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Sample records for acid receptor gamma

  1. A third human retinoic acid receptor, hRAR-. gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Krust, A.; Kastner, Ph.; Petkovich, M.; Zelent, A.; Chambon, P. )

    1989-07-01

    Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are retinoic acid (RA)-inducible enhancer factors belonging to the superfamily of steroid/thyroid nuclear receptors. The authors have previously characterized two human RAR (hRAR-{alpha} and hRAR-{beta}) cDNAs and have recently cloned their murine cognates (mRAR-{alpha} and mRAR-{beta}) together with a third RAR (mRAR-{gamma}) whose RNA was detected predominantly in skin, a well-known target for RA. mRAR-{gamma} cDNA was used here to clone its human counterpart (hRAR-{gamma}) from a T47D breast cancer cell cDNA library. Using a transient transfection assay in HeLa cells and a reporter gene harboring a synthetic RA responsive element, they demonstrate that hRAR-{gamma} cDNA indeed encodes a RA-inducible transcriptional trans-activator. Interestingly, comparisons of the amino acid sequences of all six human and mouse RARs indicate that the interspecies conservation of a given member of the RAR subfamily (either {alpha}, {beta}, or {gamma}) is much higher than the conservation of all three receptors within a given species. These observations indicate that RAR-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} may perform specific functions. They show also that hRAR-{gamma} RNA is the predominant RAR RNA species in human skin, which suggests that hRAR-{gamma} mediates some of the retinoid effects in this tissue.

  2. Characterization of cDNAs encoding the chick retinoic acid receptor gamma 2 and preferential distribution of retinoic acid receptor gamma transcripts during chick skin development.

    PubMed

    Michaille, J J; Blanchet, S; Kanzler, B; Garnier, J M; Dhouailly, D

    1994-12-01

    Retinoic acid receptors alpha, beta and gamma (RAR alpha, beta and gamma) are ligand-inductible transcriptional activators which belong to the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. At least two major isoforms (1 and 2) of each RAR arise by differential use of two promoters and alternative splicing. In mouse, the three RAR genes are expressed in stage- and tissue-specific patterns during embryonic development. In order to understand the role of the different RARs in chick, RAR gamma 2 cDNAs were isolated from an 8.5-day (stage 35 of Hamburger and Hamilton) chick embryo skin library. The deduced chick RAR gamma 2 amino acid sequence displays uncommon features such as 21 specific amino acid replacements, 12 of them being clustered in the amino-terminal region (domains A2 and B), and a truncated acidic carboxy-terminal region (F domain). However, the pattern of RAR gamma expression in chick embryo resembles that reported in mouse, particularly in skin where RAR gamma expression occurs in both the dermal and epidermal layers at the beginning of feather formation, and is subsequently restricted to the differentiating epidermal cells. Northern blot analysis suggests that different RAR gamma isoforms could be successively required during chick development.

  3. Cellular localization of retinoic acid receptor-gamma expression in normal and neoplastic skin.

    PubMed Central

    Finzi, E.; Blake, M. J.; Celano, P.; Skouge, J.; Diwan, R.

    1992-01-01

    Retinoids profoundly affect the normal growth and differentiation of epithelial tissues. Retinoic acid receptor-gamma (RAR-gamma) is a member of a family of retinoid receptors, and has been shown to be expressed almost exclusively in skin. However, little is known about the cellular localization of this receptor in human skin. The authors studied the expression of RAR-gamma in normal skin and human skin tumors by Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization. RAR-gamma mRNA was detected in normal skin as well as in cultures of neonatal keratinocytes. Using an oligonucleotide specific for the RAR-gamma cDNA isoform 1 (RAR-gamma 1), RAR-gamma 1 mRNA was localized to all layers of the epidermis, the outer root sheath of hair follicles, follicular hair bulbs, eccrine and sebaceous glands. Basal cell carcinoma constitutively expressed gamma-1 mRNA and one of seven squamous cell carcinomas showed loss of gamma-1 mRNA expression, relative to adjacent epithelium. By contrast, normal melanocytic nevi and tumor-associated lymphocytes expressed little or no RAR-gamma mRNA. These results suggest that RAR-gamma 1 may play an important role in the maintenance and differentiation of normal epidermis and skin appendages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1318641

  4. Effects of beer and hop on ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, Hitoshi; Takeda, Katsuichi; Okita, Yoichi; Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Koda, Hirofumi; Kiso, Yoshinobu

    2006-04-01

    Beer induced the response of the ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABA(A) receptors) expressed in Xenopus oocytes, indicating the presence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-like activity. Furthermore, the pentane extract of the beer, hop (Humulus lupulus L.) oil, and myrcenol potentiated the GABA(A) receptor response elicited by GABA. The GABA(A) receptor responses were also potentiated by the addition of aliphatic esters, most of which are reported to be present in beer flavor. Aliphatic esters showed the tendency to decrease in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response with an increase in their carbon chain length. When myrcenol was injected to mice prior to intraperitoneal administration of pentobarbital, the pentobarbital-induced sleeping time of mice increased additionally. Therefore, the beer contained not only GABA-like activity but also the modulator(s) of the GABA(A) receptor response.

  5. Benzodiazepine receptor agonists affect both binding and gating of recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptors.

    PubMed

    Mercik, Katarzyna; Piast, Michał; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2007-05-28

    Benzodiazepines are known to act by enhancing the effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor agonists. Positive modulation by benzodiazepines is typically ascribed to upregulation of agonist binding affinity but their effect on gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor gating remain unclear. In this work, we have used the ultrafast application system to examine the impact of flurazepam and zolpidem on recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptors. As expected, both drugs strongly enhanced currents evoked by low [gamma-aminobutyric acid]. These compounds, however, also affected currents elicited by saturating agonist concentration. In particular, flurazepam and zolpidem reduced current amplitudes and slowed down the recovery process in paired-pulse experiments. Moreover, flurazepam accelerated the current rise time and zolpidem enhanced the rate and extent of desensitization. We propose that flurazepam and zolpidem modulate gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptors by strong enhancement of agonist binding with a superimposed limited effect on the receptor gating.

  6. A widely used retinoic acid receptor antagonist induces peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activity.

    PubMed

    Schupp, Michael; Curtin, Joshua C; Kim, Roy J; Billin, Andrew N; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2007-05-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are transcription factors whose activity is regulated by the binding of small lipophilic ligands, including hormones, vitamins, and metabolites. Pharmacological NR ligands serve as important therapeutic agents; for example, all-trans retinoic acid, an activating ligand for retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha), is used to treat leukemia. Another RARalpha ligand, (E)-S,S-dioxide-4-(2-(7-(heptyloxy)-3,4-dihydro-4,4-dimethyl-2H-1-benzothiopyran-6-yl)-1-propenyl)-benzoic acid (Ro 41-5253), is a potent antagonist that has been a useful and purportedly specific probe of RARalpha function. Here, we report that Ro 41-5253 also activates the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation and target of widely prescribed antidiabetic thiazolidinediones (TZDs). Ro 41-5253 enhanced differentiation of mouse and human preadipocytes and activated PPARgamma target genes in mature adipocytes. Like the TZDs, Ro 41-5253 also down-regulated PPARgamma protein expression in adipocytes. In addition, Ro 41-5253 activated the PPARgamma-ligand binding domain in transiently transfected HEK293T cells. These effects were not prevented by a potent RARalpha agonist or by depleting cells of RARalpha, indicating that PPARgamma activation was not related to RARalpha antagonism. Indeed, Ro 41-5253 was able to compete with TZD ligands for binding to PPARgamma, suggesting that Ro 41-5253 directly affects PPAR activity. These results vividly demonstrate that pharmacological NR ligands may have "off-target" effects on other NRs. Ro 41-5253 is a PPARgamma agonist as well as an RARalpha antagonist whose pleiotropic effects on NRs may signify a unique spectrum of biological responses.

  7. Amiloride inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) receptors depends upon the alpha subunit subtype.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Janet L

    2002-06-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) receptors (GABARs) are responsible for most fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the mammalian brain. The GABARs contain several allosteric modulatory sites, many of which are useful clinically. The activity of most of these modulators depends upon the subunit composition of the receptor. The diuretic amiloride was previously reported to inhibit GABARs in frog sensory neurons. We measured its effects on recombinant GABARs to determine its mechanism of action at mammalian receptors and to examine the effect of subunit composition. Amiloride acted primarily as a competitive antagonist, reducing the sensitivity of the receptor to GABA without affecting the maximal current amplitude. Receptors containing an alpha6 subunit were about 10-fold more sensitive to amiloride than those containing other alpha subunits. In contrast, the identity of the beta or gamma subtype had little effect on amiloride sensitivity. Although several other modulators have specific effects at alpha6-containing receptors, amiloride is the first inhibitor to be reported with no additional dependence on the identity of the beta or gamma subunit. Therefore, it probably represents a unique modulatory site on the GABAR, which could be useful for developing drugs targeting these receptors. The selective activity of amiloride could also be helpful for isolating the contribution of receptors composed of alpha6 subtypes in heterogeneous native GABAR populations.

  8. Two isoforms of Xenopus retinoic acid receptor gamma 2 (B) exhibit differential expression and sensitivity to retinoic acid during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Crawford, M J; Liversage, R A; Varmuza, S L

    1995-01-01

    We report the isolation of two retinoic acid receptor isoforms (RAR gamma), which differ only in the 5'untranslated and putative N-terminus A regions. The two isoforms appear to serve as early markers for the presumptive neural axis; however, their expression patterns differ. RAR-gamma 2.1 is first expressed at gastrulation at the dorsal lip and subsequently along the presumptive neural axis. RAR- gamma 2.2 represents the full-length sequence of a receptor cDNA already partially characterized and present as a maternal transcript [Ellinger-Ziegelbauer and Dreyer (1991); Genes Dev 5:94-104, (1993): Mech Dev 41:31-46; Pfeffer and DeRobertis, (1994) Mech Dev: 45:147-153]. Unlike RAR-gamma 2.2, the 2.1 variant is not expressed either in pre-somitic mesoderm or notochord. RAR-gamma 2.1 is strongly expressed in branchial arches and to a lesser extent in the neural floor plate. The two isoforms also exhibit differential sensitivity to retinoic acid. Constitutive expression of RAR gamma 2.2 following neurulation appears to be depressed by treatment with retinoic acid, but domains of highest expression, namely, the head and tail, remain relatively unaffected, as do patterns of expression prior to late neurulation. By contrast, RAR-gamma 2.1 is not transcribed in retinoid-inhibited structures. Using microinjection techniques, we show that changes of RAR-gamma 2.1 expression in presumptive head structures occur as an early and local consequence of retinoic acid administration. Since RAR-gamma 2.1 expression is inhibited by retinoic acid, we tested to see if other treatments that perturb axis formation had any effect. Surprisingly, UV irradiation did not suppress that its inhibition by retinoic acid is not due solely to inhibition of anterior neural development. These experiments demonstrate a new subdivision of isoforms that undergo differential expression during development and that exhibit differential sensitivity to retinoic acid and to UV. This sensitivity and the presence

  9. GABAB receptor-mediated activation of astrocytes by gamma-hydroxybutyric acid

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Timothy; Chen, Lixin; Emri, Zsuzsa; Pirttimaki, Tiina; Errington, Adam C.; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Parri, H. Rheinallt

    2014-01-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolite gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) shows a variety of behavioural effects when administered to animals and humans, including reward/addiction properties and absence seizures. At the cellular level, these actions of GHB are mediated by activation of neuronal GABAB receptors (GABABRs) where it acts as a weak agonist. Because astrocytes respond to endogenous and exogenously applied GABA by activation of both GABAA and GABABRs, here we investigated the action of GHB on astrocytes on the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the ventrobasal (VB) thalamic nucleus, two brain areas involved in the reward and proepileptic action of GHB, respectively, and compared it with that of the potent GABABR agonist baclofen. We found that GHB and baclofen elicited dose-dependent (ED50: 1.6 mM and 1.3 µM, respectively) transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ in VTA and VB astrocytes of young mice and rats, which were accounted for by activation of their GABABRs and mediated by Ca2+ release from intracellular store release. In contrast, prolonged GHB and baclofen exposure caused a reduction in spontaneous astrocyte activity and glutamate release from VTA astrocytes. These findings have key (patho)physiological implications for our understanding of the addictive and proepileptic actions of GHB. PMID:25225100

  10. Potentiation of Gamma Aminobutyric Acid Receptors (GABAAR) by Ethanol: How Are Inhibitory Receptors Affected?

    PubMed Central

    Förstera, Benjamin; Castro, Patricio A.; Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Aguayo, Luis G.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the understanding of ethanol actions on the type A γ-aminobutyric acid chloride channel (GABAAR), a member of the pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs). However, the mechanism by which ethanol potentiates the complex is still not fully understood and a number of publications have shown contradictory results. Thus many questions still remain unresolved requiring further studies for a better comprehension of this effect. The present review concentrates on the involvement of GABAAR in the acute actions of ethanol and specifically focuses on the immediate, direct or indirect, synaptic and extra-synaptic modulatory effects. To elaborate on the immediate, direct modulation of GABAAR by acute ethanol exposure, electrophysiological studies investigating the importance of different subunits, and data from receptor mutants will be examined. We will also discuss the nature of the putative binding sites for ethanol based on structural data obtained from other members of the pLGICs family. Finally, we will briefly highlight the glycine gated chloride channel (GlyR), another member of the pLGIC family, as a suitable target for the development of new pharmacological tools. PMID:27199667

  11. Benzodiazepine-insensitive mice generated by targeted disruption of the gamma 2 subunit gene of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Günther, U; Benson, J; Benke, D; Fritschy, J M; Reyes, G; Knoflach, F; Crestani, F; Aguzzi, A; Arigoni, M; Lang, Y

    1995-01-01

    Vigilance, anxiety, epileptic activity, and muscle tone can be modulated by drugs acting at the benzodiazepine (BZ) site of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. In vivo, BZ sites are potential targets for endogenous ligands regulating the corresponding central nervous system states. To assess the physiological relevance of BZ sites, mice were generated containing GABAA receptors devoid of BZ sites. Following targeted disruption of the gamma 2 subunit gene, 94% of the BZ sites were absent in brain of neonatal mice, while the number of GABA sites was only slightly reduced. Except for the gamma 2 subunit, the level of expression and the regional and cellular distribution of the major GABAA receptor subunits were unaltered. The single channel main conductance level and the Hill coefficient were reduced to values consistent with recombinant GABAA receptors composed of alpha and beta subunits. The GABA response was potentiated by pentobarbital but not by flunitrazepam. Diazepam was inactive behaviorally. Thus, the gamma 2 subunit is dispensable for the assembly of functional GABAA receptors but is required for normal channel conductance and the formation of BZ sites in vivo. BZ sites are not essential for embryonic development, as suggested by the normal body weight and histology of newborn mice. Postnatally, however, the reduced GABAA receptor function is associated with retarded growth, sensorimotor dysfunction, and drastically reduced life-span. The lack of postnatal GABAA receptor regulation by endogenous ligands of BZ sites might contribute to this phenotype. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7644489

  12. Ubiquitin/proteasome pathway regulates levels of retinoic acid receptor gamma and retinoid X receptor alpha in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Boudjelal, M; Wang, Z; Voorhees, J J; Fisher, G J

    2000-04-15

    Repeated exposure of human skin to solar UV radiation leads to premature aging (photoaging) and skin cancer. UV-induced skin damage can be ameliorated by all-trans retinoic acid treatment. The actions of retinoic acid in skin keratinocytes are mediated primarily by nuclear retinoic acid receptor gamma (RARgamma) and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha). We found that exposure of cultured primary human keratinocytes to UV irradiation (30 mJ/cm2) substantially reduced (50-90%) RARgamma and RXRalpha mRNA and protein within 8 h. The rates of disappearance of RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins after UV exposure or treatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide were similar. UV irradiation did not increase the rate of breakdown of RARgamma or RXRalpha but rather reduced their rate of synthesis. The addition of proteasome inhibitors MG132 and LLvL, but not the lysosomal inhibitor E64, prevented loss of RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins after exposure of keratinocytes to either UV radiation or cycloheximide. Soluble extracts from nonirradiated or UV-irradiated keratinocytes possessed similar levels of proteasome activity that degraded RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins in vitro. Furthermore, RARgamma and RXRalpha were polyubiquitinated in intact cells. RXRalpha was found to contain two proline, glutamate/aspartate, serine, and threonine (PEST) motifs, which confer rapid turnover of many short-lived regulatory proteins that are degraded by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. However, the PEST motifs in RXRalpha did not function to regulate its stability, because deletion of the PEST motifs individually or together did not alter ubiquitination or proteasome-mediated degradation of RXRalpha. These results demonstrate that loss of RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins after UV irradiation results from degradation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Taken together, the data here indicate that ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated breakdown is an important mechanism regulating the levels of

  13. Immunochemical demonstration that amino acids 360-377 of the acetylcholine receptor gamma-subunit are cytoplasmic

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (mabs) previously prepared against Torpedo acetylcholine receptor are shown to recognize a synthetic nonadecapeptide corresponding to lys360-glu377 of the gamma subunit. The reaction was demonstrated by solid-phase enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assays, by inhibition of binding of the mabs to receptor, and by immunoprecipitation of the peptide conjugated to bovine serum albumin. Immunogold electron microscopy on isolated postsynaptic membranes from Torpedo showed that both mabs bind to intracellular epitopes on the receptor. These results establish that amino acid residues 360-377 of the receptor gamma-subunit, and probably the analogous region of the delta-subunit, reside on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. Since the primary structures of all four subunits suggest a common transmembrane arrangement, the corresponding domains of the alpha- and beta-subunits are probably also cytoplasmic. PMID:3972889

  14. Direct protein-protein coupling enables cross-talk between dopamine D5 and gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Wan, Q; Pristupa, Z B; Yu, X M; Wang, Y T; Niznik, H B

    2000-01-20

    GABA(A) (gamma-aminobutyric-acid A) and dopamine D1 and D5 receptors represent two structurally and functionally divergent families of neurotransmitter receptors. The former comprises a class of multi-subunit ligand-gated channels mediating fast interneuronal synaptic transmission, whereas the latter belongs to the seven-transmembrane-domain single-polypeptide receptor superfamily that exerts its biological effects, including the modulation of GABA(A) receptor function, through the activation of second-messenger signalling cascades by G proteins. Here we show that GABA(A)-ligand-gated channels complex selectively with D5 receptors through the direct binding of the D5 carboxy-terminal domain with the second intracellular loop of the GABA(A) gamma2(short) receptor subunit. This physical association enables mutually inhibitory functional interactions between these receptor systems. The data highlight a previously unknown signal transduction mechanism whereby subtype-selective G-protein-coupled receptors dynamically regulate synaptic strength independently of classically defined second-messenger systems, and provide a heuristic framework in which to view these receptor systems in the maintenance of psychomotor disease states.

  15. Compounds exhibiting selective efficacy for different beta subunits of human recombinant gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alison J; Oxley, Beth; Malpas, Sallie; Pillai, Gopalan V; Simpson, Peter B

    2004-11-01

    Inhibitory GABA(A) receptor modulators are widely used therapeutic agents for a variety of central nervous system disorders. Ltk(-) cells stably expressing human recombinant GABA(A) subunits (alpha1beta1-3gamma2s) were seeded into 96-well plates, loaded with chlorocoumarin-2-dimyristoyl phosphatidylethanolamine and bis(1,3-diethyl-2-thiobarbiturate)trimethineoxonol, and rapid fluorescence resonance energy transfer technique (FRET) measurements were made of GABA-evoked depolarizations in low-Cl(-) buffer using a voltage/ion probe reader. The influence of different betasubunits on the ability of agents to modulate and directly activate the ion channel was examined. GABA evoked concentration-dependent decreases in FRET, increasing fluorescence emission ratio (460/580 nm) at alpha1beta1gamma2, alpha1beta2gamma2, and alpha1beta3gamma2 receptors with similar maximal amplitude (P > 0.05, n = 17) and EC(50) values of 2.4 +/- 0.2, 2.5 +/- 0.2, and 1.3 +/- 0.1 microM, respectively. Piperidine-4-sulfonic acid and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol were less potent, with EC(50) values of 8.7 +/- 0.9, 9.2 +/- 0.5, and 11.7 +/- 1.2, and 43.7 +/- 6.4, 24.8 +/- 1.6, and 26.1 +/- 2.4 microM, respectively. Potency and maximal efficacy of propofol, methyl 6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate, pentobarbital, and steroids, 5alpha-pregnan-3alpha-ol-20-one and 5beta-pregnan-3alpha-ol-20-one, were unaffected by the beta isoform present in the receptor complex. However, several compounds displayed beta2/3 subunit selectivity, notably loreclezole, R(-)-etomidate, and a group of anti-inflammatory agents including mefenamic acid, flufenamic acid, meclofenamic acid, tolfenamic acid, niflumic acid, and diflunisal. The anti-inflammatories exhibited varying levels of efficacy at beta2/3 subunits, with micromolar potency, while having antagonist or weak inverse agonist profiles at alpha1beta1gamma2. Diflunisal was the most efficacious compound, eliciting greater

  16. [Expression of retinoic acid receptor gamma gene in ES cells and its effect on their differentiation and apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Du, Z W; Tsung, H C; Yao, Z

    1998-06-01

    We have constructed pSG5-RAR gamma-neo plasmid containing mouse retinoic acid receptor gamma (RAR gamma) gene and neo gene, and introduced it into embryonic stem ES-5 cells, by calcium phosphate mediated transfection. Some G418-resistant clones were isolated and from RNA dot blot analysis of these clones, a clone overexpressing RAR gamma gene was established, designated as ES-gamma cell line. Northern blot hydridization and Southern blot hydridization analysis of ES-gamma cells (Fig 3, 4) demonstrated that ES-gamma cells overexpressed exogenous RAR gamma mRNA and the exogenous RAR gamma cDNA integrated into the genome of ES cells. ES-gamma cells retained undifferentiated morphology and positive alkaline phosphatase activity (Plate I, Fig. 1, 2), so it resembled ES-5 cells in terms of stem cell characteristics. When ES-gamma cells were subcutaneously inoculated into nude mouse and differentiated in vivo, tumorous nodules containing various tissue structures were obtained, demonstrating their pluripotent properties just like parent ES-5 cells. Contrasting with ES-5 cells, the histological features of tumors showed no cartilage tissues, but abundant muscle tissues and keratinized cyst like structures constituted by stratified squamous epithelia (Plate I, Fig. 3). Differentiating in vitro by hanging drop culture methods, ES-gamma cells differentiated mostly into fibroblast-like cells, (Plate II, Fig. 1-5). The above results indicated that overexpression of RAR gamma gene changed the cell type of ES cells differentiating in vivo and in vitro. During the differentiation of ES-5 cells induced by RA, a large number of cells rounded up, detached from the dish and tended to die. We suspected that this phenomenon may be apoptosis. The ultrastructure appearance of the dying cells displayed typical apoptotic changes including chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation (Plate I, Fig. 4, 5). Detection of DNA fragments using agarose gel electrophoresis showed characteristic

  17. Picrotoxin inhibition mechanism of a gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor investigated by a laser-pulse photolysis technique.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Latha; Hess, George P

    2005-06-14

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) receptor, a major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptor, belongs to a family of membrane-bound proteins that regulate signal transmission between approximately 10(12) cells of the nervous system. It plays a major role in many neurological disorders, including epilepsy. It is the target of many pharmacological agents, including the convulsant picrotoxin. Here, we present the mechanism of inhibition by picrotoxin of the rat alpha1beta2gamma2L GABA(A) receptor investigated using rapid kinetic techniques in combination with whole-cell current recordings. The following new results were obtained by using transient kinetic techniques, the cell-flow method and the laser-pulse photolysis (LaPP) technique with a microsecond to millisecond time resolution. (i) The apparent dissociation constant of picrotoxin for the open-channel form of the receptor was approximately 5 times higher than that of the closed-channel form. (ii) Picrotoxin increased the channel-closing rate constant (k(cl)) approximately 4-fold, while the rate constant for channel opening (k(op)) remained essentially unaffected. (iii) The mechanism indicates that picrotoxin binds to an allosteric site of the receptor with higher affinity for the closed-channel form than for the open-channel form and thereby inhibits the receptor by decreasing 4-fold its channel-opening equilibrium constant [Phi(I)(-)(1) = k(op(I))/k(cl(I))]. (iv) The mechanism further indicates that compounds that bind with equal affinity to the picrotoxin-binding site on the open-channel form of the receptor and the closed-channel form will not affect the channel-opening equilibrium and can, therefore, displace picrotoxin and prevent inhibition of the GABA(A) receptor by picrotoxin. Such compounds may be therapeutically useful in counteracting the effects of compounds and diseases that unfavorably affect the channel-opening equilibrium of the receptor channel.

  18. Gamma-Aminobutyric acid and benzodiazepine receptors in the kindling model of epilepsy: a quantitative radiohistochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, C.; Pedersen, H.B.; McNamara, J.O.

    1985-10-01

    Quantitative radiohistochemistry was utilized to study alterations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and benzodiazepine receptors in the kindling model of epilepsy. The radioligands used for GABA and benzodiazepine receptors were (TH) muscimol and (TH)flunitrazepam, respectively. GABA receptor binding was increased by 22% in fascia dentata of the hippocampal formation but not in neocortex or substantia nigra of kindled rats. Within fascia dentata, GABA receptor binding was increased to an equivalent extent in stratum granulosum and throughout stratum moleculare; no increase was found in dentate hilus or stratum lacunosummoleculare or stratum radiatum of CA1. The increased binding was present at 24 hr but not at 28 days after the last kindled seizure. The direction, anatomic distribution, and time course of the increased GABA receptor binding were paralleled by increased benzodiazepine receptor binding. The anatomic distribution of the increased GABA receptor binding is consistent with a localization to somata and dendritic trees of dentate granule cells. The authors suggest that increased GABA and benzodiazepine receptor binding may contribute to enhanced inhibition of dentate granule cells demonstrated electrophysiologically in kindled animals.

  19. [Effect of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid receptor on focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats].

    PubMed

    Jin, Rong; Jiang, Xin-Ying; Ma, Xing; Gu, Shu-Ling; Dai, Ti-Jun

    2007-08-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid receptor (GHBR) on focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats and its mechanism. NCS-356 (the agonist of GHBR) and NCS-382 (the antagonist of GHBR) were adopted as the tool medicine. The ripe male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 240 - 280 g were randomly divided into seven groups: sham operation group (sham), ischemia-reperfusion group (Isc/R), NCS-356 160 microg x kg(-1) group (N1), NCS-356 320 microg x kg(-1) group (N2), NCS-356 640 microg x kg(-1) group (N3), NCS-382 640 microg x kg(-1) + NCS-356 640 microg x kg(-1) group (NCS-382 + N3), and nimodipine (Nim) 600 microg x kg(-1) group. The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model referring to Longa's method with modifications was adopted. The effect of GHBR on behavioral consequence of MCAO rats was studied after 2 h of ischemia-reperfusion. After 24 h of ischemia-reperfusion, part of animals were used to measure the cerebral infarction volume by TTC staining; ischemic cortex of another part of animals were used to measure the content of intracellular free calcium by flow cytometry, the tNOS, iNOS activity and the content of NO by spectrophotometric method, the content of cGMP by radioimmunoassay. The neurological function score and infarction volume rate in Isc/R group rats increased significantly than that in sham group; The content of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]) of cortex neuron and cGMP, the activities of tNOS and iNOS, and the content of NO in Isc/R group were higher than that in sham group obviously (P < 0.01); These consequence we mentioned of N1, N2, N3 and Nim group were lower than that of Isc/R. NCS-382 + N3 group could significantly antagonize the above effect of N3. Thus, NCS-356 has protective effects against ischemia-reperfusion brain injury by activating GHBR. The neuroprotective effect of GHBR is related with decreasing the content of [Ca2+]i, NO, cGMP and tNOS, iNOS activity in MCAO rats.

  20. Cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 inhibits rat cortical dialysate gamma-aminobutyric acid levels.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, L; Tomasini, M C; Cassano, T; Bebe, B W; Siniscalchi, A; O'Connor, W T; Magee, P; Tanganelli, S; Cuomo, V; Antonelli, T

    2001-10-15

    The effects of the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 (0.1-5 mg/kg i.p.) on endogenous extracellular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in the cerebral cortex of the awake rat was investigated by using microdialysis. WIN 55,212-2 (1 and 5 mg/kg i.p.) was associated with a concentration-dependent decrease in dialysate GABA levels (-16% +/- 4% and -26% +/- 4% of basal values, respectively). The WIN 55,212-2 (5 mg/kg i.p.) induced-inhibition was counteracted by a dose (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) of the CB(1) receptor antagonist SR141716A, which by itself was without effect on cortical GABA levels. These findings suggest that cannabinoids decrease cortical GABA levels in vivo, an action that might underlie some of the cognitive and behavioral effects of acute exposure to marijuana.

  1. Effect of paraoxon on muscarinic, dopamine and. gamma. -aminobutyric acid receptors of brain and sensitivity to muscarinic antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, J.C.R.; Hoskins, B.; Ho, I.K.

    1986-03-05

    Several acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors decrease muscarinic cholinergic (mACh) receptors in the brain, alteration of dopamine (DA) and ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors after AChE inhibition was also reported. In view of the important interactions among DA, GABA and ACh systems, whether this is a common effect of AChE inhibitors should be established. They report the effect of the AChE inhibitor, paraoxon, on DA, GABA and mACh receptors in the rat. The binding of /sup 3/H-QNB (for mACh), /sup 3/H-spiperone (for DA) and /sup 3/H-muscimol (for GABA) to striatal and hippocampal membranes was analyzed. Also, behavioral sensitivity to atropine was studied. Twenty-four hr after a single dose (0.75 mg/kg, s.c.) of paraoxon, the density of mACh receptors in the striatum was decreased but, at 3 days, no change was seen. In the hippocampus, the mACh receptors were not affected. Repeated treatment with paraoxon (0.3 mg/kg, 48 hourly) for 2 weeks reduced the mACh receptor density in both regions. Neither single nor repeated paraoxon treatment had an effect on DA or GABA receptors. After single or repeated dosing with paraoxon, myoclonus induced by atropine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was enhanced. The results show rapid downregulation of mACh receptors by paraoxon. DA or GABA, however, appear not to be affected under these treatment regimens.

  2. Role of a gamma-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor mutation in the evolution and spread of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera resistance to cyclodiene insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An alanine to serine amino acid substitution within the Rdl subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor confers resistance to cyclodiene insecticides in many species. The corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is a damaging pest of cultivated corn that was partially controlled by ...

  3. A single amino acid in the second Ig-like domain of the human Fc gamma receptor II is critical for human IgG2 binding.

    PubMed

    Warmerdam, P A; van de Winkel, J G; Vlug, A; Westerdaal, N A; Capel, P J

    1991-08-15

    The low-affinity human Fc gamma RIIa is encoded by a single gene with allelic variation, defined by low-responder and high-responder alleles (LR and HR). The HR Fc gamma RIIa transcript interacts strongly with murine (m) IgG1 complexes, in contrast to the LR Fc gamma RIIa. Furthermore, the transcripts can be discriminated by mAb 41H16, which recognizes an epitope expressed on the HR Fc gamma RIIa molecule. We report that this receptor is also polymorphic in its reactivity with human (h) IgG2. Binding studies using well-defined hIgG dimers revealed that LR Fc gamma RIIa molecules can efficiently bind hIgG2, in contrast to HR Fc gamma RIIa. Previous work of others showed one amino acid difference between the allelic forms of Fc gamma RII. We, however, found a second amino acid difference between both allelic forms. In this study, hybrid Fc gamma RIIa molecules were constructed to determine the epitope for mAb 41H16 and the binding domain for mIgG1 and hIgG2 complexes. Our data point to the importance of the amino acid at position 131, located in the second Ig-like domain of Fc gamma RIIa. When an arginine residue is present at amino acid position 131, the receptor is recognized by mAb 41H16. Furthermore, the receptor can bind mIgG1-sensitized indicator E, but binds hIgG2 dimers only weakly. When a histidine residue is present at this amino acid position, hIgG2 dimers do bind efficiently to Fc gamma RII, whereas mIgG1-sensitized E and mAb 41H16 exhibit a strongly diminished binding.

  4. Dual action of isoflurane on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated currents through recombinant alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2L)-GABA(A)-receptor channels.

    PubMed

    Neumahr, S; Hapfelmeier, G; Scheller, M; Schneck, H; Franke, C; Kochs, E

    2000-05-01

    Isoflurane (ISO) increased the agonist-induced chloride flux through the gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABA(A)R). This may reflect an anesthetic-induced increase in the apparent agonist affinity. A dual effect of anesthetics was postulated for both the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and the GABA(A)R. We tested the hypothesis that, in addition to a blocking effect, ISO increases gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated currents through recombinant GABA(A)R channels. HEK293 cells were transfected with rat cDNA for alpha(1),beta(2),gamma(2L) subunits. Currents elicited by 1 mM or 0. 01 mM GABA, respectively, alone, or with increasing concentrations of ISO, were recorded by using standard patch clamp techniques. ISO reduced the peak current elicited by 1 mM GABA. Currents induced by 0.01 mM GABA were potentiated by small ISO (twofold at 0.5 mM ISO) and inhibited by larger concentrations. Withdrawal of ISO and GABA induced rebound currents, suggesting an open-channel block by ISO. These currents increased with increasing concentrations of ISO. At large concentrations of ISO, the inhibitory effect predominated and was caused by, at least partly, an open-channel block. At small concentrations of ISO, potentiation of the GABA-gated currents was more prominent. This dual action of ISO indicates different binding sites at the GABA(A)R. The balance between potentiation and block depends on the concentrations of both ISO and GABA.

  5. Ligand-dependent coactivation of the human bile acid receptor FXR by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Savkur, Rajesh S; Thomas, Jeffrey S; Bramlett, Kelli S; Gao, Yunling; Michael, Laura F; Burris, Thomas P

    2005-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) has been shown to play an important role in energy metabolism by coordinating transcriptional programs involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, adaptive thermogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and fatty acid oxidation. PGC-1alpha also plays a crucial role in cholesterol metabolism by serving as a coactivator of the liver X receptor-alpha and inducing the expression of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase. Here, we demonstrate that PGC-1alpha also functions as an effective coactivator of farnesoid X receptor (FXR), the bile acid receptor. Transient cotransfection assays demonstrate that PGC-1alpha enhances ligand-mediated FXR transcription when either full-length FXR or Gal4 DNA binding domain-FXR-ligand binding domain chimeras were analyzed. Mammalian two-hybrid analyses, glutathione S-transferase affinity chromatography and biochemical coactivator recruitment assays demonstrate ligand-dependent interaction between the two proteins both in vivo and in vitro. PGC-1alpha-mediated coactivation of FXR was highly ligand-dependent and absolutely required an intact activation function-2 (AF-2) domain of FXR and the LXXLL motif in PGC-1alpha. The integrity of the charge clamp was required, further illustrating the role of the ligand binding domain of FXR in PGC-1alpha recognition. Together, these results indicate that PGC-1alpha functions as a potent coactivator for FXR and further implicates its role in the regulation of genes that are involved in bile acid and lipid metabolism.

  6. Molecular recognition of nitrated fatty acids by PPAR[gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Jifeng; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Martynowski, Dariusz; Garcia-Barrio, Minerva T.; Kovach, Amanda; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Baker, Paul R.S.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Chen, Y. Eugene; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) regulates metabolic homeostasis and adipocyte differentiation, and it is activated by oxidized and nitrated fatty acids. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPAR{gamma} ligand binding domain bound to nitrated linoleic acid, a potent endogenous ligand of PPAR{gamma}. Structural and functional studies of receptor-ligand interactions reveal the molecular basis of PPAR{gamma} discrimination of various naturally occurring fatty acid derivatives.

  7. Analysis of subcomponents of the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor macromolecular complex in mammalian central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    Since the presence of endogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) may affect benzodiazepine binding to tissue sections in autoradiographic studies, a protocol designed to check for this influence has been investigated. (/sup 3/H)Flunitrazepam (1 nM) was used to label benzodiazepine receptors for autoradiographic localization. Bicuculline was added to the incubation medium of an additional set of tissue sections to antagonize any potential effect of endogenous GABA. Binding in these sections was compared to that occurring in another set in which excess GABA was added to create further GABA enhancement. Binding was also compared to adjacent sections which were treated similarly but also preincubated in distilled-deionized water to burst the cells by osmotic shock and eliminate endogenous GABA, thereby preventing any effect on benzodiazepine binding. The results indicated that endogenous GABA is indeed present in the slide-mounted tissue sections and is affecting benzodiazepine receptor binding differentially in various regions of the brain depending on the density of GABAergic innervation. Scatchard analysis of saturation data demonstrated that the alteration in BZ binding due to GABA was a result of a change in the affinity rather than number of receptors present.

  8. Importance of the gamma-aminobutyric acid(B) receptor C-termini for G-protein coupling.

    PubMed

    Grünewald, Sylvia; Schupp, Bettina J; Ikeda, Stephen R; Kuner, Rohini; Steigerwald, Frank; Kornau, Hans-Christian; Köhr, Georg

    2002-05-01

    Functional gamma-aminobutyric acid(B) (GABA(B)) receptors assemble from two subunits, GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2).) This heteromerization, which involves a C-terminal coiled-coil interaction, ensures efficient surface trafficking and agonist-dependent G-protein activation. In the present study, we took a closer look at the implications of the intracellular C termini of GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2)) for G-protein coupling. We generated a series of C-terminal mutants of GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2)) and tested them for physical interaction, surface trafficking, coupling to adenylyl cyclase, and G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells as well as on endogenous calcium channels in sympathetic neurons of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG). We found that the C-terminal interaction contributes only partly to the heterodimeric assembly of the subunits, indicating the presence of an additional interaction site. The described endoplasmic reticulum retention signal within the C terminus of GABA(B(1)) functioned only in the context of specific amino acids, which constitute part of the GABA(B(1)) coiled-coil sequence. This finding may provide a link between the retention signal and its shielding by the coiled coil of GABA(B(2).) In HEK293 cells, we observed that the two well-known GABA(B) receptor antagonists [S-(R*,R*)]-[3-[[1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]amino]-2-hydroxypropyl](cyclohexylmethyl) phosphinic acid (CGP54626) and (+)-(2S)-5,5-dimethyl-2-morpholineacetic acid (SCH50911) CGP54626 and SCH50911 function as inverse agonists. The C termini of GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2)) strongly influenced agonist-independent G-protein coupling, although they were not necessary for agonist-dependent G-protein coupling. The C-terminal GABA(B) receptor mutants described here demonstrate that the active receptor conformation is stabilized by the coiled-coil interaction. Thus, the C-terminal conformation of the GABA(B) receptor may determine its

  9. Analogues of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and trans-4-aminocrotonic acid (TACA) substituted in the 2 position as GABAC receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Chebib, M; Vandenberg, R J; Johnston, G A

    1997-12-01

    1. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and trans-4-aminocrotonic acid (TACA) have been shown to activate GABAC receptors. In this study, a range of C2, C3, C4 and N-substituted GABA and TACA analogues were examined for activity at GABAC receptors. 2. The effects of these compounds were examined by use of electrophysiological recording from Xenopus oocytes expressing the human rho 1 subunit of GABAC receptors with the two-electrode voltage-clamp method. 3. trans-4-Amino-2-fluorobut-2-enoic acid was found to be a potent agonist (KD = 2.43 microM). In contrast, trans-4-amino-2-methylbut-2-enoic acid was found to be a moderately potent antagonist (IC50 = 31.0 microM and KB = 45.5 microM). These observations highlight the possibility that subtle structural substitutions may change an agonist into an antagonist. 4. 4-Amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (KD = 189 microM), 4-amino-2-methylenebutanoic acid (KD = 182 microM) and 4-amino-2-chlorobutanoic acid (KD = 285 microM) were weak partial agonists. The intrinsic activities of these compounds were 12.1%, 4.4% and 5.2% of the maximal response of GABA, respectively. These compounds more effectively blocked the effects of the agonist, GABA, giving rise to KB values of 53 microM and 101 microM, respectively. 5. The sulphinic acid analogue of GABA, homohypotaurine, was found to be a potent partial agonist (KD = 4.59 microM, intrinsic activity 69%). 6. It was concluded that substitution of a methyl or a halo group in the C2 position of GABA or TACA is tolerated at GABAC receptors. However, there was dramatic loss of activity when these groups were substituted at the C3, C4 and nitrogen positions of GABA and TACA. 7. Molecular modelling studies on a range of active and inactive compounds indicated that the agonist/competitive antagonist binding site of the GABAC receptor may be smaller than that of the GABAA and GABAB receptors. It is suggested that only compounds that can attain relatively flat conformations may bind to the GABAC receptor

  10. The central nervous system convulsant pentylenetetrazole stimulates gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-activated current in picrotoxin-resistant GABA(A) receptors in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Dibas, M I; Dillon, G H

    2000-05-19

    We tested the ability of the central nervous system convulsant pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) to inhibit gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated current in receptors expressing a mutation that rendered them resistant to picrotoxin. Consistent with previous reports, receptors expressing beta2(T246F), along with alpha3 and gamma2 subunits, resulted in a greatly diminished sensitivity to picrotoxin. Sensitivity to PTZ was completely abolished in the mutant receptor, confirming the hypothesis that PTZ acts at the picrotoxin site. Quite unexpected, however, was our finding that PTZ elicited marked stimulation (up to 400% of control) in the mutated receptors. This stimulatory effect was not mediated via an interaction with the benzodiazepine site, as preincubation with the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil did not block the PTZ-induced stimulation. Our results reveal the existence of a novel stimulatory domain of PTZ in GABA(A) receptors.

  11. Receptor-selective retinoids implicate retinoic acid receptor alpha and gamma in the regulation of bmp-2 and bmp-4 in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rogers, M B

    1996-01-01

    The effect of retinoids on malignant cells and embryos indicates that retinoids influence the expression of growth factors or alter the response of cells to growth factors. The bone morphogenetic proteins, Bmp-2 and Bmp-4, are candidates for such growth factors because retinoic acid (RA) treatment of F9 embryonal carcinoma cells induced Bmp-2 mRNA, while simultaneously repressing Bmp-4 levels. Also, recombinant Bmp-2 affected the growth and differentiation of these cells. Regulation of each gene was concentration dependent and required continuous RA treatment. The short half-lives of the Bmp-2 (75 +/- 11 min) and Bmp-4 (70 +/- 4 min) mRNAs suggest that their abundance is primarily controlled at the transcriptional level. To determine which RA receptor (RAR) controls bmp-2 and bmp-4 expression, F9 cells were exposed to various receptor-selective retinoids. RAR alpha- and gamma-selective retinoids induced Bmp-2 and repressed Bmp-4 equally as well as all-trans RA. In contrast, a RAR beta-selective retinoid had little effect on Bmp-2 induction but repressed Bmp-4. A RAR alpha-selective antagonist inhibited all-trans RA stimulation of Bmp-2, although not as dramatically as a RAR beta gamma-selective antagonist. No differences were observed between Bmp levels in all-trans RA and 9-cis RA-treated cells, indicating that the RXRs play little part in controlling these genes. The results are consistent with RAR alpha and gamma-controlled Bmp-2 and Bmp-4 regulation.

  12. Phenotypic consequences of deletion of the {gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, or {beta}{sub 3} subunit of the type A {gamma}-aminobutyric acid receptor in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Culia, C.T.; Stubbs, L.J.; Montgomery, C.S.; Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M.

    1994-03-29

    Three genes (Gabrg3, Gabra5, and Gabrb3) encoding the {gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, and {beta}{sub 3} subunits of the type A {gamma}-aminobutyric acid receptor, respectively, are known to map near the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in mouse chromosome 7. This region shares homology with a segment of human chromosome 15 that is implicated in Angelman syndrome, an inherited neurobehavioral disorder. By mapping Gabrg3-Gabra5-Gabrb3-telomere. Like Gabrb3, neither the Gabra5 nor Gabrg3 gene is functionally imprinted in adult mouse brain. Mice deleted for all three subunits die at birth with a cleft palate, although there are rare survivors ({approximately} 5%) that do not have a cleft palate but do exhibit a neurological abnormality characterized by tremor, jerky gait, and runtiness. The authors have previously suggested that deficiency of the {beta}{sub 3} subunit may be responsible for the clefting defect. Most notably, however, in this report they describe mice carrying two overlapping, complementing p deletions that fail to express the {gamma}{sub 3} transcript, as well as mice from another line that express neither the {gamma}{sub 3} nor {alpha}{sub 5} transcripts. Surprisingly, mice from both of these lines are phenotypically normal and do not exhibit any of the neurological symptoms characteristic of the rare survivors that are deleted for all three ({gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, and {beta}{sub 3}) subunits. These mice therefore provide a whole-organism type A {gamma}-aminobutyric-acid receptor background that is devoid of any receptor subtypes that normally contain the {gamma}{sub 3} and/or {alpha}{sub 5} subunits. The absence of an overt neurological phenotype in mice lacking the {gamma}{sub 3} and/or {alpha}{sub 5} subunits also suggests that mutations in these genes are unlikely to provide useful animal models for Angelman syndrome in humans.

  13. Gamma aminobutyric acid B and 5-hydroxy tryptamine 2A receptors functional regulation during enhanced liver cell proliferation by GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticles treatment.

    PubMed

    Shilpa, Joy; Pretty, Mary Abraham; Anitha, Malat; Paulose, Cheramadathikudyil Skaria

    2013-09-01

    Liver is one of the major organs in vertebrates and hepatocytes are damaged by many factors. The liver cell maintenance and multiplication after injury and treatment gained immense interest. The present study investigated the role of Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) coupled with chitosan nanoparticles in the functional regulation of Gamma aminobutyric acid B and 5-hydroxy tryptamine 2A receptors mediated cell signaling mechanisms, extend of DNA methylation and superoxide dismutase activity during enhanced liver cell proliferation. Liver injury was achieved by partial hepatectomy of male Wistar rats and the GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticles treatments were given intraperitoneally. The experimental groups were sham operated control (C), partially hepatectomised rats with no treatment (PHNT), partially hepatectomised rats with GABA chitosan nanoparticle (GCNP), 5-HT chitosan nanoparticle (SCNP) and a combination of GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticle (GSCNP) treatments. In GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticle treated group there was a significant decrease (P<0.001) in the receptor expression of Gamma aminobutyric acid B and a significant increase (P<0.001) in the receptor expression of 5-hydroxy tryptamine 2A when compared to PHNT. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate content and its regulatory protein, presence of methylated DNA and superoxide dismutase activity were decreased in GCNP, SCNP and GSCNP when compared to PHNT. The Gamma aminobutyric acid B and 5-hydroxy tryptamine 2A receptors coupled signaling elements played an important role in GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticles induced liver cell proliferation which has therapeutic significance in liver disease management.

  14. Effects of negative allosteric modulators of gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptors on complex behavioral processes in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Auta, J; Winsauer, P J; Faust, W B; Lambert, P; Moerschbaecher, J M

    1997-01-01

    A multiple schedule of repeated acquisition and performance of conditional discriminations was used to characterize the effects of two negative allosteric modulators of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor (ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate [beta-CCE] and N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide [FG-7142]), a hallucinogenic beta-carboline derivative (harmine), a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist (flumazenil) and a positive allosteric modulator (alprazolam). In the acquisition component, subjects acquired a different discrimination each session. Acquisition of a discrimination was defined by a decrease in errors as the session progressed. In the performance component, the discrimination was the same each session. Responding in both components was maintained by food presentation under a variable-ratio schedule. Incorrect responses in both components produced a 5-sec timeout. Alprazolam (0.1-18 mg/kg), beta-CCE (0.01-0.32 mg/kg), FG-7142 (0.1-18 mg/kg) and harmine (0.1-1.8 mg/kg) all dose-dependently decreased response rate in both components. However, accuracy of responding-was differentially affected by the drugs. Alprazolam selectively and dose-dependently increased percent errors in acquisition, whereas beta-CCE increased acquisition errors only at the highest doses tested in each subject. In contrast, FG-7142 and harmine had no effects on percent errors at doses that virtually eliminated responding. In all cases, performance accuracy was generally not affected. Flumazenil, at doses that had little or no effect (0.1 and 0.32 mg/kg) or occasionally decreased response rates (1 mg/kg) when administered alone, dose-dependently antagonized the rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects of beta-CCE, FG-7142 and alprazolam. In contrast, flumazenil failed to antagonize the effects of harmine. Thus, the negative allosteric modulators only moderately disrupted acquisition in comparison with the positive allosteric modulator, but the effects of both types of

  15. Differential expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptor subunit mRNAs in the developing nervous system and receptor coupling to adenylyl cyclase in embryonic neurons.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stella C; Steiger, Janine L; Gravielle, María Clara; Lyons, Helen R; Russek, Shelley J; Farb, David H

    2004-05-17

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid type B receptors (GABA(B)Rs) mediate both slow inhibitory synaptic activity in the adult nervous system and motility signals for migrating embryonic cortical cells. Previous papers have described the expression of GABA(B)Rs in the adult brain, but the expression and functional significance of these gene products in the embryo are largely unknown. Here we examine GABA(B)R expression from rat embryonic day 10 (E10) to E18 compared with adult and ask whether embryonic cortical neurons contain functional GABA(B)R. GABA(B)R1 transcript levels greatly exceed GABA(B)R2 levels in the developing neural tube at E11, and olfactory bulb and striatum at E17 but equalize in most regions of adult nervous tissue, except for the glomerular and granule cell layers of the main olfactory bulb and the striatum. Consistent with expression differences, the binding affinity of GABA for GABA(B)Rs is significantly lower in adult striatum compared with cerebellum. Multiple lines of evidence from in situ hybridization, RNase protection, and real-time PCR demonstrate that GABA(B)R1a, GABA(B)R1b, GABA(B)R1h (a subunit subtype, lacking a sushi domain, that we have identified in embryonic rat brain), GABA(B)R2, and GABA(B)L transcript levels are not coordinately regulated. Despite the functional requirement for a heterodimer of GABA(B)R subunits, the expression of each subunit mRNA is under independent control during embryonic development, and, by E18, GABA(B)Rs are negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase in neocortical neurons. The presence of embryonic GABA(B)R transcripts and protein and functional receptor coupling indicates potentially important roles for GABA(B)Rs in modulation of synaptic transmission in the developing embryonic nervous system.

  16. Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) disruption of passive avoidance learning in the day-old chick appears to be due to its effect on GABAB not gamma-hydroxybutyric [corrected] acid (GHB) receptors.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Joanne M; Hazi, Agnes; Hale, Mathew W; Milsome, Sarah L; Crowe, Simon F

    2009-02-11

    Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) is a prodrug to gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and metabolises to GHB when ingested. Discrimination stimulus studies report generalisation of effects of GHB to GBL. While amnesia is one of the most commonly reported symptoms of GHB's ingestion in human users, as yet few studies have examined this effect. Although an endogenous GHB specific receptor is present in the brain, several studies have indicated that the clinical effects of exogenous doses of GBL/GHB are due to its action on GABA(B) receptors rather than on the GHB receptor. In this series of studies, New Hampshire x White leghorn cockerels were trained using a modified version of the passive avoidance learning task. Subcutaneous injections of GBL induced a memory deficit by 10 min post-training, which persisted for at least 24 h. No effect on memory was seen with administration of the specific GHB agonist NCS-356 (gamma-p-chlorophenyl-trans-4-hydroxycrotonate). The GBL-induced memory deficit appeared similar to the deficit produced by baclofen, where the antagonist facilitated learning. Additionally, GBL-induced memory deficit was ameliorated by application of a GABA(B) antagonist. The results support the hypothesis that GBL exerts its influence on memory via the GABA(B) receptor rather than by the specific GHB receptor.

  17. Cloning of the. gamma. -aminobutyric acid (GABA). rho. sub 1 cDNA: A GABA receptor subunit highly expressed in the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Cutting, G.R.; Lu, Luo; Kasch, L.M.; Montrose-Rafizadeh, C.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Guggino, W.B.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr. ); O'Hara, B.F.; Donovan, D.M.; Shimada, Shoichi ); Uhl, G.R. Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD )

    1991-04-01

    Type A {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA{sub A}) receptors are a family of ligand-gated chloride channels that are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the nervous system. Molecular cloning has revealed diversity in the subunits that compose this heterooligomeric receptor, but each previously elucidated subunit displays amino acid similarity in conserved structural elements. The authors have used these highly conserved regions to identify additional members of this family by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One PCR product was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a human retina cDNA library. The mature protein predicted from this cDNA sequence is 458 amino acids long and displays between 30 and 38% amino acid similarity to the previously identified GABA{sub A} subunits. This gene is expressed primarily in the retina but transcripts are also detected in the brain, lung, and thymus. Injection of Xenopus oocytes with RNA transcribed in vitro produces a GABA-responsive chloride conductance and expression of the cDNA in COS cells yields GABA-displaceable muscimol binding. These features are consistent with our identification of a GABA subunit, GABA {rho}{sub 1}, with prominent retinal expression that increases the diversity and tissue specificity of this ligand-gated ion-channel receptor family.

  18. A novel, rapid, inhibitory effect of insulin on alpha1beta2gamma2s gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors.

    PubMed

    Williams, Daniel B

    2008-09-26

    In the CNS, GABA and insulin seem to contribute to similar processes, including neuronal survival; learning and reward; and energy balance and food intake. It is likely then that insulin and GABA may interact, perhaps at the GABA(A) receptor. One such interaction has already been described [Q. Wan, Z.G. Xiong, H.Y. Man, C.A. Ackerley, J. Braunton, W.Y. Lu, L.E. Becker, J.F. MacDonald, Y.T. Wang, Recruitment of functional GABA(A) receptors to postsynaptic domains by insulin, Nature 388 (1997) 686-690]; in it a micromolar concentration of insulin causes the insertion of GABA(A) receptors into the cell membrane, increasing GABA current. I have discovered another effect of insulin on GABA(A) currents. Using a receptor isoform, alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2s) that is the likely main neuronal GABA(A) isoform expressed recombinantly in Xenopus oocytes, insulin inhibits GABA-induced current when applied simultaneously with low concentrations of GABA. Insulin will significantly inhibit currents induced by EC(30-50) concentrations of GABA by about 38%. Insulin is potent in this effect; IC(50) of insulin was found to be about 4.3 x 10(-10) M. The insulin effect on the GABA dose responses looked like that of an antagonist similar to bicuculline or beta-carbolines. However, an effect of phosphorylation on the GABA(A) receptor from the insulin receptor signal transduction pathway cannot yet be dismissed.

  19. Identification of clathrin heavy chain as a direct interaction partner for the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor associated protein.

    PubMed

    Mohrlüder, Jeannine; Hoffmann, Yvonne; Stangler, Thomas; Hänel, Karen; Willbold, Dieter

    2007-12-18

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAA receptors) are the major sites of GABA-mediated fast synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Variation of the cell surface receptor count is postulated to be of importance in modulating inhibitory synaptic transmission. The GABAA receptor associated protein (GABARAP) is a ubiquitin-like modifier, implicated in GABAA receptor clustering, trafficking, and turnover. GABARAP pull-down experiments with brain lysate identified clathrin heavy chain to be GABARAP-associated. Phage display screening of a randomized peptide library for GABARAP ligands yielded a sequence motif which characterizes the peptide binding specificity of GABARAP. Sequence database searches with this motif revealed clathrin heavy chain as a protein containing the identified sequence motif within its residues 510-522, supporting the result of the pull-down experiments. Calreticulin, which was identified recently as a GABARAP ligand, contains a very similar sequence motif. We demonstrate that calreticulin indeed competes with clathrin heavy chain for GABARAP binding. Finally, employing nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we mapped the GABARAP residues responsible for binding to clathrin. The hereby mapped GABARAP regions overlap very well with the homologue residues in yeast Atg8 that were recently shown to be important for autophagy. Together with the knowledge that GABARAP and clathrin are known to be involved in GABAA receptor trafficking within the cell, this strongly suggests a clear physiological relevance of the direct interaction of GABARAP with clathrin heavy chain. PMID:18027972

  20. gamma-Aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptors modulate [3H]GABA release from isolated neuronal growth cones in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, R O; Gordon-Weeks, P R

    1985-04-19

    Potassium-induced release of gamma-[3H]aminobutyric acid [( 3H]GABA) from a growth cone-enriched fraction isolated from neonatal rat forebrain was inhibited by the GABA mimetic muscimol in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 15 nM). The GABA antagonist bicuculline completely reversed the effect of muscimol. Bicuculline alone slightly potentiated the K+-induced release of [3H]GABA. Baclofen, a proposed selective agonist for a bicuculline-insensitive GABAB receptor, was found to cause only a slight reduction in the K+-induced release of [3H]GABA. These results are compatible with the presence of a negative feedback mechanism mediated by GABAA receptors for controlling [3H]GABA release from growth cones of the developing rat forebrain.

  1. Stimulation of proximal tubular cell apoptosis by albumin-bound fatty acids mediated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma.

    PubMed

    Arici, Mustafa; Chana, Ravinder; Lewington, Andrew; Brown, Jez; Brunskill, Nigel John

    2003-01-01

    In nephrotic syndrome, large quantities of albumin enter the kidney tubule. This albumin carries with it a heavy load of fatty acids to which the proximal tubule cells are exposed at high concentration. It is postulated that exposure to fatty acids in this way is injurious to proximal tubule cells. This study has examined the ability of fatty acids to interact with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) in primary cultures of human proximal tubule cells. Luciferase reporter assays in transiently transfected human proximal tubule cells were used to show that albumin bound fatty acids and other agonists activate PPARgamma in a dose-dependent manner. One of the consequences of this activation is apoptosis of the cells as determined by changes in cell morphology, evidence of PARP cleavage, and appearance of DNA laddering. Overexpression of PPARgamma in these cells also results in enhanced apoptosis. Both fatty acid-induced PPAR activation and apoptosis in these cells can be blocked by PPAR response element decoy oligonucleotides. Activation of PPARgamma by the specific agonist PGJ(2) is associated with inhibition of cell proliferation, whereas activation by albumin bound fatty acids is accompanied by increased proliferation. However, the net balance of apoptosis/proliferation favors deletion of cells. These results implicate albumin-bound fatty acids as important mediators of tubular injury in nephrosis and provide fresh impetus for pursuit of lipid-lowering strategies in proteinuric renal disease. PMID:12506134

  2. Ligand-independent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor by ursodeoxycholic acid: Repression of IFN-{gamma}-induced MHC class II gene expression via a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Makino, Yuichi; Miura, Takanori

    1996-02-15

    The therapeutic effectiveness of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) for various autoimmune liver diseases strongly indicates that UDCA possesses immunomodulatory activities. Experimental evidence also supports this notion, since, for example, UDCA has been shown to suppress secretion of IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-{gamma} from activated T lymphocytes, and Ig production from B lymphocytes. To investigate the mechanical background of UDCA-mediated immunomodulation, we asked whether UDCA interacts with the intracellular signal transduction pathway, especially whether it is involved in immunosuppressive glucocorticoid hormone action. For this purpose, we used a cloned Chinese hamster ovary cell line, CHOpMTGR, in which glucocorticoid receptor cDNA was stably integrated. In immunocytochemical analysis, we found that treatment with UDCA promoted the nuclear translocation of the glucocorticoid receptor in a ligand-independent fashion, which was further confirmed by immunoprecipitation assays. Moreover, the translocated glucocorticoid receptor demonstrated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Transient transfection experiments revealed that treatment of the cells with UDCA marginally enhanced glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression. We also showed that UDCA suppressed IFN-{gamma}-mediated induction of MHC class II gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor-mediated pathway. Together, UDCA-dependent promotion of translocation of the glucocorticoid receptor may be associated with, at least in part, its immunomodulatory action through glucocorticoid receptor-mediated gene regulation. 68 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Differential transcriptional activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma by omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Thoennes, S R; Tate, P L; Price, T M; Kilgore, M W

    2000-02-25

    While the role of dietary fats in breast cancer remains controversial, the recent cloning of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a nuclear hormone receptor, from human breast cancer cells lines provides a potential molecular link. Several fatty acids from four classes of dietary fats were tested for their ability to mediate the transcriptional activity of PPARgamma in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells using growth media with minimal serum. Whereas omega-3 fatty acids inhibit transactivation of PPARgamma to levels below control, omega-6, monounsaturated and saturated fatty acids stimulate the activity of the transcriptional reporter. These studies indicate that individual fatty acids differentially regulate the transcriptional activity of PPARgamma by selectively acting as agonists or antagonists. Furthermore, the transcriptional activation of PPARgamma correlates with cell proliferation in MCF-7 cells. Understanding the effects of individual fats on breast cancer cells and PPARgamma transactivation could provide important new insights into the epidemiology of breast cancer and the role of dietary fat.

  4. In Silico Prediction of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Type-A Receptors Using Novel Machine-Learning-Based SVM and GBDT Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Ju, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors (GABAARs) belong to multisubunit membrane spanning ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) which act as the principal mediators of rapid inhibitory synaptic transmission in the human brain. Therefore, the category prediction of GABAARs just from the protein amino acid sequence would be very helpful for the recognition and research of novel receptors. Based on the proteins' physicochemical properties, amino acids composition and position, a GABAAR classifier was first constructed using a 188-dimensional (188D) algorithm at 90% cd-hit identity and compared with pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and ProtrWeb web-based algorithms for human GABAAR proteins. Then, four classifiers including gradient boosting decision tree (GBDT), random forest (RF), a library for support vector machine (libSVM), and k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) were compared on the dataset at cd-hit 40% low identity. This work obtained the highest correctly classified rate at 96.8% and the highest specificity at 99.29%. But the values of sensitivity, accuracy, and Matthew's correlation coefficient were a little lower than those of PseAAC and ProtrWeb; GBDT and libSVM can make a little better performance than RF and k-NN at the second dataset. In conclusion, a GABAAR classifier was successfully constructed using only the protein sequence information. PMID:27579307

  5. In Silico Prediction of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Type-A Receptors Using Novel Machine-Learning-Based SVM and GBDT Approaches.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhijun; Huang, Yong; Yue, Xiaodong; Lu, Huijuan; Xuan, Ping; Ju, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors (GABAARs) belong to multisubunit membrane spanning ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) which act as the principal mediators of rapid inhibitory synaptic transmission in the human brain. Therefore, the category prediction of GABAARs just from the protein amino acid sequence would be very helpful for the recognition and research of novel receptors. Based on the proteins' physicochemical properties, amino acids composition and position, a GABAAR classifier was first constructed using a 188-dimensional (188D) algorithm at 90% cd-hit identity and compared with pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and ProtrWeb web-based algorithms for human GABAAR proteins. Then, four classifiers including gradient boosting decision tree (GBDT), random forest (RF), a library for support vector machine (libSVM), and k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) were compared on the dataset at cd-hit 40% low identity. This work obtained the highest correctly classified rate at 96.8% and the highest specificity at 99.29%. But the values of sensitivity, accuracy, and Matthew's correlation coefficient were a little lower than those of PseAAC and ProtrWeb; GBDT and libSVM can make a little better performance than RF and k-NN at the second dataset. In conclusion, a GABAAR classifier was successfully constructed using only the protein sequence information. PMID:27579307

  6. Effects of electroacupuncture on the levels of retinal gamma-aminobutyric acid and its receptors in a guinea pig model of lens-induced myopia.

    PubMed

    Sha, F; Ye, X; Zhao, W; Xu, C-L; Wang, L; Ding, M-H; Bi, A-L; Wu, J-F; Jiang, W-J; Guo, D-D; Guo, J-G; Bi, H-S

    2015-02-26

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter of the retina and affects myopic development. Electroacupuncture (EA) is widely utilized to treat myopia in clinical settings. However, there are few reports on whether EA affects the level of retinal GABA during myopic development. To study this issue, in the present study, we explored the changes of retinal GABA content and the expression of its receptor subtypes, and the effects of EA stimulation on them in a guinea pig model with lens-induced myopia (LIM). Our results showed that the content of GABA and the expression of GABAA and GABAC receptors of retina were up-regulated during the development of myopia, and this up-regulation was inhibited by applying EA to Hegu (LI4) and Taiyang (EX-HN5) acupoints. Moreover, these effects of EA show a positional specificity. While applying EA at a sham acupoint, no apparent change of myopic retinal GABA and its receptor subtypes was observed. Taken together, our findings suggest that LIM is effective to up-regulate the level of retinal GABA, GABAA and GABAC receptors in guinea pigs and the effect may be inhibited by EA stimulation at LI4 and EX-HN5 acupoints.

  7. Structural model for gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor noncompetitive antagonist binding: widely diverse structures fit the same site.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ligong; Durkin, Kathleen A; Casida, John E

    2006-03-28

    Several major insecticides, including alpha-endosulfan, lindane, and fipronil, and the botanical picrotoxinin are noncompetitive antagonists (NCAs) for the GABA receptor. We showed earlier that human beta(3) homopentameric GABA(A) receptor recognizes all of the important GABAergic insecticides and reproduces the high insecticide sensitivity and structure-activity relationships of the native insect receptor. Despite large structural diversity, the NCAs are proposed to fit a single binding site in the chloride channel lumen lined by five transmembrane 2 segments. This hypothesis is examined with the beta(3) homopentamer by mutagenesis, pore structure studies, NCA binding, and molecular modeling. The 15 amino acids in the cytoplasmic half of the pore were mutated to cysteine, serine, or other residue for 22 mutants overall. Localization of A-1'C, A2'C, T6'C, and L9'C (index numbers for the transmembrane 2 region) in the channel lumen was established by disulfide cross-linking. Binding of two NCA radioligands [(3)H]1-(4-ethynylphenyl)-4-n-propyl-2,6,7-trioxabicyclo[2.2.2]octane and [(3)H] 3,3-bis-trifluoromethyl-bicyclo[2,2,1]heptane-2,2-dicarbonitrile was dramatically reduced with 8 of the 15 mutated positions, focusing attention on A2', T6', and L9' as proposed binding sites, consistent with earlier mutagenesis studies. The cytoplasmic half of the beta3 homopentamer pore was modeled as an alpha-helix. The six NCAs listed above plus t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate fit the 2' to 9' pore region forming hydrogen bonds with the T6' hydroxyl and hydrophobic interactions with A2', T6', and L9' alkyl substituents, thereby blocking the channel. Thus, widely diverse NCA structures fit the same GABA receptor beta subunit site with important implications for insecticide cross-resistance and selective toxicity between insects and mammals.

  8. The neuroactive steroid allopregnanolone suppresses hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone release through a mechanism mediated by the gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor.

    PubMed

    Calogero, A E; Palumbo, M A; Bosboom, A M; Burrello, N; Ferrara, E; Palumbo, G; Petraglia, F; D'Agata, R

    1998-07-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is able to synthesize and/or metabolize steroid hormones. These neuroactive steroids are capable of modulating several brain functions and, among these, they seem to regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Indeed, recent observations have shown that 5 alpha-pregnane-3 alpha-ol-20-one (allopregnanolone), one of the most abundant naturally occurring neuroactive steroids, suppresses ovulation and sexual behaviour when administered within the CNS. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of allopregnanolone and its inactive stereoisomer, 5 alpha-pregnane-3 beta-ol-20-one, upon the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from individually-incubated hemihypothalami. Allopregnanolone suppressed GnRH release in a concentration-dependent manner with maximal activity in the nanomolar range, a range at which this neurosteroid is capable of playing a biological action. The specificity of allopregnanolone suppression of GnRH release was provided by the lack of effect of its known inactive stereoisomer. To evaluate the involvement of gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor, we examined the effects of two neurosteroids with GABA-antagonistic properties, pregnanolone sulfate (PREG-S) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and of bicuculline, a selective antagonist of the GABA binding site on the GABAA receptor, on allopregnanolone (10 nM)-suppressed GnRH release. Both PREG-S and bicuculline overcame the inhibitory effects of allopregnanolone on GnRH release, whereas DHEAS did not. To substantiate the involvement of the GABAA receptor further, we tested the effects of muscimol, a selective agonist for this receptor, which suppressed GnRH release. In conclusion, allopregnanolone suppressed hypothalamic GnRH release in vitro and this effect appeared to be mediated by an interaction with the GABAA receptor. We speculate that the inhibitory effect of allopregnanolone on the HPG axis may also be caused by

  9. Stoichiometry of expressed alpha(4)beta(2)delta gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors depends on the ratio of subunit cDNA transfected.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Kelly R; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2010-05-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) is the target of many depressants, including benzodiazepines, anesthetics, and alcohol. Although the highly prevalent alphabetagamma GABA(A)R subtype mediates the majority of fast synaptic inhibition in the brain, receptors containing delta subunits also play a key role, mediating tonic inhibition and the actions of endogenous neurosteroids and alcohol. However, the fundamental properties of delta-containing GABA(A)Rs, such as subunit stoichiometry, are not well established. To determine subunit stoichiometry of expressed delta-containing GABA(A)Rs, we inserted the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site tag in the alpha(4), beta(2), and delta subunit N termini. An enhanced green fluorescent protein tag was also inserted into the beta(2) subunit to shift its molecular weight, allowing us to separate subunits using SDS-PAGE. Tagged alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs were expressed in HEK293T cells using various ratios of subunit cDNA, and receptor subunit stoichiometry was determined by quantitating fluorescent alpha-bungarotoxin bound to each subunit on Western blots of surface immunopurified tagged GABA(A)Rs. The results demonstrate that the subunit stoichiometry of alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs is regulated by the ratio of subunit cDNAs transfected. Increasing the ratio of delta subunit cDNA transfected increased delta subunit incorporation into surface receptors with a concomitant decrease in beta(2) subunit incorporation. Because receptor subunit stoichiometry can directly influence GABA(A)R pharmacological and functional properties, considering how the transfection protocols used affect subunit stoichiometry is essential when studying heterologously expressed alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs. Successful bungarotoxin binding site tagging of GABA(A)R subunits is a novel tool with which to accurately quantitate subunit stoichiometry and will be useful for monitoring GABA(A)R trafficking in live cells.

  10. Human α1β3γ2L gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors: High-level production and purification in a functional state

    PubMed Central

    Dostalova, Zuzana; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Liu, Aiping; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Yinghui; Desai, Rooma; Forman, Stuart A; Miller, Keith W

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) are the most important inhibitory chloride ion channels in the central nervous system and are major targets for a wide variety of drugs. The subunit compositions of GABAARs determine their function and pharmacological profile. GABAARs are heteropentamers of subunits, and (α1)2(β3)2(γ2L)1 is a common subtype. Biochemical and biophysical studies of GABAARs require larger quantities of receptors of defined subunit composition than are currently available. We previously reported high-level production of active human α1β3 GABAAR using tetracycline-inducible stable HEK293 cells. Here we extend the strategy to receptors containing three different subunits. We constructed a stable tetracycline-inducible HEK293-TetR cell line expressing human (N)–FLAG–α1β3γ2L–(C)–(GGS)3GK–1D4 GABAAR. These cells achieved expression levels of 70–90 pmol [3H]muscimol binding sites/15-cm plate at a specific activity of 15–30 pmol/mg of membrane protein. Incorporation of the γ2 subunit was confirmed by the ratio of [3H]flunitrazepam to [3H]muscimol binding sites and sensitivity of GABA-induced currents to benzodiazepines and zinc. The α1β3γ2L GABAARs were solubilized in dodecyl-d-maltoside, purified by anti-FLAG affinity chromatography and reconstituted in CHAPS/asolectin at an overall yield of ∼30%. Typical purifications yielded 1.0–1.5 nmoles of [3H]muscimol binding sites/60 plates. Receptors with similar properties could be purified by 1D4 affinity chromatography with lower overall yield. The composition of the purified, reconstituted receptors was confirmed by ligand binding, Western blot, and proteomics. Allosteric interactions between etomidate and [3H]muscimol binding were maintained in the purified state. PMID:24288268

  11. Catalase potentiates retinoic acid-induced THP-1 monocyte differentiation into macrophage through inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiurong; Jin, Ting; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Yan

    2007-06-01

    Macrophage differentiation plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular diseases and many other physiological processes. However, the role of reaction oxygen species in macrophage differentiation has not been elucidated. Here, we report functional characterization of catalase, an enzyme that degrades hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), in THP-1 monocyte differentiation. Treatment of THP-1 cells with catalase was able to synergize with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) to enhance macrophage differentiation, demonstrated by changes of cell adherence, cell cycle arrest, nitroblue tetrazolium reduction, and expression of differentiation markers including CD68, CD11b, and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9). ATRA could stimulate retinoic acid (RA) receptor-mediated transcription, but this was not affected by catalase. However, ATRA and catalase were capable of reducing transcriptional activity mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma). Consistently, PPARgamma antagonists enhanced, and PPARgamma agonists inhibited MMP9 expression stimulated by ATRA and catalase in THP-1 cells. Therefore, these data indicate that catalase is able to potentiate ATRA-induced macrophage differentiation by inhibition of PPARgamma activity, underscoring an important interplay between H(2)O(2), RA, and PPARgamma in macrophages.

  12. Neuronal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors undergo cognate ligand chaperoning in the endoplasmic reticulum by endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Eshaq, Randa S.; Meshul, Charles K.; Moore, Cynthia; Hood, Rebecca L.; Leidenheimer, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Dysfunction of these receptors is associated with various psychiatric/neurological disorders and drugs targeting this receptor are widely used therapeutic agents. Both the efficacy and plasticity of GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission depends on the number of surface GABAA receptors. An understudied aspect of receptor cell surface expression is the post-translational regulation of receptor biogenesis within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously shown that exogenous GABA can act as a ligand chaperone of recombinant GABAA receptors in the early secretory pathway leading us to now investigate whether endogenous GABA facilitates the biogenesis of GABAA receptors in primary cerebral cortical cultures. In immunofluorescence labeling experiments, we have determined that neurons expressing surface GABAA receptors contain both GABA and its degradative enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T). Treatment of neurons with GABA-T inhibitors, a treatment known to increase intracellular GABA levels, decreases the interaction of the receptor with the ER quality control protein calnexin, concomittantly increasing receptor forward-trafficking and plasma membrane insertion. The effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction is not due to the activation of surface GABAA or GABAB receptors. Consistent with our hypothesis that GABA acts as a cognate ligand chaperone in the ER, immunogold-labeling of rodent brain slices reveals the presence of GABA within the rough ER. The density of this labeling is similar to that present in mitochondria, the organelle in which GABA is degraded. Lastly, the effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction was prevented by pretreatment with a GABA transporter inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that endogenous GABA acts in the rough ER as a cognate ligand chaperone to facilitate the biogenesis of neuronal GABAA receptors. PMID

  13. Tonic inhibition in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons is mediated by alpha5 subunit-containing gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors.

    PubMed

    Caraiscos, Valerie B; Elliott, Erin M; You-Ten, Kong E; Cheng, Victor Y; Belelli, Delia; Newell, J Glen; Jackson, Michael F; Lambert, Jeremy J; Rosahl, Thomas W; Wafford, Keith A; MacDonald, John F; Orser, Beverley A

    2004-03-01

    The principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), is thought to regulate memory processes by activating transient inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Here we describe a nonsynaptic, tonic form of inhibition in mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons that is generated by a distinct subpopulation of GABA type A receptors (GABA(A)Rs). This tonic inhibitory conductance is predominantly mediated by alpha5 subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs (alpha5GABA(A)Rs) that have different pharmacological and kinetic properties compared to postsynaptic receptors. GABA(A)Rs that mediate the tonic conductance are well suited to detect low, persistent, ambient concentrations of GABA in the extracellular space because they are highly sensitive to GABA and desensitize slowly. Moreover, the tonic current is highly sensitive to enhancement by amnestic drugs. Given the restricted expression of alpha5GABA(A)Rs to the hippocampus and the association between reduced alpha5GABA(A)R function and improved memory performance in behavioral studies, our results suggest that tonic inhibition mediated by alpha5GABA(A)Rs in hippocampal pyramidal neurons plays a key role in cognitive processes.

  14. Distinction between the effects of barbiturates, benzodiazepines and phenytoin on responses to gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor activation and antagonism by bicuculline and picrotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    1 Interactions of depressant and anticonvulsant drugs with the neuronal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor + effector system have been examined on afferent fibres to the rat cuneate nucleus in vitro. Three types of interaction have been measured: (a) potentiation of depolarizing responses to the GABA analogue, muscimol: (b) reduction in the potency of bicuculline as an antagonist of muscimol at the GABA receptor: (c) reduction in the potency of picrotoxin as an antagonist of muscimol acting on the effector mechanism. 2 Phenobarbitone reduced the potency of picrotoxin in doses which did not affect the potency of bicuculline and which caused only a small potentiation of muscimol. Pentobarbitone did not show such selectivity, a reduction in potency of picrotoxin always being accompanied by a reduction in potency of bicuculline and a substantial potentiation of muscimol. 3 Flurazepam and lorazepam both reduced the potency of picrotoxin without affecting that of bicuculline and with very little potentiation of muscimol. Phenytoin had no effect on the potency of picrotoxin whilst potentiating muscimol to the same extent as phenobarbitone. 4 The spectrum of drug activity in reducing the potency of picrotoxin correlates well with the reported anticonvulsant effects of these drugs against kindled amygdaloid seizures. Potentiation of muscimol and reduction of bicuculline potency appear more closely related to hypnotic properties. PMID:6265019

  15. Cloning, Expression Analysis, and Molecular Modeling of the Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor Alpha2 Subunit Gene from the Common Cutworm, Spodoptera litura

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Hongliang; Gao, Lu; Hu, Zhen; Liu, Haiyuan; Zhong, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Intensive research on the molecule structures of the gamma-nminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor in agricultural pests has great significance to the mechanism investigation, resistance prevention, and molecular design of novel pesticides. The GABA receptor a2 (SlGABARα2) subunit gene in Spodoptera litura (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was cloned using the technologies of reverse transcription PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The gemonic DNA sequence of SlGABARα2 has 5164 bp with 8 exons and 7 introns that were in accordance with the GT-AG splicing formula. The complete mRNA sequence of SlGABARα2 was 1965 bp, with an open reading frame of 1500 bp encoding a protein of 499 amino acids. The GABA receptor is highly conserved among insects. The conserved regions include several N-glycosylation, Oglycosylation, and phosphorylation sites, as well as 4 transmembrane domains. The identities that SlGABARα2 shared with the GABA receptor a2 subunit of Spodoptera exigua, Heliothis virescens, Chilo suppressalis, Plutella xylostella, Bombyx mori ranged from 99.2% to 87.2% at the amino acid level. The comparative 3-dimensional model of SlGABARα2 showed that its tertiary structure was composed of 4 major α-helixes located at the 4 putative transmembrane domains on one side, with some β-sheets and 1 small α-helix on the other side. SlGABARα2 may be attached to the membrane by 4 α-helixes that bind ions in other conserved domains to transport them through the membrane. The results of quantitative real time PCR demonstrated that SlGABARα2 was expressed in all developmental stages of S. litura. The relative expression level of SlGABARα2 was the lowest in eggs and increased with larval growth, while it declined slightly in pupae and reached the peak in adults. The expressions of SlGABARα2 in larvae varied among different tissues; it was extremely high in the brain but was low in the midgut, epicuticle, Malpighian tube, and fat body. PMID:23909412

  16. Cloning, expression analysis, and molecular modeling of the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor alpha2 subunit gene from the common cutworm, Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hongliang; Gao, Lu; Hu, Zhen; Liu, Haiyuan; Zhong, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Intensive research on the molecule structures of the gamma-nminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor in agricultural pests has great significance to the mechanism investigation, resistance prevention, and molecular design of novel pesticides. The GABA receptor a2 (SlGABARα2) subunit gene in Spodoptera litura (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was cloned using the technologies of reverse transcription PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The gemonic DNA sequence of SlGABARα2 has 5164 bp with 8 exons and 7 introns that were in accordance with the GT-AG splicing formula. The complete mRNA sequence of SlGABARα2 was 1965 bp, with an open reading frame of 1500 bp encoding a protein of 499 amino acids. The GABA receptor is highly conserved among insects. The conserved regions include several N-glycosylation, Oglycosylation, and phosphorylation sites, as well as 4 transmembrane domains. The identities that SlGABARα2 shared with the GABA receptor a2 subunit of Spodoptera exigua, Heliothis virescens, Chilo suppressalis, Plutella xylostella, Bombyx mori ranged from 99.2% to 87.2% at the amino acid level. The comparative 3-dimensional model of SlGABARα2 showed that its tertiary structure was composed of 4 major α-helixes located at the 4 putative transmembrane domains on one side, with some β-sheets and 1 small α-helix on the other side. SlGABARα2 may be attached to the membrane by 4 α-helixes that bind ions in other conserved domains to transport them through the membrane. The results of quantitative real time PCR demonstrated that SlGABARα2 was expressed in all developmental stages of S. litura. The relative expression level of SlGABARα2 was the lowest in eggs and increased with larval growth, while it declined slightly in pupae and reached the peak in adults. The expressions of SlGABARα2 in larvae varied among different tissues; it was extremely high in the brain but was low in the midgut, epicuticle, Malpighian tube, and fat body. PMID:23909412

  17. Novel Fc gamma receptor I family gene products in human mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Porges, A J; Redecha, P B; Doebele, R; Pan, L C; Salmon, J E; Kimberly, R P

    1992-01-01

    Unlike the human Fc gamma RII and Fc gamma RIII families, which exhibit considerable diversity at both the nucleic acid and protein levels, the human Fc gamma RI family has only a single recognized product expressed as a 70-kD cell surface receptor with high affinity for monomeric IgG (hFc gamma RIa1). Using both polymerase chain reaction-based amplification and Northern hybridization, we document multiple interferon-gamma-inducible hFc gamma RI RNA transcripts in human mononuclear cells and neutrophils. The sequences of two of these Fc gamma RI related transcripts indicate that they are alternatively spliced products of a second Fc gamma RI family gene, termed Fc gamma RIB. The cDNA derived from the larger of these transcripts, termed hFc gamma RIb1, encodes a surface molecule that is not recognized by Fc gamma RI specific monoclonal antibodies when transfected into COS-7 cells. Unlike the interferon-gamma-inducible hFc gamma RIA gene product, hFc gamma RIb1 does not bind monomeric IgG with high affinity. However, both hFc gamma RIa1 and hFc gamma RIb1 do bind aggregated human IgG. Previously unrecognized diversity within the hFc gamma RI family includes an interferon-gamma-inducible, putative low affinity Fc gamma receptor that may play an important role in the mechanism by which Fc gamma receptors participate in the humoral immune response. Images PMID:1430234

  18. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. )

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  19. Propofol induces apoptosis and inhibits the proliferation of rat embryonic neural stem cells via gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, J W; Cheng, W W; Xu, T; Yang, Z Y

    2015-11-23

    We investigated the effect of propofol on the proliferation and viability of rat embryonic neural stem cells (rENSCs) and the potential mechanisms involved. rENSCs were isolated and cultured in vitro and treated with 1, 10, or 50 μM propofol, while the control group was treated with 0.1 μM dimethyl sulfoxide. The effect of propofol on the proliferation and viability of rENSCs was examined by proliferation and apoptosis assays. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was employed to analyze the mRNA expression of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) and p53 in rENSCs exposed to propofol. Immunoprecipitation assay and western blotting analysis were performed to analyze the effect of propofol on Chk1 and p53 activity. The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor antagonist securinine was added to the rENSCs before being treated with propofol to investigate the role of the GABAA receptor in propofol-triggered effects on rENSCs. rENSCs specifically expressing nestin protein were successfully isolated and cultured for experiments. The inhibitory effect of propofol on rENSCs increased dose-dependently. The percentage of apoptotic cells increased to 11.7% and the activity of Chk1 and p53 enhanced after treatment with 50 μM propofol. However, addition of securinine abrogated propofol-induced apoptosis and activation of Chk1. The GABAA receptor mediates propofol-induced apoptosis and proliferation inhibition of rENSCs, possibly by modulating the Chk1/p53 signaling pathway.

  20. ACTIVATION OF MOUSE AND HUMAN PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTORS (PPAR ALPHA, GAMMA, BETA DELTA) BY PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID (PFOA) AND PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluates the potential for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), using a transient transfection cell assay. Cos-1 cells were cultured in DMEM with fetal bovine serum (FBS) in ...

  1. Histamine H(3) receptor-mediated inhibition of depolarization-induced, dopamine D(1) receptor-dependent release of [(3)H]-gamma-aminobutryic acid from rat striatal slices.

    PubMed

    Arias-Montaño, J A; Floran, B; Garcia, M; Aceves, J; Young, J M

    2001-05-01

    1. A study was made of the regulation of [(3)H]-gamma-aminobutyric acid ([(3)H]-GABA) release from slices of rat striatum by endogenous dopamine and exogenous histamine and a histamine H(3)-agonist. Depolarization-induced release of [(3)H]-GABA was Ca(2+)-dependent and was increased in the presence of the dopamine D(2) receptor family antagonist, sulpiride (10 microM). The sulpiride-potentiated release of [(3)H]-GABA was strongly inhibited by the dopamine D(1) receptor family antagonist, SCH 23390 (1 microM). Neither antagonist altered basal release. 2. The 15 mM K(+)-induced release of [(3)H]-GABA in the presence of sulpiride was inhibited by 100 microM histamine (mean inhibition 78+/-3%) and by the histamine H(3) receptor-selective agonist, immepip, 1 microM (mean inhibition 81+/-5%). The IC(50) values for histamine and immepip were 1.3+/-0.2 microM and 16+/-2 nM, respectively. The inhibitory effects of histamine and immepip were reversed by the H(3) receptor antagonist, thioperamide, 1 microM. 3. The inhibition of 15 mM K(+)-induced [(3)H]-GABA release by immepip was reversed by the H(3) receptor antagonist, clobenpropit, K(d) 0.11+/-0.04 nM. Clobenpropit alone had no effect on basal or stimulated release of [(3)H]-GABA. 4. Elevated K(+) caused little release of [(3)H]-GABA from striatal slices from reserpinized rats, unless the D(1) partial agonist, R(+)-SKF 38393, 1 microM, was also present. The stimulated release in the presence of SKF 38393 was reduced by 1 microM immepip to the level obtained in the absence of SKF 38393. 5. These observations demonstrate that histamine H(3) receptor activation strongly inhibits the dopamine D(1) receptor-dependent release of [(3)H]-GABA from rat striatum; primarily through an interaction at the terminals of GABA neurones.

  2. Transmembrane topology, subcellular distribution and turnover of the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodizaepine receptor in chick brain cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were performed utilizing trypsinization of the GABA/BZD-R in intact cells to determine (1) the subcellular distribution of membrane-associated GABA/BZD-Rs and (2) aspects of the transmembrane topology of the BZD-R. Additionally, R07-0213, a positively charged benzodiazepine, was used to distinguish between cell surface and intracellular BZD-Rs. Following trypsin treatment of intact cells a cleaved receptor fragment of M{sub r} = 24,000 (xRF24) is generated. It remains anchored in the plasma membrane and not only retains the ability to bind ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepan reversibly and irreversibly but also retains the ability to be modulated by GABA. xRF24 is not observed following trypsinization of saponin-treated cells or cell homogenates, indicating that it has a cytoplasmic domain as well as a cell surface domain, as expected for a transmembrane fragment of the BZD-R. By utilizing ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam as an irreversible photoaffinity label, BZD-R turnover was also investigated.

  3. The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma agonist pioglitazone increases functional expression of the glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) in human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Jared; Amiridis, Stephanie; Stylli, Stanley S.; Bjorksten, Andrew R.; Kountouri, Nicole; Zheng, Thomas; Paradiso, Lucy; Luwor, Rodney B.; Morokoff, Andrew P.; O'Brien, Terence J.; Kaye, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Glioma cells release glutamate through expression of system xc−, which exchanges intracellular glutamate for extracellular cysteine. Lack of the excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression maintains high extracellular glutamate levels in the glioma microenvironment, causing excitotoxicity to surrounding parenchyma. Not only does this contribute to the survival and proliferation of glioma cells, but is involved in the pathophysiology of tumour-associated epilepsy (TAE). We investigated the role of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonist pioglitazone in modulating EAAT2 expression in glioma cells. We found that EAAT2 expression was increased in a dose dependent manner in both U87MG and U251MG glioma cells. Extracellular glutamate levels were reduced with the addition of pioglitazone, where statistical significance was reached in both U87MG and U251MG cells at a concentration of ≥ 30 μM pioglitazone (p < 0.05). The PPARγ antagonist GW9662 inhibited the effect of pioglitazone on extracellular glutamate levels, indicating PPARγ dependence. In addition, pioglitazone significantly reduced cell viability of U87MG and U251MG cells at ≥ 30 μM and 100 μM (p < 0.05) respectively. GW9662 also significantly reduced viability of U87MG and U251MG cells with 10 μM and 30 μM (p < 0.05) respectively. The effect on viability was partially dependent on PPARγ activation in U87MG cells but not U251MG cells, whereby PPARγ blockade with GW9662 had a synergistic effect. We conclude that PPARγ agonists may be therapeutically beneficial in the treatment of gliomas and furthermore suggest a novel role for these agents in the treatment of tumour associated seizures through the reduction in extracellular glutamate. PMID:26046374

  4. The noncompetitive blocker ( sup 3 H)chlorpromazine labels three amino acids of the acetylcholine receptor gamma subunit: Implications for the alpha-helical organization of regions MII and for the structure of the ion channel

    SciTech Connect

    Revah, F.; Galzi, J.L.; Giraudat, J.; Haumont, P.Y.; Lederer, F.; Changeux, J.P. )

    1990-06-01

    Labeling studies of Torpedo marmorata nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with the noncompetitive channel blocker ({sup 3}H)chlorpromazine have led to the initial identification of amino acids plausibly participating to the walls of the ion channel on the alpha, beta, and delta subunits. We report here results obtained with the gamma subunit, which bring additional information on the structure of the channel. After photolabeling of the membrane-bound receptor under equilibrium conditions in the presence of agonist and with or without phencyclidine (a specific ligand for the high-affinity site for noncompetitive blockers), the purified labeled gamma subunit was digested with trypsin, and the resulting fragments were fractionated by HPLC. Sequence analysis of peptide mixtures containing various amounts of highly hydrophobic fragments showed that three amino acids are labeled by ({sup 3}H)chlorpromazine in a phencyclidine-sensitive manner: Thr-253, Ser-257, and Leu-260. These residues all belong to the hydrophobic and putative transmembrane region MII of the gamma subunit. Their distribution along the sequence is consistent with an alpha-helical organization of this segment. The ({sup 3}H)chlorpromazine-labeled amino acids are conserved at homologous positions in the known sequences of other ligand-gated ion channels and may, thus, play a critical role in ion-transport mechanisms.

  5. Rapid and efficient reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells by retinoic acid receptor gamma and liver receptor homolog 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Jian; Liu, Hui; Lu, Dong; Chen, Xiongfeng; Zenonos, Zenon; Campos, Lia S.; Rad, Roland; Guo, Ge; Zhang, Shujun; Bradley, Allan; Liu, Pentao

    2011-01-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by expressing four transcription factors: Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc. Here we report that enhancing RA signaling by expressing RA receptors (RARs) or by RA agonists profoundly promoted reprogramming, but inhibiting it using a RAR-α dominant-negative form completely blocked it. Coexpressing Rarg (RAR-γ) and Lrh-1 (liver receptor homologue 1; Nr5a2) with the four factors greatly accelerated reprogramming so that reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblast cells to ground-state iPSCs requires only 4 d induction of these six factors. The six-factor combination readily reprogrammed primary human neonatal and adult fibroblast cells to exogenous factor-independent iPSCs, which resembled ground-state mouse ES cells in growth properties, gene expression, and signaling dependency. Our findings demonstrate that signaling through RARs has critical roles in molecular reprogramming and that the synergistic interaction between Rarg and Lrh1 directs reprogramming toward ground-state pluripotency. The human iPSCs described here should facilitate functional analysis of the human genome. PMID:21990348

  6. Lactic acid bacterial cell factories for gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Cao, Yusheng

    2010-11-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid that is widely present in organisms. Several important physiological functions of gamma-aminobutyric acid have been characterized, such as neurotransmission, induction of hypotension, diuretic effects, and tranquilizer effects. Many microorganisms can produce gamma-aminobutyric acid including bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Among them, gamma-aminobutyric acid-producing lactic acid bacteria have been a focus of research in recent years, because lactic acid bacteria possess special physiological activities and are generally regarded as safe. They have been extensively used in food industry. The production of lactic acid bacterial gamma-aminobutyric acid is safe and eco-friendly, and this provides the possibility of production of new naturally fermented health-oriented products enriched in gamma-aminobutyric acid. The gamma-aminobutyric acid-producing species of lactic acid bacteria and their isolation sources, the methods for screening of the strains and increasing their production, the enzymatic properties of glutamate decarboxylases and the relative fundamental research are reviewed in this article. And the potential applications of gamma-aminobutyric acid-producing lactic acid bacteria were also referred to.

  7. Expression and characterization of a truncated murine Fc gamma receptor

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have isolated a recombinant secreted Fc gamma R beta molecule by deletion of the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains encoding sequence from a Fc gamma R beta 1 cDNA clone, and insertion of the truncated cDNA into a eukaryotic expression vector, pcEXV-3. To express and amplify the production of the truncated Fc gamma R beta molecule, we transfected the truncated cDNA plasmid into a dihydrofolate reductase- minus CHO cell line along with a dhfr minigene, and amplified the gene products with methotrexate. The resulting cell line secretes 2-3 micrograms/ml/24 h of truncated Fc gamma R beta, which can be readily purified by affinity chromatography on IgG-Sepharose. The truncated Fc gamma R beta has a Mr of 31-33,000 on SDS-PAGE and is glycosylated. N- glycosidase F cleavage reduces the Mr to 19,000, consistent with the size of the truncated product, 176 amino acid residues. There are two disulfide bonds in the protein. Binding of immune complexes formed between DNP20BSA and anti-DNP mAbs reveals better binding of IgG1 aggregates than that of IgG2b and IgG2a aggregates. The binding of the immune complexes was somewhat better at more acidic pH, in contrast to previous experiments with binding of purified Fc gamma R to immune complex-coated beads. We were surprised to observe that the truncated Fc gamma R beta did not react with the anti-Fc gamma R mAb 6B7C. Previous work had shown that 6B7C reacts with Fc gamma R on immunoblots, fails to bind to the surface of resting B cells and peritoneal macrophages, but does bind to macrophage cell lines and LPS- stimulated B cells. We show, by binding of mAb 6B7C to a peptide conjugate, that the 6B7C epitope lies within residues 169-183 of the intact Fc gamma R beta, which is just outside the plasma membrane. The availability of the truncated Fc gamma R beta in microgram quantities should facilitate further analysis of structure and function of these receptors. PMID:2450951

  8. Oligomerization of L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. R. Jr; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Unlike glutamic acid, L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid does not oligomerize efficiently when treated with carbonyldiimidazole in aqueous solution. However, divalent ions such as Mg2+ catalyze the reaction, and lead to the formation of oligomers in good yield. In the presence of hydroxylapatite, L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid oligomerizes efficiently in a reaction that proceeds in the absence of divalent ions but is further catalyzed when they are present. After 'feeding' 50 times with activated amino acid in the presence of the Mg2+ ion, oligomers longer than the 20-mer could be detected. The effect of hydroxylapatite on peptide elongation is very sensitive to the nature of the activated amino acid and the acceptor peptide. Glutamic acid oligomerizes more efficiently than L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid on hydroxylapatite and adds more efficiently to decaglutamic acid in solution. One might, therefore, expect that glutamic acid would add more efficiently than L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid to decaglutamic acid on hydroxylapatite. The contrary is true--the addition of L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid is substantially more efficient. This suggests that oligomerization on the surface of hydroxylapatite depends on the detailed match between the structure of the surface of the mineral and the structure of the oligomer.

  9. Identification of potent and selective retinoic acid receptor gamma (RARγ) antagonists for the treatment of osteoarthritis pain using structure based drug design.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Norman E; Bleisch, Thomas J; Jones, Scott A; Richardson, Timothy I; Doti, Robert A; Wang, Yong; Stout, Stephanie L; Durst, Gregory L; Chambers, Mark G; Oskins, Jennifer L; Lin, Chaohua; Adams, Lisa A; Page, Todd J; Barr, Robert J; Zink, Richard W; Osborne, Harold; Montrose-Rafizadeh, Chahrzad; Norman, Bryan H

    2016-07-15

    A series of triaryl pyrazoles were identified as potent pan antagonists for the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) α, β and γ. X-ray crystallography and structure-based drug design were used to improve selectivity for RARγ by targeting residue differences in the ligand binding pockets of these receptors. This resulted in the discovery of novel antagonists which maintained RARγ potency but were greater than 500-fold selective versus RARα and RARβ. The potent and selective RARγ antagonist LY2955303 demonstrated good pharmacokinetic properties and was efficacious in the MIA model of osteoarthritis-like joint pain. This compound demonstrated an improved margin to RARα-mediated adverse effects. PMID:27261179

  10. Identification of potent and selective retinoic acid receptor gamma (RARγ) antagonists for the treatment of osteoarthritis pain using structure based drug design.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Norman E; Bleisch, Thomas J; Jones, Scott A; Richardson, Timothy I; Doti, Robert A; Wang, Yong; Stout, Stephanie L; Durst, Gregory L; Chambers, Mark G; Oskins, Jennifer L; Lin, Chaohua; Adams, Lisa A; Page, Todd J; Barr, Robert J; Zink, Richard W; Osborne, Harold; Montrose-Rafizadeh, Chahrzad; Norman, Bryan H

    2016-07-15

    A series of triaryl pyrazoles were identified as potent pan antagonists for the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) α, β and γ. X-ray crystallography and structure-based drug design were used to improve selectivity for RARγ by targeting residue differences in the ligand binding pockets of these receptors. This resulted in the discovery of novel antagonists which maintained RARγ potency but were greater than 500-fold selective versus RARα and RARβ. The potent and selective RARγ antagonist LY2955303 demonstrated good pharmacokinetic properties and was efficacious in the MIA model of osteoarthritis-like joint pain. This compound demonstrated an improved margin to RARα-mediated adverse effects.

  11. Concordance between isolated cleft palate in mice and alterations within a region including the gene encoding the [beta][sub 3] subunit of the type A [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Culiat, C.T.; Stubbs, L.; Nicholls, R.D.; Montgomery, C.S.; Russell, L.B.; Johnson, D.K. ); Rinchik, E.M. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville )

    1993-06-01

    Genetic and molecular analyses of a number of radiation-induced deletion mutations of the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in mouse chromosome 7 have identified a specific interval on the genetic map associated with a neonatally lethal mutation that results in cleft palate. This interval, closely linked and distal to p, and bracketed by the genes encoding the [alpha][sub 5] and [beta][sub 3] subunits of the type A [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor (Gabra5 and Gabrb3, respectively), contains a gene(s) (cp1; cleft palate 1) necessary for normal palate development. The cp1 interval extends from the distal breakpoint of the prenatally lethal p[sup 83FBFo] deletion to the Gabrb3 locus. Among 20 p deletions tested, there was complete concordance between alterations at the Gabrb3 transcription unit and inability to complement the cleft-palate defect. These mapping data, along with previously described in vivo and in vitro teratological effects of [gamma]-aminobutyric acid or its agonists on palate development, suggest the possibility that a particular type A [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor that includes the [beta][sub 3] subunit may be necessary for normal palate development. The placement of the cp1 gene within a defined segment of the larger D15S12h (p)-D15S9h-1 interval in the mouse suggests that the highly homologous region of the human genome, 15q11-q13, be evaluated for a role(s) in human fetal facial development. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Fc gamma receptor IIIb enhances Fc gamma receptor IIa function in an oxidant-dependent and allele-sensitive manner.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, J E; Millard, S S; Brogle, N L; Kimberly, R P

    1995-01-01

    Two classes of receptors for IgG, Fc gamma RIIa and Fc gamma RIIIb, both of which exist in two allelic forms, are expressed on human neutrophils. Neutrophils from normal donors, homozygous for the different allelic phenotypes of Fc gamma RIIIb, have significantly different levels of Fc gamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized erythrocytes (EA). However, the observation that Fc gamma RIIIb mediates phagocytosis of specific mAb-targeted erythrocytes poorly suggests that this receptor may influence EA internalization by Fc gamma RIIa in an allele-sensitive fashion. Donors homozygous for the NA1 allele of Fc gamma RIIIb showed greater activation of Fc gamma RIIa after Fc gamma RIIIb cross-linking than donors homozygous for the NA2 allele of Fc gamma RIIIb. This increase in receptor-specific internalization reflects both an increase in ligand binding by Fc gamma RIIa and an increase in internalization efficiency of targets bound. Activation of Fc gamma RIIa by Fc gamma RIIIb is transferable by supernatants from activated cells and is blocked by inhibitors of reactive oxygen species and the H2O2-myeloperoxidase-chloride system and by serine protease inhibitors. Thus, cross-linking of Fc gamma RIIIb, which leads to neutrophil degranulation and the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates, in turn alters Fc gamma RIIa avidity and efficiency. These oxidant-mediated changes in Fc gamma RIIa function provide a novel mechanism for receptors to collaborate in both an autocrine and paracrine fashion. The allele sensitivity of these effects suggests that Fc gamma receptor polymorphisms may be inherited disease susceptibility factors in host defense against infection and in the development of autoimmunity. Images PMID:7769129

  13. DNA Methylation at the Neonatal State and at the Time of Diagnosis: Preliminary Support for an Association with the Estrogen Receptor 1, Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor 1, and Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Female Adolescent Patients with OCD.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Judith Becker; Hansen, Christine Søholm; Starnawska, Anna; Mattheisen, Manuel; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hollegaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder. Non-genetic factors and their interaction with genes have attracted increasing attention. Epigenetics is regarded an important interface between environmental signals and activation/repression of genomic responses. Epigenetic mechanisms have not previously been examined in OCD in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of selected genes in blood spots from neonates later diagnosed with OCD and in the same children/adolescents at the time of diagnosis compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Furthermore, we wanted to characterize the association of the differential methylation profiles with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome. Dried and new blood spot samples were obtained from 21 female children/adolescents with verified OCD and 12 female controls. The differential methylation was analyzed using a linear model and the correlation with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome was analyzed using the Pearson correlation. We evaluated selected Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip probes within and up to 100,000 bp up- and downstream of 14 genes previously associated with OCD (SLC1A1, SLC25A12, GABBR1, GAD1, DLGAP1, MOG, BDNF, OLIG2, NTRK2 and 3, ESR1, SL6A4, TPH2, and COMT). The study found no significantly differential methylation. However, preliminary support for a difference was found for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor 1 (cg10234998, cg17099072) in blood samples at birth and for the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) (cg10939667), the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) (cg16650906), and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (cg14080521) in blood samples at the time of diagnosis. Preliminary support for an association was observed between the methylation profiles of GABBR1 and MOG and baseline severity, treatment effect, and responder status; and between the methylation profile of ESR1 and baseline

  14. DNA Methylation at the Neonatal State and at the Time of Diagnosis: Preliminary Support for an Association with the Estrogen Receptor 1, Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor 1, and Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Female Adolescent Patients with OCD

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Judith Becker; Hansen, Christine Søholm; Starnawska, Anna; Mattheisen, Manuel; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hollegaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder. Non-genetic factors and their interaction with genes have attracted increasing attention. Epigenetics is regarded an important interface between environmental signals and activation/repression of genomic responses. Epigenetic mechanisms have not previously been examined in OCD in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of selected genes in blood spots from neonates later diagnosed with OCD and in the same children/adolescents at the time of diagnosis compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Furthermore, we wanted to characterize the association of the differential methylation profiles with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome. Dried and new blood spot samples were obtained from 21 female children/adolescents with verified OCD and 12 female controls. The differential methylation was analyzed using a linear model and the correlation with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome was analyzed using the Pearson correlation. We evaluated selected Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip probes within and up to 100,000 bp up- and downstream of 14 genes previously associated with OCD (SLC1A1, SLC25A12, GABBR1, GAD1, DLGAP1, MOG, BDNF, OLIG2, NTRK2 and 3, ESR1, SL6A4, TPH2, and COMT). The study found no significantly differential methylation. However, preliminary support for a difference was found for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor 1 (cg10234998, cg17099072) in blood samples at birth and for the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) (cg10939667), the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) (cg16650906), and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (cg14080521) in blood samples at the time of diagnosis. Preliminary support for an association was observed between the methylation profiles of GABBR1 and MOG and baseline severity, treatment effect, and responder status; and between the methylation profile of ESR1 and baseline

  15. Demonstration and partial characterization of the interferon-gamma receptor on human mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Celada, A; Allen, R; Esparza, I; Gray, P W; Schreiber, R D

    1985-01-01

    Radioiodinated recombinant human interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) bound to human monocytes, U937, and HL60 cells in a specific, saturable, and reversible manner. At 4 degrees C, the different cell types bound 3,000-7,000 molecules of IFN gamma, and binding was of comparable affinity (Ka = 4-12 X 10(8) M-1). No change in the receptor was observed after monocytes differentiated to macrophages or when the cell lines were pharmacologically induced to differentiate. The functional relevance of the receptor was validated by the demonstration that receptor occupancy correlated with induction of Fc receptors on U937. Binding studies using U937 permeabilized with digitonin showed that only 46% of the total receptor pool was expressed at the cell surface. The receptor appears to be a protein, since treatment of U937 with trypsin or pronase reduced 125I-IFN gamma binding by 87 and 95%, respectively. At 37 degrees C, ligand was internalized, since 32% of the cell-associated IFN gamma became resistant to trypsin stripping. Monocytes degraded 125I-IFN gamma into trichloroacetic acid-soluble counts at 37 degrees C but not at 4 degrees C, at an approximate rate of 5,000 molecules/cell per h. The receptor was partially characterized by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of purified U937 membranes that had been incubated with 125I-IFN gamma. After cross-linking, the receptor-ligand complex migrated as a broad band that displayed an Mr of 104,000 +/- 18,000 at the top and 84,000 +/- 6,000 at the bottom. These results thereby define and partially characterize the IFN gamma receptor of human mononuclear phagocytes. Images PMID:2934408

  16. Expression cloning of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, S; Maniatis, T

    1989-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a receptor for murine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) was isolated from an expression library made from murine thymocytes. The clone was identified by transfecting the library into monkey COS cells and probing the transfected monolayer with radiolabeled murine IFN-gamma. Cells expressing the receptor were identified by autoradiography and plasmids encoding the receptor were directly rescued from those cells producing a positive signal. A partial cDNA so obtained was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from mouse L929 cells by conventional means. When this cDNA was expressed in COS cells it produced a specific binding site for murine IFN-gamma with an affinity constant similar to that of the receptor found on L929 cells. The predicted amino acid sequence of the murine IFN-gamma receptor shows homology to that previously reported for the human IFN-gamma receptor. However, although the two proteins are clearly related, they show less than 60% identity in both the putative extracellular domain and the intracellular domain. Images PMID:2531896

  17. Another mechanism for creating diversity in gamma-aminobutyrate type A receptors: RNA splicing directs expression of two forms of gamma 2 phosphorylation site.

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, P; McKernan, R M; Iversen, L L

    1990-01-01

    Diversity of gamma-aminobutyrate type A (GABAA) receptors has recently been proposed to be achieved by assembly of receptor subtypes from a multitude of subunits (alpha 1-6, beta 1-3, gamma 1-2, and delta) encoded by different genes. Here we report a further mechanism for creating GABAA receptor diversity: alternative RNA splicing. Two forms of bovine gamma 2 subunit cDNA were isolated (gamma 2S and gamma 2L) that differed by the presence or absence of a 24-base-pair (8-amino acid) insertion in the cytoplasmic domain between the third and fourth putative membrane-spanning regions. Polymerase chain reaction from RNA demonstrated that the two forms of gamma 2 subunit are expressed in bovine, human, and rat brain. Sequencing of genomic DNA clones encoding the gamma 2 subunit demonstrated that the 24-base-pair insert is organized as a separate exon. Analysis of the sequence of the 8-amino acid insert revealed that it contains a protein kinase C consensus phosphorylation site. Expression of the large cytoplasmic loop domains of gamma 2S and gamma 2L in Escherichia coli, followed by phosphorylation of the recombinant proteins by protein kinase C, demonstrated that gamma 2L, but not gamma 2S, could be phosphorylated. Thus the two forms of gamma 2 subunit differ by the presence or absence of a protein kinase C phosphorylation site. This mechanism for creating GABAA receptor diversity may allow differential regulation of the function of receptor subtypes. Images PMID:1702226

  18. Cell type and gene-specific activity of the retinoid inverse agonist AGN 193109: divergent effects from agonist at retinoic acid receptor gamma in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Thacher, S M; Nagpal, S; Klein, E S; Arefieg, T; Krasinski, G; DiSepio, D; Agarwal, C; Johnson, A; Eckert, R L; Chandraratna, R A

    1999-04-01

    Retinoids are important regulators of epithelial differentiation. AGN 193109 is a high-affinity antagonist and inverse agonist for the nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Paradoxically, both AGN 193109 and retinoid agonists inhibit the expression of the differentiation marker MRP-8 in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). TTNPB, an RAR agonist, and AGN 193109 mutually antagonize MRP-8 inhibition at both mRNA and protein levels. We find that this antagonism, which is greatest at an AGN 193109:TTNPB ratio of about 10:1, is absent when either compound is in significant excess. The potent RARalpha-specific agonist, AGN 193836, has no effect on MRP-8 regulation. These data indicate that inverse agonists and agonists suppress MRP-8 in NHKs through RARgamma using distinct and mutually inhibitory mechanisms. The activity of AGN 193109 on MRP-8 is cell type specific. In differentiating ECE16-1 cervical cells, TTNPB inhibits while AGN 193109 induces MRP-8 mRNA levels. The effect of AGN 193109 on genes inhibited by retinoid agonists in NHKs is also selective; expression of the differentiation markers transglutaminase 1 and keratin 6 is not down-regulated by AGN 193109 whereas stromelysin-1 expression is suppressed. These results show a complex gene and cell context-specific interplay between agonist and inverse agonist for the regulation of gene expression.

  19. Antagonistic properties of a natural product - Bicuculline with the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor: Studied through electrostatic potential mapping, electronic and vibrational spectra using ab initio and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Jain, Sudha; Asthana, B. P.

    2011-12-01

    (+)-Bicuculline (hereinafter referred to as bicuculline), a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid is of current interest as an antagonist of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Its inhibitor properties have been studied through molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) mapping of this molecule and GABA receptor. The hot site on the potential surface of bicuculline, which is also isosteric with GABA receptor, has been used to interpret the inhibitor property. A systematic quantum chemical study of the possible conformations, their relative stabilities, FT-Raman, FT-IR and UV-vis spectroscopic analysis of bicuculline has been reported. The optimized geometries, wavenumber and intensity of the vibrational bands of all the conformers of bicuculline have been calculated using ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP functional and 6-311G(d,p) basis set. Mulliken atomic charges, HOMO-LUMO gap Δ E, ionization potential, dipole moments and total energy have also been obtained for the optimized geometries of both the molecules. TD-DFT method is used to calculate the electronic absorption parameters in gas phase as well as in solvent environment using integral equation formalism-polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM) employing 6-31G basis set and the results thus obtained are compared with the UV absorption spectra. The combination of experimental and calculated results provides an insight into the structural and vibrational spectroscopic properties of bicuculline.

  20. Differential effects of methylmercury on gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor currents in rat cerebellar granule and cerebral cortical neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Herden, Christina J; Pardo, Nicole E; Hajela, Ravindra K; Yuan, Yukun; Atchison, William D

    2008-02-01

    Cerebellar granule cells are particularly sensitive to inhibition by methylmercury (MeHg) on GABA(A) receptor function. This is manifested as a more rapid block of inhibitory postsynaptic currents/inhibitory postsynaptic potentials than for Purkinje cells. The underlying mechanism(s) for differential sensitivity of GABAergic transmission to MeHg in cerebellar neurons is unknown. Differential expression of alpha(6) subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors in cerebellar granule and Purkinje neurons could partially explain this. GABA-evoked currents (I(GABA)) were recorded in response to MeHg in alpha(6) subunit-containing cerebellar granule cells and alpha(6) subunit-deficient cerebral cortical cells in culture. Cortical cells were substituted for Purkinje cells, which do not express alpha(6) subunits. They express the same alpha(1)-containing GABA(A) receptor as Purkinje cells but lack characteristics that enhance Purkinje cell resistance to MeHg. I(GABA) were obtained using whole-cell recording and symmetrical [Cl(-)]. MeHg reduced I(GABA) to complete block in both cell types in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. This effect was faster in granule cells than cortical cells. Effects of MeHg on I(GABA) were recorded in granule cells at various developmental stages (days in vitro 4, 6, and 8) to alter the expression level of alpha(6) subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors. Effects of MeHg on I(GABA) were similar in cells at all days. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing either alpha(6) or alpha(1) subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors, time to block of I(GABA) by MeHg was comparable. Thus, the presence of the alpha(6) subunit alone may not underlie the differential effects of MeHg on I(GABA) observed in cerebellar granule and cortical neurons; other factors are likely to be involved as well. PMID:17977981

  1. The human [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit [beta]3 and [alpha]5 gene cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13 is rich in highly polymorphic (CA)[sub n] repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Glatt, K.; Lalande, M. ); Sinnett, D. )

    1994-01-01

    The [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA[sub A]) receptor [beta]33 (GABRB3) and [alpha]5 (GABRA5) subunit genes have been localized to the Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome region of chromosome 15q11-q13. GABRB3, which encompasses 250 kb, is located 100 kb proximal of GABRA5, with the two genes arranged in head-to-head transcriptional orientation. In screening 135 kb of cloned DNA within a 260-kb interval extending from within GABRB3 to the 5[prime] end of GABRA5, 10 new (CA), repeats have been identified. Five of these have been analyzed in detail and found to be highly polymorphic, with the polymorphism information content (PIC) ranging from 0.7 to 0.85 and with heterozygosities of 67 to 94%. In the clones from GABRB3/GABRA5 region, therefore, the frequency of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 is 1 per 27 kb. Previous estimates of the density of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 in the human genome have been approximately 10-fold lower. The GABRB3/GABRA5 region appears, therefore, to be enriched for highly informative (CA)[sub n]. This set of closely spaced, short tandem repeat polymorphisms will be useful in the molecular analyses of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and in high-resolution studies of genetic recombination within this region. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Effects of quercetin on the sleep-wake cycle in rats: involvement of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor type A in regulation of rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Kambe, Daiji; Kotani, Makiko; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Kaku, Shinsuke; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Honda, Kazuki

    2010-05-12

    The bioflavonoid quercetin is widely found in plants and exerts a large number of biological activities such as anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of quercetin on the sleep-wake cycle has not been investigated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of quercetin on sleep-wake regulation. Intraperitoneal administration of quercetin (200mg/kg) significantly increased non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep during dark period in rats, while it significantly decreased REM sleep. The decrease in REM sleep induced by quercetin was blocked by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of bicuculline, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist. In contrast, the increase in non-REM sleep induced by quercetin was not affected by i.c.v. injection of bicuculline. Therefore, the present results suggest that quercetin alters the sleep-wake cycle partly through activation of GABA(A) receptors.

  3. Interferon enhances the expression of Fc gamma receptors.

    PubMed

    Fridman, W H; Gresser, I; Bandu, M T; Aguet, M; Neauport-Sautes, C

    1980-05-01

    Murine T2D4 cells derived from a T cell hybrid line were incubated with partially purified or electrophoretically pure mouse interferon and tested for the expression of Fc gamma R as assessed by a) counting the number of cells forming rosettes with IgG-sensitized sheep erythrocytes, and b) incubating the cells with heat-aggregated rabbit IgG and then determining either the number of cells stained with fluorescein conjugated goat anti-rabbit IgG or the extent of labeling by using radioactive iodinated staphylococcus protein A. Although interferon induced a rapid increase in Fc gamma R expression on the Fc gamma R-positive T2D4 cells, it did not induce either Fc gamma R on the Fc gamma R negative BW5147 cells or Fc gamma R on either cell line. Human leukocyte interferon enhanced the expression of Fc gamma R on human Burkitt cells (Daudi) but did not affect the expression of Fc gamma R on mouse cells. We suggest that interferon may influence several effector functions of the immune system by modulating Fc receptor expression. PMID:6154103

  4. A peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist and other constituents from Chromolaena odorata.

    PubMed

    Dat, Nguyen Tien; Lee, Kyeong; Hong, Young-Soo; Kim, Young Ho; Minh, Chau Van; Lee, Jung Joon

    2009-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are key regulators of lipid and glucose metabolism and have become important therapeutic targets for various diseases. The phytochemical investigation of the chloroform-soluble extract of Chromolaena odorata led to the isolation of a PPAR-gamma agonist, (9 S,13 R)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (1), together with 12 other compounds. The structures of chromomoric acid G (2), a new dehydrogenated derivative of 1, and chromolanone (3) were elucidated based on spectroscopic methods. Compound 1 showed a significant effect on PPAR-gamma activation in comparison with rosiglitazone. However, compound 2 was inactive, suggesting that the dehydrogenation of the prostaglandin-like structure in 1 abrogates its PPAR-gamma agonistic activity.

  5. Conjugated linoleic acid supplementation enhances insulin sensitivity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and glucose transporter type 4 protein expression in the skeletal muscles of rats during endurance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kangok; Song, Youngju; Kwon, Daekeun

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study examined whether conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplementation affects insulin sensitivity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT-4) protein expressions in the skeletal muscles of rats during endurance exercise. Materials and Methods: Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into HS (high-fat diet (HFD) sedentary group, n = 8), CS (1.0% CLA supplemented HFD sedentary group, n = 8), and CE (1.0% CLA supplemented HFD exercise group, n = 8). The rats in the CE swam for 60 min a day, 5 days a week for 8 weeks. Results: The serum glucose and insulin contents and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) value of the CS and CE were significantly decreased compared to those of the HS. The PPAR-γ protein expressions in the soleus muscle (SOM) and extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) were significantly higher in the CE than in the HS. In addition, the PPAR-γ protein expression in the SOM of the CS was significantly higher than that in the HS. On the other hand, the GLUT-4 protein expression of the SOM in the CE was significantly higher compared to that in the HS. However, there was no significant difference in GLUT-4 protein expression in the EDL among the groups. Conclusion: CLA supplementation with/without endurance exercise has role in improvement of insulin sensitivity. Moreover, when CLA supplementation was accompanied by endurance exercise, the PPAR-γ protein expression in SOM and EDL and the GLUT-4 protein expression in SOM were enhanced compared with the control group. PMID:27096060

  6. Mouse muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gamma subunit: cDNA sequence and gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L; LaPolla, R J; Davidson, N

    1986-01-01

    Clones coding for the mouse nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) gamma subunit precursor have been selected from a cDNA library derived from a mouse myogenic cell line and sequenced. The deduced protein sequence consists of a signal peptide of 22 amino acid residues and a mature gamma subunit of 497 amino acid residues. There is a high degree of sequence conservation between this mouse sequence and published human and calf AChR gamma subunits and, after allowing for functional amino acid substitutions, also to the more distantly related chicken and Torpedo AChR gamma subunits. The degree of sequence conservation is especially high in the four putative hydrophobic membrane spanning regions, supporting the assignment of these domains. RNA blot hybridization showed that the mRNA level of the gamma subunit increases by 30 fold or more upon differentiation of the two mouse myogenic cell lines, BC3H-1 and C2C12, suggesting that the primary controls for changes in gene expression during differentiation are at the level of transcription. One cDNA clone was found to correspond to a partially processed nuclear transcript containing two as yet unspliced intervening sequences. Images PMID:3010242

  7. Binding interactions of convulsant and anticonvulsant gamma-butyrolactones and gamma-thiobutyrolactones with the picrotoxin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, K.D.; McKeon, A.C.; Covey, D.F.; Ferrendelli, J.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Alkyl-substituted gamma-butyrolactones (GBLs) and gamma-thiobutyrolactones (TBLs) are neuroactive chemicals. beta-Substituted compounds are convulsant, whereas alpha-alkyl substituted GBLs and TBLs are anticonvulsant. The structural similarities between beta-alkyl GBLs and the convulsant picrotoxinin suggested that alkyl substituted GBLs and TBLs act at the picrotoxin receptor. To test this hypothesis we examined the interactions of convulsant and anticonvulsant GBLs and TBLs with the picrotoxin, benzodiazepine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding sites of the GABA receptor complex. All of these convulsants and anticonvulsants studied competitively displaced 35S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (35S-TBPS), a ligand that binds to the picrotoxin receptor. This inhibition of 35S-TBPS binding was not blocked by the GABA antagonist bicuculline methobromide. The convulsant GBLs and TBLs also partially inhibited (3H)muscimol binding to the GABA site and (3H)flunitrazepam binding to the benzodiazepine site, but they did so at concentrations substantially greater than those that inhibited 35S-TBPS binding. The anticonvulsant GBLs and TBLs had no effect on either (3H)muscimol or (3H)flunitrazepam binding. In contrast to the GBLs and TBLs, pentobarbital inhibited TBPS binding in a manner that was blocked by bicuculline methobromide, and it enhanced both (3H)flunitrazepam and (3H)muscimol binding. Both ethosuximide and tetramethylsuccinimide, neuroactive compounds structurally similar to GBLs, competitively displaced 35S-TBPS from the picrotoxin receptor and both compounds were weak inhibitors of (3H) muscimol binding. In addition, ethosuximide also partially diminished (3H)flunitrazepam binding. These data demonstrate that the site of action of alkyl-substituted GBLs and TBLs is different from that of GABA, barbiturates and benzodiazepines.

  8. Marked resistance of RAR gamma-deficient mice to the toxic effects of retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Look, J; Landwehr, J; Bauer, F; Hoffmann, A S; Bluethmann, H; LeMotte, P

    1995-07-01

    Excessive intake of retinol or of retinoic acid causes a syndrome of characteristic toxic effects known as hypervitaminosis A. To test the role of the nuclear retinoic acid receptor (RAR gamma) in this process we produced mice with a targeted disruption of the RAR gamma gene and examined toxic effects of repeated doses of retinoic acid and two other synthetic retinoids, Ro 15-1570 and Ro 40-6055. Surprisingly, homozygous mutant mice were resistant to fourfold higher doses of retinoic acid than wild-type mice as well as to elevated doses of the synthetic retinoids, indicating that RAR gamma may have a major role in mediating retinoid toxicity, a finding that possibly has practical implications for reducing the toxicity of synthetic retinoids in clinical use.

  9. Gamma linolenic acid: an antiinflammatory omega-6 fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Rakesh; Huang, Yung-Sheng

    2006-12-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in health and disease. Most of the chronic diseases of modern society, including cancer, diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, etc. have inflammatory component. At the same time, the link between diet and disease is also being recognized. Amongst dietary constituents, fat has gained most recognition in affecting health. Saturated and trans fatty acids have been implicated in obesity, heart disease, diabetes and cancer while polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) generally have a positive effect on health. The PUFAs of omega-3 and omega-6 series play a significant role in health and disease by generating potent modulatory molecules for inflammatory responses, including eicosanoids (prostaglandins, and leukotrienes), and cytokines (interleukins) and affecting the gene expression of various bioactive molecules. Gamma linolenic acid (GLA, all cis 6, 9, 12-Octadecatrienoic acid, C18:3, n-6), is produced in the body from linoleic acid (all cis 6,9-octadecadienoic acid), an essential fatty acid of omega-6 series by the enzyme delta-6-desaturase. Preformed GLA is present in trace amounts in green leafy vegetables and in nuts. The most significant source of GLA for infants is breast milk. GLA is further metabolized to dihomogamma linlenic acid (DGLA) which undergoes oxidative metabolism by cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases to produce anti-inflammatory eicosanoids (prostaglandins of series 1 and leukotrienes of series 3). GLA and its metabolites also affect expression of various genes where by regulating the levels of gene products including matrix proteins. These gene products play a significant role in immune functions and also in cell death (apoptosis). The present review will emphasize the role of GLA in modulating inflammatory response, and hence its potential applications as an anti-inflammatory nutrient or adjuvant.

  10. Metabolism and transport of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Shah, D V; Tews, J K; Harper, A E; Suttie, J W

    1978-03-01

    gamma-Carboxyglutamic acid residues have beeh shown to be present in prothrombin, the other vitamin K-dependent clotting factors, and more recently in bone and kidney proteins. This amino acid is formed by a posttranslational vitamin K-dependent carboxylation of glutamyl residues in polypeptide precursors of these protens. It has now been demonstrated that this amino acid, either in the free or peptide-bound form, is not metabolically degraded by the rat, but is quantitatively excreted in the urine. In nephrectomized rats, the tissue concentration of intravenously administered gamma-carboxyglutamic acid is increased, but there is still no evidence of any oxidative metabolism of this amino acid. These amino acid is transported by kidney slices against a concentration gradient, but does not accumulate in liver, intestinal or brain tissues. Preliminary data suggest that gamma-carboxyglutamic acid may be concentrated by a carrier system different from that utilized by other amino acids. PMID:629998

  11. Topological dispositions of lysine. alpha. 380 and lysine. gamma. 486 in the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.P. )

    1991-04-23

    The locations have been determined, with respect to the plasma membrane, of lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 in the {alpha} subunit and the {gamma} subunit, respectively, of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. Immunoadsorbents were constructed that recognize the carboxy terminus of the peptide GVKYIAE released by proteolytic digestion from positions 378-384 in the amino acid sequence of the {alpha} subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and the carboxy terminus of the peptide KYVP released by proteolytic digestion from positions 486-489 in the amino acid sequence of the {gamma} subunit. They were used to isolate these peptides from proteolytic digests of polypeptides from the acetylcholine receptor. Sealed vesicles containing the native acetylcholine receptor were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium ({sup 3}H)-borohydride. The effect of saponin on the incorporation of pyridoxamine phosphate into lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 from the acetylcholine receptor in these vesicles was assessed with the immunoadsorbents. The conclusions that follow from these results are that lysine {alpha}380 is on the inside surface of a vesicle and lysine {gamma}486 is on the outside surface. Because a majority (85%) of the total binding sites for {alpha}-bungarotoxin bind the toxin in the absence of saponin, the majority of the vesicles are right side out with the inside of the vesicle corresponding to the cytoplasmic surface and the outside of the vesicle corresponding to the extracytoplasmic, synaptic surface. Because lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 lie on opposite sides of the membrane, a membrane-spanning segment must be located between the two positions occupied by these two amino acids in the common sequence of a polypeptide of the acetylcholine receptor.

  12. Response kinetics and pharmacological properties of heteromeric receptors formed by coassembly of GABA rho- and gamma 2-subunits.

    PubMed

    Qian, H; Ripps, H

    1999-12-01

    Two of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, GABAA and GABAC, are ligand-gated chloride channels expressed by neurons in the retina and throughout the central nervous system. The different subunit composition of these two classes of GABA receptor result in very different physiological and pharmacological properties. Although little is known at the molecular level as to the subunit composition of any native GABA receptor, it is thought that GABAC receptors are homomeric assemblies of rho-subunits. However, we found that the kinetic and pharmacological properties of homomeric receptors formed by each of the rho-subunits cloned from perch retina did not resemble those of the GABAC receptors on perch bipolar cells. Because both GABAA and GABAC receptors are present on retinal bipolar cells, we attempted to determine whether subunits of these two receptor classes are capable of interacting with each other. We report here that, when coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes, heteromeric (rho 1B gamma 2) receptors formed by coassembly of the rho 1B-subunit with the gamma 2-subunit of the GABAA receptor displayed response properties very similar to those obtained with current recordings from bipolar cells. In addition to being unresponsive to bicuculline and diazepam, the time-constant of deactivation, and the sensitivities to GABA, picrotoxin and zinc closely approximated the values obtained from the native GABAC receptors on bipolar cells. These results provide the first direct evidence of interaction between GABA rho and GABAA receptor subunits. It seems highly likely that coassembly of GABAA and rho-subunits contributes to the molecular organization of GABAC receptors in the retina and perhaps throughout the nervous system. PMID:10643085

  13. GABAB receptor blockade enhances theta and gamma rhythms in the hippocampus of behaving rats.

    PubMed

    Leung, L Stan; Shen, Bixia

    2007-01-01

    The participation of GABA(B) receptors in hippocampal EEG generation was studied by intracerebroventricular (icv) and intracerebral infusions of GABA(B) receptor antagonist p-(3-aminopropyl)-p-diethoxymethyl-phosphinic acid (CGP35348) in freely behaving rats. During awake-immobility, icv CGP35348 induced a theta rhythm and increased gamma waves (30-100 Hz) in the hippocampus. The immobility theta peaked at 6-7 Hz and had a theta phase in CA1 stratum radiatum of approximately 160 degrees with reference to the theta at the alveus, when compared with approximately 130 degrees during walking. Immobility theta power peaks at 6-7 Hz was also found in normal rats, and it was detected in 27% of the EEG segments during immobility. Incidence of immobility theta increased to 87.5% after 480 nmol of CGP35348 icv. Muscarinic antagonist scopolamine (5 mg/kg, ip) suppressed the induction of immobility theta and the gamma power increase after icv CGP35348. CGP35348 icv did not significantly change the hippocampal theta power at 7-8 Hz during walking (theta fundamental), but it increased power at 12-15 Hz, at the second harmonic of theta. CGP35348 icv also increased 30-50 Hz gamma power during walking. Medial septal infusion of CGP35348 (12 nmol in 0.4 microl) increased the power and the frequency of the hippocampal theta second harmonic during walking, but did not increase gamma activity. Infusion of CGP35348 (8 nmol in 0.4 microl) in the hippocampus increased the local gamma activity at 30-100 Hz, but did not induce immobility theta or affect the walking theta rhythm. In conclusion, icv GABA(B) receptor blockade increased an atropine-sensitive input that generated an immobility theta rhythm, while GABA(B) receptor blockade of the medial septum increased atropine-resistant theta harmonics possibly generated by apical dendritic spikes. GABA(B) receptor blockade may enhance cognitive task performance by activating hippocampal theta and gamma rhythms in behaving rats.

  14. Carbonic anhydrase III regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}2

    SciTech Connect

    Mitterberger, Maria C.; Kim, Geumsoo; Rostek, Ursula; Levine, Rodney L.; Zwerschke, Werner

    2012-05-01

    Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII) is an isoenzyme of the CA family. Because of its low specific anhydrase activity, physiological functions in addition to hydrating CO{sub 2} have been proposed. CAIII expression is highly induced in adipogenesis and CAIII is the most abundant protein in adipose tissues. The function of CAIII in both preadipocytes and adipocytes is however unknown. In the present study we demonstrate that adipogenesis is greatly increased in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from CAIII knockout (KO) mice, as demonstrated by a greater than 10-fold increase in the induction of fatty acid-binding protein-4 (FABP4) and increased triglyceride formation in CAIII{sup -/-} MEFs compared with CAIII{sup +/+} cells. To address the underlying mechanism, we investigated the expression of the two adipogenic key regulators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-{alpha}. We found a considerable (approximately 1000-fold) increase in the PPAR{gamma}2 expression in the CAIII{sup -/-} MEFs. Furthermore, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous CAIII in NIH 3T3-L1 preadipocytes resulted in a significant increase in the induction of PPAR{gamma}2 and FABP4. When both CAIII and PPAR{gamma}2 were knocked down, FABP4 was not induced. We conclude that down-regulation of CAIII in preadipocytes enhances adipogenesis and that CAIII is a regulator of adipogenic differentiation which acts at the level of PPAR{gamma}2 gene expression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discover a novel function of Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that CAIII is a regulator of adipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that CAIII acts at the level of PPAR{gamma}2 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our data contribute to a better understanding of the role of CAIII in fat tissue.

  15. Discovery of Azetidinone Acids as Conformationally-Constrained Dual PPARalpha/gamma Agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Devasthale, P; Farrelly, D; Gu, L; Harrity, T; Cap, M; Chu, C; Kunselman, L; Morgan, N; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    A novel class of azetidinone acid-derived dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists has been synthesized for the treatment of diabetes and dyslipidemia. The preferred stereochemistry in this series for binding and functional agonist activity against both PPARa and PPAR? receptors was shown to be 3S,4S. Synthesis, in vitro and in vivo activities of compounds in this series are described. A high-yielding method for N-arylation of azetidinone esters is also described.

  16. SDP1 is a peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 co-activator that binds through its SCAN domain.

    PubMed Central

    Babb, Robert; Bowen, Benjamin R

    2003-01-01

    Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, play an important role in the regulation of lipid metabolism and energy homoeostasis. In a yeast two-hybrid experiment using the zinc-finger transcription factor ZNF202 as bait, we previously identified the SCAN-domain-containing protein SDP1. SDP1 shares a high degree of amino acid sequence identity with PGC-2, a previously identified PPAR gamma 2 co-activator from the mouse. Here we show that SDP1 and PGC-2 interact with PPAR gamma 2 through their SCAN domains, even though PPAR gamma 2 does not contain a SCAN domain. Similar to PGC-2, SDP1 enhanced PPAR gamma 2-dependent gene transcription in transiently transfected cells but did not alter the affinity of PPAR gamma 2 for agonists. Although the SCAN domain was necessary for binding to PPAR gamma 2, it was not sufficient for co-activation in cells, suggesting that other features of SDP1 are responsible for transcriptional co-activation. The ability of SDP1 to interact with two different transcription factors that regulate genes involved in lipid metabolism, ZNF202 and PPAR gamma 2, suggests that SDP1 may be an important co-regulator of such genes. PMID:12444922

  17. Steroid receptor coactivator 1 links the steroid and interferon gamma response pathways.

    PubMed

    Tzortzakaki, Eleni; Spilianakis, Charalambos; Zika, Eleni; Kretsovali, Androniki; Papamatheakis, Joseph

    2003-12-01

    We show here that steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1) is a coactivator of MHC class II genes that stimulates their interferon gamma (IFNgamma) and class II transactivator (CIITA)-mediated expression. SRC-1 interacts physically with the N-terminal activation domain of CIITA through two regions: one central [extending from amino acids (aa) 360-839] that contains the nuclear receptors binding region and one C-terminal (aa 1138-1441) that contains the activation domain 2. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we show that SRC-1 recruitment on the class II promoter is enhanced upon IFNgamma stimulation. Most importantly, SRC-1 relieves the inhibitory action of estrogens on the IFNgamma-mediated induction of class II genes in transient transfection assays. We provide evidence that inhibition by estradiol is due to multiple events such as slightly reduced recruitment of CIITA and SRC-1 and severely inhibited assembly of the preinitiation complex.

  18. Steroid receptor coactivator 1 links the steroid and interferon gamma response pathways.

    PubMed

    Tzortzakaki, Eleni; Spilianakis, Charalambos; Zika, Eleni; Kretsovali, Androniki; Papamatheakis, Joseph

    2003-12-01

    We show here that steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1) is a coactivator of MHC class II genes that stimulates their interferon gamma (IFNgamma) and class II transactivator (CIITA)-mediated expression. SRC-1 interacts physically with the N-terminal activation domain of CIITA through two regions: one central [extending from amino acids (aa) 360-839] that contains the nuclear receptors binding region and one C-terminal (aa 1138-1441) that contains the activation domain 2. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we show that SRC-1 recruitment on the class II promoter is enhanced upon IFNgamma stimulation. Most importantly, SRC-1 relieves the inhibitory action of estrogens on the IFNgamma-mediated induction of class II genes in transient transfection assays. We provide evidence that inhibition by estradiol is due to multiple events such as slightly reduced recruitment of CIITA and SRC-1 and severely inhibited assembly of the preinitiation complex. PMID:12933903

  19. Synergistic activation of retinoic acid (RA)-responsive genes and induction of embryonal carcinoma cell differentiation by an RA receptor {alpha} (RAR{alpha})-, RAR{beta}-, or RAR{gamma}-selective ligand in combination with retinoid Z receptor-specific ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, B.; Taneja, R.; Chambon, P.

    1995-12-01

    This research indicates thatn retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-retinoid X receptor (RXR) heterodimers activate transcription of RA-responsive genes and induce cell differentiation of P19 and F9 cells in a ligand-dependent manner. 43 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Purification and characterization of the human interferon-. gamma. receptor from placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, J.; Sheehan, K.C.F.; Chance, C.; Thomas, M.L.; Schreiber, R.D. )

    1988-07-01

    Purification of the human interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) receptor was facilitated by identification of human placenta as a large-scale receptor source. When analyzed in radioligand binding experiments, intact placental membranes and detergent-solubilized membrane proteins expressed 1.3 and 5.9 {times} 10{sup 12} receptors per mg of protein, respectively, values that were 13-163 times greater than that observed for U937 membranes. Two protocols were followed to purify the IFN-{gamma} receptor from octyl glucoside-solubilized membranes: (i) sequential affinity chromatography over wheat germ agglutinin- and INF-{gamma}-Sepharose and (ii) affinity chromatography over columns containing receptor-specific monoclonal antibody and wheat germ agglutinin. Both procedures resulted in fully active preparations that were 70-90% pure. Purified receptor migrated as a single molecular species of 90 kDa either when analyzed on silver-stained NaDodSO{sub 4}/polyacrylamide gels or when subjected to electrophoretic transfer blot analysis using a labeled IFN-{gamma} receptor-specific monoclonal antibody. The identity of the 90-kDa component as the receptor was confirmed by demonstrating its ability to specifically bind {sup 125}I-labeled IFN-{gamma} following NaDodSO{sub 4}/PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose. The ligand binding site, the epitope for the receptor-specific monoclonal antibody, and all of the N-linked carbohydrate could be localized to the 55-kDa domain of the molecule.

  1. Revealing a steroid receptor ligand as a unique PPAR[gamma] agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shengchen; Han, Ying; Shi, Yuzhe; Rong, Hui; Zheng, Songyang; Jin, Shikan; Lin, Shu-Yong; Lin, Sheng-Cai; Li, Yong

    2012-06-28

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) regulates metabolic homeostasis and is a molecular target for anti-diabetic drugs. We report here the identification of a steroid receptor ligand, RU-486, as an unexpected PPAR{gamma} agonist, thereby uncovering a novel signaling route for this steroid drug. Similar to rosiglitazone, RU-486 modulates the expression of key PPAR{gamma} target genes and promotes adipocyte differentiation, but with a lower adipogenic activity. Structural and functional studies of receptor-ligand interactions reveal the molecular basis for a unique binding mode for RU-486 in the PPAR{gamma} ligand-binding pocket with distinctive properties and epitopes, providing the molecular mechanisms for the discrimination of RU-486 from thiazolidinediones (TZDs) drugs. Our findings together indicate that steroid compounds may represent an alternative approach for designing non-TZD PPAR{gamma} ligands in the treatment of insulin resistance.

  2. Kaempferol is an estrogen-related receptor alpha and gamma inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjian; Fang, Fang; Huang, Zhiyan; Wang, Yanfei; Wong, Chiwai

    2009-02-18

    Kaempferol is a dietary flavonoid that is thought to function as a selective estrogen receptor modulator. In this study, we established that kaempferol also functions as an inverse agonist for estrogen-related receptors alpha and gamma (ERRalpha and ERRgamma). We demonstrated that kaempferol binds to ERRalpha and ERRgamma and blocks their interaction with coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha). Kaempferol also suppressed the expressions of ERR-target genes pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 and 4 (PDK2 and PDK4). This evidence suggests that kaempferol may exert some of its biological effect through both estrogen receptors and estrogen-related receptors. PMID:19171140

  3. Dopamine D3 Receptors Inhibit Hippocampal Gamma Oscillations by Disturbing CA3 Pyramidal Cell Firing Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Lemercier, Clément E.; Schulz, Steffen B.; Heidmann, Karin E.; Kovács, Richard; Gerevich, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Cortical gamma oscillations are associated with cognitive processes and are altered in several neuropsychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. Since dopamine D3 receptors are possible targets in treatment of these conditions, it is of great importance to understand their role in modulation of gamma oscillations. The effect of D3 receptors on gamma oscillations and the underlying cellular mechanisms were investigated by extracellular local field potential and simultaneous intracellular sharp micro-electrode recordings in the CA3 region of the hippocampus in vitro. D3 receptors decreased the power and broadened the bandwidth of gamma oscillations induced by acetylcholine or kainate. Blockade of the D3 receptors resulted in faster synchronization of the oscillations, suggesting that endogenous dopamine in the hippocampus slows down the dynamics of gamma oscillations by activation of D3 receptors. Investigating the underlying cellular mechanisms for these effects showed that D3 receptor activation decreased the rate of action potentials (APs) during gamma oscillations and reduced the precision of the AP phase coupling to the gamma cycle in CA3 pyramidal cells. The results may offer an explanation how selective activation of D3 receptors may impair cognition and how, in converse, D3 antagonists may exert pro-cognitive and antipsychotic effects. PMID:26779018

  4. IP receptor-dependent activation of PPAR{gamma} by stable prostacyclin analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Falcetti, Emilia; Flavell, David M.; Staels, Bart; Tinker, Andrew; Haworth, Sheila G.; Clapp, Lucie H. . E-mail: l.clapp@ucl.ac.uk

    2007-09-07

    Stable prostacyclin analogues can signal through cell surface IP receptors or by ligand binding to nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). So far these agents have been reported to activate PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{delta} but not PPAR{gamma}. Given PPAR{gamma} agonists and prostacyclin analogues both inhibit cell proliferation, we postulated that the IP receptor might elicit PPAR{gamma} activation. Using a dual luciferase reporter gene assay in HEK-293 cells stably expressing the IP receptor or empty vector, we found that prostacyclin analogues only activated PPAR{gamma} in the presence of the IP receptor. Moreover, the novel IP receptor antagonist, RO1138452, but not inhibitors of the cyclic AMP pathway, prevented activation. Likewise, the anti-proliferative effects of treprostinil observed in IP receptor expressing cells, were partially inhibited by the PPAR{gamma} antagonist, GW9662. We conclude that PPAR{gamma} is activated through the IP receptor via a cyclic AMP-independent mechanism and contributes to the anti-growth effects of prostacyclin analogues.

  5. Interactions of methoxyacetic acid with androgen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Gargi; Hurst, Christopher H.; Waxman, David J.

    2009-07-15

    Endocrine disruptive compounds (EDC) alter hormone-stimulated, nuclear receptor-dependent physiological and developmental processes by a variety of mechanisms. One recently identified mode of endocrine disruption is through hormone sensitization, where the EDC modulates intracellular signaling pathways that control nuclear receptor function, thereby regulating receptor transcriptional activity indirectly. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA), the primary, active metabolite of the industrial solvent ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and a testicular toxicant, belongs to this EDC class. Modulation of nuclear receptor activity by MAA could contribute to the testicular toxicity associated with MAA exposure. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of MAA on the transcriptional activity of several nuclear receptors including the androgen receptor (AR), which plays a pivotal role in the development and maturation of spermatocytes. AR transcriptional activity is shown to be increased by MAA through a tyrosine kinase signaling pathway that involves PI3-kinase. In a combinatorial setting with AR antagonists, MAA potentiated the AR response without significantly altering the EC{sub 50} for androgen responsiveness, partially alleviating the antagonistic effect of the anti-androgens. Finally, MAA treatment of TM3 mouse testicular Leydig cells markedly increased the expression of Cyp17a1 and Shbg while suppressing Igfbp3 expression by {approx} 90%. Deregulation of these genes may alter androgen synthesis and action in a manner that contributes to MAA-induced testicular toxicity.

  6. Formation of biologically relevant carboxylic acids during the gamma irradiation of acetic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1976-01-01

    Irradiation of aqueous solutions of acetic acid with gamma rays produced several carboxylic acids in small yield. Their identification was based on the technique of gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry. Some of these acids are Krebs Cycle intermediates. Their simultaneous formation in experiments simulating the primitive conditions on the earth suggests that metabolic pathways may have had their origin in prebiotic chemical processes.

  7. Structural analysis of the human interferon gamma receptor: a small segment of the intracellular domain is specifically required for class I major histocompatibility complex antigen induction and antiviral activity.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J R; Jung, V; Schwartz, B; Wang, P; Pestka, S

    1992-01-01

    Mutations of the human interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) receptor intracellular domain have permitted us to define a restricted region of that domain as necessary for both induction of class I major histocompatibility complex antigen by IFN-gamma and protection against encephalomyocarditis virus. This region consists of five amino acids (YDKPH), all of which are conserved in the human and murine receptors. Tyr-457 and His-461 are essential for activity. Approximately 80% of the amino acids of the intracellular domain of the receptor is not required for major histocompatibility complex class I antigen induction or for antiviral protection against encephalomyocarditis virus. The observation that there was no protection by IFN-gamma against vesiculostomatitis virus indicates that other factors, in addition to chromosome 21 accessory factor(s), are required to generate the full complement of transduction signals from the human IFN-gamma receptor. Images PMID:1454813

  8. Rearrangement of variable region T cell receptor gamma genes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. V gamma gene usage differs in mature and immature T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hara, J; Benedict, S H; Yumura, K; Ha-Kawa, K; Gelfand, E W

    1989-01-01

    Using probes recognizing variable regions (V gamma) and joining regions (J gamma) of the T cell receptor (TCR) gamma gene, we have analyzed the usage of V gamma genes in 24 patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 36 patients with B-precursor ALL. In CD3- T-ALL derived from immature T cells, V gamma genes more proximal to J gamma were frequently rearranged; V gamma 8, V gamma 9, V gamma 10, and V gamma 11 were used in 19 of 24 rearrangements. In contrast, CD3+ T-ALL derived from a more mature stage of T cell ontogeny, showed a high frequency of rearrangements involving V gamma genes distal to J gamma; V gamma 2, V gamma 3, V gamma 4, and V gamma 5 were used in 17 of 25 rearrangements. In B-precursor ALL, no notable bias of V gamma gene usage was observed. This probably reflects the possibility that TCR genes may not rearrange according to a T cell hierarchy when under control of a B cell gene program. Furthermore, deletions of those V gamma genes located 3' to rearranged V gamma genes were observed in all patients analyzed. This supports the theory that loop deletion is a major mechanism for TCR-gamma gene rearrangement. Images PMID:2522937

  9. Gamma-aminobutyric acid circuits shape response properties of auditory cortex neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; McFadden, Sandra L; Caspary, Donald; Salvi, Richard

    2002-07-19

    Neurons containing gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) are widely distributed throughout the primary auditory cortex (AI). We investigated the effects of endogenous GABA by comparing response properties of 110 neurons in chinchilla AI before and after iontophoresis of bicuculline, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, and/or CGP35348, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist. GABA(A) receptor blockade significantly increased spontaneous and driven discharge rates, dramatically decreased the thresholds of many neurons, and constricted the range of thresholds across the neural population. Some neurons with 'non-onset' temporal discharge patterns developed an onset pattern that was followed by a long pause. Interestingly, the excitatory response area typically expanded on both sides of the characteristic frequency; this expansion exceeded one octave in a third of the sample. Although GABA(B) receptor blockade had little effect alone, the combination of CGP35348 and bicuculline produced greater increases in driven rate and expansion of the frequency response area than GABA(A) receptor blockade alone, suggesting a modulatory role of local GABA(B) receptors. The results suggest that local GABA inhibition contributes significantly to intensity and frequency coding by controlling the range of intensities over which cortical neurons operate and the range of frequencies to which they respond. The inhibitory circuits that generate nonmonotonic rate-level functions are separate from those that influence other response properties of AI neurons. PMID:12106684

  10. Effect of the feeding system on the fatty acid composition, expression of the Δ9-desaturase, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha, Gamma, and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 genes in the semitendinous muscle of light lambs of the Rasa Aragonesa breed

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) are receiving increasing attention because of their beneficial effects on human health, with milk and meat products derived from ruminants as important sources of CLA in the human diet. SCD gene is responsible for some of the variation in CLA concentration in adipose tissues, and PPARγ, PPARα and SREBP1 genes are regulator of SCD gene. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the feeding system on fatty acid composition, CLA content and relative gene expression of Δ9-desaturase (SCD), Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARγ), Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha, (PPARα) and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein (SREBP1) in Rasa Aragonesa light lambs in semitendinous muscle. Forty-four single-born male lambs were used to evaluate the effect of the feeding system, varying on an intensity gradient according to the use of concentrates: 1. grazing alfalfa, 2. grazing alfalfa with a supplement for lambs, 3. indoor lambs with grazing ewes and 4. drylot. Results Both grazing systems resulted in a higher concentration of vaccenic acid (VA), CLA, CLA/VA acid ratio, and a lower oleic content, oleic acid (C18:1)/stearic acid (C18:0) ratio, PUFA n-6/n-3 ratio and SCD expression compared to other diets. In addition feeding system affected the fatty acid composition and SCD expression, possibly due to CLA concentration or the PUFA n-6/n-3 ratio. Both expression of the SCD gene and the feeding system were important factors affecting CLA concentration in the animal's semitendinous muscle. PPARγ, PPARα and SREBP1 expression seemed to be unaffected by the feeding system. Although no significant results were found, PPARγ, PPARα and SREBP1 showed similar expression pattern as SCD. Moreover, the correlation results between SCD expression and PPARγ (p < 0.01), as well as SREBP1 (p < 0.01) expression, may suggest that these genes were affecting SCD expression in a different way. Conclusions

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma overexpression suppresses proliferation of human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Haniu, Hisao

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined the correlation between PPAR{gamma} expression and cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} overexpression reduces cell viability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show the synergistic effect of cell growth inhibition by a PPAR{gamma} agonist. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) plays an important role in the differentiation of intestinal cells and tissues. Our previous reports indicate that PPAR{gamma} is expressed at considerable levels in human colon cancer cells. This suggests that PPAR{gamma} expression may be an important factor for cell growth regulation in colon cancer. In this study, we investigated PPAR{gamma} expression in 4 human colon cancer cell lines, HT-29, LOVO, DLD-1, and Caco-2. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot analysis revealed that the relative levels of PPAR{gamma} mRNA and protein in these cells were in the order HT-29 > LOVO > Caco-2 > DLD-1. We also found that PPAR{gamma} overexpression promoted cell growth inhibition in PPAR{gamma} lower-expressing cell lines (Caco-2 and DLD-1), but not in higher-expressing cells (HT-29 and LOVO). We observed a correlation between the level of PPAR{gamma} expression and the cells' sensitivity for proliferation.

  12. New insights into {gamma}-aminobutyric acid catabolism: Evidence for {gamma}-hydroxybutyric acid and polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bach, Benoît; Meudec, Emmanuelle; Lepoutre, Jean-Paul; Rossignol, Tristan; Blondin, Bruno; Dequin, Sylvie; Camarasa, Carole

    2009-07-01

    The gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) shunt, an alternative route for the conversion of alpha-ketoglutarate to succinate, involves the glutamate decarboxylase Gad1p, the GABA transaminase Uga1p and the succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase Uga2p. This pathway has been extensively described in plants and animals, but its function in yeast remains unclear. We show that the flux through Gad1p is insignificant during fermentation in rich sugar-containing medium, excluding a role for this pathway in redox homeostasis under anaerobic conditions or sugar stress. However, we found that up to 4 g of exogenous GABA/liter was efficiently consumed by yeast. We studied the fate of this consumed GABA. Most was converted into succinate, with a reaction yield of 0.7 mol/mol. We also showed that a large proportion of GABA was stored within cells, indicating a possible role for this molecule in stress tolerance mechanisms or nitrogen storage. Furthermore, based on enzymatic and metabolic evidence, we identified an alternative route for GABA catabolism, involving the reduction of succinate-semialdehyde into gamma-hydroxybutyric acid and the polymerization of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid to form poly-(3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-4-hydroxybutyric acid). This study provides the first demonstration of a native route for the formation of this polymer in yeast. Our findings shed new light on the GABA pathway and open up new opportunities for industrial applications.

  13. Aromatic L-amino acids activate the calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Conigrave, Arthur D; Mun, Hee-Chang; Lok, Hiu-Chuen

    2007-06-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is recognized as a member of class 3 of the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. Members of this subgroup, which have large N-terminal extracellular domains, include receptors that respond specifically to the amino acid glutamate; receptors that respond to the glutamate analogue, gamma-amino butyric acid; and several receptors that act as broad-spectrum amino acid sensors. The CaR is one of these broad-spectrum amino acid sensors that, along with several other members of the subgroup, also responds to extracellular Ca2+. In this mini-review, we consider evidence that the CaR is a sensor of aromatic amino acids, that it has broad-spectrum amino acid sensing properties, that it provides an amino acid binding site in its extracellular N-terminal Venus Fly Trap domain, and that amino acids have a physiological impact on systems in which the CaR is expressed.

  14. Intoxications due to ingestion of gamma-butyrolactone: organ distribution of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid and gamma-butyrolactone.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Daniel; Rothschild, Markus A; Kröner, Lars

    2008-12-01

    In Europe, the misuse of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and its analogues has increased within the recent years. Here, 2 fatalities and 1 nonfatal intoxication resulting from ingestion of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL), a precursor of GHB, are presented. GHB was quantified involving the conversion to GBL by application of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method. Besides quantitation of GHB equivalents ("total GBL"), all specimens of case 1 were analyzed for the metabolic precursor GBL itself (absolute GBL). The cause of death in each case was attributed to GHB intoxication; the manner of death was suicide in the first case and accidental in the second one. Another yet nonfatal GHB intoxication was reported by an emergency department concerning a 36-year-old woman who was hospitalized due to her comatose state and loss of adverse effects reflexes. Here nail polish remover pads were used as source for GBL. PMID:18824955

  15. Localization of Fc gamma receptors and complement receptors CR1 on human peripheral nerve fibres by immunoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vedeler, C A; Nilsen, R; Matre, R

    1989-06-01

    The localization of receptors for the Fc part of IgG (Fc gamma R) and for the complement C3b/C4b components (CR1) on human peripheral nerve fibres was investigated by indirect immunoperoxidase staining of frozen nerve sections with monoclonal antibodies. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that Fc gamma R and CR1 are localized to the entire surface membrane and inner membrane (axolemma) of the Schwann cell. Myelin and axons were not stained. The presence of Fc gamma R and CR1 in human Schwann cells adds further evidence for the immunocompetence of these cells.

  16. Adiponectin, a downstream target gene of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, controls hepatitis B virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sarah; Jung, Jaesung; Kim, Taeyeung; Park, Sun; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin

    2011-01-20

    In this study, HepG2-hepatitis B virus (HBV)-stable cells that did not overexpress HBx and HBx-deficient mutant-transfected cells were analyzed for their expression of HBV-induced, upregulated adipogenic and lipogenic genes. The mRNAs of CCAAT enhancer binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), adiponectin, liver X receptor {alpha} (LXR{alpha}), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were expressed at higher levels in HepG2-HBV and lamivudine-treated stable cells and HBx-deficient mutant-transfected cells than in the HepG2 cells. Lamivudine treatment reduced the mRNA levels of PPAR{gamma} and C/EBP{alpha}. Conversely, HBV replication was upregulated by adiponectin and PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone treatments and was downregulated by adiponectin siRNAs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that HBV replication and/or protein expression, even in the absence of HBx, upregulated adipogenic or lipogenic genes, and that the control of adiponectin might prove useful as a therapeutic modality for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B.

  17. T cell receptor gamma and delta rearrangements in hematologic malignancies. Relationship to lymphoid differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Griesinger, F; Greenberg, J M; Kersey, J H

    1989-01-01

    We have studied recombinatorial events of the T cell receptor delta and gamma chain genes in hematopoietic malignancies and related these to normal stages of lymphoid differentiation. T cell receptor delta gene recombinatorial events were found in 91% of acute T cell lymphoblastic leukemia, 68% of non-T, non-B lymphoid precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 80% of mixed lineage acute leukemias. Mature B-lineage leukemias and acute nonlymphocytic leukemias retained the T-cell receptor delta gene in the germline configuration. The incidence of T cell receptor gamma and delta was particularly high in CD10+CD19+ non-T, non-B lymphoid precursor ALL. In lymphoid precursor ALL, T cell receptor delta was frequently rearranged while T cell receptor gamma was in the germline configuration. This suggests that TCR delta rearrangements may precede TCR gamma rearrangements in lymphoid ontogeny. In T-ALL, only concordant T cell receptor delta and gamma rearrangements were observed. Several distinct rearrangements were defined using a panel of restriction enzymes. Most of the rearrangements observed in T-ALL represented joining events of J delta 1 to upstream regions. In contrast, the majority of rearrangements in lymphoid precursor ALL most likely represented D-D or V-D rearrangements, which have been found to be early recombinatorial events of the TCR delta locus. We next analyzed TCR delta rearrangements in five CD3+TCR gamma/delta+ ALL and cell lines. One T-ALL, which demonstrated a different staining pattern with monoclonal antibodies against the products of the TCR gamma/delta genes than the PEER cell line, rearranges J delta 1 to a currently unidentified variable region. Images PMID:2547833

  18. The study of gamma irradiation effects on poly (glycolic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao Nakka, Rajeswara; Rao Thumu, Venkatappa; Reddy SVS, Ramana; Rao Buddhiraju, Sanjeeva

    2015-05-01

    We have investigated the effects of gamma irradiation on chemical structure, thermal and morphological properties of biodegradable semi-crystalline poly (glycolic acid) (PGA). PGA samples were subjected to irradiation treatment using a 60Co gamma source with a delivered dose of 30, 60 and 90 kGy, respectively. Gamma irradiation induces cleavage of PGA main chains forming ∼OĊH2 and ĊH2COO∼ radicals in both amorphous and crystalline regions. The free radicals formed in the amorphous region abstract atmospheric oxygen and convert them to peroxy radicals. The peroxy radical causes chain scission at the crystal interface through hydrogen abstraction from methylene groups forming the ∼ĊHCOO∼ (I) radical. Consequently, the observed electron spin resonance (ESR) doublet of irradiated PGA is assigned to (I). The disappearance of the ESR signal above 190°C indicates that free radicals are formed in the amorphous region and decay below the melting temperature of PGA. Fourier transform infrared and optical absorption studies confirm that the ? groups are not influenced by gamma irradiation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies showed that the melting temperature of PGA decreased from 212°C to 202°C upon irradiation. Degree of crystallinity increased initially and then decreased with an increase in radiation as per DSC and X-ray diffraction studies. Irradiation produced changes in the physical properties of PGA as well as affecting the morphology of the material.

  19. Nutritional Signaling via Free Fatty Acid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Junki; Hasegawa, Sae; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Nakajima, Akira; Kimura, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when demand for energy arises. Dysfunction of energy balance by excess food intake leads to metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFAs) provided by dietary fat are not only important nutrients, but also contribute key physiological functions via FFA receptor (FFAR)-mediated signaling molecules, which depend on FFAs' carbon chain length and the ligand specificity of the receptors. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs are critical for metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and contribute to energy homeostasis. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 and GPR120 improved glucose metabolism and systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the anti-inflammation and energy metabolism effects of short chain FAs have been linked to the activation of GPR41 and GPR43. In this review, we summarize recent progress in research on FFAs and their physiological roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. PMID:27023530

  20. Nutritional Signaling via Free Fatty Acid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Junki; Hasegawa, Sae; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Nakajima, Akira; Kimura, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when demand for energy arises. Dysfunction of energy balance by excess food intake leads to metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFAs) provided by dietary fat are not only important nutrients, but also contribute key physiological functions via FFA receptor (FFAR)-mediated signaling molecules, which depend on FFAs’ carbon chain length and the ligand specificity of the receptors. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs are critical for metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and contribute to energy homeostasis. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 and GPR120 improved glucose metabolism and systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the anti-inflammation and energy metabolism effects of short chain FAs have been linked to the activation of GPR41 and GPR43. In this review, we summarize recent progress in research on FFAs and their physiological roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. PMID:27023530

  1. Protons inhibit Cl- conductance by direct or allosteric interaction with the GABA-binding site in the rat recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2L and alpha1beta2 GABAA receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-De; Rahman, Mozibur; Zhu, Di

    2005-12-28

    Functional roles of external pH on the Cl- conductance were examined on Xenopus oocytes expressing rat recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2L and alpha1beta2 GABAA receptors. Acidic pH inhibited GABA-response in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner, significantly increasing the EC50 without appreciably changing the slope or maximal currents induced by GABA in the alpha1beta2gamma2L and alpha1beta2 receptors. In contrast, protonation did not influence the pentobarbital-gated currents in the alpha1beta2gamma2L receptors, suggesting that protons do not modulate channel activity by directly affecting the channel gating process. Protons competitively inhibited the bicuculline-induced antagonism on GABA in the alpha1beta2gamma2L receptors. The data support the hypothesis that protons inhibit GABAA receptor function by direct or allosteric interaction with the GABA-binding site.

  2. Casein kinase 1 gamma couples Wnt receptor activation to cytoplasmic signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Gary; Wu, Wei; Shen, Jinlong; Bilic, Josipa; Fenger, Ursula; Stannek, Peter; Glinka, Andrei; Niehrs, Christof

    2005-12-01

    Signalling by Wnt proteins (Wingless in Drosophila) has diverse roles during embryonic development and in adults, and is implicated in human diseases, including cancer. LDL-receptor-related proteins 5 and 6 (LRP5 and LRP6; Arrow in Drosophila) are key receptors required for transmission of Wnt/beta-catenin signalling in metazoa. Although the role of these receptors in Wnt signalling is well established, their coupling with the cytoplasmic signalling apparatus remains poorly defined. Using a protein modification screen for regulators of LRP6, we describe the identification of Xenopus Casein kinase 1 gamma (CK1gamma), a membrane-bound member of the CK1 family. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments show that CK1gamma is both necessary and sufficient to transduce LRP6 signalling in vertebrates and Drosophila cells. In Xenopus embryos, CK1gamma is required during anterio-posterior patterning to promote posteriorizing Wnt/beta-catenin signalling. CK1gamma is associated with LRP6, which has multiple, modular CK1 phosphorylation sites. Wnt treatment induces the rapid CK1gamma-mediated phosphorylation of these sites within LRP6, which, in turn, promotes the recruitment of the scaffold protein Axin. Our results reveal an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that couples Wnt receptor activation to the cytoplasmic signal transduction apparatus. PMID:16341016

  3. Eskimo plasma constituents, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid inhibit the release of atherogenic mitogens.

    PubMed

    Smith, D L; Willis, A L; Nguyen, N; Conner, D; Zahedi, S; Fulks, J

    1989-01-01

    Studies in man and laboratory animals suggest that omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid constituents of fish oils have antiatherosclerotic properties. We have studied the effects of several such polyunsaturated fatty acids for ability to modify the in vitro release of mitogens from human platelets. Such mitogens may produce the fibro-proliferative component of atherosclerotic plaques. Both 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 omega 3) and 4,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 omega 3), major constituents of fish oils, inhibited adenosine diphosphate-induced aggregation of platelets and the accompanying release of mitogens. These effects are dose dependent. Linolenic acid (18:3 omega 3), the biosynthetic precursor of eicosapentaenoic acid, also inhibited platelet aggregation and mitogen release. Eicosapentaenoic acid also inhibited mitogen release from human monocyte-derived macrophages, which, in vivo, are an additional source of mitogens during atherogenesis. Potent inhibition of human platelet aggregation and mitogen release was also seen with dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid 20:3 omega 6), whose levels are reportedly elevated in Eskimos subsisting on marine diets. We conclude that diets that elevate plasma and/or tissue levels of eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid precursor gamma-linolenic acid (18:3 omega 6) may exert antiatherosclerotic effects by inhibiting the release of mitogens from platelets and other cells.

  4. Molecular characterization of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C S; Muthukumaran, G; Frost, L J; Noe, M; Ahn, Y H; Mariano, T M; Pestka, S

    1989-10-25

    Interferon gamma receptors (IFN-gamma R) exhibit remarkable species specificity. In order to understand the basis for this phenomenon, we have isolated a recombinant cDNA clone corresponding to the mouse (Mu) IFN-gamma R. Microinjection of the mRNA synthesized in vitro corresponding to the cloned cDNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes resulted in the synthesis of a protein that specifically binds Mu-IFN-gamma. Analysis of murine genomic and RNA blots with the cDNA probe indicates the presence of a single gene and a single mRNA species of about 2300 bases. Sequence analysis of the cDNA encoding the Mu-IFN-gamma R and comparison with the corresponding human IFN-gamma R sequence shows about 68% conservation of the extracellular domains and 51% conservation of the cytoplasmic domains at the nucleotide level. The results indicate that, as expected, the sequence of the receptor confers species specificity for the binding of IFN-gamma to the cell surface receptor. Moreover, it was previously shown that a human factor is required in addition to the receptor for the human IFN-gamma to function in hamster or mouse cells (Jung, V., Rashidbaigi, A., Jones, C., Tischfield, J.A., Shows, T.B., and Pestka, S. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84, 4151-4155). These results suggest an explanation for the second species-specific event required for function of the human receptor in mouse or hamster cells in that the intracellular domains are significantly different and thus cannot interact with the corresponding heterologous factor. PMID:2530216

  5. Molecular characterization of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C S; Muthukumaran, G; Frost, L J; Noe, M; Ahn, Y H; Mariano, T M; Pestka, S

    1989-10-25

    Interferon gamma receptors (IFN-gamma R) exhibit remarkable species specificity. In order to understand the basis for this phenomenon, we have isolated a recombinant cDNA clone corresponding to the mouse (Mu) IFN-gamma R. Microinjection of the mRNA synthesized in vitro corresponding to the cloned cDNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes resulted in the synthesis of a protein that specifically binds Mu-IFN-gamma. Analysis of murine genomic and RNA blots with the cDNA probe indicates the presence of a single gene and a single mRNA species of about 2300 bases. Sequence analysis of the cDNA encoding the Mu-IFN-gamma R and comparison with the corresponding human IFN-gamma R sequence shows about 68% conservation of the extracellular domains and 51% conservation of the cytoplasmic domains at the nucleotide level. The results indicate that, as expected, the sequence of the receptor confers species specificity for the binding of IFN-gamma to the cell surface receptor. Moreover, it was previously shown that a human factor is required in addition to the receptor for the human IFN-gamma to function in hamster or mouse cells (Jung, V., Rashidbaigi, A., Jones, C., Tischfield, J.A., Shows, T.B., and Pestka, S. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84, 4151-4155). These results suggest an explanation for the second species-specific event required for function of the human receptor in mouse or hamster cells in that the intracellular domains are significantly different and thus cannot interact with the corresponding heterologous factor.

  6. [Thiazolidinediones in type 2 diabetes. Role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma)].

    PubMed

    Dubois, M; Vantyghem, M-C; Schoonjans, K; Pattou, F

    2002-12-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) form a new class of oral antidiabetic agents. They improve insulin sensitivity and reduce glycemia, lipidemia and insulinemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Their mechanism is original, since they activate the nuclear receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPARgamma), altering the expression of genes involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Stimulating PPARgamma improves insulin sensitivity via several mechanisms: 1) it raises the expression of GLUT4 glucose transporter; 2) it regulates release of adipocyte-derived signaling factors that affect insulin sensitivity in muscle, and 3) it contributes to a turn-over in adipose tissue, inducing the production of smaller, more insulin sensitive adipocytes. TZDs also affect free fatty acids (FFA) lipotoxicity on islets, improving pancreatic B-cell function. In addition, triglycerides and FFA levels are lowered by TZDs. Two TZDs, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, have recently obtained the European commercial licence, but their use is restricted to the association with metformin or sulfonylureas. At the moment, they are indicated in type 2 diabetes but could be of interest in a broader array of diseases related to insulin resistance. As for side effects, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone may cause increased plasma volume, edema and dose-related weight gain. TZDs offer an attractive option in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, though it may be too soon to determine if they prevent vascular complications, as do other oral antidiabetic agents. An important issue for the future will be to assess the influence of weight gain in the long time. PMID:12527853

  7. The orphan nuclear receptor DAX-1 acts as a novel transcriptional corepressor of PPAR{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Gwang Sik; Lee, Gha Young; Nedumaran, Balachandar; Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, Kyung Tae; Park, Sang Chul; Lee, Young Chul; Kim, Jae Bum Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2008-05-30

    DAX-1 is an atypical nuclear receptor (NR) which functions primarily as a transcriptional corepressor of other NRs via heterodimerization. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {gamma} is a ligand-dependent NR which performs a key function in adipogenesis. In this study, we evaluated a novel cross-talk mechanism between DAX-1 and PPAR{gamma}. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that DAX-1 inhibits the transactivity of PPAR{gamma} in a dose-dependent manner. DAX-1 directly competed with the PPAR{gamma} coactivator (PGC)-1{alpha} for binding to PPAR{gamma}. Endogenous levels of DAX-1 were significantly lower in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes as compared to preadipocytes. Using a retroviral expression system, we demonstrated that DAX-1 overexpression downregulates the expression of PPAR{gamma} target genes, resulting in an attenuation of adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. Our results suggest that DAX-1 acts as a corepressor of PPAR{gamma} and performs a potential function in the regulation of PPAR{gamma}-mediated cellular differentiation.

  8. An alternative Fc gamma-receptor ligand: potential role in T-cell development.

    PubMed Central

    Sandor, M; Galon, J; Takacs, L; Tatsumi, Y; Mueller, A L; Sautes, C; Lynch, R G

    1994-01-01

    Fetal pre-T cells express low-affinity receptors for IgG (Fc gamma R) at a developmental stage prior to the rearrangement and expression of immunoglobulin genes. The present studies investigated the possible functional significance of Fc gamma R on fetal pre-T cells. Between 13 and 17 days of fetal development a subpopulation of T-cell receptor-, Thy-1+ thymocytes express for gamma R. The same cells contain mRNA for several forms of Fc gamma R (Fc gamma RII beta 1, beta 2, and Fc gamma RIII). Concurrently, a Pgp-1-, Thy-1-, surface-immunoglobulin- fetal thymic cell binds recombinant soluble Fc gamma R. In principle this cell can interact with the pre-T cells through this counter-receptor. To test this possibility anti-Fc gamma RII/III antibody (2.4G2) was injected into pregnant mice and then into their offspring for 6 wk postpartum. The injected antibody induced a slight increase in the proportion of CD4 or CD8 single-positive, alpha/beta T cells in the thymus. However, in fetal thymic cultures in the presence of 2.4G2 or the recombinant soluble Fc gamma R there was an accelerated differentiation of thymocytes to single-positive, CD3-bright, heat-stable antigen-dull, alpha/beta T cells. These experiments show that Fc gamma Rs are present on pre-T cells during early fetal thymic development, and that a non-IgG ligand of the Fc gamma R is expressed concurrently on Thy- fetal thymocytes. Furthermore, the presumed interaction of Fc gamma R and the alternative ligand(s) influences T-cell development. IgG binding could be an adapted function of Fc gamma Rs, and, as shown for many members of the Ig super family, these receptors may have originally served as cell-cell recognition/interaction molecules required for hematopoietic development. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7809135

  9. Expression of retinoic acid receptors in human endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Kojiro; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Tamura, Mitsutoshi; Niikura, Hitoshi; Takano, Tadao; Yoshinaga, Kohsuke; Nagase, Satoru; Suzuki, Takashi; Ito, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyo; Hayashi, Shin-ichi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2008-02-01

    The retinoids (vitamin A and its biologically active derivatives) are essential for the health and survival of the individual. Several studies have reported a strong rationale for the use of retinoids in cancer treatment and chemoprevention. It has been discovered that expression of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) beta is frequently silenced in epithelial carcinogenesis, which has led to the hypothesis that RAR beta could act as a tumor suppressor. However, the status of RAR beta in human endometrial carcinoma has not been examined. In the present study, we initially studied the effects of retinoic acid on cell proliferation and the expression of RAR alpha, RAR beta, and RAR gamma using AM580 (a RAR-specific agonist) in the Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell line. We also examined the expression of RAR in human eutopic endometrium (30 cases), endometrial hyperplasia (28 cases), and endometrial carcinoma (103 cases) using immunohistochemistry. Finally, we correlated these findings with the clinicopathological parameters. In vitro, cell growth was inhibited and RAR beta and RAR gamma mRNA was significantly induced by AM580, compared with vehicle controls, whereas RAR alpha mRNA was significantly attenuated by AM580, compared with vehicle. RAR beta was detected predominantly in endometrial hyperplasia, compared with endometrial carcinoma. No statistically significant correlation was obtained between the expression of any other RAR subtypes and clinicopathological parameters in human endometrial carcinoma. The results of our study demonstrate that AM580 inhibits cell growth and induces RAR beta mRNA expression in the Ishikawa cell line, and the expression level of RAR beta in endometrial carcinoma is significantly lower than that in endometrial hyperplasia. AM580 might therefore be considered as a potential treatment for endometrial carcinoma.

  10. Homology modeling of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABA receptor channels and Surflex-docking of fipronil.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jin; Ju, Xiu-Lian; Chen, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Gen-Yan

    2009-09-01

    To further explore the mechanism of selective binding of the representative gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABARs) noncompetitive antagonist (NCA) fipronil to insect over mammalian GABARs, three-dimensional models of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABAR were generated by homology modeling, using the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) of Torpedo marmorata as a template. Fipronil was docked into the putative binding site of the human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 receptors by Surflex-docking, and the calculated docking energies are in agreement with experimental results. The GABA receptor antagonist fipronil exhibited higher potency with house fly beta 3 GABAR than with human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 GABAR. Furthermore, analyses of Surflex-docking suggest that the H-bond interaction of fipronil with Ala2 and Thr6 in the second transmembrane segment (TM2) of these GABARs plays a relatively important role in ligand selective binding. The different subunit assemblies of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABARs may result in differential selectivity for fipronil.

  11. Enhancement of arachidonic acid signaling pathway by nicotinic acid receptor HM74A

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuting . E-mail: ytang@prdus.jnj.com; Zhou, Lubing; Gunnet, Joseph W.; Wines, Pamela G.; Cryan, Ellen V.; Demarest, Keith T.

    2006-06-23

    HM74A is a G protein-coupled receptor for nicotinic acid (niacin), which has been used clinically to treat dyslipidemia for decades. The molecular mechanisms whereby niacin exerts its pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In addition, the most common side effect in niacin therapy is skin flushing that is caused by prostaglandin release, suggesting that the phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2})/arachidonic acid (AA) pathway is involved. Various eicosanoids have been shown to activate peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) that play a diverse array of roles in lipid metabolism. To further elucidate the potential roles of HM74A in mediating the therapeutic effects and/or side effects of niacin, we sought to explore the signaling events upon HM74A activation. Here we demonstrated that HM74A synergistically enhanced UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner in A431 cells. Activation of HM74A also led to Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization and enhanced bradykinin-promoted Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization through Gi protein. While HM74A increased ERK1/2 activation by the bradykinin receptor, it had no effects on UTP-promoted ERK1/2 activation.Furthermore, UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release was significantly decreased in the presence of both MAPK kinase inhibitor PD 098059 and PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. However, the synergistic effects of HM74A were not dramatically affected by co-treatment with both inhibitors, indicating the cross-talk occurred at the receptor level. Finally, stimulation of A431 cells transiently transfected with PPRE-luciferase with AA significantly induced luciferase activity, mimicking the effects of PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that alteration of AA signaling pathway can regulate gene expression via endogenous PPARs.

  12. Novel regulation of p38gamma by dopamine D2 receptors during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Conrad, P W; Millhorn, D E; Beitner-Johnson, D

    2000-07-01

    The p38 signalling pathway is part of the MAPK superfamily and is activated by various stressors. Our previous results have shown that two p38 isoforms, p38alpha and p38gamma, are activated by hypoxia in the neural-like PC12 cell line. PC12 cells also synthesize and secrete catecholamines, including dopamine, in response to hypoxia. We have now used this system to study the interaction between D2-dopamine receptor signalling and the p38 stress-activated protein kinases. Our results show that two D2 receptor antagonists, butaclamol and sulpiride, enhance hypoxia-induced phosphorylation of p38gamma, but not p38. This effect persists in protein kinase A (PKA)-deficient PC12 cells, demonstrating that p38gamma modulation by the D2 receptor is independent of the cAMP/PKA signalling system. We further show that removal of extracellular calcium blocks the hypoxia-induced increase in p38gamma activity. These results are the first to demonstrate that p38gamma can be regulated by the D2 receptor and calcium following hypoxic exposure. PMID:10989281

  13. Separation of gamma-aminobutyric acid from fermented broth.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Qiu, Ting; Chen, Yan; Cao, Yusheng

    2011-12-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-proteinaceous amino acid that is widely distributed in nature and acts as the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. This study aimed to find a separation method for getting high-purity GABA from a fermented broth. Firstly, a fermented broth with a high content of GABA (reaching 997 ± 51 mM) was prepared by fermentation with Lactobacillus brevis NCL912. GABA purification was conducted by successive centrifugation, filtration, decoloration, desalination, ion-exchange chromatography (IEC), and crystallization. Inorganic salt (Na₂SO₄) was removed from the both by desalination with 70% ethanol solution. A ninhydrin test strip was designed for the real-time detection of GABA during IEC. The recovery rate for the whole purification process was about 50%. The purified product was characterized by thin-layer chromatography and HPLC, and its purity reached 98.66 ± 2.36%.

  14. T cell receptor gamma/delta+ lymphocyte subsets during HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Autran, B; Triebel, F; Katlama, C; Rozenbaum, W; Hercend, T; Debre, P

    1989-01-01

    The gamma/delta T cell receptor is expressed on 1-15% of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). This subpopulation is recognized by anti-TcR-delta 1 MoAb which is functionally defined as a pan-delta MoAb. Two other antibodies, anti-Ti-gamma A and anti-delta-TcS1 are directed at variable determinants of either the gamma or the delta chain, respectively. In normal individuals anti-Ti-gamma A characterizes two thirds of the TcR-delta 1+ subpopulation whereas anti-delta TcS1 reacts with most of the delta-TcR1+, Ti-gamma A- cells. In the present study, we have used these three MoAbs to characterize the TcR gamma/delta+ peripheral lymphocytes during HIV infection. Fifty patients at three distinct clinical stages (SPC/PGL, ARC, AIDS) of the infection have been studied. The Ti-gamma A+ subset in the whole group accounted for 3.45% of PBL and did not differ from controls; it was also unchanged when the three groups were analysed separately. The Ti-gamma A+ circulating cells were in a resting state as assessed by the absence of surface-expressed activation markers. In contrast, in some patients the proportion of circulating TcR-delta 1+, Ti-gamma A-, delta TcS1+ cells was increased (4.75%) leading to an inversion of the Ti-gamma A/delta-TcS1 ratio. Altogether, those data suggest a conservation of the Ti-gamma A+ subset during HIV infection, contrasting with an increase of the delta-TcS1+, Ti-gamma A- fraction in some cases. PMID:2522839

  15. Pattern of retinoid-induced teratogenic effects: possible relationship with relative selectivity for nuclear retinoid receptors RAR alpha, RAR beta, and RAR gamma.

    PubMed

    Elmazar, M M; Reichert, U; Shroot, B; Nau, H

    1996-03-01

    Retinoic acid, an oxidative metabolite of vitamin A, is involved in the control of many biological processes including embryonic development. Excess as well as deficiency of retinoids were found to be teratogenic. The effects of retinoids in normal as well as abnormal development may be mediated by two members of retinoid receptors, the RAR's and RXR's, which exhibit a specific temporal and spatial expression during development. The significance of the retinoid receptors was investigated here by studying the teratogenic effects of retinoid ligands with relative selectivity for binding and transactivation of the retinoic acid receptors RAR alpha, RAR beta and RAR gamma. Pregnant NMRI mice were administered 5 or 15 mg/kg of CD 336 (Am 580) (alpha-ligand), CD 2019 (beta-ligand), CD 437 (gamma-ligand) or 37.5 mg/kg all-trans-retinoic acid in 25% Cremophor EL on day 8.25 or day 11 of gestation by gastric intubation. External, visceral and skeletal malformations were observed on day 18 of gestation. The order of teratogenic potency was: alpha-ligand > beta-ligand > gamma-ligand. In addition, these retinoids also produced a different spectrum of defects. The alpha-ligand induced the most varied defects including severe ear, mandible, and limb malformations. The beta-ligand induced defects of the urinary system and liver in greater frequency than expected from its relative potency. The gamma-ligand preferentially induced ossification deficiencies and defects of the sternebrae and vertebral body. Our results show that these three retinoids, which were previously demonstrated to exhibit retinoid-like activities in several systems, exert differing teratogenic activities, in regard to both potency and regioselectivity: we hypothesize that the relative selectivity for binding and transactivation of the three retinoic acid receptors could possibly be related to the differences of teratogenic effects observed in this study. The low potency of the gamma-ligand may lead the way to

  16. Incorporation and distribution of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in cultured human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Punnonen, K.; Puustinen, T.; Jansen, C.T.

    1986-02-01

    Human keratinocytes in culture were labelled with /sup 14/C-dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid or /sup 14/C-eicosapentaenoic acid. All three eicosanoid precursor fatty acids were effectively incorporated into the cells. In phospholipids most of the radioactivity was recovered, in neutral lipids a substantial amount, and as free unesterified fatty acids only a minor amount. Most of the radioactivity was found in phosphatidylethanolamine which was also the major phospholipid as measured by phosphorous assay. The incorporation of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid into lipid subfractions was essentially similar. Eicosapentaenoic acid was, however, much less effectively incorporated into phosphatidylinositol + phosphatidylserine and, correspondingly, more effectively into triacylglycerols as compared to the two other precursor fatty acids. Once incorporated, the distribution of all three precursor fatty acids was relatively stable, and only minor amounts of fatty acids were released into the culture medium during short term culture (two days). Our study demonstrates that eicosanoid precursor fatty acids are avidly taken up by human keratinocytes and esterified into membrane lipids. The clinical implication of this finding is that dietary manipulations might be employed to cause changes in the fatty acid composition of keratinocytes.

  17. Gating allosterism at a single class of etomidate sites on alpha1beta2gamma2L GABA A receptors accounts for both direct activation and agonist modulation.

    PubMed

    Rüsch, Dirk; Zhong, Huijun; Forman, Stuart A

    2004-05-14

    At clinical concentrations, the potent intravenous general anesthetic etomidate enhances gamma-aminobutyric acid, type A (GABA(A)) receptor activity elicited with low gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations, whereas much higher etomidate concentrations activate receptors in the absence of GABA. Therefore, GABA(A) receptors may possess two types of etomidate sites: high affinity GABA-modulating sites and low affinity channel-activating sites. However, GABA modulation and direct activation share stereoselectivity for the (R)(+)-etomidate isomer and display parallel dependence on GABA(A) beta subunit isoforms, suggesting that these two actions may be mediated by a single class of etomidate site(s) that exert one or more molecular effects. In this study, we assessed GABA modulation by etomidate using leftward shifts of electrophysiological GABA concentration responses in cells expressing human alpha1beta2gamma2L receptors. Etomidate at up to 100 microm reduced GABA EC(50) values by over 100-fold but without apparent saturation, indicating the absence of high affinity etomidate sites. In experiments using a partial agonist, P4S, etomidate both reduced EC(50) and increased maximal efficacy, demonstrating that etomidate shifts the GABA(A) receptor gating equilibrium toward open states. Results were quantitatively analyzed using equilibrium receptor gating models, wherein a postulated class of equivalent etomidate sites both directly activates receptors and enhances agonist gating. A Monod-Wyman-Changeux co-agonist mechanism with two equivalent etomidate sites that allosterically enhance GABA(A) receptor gating independently of agonist binding most simply accounts for direct activation and agonist modulation. This model also correctly predicts the actions of etomidate on GABA(A) receptors containing a point mutation that increases constitutive gating activity.

  18. Gamma amino butyric acid accumulation in medicinal plants without stress

    PubMed Central

    Anju, P.; Moothedath, Ismail; Rema Shree, Azhimala Bhaskaranpillai

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) is an important ubiquitous four carbon nonprotein amino acid with an amino group attached to gamma carbon instead of beta carbon. It exists in different organisms including bacteria, plants, and animals and plays a crucial role in humans by regulating neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system. It is directly responsible for the regulation of muscle tone and also effective in lowering stress, blood pressure, and hypertension. Aim and Objective: The aim of the study was to develop the fingerprint profile of selected medicinally and economically important plants having central nervous system (CNS) activity and to determine the quantity of GABA in the selected plants grown under natural conditions without any added stress. Materials and Methods: The high-performance thin layer chromatography analysis was performed on precoated silica gel plate 60F–254 plate (20 cm × 10 cm) in the form of bands with width 8 mm using Hamilton syringe (100 μl) using n-butanol, acetic acid, and water in the proportion 5:2:2 as mobile phase in a CAMAG chamber which was previously saturated for 30 min. CAMAG TLC scanner 3 was used for the densitometric scanning at 550 nm. Specific marker compounds were used for the quantification. Results and Conclusion: Among the screened medicinal plants, Zingiber officinale and Solanum torvum were found to have GABA. The percentage of GABA present in Z. officinale and S. torvum were found to be 0.0114% and 0.0119%, respectively. The present work confirmed that among the selected CNS active medicinal plants, only two plants contain GABA. We found a negative correlation with plant having CNS activity and accumulation of GABA. The GABA shunt is a conserved pathway in eukaryotes and prokaryotes but, although the role of GABA as a neurotransmitter in mammals is clearly established, its role in plants is still vague. PMID:25861139

  19. Pharmacology of bile acid receptors: Evolution of bile acids from simple detergents to complex signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Copple, Bryan L; Li, Tiangang

    2016-02-01

    For many years, bile acids were thought to only function as detergents which solubilize fats and facilitate the uptake of fat-soluble vitamins in the intestine. Many early observations; however, demonstrated that bile acids regulate more complex processes, such as bile acids synthesis and immune cell function through activation of signal transduction pathways. These studies were the first to suggest that receptors may exist for bile acids. Ultimately, seminal studies by many investigators led to the discovery of several bile acid-activated receptors including the farnesoid X receptor, the vitamin D receptor, the pregnane X receptor, TGR5, α5 β1 integrin, and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2. Several of these receptors are expressed outside of the gastrointestinal system, indicating that bile acids may have diverse functions throughout the body. Characterization of the functions of these receptors over the last two decades has identified many important roles for these receptors in regulation of bile acid synthesis, transport, and detoxification; regulation of glucose utilization; regulation of fatty acid synthesis and oxidation; regulation of immune cell function; regulation of energy expenditure; and regulation of neural processes such as gastric motility. Through these many functions, bile acids regulate many aspects of digestion ranging from uptake of essential vitamins to proper utilization of nutrients. Accordingly, within a short time period, bile acids moved beyond simple detergents and into the realm of complex signaling molecules. Because of the important processes that bile acids regulate through activation of receptors, drugs that target these receptors are under development for the treatment of several diseases, including cholestatic liver disease and metabolic syndrome. In this review, we will describe the various bile acid receptors, the signal transduction pathways activated by these receptors, and briefly discuss the physiological processes that

  20. {gamma}-aminobutyric acid{sub A} (GABA{sub A}) receptor regulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation in rat hippocampus in high doses of Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE)-induced impairment of spatial memory

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Gang; Zhang Wenbin; Zhang Yun; Chen Yaoming; Liu Mingchao; Yao Ting; Yang Yanxia; Zhao Fang; Li Jingxia; Huang Chuanshu; Luo Wenjing Chen Jingyuan

    2009-04-15

    Experimental and occupational exposure to Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) has been reported to induce neurotoxicological and neurobehavioral effects, such as headache, nausea, dizziness, and disorientation, etc. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in MTBE-induced neurotoxicity are still not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of MTBE on spatial memory and the expression and function of GABA{sub A} receptor in the hippocampus. Our results demonstrated that intraventricular injection of MTBE impaired the performance of the rats in a Morris water maze task, and significantly increased the expression of GABA{sub A} receptor {alpha}1 subunit in the hippocampus. The phosphorylation of ERK1/2 decreased after the MTBE injection. Furthermore, the decreased ability of learning and the reduction of phosphorylated ERK1/2 level of the MTBE-treated rats was partly reversed by bicuculline injected 30 min before the training. These results suggested that MTBE exposure could result in impaired spatial memory. GABA{sub A} receptor may play an important role in the MTBE-induced impairment of learning and memory by regulating the phosphorylation of ERK in the hippocampus.

  1. Increased brain uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid in a rabbit model of hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, M.L.; Mullen, K.D.; Scholz, B.; Fenstermacher, J.D.; Jones, E.A. )

    1990-03-01

    Transfer of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid across the normal blood-brain barrier is minimal. One prerequisite for gamma-aminobutyric acid in plasma contributing to the neural inhibition of hepatic encephalopathy would be that increased transfer of gamma-aminobutyric acid across the blood-brain barrier occurs in liver failure. The aim of the present study was to determine if brain gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake is increased in rabbits with stage II-III (precoma) hepatic encephalopathy due to galactosamine-induced fulminant hepatic failure. A modification of the Oldendorf intracarotid artery-injection technique was applied. (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid, (14C) butanol, and 113mIn-labeled serum protein (transferrin) were injected simultaneously 4 s before decapitation. The ipsilateral brain uptake index of gamma-aminobutyric acid was determined from measurements of the 3 isotopes in 5 brain regions. Uncorrected or simple brain uptake indices of (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid and (113mIn) transferrin were calculated using (14C) butanol as the highly extracted reference compound. The (113mIn) transferrin data were also used to correct the brain uptake index of (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid for intravascular retention of (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid. The methodology adopted minimized problems attributable to rapid (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolism, and slow brain washout and recirculation of the radiolabeled tracers. Both the uncorrected and corrected brain uptake indices of gamma-aminobutyric acid as well as the simple brain uptake index of transferrin were significantly increased in both stage II and III hepatic encephalopathy in all brain regions studied. Moreover, these brain uptake indices were significantly greater in stage III hepatic encephalopathy than in stage II hepatic encephalopathy.

  2. Anatomical and pharmacological characterization of excitatory amino acid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Monaghan, D.T.

    1985-01-01

    The majority of the excitatory neurotransmission in the vertebrate Central Nervous System is thought to be mediated by acidic amino acid neurotransmitters. However, relatively little is known about the excitatory amino acid receptors and their distribution within the CNS. By analyzing radioligand binding to purified synaptic plasma membranes and to thin tissue sections processed for autoradiography, multiple distinct binding sites were found. These binding sites exhibited the pharmacological properties indicative of the excitatory amino acid receptors, which had been identified by electrophysiological techniques. Specifically, L-(/sup 3/H)-glutamate and D-(/sup 3/H)-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate appear to label N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, L-(/sup 3/H)-glutamate and (/sup 3/H)-kainic acid appear to label kainic acid receptors, and L-(/sup 3/H)-glutamate and (/sup 3/H)-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate appear to label quisqualate receptors. Together, these results confirm the three receptor scheme proposed for excitatory amino acid neurotransmission. These results also show that these transmitter-receptor systems are differentially distributed in the brain, and that the total distribution is consistent with that found by other markers for excitatory amino acid-using neurons.

  3. T-cell receptor gamma--delta lymphocytes and Eimeria vermiformis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, M E; Hesketh, P; Rothwell, L; Gramzinski, R A

    1996-01-01

    The role of T-cell receptor gamma--delta T lymphocytes in coccidiosis was examined by determining the course of infection with Eimeria vermiformis in BALB/c mice depleted of gamma--delta lymphocytes by treatment with GL3 monoclonal antibody. The replication of the parasite in primary infections was not greatly, or consistently, affected by this treatment, and there was no correlation between the extent of depletion of small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and the number of oocysts produced. The resistance of immunized mice to challenge was not compromised by depletion of intraintestinal epithelial lymphocytes when their depletion was effected at the time of primary infection and/or administration of the challenge inoculum. Thus, T-cell receptor gamma--delta T lymphocytes do not appear to be crucial to the establishment, or the control, of primary infection with E. vermiformis and are not principal mediators of the solid immunity to challenge that this infection induces. PMID:8890252

  4. Mutations in the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Potter, Carol J.; Xiao, Rui; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Kang Ho; Shneider, Benjamin L.; Picarsic, Jennifer L.; Jacobson, Theodora A.; Zhang, Jing; He, Weimin; Liu, Pengfei; Knisely, A. S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lupski, James R.; Plon, Sharon E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Yang, Yaping; Washington, Gabriel C.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Berquist, William E.; Kambham, Neeraja; Singh, Ravinder J.; Xia, Fan; Enns, Gregory M.; Moore, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring prompt diagnosis. Mutations in several different genes can cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, but known genes cannot account for all familial cases. Here we report four individuals from two unrelated families with neonatal cholestasis and mutations in NR1H4, which encodes the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a bile acid-activated nuclear hormone receptor that regulates bile acid metabolism. Clinical features of severe, persistent NR1H4-related cholestasis include neonatal onset with rapid progression to end-stage liver disease, vitamin K-independent coagulopathy, low-to-normal serum gamma-glutamyl transferase activity, elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein and undetectable liver bile salt export pump (ABCB11) expression. Our findings demonstrate a pivotal function for FXR in bile acid homeostasis and liver protection. PMID:26888176

  5. Comparative analyses of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Shoichi; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Kagawa, Nao; Katoh, Kazutaka

    2015-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator that activates G protein-coupled LPA receptors to exert fundamental cellular functions. Six LPA receptor genes have been identified in vertebrates and are classified into two subfamilies, the endothelial differentiation genes (edg) and the non-edg family. Studies using genetically engineered mice, frogs, and zebrafish have demonstrated that LPA receptor-mediated signaling has biological, developmental, and pathophysiological functions. Computational analyses have also identified several amino acids (aa) critical for LPA recognition by human LPA receptors. This review focuses on the evolutionary aspects of LPA receptor-mediated signaling by comparing the aa sequences of vertebrate LPA receptors and LPA-producing enzymes; it also summarizes the LPA receptor-dependent effects commonly observed in mouse, frog, and fish. PMID:25732591

  6. Drug-facilitated sexual assault involving gamma-hydroxybutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Stillwell, Matthew E

    2002-09-01

    The first case involving an alleged sexual assault linked to the use of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in Oklahoma is reported. A-48-year-old Caucasian woman taking amitriptyline was known to have voluntarily ingested a sports drink containing a relaxing health product. She purportedly experienced unconsciousness that persisted for approximately 4 h. The toxicological testing on urine identified GHB, amitriptyline, and nortriptyline using a capillary Hewlett-Packard 6890 gas chromatograph coupled to a Hewlett-Packard 5973 mass selective detector (MSD). The GHB concentration in urine was 26.9 microg/mL. Urine concentrations of amitriptyline and nortriptyline were not determined. The analytical method used for identifying and quantitating GHB can be applied to matters of forensic interests.

  7. Serum hormonal concentrations following transcendental meditation--potential role of gamma aminobutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Elias, A N; Wilson, A F

    1995-04-01

    Transcendental mediation (TM) is a stylized form of physical and mental relaxation which is associated with changes in the secretion and release of several pituitary hormones. The hormonal changes induced by TM mimic the effects of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA). It is hypothesized that TM produces changes in pituitary hormone secretion by enhancing hypothalamic GABAergic tone, and its anxiolytic effects by promoting GABAergic tone in specific areas of the brain. This mechanism is similar to the effects of synthetic anxiolytic and tranquilizing agents such as benzodiazepines that bind to components of the GABA-A (GABAA) receptor. TM, therefore, may produce relaxation by enhancing the effects of an endogenous neurotransmitter analogous to the effects of endorphins in runners who reportedly experience a 'runner's high'.

  8. The Fc receptor gamma-chain and the tyrosine kinase Syk are essential for activation of mouse platelets by collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, A; Gibbins, J M; Turner, M; van Vugt, M J; van de Winkel, J G; Saito, T; Tybulewicz, V L; Watson, S P

    1997-01-01

    Activation of mouse platelets by collagen is associated with tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple proteins including the Fc receptor gamma-chain, the tyrosine kinase Syk and phospholipase Cgamma2, suggesting that collagen signals in a manner similar to that of immune receptors. This hypothesis has been tested using platelets from mice lacking the Fc receptor gamma-chain or Syk. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk and phospholipase Cgamma2 by collagen stimulation is absent in mice lacking the Fc receptor gamma-chain. Tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma2 by collagen stimulation is also absent in mice platelets which lack Syk, although phosphorylation of the Fc receptor gamma-chain is maintained. In contrast, tyrosine phosphorylation of platelet proteins by the G protein-coupled receptor agonist thrombin is maintained in mouse platelets deficient in Fc receptor gamma-chain or Syk. The absence of Fc receptor gamma-chain or Syk is accompanied by a loss of secretion and aggregation responses in collagen- but not thrombin-stimulated platelets. These observations provide the first direct evidence of an essential role for the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) in signalling by a non-immune receptor stimulus. PMID:9171347

  9. Cell death is induced by ciglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) agonist, independently of PPAR{gamma} in human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung Woo; Kim, Dae Seong; Kim, Hye Ryung; Kim, Hye Jin; Yang, Jin Mo; Ryu, Somi; Noh, Yoo Hun; Lee, Soo Hyun; Son, Meong Hi; Jung, Hye Lim; Yoo, Keon Hee; Koo, Hong Hoe; Sung, Ki Woong

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Greater than 30 {mu}M ciglitazone induces cell death in glioma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death by ciglitazone is independent of PPAR{gamma} in glioma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CGZ induces cell death by the loss of MMP via decreased Akt. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) regulates multiple signaling pathways, and its agonists induce apoptosis in various cancer cells. However, their role in cell death is unclear. In this study, the relationship between ciglitazone (CGZ) and PPAR{gamma} in CGZ-induced cell death was examined. At concentrations of greater than 30 {mu}M, CGZ, a synthetic PPAR{gamma} agonist, activated caspase-3 and induced apoptosis in T98G cells. Treatment of T98G cells with less than 30 {mu}M CGZ effectively induced cell death after pretreatment with 30 {mu}M of the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662, although GW9662 alone did not induce cell death. This cell death was also observed when cells were co-treated with CGZ and GW9662, but was not observed when cells were treated with CGZ prior to GW9662. In cells in which PPAR{gamma} was down-regulated cells by siRNA, lower concentrations of CGZ (<30 {mu}M) were sufficient to induce cell death, although higher concentrations of CGZ ( Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 30 {mu}M) were required to induce cell death in control T98G cells, indicating that CGZ effectively induces cell death in T98G cells independently of PPAR{gamma}. Treatment with GW9662 followed by CGZ resulted in a down-regulation of Akt activity and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), which was accompanied by a decrease in Bcl-2 expression and an increase in Bid cleavage. These data suggest that CGZ is capable of inducing apoptotic cell death independently of PPAR{gamma} in glioma cells, by down-regulating Akt activity and inducing MMP collapse.

  10. Development of Gamma-Emitting Receptor Binding Radiopharmace

    SciTech Connect

    Reba, Richard

    2003-02-20

    The long-term objective is to develop blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeable m2-selective (relative to m1, m3, and m4) receptor-binding radiotracers and utilize these radiotracers for quantifying receptor concentrations obtained from PET or SPECT images of human brain. In initial studies, we concluded that the lipophilicity and high affinity prevented (R,S)-I-QNB from reaching a flow-independent and receptor-dependent state in a reasonable time. Thus, it was clear that (R,S)-I-QNB should be modified. Therefore, during the last portion of this funded research, we proposed that more polar heterocycles should help accomplish that. Since reports of others concluded that radiobromination and radiofluorination of the unactivated phenyl ring is not feasible (Newkome et al,,1982), we, therefore, explored during this grant period a series of analogues of (R)-QNB in which one or both of the six-membered phenyl rings is replaced by a five-membered thienyl (Boulay et al., 1995), or furyl ring. The chemistry specific aims were to synthesize novel compounds designed to be m2-selective mAChR ligands capable of penetrating into the CNS, and develop methods for efficient radiolabeling of promising m2-selective muscarinic ligands. The pharmacology specific aims were to determine the affinity and subtype-selectivity of the novel compounds using competition binding studies with membranes from cells that express each of the five muscarinic receptor subtypes, to determine the ability of the promising non-radioactive compounds and radiolabeled novel compounds to cross the BBB, to determine the biodistribution, in-vivo pharmacokinetics, and in-vitm kinetics of promising m2-selective radioligands and to determine the distribution of receptors for the novel m2-selective radioligands using quantitative autoradiography of rat brain, and compare this distribution to the distribution of known m2-selective compounds.

  11. How efficacious are 5-HT1B/D receptor ligands: an answer from GTP gamma S binding studies with stably transfected C6-glial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, P J; Tardif, S; Palmier, C; Wurch, T; Colpaert, F C

    1997-01-01

    The intrinsic activity of a series of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) receptor ligands was analysed at recombinant h5-HT1B and h5-HT1D receptor sites using a [35S]GTP gamma S binding assay and membrane preparations of stably transfected C6-glial cell lines. Compounds either stimulated or inhibited [35S]GTP gamma S binding to a membrane preparation containing either h5-HT1B or h5-HT1D receptors. The potencies observed for most of the compounds at the h5-HT1B receptor subtype correlated with their potencies measured by inhibition of stimulated cAMP formation on intact cells. Apparent agonist potencies in the [35S]GTP gamma S binding assay to C6-glial/h5-HT1D membranes were, with the exception of 2-[5-[3-(4-methylsulphonylamino)benzyl-1 2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]-1H-indol-3-yl] ethanamine (L694247), 5- to 13-times lower than in the cAMP assay on intact cells. This suggests that receptor coupling in the h5-HT1D membrane preparation is less efficient than that in the intact cell. It further appeared that 6-times more h5-HT1D than h5-HT1B binding sites were required to attain a similar, maximal (73%), 5-HT-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding response: Hence, the h5-HT1B receptor in C6-glial cell membranes could be more efficiently coupled, even though some compounds more readily displayed intrinsic activity at h5-HT1D receptor sites [e.g. dihydroergotamine and (2'-methyl-4'-(5-methyl[1,2,4]oxadiazol-3-yl)biphenyl-4-carboxylic acid [4-methoxy-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)phenyl]amide (GR127935)]. Efficacy differences were apparent for most of the compounds (sumatriptan, zolmitriptan, rizatriptan, N-methyl-3-[pyrrolidin-2(R)-ylmethyl]-1H-indol-5-ylmethyl sulfonamide (CP122638), dihydroergotamine, naratriptan and GR127935) that stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding compared to the native agonist 5-HT. The observed maximal responses were different for the h5-HT1B and h5-HT1D receptor subtypes. Few compounds behaved as full agonists: L694247, zolmitriptan and sumatriptan did so at

  12. Two mutational hotspots in the interleukin-2 receptor {gamma} chain gene causing human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, A.E.; Puck, J.M.; Buckley, R.H.

    1995-09-01

    Human severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a syndrome of profoundly impaired cellular and humoral immunity, is most commonly caused by mutations in the X-linked gene for interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor {gamma} chain (IL2RG). For mutational analysis of IL2RG in males with SCID, SSCP screening was followed by DNA sequencing. Of 40 IL2RG mutations found in unrelated SCID patients, 6 were point mutations at the CpG dinucleotide at cDNA 690-691, encoding amino acid R226. This residue lies in the extracellular domain of the protein in a region not previously recognized to be significantly conserved in the cytokine receptor gene family, 11 amino acids upstream from the highly conserved WSXWS motif. Three additional instances of mutation at another CpG dinucleotide at cDNA 879 produced a premature termination signal in the intracellular domain of IL2RG, resulting in loss of the SH2-homologous intracellular domain known to be essential for signaling from the IL-2 receptor complex. Mutations at these two hotspots constitute >20% of the X-linked SCID mutations found by our group and a similar proportion of all reported IL2RG mutations. 41 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Effect of 5-caffeoylquinic acid on the NF-κB signaling pathway, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2, and macrophage infiltration in high-fat diet-fed Sprague-Dawley rat adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Liu, Si-Le; Peng, Bing-Jie; Zhong, Ying-Li; Liu, Yun-Long; Song, Zhuo; Wang, Zheng

    2015-08-01

    Obesity, considered as a consequence of overnutrition, sustains a low-degree inflammatory state and results in insulin-resistance and type 2 diabetes. Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of 5-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA) in high-fat diet-induced obese rats. Serum interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and free fatty acid (FFA) levels were determined. Expression of genes related to TG metabolism, macrophage biomarkers, and inflammation was assessed by real-time PCR. Protein expression of NF-κB, PPARγ2, and phosphorylated IκBα was evaluated by western blotting, and the histology of adipose tissue was examined. Supplementation of the rat diet with 5-CQA reduced obesity development, macrophage infiltration, and steatosis. Additionally, 5-CQA decreased the expression of NF-κB and downstream inflammatory cytokines, but increased the expression of PPARγ2, in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, 5-CQA improved obesity and obesity-related metabolic disturbances via PPARγ2 and the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  14. [Antinociceptive effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) through long fatty acid receptor G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40)].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Kazuo; Nishinaka, Takashi; Sato, Naoya; Mankura, Mitsumasa; Koyama, Yutaka; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids, one class of essential nutrients for humans, are an important source of energy and an essential component of cell membranes. They also function as signal transduction molecules in a variety of biological phenomena. The important functional role of fatty acids in both onset and suppression of pain has become increasingly apparent in recent years. Recently, we have also demonstrated that the release of an endogenous opioid peptide, β-endorphin, plays an important role in the induction of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-induced antinociception. It is well known that fatty acids affect intracellular and intercellular signaling as well as the membrane fluidity of neurons. In addition to intracellular actions, unbound free fatty acids (FFAs) can also carry out extracellular signaling by stimulating the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Among these receptors, G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) has been reported to be activated by long-chain fatty acids such as DHA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and arachidonic acid. In the peripheral area, GPR40 is preferentially expressed in pancreatic β-cells and is known to relate to the secretion of hormone and peptides. On the other hand, even though this receptor is widely distributed in the central nervous system, reports studying the role and functions of GPR40 in the brain have not been found. In this review, we summarize the findings of our recent study about the long-chain fatty acid receptor GPR40 as a novel pain regulatory system. PMID:24584021

  15. Retinoic acid receptor alpha mediates growth inhibition by retinoids in human colon carcinoma HT29 cells.

    PubMed

    Nicke, B; Kaiser, A; Wiedenmann, B; Riecken, E O; Rosewicz, S

    1999-08-11

    Although retinoids have been suggested to inhibit chemically induced colon carcinogenesis, the molecular mechanisms underlying retinoid-mediated growth regulation in colon carcinoma cells are unknown. Therefore, we investigated the biological effects of retinoids on growth in HT29 colon carcinoma cells. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment of HT29 cells resulted in a profound inhibition of anchorage-independent growth without biochemical or morphological evidence for induction of differentiation. Treatment with the selective RARalpha agonist Ro 40-6055 completely mimicked the effects of ATRA on growth and transactivation of a betaRAREx2-luciferase reporter construct, while RARbeta- and gamma-specific analogues were ineffective. Furthermore, ATRA-regulated growth and transactivation could be completely blocked by a RARalpha-selective receptor antagonist. Thus, ATRA potently inhibits anchorage-independent growth in HT29 cells and this effect is mainly if not exclusively mediated by the retinoic acid receptor alpha.

  16. [Effect of gamma-linolenic acid on microsomal oxidation in the rat liver following gamma-irradiation].

    PubMed

    Zavodnik, L B; Sushko, L I; Tarasov, Iu A; Ignatenko, K V; Chumachenko, S S; Ovchinnikov, V A; Brzosko, V; Buko, V U

    2001-01-01

    The antioxidant and radioprotector properties of gamma-linolenic acid isolated from the seeds of Borago officialis were studied on rats gamma-irradiated to a dose of 1 Gy. The irradiation caused an increase in the content of malonaldehyde in microsomal liver fraction and disturbed the metabolism of xenobiotics. The administration of gamma-linolenic acid in the form of a commercial drug Neoglandin (daily dose, 150 mg/kg, p.o.; over 1, 3, or 7 days after irradiation reduced the level of lipid peroxidation (for all treatment schedules), normalized the activity of NADPH-oxidase, NADH-oxidase, and NADPH-reductase, and increased the content of cytochromes P-450 and b5 as compared to bothirradiated and control animals. PMID:11589114

  17. Recognition of Legionella pneumophila nucleic acids by innate immune receptors.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Larissa D; Zamboni, Dario S

    2014-12-01

    Innate immune receptors evolved to sense conserved molecules that are present in microbes or are released during non-physiological conditions. Activation of these receptors is essential for early restriction of microbial infections and generation of adaptive immunity. Among the conserved molecules sensed by innate immune receptors are the nucleic acids, which are abundantly contained in all infectious organisms including virus, bacteria, fungi and parasites. In this review we focus in the innate immune proteins that function to sense nucleic acids from the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila and the importance of these processes to the outcome of the infection.

  18. Production of interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor-alpha by human T-cell clones expressing different forms of the gamma delta receptor.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Meager, A

    1990-12-01

    Panels of human T-cell clones bearing the gamma delta T-cell receptor (TcR) were obtained from peripheral blood and decidual tissue and maintained in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2). TcR V gamma and V delta gene expression was determined in 40 TcR delta 1+ clones using the gamma delta T-cell subset markers Ti gamma A and delta TCS1, in conjunction with Southern blot analysis using TcR J gamma and J delta probes. gamma delta T-cell clones, together with control alpha beta T-cell clones derived from the same lymphocyte populations, were stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and their ability to produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) tested using specific ELISA. Many clones representative of the major peripheral V gamma 9/V delta 2J1 subset produced high amounts of both cytokines and mean levels were not significantly different from those produced by alpha beta T-cell clones. Panels of clones expressing V gamma 9 and V delta 2J1 produced significantly higher levels of TNF-alpha than clones not expressing V delta 2J1 and those expressing V delta 1J1. There was no relationship between levels of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha produced by individual gamma delta T-cell clones and also no relationship between their non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxic activity and levels of either cytokine. There was a significant tendency for gamma delta T-cell clones to produce more TNF-alpha than IFN-gamma in comparison to alpha beta T-cell clones. The significance of these findings is discussed in the light of the reported differences in distribution in vivo of V delta 1J1+ and V delta 2J1+ cells.

  19. Use of chemical modifications and site-directed mutagenesis to probe the functional role of thiol groups on the. gamma. subunit of Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pradier, L.; Yee, A.S.; McNamee, M.G. )

    1989-08-08

    Alkylation of Torpedo californica purified nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) with N-phenylmaleimide (NPM) under nonreducing conditions led to ion flux inhibition without affecting ligand binding properties. The {gamma} subunit was shown to be preferentially labeled by ({sup 3}H)NPM with partial labeling of the {alpha} subunit at higher NPM concentrations. Alkylation occurs at cysteine residues as confirmed by amino acid analysis. Cyanogen bromide peptide mapping of the {gamma} subunit indicates that at least two residues corresponding to Cys-416, -420, or -451 are labeled. Residues 416 and 420 are part of the proposed amphipathic helix, and the functional role of these two cysteines is further investigated by site-directed mutagenesis of T. californica AChR cDNAs and expression of the mutants in Xenopus laevis oocytes following injection of SP6 transcripts. Several features of SP6 transcripts are shown to be important for efficient translation in vivo. Mutations Cys {yields} Ser{gamma}416,420 and Cys {yields} Phe{gamma}416 did not perturb either the receptor functional properties or its expression levels. The double mutant Cys {yields} Phe{gamma}416,420 displayed a 30% decrease of normalized AChR activity. The relatively small effect of large steric mutations in the amphipathic helix argues against its presence in the tightly packed transmembrane domain of the protein.

  20. Receptor-level interrelationships of amino acids and the adequate amino acid type hormones in Tetrahymena: a receptor evolution model.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Darvas, Z

    1986-01-01

    Histidine stimulates the phagocytosis of Tetrahymena to the same extent as histamine, and also stimulates its division, which histamine does not. Tyrosine and diiodotyrosine equally stimulate the growth of the Tetrahymena. Both amino acids inhibit the characteristic influence of the adequate amino acid hormone when added to Tetrahymena culture 72 h in advance of it. Primary interaction with diiodotyrosine and tyrosine notably increases the cellular growth rate. Histamine has a similar, although less notable effect than histidine. In the light of these experimental observations there is reason to postulate that the receptors of the amino acid hormones have developed from amino acid receptors.

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma regulates expression of the anti-lipolytic G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81/Gpr81).

    PubMed

    Jeninga, Ellen H; Bugge, Anne; Nielsen, Ronni; Kersten, Sander; Hamers, Nicole; Dani, Christian; Wabitsch, Martin; Berger, Ruud; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Mandrup, Susanne; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2009-09-25

    The ligand-inducible nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) plays a key role in the differentiation, maintenance, and function of adipocytes and is the molecular target for the insulin-sensitizing thiazoledinediones (TZDs). Although a number of PPARgamma target genes that may contribute to the reduction of circulating free fatty acids after TZD treatment have been identified, the relevant PPARgamma target genes that may exert the anti-lipolytic effect of TZDs are unknown. Here we identified the anti-lipolytic human G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81), GPR109A, and the (human-specific) GPR109B genes as well as the mouse Gpr81 and Gpr109A genes as novel TZD-induced genes in mature adipocytes. GPR81/Gpr81 is a direct PPARgamma target gene, because mRNA expression of GPR81/Gpr81 (and GPR109A/Gpr109A) increased in mature human and murine adipocytes as well as in vivo in epididymal fat pads of mice upon rosiglitazone stimulation, whereas small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of PPARgamma in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes showed a significant decrease in Gpr81 protein expression. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analysis in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells revealed a conserved PPAR:retinoid X receptor-binding site in the proximal promoter of the Gpr81 gene, which was proven to be functional by electromobility shift assay and reporter assays. Importantly, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Gpr81 partly reversed the inhibitory effect of TZDs on lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The coordinated PPARgamma-mediated regulation of the GPR81/Gpr81 and GPR109A/Gpr109A genes (and GPR109B in humans) presents a novel mechanism by which TZDs may reduce circulating free fatty acid levels and perhaps ameliorate insulin resistance in obese patients.

  2. G-protein-coupled receptors for neurotransmitter amino acids: C-terminal tails, crowded signalosomes.

    PubMed Central

    El Far, Oussama; Betz, Heinrich

    2002-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a superfamily of highly diverse integral membrane proteins that transduce external signals to different subcellular compartments, including nuclei, via trimeric G-proteins. By differential activation of diffusible G(alpha) and membrane-bound G(beta)gamma subunits, GPCRs might act on both cytoplasmic/intracellular and plasma-membrane-bound effector systems. The coupling efficiency and the plasma membrane localization of GPCRs are regulated by a variety of interacting proteins. In this review, we discuss recently disclosed protein interactions found with the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail regions of two types of presynaptic neurotransmitter receptors, the group III metabotropic glutamate receptors and the gamma-aminobutyric acid type-B receptors (GABA(B)Rs). Calmodulin binding to mGluR7 and other group III mGluRs may provide a Ca(2+)-dependent switch for unidirectional (G(alpha)) versus bidirectional (G(alpha) and G(beta)gamma) signalling to downstream effector proteins. In addition, clustering of mGluR7 by PICK1 (protein interacting with C-kinase 1), a polyspecific PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg1/ZO-1) domain containing synaptic organizer protein, sheds light on how higher-order receptor complexes with regulatory enzymes (or 'signalosomes') could be formed. The interaction of GABA(B)Rs with the adaptor protein 14-3-3 and the transcription factor ATF4 (activating transcription factor 4) suggests novel regulatory pathways for G-protein signalling, cytoskeletal reorganization and nuclear gene expression: processes that may all contribute to synaptic plasticity. PMID:12006104

  3. A potential new metabolite of gamma-hydroxybutyrate: sulfonated gamma-hydroxybutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Stephanie; Stachel, Nicole; Skopp, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    Detection of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) became crucial in many clinical and forensic settings due to its increasing use for recreational purposes and drug-facilitated sexual assault. Its narrow window of detection of about 3-12 h in urine represents a major problem. Analogous to ethyl glucuronide, the recently identified GHB-glucuronide exhibits a longer window of detection than the parent drug. It appeared reasonable that a sulfonated metabolite of GHB (GHB-SUL) will also be formed. Due to the lack of an appropriate standard, GHB was incubated with a human liver cytosolic fraction to produce GHB-SUL. Following development of a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay to measure GHB and GHB-SUL, authentic urine samples (n = 5) were tested for GHB-SUL. These investigations revealed detectable signals of both GHB and GHB-SUL, strongly indicating that GHB is not only glucuronidated but also sulfonated. Given that sulfonated metabolites generally have longer half-life times than the corresponding free drugs, GHB-SUL may serve as a biomarker of GHB misuse along with its glucuronide. PMID:26210636

  4. Peripheral tackykinin and excitatory amino acid receptors mediate hyperalgesia induced by Phoneutria nigriventer venom.

    PubMed

    Zanchet, Eliane Maria; Cury, Yara

    2003-04-25

    The generation of hyperalgesia by Phoneutria nigriventer venom was investigated in rats using the paw pressure test, through the intraplantar injection of the venom. Hyperalgesia was significantly inhibited by N-[2-(4-chlorophenyl) ethyl]-1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-7,8-dihydroxy-2H-2-benzazepine-2-carbothioamide (capsazepine), a vanilloid receptor antagonist, by the local administration of pGlu-Ala-Asp-Pro-Asn-Lys-Phe-Tyr-Pro (spiro-gamma-lactam) Leu-Trp-NH(2) (GR82334) or of Phenyl-CO-Ala-Ala-D-Trp-Phe-D-Pro-Pro-Nle-NH(2) (GR94800), inhibitors of tachykinin NK(1) and NK(2) receptors, respectively, or by the local injection of dizocilpine (MK 801), (+/-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid ((+/-)-AP-5), or 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), antagonists of NMDA and non-NMDA excitatory amino acid receptors. The correlation between hyperalgesia and the inflammatory response induced by the venom was also investigated. The venom-induced edematogenic response was not modified by the pharmacological treatments. These results suggest that hyperalgesia induced by P. nigriventer venom is mediated by stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive neurons, with activation of peripheral tachykinin NK(1) and NK(2) receptors and of both the NMDA and AMPA receptors. Distinct mechanisms are involved in the development of hyperalgesia and edema induced by the venom.

  5. Rearrangement and expression of T cell antigen receptor and gamma genes during thymic development

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Rearrangement and expression of the T cell antigen receptor and the gamma genes during T cell ontogeny is a regulated process; the gamma genes are rearranged and expressed first, followed by the beta and then the alpha genes. Expression of both functional alpha and beta gene RNA first occurs at day 17 of gestation, along with the expression of T3 delta chain RNA. T cell antigen receptor gene rearrangements occur primarily or exclusively in the thymus, although some gamma gene rearrangements occur outside the thymus in fetal liver cells that may be committed T cell progenitors. There is no gross difference in the extent of beta and gamma gene rearrangements in the adult thymocyte subpopulations that were analyzed, despite the fact that some of these populations cannot respond to antigen and never emigrate from the thymus. Quantitative analysis of rearrangements in total adult thymocyte DNA shows that beta gene rearrangements generally occur on both chromosomal homologs, and that rearrangements occur preferentially to the J beta 2 gene segment cluster. PMID:3487610

  6. Crosslinking of surface antibodies and Fc sub. gamma. receptors: Theory and application

    SciTech Connect

    Wofsy, C.; Goldstein, B. Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1991-03-15

    In an immune response, the crosslinking of surface immunoglobulin (sIg) on B cells by multiply-bound ligand activates a range of cell responses, culminating in the production of antibody-secreting cells. However, when the crosslinking agent is itself an antibody, B cell activation is inhibited. Solution antibody (IgG) can bind simultaneously to sIg and to another cell surface receptor, Fc{sub {gamma}}R, co-crosslinking' the distinct receptors. Experiments point to co-crosslinking as the inhibitory signal. It is not clear how co-crosslinking inhibits B cell stimulation. The authors construct and analyze a mathematical model aimed at clarifying the nature and mechanisms of action of the separate cell signals controlling B cell responses to antibodies. Basophils and mast cells respond to the crosslinking of cell surface antibody by releasing histamine. Like B cells, basophils also express FC{sub {gamma}}R. They use their model to analyze new data on the effect of antibody-induced co-crosslinking of the two types of receptor on this family of cells. Predictions of the model indicate that an observed difference between the response patterns induced by antibodies and by antibody fragments that cannot bind to FC{sub {gamma}}R can be explained if co-crosslinking is neither inhibitory nor stimulatory in this system.

  7. Protein kinase activity associated with Fc. gamma. /sub 2a/ receptor of a murine macrophage like cell line, P388D/sub 1/

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Y.; Suzuki, T.

    1987-12-15

    The properties of protein kinase activity associated with Fc receptor specific for IgG/sub 2a/(Fc..gamma../sub 2a/R) of a murine macrophage like cell line, P388D/sub 1/, were investigated. IgG/sub 2a/-binding protein isolated from the detergent lysate of P388D/sub 1/ cells by affinity chromatography of IgG-Sepharose was found to contain four distinct proteins of M/sub r/ 50,000, 43,000, 37,000, and 17,000, which could be autophosphorylated upon incubation with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. The autophosphorylation of Fc..gamma../sub 2a/ receptor complex ceased when exogenous phosphate acceptors (casein or histone) were added in the reaction mixture. Phosphorylation of casein catalyzed by Fc..gamma../sub 2a/ receptor complex was dependent on casein concentration, increased with time or temperature, was dependent on the concentration of ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/, and was maximum at pH near 8. Casein phosphorylation was significantly inhibited by a high concentration of Mn/sup 2 +/ or KCl or by a small amount of heparin and was enhanced about 2-fold by protamine. Casein kinase activity associated with Fc..gamma../sub 2a/ receptor used ATP as substrate with an apparent K/sub m/ of 2 ..mu..M as well as GTP with an apparent K/sub m/ of 10 ..mu..M. Prior heating (60/sup 0/C for 15 min) or treatment with protease (trypsin or Pronase) of Fc..gamma../sub 2a/ receptor complex almost totally abolished casein kinase activity. Thin-layer chromatography of a partial acid hydrolysate of the phosphorylated casein showed that the site of phosphorylation is at a seryl residue. These results suggest that Fc..gamma../sub 2//sub a/ receptor forms a molecule complex with protein kinase, whose characteristics resemble those of type II casein kinase but are different from those of cyclic nucleotide dependent protein kinase or from those of C protein kinase.

  8. Ubiquitination of the common cytokine receptor {gamma}{sub c} and regulation of expression by an ubiquitination/deubiquitination machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Gesbert, Franck; Malarde, Valerie; Dautry-Varsat, Alice . E-mail: adautry@pasteur.fr

    2005-08-26

    The common cytokine receptor {gamma}{sub c} is shared by the interleukin-2, -4, -7, -9, -15, and -21 receptors, and is essential for lymphocyte proliferation and survival. The regulation of {gamma}{sub c} receptor expression level is therefore critical for the ability of cells to respond to these cytokines. We previously reported that {gamma}{sub c} is efficiently constitutively internalized and addressed towards a degradation endocytic compartment. We show that {gamma}{sub c} is ubiquitinated and also associated to ubiquitinated proteins. We report that the ubiquitin-ligase c-Cbl induces {gamma}{sub c} down-regulation. In addition, the ubiquitin-hydrolase, DUB-2, counteracts the effect of c-Cbl on {gamma}{sub c} expression. We show that an increase in DUB-2 expression correlates with an increased {gamma}{sub c} half-life, resulting in the up-regulation of the receptor. Altogether, we show that {gamma}{sub c} is the target of an ubiquitination mechanism and its expression level can be regulated through the activities of a couple of ubiquitin-ligase/ubiquitin-hydrolase enzymes, namely c-Cbl/DUB-2.

  9. Gamma-polyglutamic acid (gamma-PGA) produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens C06 promoting its colonization on fruit surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; He, Dan; Li, Xiu-zhen; Gao, Shengfeng; Wu, Huijun; Liu, Wenzhe; Gao, Xuewen; Zhou, Ting

    2010-08-15

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens C06, an effective biological agent in controlling brown rot of stone fruit caused by Monilinia fructicola, was also found to produce extra-cellular mucilage and form mucoid colonies on semi-solid surfaces. This study aimed to characterize the extra-cellular mucilage produced by B. amyloliquefaciens C06 using transposon mutagenesis and biochemical and physical analyses. The mucilage production in B. amyloliquefaciens C06 was demonstrated to be associated with ywsC gene expression and characterized to be of high molecular weight, consisted of only glutamic acid and linked with non-peptide bonds, thus identified as gamma-polyglutamic acid (gamma-PGA). Compared with wild type B. amyloliquefaciens C06, its mutants deficient in producing gamma-PGA, e.g. M106 and C06DeltaywsC showed less efficiency in biofilm formation, surface adhesion and swarming ability. It was also demonstrated that gamma-PGA was not essential for C06 to form colony on semi-solid surfaces, but was able to improve its colony structure. In vivo evaluation showed that disruption of gamma-PGA production in C06DeltaywsC impaired its efficiency of colonizing apple surfaces.

  10. Modulation of GABA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes by 13-L-hydroxylinoleic acid and food additives.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, H; Tenpaku, Y

    1997-12-01

    To study the effects of 13-L-hydroxylinoleic acid (LOH) and food additives on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, ionotropic GABA receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injecting mRNAs prepared from rat whole brain. LOH, which was prepared by reduction of 13-L-hydroperoxylinoleic acid (LOOH), inhibited the response of GABA receptors in the presence of high concentrations of GABA. LOH also inhibited nicotinic acetylcholine, glycine, and kainate receptors, while it had little effect on NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. However, LOH potentiated the response of GABA receptors as well as LOOH in the presence of low concentrations of GABA, possibly increasing the affinity of GABA for the receptors, while linoleic acid did not. Since some modification of the compounds seemed to change their effects on GABA receptors, the responses of GABA receptors elicited by 10 microM GABA were measured in the presence of compounds with various kinds of functional groups or the structural isomers of pentanol. Potentiation of GABA receptors depended strongly on the species of functional groups and also depended on the structure of the isomers. Then effects of various kinds of food additives on GABA receptors were also examined; perfumes such as alcohols or esters potentiated the responses strongly, while hexylamine, nicotinamide, or caffeine inhibited the responses, mainly in a competitive manner, and vanillin inhibited the responses noncompetitively. These results suggest the possibility that production of LOOH and LOH, or intake of much of some food additives, modulates the neural transmission in the brain, especially through ionotropic GABA receptors and changes the frame of the human mind, as alcohol or tobacco does.

  11. Enhancement by GABA of the association rate of picrotoxin and tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate to the rat cloned alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 GABAA receptor subtype.

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, G. H.; Im, W. B.; Carter, D. B.; McKinley, D. D.

    1995-01-01

    1. We examined how gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) influences interaction of picrotoxin and tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) with recombinant rat alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 GABAA receptors stably expressed in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293), as monitored with changes in Cl- currents measured by the whole-cell patch clamp technique. 2. During application of GABA (5 microM) for 15 s, picrotoxin and TBPS dose-dependently accelerated the decay of inward GABA-induced currents (a holding potential of -60 mV under a symmetrical Cl- gradient). The drugs, upon preincubation with the receptors, also reduced the initial current amplitude in a preincubation time and concentration-dependent manner. This indicates their interaction with both GABA-bound and resting receptors. 3. The half maximal inhibitory concentration for picrotoxin and TBPS at the beginning of a 15 s GABA (5 microM) pulse was several times greater than that obtained at the end of the pulse. GABA thus appears to enhance picrotoxin and TBPS potency, but only at concentrations leading to occupancy of both high and low affinity GABA sites, i.e., 5 microM. Preincubation of the receptors with the drugs in the presence of GABA at 200 nM, which leads to occupancy of only high affinity GABA sites in the alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 subtype, produced no appreciable change in potency of picrotoxin or TBPS. This indicates that they preferentially interact with multiliganded, but not monoliganded receptors, unlike U-93631, a novel ligand to the picrotoxin site, which has higher affinity to both mono- and multiliganded receptors than resting receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7582470

  12. RELAXIN ACTIVATES PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR GAMMA

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhir; Bennett, Robert G

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Relaxin is a polypeptide hormone that triggers multiple signaling pathways through its receptor RXFP1. Many of relaxin’s functions, including vascular and antifibrotic effects, are similar to those induced by activation of PPARγ. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that relaxin signaling through RXFP1 would activate PPARγ activity. In cells overexpressing RXFP1 (HEK-RXFP1), relaxin increased transcriptional activity through a PPAR response element (PPRE) in a concentration-dependent manner. In cells lacking RXFP1, relaxin had no effect. Relaxin increased both the baseline activity and the response to the PPARγ agonists rosiglitazone and 15d-PGJ2, but not to agonists of PPARα or PPARδ. In HEK-RXFP1 cells infected with adenovirus expressing PPARγ, relaxin increased transcriptional activity through PPRE, and this effect was blocked with an adenovirus expressing a dominant-negative PPARγ. Knockdown of PPARγ using siRNA resulted in a decrease in the response to both relaxin and rosiglitazone. Both relaxin and rosiglitazone increased expression of the PPARγ target genes CD36 and LXRα in HEK-RXFP1 and in THP-1 cells naturally expressing RXFP1. Relaxin did not increase PPARγ mRNA or protein levels. Treatment of cells with GW9662, an inhibitor of PPARγ ligand binding, effectively blocked rosiglitazone-induced PPARγ activation, but had no effect on relaxin activation of PPARγ. These results suggest that relaxin activates PPARγ activity, and increases the overall response in the presence PPARγ agonists. This activation is dependent on the presence of RXFP1. Furthermore, relaxin activates PPARγ via a ligand-independent mechanism. These studies represent the first report that relaxin can activate the transcriptional activity of PPARγ. PMID:19712722

  13. Bio-derived poly(gamma-glutamic acid) nanogels as controlled anticancer drug delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee Ho; Cho, Mi Young; Hong, Ji Hyeon; Poo, Haryoung; Sung, Moon-Hee; Lim, Yong Taik

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a novel type of polymer nanogel loaded with anticancer drug based on bio-derived poly(gamma- glutamic acid) (gamma-PGA). gamma-PGA is a highly anionic polymer that is synthesized naturally by microbial species, most prominently in various bacilli, and has been shown to have excellent biocompatibility. Thiolated gamma-PGA was synthesized by covalent coupling between the carboxyl groups of gamma-PGA and the primary amine group of cysteamine. Doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded gamma-PGA nanogels were fabricated using the following steps: (1) an ionic nanocomplex was formed between thiolated gamma-PGA as the negative charge component, and Dox as the positive charge component; (2) addition of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) induced hydrogen-bond interactions between thiol groups of thiolated gamma-PGA and hydroxyl groups of PEG, resulting in the nanocomplex; and (3) disulfide crosslinked gamma-PGA nanogels were fabricated by ultrasonication. The average size and surface charge of Dox-loaded disulfide cross-linked gamma-PGA nanogels in aqueous solution were 136.3 +/- 37.6 nm and -32.5 +/- 5.3 mV, respectively. The loading amount of Dox was approximately 38.7 microgram per mg of gamma-PGA nanogel. The Dox-loaded disulfide cross-linked gamma-PGA nanogels showed controlled drug release behavior in the presence of reducing agents, glutathione (GSH) (1- 10 mM). Through fluorescence microscopy and FACS, the cellular uptake of gamma-PGA nanogels into breast cancer cells (MCF-7) was analyzed. The cytotoxic effect was evaluated using the MTT assay and was determined to be dependent on both the concentration and treatment time of gamma-PGA nanogels. The bio-derived gamma-PGA nanogels are expected to be a well-designed delivery carrier for controlled drug delivery applications. PMID:23221543

  14. Role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and gamma in gastric ulcer: An overview of experimental evidences.

    PubMed

    Saha, Lekha

    2015-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Three subtypes, PPARα, PPARβ/δ, and PPARγ, have been identified so far. PPARα is expressed in the liver, kidney, small intestine, heart, and muscle, where it activates the fatty acid catabolism and control lipoprotein assembly in response to long-chain unsaturated fatty acids, eicosanoids, and hypolipidemic drugs (e.g., fenofibrate). PPARβ/δ is more broadly expressed and is implicated in fatty acid oxidation, keratinocyte differentiation, wound healing, and macrophage response to very low density lipoprotein metabolism. This isoform has been implicated in transcriptional-repression functions and has been shown to repress the activity of PPARα or PPARγ target genes. PPARγ1 and γ2 are generated from a single-gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma by differential promoter usage and alternative splicing. PPARγ1 is expressed in colon, immune system (e.g., monocytes and macrophages), and other tissues where it participates in the modulation of inflammation, cell proliferation, and differentiation. PPARs regulate gene expression through distinct mechanisms: Ligand-dependent transactivation, ligand-independent repression, and ligand-dependent transrepression. Studies in animals have demonstrated the gastric antisecretory activity of PPARα agonists like ciprofibrate, bezafibrate and clofibrate. Study by Pathak et al also demonstrated the effect of PPARα agonist, bezafibrate, on gastric secretion and gastric cytoprotection in various gastric ulcer models in rats. The majority of the experimental studies is on pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, which are PPARγ activators. In all the studies, both the PPARγ activators showed protection against the gastric ulcer and also accelerate the ulcer healing in gastric ulcer model in rats. Therefore, PPARα and PPARγ may be a target for gastric ulcer therapy

  15. Role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and gamma in gastric ulcer: An overview of experimental evidences

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Lekha

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Three subtypes, PPARα, PPARβ/δ, and PPARγ, have been identified so far. PPARα is expressed in the liver, kidney, small intestine, heart, and muscle, where it activates the fatty acid catabolism and control lipoprotein assembly in response to long-chain unsaturated fatty acids, eicosanoids, and hypolipidemic drugs (e.g., fenofibrate). PPARβ/δ is more broadly expressed and is implicated in fatty acid oxidation, keratinocyte differentiation, wound healing, and macrophage response to very low density lipoprotein metabolism. This isoform has been implicated in transcriptional-repression functions and has been shown to repress the activity of PPARα or PPARγ target genes. PPARγ1 and γ2 are generated from a single-gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma by differential promoter usage and alternative splicing. PPARγ1 is expressed in colon, immune system (e.g., monocytes and macrophages), and other tissues where it participates in the modulation of inflammation, cell proliferation, and differentiation. PPARs regulate gene expression through distinct mechanisms: Ligand-dependent transactivation, ligand-independent repression, and ligand-dependent transrepression. Studies in animals have demonstrated the gastric antisecretory activity of PPARα agonists like ciprofibrate, bezafibrate and clofibrate. Study by Pathak et al also demonstrated the effect of PPARα agonist, bezafibrate, on gastric secretion and gastric cytoprotection in various gastric ulcer models in rats. The majority of the experimental studies is on pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, which are PPARγ activators. In all the studies, both the PPARγ activators showed protection against the gastric ulcer and also accelerate the ulcer healing in gastric ulcer model in rats. Therefore, PPARα and PPARγ may be a target for gastric ulcer therapy

  16. Effect of STI-571 (imatinib mesylate) in combination with retinoic acid and {gamma}-irradiation on viability of neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roessler, Jochen . E-mail: jochen.roessler@uniklinik-freiburg.de; Zambrzycka, Izabella; Lagodny, Jeanette; Kontny, Udo; Niemeyer, Charlotte Marie

    2006-04-21

    Neuroblastoma (NB) expresses the tyrosine kinase receptors c-Kit, PDGFR-{alpha} and -{beta}-targets for STI-571.We investigated a possible combination therapy of STI-571 with retinoic acid (RA) and {gamma}-irradiation on NB cell viability in vitro. Expression of tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligands was examined in 6 NB cell lines by RT-PCR and FACS. The effect on cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Cell viability of all 6 NB cell lines was significantly inhibited after treatment with 20 {mu}M STI-571 for 72 h, two cell lines responding already to 10 {mu}M. Cell lines responded irrespective of their mRNA status or cell surface expression of c-Kit, PDGFR-{alpha} and -{beta}. Co-incubation with 9-cis RA sensitized cells to the inhibitory effects of STI-571. However, pre-treatment with 9-cis RA resulted in resistance of NB cell lines to STI-571 and {gamma}-irradiation. Treatment of NB with STI-571 in combination with 9-cis RA might be a therapeutic strategy for patients in consolidation therapy who have completed {gamma}-irradiation therapy.

  17. Alpha-amino acid behaves differently from beta- or gamma-amino acids as treated by trimetaphosphate.

    PubMed

    Gao, X; Liu, Y; Xu, P X; Cai, Y M; Zhao, Y F

    2008-01-01

    The condensation reactions of sodium trimetaphosphate with single amino acids, namely glycine, L-alanine, beta-alanine and gamma-aminobutyric acid or pairs of these amino acids were reinvestigated by electrospray ion-trap mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography. It was found when mixtures were treated by sodium trimetaphosphate only in the presence of alpha-amino acid dipeptides were formed. Without addition of alpha-amino acids, the beta-amino acid or gamma-aminobutyric acid could not form peptide either by themselves or with their mixtures under the same conditions. From the data it is concluded that phosphate might select alpha-amino acids to produce the peptides being important precursors for the origin of life. PMID:17973074

  18. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) induces cognitive deficits and affects GABAB receptors and IGF-1 receptors in male rats.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jenny; Grönbladh, Alfhild; Hallberg, Mathias

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, the abuse of the club drug gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has become increasingly popular among adolescents. The drug induces euphoria but can also result in sedation, anaesthesia as well as short-term amnesia. In addition, the abuse of GHB causes cognitive impairments and the mechanism by which GHB induces these impairments is not clarified. The present study investigates the impact of GHB treatment on spatial learning and memory using a water maze (WM) test in rats. Furthermore, the behavioural data is combined with an autoradiographic analysis of the GABAB and the IGF-1 receptor systems. The results demonstrate that the animals administered with GHB display an impaired performance in the WM test as compared to controls. In addition, significant alterations in GABAB and IGF-1 receptor density as well as GABAB receptor functionality, were observed in several brain regions associated with cognitive functions e.g. hippocampus. To conclude, our findings suggest that GHB treatment can affect spatial learning and memory, and that this outcome at least to some extent is likely to involve both GABAB and IGF-1 receptors.

  19. A putative G-protein-coupled receptor, H218, is down-regulated during the retinoic acid-induced differentiation of F9 embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; MacLennan, A J; Rogers, M B

    1998-03-15

    We have previously cloned a novel guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G-protein)-coupled receptor, H218, that has sequence similarity to a lysophosphatidic acid receptor, edg2. We present here Northern analysis indicating that the H218 mRNA is expressed in undifferentiated F9 embryonal carcinoma cells. The H218 message is down-regulated and its stability is decreased during retinoic acid- and dibutyryl cAMP-induced differentiation. Treatment by various receptor-selective retinoids indicated that retinoic acid receptor beta or gamma signaling, but not retinoid X receptor activation, is required for the down-regulation of H218 mRNA. Activation of the H218 receptor may contribute to the phenotype of undifferentiated F9 embryonal carcinoma cells.

  20. Glutamic acid decarboxylase and glutamate receptor changes during tolerance and dependence to benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Izzo, E; Auta, J; Impagnatiello, F; Pesold, C; Guidotti, A; Costa, E

    2001-03-13

    Protracted administration of diazepam elicits tolerance, whereas discontinuation of treatment results in signs of dependence. Tolerance to the anticonvulsant action of diazepam is present in an early phase (6, 24, and 36 h) but disappears in a late phase (72-96 h) of withdrawal. In contrast, signs of dependence such as decrease in open-arm entries on an elevated plus-maze and increased susceptibility to pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures were apparent 96 h (but not 12, 24, or 48 h) after diazepam withdrawal. During the first 72 h of withdrawal, tolerance is associated with changes in the expression of GABA(A) (gamma-aminobutyric acid type A) receptor subunits (decrease in gamma(2) and alpha(1); increase in alpha(5)) and with an increase of mRNA expression of the most abundant form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD(67). In contrast, dl-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor GluR1 subunit mRNA and cognate protein, which are normal during the early phase of diazepam withdrawal, increase by approximately 30% in cortex and hippocampus in association with the appearance of signs of dependence 96 h after diazepam withdrawal. Immunohistochemical studies of GluR1 subunit expression with gold-immunolabeling technique reveal that the increase of GluR1 subunit protein is localized to layer V pyramidal neurons and their apical dendrites in the cortex, and to pyramidal neurons and in their dendritic fields in hippocampus. The results suggest an involvement of GABA-mediated processes in the development and maintenance of tolerance to diazepam, whereas excitatory amino acid-related processes (presumably via AMPA receptors) may be involved in the expression of signs of dependence after withdrawal.

  1. A thermodynamic switch modulates abscisic acid receptor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Dupeux, Florine; Santiago, Julia; Betz, Katja; Twycross, Jamie; Park, Sang-Youl; Rodriguez, Lesia; Gonzalez-Guzman, Miguel; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Krasnogor, Natalio; Blackledge, Martin; Holdsworth, Michael; Cutler, Sean R; Rodriguez, Pedro L; Márquez, José Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key hormone regulating plant growth, development and the response to biotic and abiotic stress. ABA binding to pyrabactin resistance (PYR)/PYR1-like (PYL)/Regulatory Component of Abscisic acid Receptor (RCAR) intracellular receptors promotes the formation of stable complexes with certain protein phosphatases type 2C (PP2Cs), leading to the activation of ABA signalling. The PYR/PYL/RCAR family contains 14 genes in Arabidopsis and is currently the largest plant hormone receptor family known; however, it is unclear what functional differentiation exists among receptors. Here, we identify two distinct classes of receptors, dimeric and monomeric, with different intrinsic affinities for ABA and whose differential properties are determined by the oligomeric state of their apo forms. Moreover, we find a residue in PYR1, H60, that is variable between family members and plays a key role in determining oligomeric state. In silico modelling of the ABA activation pathway reveals that monomeric receptors have a competitive advantage for binding to ABA and PP2Cs. This work illustrates how receptor oligomerization can modulate hormonal responses and more generally, the sensitivity of a ligand-dependent signalling system. PMID:21847091

  2. Human macrophage activation. Modulation of mannosyl, fucosyl receptor activity in vitro by lymphokines, gamma and alpha interferons, and dexamethasone.

    PubMed Central

    Mokoena, T; Gordon, S

    1985-01-01

    We describe a sensitive assay to measure immune activation of human macrophages in cell culture. Freshly isolated blood monocytes from normal subjects lack the ability to endocytose and degrade mannosyl-terminated glycoconjugates via specific receptors, but acquired this activity after cultivation in autologous serum for approximately 3 d. Addition of specific antigen, purified protein derivative, or T cell mitogens to mononuclear cells prevented the appearance of macrophage mannosyl receptor activity and lymphokine, gamma-, and alpha-interferons selectively down-regulated receptor activity in monocyte-macrophage targets. The effects of antigen challenge and gamma-interferon on mannosyl receptors can be prevented by 10(-8) M dexamethasone. Dexamethasone also inhibited release of another macrophage activation marker, plasminogen activator, which was increased by both gamma- and alpha-interferons. These studies show that activation of human macrophages is regulated by opposing actions of lymphokines and glucocorticoids. PMID:2579101

  3. Bile acid receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liyun; Bambha, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    With the high prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and other features of the metabolic syndrome in United States, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has inevitably become a very prevalent chronic liver disease and is now emerging as one of the leading indications for liver transplantation. Insulin resistance and derangement of lipid metabolism, accompanied by activation of the pro-inflammatory response and fibrogenesis, are essential pathways in the development of the more clinically significant form of NAFLD, known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Recent advances in the functional characterization of bile acid receptors, such as farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (TGR) 5, have provided further insight in the pathophysiology of NASH and have led to the development of potential therapeutic targets for NAFLD and NASH. Beyond maintaining bile acid metabolism, FXR and TGR5 also regulate lipid metabolism, maintain glucose homeostasis, increase energy expenditure, and ameliorate hepatic inflammation. These intriguing features have been exploited to develop bile acid analogues to target pathways in NAFLD and NASH pathogenesis. This review provides a brief overview of the pathogenesis of NAFLD and NASH, and then delves into the biological functions of bile acid receptors, particularly with respect to NASH pathogenesis, with a description of the associated experimental data, and, finally, we discuss the prospects of bile acid analogues in the treatment of NAFLD and NASH. PMID:26668692

  4. Opsonin-independent ligation of Fc gamma receptors. The 3G8-bearing receptors on neutrophils mediate the phagocytosis of concanavalin A- treated erythrocytes and nonopsonized Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We report that phagocytosis by human neutrophils of Con A-treated erythrocytes (E-Con A) and nonopsonized Escherichia coli with mannose- binding adhesions is mediated by the Fc gamma receptor bearing the 3G8 epitope. Modulation of Fc receptors by pretreating with aggregated-IgG or with 3G8 anti-Fc gamma receptor mAb markedly inhibited internalization of E-Con A and E. coli without altering their cell surface attachment. Phagocytosis of these probes was specifically blocked by alpha-methylmannoside and D-mannose and not by other monosaccharides. Thus, recognition of E-Con A and E. coli by the Fc receptor is dependent upon the mannose-specific interaction with lectin or lectin-like adhesions. These data demonstrate that ligands other than the classical IgG opsonins can bind to classical immune receptors for IgG through lectin-carbohydrate interactions. PMID:2445895

  5. Coactivation of the human vitamin D receptor by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Savkur, Rajesh S; Bramlett, Kelli S; Stayrook, Keith R; Nagpal, Sunil; Burris, Thomas P

    2005-08-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) belongs to the superfamily of steroid/thyroid hormone receptors that is activated by 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3). Traditional targets for 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) action include tissues involved in the maintenance of calcium homeostasis and bone development and remodeling. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha), a transcriptional coactivator that plays a role in mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism, is predominantly expressed in kidney, heart, liver, and skeletal muscle. Because VDR and PGC-1alpha display an overlapping pattern of expression, we investigated the possibility that PGC-1alpha could serve as a coactivator for VDR. Transient cotransfection assays demonstrate that PGC-1alpha augments ligand-dependent VDR transcription when either full-length VDR or Gal4 DNA binding domain-VDR-ligand binding domain chimeras were analyzed. Furthermore, mammalian two-hybrid assays, coimmunoprecipitation analyses, and biochemical coactivator recruitment assays demonstrate a ligand-dependent interaction between the two proteins both in cells and in vitro. The coactivation potential of PGC-1alpha requires an intact AF-2 domain of VDR and the LXXLL motif in PGC-1alpha. Taken together, these results indicate that PGC-1alpha serves as a coactivator for VDR.

  6. Characterization of the hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 2 in cats.

    PubMed

    Graff, E C; Norris, O C; Sandey, M; Kemppainen, R J; Judd, R L

    2015-10-01

    The hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 2 (HCA2) belongs to a family of nutrient-sensing receptors that bind β-hydroxybutyrate, an alternative fuel source produced during a negative energy balance. The HCA2 receptor has not been identified or characterized in cats. Therefore, the following were the objectives of this study: (1) identify the feline HCA2 receptor protein sequence and compare against known human and rodent sequences, (2) determine tissue distribution and relative expression in lean, healthy cats, and (3) demonstrate in vitro functionality in feline adipose tissue. Tissues (n = 6) and primary adipocytes (n = 4) were collected from lean, healthy, female cats. The published genomic sequence for cats was used to design primers for polymerase chain reaction isolation of HCA2. Relative tissue distribution was evaluated using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction with RNA isolated from 9 different tissues (spleen, pancreas, lymph node, jejunum, kidney, liver, heart, and subcutaneous and abdominal adipose tissue). Receptor function was evaluated in primary feline adipocyte culture, and changes were compared with basal lipolysis. The in silico predicted feline HCA2 protein sequence exhibited 83.1% and 86.5% amino acid similarity to human and mouse sequences, respectively. The feline HCA2 receptor is predominantly expressed in adipose tissue and spleen. Exposure of feline adipocytes to niacin, a pharmacologic ligand of HCA2, inhibited lipolysis to a similar degree as insulin, a potent lipolytic inhibitor. In conclusion, the feline HCA2 receptor is similar to human and murine receptors in sequence, distribution, and functionality. By gaining a better understanding of the HCA2 receptor in cats, we will be able to better manage feline patients.

  7. 5-Hydroxytryptamine1A receptor-activation hyperpolarizes pyramidal cells and suppresses hippocampal gamma oscillations via Kir3 channel activation

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, April; McBain, Chris J; Fisahn, André

    2014-01-01

    Rhythmic cortical neuronal oscillations in the gamma frequency band (30–80 Hz, gamma oscillations) have been associated with cognitive processes such as sensory perception and integration, attention, learning, and memory. Gamma oscillations are disrupted in disorders for which cognitive deficits are hallmark symptoms such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. In vitro, various neurotransmitters have been found to modulate gamma oscillations. Serotonin (5-HT) has long been known to be important for both behavioural and cognitive functions such as learning and memory. Multiple 5-HT receptor subtypes are expressed in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and high doses of 5-HT reduce the power of induced gamma oscillations. Hypothesizing that 5-HT may have cell- and receptor subtype-specific modulatory effects, we investigated the receptor subtypes, cell types and cellular mechanisms engaged by 5-HT in the modulation of gamma oscillations in mice and rats. We found that 5-HT decreases the power of kainate-induced hippocampal gamma oscillations in both species via the 5-HT1A receptor subtype. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings demonstrated that this decrease was caused by a hyperpolarization of CA3 pyramidal cells and a reduction of their firing frequency, but not by alteration of inhibitory neurotransmission. Finally, our results show that the effect on pyramidal cells is mediated via the G protein-coupled receptor inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir3. Our findings suggest this novel cellular mechanism as a potential target for therapies that are aimed at alleviating cognitive decline by helping the brain to maintain or re-establish normal gamma oscillation levels in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25107925

  8. Carbobenzoxy amino acids: Structural requirements for cholecystokinin receptor antagonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Maton, P.N.; Sutliff, V.E.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    The authors used dispersed acini prepared from guinea pig pancreas to examine 28 carbobenzoxy (CBZ) amino acids for their abilities to function as cholecystokinin receptor antagonists. All amino acid derivatives tested, except for CBZ-alanine, CBZ-glycine, and N alpha-CBZ- lysine, were able to inhibit the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by the C-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin. In general, there was a good correlation between the ability of a carbobenzoxy amino acid to inhibit stimulated amylase secretion and the ability of the amino acid derivative to inhibit binding of /sup 125/I-cholecystokinin. The inhibition of cholecystokinin-stimulated amylase secretion was competitive, fully reversible, and specific for those secretagogues that interact with the cholecystokinin receptor. The potencies with which the various carbobenzoxy amino acids inhibited the action of cholecystokinin varied 100-fold and CBZ-cystine was the most potent cholecystokinin receptor antagonist. This variation in potency was primarily but not exclusively a function of the hydrophobicity of the amino acid side chain.

  9. Evaluation of radiological data of some saturated fatty acids using gamma ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, Prashant S.; Pawar, Pravina P.; Palani Selvam, T.

    2016-02-01

    Radiological parameters such as mass attenuation coefficients (μm), total attenuation cross section (σtot), molar extinction coefficient (ε), mass energy absorption coefficient (μen/ρ) and effective electronic cross section (σt, el) of saturated fatty acids, namely butyric acid (C4H8O2), caproic acid (C6H12O2), enanthic acid (C7H14O2), caprylic acid (C8H16O2), pelargonic acid (C9H18O2) and valeric acid (C5H10O2) were measured using NaI(Tl)-based gamma spectrometry. Radioactive sources used in the study are 57Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, 54Mn, 60Co and 22Na. Gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set up was used in the study. The measured data were compared against Win-XCOM-based data. The agreement is within 1%.

  10. GC-MS Analysis of [gamma]-Hydroxybutyric Acid Analogs: A Forensic Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henck, Colin; Nally, Luke

    2007-01-01

    An upper-division forensic chemistry experiment is described. It involves using glycolic acid and sodium glycolate as analogs of [gamma]-hydroxybutyric acid and its sodium salt. The experiment shows the use of silylation in GC-MS analysis and gives students the opportunity to work with a commonly used silylating reagent,…

  11. Induction of renal cytochrome P450 arachidonic acid epoxygenase activity by dietary gamma-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhigang; Ng, Valerie Y; Su, Ping; Engler, Marguerite M; Engler, Mary B; Huang, Yong; Lin, Emil; Kroetz, Deanna L

    2006-05-01

    Dietary gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), a omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid found in borage oil (BOR), lowers systolic blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). GLA is converted into arachidonic acid (AA) by elongation and desaturation steps. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) are cytochrome P450 (P450)-derived AA eicosanoids with important roles in regulating blood pressure. This study tested the hypothesis that the blood pressure-lowering effect of a GLA-enriched diet involves alteration of P450-catalyzed AA metabolism. Microsomes and RNA were isolated from the renal cortex of male SHRs fed a basal fat-free diet for 5 weeks to which 11% by weight of sesame oil (SES) or BOR was added. There was a 2.6- to 3.5-fold increase in P450 epoxygenase activity in renal microsomes isolated from the BOR-fed SHRs compared with the SES-fed rats. Epoxygenase activity accounted for 58% of the total AA metabolism in the BOR-treated kidney microsomes compared with 33% in the SES-treated rats. More importantly, renal 14,15- and 8,9-EET levels increased 1.6- to 2.5-fold after dietary BOR treatment. The increase in EET formation is consistent with increases in CYP2C23, CYP2C11, and CYP2J protein levels. There were no differences in the level of renal P450 epoxygenase mRNA between the SES- and BOR-treated rats. Enhanced synthesis of the vasodilatory EETs and decreased formation of the vasoconstrictive 20-HETE suggests that changes in P450-mediated AA metabolism may contribute, at least in part, to the blood pressure-lowering effect of a BOR-enriched diet. PMID:16421287

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma signaling in human sperm physiology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Li; Xian, Hua; Cao, Jing-Chen; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Chen, Miao-Miao; Qian, Yi; Jiang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a member of the PPARs, which are transcription factors of the steroid receptor superfamily. PPARγ acts as an important molecule for regulating energy homeostasis, modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and is reciprocally regulated by HPG. In the human, PPARγ protein is highly expressed in ejaculated spermatozoa, implying a possible role of PPARγ signaling in regulating sperm energy dissipation. PPARγ protein is also expressed in Sertoli cells and germ cells (spermatocytes). Its activation can be induced during capacitation and the acrosome reaction. This mini-review will focus on how PPARγ signaling may affect fertility and sperm quality and the potential reversibility of these adverse effects.

  13. Wakayama Symposium: Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-gamma (PPARγ) and Meibomian Gland Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jester, James V.; Brown, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Recently we have shown that mouse and human meibomian glands undergo specific age-related changes, including decreased acinar cell proliferation, acinar atrophy, and altered peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) localization from cytoplasmic-vesicular/nuclear in young mice and humans to nuclear in old mice and humans. Since PPARγ is a lipid-sensitive, nuclear receptor implicated in regulating adipocyte and sebocyte differentiation and lipogenesis, our findings suggest that PPARγ may be involved in modulating meibomian gland differentiation during aging. Based on these findings, we propose that aging of the meibomian gland results in downregulation of PPARγ, leading to decreased meibocyte differentiation and lipid synthesis, gland atrophy, and a hyposecretory meibomian gland dysfunction. PMID:23084144

  14. Wakayama Symposium: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) and meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jester, James V; Brown, Donald J

    2012-10-01

    Recently we have shown that mouse and human meibomian glands undergo specific age-related changes, including decreased acinar cell proliferation, acinar atrophy, and altered peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) localization from cytoplasmic-vesicular/nuclear in young mice and humans to nuclear in old mice and humans. Since PPARγ is a lipid-sensitive, nuclear receptor implicated in regulating adipocyte and sebocyte differentiation and lipogenesis, our findings suggest that PPARγ may be involved in modulating meibomian gland differentiation during aging. Based on these findings, we propose that aging of the meibomian gland results in downregulation of PPARγ, leading to decreased meibocyte differentiation and lipid synthesis, gland atrophy, and a hyposecretory meibomian gland dysfunction.

  15. High affinity retinoic acid receptor antagonists: analogs of AGN 193109.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A T; Wang, L; Gillett, S J; Chandraratna, R A

    1999-02-22

    A series of high affinity retinoic acid receptor (RAR) antagonists were prepared based upon the known antagonist AGN 193109 (2). Introduction of various phenyl groups revealed a preference for substitution at the para-position relative to the meta-site. Antagonists with the highest affinities for the RARs possessed hydrophobic groups, however, the presence of polar functionality was also well tolerated.

  16. Combined Treatment With Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) Gamma Ligands and Gamma Radiation Induces Apoptosis by PPARγ-Independent Up-Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Deoxyribonucleic Acid Damage Signals in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Eun Jong; Im, Chang-Nim; Park, Seon Hwa; Moon, Eun-Yi; Hong, Sung Hee

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate possible radiosensitizing activities of the well-known peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ ligand ciglitazone and novel PPARγ ligands CAY10415 and CAY10506 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity was assessed using a clonogenic cell survival assay. To investigate the mechanism underlying PPARγ ligand-induced radiosensitization, the subdiploid cellular DNA fraction was analyzed by flow cytometry. Activation of the caspase pathway by combined PPARγ ligands and γ-radiation treatment was detected by immunoblot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and flow cytometry. Results: The 3 PPARγ ligands induced cell death and ROS generation in a PPARγ-independent manner, enhanced γ-radiation–induced apoptosis and caspase-3–mediated poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage in vitro. The combined PPARγ ligand/γ-radiation treatment triggered caspase-8 activation, and this initiator caspase played an important role in the combination-induced apoptosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ ligands may enhance the γ-radiation-induced DNA damage response, possibly by increasing γ-H2AX expression. Moreover, the combination treatment significantly increased ROS generation, and the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine inhibited the combined treatment-induced ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Conclusions: Taken together, these results indicated that the combined treatment of PPARγ ligands and γ-radiation synergistically induced DNA damage and apoptosis, which was regulated by ROS.

  17. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role.

  18. A comparison of gamma-aminobutyric acid and the semi-rigid analogues 4-aminotetrolic acid, 4-aminocrotonic acid and imidazole-4-acetic acid on the isolated superior cervical ganglion of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bowery, N G; Jones, G P

    1976-01-01

    1 The rat superior cervical ganglion possesses receptors for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This can be demonstrated in vitro by recording the changes in ganglionic surface potential which occur after the addition of GABA to the bathing solution. 2 The action of three conformationally-restricted analogues of GABA namely 4-aminotetrolic acid (4-ATA), trans 4-aminocrotonic acid (4-ACA) and imidazole-4-acetic acid (IAA) have been examined for activity at this peripheral receptor. 3 All three analogues depolarized the ganglion in a manner similar to GABA. Their actions were transient and were 'occluded' by GABA; also the dose-response curve in each case was parallel to that of GABA. Molar potencies relative to GABA (= 1) were 4-ACA = 1.48, IAA = 0.100, 4-ATA = 0.0028. 4 The action of each analogue could be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline and tetramethylenedisulphotetramine at doses which had relatively little effect on responses to the cholinomimetic carbachol. 5 4-ACA and IAA (1 mM) significantly reduced the ganglionic accumulation of [3H]-GABA (0.2 muM) by 88% and 58% respectively whereas 4-ATA (1 mM), caused no significant reduction in [3H]-GABA accumulation. PMID:1260178

  19. Dopamine D2High receptors stimulated by phencyclidines, lysergic acid diethylamide, salvinorin A, and modafinil.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Philip; Guan, Hong-Chang; Hirbec, Hélène

    2009-08-01

    Although it is commonly stated that phencyclidine is an antagonist at ionotropic glutamate receptors, there has been little measure of its potency on other receptors in brain tissue. Although we previously reported that phencyclidine stimulated cloned-dopamine D2Long and D2Short receptors, others reported that phencyclidine did not stimulate D2 receptors in homogenates of rat brain striatum. This study, therefore, examined whether phencyclidine and other hallucinogens and psychostimulants could stimulate the incorporation of [(35)S]GTP-gamma-S into D2 receptors in homogenates of rat brain striatum, using the same conditions as previously used to study the cloned D2 receptors. Using 10 microM dopamine to define 100% stimulation, phencyclidine elicited a maximum incorporation of 46% in rat striata, with a half-maximum concentration of 70 nM for phencyclidine, when compared with 80 nM for dopamine, 89 nM for salvinorin A (48 nM for D2Long), 105 nM for lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), 120 nM for R-modafinil, 710 nM for dizocilpine, 1030 nM for ketamine, and >10,000 nM for S-modafinil. These compounds also inhibited the binding of the D2-selective ligand [(3)H]domperidone. The incorporation was inhibited by the presence of 200 microM guanylylimidodiphosphate and also by D2 blockade, using 10 microM S-sulpiride, but not by D1 blockade with 10 microM SCH23390. Hypertonic buffer containing 150 mM NaCl inhibited the stimulation by phencyclidine, which may explain negative results by others. It is concluded that phencyclidine and other psychostimulants and hallucinogens can stimulate dopamine D2 receptors at concentrations related to their behavioral actions.

  20. Up-regulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter I mediates ethanol sensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, J-H; Ma, Y-H; Yang, N; Mei, Z-T; Zhang, M-H; Fei, J; Guo, L-H

    2004-01-01

    Ethanol is among the most widely abused drugs in the world. Chronic ethanol consumption leads to ethanol tolerance and addiction, and impairs learning and memory. Na+/Cl- dependent GABA transporters play an important role in controlling the concentration of GABA in the synaptic cleft, and thus they control the intensity and duration of synaptic transmission of GABA. It has been suggested that GABAergic system is involved in ethanol consumption, tolerance and addiction, because chronic ethanol consumption alters the expression of GABAA receptors and drugs on GABA receptors affect ethanol actions. The results of the present study reveal that that activity of GABA transporters in mouse brain after 15-min acute ethanol injection or after chronic ethanol consumption is increased. Moreover, mice pre-injected with a competitive or a noncompetitive antagonist of gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter subtype 1 (GAT1) showed high sensitivity to the sedative/hypnotic effects of ethanol. In contrast, transgenic mice overexpressing GAT1 displayed low sensitivity to ethanol, as shown by the righting reflex test. Mice overexpressing GAT1 survived a lethal dose of ethanol (9 g/kg, i.p.) longer, maintained locomotor activity longer after a sub-lethal dose (1.75 g/kg, i.p.) and exhibited a higher median lethal dose than wild-type littermates. These results suggest that GAT1 plays an important role in sensitivity to ethanol, and might be a therapeutic target for alcoholism prevention and treatment. Acute and chronic ethanol administration resulted in the increase of GABA transporter function. Use of GAT1 selective inhibitors and GAT1 overexpressing mice thus demonstrate that GAT1 should be an important protein mediating sensitivity to ethanol in mice.

  1. A role for Bruton's tyrosine kinase in B cell antigen receptor-mediated activation of phospholipase C-gamma 2

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Defects in the gene encoding Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) result in a disease called X-linked agammaglobulinemia, in which there is a profound decrease of mature B cells due to a block in B cell development. Recent studies have shown that Btk is tyrosine phosphorylated and activated upon B cell antigen receptor (BCR) stimulation. To elucidate the functions of this kinase, we examined BCR signaling of DT40 B cells deficient in Btk. Tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)-gamma 2 upon receptor stimulation was significantly reduced in the mutant cells, leading to the loss of both BCR-coupled phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis and calcium mobilization. Pleckstrin homology and Src-homology 2 domains of Btk were required for PLC-gamma 2 activation. Since Syk is also required for the BCR-induced PLC-gamma 2 activation, our findings indicate that PLC-gamma 2 activation is regulated by Btk and Syk through their concerted actions. PMID:8691147

  2. Pharmacophore modeling improves virtual screening for novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma ligands

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Stephanie N.; Garcia, Zulma; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Bevan, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in regulating various metabolic and immune processes. The PPAR family of receptors possesses a large binding cavity that imparts promiscuity of ligand binding not common to other nuclear receptors. This feature increases the challenge of using computational methods to identify PPAR ligands that will dock favorably into a structural model. Utilizing both ligand- and structure-based pharmacophore methods, we sought to improve agonist prediction by grouping ligands according to pharmacophore features, and pairing models derived from these features with receptor structures for docking. For 22 of the 33 receptor structures evaluated we observed an increase in true positive rate (TPR) when screening was restricted to compounds sharing molecular features found in rosiglitazone. A combination of structure models used for docking resulted in a higher TPR (40%) when compared to docking with a single structure model (less than 20%). Prediction was also improved when specific protein-ligand interactions between the docked ligands and structure models were given greater weight than the calculated free energy of binding. A large-scale screen of compounds using a marketed drug database verified the predictive ability of the selected structure models. This study highlights the steps necessary to improve screening for PPARγ ligands using multiple structure models, ligand-based pharmacophore data, evaluation of protein-ligand interactions, and comparison of docking datasets. The unique combination of methods presented here holds potential for more efficient screening of compounds with unknown affinity for PPARγ that could serve as candidates for therapeutic development. PMID:25616366

  3. Gamma-aminobutyric acid induces tumor cells apoptosis via GABABR1·β-arrestins·JNKs signaling module.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hui; Wu, Jin-Xia; Shan, Feng-Xiao; Zhang, Shang-Nuan; Cheng, Qian; Zheng, Jun-Nian; Pei, Dong-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter in central nervous system, has yet been found to widely exist in tumor tissues to regulate tumor cells growth. However, the function of GABA on inducing tumor cells apoptosis and the potential mechanism are still unclear. In order to detect whether GABA via GABAB receptor GABABR1 would activate c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) to promote tumor cells apoptosis, co-immunoprecipitation assay was used to investigate the association of β-arrestins with GABABR1 and JNKs in the different four cancer cell lines. Our observation demonstrated that β-arrestins, in addition to their role in G protein-coupled receptors desensitization, had an additional function as adapter proteins to recruit JNKs to GABABR1, thereby conferring distinct enzymatic activities upon the receptor, which may trigger JNKs signal pathway involved in the regulation of cellular growth. Activated JNKs subsequently phosphorylated downstream c-Jun to transcribe a wide variety of pro-apoptotic genes. Additionally, GABA up-regulated the ratio of pro-apoptotic protein Bax to anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, and thus facilitated caspase-3 cleavage, leading to tumor cells apoptosis in a mitochondrial-dependent pathway. In contrast, GABABR antagonist CGP35348 reversed GABA-induced JNKs phosphorylation and its downstream proteins activation, which consequently restrained tumor cells apoptosis. Taken together, our study suggested that GABA via its receptor GABABR1 recruited β-arrestins to facilitate the activation of JNKs cascade, resulting in tumor cells growth inhibition.

  4. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases. PMID:26579439

  5. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-03-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases. PMID:26579439

  6. Gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions. [prebiotic significance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Graff, R. L.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1980-01-01

    The gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions was studied under initially oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions in an attempt to determine the possible interconversion of malic acid into other carboxylic acids, specifically those associated with Krebs cycle. The effect of dose on product formation of the system was investigated. Gas-liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry was used as the principal means of identification of the nonvolatile products. Thin layer chromatography and direct probe mass spectroscopy were also employed. The findings show that a variety of carboxylic acids are formed, with malonic and succinic acids in greatest abundance. These products have all been identified as being formed in the gamma-irradiation of acetic acid, suggesting a common intermediary. Since these molecules fit into a metabolic cycle, it is strongly suggestive that prebiotic pathways provided the basis for biological systems.

  7. Expression of the human interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain in insect cells using a baculovirus expression vector.

    PubMed

    Raivio, E; Oetken, C; Oker-Blom, C; Engberg, C; Akerman, K; Lindqvist, C

    1995-04-01

    The gene encoding the gamma-chain of the human Interleukin-2 receptor was expressed in lepidopteran insect cells using the baculovirus expression vector system. The corresponding gene was inserted under the polyhedrin promoter of the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus and expressed in the Spodoptera frugiperda insect cell line Sf9 during viral infection. The recombinant receptor protein was identified by immunoblotting in cell lysates, prepared from insect cells infected with the recombinant virus. At 40 h post infection the corresponding protein was detected as two major bands with apparent molecular weights of 50-60 kDa using a rabbit anti-human IL-2R gamma-receptor specific antiserum. Metabolic labelling with [35S]-methionine and SDS-PAGE analysis of the recombinant baculovirus infected insect cells verified the immunoblotting data. The expressed IL-2R gamma- protein could also be determined on the surface of infected insect cells by flow cytometer analysis. PMID:7899821

  8. Antiviral defense in mice lacking both alpha/beta and gamma interferon receptors.

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, M F; Müller, U; Huang, S; Aguet, M; Zinkernagel, R M

    1995-01-01

    Alpha/beta interferon (IFN) and gamma IFN exert widely overlapping biological effects. Still, mice with individually inactivated alpha/beta or gamma receptors exhibit variably severely reduced resistance to infection and altered immune responses. To investigate to what extent the two IFN systems are functionally redundant, we generated mice with a combined receptor defect (AG129 mice). Like mice with individual mutations, AG129 mice had no apparent anomalies, confirming that in the mouse the IFN system is not essential for normal development. These mice showed an additive phenotype with respect to antiviral defense and exhibited an increased susceptibility to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and notably vaccinia virus infection. Because of unlimited replication and subsequent rapid exhaustion of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) precursors, these mice were unable to mount a CTL response to LCMV. CD8(+)-mediated immunopathology was absent in LCMV-infected mice, and virus persisted. Vaccinia virus replicated much faster in AG129 mice, and a 10(4)-fold lower dose of vaccinia virus was sufficient to prime these mice. With the normal priming dose of 10(6) PFU, cytopathic effects and overwhelming infection possibly causing partial exhaustion of CTL interfered with the anti-vaccinia virus response. Even though global antiviral immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers were within normal ranges, the IgG subclass distribution was heavily biased toward IgG1. PMID:7609046

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma abrogates Smad-dependent collagen stimulation by targeting the p300 transcriptional coactivator.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Asish K; Bhattacharyya, Swati; Wei, Jun; Kim, Suyeon; Barak, Yaacov; Mori, Yasuji; Varga, John

    2009-09-01

    Ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) abrogate the stimulation of collagen gene transcription induced by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Here, we delineate the mechanisms underlying this important novel physiological function for PPAR-gamma in connective tissue homeostasis. First, we demonstrated that antagonistic regulation of TGF-beta activity by PPAR-gamma ligands involves cellular PPAR-gamma, since 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) failed to block TGF-beta-induced responses in either primary cultures of PPAR-gamma-null murine embryonic fibroblasts, or in normal human skin fibroblasts with RNAi-mediated knockdown of PPAR-gamma. Next, we examined the molecular basis underlying the abrogation of TGF-beta signaling by PPAR-gamma in normal human fibroblasts in culture. The results demonstrated that Smad-dependent transcriptional responses were blocked by PPAR-gamma without preventing Smad2/3 activation. In contrast, the interaction between activated Smad2/3 and the transcriptional coactivator and histone acetyltransferase p300 induced by TGF-beta, and the accumulation of p300 on consensus Smad-binding DNA sequences and histone H4 hyperacetylation at the COL1A2 locus, were all prevented by PPAR-gamma. Wild-type p300, but not a mutant form of p300 lacking functional histone acetyltransferase, was able to restore TGF-beta-induced stimulation of COL1A2 in the presence of PPAR-gamma ligands. Collectively, these results indicate that PPAR-gamma blocked Smad-mediated transcriptional responses by preventing p300 recruitment and histone H4 hyperacetylation, resulting in the inhibition of TGF-beta-induced collagen gene expression. Pharmacological activation of PPAR-gamma thus may represent a novel therapeutic approach to target p300-dependent TGF-beta profibrotic responses such as stimulation of collagen gene expression.

  10. Novel time-dependent vascular actions of {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, Saoirse E. . E-mail: Saoirse.o'sullivan@nottingham.ac.uk; Tarling, Elizabeth J.; Bennett, Andrew J.; Kendall, David A.; Randall, Michael D.

    2005-11-25

    Cannabinoids have widespread effects on the cardiovascular system, only some of which are mediated via G-protein-coupled cell surface receptors. The active ingredient of cannabis, {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), causes acute vasorelaxation in various arteries. Here we show for the first time that THC also causes slowly developing vasorelaxation through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma (PPAR{gamma}). In vitro, THC (10 {mu}M) caused time-dependent vasorelaxation of rat isolated arteries. Time-dependent vasorelaxation to THC was similar to that produced by the PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone and was inhibited by the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 (1 {mu}M), but not the cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist AM251 (1 {mu}M). Time-dependent vasorelaxation to THC requires an intact endothelium, nitric oxide, production of hydrogen peroxide, and de novo protein synthesis. In transactivation assays in cultured HEK293 cells, THC-activated PPAR{gamma}, transiently expressed in combination with retinoid X receptor {alpha} and a luciferase reporter gene, in a concentration-dependent manner (100 nM-10 {mu}M). In vitro incubation with THC (1 or 10 {mu}M, 8 days) stimulated adipocyte differentiation in cultured 3T3L1 cells, a well-accepted property of PPAR{gamma} ligands. The present results provide strong evidence that THC is a PPAR{gamma} ligand, stimulation of which causes time-dependent vasorelaxation, implying some of the pleiotropic effects of cannabis may be mediated by nuclear receptors.

  11. The gamma-aminobutyric acid shunt contributes to closing the tricarboxylic acid cycle in Synechocystis sp PCC 6803

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, W; Brune, D; Vermaas, WFJ

    2014-07-16

    A traditional 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is missing in the cyanobacterial tricarboxylic acid cycle. To determine pathways that convert 2-oxoglutarate into succinate in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a series of mutant strains, Delta sll1981, Delta slr0370, Delta slr1022 and combinations thereof, deficient in 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase (Sll1981), succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (Slr0370), and/or in gamma-aminobutyrate metabolism (Slr1022) were constructed. Like in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, N-acetylornithine aminotransferase, encoded by slr1022, was shown to also function as gamma-aminobutyrate aminotransferase, catalysing gamma-aminobutyrate conversion to succinic semialdehyde. As succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase converts succinic semialdehyde to succinate, an intact gamma-aminobutyrate shunt is present in Synechocystis. The Delta sll1981 strain, lacking 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase, exhibited a succinate level that was 60% of that in wild type. However, the succinate level in the Delta slr1022 and Delta slr0370 strains and the Delta sll1981/Delta slr1022 and Delta sll1981/Delta slr0370 double mutants was reduced to 20-40% of that in wild type, suggesting that the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt has a larger impact on metabolite flux to succinate than the pathway via 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase. C-13-stable isotope analysis indicated that the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt catalysed conversion of glutamate to succinate. Independent of the 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase bypass, the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt is a major contributor to flux from 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate to succinate in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  12. Selective agonists of retinoic acid receptors: comparative toxicokinetics and embryonic exposure.

    PubMed

    Arafa, H M; Elmazar, M M; Hamada, F M; Reichert, U; Shroot, B; Nau, H

    2000-01-01

    Three biologically active synthetic retinoids were investigated that bind selectively to retinoic acid receptors RARs (alpha, beta and gamma). The retinoids were previously demonstrated to have different teratogenic effects in the mouse in terms of potency and regioselectivity. The teratogenic potency rank order (alpha >beta >gamma) was found to be more or less compatible with the receptor binding affinities and transactivation potencies of the retinoid ligands to their respective receptors. The RARalpha agonist (Am580; CD336) induced a wide spectrum of malformations; CD2019 (RARbeta agonist) and especially CD437 (RARgamma agonist) produced more restricted defects. In the current study we tried to address whether the differences in teratogenic effects are solely related to binding affinity and transactivation differences or also due to differences in embryonic exposure. Therefore, transplacental kinetics of the ligands were assessed following administration of a single oral dose of 15 mg/kg of either retinoid given to NMRI mice on day 11 of gestation. Am580 was rapidly transferred to the embryo resulting in the highest embryonic exposure [embryo to maternal plasma area under the time vs concentration curve (AUC)(0-24 h )ratio (E/M) was 1.7], in accordance with its highest teratogenic potency. The low placental transfer of CD2019 (E/M of 0.3) was compatible with its lower teratogenic potential. Of major interest was the finding that the CD437, though being least teratogenic, exhibited considerable embryonic exposure (E/M of 0.6). These findings suggest that both the embryonic exposure and receptor binding transactivation selectivity are crucial determinants of the teratogenicity of these retinoid ligands.

  13. Cortical and subcortical gamma amino acid butyric acid deficits in anxiety and stress disorders: Clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and stress disorders are a major public health issue. However, their pathophysiology is still unclear. The gamma amino acid butyric acid (GABA) neurochemical system has been strongly implicated in their pathogenesis and treatment by numerous preclinical and clinical studies, the most recent of which have been highlighted and critical review in this paper. Changes in cortical GABA appear related to normal personality styles and responses to stress. While there is accumulating animal and human neuroimaging evidence of cortical and subcortical GABA deficits across a number of anxiety conditions, a clear pattern of findings in specific brain regions for a given disorder is yet to emerge. Neuropsychiatric conditions with anxiety as a clinical feature may have GABA deficits as an underlying feature. Different classes of anxiolytic therapies support GABA function, and this may be an area in which newer GABA neuroimaging techniques could soon offer more personalized therapy. Novel GABAergic pharmacotherapies in development offer potential improvements over current therapies in reducing sedative and physiologic dependency effects, while offering rapid anxiolysis. PMID:27014597

  14. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Solanky, Bhavana S.; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A. E.; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.; Miller, David H.; Thompson, Alan J.; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is thought to be the major cause of ongoing, irreversible disability in progressive stages of multiple sclerosis. Gamma-aminobutyric acid is the principle inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. The aims of this study were to investigate if gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (i) are abnormal in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis compared with healthy controls; and (ii) correlate with physical and cognitive performance in this patient population. Thirty patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and 17 healthy control subjects underwent single-voxel MEGA-PRESS (MEscher-GArwood Point RESolved Spectroscopy) magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T, to quantify gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the prefrontal cortex, right hippocampus and left sensorimotor cortex. All subjects were assessed clinically and underwent a cognitive assessment. Multiple linear regression models were used to compare differences in gamma-aminobutyric acid concentrations between patients and controls adjusting for age, gender and tissue fractions within each spectroscopic voxel. Regression was used to examine the relationships between the cognitive function and physical disability scores specific for these regions with gamma-aminobuytric acid levels, adjusting for age, gender, and total N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamine-glutamate complex levels. When compared with controls, patients performed significantly worse on all motor and sensory tests, and were cognitively impaired in processing speed and verbal memory. Patients had significantly lower gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the hippocampus (adjusted difference = −0.403 mM, 95% confidence intervals −0.792, −0.014, P = 0.043) and sensorimotor cortex (adjusted difference = −0.385 mM, 95% confidence intervals −0.667, −0.104, P = 0.009) compared with controls. In patients, reduced motor function in the right upper and lower limb was associated with lower gamma-aminobutyric acid

  15. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cawley, Niamh; Solanky, Bhavana S; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A E; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Miller, David H; Thompson, Alan J; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-09-01

    Neurodegeneration is thought to be the major cause of ongoing, irreversible disability in progressive stages of multiple sclerosis. Gamma-aminobutyric acid is the principle inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. The aims of this study were to investigate if gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (i) are abnormal in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis compared with healthy controls; and (ii) correlate with physical and cognitive performance in this patient population. Thirty patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and 17 healthy control subjects underwent single-voxel MEGA-PRESS (MEscher-GArwood Point RESolved Spectroscopy) magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T, to quantify gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the prefrontal cortex, right hippocampus and left sensorimotor cortex. All subjects were assessed clinically and underwent a cognitive assessment. Multiple linear regression models were used to compare differences in gamma-aminobutyric acid concentrations between patients and controls adjusting for age, gender and tissue fractions within each spectroscopic voxel. Regression was used to examine the relationships between the cognitive function and physical disability scores specific for these regions with gamma-aminobuytric acid levels, adjusting for age, gender, and total N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamine-glutamate complex levels. When compared with controls, patients performed significantly worse on all motor and sensory tests, and were cognitively impaired in processing speed and verbal memory. Patients had significantly lower gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the hippocampus (adjusted difference = -0.403 mM, 95% confidence intervals -0.792, -0.014, P = 0.043) and sensorimotor cortex (adjusted difference = -0.385 mM, 95% confidence intervals -0.667, -0.104, P = 0.009) compared with controls. In patients, reduced motor function in the right upper and lower limb was associated with lower gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration in the

  16. Impact evaluation of α-lipoic acid in gamma-irradiated erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouky, Omar S.; Selim, Nabila S.; Elbakrawy, Eman M.; Rezk, Rezk A.

    2011-03-01

    This work is intended to study in vitro the ability of lipoic acid to protect erythrocytes against the oxidative damage resulting from exposure to gamma radiation through measurement of their rheological properties and to study the effects of detergent on their membrane solubility and permeability. Different doses of gamma radiation were applied: the most recommended and applied dose (25 Gy), and two higher doses, namely 50 and 100 Gy. The effect of addition of lipoic acid as well as its effect as a radioprotector was tested. The obtained results show changes in structural integrity of the erythrocyte cell membrane components as a result of oxidative damage due to gamma radiation that could be improved by pre-treatment with the antioxidant lipoic acid.

  17. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cawley, Niamh; Solanky, Bhavana S; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A E; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Miller, David H; Thompson, Alan J; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-09-01

    Neurodegeneration is thought to be the major cause of ongoing, irreversible disability in progressive stages of multiple sclerosis. Gamma-aminobutyric acid is the principle inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. The aims of this study were to investigate if gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (i) are abnormal in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis compared with healthy controls; and (ii) correlate with physical and cognitive performance in this patient population. Thirty patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and 17 healthy control subjects underwent single-voxel MEGA-PRESS (MEscher-GArwood Point RESolved Spectroscopy) magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T, to quantify gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the prefrontal cortex, right hippocampus and left sensorimotor cortex. All subjects were assessed clinically and underwent a cognitive assessment. Multiple linear regression models were used to compare differences in gamma-aminobutyric acid concentrations between patients and controls adjusting for age, gender and tissue fractions within each spectroscopic voxel. Regression was used to examine the relationships between the cognitive function and physical disability scores specific for these regions with gamma-aminobuytric acid levels, adjusting for age, gender, and total N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamine-glutamate complex levels. When compared with controls, patients performed significantly worse on all motor and sensory tests, and were cognitively impaired in processing speed and verbal memory. Patients had significantly lower gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the hippocampus (adjusted difference = -0.403 mM, 95% confidence intervals -0.792, -0.014, P = 0.043) and sensorimotor cortex (adjusted difference = -0.385 mM, 95% confidence intervals -0.667, -0.104, P = 0.009) compared with controls. In patients, reduced motor function in the right upper and lower limb was associated with lower gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration in the

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist rosiglitazone attenuates postincisional pain by regulating macrophage polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa-Moriyama, Maiko; Ohnou, Tetsuya; Godai, Kohei; Kurimoto, Tae; Nakama, Mayo; Kanmura, Yuichi

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone attenuated postincisional pain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone alters macrophage polarization to F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages at the incisional sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transplantation of rosiglitazone-treated macrophages produced analgesic effects. -- Abstract: Acute inflammation triggered by macrophage infiltration to injured tissue promotes wound repair and may induce pain hypersensitivity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR){gamma} signaling is known to regulate heterogeneity of macrophages, which are often referred to as classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages have considerable antimicrobial activity and produce a wide variety of proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, M2 macrophages are involved in anti-inflammatory and homeostatic functions linked to wound healing and tissue repair. Although it has been suggested that PPAR{gamma} agonists attenuate pain hypersensitivity, the molecular mechanism of macrophage-mediated effects of PPAR{gamma} signaling on pain development has not been explored. In this study, we investigated the link between the phenotype switching of macrophage polarization induced by PPAR{gamma} signaling and the development of acute pain hypersensitivity. Local administration of rosiglitazone significantly ameliorated hypersensitivity to heat and mechanical stimuli, and paw swelling. Consistent with the down-regulation of nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) phosphorylation by rosiglitazone at the incisional sites, the number of F4/80{sup +}iNOS{sup +} M1 macrophages was decreased whereas numbers of F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages were increased in rosiglitazone-treated incisional sites 24 h after the procedure. In addition, gene induction of anti-inflammatory M2-macrophage-associated markers such as arginase1, FIZZ1 and interleukin (IL)-10 were significantly increased, whereas

  19. Ligand regulation of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors: implications for development of novel therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Solt, Laura A.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review In the late 1980s, the cloning of several nuclear receptors led to the intense search and isolation of new members of this superfamily. Despite their identification, many of these receptors were dubbed ‘orphan’ receptors, as their physiological ligands remained unknown. Recent reports have presented evidence for one family of orphan receptors, the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors (RORs), in several pathologies, including osteoporosis, several autoimmune diseases, asthma, cancer, diabetes and obesity. The present review summarizes the studies identifying ligands for the RORs and evaluates their role as targets for potential therapeutics. Recent findings Significant progress was made in the initial identification of ligands for the RORs when X-ray crystallographic studies identified several molecules within the ligand-binding pockets of RORα and RORβ. Recently, we identified endogenous and synthetic ligands for RORα and RORγ, thereby solidifying their function as ligand-dependent transcription factors. Summary Recent studies have established roles for the RORs in physiological development and the advent of disease. Identification of ligands for the RORs, both endogenous and synthetic, has established these receptors as attractive new therapeutic targets for the treatment of ROR-related diseases. PMID:20463469

  20. Molecular characterization, transcriptional activity and nutritional regulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    He, An-Yuan; Liu, Cai-Zhi; Chen, Li-Qiao; Ning, Li-Jun; Qin, Jian-Guang; Li, Jia-Ming; Zhang, Mei-Ling; Du, Zhen-Yu

    2015-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a master regulator in lipid metabolism and widely exists in vertebrates. However, the molecular structure and transcriptional activity of PPARγ in fish are still unclear. This study cloned PPARγ from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) referred as NtPPARγ and transfected the NtPPARγ plasmids into HEK-293 cells to explore its mechanism of transcriptional regulation in fish. The expression of NtPPARγ was compared in fed and fasted fish. Two transcripts of NtPPARγ varied at the 5'-untranslated region and the DNA binding domain was highly conserved. Thirty-nine amino acid residues in the ligand binding domain in Nile tilapia were different from those in human. Two transcripts showed different expression profiles in 11 tissues, but both were highly expressed in liver, intestine and kidney. The transcriptional activity assay showed that NtPPARγ collaborates with retinoid X-receptor α (NtRXRα) to regulate the expression of Nile tilapia fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), the compartment of which have been identified as the target gene of PPARγ in human. In the fish fasting trial, the mRNA expression of NtPPARγ1 and NtPPARγ2 in intestine and liver at 3h post-feeding (HPF) was lower than those at 8 HPF, 24 HPF and in fish fasted for 36h, but was relatively stable in kidney among different feeding treatments. In conclusion, the DNA binding domain in PPARγ was highly conserved, while the ligand binding domain was moderately conserved. In Nile tilapia, the PPARγ collaborates with RXRα to perform transcriptional regulation of FABP4 at least in vitro. The plasmid system established in this study along with a cell line from Nile tilapia will be useful tools for the further functional study of PPARγ in fish.

  1. Molecular characterization, transcriptional activity and nutritional regulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    He, An-Yuan; Liu, Cai-Zhi; Chen, Li-Qiao; Ning, Li-Jun; Qin, Jian-Guang; Li, Jia-Ming; Zhang, Mei-Ling; Du, Zhen-Yu

    2015-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a master regulator in lipid metabolism and widely exists in vertebrates. However, the molecular structure and transcriptional activity of PPARγ in fish are still unclear. This study cloned PPARγ from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) referred as NtPPARγ and transfected the NtPPARγ plasmids into HEK-293 cells to explore its mechanism of transcriptional regulation in fish. The expression of NtPPARγ was compared in fed and fasted fish. Two transcripts of NtPPARγ varied at the 5'-untranslated region and the DNA binding domain was highly conserved. Thirty-nine amino acid residues in the ligand binding domain in Nile tilapia were different from those in human. Two transcripts showed different expression profiles in 11 tissues, but both were highly expressed in liver, intestine and kidney. The transcriptional activity assay showed that NtPPARγ collaborates with retinoid X-receptor α (NtRXRα) to regulate the expression of Nile tilapia fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), the compartment of which have been identified as the target gene of PPARγ in human. In the fish fasting trial, the mRNA expression of NtPPARγ1 and NtPPARγ2 in intestine and liver at 3h post-feeding (HPF) was lower than those at 8 HPF, 24 HPF and in fish fasted for 36h, but was relatively stable in kidney among different feeding treatments. In conclusion, the DNA binding domain in PPARγ was highly conserved, while the ligand binding domain was moderately conserved. In Nile tilapia, the PPARγ collaborates with RXRα to perform transcriptional regulation of FABP4 at least in vitro. The plasmid system established in this study along with a cell line from Nile tilapia will be useful tools for the further functional study of PPARγ in fish. PMID:26002036

  2. Seizure control by decanoic acid through direct AMPA receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pishan; Augustin, Katrin; Boddum, Kim; Williams, Sophie; Sun, Min; Terschak, John A; Hardege, Jörg D; Chen, Philip E; Walker, Matthew C; Williams, Robin S B

    2016-02-01

    The medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet is an established treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy that increases plasma levels of decanoic acid and ketones. Recently, decanoic acid has been shown to provide seizure control in vivo, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we show that decanoic acid, but not the ketones β-hydroxybutryate or acetone, shows antiseizure activity in two acute ex vivo rat hippocampal slice models of epileptiform activity. To search for a mechanism of decanoic acid, we show it has a strong inhibitory effect on excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurotransmission in hippocampal slices. Using heterologous expression of excitatory ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA subunits in Xenopus oocytes, we show that this effect is through direct AMPA receptor inhibition, a target shared by a recently introduced epilepsy treatment perampanel. Decanoic acid acts as a non-competitive antagonist at therapeutically relevant concentrations, in a voltage- and subunit-dependent manner, and this is sufficient to explain its antiseizure effects. This inhibitory effect is likely to be caused by binding to sites on the M3 helix of the AMPA-GluA2 transmembrane domain; independent from the binding site of perampanel. Together our results indicate that the direct inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission by decanoic acid in the brain contributes to the anti-convulsant effect of the medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet. PMID:26608744

  3. Safety and tolerability of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in the treatment of alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Beghè, F; Carpanini, M T

    2000-04-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) has been in clinical use in Italy since 1991 for treatment of alcohol dependence. Results of phase III and phase IV studies have shown that the drug is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and in reducing alcohol consumption and alcohol craving. Pharmacosurveillance indicates that abuse of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid is a limited phenomenon in clinical settings when the drug is dispensed under strict medical surveillance and entrusted to a referring familiar member of the patient.

  4. Comparison of gamma-aminobutyric acid effects in different parts of the cat ileum.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N; Itzev, D; Milanov, P

    1999-02-26

    The effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and those of a GABA(A) (muscimol) and a GABA(B) (baclofen) receptor agonists were determined on the spontaneous activity of longitudinally or circularly oriented preparations (segments) isolated from terminal, proximal and distal parts of the cat ileum. GABA applied at 1 microM to 2 mM caused dose-dependent biphasic changes (relaxation and contraction) in spontaneous activity of the longitudinal and circular layers in the terminal and distal parts of the cat ileum and monophasic changes (contraction) in the proximal part. The potency of GABA to elicit relaxant and/or contractile effects in different parts of the ileum showed a proximal-to-terminal increasing pattern. In the longitudinal layer of the distal and terminal ileum, muscimol (100 microM) mimicked the relaxation phase of the GABA effect, while baclofen (100 microM) simulated the contractile phase. Bicuculline, atropine and tetrodotoxin abolished GABA- and muscimol-induced relaxation and suppressed, but failed to prevent GABA- and baclofen-induced contractions. In addition, 2-hydroxysaclofen antagonized the baclofen-induced contractile effect, reduced the GABA-induced contractile phase but failed to prevent GABA- and muscimol-induced relaxation. In the circular layer of the same regions, muscimol mimicked the biphasic GABA effects, while baclofen was without effect. Bicuculline, atropine and tetrodotoxin completely prevented the GABA- and muscimol effects, while 2-hydroxysaclofen failed to antagonize them. In the longitudinal and circular layers of the proximal ileum, muscimol (100 microM) exerted a 'GABA-like' transient contractile effect, while baclofen (100 microM) did not elicit any response. Bicuculline, atropine and tetrodotoxin antagonized the GABA- and muscimol-induced contractile responses of longitudinal and circular layers, while 2-hydroxysaclofen was ineffective. The results suggested that the inhibitory and/or excitatory action of GABA on

  5. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor (LPAR) modulators: The current pharmacological toolbox.

    PubMed

    Llona-Minguez, Sabin; Ghassemian, Artin; Helleday, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Lysophosphatidic acids (LPA) are key lipid-signalling molecules that regulate a remarkably diverse set of cellular events, such as motility, chemotaxis, cell cycle progression, viability, and wound healing. The physiological and pathophysiological consequences of LPA signalling are evident and misregulation of LPA signalling can lead to pathologies like cancer, atherosclerosis, ischaemia, and fibrosis. LPA exerts its biological actions mainly through several types of G protein-coupled receptors, some of which display opposing or redundant effects. For this reason, selective LPA receptor small-molecule ligands can shine light on LPA biology and present an exciting opportunity for drug discovery endeavours. This review provides insights into the detailed chemical nature and pharmacological profile of the small-molecules thus far developed as LPA receptor modulators, as well as information on the preparation of key pharmaceuticals. This summary will facilitate future research efforts and nurture collaboration between chemists and biologists working in this emerging field. PMID:25704399

  6. Ligands and Regulatory Modes of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARγ) in Avians.

    PubMed

    Navidshad, Bahman; Royan, M

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient and gene interaction is an important aspect of poultry metabolism that determines performance capacity. New technological tools in biochemistry and biotechnology make it possible to explore the molecular base of phenotypic characteristics of poultry production. Fats act as energy deposits in the poultry body and are an essential constituent of animal cell membranes. From a functional standpoint, it has been suggested that ingested lipids change liver fatty acid synthesis and other lipogenic enzymes by regulating mRNA synthesis. Nuclear hormone receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors that control several genes involved in lipid metabolism. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors. Three separate PPAR genes have been identified; they are known as α, δ, and γ. The most important metabolic effect of PPARγ in chicken is its task in adipogenesis. Reviewing the ligands of chicken PPARγ gene can be useful to a better understanding of PPARγ regulatory functions.

  7. Retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAralpha) Mutations in Human Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Parrado, A; Chomienne, C; Padua, R A

    2000-10-01

    The retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha) plays a central role in the biology of the myeloid cellular compartment. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARalpha locus probably represent the malignant initiating events in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Recent studies that identify novel interactions between RARalpha and the nuclear receptor co-activators and co-repressors, new functions of the oncogenic RARalpha fusion proteins and their catabolism in retinoic acid-induced differentiation, and the availability of new transgenic mice models have provided important insights into our understanding of the mechanisms by which mutant forms of RARalpha can be implicated in the development of leukemia. Novel alterations of the RARalpha gene identified in hematopoietic malignant disorders other than APL, such as myelodysplastic syndromes, non-APL acute myeloid leukemias and B-chronic lymphocytic leukemias, suggest that disruption of the RARalpha gene might predispose to myeloid and lymphoid disorders.

  8. The role of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid in fear extinction: clinical implications for exposure therapy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael; Myers, Karyn M

    2002-11-15

    Although much is now known about the neural basis of fear acquisition, the mechanisms of fear inhibition or suppression remain largely obscure. Fear inhibition is studied in the laboratory through the use of an extinction procedure, in which an animal (typically a rat) is exposed to nonreinforced presentations of a conditioned stimulus (CS; e.g., a light or tone) that had previously been paired with a fear-inducing unconditioned stimulus (US; e.g., a mild footshock). Over the course of such training, the conditioned fear response exhibited by the rat in the presence of the CS is reduced in amplitude and frequency. This procedure is analogous to those employed in the treatment of fear dysregulation in humans, which typically involve exposure to the feared object in the absence of any overt danger. Recent work on the neural basis of extinction indicates that the neurotransmitters gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate are critically involved. Gamma-aminobutyric acid may act to inhibit brain areas involved in fear learning (e.g., the amygdala), and glutamate, acting at N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, may play a role in the neural plasticity that permits this GABA-mediated inhibition to be exerted appropriately. These insights have significant implications for the conduct of extinction-based clinical interventions for fear disorders.

  9. Rearrangement and junctional-site sequence analyses of T-cell receptor gamma genes in intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes from murine athymic chimeras.

    PubMed

    Whetsell, M; Mosley, R L; Whetsell, L; Schaefer, F V; Miller, K S; Klein, J R

    1991-12-01

    The molecular organization of rearranged T-cell receptor (TCR) gamma genes intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) was studied in athymic radiation chimeras and was compared with the organization of gamma gene rearrangements in IEL from thymus-bearing animals by polymerase chain reaction and by sequence analyses of DNA spanning the junction of the variable (V) and joining (J) genes. In both thymus-bearing mice and athymic chimeras, IEL V-J gamma-gene rearrangements occurred for V gamma 1.2, V gamma 2, and V gamma 5 but not for V gamma 3 or V gamma 4. Sequence analyses of cloned V-J polymerase chain reaction-amplified products indicated that in both thymus-bearing mice and athymic chimeras, rearrangement of V gamma 1.2 and V gamma 5 resulted in in-frame as well as out-of-frame genes, whereas nearly all V gamma 2 rearrangements were out of frame from either type of animal. V-segment nucleotide removal occurred in most V gamma 1.2, V gamma 2, and V gamma 5 rearrangements; J-segment nucleotide removal was common in V gamma 1.2 but not in V gamma 2 or V gamma 5 rearrangements. N-segment nucleotide insertions were present in V gamma 1.2, V gamma 2, and V gamma 5 IEL rearrangements in both thymus-bearing mice and athymic chimeras, resulting in a predominant in-frame sequence for V gamma 5 and a predominant out-of-frame sequence for V gamma 2 genes. These findings demonstrate that (i) TCR gamma-gene rearrangement occurs extrathymically in IEL, (ii) rearrangements of TCR gamma genes involve the same V gene regardless of thymus influence; and (iii) the thymus does not determine the degree to which functional or nonfunctional rearrangements occur in IEL.

  10. Identification of COUP-TFII Orphan Nuclear Receptor as a Retinoic Acid-Activated Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Schoen W; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Zhou, X Edward; Kretschman, Jennifer E; Reynolds, Ross; Vonrhein, Clemens; Xu, Yong; Wang, Liliang; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFI and II) make up the most conserved subfamily of nuclear receptors that play key roles in angiogenesis, neuronal development, organogenesis, cell fate determination, and metabolic homeostasis. Although the biological functions of COUP-TFs have been studied extensively, little is known of their structural features or aspects of ligand regulation. Here we report the ligand-free 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of the human COUP-TFII ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals an autorepressed conformation of the receptor, where helix {alpha}10 is bent into the ligand-binding pocket and the activation function-2 helix is folded into the cofactor binding site, thus preventing the recruitment of coactivators. In contrast, in multiple cell lines, COUP-TFII exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, and ligand binding, substantially reduce the COUP-TFII transcriptional activity. Importantly, retinoid acids are able to promote COUP-TFII to recruit coactivators and activate a COUP-TF reporter construct. Although the concentration needed is higher than the physiological levels of retinoic acids, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, in which ligands activate the receptor by releasing it from the autorepressed conformation.

  11. Expression of the mouse interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain in insect cells using a baculovirus expression vector--comparison with the human common gamma chain.

    PubMed

    Stenroos, K; West, A; Raivio, E; Lindqvist, C

    1997-02-01

    The gene encoding the gamma-chain of the mouse Interleukin-2 receptor was expressed in lepidopteran insect cells using the baculovirus expression vector system. The corresponding gene was inserted under the polyhedrin promoter of the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus and expressed in the Spodoptera frugiperda insect cell line Sf9 during viral infection. The recombinant receptor protein was identified by immunoblotting in cell lysates prepared from insect cells infected with the produced recombinant virus VL1392-mIL-2R gamma. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the corresponding protein could be detected as an approximately 50 kDa protein already at 24 h post-infection. Intrinsic labelling with [35S]-methionine/cysteine and SDS-PAGE analysis of the recombinant baculovirus infected insect cells verified the immunoblotting data. The expressed IL-2R gamma protein could also be determined on the surface of infected insect cells by flow cytometric analysis. Comparison of the molecular weights between baculovirus expressed human and mouse IL-2R gamma chains indicated differences in the glycosylation pattern despite similar numbers of N-linked glycosylation sites. PMID:9042425

  12. Adsorption of benzoic acid on [alpha]-alumina and [gamma]-boehmite

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, L. . Dept. of Geology and Geotechnical Engineering); Blokhus, A.M. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-08-01

    The adsorption of benzoic acid (BzCOOH) on [alpha]-alumina ([alpha]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) and [gamma]-boehmite ([gamma]-AlOOH) from the aqueous phase has been studied. The adsorption experiments were carried out in 0 and 0.1 M NaCl solutions, with pH adjusted to 4 or 6. For both [alpha]-alumina and [gamma]-boehmite, increasing ionic strength decreases the maximum adsorption. Increasing the pH to 6 at the same ionic strength also reduces the maximum adsorption markedly. This suggests that both the anion and the corresponding acid participate in the adsorption process. The results show that benzoic acid has a greater affinity for [alpha]-alumina than for [gamma]-boehmite. Under the same experimental conditions (0.1 M NaCl, pH 4) the maximum adsorption capacities are 5.0 and 1.5 [mu]mol/m[sup 2] for [alpha]-alumina and [gamma]-boehmite, respectively. This difference in adsorption capacities is probably due to the mineralogical difference. These results illustrate the importance of knowing the mineralogical composition of the solid phase.

  13. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hashizaki, Hikari; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPAR{alpha} in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPAR{alpha} using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPAR{alpha} by GW7647, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPAR{gamma}, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPAR{gamma} is activated. On the other hand, PPAR{alpha} activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Moreover, PPAR{alpha} activation increased the production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPAR{alpha} stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected

  14. Dominant negative mutant of retinoic acid receptor alpha inhibits retinoic acid-induced P19 cell differentiation by binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Costa, S L; McBurney, M W

    1996-05-25

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a potent inducer of P19 cell differentiation. RA activity is thought to be mediated by nuclear RA receptors (RARs), transcription factors whose activity is dependent on RA. There are three RARs called alpha, beta, and gamma. We created truncated versions of the three RARs and compared their activities as inhibitors of RA-mediated gene transcription and of P19 cell differentiation. Only mutants of the RAR alpha were inhibitory in these assays. A mutant of RAR alpha carrying a 10-amino-acid insert was able to heterodimerize with RXRbeta or with the normal RAR alpha and the inhibitory activity of this mutant was dependent on an intact DNA binding domain. We conclude that dominant negative mutants of RAR alpha act by heterodimerizing with RXRs or RARs and binding to RA response elements on DNA, thereby preventing binding of the normal receptors to those sites. PMID:8635515

  15. A GC-ECD method for estimation of free and bound amino acids, gamma-aminobutyric acid, salicylic acid, and acetyl salicylic acid from Solanum lycopersicum (L.).

    PubMed

    Meher, Hari Charan; Gajbhiye, Vijay T; Singh, Ghanendra

    2011-01-01

    A gas chromatograph with electron capture detection method for estimation of selected metabolites--amino acids (free and bound), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), salicylic acid (SA), and acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) from tomato--is reported. The method is based on nitrophenylation of the metabolites by 1-fluoro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene under aqueous alkaline conditions to form dinitophenyl derivatives. The derivatives were stable under the operating conditions of GC. Analysis of bound amino acids comprised perchloric acid precipitation of protein, alkylation (carboxymethylation) with iodoacetic acid, vapor-phase hydrolysis, and derivatization with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in that order. The metabolites were resolved in 35 min, using a temperature-programmed run. The method is rapid, sensitive, and precise. It easily measured the typical amino acids (aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, alanine, leucine, lysine, and phenylalanine) used for identification and quantification of a protein, resolved amino acids of the same mass (leucine and isoleucine), satisfactorily measured sulfur amino acid (methionine, cystine, and cysteine), and quantified GABA, SA, and ASA, as well. The developed method was validated for specificity, linearity, and precision. It has been applied and recommended for estimation of 25 metabolites from Solanum lycopersicum (L.).

  16. A GC-ECD method for estimation of free and bound amino acids, gamma-aminobutyric acid, salicylic acid, and acetyl salicylic acid from Solanum lycopersicum (L.).

    PubMed

    Meher, Hari Charan; Gajbhiye, Vijay T; Singh, Ghanendra

    2011-01-01

    A gas chromatograph with electron capture detection method for estimation of selected metabolites--amino acids (free and bound), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), salicylic acid (SA), and acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) from tomato--is reported. The method is based on nitrophenylation of the metabolites by 1-fluoro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene under aqueous alkaline conditions to form dinitophenyl derivatives. The derivatives were stable under the operating conditions of GC. Analysis of bound amino acids comprised perchloric acid precipitation of protein, alkylation (carboxymethylation) with iodoacetic acid, vapor-phase hydrolysis, and derivatization with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in that order. The metabolites were resolved in 35 min, using a temperature-programmed run. The method is rapid, sensitive, and precise. It easily measured the typical amino acids (aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, alanine, leucine, lysine, and phenylalanine) used for identification and quantification of a protein, resolved amino acids of the same mass (leucine and isoleucine), satisfactorily measured sulfur amino acid (methionine, cystine, and cysteine), and quantified GABA, SA, and ASA, as well. The developed method was validated for specificity, linearity, and precision. It has been applied and recommended for estimation of 25 metabolites from Solanum lycopersicum (L.). PMID:21391500

  17. Adenovirus Type 37 Uses Sialic Acid as a Cellular Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Arnberg, Niklas; Edlund, Karin; Kidd, Alistair H.; Wadell, Göran

    2000-01-01

    Two cellular receptors for adenovirus, coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) α2, have recently been identified. In the absence of CAR, MHC-I α2 has been suggested to serve as a cellular attachment protein for subgenus C adenoviruses, while members from all subgenera except subgenus B have been shown to interact with CAR. We have found that adenovirus type 37 (Ad37) attachment to CAR-expressing CHO cells was no better than that to CHO cells lacking CAR expression, suggesting that CAR is not used by Ad37 during attachment. Instead, we have identified sialic acid as a third adenovirus receptor moiety. First, Ad37 attachment to both CAR-expresing CHO cells and MHC-I α2-expressing Daudi cells was sensitive to neuraminidase treatment, which eliminates sialic acid on the cell surface. Second, Ad37 attachment to sialic acid-expressing Pro-5 cells was more than 10-fold stronger than that to the Pro-5 subline Lec2, which is deficient in sialic acid expression. Third, neuraminidase treatment of A549 cells caused a 60% decrease in Ad37 replication in a fluorescent-focus assay. Moreover, the receptor sialoconjugate is most probably a glycoprotein rather than a ganglioside, since Ad37 attachment to sialic acid-expressing Pro-5 cells was sensitive to protease treatment. Ad37 attachment to Pro-5 cells occurs via α(2→3)-linked sialic acid saccharides rather than α(2→6)-linked ones, since (i) α(2→3)-specific but not α(2→6)-specific lectins blocked Ad37 attachment to Pro-5 cells and (ii) pretreatment of Pro-5 cells with α(2→3)-specific neuraminidase resulted in decreased Ad37 binding. Taken together, these results suggest that, unlike Ad5, Ad37 makes use of α(2→3)-linked sialic acid saccharides on glycoproteins for entry instead of using CAR or MHC-I α2. PMID:10590089

  18. Radiolysis of aqueous solutions of 2-aminoethanethiosulfuric acid. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Grachev, S.A.; Koroleva, I.K.; Kropachev, E.V.; Litvyakova, G.I.

    1982-07-10

    In the radiolysis products of aerated and deaerated solutions of the 2-aminoethanethiosulfuric acid the authors have identified cystamine monoxide, cystamine, taurine, mercamine, the sulfate ion, the sulfite ion, and the dithionate ion. The yields of these products under different conditions have been determined. Results indicated that the sulfate ion is formed both from the divalent and the hexavalent sulfur atom of the 2-aminoethanethiosulfuric acid moelcule. A possible radiolysis mechanism is discussed.

  19. Localization of Fc gamma receptors in the human central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nyland, H; Nilsen, R

    1982-08-01

    Immune complexes of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and rabbit IgG antibodies to HRP were used to study the Fc gamma receptors in the human central nervous system (CNS). The peroxidase activity was demonstrated with 3,3'-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride and H2O2. The majority of the pia and arachnoid cells of the leptomeninges, the stroma cells of the arachnoid granulations and the adventitial cells in the perivascular spaces of the nervous tissue were stained. The villi of the choroid plexus were also stained. By electron microscopy the reaction products were localized to the plasma membranes of the stroma cells and at the basal aspects of the epithelial cells in the choroid villi. In addition, reaction product was demonstrated on pericytes of some of the brain capillaries. The immune complexes did not bind to the brain parenchyma.

  20. Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} agonists inhibit the release of proinflammatory cytokines from RSV-infected epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Ralf . E-mail: ralf.arnold@medizin.uni-magdeburg.de; Koenig, Wolfgang

    2006-03-15

    The epithelial cells of the airways are the target cells for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and the site of the majority of the inflammation associated with the disease. Recently, peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, we investigated the role of PPAR{gamma} agonists (15d-PGJ{sub 2}, ciglitazone and troglitazone) on the synthesis of RSV-induced cytokine release from RSV-infected human lung epithelial cells (A549). We observed that all PPAR{gamma} ligands inhibited dose-dependently the release of TNF-{alpha}, GM-CSF, IL-1{alpha}, IL-6 and the chemokines CXCL8 (IL-8) and CCL5 (RANTES) from RSV-infected A549 cells. Concomitantly, the PPAR{gamma} ligands diminished the cellular amount of mRNA encoding for IL-6, CXCL8 and CCL5 and the RSV-induced binding activity of the transcription factors NF-{kappa}B (p65/p50) and AP-1 (c-fos), respectively. Our data presented herein suggest a potential application of PPAR{gamma} ligands in the anti-inflammatory treatment of RSV infection.

  1. Estrogen-related receptor gamma regulates dopaminergic neuronal phenotype by activating GSK3β/NFAT signaling in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Juhee; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Choi, Hyun Jin

    2015-05-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) is highly expressed in the nervous system during embryogenesis and in adult brains, but its physiological role in neuronal development remains unknown. In this study, we evaluated the relevance of ERRγ in regulating dopaminergic (DAergic) phenotype and the corresponding signaling pathway. We used retinoic acid (RA) to differentiate human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. RA induced neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y cells with an increase in DAergic neuron-like properties, including up-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter, and vesicular monoamine transporter 2. ERRγ, but not ERRα, was up-regulated by RA, and participated in RA effect on SH-SY5Y cells. ERRγ over-expression enhanced mature DAergic neuronal phenotype with neurite outgrowth as with RA treatment; and RA-induced increase in DAergic phenotype was attenuated by silencing ERRγ expression. ERRγ appears to have a crucial role in morphological and functional regulation of cells that is selective for DAergic neurons. Polo-like kinase 2 was up-regulated in ERRγ-over-expressing SH-SY5Y cells, which was involved in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and resulting downstream activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells. The likely involvement of ERRγ in regulating the DAergic neuronal phenotype makes this orphan nuclear receptor a novel target for understanding DAergic neuronal differentiation. We propose the relevance of estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) in regulating dopaminergic neuronal phenotype: ERRγ is up-regulated by retinoic acid in SH-SY5Y cells, and enhances dopaminergic phenotypes and induces neurite outgrowth; Polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta/nuclear factor of activated T cells (GSK3β/NFAT) signaling are responsible for the ERRγ effect. Our findings provide the first insights into the role of ERRγ in the brain, as a novel approach toward understanding

  2. Age-dependent alterations of Fc gamma receptor-mediated effector functions of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fülöp, T; Fóris, G; Wórum, I; Leövey, A

    1985-01-01

    Changes in the effector functions in polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL), harvested from blood of young and aged healthy subjects of both sexes, were studied. FC gamma-receptor (Fc gamma R)-mediated incorporation of IgG coated 51Cr-HRBC significantly increased in the aged male group, while the phagocytosis of pre-opsonized fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans) was independent of both the age and sex. However, the intracellular killing capacity of neutrophils obtained from aged male subjects significantly decreased toward 51Cr-labelled c. albicans. The antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was also impaired with ageing in both sexes. The age-dependent decrease in the effector functions of PMNL may be explained, among others, by the fact that during yeast cell incorporation the increased cAMP level does not return to the basic level in the old group. On the other hand, the cGMP level which increased in PMNL of aged subjects does not show any progressive increase as in the young subjects, but remains unchanged. The oxidative metabolism producing free radicals being necessary for the effective intracellular killing and ADCC diminished in PMNL of aged subjects of both sexes. The above findings indicate that the adaptation of cyclic nucleotide system and the oxidative burst to the cell activation becomes impaired with ageing. PMID:2994926

  3. Expression and function of a variant T cell receptor complex lacking CD3-gamma

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    A T cell line termed DIL2 has been derived from an infant with a polyclonal T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 cell surface expression defect. Indirect immunofluorescence showed that the expression of certain TCR/CD3 epitopes (like those detected by WT31 and BMA031 monoclonals) was strongly reduced (around five-fold) on DIL2, whereas other epitopes (like those detected by SP34 and Leu4) were only around two-fold lower than in normal T cell lines. Specific immunoprecipitates of surface- radioiodinated DIL2 cells contained TCR-alpha, TCR-beta, CD3-delta, CD3- epsilon and TCR-zeta chains, but lacked CD3-gamma. This structural TCR/CD3 variant was, however, capable of transducing certain activation signals, since normal proliferation and a low but significant calcium flux was observed in DIL2 cells after engagement with specific antibodies. Our data suggest that a functional TCR/CD3 complex can be expressed on the surface of T cells in the absence of CD3-gamma. PMID:1713248

  4. Solute-enhanced production of gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from aqueous solutions of levulinic acid

    DOEpatents

    Dumesic, James A; Wettstein, Stephanie G; Alonso, David Martin; Gurbuz, Elif Ispir

    2015-02-24

    A method to produce levulinic acid (LA) and gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from biomass-derived cellulose or lignocellulose by selective extraction of LA using GVL and optionally converting the LA so isolated into GVL, with no purifications steps required to yield the GVL.

  5. A validated method for gas chromatographic analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tall fescue herbage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in animals that is also found in plants and has been associated with plant responses to stress. A simple and relatively rapid method of GABA separation and quantification was developed from a commercially available kit for serum amino...

  6. T-cell receptor heterogeneity of gamma delta T-cell clones from human female reproductive tissues.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Brew, R; Deniz, G; Taylor, J J

    1993-03-01

    gamma delta T cells were isolated from human decidua parietalis, decidua basalis and cervix and cloned in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2). T-cell receptor (TcR) expression was then analysed and compared with that of a panel of gamma delta T-cell clones from peripheral blood. Only 17/40 (42.5%) clones from decidua parietalis were V gamma 9+/V delta 2+ as compared to 68/94 (72%) of peripheral blood clones (P < 0.005). Conversely, 50% of clones from decidua parietalis but only 15% of clones from peripheral blood were V delta 1+ (P < 0.001). At least seven distinct TcR types were identified among the panel of clones from decidua parietalis and at least six different types were expressed by the panel of 17 clones from cervix. This receptor heterogeneity was not a result of interdonor variation as in all instances where more than one clone was obtained from a single sample, individual clones having between two and five receptor types were identified. However, 23/24 (95.8%) of clones from decidua basalis were V gamma 9+/V delta 2+. Most clones from decidua parietalis and cervix, whether V gamma 9+/V delta 2+ or V delta 1+, were positive for the mucosal lymphocyte marker, HML-1, but expression was often heterogeneous within a single clone. In contrast, almost all gamma delta T-cell clones from peripheral blood were HML-1-. Thus, unlike the mouse, gamma delta T cells within these human female reproductive tissues have a diverse TcR repertoire which, in decidua parietalis, is distinct from that of peripheral blood.

  7. Cholestenoic acids regulate motor neuron survival via liver X receptors

    PubMed Central

    Theofilopoulos, Spyridon; Griffiths, William J.; Crick, Peter J.; Yang, Shanzheng; Meljon, Anna; Ogundare, Michael; Kitambi, Satish Srinivas; Lockhart, Andrew; Tuschl, Karin; Clayton, Peter T.; Morris, Andrew A.; Martinez, Adelaida; Reddy, M. Ashwin; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Bassi, Maria T.; Honda, Akira; Mizuochi, Tatsuki; Kimura, Akihiko; Nittono, Hiroshi; De Michele, Giuseppe; Carbone, Rosa; Criscuolo, Chiara; Yau, Joyce L.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Schüle, Rebecca; Schöls, Ludger; Sailer, Andreas W.; Kuhle, Jens; Fraidakis, Matthew J.; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Steffensen, Knut R.; Björkhem, Ingemar; Ernfors, Patrik; Sjövall, Jan; Arenas, Ernest; Wang, Yuqin

    2014-01-01

    Cholestenoic acids are formed as intermediates in metabolism of cholesterol to bile acids, and the biosynthetic enzymes that generate cholestenoic acids are expressed in the mammalian CNS. Here, we evaluated the cholestenoic acid profile of mammalian cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and determined that specific cholestenoic acids activate the liver X receptors (LXRs), enhance islet-1 expression in zebrafish, and increase the number of oculomotor neurons in the developing mouse in vitro and in vivo. While 3β,7α-dihydroxycholest-5-en-26-oic acid (3β,7α-diHCA) promoted motor neuron survival in an LXR-dependent manner, 3β-hydroxy-7-oxocholest-5-en-26-oic acid (3βH,7O-CA) promoted maturation of precursors into islet-1+ cells. Unlike 3β,7α-diHCA and 3βH,7O-CA, 3β-hydroxycholest-5-en-26-oic acid (3β-HCA) caused motor neuron cell loss in mice. Mutations in CYP7B1 or CYP27A1, which encode enzymes involved in cholestenoic acid metabolism, result in different neurological diseases, hereditary spastic paresis type 5 (SPG5) and cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX), respectively. SPG5 is characterized by spastic paresis, and similar symptoms may occur in CTX. Analysis of CSF and plasma from patients with SPG5 revealed an excess of the toxic LXR ligand, 3β-HCA, while patients with CTX and SPG5 exhibited low levels of the survival-promoting LXR ligand 3β,7α-diHCA. Moreover, 3β,7α-diHCA prevented the loss of motor neurons induced by 3β-HCA in the developing mouse midbrain in vivo.Our results indicate that specific cholestenoic acids selectively work on motor neurons, via LXR, to regulate the balance between survival and death. PMID:25271621

  8. The effect of folic acid on GABA(A)-B 1 receptor subunit.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Kizzy; Kuizon, Salomon; Junaid, Mohammed; Idrissi, Abdeslem El

    2013-01-01

    Autism contains a spectrum of behavioral and cognitive disturbances of childhood development that is manifested by deficits in social interaction, impaired communication, repetitive behavior, and/or restricted interest. Much research has been dedicated to finding the genes that are responsible for autism, but less than 10% of the cases can be attributed to one gene. Autism prevalence has increased in the last decade and there may be environmental components that are leading to this increase. There are reports of disruption of epigenetic mechanisms controlling the regulation of gene expression as probable cause for autism. Folic acid (FA) is prescribed to women during pregnancy, and can cause epigenetic changes. GABAergic pathway is involved in inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and plays a crucial role during early embryonic development. Autism may entail defect or deregulation of the GABAergic receptor pathway in the brain. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (type A) beta 1 receptor (GABRB1) disruption has been implicated in autism. In the present study, we investigated GABRB1 expression in response to FA supplementation in neuronal cells. Western blot analysis showed GABRB1 protein levels increased in the FA-treated cells in a concentration-dependent manner. FA-dependent increased expression of GABRB1 was further confirmed at the mRNA level using quantitative RT-PCR. These results suggest that epigenetic control of gene expression may affect the expression of GABRB1 and disrupt inhibitory synaptic transmission during embryonic development. PMID:23392927

  9. Development of novel silicon-containing inverse agonists of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Hirozumi; Nakamura, Masaharu; Nakamura, Masahiko; Matsumoto, Yotaro; Nakagomi, Madoka; Hashimoto, Yuichi

    2014-03-15

    Retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-related orphan receptors (RORs) regulate a variety of physiological processes, including hepatic gluconeogenesis, lipid metabolism, circadian rhythm and immune function. The RAR agonist: all-trans retinoic acid was reported to be an RORβ inverse agonist, but no information is available regarding ROR activity of its synthetic analogue Am580. Therefore, we screened Am580 and some related tetramethyltetrahydronaphthalene derivatives and carried out structural development studies, including substitution of carbon atoms with silicon, with the aim of creating a potent ROR transcriptional inhibitor. The phenyl amide disila compound 22 showed the most potent ROR-inhibitory activity among the compounds examined. Its activity towards RORα, RORβ and RORγ was increased compared to that of Am580. The IC₅₀ values for RORα, RORβ and RORγ are 1.3, >10 and 4.5 μM, respectively.

  10. Rosehip Extract Inhibits Lipid Accumulation in White Adipose Tissue by Suppressing the Expression of Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor Gamma.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Akifumi; Nishida, Norihisa; Matsuura, Yoichi; Shibata, Nobuhito

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that Rosa canina L. and tiliroside, the principal constituent of its seeds, exhibit anti-obesity and anti-diabetic activities via enhancement of fatty acid oxidation in the liver and skeletal muscle. However, the effects of rosehip, the fruit of this plant, extract (RHE), or tiliroside on lipid accumulation in adipocytes have not been analyzed. We investigated the effects of RHE and tiliroside on lipid accumulation and protein expression of key transcription factors in both in vitro and in vivo models. RHE and tiliroside inhibited lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner in 3T3-L1 cells. We also analyzed the inhibitory effect of RHE on white adipose tissue (WAT) in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity mice model. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed HFD or HFD supplemented with 1% RHE (HFDRH) for 8 weeks. The HFDRH-fed group gained less body weight and had less visceral fat than the HFD-fed group. Liver weight was significantly lower in the HFDRH-fed group and total hepatic lipid and triglyceride (TG) content was also reduced. A significant reduction in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) was observed in epididymal fat in the HFDRH-fed group, in comparison with controls, through Western blotting. These results suggest that downregulation of PPARγ expression is involved, at least in part, in the suppressive effect of RHE on lipid accumulation in WAT.

  11. Rosehip Extract Inhibits Lipid Accumulation in White Adipose Tissue by Suppressing the Expression of Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor Gamma

    PubMed Central

    Nagatomo, Akifumi; Nishida, Norihisa; Matsuura, Yoichi; Shibata, Nobuhito

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that Rosa canina L. and tiliroside, the principal constituent of its seeds, exhibit anti-obesity and anti-diabetic activities via enhancement of fatty acid oxidation in the liver and skeletal muscle. However, the effects of rosehip, the fruit of this plant, extract (RHE), or tiliroside on lipid accumulation in adipocytes have not been analyzed. We investigated the effects of RHE and tiliroside on lipid accumulation and protein expression of key transcription factors in both in vitro and in vivo models. RHE and tiliroside inhibited lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner in 3T3-L1 cells. We also analyzed the inhibitory effect of RHE on white adipose tissue (WAT) in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity mice model. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed HFD or HFD supplemented with 1% RHE (HFDRH) for 8 weeks. The HFDRH-fed group gained less body weight and had less visceral fat than the HFD-fed group. Liver weight was significantly lower in the HFDRH-fed group and total hepatic lipid and triglyceride (TG) content was also reduced. A significant reduction in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) was observed in epididymal fat in the HFDRH-fed group, in comparison with controls, through Western blotting. These results suggest that downregulation of PPARγ expression is involved, at least in part, in the suppressive effect of RHE on lipid accumulation in WAT. PMID:24471115

  12. Increased renin production in mice with deletion of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma in juxtaglomerular cells.

    PubMed

    Desch, Michael; Schreiber, Andrea; Schweda, Frank; Madsen, Kirsten; Friis, Ulla G; Weatherford, Eric T; Sigmund, Curt D; Sequeira Lopez, Maria Luisa; Gomez, R Ariel; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2010-03-01

    We recently found that endogenous (free fatty acids) and pharmacological (thiazolidinediones) agonists of nuclear receptor Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)gamma stimulate renin transcription. In addition, the renin gene was identified as a direct target of PPARgamma. The mouse renin gene is regulated by PPARgamma through a distal enhancer direct repeat closely related to consensus PPAR response element (PPRE). In vitro studies demonstrated that PPARgamma knockdown stimulated PPRE-driven transcription. These data predicted that deficiency of PPARgamma would upregulate mouse renin expression. Consistent with these observations knockdown of PPARgamma increased the transcription of a reporter gene driven by the mouse renin PPRE-like motif in vitro. To study the impact of PPARgamma on renin production in vivo, we used a cre/lox system to generate double-transgenic mice with disrupted PPARgamma locus in renin-producing juxtaglomerular (JG) cells of the kidney (RC-PPARgamma(fl/fl) mice). We provide evidence that PPARgamma expression was effectively reduced in JG cells of RC-PPARgamma(fl/fl) mice. Fluorescent immunohistochemistry showed stronger renin signal in RC-PPARgamma(fl/fl) than in littermate control RC-PPARgamma(wt/wt) mice. Renin mRNA levels and plasma renin concentration in RC-PPARgamma(fl/fl) mice were almost 2-fold higher than in littermate controls. Arterial blood pressure and pressure control of renal vascular resistance, which play decisive roles in the regulation of renin production were indistinguishable between RC-PPARgamma(wt/wt) and RC-PPARgamma(fl/fl) mice. These data demonstrate that the JG-specific PPARgamma deficiency results in increased mouse renin expression in vivo thus corroborating earlier in vitro results. PPARgamma appears to be a relevant transcription factor for the control of renin gene in JG cells.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists as insulin sensitizers: from the discovery to recent progress.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nobuo; Momose, Yu

    2008-01-01

    An epidemic of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes and obesity is undermining the health of people living in industrialized societies. There is an urgent need to develop innovative therapeutics. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is one of the ligand-activated transcription factors in the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and a pivotal regulator of glucose and lipid homeostasis. The discovery of PPARgamma as a target of multimodal insulin sensitizers, represented by thiazolidinediones (TZDs), has attracted remarkable scientific interest and had a great impact on the pharmaceutical industry. With the clinical success of the PPARgamma agonists, pioglitazone (Actos) and rosiglitazone (Avandia), development of novel and potent insulin-sensitizing agents with diverse clinical profiles has been accelerated. Currently, a number of PPARgamma agonists from different chemical classes and with varying pharmacological profiles are being developed. Despite quite a few obstacles to the development of PPAR-related drugs, PPARgamma-targeted agents still hold promise. There are new concepts and encouraging evidence emerging that suggest this class can yield improved anti-diabetic agents. This review covers the discovery of TZDs, provides an overview of PPARgamma including the significance of PPARgamma as a drug target, describes the current status of a wide variety of novel PPARgamma ligands including PPAR dual and pan agonists and selective PPARgamma modulators (SPPARgammaMs), and highlights new approaches for identifying agents targeting PPARgamma in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:19075761

  14. Ligation of Fc gamma receptor IIB inhibits antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kuan Rong; Zhang, Summer Li-Xin; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Chan, Ying Kai; Chow, Angelia; Lim, Angeline Pei Chiew; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hanson, Brendon J; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2011-07-26

    The interaction of antibodies, dengue virus (DENV), and monocytes can result in either immunity or enhanced virus infection. These opposing outcomes of dengue antibodies have hampered dengue vaccine development. Recent studies have shown that antibodies neutralize DENV by either preventing virus attachment to cellular receptors or inhibiting viral fusion intracellularly. However, whether the antibody blocks attachment or fusion, the resulting immune complexes are expected to be phagocytosed by Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells and cleared from circulation. This suggests that only antibodies that are able to block fusion intracellularly would be able to neutralize DENV upon FcγR-mediated uptake by monocytes whereas other antibodies would have resulted in enhancement of DENV replication. Using convalescent sera from dengue patients, we observed that neutralization of the homologous serotypes occurred despite FcγR-mediated uptake. However, FcγR-mediated uptake appeared to be inhibited when neutralized heterologous DENV serotypes were used instead. We demonstrate that this inhibition occurred through the formation of viral aggregates by antibodies in a concentration-dependent manner. Aggregation of viruses enabled antibodies to cross-link the inhibitory FcγRIIB, which is expressed at low levels but which inhibits FcγR-mediated phagocytosis and hence prevents antibody-dependent enhancement of DENV infection in monocytes. PMID:21746897

  15. KR-62980: a novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist with weak adipogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Rok; Lee, Jeong Hyung; Kim, Seung Jun; Rhee, Sang Dal; Jung, Won Hoon; Yang, Sung-Don; Kim, Sung Soo; Ahn, Jin Hee; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2006-08-14

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is the target for the anti-diabetic drugs including thiazolidinediones. We report here the identification and characterization of a novel PPARgamma agonist KR-62980. KR-62980 acted as a selective PPARgamma agonist in transactivation assay with an EC50 of 15 nM. In fully differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, KR-62980 induced [3H]-deoxyglucose uptake in a concentration-dependent manner in the presence of insulin. KR-62980 was weakly adipogenic with little induction of aP2 mRNA, and was able to antagonize the adipogenic effects of rosiglitazone in C3H10T1/2 cells. In vivo pharmacokinetic profile of KR-62980 revealed that the compound exhibited good oral bioavailability of 65% with a terminal elimination half-life of 2.5 h in the rat. Treatment of high fat diet-induced C57BL/6J mice with KR-62980 for 14 days reduced plasma glucose levels with little side effects with regard to weight gain, cardiac hypertrophy and hepatotoxicity. These results suggest that KR-62980 acts as a selective PPARgamma modulator with anti-hyperglycemic activity, and that the mechanism of actions of KR-62980 appears to be different from that of rosiglitazone with improved side effect profiles.

  16. Receptor for protons: First observations on Acid Sensing Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Krishtal, Oleg

    2015-07-01

    The history of ASICs began in 1980 with unexpected observation. The concept of highly selective Na(+) current gated by specific receptors for protons was not easily accepted. It took 16 years to get these receptor/channels cloned and start a new stage in their investigation. "The receptor for protons" became ASIC comprising under this name a family of receptor/channels ubiquitous for mammalian nervous system, both peripheral and central. The role of ASICs as putative nociceptors was suggested almost immediately after their discovery. This role subsequently was proven in many forms of pain-related phenomena. Many other functions of ASICs have been also found or primed for speculations both in physiology and in disease. Despite the width of field and strength of efforts, numerous basic questions are to be answered before we understand how the local changes in pH in the nervous tissue transform into electric and messenger signaling via ASICs as transducers. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'.

  17. Bridging cell surface receptor with nuclear receptors in control of bile acid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuangwei; Ni, Andrew; Feng, Gen-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are traditionally considered as “physiological detergents” for emulsifying hydrophobic lipids and vitamins due to their amphipathic nature. But accumulating clinical and experimental evidence shows an association between disrupted BA homeostasis and various liver disease conditions including hepatitis infection, diabetes and cancer. Consequently, BA homeostasis regulation has become a field of heavy interest and investigation. After identification of the Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) as an endogenous receptor for BAs, several nuclear receptors (SHP, HNF4α, and LRH-1) were also found to be important in regulation of BA homeostasis. Some post-translational modifications of these nuclear receptors have been demonstrated, but their physiological significance is still elusive. Gut secrets FGF15/19 that can activate hepatic FGFR4 and its downstream signaling cascade, leading to repressed hepatic BA biosynthesis. However, the link between the activated kinases and these nuclear receptors is not fully elucidated. Here, we review the recent literature on signal crosstalk in BA homeostasis. PMID:25500873

  18. Retinoic acid receptor alpha is associated with tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Henrik J.; Sanchez, Betzabe C.; Mundt, Filip; Forshed, Jenny; Kovacs, Aniko; Panizza, Elena; Hultin-Rosenberg, Lina; Lundgren, Bo; Martens, Ulf; Máthé, Gyöngyvér; Yakhini, Zohar; Helou, Khalil; Krawiec, Kamilla; Kanter, Lena; Hjerpe, Anders; Stål, Olle; Linderholm, Barbro K.; Lehtiö, Janne

    2013-01-01

    About one-third of oestrogen receptor alpha-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen relapse. Here we identify the nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor alpha as a marker of tamoxifen resistance. Using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics, we show that retinoic acid receptor alpha protein networks and levels differ in a tamoxifen-sensitive (MCF7) and a tamoxifen-resistant (LCC2) cell line. High intratumoural retinoic acid receptor alpha protein levels also correlate with reduced relapse-free survival in oestrogen receptor alpha-positive breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen solely. A similar retinoic acid receptor alpha expression pattern is seen in a comparable independent patient cohort. An oestrogen receptor alpha and retinoic acid receptor alpha ligand screening reveals that tamoxifen-resistant LCC2 cells have increased sensitivity to retinoic acid receptor alpha ligands and are less sensitive to oestrogen receptor alpha ligands compared with MCF7 cells. Our data indicate that retinoic acid receptor alpha may be a novel therapeutic target and a predictive factor for oestrogen receptor alpha-positive breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen. PMID:23868472

  19. Degradation of 3-chloro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid in biological treated effluent by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Libing; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-02-01

    Gamma irradiation-induced degradation of a chlorinated aromatic compound, 3-chloro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid (CHBA) in biological treated effluent was studied and the results were compared with those obtained in deionized water. Gamma irradiation led to a complete decomposition of CHBA and a partial mineralization in the treated effluent. The removal of CHBA followed the pseudo first-order reaction kinetic model and the rate constant in the treated effluent was 1.7-3.5 times lower than that in deionized water. The CHBA degradation rate was higher at acidic condition than at neutral and alkaline conditions. The radiolytic yield, G-value for CHBA degradation was lower in the treated effluent, which decreased with increase in absorbed doses and increased with increase in initial concentrations of CHBA. The degradation mechanism of CHBA using gamma irradiation was proposed through the oxidation by -OH and reduction by eaq- and H- radicals. As exposed to gamma irradiation, dechlorination takes place rapidly and combines with the oxidation and cleavage of the aromatic ring, producing chloride ions, small carboxylic acids, acetaldehyde and other intermediates into the solution.

  20. Crosstalk between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in human breast cancer cells: PPAR{gamma} binds to VDR and inhibits 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} mediated transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Alimirah, Fatouma; Peng, Xinjian; Yuan, Liang; Mehta, Rajeshwari R.; Knethen, Andreas von; Choubey, Divaker; Mehta, Rajendra G.

    2012-11-15

    Heterodimerization and cross-talk between nuclear hormone receptors often occurs. For example, estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) physically binds to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and inhibits its transcriptional activity. The interaction between PPAR{gamma} and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) however, is unknown. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms linking PPAR{gamma} and VDR signaling, and for the first time we show that PPAR{gamma} physically associates with VDR in human breast cancer cells. We found that overexpression of PPAR{gamma} decreased 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D{sub 3}) mediated transcriptional activity of the vitamin D target gene, CYP24A1, by 49% and the activity of VDRE-luc, a vitamin D responsive reporter, by 75% in T47D human breast cancer cells. Deletion mutation experiments illustrated that helices 1 and 4 of PPAR{gamma}'s hinge and ligand binding domains, respectively, governed this suppressive function. Additionally, abrogation of PPAR{gamma}'s AF2 domain attenuated its repressive action on 1,25D{sub 3} transactivation, indicating that this domain is integral in inhibiting VDR signaling. PPAR{gamma} was also found to compete with VDR for their binding partner retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR{alpha}). Overexpression of RXR{alpha} blocked PPAR{gamma}'s suppressive effect on 1,25D{sub 3} action, enhancing VDR signaling. In conclusion, these observations uncover molecular mechanisms connecting the PPAR{gamma} and VDR pathways. -- Highlights: PPAR{gamma}'s role on 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} transcriptional activity is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} physically binds to VDR and inhibits 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma}'s hinge and ligand binding domains are important for this inhibitory effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} competes with VDR for the availability of their binding partner, RXR{alpha}.

  1. Excitatory amino acid receptors and synaptic transmission in the rat ventrobasal thalamus.

    PubMed

    Salt, T E

    1987-10-01

    1. Extracellular single-neurone recordings were made in the ventrobasal thalamus (v.b.t.) of urethane-anaesthetized rats with multi-barrel ionophoretic electrodes in order to test the hypothesis that excitatory amino acid receptors are involved in the responses of these neurones to stimulation of sensory afferents. 2. Responses of neurones to either physiological stimulation of hair and vibrissa follicle sensory afferents and to ionophoretically applied excitatory amino acids were challenged with the antagonists D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV), kynurenate and gamma-D-glutamylaminomethyl sulphonate (GAMS). 3. In agreement with previous findings in other brain areas, ionophoretically applied APV was found to selectively antagonize responses of v.b.t. neurones to N-methylaspartate (NMA), whereas GAMS was found to be moderately kainate selective. Kynurenate was found to be relatively non-selective. 4. Responses of neurones to short-duration (10-20 ms) physiological stimulation of afferents were resistant to APV when this antagonist was applied with NMA-selective ionophoretic currents. In contrast, these APV currents were adequate to antagonize responses to maintained physiological stimulation. 5. The broad spectrum excitatory amino acid antagonist kynurenate was found to block synaptic responses of v.b.t. neurones to both short-duration and maintained stimuli when it was applied with currents which were sufficient to reduce responses to ionophoretic quisqualate. 6. GAMS was found to selectively block kainate responses in a proportion of the neurones tested. In such cases, there was little effect of the antagonist on the responses evoked by either short-duration or maintained sensory stimuli. 7. It is concluded that excitatory amino acid receptors of both the NMDA and non-NMDA type are involved in the synaptic responses of v.b.t. neurones to sensory afferent stimulation, and that the apparent synaptic pharmacology depends on the mode of stimulation of the afferent

  2. Monitoring of the interconversion of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) to gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Tasnim; Brewster, Victoria L; Edwards, Howell G M; Hargreaves, Michael D; Jilani, Shelina K; Scowen, Ian J

    2013-08-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a drug-of-abuse that has recently become associated with drug-facilitated sexual assault, known as date rape. For this reason the drug is commonly found 'spiked' in alcoholic beverages. When GHB is in solution it may undergo conversion into the corresponding lactone, Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL). Studies have been carried out to determine the detection limits of GHB and GBL in various solutions by Raman spectroscopy and to monitor the interconversion of GHB and GBL in solution with different pH conditions and temperature. In this study, a portable Raman spectrometer was used to study the interconversion of GHB and GBL in water and ethanol solutions as a function of pH, time, and temperature. The aim of this was to determine the optimum pH range for conversion in order to relate this to the pH ranges that the drug is likely to be subjected to, first in spiked beverages and secondly after ingestion in the digestive system. The aim was also to identify a timescale for this conversion in relation to possible scenarios, for example if GHB takes a number of hours to convert to GBL, it is likely for the beverage to be ingested before esterification can take place. GHB and GBL were then spiked into a selection of beverages of known pH in order to study the stability of GHB and GBL in real systems.

  3. [Current knowledge on gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) and 1 ,4-butanediol (1,4-BD)].

    PubMed

    Dematteis, Maurice; Pennel, Lucie; Mallaret, Michel

    2012-05-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an old anaesthetic drug which was misused in the 80-90's as an anabolic agent (bodybuilding), recreational drug (drunkenness, euphoric, disinhibiting and aphrodisiac effects) and as a date rape drug (disinhibiting, hypnotic and amnesic effects). Its use in the general population is low, and mainly concerns gay population in nightclubs and young people in parties. The intoxications, above all with alcohol combination, can be severe, with coma and breathing depression, or even fatal. Chronic use leads to psychic and physical dependence; withdrawal syndrome can be severe, with agitation and delirium. In 1999, GHB classification as a narcotic resulted in the increased use of GHB prodrugs gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) and 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BD), which were easily commercially available as solvent and cleaning products. Like GHB, they have a narrow window of use, and share similar toxicity. Their increased cases of recreational use and of severe drug intoxication, abuse and dependence, led the French Ministry of Health in 2011 to prohibit their sale and transfer to the public. PMID:22730800

  4. Monitoring of the interconversion of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) to gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Tasnim; Brewster, Victoria L; Edwards, Howell G M; Hargreaves, Michael D; Jilani, Shelina K; Scowen, Ian J

    2013-08-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a drug-of-abuse that has recently become associated with drug-facilitated sexual assault, known as date rape. For this reason the drug is commonly found 'spiked' in alcoholic beverages. When GHB is in solution it may undergo conversion into the corresponding lactone, Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL). Studies have been carried out to determine the detection limits of GHB and GBL in various solutions by Raman spectroscopy and to monitor the interconversion of GHB and GBL in solution with different pH conditions and temperature. In this study, a portable Raman spectrometer was used to study the interconversion of GHB and GBL in water and ethanol solutions as a function of pH, time, and temperature. The aim of this was to determine the optimum pH range for conversion in order to relate this to the pH ranges that the drug is likely to be subjected to, first in spiked beverages and secondly after ingestion in the digestive system. The aim was also to identify a timescale for this conversion in relation to possible scenarios, for example if GHB takes a number of hours to convert to GBL, it is likely for the beverage to be ingested before esterification can take place. GHB and GBL were then spiked into a selection of beverages of known pH in order to study the stability of GHB and GBL in real systems. PMID:23225646

  5. Ultraviolet B irradiation induces changes in the distribution and release of arachidonic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in human keratinocytes in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Punnonen, K.; Puustinen, T.; Jansen, C.T.

    1987-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that derivatives of 20-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids, the eicosanoids, play an important role in the inflammatory responses of the human skin. To better understand the metabolic fate of fatty acids in the skin, the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation (280-320 nm) on the distribution and release of /sup 14/C-labeled arachidonic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in human keratinocytes in culture was investigated. Ultraviolet B irradiation induced the release of all three /sup 14/C-labeled fatty acids from the phospholipids, especially from phosphatidylethanolamine, and this was accompanied by increased labeling of the nonphosphorus lipids. This finding suggests that UVB induces a significant liberation of eicosanoid precursor fatty acids from cellular phospholipids, but the liberated fatty acids are largely reincorporated into the nonphosphorus lipids. In conclusion, the present study suggests that not only arachidonic acid but also dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid might be involved in the UVB irradiation-induced inflammatory reactions of human skin.

  6. Gamma-irradiation stability of saturated and unsaturated aliphatic polyanhydrides--ricinoleic acid based polymers.

    PubMed

    Teomim, D; Mäder, K; Bentolila, A; Magora, A; Domb, A J

    2001-01-01

    The effect of terminal sterilization by gamma-irradiation on several ricinoleic acid based polyanhydrides was investigated. The following polymers were used: poly(ricinoleic acid maleate) [P(RAM)], poly(ricinoleic acid succinate) [P(RAS)], poly(hydroxy stearic acid succinate) [P(HSAS)], poly(hydroxy stearic acid maleate) [P(HSAM)], and their copolymers with sebacic acid. The polymers were irradiated with an absorbed dose of 2.5 or 10 Mrad by means of a 60Co source under dry ice or at room temperature. No differences were found between samples irradiated under dry ice and at room temperature. Polymers prepared from monomers containing maleate residues, which contain double bonds adjusted to the anhydride linkage along the polymer chain, decreased in molecular weight, became insoluble, and showed fast hydrolytic degradation. For example, p(RAM), p(HSAM), and their copolymers with sebacic acid decreased in Mw from about 10,000 to about 2000, and from about 30,000 to about 5000, respectively, while polymers based on RAS and HSAS remained stable. This phenomenon was explained by an anhydride interchange-self-depolymerization process of the unsaturated anhydride bonds induced by gamma-irradiation. This explanation was supported by the depolymerization of another class of polymers having an anhydride bond between two double bonds, fumaric acid anhydride polymers. The anhydride bond that lies between two double bonds was found to be more sensitive to gamma-irradiation. This anhydride bond may be cleaved to form two radicals that further react with aliphatic anhydride bonds along the polymer chain to form inter- and/or intracyclization products. PMID:11710004

  7. Novel high-affinity and selective biaromatic 4-substituted gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) analogues as GHB ligands: design, synthesis, and binding studies.

    PubMed

    Høg, Signe; Wellendorph, Petrine; Nielsen, Birgitte; Frydenvang, Karla; Dahl, Ivar F; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Brehm, Lotte; Frølund, Bente; Clausen, Rasmus P

    2008-12-25

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a metabolite of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and has been proposed to function as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. GHB is used in the treatment of narcolepsy and is a drug of abuse. GHB binds to both GABA(B) receptors and specific high-affinity GHB sites in brain, of which the latter have not been linked unequivocally to function, but are speculated to be GHB receptors. In this study, a series of biaromatic 4-substituted GHB analogues, including 4'-phenethylphenyl, 4'-styrylphenyl, and 4'-benzyloxyphenyl GHB analogues, were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically in a [3H](E,RS)-(6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-hydroxy-5H-benzocyclohept-6-ylidene)acetic acid ([3H]NCS-382) binding assay and in GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor binding assays. The compounds were selective for the high-affinity GHB binding sites and several displayed Ki values below 100 nM. The affinity of the 4-[4'-(2-iodobenzyloxy)phenyl] GHB analogue 17b was shown to reside predominantly with the R-enantiomer (Ki = 22 nM), which has higher affinity than previously reported GHB ligands.

  8. Dopamine, cognitive function, and gamma oscillations: role of D4 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Furth, Katrina E.; Mastwal, Surjeet; Wang, Kuan H.; Buonanno, Andres; Vullhorst, Detlef

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in individuals with schizophrenia (SCZ) are considered core symptoms of this disorder, and can manifest at the prodromal stage. Antipsychotics ameliorate positive symptoms but only modestly improve cognitive symptoms. The lack of treatments that improve cognitive abilities currently represents a major obstacle in developing more effective therapeutic strategies for this debilitating disorder. While D4 receptor (D4R)-specific antagonists are ineffective in the treatment of positive symptoms, animal studies suggest that D4R drugs can improve cognitive deficits. Moreover, recent work from our group suggests that D4Rs synergize with the neuregulin/ErbB4 signaling pathway, genetically identified as risk factors for SCZ, in parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons to modulate gamma oscillations. These high-frequency network oscillations correlate with attention and increase during cognitive tasks in healthy subjects, and this correlation is attenuated in affected individuals. This finding, along with other observations indicating impaired GABAergic function, has led to the idea that abnormal neural activity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in individuals with SCZ reflects a perturbation in the balance of excitation and inhibition. Here we review the current state of knowledge of D4R functions in the PFC and hippocampus, two major brain areas implicated in SCZ. Special emphasis is given to studies focusing on the potential role of D4Rs in modulating GABAergic transmission and to an emerging concept of a close synergistic relationship between dopamine/D4R and neuregulin/ErbB4 signaling pathways that tunes the activity of PV interneurons to regulate gamma frequency network oscillations and potentially cognitive processes. PMID:23847468

  9. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) binding-mediated induction of human gamma-globin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Xu, X; Pace, B; Dean, D A; Glazer, P M; Chan, P; Goodman, S R; Shokolenko, I

    1999-07-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) can bind to homopurine/homopyrimidine sequences of double-stranded DNA targets in a sequence-specific manner and form [PNA]2/DNA triplexes with single-stranded DNA D-loop structures at the PNA binding sites. These D-loop structures have been found to have a capacity to initiate transcription in vitro. If this strategy can be used to induce transcription of endogenous genes, it may provide a novel approach for gene therapy of many human diseases. Human [beta] globin disorders such as sickle cell anemia and beta-thalassemia are very common genetic diseases that are caused by mutations in the beta-globin gene. When gamma-globin genes are highly expressed in sickle cell patients, the presence of high levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF, alpha2gamma2) can compensate for the defective beta-globin gene product and such patients have much improved symptoms or are free of disease. However, the gamma-globin genes are developmentally regulated and normally expressed at very low levels (>1%) in adult blood cells. We have investigated the possibility of inducing gamma-globin gene expression with PNAs. Using PNAs designed to bind to the 5' flanking region of the gamma-globin gene, induction of expression of a reporter gene construct was demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, PNA-mediated induction of endogenous gamma-globin gene expression was also demonstrated in K562 human erythroleukemia cells. This result suggests that induction of gamma-globin gene expression with PNAs might provide a new approach for the treatment of sickle cell disease. PNA-induced gene expression strategy also may have implications in gene therapy of other diseases such as genetic diseases, cancer and infectious diseases.

  10. Effect of gamma-linolenic acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramchurren, N.; Karmali, R.A. )

    1991-03-15

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and its sequential metabolite, dihomogamma-linolenic acid (DHLA) have been reported to influence growth of neoplastic cells in culture. The pure forms of these fatty acids have not been tested in vivo. The authors have studied the effect of GLA and DHLA on mammary tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a) anthracene (DMBA) (7.5 mg/rat) in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats received either 0.15 g of GLA or DHLA or corn oil (CO) orally, twice weekly for a period of 12 weeks. All three groups of rats were maintained on a diet containing 5% (w/w) corn oil as fat. Tumor incidence and multiplicity were recorded. The group receiving 0.15 g Co had higher tumor yields than those receiving GLA or DHLA. At the end of the experiment, tumor incidence was the lowest in the group receiving DHLA. Tumor multiplicity was consistently lowest with GLA. Fatty acid composition of mammary tissue and liver reflected that of fatty acid treatment. These results suggest that oral administration of GLA or DHLA retards the development of DMBA-induced mammary tumors in rats receiving a diet containing 5% (w/w) corn oil.

  11. A novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha/gamma agonist, BPR1H0101, inhibits topoisomerase II catalytic activity in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yu-Hsun; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang; Chitlimalla, Santhosh Kumar; Pan, Wen-Yu; Kuo, Ching-Chuan; Tsai, Yuan-Chin; Lin, Wen-Hsing; Chuang, Shuang-En; Chang, Jang-Yang

    2008-02-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists are used clinically for treating diabetes mellitus and cancer. 2-Methyl-2[(1-{3-phenyl-7-propylbenzol[d]isoxazol-6-yl}oxy)propyl]-1H-4-indolyl) oxy]propanoic acid (BPR1H0101) is a novel synthetic indole-based compound, discovered through research to identify new PPARgamma agonists, and it acts as a dual agonist for PPARgamma and PPARalpha. Isobologram analysis demonstrated that BPR1H0101 is capable of antagonistic interaction with the topoisomerase (topo) II poison, VP16. A study of its mechanism showed that BPR1H0101 could inhibit the catalytic activity of topo II in vitro, but did not produce detectable topo II-mediated DNA strand breaks in human oral cancer KB cells. Furthermore, BPR1H0101 could inhibit VP16-induced topo II-mediated DNA cleavage and ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated phosphorylation in KB cells. The results suggest that BPR1H0101 can interfere with the topo II reaction by inhibiting catalytic activity before the formation of the intermediate cleavable complex; consequently, it can impede VP16-induced topo II-mediated DNA cleavage and cell death. This is the first identified PPARalpha/gamma agonist that can serve as a topo II catalytic inhibitor, to interfere with VP16-induced cell death. The result might have relevance to the clinical use of the PPARalpha/gamma agonist in combination chemotherapy. PMID:18176111

  12. Fetal liver T cell receptor gamma/delta+ T cells as cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for maternal alloantigens

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have established fetal liver-derived T cell receptor (TCR) gamma/delta+, CD3+ T cell lines that are cytotoxic for maternal T cells. Fetal liver-derived lymphoid progenitors yielded predominantly TCR-gamma/delta+ cell clusters when cultured on fetal bone marrow- derived stromal cells in the presence of a cytokine cocktail under magnetic force. These tightly adherent clusters were cloned by limiting dilution and the resulting cell lines analyzed for phenotype and function. Six of eight TCR-gamma/delta lines from 8-9.5-wk gestation fetuses were V delta 2+ as compared with zero of eight lines from later stages of gestation (10 and 15 wk), where all the lines were V delta 1+. In cytotoxicity assays, these TCR-gamma/delta+, CD3+, CD4-, and CD8+ or CD8- long-term cultured lymphoid cells (LLC) were killer cells active against the class I antigens on maternal T cells. Of the cell lines, the CD8+ TCR-gamma/delta+ LLC had the highest levels of killer activity. Thus fetal liver TCR-gamma/delta+ T cells may play a crucial role in protection against invading maternal T cells generated in the feto-maternal interaction. PMID:1535364

  13. Involvement of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) in the anticonvulsant action of methaqualone.

    PubMed

    Naik, S R; Naid, P R; Sheth, U K

    1978-04-14

    The effects of methaqualone on isonicotinic acid hydrazide, 6-mercapto propionic acid, picrotoxin, and strychnine-induced convulsion were studied in mice and the results compared with diazepam. Methaqualone, like diazepam, was found to be a selective antagonist of isoniazid-induced convulsion and a much less effective inhibitor of strychnine convulsion. Methaqualone elicits muscle-relaxant, sedative, and anticonvulsant effects at different dose levels. At low, nonsedative doses the drug produces anticonvulsant effects, and at higher doses, muscle-relaxant and sedative effects. It appears that the mechanism(s) of action of methaqualone in on GABA deficiency or receptor blockade, rather than on glycine receptors.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha activation of CYP7A1 during food restriction and diabetes is still inhibited by small heterodimer partner.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Ju; Osborne, Timothy F

    2008-05-30

    Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the classic pathway of hepatic bile acid biosynthesis from cholesterol. During fasting and in type I diabetes, elevated levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) induce expression of the Cyp7A1 gene and overexpression of PGC-1alpha in hepatoma cells stimulates bile acid synthesis. Using Ad-PGC-1alpha-RNA interference to induce acute disruption of PGC-1alpha in mice, here we show that PGC-1alpha is necessary for fasting-mediated induction of CYP7A1. Co-immunoprecipitation and promoter activation studies reveal that the induction of CYP7A1 is mediated by direct interaction between PGC-1alpha and the AF2 domain of liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1). In contrast, the very similar PGC-1beta could not substitute for PGC-1alpha. We also show that transactivation of PGC-1alpha and LRH-1 is repressed by the small heterodimer partner (SHP). Treatment of mice with GW4064, a synthetic agonist for farnesoid X receptor, induced SHP expression and decreased both the recruitment of PGC-1alpha to the Cyp7A1 promoter and the fasting-induced expression of CYP7A1 mRNA. These data suggest that PGC-1alpha is an important co-activator for LRH-1 and that SHP targets the interaction between LRH-1 and PGC-1alpha to inhibit CYP7A1 expression. Overall, these studies provide further evidence for the important role of PGC-1alpha in bile acid homeostasis and suggest that pharmacological targeting of farnesoid X receptor in vivo can be used to reverse the increase in CYP7A1 associated with adverse metabolic conditions.

  15. Physiological and receptor-selective retinoids modulate interferon gamma signaling by increasing the expression, nuclear localization, and functional activity of interferon regulatory factor-1.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin M; Ross, A Catharine

    2005-10-28

    Synergistic actions between all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) and interferon gamma (IFNgamma) on modulation of cellular functions have been reported both in vitro and in vivo. However, the mechanism of atRA-mediated regulation of IFNgamma signaling is poorly understood. In this study, we have used the human lung epithelial cell line A549 to examine the effect of atRA on IFNgamma-induced expression of IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1), an important transcription factor involved in cell growth and apoptosis, differentiation, and antiviral and antibacterial immune responses. At least 4 h of pretreatment with atRA followed by suboptimal concentrations of IFNgamma induced a faster, higher, and more stable expression of IRF-1 than IFNgamma alone. Actinomycin D completely blocked the induction of IRF-1 by the combination, suggesting regulation at the transcriptional level. Further, we found that activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 was induced more dramatically by atRA and IFNgamma than by IFNgamma alone. Expression of IFNgamma receptor-1 on the cell surface was also increased upon atRA pretreatment. Experiments using receptor-selective retinoids revealed that ligands for retinoic acid receptor-alpha (RARalpha), including atRA, 9-cis-retinoic acid, and Am580, sequentially increased the levels of IFNgamma receptor-1, activated signal transducer and activator of transcription-1, and IRF-1 and that an RARalpha antagonist was able to inhibit the effects of atRA and Am580. In addition, atRA pretreatment affected the transcriptional functions of IFNgamma-induced IRF-1, increasing its nuclear localization and DNA binding activity as well as the transcript levels of IRF-1 target genes. These results suggest that atRA, an RARalpha ligand, regulates IFNgamma-induced IRF-1 by affecting multiple components of the IFNgamma signaling pathway, from the plasma membrane to the nuclear transcription factors.

  16. Bidirectional modulation of hippocampal gamma (20-80 Hz) frequency activity in vitro via alpha(α)- and beta(β)-adrenergic receptors (AR).

    PubMed

    Haggerty, D C; Glykos, V; Adams, N E; Lebeau, F E N

    2013-12-01

    Noradrenaline (NA) in the hippocampus plays an important role in memory function and has been shown to modulate different forms of synaptic plasticity. Oscillations in the gamma frequency (20-80 Hz) band in the hippocampus have also been proposed to play an important role in memory functions and, evidence from both in vitro and in vivo studies, has suggested this activity can be modulated by NA. However, the role of different NA receptor subtypes in the modulation of gamma frequency activity has not been fully elucidated. We have found that NA (30 μM) exerts a bidirectional control on the magnitude of kainate-evoked (50-200 nM) gamma frequency oscillations in the cornu Ammonis (CA3) region of the rat hippocampus in vitro via activation of different receptor subtypes. Activation of alpha-adrenergic receptors (α-AR) reduced the power of the gamma frequency oscillation. In contrast, activation of beta-adrenergic receptors (β-AR) caused an increase in the power of the gamma frequency oscillations. Using specific agonists and antagonists of AR receptor subtypes we demonstrated that these effects are mediated specifically via α1A-AR and β1-AR subtypes. NA activated both receptor subtypes, but the α1A-AR-mediated effect predominated, resulting in a reversible suppression of gamma frequency activity. These results suggest that NA is able to differentially modulate on-going gamma frequency oscillatory activity that could result in either increased or decreased information flow through the hippocampus.

  17. Pharmacological activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptors regulates erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Ho, Ya-Hsuan; Chiang, Jui-Chung; Li, Meng-Wei; Lin, Shi-Hung; Chen, Wei-Min; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Yu-Nung; Yang, Ya-Jan; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lu, Jenher; Huang, Chang-Jen; Tigyi, Gabor; Yao, Chao-Ling; Lee, Hsinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a growth factor-like phospholipid, regulates numerous physiological functions, including cell proliferation and differentiation. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that LPA activates erythropoiesis by activating the LPA 3 receptor subtype (LPA3) under erythropoietin (EPO) induction. In the present study, we applied a pharmacological approach to further elucidate the functions of LPA receptors during red blood cell (RBC) differentiation. In K562 human erythroleukemia cells, knockdown of LPA2 enhanced erythropoiesis, whereas knockdown of LPA3 inhibited RBC differentiation. In CD34+ human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) and K526 cells, the LPA3 agonist 1-oleoyl-2-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothionate (2S-OMPT) promoted erythropoiesis, whereas the LPA2 agonist dodecyl monophosphate (DMP) and the nonlipid specific agonist GRI977143 (GRI) suppressed this process. In zebrafish embryos, hemoglobin expression was significantly increased by 2S-OMPT treatment but was inhibited by GRI. Furthermore, GRI treatment decreased, whereas 2S-OMPT treatment increased RBC counts and amount of hemoglobin level in adult BALB/c mice. These results indicate that LPA2 and LPA3 play opposing roles during RBC differentiation. The pharmacological activation of LPA receptor subtypes represent a novel strategies for augmenting or inhibiting erythropoiesis. PMID:27244685

  18. Constitutive Smad signaling and Smad-dependent collagen gene expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Asish K Wei, Jun; Wu, Minghua; Varga, John

    2008-09-19

    Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}), a potent inducer of collagen synthesis, is implicated in pathological fibrosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}) is a nuclear hormone receptor that regulates adipogenesis and numerous other biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that collagen gene expression was markedly elevated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking PPAR-{gamma} compared to heterozygous control MEFs. Treatment with the PPAR-{gamma} ligand 15d-PGJ{sub 2} failed to down-regulate collagen gene expression in PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs, whereas reconstitution of these cells with ectopic PPAR-{gamma} resulted in their normalization. Compared to control MEFs, PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs displayed elevated levels of the Type I TGF-{beta} receptor (T{beta}RI), and secreted more TGF-{beta}1 into the media. Furthermore, PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs showed constitutive phosphorylation of cellular Smad2 and Smad3, even in the absence of exogenous TGF-{beta}, which was abrogated by the ALK5 inhibitor SB431542. Constitutive Smad2/3 phosphorylation in PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs was associated with Smad3 binding to its cognate DNA recognition sequences, and interaction with coactivator p300 previously implicated in TGF-{beta} responses. Taken together, these results indicate that loss of PPAR-{gamma} in MEFs is associated with upregulation of collagen synthesis, and activation of intracellular Smad signal transduction, due, at least in part, to autocrine TGF-{beta} stimulation.

  19. Retinoic acid receptors: from molecular mechanisms to cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    di Masi, Alessandra; Leboffe, Loris; De Marinis, Elisabetta; Pagano, Francesca; Cicconi, Laura; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Nervi, Clara

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the major bioactive metabolite of retinol or vitamin A, induces a spectrum of pleiotropic effects in cell growth and differentiation that are relevant for embryonic development and adult physiology. The RA activity is mediated primarily by members of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) subfamily, namely RARα, RARβ and RARγ, which belong to the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. RARs form heterodimers with members of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) subfamily and act as ligand-regulated transcription factors through binding specific RA response elements (RAREs) located in target genes promoters. RARs also have non-genomic effects and activate kinase signaling pathways, which fine-tune the transcription of the RA target genes. The disruption of RA signaling pathways is thought to underlie the etiology of a number of hematological and non-hematological malignancies, including leukemias, skin cancer, head/neck cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, renal cell carcinoma, pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, glioblastoma and neuroblastoma. Of note, RA and its derivatives (retinoids) are employed as potential chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents because of their differentiation, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant effects. In humans, retinoids reverse premalignant epithelial lesions, induce the differentiation of myeloid normal and leukemic cells, and prevent lung, liver, and breast cancer. Here, we provide an overview of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that regulate the RA and retinoid signaling pathways. Moreover, mechanisms through which deregulation of RA signaling pathways ultimately impact on cancer are examined. Finally, the therapeutic effects of retinoids are reported. PMID:25543955

  20. Molecular basis for amino acid sensing by family C G-protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wellendorph, P; Bräuner-Osborne, H

    2009-01-01

    Family C of human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is constituted by eight metabotropic glutamate receptors, two γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB1–2) subunits forming the heterodimeric GABAB receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor, three taste1 receptors (T1R1–3), a promiscuous L-α-amino acid receptor G-protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) and seven orphan receptors. Aside from the orphan receptors, the family C GPCRs are dimeric receptors characterized by a large extracellular Venus flytrap domain which bind the endogenous agonists. Except from the GABAB1–2 and T1R2–3 receptor, all receptors are either activated or positively modulated by amino acids. In this review, we outline mutational, biophysical and structural studies which have elucidated the interaction of the amino acids with the Venus flytrap domains, molecular mechanisms of receptor selectivity and the initial steps in receptor activation. PMID:19298394

  1. Deficiency of interferon-gamma or its receptor promotes colorectal cancer development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Yan; Song, Zhiyu; Chu, Jiahui; Qu, Xianjun

    2015-04-01

    Genetic variations in interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and its receptor (IFNγR) subunits are closely associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and survival after diagnosis. However, the role of loss of IFN-γ or IFNγR function in the pathogenesis of CRC remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of endogenous IFN-γ deficiency in adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc)-mediated intestinal tumor by developing a variant of Apc(Min/+) mice. The Apc(Min/+)IFN-γ(+/-) mice presented with increased number and size of adenomas, and 41.7% of these mice developed adenocarcinoma. Molecular analyses of the adenomas suggested that heterozygous deletion of IFN-γ promoted EGFR/Erk1/2 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. In vitro, IFN-γ administration inhibited Apc-mutated HT-29 colon cancer cell proliferation and had no effect on the proliferation of HCT-116 colon cancer cells that express wild-type Apc. Besides, we challenged HT-29 cells with small interfering RNA targeting one of its receptor subunits IFNγR1. We found that knockdown of IFNγR1 in HT-29 cells stimulated cell proliferation and colony formation, which was also related to the regulation of EGFR/Erk1/2 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Thus, our results strongly support the notion that IFN-γ and IFNγR1 act as a rate-limiting factor in the development of CRC, uncovering a novel role for them in cancer biology.

  2. Antioxidant activities of fucoidan degraded by gamma irradiation and acidic hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sangyong; Choi, Jong-il; Park, Hyun

    2015-04-01

    Low molecular weight fucoidan, prepared by radical degradation using gamma ray was investigated for its antioxidant activities with different assay methods. As the molecular weight of fucoidan decreased with a higher absorbed dose, ferric-reducing antioxidant power values increased, but β-carotene bleaching inhibition did not change significantly. The antioxidant activity of acid-degraded fucoidan was also examined to investigate the effect of different degradation methods. At the same molecular weight, fucoidan degraded by gamma irradiation showed higher 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity than that observed with the acidic method. This result reveals that in addition to molecular weight, the degradation method affects the antioxidant activity of fucoidan.

  3. Leveraging abscisic acid receptors for efficient water use in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Liu, Jinghui; Tischer, Stefanie V; Christmann, Alexander; Windisch, Wilhelm; Schnyder, Hans; Grill, Erwin

    2016-06-14

    Plant growth requires the influx of atmospheric CO2 through stomatal pores, and this carbon uptake for photosynthesis is inherently associated with a large efflux of water vapor. Under water deficit, plants reduce transpiration and are able to improve carbon for water exchange leading to higher water use efficiency (WUE). Whether increased WUE can be achieved without trade-offs in plant growth is debated. The signals mediating the WUE response under water deficit are not fully elucidated but involve the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is perceived by a family of related receptors known to mediate acclimation responses and to reduce transpiration. We now show that enhanced stimulation of ABA signaling via distinct ABA receptors can result in plants constitutively growing at high WUE in the model species Arabidopsis WUE was assessed by three independent approaches involving gravimetric analyses, (13)C discrimination studies of shoots and derived cellulose fractions, and by gas exchange measurements of whole plants and individual leaves. Plants expressing the ABA receptors RCAR6/PYL12 combined up to 40% increased WUE with high growth rates, i.e., are water productive. Water productivity was associated with maintenance of net carbon assimilation by compensatory increases of leaf CO2 gradients, thereby sustaining biomass acquisition. Leaf surface temperatures and growth potentials of plants growing under well-watered conditions were found to be reliable indicators for water productivity. The study shows that ABA receptors can be explored to generate more plant biomass per water transpired, which is a prime goal for a more sustainable water use in agriculture. PMID:27247417

  4. Leveraging abscisic acid receptors for efficient water use in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenyu; Liu, Jinghui; Tischer, Stefanie V.; Christmann, Alexander; Windisch, Wilhelm; Schnyder, Hans; Grill, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth requires the influx of atmospheric CO2 through stomatal pores, and this carbon uptake for photosynthesis is inherently associated with a large efflux of water vapor. Under water deficit, plants reduce transpiration and are able to improve carbon for water exchange leading to higher water use efficiency (WUE). Whether increased WUE can be achieved without trade-offs in plant growth is debated. The signals mediating the WUE response under water deficit are not fully elucidated but involve the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is perceived by a family of related receptors known to mediate acclimation responses and to reduce transpiration. We now show that enhanced stimulation of ABA signaling via distinct ABA receptors can result in plants constitutively growing at high WUE in the model species Arabidopsis. WUE was assessed by three independent approaches involving gravimetric analyses, 13C discrimination studies of shoots and derived cellulose fractions, and by gas exchange measurements of whole plants and individual leaves. Plants expressing the ABA receptors RCAR6/PYL12 combined up to 40% increased WUE with high growth rates, i.e., are water productive. Water productivity was associated with maintenance of net carbon assimilation by compensatory increases of leaf CO2 gradients, thereby sustaining biomass acquisition. Leaf surface temperatures and growth potentials of plants growing under well-watered conditions were found to be reliable indicators for water productivity. The study shows that ABA receptors can be explored to generate more plant biomass per water transpired, which is a prime goal for a more sustainable water use in agriculture. PMID:27247417

  5. Natural product agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ): a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Limei; Waltenberger, Birgit; Pferschy-Wenzig, Eva-Maria; Blunder, Martina; Liu, Xin; Malainer, Clemens; Blazevic, Tina; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M; Heiss, Elke H; Schuster, Daniela; Kopp, Brigitte; Bauer, Rudolf; Stuppner, Hermann; Dirsch, Verena M; Atanasov, Atanas G

    2014-11-01

    Agonists of the nuclear receptor PPARγ are therapeutically used to combat hyperglycaemia associated with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. In spite of being effective in normalization of blood glucose levels, the currently used PPARγ agonists from the thiazolidinedione type have serious side effects, making the discovery of novel ligands highly relevant. Natural products have proven historically to be a promising pool of structures for drug discovery, and a significant research effort has recently been undertaken to explore the PPARγ-activating potential of a wide range of natural products originating from traditionally used medicinal plants or dietary sources. The majority of identified compounds are selective PPARγ modulators (SPPARMs), transactivating the expression of PPARγ-dependent reporter genes as partial agonists. Those natural PPARγ ligands have different binding modes to the receptor in comparison to the full thiazolidinedione agonists, and on some occasions activate in addition PPARα (e.g. genistein, biochanin A, sargaquinoic acid, sargahydroquinoic acid, resveratrol, amorphastilbol) or the PPARγ-dimer partner retinoid X receptor (RXR; e.g. the neolignans magnolol and honokiol). A number of in vivo studies suggest that some of the natural product activators of PPARγ (e.g. honokiol, amorfrutin 1, amorfrutin B, amorphastilbol) improve metabolic parameters in diabetic animal models, partly with reduced side effects in comparison to full thiazolidinedione agonists. The bioactivity pattern as well as the dietary use of several of the identified active compounds and plant extracts warrants future research regarding their therapeutic potential and the possibility to modulate PPARγ activation by dietary interventions or food supplements.

  6. Natural product agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ): a review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limei; Waltenberger, Birgit; Pferschy-Wenzig, Eva-Maria; Blunder, Martina; Liu, Xin; Malainer, Clemens; Blazevic, Tina; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Heiss, Elke H.; Schuster, Daniela; Kopp, Brigitte; Bauer, Rudolf; Stuppner, Hermann; Dirsch, Verena M.; Atanasov, Atanas G.

    2014-01-01

    Agonists of the nuclear receptor PPARγ are therapeutically used to combat hyperglycaemia associated with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. In spite of being effective in normalization of blood glucose levels, the currently used PPARγ agonists from the thiazolidinedione type have serious side effects, making the discovery of novel ligands highly relevant. Natural products have proven historically to be a promising pool of structures for drug discovery, and a significant research effort has recently been undertaken to explore the PPARγ-activating potential of a wide range of natural products originating from traditionally used medicinal plants or dietary sources. The majority of identified compounds are selective PPARγ modulators (SPPARMs), transactivating the expression of PPARγ-dependent reporter genes as partial agonists. Those natural PPARγ ligands have different binding modes to the receptor in comparison to the full thiazolidinedione agonists, and on some occasions activate in addition PPARα (e.g. genistein, biochanin A, sargaquinoic acid, sargahydroquinoic acid, resveratrol, amorphastilbol) or the PPARγ-dimer partner retinoid X receptor (RXR; e.g. the neolignans magnolol and honokiol). A number of in vivo studies suggest that some of the natural product activators of PPARγ (e.g. honokiol, amorfrutin 1, amorfrutin B, amorphastilbol) improve metabolic parameters in diabetic animal models, partly with reduced side effects in comparison to full thiazolidinedione agonists. The bioactivity pattern as well as the dietary use of several of the identified active compounds and plant extracts warrants future research regarding their therapeutic potential and the possibility to modulate PPARγ activation by dietary interventions or food supplements. PMID:25083916

  7. Biological roles and therapeutic potential of hydroxy-carboxylic Acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kashan

    2011-01-01

    In the recent past, deorphanization studies have described intermediates of energy metabolism to activate G protein-coupled receptors and to thereby regulate metabolic functions. GPR81, GPR109A, and GPR109B, formerly known as the nicotinic acid receptor family, are encoded by clustered genes and share a high degree of sequence homology. Recently, hydroxy-carboxylic acids were identified as endogenous ligands of GPR81, GPR109A, and GPR109B, and therefore these receptors have been placed into a novel receptor family of hydroxy-carboxylic acid (HCA) receptors. The HCA(1) receptor (GPR81) is activated by the glycolytic metabolite 2-hydroxy-propionic acid (lactate), the HCA(2) receptor is activated by the ketone body 3-hydroxy-butyric acid, and the HCA(3) receptor (GPR109B) is a receptor for the β-oxidation intermediate 3-hydroxy-octanoic acid. While HCA(1) and HCA(2) receptors are present in most mammalian species, the HCA(3) receptor is exclusively found in humans and higher primates. HCA receptors are expressed in adipose tissue and mediate anti-lipolytic effects in adipocytes through G(i)-type G protein-dependent inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. HCA(2) and HCA(3) inhibit lipolysis during conditions of increased β-oxidation such as prolonged fasting, whereas HCA(1) mediates the anti-lipolytic effects of insulin in the fed state. As HCA(2) is a receptor for the established anti-dyslipidemic drug nicotinic acid, HCA(1) and HCA(3) also represent promising drug targets and several synthetic ligands for HCA receptors have been developed. In this article, we will summarize the deorphanization and pharmacological characterization of HCA receptors. Moreover, we will discuss recent progress in elucidating the physiological and pathophysiological role to further evaluate the therapeutic potential of the HCA receptor family for the treatment of metabolic disease.

  8. Induction of human adiponectin gene transcription by telmisartan, angiotensin receptor blocker, independently on PPAR-{gamma} activation

    SciTech Connect

    Moriuchi, Akie ||. E-mail: f1195@cc.nagasaki-u-ac.jp; Shimamura, Mika; Kita, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Hironaga; Satoh, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Tsuyoshi; Fujishima, Keiichiro; Fukushima, Keiko |; Hayakawa, Takao; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Nagayama, Yuji; Kawasaki, Eiji

    2007-05-18

    Adiponectin, an adipose tissue-specific plasma protein, has been shown to ameliorate insulin resistance and inhibit the process of atherosclerosis. Recently, several reports have stated that angiotensin type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), increase adiponectin plasma level, and ameliorate insulin resistance. Telmisartan, a subclass of ARBs, has been shown to be a partial agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{gamma}, and to increase the plasma adiponectin level. However, the transcriptional regulation of the human adiponectin gene by telmisartan has not been determined yet. To elucidate the effect of telmisartan on adiponectin, the stimulatory regulation of human adiponectin gene by telmisartan was investigated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, utilizing adenovirus-mediated luciferase reporter gene-transferring technique. This study indicates that telmisartan may stimulate adiponectin transcription independent of PPAR-{gamma}.

  9. Letter: Iatrogenic lipomatosis: a rare manifestation of treatment with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist.

    PubMed

    Femia, Alisa; Klein, Peter A

    2010-04-15

    Lipomas are common benign neoplasms of adipose tissue. Lipomatosis, the progressive appearance of multiple lipomas, is most often associated with specific congenital, familial, or idiopathic syndromes. In one reported case, the development of multiple lipomas occurred as a result of treatment with rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonist. We report a second case of lipomatosis occurring as a result of treatment with a PPAR gamma agonist. This case occurred in a 77-year-old woman who developed multiple lipomas two years after beginning treatment with pioglitazone, a PPAR gamma agonist. Histopathologic examination confirmed these lesions to be lipomas. Within four weeks of discontinuation of pioglitazone, regression of the lipomas began. We describe a case of PPAR agonist-induced lipoma formation, review relevant literature, and provide a molecular mechanism for this side effect.

  10. The Differential Interactions of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor [gamma] Ligands with Tyr473 Is a Physical Basis for Their Unique Biological Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Einstein, Monica; Akiyama, Taro E.; Castriota, Gino A.; Wang, Chuanlin F.; McKeever, Brian; Mosley, Ralph T.; Becker, Joseph W.; Moller, David E.; Meinke, Peter T.; Wood, Harold B.; Berger, Joel P.

    2008-08-01

    Despite their proven antidiabetic efficacy, widespread use of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){gamma} agonists has been limited by adverse cardiovascular effects. To overcome this shortcoming, selective PPAR{gamma} modulators (SPPAR{gamma}Ms) have been identified that have antidiabetic efficacy comparable with full agonists with improved tolerability in preclinical species. The results of structural studies support the proposition that SPPAR{gamma}Ms interact with PPAR{gamma} differently from full agonists, thereby providing a physical basis for their novel activities. Herein, we describe a novel PPAR{gamma} ligand, SPPAR{gamma}M2. This compound was a partial agonist in a cell-based transcriptional activity assay, with diminished adipogenic activity and an attenuated gene signature in cultured human adipocytes. X-ray cocrystallography studies demonstrated that, unlike rosiglitazone, SPPAR{gamma}M2 did not interact with the Tyr473 residue located within helix 12 of the ligand binding domain (LBD). Instead, SPPAR{gamma}M2 was found to bind to and activate human PPAR{gamma} in which the Tyr473 residue had been mutated to alanine (hPPAR{gamma}Y473A), with potencies similar to those observed with the wild-type receptor (hPPAR{gamma}WT). In additional studies, we found that the intrinsic binding and functional potencies of structurally distinct SPPAR{gamma}Ms were not diminished by the Y473A mutation, whereas those of various thiazolidinedione (TZD) and non-TZD PPAR{gamma} full agonists were reduced in a correlative manner. These results directly demonstrate the important role of Tyr473 in mediating the interaction of full agonists but not SPPAR{gamma}Ms with the PPAR{gamma} LBD, thereby providing a precise molecular determinant for their differing pharmacologies.

  11. Bile acid receptor agonist GW4064 regulates PPARγ coactivator-1α expression through estrogen receptor-related receptor α.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Shailendra Kumar Dhar; Singh, Nidhi; Kumari, Rashmi; Mishra, Jay Sharan; Tripathi, Sarita; Banerjee, Priyam; Shah, Priyanka; Kukshal, Vandana; Tyagi, Abdul Malik; Gaikwad, Anil Nilkanth; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Mishra, Durga Prasad; Trivedi, Arun Kumar; Sanyal, Somali; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Ramachandran, Ravishankar; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Bandyopadhyay, Arun; Arora, Ashish; Lundåsen, Thomas; Anakk, Sayee Priyadarshini; Moore, David D; Sanyal, Sabyasachi

    2011-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is induced in energy-starved conditions and is a key regulator of energy homeostasis. This makes PGC-1α an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In our effort to identify new regulators of PGC-1α expression, we found that GW4064, a widely used synthetic agonist for the nuclear bile acid receptor [farnesoid X receptor (FXR)] strongly enhances PGC-1α promoter reporter activity, mRNA, and protein expression. This induction in PGC-1α concomitantly enhances mitochondrial mass and expression of several PGC-1α target genes involved in mitochondrial function. Using FXR-rich or FXR-nonexpressing cell lines and tissues, we found that this effect of GW4064 is not mediated directly by FXR but occurs via activation of estrogen receptor-related receptor α (ERRα). Cell-based, biochemical and biophysical assays indicate GW4064 as an agonist of ERR proteins. Interestingly, FXR disruption alters GW4064 induction of PGC-1α mRNA in a tissue-dependent manner. Using FXR-null [FXR knockout (FXRKO)] mice, we determined that GW4064 induction of PGC-1α expression is not affected in oxidative soleus muscles of FXRKO mice but is compromised in the FXRKO liver. Mechanistic studies to explain these differences revealed that FXR physically interacts with ERR and protects them from repression by the atypical corepressor, small heterodimer partner in liver. Together, this interplay between ERRα-FXR-PGC-1α and small heterodimer partner offers new insights into the biological functions of ERRα and FXR, thus providing a knowledge base for therapeutics in energy balance-related pathophysiology.

  12. Thyroid hormone receptor can modulate retinoic acid-mediated axis formation in frog embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Banker, D E; Eisenman, R N

    1993-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor acts as a hormone-dependent transcriptional transactivator and as a transcriptional repressor in the absence of thyroid hormone. Specifically, thyroid hormone receptor can repress retinoic acid-induced gene expression through interactions with retinoic acid receptor. (Retinoic acid is a potent teratogen in the frog Xenopus laevis, acting at early embryonic stages to interfere with the formation of anterior structures. Endogenous retinoic acid is thought to act in normal anterior-posterior axis formation.) We have previously shown that thyroid hormone receptor RNA (alpha isotype) is expressed and polysome-associated during Xenopus embryogenesis preceding thyroid gland maturation and endogenous thyroid hormone production (D. E. Banker, J. Bigler, and R. N. Eisenman, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5079-5089, 1991). To determine whether thyroid hormone receptor might influence the effects of retinoic acid in early frog development, we have examined the results of ectopic thyroid hormone receptor expression on retinoic acid teratogenesis. We demonstrate that microinjections of full-length thyroid hormone receptor RNA protect injected embryos from retinoic acid teratogenesis. DNA binding is apparently essential to this protective function, as truncated thyroid hormone receptors, lacking DNA-binding domains but including hormone-binding and dimerization domains, do not protect from retinoic acid. We have shown that microinjections of these dominant-interfering thyroid hormone receptors, as well as anti-thyroid hormone receptor antibodies, increase retinoic acid teratogenesis in injected embryos, presumably by inactivating endogenous thyroid hormone receptor. This finding suggests that endogenous thyroid hormone receptors may act to limit retinoic acid sensitivity. On the other hand, after thyroid hormone treatment, ectopic thyroid hormone receptor mediates teratogenesis that is indistinguishable from the dorsoanterior deficiencies produced in retinoic acid

  13. Functional genomics analysis of big data identifies novel peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor gamma target single nucleotide polymorphisms showing association with cardiometabolic outcomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus represent overlapping diseases where a large portion of the variation attributable to genetics remains unexplained. An important player in their pathogenesis is peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) that is involve...

  14. A heavy metal biotrap for wastewater remediation using poly-gamma-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Mark, Sonny S; Crusberg, Theodore C; Dacunha, Christopher M; Di Iorio, Alexander A

    2006-01-01

    Poly-gamma-glutamic acid (gamma-PGA) obtained from Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 9945 was evaluated as a potential biosorbent material for use in the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution. Copper (Cu(2+)) was chosen as the model heavy metal used in these studies since it is extensively used by electroplating and other industries, has been the model for many other similar studies, and can be easily assayed through a number of convenient methods. Cu(2+)-gamma-PGA binding parameters under varying conditions of pH, temperature, ionic strength, and in the presence of other heavy metal ions were determined for the purified biopolymer using a specially designed dialysis apparatus. Applying the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model showed that gamma-PGA had a copper capacity approaching 77.9 mg/g and a binding constant of 32 mg/L (0.5 mM) at pH 4.0 and 25 degrees C. Cu(2+)-gamma-PGA adsorption was relatively temperature independent between 7 and 40 degrees C, while an increase in ionic strength led to a decrease in metal ion binding. Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) ions compete with Cu(2+) for binding sites on the gamma-PGA biopolymer. Metal uptake by gamma-PGA was further tested using a tangential flow filtration apparatus in a diafiltration mode in which metal was continually processed through a dilute solution of gamma-PGA without allowing for equilibrium to be established. The circulating polymer solution was able to complex metal as well as successfully prevent passage of unbound copper ions present in solution through the membrane. Using 500 mL of a 0.2% gamma-PGA solution, up to 97% of a 50 mg/L copper sulfate solution processed at a flow rate of 115 mL/min was retained by the polymer. For a 10 mg/L solution of Cu(2+) as copper sulfate, filtrate concentrations of Cu(2+) never rose above 0.6 mg/L while processing 2.5 L of dilute copper sulfate.

  15. Thiazolidinediones repress ob gene expression in rodents via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, P; Lefebvre, A M; Miller, S G; Guerre-Millo, M; Wong, K; Saladin, R; Hamann, L G; Staels, B; Briggs, M R; Auwerx, J

    1996-01-01

    The ob gene product, leptin, is a signaling factor regulating body weight and energy balance. ob gene expression in rodents is increased in obesity and is regulated by feeding patterns and hormones, such as insulin and glucocorticoids. In humans with gross obesity, ob mRNA levels are higher, but other modulators of human ob expression are unknown. In view of the importance of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) in adipocyte differentiation, we analyzed whether ob gene expression is subject to regulation by factors activating PPARs. Treatment of rats with the PPARalpha activator fenofibrate did not change adipose tissue and body weight and had no significant effect on ob mRNA levels. However, administration of the thiazolidinedione BRL49653, a PPARgamma ligand, increased food intake and adipose tissue weight while reducing ob mRNA levels in rats in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of the thiazolidinedione BRL49653 on ob mRNA levels was also observed in vitro. Thiazolidinediones reduced the expression of the human ob promoter in primary adipocytes, however, in undifferentiated 3T3-L1 preadipocytes lacking endogenous PPARgamma, cotransfection of PPARgamma was required to observe the decrease. In conclusion, these data suggest that PPARgamma activators reduce ob mRNA levels through an effect of PPARgamma on the ob promoter. PMID:8770873

  16. Thiazolidinediones repress ob gene expression in rodents via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    De Vos, P; Lefebvre, A M; Miller, S G; Guerre-Millo, M; Wong, K; Saladin, R; Hamann, L G; Staels, B; Briggs, M R; Auwerx, J

    1996-08-15

    The ob gene product, leptin, is a signaling factor regulating body weight and energy balance. ob gene expression in rodents is increased in obesity and is regulated by feeding patterns and hormones, such as insulin and glucocorticoids. In humans with gross obesity, ob mRNA levels are higher, but other modulators of human ob expression are unknown. In view of the importance of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) in adipocyte differentiation, we analyzed whether ob gene expression is subject to regulation by factors activating PPARs. Treatment of rats with the PPARalpha activator fenofibrate did not change adipose tissue and body weight and had no significant effect on ob mRNA levels. However, administration of the thiazolidinedione BRL49653, a PPARgamma ligand, increased food intake and adipose tissue weight while reducing ob mRNA levels in rats in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of the thiazolidinedione BRL49653 on ob mRNA levels was also observed in vitro. Thiazolidinediones reduced the expression of the human ob promoter in primary adipocytes, however, in undifferentiated 3T3-L1 preadipocytes lacking endogenous PPARgamma, cotransfection of PPARgamma was required to observe the decrease. In conclusion, these data suggest that PPARgamma activators reduce ob mRNA levels through an effect of PPARgamma on the ob promoter.

  17. Interferon-gamma receptor 1 promoter polymorphisms: population distribution and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Sergio D; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Ding, Li; Sullivan, Rachel; Enyedi, Balasz; Yim, Jae-Joon; Cook, James L; Musser, James M; Holland, Steven M

    2004-07-01

    Different polymorphisms have been described in the minimal promoter region (MPR) of the interferon-gamma receptor 1 (IFNGR1), a molecule that plays a critical role in mycobacterial control. We sequenced the IFNGR1 MPR from African American, Caucasian and Korean controls, and from mycobacteria-infected patients. Six different single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in the IFNGR1 MPR. The three ethnic groups showed different SNP distribution patterns, but no significant differences were detected between mycobacterial cases and controls. Two polymorphisms were found in all populations (G-611A, T-56C). We cloned the four allelic variants (var) of haplotype G-611A/T-56C into a luciferase reporter vector and determined their promoter activity. Polymorphisms at position -611 had a stronger effect on the promoter activity than those at position -56, and constructs carrying G-611 produced a stronger promoter activity than -611A constructs. The IFNGR1 MPR is a polymorphic region with at least two SNPs influencing its activity, but these are not associated with increased mycobacterial susceptibility.

  18. Estrogen-related receptor gamma and hearing function: evidence of a role in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Lisa S.; Maier, Hannes; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Girotto, Giorgia; Ecob, Russell; Pirastu, Nicola; Cadge, Barbara A.; Hübner, Christian; Gasparini, Paolo; Strachan, David P.; Davis, Adrian; Dawson, Sally J.

    2013-01-01

    Since estrogen is thought to protect pre-menopausal women from age-related hearing loss, we investigated whether variation in estrogen-signalling genes is linked to hearing status in the 1958 British Birth Cohort. This analysis implicated the estrogen-related receptor gamma (ESRRG) gene in determining adult hearing function and was investigated further in a total of 6134 individuals in 3 independent cohorts: (i) the 1958 British Birth Cohort; (ii) a London ARHL case-control cohort; and (iii) a cohort from isolated populations of Italy and Silk Road countries. Evidence of an association between the minor allele of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2818964 and hearing status was found in females, but not in males in 2 of these cohorts: p = 0.0058 (London ARHL) and p = 0.0065 (Carlantino, Italy). Furthermore, assessment of hearing in Esrrg knock-out mice revealed a mild 25-dB hearing loss at 5 weeks of age. At 12 weeks, average hearing thresholds in female mice(-/-) were 15 dB worse than in males(-/-). Together these data indicate ESRRG plays a role in maintenance of hearing in both humans and mice. PMID:23540940

  19. Arginine of retinoic acid receptor beta which coordinates with the carboxyl group of retinoic acid functions independent of the amino acid residues responsible for retinoic acid receptor subtype ligand specificity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zeng Ping; Hutcheson, Juliet M; Poynton, Helen C; Gabriel, Jerome L; Soprano, Kenneth J; Soprano, Dianne Robert

    2003-01-15

    The biological actions of retinoic acid (RA) are mediated by retinoic acid receptors (RARalpha, RARbeta, and RARgamma) and retinoid X receptors (RXRalpha, RXRbeta, and RXRgamma). Consistent with the X-ray crystal structures of RARalpha and RARgamma, site-directed mutagenesis studies have demonstrated the importance of a conserved Arg residue (alphaArg(276), betaArg(269), and gammaArg(278)) for coordination with the carboxyl group of RA. However, mutation of Arg(269) to Ala in RARbeta causes only a 3- to 6-fold increase in the K(d) for RA and EC(50) in RA-dependent transcriptional transactivation assays while the homologous mutation in either RARalpha or RARgamma causes a 110-fold and a 45-fold increase in EC(50) value, respectively. To further investigate the nature of this difference, we prepared mutant RARs to determine the effect of conversion of betaR269A to a mutant which mimics either RARalpha ligand selectivity (betaA225S/R269A) or RARgamma ligand selectivity (betaI263M/R269A/V338A). Our results demonstrate that in RARbeta mutants that acquire either RARalpha or RARgamma ligand specificity the Arg(269) position responsible for coordination with the carboxyl group of retinoids continued to function like that of RARbeta. Furthermore, three mutant receptors (betaA225S/R269A, betaA225S/F279, and alphaF286A) were found to have a greater than wild-type affinity for the RARalpha-selective ligand Am580. Finally, a homology-based computer model of the ligand binding domain (LBD) of RARbeta and the X-ray crystal structures of the LBD of both RARalpha and RARgamma are used to describe potential mechanisms responsible for the increased affinity of some mutants for Am580 and for the difference in the effect of mutation of Arg(269) in RARbeta compared to its homologous Arg in RARalpha and RARgamma.

  20. FATTY ACIDS MODULATE TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 4 ACTIVATION THROUGH REGULATION OF RECEPTOR DIMERIZATION AND RECRUITMENT INTO LIPID RAFTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The saturated fatty acids acylated on Lipid A of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or bacterial lipoproteins play critical roles in ligand recognition and receptor activation for Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2. The results from our previous studies (J Biol Chem 2003, 2004) demonstrated that saturated ...

  1. Allosteric regulation of the discriminative responsiveness of retinoic acid receptor to natural and synthetic ligands by retinoid X receptor and DNA.

    PubMed

    Mouchon, A; Delmotte, M H; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1999-04-01

    Transcriptional activation by retinoids is mediated through two families of nuclear receptors, all-trans-retinoic acid (RARs) and 9-cis retinoic acid receptors (RXRs). Conformationally restricted retinoids are used to achieve selective activation of RAR isotype alpha, beta or gamma, which reduces side effects in therapeutical applications. Synthetic retinoids mimic some of all-trans retinoic acid biological effects in vivo but interact differently with the ligand binding domain of RARalpha and induce distinct structural transitions of the receptor. In this report, we demonstrate that RAR-selective ligands have distinct quantitative activation properties which are reflected by their abilities to promote interaction of DNA-bound human RXRalpha (hRXRalpha)-hRARalpha heterodimers with the nuclear receptor coactivator (NCoA) SRC-1 in vitro. The hormone response element core motifs spacing defined the relative affinity of liganded heterodimers for two NCoAs, SRC-1 and RIP140. hRXRalpha activating function 2 was critical to confer hRARalpha full responsiveness but not differential sensitivity of hRARalpha to natural or synthetic retinoids. We also provide evidence showing that lysines located in helices 3 and 4, which define part of hRARalpha NCoA binding surface, contribute differently to (i) the transcriptional activity and (ii) the interaction of RXR-RAR heterodimers with SRC-1, when challenged by either natural or RAR-selective retinoids. Thus, ligand structure, DNA, and RXR exert allosteric regulations on hRARalpha conformation organized as a DNA-bound heterodimer. We suggest that the use of physically distinct NCoA binding interfaces may be important in controlling specific genes by conformationally restricted ligands.

  2. Fatty acid profile of gamma-irradiated and cooked African oil bean seed (Pentaclethra macrophylla Benth)

    PubMed Central

    Olotu, Ifeoluwa; Enujiugha, Victor; Obadina, Adewale; Owolabi, Kikelomo

    2014-01-01

    The safety and shelf-life of food products can be, respectively, ensured and extended with important food-processing technologies such as irradiation. The joint effect of cooking and 10 kGy gamma irradiation on the fatty acid composition of the oil of Pentaclethra macrophylla Benth was evaluated. Oils from the raw seed, cooked seeds, irradiated seeds (10 kGy), cooked, and irradiated seeds (10 kGy) were extracted and analyzed for their fatty acid content. An omega-6-fatty acid (linoleic acid) was the principal unsaturated fatty acid in the bean seed oil (24.6%). Cooking significantly (P < 0.05) increased Erucic acid by 3.3% and Linolenic acid by 23.0%. Combined treatment significantly (P < 0.05) increased C18:2, C6:0, C20:2, C18:3, C20:3, C24:0, and C22:6 being linoleic, caproic, eicosadienoic, linolenic, eicosatrienoic, ligoceric, and docosahexaenoic acid, respectively, and this increase made the oil sample to have the highest total fatty acid content (154.9%), unsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratio (109.6), and unsaturated fatty acid content (153.9%). 10 kGy irradiation induces the formation of C20:5 (eicosapentaenoic), while cooking induced the formation of C20:4 (arachidic acid), C22:6 (Heneicosanoic acid), and C22:2 (docosadienoic acid). Combined 10 kGy cooking and irradiation increased the susceptibility of the oil of the African oil bean to rancidity. PMID:25493197

  3. Fatty acid profile of gamma-irradiated and cooked African oil bean seed (Pentaclethra macrophylla Benth).

    PubMed

    Olotu, Ifeoluwa; Enujiugha, Victor; Obadina, Adewale; Owolabi, Kikelomo

    2014-11-01

    The safety and shelf-life of food products can be, respectively, ensured and extended with important food-processing technologies such as irradiation. The joint effect of cooking and 10 kGy gamma irradiation on the fatty acid composition of the oil of Pentaclethra macrophylla Benth was evaluated. Oils from the raw seed, cooked seeds, irradiated seeds (10 kGy), cooked, and irradiated seeds (10 kGy) were extracted and analyzed for their fatty acid content. An omega-6-fatty acid (linoleic acid) was the principal unsaturated fatty acid in the bean seed oil (24.6%). Cooking significantly (P < 0.05) increased Erucic acid by 3.3% and Linolenic acid by 23.0%. Combined treatment significantly (P < 0.05) increased C18:2, C6:0, C20:2, C18:3, C20:3, C24:0, and C22:6 being linoleic, caproic, eicosadienoic, linolenic, eicosatrienoic, ligoceric, and docosahexaenoic acid, respectively, and this increase made the oil sample to have the highest total fatty acid content (154.9%), unsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratio (109.6), and unsaturated fatty acid content (153.9%). 10 kGy irradiation induces the formation of C20:5 (eicosapentaenoic), while cooking induced the formation of C20:4 (arachidic acid), C22:6 (Heneicosanoic acid), and C22:2 (docosadienoic acid). Combined 10 kGy cooking and irradiation increased the susceptibility of the oil of the African oil bean to rancidity.

  4. Retinal pigment epithelial acid lipase activity and lipoprotein receptors: effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Elner, Victor M

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To show that fish oil-derived omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, delivered to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) by circulating low-density lipoproteins (LDL), enhance already considerable RPE lysosomal acid lipase activity, providing for more efficient hydrolysis of intralysosomal RPE lipids, an effect that may help prevent development of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). METHODS: Colorimetric biochemical and histochemical techniques were used to demonstrate RPE acid lipase in situ, in vitro, and after challenge with phagocytic stimuli. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of fluorescently labeled native, aceto-acetylated, and oxidized LDL was studied in vitro and in vivo. LDL effects on RPE lysosomal enzymes were assessed. Lysosomal enzyme activity was compared in RPE cells from monkeys fed diets rich in fish oil to those from control animals and in cultured RPE cells exposed to sera from these monkeys. RESULTS: RPE acid lipase activity was substantial and comparable to that of mononuclear phagocytes. Acid lipase activity increased significantly following phagocytic challenge with photoreceptor outer segment (POS) membranes. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of labeled lipoproteins was determined in vitro. Distinctive uptake of labeled lipoproteins occurred in RPE cells and mononuclear phagocytes in vivo. Native LDL enhanced RPE lysosomal enzyme activity. RPE lysosomal enzymes increased significantly in RPE cells from monkeys fed fish oil-rich diets and in cultured RPE cells exposed to their sera. CONCLUSIONS: RPE cells contain substantial acid lipase for efficient metabolism of lipids imbibed by POS phagocytosis and LDL uptake. Diets rich in fish oil-derived omega-3 fatty acids, by enhancing acid lipase, may reduce RPE lipofuscin accumulation, RPE oxidative damage, and the development of ARMD. PMID:12545699

  5. gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) induces GABA(B) receptor independent intracellular Ca2+ transients in astrocytes, but has no effect on GHB or GABA(B) receptors of medium spiny neurons in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Molnár, T; Antal, K; Nyitrai, G; Emri, Z

    2009-08-18

    We report on cellular actions of the illicit recreational drug gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in the brain reward area nucleus accumbens. First, we compared the effects of GHB and the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen. Neither of them affected the membrane currents of medium spiny neurons in rat nucleus accumbens slices. GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic potentials of medium spiny neurons, however, were reduced by baclofen but not GHB. These results indicate the lack of GHB as well as postsynaptic GABA(B) receptors, and the presence of GHB insensitive presynaptic GABA(B) receptors in medium spiny neurons. In astrocytes GHB induced intracellular Ca(2+) transients, preserved in slices from GABA(B) receptor type 1 subunit knockout mice. The effects of tetrodotoxin, zero added Ca(2+) with/without intracellular Ca(2+) store depletor cyclopiazonic acid or vacuolar H-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 indicate that GHB-evoked Ca(2+) transients depend on external Ca(2+) and intracellular Ca(2+) stores, but not on vesicular transmitter release. GHB-induced astrocytic Ca(2+) transients were not affected by the GHB receptor-specific antagonist NCS-382, suggesting the presence of a novel NCS-382-insensitive target for GHB in astrocytes. The activation of astrocytes by GHB implies their involvement in physiological actions of GHB. Our findings disclose a novel profile of GHB action in the nucleus accumbens. Here, unlike in other brain areas, GHB does not act on GABA(B) receptors, but activates an NCS-382 insensitive GHB-specific target in a subpopulation of astrocytes. The lack of either post- or presynaptic effects on medium spiny neurons in the nucleus accumbens distinguishes GHB from many drugs and natural rewards with addictive properties and might explain why GHB has only a weak reinforcing capacity.

  6. EMBO Retinoids 2011: mechanisms, biology and pathology of signaling by retinoic acid and retinoic acid receptors

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Neil J.

    2012-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is one of the principal active metabolites of vitamin A (retinol) which mediates a spectrum of critical physiological and developmental processes. Transcriptional regulation by RA is mediated primarily by members of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) subfamily of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. NRs bind specific genomic DNA sequence motifs and engage coregulators and components of the basal transcription machinery to effect transcriptional regulation at target gene promoters. Disruption of signaling by retinoic acid is thought to underlie the etiology of a number of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases including breast cancer and haematological malignancies. A meeting of international researchers in retinoid signaling was convened in Strasbourg in September 2011 under the auspices of the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO). Retinoids 2011 encompassed myriad mechanistic, biological and pathological aspects of these hormones and their cognate receptors, as well as setting these advances in the context of wider current questions on signaling by members of the NR superfamily. PMID:22438793

  7. Mycophenolic acid induces ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression through the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yanni; Lai, Fangfang; Xu, Yang; Wu, Yexiang; Liu, Qi; Li, Ni; Wei, Yuzhen; Feng, Tingting; Zheng, Zhihui; Jiang, Wei; Yu, Liyan; Hong, Bin; Si, Shuyi

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using an ABCA1p-LUC HepG2 cell line, we found that MPA upregulated ABCA1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPA induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 markedly inhibited MPA-induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of MPA upregulating ABCA1 was due mainly to activation of the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 pathway. -- Abstract: ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) promotes cholesterol and phospholipid efflux from cells to lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I and plays an important role in atherosclerosis. In a previous study, we developed a high-throughput screening method using an ABCA1p-LUC HepG2 cell line to find upregulators of ABCA1. Using this method in the present study, we found that mycophenolic acid (MPA) upregulated ABCA1 expression (EC50 = 0.09 {mu}M). MPA upregulation of ABCA1 expression was confirmed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis in HepG2 cells. Previous work has indicated that MPA is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}; EC50 = 5.2-9.3 {mu}M). Liver X receptor {alpha} (LXR{alpha}) is a target gene of PPAR{gamma} and may directly regulate ABCA1 expression. Western blot analysis showed that MPA induced LXR{alpha} protein expression in HepG2 cells. Addition of PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 markedly inhibited MPA-induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression. These data suggest that MPA increased ABCA1 expression mainly through activation of PPAR{gamma}. Thus, the effects of MPA on upregulation of ABCA1 expression were due mainly to activation of the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 signaling pathway. This is the first report that the antiatherosclerosis activity of MPA is due to this mechanism.

  8. Medium-chain Fatty Acid-sensing Receptor, GPR84, Is a Proinflammatory Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masakatsu; Takaishi, Sachiko; Nagasaki, Miyuki; Onozawa, Yoshiko; Iino, Ikue; Maeda, Hiroaki; Komai, Tomoaki; Oda, Tomiichiro

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 84 (GPR84) is a putative receptor for medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs), whose pathophysiological roles have not yet been clarified. Here, we show that GPR84 was activated by MCFAs with the hydroxyl group at the 2- or 3-position more effectively than nonhydroxylated MCFAs. We also identified a surrogate agonist, 6-n-octylaminouracil (6-OAU), for GPR84. These potential ligands and the surrogate agonist, 6-OAU, stimulated [35S]GTP binding and accumulated phosphoinositides in a GPR84-dependent manner. The surrogate agonist, 6-OAU, internalized GPR84-EGFP from the cell surface. Both the potential ligands and 6-OAU elicited chemotaxis of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and macrophages and amplified LPS-stimulated production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 from PMNs and TNFα from macrophages. Furthermore, the intravenous injection of 6-OAU raised the blood CXCL1 level in rats, and the inoculation of 6-OAU into the rat air pouch accumulated PMNs and macrophages in the site. Our results indicate a proinflammatory role of GPR84, suggesting that the receptor may be a novel target to treat chronic low grade inflammation associated-disease. PMID:23449982

  9. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid affects the acquisition and reinstatement of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference in mice.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Concepción; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Castillo, Ana; Aguilar, María A; Miñarro, José

    2006-03-01

    Cocaine addicts very often use different combinations of cocaine and other drugs of abuse such as gamma-hydroxybutyric acid. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the impact of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid administration on the rewarding actions of cocaine, using the conditioned place preference procedure. Cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (50 mg/kg) was studied after pairing this drug with different gamma-hydroxybutyric acid doses (6.25, 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg) during either the acquisition or the expression phase of the procedure. After conditioned place preference had been established, and the preference was extinguished, a reinstatement was induced by a dose of cocaine half of that used to produce conditioning, or by gamma-hydroxybutyric acid alone or by both drugs together. The doses of 12.5 and 100 mg/kg of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid blocked the acquisition of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference, and no dose affected the expression of this conditioning. Reinstatement was abolished only with the dose of 25 mg/kg gamma-hydroxybutyric acid, which did not reinstate the preference by itself. This is the first study evaluating the effects of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid on the rewarding properties of cocaine using the conditioned place preference procedure. The principal conclusion of the study is that gamma-hydroxybutyric acid does not enhance the rewarding effect of cocaine, and within a narrow margin of effective doses, blocks the acquisition and reinstatement of cocaine-induced preference.

  10. Effects of free fatty acids, ethanol and development on gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate fluxes in rat nerve endings.

    PubMed

    Hitzemann, R; Mark, C; Panini, A

    1982-12-15

    The effects of type A (cis-unsaturated) and type B (trans-unsaturated and saturated) fatty acids, 1% and 3% ethanol (v/v), and development (7 days) on the thermodynamics of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport into cortical rat brain nerve endings were examined. The effects of the various manipulations, which are known to affect membrane fluidity, may be summarized. Three percent ethanol and oleic acid increased delta S degrees and delta S+ for glutamate transport and decreased delta H degrees and delta H+. Type B fatty acids had the opposite effects. In comparison to glutamate transport, GABA transport was less affected by the various manipulations and showed less specificity in terms of the fatty acid effects. Similarly, the effects of development on the thermodynamic parameters for glutamate and GABA transport were not consistent. Glutamate transport into 7-day nerve endings showed thermodynamic behavior similar to that seen when type A fatty acids were incorporated into adult nerve endings. In contrast, GABA transport into 7-day nerve endings had the character of adult nerve endings into which type B fatty acids were incorporated.

  11. Structure of the T-cell receptor in a Ti alpha beta, Ti gamma delta double positive T-cell line.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, J; Geisler, C

    1993-02-01

    The multichain T-cell receptor is composed of at least six different polypeptide chains. The clonotypic Ti heterodimer (Ti alpha beta or Ti gamma delta) is non-covalently associated with the CD3 chains (CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta). The exact number of subunits constituting the T-cell receptor is still not known. It has been suggested that each T-cell receptor contains two Ti dimers. To gain insight into the structure of the T-cell receptor we constructed a Ti alpha beta, Ti gamma delta double positive T-cell line which contained four functional Ti chains (Ti alpha, beta, gamma, and delta). The data demonstrated an absence of Ti dimers containing mixtures of chains other than the typical Ti alpha beta and Ti gamma delta combinations. Furthermore, by co-modulation experiments we demonstrated that the Ti alpha beta and the Ti gamma delta dimers were not expressed in the same T-cell receptor. Our data indicate that the T-cell receptor does not contain two Ti dimers.

  12. T-cell receptor gamma/delta expressing acute leukemia emerging from sideroblastic anemia: morphological, immunological, and cytogenetic features.

    PubMed

    Meckenstock, G; Fonatsch, C; Heyll, A; Schneider, E M; Kögler, G; Söhngen, D; Aul, C; Schneider, W

    1992-01-01

    Striking numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities (-Y, +8, i(7q), del (10)(q24), and del (11)(q21)) were detected by cytogenetic analysis in a patient's bone marrow with morphological features of both acute lymphoblastic leukemia and myelodysplastic disorder. Surface marker analysis characterized blast cells to be CD2+ CD7+ CD3+ CD4- CD8- expressing gamma/delta-T-cell receptor antigen and coexpressing CD11b and CD16. Exhibiting an identical phenotype as the leukemic cells, a prominent gamma/delta-TCR+ lymphocyte population was found in the bone marrow as well as in the peripheral blood. Cells of the latter compartment coexpressed CD56 and HLA-DR antigens and exhibited nonspecific cytotoxic activity. In the bone marrow cells NSCA could be induced after stimulation with interleukin 2 in vitro. Morphological, immunological, and cytogenetic findings suggest that gamma/delta-T-ALL emerged from a myelodysplastic disorder after sequential steps of malignant transformation. Leukemic cells with "mixed lineage" character may provide evidence for a common progenitor cell in the bone marrow. Assuming that the leukemic cells represent the malignant counterpart of normal CD3+ gamma/delta-TCR+ cells the results may contribute to our understanding of the origin and differentiation as well as the possible steps of malignant transformation of a gamma/delta-TCR+ lymphocyte population.

  13. Two proteins with gamma-carboxyglutamic acid in frog bone: isolation and comparative characterization.

    PubMed

    Dohi, Y; Iwami, K; Yonemasu, K; Moriyama, T

    1987-10-15

    Two gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-containing proteins were purified from neutral (pH 7.5) EDTA-extract of frog, Rana catesbiana, cortical bone by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration, DEAE-Sephadex A-25 chromatography and successive hydroxyapatite column chromatography. These two bone gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-containing proteins, termed osteocalcin, P-1 and P-2, had molecular weights of about 5100 and 4900, respectively, based on their amino-acid composition. Both species of osteocalcin have two gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues, one disulfide bond, but there was no 4-hydroxyproline in either molecule. Each N-terminus of both proteins was acetylated and each C-terminal amino acid was lysine. The isoelectric points of P-1 and P-2 are 4.02 and 3.91, respectively, and their pI values shifted to more neutral pH in the presence of calcium ions. Equilibrium dialysis has indicated that each of these two proteins binds specifically 2 mol Ca2+, and nonspecifically more, 4-5 mol, Ca2+ in 0.02 M Tris-HCl/0.15 M NaCl (pH 7.4), at 4 degrees C. By the best-fitted calculation, P-1 had one high affinity Ca2+-binding site (Kd1 = 0.17 mM) and one lower affinity site (Kd2 = 0.29 mM), and P-2 contained one high affinity site (Kd1 = 0.154 mM) and one lower affinity site (Kd2 = 0.67 mM). PMID:2443180

  14. Functional co-localization of monocytic aminopeptidase N/CD13 with the Fc{gamma} receptors CD32 and CD64

    SciTech Connect

    Riemann, Dagmar; Wulfaenger, Jens

    2005-06-17

    Information about the function of aminopeptidase N/CD13 on monocytes is limited. In order to gain more insight into its interaction with other proteins, we have identified molecules that co-localize with the membrane ectoenzyme at the cell surface of monocytes. Using laser scanning and electron microscopy as well as fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measured by flow cytometry we show that monocytic CD13 co-localized with the Fc{gamma} receptor II/CD32 after Fc receptor ligation by a CD32-specific antibody. FRET was also observed between CD13 and the Fc{gamma} receptor I/CD64, but not with the myeloid marker CD33 representing a member of the sialoadhesin family. Our results imply a novel functional role of CD13 and Fc{gamma} receptors as members of a multimeric receptor complex. Further studies have to be done to elucidate common signaling pathways of these molecules.

  15. Regulation of vitamin D receptor expression by retinoic acid receptor alpha in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Marchwicka, Aleksandra; Cebrat, Małgorzata; Łaszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Śnieżewski, Łukasz; Brown, Geoffrey; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2016-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by an accumulation of malignant immature myeloid precursors. A very promising way to treat AML is differentiation therapy using either all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D), or the use of both these differentiation-inducing agents. However, the effect of combination treatment varies in different AML cell lines, and this is due to ATRA either down- or up-regulating transcription of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in the cells examined. The mechanism of transcriptional regulation of VDR in response to ATRA has not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) is responsible for regulating VDR transcription in AML cells. We have shown that a VDR transcriptional variant, originating in exon 1a, is regulated by RARα agonists in AML cells. Moreover, in cells with a high basal level of RARα protein, the VDR gene is transcriptionally repressed as long as RARα agonist is absent. In these cells down-regulation of the level of RARα leads to increased expression of VDR. We consider that our findings provide a mechanistic background to explain the different outcomes from treating AML cell lines with a combination of ATRA and 1,25D. PMID:26969398

  16. Biosynthesis, biological effects, and receptors of hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) and oxoeicosatetraenoic acids (oxo-ETEs) derived from arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Powell, William S; Rokach, Joshua

    2015-04-01

    Arachidonic acid can be oxygenated by a variety of different enzymes, including lipoxygenases, cyclooxygenases, and cytochrome P450s, and can be converted to a complex mixture of oxygenated products as a result of lipid peroxidation. The initial products in these reactions are hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HpETEs) and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs). Oxoeicosatetraenoic acids (oxo-ETEs) can be formed by the actions of various dehydrogenases on HETEs or by dehydration of HpETEs. Although a large number of different HETEs and oxo-ETEs have been identified, this review will focus principally on 5-oxo-ETE, 5S-HETE, 12S-HETE, and 15S-HETE. Other related arachidonic acid metabolites will also be discussed in less detail. 5-Oxo-ETE is synthesized by oxidation of the 5-lipoxygenase product 5S-HETE by the selective enzyme, 5-hydroxyeicosanoid dehydrogenase. It actions are mediated by the selective OXE receptor, which is highly expressed on eosinophils, suggesting that it may be important in eosinophilic diseases such as asthma. 5-Oxo-ETE also appears to stimulate tumor cell proliferation and may also be involved in cancer. Highly selective and potent OXE receptor antagonists have recently become available and could help to clarify its pathophysiological role. The 12-lipoxygenase product 12S-HETE acts by the GPR31 receptor and promotes tumor cell proliferation and metastasis and could therefore be a promising target in cancer therapy. It may also be involved as a proinflammatory mediator in diabetes. In contrast, 15S-HETE may have a protective effect in cancer. In addition to GPCRs, higher concentration of HETEs and oxo-ETEs can activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and could potentially regulate a variety of processes by this mechanism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Oxygenated metabolism of PUFA: analysis and biological relevance".

  17. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and related molecules in the sea fan Eunicella cavolini (Cnidaria: Octocorallia): a biochemical and immunohistochemical approach.

    PubMed

    Girosi, Laura; Ferrando, Sara; Beltrame, Francesco; Ciarcia, Gaetano; Diaspro, Alberto; Fato, Marco; Magnone, Mirko; Raiteri, Luca; Ramoino, Paola; Tagliafierro, Grazia

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study has been the biochemical demonstration of the presence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the Mediterranean sea fan Eunicella cavolini by means of high-performance liquid chromatography, and the description of the distribution pattern of GABA and its related molecules, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) and one of the GABA receptors (GABA(B) R) by immunohistochemical methods. The interrelationships of GABA, GAD and GABA receptor immunoreactivity have been established by using double-immunohistochemical methods and confocal microscopy. The immunodetection of monoclonal and/or polyclonal antibodies has revealed GABA immunoreactivity throughout the polyp tissue, both in neuronal and non-neuronal elements. GAD immunoreactivity has been mostly localized in the neuronal compartment, contacting epithelial and muscular elements. GABA(B) R immunoreactivity appears particularly intense in the nematocytes and in the oocyte envelope; its presence in GAD-immunoreactive neurons in the tentacles suggests an autocrine type of regulation. Western blot analysis has confirmed that a GABA(B) R, with a molecular weight of 142 kDa, similar to that of rat brain, is present in E. cavolini polyp tissue. The identification of the sites of the synthesis, vesicular transport, storage and reception of GABA strongly suggests the presence of an almost complete set of GABA-related molecules for the functioning of the GABAergic system in this simple nervous system. The distribution of these different immunoreactivities has allowed us to hypothesize GABA involvement in nematocyst discharge, in body wall and enteric muscular contraction, in neuronal integration and in male gametocyte differentiation.

  18. Tulane virus recognizes sialic acids as cellular receptors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming; Wei, Chao; Huang, Pengwei; Fan, Qiang; Quigley, Christina; Xia, Ming; Fang, Hao; Zhang, Xufu; Zhong, Weiming; Klassen, John S; Jiang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery that human noroviruses (huNoVs) recognize sialic acids (SAs) in addition to histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) pointed to a new direction in studying virus-host interactions during calicivirus infection. HuNoVs remain difficult to study due to the lack of an effective cell culture model. In this study, we demonstrated that Tulane virus (TV), a cultivable primate calicivirus, also recognizes SAs in addition to the previously known TV-HBGA interactions. Evidence supporting this discovery includes that TV virions bound synthetic sialoglycoconjugates (SGCs) and that treatment of TV permissive LLC-MK2 cells with either neuraminidases or SA-binding lectins inhibited TV infectivity. In addition, we found that Maackia amurensis leukoagglutinin (MAL), a lectin that recognizes the α-2,3 linked SAs, bound LLC-MK2 cells, as well as TV, by which MAL promoted TV infectivity in cell culture. Our findings further highlight TV as a valuable surrogate for huNoVs, particularly in studying virus-host interactions that may involve two host carbohydrate receptors or co-receptors for infection. PMID:26146020

  19. Effect of extracellular pH on recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha1beta2 GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Mercik, Katarzyna; Pytel, Maria; Cherubini, Enrico; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-08-01

    Recently, we have reported that extracellular protons allosterically modulated neuronal GABA(A) receptors [Mozrzymas, J.W., Zarnowska, E.D., Pytel, M., Mercik, K., 2003a. Modulation of GABA(A) receptors by hydrogen ions reveals synaptic GABA transient and a crucial role of desensitiztion process. Journal of Neuroscience 23, 7981-7992]. However, GABAARs in neurons are heterogeneous and the effect of hydrogen ions depends on the receptor subtype. In particular, gamma2 subunit sets the receptor sensibility to several modulators including protons. However, the mechanisms whereby protons modulate gamma2-containing and gamma2-free GABAARs have not been fully elucidated. To this end, current responses to ultrafast GABA applications were recorded for alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha1beta2 receptors at different pH values. For both receptor types, increase in pH induced a decrease in amplitudes of currents elicited by saturating [GABA] but this effect was stronger for alpha1beta2 receptors. In the case of alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors, protons strongly affected the current time course due to a down regulation of binding and desensitization rates. This effect was qualitatively similar to that described in neurons. Protons strongly influenced the amplitude of alpha1beta2 receptor-mediated currents but the effect on their kinetics was weak suggesting a predominant direct non-competitive inhibition with a minor allosteric modulation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that extracellular protons strongly affect GABAA receptors and that, depending on the presence of the gamma2 subunit, the modulatory mechanisms show profound quantitative and qualitative differences.

  20. Identification of the orphan GPCR, P2Y(10) receptor as the sphingosine-1-phosphate and lysophosphatidic acid receptor.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masanori; Shiraishi, Akira; Tabata, Kenichi; Fujita, Norihisa

    2008-07-11

    Phylogenetic analysis of transmembrane regions of GPCRs using PHYLIP indicated that the orphan receptor P2Y(10) receptor was classified into the cluster consisting nucleotide and lipid receptors. Based on the results, we studied the abilities of nucleotides and lipids to activate the P2Y(10) receptors. As a result, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) evoked intracellular Ca(2+) increases in the CHO cells stably expressing the P2Y(10) fused with a G(16alpha) protein. These Ca(2+) responses were inhibited by S1P receptor and LPA receptor antagonists. The introduction of siRNA designed for P2Y(10) receptor into the P2Y(10)-CHO cells effectively blocked both S1P- and LPA-induced Ca(2+) increases. RT-PCR analysis showed that the mouse P2Y(10) was expressed in reproductive organs, brain, lung and skeletal muscle, suggesting the receptor plays physiological roles throughout the whole body. In conclusion, the P2Y(10) receptor is the first receptor identified as a dual lysophospholipid receptor. PMID:18466763

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) polymorphisms and breast cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weifeng; Chen, Yuanmei; Wang, Yafeng; Gu, Haiyong; Chen, Shuchen; Kang, Mingqiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG), a nuclear hormone receptor, plays a critical role in the lipid and glucose homeostasis, adipocyte differentiation, as well as intracellular insulin-signaling events. Several studies have been conducted to explore the associations of PPARG polymorphisms with breast cancer (BC), yet the findings are inconsistent. Methods: Databases of Pubmed and Embase were searched until October 5, 2014. The association between PPARG polymorphisms and BC risk was determined by crude odds ratios (ORs) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Finally, there are nine publications involving 3,931 BC cases and 5,382 controls included in this meta-analysis. No significant association was observed between PPARG rs1801282 C>G variants and overall BC risk in all genetic comparison models. However, in a subgroup analysis by ethnicity, significant association was observed between PPARG rs1801282 C>G variants and decreased BC risk in three genetic models: GG+CG vs. CC (OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.71-0.96; P = 0.011), CG vs. CC (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71-0.96; P = 0.011) and G vs. C (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.75-0.97; P = 0.016) in Caucasians and in a subgroup analysis by menopausal status, significantly decreased BC risk was also found in two genetic models: GG+CG vs. CC (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.67-0.95; P = 0.011) and CG vs. CC (OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.64-0.92; P = 0.005) in post-menopause subgroup. For PPARG rs3856806 C>T, we found no significant association between PPARG rs3856806 C>T polymorphism and breast cancer. Conclusions: In summary, despite some limitations, the results suggest that PPARG rs1801282 C>G polymorphism may be a protective factor for BC in Caucasians and in post-menopause women. PMID:26550133

  2. Synthesis and characterization of zinc chloride containing poly(acrylic acid) hydrogel by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong-Seok; Kuang, Jia; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Lim, Youn-Mook; Jeong, Sung-In; Shin, Young-Min; Seob Khil, Myung; Nho, Young-Chang

    2013-07-01

    In this study, the characterization of zinc chloride incorporated into a poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc) hydrogel prepared by gamma-ray irradiation was investigated. Zinc chloride powder with different concentrations was dissolved in the PAAc solution, and it was crosslinked with gamma-ray irradiation. The effects of various parameters such as zinc ion concentration and irradiation doses on characteristics of the hydrogel formed were investigated in detail for obtaining an antibacterial wound dressing. In addition, the gel content, pH-sensitive (pH 4 or 7) swelling ratio, and UV-vis absorption spectra of the zinc particles in the hydrogels were characterized. Moreover, antibacterial properties of these new materials against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli strains were observed on solid growth media. The antibacterial tests indicated that the zinc chloride containing PAAc hydrogels have good antibacterial activity.

  3. Fc gamma receptor type III (CD16) is included in the zeta NK receptor complex expressed by human natural killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, P; Caligiuri, M; O'Brien, C; Manley, T; Ritz, J; Schlossman, S F

    1990-01-01

    We recently reported that CD3- natural killer (NK) cells express the zeta chain of the T-cell receptor complex (zeta NK) in association with higher molecular weight structures whose expression differs between individual NK cell clones. Because NK cell cytolytic activity is known to be triggered by perturbation of the type III Fc gamma receptor (CD16), we sought to determine whether this activating molecule is included in the zeta NK molecular complex. Biochemical evidence for a physical association between CD16 and zeta NK was obtained by comparing immunoprecipitates formed using monoclonal antibodies reactive with each of these molecules by SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and peptide mapping. In both clonal and polyclonal populations of CD3- NK cells, CD16 and zeta NK specifically associated with one another. Functional evidence for a specific association between CD16 and zeta NK in intact cells was obtained by demonstrating a coordinate down-modulation of both of these molecules induced by either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or monoclonal antibodies reactive with CD16. Our results suggest that Fc gamma receptor type III (CD16) is included in the zeta NK complex and that this complex is likely to play an important role in NK cell activation. Images PMID:2138330

  4. Role of Fc Gamma Receptors in Triggering Host Cell Activation and Cytokine Release by Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Talkington, Jeffrey; Nickell, Steven P.

    2001-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochetal bacterium that causes human Lyme disease, encodes numerous lipoproteins which have the capacity to trigger the release of proinflammatory cytokines from a variety of host cell types, and it is generally believed that these cytokines contribute to the disease process in vivo. We previously reported that low-passage-number infectious B. burgdorferi spirochetes express a novel lipidation-independent activity which induces secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) by the mouse MC/9 mast cell line. Using RNase protection assays, we determined that mast cells exposed in vitro to low-passage-number, but not high-passage-number, B. burgdorferi spirochetes show increased expression of additional mRNAs representing several chemokines, including macrophage-inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α), MIP-1β, and TCA3, as well as the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6. Furthermore, mast cell TNF-α secretion can be inhibited by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin and also by preincubation with purified mouse immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and IgG2a, but not mouse IgG3, and by a mouse Fc gamma receptor II and III (FcγRII/III)-specific rat monoclonal antibody, suggesting the likely involvement of host FcγRIII in B. burgdorferi-mediated signaling. A role for passively adsorbed rabbit or bovine IgG or serum components in B. burgdorferi-mediated FcγR signaling was excluded in control experiments. These studies confirm that low-passage-number B. burgdorferi spirochetes express a novel activity which upregulates the expression of a variety of host cell chemokine and cytokine genes, and they also establish a novel antibody-independent role for FcγRs in transduction of activation signals by bacterial products. PMID:11119532

  5. Insights into the Relationship between Toll Like Receptors and Gamma Delta T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Asif Amin; Patil, Rushikesh Sudam; Chiplunkar, Shubhada Vivek

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is an important aspect of cancer biology that contributes to tumor initiation, tumor progression and responses to therapy. The composition and characteristics of the tumor microenvironment vary widely and are important in determining the anti-tumor immune response. Successful immunization requires activation of both innate and adaptive immunity. Generally, immune system is compromised in patients with cancer due to immune suppression, loss of tumor antigen expression and dysfunction of antigen presenting cells (APC). Thus, therapeutic immunization leading to cancer regression remains a significant challenge. Certain cells of the immune system, including dendritic cells (DCs) and gamma delta (γδ) T cells are capable of driving potent anti-tumor responses. The property of MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity, high potential of cytokine release, tissue tropism and early activation in infections and malignant disease makes γδ T cells as an emerging candidate for immunotherapy. Various strategies are being developed to enhance anti-tumor immune responses of γδ T cells and DCs one of them is the use of novel adjuvants like toll like receptors (TLR) agonists, which enhance γδ T cell function directly or through DC activation, which has ability to prime γδ T cells. TLR agonists are being used clinically either alone or in combination with tumor antigens and has shown initial success in both enhancing immune responses and eliciting anti-tumor activity. TLR activated γδ T cells and DCs nurture each other’s activation. This provides a potent base for first line of defense and manipulation of the adaptive response against pathogens and cancer. The available data provides a strong rationale for initiating combinatorial therapy for the treatment of diseases and this review will summarize the application of adjuvants (TLRs) for boosting immune response of γδ T cells to treat cancer and infectious diseases and their use in combinatorial therapy

  6. T cell receptor junctional regions of V gamma 9+/V delta 2+ T cell clones in relation to non-MHC restricted cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, B F; Wheatcroft, N J; Thornton, S M; Christmas, S E

    1993-05-01

    Human gamma delta T cell clones having V gamma 9JP and V delta 2DJ1 T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements were isolated form an individual donor and tested for non-MHC restricted cytotoxicity against the B lymphoblastoid cell line, BSM. Most clones were highly cytotoxic but 3/9 clones had very low activity, comparable to that of CD4+ alpha beta T cell clones. Although there was a tendency for clones with low cytotoxic function to produce high levels of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, this correlation was not complete. TCR gamma and delta junctional sequences were obtained and were found to be different for all clones. There were no consistent structural differences between gamma delta TCRs of cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic clones, but gamma or delta junctional regions of all three non-cytotoxic clones had unusual features. One clone had a particularly short gamma chain junctional sequence, one had a short delta chain junctional sequence and the third clone was the only one of the panel which failed to utilise the D delta 3 segment. If the gamma delta TCR is involved in target cell recognition in this model of non-MHC restricted killing, such variations in receptor structure may be sufficient to inhibit recognition and thereby reduce the cytotoxic capacity of a minority of V gamma 9+/V delta 2+ clones. Also, a panel of gamma delta T cell clones expressing V gamma 8/V delta 3 isolated from a different donor, were all highly cytotoxic against BSM, indicating that these target cells can be recognised by effector cells expressing a TCR other than the V gamma 9/V delta 2 receptor. The possible influence of other cell surface molecules on non-MHC restricted cytotoxic function is discussed.

  7. Agonist-dependent single channel current and gating in alpha4beta2delta and alpha1beta2gamma2S GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Angelo; Harrison, Neil L

    2008-02-01

    The family of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA(A)Rs) mediates two types of inhibition in the mammalian brain. Phasic inhibition is mediated by synaptic GABA(A)Rs that are mainly comprised of alpha(1), beta(2), and gamma(2) subunits, whereas tonic inhibition is mediated by extrasynaptic GABA(A)Rs comprised of alpha(4/6), beta(2), and delta subunits. We investigated the activation properties of recombinant alpha(4)beta(2)delta and alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A)Rs in response to GABA and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3(2H)-one (THIP) using electrophysiological recordings from outside-out membrane patches. Rapid agonist application experiments indicated that THIP produced faster opening rates at alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs (beta approximately 1600 s(-1)) than at alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A)Rs (beta approximately 460 s(-1)), whereas GABA activated alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A)Rs more rapidly (beta approximately 1800 s(-1)) than alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs (beta < 440 s(-1)). Single channel recordings of alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) and alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs showed that both channels open to a main conductance state of approximately 25 pS at -70 mV when activated by GABA and low concentrations of THIP, whereas saturating concentrations of THIP elicited approximately 36 pS openings at both channels. Saturating concentrations of GABA elicited brief (<10 ms) openings with low intraburst open probability (P(O) approximately 0.3) at alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs and at least two "modes" of single channel bursting activity, lasting approximately 100 ms at alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A)Rs. The most prevalent bursting mode had a P(O) of approximately 0.7 and was described by a reaction scheme with three open and three shut states, whereas the "high" P(O) mode ( approximately 0.9) was characterized by two shut and three open states. Single channel activity elicited by THIP in alpha(4)beta(2)delta and alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA

  8. Cinnabarinic acid, an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, activates type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Fazio, F; Lionetto, L; Molinaro, G; Bertrand, H O; Acher, F; Ngomba, R T; Notartomaso, S; Curini, M; Rosati, O; Scarselli, P; Di Marco, R; Battaglia, G; Bruno, V; Simmaco, M; Pin, J P; Nicoletti, F; Goudet, C

    2012-05-01

    Cinnabarinic acid is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway that meets the structural requirements to interact with glutamate receptors. We found that cinnabarinic acid acts as a partial agonist of type 4 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu4) receptors, with no activity at other mGlu receptor subtypes. We also tested the activity of cinnabarinic acid on native mGlu4 receptors by examining 1) the inhibition of cAMP formation in cultured cerebellar granule cells; 2) protection against excitotoxic neuronal death in mixed cultures of cortical cells; and 3) protection against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine toxicity in mice after local infusion into the external globus pallidus. In all these models, cinnabarinic acid behaved similarly to conventional mGlu4 receptor agonists, and, at least in cultured neurons, the action of low concentrations of cinnabarinic acid was largely attenuated by genetic deletion of mGlu4 receptors. However, high concentrations of cinnabarinic acid were still active in the absence of mGlu4 receptors, suggesting that the compound may have off-target effects. Mutagenesis and molecular modeling experiments showed that cinnabarinic acid acts as an orthosteric agonist interacting with residues of the glutamate binding pocket of mGlu4. Accordingly, cinnabarinic acid did not activate truncated mGlu4 receptors lacking the N-terminal Venus-flytrap domain, as opposed to the mGlu4 receptor enhancer, N-phenyl-7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxamide (PHCCC). Finally, we could detect endogenous cinnabarinic acid in brain tissue and peripheral organs by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Levels increased substantially during inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide. We conclude that cinnabarinic acid is a novel endogenous orthosteric agonist of mGlu4 receptors endowed with neuroprotective activity. PMID:22311707

  9. Gamma-linolenic acid enrichment from Borago officinalis and Echium fastuosum seed oils and fatty acids by low temperature crystallization.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, Juan Carlos; Campra-Madrid, Pablo; Guil-Guerrero, José Luis

    2004-01-01

    Solvent winterization of seed oil and free fatty acids (FFAs) was employed to obtain gamma-linolenic acid (GLA; 18:3omega6) concentrates from seed oils of two Boraginaceae species, Echium fastuosum and Borago officinalis. Different solutions of seed oils and FFAs from these two oils at 10%, 20% and 40% (w/w) were crystallized at 4 degrees C, -24 degrees C and -70 degrees C, respectively, using hexane, acetone, diethyl ether, isobutanol and ethanol as solvents. Best results were obtained for B. officinalis FFAs in hexane, reaching a maximum GLA concentration of 58.8% in the liquid fraction (LF). In E. fastuosum, the highest GLA concentration (39.9%) was also achieved with FFAs in hexane. PMID:16233632

  10. Gamma-linolenic acid enrichment from Borago officinalis and Echium fastuosum seed oils and fatty acids by low temperature crystallization.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, Juan Carlos; Campra-Madrid, Pablo; Guil-Guerrero, José Luis

    2004-01-01

    Solvent winterization of seed oil and free fatty acids (FFAs) was employed to obtain gamma-linolenic acid (GLA; 18:3omega6) concentrates from seed oils of two Boraginaceae species, Echium fastuosum and Borago officinalis. Different solutions of seed oils and FFAs from these two oils at 10%, 20% and 40% (w/w) were crystallized at 4 degrees C, -24 degrees C and -70 degrees C, respectively, using hexane, acetone, diethyl ether, isobutanol and ethanol as solvents. Best results were obtained for B. officinalis FFAs in hexane, reaching a maximum GLA concentration of 58.8% in the liquid fraction (LF). In E. fastuosum, the highest GLA concentration (39.9%) was also achieved with FFAs in hexane.

  11. Delta-6 desaturase from borage converts linoleic acid to gamma-linolenic acid in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Nimal, Jonathan; Li, Wanli; Liu, Xia; Cao, Wenguang

    2011-07-01

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, 18:3 n6) is an essential polyunsaturated fatty acid of the omega-6 family and is found to be effective in prevention and/or treatment of various health problems. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of increasing γ-linolenic acid contents in mammalian cells using the delta-6 gene from Borago officinalis. The borage Δ6-desaturase gene (sDelta-6) was codon-optimized and introduced into HEK293 cells by lipofectin transfection. Co-expression of GFP with sDelta-6 and RT-PCR analysis indicated that sDelta-6 could be expressed in mammalian cells. Subsequently, the heterologous expression of borage Δ6-desaturase was evaluated by fatty acid analysis. Total cellular lipid analysis of transformed cells fed with linoleic acid (LA 18:2 n6) as a substrate showed that the expression of sDelta-6 resulted in an 228-483% (p<0.05) increase of GLA when compared with that in the control cells. The highest conversion efficiency of LA into GLA in sDelta-6(+) cells was 6.9 times higher than that in the control group (11.59% vs. 1.69%; p<0.05). Our present work demonstrated that the sDelta-6 gene from borage could be functionally expressed in mammalian cells, and could convert LA into GLA. Furthermore, this study may pave the way to generate transgenic livestock that can synthesise GLA.

  12. Regulation of transferrin receptor expression and ferritin content in human mononuclear phagocytes. Coordinate upregulation by iron transferrin and downregulation by interferon gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, T F; Horwitz, M A

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of key human iron binding proteins in mononuclear phagocytes by IFN gamma and iron transferrin. In a previous study, we demonstrated that IFN gamma downregulates the expression on human monocytes of transferrin receptors, the major source of iron for the cell. In the present study, we show that IFN gamma also downregulates the intracellular concentration of ferritin, the major iron storage protein in the cell. By radioimmunoassay, the mean ferritin content of nonactivated monocytes was 361 +/- 107 fg/monocyte (mean +/- SEM) whereas the mean ferritin content of IFN gamma-activated monocytes was 64 +/- 13 fg/monocyte, an 82% reduction with activation (P < 0.01, t test). Consistent with its downregulating effect on these iron proteins, IFN gamma treatment also results in decreased iron incorporation. IFN gamma-activated monocytes incorporated 33% less iron from 59Fe-transferrin than nonactivated monocytes (P < 0.05, t test). Gel filtration chromatography revealed that incorporated iron is located primarily in ferritin in both nonactivated and IFN gamma-activated monocytes. Ferritin in IFN gamma-activated monocytes is saturated with approximately three times as much 59Fe as ferritin in nonactivated monocytes. We have also explored the effect of iron transferrin on transferrin receptor expression and intracellular ferritin content in human monocytes. We have found that iron transferrin markedly upregulates both transferrin receptor expression and intracellular ferritin content in both nonactivated (2.3- and 1.3-fold, respectively) and IFN gamma-activated (3.4- and 2.9-fold, respectively) monocytes. This study demonstrates that transferrin receptor expression and intracellular ferritin content in human monocytes is unidirectionally and coordinately upregulated by iron transferrin and unidirectionally and coordinately downregulated by IFN gamma. PMID:8450071

  13. Effect of gamma irradiation on hyaluronic acid and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohd, Hur Munawar Kabir; Taqiyuddin Mawardi bin Ayob, Muhammad; Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md; Mohamed, Faizal; Radiman, Shahidan; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2014-09-03

    DPPC lipids are the major component constituting the biological membrane, and their importances in various physiological functions are well documented. Hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial joint fluid functions as a lubricant, shock absorber and a nutrient carrier. Gamma irradiation has also been found to be effective in depolymerizing and cleaving molecular chains related to free radicals, thus extends with changes in chemical composition as well as its physiological functions. This research are conducted to investigate the hyaluronic acid (HA) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction in form of vesicles and its effect to gamma radiation. The size of DPPC vesicles formed via gentle hydration method is between 100 to 200 nm in diameter. HA (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml) was added into the vesicles and characterized by using TEM to determine vesicle size distributions, fusion and rupture of DPPC structure. The results demonstrated that the size of the vesicles approximately between 200 to 300 nm which caused by vesicles fusion with HA and formed even larger vesicles. After being irradiated by 0 to 200 Gy, the size of vesicles decreased as HA was degraded. To elucidate the mechanism of these effects, FTIR spectra were carried out and have shown that at absorption bands at 1700–1750 cm{sup −1} due to formation of carboxylic acid and leads to alteration of HA structure.

  14. Effect of gamma irradiation on hyaluronic acid and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohd, Hur Munawar Kabir; bin Ayob, Muhammad Taqiyuddin Mawardi; Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md; Mohamed, Faizal; Radiman, Shahidan; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2014-09-01

    DPPC lipids are the major component constituting the biological membrane, and their importances in various physiological functions are well documented. Hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial joint fluid functions as a lubricant, shock absorber and a nutrient carrier. Gamma irradiation has also been found to be effective in depolymerizing and cleaving molecular chains related to free radicals, thus extends with changes in chemical composition as well as its physiological functions. This research are conducted to investigate the hyaluronic acid (HA) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction in form of vesicles and its effect to gamma radiation. The size of DPPC vesicles formed via gentle hydration method is between 100 to 200 nm in diameter. HA (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml) was added into the vesicles and characterized by using TEM to determine vesicle size distributions, fusion and rupture of DPPC structure. The results demonstrated that the size of the vesicles approximately between 200 to 300 nm which caused by vesicles fusion with HA and formed even larger vesicles. After being irradiated by 0 to 200 Gy, the size of vesicles decreased as HA was degraded. To elucidate the mechanism of these effects, FTIR spectra were carried out and have shown that at absorption bands at 1700-1750 cm-1 due to formation of carboxylic acid and leads to alteration of HA structure.

  15. Obeticholic acid, a synthetic bile acid agonist of the farnesoid X receptor, attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Peggy P.; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids are ligands for the nuclear hormone receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). The bile acid–FXR interaction regulates bile acid synthesis, transport, and cholesterol metabolism. Recently, bile acid–FXR regulation has been reported to play an integral role in both hepatic and intestinal inflammation, and in atherosclerosis. In this study, we found that FXR knockout mice had more disease severity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Obeticholic acid (6α-ethyl-chenodeoxycholic acid, 6-ECDCA), a synthetic FXR agonist, is an orally available drug that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as alcoholic hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and primary biliary cirrhosis. When we treated mice exhibiting established EAE with 6-ECDCA, or the natural FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), clinical disease was ameliorated by (i) suppressing lymphocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine production; (ii) reducing CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cell populations and their expression of negative checkpoint regulators programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1), programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA); (iii) increasing CD8+ T cells and PD1, PDl-1, and BTLA expression; and (iv) reducing VLA-4 expression in both the T- and B-cell populations. Moreover, adoptive transfer of 6-ECDCA– or CDCA-treated donor cells failed to transfer disease in naive recipients. Thus, we show that FXR functions as a negative regulator in neuroinflammation and we highlight that FXR agonists represent a potential previously unidentified therapy for MS. PMID:26811456

  16. Expression of retinoic acid receptor genes in fetal and newborn rat lung.

    PubMed

    Grummer, M A; Thet, L A; Zachman, R D

    1994-04-01

    Lung differentiation and development are affected by vitamin A and its metabolites. One mechanism through which retinoids might exert their effects is through nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RAR). The gene expression profile of the RAR family (alpha, beta, gamma) has previously been determined in both the developing mouse embryo to 14.5 days gestation, and in the adult lung. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression of the RAR genes during the period of gestation that results in the formation of the saccular lung stage. Total RNA was extracted from fetal lungs of Sprague-Dawley rats at gestational days 17, 19, 20, 21, and 22, and from 12-hour-old newborns for Northern hybridization. Two transcripts of RAR alpha mRNA (3.7 and 2.7 kb) were found at each time point. At day 17, the 2.7 kb RAR alpha mRNA was increased two-fold or more than at any other time studied. At days 19-22 the levels of the 3.7 kb RAR alpha species were also lower than day 17 and newborn levels. One RAR beta mRNA transcript (3.4 kb), present at all time points, was significantly higher in the newborn than on days 17-22. Expression of RAR gamma mRNA could only be demonstrated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We speculate that the higher RAR alpha species at day 17 indicates a role for RAR alpha in the maintenance of the columnar epithelial cells of the glandular phase of lung development.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8208594

  17. Farnesoid X receptor, the bile acid sensing nuclear receptor, in liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guodong; L. Guo, Grace

    2015-01-01

    The liver is unique in regenerative potential, which could recover the lost mass and function after injury from ischemia and resection. The underlying molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration have been extensively studied in the past using the partial hepatectomy (PH) model in rodents, where 2/3 PH is carried out by removing two lobes. The whole process of liver regeneration is complicated, orchestrated event involving a network of connected interactions, which still remain fully elusive. Bile acids (BAs) are ligands of farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor of ligand-activated transcription factor. FXR has been shown to be highly involved in liver regeneration. BAs and FXR not only interact with each other but also regulate various downstream targets independently during liver regeneration. Moreover, recent findings suggest that tissue-specific FXR also contributes to liver regeneration significantly. These novel findings suggest that FXR has much broader role than regulating BA, cholesterol, lipid and glucose metabolism. Therefore, these researches highlight FXR as an important pharmaceutical target for potential use of FXR ligands to regulate liver regeneration in clinic. This review focuses on the roles of BAs and FXR in liver regeneration and the current underlying molecular mechanisms which contribute to liver regeneration. PMID:26579433

  18. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) Receptor 5 Inhibits B Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling and Antibody Response1

    PubMed Central

    Shotts, Kristin; Donovan, Erin E.; Strauch, Pamela; Pujanauski, Lindsey M.; Victorino, Francisco; Al-Shami, Amin; Fujiwara, Yuko; Tigyi, Gabor; Oravecz, Tamas; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids have emerged as biologically important chemoattractants capable of directing lymphocyte development, trafficking and localization. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a major lysophospholipid found systemically and whose levels are elevated in certain pathological settings such as cancer and infections. Here, we demonstrate that BCR signal transduction by mature murine B cells is inhibited upon LPA engagement of the LPA5 (GPR92) receptor via a Gα12/13 – Arhgef1 pathway. The inhibition of BCR signaling by LPA5 manifests by impaired intracellular calcium store release and most likely by interfering with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activity. We further show that LPA5 also limits antigen-specific induction of CD69 and CD86 expression and that LPA5-deficient B cells display enhanced antibody responses. Thus, these data show that LPA5 negatively regulates BCR signaling, B cell activation and immune response. Our findings extend the influence of lysophospholipids on immune function and suggest that alterations in LPA levels likely influence adaptive humoral immunity. PMID:24890721

  19. T helper cell recognition of muscle acetylcholine receptor in myasthenia gravis. Epitopes on the gamma and delta subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Manfredi, A A; Protti, M P; Dalton, M W; Howard, J F; Conti-Tronconi, B M

    1993-01-01

    We tested the response of CD4+ cells and/or total lymphocytes from the blood of 22 myasthenic patients and 10 healthy controls to overlapping synthetic peptides, 20 residues long, to screen the sequence of the gamma and delta subunits of human muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The gamma subunit is part of the AChR expressed in embryonic muscle and is substituted in the AChRs of most adult muscles by an epsilon subunit. The delta subunit is present in both embryonic and adult AChRs. Adult extrinsic ocular muscles, which are preferentially and sometimes uniquely affected by myasthenic symptoms, and thymus, which has a still obscure but important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, express the embryonic gamma subunit. Anti-AChR CD4+ responses were more easily detected after CD8+ depletion. All responders recognized epitopes on both the gamma and delta subunits and had severe symptoms. In four patients the CD4+ cell response was tested twice, when the symptoms were severe and during a period of remission. Consistently, the response was only detectable, or larger, when the patients were severely affected. Images PMID:7688757

  20. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid on skate retinal horizontal cells: evidence for an electrogenic uptake mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Malchow, R P; Ripps, H

    1990-01-01

    In the retinae of many vertebrates, there are classes of horizontal cell that probably utilize gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as a neurotransmitter. As with other amino acid transmitter agents, the postsynaptic action of GABA is thought to be terminated by uptake into neurons and glia surrounding the release site. The present study examined whether an uptake system for GABA could be detected in isolated skate horizontal cells by means of electrophysiological methods. Pressure ejection of GABA onto voltage-clamped horizontal cells produced an inward current that showed no sign of desensitization regardless of the GABA concentration. The dose-response relationship followed simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a half-maximal response elicited at approximately 110 microM. Nipecotic acid produced a similar current and reduced the responses to GABA when introduced in the bath solution prior to the GABA pulse. On the other hand, application of 500 microM muscimol or 1 mM baclofen, GABAA and GABAB receptor agonists, respectively, were completely without effect. The GABA-induced current was not blocked by superfusion with 500 microM bicuculline, 500 microM picrotoxin, or 500 microM phaclofen. However, the responses to GABA were abolished when the cells were superfused in Ringer's solution in which choline or lithium had been substituted for sodium, and were reduced when the extracellular chloride concentration was decreased from 266 mM to 16 mM. Current-voltage data showed a maximal response to GABA when the cells were held at or below their resting potential. At more depolarized levels, the inward current became progressively smaller until, near +50 mV, it could no longer be detected; over the range tested (-90 to +50 mV), the response never reversed into an outward current. These findings suggest that the GABA-induced currents in skate horizontal cells are mediated by an electrogenic uptake mechanism. PMID:2247470

  1. Direct activation of GABAA receptors by substances in the organic acid fraction of Japanese sake.

    PubMed

    Izu, Hanae; Shigemori, Kensuke; Eguchi, Masaya; Kawane, Shuhei; Fujii, Shouko; Kitamura, Yuji; Aoshima, Hitoshi; Yamada, Yasue

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the effect of substances present in Japanese sake on the response of ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Sake was fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography. The fraction containing organic acids (OA fraction) showed agonist activities on the GABAA receptor. OA fractions from sake were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS). Of the 64 compounds identified, 13 compounds showed GABAA receptor agonist activities. Especially, l-lactic acid showed high agonist activity and its EC50 value was 37μM. Intraperitoneal injections of l-lactic acid, gluconic acid, and pyruvic acid (10, 10, and 5mg/kg BW, respectively), which showed agonistic activity on the GABAA receptor, led to significant anxiolytic effects during an elevated plus-maze test in mice. PMID:27507485

  2. 14C dating of bone using (gamma) Carboxyglutamic Acid and Carboxyglycine (Aminomalonate)

    SciTech Connect

    Southon, J R; Burky, R T; Kirner, D L; Taylor, R E; Hare, P E

    1999-04-27

    Radiocarbon determinations have been obtained on {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid [Gla] and {alpha}-carboxyglycine (aminomalonate) [Am] as well as acid- and base-hydrolyzed total amino acids isolated from a series of fossil bones. As far as they are aware, Am has not been reported previously in fossil bone and neither Gla nor Am {sup 14}C values have been measured previously. Interest in Gla, an amino acid found in the non-collagen proteins osteocalcin and matrix Gla-protein (MGP), proceeds from the suggestion that it may be preferentially retained and more resistant to diagenetic contamination affecting {sup 14}C values in bones exhibiting low and trace amounts of collagen. The data do not support these suggestions. The suite of bones examined showed a general tendency for total amino acid and Gla concentrations to decrease in concert. Even for bones retaining significant amounts of collagen, Gla (and Am extracts) can yield {sup 14}C values discordant with their expected age and with {sup 14}C values obtained on total amino-acid fractions isolated from the same bone sample.

  3. Biosynthesis of gamma-linolenic acid and beta-carotene by Zygomycetes fungi.

    PubMed

    Klempova, Tatiana; Basil, Eva; Kubatova, Alena; Certik, Milan

    2013-07-01

    Due to increasing demand for natural sources of both polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and beta-carotene, 28 Zygomycetes fungal soil isolates were screened for their potential to synthesize these biologically active compounds. Although all fungi produced C18 PUFAs, only nine strains also formed beta-carotene. Although Actinomucor elegans CCF 3218 was the best producer of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) (251 mg/L), Umbelopsis isabellina CCF 2412 was found to be the most valuable fungus because of the dual production of GLA (217 mg/L) and beta-carotene (40.7 mg/L). The calculated ratio of formed PUFAs provided new insight into activities of individual fatty acid desaturases involved in biosynthetic pathways for various types of PUFAs. The maximal activity of delta-9 desaturase was accompanied by high accumulation of storage lipids in fungal cells. On the other hand, maximal activity of delta-15 desaturase was found in strains synthesizing low amounts of oleic acid due to diminished delta-9 desaturase. Activities of delta-6 desaturase showed competition for fatty acids engaged in n3, n6, and n9 biosynthetic pathways. Such knowledge about fatty acid desaturase activities provides new challenges for the regulation of biotechnological production of PUFAs by Zygomycetes fungi. PMID:23625863

  4. Synthesis and proton NMR spectroscopy of intra-vesicular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    PubMed

    Wang, Luke Y-J; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vesicles containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and their proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra. These vesicles were constructed to more closely mimic the intracellular environment wherein GABA exists. For this study, these GABA-containing vesicles were examined under (1)H NMR as a potential platform for future studies on the differences between aqueous phantoms, ex vivo brain extracts, and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy results. We found that intra-vesicular GABA faithfully yielded the chemical shifts and J-coupling constants of free aqueous GABA, alongside the chemical shift signals of the vesicle wall.

  5. Association analysis of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma gene polymorphisms with asprin hypersensitivity in asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sun-Hee; Park, Se-Min; Park, Jong-Sook; Jang, An-Soo; Lee, Yong-Mok; Uh, Soo-Taek; Kim, Young Hoon; Choi, In-Seon; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Park, Byeong Lae

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are transcriptional factors activated by ligands of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. The activation of PPARγ regulates inflammation by downregulating the production of Th2 type cytokines and eosinophil function. In addition, a range of natural substances, including arachidonate pathway metabolites such as 15-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid (15-HETE), strongly promote PPARG expression. Therefore, genetic variants of the PPARG gene may be associated with the development of aspirin-intolerant asthma (AIA). We investigated the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the PPARG gene and AIA. Methods Based on the results of an oral aspirin challenge, asthmatics (n=403) were categorized into two groups: those with a decrease in FEV1 of 15% or greater (AIA) or less than 15% (aspirin-tolerant asthma, ATA). We genotyped two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PPARG gene from Korean asthmatics and normal controls (n=449): +34C>G (Pro12Ala) and +82466C>T (His449His). Results Logistic regression analysis showed that +82466C>T and haplotype 1 (CC) were associated with the development of aspirin hypersensitivity in asthmatics (P=0.04). The frequency of the rare allele of +82466C>T was significantly higher in AIA patients than in ATA patients in the recessive model [P=0.04, OR=3.97 (1.08-14.53)]. In addition, the frequency of PPARG haplotype 1 was significantly lower in AIA patients than in ATA patients in the dominant model (OR=0.25, P=0.04). Conclusions The +82466C>T polymorphism and haplotype 1 of the PPARG gene may be linked to increased risk for aspirin hypersensitivity in asthma. PMID:20224667

  6. Metal ion blockage of tritium incorporation into gamma-carboxyglutamic acid of prothrombin. Stoichiometry of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid to Gd3+ for the high affinity sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, S.P.; Saini, R.; Katz, A.; Cai, G.Z.; Maki, S.L.; Brodsky, G.L.

    1988-07-15

    Prothrombin possesses two high affinity and four low affinity gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla)-dependent gadolinium binding sites. Earlier work has shown that tritium can be specifically incorporated at the gamma-carbon of Gla in proteins at pH 5. In the present work we show that inclusion of saturating concentrations of Ca2+ in nondenaturing buffer systems ranging from pH 5.5 to 8.5 prevents the exchange of tritium into all 10 Gla residues of prothrombin. Similarly, saturating concentrations of Gd3+ prevent tritium incorporation into Gla at pH 5.5. Positive cooperativity was observed for the binding of Gd3+ to human prothrombin (at pH 5.5) for the two high affinity sites (Kd congruent to 35 nM). The four low affinity sites bind Gd3+ with a Kd congruent to 5 microM. Incubation of prothrombin ranging in concentrations from 10 to 40 microM with 2 eq of Gd3+ at pH 5.5 prevents 5.7 (average of seven determinations) Gla residues from tritium incorporation. Sedimentation velocity experiments conducted at pH 5.5 indicate that prothrombin in the presence of saturating concentrations of Gd3+ polymerizes, most likely, to a trimer. Further, in the presence of 2 eq of Gd3+, calculated percent weight average concentration of monomer prothrombin is congruent to 100% at 10 microM, approximately equal to 95% at 20 microM, and congruento to 80% at 40 microM protein concentration. Thus, it appears that under conditions in which prothrombin primarily exists as a monomer, occupancy of the initial two metal binding sites by Gd3+ involves six Gla residues.

  7. Furan formation from fatty acids as a result of storage, gamma irradiation, UV-C and heat treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furan is a possible human carcinogen that has been found in many thermally processed foods. The effects of thermal processing, gamma and UV-C irradiation on formation of furan from different fatty acids was studied. In addition, formation of furan from fatty acid emulsions during storage at 25C and...

  8. Identification of Hydroxybenzoic Acids as Selective Lactate Receptor (GPR81) Agonists with Antilipolytic Effects.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Curt A; Liu, Changlu; Shelton, Jonathan; Kuei, Chester; Sutton, Steven W; Lovenberg, Timothy W; Carruthers, Nicholas I

    2012-08-01

    Following the characterization of the lactate receptor (GPR81), a focused screening effort afforded 3-hydroxybenzoic acid 1 as a weak agonist of both GPR81 and GPR109a (niacin receptor). An examination of structurally similar arylhydroxy acids led to the identification of 3-chloro-5-hydroxybenzoic acid 2, a selective GPR81 agonist that exhibited favorable in vivo effects on lipolysis in a mouse model of obesity.

  9. Identification of Hydroxybenzoic Acids as Selective Lactate Receptor (GPR81) Agonists with Antilipolytic Effects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Following the characterization of the lactate receptor (GPR81), a focused screening effort afforded 3-hydroxybenzoic acid 1 as a weak agonist of both GPR81 and GPR109a (niacin receptor). An examination of structurally similar arylhydroxy acids led to the identification of 3-chloro-5-hydroxybenzoic acid 2, a selective GPR81 agonist that exhibited favorable in vivo effects on lipolysis in a mouse model of obesity. PMID:24900524

  10. Prolonged treatment with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mimetic substances in prepubertal male rats.

    PubMed

    Debeljuk, L; Díaz, M D; Maines, V M; Seilicovich, A

    1983-06-01

    The effect of chronic treatment with a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mimetic compound, progabide, and an inhibitor of GABA-transaminase, gamma-acetylenic GABA (GAG), was tested in prepubertal male rats. The effect of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL), given orally, was also tested. The rats treated with progabide did not show any difference in body, testicular, or seminal vesicle weights or serum prolactin levels, as compared with control rats. Treatment with GAG, at both dose levels used, did not significantly affect body weight. Testicular weight was significantly lower in the group of rats treated with the low dosage of GAG (5 mg/kg), and serum prolactin was significantly lower in the rats treated with the high dosage of GAG (20 mg/kg) as compared with control rats. In the first experiment performed with GBL, the rats given this compound had significantly lower body and testicular weights as compared with control rats. In the second experiment, GBL-treated rats had body weights similar to those of control rats, but testicular weights were significantly decreased. Prolonged treatment with GABA mimetics may affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis.

  11. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) induces cell death through MAPK-dependent mechanism in osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Hun; Yoo, Chong Il; Kim, Hui Taek; Park, Ji Yeon; Kwon, Chae Hwa; Keun Kim, Yong . E-mail: kim430@pusan.ac.kr

    2006-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) subfamilies in cell death induced by PPAR{gamma} agonists in osteoblastic cells. Ciglitazone and troglitazone, PPAR{gamma} agonists, resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent cell death, which was largely attributed to apoptosis. But a PPAR{alpha} agonist ciprofibrate did not affect the cell death. Ciglitazone caused reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and ciglitazone-induced cell death was prevented by antioxidants, suggesting an important role of ROS generation in the ciglitazone-induced cell death. ROS generation and cell death induced by ciglitazone were inhibited by the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662. Ciglitazone treatment caused activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38. Activation of ERK was dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and that of p38 was independent. Ciglitazone-induced cell death was significantly prevented by PD98059, an inhibitor of ERK upstream kinase MEK1/2, and SB203580, a p38 inhibitor. Ciglitazone treatment increased Bax expression and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and its effect was prevented by N-acetylcysteine, PD98059, and SB203580. Ciglitazone induced caspase activation, which was prevented by PD98059 and SB203580. The general caspase inhibitor z-DEVD-FMK and the specific inhibitor of caspases-3 DEVD-CHO exerted the protective effect against the ciglitazone-induced cell death. The EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and suramin protected against the ciglitazone-induced cell death. Taken together, these findings suggest that the MAPK signaling pathways play an active role in mediating the ciglitazone-induced cell death of osteoblasts and function upstream of a mitochondria-dependent mechanism. These data may provide a novel insight into potential therapeutic strategies for treatment of osteoporosis.

  12. Analysis of beta, gamma, and delta T-cell receptor genes in mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, S J; Smith, N P; Jones, R R; Luzzatto, L

    1991-10-01

    The authors have analyzed the configuration of immunoglobulin (Ig) and beta, gamma and delta T-cell receptor (TCR) genes in DNA extracted from skin, lymph nodes, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from 41 patients with mycosis fungoides (MF), 14 patients with Sezary syndrome, and 13 patients with benign inflammatory dermatoses. No discrete rearranged bands (DRB) were detected in patients with inflammatory dermatoses. In tissue DNA from 19 patients with MF DRB were detected with beta and gamma, but not delta TCR probes. Only one patient with MF had a rearrangement of gamma and delta with germ line beta TCR genes. In 13 patients multiple biopsies were analyzed and DRB, when present, were identical in different lesions from individual patients. In three patients analysis of DNA from dermatopathic lymph nodes did not reveal DRB. Analysis of peripheral blood DNA from 24 patients revealed a discrete rearrangement of the gamma TCR gene in four patients and both beta and gamma genes in four additional patients. In MF DRB were detected more frequently with advancing stage of disease in tissues (P less than 0.01) but not in peripheral blood (P equals 0.36). Of 14 patients with Sezary syndrome, eight had DRB in peripheral blood DNA with both beta and gamma probes and in three of these patients identical DRB were also detected in DNA from skin biopsy samples. In contrast, DRB were not detected in the peripheral blood of the other six patients. In both MF and Sezary syndrome there was no restricted usage of particular V gamma genes. These results indicate that in MF (1) T-cell clones can be detected in skin biopsy specimens from the majority of patients with early stage disease, (2) gamma delta T-cell clones are only rarely found, and (3) TCR gene analysis can detect T-cell clones in the peripheral blood with a greater degree of specificity than conventional light microscopic study. In Sezary syndrome these studies also suggest that a subset of patients have a

  13. Dependence of gamma-aminobutyric acid modulation of cholinergic transmission on nitric oxide and purines in cat terminal ileum.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N

    1997-11-27

    The possible involvement of purines and/or nitric oxide (NO) in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-mediated effects on the spontaneous activity of isolated preparations from longitudinal and circular muscles of cat terminal ileum was investigated. GABA had biphasic effects, which were neurogenic and muscarinic. ATP and adenosine dose dependently inhibited the activity of the muscles. A contractile response evoked by the nucleotide only was also observed. The effects of the purines were equipotent and resistant to Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), tetrodotoxin and to desensitization by alpha,beta-methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate (alpha,beta-meATP), except for the contractile effect of ATP, which was abolished by alpha,beta-meATP. Pretreatment of the preparations with ATP or adenosine produced: (i) desensitization to the effects of the respective purinoceptor agonist only; and (ii) suppression of the GABA-induced responses of longitudinal and circular muscles. Hemoglobin and L-NNA greatly reduced or completely blocked the GABA(A)-induced relaxation and decreased the GABA(A)-induced contraction. Our results indicate that purines and NO, to a different extent, mediate the relaxant phase of the GABA effects in both layers. Interactions between muscarinic cholinoceptors and GABA-nitrergic pathway and a concomitant activation of postjunctional P1 and P2y purinoceptors are suggested to explain the prejunctional biphasic effects of GABA.

  14. Distinct Phosphorylation Clusters Determine the Signaling Outcome of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 4/G Protein-Coupled Receptor 120.

    PubMed

    Prihandoko, Rudi; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Hudson, Brian D; Butcher, Adrian J; Ulven, Trond; Miller, Ashley M; Tobin, Andrew B; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-05-01

    It is established that long-chain free fatty acids includingω-3 fatty acids mediate an array of biologic responses through members of the free fatty acid (FFA) receptor family, which includes FFA4. However, the signaling mechanisms and modes of regulation of this receptor class remain unclear. Here, we employed mass spectrometry to determine that phosphorylation of mouse (m)FFAR4 occurs at five serine and threonine residues clustered in two separable regions of the C-terminal tail, designated cluster 1 (Thr(347), Thr(349), and Ser(350)) and cluster 2 (Ser(357)and Ser(361)). Mutation of these phosphoacceptor sites to alanine completely prevented phosphorylation of mFFA4 but did not limit receptor coupling to extracellular signal regulated protein kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) activation. Rather, an inhibitor of Gq/11proteins completely prevented receptor signaling to ERK1/2. By contrast, the recruitment of arrestin 3, receptor internalization, and activation of Akt were regulated by mFFA4 phosphorylation. The analysis of mFFA4 phosphorylation-dependent signaling was extended further by selective mutations of the phosphoacceptor sites. Mutations within cluster 2 did not affect agonist activation of Akt but instead significantly compromised receptor internalization and arrestin 3 recruitment. Distinctly, mutation of the phosphoacceptor sites within cluster 1 had no effect on receptor internalization and had a less extensive effect on arrestin 3 recruitment but significantly uncoupled the receptor from Akt activation. These unique observations define differential effects on signaling mediated by phosphorylation at distinct locations. This hallmark feature supports the possibility that the signaling outcome of mFFA4 activation can be determined by the pattern of phosphorylation (phosphorylation barcode) at the C terminus of the receptor.

  15. Syk interacts with tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in human platelets activated by collagen and cross-linking of the Fc gamma-IIA receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Yanaga, F; Poole, A; Asselin, J; Blake, R; Schieven, G L; Clark, E A; Law, C L; Watson, S P

    1995-01-01

    Activation of human platelets by cross-linking of the platelet low-affinity IgG receptor, the Fc gamma receptor IIA (Fc gamma-RIIA), or by collagen is associated with rapid phosphorylation on tyrosine of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase syk. Phosphorylation is still observed, albeit sometimes reduced, in the presence of a combination of a protein kinase C inhibitor, Ro 31-8220, and the intracellular calcium chelator, BAPTA-AM, demonstrating independence from phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) activity. In contrast, the combination of Ro 31-8220 and BAPTA-AM completely inhibits phosphorylation of syk in thrombin-stimulated platelets. Phosphorylation of syk increases its autophosphorylation activity measured in a kinase assay performed on syk immunoprecipitates. Fc gamma-RIIA also undergoes phosphorylation in syk immunoprecipitates from platelets activated by cross-linking of Fc gamma-RIIA but not by collagen, suggesting that it associates with the kinase. Consistent with this, tyrosine-phosphorylated Fc gamma-RIIA is precipitated by a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein containing the tandem src homology (SH2) domains of syk from Fc gamma-RIIA- but not collagen-activated cells. Two uncharacterized tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins of 40 and 65 kDa are uniquely precipitated by a GST fusion protein containing the tandem syk-SH2 domains in collagen-stimulated platelets. A peptide based on the antigen recognition activation motif (ARAM) of Fc gamma-RIIA, and phosphorylated on the two tyrosine residues found within this region, selectively binds syk from lysates of resting platelets; this interaction is not seen with a non-phosphorylated peptide. Kinase assays on Fc gamma-RIIA immunoprecipitates reveal the constitutive association of an unidentified kinase activity in resting cells which phosphorylates a 67 kDa protein. Syk is not detected in Fc gamma-RIIA immunoprecipitates from resting cells but associates with the receptor following activation

  16. Dominant negative retinoic acid receptor initiates tumor formation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kupumbati, Tara S; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Marzan, Christine; Farias, Eduardo F; Taneja, Reshma; Mira-y-Lopez, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    Background Retinoic acid suppresses cell growth and promotes cell differentiation, and pharmacological retinoic acid receptor (RAR) activation is anti-tumorigenic. This begs the question of whether chronic physiological RAR activation by endogenous retinoids is likewise anti-tumorigenic. Results To address this question, we generated transgenic mice in which expression of a ligand binding defective dominant negative RARα (RARαG303E) was under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. The transgene was expressed in the lymphoid compartment and in the mammary epithelium. Observation of aging mice revealed that transgenic mice, unlike their wild type littermates, developed B cell lymphomas at high penetrance, with a median latency of 40 weeks. MMTV-RARαG303E lymphomas were high grade Pax-5+, surface H+L Ig negative, CD69+ and BCL6- and cytologically and phenotypically resembled human adult high grade (Burkitt's or lymphoblastic) lymphomas. We postulated that mammary tumors might arise after a long latency period as seen in other transgenic models of breast cancer. We tested this idea by transplanting transgenic epithelium into the cleared fat pads of wild type hosts, thus bypassing lymphomagenesis. At 17 months post-transplantation, a metastatic mammary adenocarcinoma developed in one of four transplanted glands whereas no tumors developed in sixteen of sixteen endogenous glands with wild type epithelium. Conclusion These findings suggest that physiological RAR activity may normally suppress B lymphocyte and mammary epithelial cell growth and that global RAR inactivation is sufficient to initiate a stochastic process of tumor development requiring multiple transforming events. Our work makes available to the research community a new animal resource that should prove useful as an experimental model of aggressive sporadic lymphoma in immunologically uncompromised hosts. We anticipate that it may also prove useful as a model of breast cancer. PMID

  17. Histamine H3 receptor activation decreases kainate-induced hippocampal gamma oscillations in vitro by action potential desynchronization in pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Richard; Lindskog, Maria; Fisahn, André

    2010-01-01

    The study of rhythmic electrical activity in slice preparations has generated important insights into neural network function. While the synaptic mechanisms involved in the generation of in vitro network oscillations have been studied widely, little is known about the modulatory influence exerted on rhythmic activity in neuronal networks by neuropeptides and biogenic amines. Gamma oscillations play an important role in cognitive processes and are altered or disrupted in disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and schizophrenia. Given the importance of gamma oscillations for learning, memory and cognition processes as well as the recent interest in histamine H3 receptors in the development of pro-cognitive drugs to treat disorders such as AD and schizophrenia, it is relevant to study the impact of histaminergic mechanisms on network gamma oscillations. Here we show for the first time a modulation of gamma oscillation by histaminergic mechanisms. Selective activation of the H3 receptor by R-α-methylhistamine significantly reduces the power of kainate-induced gamma oscillations, but not carbachol-induced gamma oscillations, in the rat hippocampal slice preparation without affecting oscillation frequency. This effect is neither caused by a decrease in excitatory or inhibitory postsynaptic currents, nor a decrease in cellular excitability. Instead, we find that the decrease in oscillation power following H3 receptor activation results from a desynchronization of pyramidal neuron action potential firing with regard to the local field potential oscillation cycle. Our data provide a possible mechanism of action for histamine in regulating gamma oscillations in the hippocampal network. PMID:20156850

  18. Fc Gamma Receptor 3A Polymorphism and Risk for HIV-Associated Cryptococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rohatgi, Soma; Gohil, Shruti; Kuniholm, Mark H.; Schultz, Hannah; Dufaud, Chad; Armour, Kathryn L.; Badri, Sheila; Mailliard, Robbie B.; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is one of the most common causes of fungal disease in HIV-infected persons, but not all of those who are infected develop cryptococcal disease (CD). Although CD4+ T cell deficiency is a risk factor for HIV-associated CD, polymorphisms of phagocytic Fc gamma receptors (FCGRs) have been linked to CD risk in HIV-uninfected persons. To investigate associations between FCGR2A 131 H/R and FCGR3A 158 F/V polymorphisms and CD risk in HIV-infected persons, we performed PCR-based genotyping on banked samples from 164 men enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS): 55 who were HIV infected and developed CD and a matched control group of 54 who were HIV infected and 55 who were HIV uninfected. Using additive and allelic statistical models for analysis, the high-affinity FCGR3A 158V allele was significantly associated with CD status after adjusting for race/ethnicity (odds ratio [OR], 2.1; P = 0.005), as was the FCGR3A 158 VV homozygous genotype after adjusting for race/ethnicity, rate of CD4+ T cell decline, and nadir CD4+ T cell count (OR, 21; P = 0.005). No associations between CD and FCGR2A 131 H/R polymorphism were identified. In binding studies, human IgG (hIgG)-C. neoformans complexes exhibited more binding to CHO-K1 cells expressing FCGR3A 158V than to those expressing FCGR3A 158F, and in cytotoxicity assays, natural killer (NK) cells expressing FCGR3A 158V induced more C. neoformans-infected monocyte cytotoxicity than those expressing FCGR3A 158F. Together, these results show an association between the FCGR3A 158V allele and risk for HIV-associated CD and suggest that this polymorphism could promote C. neoformans pathogenesis via increased binding of C. neoformans immune complexes, resulting in increased phagocyte cargo and/or immune activation. PMID:23982074

  19. Structural basis and functions of abscisic acid receptors PYLs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing L.; Jiang, Lun; Xin, Qi; Liu, Yang; Tan, Jian X.; Chen, Zhong Z.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a key role in many developmental processes and responses to adaptive stresses in plants. Recently, a new family of nucleocytoplasmic PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYLs) has been identified as bona fide ABA receptors. PYLs together with protein phosphatases type-2C (PP2Cs), Snf1 (Sucrose-non-fermentation 1)-related kinases subfamily 2 (SnRK2s) and downstream substrates constitute the core ABA signaling network. Generally, PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s kinases by physical interaction and direct dephosphorylation. Upon ABA binding, PYLs change their conformations and then contact and inhibit PP2Cs, thus activating SnRK2s. Here, we reviewed the recent progress in research regarding the structures of the core signaling pathways of ABA, including the (+)-ABA, (−)-ABA and ABA analogs pyrabactin as well as 6AS perception by PYLs, SnRK2s mimicking PYLs in binding PP2Cs. PYLs inhibited PP2Cs in both the presence and absence of ABA and activated SnRK2s. The present review elucidates multiple ABA signal perception and transduction by PYLs, which might shed light on how to design small chemical compounds for improving plant performance in the future. PMID:25745428

  20. Succinic semialdehyde as a substrate for the formation of gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    PubMed

    van Bemmelen, F J; Schouten, M J; Fekkes, D; Bruinvels, J

    1985-11-01

    The conversion of succinic semialdehyde into gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by GABA-transaminase was measured in rat brain homogenate in the presence of different concentrations of the cosubstrate glutamate. The calculated kinetic parameters of succinic semialdehyde for GABA-transaminase were a limiting Km value of 168 microM and a limiting Vmax value of 38 mumol g-1 h-1. Combination with previously obtained data for the conversion of GABA into succinic semialdehyde revealed a kEq value of 0.04, indicating that equilibrium of GABA-transaminase is biased toward the formation of GABA. The increased formation of GABA in the presence of succinic semialdehyde was not due to an increased conversion of glutamate into GABA by glutamic acid decarboxylase. Therefore these results indicate that succinic semialdehyde can act as a precursor for GABA synthesis.

  1. Biosynthesis of gamma-linolenic acid in cotyledons and microsomal preparations of the developing seeds of common borage (Borago officinalis).

    PubMed

    Stymne, S; Stobart, A K

    1986-12-01

    The developing seeds of Borago officinalis (common borage) accumulate a triacylglycerol oil that is relatively rich in the uncommon fatty acid gamma-linolenate (octadec-6,9,12-trienoic acid). Incubation of developing, whole, cotyledons with [14C]oleate and [14C]linoleate showed that the gamma-linolenate was synthesized by the sequential desaturation of oleate----linoleate----gamma-linolenate. Microsomal membrane preparations from the developing cotyledons contained an active delta 6-desaturase enzyme that catalysed the conversion of linoleate into gamma-linolenate. Experiments were designed to manipulate the [14C]linoleate content of the microsomal phosphatidylcholine. The [14C]linoleoyl phosphatidylcholine labelled in situ was converted into gamma-linolenoyl phosphatidylcholine in the presence of NADH. The substrate for the delta 6-desaturase in borage was, therefore, the linoleate in the complex microsomal lipid phosphatidylcholine, rather than, as in animals, the acyl-CoA. This was further confirmed in experiments that compared the specific radioactivity of the gamma-linolenate, in acyl-CoA and phosphatidylcholine, that was synthesized when [14C]linoleoyl-CoA was incubated with microsomal membranes, NADH and non-radioactive gamma-linolenoyl-CoA. The delta 6-desaturase was positionally specific and only utilized the linoleate in position 2 of sn-phosphatidylcholine. Analysis of the positional distribution of fatty acids in the endogenous microsomal sn-phosphatidylcholine showed that, whereas position 1 contained substantial linoleate, only small amounts of gamma-linolenate were present. The results shed further light on the synthesis of C18 polyunsaturated fatty acids in plants and in particular its relationship to the regulation of the acyl quality of the triacylglycerols in oilseeds.

  2. Characterization of DNA Binding and Retinoic Acid Binding Properties of Retinoic Acid Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Na; Schule, Roland; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Evans, Ronald M.

    1991-05-01

    High-level expression of the full-length human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) α and the DNA binding domain of the RAR in Escherichia coli was achieved by using a T7 RNA polymerase-directed expression system. After induction, full-length RAR protein was produced at an estimated level of 20% of the total bacterial proteins. Both intact RAR molecules and the DNA binding domain bind to the cognate DNA response element with high specificity in the absence of retinoic acid. However, this binding is enhanced to a great extent upon the addition of eukaryotic cell extracts. The factor responsible for this enhancement is heat-sensitive and forms a complex with RAR that binds to DNA and exhibits a distinct migration pattern in the gel-mobility-shift assay. The interaction site of the factor with RAR is localized in the 70-amino acid DNA binding region of RAR. The hormone binding ability of the RARα protein was assayed by a charcoal absorption assay and the RAR protein was found to bind to retinoic acid with a K_d of 2.1 x 10-10 M.

  3. Human CD4-8- -derived clones. Phenotypic and functional characteristics and variation between donors in patterns of T-cell receptor gamma gene rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E

    1989-06-01

    Clones were derived from highly purified human CD4-8- lymphocytes from three different donors and maintained in the presence of interleukin 2 and phytohaemagglutinin. Considerable variation was noted between donors in the phenotype and T-cell receptor (TCR) gamma gene rearrangements of CD4-8- -derived clones. In one donor, most clones remained CD4-8- and all were CD3+WT31- and therefore expressed gamma/delta heterodimers. TCR gamma gene rearrangements almost all involved C gamma 1. In contrast, most clones from a second donor were CD3+WT31+, and therefore expressed alpha/beta heterodimers, and many were positive for CD4 or CD8. Most clones from a third donor were CD3+WT31- with a high proportion of TCR gamma gene rearrangements involving C gamma 2. The V gamma 9JP rearrangement was exclusively confined to CD3+WT31- clones and was present in the majority of clones. Almost all CD3+WT31- clones showed TCR beta as well as gamma gene rearrangements. Most CD3+WT31- clones with at least one chromosome rearranged to C gamma 1 exhibited high non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxic activity, while most of those with two C gamma 2 rearrangements, and therefore expressing a non-disulphide-linked gamma/delta heterodimer, had low activity. Preincubation of effector cells with anti-CD3 strongly inhibited the cytotoxicity of CD3+WT31- clones while that of CD3+WT31+ clones was enhanced. This implicates the CD3-gamma/delta complex in target cell recognition by cytotoxic gamma/delta-bearing T-cell clones. The results show that there is heterogeneity between donors in the relative proportions of CD4-8- -derived clones expressing alpha/beta heterodimers and the different forms of the gamma/delta heterodimer.

  4. Pre-staining paper chromatography method for quantification of gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Qiu, Ting; Cao, Yusheng; Yang, Jiyan; Huang, Zhibing

    2009-06-19

    The routine method of paper chromatography includes five steps: spotting, separating, drying, spraying/immersing and color development. In this paper, a pre-staining paper chromatography which only consisted of spotting, separating and color development was developed for quantitative analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid. Compared to the routine paper chromatography, the improved method is clean, rapid, inexpensive and reproducible. The effects of ninhydrin concentration, color temperature, color time and Cu(2+) concentration on the color yield in the ninhydrin reaction were optimized. And then the pre-staining paper chromatography coupled with vis spectrophotometry was applied to gamma-aminobutyric acid quantification. The results indicated that the limit of detection was 0.05 mg mL(-1) and the linear range was from 0.5 to 20.0 mg mL(-1). Furthermore, an excellent correlation coefficient was observed with an R(2)=0.998. The method is accurate (RSD<2.64%), and has good recoveries (102.7-103.9%). The validation of the modified technique was verified by a HPLC method.

  5. Direct analysis reveals an absence of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid in cancer procoagulant from human tissues.

    PubMed

    Kaplinska, Katarzyna; Mielicki, Wojciech P

    2009-07-01

    Additional carboxylation of glutamic acid by vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylase is a common posttranslational modification of many proteins, including some of blood clotting factors. Vitamin K-antagonists, such as warfarin, are often included in the therapy of malignant disease, decreasing the blood coagulation potential. Cancer procoagulant, a direct blood coagulation factor X activator from malignant tissue, is considered as a vitamin K-dependent protein, so it could serve as one of possible targets for the therapy with warfarin. However, there is still no experimental data demonstrating directly the presence of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) in a cancer procoagulant molecule. The presence of Gla in cancer procoagulant isolated from human amnion-chorion membranes and from human malignant melanoma WM 115 cell line was analyzed directly, using specific anti-Gla monoclonal antibodies. There was no detectable amount of Gla in cancer procoagulant isolated from fetal or malignant tissue. Cancer procoagulant from human tissues does not contain Gla-rich domain. The finding indicates that cancer procoagulant is rather a poor target for warfarin therapy of malignant disease.

  6. Gamma-irradiation effect on a commercial composite anticorrosive pigment and acidity-to-alkalinity conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Weiqiang; Niu, Kaihui; Wu, Longchao

    2016-05-01

    A commercial composite anticorrosive pigment based on aluminum dihydrogen tripolyphosphate was studied after exposure to gamma irradiation (Co60, 0, 20, 50, 100 and 150 kGy) using FTIR, XRD, TGA and acid-base titration technologies. Although the FTIR spectra showed that the effect of the irradiation on functional groups in the pigments was not obvious, the decrease in the crystal lattice parameters of the irradiated pigments was observed in the XRD spectra compared to the non-irradiated sample. But the extent of the lattice parameter decrease monotonically with the increase of absorbed dose from 20 to 150 kGy, which was attributed to the decomposition of water and the simultaneous occurrence of lattice damage when the pigments were exposed to gamma rays. Of particular significance was the displayed basicity of the aqueous solutions of the irradiated pigments compared to the acidity of the solution of the non-irradiated pigment, which was attributed to the decomposition of P-OH groups (combined water).

  7. Genetic manipulation of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) synthesis in a commercial variety of evening primrose (Oenothera sp.).

    PubMed

    de Gyves, Emilio Mendoza; Sparks, Caroline A; Sayanova, Olga; Lazzeri, Paul; Napier, Johnathan A; Jones, Huw D

    2004-07-01

    A robust Agrobacterium-mediated transformation procedure was developed for Rigel, a commercial cultivar of evening primrose, and used to deliver a cDNA encoding a Delta(6)-desaturase from borage under the control of a cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Analysis of the transformed plants demonstrated an altered profile of polyunsaturated fatty acids, with an increase in gamma-linolenic acid and octadecatetraenoic acid in leaf tissues when compared with control lines. PMID:17134396

  8. Most human CD3+WT31- clones with T cell receptor C gamma 1 rearrangements show strong non-MHC-restricted cytotoxic activity in contrast to those with C gamma 2 rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E

    1989-04-01

    Clones expressing CD3 in the absence of WT31 expression were obtained by growing highly purified WT31- cells in the presence of interleukin 2 and phytohemagglutinin. Most clones showed rearrangements of T cell receptor (TcR) gamma genes on both chromosomes involving all five currently identified J gamma segments. About a third of these clones had a rearranged 12 kb Kpn I band with the J gamma probe, consistent with a V9JPC gamma 1 rearrangement. All clones with both chromosomes rearranged to C gamma 2 had low or intermediate cytotoxic activity while most of those with at least one chromosome rearranged to C gamma 1 had high cytotoxic activity against both natural killer-sensitive and natural killer-resistant targets. This applied both to clones with and without the V9JPC gamma 1 rearrangement. Of three clones with both C gamma 1 and C gamma 2 rearrangements two had high activity and the other was only weakly cytotoxic. In addition, most clones showed rearrangement of TcR beta genes. Some clones were capable of secreting levels of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha which were as high as those produced by CD3+4+WT31+ T cell clones. The results suggest that most human CD3+WT31- clones expressing a disulfide-linked C gamma 1/delta heterodimer are capable of mediating strong non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxicity whereas those expressing non-disulfide-linked C gamma 2/delta heterodimers are not.

  9. Telmisartan protects against diabetic vascular complications in a mouse model of obesity and type 2 diabetes, partially through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-{gamma}-dependent activity

    SciTech Connect

    Toyama, Kensuke; Nakamura, Taishi; Kataoka, Keiichiro; Yasuda, Osamu; Fukuda, Masaya; Tokutomi, Yoshiko; Dong, Yi-Fei; Ogawa, Hisao; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, acts as a partial PPAR{gamma} agonist. {yields} The protective effects of telmisartan against diabetic vascular injury were associated with attenuation of vascular NF{kappa}B activation and TNF {alpha}. {yields} PPAR{gamma} activity of telmisartan was involved in the normalization of vascular PPAR{gamma} downregulation in diabetic mice. {yields} We provided the first evidence indicating that PPAR{gamma} activity of telmisartan contributed to the protective effects of telmisartan against diabetic vascular complication. -- Abstract: Experimental and clinical data support the notion that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) activation is associated with anti-atherosclerosis as well as anti-diabetic effect. Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), acts as a partial PPAR{gamma} agonist. We hypothesized that telmisartan protects against diabetic vascular complications, through PPAR{gamma} activation. We compared the effects of telmisartan, telmisartan combined with GW9662 (a PPAR{gamma} antagonist), and losartan with no PPAR{gamma} activity on vascular injury in obese type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Compared to losartan, telmisartan significantly ameliorated vascular endothelial dysfunction, downregulation of phospho-eNOS, and coronary arterial remodeling in db/db mice. More vascular protective effects of telmisartan than losartan were associated with greater anti-inflammatory effects of telmisartan, as shown by attenuation of vascular nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) activation and tumor necrosis factor {alpha}. Coadministration of GW9662 with telmisartan abolished the above mentioned greater protective effects of telmisartan against vascular injury than losartan in db/db mice. Thus, PPAR{gamma} activity appears to be involved in the vascular protective effects of telmisartan in db/db mice. Moreover, telmisartan, but not losartan, prevented the downregulation of

  10. Identification of a second T-cell antigen receptor in human and mouse by an anti-peptide gamma-chain-specific monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Ioannides, C G; Itoh, K; Fox, F E; Pahwa, R; Good, R A; Platsoucas, C D

    1987-01-01

    We developed a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (9D7) against a synthetic peptide (P13K) selected from the deduced amino acid sequence of the constant region of the gamma chain of the murine T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) (amino acids 118-130). Using this mAb, we identified a putative second TCR expressed on peripheral blood lymphocytes from a patient with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) that were propagated in culture with recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2) and Con A. This mAb immunoprecipitated two polypeptide chains of 40 and 58 kDa under nonreducing conditions and of 40 and 56 kDa under reducing conditions from 125I-labeled denatured lysates of T3+ WT31- lymphocytes expanded in culture from a SCID patient. These polypeptide chains were not disulfide linked and were not present on human peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal donors cultured for 5 days with phytohemagglutinin or for 2 weeks with rIL-2 and polyclonal activators or on cells of the Jurkat lymphoblastoid human T-cell line. Chemical crosslinking of 125I-labeled cells followed by immunoprecipitation with anti-Leu-4 mAb under nonreducing or reducing conditions revealed that the 40- and 56-kDa polypeptide chains were associated with the T3 differentiation antigen. These results were confirmed by sequential immunoprecipitation with anti-Leu-4 mAb followed by 9D7 anti-P13K mAb. The 9D7 anti-P13K mAb immunoprecipitated two polypeptide chains of 43 and 64 kDa from denatured lysates of lymphocytes from a patient with severe common variable immunodeficiency (CVI) that were expanded in culture with rIL-2 and Con A. Thus, this second TCR may be composed of two polypeptide chains (gamma gamma'), both of which appear to be the product of the gamma-chain gene. These experiments were done with polyclonal cell populations. Cloned T3+ WT31- cell populations are required to determine whether this TCR contains two gamma polypeptide chains. In contrast, only one polypeptide chain of 56 kDa was immunoprecipitated by the

  11. Formation of hydrocarbons from acid-Clay suspensions by gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Castaneda, J.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2013-07-03

    The adsorption of certain organic compounds by clays gives rise to the transformation of the adsorbate through the action of the clays. This phenomenon can be enhanced using ionizing radiation. In this context, these kinds of reactions play an important role in many natural and industrial processes. For example, in oil and gas exploration, the source and trap of petroleum hydrocarbons is frequently clay-rich rocks. Clay-water-based muds are also seen as environmentally friendly alternatives to toxic oil-based fluids. The principal processes that occur in sediments are usually held to be of bacterial action and thermal transformation, which may include thermally induced catalytic alteration of the organic debris. On the other hand, radioactive materials are widely distributed throughout Earth. They were more abundant in the past, but are present in petroleum reservoirs. Their presence induced radioactive bombardment, which may have altered these sediments. This important subject has not been extensively studied. The aim of this work is to study the behavior of fatty acids-like behenic acid-and dicarboxylic acids-like fumaric acid-as model compounds, which are adsorbed in a clay mineral (Na-montmorillonite) and exposed to gamma radiation. The results show that the radiation-induced decomposition of the clay-acid system goes along a definitive path (oxidation), rather than following several modes of simultaneous decomposition, as happens in radiolysis without clay or by heating the system. The main radiolytic products for fatty acids are their corresponding hydrocarbons, with one C-atom less than the original acid.

  12. Among the twenty classical L-amino acids, only glutamate directly activates metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Frauli, Mélanie; Neuville, Pascal; Vol, Claire; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Prézeau, Laurent

    2006-02-01

    Under pathophysiological conditions, cellular amino acids can be profusely released from cells into the cerebral interstitial space. Because several class-C G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) display a broad natural ligand spectrum, being sensitive to more than one endogenous ligand, we wondered whether the related metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors could be modulated by various types of L-amino acids, allowing them to sense large increase in extracellular amino acid concentration. Here, the agonist, antagonist and allosteric effects of the twenty classical L-amino acids were evaluated on the eight mGlu receptor subtypes. We show that, in addition to glutamate (Glu), cysteine, aspartate and asparagine also lead to the activation of mGlu3, 4 and 5. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that the effect of these three amino acids did not result from a direct activation of the receptors, but from an indirect action involving Glu-transporters/exchangers. These data first demonstrate that mGlu receptors, unlike other class-C GPCRs, display an extremely high selectivity towards one ligand. Moreover, our results also show that Glu transport systems allow mGlu receptors to sense large increase in the extracellular concentration of some amino acids. Such a system will certainly lead to a large increase in some mGlu receptor activity under pathological conditions, such as seizure, ischemia or other brain injuries. PMID:16310227

  13. Interaction between retinoid acid receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) and neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) in asthma.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Sääf, Annika; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Mandelin, Jami; Pietras, Christina Orsmark; Ezer, Sini; Karisola, Piia; Vendelin, Johanna; Gennäs, Gustav Boije af; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Alenius, Harri; von Mutius, Erika; Doekes, Gert; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Riedler, Josef; van Hage, Marianne; D'Amato, Mauro; Scheynius, Annika; Pershagen, Göran; Kere, Juha; Pulkkinen, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Retinoid acid receptor-related Orphan Receptor Alpha (RORA) was recently identified as a susceptibility gene for asthma in a genome-wide association study. To investigate the impact of RORA on asthma susceptibility, we performed a genetic association study between RORA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the vicinity of the asthma-associated SNP (rs11071559) and asthma-related traits. Because the regulatory region of a previously implicated asthma susceptibility gene, Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1), has predicted elements for RORA binding, we hypothesized that RORA may interact biologically and genetically with NPSR1. 37 RORA SNPs and eight NPSR1 SNPs were genotyped in the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE (2033 children) and the European cross-sectional PARSIFAL study (1120 children). Seven RORA SNPs confined into a 49 kb region were significantly associated with physician-diagnosed childhood asthma. The most significant association with rs7164773 (T/C) was driven by the CC genotype in asthma cases (OR = 2.0, 95%CI 1.36-2.93, p = 0.0003 in BAMSE; and 1.61, 1.18-2.19, p = 0.002 in the combined BAMSE-PARSIFAL datasets, respectively), and strikingly, the risk effect was dependent on the Gln344Arg mutation in NPSR1. In cell models, stimulation of NPSR1 activated a pathway including RORA and other circadian clock genes. Over-expression of RORA decreased NPSR1 promoter activity further suggesting a regulatory loop between these genes. In addition, Rora mRNA expression was lower in the lung tissue of Npsr1 deficient mice compared to wildtype littermates during the early hours of the light period. We conclude that RORA SNPs are associated with childhood asthma and show epistasis with NPSR1, and the interaction between RORA and NPSR1 may be of biological relevance. Combinations of common susceptibility alleles and less common functional polymorphisms may modify the joint risk effects on asthma susceptibility. PMID:23565190

  14. Phenotypic screening of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4-{gamma} receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdin, Anna Karin; Surve, Vikas V.; Joensson, Marie; Bjursell, Mikael; Edenro, Anne; Schuelke, Meint; Saad, Alaa; Bjurstroem, Sivert; Lundgren, Elisabeth Jensen; Snaith, Michael; Fransson-Steen, Ronny; Toernell, Jan; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad . E-mail: mohammad.bohlooly@astrazeneca.com

    2006-10-20

    Using the mouse as a model organism in pharmaceutical research presents unique advantages as its physiology in many ways resembles the human physiology, it also has a relatively short generation time, low breeding and maintenance costs, and is available in a wide variety of inbred strains. The ability to genetically modify mouse embryonic stem cells to generate mouse models that better mimic human disease is another advantage. In the present study, a comprehensive phenotypic screening protocol is applied to elucidate the phenotype of a novel mouse knockout model of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4-{gamma}. HNF4-{gamma} is expressed in the kidneys, gut, pancreas, and testis. First level of the screen is aimed at general health, morphologic appearance, normal cage behaviour, and gross neurological functions. The second level of the screen looks at metabolic characteristics and lung function. The third level of the screen investigates behaviour more in-depth and the fourth level consists of a thorough pathological characterisation, blood chemistry, haematology, and bone marrow analysis. When compared with littermate wild-type mice (HNF4-{gamma}{sup +/+}), the HNF4-{gamma} knockout (HNF4-{gamma}{sup -/-}) mice had lowered energy expenditure and locomotor activity during night time that resulted in a higher body weight despite having reduced intake of food and water. HNF4-{gamma}{sup -/-} mice were less inclined to build nest and were found to spend more time in a passive state during the forced swim test.

  15. Identification of isosilybin a from milk thistle seeds as an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Pferschy-Wenzig, Eva-Maria; Atanasov, Atanas G; Malainer, Clemens; Noha, Stefan M; Kunert, Olaf; Schuster, Daniela; Heiss, Elke H; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Wagner, Hildebert; Bauer, Rudolf; Dirsch, Verena M

    2014-04-25

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a key regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism. Agonists of this nuclear receptor are used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and are also studied as a potential treatment of other metabolic diseases, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Silymarin, a concentrated phenolic mixture from milk thistle (Silybum marianum) seeds, is used widely as a supportive agent in the treatment of a variety of liver diseases. In this study, the PPARγ activation potential of silymarin and its main constituents was investigated. Isosilybin A (3) caused transactivation of a PPARγ-dependent luciferase reporter in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect could be reversed upon co-treatment with the PPARγ antagonist T0070907. In silico docking studies suggested a binding mode for 3 distinct from that of the inactive silymarin constituents, with one additional hydrogen bond to Ser342 in the entrance region of the ligand-binding domain of the receptor. Hence, isosilybin A (3) has been identified as the first flavonolignan PPARγ agonist, suggesting its further investigation as a modulator of this nuclear receptor.

  16. Antiepileptic potential of matrine via regulation the levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid in the brain.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jun; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-12-05

    Our present study aimed to determine the antiepileptic activity of matrine, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. To evaluate the antiepileptic activity of matrine, seizures in mice induced by PTZ and MES were established, then the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests in mice were also carried out. For the molecular mechanism investigations, contents of aspartic acid (Asp), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid (Glu), glycine (Gly) in seizures mice were determined; then, the chronic seizures rats induced by PTZ were prepared, and western blotting was used to determine the expressions of GAD 65, GABAA and GABAB in the brains. In the results, matrine showed significant antiepileptic effects on seizures mice induced by MES and PTZ. Moreover, the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests were also demonstrated that matrine had obvious antiepileptic effects. Additionally, our results revealed that after treatment with matrine, contents of GABA can be elevated, and the contents of Glu were obviously decreased. Furthermore, western blotting revealed that the mechanism regarding the antiepileptic effect of may be related to the up-regulations of GAD 65 and GABAA in the brain. Collectively, we suggested that matrine can be developed as an effective antiseptic drug.

  17. Antiepileptic Potential of Matrine via Regulation the Levels of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamic Acid in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jun; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-01-01

    Our present study aimed to determine the antiepileptic activity of matrine, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. To evaluate the antiepileptic activity of matrine, seizures in mice induced by PTZ and MES were established, then the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests in mice were also carried out. For the molecular mechanism investigations, contents of aspartic acid (Asp), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid (Glu), glycine (Gly) in seizures mice were determined; then, the chronic seizures rats induced by PTZ were prepared, and western blotting was used to determine the expressions of GAD 65, GABAA and GABAB in the brains. In the results, matrine showed significant antiepileptic effects on seizures mice induced by MES and PTZ. Moreover, the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests were also demonstrated that matrine had obvious antiepileptic effects. Additionally, our results revealed that after treatment with matrine, contents of GABA can be elevated, and the contents of Glu were obviously decreased. Furthermore, western blotting revealed that the mechanism regarding the antiepileptic effect of may be related to the up-regulations of GAD 65 and GABAA in the brain. Collectively, we suggested that matrine can be developed as an effective antiseptic drug. PMID:24317434

  18. Delta-6 desaturase from borage converts linoleic acid to gamma-linolenic acid in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Nimal, Jonathan; Li, Wanli; Liu, Xia; Cao, Wenguang

    2011-07-01

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, 18:3 n6) is an essential polyunsaturated fatty acid of the omega-6 family and is found to be effective in prevention and/or treatment of various health problems. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of increasing γ-linolenic acid contents in mammalian cells using the delta-6 gene from Borago officinalis. The borage Δ6-desaturase gene (sDelta-6) was codon-optimized and introduced into HEK293 cells by lipofectin transfection. Co-expression of GFP with sDelta-6 and RT-PCR analysis indicated that sDelta-6 could be expressed in mammalian cells. Subsequently, the heterologous expression of borage Δ6-desaturase was evaluated by fatty acid analysis. Total cellular lipid analysis of transformed cells fed with linoleic acid (LA 18:2 n6) as a substrate showed that the expression of sDelta-6 resulted in an 228-483% (p<0.05) increase of GLA when compared with that in the control cells. The highest conversion efficiency of LA into GLA in sDelta-6(+) cells was 6.9 times higher than that in the control group (11.59% vs. 1.69%; p<0.05). Our present work demonstrated that the sDelta-6 gene from borage could be functionally expressed in mammalian cells, and could convert LA into GLA. Furthermore, this study may pave the way to generate transgenic livestock that can synthesise GLA. PMID:21679695

  19. Therapeutic role of bile acids and nuclear receptor agonists in fibrosing cholangiopathies.

    PubMed

    Trauner, Michael; Halilbasic, Emina; Kazemi-Shirazi, Lili; Kienbacher, Christian; Staufer, Katharina; Traussnigg, Stefan; Hofer, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory bile duct diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) result in progressive fibrosis of the biliary tract and ultimately cirrhosis of the liver. Since the etiology and pathogenesis of these fibrosing cholangiopathies are still poorly understood, therapeutic options are rather limited at present. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the paradigm therapeutic bile acid and established standard treatment for PBC, but its role for medical therapy of PSC is still under debate. Promising novel bile acid-based therapeutic options include 24-norursodeoxycholic acid, a side chain-shortened C23 homologue of UDCA, and bile acid receptor/farnesoid X receptor agonists (e.g., obeticholic acid) which currently undergo clinical development for fibrosing cholangiopathies such as PBC and PSC. Other nuclear receptors such as vitamin D receptor and fatty acid-activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are also of considerable interest. This review article is a summary of an overview talk given at Falk Symposium 191 on Advances in Pathogenesis and Treatment of Liver Diseases held in London, October 3-4, 2013, and summarizes the recent progress with novel therapeutic bile acids and bile acid derivatives as novel therapies for fibrosing cholangiopathies such as PBC and PSC.

  20. Identification of a second T-cell antigen receptor in human and mouse by an anti-peptide. gamma. -chain-specific monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Ioannides, C.G.; Itoh, K.; Fox, F.E.; Pahwa, R.; Good, R.A.; Platsoucas, C.D.

    1987-06-01

    The authors developed a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (9D7) against a synthetic peptide (P13K) selected from the deduced amino acid sequence of the constant region of the lambda chain of the murine T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) (amino acids 118-130). Using this mAb, they identified a putative second TCR expressed on peripheral blood lymphocytes from a patient with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) that were propagated in culture with recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2) and Con A. This mAb immunoprecipitated two polypeptide chains of 40 and 58 kDa under nonreducing conditions and of 40 and 56 kDa under reducing conditions from /sup 125/I-labeled denatured lysates of T3/sup +/ WT31/sup -/ lymphocytes expanded in culture from a SCID patient. Chemical crosslinking of /sup 125/I-labeled cells followed by immunoprecipitation with anti-Leu-4 mAb under nonreducing or reducing conditions revealed that the 40- and 56-kDa polypeptide chains were associated with the T3 differentiation antigen. These experiments were done with polyclonal cell populations. Cloned T3/sup +/ WT31/sup -/ cell populations are required to determine whether the TCR contains two lambda polypeptide chains. Using the same 9D7 anti-P18K mAb and immunoblotting analysis, they identified a 35 kDa ..gamma..-chain polypeptide under reducing conditions expressed on purified L3T4/sup -/ Lyt2/sup -/ BALB/c mouse thymocytes. This ..gamma..-chain TCR is disulfide linked and has a molecular mass of 80 kDa under nonreducing conditions.

  1. Discovery of a Series of Imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines with Dual Activity at Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-[gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Filzen, Gary F.; Flynn, Declan; Bigge, Christopher F.; Chen, Jing; Davis, Jo Ann; Dudley, Danette A.; Edmunds, Jeremy J.; Esmaeil, Nadia; Geyer, Andrew; Heemstra, Ronald J.; Jalaie, Mehran; Ohren, Jeffrey F.; Ostroski, Robert; Ellis, Teresa; Schaum, Robert P.; Stoner, Chad

    2013-03-07

    Mining of an in-house collection of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists to identify compounds with activity at the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) revealed a new series of imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines 2 possessing activity at these two receptors. Early availability of the crystal structure of the lead compound 2a bound to the ligand binding domain of human PPAR{gamma} confirmed the mode of interaction of this scaffold to the nuclear receptor and assisted in the optimization of PPAR{gamma} activity. Among the new compounds, (S)-3-(5-(2-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)phenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl)-2-ethyl-5-isobutyl-7-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (2l) was identified as a potent angiotensin II type I receptor blocker (IC{sub 50} = 1.6 nM) with partial PPAR{gamma} agonism (EC{sub 50} = 212 nM, 31% max) and oral bioavailability in rat. The dual pharmacology of 2l was demonstrated in animal models of hypertension (SHR) and insulin resistance (ZDF rat). In the SHR, 2l was highly efficacious in lowering blood pressure, while robust lowering of glucose and triglycerides was observed in the male ZDF rat.

  2. Active transport of. gamma. -aminobutyric acid and glycine into synaptic vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kish, P.E.; Fischer-Bovenkerk, C.; Ueda, T. )

    1989-05-01

    Although {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine are recognized as major amino acid inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system, their storage is poorly understood. In this study the authors have characterized vesicular GABA and glycine uptakes in the cerebrum and spinal cord, respectively. They present evidence that GABA and glycine are each taken up into isolated synaptic vesicles in an ATP-dependent manner and that the uptake is driven by an electrochemical proton gradient. Uptake for both amino acids exhibited kinetics with low affinity similar to a vesicular glutamate uptake. The ATP-dependent GABA uptake was not inhibited by the putative amino acid neurotransmitters glycine, taurine, glutamate, or aspartate or by GABA analogs, agonists, and antagonists. Similarly, ATP-dependent glycine uptake was hardly affected by GABA, taurine, glutamate, or aspartate or by glycine analogs or antagonists. The GABA uptake was not affected by chloride, which is in contrast to the uptake of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, whereas the glycine uptake was slightly stimulated by low concentrations of chloride. Tissue distribution studies indicate that the vesicular uptake systems for GABA, glycine, and glutamate are distributed in different proportions in the cerebrum and spinal cord. These results suggest that the vesicular uptake systems for GABA, glycine, and glutamate are distinct from each other.

  3. Eicosapentaenoic and dihomo gamma linolenic acid metabolism by cultured rat mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Scharschmidt, L.A.; Gibbons, N.B.; Neuwirth, R.

    1989-01-01

    To better understand the effects of dietary fatty acid manipulations on glomerular function, we compared mesangial incorporation, release, and metabolism of arachidonic (AA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and dihomo gamma linolenic (DHG) acids. We found marked differences in mesangial handling of these fatty acids. AA was incorporated into lipids of mesangial cells much more rapidly than EPA or DHG. Ionophore-induced stimulation of fatty acid release from mesangial cells prelabeled with (/sup 14/C)AA, (/sup 14/C)EPA, or (/sup 14/C)DHG caused a release of labeled AA greater than DHG much less than EPA, respectively. Preloading mesangial cells with DHG or EPA for 24 h reduced subsequent basal, ionophore-, and hormone-stimulated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis. Finally, unlike AA, neither EPA nor DHG was converted to a significant extent by mesangial cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase. Thus the mesangial metabolism of DHG and EPA differs both quantitatively and qualitatively from that of AA. Furthermore, EPA and DHG inhibit metabolism of AA at the level of mesangial cyclooxygenase.

  4. Synthesis of a novel acrylated abietic acid-g-bacterial cellulose hydrogel by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Abeer, Muhammad Mustafa; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd; Lazim, Azwan Mat; Pandey, Manisha; Martin, Claire

    2014-09-22

    Acrylated abietic acid (acrylated AbA) and acrylated abietic acid-grafted bacterial cellulose pH sensitive hydrogel (acrylated AbA-g-BC) were prepared by a one-pot synthesis. The successful dimerization of acrylic acid (AA) and abietic acid (AbA) and grafting of the dimer onto bacterial cellulose (BC) was confirmed by 13C solid state NMR as well as FT-IR. X-ray diffraction analysis showed characteristic peaks for AbA and BC; further, there was no effect of increasing amorphous AA content on the overall crystallinity of the hydrogel. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed a glass transition temperature of 80°C. Gel fraction and swelling studies gave insight into the features of the hydrogel, suggesting that it was suitable for future applications such as drug delivery. Scanning electron microscopy observations showed an interesting interpenetrating network within the walls of hydrogel samples with the lowest levels of AA and gamma radiation doses. Cell viability test revealed that the synthesized hydrogel is safe for future use in biomedical applications.

  5. Modulation of the release of norepinephrine by gamma-aminobutyric acid and morphine in the frontal cerebral cortex of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Peoples, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Agents that enhance gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA, neurotransmission modulate certain effects of opioids, such as analgesia. Opioid analgesia is mediated in part by norepinephrine in the forebrain. In this study, the interactions between morphine and GABAergic agents on release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine from rat frontal cerebral cortical slices were examined. GABA, 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}-10{sup {minus}3} M, enhanced potassium stimulated ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine release and reversed the inhibitory effect of morphine in a noncompetitive manner. GABA did not enhance release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine stimulated by the calcium ionophore A23187. The effect of GABA was reduced by the GABA{sub A} receptor antagonists bicuculline methiodide or picrotoxin, and by the selective inhibitor of GABA uptake SKF 89976A, but was blocked completely only when bicuculline methiodide and SKF 89976A were used in combination. The GABA{sub A} agonist muscimol, 10{sup {minus}4} M, mimicked the effect of GABA, but the GABA{sub B} agonist ({plus minus})baclofen, 10{sup {minus}4} M, did not affect the release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine in the absence or the presence of morphine. Thus GABA appears to produce this effect by stimulating GABA uptake and GABA{sub A}, but not GABA{sub B}, receptors. In contrast to the results that would be predicted for an event involving GABA{sub A} receptors, however, the effect of GABA did not desensitize, and benzodiazepine agonists did not enhance the effect of GABA at any concentration tested between 10{sup {minus}8} and 10{sup {minus}4} M. Thus these receptors may constitute a subclass of GABA{sub A} receptors. These results support a role of GABA uptake and GABA{sub A} receptors in enhancing the release of norepinephrine and modulating its inhibition by opioids in the frontal cortex of the rat.

  6. Hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma: sinusal/sinusoidal localization of malignant cells expressing the T-cell receptor gamma delta.

    PubMed

    Farcet, J P; Gaulard, P; Marolleau, J P; Le Couedic, J P; Henni, T; Gourdin, M F; Divine, M; Haioun, C; Zafrani, S; Goossens, M

    1990-06-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas consist of a clinically heterogeneous group of malignant disorders whose immunophenotype usually corresponds to that of normal mature T cells. We describe and correlate the clinical, histopathologic, phenotypic, and genotypic findings in two patients with malignant lymphoma presenting with hepatosplenic disease. The morphologic pattern of lymphoma was that of a sinusal/sinusoidal infiltration in spleen, marrow, and liver. This morphologic characteristic was associated with the presence of a productive clonal rearrangement of the T-cell receptor (TCR) delta gene. Lymphoma cells expressed a CD3-TCR-gamma delta- phenotype. They were also double negative (ie, CD4-CD8-) and lacked the CD5 and CD7 antigens. In one patient, tumor progression was associated with phenotypic changes that resulted in a CD3-TCR-gamma delta- phenotype with the same delta-gene rearrangement as initially. These observations suggest the existence of a new type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma characterized by its hepatosplenic presentation, and by the sinusal/sinusoidal tropism and the TCR-gamma delta phenotype of the malignant cells. PMID:2140703

  7. Gamma Peptide Nucleic Acids: As Orthogonal Nucleic Acid Recognition Codes for Organizing Molecular Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Sacui, Iulia; Hsieh, Wei-Che; Manna, Arunava; Sahu, Bichismita; Ly, Danith H

    2015-07-01

    Nucleic acids are an attractive platform for organizing molecular self-assembly because of their specific nucleobase interactions and defined length scale. Routinely employed in the organization and assembly of materials in vitro, however, they have rarely been exploited in vivo, due to the concerns for enzymatic degradation and cross-hybridization with the host's genetic materials. Herein we report the development of a tight-binding, orthogonal, synthetically versatile, and informationally interfaced nucleic acid platform for programming molecular interactions, with implications for in vivo molecular assembly and computing. The system consists of three molecular entities: the right-handed and left-handed conformers and a nonhelical domain. The first two are orthogonal to each other in recognition, while the third is capable of binding to both, providing a means for interfacing the two conformers as well as the natural nucleic acid biopolymers (i.e., DNA and RNA). The three molecular entities are prepared from the same monomeric chemical scaffold, with the exception of the stereochemistry or lack thereof at the γ-backbone that determines if the corresponding oligo adopts a right-handed or left-handed helix, or a nonhelical motif. These conformers hybridize to each other with exquisite affinity, sequence selectivity, and level of orthogonality. Recognition modules as short as five nucleotides in length are capable of organizing molecular assembly.

  8. Gamma-linolenic acid in borage oil reverses epidermal hyperproliferation in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Chung, S; Kong, S; Seong, K; Cho, Y

    2002-10-01

    As dietary sources of gamma-linolenic acid [GLA; 18:3(n-6)], borage oil (BO; 24-25 g/100 g GLA) and evening primrose oil (PO; 8-10 g/100 g GLA) are efficacious in treating skin disorders. The triglycerol stereospecificity of these oils is distinct, with GLA being concentrated in the sn-2 position of BO and in the sn-3 position of PO. To determine whether the absolute level and/or the triglycerol stereospecificity of GLA in oils affect biological efficacy, epidermal hyperproliferation was induced in guinea pigs by a hydrogenated coconut oil (HCO) diet for 8 wk. Subsequently, guinea pigs were fed diets of PO, BO or a mixture of BO and safflower oil (SO) for 2 wk. The mixture of BO and SO (BS) diet had a similar level of GLA as PO but with sn-2 stereospecificity. As controls, two groups were fed SO and HCO for 10 wk. Epidermal hyperproliferation was reversed by all three oils in the order of BO > BS > PO. However, proliferation scores of group PO were higher than of the normal control group, SO. The accumulations of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid [DGLA; 20:3(n-6)], an elongase product of GLA, into phospholipids and ceramides, of 15-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (15-HETrE), the potent antiproliferative metabolite of DGLA, and of ceramides, the major lipid maintaining epidermal barrier, in the epidermis of group BO were greater than of groups BS and PO. Group BS had higher levels of DGLA, 15-HETrE and ceramides than group PO. With primary dependence on absolute levels, our data demonstrate that the antiproliferative efficacy of GLA in the epidermis is preferably exerted from sn-2 stereospecificity of GLA in BO. PMID:12368400

  9. Gamma-linolenic acid in borage oil reverses epidermal hyperproliferation in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Chung, S; Kong, S; Seong, K; Cho, Y

    2002-10-01

    As dietary sources of gamma-linolenic acid [GLA; 18:3(n-6)], borage oil (BO; 24-25 g/100 g GLA) and evening primrose oil (PO; 8-10 g/100 g GLA) are efficacious in treating skin disorders. The triglycerol stereospecificity of these oils is distinct, with GLA being concentrated in the sn-2 position of BO and in the sn-3 position of PO. To determine whether the absolute level and/or the triglycerol stereospecificity of GLA in oils affect biological efficacy, epidermal hyperproliferation was induced in guinea pigs by a hydrogenated coconut oil (HCO) diet for 8 wk. Subsequently, guinea pigs were fed diets of PO, BO or a mixture of BO and safflower oil (SO) for 2 wk. The mixture of BO and SO (BS) diet had a similar level of GLA as PO but with sn-2 stereospecificity. As controls, two groups were fed SO and HCO for 10 wk. Epidermal hyperproliferation was reversed by all three oils in the order of BO > BS > PO. However, proliferation scores of group PO were higher than of the normal control group, SO. The accumulations of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid [DGLA; 20:3(n-6)], an elongase product of GLA, into phospholipids and ceramides, of 15-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (15-HETrE), the potent antiproliferative metabolite of DGLA, and of ceramides, the major lipid maintaining epidermal barrier, in the epidermis of group BO were greater than of groups BS and PO. Group BS had higher levels of DGLA, 15-HETrE and ceramides than group PO. With primary dependence on absolute levels, our data demonstrate that the antiproliferative efficacy of GLA in the epidermis is preferably exerted from sn-2 stereospecificity of GLA in BO.

  10. Data for amino acid alignment of Japanese stingray melanocortin receptors with other gnathostome melanocortin receptor sequences, and the ligand selectivity of Japanese stingray melanocortin receptors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Davis, Perry; Reinick, Christina; Mizusawa, Kanta; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Dores, Robert M

    2016-06-01

    This article contains structure and pharmacological characteristics of melanocortin receptors (MCRs) related to research published in "Characterization of melanocortin receptors from stingray Dasyatis akajei, a cartilaginous fish" (Takahashi et al., 2016) [1]. The amino acid sequences of the stingray, D. akajei, MC1R, MC2R, MC3R, MC4R, and MC5R were aligned with the corresponding melanocortin receptor sequences from the elephant shark, Callorhinchus milii, the dogfish, Squalus acanthias, the goldfish, Carassius auratus, and the mouse, Mus musculus. These alignments provide the basis for phylogenetic analysis of these gnathostome melanocortin receptor sequences. In addition, the Japanese stingray melanocortin receptors were separately expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, and stimulated with stingray ACTH, α-MSH, β-MSH, γ-MSH, δ-MSH, and β-endorphin. The dose response curves reveal the order of ligand selectivity for each stingray MCR. PMID:27408924

  11. Improved enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw by combined use of gamma ray and dilute acid for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun Hong, Sung; Taek Lee, Jae; Lee, Sungbeom; Gon Wi, Seung; Ju Cho, Eun; Singh, Sudhir; Sik Lee, Seung; Yeoup Chung, Byung

    2014-01-01

    Pretreating wheat straw with a combination of dilute acid and gamma irradiation was performed in an attempt to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis for bioethanol production. The glucose yield was significantly affected by combined pretreatment (3% sulfuric acid-gamma irradiation), compared with untreated wheat straw and individual pretreatment. The increasing enzymatic hydrolysis after combined pretreatment is resulting from decrease in crystallinity of cellulose, loss of hemicelluloses, and removal or modification of lignin. Therefore, combined pretreatment is one of the most effective methods for enhancing the enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw biomass.

  12. Hepatic handling of a synthetic gamma-labeled bile acid (/sup 75/SeHCAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Galatola, G.; Jazrawi, R.P.; Bridges, C.; Joseph, A.E.; Northfield, T.C.

    1988-03-01

    /sup 75/Se-homocholic acid-taurine (/sup 75/SeHCAT) is the first available gamma-labeled bile acid, and should therefore be handled more efficiently and specifically by the liver than previous hepatoscintigraphic agents. We have measured serum and hepatic kinetics for /sup 75/SeHCAT, and compared them with those for the conventional hepatobiliary scintigraphic agent 99mTc-hepatoiminodiacetic acid, and with serum kinetics for the corresponding natural bile acid, (/sup 14/C)cholic acid-taurine. We used a dynamic scintigraphic technique and serial blood sampling in 8 subjects. Initial hepatic uptake rate was identical to initial serum disappearance rate (14% dose/min) for /sup 75/SeHCAT, but significantly lower for 99mTc-hepatoiminodiacetic acid (6% vs. 14% dose/min, p less than 0.001). Hepatic transit time was shorter for /sup 75/SeHCAT (13 min vs. 22 min, p less than 0.02), net hepatic excretory rate was more rapid (1.4% vs. 0.8% dose/min, p less than 0.001), and urinary excretion was lower (1.0% vs. 9.0% dose, p less than 0.001). Initial and late-plasma disappearance rates were significantly lower for /sup 75/SeHCAT (14.3% and 1.5% dose/min) than for (/sup 14/C)cholic acid-taurine (21.3% and 2.8% dose/min, respectively), and plasma clearance was also lower (2/sup 75/ vs. 670 ml/min). In vitro, /sup 75/SeHCAT was bound to serum proteins more completely than (/sup 14/C)cholic acid-taurine (90.4% vs. 86.5%, p less than 0.005). We conclude that /sup 75/SeHCAT provides a hepatoscintigraphic agent that is handled more efficiently and specifically by the liver than the conventionally used agent 99mTc-hepatoiminodiacetic acid. It is not cleared from the serum as rapidly as (/sup 14/C)cholic acid-taurine, probably due to its stronger protein binding. The clinical value of /sup 75/SeHCAT in assessing liver disease should be investigated.

  13. T cell receptor gamma gene status of human alpha/beta+ and gamma/delta+ T cell clones: absence of V9JP rearrangements in alpha/beta+ clones is not a result of a lack of rearrangements involving more 5' J gamma segments.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E

    1989-11-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) gamma gene rearrangements were examined in panels of human T cell clones expressing TCR alpha/beta or gamma/delta heterodimers. Over half of the alpha/beta+ clones had both chromosomes rearranged to C gamma 2 but this was the case for only 20% of the gamma/delta+ clones. While more than half of the gamma/delta+ clones showed a V9JP rearrangement, this configuration was absent from all 49 alpha/beta+ clones analysed. However, this was not a result of all rearrangements being to the more 3' J gamma genes as 11 alpha/beta+ clones had rearrangement(s) to JP1, the most 5' J gamma gene segment. Both alpha/beta+ and gamma/delta+ clones showed a similar pattern of V gamma gene usage in rearrangements to J gamma 1 or J gamma 2 with a lower proportion of the more 3' genes being rearranged to J gamma 2 than for the more 5' genes. Several alpha/beta+ and several gamma/delta+ clones had noncoordinate patterns of rearrangement involving both C gamma 1 and C gamma 2. Eleven out of fourteen CD8+ clones tested had both chromosomes rearranged to C gamma 2 whereas all clones derived from CD4-8- cells and having unconventional phenotypes (CD4-8- or CD4+8+) had at least one C gamma 1 rearrangement. Twelve out of twenty-seven CD4+ clones also had this pattern, suggesting that CD4-8+ clones had a tendency to utilize more 3' J gamma gene segments than CD4+ clones. There was some evidence for interdonor variation in the proportions of TCR gamma rearrangements to C gamma 1 or C gamma 2 in alpha/beta+ clones as well as gamma/delta+ clones. The results illustrate the unique nature of the V9JP rearrangement in gamma/delta+ clones and the possible use of a sequential mechanism of TCR gamma gene rearrangements during T cell differentiation is discussed.

  14. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the catalytic domain of human receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase [gamma] in three different crystal forms

    SciTech Connect

    Kish, Kevin; McDonnell, Patricia A.; Goldfarb, Valentina; Gao, Mian; Metzler, William J.; Langley, David R.; Bryson, James W.; Kiefer, Susan E.; Carpenter, Brian; Kostich, Walter A.; Westphal, Ryan S.; Sheriff, Steven

    2013-03-07

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase {gamma} is a membrane-bound receptor and is designated RPTP{gamma}. RPTP{gamma} and two mutants, RPTP{gamma}(V948I, S970T) and RPTP{gamma}(C858S, S970T), were recombinantly expressed and purified for X-ray crystallographic studies. The purified enzymes were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. Crystallographic data were obtained from several different crystal forms in the absence and the presence of inhibitor. In this paper, a description is given of how three different crystal forms were obtained that were used with various ligands. An orthorhombic crystal form and a trigonal crystal form were obtained both with and without ligand, and a monoclinic crystal form was only obtained in the presence of a particularly elaborated inhibitor.

  15. Nuclear retinoic acid receptors: conductors of the retinoic acid symphony during development.

    PubMed

    Samarut, Eric; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2012-01-30

    The vitamin A derivative, retinoic acid (RA), is essential for embryonic development through the activation of cognate nuclear receptors, RARs, which work as ligand dependent regulators of transcription. In vitro studies revealed how RARs control gene expression at the molecular level and now it appears that it is fine-tuned by a phosphorylation code. In addition, several genetic approaches provided valuable insights on the functions of RARs during development and on the influence of other actors such as the enzymes involved in RA synthesis and degradation and other signaling pathways. It appears that RARs are the conductors of the RA signaling symphony through controlling the dynamics and the coordination of the different players and development steps.

  16. Preferential pi-pi complexation between tamoxifen and borage oil/gamma linolenic acid: transcutaneous delivery and NMR spectral modulation.

    PubMed

    Heard, Charles M; Gallagher, Simon J; Congiatu, Costantino; Harwood, John; Thomas, Christopher P; McGuigan, Christopher; Nemcová, Marta; Nouskova, Tereza

    2005-09-30

    The effect of different proportions of borage oil on the in vitro transcutaneous delivery of tamoxifen were studied, with the aim of developing a gel capable of the simultaneous delivery of tamoxifen and gamma linolenic acid across (breast) skin. Supplementary work probed 1H NMR spectral data for tamoxifen in the presence of different proportions of polyunsaturated or unsaturated fatty acids. Typical, non-aqueous gels were modified to contain 1% tamoxifen and three levels of borage oil ( approximately 25% gamma linolenic acid) and the transcutaneous delivery of both tamoxifen and GLA across full thickness skin determined in vitro. Both tamoxifen and gamma linolenic acid permeated the skin with the ratio of moles being consistent at approximately 4:1. This was irrespective of time, amount of borage oil contained in the formulation (above a minimum) and the presence of other (unsaturated) excipients: mineral oil, Miglyiol 810N, white soft paraffin, PEG400 and Cabosil M5. Dose-dependent downfield shifts of tamoxifen aromatic protons were observed in the presence of borage oil and linolenic acid (gamma and alpha), but not saturated triacyl glycerol. The permeation data suggested vehicular complexation between tamoxifen and polyunsaturated constituents of borage oil and that such complexes permeated the skin intact. The 1H NMR data supported the hypothesis that such complexation was a consequence of preferential pi-pi orbital interactions between the phenyl groups of tamoxifen and the multiple double bonds of GLA. The mechanism for the permeation of intact complexes across skin remains to be elucidated.

  17. Crystal structure of FAS thioesterase domain with polyunsaturated fatty acyl adduct and inhibition by dihomo-[gamma]-linolenic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Chakravarty, Bornali; Zheng, Fei; Gu, Ziwei; Wu, Hongmei; Mao, Jianqiang; Wakil, Salih J.; Quiocho, Florante A.

    2012-05-29

    Human fatty acid synthase (hFAS) is a homodimeric multidomain enzyme that catalyzes a series of reactions leading to the de novo biosynthesis of long-chain fatty acids, mainly palmitate. The carboxy-terminal thioesterase (TE) domain determines the length of the fatty acyl chain and its ultimate release by hydrolysis. Because of the upregulation of hFAS in a variety of cancers, it is a target for antiproliferative agent development. Dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been known to confer beneficial effects on many diseases and health conditions, including cancers, inflammations, diabetes, and heart diseases, but the precise molecular mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. We report the crystal structure of the hFAS TE domain covalently modified and inactivated by methyl {gamma}-linolenylfluorophosphonate. Whereas the structure confirmed the phosphorylation by the phosphonate head group of the active site serine, it also unexpectedly revealed the binding of the 18-carbon polyunsaturated {gamma}-linolenyl tail in a long groove-tunnel site, which itself is formed mainly by the emergence of an {alpha} helix (the 'helix flap'). We then found inhibition of the TE domain activity by the PUFA dihomo-{gamma}-linolenic acid; {gamma}- and {alpha}-linolenic acids, two popular dietary PUFAs, were less effective. Dihomo-{gamma}-linolenic acid also inhibited fatty acid biosynthesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and selective human breast cancer cell lines, including SKBR3 and MDAMB231. In addition to revealing a novel mechanism for the molecular recognition of a polyunsaturated fatty acyl chain, our results offer a new framework for developing potent FAS inhibitors as therapeutics against cancers and other diseases.

  18. Castor oil induces laxation and uterus contraction via ricinoleic acid activating prostaglandin EP3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Tunaru, Sorin; Althoff, Till F; Nüsing, Rolf M; Diener, Martin; Offermanns, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Castor oil is one of the oldest drugs. When given orally, it has a laxative effect and induces labor in pregnant females. The effects of castor oil are mediated by ricinoleic acid, a hydroxylated fatty acid released from castor oil by intestinal lipases. Despite the wide-spread use of castor oil in conventional and folk medicine, the molecular mechanism by which ricinoleic acid acts remains unknown. Here we show that the EP(3) prostanoid receptor is specifically activated by ricinoleic acid and that it mediates the pharmacological effects of castor oil. In mice lacking EP(3) receptors, the laxative effect and the uterus contraction induced via ricinoleic acid are absent. Although a conditional deletion of the EP(3) receptor gene in intestinal epithelial cells did not affect castor oil-induced diarrhea, mice lacking EP(3) receptors only in smooth-muscle cells were unresponsive to this drug. Thus, the castor oil metabolite ricinoleic acid activates intestinal and uterine smooth-muscle cells via EP(3) prostanoid receptors. These findings identify the cellular and molecular mechanism underlying the pharmacological effects of castor oil and indicate a role of the EP(3) receptor as a target to induce laxative effects.

  19. Degradation of cyanidin-3-rutinoside and formation of protocatechuic acid methyl ester in methanol solution by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Sik; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Eun Mi; Lee, Min Hee; Lee, Ha Yeong; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2014-08-01

    Anthocyanins are naturally occurring phenolic compounds having broad biological activities including anti-mutagenesis and anti-carcinogenesis. We studied the effects and the degradation mechanisms of the most common type of anthocyanins, cyanidin-3-rutinoside (cya-3-rut), by using gamma ray. Cya-3-rut in methanol (1mg/ml) was exposed to gamma-rays from 1 to 10kGy. We found that the reddish colour of cya-3-rut in methanol disappeared gradually in a dose-dependent manner and effectively disappeared (>97%) at 10kGy of gamma ray. Concomitantly, a new phenolic compound was generated and identified as a protocatechuic acid methyl ester by liquid chromatography, (1)H, and (13)C NMR. The formation of protocatechuic acid methyl ester increased with increasing irradiation and the amount of protocatechuic acid methyl ester formed by decomposition of cya-3-rut (20μg) at 10kGy of gamma ray was 1.95μg. In addition, the radical-scavenging activities were not affected by gamma irradiation. PMID:24629974

  20. Polyaniline/poly acid acrylic thin film composites: a new gamma radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lima Pacheco, Ana P.; Araujo, Elmo S.; Azevedo, Walter M. de

    2003-03-15

    In this paper, we present a new and straightforward route to prepare polyaniline/poly acid acrylic (PAA) thin film composites in large areas and on almost any surface. This method was developed to improve the mechanical and adherence properties of polyaniline devices used as ionization radiation sensors. The route consists of the combination of the metal oxidant with polymer acid to form a highly homogeneous and viscous paste, which can be easily spread over any surface. In the second step, an aniline acid solution is brought in contact with the dried paste where polymerization occurs, yielding a high homogeneous and conducting polymer composite. The UV-visible absorption and infrared analysis confirm that a polyaniline/PAA complex is obtained. The four-point conductivity measurements show that the composite conductivity {rho} is the order of 5 {omega}{sup -1} cm{sup -1}. Preliminary gamma radiation interaction with the composite shows that the doped composite exhibits a linear response that can be used in the development of real-time radiation sensors for the dose range from 0 to 5000 Gy.

  1. Expression of the alpha/beta and gamma/delta T-cell receptors in 57 cases of peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Identification of a subset of gamma/delta T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Gaulard, P.; Bourquelot, P.; Kanavaros, P.; Haioun, C.; Le Couedic, J. P.; Divine, M.; Goossens, M.; Zafrani, E. S.; Farcet, J. P.; Reyes, F.

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-seven cases of peripheral T-cell lymphoma were studied for cell expression of the T-cell receptor (TCR) chains, using monoclonal antibodies specific for the beta chain (beta F1) of the alpha/beta TCR, and for the delta chain (anti-TCR delta-1) of the gamma/delta TCR. Three different patterns were demonstrated: in 39 cases (69%), the phenotype (CD3+beta F1+TCR delta-1-) was that of most normal T cells. A second pattern was found on six cases (10%), which were of CD3+beta F1-TCR delta-1+ phenotype, and in which DNA analysis showed a clonal rearrangement of the delta locus in the five cases studied. It is suggested that these cases are the neoplastic counterpart of the small subpopulation of normal T cells that express gamma delta receptor. It is of considerable interest that these gamma delta lymphomas had unusual clinicopathologic presentations, as one case corresponded to a lethal midline granuloma and the five others to hepatosplenic lymphomas with a sinusal/sinusoidal infiltration in spleen, marrow, and liver. The fact that the distribution of the neoplastic gamma delta cells in the splenic red pulp resembles that of normal gamma delta cells reinforces the concept of a preferential homing of gamma delta T cells to this tissue. A third pattern (CD3 +/- beta F1-TCR delta-1-) was seen in 12 cases (21%), in which, by contrast to normal post-thymic T cells, no evidence of either alpha beta or gamma delta T cell receptor was found. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1698028

  2. [Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) dependence and the GHB withdrawal syndrome: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    van Noorden, Martijn S; Kamal, Rama; de Jong, Cor A J; Vergouwen, A C M Ton; Zitman, Frans G

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a neurotransmitter that occurs naturally in the brain and is increasingly being used as a 'party drug' because of its relaxing and euphoria-inducing effects. GHB has a limited medical use in the treatment of narcolepsy. GHB-intoxications occur often in non-medical use, and generally result in a coma of short duration. GHB use several times a day can lead to tolerance and dependence. After sudden cessation or reduction of intensive GHB use, a severe withdrawal syndrome may occur with symptoms varying from tremor, anxiety and agitation to autonomic instability, hallucinations and delirium. Treatment of the GHB withdrawal syndrome consists of supportive care and benzodiazepines, often in high doses. The controlled detoxification of GHB using pharmaceutical GHB in an adjusted dose is currently being investigated in the Netherlands. There is no literature concerning the treatment of patients following GHB intoxication or after detoxification.

  3. Effect of diphenylhydantoin on gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and succinate activity in rat Purkinje cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, E; Gabra-Sanders, T

    1977-01-01

    A study has been made of the effect of diphenylhydantoin (DPH) upon the levels of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and succinic dehydrogenase in rat Purkinje cells. DPH was administered over 26 days in chronic experiments using controls receiving the same injection vehicle without DPH. Animals in this group received daily 1.25 mg/kg body weight, 12.5 mg/kg body weight, and 50 mg/kg body weight DPH. Acute experiments were carried out over the course of not more than four days, three groups of animals receiving 75 mg/kg body weight, 87.5 mg/kg body weight, and 100 mg/kg body weight DPH. No effect upon succinic dehydrogenase could be demonstrated at any dose level. There was a significant progressive loss of GABA with increasing dosage of DPH. Images PMID:903771

  4. [The knowledge about gamma-hydroxybutyric acid as by students of Physical Education Academy].

    PubMed

    Chwaluk, Paweł; Chwaluk, Agnieszka; Parnicki, Florian

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid is a substance stealthily used by criminals to facilitate sexual assaults. It is also known as doping agent in sports. Physical Education Academies should prepare their graduates to be educators for young people, their trainers, organizers of sports and recreational events. Second year students of two majors: physical education and tourism and recreation were surveyed by means of questionnaire on "date-rape drug". As much as 320 among 327 students surveyed had heard about "date-rape drug". However their knowledge on it was shallow and unsystematic. None of the surveyed knew that the substance of "date-rape drug" could also be used as a doping agent. Only 31% of respondents were aware of existence of the test to detect "date-rape drug" in drinks. Physical Education Academy students should be thoroughly and relevantly educated on the matter of pharmacologic doping agents and drugs endangerment. PMID:19788135

  5. Neurons and glia in cat superior colliculus accumulate [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    PubMed

    Mize, R R; Spencer, R F; Sterling, P

    1981-11-01

    We have examined by autoradiography the labeling pattern in the cat superior colliculus following injection of tritiated gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Silver grains were heavily distributed within the zonal layer and the upper 200 micrometer of the superficial gray. Fewer grains were observed deeper within the superficial gray, and still fewer were found within the optic and intermediate gray layers. The accumulation of label was restricted to certain classes of neuron and glia. Densely labeled neurons were small (8-12 micrometer in diameter) and located primarily within the upper 200 micrometer. Dark oligodendrocytes and astrocytes showed a moderate accumulation of label while pale oligodendrocytes and microglia were unlabeled. Label was also selectively accumulated over several other types of profile within the neuropil, including presynaptic dendrites, axons, and axon terminals.

  6. Articular-cartilage matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-containing protein. Characterization and immunolocalization.

    PubMed Central

    Loeser, R; Carlson, C S; Tulli, H; Jerome, W G; Miller, L; Wallin, R

    1992-01-01

    Matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla)-containing protein (MGP) was found to be present in articular cartilage by Western-blot analysis of guanidinium chloride extracts of human and bovine cartilage and was further localized by immunohistochemical studies on human and monkey specimens. In newborn articular cartilage MGP was present diffusely throughout the matrix, whereas in growth-plate cartilage it was seen mainly in late hypertrophic and calcifying-zone chondrocytes. In adult articular cartilage MGP was present primarily in chondrocytes and the pericellular matrix. Immunoelectron microscopy studies revealed an association between MGP and vesicular structures with an appearance consistent with matrix vesicles. MGP may be an important regulator of cartilage calcification because of its localization in cartilage and the known affinity of Gla-containing proteins for Ca2+ and hydroxyapatite. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1540125

  7. [Expression of Mortierella isabellina delta6-fatty acid desaturase gene in gamma-linolenic acid production in transgenic tobacco].

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Chun; Liu, Li; Hu, Guo-Wu; Xing, Lai-Jun

    2003-03-01

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, C18:3delta6.9.12) is nutritional and important polyunsaturated fatty acid in human and animal diets. GLA play an important role in hormone regulation and fatty acid metabolization. Furthermore it is also the biological precursor of a group of molecules, including prostaglandins, leukotrienes and thromboxanes. Vast majority of oilseed crops do not produce GLA, but linoleic acid (LA, C18:2delta9.12) as its substrate. GLA is only produced by a small number of oilseed plants such as evening promrose ( Oenotheera spp.), borage (Borago officinalis) and etc. delta6-fatty acid desaturase (D6D) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of GLA. It can convert from linoleic acid to linolenic acid. To produce GLA in tobacco, plant expression vector was first constructed. To facilitate preparation of plant expression constructs, flanking Xba I and Bgl II restriction enzyme sites were added to the coding region of clone pTMICL6 by PCR amplification. pTMICL6 contains delta6-fatty acid desaturase gene cloned from Mortierella isabellina which is an oil-producing fugus. The PCR product was purified and subcloned into the plant expression vector pGA643 to generate the recombinant vector pGAMICL6 which contains the ORF of the D6D gene of Mortierella isabellina, together with regulatory elements consisting of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the nopaline synthase (nos) termination sequence. The plasmid pGAMICL6 was transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404 by method of freeze thawing of liquid nitrogen. Transformants were selected by plating on YEB medium plates containing kanamycin and streptomycin and grown overnight at 28 degrees C, then transformants were further identified by PCR. The positive transformant containing the plant expression vector pGAMICL6 was transformed into tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi) via Agrobacterium infection. Transgenic plants were selected on 100 microg/mL kanamycin. Plants were

  8. Functional RNAi screen targeting cytokine and growth factor receptors reveals oncorequisite role for interleukin-2 gamma receptor in JAK3 mutation-positive leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anupriya; MacKenzie, Ryan J.; Eide, Christopher A.; Davare, Monika A.; Watanabe-Smith, Kevin; Tognon, Cristina E.; Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange; Park, Byung; Braziel, Rita M.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Druker, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the role for cytokine and growth factor receptor-mediated signaling in leukemia pathogenesis we designed a functional RNAi screen targeting 188 cytokine and growth factor receptors that we found highly expressed in primary leukemia specimens. Using this screen we identified interleukin-2 gamma receptor (IL2Rγ) as a critical growth determinant for the JAK3A572V mutation-positive AML cell line. We observed that knockdown of IL2Rγ abrogates phosphorylation of JAK3 and downstream signaling molecules, JAK1, STAT5, MAPK and pS6 ribosomal protein. Overexpression of IL2Rγ in murine cells increased the transforming potential of activating JAK3 mutations, whereas absence of IL2Rγ completely abrogated the clonogenic potential of JAK3A572V as well as the transforming potential of additional JAK3 activating mutations such as JAK3M511I. In addition, mutation at the IL2Rγ interaction site in the FERM domain of JAK3 (Y100C) completely abrogated JAK3-mediated leukemic transformation. Mechanistically, we found IL2Rγ contributes to constitutive JAK3 mutant signaling by increasing JAK3 expression and phosphorylation. Conversely, we found that mutant but not wild type JAK3 increased the expression of IL2Rγ, indicating IL2Rγ and JAK3 contribute to constitutive JAK/STAT signaling through their reciprocal regulation. Overall we demonstrate a novel role for IL2Rγ in potentiating oncogenesis in the setting of JAK3-mutation positive leukemia. Additionally, our study highlights an RNAi-based functional assay that can be used to facilitate the identification of non-kinase cytokine and growth factor receptor targets for inhibiting leukemic cell growth. PMID:25109334

  9. (+/-)-1-Tetralone-3-carboxylic acid and (+/-)-1-tetralone-2-acetic acid: hydrogen bonding in two gamma-keto acids.

    PubMed

    Barcon, A; Brunskill, A P; Lalancette, R A; Thompson, H W; Miller, A J

    2001-03-01

    The crystal structure of (+/-)-4-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-2-carboxylic acid (C(11)H(10)O(3)) involves projection of the carboxyl group nearly orthogonal to the aromatic plane and hydrogen bonding of the acid groups by centrosymmetric pairing across the a edge and the center of the chosen cell [O...O = 2.705 (2) A]. Intermolecular C--H...O==C close contacts to translationally related molecules are found for both the ketone (2.55 A) and the acid (2.67 A). In (+/-)-1-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-2-acetic acid (C(12)H(12)O(3)), the aggregation involves centrosymmetric carboxyl dimers mutually hydrogen bonded across the bc face and the a edge of the chosen cell [O...O = 2.674 (2) A]. A 2.60 A close C--H...O==C contact is found to the carboxyl group of centrosymmetrically related molecule. PMID:11250596

  10. Isolation and characterization of a gamma-aminobutyric acid producing strain Lactobacillus buchneri WPZ001 that could efficiently utilize xylose and corncob hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Anqi; Hu, Xiaoqing; Pan, Lu; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-04-01

    Lactobacillus buchneri strain WPZ001 that could efficiently produce gamma-aminobutyric acid was isolated from Chinese fermented sausages. Optimal cultivation conditions for gamma-aminobutyric acid production in L. buchneri WPZ001 were determined, and xylose was found to be the best carbon source. Using xylose as the sole carbon source, 70 g/L gamma-aminobutyric acid was produced by flask fermentation of L. buchneri WPZ001 for 48 h, and the harvested cells could continue to convert monosodium glutamate to gamma-aminobutyric acid in buffer and produce 59 g gamma-aminobutyric acid after eight runs of biotransformation; the total yield of gamma-aminobutyric acid reached 129 g/L. This combination strategy also worked well when the low-cost corncob hydrolysate was used as the sole carbon source, and the yield of gamma-aminobutyric acid reached 117 g/L. The results indicate that L. buchneri WPZ001 has great potential for industrial production of gamma-aminobutyric acid. PMID:25524701

  11. Non-neuronal release of gamma-aminobutyric Acid by embryonic pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Teng, Lin; Tang, Ya-Bin; Sun, Fan; An, Shi-Min; Zhang, Chun; Yang, Xin-Jie; Lv, Hao-Yu; Lu, Qin; Cui, Yong-Yao; Hu, Jin-Jia; Zhu, Liang; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2013-11-15

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the principle inhibitory transmitter in the mature central nervous system, is also involved in activities outside the nervous system. Recent studies have shown that functional GABA receptors are expressed in embryonic stem (ES) cells and these receptors control ES cell proliferation. However, it is not clear whether ES cells have their own GABAergic transmission output machinery that can fulfill GABA release or whether the cells merely process the GABA receptors by receiving and responding to the diffused GABA released elsewhere. To get further insight into this unresolved problem, we detected the repertoire of components for GABA synthesis, storage, reaction, and termination in ES and embryonal carcinoma stem cells by biological assays, and then directly quantified released GABA in the intercellular milieu from these pluripotent stem (PS) cells by an analytical chemical assay based on high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). We found that embryonic PS cells processed a GABAergic circuit machinery and spontaneously released GABA, which suggests the potential that embryonic PS cells could autonomously establish a GABA niche via release of the transmitter.

  12. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor. PMID:26821052

  13. γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is not an agonist of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Connelly, William M; Errington, Adam C; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound and a drug used clinically to treat the symptoms of narcolepsy. GHB is known to be an agonist of GABAB receptors with millimolar affinity, but also binds with much higher affinity to another site, known as the GHB receptor. While a body of evidence has shown that GHB does not bind to GABAA receptors widely, recent evidence has suggested that the GHB receptor is in fact on extrasynaptic α4β1δ GABAA receptors, where GHB acts as an agonist with an EC50 of 140 nM. We investigated three neuronal cell types that express a tonic GABAA receptor current mediated by extrasynaptic receptors: ventrobasal (VB) thalamic neurons, dentate gyrus granule cells and striatal medium spiny neurons. Using whole-cell voltage clamp in brain slices, we found no evidence that GHB (10 µM) induced any GABAA receptor mediated current in these cell types, nor that it modulated inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, a high concentration of GHB (3 mM) was able to produce a GABAB receptor mediated current, but did not induce any other currents. These results suggest either that GHB is not a high affinity agonist at native α4β1δ receptors, or that these receptors do not exist in classical areas associated with extrasynaptic currents.

  14. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus curieae CCTCC M 2011381T, a Novel Producer of Gamma-aminobutyric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Yu; Lang, Chong; Wei, Dongzhi; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus curieae CCTCC M 2011381T is a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus and a gamma-aminobutyric acid producer that was isolated from stinky tofu brine. Here, we present a 2.19-Mb assembly of its genome, which may provide further insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying its beneficial properties. PMID:26021929

  15. Enterohepatic circulation in man of a gamma-emitting bile-acid conjugate, 23-selena-25-homotaurocholic acid (SeHCAT).

    PubMed

    Merrick, M V; Eastwood, M A; Anderson, J R; Ross, H M

    1982-02-01

    A conjugated bile acid, 23-selena-25-homotaurocholic acid (SeHCAT), labeled with the gamma emitter Se-75, has been evaluated in man. Absorption and excretion were compared with that of simultaneously administered [23-14C]cholic acid. SeHCAT is absorbed quantitatively following oral administration, secreted into the bile at the same rate as cholic acid, reabsorbed from the small intestine, and resecreted. It is not absorbed when the terminal ileum has been excised or bypassed. SeHCAT is therefore the first of a new class of radiopharmaceuticals, namely, gamma-emitting tracers of the complete cycle of the enterohepatic circulation. Its use will simplify investigation of the functional state of the terminal ileum by eliminating the need to collect and process feces.

  16. Enterohepatic circulation in man of a gamma-emitting bile-acid conjugate, 23-selena-25-homotaurocholic acid (SeHCAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, M.V.; Eastwood, M.A.; Anderson, J.R.; Ross, H.M.

    1982-02-01

    A conjugated bile acid, 23-selena-25-homotaurocholic acid (SeHCAT), labeled with the gamma emitter Se-75, has been evaluated in man. Absorption and excretion were compared with that of simultaneously administered (23-14C)cholic acid. SeHCAT is absorbed quantitatively following oral administration, secreted into the bile at the same rate as cholic acid, reabsorbed from the small intestine, and resecreted. It is not absorbed when the terminal ileum has been excised or bypassed. SeHCAT is therefore the first of a new class of radiopharmaceuticals, namely, gamma-emitting tracers of the complete cycle of the enterohepatic circulation. Its use will simplify investigation of the functional state of the terminal ileum by eliminating the need to collect and process feces.

  17. Enterohepatic circulation in man of a gamma-emitting bile-acid conjugate, 23-selena-25-homotaurocholic acid (SeHCAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, M.V.; Eastwood, M.A.; Anderson, J.R.; Ross, H.M.

    1982-02-01

    A conjugated bile acid, 23-selena-25-homotaurocholic acid (SeHCAT), labeled with the gamma emitter Se-75, has been evaluated in man. Absorption and excretion were compared with that of simultaneously administered (23-/sup 14/C)cholic acid. SeHCAT is absorbed quantitatively following oral administration, secreted into the bile at the same rate as cholic acid, reabsorbed from the small intestine, and resecreted. It is not absorbed when the terminal ileum has been excised or bypassed. SeHCAT is therefore the first of a new class of radiopharmaceuticals, namely, gamma-emitting tracers of the complete cycle of the enterohepatic circulation. Its use will simplify investigation of the functional state of the terminal ileum by eliminating the need to collect and process feces.

  18. Expression and localization of the omega-3 fatty acid receptor GPR120 in human term placenta.

    PubMed

    Lager, S; Ramirez, V I; Gaccioli, F; Jansson, T; Powell, T L

    2014-07-01

    Fatty acids can function as signaling molecules, acting through receptors in the cytosol or on the cell surface. G-Protein Receptor (GPR)120 is a membrane-bound receptor mediating anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing effects of the omega-3 fatty acid docohexaenoic acid (DHA). GPR120 dysfunction is associated with obesity in humans. Cellular localization of GPR120 and the influence of maternal obesity on GPR120 protein expression in the placenta are unknown. Herein we demonstrate that GPR120 is predominantly expressed in the microvillous membrane (MVM) of human placenta and that the expression level of this receptor in MVM is not altered by maternal body mass index (BMI).

  19. Triggering of Toll-like receptors modulates IFN-gamma signaling: involvement of serine 727 STAT1 phosphorylation and suppressors of cytokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Dalpke, Alexander H; Eckerle, Susan; Frey, Markus; Heeg, Klaus

    2003-07-01

    Microbial stimuli activate cells of the innate immune system by triggering Toll-like receptors (TLR). Activation of macrophages and dendritic cells is further enhanced by secondary signals like IFN-gamma. Here we analyzed the interplay of IFN-gamma and TLR signaling in cells of the innate immune system. Using a STAT1-dependent reporter construct we show that IFN-gamma signaling can be enhanced as well as inhibited by simultaneous stimulation with either defined TLR agonists or whole-bacterial lysates. Short costimulation resulted in the amplification of IFN-gamma signaling and was attributable to the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)1 on serine 727. In contrast, prolonged co-incubation as well as pre-incubation with TLR agonists led to an inhibition of IFN-gamma signaling. TLR triggering induced expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1, SOCS-3 and cytokine-inducible SH2 domain-containing protein (CIS). Overexpression of SOCS-1 and, to a lesser extend, of SOCS-3 and CIS inhibited IFN-gamma signaling as measured by activation of STAT1. Moreover, pre-incubation with TLR-dependent stimuli impaired IFN-gamma-induced MHC class II regulation but enhanced CD40 and CD86 expression. Taken together, the results indicate a tight interplay between TLR and IFN-gamma signaling pathways which involve induction of SOCS proteins and serine phosphorylation of STAT1.

  20. Antagonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} induces cerebellar amyloid-{beta} levels and motor dysfunction in APP/PS1 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Jing; Sun, Bing; Chen, Kui; Fan, Li; Wang, Zhao

    2009-07-03

    Recent evidences show that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) is involved in the modulation of the amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) cascade causing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and treatment with PPAR{gamma} agonists protects against AD pathology. However, the function of PPAR{gamma} steady-state activity in A{beta} cascade and AD pathology remains unclear. In this study, an antagonist of PPAR{gamma}, GW9662, was injected into the fourth ventricle of APP/PS1 transgenic mice to inhibit PPAR{gamma} activity in cerebellum. The results show that inhibition of PPAR{gamma} significantly induced A{beta} levels in cerebellum and caused cerebellar motor dysfunction in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Moreover, GW9662 treatment markedly decreased the cerebellar levels of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), which is responsible for the cellular degradation of A{beta}. Since cerebellum is spared from significant A{beta} accumulation and neurotoxicity in AD patients and animal models, these findings suggest a crucial role of PPAR{gamma} steady-state activity in protection of cerebellum against AD pathology.

  1. The effects of avermectin on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors in the pigeon brain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Jie; Sun, Bao-Hong; Cao, Ye; Yao, Hai-Dong; Qu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Ci; Xu, Shi-Wen; Li, Shu

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of avermectin (AVM) on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors in the pigeon brain. Four groups two-month-old American king pigeons (n=20/group) were fed either a commercial diet or an AVM-supplemented diet (20mg/kg·diet, 40 mg/kg·diet, or 60 mg/kg·diet) for 30, 60, or 90 days. The contents of aspartic acid (ASP), glutamate (GLU), glycine (GLY), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain tissues were determined using ultraviolet high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The expression levels of the GLU and GABA receptor genes were analyzed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results indicate that AVM exposure significantly enhances the contents of GABA, GLY, GLU, and ASP in the cerebrum, cerebellum, and optic lobe. In addition, AVM exposure increases the mRNA expression levels of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR), γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR), N-methyl-d-aspartate 1 receptor (NR1), N-methyl-d-aspartate 2A receptor (NR2A), and N-methyl-d-aspartate 2B receptor (NR2B) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that the most damaged organ was the cerebrum, followed by the cerebellum, and then the optic lobe. These results show that the AVM-induced neurotoxicity may be associated with its effects on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors. The information presented in this study will help supplement the available data for future AVM toxicity studies.

  2. Corticotropin Releasing Factor–Induced Amygdala Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Release Plays a Key Role in Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Marisa; Cruz, Maureen T.; Gilpin, Nicholas W.; Sabino, Valentina; Schweitzer, Paul; Bajo, Michal; Cottone, Pietro; Madamba, Samuel G.; Stouffer, David G.; Zorrilla, Eric P.; Koob, George F.; Siggins, George R.; Parsons, Loren H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic systems in the central amygdala (CeA) are implicated in the high-anxiety, high-drinking profile associated with ethanol dependence. Ethanol augments CeA GABA release in ethanol-naive rats and mice. Methods Using naive and ethanol-dependent rats, we compared electrophysiologic effects and interactions of CRF and ethanol on CeA GABAergic transmission, and we measured GABA dialyzate in CeA after injection of CRF1 antagonists and ethanol. We also compared mRNA expression in CeA for CRF and CRF1 using real-time polymerase chain reaction. We assessed effects of chronic treatment with a CRF1 antagonist on withdrawal-induced increases in alcohol consumption in dependent rats. Results CRF and ethanol augmented CeA GABAergic transmission in naive rats via increased GABA release. Three CRF1 receptor (CRF1) antagonists decreased basal GABAergic responses and abolished ethanol effects. Ethanol-dependent rats exhibited heightened sensitivity to CRF and CRF1 antagonists on CeA GABA release. Intra-CeA CRF1 antagonist administration reversed dependence–related elevations in GABA dialysate and blocked ethanol-induced increases in GABA dialyzate in both dependent and naive rats. Polymerase chain reaction studies indicate increased expression of CRF and CRF1 in CeA of dependent rats. Chronic CRF1 antagonist treatment blocked withdrawal-induced increases in alcohol drinking by dependent rats and tempered moderate increases in alcohol consumption by nondependent rats in intermittent testing. Conclusions These combined findings suggest a key role for specific presynaptic CRF-GABA interactions in CeA in the development and maintenance of ethanol dependence. PMID:20060104

  3. Developmental toxicity of perfluorononanoic acid is dependent on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is one of the predominant perfluoroalkyl acids in the environment and in tissues of humans and wildlife. PFNA strongly activates the mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) in vitro and negatively impacts development ...

  4. REACTIVITY PROFILE OF LIGANDS OF MAMMALIAN RETINOIC ACID RECEPTORS: A PRELIMINARY COREPA ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retinoic acid and associated derivatives comprise a class of endogenous hormones that bind to and activate different families of retinoic acid receptors (RARs, RXRs), and control many aspects of vertebrate development. Identification of potential RAR and RXR ligands is of interes...

  5. Exposure to receptor-activator of NFkappaB ligand renders pre-osteoclasts resistant to IFN-gamma by inducing terminal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Willis; O'Keefe, Regis J; Schwarz, Edward M

    2003-01-01

    While it has been established that IFN-gamma is a strong activator of macrophages and a potent inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis in vitro, it is also known that this cytokine is produced in particular settings of inflammatory bone loss, such as infection and psoriatic arthritis. Because of the different kinetics between rapid IFN-gamma macrophage activation (<24 hours) and the slower receptor-activator of NFkappaB ligand (RANKL) osteoclast differentiation (7 days), we postulated that IFN-gamma would have different effects on early-stage and late-stage osteoclast precursors. In RAW264.7 cells and primary splenocyte cultures, pretreatment with RANKL rendered these cells resistant to maximally anti-osteoclastogenic doses of IFN-gamma. These cells were also resistant to IFN-gamma-induced nitric oxide production, morphological change, and surface upregulation of CD11b and receptor-activator of NFkappaB, suggesting that early exposure of osteoclast precursors to RANKL induces a broad resistance to the cellular effects of IFN-gamma. Changes in STAT1 activation did not correlate with this resistance, as IFN-gamma activated STAT1 equally in both early-stage and late-stage pre-osteoclasts. Furthermore, we failed to observe changes in TRAF6 expression following IFN-gamma treatment in pre-osteoclasts. Together these data support a model of inflammatory bone loss in which early exposure to RANKL can prime osteoclast precursors to form in the presence of high levels of IFN-gamma using mechanisms independent of the signal molecules STAT1 and TRAF6.

  6. Detection of three nonsense mutations and one missense mutation in the interleukin-2 receptor [gamma] chain gene in SCIDX1 that differently affect the mRNA processing

    SciTech Connect

    Markiewicz, S.; Fischer, A.; Saint Basile, G. de ); Subtil, A.; Dautry-Varsat, A. )

    1994-05-01

    The interleukin-2 receptor [gamma] (IL-2R[gamma]) chain gene encodes a 64-kDa protein that not only composes the high-affinity form of the IL-2 binding receptor in association with the 2R [alpha] and [beta] chains, but also participates in at least the IL-4 and IL-7 receptor complexes. Mutations in this gene have recently been shown to cause X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCIDX1). This disease of the immune system results from an early block of T lymphocyte and natural killer (NK) cell differentiation, which leads to a severe cellular and humoral immune defect that is lethal unless treated by bone marrow transplantation. Analysis of the IL-2R[gamma] gene in SCIDX1 patients has revealed the presence of heterogeneous mutations principally located in the extracellular domain of the molecule. We report here three intraexonic mutations and one deletion in the IL-2R[gamma] gene in four SCIDX1 patients. These mutations appear to differentially affect RNA processing, either by decreasing IL-2R[gamma] mRNA level or by the skipping of a constitutive exon. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Amino acid sequence of the alpha subunit of human leukocyte adhesion receptor Mo1 (complement receptor type 3)

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Mo1 (complement receptor type 3, CR3; CD11b/CD18) is an adhesion- promoting human leukocyte surface membrane heterodimer (alpha subunit 155 kD [CD11b] noncovalently linked to a beta subunit of 95 kD [CD18]). The complete amino acid sequence deduced from cDNA of the human alpha subunit is reported. The protein consists of 1,136 amino acids with a long amino-terminal extracytoplasmic domain, a 26-amino acid hydrophobic transmembrane segment, and a 19-carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic domain. The extracytoplasmic region has three putative Ca2+- binding domains with good homology and one with weak homology to the "lock washer" Ca2+-binding consensus sequence. These metal-binding domains explain the divalent cation-dependent functions mediated by Mo1. The alpha subunit is highly homologous to the alpha subunit of leukocyte p150,95 and to a lesser extent, to the alpha subunit of other "integrin" receptors such as fibronectin, vitronectin, and platelet IIb/IIIa receptors in humans and position-specific antigen-2 (PS2) in Drosophila. Mo1 alpha, like p150, contains a unique 187-amino acid stretch NH2-terminal to the metal-binding domains. This region could be involved in some of the specific functions mediated by these leukocyte glycoproteins. PMID:2454931

  8. Peroxisome-proliferator activator receptor-gamma activation decreases attachment of endometrial cells to peritoneal mesothelial cells in an in vitro model of the early endometriotic lesion.

    PubMed

    Kavoussi, S K; Witz, C A; Binkley, P A; Nair, A S; Lebovic, D I

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma activation has an effect on the attachment of endometrial cells to peritoneal mesothelial cells in a well-established in vitro model of the early endometriotic lesion. The endometrial epithelial cell line EM42 and mesothelial cell line LP9 were used for this study. EM42 cells, LP9 cells or both were treated with the PPAR-gamma agonist ciglitazone (CTZ) at varying concentrations (10, 20 and 40 microM) x 48 h with subsequent co-culture of EM42 and LP9 cells. The rate of EM42 attachment and invasion through LP9 cells was then assessed and compared with control (EM42 and LP9 cells co-cultured without prior treatment with CTZ). Next, attachment of CTZ-treated and untreated EM42 cells to hyaluronic acid (HA), a cell adhesion molecule (CAM) on peritoneal mesothelial cells, were assessed. Although there was no difference in EM42 attachment when LP9 cells alone were treated with CTZ, treatment of EM42 cells with 40 microM CTZ decreased EM42 attachment to LP9 cells by 27% (P < 0.01). Treatment of both EM42 and LP9 cells with 40 microM CTZ decreased EM42 attachment to LP9 by 37% (P < 0.01). Treatment of EM42 cells with 40 microM CTZ decreased attachment to HA by 66% (P = 0.056). CTZ did not decrease invasion of EM42 cells through the LP9 monolayer. CTZ may inhibit EM42 cell proliferation. In conclusion, CTZ significantly decreased EM42 attachment to LP9 cells and HA in an in vitro model of the early endometriotic lesion. PMID:19643817

  9. Pharmacologic retinoid signaling and physiologic retinoic acid receptor signaling inhibit basal cell carcinoma tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    So, Po-Lin; Fujimoto, Michele A; Epstein, Ervin H

    2008-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer. Patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome) are highly susceptible to developing many BCCs as a result of a constitutive inactivating mutation in one allele of PATCHED 1, which encodes a tumor suppressor that is a major inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling. Dysregulated Hedgehog signaling is a common feature of both hereditary and sporadic BCCs. Recently, we showed remarkable anti-BCC chemopreventive efficacy of tazarotene, a retinoid with retinoic acid receptor (RAR) beta/gamma specificity, in Ptch1+/- mice when treatment was commenced before carcinogenic insults. In this study, we assessed whether the effect of tazarotene against BCC carcinogenesis is sustained after its withdrawal and whether tazarotene is effective against preexisting microscopic BCC lesions. We found that BCCs did not reappear for at least 5 months after topical drug treatment was stopped and that already developed, microscopic BCCs were susceptible to tazarotene inhibition. In vitro, tazarotene inhibited a murine BCC keratinocyte cell line, ASZ001, suggesting that its effect in vivo is by direct action on the actual tumor cells. Down-regulation of Gli1, a target gene of Hedgehog signaling and up-regulation of CRABPII, a target gene of retinoid signaling, were observed with tazarotene treatment. Finally, we investigated the effects of topical applications of other retinoid-related compounds on BCC tumorigenesis in vivo. Tazarotene was the most effective of the preparations studied, and its effect most likely was mediated by RARgamma activation. Furthermore, inhibition of basal RAR signaling in the skin promoted BCC carcinogenesis, suggesting that endogenous RAR signaling restrains BCC growth.

  10. Abnormal essential fatty acid composition of tissue lipids in genetically diabetic mice is partially corrected by dietary linoleic and gamma-linolenic acids.

    PubMed

    Cunnane, S C; Manku, M S; Horrobin, D F

    1985-05-01

    Genetically diabetic mice (db/db) and their non-diabetic litter-mates were maintained for 15 weeks on diets supplemented with safflower oil or evening primrose (Oenothera bienis) oil, both essential fatty acid (EFA)-rich sources, or hydrogenated coconut oil (devoid of EFA). Plasma glucose was higher in the diabetic mice supplemented with the oils than in the unsupplemented diabetic mice. In the oil-supplemented non-diabetic mice, plasma glucose did not differ compared with the unsupplemented non-diabetic mice. The proportional content of arachidonic acid in the phospholipids of the pancreas was significantly decreased in diabetic mice, an effect which was completely prevented by supplementation with safflower or evening primrose oil but not hydrogenated coconut oil. In the liver phospholipids of the diabetic mice, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid was proportionally increased, an effect reduced by supplementation with safflower oil but not evening primrose or hydrogenated coconut oils. In the liver triglycerides of the diabetic mice, gamma-linolenic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid were all proportionally decreased, effects which were also prevented by safflower or evening primrose oil but not hydrogenated coconut oil. Alopecia and dry scaly skin were prominent in the diabetic mice but less extensive in the diabetic mice supplemented with EFA.

  11. EPI-001 is a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma modulator with inhibitory effects on androgen receptor expression and activity in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Lucas J.; Olson, Margaret E.; Ravindranathan, Preethi; Guo, Hong; Kempema, Aaron M.; Andrews, Timothy E.; Chen, Xiaoli; Raj, Ganesh V.; Harki, Daniel A.; Dehm, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a driver of prostate cancer (PCa) cell growth and disease progression. Therapies for advanced PCa exploit AR dependence by blocking the production or action of androgens, but these interventions inevitably fail via multiple mechanisms including mutation or deletion of the AR ligand binding domain (LBD). Thus, the development of new inhibitors which act through non-LBD interfaces is an unmet clinical need. EPI-001 is a bisphenol A-derived compound shown to bind covalently and inhibit the AR NH2-terminal domain (NTD). Here, we demonstrate that EPI-001 has general thiol alkylating activity, resulting in multilevel inhibitory effects on AR in PCa cell lines and tissues. At least one secondary mechanism of action associated with AR inhibition was found to be selective modulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ). These multi-level effects of EPI-001 resulted in inhibition of transcriptional activation units (TAUs) 1 and 5 of the AR NTD, and reduced AR expression. EPI-001 inhibited growth of AR-positive and AR-negative PCa cell lines, with the highest sensitivity observed in LNCaP cells. Overall, this study provides new mechanistic insights to the chemical biology of EPI-001, and raises key issues regarding the use of covalent inhibitors of the intrinsically unstructured AR NTD. PMID:25669987

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and retinoid X receptor transcription factors are released from activated human platelets and shed in microparticles.

    PubMed

    Ray, Denise M; Spinelli, Sherry L; Pollock, Stephen J; Murant, Thomas I; O'Brien, Jamie J; Blumberg, Neil; Francis, Charles W; Taubman, Mark B; Phipps, Richard P

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) and its ligands are important regulators of lipid metabolism, inflammation, and diabetes. We previously demonstrated that anucleate human platelets express the transcription factor PPARgamma and that PPARgamma ligands blunt platelet activation. To further understand the nature of PPARgamma in platelets, we determined the platelet PPARgamma isoform(s) and investigated the fate of PPARgamma following platelet activation. Our studies demonstrated that human platelets contain only the PPARgamma1 isoform and after activation with thrombin, TRAP, ADP or collagen PPARgamma is released from internal stores. PPARgamma release was blocked by a cytoskeleton inhibitor, Latrunculin A. Platelet-released PPARgamma was complexed with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) and retained its ability to bind DNA. Interestingly, the released PPARgamma and RXR were microparticle associated and the released PPARgamma/RXR complex retained DNA-binding ability. Additionally, a monocytic cell line, THP-1, is capable of internalizing PMPs. Further investigation following treatment of these cells with the PPARgamma agonist, rosiglitazone and PMPs revealed a possible transcellular mechanism to attenuate THP-1 activation. These new findings are the first to demonstrate transcription factor release from platelets, revealing the complex spectrum of proteins expressed and expelled from platelets, and suggests that platelet PPARgamma has an undiscovered role in human biology. PMID:18217139

  13. Susceptibility to dengue hemorrhagic fever in vietnam: evidence of an association with variation in the vitamin d receptor and Fc gamma receptor IIa genes.

    PubMed

    Loke, Hsin; Bethell, Delia; Phuong, Cao Xuan Thanh; Day, Nick; White, Nicholas; Farrar, Jeremy; Hill, Adrian

    2002-07-01

    Dengue is an increasingly important cause of morbidity and mortality in the tropics, with more than a billion people at risk each year. Immunologic enhancement is thought to contribute to disease pathogenesis. Only a very small proportion of infected individuals develop life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). In a large case-control study with 400 DHF patients and 300 matched controls, we have assessed five polymorphic non-HLA host genetic factors that might influence susceptibility to DHF. The less frequent t allele of a variant at position 352 of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene was associated with resistance to severe dengue (P = 0.03). Homozygotes for the arginine variant at position 131 of the Fc gammaRIIA gene, who have less capacity to opsonize IgG2 antibodies, may also be protected from DHF (one-tailed P = 0.03). No associations were found with polymorphisms in the mannose binding lectin, interleukin-1 (IL-4), and IL-1 receptor antagonist genes. Further studies to confirm these associations are warranted.

  14. Expression of retinoic acid nuclear receptors and tissue transglutaminase is altered in various tissues of rats fed a vitamin A-deficient diet.

    PubMed

    Verma, A K; Shoemaker, A; Simsiman, R; Denning, M; Zachman, R D

    1992-11-01

    The effects of vitamin A nutritional status on the levels of expression of retinoic acid nuclear receptors (RAR), and the retinoic acid-responsive gene, tissue transglutaminase, were determined in rats. Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a vitamin A-deficient diet for approximately 7 wk developed vitamin A deficiency, as confirmed by the depletion of liver retinol and retinyl palmitate. Controls were fed the same diet supplemented with 24 mg/kg retinyl acetate. The levels of expression of RAR beta mRNA were approximately 80% lower in bladder, brain, liver, lung and trachea and those of RAR gamma mRNA were approximately 50% lower in bladder, lung and trachea of rats fed the vitamin A-deficient diet than in controls. The levels of expression of RAR alpha mRNA were approximately 90% lower in brain and approximately 30% greater in liver, kidney, intestine and lung of rats fed the vitamin A-deficient diet. Vitamin A deficiency also resulted in reduced expression of tissue transglutaminase in the bladder, lungs and trachea, which paralleled the effects observed for RAR beta and RAR gamma. When vitamin A-deficient rats were subsequently fed a retinol-deficient diet supplemented with retinoic acid for 4 wk, the expression of RAR (beta and gamma) and tissue transglutaminase returned to the control levels. These results indicate that vitamin A nutritional status in rats influences the expression of both RAR and tissue transglutaminase in certain tissues. PMID:1279143

  15. The inimitable kynurenic acid: the roles of different ionotropic receptors in the action of kynurenic acid at a spinal level.

    PubMed

    Tuboly, Gabor; Tar, Lilla; Bohar, Zsuzsanna; Safrany-Fark, Arpad; Petrovszki, Zita; Kekesi, Gabriella; Vecsei, Laszlo; Pardutz, Arpad; Horvath, Gyongyi

    2015-03-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is a neuroactive metabolite that interacts with NMDA, AMPA/kainate and alpha 7 nicotinic receptors. The goal of this study was to clarify the roles of these receptors in the action of KYNA at a spinal level by using highly specific receptor antagonists alone or in triple combinations. Chronic osteoarthritis-like joint pain was induced with monosodium-iodoacetate in male Wistar rats. Mechanical allodynia and motor function were quantified. In the first series we determined the dose-response and time course effects of intrathecally administered KYNA (10-100 μg), D-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5; an NMDA receptor antagonist; 10-200 μg), methyllycaconitine (MLA; an alpha 7 nicotinic receptor antagonist; 100-200 μg) and 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzoquinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX; an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist; 1-20 μg). In the second series, four different triple combinations of MLA, AP5 and NBQX were investigated. Intrathecal administration of KYNA caused a dose-dependent motor impairment and antinociception. The highly specific NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 caused a motor impairment and antinociception with lower potency. High doses of NBQX resulted in significant antinociception with a slight motor impairment, while only the highest dose of MLA gave rise to significant antinociception with a slight motor impairment. After the coadministration of these ligands as combinations, no potentiation was observed. It may be supposed that the effects of KYNA are primarily due to the inhibition of NMDA receptors at both glycine and phencyclidine (PCP) binding sites, and not to the interactions at the different ionotropic receptors, but the mechanisms behind its high bio-efficiency are still unknown.

  16. Short communication: Fc gamma receptors IIa and IIIa genetic polymorphisms do not predict HIV-1 disease progression in Kenyan women.

    PubMed

    Weis, Julie F; McClelland, R Scott; Jaoko, Walter; Mandaliya, Kishor N; Overbaugh, Julie; Graham, Susan M

    2015-03-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of the Fc gamma receptors (FcγR) IIa and IIIa have been implicated in the rate of HIV-1 disease progression, but results are inconsistent. We aimed to determine the association between these polymorphisms and disease progression in a cohort of HIV-1 seroconverters from Mombasa, Kenya. Neither FcγRIIa nor FcγRIIIa genotypes were predictive of set point viral load, viral load increase, CD4 decline, or HIV-1 disease progression (time to CD4 count <200 cells/mm(3), death, or treatment initiation). Our results suggest that FcγR polymorphisms might not be an important indicator of viral control and disease progression in this population.

  17. Enhancement of macrophage candidacidal activity by interferon-gamma. Increased phagocytosis, killing, and calcium signal mediated by a decreased number of mannose receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Maródi, L; Schreiber, S; Anderson, D C; MacDermott, R P; Korchak, H M; Johnston, R B

    1993-01-01

    In contrast to its macrophage-activating capacity, IFN-gamma downregulates expression of the macrophage mannose receptor (MMR), which mediates uptake of Candida and other microorganisms. We found that IFN-gamma induced a concentration-dependent increase in the capacity of human monocyte-derived macrophages to ingest and kill both opsonized and unopsonized Candida albicans and to release superoxide anion upon stimulation with Candida. Mannan or mannosylated albumin inhibited this activated uptake of unopsonized Candida, but glucan did not. Addition of mAb to complement receptor (CR) 3 did not inhibit ingestion; macrophages that lacked CR3 (leukocyte adhesion defect) showed normal upregulation of ingestion by IFN-gamma. The increased candidacidal activity of IFN-gamma-activated macrophages was associated with reduced expression of MMR by a mean of 79% and decreased pinocytic uptake of 125I-mannosylated BSA by 73%; K(uptake) of pinocytosis was not changed. Exposure of resident macrophages to unopsonized Candida did not elicit a transient increase in intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i); macrophages activated by IFN-gamma expressed a brisk increase in [Ca2+]i on exposure to Candida. These data suggest that macrophage activation by IFN-gamma can enhance resistance to C. albicans infection in spite of downregulation of the MMR, perhaps through enhanced coupling of the MMR to microbicidal functions. PMID:8390485

  18. Interferon-gamma-responsive neuronal sites in the normal rat brain: receptor protein distribution and cell activation revealed by Fos induction.

    PubMed

    Robertson, B; Kong, G; Peng, Z; Bentivoglio, M; Kristensson, K

    2000-05-01

    Constitutive expression of the interferon-gamma receptor protein (IFN-gammaR), and the distribution of cells in which Fos, a marker of cell activation, is induced by intracerebroventricular administration of IFN-gamma, were studied in the rat brain by immunohistochemistry. IFN-gammaR immunopositivity was found in neuronal elements, which exhibited a selective distribution being concentrated in the piriform and entorhinal cortex, midline thalamus and medial hypothalamic structures, brainstem nociceptive relays (including the periaqueductal gray, the parabrachial nuclei and the caudal part of the spinal trigeminal nuclei), and circumventricular organs such as the median eminence and area postrema. IFN-gamma-induced Fos expression mostly corresponded to neuronal sites of receptor distribution. Because of its topographical distribution, it is suggested that activation of the IFN-gammaR in neurons may play a role to limit spread of infections in the brain and, in concert with other proinflammatory cytokines, to modulate adaptive responses to an antigen challenge mediated by the central nervous system. PMID:10779704

  19. Surface modification of superparamagnetic iron nanoparticles with calcium salt of poly({gamma}-glutamic acid) as coating material

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ramesh; Inbaraj, B. Stephen; Chen, B.H.

    2010-11-15

    Surface-modified magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized by co-precipitation of aqueous solution of ferrous and ferric salts (molar ratio 1:2) upon adding a base followed by calcium salt of poly({gamma}-glutamic acid) (Ca-{gamma}-PGA) for uniform coating on the surface of MNPs. Both uncoated and Ca-{gamma}-PGA-coated MNPs were characterized using various techniques including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and vibrating sample magnetometric (VSM) studies. Compared with bare MNPs, the IR spectra of coated MNPs showed characteristic peaks of {gamma}-PGA, implying the {gamma}-PGA coating on MNPs did occur. The TEM images depicted an average size of 8-10 nm for bare MNPs and 14 nm for coated MNPs, with their shape being spherical in nature. In the presence of applied magnetic field, a superparamagnetic behavior was observed at room temperature for both bare and Ca-{gamma}-PGA-coated MNPs, with no magnetism left upon magnetic-field removal.

  20. Effects of traditionally used anxiolytic botanicals on enzymes of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system.

    PubMed

    Awad, R; Levac, D; Cybulska, P; Merali, Z; Trudeau, V L; Arnason, J T

    2007-09-01

    In Canada, the use of botanical natural health products (NHPs) for anxiety disorders is on the rise, and a critical evaluation of their safety and efficacy is required. The purpose of this study was to determine whether commercially available botanicals directly affect the primary brain enzymes responsible for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism. Anxiolytic plants may interact with either glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or GABA transaminase (GABA-T) and ultimately influence brain GABA levels and neurotransmission. Two in vitro rat brain homogenate assays were developed to determine the inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of aqueous and ethanolic plant extracts. Approximately 70% of all extracts that were tested showed little or no inhibitory effect (IC50 values greater than 1 mg/mL) and are therefore unlikely to affect GABA metabolism as tested. The aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) exhibited the greatest inhibition of GABA-T activity (IC50 = 0.35 mg/mL). Extracts from Centella asiatica (gotu kola) and Valeriana officinalis (valerian) stimulated GAD activity by over 40% at a dose of 1 mg/mL. On the other hand, both Matricaria recutita (German chamomile) and Humulus lupulus (hops) showed significant inhibition of GAD activity (0.11-0.65 mg/mL). Several of these species may therefore warrant further pharmacological investigation. The relation between enzyme activity and possible in vivo mode of action is discussed. PMID:18066140

  1. Fc Gamma Receptor Signaling in Mast Cells Links Microbial Stimulation to Mucosal Immune Inflammation in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao; Feng, Bai-Sui; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Liao, Xue-Qing; Chong, Jasmine; Tang, Shang-Guo; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2008-01-01

    Microbes and microbial products are closely associated with the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, the mechanisms behind this connection remain unclear. It has been previously reported that flagellin-specific antibodies are increased in IBD patient sera. As mastocytosis is one of the pathological features of IBD, we hypothesized that flagellin-specific immune responses might activate mast cells that then contribute to the initiation and maintenance of intestinal inflammation. Thirty-two colonic biopsy samples were collected from IBD patients. A flagellin/flagellin-specific IgG/Fc gamma receptor I complex was identified on biopsied mast cells using both immunohistochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation experiments; this complex was shown to co-localize on the surfaces of mast cells in the colonic mucosa of patients with IBD. In addition, an ex vivo study showed flagellin-IgG was able to bind to human mast cells. These cells were found to be sensitized to flagellin-specific IgG; re-exposure to flagellin induced the mast cells to release inflammatory mediators. An animal model of IBD was then used to examine flagellin-specific immune responses in the intestine. Mice could be sensitized to flagellin, and repeated challenges with flagellin induced an IBD-like T helper 1 pattern of intestinal inflammation that could be inhibited by pretreatment with anti-Fc gamma receptor I antibodies. Therefore, flagellin-specific immune responses activate mast cells in the intestine and play important roles in the pathogenesis of intestinal immune inflammation. PMID:18974296

  2. Inhibitory effect on hepatitis B virus in vitro by a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} ligand, rosiglitazone

    SciTech Connect

    Wakui, Yuta; Inoue, Jun; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Fukushima, Koji; Kondo, Yasuteru; Kakazu, Eiji; Obara, Noriyuki; Kimura, Osamu; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2010-05-28

    Although chronic infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is currently managed with nucleot(s)ide analogues or interferon-{alpha}, the control of HBV infection still remains a clinical challenge. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor, that plays a role in glucose and lipid metabolism, immune reactions, and inflammation. In this study, the suppressive effect of PPAR ligands on HBV replication was examined in vitro using a PPAR{alpha} ligand, bezafibrate, and a PPAR{gamma} ligand, rosiglitazone. The effects were examined in HepG2 cells transfected with a plasmid containing 1.3-fold HBV genome. Whereas bezafibrate showed no effect against HBV replication, rosiglitazone reduced the amount of HBV DNA, hepatitis B surface antigen, and hepatitis B e antigen in the culture supernatant. Southern blot analysis showed that the replicative intermediates of HBV in the cells were also inhibited. It was confirmed that GW9662, an antagonist of PPAR{gamma}, reduced the suppressive effect of rosiglitazone on HBV. Moreover, rosiglitazone showed a synergistic effect on HBV replication with lamivudine or interferon-{alpha}-2b. In conclusion, this study showed that rosiglitazone inhibited the replication of HBV in vitro, and suggested that the combination therapy of rosiglitazone and nucleot(s)ide analogues or interferon could be a therapeutic option for chronic HBV infection.

  3. GABAB receptor-mediated, layer-specific synaptic plasticity reorganizes gamma-frequency neocortical response to stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Matthew; Lee, Shane; Kaiser, Marcus; Simonotto, Jennifer; Kopell, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Repeated presentations of sensory stimuli generate transient gamma-frequency (30–80 Hz) responses in neocortex that show plasticity in a task-dependent manner. Complex relationships between individual neuronal outputs and the mean, local field potential (population activity) accompany these changes, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible. Here we show that transient stimulation of input layer 4 sufficient to generate gamma oscillations induced two different, lamina-specific plastic processes that correlated with lamina-specific changes in responses to further, repeated stimulation: Unit rates and recruitment showed overall enhancement in supragranular layers and suppression in infragranular layers associated with excitatory or inhibitory synaptic potentiation onto principal cells, respectively. Both synaptic processes were critically dependent on activation of GABAB receptors and, together, appeared to temporally segregate the cortical representation. These data suggest that adaptation to repetitive sensory input dramatically alters the spatiotemporal properties of the neocortical response in a manner that may both refine and minimize cortical output simultaneously. PMID:27118845

  4. Role of retinoid receptors in the regulation of mucin gene expression by retinoic acid in human tracheobronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Koo, J S; Jetten, A M; Belloni, P; Yoon, J H; Kim, Y D; Nettesheim, P

    1999-01-01

    To investigate which retinoid receptors are critical in the regulation by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) of the mucin genes MUC2, MUC5AC and MUC5B in cultured normal human tracheobronchial epithelial (NHTBE) cells, we used pan-RAR-, pan-RXR- and RAR- isotype (alpha, beta and gamma)-selective agonists and RARalpha- and RARgamma-selective antagonists (RAR is RA receptor and RXR is retinoid X receptor). RAR-, RARalpha- and RARgamma-selective agonists strongly induced mucin mRNAs in a dose-dependent manner, while the RARbeta-selective retinoid only weakly induced mucin gene expression at very high concentrations (1 microM). The pan-RXR-selective agonist by itself did not induce mucin gene expression, but acted synergistically with suboptimal concentrations of the pan-RAR agonist. A retinoid with selective anti-activator-protein-1 activity only marginally induced mucin gene expression. The RARalpha antagonist strongly inhibited mucin gene induction and mucous cell differentiation caused by RA and by the RARalpha- and RARgamma-selective retinoids. In contrast, the RARgamma antagonist only weakly inhibited RARalpha-selective-retinoid-induced mucin gene expression, but completely blocked mucin gene expression induced by the RARgamma-selective retinoid. Our studies indicate that RARalpha is the major retinoid receptor subtype mediating RA-dependent mucin gene expression and mucous cell differentiation, but that the RARgamma isotype can also induce mucin genes. Furthermore these studies suggest that RARbeta is probably not (directly) involved in RA-induced mucin gene expression. PMID:10024510

  5. mu-Opioid receptor-stimulated guanosine-5'-O-(gamma-thio)-triphosphate binding in rat thalamus and cultured cell lines: signal transduction mechanisms underlying agonist efficacy.

    PubMed

    Selley, D E; Sim, L J; Xiao, R; Liu, Q; Childers, S R

    1997-01-01

    G protein activation by different mu-selective opioid agonists was examined in rat thalamus, SK-N-SH cells, and mu-opioid receptor-transfected mMOR-CHO cells using agonist-stimulated guanosine-5'-O-(gamma-thio)-triphosphate ([35S]GTP gamma S) binding to membranes in the presence of excess GDP. [D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly5-ol]Enkephalin (DAMGO) was the most efficacious agonist in rat thalamus and SK-N-SH cells, followed by (in rank order) fentanyl = morphine > > buprenorphine. In mMOR-CHO cells expressing a high density of mu receptors, no differences were observed among DAMGO, morphine or fentanyl, but these agonists were more efficacious than buprenorphine, which was more efficacious than levallorphan. In all three systems, efficacy differences were magnified by increasing GDP concentrations, indicating that the activity state of G proteins can affect agonist efficacy. Scatchard analysis of net agon stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding revealed two major components responsible for agonist efficacy differences. First, differences in the KD values of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding between high efficacy agonists (DAMGO, fentanyl, and morphine) and classic partial agonists (buprenorphine and levallorphan) were observed in all three systems. Second, differences in the Bmax value of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding were observed between DAMGO and morphine or fentanyl in rat thalamus and SK-N-SH cells and between the high efficacy agonists and buprenorphine or levallorphan in all three systems. These results suggest that mu-opioid agonist efficacy is determined by the magnitude of the receptor-mediated affinity shift in the binding of GTP (or[35S]GTP gamma S) versus GDP to the G protein and by the number of G proteins activated per occupied receptor.

  6. (Development of gamma emitting, receptor-binding, radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This progress report covers the period from March 1, 1987 to Feb. 28, 1988. In studies to better understand the nature of the m-AChR receptor subtypes, we have generated a manuscript which has been submitted for publication in Life sciences entitled: The effect of chronic atropine and diisopropylfluorophosphate on rat brain muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype concentrations. We have also developed a more direct synthesis of 3-quinuclidinyl 4-iodobenzilate and its analogues. During this contract period, we have been involved with the synthesis of analogues 3-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). We have determined the affinity constants of various compounds synthesized this year for the muscarinic receptor from rat corpus striatum. We have continued our investigation of the m-AChR in pancreas. 25 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Effects of stearic acid and gamma irradiation, alone and in combination, on pasting properties of high amylose maize starch.

    PubMed

    Ocloo, Fidelis C K; Minnaar, Amanda; Emmambux, Naushad M

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stearic acid and gamma irradiation on pasting properties of high amylose maize starch (HAMS) were studied. Stearic acid (0%, 1.5%, and 5%) was added to HAMS, and then irradiated at 0, 30, and 60 kGy before pasting. Stearic acid increased the paste viscosity of un-irradiated HAMS from 420 mPas to 557 and 652 mPas for 1.5% and 5% stearic acid, respectively. This observation related well with the formation of type II amylose-lipid complexes, with melting temperatures of about 100-120 °C. Gamma irradiation (30 and 6 0kGy) reduced pasting viscosity of HAMS. Pasting of gamma irradiated HAMS resulted in the formation of type I amylose-lipid complexes, with melting temperatures and enthalpies ranging from 82 to 102 °C and 0.22 to 1.85 J/g, respectively. Stearic acid addition followed by irradiation creates means of producing different types of amylose-lipid complexes from HAMS for industrial utilization.

  8. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of poplar bark by combined use of gamma ray and dilute acid for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Lee, Jae Taek; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Kim, Ung-Jin; Bae, Hyeun-Jong; Gon Wi, Seung; Cho, Jae-Young

    2012-08-01

    Pretreatment of poplar bark with a combination of sulfuric acid (3%, w/w, H2SO4) and gamma irradiation (0-1000 kGy) was performed in an attempt to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis for bioethanol production. The yields of reducing sugar were slightly increased with an increasing irradiation dose, ranging from 35.4% to 51.5%, with a 56.1% reducing sugar yield observed after dilute acid pretreatment. These results clearly showed that soluble sugars were released faster and to a greater extent in dilute acid-pretreated poplar bark than in gamma irradiation-pretreated bark. When combined pretreatment was carried out, a drastic increase in reducing sugar yield (83.1%) was found compared with individual pretreatment, indicating the possibility of increasing the convertibility of poplar bark following combined pretreatment. These findings are likely associated with cellulose crystallinity, lignin modification, and removal of hemicelluloses.

  9. Stimulation of acid secretion and phosphoinositol production b