

    SciTech Connect

    Isono, T.; Kim, C.J.; Seto, A.

    1995-03-01

    The nucleotide sequences of one constant (C), six variable (V), and two joining (J) gene segments coding for the rabbit T-cell receptor gamma chain (Tcrg) were determined by directly sequencing fragments amplified by the cassette-ligation mediated polymerase chain reaction. The Tcrg-C gene segment did not encode a cysteine residue for connection to the Tcr delta chain in the connecting region, and two variant forms of the Tcrg-C gene segment were generated by alternative splicing, like the human Tcrg-C2 gene. Five of six rabbit Tcrg-V gene segments belonged to the same family and displayed similarity to five productive human Tcrg-V1 family genes as well as the mouse Tcrg-V5 gene. The remaining rabbit Tcrg-V gene segment displayed similarity to the human Tcrg-V3 gene. Both rabbit Tcrg-J gene segments displayed similarity to the human Tcrg-J2.1 and 2.3, respectively. These findings suggested that the genomic organization of rabbit Tcrg genes is more similar to that of human than of mouse Tcrg genes. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Nifedipine inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction-mediated proximal tubular cell injury via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Takanori; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}. {yields} GW9662 treatment alone increased RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. {yields} Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-{kappa}B activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-{beta} gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. -- Abstract: There is a growing body of evidence that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction evokes oxidative stress generation and subsequently elicits inflammatory and fibrogenic reactions, thereby contributing to the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. We have previously found that nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker (CCB), inhibits the AGE-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. However, effects of nifedipine on proximal tubular cell injury remain unknown. We examined here whether and how nifedipine blocked the AGE-induced tubular cell damage. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}). GW9662 treatment alone was found to increase RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. Further, nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-{kappa}B activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-beta gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory agent against AGEs in tubular cells by suppressing RAGE expression

  7. Amino acid receptors mediate calcium permeability in synaptosomes from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pastuszko, A.; Wilson, D.F.

    1986-05-01

    Selected acidic amino acids and amino acid analogues were shown to increase the Ca/sup 2 +/ permeability of the plasma membrane of synaptosomes isolated from rat brain. Increased synaptosomal Ca/sup 2 +/ content was measured by uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Increased intrasynaptosomal free calcium was measured by the fluorescent calcium indicators indo 1 and quin 2. The increase in calcium permeability was maximal within 0.5 seconds (the limit of resolution of the methods used). The calcium permeability system(s) being modulated by the receptors appears to be Ca/sup 2 +/ channels but has properties different from the voltage dependent Ca/sup 2 +/ channels. Four different types of receptors have been observed; a kainate receptor antagonized by quisqualate, an L-cysteine sulfinate receptor, a 2-amino-2-phosphono-valerate receptor and an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. Each type of receptor is highly specific in ligand binding and none were activated or antagonized by aspartate or glutamate at concentrations up to 10 mM. Currently available data indicate substantial differences in ligand specificity between these presynaptic receptors and the postsynaptic receptors which have been classified by electrophysiological and radio-ligand binding studies. The neurotoxicity of kainate, L-cysteine sulfinate and N-methyl-D-aspartate may be due in part to metabolic and electrophysiological disturbances resulting from increased calcium in neurons having these receptors.

  8. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and PPAR gamma coactivator (PGC-1α) induce carnitine palmitoyltransferase IA (CPT-1A) via independent gene elements

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shulan; Attia, Ramy R.; Connaughton, Sara; Niesen, Melissa I.; Ness, Gene C.; Elam, Marshall B.; Hori, Roderick T.; Cook, George A.; Park, Edwards A.

    2010-01-01

    Long chain fatty acids and pharmacologic ligands for the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) activate expression of genes involved in fatty acid and glucose oxidation including carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT-1A) and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4). CPT-1A catalyzes the transfer of long chain fatty acids from acyl-CoA to carnitine for translocation across the mitochondrial membranes and is an initiating step in the mitochondrial oxidation of long chain fatty acids. PDK4 phosphorylates and inhibits the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) which catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in the glucose oxidation pathway. The activity of CPT-1A is modulated both by transcriptional changes as well as by malonyl-CoA inhibition. In the liver, CPT-1A and PDK4 gene expression are induced by starvation, high fat diets and PPARα ligands. Here, we characterized a binding site for PPARα in the second intron of the rat CPT-1A gene. Our studies indicated that WY14643 and long chain fatty acids induce CPT-1A gene expression through this element. In addition, we found that mutation of the PPARα binding site reduced the expression of CPT-1A-luciferase vectors in the liver of fasted rats. We had demonstrated previously that CPT-1A was stimulated by the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1α) via sequences in the first intron of the rat CPT-1A gene. Surprisingly, PGC-1α did not enhance CPT-1A transcription through the PPARα binding site in the second intron. Following knockdown of PGC-1α with short hairpin RNA, the CPT-1A and PDK4 genes remained responsive to WY14643. Overall, our studies indicated that PPARα and PGC-1α stimulate transcription of the CPT-1A gene through different regions of the CPT-1A gene. PMID:20638986

  9. Mycophenolic acid induces ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression through the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yanni; Lai, Fangfang; Xu, Yang; Wu, Yexiang; Liu, Qi; Li, Ni; Wei, Yuzhen; Feng, Tingting; Zheng, Zhihui; Jiang, Wei; Yu, Liyan; Hong, Bin; Si, Shuyi

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using an ABCA1p-LUC HepG2 cell line, we found that MPA upregulated ABCA1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPA induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 markedly inhibited MPA-induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of MPA upregulating ABCA1 was due mainly to activation of the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 pathway. -- Abstract: ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) promotes cholesterol and phospholipid efflux from cells to lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I and plays an important role in atherosclerosis. In a previous study, we developed a high-throughput screening method using an ABCA1p-LUC HepG2 cell line to find upregulators of ABCA1. Using this method in the present study, we found that mycophenolic acid (MPA) upregulated ABCA1 expression (EC50 = 0.09 {mu}M). MPA upregulation of ABCA1 expression was confirmed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis in HepG2 cells. Previous work has indicated that MPA is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}; EC50 = 5.2-9.3 {mu}M). Liver X receptor {alpha} (LXR{alpha}) is a target gene of PPAR{gamma} and may directly regulate ABCA1 expression. Western blot analysis showed that MPA induced LXR{alpha} protein expression in HepG2 cells. Addition of PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 markedly inhibited MPA-induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression. These data suggest that MPA increased ABCA1 expression mainly through activation of PPAR{gamma}. Thus, the effects of MPA on upregulation of ABCA1 expression were due mainly to activation of the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 signaling pathway. This is the first report that the antiatherosclerosis activity of MPA is due to this mechanism.

  10. The Differential Interactions of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor [gamma] Ligands with Tyr473 Is a Physical Basis for Their Unique Biological Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Einstein, Monica; Akiyama, Taro E.; Castriota, Gino A.; Wang, Chuanlin F.; McKeever, Brian; Mosley, Ralph T.; Becker, Joseph W.; Moller, David E.; Meinke, Peter T.; Wood, Harold B.; Berger, Joel P.

    2008-08-01

    Despite their proven antidiabetic efficacy, widespread use of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){gamma} agonists has been limited by adverse cardiovascular effects. To overcome this shortcoming, selective PPAR{gamma} modulators (SPPAR{gamma}Ms) have been identified that have antidiabetic efficacy comparable with full agonists with improved tolerability in preclinical species. The results of structural studies support the proposition that SPPAR{gamma}Ms interact with PPAR{gamma} differently from full agonists, thereby providing a physical basis for their novel activities. Herein, we describe a novel PPAR{gamma} ligand, SPPAR{gamma}M2. This compound was a partial agonist in a cell-based transcriptional activity assay, with diminished adipogenic activity and an attenuated gene signature in cultured human adipocytes. X-ray cocrystallography studies demonstrated that, unlike rosiglitazone, SPPAR{gamma}M2 did not interact with the Tyr473 residue located within helix 12 of the ligand binding domain (LBD). Instead, SPPAR{gamma}M2 was found to bind to and activate human PPAR{gamma} in which the Tyr473 residue had been mutated to alanine (hPPAR{gamma}Y473A), with potencies similar to those observed with the wild-type receptor (hPPAR{gamma}WT). In additional studies, we found that the intrinsic binding and functional potencies of structurally distinct SPPAR{gamma}Ms were not diminished by the Y473A mutation, whereas those of various thiazolidinedione (TZD) and non-TZD PPAR{gamma} full agonists were reduced in a correlative manner. These results directly demonstrate the important role of Tyr473 in mediating the interaction of full agonists but not SPPAR{gamma}Ms with the PPAR{gamma} LBD, thereby providing a precise molecular determinant for their differing pharmacologies.

  11. Vitamin D receptor regulation of the steroid/bile acid sulfotransferase SULT2A1.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Bandana; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Song, Chung Seog

    2005-01-01

    SULT2A1 is a sulfo-conjugating phase II enzyme expressed at very high levels in the liver and intestine, the two major first-pass metabolic tissues, and in the steroidogenic adrenal tissue. SULT2A1 acts preferentially on the hydroxysteroids dehydroepiandrosterone, testosterone/dihydrotestosterone, and pregnenolone and on cholesterol-derived amphipathic sterol bile acids. Several therapeutic drugs and other xenobiotics, which include xenoestrogens, are also sulfonated by this cytosolic steroid/bile acid sulfotransferase. Nonsteroid nuclear receptors with key roles in the metabolism and detoxification of endobiotics and xenobiotics, such as bile acid-activated farnesoid X receptor, xenobiotic-activated pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor, and lipid-activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha, mediate transcription induction of SULT2A1 in the enterohepatic system. The ligand-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR) is another nuclear receptor that stimulates SULT2A1 transcription, and the regulatory elements in human, mouse, and rat promoters directing this induction have been characterized. Given that bile acid sulfonation is catalyzed exclusively by SULT2A1 and that the 3alpha-sulfate of the highly toxic lithocholic acid is a major excretory metabolite in humans, we speculate that a role for the VDR pathway in SULT2A1 expression may have emerged to shield first-pass tissues from the cytotoxic effects of a bile acid overload arising from disrupted sterol homeostasis triggered by endogenous and exogenous factors. PMID:16399349

  12. Activator protein-2gamma (AP-2gamma) expression is specifically induced by oestrogens through binding of the oestrogen receptor to a canonical element within the 5'-untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Orso, Francesca; Cottone, Erika; Hasleton, Mark D; Ibbitt, J Claire; Sismondi, Piero; Hurst, Helen C; De Bortoli, Michele

    2004-01-01

    The activator protein 2 (AP-2) transcription factors are essential proteins for oestrogenic repression of the ERBB2 proto-oncogene in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we have examined the possible oestrogenic regulation of AP-2 genes themselves in breast-tumour-derived lines. As early as 1 h after oestrogen treatment, AP-2gamma mRNA was markedly increased, whereas AP-2alpha was down-regulated, but with slower kinetics, and AP-2beta was not affected at all. Addition of anti-oestrogens ablated these effects. Modulation of the protein levels corresponded to changes in the transcript levels, thus suggesting that in oestrogen-treated cells, an inversion of the balance between AP-2alpha and AP-2gamma isoforms occurs. The 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the human AP-2gamma gene contains one consensus and one degenerate oestrogen-responsive element (ERE). Reporter constructs carrying the AP-2gamma promoter and the 5'-UTR were up-regulated by oestrogens in transient transfection assays. Deletion of the most conserved (but not of the degenerate) ERE from reporter constructs abrogated the oestrogenic response, although both ERE-containing segments were footprinted in DNaseI protection assays. In vitro binding assays demonstrated the ability of oestrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) to bind to this site, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of the endogenous gene showed that ERalpha occupies this region in response to oestrogens. We conclude that AP-2gamma is a primary oestrogen-responsive gene and suggest that AP-2 proteins may mediate some oestrogenic responses. PMID:14565844

  13. Functional co-localization of monocytic aminopeptidase N/CD13 with the Fc{gamma} receptors CD32 and CD64

    SciTech Connect

    Riemann, Dagmar; Wulfaenger, Jens

    2005-06-17

    Information about the function of aminopeptidase N/CD13 on monocytes is limited. In order to gain more insight into its interaction with other proteins, we have identified molecules that co-localize with the membrane ectoenzyme at the cell surface of monocytes. Using laser scanning and electron microscopy as well as fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measured by flow cytometry we show that monocytic CD13 co-localized with the Fc{gamma} receptor II/CD32 after Fc receptor ligation by a CD32-specific antibody. FRET was also observed between CD13 and the Fc{gamma} receptor I/CD64, but not with the myeloid marker CD33 representing a member of the sialoadhesin family. Our results imply a novel functional role of CD13 and Fc{gamma} receptors as members of a multimeric receptor complex. Further studies have to be done to elucidate common signaling pathways of these molecules.

  14. Interaction between retinoid acid receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) and neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) in asthma.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Sääf, Annika; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Mandelin, Jami; Pietras, Christina Orsmark; Ezer, Sini; Karisola, Piia; Vendelin, Johanna; Gennäs, Gustav Boije af; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Alenius, Harri; von Mutius, Erika; Doekes, Gert; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Riedler, Josef; van Hage, Marianne; D'Amato, Mauro; Scheynius, Annika; Pershagen, Göran; Kere, Juha; Pulkkinen, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Retinoid acid receptor-related Orphan Receptor Alpha (RORA) was recently identified as a susceptibility gene for asthma in a genome-wide association study. To investigate the impact of RORA on asthma susceptibility, we performed a genetic association study between RORA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the vicinity of the asthma-associated SNP (rs11071559) and asthma-related traits. Because the regulatory region of a previously implicated asthma susceptibility gene, Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1), has predicted elements for RORA binding, we hypothesized that RORA may interact biologically and genetically with NPSR1. 37 RORA SNPs and eight NPSR1 SNPs were genotyped in the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE (2033 children) and the European cross-sectional PARSIFAL study (1120 children). Seven RORA SNPs confined into a 49 kb region were significantly associated with physician-diagnosed childhood asthma. The most significant association with rs7164773 (T/C) was driven by the CC genotype in asthma cases (OR = 2.0, 95%CI 1.36-2.93, p = 0.0003 in BAMSE; and 1.61, 1.18-2.19, p = 0.002 in the combined BAMSE-PARSIFAL datasets, respectively), and strikingly, the risk effect was dependent on the Gln344Arg mutation in NPSR1. In cell models, stimulation of NPSR1 activated a pathway including RORA and other circadian clock genes. Over-expression of RORA decreased NPSR1 promoter activity further suggesting a regulatory loop between these genes. In addition, Rora mRNA expression was lower in the lung tissue of Npsr1 deficient mice compared to wildtype littermates during the early hours of the light period. We conclude that RORA SNPs are associated with childhood asthma and show epistasis with NPSR1, and the interaction between RORA and NPSR1 may be of biological relevance. Combinations of common susceptibility alleles and less common functional polymorphisms may modify the joint risk effects on asthma susceptibility. PMID:23565190

  15. Differential chemokine and cytokine production by neonatal bovine gamma delta T-cell subsets in response to viral toll-like receptor agonists and in vivo respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma delta T cells have recently been shown to respond to stimulation via toll like receptors (TLR). Bovine gamma delta T cells express TLR3 and TLR7, endosomal receptors that are key for the recognition of viruses such as bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV); however, responses of gamma delta...

  16. Kynurenic acid amides as novel NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Borza, István; Kolok, Sándor; Galgóczy, Kornél; Gere, Anikó; Horváth, Csilla; Farkas, Sándor; Greiner, István; Domány, György

    2007-01-15

    A novel series of kynurenic acid amides, ring-enlarged derivatives of indole-2-carboxamides, was prepared and identified as in vivo active NR2B subtype selective NMDA receptor antagonists. The synthesis and SAR studies are discussed. PMID:17074483

  17. Gamma-linolenic acid enrichment from Borago officinalis and Echium fastuosum seed oils and fatty acids by low temperature crystallization.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, Juan Carlos; Campra-Madrid, Pablo; Guil-Guerrero, José Luis

    2004-01-01

    Solvent winterization of seed oil and free fatty acids (FFAs) was employed to obtain gamma-linolenic acid (GLA; 18:3omega6) concentrates from seed oils of two Boraginaceae species, Echium fastuosum and Borago officinalis. Different solutions of seed oils and FFAs from these two oils at 10%, 20% and 40% (w/w) were crystallized at 4 degrees C, -24 degrees C and -70 degrees C, respectively, using hexane, acetone, diethyl ether, isobutanol and ethanol as solvents. Best results were obtained for B. officinalis FFAs in hexane, reaching a maximum GLA concentration of 58.8% in the liquid fraction (LF). In E. fastuosum, the highest GLA concentration (39.9%) was also achieved with FFAs in hexane. PMID:16233632

  18. Data for amino acid alignment of Japanese stingray melanocortin receptors with other gnathostome melanocortin receptor sequences, and the ligand selectivity of Japanese stingray melanocortin receptors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Davis, Perry; Reinick, Christina; Mizusawa, Kanta; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Dores, Robert M

    2016-06-01

    This article contains structure and pharmacological characteristics of melanocortin receptors (MCRs) related to research published in "Characterization of melanocortin receptors from stingray Dasyatis akajei, a cartilaginous fish" (Takahashi et al., 2016) [1]. The amino acid sequences of the stingray, D. akajei, MC1R, MC2R, MC3R, MC4R, and MC5R were aligned with the corresponding melanocortin receptor sequences from the elephant shark, Callorhinchus milii, the dogfish, Squalus acanthias, the goldfish, Carassius auratus, and the mouse, Mus musculus. These alignments provide the basis for phylogenetic analysis of these gnathostome melanocortin receptor sequences. In addition, the Japanese stingray melanocortin receptors were separately expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, and stimulated with stingray ACTH, α-MSH, β-MSH, γ-MSH, δ-MSH, and β-endorphin. The dose response curves reveal the order of ligand selectivity for each stingray MCR. PMID:27408924

  19. Unnatural agrochemical ligands for engineered abscisic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Pedro L; Lozano-Juste, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    Existing agrochemicals can be endowed with new applications through protein engineering of plant receptors. A recent study shows an engineered PYR1 ABA receptor can be activated by mandipropamid. Plants engineered with such PYR1 variant are responsive to this agrochemical, which confers protection against drought through activation of ABA signaling. PMID:25891067

  20. Castor oil induces laxation and uterus contraction via ricinoleic acid activating prostaglandin EP3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Tunaru, Sorin; Althoff, Till F; Nüsing, Rolf M; Diener, Martin; Offermanns, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Castor oil is one of the oldest drugs. When given orally, it has a laxative effect and induces labor in pregnant females. The effects of castor oil are mediated by ricinoleic acid, a hydroxylated fatty acid released from castor oil by intestinal lipases. Despite the wide-spread use of castor oil in conventional and folk medicine, the molecular mechanism by which ricinoleic acid acts remains unknown. Here we show that the EP(3) prostanoid receptor is specifically activated by ricinoleic acid and that it mediates the pharmacological effects of castor oil. In mice lacking EP(3) receptors, the laxative effect and the uterus contraction induced via ricinoleic acid are absent. Although a conditional deletion of the EP(3) receptor gene in intestinal epithelial cells did not affect castor oil-induced diarrhea, mice lacking EP(3) receptors only in smooth-muscle cells were unresponsive to this drug. Thus, the castor oil metabolite ricinoleic acid activates intestinal and uterine smooth-muscle cells via EP(3) prostanoid receptors. These findings identify the cellular and molecular mechanism underlying the pharmacological effects of castor oil and indicate a role of the EP(3) receptor as a target to induce laxative effects. PMID:22615395

  1. Oregano: a source for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Monika; Lukas, Brigitte; Novak, Johannes; Simoncini, Tommaso; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo; Jungbauer, Alois

    2008-12-24

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are drug targets for several perturbations of metabolic syndrome, defined as the coexistence of obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertension, and hyper/dyslipidemia. In this study, PPAR activation by oregano (e.g., Origanum vulgare) and its components was tested. Oregano extracts bind but do not transactivate PPARgamma, and binding affinity differs among different oregano extracts. The extracts contain PPARgamma antagonists (e.g., quercetin, luteolin, rosmarinic acid, and diosmetin), selective PPARgamma modulators (e.g., naringenin and apigenin), and PPARgamma agonists (e.g., biochanin A). Oregano extract and isolated compounds in the extract antagonize rosiglitazone-mediated DRIP205/TRAP220 recruitment to PPARgamma, pointing to oregano extracts as putative food supplements for weight reduction. Rosmarinic acid and biochanin A, PPARalpha agonists, may ameliorate the lipid profile. By endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation, oregano extract could prevent atherosclerosis. The results warrant further investigation of oregano extract for its potential to prevent and ameliorate metabolic syndrome and its complications. PMID:19053389

  2. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid on skate retinal horizontal cells: evidence for an electrogenic uptake mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Malchow, R P; Ripps, H

    1990-01-01

    In the retinae of many vertebrates, there are classes of horizontal cell that probably utilize gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as a neurotransmitter. As with other amino acid transmitter agents, the postsynaptic action of GABA is thought to be terminated by uptake into neurons and glia surrounding the release site. The present study examined whether an uptake system for GABA could be detected in isolated skate horizontal cells by means of electrophysiological methods. Pressure ejection of GABA onto voltage-clamped horizontal cells produced an inward current that showed no sign of desensitization regardless of the GABA concentration. The dose-response relationship followed simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a half-maximal response elicited at approximately 110 microM. Nipecotic acid produced a similar current and reduced the responses to GABA when introduced in the bath solution prior to the GABA pulse. On the other hand, application of 500 microM muscimol or 1 mM baclofen, GABAA and GABAB receptor agonists, respectively, were completely without effect. The GABA-induced current was not blocked by superfusion with 500 microM bicuculline, 500 microM picrotoxin, or 500 microM phaclofen. However, the responses to GABA were abolished when the cells were superfused in Ringer's solution in which choline or lithium had been substituted for sodium, and were reduced when the extracellular chloride concentration was decreased from 266 mM to 16 mM. Current-voltage data showed a maximal response to GABA when the cells were held at or below their resting potential. At more depolarized levels, the inward current became progressively smaller until, near +50 mV, it could no longer be detected; over the range tested (-90 to +50 mV), the response never reversed into an outward current. These findings suggest that the GABA-induced currents in skate horizontal cells are mediated by an electrogenic uptake mechanism. PMID:2247470

  3. Distinct binding determinants for 9-cis retinoic acid are located within AF-2 of retinoic acid receptor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Tate, B F; Allenby, G; Janocha, R; Kazmer, S; Speck, J; Sturzenbecker, L J; Abarzúa, P; Levin, A A; Grippo, J F

    1994-01-01

    Retinoids exert their physiological action by interacting with two families of nuclear receptors, the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the retinoid X receptors (RXRs), which regulate gene expression by forming transcriptionally active heterodimeric RAR/RXR or homodimeric RXR/RXR complexes on DNA. Retinoid receptor activity resides in several regions, including the DNA and ligand binding domains, a dimerization interface, and both a ligand-independent (AF-1) and a ligand-dependent (AF-2) transactivation function. While 9-cis retinoic acid (RA) alone is the cognate ligand for the RXRs, both 9-cis RA and all-trans RA (t-RA) compete for binding with high affinity to the RARs. This latter observation suggested to us that the two isomers may interact with a common binding site. Here we report that RAR alpha has two distinct but overlapping binding sites for 9-cis RA and t-RA. Truncation of a human RAR alpha to 419 amino acids yields a receptor that binds both t-RA and 9-cis RA with high affinity, but truncation to amino acid 404 yields a mutant receptor that binds only t-RA with high affinity. Remarkably, this region also defines a C-terminal boundary for AF-2, as addition of amino acids 405 to 419 restores receptor-mediated gene activity to a truncated human RAR alpha lacking this region. It is interesting to speculate that binding of retinoid stereoisomers to unique sites within an RAR may function with AF-2 to cause differential activation of retinoid-responsive gene pathways. Images PMID:8139538

  4. Nuclear receptor-dependent bile acid signaling is required for normal liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wendong; Ma, Ke; Zhang, Jun; Qatanani, Mohammed; Cuvillier, James; Liu, Jun; Dong, Bingning; Huang, Xiongfei; Moore, David D

    2006-04-14

    Liver mass depends on one or more unidentified humoral signals that drive regeneration when liver functional capacity is diminished. Bile acids are important liver products, and their levels are tightly regulated. Here, we identify a role for nuclear receptor-dependent bile acid signaling in normal liver regeneration. Elevated bile acid levels accelerate regeneration, and decreased levels inhibit liver regrowth, as does the absence of the primary nuclear bile acid receptor FXR. We propose that FXR activation by increased bile acid flux is a signal of decreased functional capacity of the liver. FXR, and possibly other nuclear receptors, may promote homeostasis not only by regulating expression of appropriate metabolic target genes but also by driving homeotrophic liver growth. PMID:16614213

  5. Crosstalk between circulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, adipokines and metabolic syndrome in obese subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) has direct and indirect function in adipokines production process. We aimed to assess the possible influence of circulating PPARγ on relative risk of metabolic syndrome and also examine the association between circulating PPARγ and adipokines levels among obese subjects. Methods A total of 96 obese subjects (body mass index (BMI) ≥30) were included in the current cross-sectional study. We assessed the body composition with the use of Body Composition Analyzer BC-418MA - Tanita. The MetS (metabolic syndrome) was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. All baseline blood samples were obtained following an overnight fasting. Serum concentrations of adipokines including Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), omentin-1, vaspin, progranulin, nesfatin-1 and circulating PPARγ was measured with the use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Statistical analyses were performed using software package used for statistical analysis (SPSS). Results We found main association between circulating PPARγ and body composition in obese population. The risk of metabolic syndrome in subjects with higher concentration of PPARγ was 1.9 fold in compared with lower concentration of PPARγ after adjustment for age, sex and BMI. There was significant association between PPARγ and adipokines, specially nesfatin-1 and progranulin. Defined adipokines pattern among participants demonstrated the markedly higher concentration of vaspin, RBP4 and nesfatin-1 in participants with MetS compared to non-MetS subjects. Conclusions It appears all of studied adipokines might have association with PPARγ level and might simultaneously be involve in some common pathway to make susceptible obese subjects for MetS. PMID:24330836

  6. Insights into the Relationship between Toll Like Receptors and Gamma Delta T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Asif Amin; Patil, Rushikesh Sudam; Chiplunkar, Shubhada Vivek

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is an important aspect of cancer biology that contributes to tumor initiation, tumor progression and responses to therapy. The composition and characteristics of the tumor microenvironment vary widely and are important in determining the anti-tumor immune response. Successful immunization requires activation of both innate and adaptive immunity. Generally, immune system is compromised in patients with cancer due to immune suppression, loss of tumor antigen expression and dysfunction of antigen presenting cells (APC). Thus, therapeutic immunization leading to cancer regression remains a significant challenge. Certain cells of the immune system, including dendritic cells (DCs) and gamma delta (γδ) T cells are capable of driving potent anti-tumor responses. The property of MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity, high potential of cytokine release, tissue tropism and early activation in infections and malignant disease makes γδ T cells as an emerging candidate for immunotherapy. Various strategies are being developed to enhance anti-tumor immune responses of γδ T cells and DCs one of them is the use of novel adjuvants like toll like receptors (TLR) agonists, which enhance γδ T cell function directly or through DC activation, which has ability to prime γδ T cells. TLR agonists are being used clinically either alone or in combination with tumor antigens and has shown initial success in both enhancing immune responses and eliciting anti-tumor activity. TLR activated γδ T cells and DCs nurture each other’s activation. This provides a potent base for first line of defense and manipulation of the adaptive response against pathogens and cancer. The available data provides a strong rationale for initiating combinatorial therapy for the treatment of diseases and this review will summarize the application of adjuvants (TLRs) for boosting immune response of γδ T cells to treat cancer and infectious diseases and their use in combinatorial therapy

  7. Effect of gamma irradiation on hyaluronic acid and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohd, Hur Munawar Kabir; Taqiyuddin Mawardi bin Ayob, Muhammad; Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md; Mohamed, Faizal; Radiman, Shahidan; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2014-09-03

    DPPC lipids are the major component constituting the biological membrane, and their importances in various physiological functions are well documented. Hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial joint fluid functions as a lubricant, shock absorber and a nutrient carrier. Gamma irradiation has also been found to be effective in depolymerizing and cleaving molecular chains related to free radicals, thus extends with changes in chemical composition as well as its physiological functions. This research are conducted to investigate the hyaluronic acid (HA) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction in form of vesicles and its effect to gamma radiation. The size of DPPC vesicles formed via gentle hydration method is between 100 to 200 nm in diameter. HA (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml) was added into the vesicles and characterized by using TEM to determine vesicle size distributions, fusion and rupture of DPPC structure. The results demonstrated that the size of the vesicles approximately between 200 to 300 nm which caused by vesicles fusion with HA and formed even larger vesicles. After being irradiated by 0 to 200 Gy, the size of vesicles decreased as HA was degraded. To elucidate the mechanism of these effects, FTIR spectra were carried out and have shown that at absorption bands at 1700–1750 cm{sup −1} due to formation of carboxylic acid and leads to alteration of HA structure.

  8. Effect of gamma irradiation on hyaluronic acid and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohd, Hur Munawar Kabir; bin Ayob, Muhammad Taqiyuddin Mawardi; Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md; Mohamed, Faizal; Radiman, Shahidan; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2014-09-01

    DPPC lipids are the major component constituting the biological membrane, and their importances in various physiological functions are well documented. Hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial joint fluid functions as a lubricant, shock absorber and a nutrient carrier. Gamma irradiation has also been found to be effective in depolymerizing and cleaving molecular chains related to free radicals, thus extends with changes in chemical composition as well as its physiological functions. This research are conducted to investigate the hyaluronic acid (HA) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction in form of vesicles and its effect to gamma radiation. The size of DPPC vesicles formed via gentle hydration method is between 100 to 200 nm in diameter. HA (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml) was added into the vesicles and characterized by using TEM to determine vesicle size distributions, fusion and rupture of DPPC structure. The results demonstrated that the size of the vesicles approximately between 200 to 300 nm which caused by vesicles fusion with HA and formed even larger vesicles. After being irradiated by 0 to 200 Gy, the size of vesicles decreased as HA was degraded. To elucidate the mechanism of these effects, FTIR spectra were carried out and have shown that at absorption bands at 1700-1750 cm-1 due to formation of carboxylic acid and leads to alteration of HA structure.

  9. 14C dating of bone using (gamma) Carboxyglutamic Acid and Carboxyglycine (Aminomalonate)

    SciTech Connect

    Southon, J R; Burky, R T; Kirner, D L; Taylor, R E; Hare, P E

    1999-04-27

    Radiocarbon determinations have been obtained on {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid [Gla] and {alpha}-carboxyglycine (aminomalonate) [Am] as well as acid- and base-hydrolyzed total amino acids isolated from a series of fossil bones. As far as they are aware, Am has not been reported previously in fossil bone and neither Gla nor Am {sup 14}C values have been measured previously. Interest in Gla, an amino acid found in the non-collagen proteins osteocalcin and matrix Gla-protein (MGP), proceeds from the suggestion that it may be preferentially retained and more resistant to diagenetic contamination affecting {sup 14}C values in bones exhibiting low and trace amounts of collagen. The data do not support these suggestions. The suite of bones examined showed a general tendency for total amino acid and Gla concentrations to decrease in concert. Even for bones retaining significant amounts of collagen, Gla (and Am extracts) can yield {sup 14}C values discordant with their expected age and with {sup 14}C values obtained on total amino-acid fractions isolated from the same bone sample.

  10. Radiation-initiated emulsion copolymerization of styrene and carboxylic acid monomers. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Egusa, S.; Makuuchi, K.

    1982-03-01

    The emulsion copolymerization of styrene and carboxylic acid monomers such as acrylic, methacrylic, and itaconic acids (AAc, MAAc, IAc) was studied by using /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays as initiator and sodium dodecylsulfate as emulsifier. The polymerization behavior of these acid monomers was followed by simultaneous conductometric and potentiometric titrations for a latex sample taken in polymerization. The polymerization rate of these acid monomers increases in the following order of hydrophobicity: IAc < AAc < MAAc; this suggests that their polymerization sites are mainly the surface and/or subsurface regions of latex particles. The copolymerization rate of styrene and acid monomer increases with an increase in the acid monomer content for AAc and MAAc, whereas for IAc the rate decreases. The particle sizes determined by the stopped-flow method reveal that this variation of copolymerization rate cannot be explained by the number of growing particles and should be attributed to another factor; for instance, the transfer rate of styrene molecules from oil droplets to growing particles.

  11. Biosynthesis of gamma-linolenic acid and beta-carotene by Zygomycetes fungi.

    PubMed

    Klempova, Tatiana; Basil, Eva; Kubatova, Alena; Certik, Milan

    2013-07-01

    Due to increasing demand for natural sources of both polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and beta-carotene, 28 Zygomycetes fungal soil isolates were screened for their potential to synthesize these biologically active compounds. Although all fungi produced C18 PUFAs, only nine strains also formed beta-carotene. Although Actinomucor elegans CCF 3218 was the best producer of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) (251 mg/L), Umbelopsis isabellina CCF 2412 was found to be the most valuable fungus because of the dual production of GLA (217 mg/L) and beta-carotene (40.7 mg/L). The calculated ratio of formed PUFAs provided new insight into activities of individual fatty acid desaturases involved in biosynthetic pathways for various types of PUFAs. The maximal activity of delta-9 desaturase was accompanied by high accumulation of storage lipids in fungal cells. On the other hand, maximal activity of delta-15 desaturase was found in strains synthesizing low amounts of oleic acid due to diminished delta-9 desaturase. Activities of delta-6 desaturase showed competition for fatty acids engaged in n3, n6, and n9 biosynthetic pathways. Such knowledge about fatty acid desaturase activities provides new challenges for the regulation of biotechnological production of PUFAs by Zygomycetes fungi. PMID:23625863

  12. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor. PMID:26821052

  13. Agonist-dependent single channel current and gating in alpha4beta2delta and alpha1beta2gamma2S GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Angelo; Harrison, Neil L

    2008-02-01

    The family of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA(A)Rs) mediates two types of inhibition in the mammalian brain. Phasic inhibition is mediated by synaptic GABA(A)Rs that are mainly comprised of alpha(1), beta(2), and gamma(2) subunits, whereas tonic inhibition is mediated by extrasynaptic GABA(A)Rs comprised of alpha(4/6), beta(2), and delta subunits. We investigated the activation properties of recombinant alpha(4)beta(2)delta and alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A)Rs in response to GABA and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3(2H)-one (THIP) using electrophysiological recordings from outside-out membrane patches. Rapid agonist application experiments indicated that THIP produced faster opening rates at alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs (beta approximately 1600 s(-1)) than at alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A)Rs (beta approximately 460 s(-1)), whereas GABA activated alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A)Rs more rapidly (beta approximately 1800 s(-1)) than alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs (beta < 440 s(-1)). Single channel recordings of alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) and alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs showed that both channels open to a main conductance state of approximately 25 pS at -70 mV when activated by GABA and low concentrations of THIP, whereas saturating concentrations of THIP elicited approximately 36 pS openings at both channels. Saturating concentrations of GABA elicited brief (<10 ms) openings with low intraburst open probability (P(O) approximately 0.3) at alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs and at least two "modes" of single channel bursting activity, lasting approximately 100 ms at alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A)Rs. The most prevalent bursting mode had a P(O) of approximately 0.7 and was described by a reaction scheme with three open and three shut states, whereas the "high" P(O) mode ( approximately 0.9) was characterized by two shut and three open states. Single channel activity elicited by THIP in alpha(4)beta(2)delta and alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA

  14. [Changes in the collagen amino acid composition of calf skin after gamma-irradiation in an aqueous solution].

    PubMed

    Duzhenkova, N A; Savich, A V

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the amino acid composition of calf skin collagen after gamma-irradiation (60Co) of 2.5 X 10(-6) M aerated aqueous protein solution within the dose range from 30 to 2000 Gy. The radiosensitivity of amino acid residues was compared. PMID:6657935

  15. Furan formation from fatty acids as a result of storage, gamma irradiation, UV-C and heat treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furan is a possible human carcinogen that has been found in many thermally processed foods. The effects of thermal processing, gamma and UV-C irradiation on formation of furan from different fatty acids was studied. In addition, formation of furan from fatty acid emulsions during storage at 25C and...

  16. Circadian rhythm in plasma concentrations of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Hoes, M J; Vree, T B; Guelen, P J

    1981-08-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) was orally administered to six alcoholics at 09.00 and 23.00 h. The plasma concentrations of GHB show a clear circadian pattern, the area under the curve in the daytime experiments being 61% of that in the night experiments. The significance of alcohol dehydrogenase, the catabolic enzyme of GHB, for the difference is discussed. It is concluded that, although the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase in alcoholics is quantitatively disturbed, it remains subject to physiologic circadian activation. PMID:7341501

  17. Atopic eczema unresponsive to evening primrose oil (linoleic and gamma-linolenic acids).

    PubMed

    Bamford, J T; Gibson, R W; Renier, C M

    1985-12-01

    This study was designed to look at the effect of evening primrose oil (linoleic and gamma-linolenic acids) as an oral supplement for patients with atopic eczema. We used a double-blind, blocked crossover design with random assignment of patients to treatment groups. We used Wilcoxon's signed-ranks method of comparing changes during the trial. We observed no significant effect on erythema, scale, excoriation, lichenification, or overall severity in 123 patients with atopic eczema of average severity while they took oral doses of evening primrose oil (2 or 4 gm in children, 6 or 8 gm in adults). PMID:3908514

  18. Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectroscopy of Intra-Vesicular Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luke Y.-J.; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vesicles containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and their proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectra. These vesicles were constructed to more closely mimic the intracellular environment wherein GABA exists. For this study, these GABA-containing vesicles were examined under 1H NMR as a potential platform for future studies on the differences between aqueous phantoms, ex vivo brain extracts, and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy results. We found that intra-vesicular GABA faithfully yielded the chemical shifts and J-coupling constants of free aqueous GABA, alongside the chemical shift signals of the vesicle wall. PMID:24109882

  19. Regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-Iα) gene expression by the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1) isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Sadana, Prabodh; Zhang, Yi; Song, Shulan; Cook, George A.; Elam, Marshall B.; Park, Edwards A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivators (PGC-1) have important roles in mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolic control in a variety of tissues. There are multiple isoforms of PGC-1 including PGC-1α and PGC-1β. Both the PGC-1α and β isoforms promote mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid oxidation, but only PGC-1α stimulates gluconeogenesis in the liver. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I) is a key enzyme regulating mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. In these studies, we determined that PGC-1β stimulated expression of the “liver” isoform of CPT-I (CPT-Iα) but that PGC-1β did not induce pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) which is a regulator of pyruvate metabolism. The CPT-Iα gene is induced by thyroid hormone. We found that T3 increased the expression of PGC-1β and that PGC-1β enhanced the T3 induction of CPT-Iα. The thyroid hormone receptor interacts with PGC-1β in a ligand dependent manner. Unlike PGC-1α, the interaction of PGC-1β and the T3 receptor does not occur exclusively through the leucine-X-X-leucine-leucine motif in PGC-1β. We have found that PGC-1β is associated with the CPT-Iα gene in vivo. Overall, our results demonstrate that PGC-1β is a coactivator in the T3 induction of CPT-Iα and that PGC-1β has similarities and differences with the PGC-1α isoform. PMID:17239528

  20. γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is not an agonist of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Connelly, William M; Errington, Adam C; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound and a drug used clinically to treat the symptoms of narcolepsy. GHB is known to be an agonist of GABAB receptors with millimolar affinity, but also binds with much higher affinity to another site, known as the GHB receptor. While a body of evidence has shown that GHB does not bind to GABAA receptors widely, recent evidence has suggested that the GHB receptor is in fact on extrasynaptic α4β1δ GABAA receptors, where GHB acts as an agonist with an EC50 of 140 nM. We investigated three neuronal cell types that express a tonic GABAA receptor current mediated by extrasynaptic receptors: ventrobasal (VB) thalamic neurons, dentate gyrus granule cells and striatal medium spiny neurons. Using whole-cell voltage clamp in brain slices, we found no evidence that GHB (10 µM) induced any GABAA receptor mediated current in these cell types, nor that it modulated inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, a high concentration of GHB (3 mM) was able to produce a GABAB receptor mediated current, but did not induce any other currents. These results suggest either that GHB is not a high affinity agonist at native α4β1δ receptors, or that these receptors do not exist in classical areas associated with extrasynaptic currents. PMID:24244421

  1. γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid (GHB) Is Not an Agonist of Extrasynaptic GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, William M.; Errington, Adam C.; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound and a drug used clinically to treat the symptoms of narcolepsy. GHB is known to be an agonist of GABAB receptors with millimolar affinity, but also binds with much higher affinity to another site, known as the GHB receptor. While a body of evidence has shown that GHB does not bind to GABAA receptors widely, recent evidence has suggested that the GHB receptor is in fact on extrasynaptic α4β1δ GABAA receptors, where GHB acts as an agonist with an EC50 of 140 nM. We investigated three neuronal cell types that express a tonic GABAA receptor current mediated by extrasynaptic receptors: ventrobasal (VB) thalamic neurons, dentate gyrus granule cells and striatal medium spiny neurons. Using whole-cell voltage clamp in brain slices, we found no evidence that GHB (10 µM) induced any GABAA receptor mediated current in these cell types, nor that it modulated inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, a high concentration of GHB (3 mM) was able to produce a GABAB receptor mediated current, but did not induce any other currents. These results suggest either that GHB is not a high affinity agonist at native α4β1δ receptors, or that these receptors do not exist in classical areas associated with extrasynaptic currents. PMID:24244421

  2. Dependence of gamma-aminobutyric acid modulation of cholinergic transmission on nitric oxide and purines in cat terminal ileum.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N

    1997-11-27

    The possible involvement of purines and/or nitric oxide (NO) in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-mediated effects on the spontaneous activity of isolated preparations from longitudinal and circular muscles of cat terminal ileum was investigated. GABA had biphasic effects, which were neurogenic and muscarinic. ATP and adenosine dose dependently inhibited the activity of the muscles. A contractile response evoked by the nucleotide only was also observed. The effects of the purines were equipotent and resistant to Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), tetrodotoxin and to desensitization by alpha,beta-methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate (alpha,beta-meATP), except for the contractile effect of ATP, which was abolished by alpha,beta-meATP. Pretreatment of the preparations with ATP or adenosine produced: (i) desensitization to the effects of the respective purinoceptor agonist only; and (ii) suppression of the GABA-induced responses of longitudinal and circular muscles. Hemoglobin and L-NNA greatly reduced or completely blocked the GABA(A)-induced relaxation and decreased the GABA(A)-induced contraction. Our results indicate that purines and NO, to a different extent, mediate the relaxant phase of the GABA effects in both layers. Interactions between muscarinic cholinoceptors and GABA-nitrergic pathway and a concomitant activation of postjunctional P1 and P2y purinoceptors are suggested to explain the prejunctional biphasic effects of GABA. PMID:9473135

  3. Nucleic acid recognizing Toll-like receptors and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    von Landenberg, Philipp; Bauer, Stefan

    2007-12-01

    The understanding of autoimmune diseases experienced an impressive boost since the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been identified as possible key players in autoimmune pathophysiology. Although these receptors recognize a variety of structures derived from viruses, bacteria, and fungi leading to subsequent initiation of the relevant immune responses, recent data support the idea that TLRs are crucial in the induction and perpetuation of certain autoimmune diseases, especially the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this review, we will summarize recent data on involvement of TLRs in the development of autoimmune diseases. We will focus on TLRs 7, 8, and 9 that were originally identified as receptors specific for bacterial and viral RNA/DNA, but more recent in vitro and in vivo studies have linked these receptors to the detection of host RNA, DNA, and RNA-associated or DNA-associated proteins in the context of autoimmunity. PMID:18060756

  4. Developmental toxicity of perfluorononanoic acid is dependent on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is one of the predominant perfluoroalkyl acids in the environment and in tissues of humans and wildlife. PFNA strongly activates the mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) in vitro and negatively impacts development ...

  5. REACTIVITY PROFILE OF LIGANDS OF MAMMALIAN RETINOIC ACID RECEPTORS: A PRELIMINARY COREPA ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retinoic acid and associated derivatives comprise a class of endogenous hormones that bind to and activate different families of retinoic acid receptors (RARs, RXRs), and control many aspects of vertebrate development. Identification of potential RAR and RXR ligands is of interes...

  6. Identification and characterization of estrogen receptor-related receptor alpha and gamma in human glioma and astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gandhari, Mukesh K; Frazier, Chester R; Hartenstein, Julia S; Cloix, Jean-Francois; Bernier, Michel; Wainer, Irving W

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine expression and function of estrogen receptor-related receptors (ERRs) in human glioma and astrocytoma cell lines. These estrogen receptor-negative cell lines expressed ERRalpha and ERRgamma proteins to varying degree in a cell context dependent manner, with U87MG glioma cells expressing both orphan nuclear receptors. Cell proliferation assays were performed in the presence of ERR isoform-specific agonists and antagonists, and the calculated EC(50) and IC(50) values were consistent with previous reported values determined in other types of cancer cell lines. Induction of luciferase expression under the control of ERR isoform-specific promoters was also observed in these cells. These results indicate that ERRalpha and ERRgamma are differentially expressed in these tumor cell lines and likely contribute to agonist-dependent ERR transcriptional activity. PMID:19822186

  7. Identification and characterization of estrogen receptor-related receptor alpha and gamma in human glioma and astrocytoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Gandhari, Mukesh K; Frazier, Chester R; Hartenstein, Julia S; Cloix, Jean-Francois; Bernier, Michel; Wainer, Irving W.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine expression and function of estrogen receptor-related receptors (ERRs) in human glioma and astrocytoma cell lines. These estrogen receptor-negative cell lines expressed ERRα and ERRγ proteins to varying degree in a cell context dependent manner, with U87MG glioma cells expressing both orphan nuclear receptors. Cell proliferation assays were performed in the presence of ERR isoform-specific agonists and antagonists, and the calculated EC50 and IC50 values were consistent with previous reported values determined in other types of cancer cell lines. Induction of luciferase expression under the control of ERR isoform-specific promoters was also observed in these cells. These results indicate that ERRα and ERRγ are differentially expressed in these tumor cell lines and likely contribute to agonist-dependent ERR transcriptional activity. PMID:19822186

  8. T helper cell recognition of muscle acetylcholine receptor in myasthenia gravis. Epitopes on the gamma and delta subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Manfredi, A A; Protti, M P; Dalton, M W; Howard, J F; Conti-Tronconi, B M

    1993-01-01

    We tested the response of CD4+ cells and/or total lymphocytes from the blood of 22 myasthenic patients and 10 healthy controls to overlapping synthetic peptides, 20 residues long, to screen the sequence of the gamma and delta subunits of human muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The gamma subunit is part of the AChR expressed in embryonic muscle and is substituted in the AChRs of most adult muscles by an epsilon subunit. The delta subunit is present in both embryonic and adult AChRs. Adult extrinsic ocular muscles, which are preferentially and sometimes uniquely affected by myasthenic symptoms, and thymus, which has a still obscure but important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, express the embryonic gamma subunit. Anti-AChR CD4+ responses were more easily detected after CD8+ depletion. All responders recognized epitopes on both the gamma and delta subunits and had severe symptoms. In four patients the CD4+ cell response was tested twice, when the symptoms were severe and during a period of remission. Consistently, the response was only detectable, or larger, when the patients were severely affected. Images PMID:7688757

  9. Linking pattern recognition and salicylic acid responses in Arabidopsis through ACCELERATED CELL DEATH6 and receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tateda, Chika; Zhang, Zhongqin; Greenberg, Jean T

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis membrane protein ACCELERATED CELL DEATH 6 (ACD6) and the defense signal salicylic acid (SA) are part of a positive feedback loop that regulates the levels of at least 2 pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP) receptors, including FLAGELLIN SENSING 2 (FLS2) and CHITIN ELICITOR RECEPTOR (LYSM domain receptor-like kinase 1, CERK1). ACD6- and SA-mediated regulation of these receptors results in potentiation of responses to FLS2 and CERK1 ligands (e.g. flg22 and chitin, respectively). ACD6, FLS2 and CERK1 are also important for callose induction in response to an SA agonist even in the absence of PAMPs. Here, we report that another receptor, EF-Tu RECEPTOR (EFR) is also part of the ACD6/SA signaling network, similar to FLS2 and CERK1. PMID:26442718

  10. Elevated spectroscopic glutamate/gamma-amino butyric acid in rats bred for learned helplessness.

    PubMed

    Sartorius, Alexander; Mahlstedt, Magdalena M; Vollmayr, Barbara; Henn, Fritz A; Ende, Gabriele

    2007-09-17

    The theory of depression is dominated by the monoamine hypothesis but there is increasing evidence that beyond monoamines, glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) play an essential role in the pathogenesis of depression. In this study, the effect of alterations of GABA and Glu were investigated in the congenital learned helplessness paradigm. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is an important monitoring tool to bridge the findings in clinical and preclinical studies. We found increased Glu/GABA ratios in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of placebo-treated (saline intraperitoneally) congenital learned helplessness rats versus wild-type rats, and a treatment-induced (desipramine 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally or electroconvulsive shock) decrease of this monoamine ratio in both brain regions. Our results corroborate previous findings of an amino-acid influence on the pathomechanisms of mood disorders. PMID:17712276

  11. Delta-6 desaturase from borage converts linoleic acid to gamma-linolenic acid in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Nimal, Jonathan; Li, Wanli; Liu, Xia; Cao, Wenguang

    2011-07-01

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, 18:3 n6) is an essential polyunsaturated fatty acid of the omega-6 family and is found to be effective in prevention and/or treatment of various health problems. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of increasing γ-linolenic acid contents in mammalian cells using the delta-6 gene from Borago officinalis. The borage Δ6-desaturase gene (sDelta-6) was codon-optimized and introduced into HEK293 cells by lipofectin transfection. Co-expression of GFP with sDelta-6 and RT-PCR analysis indicated that sDelta-6 could be expressed in mammalian cells. Subsequently, the heterologous expression of borage Δ6-desaturase was evaluated by fatty acid analysis. Total cellular lipid analysis of transformed cells fed with linoleic acid (LA 18:2 n6) as a substrate showed that the expression of sDelta-6 resulted in an 228-483% (p<0.05) increase of GLA when compared with that in the control cells. The highest conversion efficiency of LA into GLA in sDelta-6(+) cells was 6.9 times higher than that in the control group (11.59% vs. 1.69%; p<0.05). Our present work demonstrated that the sDelta-6 gene from borage could be functionally expressed in mammalian cells, and could convert LA into GLA. Furthermore, this study may pave the way to generate transgenic livestock that can synthesise GLA. PMID:21679695

  12. Gamma-linolenic acid provides additional protection against ventricular fibrillation in aged rats fed linoleic acid rich diets.

    PubMed

    Charnock, J S

    2000-02-01

    Ligation of the coronary artery in rats produces severe ventricular fibrillation (VF) and malignant cardiac arrhythmia. Mortality increases with the age of the animal. Diets rich in saturated fatty acids (SF) but low in linoleic acid (LA) increase, but diets high in LA and low in SF decrease the severity of VF and mortality in older animals. The effects of an LA enriched diet can be blocked by inhibition of cyclooxygenase suggesting that conversion of LA to eicosanoids is central to the development of VF. Conversion of LA to gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) via delta-6 desaturase is the first step in the process. The activity of delta-6 desaturase declines with age. Thus inclusion of GLA in the diet of older animals may provide an additional benefit over LA alone. Dietary supplements of evening primrose oil (EPO) to one year old rats reduced ischaemic VF more than a supplement of sunflower seed oil (SSO) without GLA. Substitution of borage oil (more GLA than EPO but less LA than either EPO or SSO) was without additional benefit. PMID:10780878

  13. Antiepileptic Potential of Matrine via Regulation the Levels of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamic Acid in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jun; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-01-01

    Our present study aimed to determine the antiepileptic activity of matrine, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. To evaluate the antiepileptic activity of matrine, seizures in mice induced by PTZ and MES were established, then the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests in mice were also carried out. For the molecular mechanism investigations, contents of aspartic acid (Asp), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid (Glu), glycine (Gly) in seizures mice were determined; then, the chronic seizures rats induced by PTZ were prepared, and western blotting was used to determine the expressions of GAD 65, GABAA and GABAB in the brains. In the results, matrine showed significant antiepileptic effects on seizures mice induced by MES and PTZ. Moreover, the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests were also demonstrated that matrine had obvious antiepileptic effects. Additionally, our results revealed that after treatment with matrine, contents of GABA can be elevated, and the contents of Glu were obviously decreased. Furthermore, western blotting revealed that the mechanism regarding the antiepileptic effect of may be related to the up-regulations of GAD 65 and GABAA in the brain. Collectively, we suggested that matrine can be developed as an effective antiseptic drug. PMID:24317434

  14. Genetic manipulation of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) synthesis in a commercial variety of evening primrose (Oenothera sp.).

    PubMed

    de Gyves, Emilio Mendoza; Sparks, Caroline A; Sayanova, Olga; Lazzeri, Paul; Napier, Johnathan A; Jones, Huw D

    2004-07-01

    A robust Agrobacterium-mediated transformation procedure was developed for Rigel, a commercial cultivar of evening primrose, and used to deliver a cDNA encoding a Delta(6)-desaturase from borage under the control of a cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Analysis of the transformed plants demonstrated an altered profile of polyunsaturated fatty acids, with an increase in gamma-linolenic acid and octadecatetraenoic acid in leaf tissues when compared with control lines. PMID:17134396

  15. Effect of gamma interferon on phospholipid hydrolysis and fatty acid incorporation in L929 cells infected with Rickettsia prowazekii.

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, H H; Day, L; Daugherty, R; Turco, J

    1993-01-01

    Treatment of Rickettsia prowazekii-infected L929 cells with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) immediately after infection altered the lipid metabolism of the host cells as determined by measurement of phospholipid hydrolysis and oleic acid incorporation into phospholipids and neutral lipids. At 48 h postinfection, there was increased phospholipid hydrolysis in infected cultures relative to mock-infected cultures and a further increase in radiolabeled phospholipid hydrolysis in IFN-gamma-treated infected cultures. Oleic acid, the radiolabeled product of hydrolysis, was found in both the free fatty acid and neutral lipid fractions. None of the mock-infected cultures demonstrated increased hydrolysis of their radiolabeled phospholipids in response to treatment with IFN-gamma. Most of the radiolabeled oleic acid incorporated into cultures in the interval between 24 and 48 h after infection and IFN-gamma treatment was present in the phospholipid fraction. However, the neutral lipid fraction from the infected cultures that had been IFN-gamma treated was labeled to a greater extent than that from the untreated cultures. Thin-layer chromatographic analysis of the neutral lipid fractions from both the hydrolysis and incorporation experiments demonstrated that most of the radiolabel was in triglycerides. The infected cultures at 30 h were intact as assessed by the exclusion of trypan blue, but at 48 h postinfection in the IFN-gamma-treated infected cultures more than half of the cells were unable to exclude trypan blue. In no case did the mock-infected cells show substantial damage as a result of IFN-gamma treatment. PMID:8335370

  16. Paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PIR)-A is involved in activating mast cells through its association with Fc receptor gamma chain.

    PubMed

    Maeda, A; Kurosaki, M; Kurosaki, T

    1998-09-01

    Paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PIR)-A and PIR-B possess similar ectodomains with six immunoglobulin-like loops, but have distinct transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. PIR-B bears immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) sequences in its cytoplasmic domain that recruit Src homology (SH)2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2, leading to inhibition of B and mast cell activation. In contrast, the PIR-A protein has a charged Arg residue in its transmembrane region and a short cytoplasmic domain that lacks ITIM sequences. Here we show that Fc receptor gamma chain, containing an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), associates with PIR-A. Cross-linking of this PIR-A complex results in mast cell activation such as calcium mobilization in an ITAM-dependent manner. Thus, our data provide evidence for the existence of two opposite signaling pathways upon PIR aggregation. PIR-A induces the stimulatory signal by using ITAM in the associated gamma chain, whereas PIR-B mediates the inhibitory signal through its ITIMs. PMID:9730901

  17. Placenta expressing the greatest quantity of bisphenol A receptor ERR{gamma} among the human reproductive tissues: Predominant expression of type-1 ERRgamma isoform.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yukimasa; Liu, Xiaohui; Sumiyoshi, Miho; Matsushima, Ayami; Shimohigashi, Miki; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki

    2009-07-01

    Estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma), one of the 48 human nuclear receptors, has a fully active conformation with no ligand. We recently demonstrated that ERRgamma binds strongly bisphenol A (BPA), one of the nastiest endocrine disruptors, and thus retaining ERRgamma's high basal constitutive activity. A report that BPA accumulates in the human maternal-fetal placental unit has led us to hypothesize that a large amount of ERRgamma might exist in the human placenta. Here we report evidence that placenta indeed expresses ERRgamma exceptionally strongly. We first ascertained the presence of nine different ERRgamma mRNA variants and the resulting three ERRgamma protein isoforms. By real-time PCR, we estimated the relative amount of ERRgamma mRNA using total RNA extracts from human reproductive tissues. Placenta was found to express ERRgamma extremely highly. Among the three ERRgamma protein isoforms, placenta exclusively expresses the type-1 isoform, which possesses additional 23-mer amino-acid residues at the N-terminus of the ordinary ERRgamma. This N-terminal elongation was found to elevate by approximately 50% the basal constitutive activity of ERRgamma, as evidenced in the luciferase reporter gene assay. The present results suggest that BPA accumulates in the placenta by binding to ERRgamma. PMID:19304792

  18. Retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) inhibitors from Vitae Pharmaceuticals (WO2015116904) and structure proposal for their Phase I candidate VTP-43742.

    PubMed

    Gege, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan nuclear receptor gamma t (RORγt or RORC2) is a key transcription factor for the differentiation of naïve proinflammatory CD4(+) T cells and the production of T helper-17 (TH17) cells. Inhibiting RORγt activity is thought to be beneficial in targeting a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, however current candidates remain to be validated in the clinic. Recently Vitae Pharmaceuticals successfully finished its Phase 1 single ascending dose clinical study with their proprietary RORγt inverse agonist VTP-43742. On the basis of the reported promising results, Vitae Pharmaceuticals could currently be considered as having the leading clinical candidate in the RORγt inverse agonist category. This prompts the interest on the exact chemical structure of their clinical candidate. The first relevant patent application (WO2014179564) from Vitae Pharmaceuticals describes RORγt inverse agonists with a 5,6-dihydro-4H-pyrrolo[3,4-d]thiazole core, while in the second and latest patent application (WO2015116904) this element has changed towards a 6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[3,4-b]pyridine core. By combining information from Vitae's patent applications and trustworthy online information, the potential elucidation of the chemical structure of clinical candidate VTP-43742 is described. PMID:26895086

  19. RAGE is a nucleic acid receptor that promotes inflammatory responses to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sirois, Cherilyn M.; Jin, Tengchuan; Miller, Allison L.; Bertheloot, Damien; Nakamura, Hirotaka; Horvath, Gabor L.; Mian, Abubakar; Jiang, Jiansheng; Schrum, Jacob; Bossaller, Lukas; Pelka, Karin; Garbi, Natalio; Brewah, Yambasu; Tian, Jane; Chang, ChewShun; Chowdhury, Partha S.; Sims, Gary P.; Kolbeck, Roland; Coyle, Anthony J.; Humbles, Alison A.

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of DNA and RNA molecules derived from pathogens or self-antigen is one way the mammalian immune system senses infection and tissue damage. Activation of immune signaling receptors by nucleic acids is controlled by limiting the access of DNA and RNA to intracellular receptors, but the mechanisms by which endosome-resident receptors encounter nucleic acids from the extracellular space are largely undefined. In this study, we show that the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) promoted DNA uptake into endosomes and lowered the immune recognition threshold for the activation of Toll-like receptor 9, the principal DNA-recognizing transmembrane signaling receptor. Structural analysis of RAGE–DNA complexes indicated that DNA interacted with dimers of the outermost RAGE extracellular domains, and could induce formation of higher-order receptor complexes. Furthermore, mice deficient in RAGE were unable to mount a typical inflammatory response to DNA in the lung, indicating that RAGE is important for the detection of nucleic acids in vivo. PMID:24081950

  20. Modulation of the release of norepinephrine by gamma-aminobutyric acid and morphine in the frontal cerebral cortex of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Peoples, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Agents that enhance gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA, neurotransmission modulate certain effects of opioids, such as analgesia. Opioid analgesia is mediated in part by norepinephrine in the forebrain. In this study, the interactions between morphine and GABAergic agents on release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine from rat frontal cerebral cortical slices were examined. GABA, 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}-10{sup {minus}3} M, enhanced potassium stimulated ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine release and reversed the inhibitory effect of morphine in a noncompetitive manner. GABA did not enhance release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine stimulated by the calcium ionophore A23187. The effect of GABA was reduced by the GABA{sub A} receptor antagonists bicuculline methiodide or picrotoxin, and by the selective inhibitor of GABA uptake SKF 89976A, but was blocked completely only when bicuculline methiodide and SKF 89976A were used in combination. The GABA{sub A} agonist muscimol, 10{sup {minus}4} M, mimicked the effect of GABA, but the GABA{sub B} agonist ({plus minus})baclofen, 10{sup {minus}4} M, did not affect the release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine in the absence or the presence of morphine. Thus GABA appears to produce this effect by stimulating GABA uptake and GABA{sub A}, but not GABA{sub B}, receptors. In contrast to the results that would be predicted for an event involving GABA{sub A} receptors, however, the effect of GABA did not desensitize, and benzodiazepine agonists did not enhance the effect of GABA at any concentration tested between 10{sup {minus}8} and 10{sup {minus}4} M. Thus these receptors may constitute a subclass of GABA{sub A} receptors. These results support a role of GABA uptake and GABA{sub A} receptors in enhancing the release of norepinephrine and modulating its inhibition by opioids in the frontal cortex of the rat.

  1. Formation of hydrocarbons from acid-Clay suspensions by gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Castaneda, J.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2013-07-03

    The adsorption of certain organic compounds by clays gives rise to the transformation of the adsorbate through the action of the clays. This phenomenon can be enhanced using ionizing radiation. In this context, these kinds of reactions play an important role in many natural and industrial processes. For example, in oil and gas exploration, the source and trap of petroleum hydrocarbons is frequently clay-rich rocks. Clay-water-based muds are also seen as environmentally friendly alternatives to toxic oil-based fluids. The principal processes that occur in sediments are usually held to be of bacterial action and thermal transformation, which may include thermally induced catalytic alteration of the organic debris. On the other hand, radioactive materials are widely distributed throughout Earth. They were more abundant in the past, but are present in petroleum reservoirs. Their presence induced radioactive bombardment, which may have altered these sediments. This important subject has not been extensively studied. The aim of this work is to study the behavior of fatty acids-like behenic acid-and dicarboxylic acids-like fumaric acid-as model compounds, which are adsorbed in a clay mineral (Na-montmorillonite) and exposed to gamma radiation. The results show that the radiation-induced decomposition of the clay-acid system goes along a definitive path (oxidation), rather than following several modes of simultaneous decomposition, as happens in radiolysis without clay or by heating the system. The main radiolytic products for fatty acids are their corresponding hydrocarbons, with one C-atom less than the original acid.

  2. Fc Gamma Receptor 3A Polymorphism and Risk for HIV-Associated Cryptococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rohatgi, Soma; Gohil, Shruti; Kuniholm, Mark H.; Schultz, Hannah; Dufaud, Chad; Armour, Kathryn L.; Badri, Sheila; Mailliard, Robbie B.; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is one of the most common causes of fungal disease in HIV-infected persons, but not all of those who are infected develop cryptococcal disease (CD). Although CD4+ T cell deficiency is a risk factor for HIV-associated CD, polymorphisms of phagocytic Fc gamma receptors (FCGRs) have been linked to CD risk in HIV-uninfected persons. To investigate associations between FCGR2A 131 H/R and FCGR3A 158 F/V polymorphisms and CD risk in HIV-infected persons, we performed PCR-based genotyping on banked samples from 164 men enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS): 55 who were HIV infected and developed CD and a matched control group of 54 who were HIV infected and 55 who were HIV uninfected. Using additive and allelic statistical models for analysis, the high-affinity FCGR3A 158V allele was significantly associated with CD status after adjusting for race/ethnicity (odds ratio [OR], 2.1; P = 0.005), as was the FCGR3A 158 VV homozygous genotype after adjusting for race/ethnicity, rate of CD4+ T cell decline, and nadir CD4+ T cell count (OR, 21; P = 0.005). No associations between CD and FCGR2A 131 H/R polymorphism were identified. In binding studies, human IgG (hIgG)-C. neoformans complexes exhibited more binding to CHO-K1 cells expressing FCGR3A 158V than to those expressing FCGR3A 158F, and in cytotoxicity assays, natural killer (NK) cells expressing FCGR3A 158V induced more C. neoformans-infected monocyte cytotoxicity than those expressing FCGR3A 158F. Together, these results show an association between the FCGR3A 158V allele and risk for HIV-associated CD and suggest that this polymorphism could promote C. neoformans pathogenesis via increased binding of C. neoformans immune complexes, resulting in increased phagocyte cargo and/or immune activation. PMID:23982074

  3. Modulatory effects of unsaturated fatty acids on the binding of glucocorticoids to rat liver glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Vallette, G; Vanet, A; Sumida, C; Nunez, E A

    1991-09-01

    Binding of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone to the rat liver cytosol glucocorticoid receptor was inhibited by physiological concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids as a function of increasing dose, degree of unsaturation, and chain length of the fatty acid. Polyunsaturated fatty acids were the most potent inhibitors. Scatchard analysis and Line-weaver-Burk plots of the binding data revealed that both the association constants and number of binding sites decreased and that polyunsaturated fatty acids inhibition was of a mixed non-competitive type. The dissociation rate constant of [3H]dexamethasone from glucocorticoid receptors was increased by up to 10 times in the presence of docosahexaenoic acid, whereas a competitive inhibitor like the glucocorticoid antagonist RU 38486 had no effect. Moreover, sucrose density gradient analysis showed that docosahexaenoic acid inhibited the binding of [3H] dexamethasone to both the 8.8S and 4S forms. The results strongly suggest that unsaturated fatty acids are interacting at a site on the receptor different from the hormone binding site and the heat shock protein and that by binding to a second site unsaturated fatty acids greatly change the conformation of the hormone binding site to reduce its affinity for the hormone, either partially or completely depending on the concentration and the class of the fatty acid. PMID:1874175

  4. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) induces cell death through MAPK-dependent mechanism in osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Hun; Yoo, Chong Il; Kim, Hui Taek; Park, Ji Yeon; Kwon, Chae Hwa; Keun Kim, Yong . E-mail: kim430@pusan.ac.kr

    2006-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) subfamilies in cell death induced by PPAR{gamma} agonists in osteoblastic cells. Ciglitazone and troglitazone, PPAR{gamma} agonists, resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent cell death, which was largely attributed to apoptosis. But a PPAR{alpha} agonist ciprofibrate did not affect the cell death. Ciglitazone caused reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and ciglitazone-induced cell death was prevented by antioxidants, suggesting an important role of ROS generation in the ciglitazone-induced cell death. ROS generation and cell death induced by ciglitazone were inhibited by the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662. Ciglitazone treatment caused activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38. Activation of ERK was dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and that of p38 was independent. Ciglitazone-induced cell death was significantly prevented by PD98059, an inhibitor of ERK upstream kinase MEK1/2, and SB203580, a p38 inhibitor. Ciglitazone treatment increased Bax expression and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and its effect was prevented by N-acetylcysteine, PD98059, and SB203580. Ciglitazone induced caspase activation, which was prevented by PD98059 and SB203580. The general caspase inhibitor z-DEVD-FMK and the specific inhibitor of caspases-3 DEVD-CHO exerted the protective effect against the ciglitazone-induced cell death. The EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and suramin protected against the ciglitazone-induced cell death. Taken together, these findings suggest that the MAPK signaling pathways play an active role in mediating the ciglitazone-induced cell death of osteoblasts and function upstream of a mitochondria-dependent mechanism. These data may provide a novel insight into potential therapeutic strategies for treatment of osteoporosis.

  5. The Pharmacology and Function of Receptors for Short-Chain Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Bolognini, Daniele; Tobin, Andrew B; Milligan, Graeme; Moss, Catherine E

    2016-03-01

    Despite some blockbuster G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) drugs, only a small fraction (∼ 15%) of the more than 390 nonodorant GPCRs have been successfully targeted by the pharmaceutical industry. One way that this issue might be addressed is via translation of recent deorphanization programs that have opened the prospect of extending the reach of new medicine design to novel receptor types with potential therapeutic value. Prominent among these receptors are those that respond to short-chain free fatty acids of carbon chain length 2-6. These receptors, FFA2 (GPR43) and FFA3 (GPR41), are each predominantly activated by the short-chain fatty acids acetate, propionate, and butyrate, ligands that originate largely as fermentation by-products of anaerobic bacteria in the gut. However, the presence of FFA2 and FFA3 on pancreatic β-cells, FFA3 on neurons, and FFA2 on leukocytes and adipocytes means that the biologic role of these receptors likely extends beyond the widely accepted role of regulating peptide hormone release from enteroendocrine cells in the gut. Here, we review the physiologic roles of FFA2 and FFA3, the recent development and use of receptor-selective pharmacological tool compounds and genetic models available to study these receptors, and present evidence of the potential therapeutic value of targeting this emerging receptor pair. PMID:26719580

  6. Stacking interaction and its role in kynurenic acid binding to glutamate ionotropic receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, Alexander V; Zakharov, Gennady A; Shchegolev, Boris F; Savvateeva-Popova, Elena V

    2012-05-01

    Stacking interaction is known to play an important role in protein folding, enzyme-substrate and ligand-receptor complex formation. It has been shown to make a contribution into the aromatic antagonists binding with glutamate ionotropic receptors (iGluRs), in particular, the complex of NMDA receptor NR1 subunit with the kynurenic acid (KYNA) derivatives. The specificity of KYNA binding to the glutamate receptors subtypes might partially result from the differences in stacking interaction. We have calculated the optimal geometry and binding energy of KYNA dimers with the four types of aromatic amino acid residues in Rattus and Drosophila ionotropic iGluR subunits. All ab initio quantum chemical calculations were performed taking into account electron correlations at MP2 and MP4 perturbation theory levels. We have also investigated the potential energy surfaces (PES) of stacking and hydrogen bonds (HBs) within the receptor binding site and calculated the free energy of the ligand-receptor complex formation. The energy of stacking interaction depends both on the size of aromatic moieties and the electrostatic effects. The distribution of charges was shown to determine the geometry of polar aromatic ring dimers. Presumably, stacking interaction is important at the first stage of ligand binding when HBs are weak. The freedom of ligand movements and rotation within receptor site provides the precise tuning of the HBs pattern, while the incorrect stacking binding prohibits the ligand-receptor complex formation. PMID:21833825

  7. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and the regulation of adipocyte function: lessons from human genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Gurnell, Mark

    2005-12-01

    In recent years, the thiazolidinediones (e.g. rosiglitazone, pioglitazone) have emerged as an exciting novel class of therapeutic agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and the human metabolic syndrome. At first glance, the use of these high-affinity peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonists, that promote adipogenesis, to treat a group of disorders that typically have their origins in obesity seems counter-intuitive. However, to view PPARgamma simply as a regulator of fat mass, and adipocytes themselves as passive vessels for energy storage, is to ignore an extensive body of data that speaks of the diverse roles of both this receptor and adipose tissue in the maintenance of normal metabolic homeostasis. This article highlights the important clinical and laboratory observations made in human subjects harbouring genetic variations in PPARgamma that have confirmed its pivotal role in the regulation of adipocyte endocrine function, and thus our metabolic response to the environment. PMID:16311214

  8. Inhibitory effect of PYY on vagally stimulated acid secretion is mediated predominantly by Y1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, K C; Grandt, D; Aurang, K; Eysselein, V E; Schimiczek, M; Reeve, J R

    1996-01-01

    Two molecular forms of peptide YY (PYY), PYY-(1--36) and PYY-(3--36), are abundant in rabbit intestine and blood. We have previously shown that PYY-(1--36) (PYYI) activates equipotently Y1 and Y2 receptors and PYY-(3--36) (PYY II) is a highly selective agonist for Y2 receptors. In the present study, we examined the effect of exogenous infusion of PYY on vagally stimulated gastric acid secretion in awake rabbits with chronic gastric fistula. To determine the specific PYY receptor(s) that mediates this effect, we used a highly selective Y1 agonist, Pro34-PYY, a synthetic PYY, and a Y2-selective agonist, PYY II. Vagal stimulation of acid secretion was elicited by an intravenous bolus injection of insulin (0.125 U/kg) 30 min after beginning a 180-min intravenous infusion of either PYY I, PYY II, or [Pro34]-PYY after a 50 micrograms/kg i.v. bolus of atropine followed immediately by a 500 micrograms/kg sc injection. During infusion of 200 pmol.kg 1.h-1 PYY I, acid output was significantly inhibited to 45 +/- 13% of maximum acid output 60 min after injection of insulin. Similarly, acid output during infusion of 200 pmol.kg-1.h-1 [Pro34]-PYY was significantly inhibited to 52 +/- 12% of maximum. In contrast, acid output during infusion of 200 pmol.kg-1.h-1 of PYY II was not significantly inhibited (101 +/- 18% of maximum). Infusion of double the dose (400 pmol.kg-1.h-1) of PYY II resulted in acid inhibition (51 = 15% of maximum), whereas infusion of the same dose did not significantly enhance acid inhibition by infusion of either PYY I or [Pro34]-PYY (28 +/- 11 and 42 +/- 15% of maximum). These results indicate that PYY, acting predominantly at Y1 receptors, is a potent inhibitor of vagally stimulated acid secretion in adult rabbits. PMID:8772509

  9. Eicosapentaenoic and dihomo gamma linolenic acid metabolism by cultured rat mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Scharschmidt, L.A.; Gibbons, N.B.; Neuwirth, R.

    1989-01-01

    To better understand the effects of dietary fatty acid manipulations on glomerular function, we compared mesangial incorporation, release, and metabolism of arachidonic (AA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and dihomo gamma linolenic (DHG) acids. We found marked differences in mesangial handling of these fatty acids. AA was incorporated into lipids of mesangial cells much more rapidly than EPA or DHG. Ionophore-induced stimulation of fatty acid release from mesangial cells prelabeled with (/sup 14/C)AA, (/sup 14/C)EPA, or (/sup 14/C)DHG caused a release of labeled AA greater than DHG much less than EPA, respectively. Preloading mesangial cells with DHG or EPA for 24 h reduced subsequent basal, ionophore-, and hormone-stimulated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis. Finally, unlike AA, neither EPA nor DHG was converted to a significant extent by mesangial cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase. Thus the mesangial metabolism of DHG and EPA differs both quantitatively and qualitatively from that of AA. Furthermore, EPA and DHG inhibit metabolism of AA at the level of mesangial cyclooxygenase.

  10. Active transport of. gamma. -aminobutyric acid and glycine into synaptic vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kish, P.E.; Fischer-Bovenkerk, C.; Ueda, T. )

    1989-05-01

    Although {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine are recognized as major amino acid inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system, their storage is poorly understood. In this study the authors have characterized vesicular GABA and glycine uptakes in the cerebrum and spinal cord, respectively. They present evidence that GABA and glycine are each taken up into isolated synaptic vesicles in an ATP-dependent manner and that the uptake is driven by an electrochemical proton gradient. Uptake for both amino acids exhibited kinetics with low affinity similar to a vesicular glutamate uptake. The ATP-dependent GABA uptake was not inhibited by the putative amino acid neurotransmitters glycine, taurine, glutamate, or aspartate or by GABA analogs, agonists, and antagonists. Similarly, ATP-dependent glycine uptake was hardly affected by GABA, taurine, glutamate, or aspartate or by glycine analogs or antagonists. The GABA uptake was not affected by chloride, which is in contrast to the uptake of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, whereas the glycine uptake was slightly stimulated by low concentrations of chloride. Tissue distribution studies indicate that the vesicular uptake systems for GABA, glycine, and glutamate are distributed in different proportions in the cerebrum and spinal cord. These results suggest that the vesicular uptake systems for GABA, glycine, and glutamate are distinct from each other.

  11. Synthesis of a novel acrylated abietic acid-g-bacterial cellulose hydrogel by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Abeer, Muhammad Mustafa; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd; Lazim, Azwan Mat; Pandey, Manisha; Martin, Claire

    2014-09-22

    Acrylated abietic acid (acrylated AbA) and acrylated abietic acid-grafted bacterial cellulose pH sensitive hydrogel (acrylated AbA-g-BC) were prepared by a one-pot synthesis. The successful dimerization of acrylic acid (AA) and abietic acid (AbA) and grafting of the dimer onto bacterial cellulose (BC) was confirmed by 13C solid state NMR as well as FT-IR. X-ray diffraction analysis showed characteristic peaks for AbA and BC; further, there was no effect of increasing amorphous AA content on the overall crystallinity of the hydrogel. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed a glass transition temperature of 80°C. Gel fraction and swelling studies gave insight into the features of the hydrogel, suggesting that it was suitable for future applications such as drug delivery. Scanning electron microscopy observations showed an interesting interpenetrating network within the walls of hydrogel samples with the lowest levels of AA and gamma radiation doses. Cell viability test revealed that the synthesized hydrogel is safe for future use in biomedical applications. PMID:24906785

  12. Mechanisms for the activation of Toll-like receptor 2/4 by saturated fatty acids and inhibition by docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Daniel H; Kim, Jeong-A; Lee, Joo Young

    2016-08-15

    Saturated fatty acids can activate Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 but polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) inhibit the activation. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and lipopetides, ligands for TLR4 and TLR2, respectively, are acylated by saturated fatty acids. Removal of these fatty acids results in loss of their ligand activity suggesting that the saturated fatty acyl moieties are required for the receptor activation. X-ray crystallographic studies revealed that these saturated fatty acyl groups of the ligands directly occupy hydrophobic lipid binding domains of the receptors (or co-receptor) and induce the dimerization which is prerequisite for the receptor activation. Saturated fatty acids also induce the dimerization and translocation of TLR4 and TLR2 into lipid rafts in plasma membrane and this process is inhibited by DHA. Whether saturated fatty acids induce the dimerization of the receptors by interacting with these lipid binding domains is not known. Many experimental results suggest that saturated fatty acids promote the formation of lipid rafts and recruitment of TLRs into lipid rafts leading to ligand independent dimerization of the receptors. Such a mode of ligand independent receptor activation defies the conventional concept of ligand induced receptor activation; however, this may enable diverse non-microbial molecules with endogenous and dietary origins to modulate TLR-mediated immune responses. Emerging experimental evidence reveals that TLRs play a key role in bridging diet-induced endocrine and metabolic changes to immune responses. PMID:27085899

  13. Identification of a second T-cell antigen receptor in human and mouse by an anti-peptide gamma-chain-specific monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Ioannides, C G; Itoh, K; Fox, F E; Pahwa, R; Good, R A; Platsoucas, C D

    1987-01-01

    We developed a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (9D7) against a synthetic peptide (P13K) selected from the deduced amino acid sequence of the constant region of the gamma chain of the murine T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) (amino acids 118-130). Using this mAb, we identified a putative second TCR expressed on peripheral blood lymphocytes from a patient with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) that were propagated in culture with recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2) and Con A. This mAb immunoprecipitated two polypeptide chains of 40 and 58 kDa under nonreducing conditions and of 40 and 56 kDa under reducing conditions from 125I-labeled denatured lysates of T3+ WT31- lymphocytes expanded in culture from a SCID patient. These polypeptide chains were not disulfide linked and were not present on human peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal donors cultured for 5 days with phytohemagglutinin or for 2 weeks with rIL-2 and polyclonal activators or on cells of the Jurkat lymphoblastoid human T-cell line. Chemical crosslinking of 125I-labeled cells followed by immunoprecipitation with anti-Leu-4 mAb under nonreducing or reducing conditions revealed that the 40- and 56-kDa polypeptide chains were associated with the T3 differentiation antigen. These results were confirmed by sequential immunoprecipitation with anti-Leu-4 mAb followed by 9D7 anti-P13K mAb. The 9D7 anti-P13K mAb immunoprecipitated two polypeptide chains of 43 and 64 kDa from denatured lysates of lymphocytes from a patient with severe common variable immunodeficiency (CVI) that were expanded in culture with rIL-2 and Con A. Thus, this second TCR may be composed of two polypeptide chains (gamma gamma'), both of which appear to be the product of the gamma-chain gene. These experiments were done with polyclonal cell populations. Cloned T3+ WT31- cell populations are required to determine whether this TCR contains two gamma polypeptide chains. In contrast, only one polypeptide chain of 56 kDa was immunoprecipitated by the

  14. Hepatic handling of a synthetic gamma-labeled bile acid (/sup 75/SeHCAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Galatola, G.; Jazrawi, R.P.; Bridges, C.; Joseph, A.E.; Northfield, T.C.

    1988-03-01

    /sup 75/Se-homocholic acid-taurine (/sup 75/SeHCAT) is the first available gamma-labeled bile acid, and should therefore be handled more efficiently and specifically by the liver than previous hepatoscintigraphic agents. We have measured serum and hepatic kinetics for /sup 75/SeHCAT, and compared them with those for the conventional hepatobiliary scintigraphic agent 99mTc-hepatoiminodiacetic acid, and with serum kinetics for the corresponding natural bile acid, (/sup 14/C)cholic acid-taurine. We used a dynamic scintigraphic technique and serial blood sampling in 8 subjects. Initial hepatic uptake rate was identical to initial serum disappearance rate (14% dose/min) for /sup 75/SeHCAT, but significantly lower for 99mTc-hepatoiminodiacetic acid (6% vs. 14% dose/min, p less than 0.001). Hepatic transit time was shorter for /sup 75/SeHCAT (13 min vs. 22 min, p less than 0.02), net hepatic excretory rate was more rapid (1.4% vs. 0.8% dose/min, p less than 0.001), and urinary excretion was lower (1.0% vs. 9.0% dose, p less than 0.001). Initial and late-plasma disappearance rates were significantly lower for /sup 75/SeHCAT (14.3% and 1.5% dose/min) than for (/sup 14/C)cholic acid-taurine (21.3% and 2.8% dose/min, respectively), and plasma clearance was also lower (2/sup 75/ vs. 670 ml/min). In vitro, /sup 75/SeHCAT was bound to serum proteins more completely than (/sup 14/C)cholic acid-taurine (90.4% vs. 86.5%, p less than 0.005). We conclude that /sup 75/SeHCAT provides a hepatoscintigraphic agent that is handled more efficiently and specifically by the liver than the conventionally used agent 99mTc-hepatoiminodiacetic acid. It is not cleared from the serum as rapidly as (/sup 14/C)cholic acid-taurine, probably due to its stronger protein binding. The clinical value of /sup 75/SeHCAT in assessing liver disease should be investigated.

  15. Identification of isosilybin a from milk thistle seeds as an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Pferschy-Wenzig, Eva-Maria; Atanasov, Atanas G; Malainer, Clemens; Noha, Stefan M; Kunert, Olaf; Schuster, Daniela; Heiss, Elke H; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Wagner, Hildebert; Bauer, Rudolf; Dirsch, Verena M

    2014-04-25

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a key regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism. Agonists of this nuclear receptor are used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and are also studied as a potential treatment of other metabolic diseases, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Silymarin, a concentrated phenolic mixture from milk thistle (Silybum marianum) seeds, is used widely as a supportive agent in the treatment of a variety of liver diseases. In this study, the PPARγ activation potential of silymarin and its main constituents was investigated. Isosilybin A (3) caused transactivation of a PPARγ-dependent luciferase reporter in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect could be reversed upon co-treatment with the PPARγ antagonist T0070907. In silico docking studies suggested a binding mode for 3 distinct from that of the inactive silymarin constituents, with one additional hydrogen bond to Ser342 in the entrance region of the ligand-binding domain of the receptor. Hence, isosilybin A (3) has been identified as the first flavonolignan PPARγ agonist, suggesting its further investigation as a modulator of this nuclear receptor. PMID:24597776

  16. (+/-)-1-Tetralone-3-carboxylic acid and (+/-)-1-tetralone-2-acetic acid: hydrogen bonding in two gamma-keto acids.

    PubMed

    Barcon, A; Brunskill, A P; Lalancette, R A; Thompson, H W; Miller, A J

    2001-03-01

    The crystal structure of (+/-)-4-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-2-carboxylic acid (C(11)H(10)O(3)) involves projection of the carboxyl group nearly orthogonal to the aromatic plane and hydrogen bonding of the acid groups by centrosymmetric pairing across the a edge and the center of the chosen cell [O...O = 2.705 (2) A]. Intermolecular C--H...O==C close contacts to translationally related molecules are found for both the ketone (2.55 A) and the acid (2.67 A). In (+/-)-1-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-2-acetic acid (C(12)H(12)O(3)), the aggregation involves centrosymmetric carboxyl dimers mutually hydrogen bonded across the bc face and the a edge of the chosen cell [O...O = 2.674 (2) A]. A 2.60 A close C--H...O==C contact is found to the carboxyl group of centrosymmetrically related molecule. PMID:11250596

  17. Gamma-linolenic acid in borage oil reverses epidermal hyperproliferation in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Chung, S; Kong, S; Seong, K; Cho, Y

    2002-10-01

    As dietary sources of gamma-linolenic acid [GLA; 18:3(n-6)], borage oil (BO; 24-25 g/100 g GLA) and evening primrose oil (PO; 8-10 g/100 g GLA) are efficacious in treating skin disorders. The triglycerol stereospecificity of these oils is distinct, with GLA being concentrated in the sn-2 position of BO and in the sn-3 position of PO. To determine whether the absolute level and/or the triglycerol stereospecificity of GLA in oils affect biological efficacy, epidermal hyperproliferation was induced in guinea pigs by a hydrogenated coconut oil (HCO) diet for 8 wk. Subsequently, guinea pigs were fed diets of PO, BO or a mixture of BO and safflower oil (SO) for 2 wk. The mixture of BO and SO (BS) diet had a similar level of GLA as PO but with sn-2 stereospecificity. As controls, two groups were fed SO and HCO for 10 wk. Epidermal hyperproliferation was reversed by all three oils in the order of BO > BS > PO. However, proliferation scores of group PO were higher than of the normal control group, SO. The accumulations of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid [DGLA; 20:3(n-6)], an elongase product of GLA, into phospholipids and ceramides, of 15-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (15-HETrE), the potent antiproliferative metabolite of DGLA, and of ceramides, the major lipid maintaining epidermal barrier, in the epidermis of group BO were greater than of groups BS and PO. Group BS had higher levels of DGLA, 15-HETrE and ceramides than group PO. With primary dependence on absolute levels, our data demonstrate that the antiproliferative efficacy of GLA in the epidermis is preferably exerted from sn-2 stereospecificity of GLA in BO. PMID:12368400

  18. Discovery of a Series of Imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines with Dual Activity at Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-[gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Filzen, Gary F.; Flynn, Declan; Bigge, Christopher F.; Chen, Jing; Davis, Jo Ann; Dudley, Danette A.; Edmunds, Jeremy J.; Esmaeil, Nadia; Geyer, Andrew; Heemstra, Ronald J.; Jalaie, Mehran; Ohren, Jeffrey F.; Ostroski, Robert; Ellis, Teresa; Schaum, Robert P.; Stoner, Chad

    2013-03-07

    Mining of an in-house collection of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists to identify compounds with activity at the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) revealed a new series of imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines 2 possessing activity at these two receptors. Early availability of the crystal structure of the lead compound 2a bound to the ligand binding domain of human PPAR{gamma} confirmed the mode of interaction of this scaffold to the nuclear receptor and assisted in the optimization of PPAR{gamma} activity. Among the new compounds, (S)-3-(5-(2-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)phenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl)-2-ethyl-5-isobutyl-7-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (2l) was identified as a potent angiotensin II type I receptor blocker (IC{sub 50} = 1.6 nM) with partial PPAR{gamma} agonism (EC{sub 50} = 212 nM, 31% max) and oral bioavailability in rat. The dual pharmacology of 2l was demonstrated in animal models of hypertension (SHR) and insulin resistance (ZDF rat). In the SHR, 2l was highly efficacious in lowering blood pressure, while robust lowering of glucose and triglycerides was observed in the male ZDF rat.

  19. Unbinding of Retinoic Acid from its Receptor Studied by Steered Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztin, D.

    1999-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptor (RAR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes involved in cell growth, differentiation, and development. Binding of the retinoic acid hormone to RAR is accompanied by conformational changes in the protein which induce transactivation or transrepression of the target genes. In this paper we present a study of the hormone binding/unbinding process in order to clarify the role of some of the amino acid contacts and identify possible pathways of the all-trans retinoic acid binding/unbinding to/from human retinoic acid receptor (hRAR)-g. Three possible pathways were explored using steered molecular dynamics simulations. Unbinding was induced on a time scale of 1 ns by applying external forces to the hormone. The simulations suggest that the hormone may employ one pathway for binding and an alternative "back door" pathway for unbinding.

  20. Three amino acids in the D2 dopamine receptor regulate selective ligand function and affinity

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, David F.; Ericksen, Spencer S.; Schetz, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The D2 dopamine receptor is an important therapeutic target for the treatment of psychotic, agitated, and abnormal behavioral states. To better understand the specific interactions of subtype-selective ligands with dopamine receptor subtypes, seven ligands with high selectivity (>120-fold) for the D4 subtype of dopamine receptor were tested on wild-type and mutant D2 receptors. Five of the selective ligands were observed to have 21-fold to 293-fold increases in D2 receptor affinity when three non-conserved amino acids in TM2 and TM3 were mutated to the corresponding D4 amino acids. The two ligands with the greatest improvement in affinity for the D2 mutant receptor [i.e., 3-{[4-(4-iodophenyl) piperazin-1-yl]methyl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (L-750,667) and 1-[4-iodobenzyl]-4-[N-(3-isopropoxy-2-pyridinyl)-N-methyl]-aminopiperidine (RBI-257)] were investigated in functional assays. Consistent with their higher affinity for the mutant than for the wild-type receptor, concentrations of L-750,667 or RBI-257 that produced large reductions in the potency of quinpirole’s functional response in the mutant did not significantly reduce quinpirole’s functional response in the wild-type D2 receptor. In contrast to RBI-257 which is an antagonist at all receptors, L-750,667 is a partial agonist at the wild-type D2 but an antagonist at both the mutant D2 and wild-type D4 receptors. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the TM2/3 microdomain of the D2 dopamine receptor not only regulates the selective affinity of ligands, but in selected cases can also regulate their function. Utilizing a new docking technique that incorporates receptor backbone flexibility, the three non-conserved amino acids that encompass the TM2/3 microdomain were found to account in large part for the differences in intermolecular steric contacts between the ligands and receptors. Consistent with the experimental data, this model illustrates the interactions between a variety of subtype

  1. [Expression of Mortierella isabellina delta6-fatty acid desaturase gene in gamma-linolenic acid production in transgenic tobacco].

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Chun; Liu, Li; Hu, Guo-Wu; Xing, Lai-Jun

    2003-03-01

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, C18:3delta6.9.12) is nutritional and important polyunsaturated fatty acid in human and animal diets. GLA play an important role in hormone regulation and fatty acid metabolization. Furthermore it is also the biological precursor of a group of molecules, including prostaglandins, leukotrienes and thromboxanes. Vast majority of oilseed crops do not produce GLA, but linoleic acid (LA, C18:2delta9.12) as its substrate. GLA is only produced by a small number of oilseed plants such as evening promrose ( Oenotheera spp.), borage (Borago officinalis) and etc. delta6-fatty acid desaturase (D6D) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of GLA. It can convert from linoleic acid to linolenic acid. To produce GLA in tobacco, plant expression vector was first constructed. To facilitate preparation of plant expression constructs, flanking Xba I and Bgl II restriction enzyme sites were added to the coding region of clone pTMICL6 by PCR amplification. pTMICL6 contains delta6-fatty acid desaturase gene cloned from Mortierella isabellina which is an oil-producing fugus. The PCR product was purified and subcloned into the plant expression vector pGA643 to generate the recombinant vector pGAMICL6 which contains the ORF of the D6D gene of Mortierella isabellina, together with regulatory elements consisting of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the nopaline synthase (nos) termination sequence. The plasmid pGAMICL6 was transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404 by method of freeze thawing of liquid nitrogen. Transformants were selected by plating on YEB medium plates containing kanamycin and streptomycin and grown overnight at 28 degrees C, then transformants were further identified by PCR. The positive transformant containing the plant expression vector pGAMICL6 was transformed into tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi) via Agrobacterium infection. Transgenic plants were selected on 100 microg/mL kanamycin. Plants were

  2. Improved enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw by combined use of gamma ray and dilute acid for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun Hong, Sung; Taek Lee, Jae; Lee, Sungbeom; Gon Wi, Seung; Ju Cho, Eun; Singh, Sudhir; Sik Lee, Seung; Yeoup Chung, Byung

    2014-01-01

    Pretreating wheat straw with a combination of dilute acid and gamma irradiation was performed in an attempt to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis for bioethanol production. The glucose yield was significantly affected by combined pretreatment (3% sulfuric acid-gamma irradiation), compared with untreated wheat straw and individual pretreatment. The increasing enzymatic hydrolysis after combined pretreatment is resulting from decrease in crystallinity of cellulose, loss of hemicelluloses, and removal or modification of lignin. Therefore, combined pretreatment is one of the most effective methods for enhancing the enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw biomass.

  3. Telmisartan protects against diabetic vascular complications in a mouse model of obesity and type 2 diabetes, partially through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-{gamma}-dependent activity

    SciTech Connect

    Toyama, Kensuke; Nakamura, Taishi; Kataoka, Keiichiro; Yasuda, Osamu; Fukuda, Masaya; Tokutomi, Yoshiko; Dong, Yi-Fei; Ogawa, Hisao; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, acts as a partial PPAR{gamma} agonist. {yields} The protective effects of telmisartan against diabetic vascular injury were associated with attenuation of vascular NF{kappa}B activation and TNF {alpha}. {yields} PPAR{gamma} activity of telmisartan was involved in the normalization of vascular PPAR{gamma} downregulation in diabetic mice. {yields} We provided the first evidence indicating that PPAR{gamma} activity of telmisartan contributed to the protective effects of telmisartan against diabetic vascular complication. -- Abstract: Experimental and clinical data support the notion that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) activation is associated with anti-atherosclerosis as well as anti-diabetic effect. Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), acts as a partial PPAR{gamma} agonist. We hypothesized that telmisartan protects against diabetic vascular complications, through PPAR{gamma} activation. We compared the effects of telmisartan, telmisartan combined with GW9662 (a PPAR{gamma} antagonist), and losartan with no PPAR{gamma} activity on vascular injury in obese type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Compared to losartan, telmisartan significantly ameliorated vascular endothelial dysfunction, downregulation of phospho-eNOS, and coronary arterial remodeling in db/db mice. More vascular protective effects of telmisartan than losartan were associated with greater anti-inflammatory effects of telmisartan, as shown by attenuation of vascular nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) activation and tumor necrosis factor {alpha}. Coadministration of GW9662 with telmisartan abolished the above mentioned greater protective effects of telmisartan against vascular injury than losartan in db/db mice. Thus, PPAR{gamma} activity appears to be involved in the vascular protective effects of telmisartan in db/db mice. Moreover, telmisartan, but not losartan, prevented the downregulation of

  4. A mollusk retinoic acid receptor (RAR) ortholog sheds light on the evolution of ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Nadendla, Eswar Kumar; Lima, Daniela; Pierzchalski, Keely; Jones, Jace W; Kane, Maureen; Nishikawa, Jun-Ichi; Hiromori, Youhei; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Santos, Miguel M; Castro, L Filipe C; Bourguet, William; Schubert, Michael; Laudet, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors that regulate networks of target genes in response to small molecules. There is a strong bias in our knowledge of these receptors because they were mainly characterized in classical model organisms, mostly vertebrates. Therefore, the evolutionary origins of specific ligand-receptor couples still remain elusive. Here we present the identification and characterization of a retinoic acid receptor (RAR) from the mollusk Nucella lapillus (NlRAR). We show that this receptor specifically binds to DNA response elements organized in direct repeats as a heterodimer with retinoid X receptor. Surprisingly, we also find that NlRAR does not bind all-trans retinoic acid or any other retinoid we tested. Furthermore, NlRAR is unable to activate the transcription of reporter genes in response to stimulation by retinoids and to recruit coactivators in the presence of these compounds. Three-dimensional modeling of the ligand-binding domain of NlRAR reveals an overall structure that is similar to vertebrate RARs. However, in the ligand-binding pocket (LBP) of the mollusk receptor, the alteration of several residues interacting with the ligand has apparently led to an overall decrease in the strength of the interaction with the ligand. Accordingly, mutations of NlRAR at key positions within the LBP generate receptors that are responsive to retinoids. Altogether our data suggest that, in mollusks, RAR has lost its affinity for all-trans retinoic acid, highlighting the evolutionary plasticity of its LBP. When put in an evolutionary context, our results reveal new structural and functional features of nuclear receptors validated by millions of years of evolution that were impossible to reveal in model organisms. PMID:25116705

  5. A Mollusk Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR) Ortholog Sheds Light on the Evolution of Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Nadendla, Eswar Kumar; Lima, Daniela; Pierzchalski, Keely; Jones, Jace W.; Kane, Maureen; Nishikawa, Jun-Ichi; Hiromori, Youhei; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Santos, Miguel M.; Castro, L. Filipe C.; Bourguet, William

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors that regulate networks of target genes in response to small molecules. There is a strong bias in our knowledge of these receptors because they were mainly characterized in classical model organisms, mostly vertebrates. Therefore, the evolutionary origins of specific ligand-receptor couples still remain elusive. Here we present the identification and characterization of a retinoic acid receptor (RAR) from the mollusk Nucella lapillus (NlRAR). We show that this receptor specifically binds to DNA response elements organized in direct repeats as a heterodimer with retinoid X receptor. Surprisingly, we also find that NlRAR does not bind all-trans retinoic acid or any other retinoid we tested. Furthermore, NlRAR is unable to activate the transcription of reporter genes in response to stimulation by retinoids and to recruit coactivators in the presence of these compounds. Three-dimensional modeling of the ligand-binding domain of NlRAR reveals an overall structure that is similar to vertebrate RARs. However, in the ligand-binding pocket (LBP) of the mollusk receptor, the alteration of several residues interacting with the ligand has apparently led to an overall decrease in the strength of the interaction with the ligand. Accordingly, mutations of NlRAR at key positions within the LBP generate receptors that are responsive to retinoids. Altogether our data suggest that, in mollusks, RAR has lost its affinity for all-trans retinoic acid, highlighting the evolutionary plasticity of its LBP. When put in an evolutionary context, our results reveal new structural and functional features of nuclear receptors validated by millions of years of evolution that were impossible to reveal in model organisms. PMID:25116705

  6. Peroxisome proliferators and fatty acids negatively regulate liver X receptor-mediated activity and sterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T E; Ledwith, B J

    2001-04-01

    Peroxisome proliferators (PPs) are potent tumor promoters in rodents. The mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis requires the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha), but might also involve the PPARalpha independent alteration of signaling pathways that regulate cell growth. Here, we studied the effects of PPs on the mevalonate pathway, a critical pathway that controls cell proliferation. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are nuclear receptors that act as sterol sensors in the mevalonate pathway. In gene reporter assays in COS-7 cells, the basal activity of the LXR responsive reporter gene (LXRE-luc) was suppressed by 10 microM lovastatin and zaragozic acid A, suggesting that this activity was attributed to the activation of native LXRs, by endogenously produced mevalonate products. The potent PP and rodent tumor promoter, pirinixic acid (WY-14643) also inhibited LXR-mediated transcription in a dose related manner (approximate IC(50) of 100 microM). As did several other PPs including ciprofibric acid and mono-ethylhexylphthalate. Polyunsaturated and medium to long chain fatty acids at 100 microM were also potent inhibitors; the arachidonic acid analogue eicosatetraynoic acid being the most active (approximate IC(50) of 10 microM). Of the PPs and fatty acids tested, there was a strong correlation between the ability of these agents to suppress de novo sterol synthesis in a rat hepatoma cell line, H4IIEC3, and inhibit LXR-mediated transcription in COS-7 cells, but a discordance between these endpoints and PPARalpha activation and fatty acid acyl-CoA oxidase induction. Taken together, these results suggest that PPs and fatty acids negatively regulate the mevalonate pathway through a mechanism that is not entirely dependent on PPARalpha activation. Because of the importance of the mevalonate pathway in regulating cell proliferation, the modulation of this pathway by PPs and fatty acids might contribute to their actions on cell growth

  7. Identification of a novel agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and gamma that may contribute to the anti-diabetic activity of guggulipid in Lep(ob)/Lep(ob) mice.

    PubMed

    Cornick, Claire L; Strongitharm, Barbara H; Sassano, Gary; Rawlins, Christopher; Mayes, Andrew E; Joseph, Alison N; O'Dowd, Jacqueline; Stocker, Claire; Wargent, Ed; Cawthorne, Michael A; Brown, A Louise; Arch, Jonathan R S

    2009-10-01

    The ethyl acetate extract of the gum of the guggul tree, Commiphora mukul (guggulipid), is marketed for the treatment of dyslipidaemia and obesity. We have found that it protects Lep(ob)/Lep(ob) mice from diabetes and have investigated possible molecular mechanisms for its metabolic effects, in particular those due to a newly identified component, commipheric acid. Both guggulipid (EC(50)=0.82 microg/ml) and commipheric acid (EC(50)=0.26 microg/ml) activated human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) in COS-7 cells transiently transfected with the receptor and a reporter gene construct. Similarly, both guggulipid (EC(50)=2.3 microg/ml) and commipheric acid (EC(50)=0.3 microg/ml) activated PPARgamma and both promoted the differentiation of 3T3 L1 preadipocytes to adipocytes. Guggulipid (EC(50)=0.66 microg/ml), but not commipheric acid, activated liver X receptor alpha (LXRalpha). E- and Z-guggulsterones, which are largely responsible for guggulipid's hypocholesterolaemic effect, had no effects in these assays. Guggulipid (20 g/kg diet) improved glucose tolerance in female Lep(ob)/Lep(ob) mice. Pure commipheric acid, given orally (960 mg/kg body weight, once daily), increased liver weight but did not affect body weight or glucose tolerance. However, the ethyl ester of commipheric acid (150 mg/kg, twice daily) lowered fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin, and plasma triglycerides without affecting food intake or body weight. These results raise the possibility that guggulipid has anti-diabetic activity due partly to commipheric acid's PPARalpha/gamma agonism, but the systemic bioavailability of orally dosed, pure commipheric acid appears poor. Another component may contribute to guggulipid's anti-diabetic and hypocholesterolaemic activity by stimulating LXRalpha. PMID:18926687

  8. Role of transient receptor potential and acid-sensing ion channels in peripheral inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    White, John P M; Cibelli, Mario; Rei Fidalgo, Antonio; Paule, Cleoper C; Noormohamed, Faruq; Urban, Laszlo; Maze, Mervyn; Nagy, Istvan

    2010-03-01

    Pain originating in inflammation is the most common pathologic pain condition encountered by the anesthesiologist whether in the context of surgery, its aftermath, or in the practice of pain medicine. Inflammatory agents, released as components of the body's response to peripheral tissue damage or disease, are now known to be collectively capable of activating transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4, transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1, and acid-sensing ion channels, whereas individual agents may activate only certain of these ion channels. These ionotropic receptors serve many physiologic functions-as, indeed, do many of the inflammagens released in the inflammatory process. Here, we introduce the reader to the role of these ionotropic receptors in mediating peripheral pain in response to inflammation. PMID:20179512

  9. Farnesoid X Receptor Agonists and Other Bile Acid Signaling Strategies for Treatment of Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Halilbasic, Emina; Fuchs, Claudia; Traussnigg, Stefan; Trauner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) respond to bile acids (BAs) by activating transcriptional networks and/or signaling cascades. These cascades affect the expression of a great number of target genes relevant for BA, cholesterol, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, as well as genes involved in inflammation, fibrosis and carcinogenesis. FXR activation in the liver tissue and beyond, such as the gut-liver axis, kidney and adipose tissue, plays a role in metabolic diseases. These BA receptors activators hold promise to become a new class of drugs to be used in the treatment of chronic liver disease, hepatocellular cancer and extrahepatic inflammatory and metabolic diseases. This review discusses the relevant BA receptors, the new drugs that target BA transport and signaling and their possible applications. PMID:27332721

  10. Site-specific incorporation of keto amino acids into functional G protein-coupled receptors using unnatural amino acid mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shixin; Köhrer, Caroline; Huber, Thomas; Kazmi, Manija; Sachdev, Pallavi; Yan, Elsa C Y; Bhagat, Aditi; RajBhandary, Uttam L; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2008-01-18

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are ubiquitous heptahelical transmembrane proteins involved in a wide variety of signaling pathways. The work described here on application of unnatural amino acid mutagenesis to two GPCRs, the chemokine receptor CCR5 (a major co-receptor for the human immunodeficiency virus) and rhodopsin (the visual photoreceptor), adds a new dimension to studies of GPCRs. We incorporated the unnatural amino acids p-acetyl-L-phenylalanine (Acp) and p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine (Bzp) into CCR5 at high efficiency in mammalian cells to produce functional receptors harboring reactive keto groups at three specific positions. We obtained functional mutant CCR5, at levels up to approximately 50% of wild type as judged by immunoblotting, cell surface expression, and ligand-dependent calcium flux. Rhodopsin containing Acp at three different sites was also purified in high yield (0.5-2 microg/10(7) cells) and reacted with fluorescein hydrazide in vitro to produce fluorescently labeled rhodopsin. The incorporation of reactive keto groups such as Acp or Bzp into GPCRs allows their reaction with different reagents to introduce a variety of spectroscopic and other probes. Bzp also provides the possibility of photo-cross-linking to identify precise sites of protein-protein interactions, including GPCR binding to G proteins and arrestins, and for understanding the molecular basis of ligand recognition by chemokine receptors. PMID:17993461

  11. Farnesoid X receptor alpha: a molecular link between bile acids and steroid signaling?

    PubMed

    Baptissart, Marine; Vega, Aurelie; Martinot, Emmanuelle; Baron, Silvère; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A; Volle, David H

    2013-12-01

    Bile acids are cholesterol metabolites that have been extensively studied in recent decades. In addition to having ancestral roles in digestion and fat solubilization, bile acids have recently been described as signaling molecules involved in many physiological functions, such as glucose and energy metabolisms. These signaling pathways involve the activation of the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXRα) or of the G protein-coupled receptor TGR5. In this review, we will focus on the emerging role of FXRα, suggesting important functions for the receptor in steroid metabolism. It has been described that FXRα is expressed in the adrenal glands and testes, where it seems to control steroid production. FXRα also participates in steroid catabolism in the liver and interferes with the steroid signaling pathways in target tissues via crosstalk with steroid receptors. In this review, we discuss the potential impacts of bile acid (BA), through its interactions with steroid metabolism, on glucose metabolism, sexual function, and prostate and breast cancers. Although several of the published reports rely on in vitro studies, they highlight the need to understand the interactions that may affect health. This effect is important because BA levels are increased in several pathophysiological conditions related to liver injuries. Additionally, BA receptors are targeted clinically using therapeutics to treat liver diseases, diabetes, and cancers. PMID:23784309

  12. Phenotypic screening of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4-{gamma} receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdin, Anna Karin; Surve, Vikas V.; Joensson, Marie; Bjursell, Mikael; Edenro, Anne; Schuelke, Meint; Saad, Alaa; Bjurstroem, Sivert; Lundgren, Elisabeth Jensen; Snaith, Michael; Fransson-Steen, Ronny; Toernell, Jan; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad . E-mail: mohammad.bohlooly@astrazeneca.com

    2006-10-20

    Using the mouse as a model organism in pharmaceutical research presents unique advantages as its physiology in many ways resembles the human physiology, it also has a relatively short generation time, low breeding and maintenance costs, and is available in a wide variety of inbred strains. The ability to genetically modify mouse embryonic stem cells to generate mouse models that better mimic human disease is another advantage. In the present study, a comprehensive phenotypic screening protocol is applied to elucidate the phenotype of a novel mouse knockout model of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4-{gamma}. HNF4-{gamma} is expressed in the kidneys, gut, pancreas, and testis. First level of the screen is aimed at general health, morphologic appearance, normal cage behaviour, and gross neurological functions. The second level of the screen looks at metabolic characteristics and lung function. The third level of the screen investigates behaviour more in-depth and the fourth level consists of a thorough pathological characterisation, blood chemistry, haematology, and bone marrow analysis. When compared with littermate wild-type mice (HNF4-{gamma}{sup +/+}), the HNF4-{gamma} knockout (HNF4-{gamma}{sup -/-}) mice had lowered energy expenditure and locomotor activity during night time that resulted in a higher body weight despite having reduced intake of food and water. HNF4-{gamma}{sup -/-} mice were less inclined to build nest and were found to spend more time in a passive state during the forced swim test.

  13. Statistical Mechanics Model for the Interaction between the Neurotransmitter γ-Aminobutyric acid and GABAA Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Sufi; Saxena, Nina C.; Conrad, Kevin A.; Hussain, Arif

    2004-07-01

    Interactions between the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABAA receptor ion channels play an important role in the central nervous system. A statistical mechanics model is proposed for the interaction between GABA and GABAA receptors. The model provides good fits to the electrophysiology data as well as an estimation of receptor activation energies, and predicts the temperature dependence consistent with measurements. In addition, the model provides insights into single channel conductance measurements. This model is also applicable to other ligand-gated ion channels with similar pentameric structures.

  14. Crystal structure of FAS thioesterase domain with polyunsaturated fatty acyl adduct and inhibition by dihomo-[gamma]-linolenic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Chakravarty, Bornali; Zheng, Fei; Gu, Ziwei; Wu, Hongmei; Mao, Jianqiang; Wakil, Salih J.; Quiocho, Florante A.

    2012-05-29

    Human fatty acid synthase (hFAS) is a homodimeric multidomain enzyme that catalyzes a series of reactions leading to the de novo biosynthesis of long-chain fatty acids, mainly palmitate. The carboxy-terminal thioesterase (TE) domain determines the length of the fatty acyl chain and its ultimate release by hydrolysis. Because of the upregulation of hFAS in a variety of cancers, it is a target for antiproliferative agent development. Dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been known to confer beneficial effects on many diseases and health conditions, including cancers, inflammations, diabetes, and heart diseases, but the precise molecular mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. We report the crystal structure of the hFAS TE domain covalently modified and inactivated by methyl {gamma}-linolenylfluorophosphonate. Whereas the structure confirmed the phosphorylation by the phosphonate head group of the active site serine, it also unexpectedly revealed the binding of the 18-carbon polyunsaturated {gamma}-linolenyl tail in a long groove-tunnel site, which itself is formed mainly by the emergence of an {alpha} helix (the 'helix flap'). We then found inhibition of the TE domain activity by the PUFA dihomo-{gamma}-linolenic acid; {gamma}- and {alpha}-linolenic acids, two popular dietary PUFAs, were less effective. Dihomo-{gamma}-linolenic acid also inhibited fatty acid biosynthesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and selective human breast cancer cell lines, including SKBR3 and MDAMB231. In addition to revealing a novel mechanism for the molecular recognition of a polyunsaturated fatty acyl chain, our results offer a new framework for developing potent FAS inhibitors as therapeutics against cancers and other diseases.

  15. Role of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 (FFAR2) in the Regulation of Metabolic Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Besides being an important source of fuel and structural components of biological membranes, free fatty acids (FFAs) are known to display a wide variety of roles that include modulation of receptor signaling and regulation of gene expression among many. FFAs play a significant role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis by activating specific G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) in pancreatic β cells, immune cells, white adipose tissue, intestine and several other tissues. Free Fatty acid receptor 2 (FFAR2) also known as GPR43 belongs to this group of GPCRs and has been shown to participate in a number of important biological activities. FFAR2 is activated by short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) such as acetate, propionate and butyrate. SCFAs are formed in the distal gut by bacterial fermentation of macro-fibrous material that escapes digestion in the upper gastrointestinal tract and enters the colon and have been shown to play vital role in the immune regulation and metabolic homeostasis. FFAR2 and other free fatty acid receptors are considered key components of the body's nutrient sensing mechanism and targeting these receptors is assumed to offer novel therapies for the management of diabetes and other metabolic disorders. This review aims to summarize the current state of our understanding of FFAR2 biology with a particular focus on its role in metabolic homeostasis. PMID:25850624

  16. Phosphorylation-dependent sumoylation regulates estrogen-related receptor-alpha and -gamma transcriptional activity through a synergy control motif.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Annie M; Wilson, Brian J; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Giguère, Vincent

    2008-03-01

    Interplay between different posttranslational modifications of transcription factors is an important mechanism to achieve an integrated regulation of gene expression. For the estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) alpha and gamma, regulation by posttranslational modifications is still poorly documented. Here we show that transcriptional repression associated with the ERR amino-terminal domains is mediated through sumoylation at a conserved phospho-sumoyl switch, psiKxEPxSP, that exists within a larger synergy control motif. Arginine substitution of the sumoylatable lysine residue or alanine substitution of a nearby phosphorylatable serine residue (serine 19 in ERRalpha) increased the transcriptional activity of both ERRalpha and -gamma. In addition, phospho-mimetic substitution of the serine residue with aspartate restored the sumoylation and transcriptional repression activity. The increased transcriptional activity of the sumoylation-deficient mutants was more pronounced in the presence of multiple adjacent ERR response elements. We also identified protein inhibitor of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription y as an interacting partner and a small ubiquitin-related modifier E3 ligase for ERRalpha. Importantly, analysis with a phospho-specific antibody revealed that sumoylation of ERRalpha in mouse liver requires phosphorylation of serine 19. Taken together, these results show that the interplay of phosphorylation and sumoylation in the amino-terminal domain provides an additional mechanism to regulate the transcriptional activity of ERRalpha and -gamma. PMID:18063693

  17. Functional effects on the acetylcholine receptor of multiple mutations of gamma Asp174 and delta Asp180.

    PubMed

    Martin, M D; Karlin, A

    1997-09-01

    Residues gamma Asp174 and delta Asp180, previously implicated in the binding of acetylcholine (ACh) by the mouse muscle ACh receptor, were each mutated to nine other residues, Asn, Glu, Thr, Ala, Cys, His, Val, Tyr, and Lys. The effects of the mutations on ACh-induced current was determined on surface receptors containing wild-type alpha and beta subunits and mutant gamma and delta subunits. The mutations increased the concentration of ACh eliciting half-maximal current (EC50) by factors from 22 for the Glu mutant to 660 for the Lys mutant. Analysis of the effects in terms of the difference in the accessible surface areas of the mutant and wild-type side chains and the difference in side-chain charges indicated that, per binding site, Delta DeltaG0 for activation was a sum of 10 cal mol-1 A-2 of change in side-chain accessible surface area and of 0.95 kcal mol-1 positive step-1 in side-chain charge, equivalent to 1 mol of charge falling through 42 mV. The effects on the concentration of ACh (IC50, ACh) and of d-tubocurarine (IC50,dTC) causing half-maximal retardation of alpha-bungarotoxin binding were determined on complexes containing wild-type alpha and beta subunits and either mutant gamma or mutant delta subunit. The effects on IC50,ACh correlated well with the effects on EC50, with a similar magnitude for the influence of side-chain charge on the free energy of binding (in this case to the desensitized state) and on the electrostatic potential at the binding site. The effects on IC50,dTC were in all cases less than the effects on IC50,ACh, and the two sets of effects were poorly correlated. In line with the higher ACh affinity and lower d-tubocurarine affinity of the alpha-delta binding site compared to the alpha-gamma binding site, mutations of delta Asp180 had a greater effect on IC50,ACh than did the same mutations of gamma Asp174, and vice versa for effects on IC50,dTC. Consequently, all mutations decreased the asymmetry in the binding properties of the

  18. Critical role of tyrosine 277 in the ligand-binding and transactivating properties of retinoic acid receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Mailfait, S; Belaiche, D; Kouach, M; Dallery, N; Chavatte, P; Formstecher, P; Sablonnière, B

    2000-03-01

    Retinoic acid receptors specifically bind all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) and function as RA-inducible transcriptional regulatory factors. Binding of RA to RARalpha, beta, and gamma is sensitive to nitration with tetranitromethane, a tyrosine-specific modifying reagent. To identify tyrosine residue(s) that are important for RA binding, we carried out chemical modification experiments with purified RARalpha ligand-binding domain (RARalpha-LBD) subjected to partial acid hydrolysis and selective proteolysis. The chemically modified peptides containing each of the three Tyr residues present in the RARalpha-LBD sequence were then analyzed and identified by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS). We found that RA binding to RARalpha-LBD protected Tyr(277)-containing peptides from nitration. Protection of Tyr(277) could result either from direct masking by the bound ligand or from ligand-induced changes in receptor conformation and tyrosine accessibility. The role of Tyr residues was further documented by site directed mutagenesis using three site-specific RARalpha mutants: Y208A, Y277A, and Y362A. The affinity for RA of these mutant receptors was in the range of that of the wild-type protein, except for the Y277A receptor mutant, which displays a 15-20-fold reduction in affinity and transactivation activity for RA. Whereas mutation of Tyr(277) into alanine had a variable effect on different agonists and antagonists binding, it caused a dramatic decrease of retinoid-dependent transactivation activity. This later effect was also observed with mutation of Tyr(277) into phenylalanine. It is unlikely that major conformational changes are responsible for the lower affinity of RA binding and RA-dependent transactivation since these mutants displayed wild-type dimerization and DNA-binding activities. Limited proteolysis revealed that upon ligand binding, the Y277A mutant induced a conformational change slightly

  19. A validated method for gas chromatographic analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tall fescue herbage.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Isabelle A; Coe, Brenda L; Smith, Lori L; Huo, Cheng-Jun; Dougherty, Charles T; Strickland, James R

    2008-07-23

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in animals that is also found in plants and has been associated with plant responses to stress. A simple and relatively rapid method of GABA separation and quantification was developed from a commercially available kit for serum amino acids (Phenomenex EZ:faast) and validated for tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea). Extraction in ethanol/water (80:20, v/v) at ambient temperature yielded detectable amounts of GABA. Clean separation from other amino acids in 28 min was achieved by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection (FID), using a 30 m, 5% phenyl/95% dimethylpolysiloxane column. The identity of the putative GABA peak was confirmed by GC with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. The relatively small effects of the sample matrix on GABA measurement were verified by demonstrating slope parallelism of GABA curves prepared in the presence and absence of fescue extracts. Limits of quantification and detection were 2.00 and 1.00 nmol/100 microL, respectively. Method recoveries at two different spike levels were 96.4 and 94.2%, with coefficients of variation of 7.3 and 7.2%, respectively. PMID:18558696

  20. Epoxides Derived from Dietary Dihomo-Gamma-Linolenic Acid Induce Germ Cell Death in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Deline, Marshall; Keller, Julia; Rothe, Michael; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen; Menzel, Ralph; Watts, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fats are not created equally, slight differences in structure lead to crucial differences in function. Muticellular organisms use polyunsaturated fatty acid as substrates to produce potent signaling molecules crucial for many physiological processes, including reproduction. Here we explored the mechanism responsible for germ cell loss induced by dietary supplementation of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA, 20:3n-6) in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study we found that C. elegans CYP-33E2 activity produces a range of epoxy and hydroxy metabolites from dietary DGLA. Knockdown of cyp-33E2 suppressed the DGLA-induced sterility phenotype. Additionally, direct exposure of two specific DGLA-derived epoxy products, 8,9- and 14,15-epoxyeicosadienoic acids, produced germ cell abnormalities in the C. elegans gonad. We propose that sterility is mediated by the production of toxic DGLA-derived epoxides that trigger germ cell destruction. These studies are the first to establish a biological activity for a CYP-produced metabolite of DGLA. PMID:26486965

  1. Polyaniline/poly acid acrylic thin film composites: a new gamma radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lima Pacheco, Ana P.; Araujo, Elmo S.; Azevedo, Walter M. de

    2003-03-15

    In this paper, we present a new and straightforward route to prepare polyaniline/poly acid acrylic (PAA) thin film composites in large areas and on almost any surface. This method was developed to improve the mechanical and adherence properties of polyaniline devices used as ionization radiation sensors. The route consists of the combination of the metal oxidant with polymer acid to form a highly homogeneous and viscous paste, which can be easily spread over any surface. In the second step, an aniline acid solution is brought in contact with the dried paste where polymerization occurs, yielding a high homogeneous and conducting polymer composite. The UV-visible absorption and infrared analysis confirm that a polyaniline/PAA complex is obtained. The four-point conductivity measurements show that the composite conductivity {rho} is the order of 5 {omega}{sup -1} cm{sup -1}. Preliminary gamma radiation interaction with the composite shows that the doped composite exhibits a linear response that can be used in the development of real-time radiation sensors for the dose range from 0 to 5000 Gy.

  2. Theanine, gamma-glutamylethylamide, a unique amino acid in tea leaves, modulates neurotransmitter concentrations in the brain striatum interstitium in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Terashima, T; Kawano, S; Furuno, R; Okubo, T; Juneja, L R; Yokogoshi, H

    2009-01-01

    Theanine (gamma-glutamylethylamide) is one of the major amino acid components in green tea and can pass through the blood-brain barrier. Recent studies suggest that theanine affects the mammalian central nervous system; however, the detailed mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated the effect of theanine on neurotransmission in the brain striatum by in vivo brain microdialysis. Theanine injection into the rat brain striatum did not increase the concentration of excitatory neurotransmitters in the perfusate. On the other hand, theanine injection increased the concentration of glycine in the perfusate. Because it has been reported that theanine promotes dopamine release in the rat striatum, we investigated the glycine and dopamine concentrations in the perfusate. Co-injection of glycine receptor antagonist, strychnine, reduced theanine-induced changes in dopamine. Moreover, AMPA receptor antagonist, which regulates glycine and GABA release from glia cells, inhibited these effects of theanine and this result was in agreement with the known inhibitory effect of theanine at AMPA receptors. PMID:18196445

  3. Hydroxy-1,2,5-oxadiazolyl moiety as bioisoster of the carboxy function. A computational study on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) related compounds.

    PubMed

    Tosco, Paolo; Lolli, Marco L

    2008-04-01

    Recently, our research group has proposed the hydroxyfurazanyl (4-hydroxy-1,2,5-oxadiazole-3-yl) moiety as a new non-classical isoster of the carboxy function in the design of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogues. Some compounds showed significant activity at the GABA(A) receptor, representing the only examples of pentatomic heterocycles bearing an omega-aminoalkyl flexible side chain in the position vicinal to the hydroxy group displaying agonist activity at this receptor subtype. In this work, an ab initio analysis of the structural and electronic features of furazan-3-ol is presented, in order to provide a theoretical basis to the claimed bioisosterism with the carboxy function. An ab initio conformational study with the C-PCM implicit solvent model was carried out to elucidate the reasons of the peculiar behaviour of the furazan models. Alongside, another conformational search through molecular dynamics in explicit solvent was accomplished, in order to validate the first method. The electronic features of the 4-hydroxy-1,2,5-oxadiazole-3-yl substructure seem to account for a marked stabilising effect of the putative bioactive conformation at the GABA(A) receptor subtype. The 1,2,5-thiadiazole analogue, which shares the same conformational preference of its oxygenated counterpart, was identified as a potential candidate for synthesis and pharmacological testing. Figure 4-(omega-aminoalkyl)-1,2,5-oxadiazole-3-ol analogues of GABA. PMID:18247067

  4. Recent Progress on Bile Acid Receptor Modulators for Treatment of Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping

    2016-07-28

    Bile acids are steroid-derived molecules synthesized in the liver, secreted from hepatocytes into the bile canaliculi, and subsequently stored in the gall bladder. During the feeding, bile flows into the duodenum, where it contributes to the solubilization and digestion of lipid-soluble nutrients. After a meal, bile-acid levels increase in the intestine, liver, and also in the systemic circulation. Therefore, serum bile-acid levels serve as an important sensing mechanism for nutrient and energy. Recent studies have described bile acids as versatile signaling molecules endowed with systemic endocrine functions. Bile acids are ligands for G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) such as TGR5 (also known as GPBAR1, M-BAR, and BG37) and nuclear hormone receptors including farnesoid X receptor (FXR; also known as NR1H4). Acting through these diverse signaling pathways, bile acids regulate triglyceride, cholesterol, glucose homeostasis, and energy expenditure. These bile-acid-controlled signaling pathways have become the source of promising novel drug targets to treat common metabolic and hepatic diseases. PMID:26878262

  5. An analysis of [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, K G; Dreksler, S

    1979-03-01

    The binding of [3H]GABA to membranes prepared from human brains obtained post morten was examined. This binding was independent of patient sex, age (16--80 years), postmortem interval (4--33 h) or storage time when frozen (0-64 months). In preparations from cerebellar cortex various compounds displaced [3H]GABA binding with the following order of potency: muscimol greater than 3-aminopropanesulfonic acid greater than GABA greater than imidazoleacet acid greater than delta-amino-n-valeric acid greater than 3-hydroxyGABA greater than bicuculline. Other compounds active 'in vitro' included strychnine, homocarnosine and some (e.g. clozapine, thioridazine, pimozide) but not all (chlorpromazine, haloperiodol) neuroleptics. Compounds inactive 'in vitro' included aminooxyacetic acid, baclofen, picrotoxin, anticholinergics, metrazole, anticonvulsants and naloxone. Triton X-100 augmented the [3H]GABA binding (25 nM) by about 10--20-fold in most brain regions. [3H]GABA binding (IC50) was altered in Huntington's chorea and Reye's syndrome, but not in schizophrenics (4-neuroleptic-treated patients) or sudden infant death syndrome. The data presented strongly support the proposal that the measurement of [3H]GABA binding in postmortem human brain offers a reflection of the state of the physiologically relevant GABA receptor. PMID:218679

  6. Lysophosphatidic Acid Signaling through the Lysophosphatidic Acid-1 Receptor Is Required for Alveolarization.

    PubMed

    Funke, Manuela; Knudsen, Lars; Lagares, David; Ebener, Simone; Probst, Clemens K; Fontaine, Benjamin A; Franklin, Alicia; Kellner, Manuela; Kühnel, Mark; Matthieu, Stephanie; Grothausmann, Roman; Chun, Jerold; Roberts, Jesse D; Ochs, Matthias; Tager, Andrew M

    2016-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling through one of its receptors, LPA1, contributes to both the development and the pathological remodeling after injury of many organs. Because we found previously that LPA-LPA1 signaling contributes to pulmonary fibrosis, here we investigated whether this pathway is also involved in lung development. Quantitative assessment of lung architecture of LPA1-deficient knock-out (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice at 3, 12, and 24 weeks of age using design-based stereology suggested the presence of an alveolarization defect in LPA1 KO mice at 3 weeks, which persisted as alveolar numbers increased in WT mice into adulthood. Across the ages examined, the lungs of LPA1 KO mice exhibited decreased alveolar numbers, septal tissue volumes, and surface areas, and increased volumes of the distal airspaces. Elastic fibers, critical to the development of alveolar septa, appeared less organized and condensed and more discontinuous in KO alveoli starting at P4. Tropoelastin messenger RNA expression was decreased in KO lungs, whereas expression of matrix metalloproteinases degrading elastic fibers was either decreased or unchanged. These results are consistent with the abnormal lung phenotype of LPA1 KO mice, being attributable to reduced alveolar septal formation during development, rather than to increased septal destruction as occurs in the emphysema of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Peripheral septal fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, which direct septation in late alveolarization, demonstrated reduced production of tropoelastin and matrix metalloproteinases, and diminished LPA-induced migration, when isolated from LPA1 KO mice. Taken together, our data suggest that LPA-LPA1 signaling is critically required for septation during alveolarization. PMID:27082727

  7. Effect of diphenylhydantoin on gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and succinate activity in rat Purkinje cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, E; Gabra-Sanders, T

    1977-01-01

    A study has been made of the effect of diphenylhydantoin (DPH) upon the levels of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and succinic dehydrogenase in rat Purkinje cells. DPH was administered over 26 days in chronic experiments using controls receiving the same injection vehicle without DPH. Animals in this group received daily 1.25 mg/kg body weight, 12.5 mg/kg body weight, and 50 mg/kg body weight DPH. Acute experiments were carried out over the course of not more than four days, three groups of animals receiving 75 mg/kg body weight, 87.5 mg/kg body weight, and 100 mg/kg body weight DPH. No effect upon succinic dehydrogenase could be demonstrated at any dose level. There was a significant progressive loss of GABA with increasing dosage of DPH. Images PMID:903771

  8. [The knowledge about gamma-hydroxybutyric acid as by students of Physical Education Academy].

    PubMed

    Chwaluk, Paweł; Chwaluk, Agnieszka; Parnicki, Florian

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid is a substance stealthily used by criminals to facilitate sexual assaults. It is also known as doping agent in sports. Physical Education Academies should prepare their graduates to be educators for young people, their trainers, organizers of sports and recreational events. Second year students of two majors: physical education and tourism and recreation were surveyed by means of questionnaire on "date-rape drug". As much as 320 among 327 students surveyed had heard about "date-rape drug". However their knowledge on it was shallow and unsystematic. None of the surveyed knew that the substance of "date-rape drug" could also be used as a doping agent. Only 31% of respondents were aware of existence of the test to detect "date-rape drug" in drinks. Physical Education Academy students should be thoroughly and relevantly educated on the matter of pharmacologic doping agents and drugs endangerment. PMID:19788135

  9. Retinoid X receptor and retinoic acid response in the marine sponge Suberites domuncula.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Matthias; Batel, Renato; Korzhev, Michael; Müller, Werner E G

    2003-09-01

    To date no nuclear receptors have been identified or cloned from the phylogenetically oldest metazoan phylum, the Porifera (sponges). We show that retinoic acid causes tissue regression in intact individuals of the demosponge Suberites domuncula and in primmorphs, special three-dimensional cell aggregates. Primmorphs were cultivated on a galectin/poly-L-lysine matrix in order to induce canal formation. In the presence of 1 or 50 micromol l(-1) retinoic acid these canals undergo regression, a process that is reversible. We also cloned the cDNA from S. domuncula encoding the retinoid X receptor (RXR), which displays the two motifs of nuclear hormone receptors, the ligand-binding and the DNA-binding domains, and performed phylogenetic analyses of this receptor. RXR expression undergoes strong upregulation in response to treatment with retinoic acid, whereas the expression of the sponge caspase is not increased. The gene encoding the LIM homeodomain protein was found to be strongly upregulated in response to retinoic acid treatment. These data indicate that the RXR and its ligand retinoic acid play a role in the control of morphogenetic events in sponges. PMID:12909707

  10. Mapping of the {alpha}{sub 4} subunit gene (GABRA4) to human chromosome 4 defines an {alpha}{sub 2}-{alpha}{sub 4}-{beta}{sub 1}-{gamma}{sub 1} gene cluster: Further evidence that modern GABA{sub a} receptor gene clusters are derived from an ancestral cluster

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, P.J.; Farb, D.H.; Russek, S.J.

    1995-04-10

    We demonstrated previously that an {alpha}{sub 1}-{beta}{sub 2}-{gamma}{sub 2} gene cluster of the {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA{sub A}) receptor is located on human chromosome 5q34-q35 and that an ancestral {alpha}-{beta}-{gamma} gene cluster probably spawned clusters on chromosomes 4, 5, and 15. Here, we report that the {alpha}{sub 4} gene (GABRA4) maps to human chromosome 4p14-q12, defining a cluster comprising the {alpha}{sub 2}, {alpha}{sub 4}, {beta}{sub 1}, and {gamma}{sub 1} genes. The existence of an {alpha}{sub 2}-{alpha}{sub 4}-{beta}{sub 1}-{gamma}{sub 2} cluster on chromosome 4 and an {alpha}{sub 1}-{alpha}{sub 6}-{beta}{sub 2}-{gamma}{sub 2} cluster on chromosome 5 provides further evidence that the number of ancestral GABA{sub A} receptor subunit genes has been expanded by duplication within an ancestral gene cluster. Moreover, if duplication of the {alpha} gene occurred before duplication of the ancestral gene cluster, then a heretofore undiscovered subtype of a subunit should be located on human chromosome 15q11-q13 within an {alpha}{sub 5}-{alpha}{sub x}-{beta}{sub 3}-{gamma}{sub 3} gene cluster at the locus for Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Effect of mitragynine, derived from Thai folk medicine, on gastric acid secretion through opioid receptor in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Shizuko; Miyashita, Sanae; Yamamoto, Makiko; Horie, Syunji; Sakai, Shin-Ichiro; Aimi, Norio; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2002-05-17

    Mitragynine, an indole alkaloid from Thai folk medicine Mitragyna speciosa, exerts agonistic effects on opioid receptors. Gastric acid secretion is proposed to be regulated by opioid receptors in the central nervous system (CNS). Previously, we reported the dual roles (inhibition via micro-opioid receptors and stimulation via kappa-opioid receptors) of the opioid system in the central control of gastric acid secretion. We investigated whether mitragynine affects gastric acid secretion via opioid receptors in the CNS. Injection of mitragynine (30 microg) alone into the lateral cerebroventricle did not have a significant effect on basal gastric acid secretion in the perfused stomach of anesthetized rats. Injection of mitragynine (3-30 microg) into the fourth cerebroventricle, like morphine, inhibited 2-deoxy-D-glucose-stimulated gastric acid secretion. The inhibitory effect of mitragynine (30 microg) was reversed by naloxone (100 microg). These results suggest that mitragynine has a morphine-like action on gastric acid secretion in the CNS. PMID:12044808

  12. Scrapie-Induced Defects in Learning and Memory of Transgenic Mice Expressing Anchorless Prion Protein Are Associated with Alterations in the Gamma Aminobutyric Acid-Ergic Pathway▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Trifilo, Matthew J.; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Solforosi, Laura; Bernard-Trifilo, Joie; Kunz, Stefan; McGavern, Dorian; Oldstone, Michael B. A.

    2008-01-01

    After infection with RML murine scrapie agent, transgenic (tg) mice expressing prion protein (PrP) without its glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) membrane anchor (GPI−/− PrP tg mice) continue to make abundant amounts of the abnormally folded disease-associated PrPres but have a normal life span. In contrast, all age-, sex-, and genetically matched mice with a GPI-anchored PrP become moribund and die due to a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disease by 160 days after RML scrapie agent infection. We report here that infected GPI−/− PrP tg mice, although free from progressive neurodegenerative disease of the cerebellum and extrapyramidal and pyramidal systems, nevertheless suffer defects in learning and memory, long-term potentiation, and neuronal excitability. Such dysfunction increases over time and is associated with an increase in gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibition but not loss of excitatory glutamate/N-methyl-d-aspartic acid. Enhanced deposition of abnormally folded infectious PrP (PrPsc or PrPres) in the central nervous system (CNS) localizes with GABAA receptors. This occurs with minimal evidence of CNS spongiosis or apoptosis of neurons. The use of monoclonal antibodies reveals an association of PrPres with GABAA receptors. Thus, the clinical defects of learning and memory loss in vivo in GPI−/− PrP tg mice infected with scrapie agent may likely involve the GABAergic pathway. PMID:18667494

  13. Identification of two C-terminal autophosphorylation sites in the PDGF beta-receptor: involvement in the interaction with phospholipase C-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Rönnstrand, L; Mori, S; Arridsson, A K; Eriksson, A; Wernstedt, C; Hellman, U; Claesson-Welsh, L; Heldin, C H

    1992-01-01

    Two novel sites of autophosphorylation were localized to the C-terminal tail of the PDGF beta-receptor. To evaluate the importance of these phosphorylation sites, receptor mutants in which Tyr1009, Tyr1021 or both were replaced with phenylalanine residues, were expressed in porcine aortic endothelial (PAE) cells. These mutants were similar to the wild type receptor with regard to protein tyrosine kinase activity and ability to induce mitogenicity in response to PDGF-BB. However, both the Y1009F and Y1021F mutants showed a decreased ability to mediate association with and the tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-gamma) compared to the wild type PDGF beta-receptor; in the case of the Y1009F/Y1021F double mutant, no association or phosphorylation of PLC-gamma could be detected. These data show that tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-gamma is dependent on autophosphorylation of the PDGF beta-receptor at Tyr1009 and Tyr1021. Images PMID:1396585

  14. Interleukin 4 reduces expression of inhibitory receptors on B cells and abolishes CD22 and Fc gamma RII-mediated B cell suppression.

    PubMed

    Rudge, Elizabeth U; Cutler, Antony J; Pritchard, Nicholas R; Smith, Kenneth G C

    2002-04-15

    Inhibitory receptors CD22, Fc gamma RII (CD32), CD72, and paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PIR)-B are critically involved in negatively regulating the B cell immune response and in preventing autoimmunity. Here we show that interleukin 4 (IL-4) reduces expression of all four on activated B cells at the level of messenger RNA and protein. This reduced expression is dependent on continuous exposure to IL-4 and is mediated through Stat6. Coligation of Fc gamma RII to the B cell receptor (BCR) via intact IgG increases the B cell activation threshold and suppresses antigen presentation. IL-4 completely abolishes these negative regulatory effects of Fc gamma RII. CD22 coligation with the BCR also suppresses activation -- this suppression too is abolished by IL-4. Thus, IL-4 is likely to enhance the B cell immune response by releasing B cells from inhibitory receptor suppression. By this coordinate reduction in expression of inhibitory receptors, and release from CD22 and Fc gamma RII-mediated inhibition, IL-4 is likely to play a role in T cell help of B cells and the development of T helper cell type 2 responses. Conversely, B cell activation in the absence of IL-4 would be more difficult to achieve, contributing to the maintenance of B cell tolerance in the absence of T cell help. PMID:11956299

  15. Electro-olfactogram and multiunit olfactory receptor responses to complex mixtures of amino acids in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Kang, J S; Caprio, J

    1991-10-01

    In vivo electrophysiological recordings from populations of olfactory receptor neurons in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, clearly showed that both electro-olfactogram and integrated neural responses of olfactory receptor cells to complex mixtures consisting of up to 10 different amino acids were predictable with knowledge of (a) the responses to the individual components in the mixture and (b) the relative independence of the respective receptor sites for the component stimuli. All amino acid stimuli used to form the various mixtures were initially adjusted in concentration to provide approximately equal response magnitudes. Olfactory receptor responses to both multimixtures and binary mixtures were recorded. Multimixtures were formed by mixing equal aliquots of 3-10 different amino acids. Binary mixtures were formed by mixing equal aliquots of two equally stimulatory solutions. Solution 1 contained either one to nine different neutral amino acids with long side-chains (LCNs) or one to five different neutral amino acids with short side-chains (SCNs). Solution 2, comprising the binary mixture, consisted of only a single stimulus, either a LCN, SCN, basic, or acidic amino acid. The increasing magnitude of the olfactory receptor responses to mixtures consisting of an increasing number of neutral amino acids indicated that multiple receptor site types with highly overlapping specificities exist to these compounds. For both binary mixtures and multimixtures composed of neutral and basic or neutral and acidic amino acids, the receptor responses were significantly enhanced compared with those mixtures consisting of an equal number of only neutral amino acids. These results demonstrate that receptor sites for the basic and acidic amino acids, respectively, are highly independent of those for the neutral amino acids, and suggest that a mechanism for synergism is the simultaneous activation of relatively independent receptor sites by the components in the mixture

  16. Regulation of Expression of Citrate Synthase by the Retinoic Acid Receptor-Related Orphan Receptor α (RORα)

    PubMed Central

    Crumbley, Christine; Wang, Yongjun; Banerjee, Subhashis; Burris, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORα) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors that plays an important role in regulation of the circadian rhythm and metabolism. Mice lacking a functional RORα display a range of metabolic abnormalities including decreased serum cholesterol and plasma triglycerides. Citrate synthase (CS) is a key enzyme of the citric acid cycle that provides energy for cellular function. Additionally, CS plays a critical role in providing citrate derived acetyl-CoA for lipogenesis and cholesterologenesis. Here, we identified a functional RORα response element (RORE) in the promoter of the CS gene. ChIP analysis demonstrates RORα occupancy of the CS promoter and a putative RORE binds to RORα effectively in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and confers RORα responsiveness to a reporter gene in a cotransfection assay. We also observed a decrease in CS gene expression and CS enzymatic activity in the staggerer mouse, which has a mutation of in the Rora gene resulting in nonfunctional RORα protein. Furthermore, we found that SR1001 a RORα inverse agonist eliminated the circadian pattern of expression of CS mRNA in mice. These data suggest that CS is a direct RORα target gene and one mechanism by which RORα regulates lipid metabolism is via regulation of CS expression. PMID:22485150

  17. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the catalytic domain of human receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase [gamma] in three different crystal forms

    SciTech Connect

    Kish, Kevin; McDonnell, Patricia A.; Goldfarb, Valentina; Gao, Mian; Metzler, William J.; Langley, David R.; Bryson, James W.; Kiefer, Susan E.; Carpenter, Brian; Kostich, Walter A.; Westphal, Ryan S.; Sheriff, Steven

    2013-03-07

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase {gamma} is a membrane-bound receptor and is designated RPTP{gamma}. RPTP{gamma} and two mutants, RPTP{gamma}(V948I, S970T) and RPTP{gamma}(C858S, S970T), were recombinantly expressed and purified for X-ray crystallographic studies. The purified enzymes were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. Crystallographic data were obtained from several different crystal forms in the absence and the presence of inhibitor. In this paper, a description is given of how three different crystal forms were obtained that were used with various ligands. An orthorhombic crystal form and a trigonal crystal form were obtained both with and without ligand, and a monoclinic crystal form was only obtained in the presence of a particularly elaborated inhibitor.

  18. Bile acid receptors as targets for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Porez, Geoffrey; Prawitt, Janne; Gross, Barbara; Staels, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and atherosclerosis. When dyslipidemia coincides with other metabolic disorders such as obesity, hypertension, and glucose intolerance, defined as the metabolic syndrome (MS), individuals present an elevated risk to develop type 2 diabetes (T2D) as well as CVD. Because the MS epidemic represents a growing public health problem worldwide, the development of therapies remains a major challenge. Alterations of bile acid pool regulation in T2D have revealed a link between bile acid and metabolic homeostasis. The bile acid receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5 both regulate lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, rendering them potential pharmacological targets for MS therapy. This review discusses the mechanisms of metabolic regulation by FXR and TGR5 and the utility relevance of natural and synthetic modulators of FXR and TGR5 activity, including bile acid sequestrants, in the treatment of the MS. PMID:22550135

  19. The degradation of airway tight junction protein under acidic conditions is probably mediated by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Li, Qi; Zhou, Jia; Zhou, Xiang-dong; Perelman, Juliy M.; Kolosov, Victor P.

    2013-01-01

    Acidic airway microenvironment is one of the representative pathophysiological features of chronic inflammatory respiratory diseases. Epithelial barrier function is maintained by TJs (tight junctions), which act as the first physical barrier against the inhaled substances and pathogens of airway. As previous studies described, acid stress caused impaired epithelial barriers and led the hyperpermeability of epithelium. However, the specific mechanism is still unclear. We have showed previously the existence of TRPV (transient receptor potential vanilloid) 1 channel in airway epithelium, as well as its activation by acidic stress in 16HBE cells. In this study, we explored the acidic stress on airway barrier function and TJ proteins in vitro with 16HBE cell lines. Airway epithelial barrier function was determined by measuring by TER (trans-epithelial electrical resistance). TJ-related protein [claudin-1, claudin-3, claudin-4, claudin-5, claudin-7 and ZO-1 (zonula occluden 1)] expression was examined by western blotting of insoluble fractions of cell extraction. The localization of TJ proteins were visualized by immunofluorescent staining. Interestingly, stimulation by pH 6.0 for 8 h slightly increased the epithelial resistance in 16HBE cells insignificantly. However, higher concentration of hydrochloric acid (lower than pH 5.0) did reduce the airway epithelial TER of 16HBE cells. The decline of epithelial barrier function induced by acidic stress exhibited a TRPV1-[Ca2+]i-dependent pathway. Of the TJ proteins, claudin-3 and claudin-4 seemed to be sensitive to acidic stress. The degradation of claudin-3 and claudin-4 induced by acidic stress could be attenuated by the specific TRPV1 blocker or intracellular Ca2+ chelator BAPTA/AM [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester)]. PMID:24073800

  20. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} is expressed in hippocampal neurons and its activation prevents {beta}-amyloid neurodegeneration: role of Wnt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C. . E-mail: ninestr@genes.bio.puc.cl; Godoy, Juan A.; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A.; Koenig, Cecilia S.; Bronfman, Miguel

    2005-03-10

    The molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves the participation of the amyloid-{beta}-peptide (A{beta}), which plays a critical role in the neurodegeneration that triggers the disease. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors, which are members of the nuclear receptor family. We report here that (1) PPAR{gamma} is present in rat hippocampal neurons in culture. (2) Activation of PPAR{gamma} by troglitazone and rosiglitazone protects rat hippocampal neurons against A{beta}-induced neurodegeneration, as shown by the 3-[4,5 -2yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay, immunofluorescence using an anti-heavy neurofilament antibody, and quantitative electron microscopy. (3) Hippocampal neurons treated with several PPAR{gamma} agonists, including troglitazone, rosiglitazone, and ciglitazone, prevent the excitotoxic A{beta}-induced rise in bulk-free Ca{sup 2+}. (4) PPAR{gamma} activation results in the modulation of Wnt signaling components, including the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and an increase of the cytoplasmic and nuclear {beta}-catenin levels. We conclude that the activation of PPAR{gamma} prevents A{beta}-induced neurodegeneration by a mechanism that may involve a cross talk between neuronal PPAR{gamma} and the Wnt signaling pathway. More important, the fact that the activation of PPAR{gamma} attenuated A{beta}-dependent neurodegeneration opens the possibility to fight AD from a new therapeutic perspective.

  1. Rho/ROCK acts downstream of lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 in modulating P2X3 receptor-mediated bone cancer pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing-xiang; Yuan, Xiao-min; Wang, Qiong; Wei, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Background Lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 and Rho/ROCK signaling is implicated in bone cancer pain development. However, it remains unknown whether the two signaling pathways function together in P2X3 receptor-mediated bone cancer pain. Results In this study, using a rat model of bone cancer, we examined the expression of P2X3 and lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons and further dissected whether lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 and Rho/ROCK-mediated pathways interacted in modulating rat pain behavior. Bone cancer was established by inoculating Walker 256 cells into the left tibia of female Wistar rats. We observed a gradual and yet significant decline in mean paw withdrawal threshold in rats with bone cancer, but not in control rats. Our immunohistochemical staining revealed that the number of P2X3- and lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1-positive dorsal root ganglion neurons was significantly greater in rats with bone cancer than control rats. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 blockade with VPC32183 significantly attenuated decline in mean paw withdrawal threshold. Flinching behavior test further showed that lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 inhibition with VPC32183 transiently but significantly attenuated α,β-meATP-induced increase in paw lift time per minute. Rho inhibition by intrathecal BoTXC3 caused a rapid reversal in decline in mean paw withdrawal threshold of rats with bone cancer. Flinching behavior test showed that BoTXC3 transiently and significantly attenuated α,β-meATP-induced increase in paw lift time per minute. Similar findings were observed with ROCK inhibition by intrathecal Y27632. Furthermore, VPC32183 and BoTXC3 effectively aborted the appearance of lysophosphatidic acid-induced calcium influx peak. Conclusions Lysophosphatidic acid and its receptor LPAR1, acting through the Rho-ROCK pathway, regulate P2X3 receptor in the development of both mechanical and spontaneous pain in bone cancer. PMID:27094551

  2. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Brighton, Cheryl A; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E; Glass, Leslie L; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca(2+). In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca(2+) response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber-mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms. PMID:26280129

  3. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein–Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E.; Glass, Leslie L.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein–coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1–secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca2+. In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca2+ response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber–mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms. PMID:26280129

  4. Position and length of fatty acids strongly affect receptor selectivity pattern of human pancreatic polypeptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Mäde, Veronika; Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Kaiser, Anette; Meiler, Jens; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2014-11-01

    Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) is a satiety-inducing gut hormone targeting predominantly the Y4 receptor within the neuropeptide Y multiligand/multireceptor family. Palmitoylated PP-based ligands have already been reported to exert prolonged satiety-inducing effects in animal models. Here, we suggest that other lipidation sites and different fatty acid chain lengths may affect receptor selectivity and metabolic stability. Activity tests revealed significantly enhanced potency of long fatty acid conjugates on all four Y receptors with a preference of position 22 over 30 at Y1 , Y2 and Y5 receptors. Improved Y receptor selectivity was observed for two short fatty acid analogues. Moreover, [K(30)(E-Prop)]hPP2-36 (15) displayed enhanced stability in blood plasma and liver homogenates. Thus, short chain lipidation of hPP at key residue 30 is a promising approach for anti-obesity therapy because of maintained selectivity and a sixfold increased plasma half-life. PMID:25156249

  5. Report on the analysis of common beverages spiked with gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) using NMR and the PURGE solvent-suppression technique.

    PubMed

    Lesar, Casey T; Decatur, John; Lukasiewicz, Elaan; Champeil, Elise

    2011-10-10

    In forensic evidence, the identification and quantitation of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in "spiked" beverages is challenging. In this report, we present the analysis of common alcoholic beverages found in clubs and bars spiked with gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL). Our analysis of the spiked beverages consisted of using (1)H NMR with a water suppression method called Presaturation Utilizing Relaxation Gradients and Echoes (PURGE). The following beverages were analyzed: water, 10% ethanol in water, vodka-cranberry juice, rum and coke, gin and tonic, whisky and diet coke, white wine, red wine, and beer. The PURGE method allowed for the direct identification and quantitation of both compounds in all beverages except red and white wine where small interferences prevented accurate quantitation. The NMR method presented in this paper utilizes PURGE water suppression. Thanks to the use of a capillary internal standard, the method is fast, non-destructive, sensitive and requires no sample preparation which could disrupt the equilibrium between GHB and GBL. PMID:21775083

  6. Ascorbic acid enables reversible dopamine receptor /sup 3/H-agonist binding

    SciTech Connect

    Leff, S.; Sibley, D.R.; Hamblin, M.; Creese, I.

    1981-11-16

    The effects of ascorbic acid on dopaminergic /sup 3/H-agonist receptor binding were studied in membrane homogenates of bovine anterior pituitary and caudate, and rat striatum. In all tissues virtually no stereospecific binding (defined using 1uM (+)butaclamol) of the /sup 3/H-agonists N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA), apomorphine, or dopamine could be demonstrated in the absence of ascorbic acid. Although levels of total /sup 3/H-agonist binding were three to five times greater in the absence than in the presence of 0.1% ascorbic acid, the increased binding was entirely non-stereospecific. Greater amounts of dopamine-inhibitable /sup 3/H-NPA binding could be demonstrated in the absence of 0.1% ascorbic acid, but this measure of ''specific binding'' was demonstrated not to represent dopamine receptor binding since several other catecholamines and catechol were equipotent with dopamine and more potent than the dopamine agonist (+/-)amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene (ADTN) in inhibiting this binding. High levels of dopamine-displaceable /sup 3/H-agonist binding were detected in fresh and boiled homogenates of cerebellum, an area of brain which receives no dopaminergic innervation, further demonstrating the non-specific nature of /sup 3/H-agonist binding in the absence of ascorbic acid. These studies emphasize that under typical assay conditions ascorbic acid is required in order to demonstrate reversible and specific /sup 3/H-agonist binding to dopamine receptors.

  7. Expression of the alpha/beta and gamma/delta T-cell receptors in 57 cases of peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Identification of a subset of gamma/delta T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Gaulard, P.; Bourquelot, P.; Kanavaros, P.; Haioun, C.; Le Couedic, J. P.; Divine, M.; Goossens, M.; Zafrani, E. S.; Farcet, J. P.; Reyes, F.

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-seven cases of peripheral T-cell lymphoma were studied for cell expression of the T-cell receptor (TCR) chains, using monoclonal antibodies specific for the beta chain (beta F1) of the alpha/beta TCR, and for the delta chain (anti-TCR delta-1) of the gamma/delta TCR. Three different patterns were demonstrated: in 39 cases (69%), the phenotype (CD3+beta F1+TCR delta-1-) was that of most normal T cells. A second pattern was found on six cases (10%), which were of CD3+beta F1-TCR delta-1+ phenotype, and in which DNA analysis showed a clonal rearrangement of the delta locus in the five cases studied. It is suggested that these cases are the neoplastic counterpart of the small subpopulation of normal T cells that express gamma delta receptor. It is of considerable interest that these gamma delta lymphomas had unusual clinicopathologic presentations, as one case corresponded to a lethal midline granuloma and the five others to hepatosplenic lymphomas with a sinusal/sinusoidal infiltration in spleen, marrow, and liver. The fact that the distribution of the neoplastic gamma delta cells in the splenic red pulp resembles that of normal gamma delta cells reinforces the concept of a preferential homing of gamma delta T cells to this tissue. A third pattern (CD3 +/- beta F1-TCR delta-1-) was seen in 12 cases (21%), in which, by contrast to normal post-thymic T cells, no evidence of either alpha beta or gamma delta T cell receptor was found. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1698028

  8. Identification of dehydroabietc acid from Boswellia thurifera resin as a positive GABAA receptor modulator.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Diana C; Raith, Melanie; De Mieri, Maria; Schöffmann, Angela; Hering, Steffen; Hamburger, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    In a two-microelectrode voltage clamp assay with Xenopus laevis oocytes, a petroleum ether extract (100 μg/mL) of the resin of Boswellia thurifera (Burseraceae) potentiated GABA-induced chloride currents (IGABA) through receptors of the subtype α₁β₂γ₂s by 319.8% ± 79.8%. With the aid of HPLC-based activity profiling, three known terpenoids, dehydroabietic acid (1), incensole (2), and AKBA (3), were identified in the active fractions of the extract. Structure elucidation was achieved by means of HR-MS and microprobe 1D/2D NMR spectroscopy. Compound 1 induced significant receptor modulation in the oocyte assay, with a maximal potentiation of IGABA of 397.5% ± 34.0%, and EC₅₀ of 8.7 μM ± 1.3 μM. This is the first report of dehydroabietic acid as a positive GABAA receptor modulator. PMID:25200370

  9. Activiation of the calcium sensing receptor stimulates serum gastrin and gastric acid secretion in healthy subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastric acid secretion is a complex process regulated by neuronal and hormonal pathways. Ex vivo studies in human gastric tissues indicate that the calcium sensing receptor (CaR), expressed on the surface of G and parietal cells, may be involved in this regulation. We sought to determine whether cin...

  10. Activation of the calcium sensing receptor stimulates gastrin and gastric acid secretion in healthy participants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastric acid secretion is a complex process regulated by neuronal and hormonal pathways. Ex vivo studies in human gastric tissues indicate that the calcium sensing receptor (CaR), expressed on the surface of G and parietal cells, may be involved in this regulation. We sought to determine whether cin...

  11. Activation of the calcium sensing receptor stimulates serum gastrin and gastric acid secretion in healthy subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastric acid secretion is a complex process regulated by neuronal and hormonal pathways. Ex vivo studies in human gastric tissues indicate that the calcium sensing receptor (CaR), expressed on the surface of G and parietal cells, may be involved in this regulation. We sought to determine whether cin...

  12. 7-Azaindole-3-acetic acid derivatives: potent and selective CRTh2 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sandham, David A; Adcock, Claire; Bala, Kamlesh; Barker, Lucy; Brown, Zarin; Dubois, Gerald; Budd, David; Cox, Brian; Fairhurst, Robin A; Furegati, Markus; Leblanc, Catherine; Manini, Jodie; Profit, Rachael; Reilly, John; Stringer, Rowan; Schmidt, Alfred; Turner, Katharine L; Watson, Simon J; Willis, Jennifer; Williams, Gareth; Wilson, Caroline

    2009-08-15

    High throughput screening identified a 7-azaindole-3-acetic acid scaffold as a novel CRTh2 receptor antagonist chemotype, which could be optimised to furnish a highly selective compound with good functional potency for inhibition of human eosinophil shape change in whole blood and oral bioavailability in the rat. PMID:19592244

  13. Surface chemistry of Rh-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: An analysis of surface acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenthal, E.E.; Schwarz, S.; Foley, H.C.

    1995-09-15

    This study highlights the nature of the interactions between the transition metals in the Rh-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} system and the underlying alumina surface. The investigation was carried out in the context of exploring the retrograde dehydration to dimethyl ether of primary alcohols produced at active metal sites during CO hydrogenation. Both native {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Rh-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples were doped with KNO{sub 3} in an attempt to create an alkaline-metal oxide layer on the support surface which would screen alcohols from underlying Lewis acidity. The samples were characterized by microreactor-based methanol dehydration studies, analysis of infrared spectra of adsorbed pyridine, and ammonia saturation and temperature-programmed desorption. As expected, the dehydration activity of the samples was strongly correlated to their potassium loading and, hence, their Lewis acidity. More intriguing, however, are the insights gained in this analysis concerning the nature of the interactions between Mo, Rh, and the Lewis acid sites on the alumina surface. Our results are consistent with the principle, suggested in the Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} literature, that our Mo(CO){sub 6} precursor interacts primarily with nonacidic hydroxyl groups on the dehydrated alumina surface. Furthermore, we provide strong evidence for the diminution of acidity brought on by the adsorption of Rh on Lewis acid sites of Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. 30 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Highly specific olfactory receptor neurons for types of amino acids in the channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Nikonov, Alexander A; Caprio, John

    2007-10-01

    Odorant specificity to l-alpha-amino acids was determined electrophysiologically for 93 single catfish olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) selected for their narrow excitatory molecular response range (EMRR) to only one type of amino acid (i.e., Group I units). These units were excited by either a basic amino acid, a neutral amino acid with a long side chain, or a neutral amino acid with a short side chain when tested at 10(-7) to 10(-5) M. Stimulus-induced inhibition, likely for contrast enhancement, was primarily observed in response to the types of amino acid stimuli different from that which activated a specific ORN. The high specificity of single Group I ORNs to type of amino acid was also previously observed for single Group I neurons in both the olfactory bulb and forebrain of the same species. These results indicate that for Group I neurons olfactory information concerning specific types of amino acids is processed from receptor neurons through mitral cells of the olfactory bulb to higher forebrain neurons without significant alteration in unit odorant specificity. PMID:17686913

  15. AKR1B7 Is Induced by the Farnesoid X Receptor and Metabolizes Bile Acids*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Daniel R.; Schmidt, Samuel; Holmstrom, Sam R.; Makishima, Makoto; Yu, Ruth T.; Cummins, Carolyn L.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Although bile acids are crucial for the absorption of lipophilic nutrients in the intestine, they are cytotoxic at high concentrations and can cause liver damage and promote colorectal carcinogenesis. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is activated by bile acids and abundantly expressed in enterohepatic tissues, plays a crucial role in maintaining bile acids at safe concentrations. Here, we show that FXR induces expression of Akr1b7 (aldo-keto reductase 1b7) in murine small intestine, colon, and liver by binding directly to a response element in the Akr1b7 promoter. We further show that AKR1B7 metabolizes 3-keto bile acids to 3β-hydroxy bile acids that are less toxic to cultured cells than their 3α-hydroxy precursors. These findings reveal a feed-forward, protective pathway operative in murine enterohepatic tissues wherein FXR induces AKR1B7 to detoxify bile acids. PMID:21081494

  16. Amino acid coevolution reveals three-dimensional structure and functional domains of insect odorant receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, Thomas A.; Morinaga, Satoshi; Ihara, Sayoko; Touhara, Kazushige; Marks, Debora S.; Benton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Insect Odorant Receptors (ORs) comprise an enormous protein family that translates environmental chemical signals into neuronal electrical activity. These heptahelical receptors are proposed to function as ligand-gated ion channels and/or to act metabotropically as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Resolving their signalling mechanism has been hampered by the lack of tertiary structural information and primary sequence similarity to other proteins. We use amino acid evolutionary covariation across these ORs to define restraints on structural proximity of residue pairs, which permit de novo generation of three-dimensional models. The validity of our analysis is supported by the location of functionally important residues in highly constrained regions of the protein. Importantly, insect OR models exhibit a distinct transmembrane domain packing arrangement to that of canonical GPCRs, establishing the structural unrelatedness of these receptor families. The evolutionary couplings and models predict odour binding and ion conduction domains, and provide a template for rationale structure-activity dissection. PMID:25584517

  17. Effects of traditionally used anxiolytic botanicals on enzymes of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system.

    PubMed

    Awad, R; Levac, D; Cybulska, P; Merali, Z; Trudeau, V L; Arnason, J T

    2007-09-01

    In Canada, the use of botanical natural health products (NHPs) for anxiety disorders is on the rise, and a critical evaluation of their safety and efficacy is required. The purpose of this study was to determine whether commercially available botanicals directly affect the primary brain enzymes responsible for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism. Anxiolytic plants may interact with either glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or GABA transaminase (GABA-T) and ultimately influence brain GABA levels and neurotransmission. Two in vitro rat brain homogenate assays were developed to determine the inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of aqueous and ethanolic plant extracts. Approximately 70% of all extracts that were tested showed little or no inhibitory effect (IC50 values greater than 1 mg/mL) and are therefore unlikely to affect GABA metabolism as tested. The aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) exhibited the greatest inhibition of GABA-T activity (IC50 = 0.35 mg/mL). Extracts from Centella asiatica (gotu kola) and Valeriana officinalis (valerian) stimulated GAD activity by over 40% at a dose of 1 mg/mL. On the other hand, both Matricaria recutita (German chamomile) and Humulus lupulus (hops) showed significant inhibition of GAD activity (0.11-0.65 mg/mL). Several of these species may therefore warrant further pharmacological investigation. The relation between enzyme activity and possible in vivo mode of action is discussed. PMID:18066140

  18. Cross-talk between lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 and tropomyosin receptor kinase A promotes lung epithelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Nan, Ling; Wei, Jianxin; Jacko, Anastasia M; Culley, Miranda K; Zhao, Jing; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Ma, Haichun; Zhao, Yutong

    2016-02-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lysophospholipid, which plays a crucial role in the regulation of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. LPA exerts its biological effects mainly through binding to cell-surface LPA receptors (LPA1-6), which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Recent studies suggest that cross-talk between receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and GPCRs modulates GPCRs-mediated signaling. Tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) is a RTK, which mediates nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced biological functions including cell migration in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Here, we show LPA1 transactivation of TrkA in murine lung epithelial cells (MLE12). LPA induced tyrosine phosphorylation of TrkA in both time- and dose-dependent manners. Down-regulation of LPA1 by siRNA transfection attenuated LPA-induced phosphorylation of TrkA, suggesting a cross-talk between LPA1 and TrkA. To investigate the molecular regulation of the cross-talk, we focused on the interaction between LPA1 and TrkA. We found that LPA induced interaction between LPA1 and TrkA. The LPA1/TrkA complex was localized on the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. The C-terminus of LPA1 was identified as the binding site for TrkA. Inhibition of TrkA attenuated LPA-induced phosphorylation of TrkA and LPA1 internalization, as well as lung epithelial cell migration. These studies provide a molecular mechanism for the transactivation of TrkA by LPA, and suggest that the cross-talk between LPA1 and TrkA regulates LPA-induced receptor internalization and lung epithelial cell migration. PMID:26597701

  19. Extraction and carrier-facilitated transport of amino acids using synthetic non-cyclic receptors through bulk liquid membrane.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pratibha; Joshi, Nidhi; Sharma, Uma

    2006-10-01

    The extraction and carrier-facilitated transport of amino acids (leucine, valine and glycine) was studied through chloroform bulk liquid membrane system using a series of non-cyclic receptors such as diethylene glycol (1), diethylene glycol dimethyl ether (2), diethylene glycol dibutyl ether (3), diethyl