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Sample records for acid receptor gene

  1. Nuclear receptors for retinoic acid and thyroid hormone regulate transcription of keratin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Tomic, M; Jiang, C K; Epstein, H S; Freedberg, I M; Samuels, H H; Blumenberg, M

    1990-01-01

    In the epidermis, retinoids regulate the expression of keratins, the intermediate filament proteins of epithelial cells. We have cloned the 5' regulatory regions of four human epidermal keratin genes, K#5, K#6, K#10, and K#14, and engineered constructs in which these regions drive the expression of the CAT reporter gene. By co-transfecting the constructs into epithelial cells along with the vectors expressing nuclear receptors for retinoic acid (RA) and thyroid hormone, we have demonstrated that the receptors can suppress the promoters of keratin genes. The suppression is ligand dependent; it is evident both in established cell lines and in primary cultures of epithelial cells. The three RA receptors have similar effects on keratin gene transcription. Our data indicate that the nuclear receptors for RA and thyroid hormone regulate keratin synthesis by binding to negative recognition elements in the upstream DNA sequences of the keratin genes. RA thus has a twofold effect on epidermal keratin expression: qualitatively, it regulates the regulators that effect the switch from basal cell-specific keratins to differentiation-specific ones; and quantitatively, it determines the level of keratin synthesis within the cell by direct interaction of its receptors with the keratin gene promoters. Images PMID:1712634

  2. Gene Interaction Network Suggests Dioxin Induces a Significant Linkage between Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and Retinoic Acid Receptor Beta

    PubMed Central

    Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Sone, Hideko; Parham, Frederick M.; Walker, Nigel J.; Martinez, Jeanelle; Portier, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    Gene expression arrays (gene chips) have enabled researchers to roughly quantify the level of mRNA expression for a large number of genes in a single sample. Several methods have been developed for the analysis of gene array data including clustering, outlier detection, and correlation studies. Most of these analyses are aimed at a qualitative identification of what is different between two samples and/or the relationship between two genes. We propose a quantitative, statistically sound methodology for the analysis of gene regulatory networks using gene expression data sets. The method is based on Bayesian networks for direct quantification of gene expression networks. Using the gene expression changes in HPL1A lung airway epithelial cells after exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin at levels of 0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 nM for 24 hr, a gene expression network was hypothesized and analyzed. The method clearly demonstrates support for the assumed network and the hypothesis linking the usual dioxin expression changes to the retinoic acid receptor system. Simulation studies demonstrated the method works well, even for small samples. PMID:15345368

  3. Expanding Duplication of Free Fatty Acid Receptor-2 (GPR43) Genes in the Chicken Genome.

    PubMed

    Meslin, Camille; Desert, Colette; Callebaut, Isabelle; Djari, Anis; Klopp, Christophe; Pitel, Frédérique; Leroux, Sophie; Martin, Pascal; Froment, Pascal; Guilbert, Edith; Gondret, Florence; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Monget, Philippe

    2015-04-24

    Free fatty acid receptors (FFAR) belong to a family of five G-protein coupled receptors that are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism, so that their loss of function increases the risk of obesity. The aim of this study was to determine the expansion of genes encoding paralogs of FFAR2 in the chicken, considered as a model organism for developmental biology and biomedical research. By estimating the gene copy number using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, genomic DNA resequencing, and RNA sequencing data, we showed the existence of 23 ± 1.5 genes encoding FFAR2 paralogs in the chicken genome. The FFAR2 paralogs shared an identity from 87.2% up to 99%. Extensive gene conversion was responsible for this high degree of sequence similarities between these genes, and this concerned especially the four amino acids known to be critical for ligand binding. Moreover, elevated nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios on some amino acids within or in close-vicinity of the ligand-binding groove suggest that positive selection may have reduced the effective rate of gene conversion in this region, thus contributing to diversify the function of some FFAR2 paralogs. All the FFAR2 paralogs were located on a microchromosome in a same linkage group. FFAR2 genes were expressed in different tissues and cells such as spleen, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, abdominal adipose tissue, intestine, and lung, with the highest rate of expression in testis. Further investigations are needed to determine whether these chicken-specific events along evolution are the consequence of domestication and may play a role in regulating lipid metabolism in this species.

  4. Dynamic and combinatorial control of gene expression by nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs)

    PubMed Central

    Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Germain, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are transcriptional regulators controlling the expression of specific subsets of genes in a ligand-dependent manner. The basic mechanism for switching on transcription of cognate target genes involves RAR binding at specific response elements and a network of interactions with coregulatory protein complexes, the assembly of which is directed by the C-terminal ligand-binding domain of RARs. In addition to this scenario, new roles for the N-terminal domain and the ubiquitin-proteasome system recently emerged. Moreover, the functions of RARs are not limited to the regulation of cognate target genes, as they can transrepress other gene pathways. Finally, RARs are also involved in nongenomic biological activities such as the activation of translation and of kinase cascades. Here we will review these mechanisms, focusing on how kinase signaling and the proteasome pathway cooperate to influence the dynamics of RAR transcriptional activity. PMID:19471584

  5. Expression and retinoic acid regulation of the zebrafish nr2f orphan nuclear receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Love, Crystal E.; Prince, Victoria E.

    2012-01-01

    Background The vertebrate nuclear receptor subfamily 2, group f (nr2f) genes encode orphan receptors that have the capacity to act as negative regulators of retinoic acid (RA) signaling. Results We describe embryonic and larval expression of four of the six zebrafish nr2f genes, nr2f1a, nr2f1b, nr2f2 and nr2f5. These genes show highly regulated patterns of expression within the CNS, including in the developing hindbrain, as well as in the mesoderm and endoderm. We also investigated the role of RA and Fgf signaling in regulating early nr2f gene expression. RA is not required for nr2f expression in the hindbrain; however, exogenous RA can repress this expression. Conversely, we find that RA positively regulates nr2f1a expression in trunk endoderm and mesoderm. Fgf signaling is not required for nr2f expression onset in the hindbrain; however, it may play a role in maintaining rhombomere-specific expression. Conclusions We report detailed expression analysis of four nr2f genes in all three germ layers. The onset of nr2f expression in the hindbrain does not require RA or Fgf signals. Our finding that RA positively regulates nr2f1a expression in the trunk supports the possibility that Nr2fs function in a negative feedback loop to modulate RA signaling in this region. PMID:22836912

  6. Mutations of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene during progression of lung tumors in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Takanori; Obo, Yumi; Furukawa, Mami; Hotta, Mayuko; Yamasaki, Ayako; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2009-01-16

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. In this study, mutations of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 (LPA1) gene were investigated to clarify the possible molecular mechanisms underlying the development of lung tumors induced by N-nitrosobis(2-hydroxypropyl)amine (BHP) in rats. Male Wistar rats, 6 weeks of age, were given 2000 ppm BHP in their drinking water for 12 weeks and then maintained without further treatment until sacrifice at 25 weeks. Genomic DNAs were extracted from paraffin-embedded tissues and exons 2-4 were examined for mutations, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. No LPA1 mutations were detected in 15 hyperplasias, but 2 out of 12 adenomas (16.7%) and 7 out of 17 adenocarcinomas (41.2%). These results suggest that mutations of LPA1 gene may be involved in the acquisition of growth advantage from adenomas to adenocarcinomas in lung carcinogenesis induced in rats by BHP.

  7. Expression of retinoic acid receptor genes in fetal and newborn rat lung.

    PubMed

    Grummer, M A; Thet, L A; Zachman, R D

    1994-04-01

    Lung differentiation and development are affected by vitamin A and its metabolites. One mechanism through which retinoids might exert their effects is through nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RAR). The gene expression profile of the RAR family (alpha, beta, gamma) has previously been determined in both the developing mouse embryo to 14.5 days gestation, and in the adult lung. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression of the RAR genes during the period of gestation that results in the formation of the saccular lung stage. Total RNA was extracted from fetal lungs of Sprague-Dawley rats at gestational days 17, 19, 20, 21, and 22, and from 12-hour-old newborns for Northern hybridization. Two transcripts of RAR alpha mRNA (3.7 and 2.7 kb) were found at each time point. At day 17, the 2.7 kb RAR alpha mRNA was increased two-fold or more than at any other time studied. At days 19-22 the levels of the 3.7 kb RAR alpha species were also lower than day 17 and newborn levels. One RAR beta mRNA transcript (3.4 kb), present at all time points, was significantly higher in the newborn than on days 17-22. Expression of RAR gamma mRNA could only be demonstrated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We speculate that the higher RAR alpha species at day 17 indicates a role for RAR alpha in the maintenance of the columnar epithelial cells of the glandular phase of lung development.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8208594

  8. Role of retinoid receptors in the regulation of mucin gene expression by retinoic acid in human tracheobronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Koo, J S; Jetten, A M; Belloni, P; Yoon, J H; Kim, Y D; Nettesheim, P

    1999-01-01

    To investigate which retinoid receptors are critical in the regulation by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) of the mucin genes MUC2, MUC5AC and MUC5B in cultured normal human tracheobronchial epithelial (NHTBE) cells, we used pan-RAR-, pan-RXR- and RAR- isotype (alpha, beta and gamma)-selective agonists and RARalpha- and RARgamma-selective antagonists (RAR is RA receptor and RXR is retinoid X receptor). RAR-, RARalpha- and RARgamma-selective agonists strongly induced mucin mRNAs in a dose-dependent manner, while the RARbeta-selective retinoid only weakly induced mucin gene expression at very high concentrations (1 microM). The pan-RXR-selective agonist by itself did not induce mucin gene expression, but acted synergistically with suboptimal concentrations of the pan-RAR agonist. A retinoid with selective anti-activator-protein-1 activity only marginally induced mucin gene expression. The RARalpha antagonist strongly inhibited mucin gene induction and mucous cell differentiation caused by RA and by the RARalpha- and RARgamma-selective retinoids. In contrast, the RARgamma antagonist only weakly inhibited RARalpha-selective-retinoid-induced mucin gene expression, but completely blocked mucin gene expression induced by the RARgamma-selective retinoid. Our studies indicate that RARalpha is the major retinoid receptor subtype mediating RA-dependent mucin gene expression and mucous cell differentiation, but that the RARgamma isotype can also induce mucin genes. Furthermore these studies suggest that RARbeta is probably not (directly) involved in RA-induced mucin gene expression. PMID:10024510

  9. Taste Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Beauchamp, Gary K.

    2009-01-01

    In the past several years, tremendous progress has been achieved with the discovery and characterization of vertebrate taste receptors from the T1R and T2R families, which are involved in recognition of bitter, sweet, and umami taste stimuli. Individual differences in taste, at least in some cases, can be attributed to allelic variants of the T1R and T2R genes. Progress with understanding how T1R and T2R receptors interact with taste stimuli and with identifying their patterns of expression in taste cells sheds light on coding of taste information by the nervous system. Candidate mechanisms for detection of salts, acids, fat, complex carbohydrates, and water have also been proposed, but further studies are needed to prove their identity. PMID:17444812

  10. Identification of miR-26a as a Target Gene of Bile Acid Receptor GPBAR-1/TGR5

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaosong; Xu, Haixia; Ding, Lili; Lou, Guiyu; Liu, Yan; Yao, Yalan; Chen, Liangwan; Huang, Wendong; Fu, Xianghui

    2015-01-01

    GPBAR1/TGR5 is a G protein–coupled receptor of bile acids. TGR5 is known to regulate the BA homeostasis and energy metabolism. Recent studies highlight an important role of TGR5 in alleviating obesity and improving glucose regulation, however, the mechanism of which is still unclear. Here we report that TGR5 is involved in mediating the anti-obesity and anti-hyperglycemia effect of a natural compound, oleanolic acid. By comparing the miRNA profiles between wild type and TGR5-/- livers after OA treatment, we identified miR-26a as a novel downstream target gene of TGR5 activation. The expression of miR-26a in the liver was induced in a TGR5-dependent manner after feeding the mice with a bile acid diet. TGR5 activation strongly increased the expression of miR-26a in macrophages, including the Kupffer cells in the liver. We further demonstrated that JNK pathway was required for miR-26a induction by TGR5 activation. Interestingly, we located the TGR5-responsive DNA element to a proximal region of miR-26’s promoter, which was independent of the transcription of its host genes. These results unravel a new mechanism by which bile acid receptor TGR5 activates a miRNA gene expression. PMID:26107166

  11. Involvement of aberrant DNA methylation on reduced expression of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene in rat tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi . E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp; Shimizu, Kyoko; Onishi, Mariko; Sugata, Eriko; Fujii, Hiromasa; Mori, Toshio; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki

    2006-10-27

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. Recently, it has been reported that alterations of LPA receptor expression might be important in the malignant transformation of tumor cells. Therefore, to assess an involvement of DNA methylation in reduced expression of the LPA receptor-1 (lpa1) gene, we investigated the expression of the lpa1 gene and its DNA methylation patterns in rat tumor cell lines. Both rat brain-derived neuroblastoma B103 and liver-derived hepatoma RH7777 cells used in this study indicated no expression of lpa1. For the analysis of methylation status, bisulfite sequencing was performed with B103 and RH7777 cells, comparing with other lpa1 expressed cells and normal tissues of brain and liver. The lpa1 expressed cells and tissues were all unmethylated in this region of lpa1. In contrast, both B103 and RH7777 cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expression of the lpa1. Treatment with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine induced expression of lpa1 gene in B103 and RH7777 cells after 24 h. In RH7777 cells treated with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine, stress fiber formation was also observed in response to LPA in RH7777 cells, but not in untreated RH7777 cells. These results suggest that aberrant DNA methylation of the lpa1 gene may be involved in its reduced expression in rat tumor cells.

  12. Specificity of a retinoic acid response element in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene promoter: consequences of both retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, P C; Forman, B M; Samuels, H H; Granner, D K

    1991-01-01

    The ability of a retinoic acid (RA) response element (RARE) in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene promoter to mediate effects of either RA or thyroid hormone (T3) on gene expression was studied. Fusion gene constructs consisting of PEPCK promoter sequences ligated to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene were used for this analysis. While T3 induced CAT expression to a small degree (about twofold) when such constructs were transiently transfected into H4IIE rat hepatoma cells, along with an expression vector encoding the alpha subtype of the T3 receptor (TR), this effect was mediated by promoter sequences distinct from the PEPCK RARE. Although TRs were capable of binding the PEPCK RARE in the form of putative monomers, dimers, and heterodimers with RA receptors (RARs), this element failed to mediate any positive effect of T3 on gene expression. In contrast, the PEPCK RARE mediated six- to eightfold induction of CAT expression by RA. When TRs were coexpressed along with RARs in transfected H4IIE cells, this RA induction was substantially blunted in a T3-independent manner. This inhibitory effect may be due to the binding of nonfunctional TRs or TR-RAR heterodimers to the PEPCK RARE. A model is proposed to explain the previously observed in vivo effects of T3 on PEPCK gene expression. Images PMID:1656224

  13. Ventricular zone gene-1 (vzg-1) encodes a lysophosphatidic acid receptor expressed in neurogenic regions of the developing cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Neocortical neuroblast cell lines were used to clone G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes to study signaling mechanisms regulating cortical neurogenesis. One putative GPCR gene displayed an in situ expression pattern enriched in cortical neurogenic regions and was therefore named ventricular zone gene-1 (vzg-1). The vzg-1 cDNA hybridized to a 3.8-kb mRNA transcript and encoded a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 41-42 kD, confirmed by Western blot analysis. To assess its function, vzg-1 was overexpressed in a cell line from which it was cloned, inducing serum-dependent "cell rounding." Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lipid present in high concentrations in serum, reproduced the effect seen with serum alone. Morphological responses to other related phospholipids or to thrombin, another agent that induces cell rounding through a GPCR, were not observed in vzg-1 overexpressing cells. Vzg-1 overexpression decreased the EC50 of both cell rounding and Gi activation in response to LPA. Pertussis toxin treatment inhibited vzg-1-dependent LPA-mediated Gi activation, but had no effect on cell rounding. Membrane binding studies indicated that vzg-1 overexpression increased specific LPA binding. These analyses identify the vzg-1 gene product as a receptor for LPA, suggesting the operation of LPA signaling mechanisms in cortical neurogenesis. Vzg-1 therefore provides a link between extracellular LPA and the activation of LPA- mediated signaling pathways through a single receptor and will allow new investigations into LPA signaling both in neural and nonneural systems. PMID:8922387

  14. Retinoic acid receptors and GATA transcription factors activate the transcription of the human lecithin:retinol acyltransferase gene

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Kun; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2008-01-01

    Lecithin retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) catalyzes the esterification of retinol (vitamin A). Retinyl esters and LRAT protein levels are reduced in many types of cancer cells. We present data that both the LRAT and retinoic acid receptor β2 (RARβ2) mRNA levels in the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3 are lower than those in cultured normal human prostate epithelial cells (PrEC). The activity of the human LRAT promoter (2.0 kb) driving a luciferase reporter gene in PC-3 cells is less than 40% of that in PrEC cells. Retinoic acid (RA) treatment increased this LRAT promoter-luciferase activity in PrEC cells, but not in PC-3 cells. Deletion of various regions of the human LRAT promoter demonstrated that a 172-bp proximal promoter region is essential for LRAT transcription and confers RA responsiveness in PrEC cells. This 172-bp region, contained within the 186 bp pLRAT/luciferase construct, has five putative GATA binding sites. Co-transfection of RARβ2 or RARγ and the transcription factor GATA-4 increased LRAT (pLRAT186) promoter activity in both PrEC and PC-3 cells. In addition, we found that both retinoic acid and retinol induced transcripts for the STRA6 gene, which encodes a membrane receptor involved in retinol (vitamin A) uptake, in PrEC cells but not in PC-3 cells. In summary, our data show that the transcriptional regulation of the human LRAT gene is aberrant in human prostate cancer cells and that GATA transcription factors are involved in the transcriptional activation of LRAT in PrEC cells. PMID:18652909

  15. Transport of long-chain fatty acids in Escherichia coli. Evidence for role of fadL gene product as long-chain fatty acid receptor.

    PubMed

    Nunn, W D; Colburn, R W; Black, P N

    1986-01-01

    Transport of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) across the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli requires functional fadL and fadD genes. The fadD gene codes for an acyl-CoA synthetase (fatty acid: CoA ligase (AMP forming] which has broad chain length specificity and is loosely bound to the cytoplasmic membrane. The fadL gene codes for a 43,000-dalton cytoplasmic membrane protein which, acting by an unknown mechanism, is needed specifically for LCFA transport. As a first step to define the role of the fadL gene product, studies were performed to determine if it functions as a LCFA receptor. The LCFA-binding activity was quantitated in intact cells in the absence of LCFA transport by comparing the binding of LCFA in fadD fadL and fadD fadL+ strains. These studies revealed that (i) fadD fadL+ strains bind 6-fold more LCFA than fadD fadL strains; (ii) fadD fadL strains harboring a plasmid containing the fadL gene bind 16-fold more LCFA than fadD fadL strains harboring only the plasmid vector; and (iii) the fadL-specific LCFA-binding activity is regulated by the fadR gene and catabolite repression. Studies with fadL strains harboring fadL plasmids containing in vitro constructed deletions indicate that mutations which alter the physical properties of the 43,000-dalton fadL gene product also affect fadL gene product-specific LCFA-binding activity. Overall, these studies suggest that one role of the fadL gene product in the LCFA transport process is to sequester LCFA at sites in the cell membrane for transport.

  16. Effects of receptor-selective retinoids on CYP26 gene expression and metabolism of all-trans-retinoic acid in intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Lampen, A; Meyer, S; Nau, H

    2001-05-01

    Retinoids mediate most of their function via interaction with retinoid receptors [retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs)], which act as ligand-activated transcription factors controlling the expression of a number of target genes. The complex mechanistic pattern of retinoid-induced effects on gene expression of CYP26 and intestinal metabolism of all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) was investigated here by studying the effects of retinoid ligands with relative selectivity for binding and transactivation of the retinoid acid receptors, RARs and RXRs, in human intestinal Caco-2 cells. We show here that CYP26 is expressed in human duodenum and colon. In Caco-2 cells not only all-trans-RA but also synthetic agonists of the RAR induced intestinal CYP26 gene expression and all-trans-RA metabolism as well. The RARalpha ligand Am580 induced the CYP26 gene expression more than the RARbeta ligand CD2019 or the RARgamma ligand CD437 suggesting the highest specificity for RARalpha on intestinal CYP26 gene regulation. RXR ligands alone did not induce CYP26 gene expression or RA metabolism in Caco-2 cells at all. But together with the RARalpha ligand, Am580, there were enhanced effects on the induction of CYP26 gene expression and on the induction of the metabolism of all-trans-RA. We conclude that gene regulation of CYP26 and the metabolism of all-trans-RA in intestinal cells is regulated through RXR and RAR heterodimerization. When coadministered, RAR agonists showed the highest potency for CYP26 gene regulation. Receptor-selective retinoids showed enhanced effects on induction of CYP26 gene expression and all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism.

  17. Retinoid X Receptor Agonists Upregulate Genes Responsible for the Biosynthesis of All-Trans-Retinoic Acid in Human Epidermis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lizhi; Chaudhary, Sandeep C; Atigadda, Venkatram R; Belyaeva, Olga V; Harville, Steven R; Elmets, Craig A; Muccio, Donald D; Athar, Mohammad; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2016-01-01

    UAB30 is an RXR selective agonist that has been shown to have potential cancer chemopreventive properties. Due to high efficacy and low toxicity, it is currently being evaluated in human Phase I clinical trials by the National Cancer Institute. While UAB30 shows promise as a low toxicity chemopreventive drug, the mechanism of its action is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of UAB30 on gene expression in human organotypic skin raft cultures and mouse epidermis. The results of this study indicate that treatment with UAB30 results in upregulation of genes responsible for the uptake and metabolism of all-trans-retinol to all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), the natural agonist of RAR nuclear receptors. Consistent with the increased expression of these genes, the steady-state levels of ATRA are elevated in human skin rafts. In ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiated mouse skin, the expression of ATRA target genes is found to be reduced. A reduced expression of ATRA sensitive genes is also observed in epidermis of mouse models of UVB-induced squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinomas. However, treatment of mouse skin with UAB30 prior to UVB irradiation prevents the UVB-induced decrease in expression of some of the ATRA-responsive genes. Considering its positive effects on ATRA signaling in the epidermis and its low toxicity, UAB30 could be used as a chemoprophylactic agent in the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer, particularly in organ transplant recipients and other high risk populations. PMID:27078158

  18. Retinoid X Receptor Agonists Upregulate Genes Responsible for the Biosynthesis of All-Trans-Retinoic Acid in Human Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lizhi; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Atigadda, Venkatram R.; Belyaeva, Olga V.; Harville, Steven R.; Elmets, Craig A.; Muccio, Donald D.; Athar, Mohammad; Kedishvili, Natalia Y.

    2016-01-01

    UAB30 is an RXR selective agonist that has been shown to have potential cancer chemopreventive properties. Due to high efficacy and low toxicity, it is currently being evaluated in human Phase I clinical trials by the National Cancer Institute. While UAB30 shows promise as a low toxicity chemopreventive drug, the mechanism of its action is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of UAB30 on gene expression in human organotypic skin raft cultures and mouse epidermis. The results of this study indicate that treatment with UAB30 results in upregulation of genes responsible for the uptake and metabolism of all-trans-retinol to all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), the natural agonist of RAR nuclear receptors. Consistent with the increased expression of these genes, the steady-state levels of ATRA are elevated in human skin rafts. In ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiated mouse skin, the expression of ATRA target genes is found to be reduced. A reduced expression of ATRA sensitive genes is also observed in epidermis of mouse models of UVB-induced squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinomas. However, treatment of mouse skin with UAB30 prior to UVB irradiation prevents the UVB-induced decrease in expression of some of the ATRA-responsive genes. Considering its positive effects on ATRA signaling in the epidermis and its low toxicity, UAB30 could be used as a chemoprophylactic agent in the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer, particularly in organ transplant recipients and other high risk populations. PMID:27078158

  19. All-Trans Retinoic Acid and Sodium Butyrate Enhance Natriuretic Peptide Receptor A Gene Transcription: Role of Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prerna; Periyasamy, Ramu; Das, Subhankar; Neerukonda, Smitha; Mani, Indra

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to delineate the mechanisms of GC-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) gene (Npr1) expression in vivo. We used all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, sodium butyrate (NaBu) to examine the expression and function of Npr1 using gene-disrupted heterozygous (1-copy; +/−), wild-type (2-copy; +/+), and gene-duplicated heterozygous (3-copy; ++/+) mice. Npr1+/− mice exhibited increased renal HDAC and reduced histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity; on the contrary, Npr1++/+ mice showed decreased HDAC and enhanced HAT activity compared with Npr1+/+ mice. ATRA and NaBu promoted global acetylation of histones H3-K9/14 and H4-K12, reduced methylation of H3-K9 and H3-K27, and enriched accumulation of active chromatin marks at the Npr1 promoter. A combination of ATRA-NaBu promoted recruitment of activator-complex containing E26 transformation–specific 1, retinoic acid receptor α, and HATs (p300 and p300/cAMP response element–binding protein-binding protein–associated factor) at the Npr1 promoter, and significantly increased renal NPRA expression, GC activity, and cGMP levels. Untreated 1-copy mice showed significantly increased systolic blood pressure and renal expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) compared with 2- and 3-copy mice. Treatment with ATRA and NaBu synergistically attenuated the expression of α-SMA and PCNA and reduced systolic blood pressure in Npr1+/− mice. Our findings demonstrate that epigenetic upregulation of Npr1 gene transcription by ATRA and NaBu leads to attenuation of renal fibrotic markers and systolic blood pressure in mice with reduced Npr1 gene copy number, which will have important implications in prevention and treatment of hypertension-related renal pathophysiological conditions. PMID:24714214

  20. Evolution of the nuclear receptor gene superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Laudet, V; Hänni, C; Coll, J; Catzeflis, F; Stéhelin, D

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear receptor genes represent a large family of genes encoding receptors for various hydrophobic ligands such as steroids, vitamin D, retinoic acid and thyroid hormones. This family also contains genes encoding putative receptors for unknown ligands. Nuclear receptor gene products are composed of several domains important for transcriptional activation, DNA binding (C domain), hormone binding and dimerization (E domain). It is not known whether these genes have evolved through gene duplication from a common ancestor or if their different domains came from different independent sources. To test these possibilities we have constructed and compared the phylogenetic trees derived from two different domains of 30 nuclear receptor genes. The tree built from the DNA binding C domain clearly shows a common progeny of all nuclear receptors, which can be grouped into three subfamilies: (i) thyroid hormone and retinoic acid receptors, (ii) orphan receptors and (iii) steroid hormone receptors. The tree constructed from the central part of the E domain which is implicated in transcriptional regulation and dimerization shows the same distribution in three subfamilies but two groups of receptors are in a different position from that in the C domain tree: (i) the Drosophila knirps family genes have acquired very different E domains during evolution, and (ii) the vitamin D and ecdysone receptors, as well as the FTZ-F1 and the NGF1B genes, seem to have DNA binding and hormone binding domains belonging to different classes. These data suggest a complex evolutionary history for nuclear receptor genes in which gene duplication events and swapping between domains of different origins took place. PMID:1312460

  1. ORA1, a Zebrafish Olfactory Receptor Ancestral to All Mammalian V1R Genes, Recognizes 4-Hydroxyphenylacetic Acid, a Putative Reproductive Pheromone

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Maik; Frank, Oliver; Rawel, Harshadrai; Ahuja, Gaurav; Potting, Christoph; Hofmann, Thomas; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Korsching, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    The teleost v1r-related ora genes are a small, highly conserved olfactory receptor gene family of only six genes, whose direct orthologues can be identified in lineages as far as that of cartilaginous fish. However, no ligands for fish olfactory receptor class A related genes (ORA) had been uncovered so far. Here we have deorphanized the ORA1 receptor using heterologous expression and calcium imaging. We report that zebrafish ORA1 recognizes with high specificity and sensitivity 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid. The carboxyl group of this compound is required in a particular distance from the aromatic ring, whereas the hydroxyl group in the para-position is not essential, but strongly enhances the binding efficacy. Low concentrations of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid elicit increases in oviposition frequency in zebrafish mating pairs. This effect is abolished by naris closure. We hypothesize that 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid might function as a pheromone for reproductive behavior in zebrafish. ORA1 is ancestral to mammalian V1Rs, and its putative function as pheromone receptor is reminiscent of the role of several mammalian V1Rs as pheromone receptors. PMID:24831010

  2. Lineage-specific expansion of vomeronasal type 2 receptor-like (OlfC) genes in cichlids may contribute to diversification of amino acid detection systems.

    PubMed

    Nikaido, Masato; Suzuki, Hikoyu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Hagino-Yamagishi, Kimiko; Kocher, Thomas D; Carleton, Karen; Okada, Norihiro

    2013-01-01

    Fish use olfaction to sense a variety of nonvolatile chemical signals in water. However, the evolutionary importance of olfaction in species-rich cichlids is controversial. Here, we determined an almost complete sequence of the vomeronasal type 2 receptor-like (OlfC: putative amino acids receptor in teleosts) gene cluster using the bacterial artificial chromosome library of the Lake Victoria cichlid, Haplochromis chilotes. In the cluster region, we found 61 intact OlfC genes, which is the largest number of OlfC genes identified among the seven teleost fish investigated to date. Data mining of the Oreochromis niloticus (Nile tilapia) draft genome sequence, and genomic Southern hybridization analysis revealed that the ancestor of all modern cichlids had already developed almost the same OlfC gene repertoire, which was accomplished by lineage-specific gene expansions. Furthermore, comparison of receptor sequences showed that recently duplicated paralogs are more variable than orthologs of different species at particular sites that were predicted to be involved in amino acid selectivity. Thus, the increase of paralogs through gene expansion may lead to functional diversification in detection of amino acids. This study implies that cichlids have developed a potent capacity to detect a variety of amino acids (and their derivatives) through OlfCs, which may have contributed to the extraordinary diversity of their feeding habitats. PMID:23501830

  3. Fatty acid represses insulin receptor gene expression by impairing HMGA1 through protein kinase C{epsilon}

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Debleena; Bhattacharya, Anirban; Roy, SibSankar; Bhattacharya, Samir . E-mail: smrbhattacharya@gmail.com

    2007-06-01

    It is known that free fatty acid (FFA) contributes to the development of insulin resistance and type2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism in FFA-induced insulin resistance is still unclear. In the present investigation we have demonstrated that palmitate significantly (p < 0.001) inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of PDK1, the key insulin signaling molecule. Consequently, PDK1 phosphorylation of plasma membrane bound PKC{epsilon} was also inhibited. Surprisingly, phosphorylation of cytosolic PKC{epsilon} was greatly stimulated by palmitate; this was then translocated to the nuclear region and associated with the inhibition of insulin receptor (IR) gene transcription. A PKC{epsilon} translocation inhibitor peptide, {epsilon}V1, suppressed this inhibitory effect of palmitate, suggesting requirement of phospho-PKC{epsilon} migration to implement palmitate effect. Experimental evidences indicate that phospho-PKC{epsilon} adversely affected HMGA1. Since HMGA1 regulates IR promoter activity, expression of IR gene was impaired causing reduction of IR on cell surface and that compromises with insulin sensitivity.

  4. Repeated ketamine administration alters N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor subunit gene expression: implication of genetic vulnerability for ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis in humans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Lipsky, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    For more than 40 years following its approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an anesthetic, ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been used as a tool of psychiatric research. As a psychedelic drug, ketamine induces psychotic symptoms, cognitive impairment, and mood elevation, which resemble some symptoms of schizophrenia. Recreational use of ketamine has been increasing in recent years. However, little is known of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for ketamine-associated psychosis. Recent animal studies have shown that repeated ketamine administration significantly increases NMDA receptor subunit gene expression, in particular subunit 1 (NR1 or GluN1) levels. This results in neurodegeneration, supporting a potential mechanism where up-regulation of NMDA receptors could produce cognitive deficits in chronic ketamine abuse patients. In other studies, NMDA receptor gene variants are associated with addictive behavior. Here, we focus on the roles of NMDA receptor gene subunits in ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis and propose that full sequencing of NMDA receptor genes may help explain individual vulnerability to ketamine abuse and ketamine-associated psychosis.

  5. Anacardic acid inhibits estrogen receptor alpha-DNA binding and reduces target gene transcription and breast cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, David J.; Wickramasinghe, Nalinie S.; Ivanova, Margarita M.; Isaacs, Susan M.; Dougherty, Susan M.; Imbert-Fernandez, Yoannis; Cunningham, Albert R.; Chen, Chunyuan; Klinge, Carolyn M.

    2010-01-01

    Anacardic acid (2-hydroxy-6-alkylbenzoic acid) is a dietary and medicinal phytochemical with established anticancer activity in cell and animal models. The mechanisms by which anacardic acid inhibits cancer cell proliferation remain undefined. Anacardic acid 24:1ω5 (AnAc 24:1ω5) was purified from geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum) and shown to inhibit the proliferation of estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive MCF-7 and endocrine-resistant LCC9 and LY2 breast cancer cells with greater efficacy than ERα-negative primary human breast epithelial cells, MCF-10A normal breast epithelial cells, and MDA-MB-231 basal-like breast cancer cells. AnAc 24:1ω5 inhibited cell cycle progression and induced apoptosis in a cell-specific manner. AnAc 24:1ω5 inhibited estradiol (E2)-induced estrogen response element (ERE) reporter activity and transcription of the endogenous E2-target genes: pS2, cyclin D1, and cathepsin D in MCF-7 cells. AnAc 24:1ω5 did not compete with E2 for ERα or ERβ binding, nor did AnAc 24:1ω5 reduce ERα or ERβ steady state protein levels in MCF-7 cells; rather, AnAc 24:1ω5 inhibited ER-ERE binding in vitro. Virtual Screening with the molecular docking software Surflex evaluated AnAc 24:1ω5 interaction with ERα ligand binding and DNA binding domains (LBD and DBD) in conjunction with experimental validation. Molecular modeling revealed AnAc 24:1ω5 interaction with the ERα DBD but not the LBD. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments revealed that AnAc 24:1ω5 inhibited E2-ERα interaction with the endogenous pS2 gene promoter region containing an ERE. These data indicate that AnAc 24:1ω5 inhibits cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in an ER-dependent manner by reducing ER-DNA interaction and inhibiting ER-mediated transcriptional responses. PMID:20197399

  6. [Expression of retinoic acid receptor gamma gene in ES cells and its effect on their differentiation and apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Du, Z W; Tsung, H C; Yao, Z

    1998-06-01

    We have constructed pSG5-RAR gamma-neo plasmid containing mouse retinoic acid receptor gamma (RAR gamma) gene and neo gene, and introduced it into embryonic stem ES-5 cells, by calcium phosphate mediated transfection. Some G418-resistant clones were isolated and from RNA dot blot analysis of these clones, a clone overexpressing RAR gamma gene was established, designated as ES-gamma cell line. Northern blot hydridization and Southern blot hydridization analysis of ES-gamma cells (Fig 3, 4) demonstrated that ES-gamma cells overexpressed exogenous RAR gamma mRNA and the exogenous RAR gamma cDNA integrated into the genome of ES cells. ES-gamma cells retained undifferentiated morphology and positive alkaline phosphatase activity (Plate I, Fig. 1, 2), so it resembled ES-5 cells in terms of stem cell characteristics. When ES-gamma cells were subcutaneously inoculated into nude mouse and differentiated in vivo, tumorous nodules containing various tissue structures were obtained, demonstrating their pluripotent properties just like parent ES-5 cells. Contrasting with ES-5 cells, the histological features of tumors showed no cartilage tissues, but abundant muscle tissues and keratinized cyst like structures constituted by stratified squamous epithelia (Plate I, Fig. 3). Differentiating in vitro by hanging drop culture methods, ES-gamma cells differentiated mostly into fibroblast-like cells, (Plate II, Fig. 1-5). The above results indicated that overexpression of RAR gamma gene changed the cell type of ES cells differentiating in vivo and in vitro. During the differentiation of ES-5 cells induced by RA, a large number of cells rounded up, detached from the dish and tended to die. We suspected that this phenomenon may be apoptosis. The ultrastructure appearance of the dying cells displayed typical apoptotic changes including chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation (Plate I, Fig. 4, 5). Detection of DNA fragments using agarose gel electrophoresis showed characteristic

  7. Identification of a receptor-like protein kinase gene rapidly induced by abscisic acid, dehydration, high salt, and cold treatments in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, S W; Jon, J H; Kwak, J M; Nam, H G

    1997-01-01

    A cDNA clone for a receptor-like protein kinase gene (RPK1) was isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. The clone is 1952 bp long with 1623 bp of an open reading frame encoding a peptide of 540 amino acids. The deduced peptide (RPK1) contains four distinctive domains characteristic of receptor kinases: (a) a putative amino-terminal signal sequence domain; (b) a domain with five extracellular leucine-rich repeat sequences; (c) a membrane-spanning domain; and (d) a cytoplasmic protein kinase domain that contains all of the 11 subdomains conserved among protein kinases. The RPK1 gene is expressed in flowers, stems, leaves, and roots. Expression of the RPK1 gene is induced within 1 h after treatment with abscisic acid (ABA). The gene is also rapidly induced by several environmental stresses such as dehydration, high salt, and low temperature, suggesting that the gene is involved in a general stress response. The dehydration-induced expression is not impaired in aba-1, abi1-1, abi2-1, and abi3-1 mutants, suggesting that the dehydration-induced expression of the RPK1 gene is ABA-independent. A possible role of this gene in the signal transduction pathway of ABA and the environmental stresses is discussed. PMID:9112773

  8. Associations of blood lead, dimercaptosuccinic acid-chelatable lead, and tibia lead with polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor and [delta]-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, B S; Lee, B K; Lee, G S; Stewart, W F; Simon, D; Kelsey, K; Todd, A C

    2000-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed to evaluate the influence of polymorphisms in the [delta]-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) and vitamin D receptor (VDR) genes on blood lead, tibia lead, and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-chelatable lead levels in 798 lead workers and 135 controls without occupational lead exposure in the Republic of Korea. Tibia lead was assessed with a 30-min measurement by (109)Cd-induced K-shell X-ray fluorescence, and DMSA-chelatable lead was estimated as 4-hr urinary lead excretion after oral administration of 10 mg/kg DMSA. The primary goals of the analysis were to examine blood lead, tibia lead, and DMSA-chelatable lead levels by ALAD and VDR genotypes, controlling for covariates; and to evaluate whether ALAD and VDR genotype modified relations among the different lead biomarkers. There was a wide range of blood lead (4-86 microg/dL), tibia lead (-7-338 microg Pb/g bone mineral), and DMSA-chelatable lead (4.8-2,103 microg) levels among lead workers. Among lead workers, 9.9% (n = 79) were heterozygous for the ALAD(2) allele and there were no homozygotes. For VDR, 10.7% (n = 85) had the Bb genotype, and 0.5% (n = 4) had the BB genotype. Although the ALAD and VDR genes are located on different chromosomes, lead workers homozygous for the ALAD(1) allele were much less likely to have the VDR bb genotype (crude odds ratio = 0.29, 95% exact confidence interval = 0.06-0.91). In adjusted analyses, subjects with the ALAD(2) allele had higher blood lead levels (on average, 2.9 microg/dL, p = 0.07) but no difference in tibia lead levels compared with subjects without the allele. In adjusted analyses, lead workers with the VDR B allele had significantly (p < 0.05) higher blood lead levels (on average, 4.2 microg/dL), chelatable lead levels (on average, 37.3 microg), and tibia lead levels (on average, 6.4 microg/g) than did workers with the VDR bb genotype. The current data confirm past observations that the ALAD gene modifies the

  9. Benzodiazepine-insensitive mice generated by targeted disruption of the gamma 2 subunit gene of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Günther, U; Benson, J; Benke, D; Fritschy, J M; Reyes, G; Knoflach, F; Crestani, F; Aguzzi, A; Arigoni, M; Lang, Y

    1995-01-01

    Vigilance, anxiety, epileptic activity, and muscle tone can be modulated by drugs acting at the benzodiazepine (BZ) site of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. In vivo, BZ sites are potential targets for endogenous ligands regulating the corresponding central nervous system states. To assess the physiological relevance of BZ sites, mice were generated containing GABAA receptors devoid of BZ sites. Following targeted disruption of the gamma 2 subunit gene, 94% of the BZ sites were absent in brain of neonatal mice, while the number of GABA sites was only slightly reduced. Except for the gamma 2 subunit, the level of expression and the regional and cellular distribution of the major GABAA receptor subunits were unaltered. The single channel main conductance level and the Hill coefficient were reduced to values consistent with recombinant GABAA receptors composed of alpha and beta subunits. The GABA response was potentiated by pentobarbital but not by flunitrazepam. Diazepam was inactive behaviorally. Thus, the gamma 2 subunit is dispensable for the assembly of functional GABAA receptors but is required for normal channel conductance and the formation of BZ sites in vivo. BZ sites are not essential for embryonic development, as suggested by the normal body weight and histology of newborn mice. Postnatally, however, the reduced GABAA receptor function is associated with retarded growth, sensorimotor dysfunction, and drastically reduced life-span. The lack of postnatal GABAA receptor regulation by endogenous ligands of BZ sites might contribute to this phenotype. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7644489

  10. Transplantation of Nogo-66 receptor gene-silenced cells in a poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Fan, Yuhong; Zhang, Jianjun

    2013-03-15

    Inhibition of neurite growth, which is in large part mediated by the Nogo-66 receptor, affects neural regeneration following bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. The tissue engineering scaffold poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) has good histocompatibility and can promote the growth of regenerating nerve fibers. The present study used small interfering RNA to silence Nogo-66 receptor gene expression in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and Schwann cells, which were subsequently transplanted with poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) into the spinal cord lesion regions in rats. Simultaneously, rats treated with scaffold only were taken as the control group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry revealed that at 4 weeks after transplantation, rats had good motor function of the hind limb after treatment with Nogo-66 receptor gene-silenced cells plus the poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) scaffold compared with rats treated with scaffold only, and the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and neuron-like cells was also increased. At 8 weeks after transplantation, horseradish peroxidase tracing and transmission electron microscopy showed a large number of unmyelinated and myelinated nerve fibers, as well as intact regenerating axonal myelin sheath following spinal cord hemisection injury. These experimental findings indicate that transplantation of Nogo-66 receptor gene-silenced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and Schwann cells plus a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) scaffold can significantly enhance axonal regeneration of spinal cord neurons and improve motor function of the extremities in rats following spinal cord injury.

  11. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Di Yan; Smith, David Glenn; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Yang, Ming Yao; Xu, Huai Liang; Zhang, Long; Yin, Hua Dong; Zhu, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A) and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B) receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C), has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor. PMID:23712359

  12. Ligand-independent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor by ursodeoxycholic acid: Repression of IFN-{gamma}-induced MHC class II gene expression via a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Makino, Yuichi; Miura, Takanori

    1996-02-15

    The therapeutic effectiveness of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) for various autoimmune liver diseases strongly indicates that UDCA possesses immunomodulatory activities. Experimental evidence also supports this notion, since, for example, UDCA has been shown to suppress secretion of IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-{gamma} from activated T lymphocytes, and Ig production from B lymphocytes. To investigate the mechanical background of UDCA-mediated immunomodulation, we asked whether UDCA interacts with the intracellular signal transduction pathway, especially whether it is involved in immunosuppressive glucocorticoid hormone action. For this purpose, we used a cloned Chinese hamster ovary cell line, CHOpMTGR, in which glucocorticoid receptor cDNA was stably integrated. In immunocytochemical analysis, we found that treatment with UDCA promoted the nuclear translocation of the glucocorticoid receptor in a ligand-independent fashion, which was further confirmed by immunoprecipitation assays. Moreover, the translocated glucocorticoid receptor demonstrated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Transient transfection experiments revealed that treatment of the cells with UDCA marginally enhanced glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression. We also showed that UDCA suppressed IFN-{gamma}-mediated induction of MHC class II gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor-mediated pathway. Together, UDCA-dependent promotion of translocation of the glucocorticoid receptor may be associated with, at least in part, its immunomodulatory action through glucocorticoid receptor-mediated gene regulation. 68 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Control of Gene Expression by the Retinoic Acid-Related Orphan Receptor Alpha in HepG2 Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chauvet, Caroline; Vanhoutteghem, Amandine; Duhem, Christian; Saint-Auret, Gaëlle; Bois-Joyeux, Brigitte; Djian, Philippe; Staels, Bart; Danan, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Retinoic acid-related Orphan Receptor alpha (RORα; NR1F1) is a widely distributed nuclear receptor involved in several (patho)physiological functions including lipid metabolism, inflammation, angiogenesis, and circadian rhythm. To better understand the role of this nuclear receptor in liver, we aimed at displaying genes controlled by RORα in liver cells by generating HepG2 human hepatoma cells stably over-expressing RORα. Genes whose expression was altered in these cells versus control cells were displayed using micro-arrays followed by qRT-PCR analysis. Expression of these genes was also altered in cells in which RORα was transiently over-expressed after adenoviral infection. A number of the genes found were involved in known pathways controlled by RORα, for instance LPA, NR1D2 and ADIPOQ in lipid metabolism, ADIPOQ and PLG in inflammation, PLG in fibrinolysis and NR1D2 and NR1D1 in circadian rhythm. This study also revealed that genes such as G6PC, involved in glucose homeostasis, and AGRP, involved in the control of body weight, are also controlled by RORα. Lastly, SPARC, involved in cell growth and adhesion, and associated with liver carcinogenesis, was up-regulated by RORα. SPARC was found to be a new putative RORα target gene since it possesses, in its promoter, a functional RORE as evidenced by EMSAs and transfection experiments. Most of the other genes that we found regulated by RORα also contained putative ROREs in their regulatory regions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) confirmed that the ROREs present in the SPARC, PLG, G6PC, NR1D2 and AGRP genes were occupied by RORα in HepG2 cells. Therefore these genes must now be considered as direct RORα targets. Our results open new routes on the roles of RORα in glucose metabolism and carcinogenesis within cells of hepatic origin. PMID:21818335

  14. LIVER TYPE FATTY ACID BINDING PROTEIN (L-FABP) GENE ABLATION REDUCES NUCLEAR LIGAND DISTRIBUTION AND PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR ACTIVATED RECEPTOR-α ACTIVITY IN CULTURED PRIMARY HEPATOCYTES1

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Avery L.; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Hostetler, Heather A.; Huang, Huan; Davis, Jason; Lyuksyutova, Olga I.; Landrock, Danilo; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2009-01-01

    The effect of liver type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) gene ablation on the uptake and distribution of long chain fatty acids (LCFA) to the nucleus by real-time laser scanning confocal imaging and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα) activity was examined in cultured primary hepatocytes from livers wild-type L-FABP+/+ and gene ablated L-FABP−/− mice. Cultured primary hepatocytes from livers of L-FABP−/− mice exhibited: (i) reduced oxidation of palmitic acid, a common dietary long chain fatty acid (LCFA); (ii) reduced expression of fatty acid oxidative enzymes—proteins transcriptionally regulated by PPARα; (iii) reduced palmitic acid-induced PPARα coimmunoprecipitation with coactivator SRC1 concomitant with increased PPARα coimmunoprecipitation with coinhibitor N-CoR; (iv) reduced palmitic acid-induced PPARα. Diminished PPARα activation in L-FABP null hepatocytes was associated with lower uptake of common dietary LCFA (palmitic acid as well as its fluorescent derivative BODIPY FL C16), reduced level of total unesterified LCFA, and real-time redistribution of BODIPY FL C16 from the central nucleoplasm to the nuclear envelope. Taken together, these studies support the hypothesis that L-FABP may facilitate ligand (LCFA)-activated PPARα transcriptional activity at least in part by increasing total LCFA ligand available to PPARα for inducing PPARα-mediated transcription of proteins involved in LCFA metabolism. PMID:19285478

  15. Coactivator TIF1β Interacts with Transcription Factor C/EBPβ and Glucocorticoid Receptor To Induce α1-Acid Glycoprotein Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Jin; Chen, Ya-Ling; Lee, Sheng-Chung

    1998-01-01

    The transcription of the α1-acid glycoprotein gene is induced by inflammatory cytokines and glucocorticoids. C/EBPβ is a major transcription factor involved in the induction of the agp gene by some cytokines. In this report, we have identified a novel transcriptional intermediary factor, TIF1β, which could enhance the transcription of the agp gene by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and C/EBPβ. TIF1β belongs to a subgroup of RING (really interesting new gene) finger proteins that contain a RING finger preceding two B box-type fingers and a putative coiled-coil domain (RBCC domain). Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that the interaction between GR and TIF1β is ligand independent. The overexpression of the TIF1β gene enhances GR-regulated expression in a ligand- and glucocorticoid-responsive element (GRE)-dependent manner. TIF1β can also augment C/EBPβ-mediated activity on wild-type and GRE-mutated agp genes, but this augmentation is diminished when all three C/EBPβ-binding elements are mutated. Functional and biochemical characterizations indicated that the bZIP domain of C/EBPβ and the RBCC domain, plant homeodomain finger, and bromodomain of TIF1β are crucial for the interactions of these proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that TIF1β serves as a converging mediator of signal transduction pathways of glucocorticoids and some inflammatory cytokines. PMID:9742105

  16. Associations of Uric Acid with Polymorphisms in the δ-Aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase, Vitamin D Receptor, and Nitric Oxide Synthase Genes in Korean Lead Workers

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Schwartz, Brian S.; Jaar, Bernard G.; Ahn, Kyu-Dong; Todd, Andrew C.; Lee, Sung-Soo; Kelsey, Karl T.; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Lustberg, Mark E.; Parsons, Patrick J.; Wen, Jiayu; Lee, Byung-Kook

    2005-01-01

    Recent research suggests that uric acid may be nephrotoxic at lower levels than previously recognized and that it may be one mechanism for lead-related nephrotoxicity. Therefore, in understanding mechanisms for lead-related nephrotoxicity, it would be of value to determine whether genetic polymorphisms that are associated with renal outcomes in lead workers and/or modify associations between lead dose and renal function are also associated with uric acid and/or modify associations between lead dose and uric acid. We analyzed data on three such genetic polymorphisms: δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Mean (± SD) tibia, blood, and dimercaptosuccinic acid–chelatable lead levels were 37.2 ± 40.4 μg/g bone mineral, 32.0± 15.0 g/dL, and 0.77± 0.86 μg/mg creatinine, respectively, in 798 current and former lead workers. Participants with the eNOS Asp allele had lower mean serum uric acid compared with those with the Glu/Glu genotype. Among older workers (age ≥ median of 40.6 years), ALAD genotype modified associations between lead dose and uric acid levels. Higher lead dose was significantly associated with higher uric acid in workers with the ALAD1-1 genotype; associations were in the opposite direction in participants with the variant ALAD1-2 genotype. In contrast, higher tibia lead was associated with higher uric acid in those with the variant VDR B allele; however, modification was dependent on participants with the bb genotype and high tibia lead levels. We conclude that genetic polymorphisms may modify uric acid mediation of lead-related adverse renal effects. PMID:16263504

  17. Comparative analyses of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Shoichi; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Kagawa, Nao; Katoh, Kazutaka

    2015-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator that activates G protein-coupled LPA receptors to exert fundamental cellular functions. Six LPA receptor genes have been identified in vertebrates and are classified into two subfamilies, the endothelial differentiation genes (edg) and the non-edg family. Studies using genetically engineered mice, frogs, and zebrafish have demonstrated that LPA receptor-mediated signaling has biological, developmental, and pathophysiological functions. Computational analyses have also identified several amino acids (aa) critical for LPA recognition by human LPA receptors. This review focuses on the evolutionary aspects of LPA receptor-mediated signaling by comparing the aa sequences of vertebrate LPA receptors and LPA-producing enzymes; it also summarizes the LPA receptor-dependent effects commonly observed in mouse, frog, and fish. PMID:25732591

  18. Down-regulation of the tumor suppressor gene retinoic acid receptor beta2 through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Bruno; Brand, Céline; Flajollet, Sébastien; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2006-09-01

    The retinoic acid receptor beta2 (RARbeta2) is a potent, retinoid-inducible tumor suppressor gene, which is a critical molecular relay for retinoid actions in cells. Its down-regulation, or loss of expression, leads to resistance of cancer cells to retinoid treatment. Up to now, no primary mechanism underlying the repression of the RARbeta2 gene expression, hence affecting cellular retinoid sensitivity, has been identified. Here, we demonstrate that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway affects cellular retinoid sensitivity, by regulating corepressor recruitment to the RARbeta2 promoter. Through direct phosphorylation of the corepressor silencing mediator for retinoic and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT), Akt stabilized RAR/SMRT interaction, leading to an increased tethering of SMRT to the RARbeta2 promoter, decreased histone acetylation, down-regulation of the RARbeta2 expression, and impaired cellular differentiation in response to retinoid. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway, an important modulator of cellular survival, has thus a direct impact on cellular retinoid sensitivity, and its deregulation may be the triggering event in retinoid resistance of cancer cells.

  19. Comparative analysis of transcriptional profiles of retinoic-acid-induced gene I-like receptors and interferons in seven tissues from ducks infected with avian Tembusu virus.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guanghua; Chen, Cuiteng; Huang, Yu; Cheng, Longfei; Fu, Qiuling; Wan, Chunhe; Shi, Shaohua; Chen, Hongmei; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Avian Tembusu virus (ATV), an emerging virus that mainly infects laying and breeding ducks in China, has caused severe economic loss in duck industry. However, there have been no reports about host innate immune responses during ATV infection and its correlation with clinical signs or pathology. To identify the roles of these immune factors in the innate host response to ATV infection, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was used to analyze the transcriptional profiles on the genes encoding two retinoic-acid-induced gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) and two interferons (INF-α and INF-γ) in seven tissues of an ATV-infected shelduck. After infection with ATV, both RLR genes were significantly upregulated (P < 0.05) in all seven tissues. The peak expression levels of the two RLR genes were observed at 24 hours postinfection (hpi) and were higher in non-lymphoid tissues (liver, lung, kidney, and ovary) than in lymphoid tissues (thymus, spleen and bursa). Although the transcription levels of both IFN genes were also upregulated, they showed different time-dependent expression patterns compared with those of the RLR genes. In addition, the highest mRNA expression of the two IFN genes was observed in the ovary at 6 hpi. This observation suggests that the ovary is the primary target tissue in ATV infection and explains the clinical characteristics of the primary pathological changes in the ovaries of ATV-infected ducks. Our results, for the first time, elucidate the differential and coordinated expression profiles of two RLRs and two IFNs in an ATV-infected shelduck.

  20. Interactions of methoxyacetic acid with androgen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Gargi; Hurst, Christopher H.; Waxman, David J.

    2009-07-15

    Endocrine disruptive compounds (EDC) alter hormone-stimulated, nuclear receptor-dependent physiological and developmental processes by a variety of mechanisms. One recently identified mode of endocrine disruption is through hormone sensitization, where the EDC modulates intracellular signaling pathways that control nuclear receptor function, thereby regulating receptor transcriptional activity indirectly. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA), the primary, active metabolite of the industrial solvent ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and a testicular toxicant, belongs to this EDC class. Modulation of nuclear receptor activity by MAA could contribute to the testicular toxicity associated with MAA exposure. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of MAA on the transcriptional activity of several nuclear receptors including the androgen receptor (AR), which plays a pivotal role in the development and maturation of spermatocytes. AR transcriptional activity is shown to be increased by MAA through a tyrosine kinase signaling pathway that involves PI3-kinase. In a combinatorial setting with AR antagonists, MAA potentiated the AR response without significantly altering the EC{sub 50} for androgen responsiveness, partially alleviating the antagonistic effect of the anti-androgens. Finally, MAA treatment of TM3 mouse testicular Leydig cells markedly increased the expression of Cyp17a1 and Shbg while suppressing Igfbp3 expression by {approx} 90%. Deregulation of these genes may alter androgen synthesis and action in a manner that contributes to MAA-induced testicular toxicity.

  1. Cloning, Expression Analysis, and Molecular Modeling of the Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor Alpha2 Subunit Gene from the Common Cutworm, Spodoptera litura

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Hongliang; Gao, Lu; Hu, Zhen; Liu, Haiyuan; Zhong, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Intensive research on the molecule structures of the gamma-nminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor in agricultural pests has great significance to the mechanism investigation, resistance prevention, and molecular design of novel pesticides. The GABA receptor a2 (SlGABARα2) subunit gene in Spodoptera litura (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was cloned using the technologies of reverse transcription PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The gemonic DNA sequence of SlGABARα2 has 5164 bp with 8 exons and 7 introns that were in accordance with the GT-AG splicing formula. The complete mRNA sequence of SlGABARα2 was 1965 bp, with an open reading frame of 1500 bp encoding a protein of 499 amino acids. The GABA receptor is highly conserved among insects. The conserved regions include several N-glycosylation, Oglycosylation, and phosphorylation sites, as well as 4 transmembrane domains. The identities that SlGABARα2 shared with the GABA receptor a2 subunit of Spodoptera exigua, Heliothis virescens, Chilo suppressalis, Plutella xylostella, Bombyx mori ranged from 99.2% to 87.2% at the amino acid level. The comparative 3-dimensional model of SlGABARα2 showed that its tertiary structure was composed of 4 major α-helixes located at the 4 putative transmembrane domains on one side, with some β-sheets and 1 small α-helix on the other side. SlGABARα2 may be attached to the membrane by 4 α-helixes that bind ions in other conserved domains to transport them through the membrane. The results of quantitative real time PCR demonstrated that SlGABARα2 was expressed in all developmental stages of S. litura. The relative expression level of SlGABARα2 was the lowest in eggs and increased with larval growth, while it declined slightly in pupae and reached the peak in adults. The expressions of SlGABARα2 in larvae varied among different tissues; it was extremely high in the brain but was low in the midgut, epicuticle, Malpighian tube, and fat body. PMID:23909412

  2. Cloning, expression analysis, and molecular modeling of the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor alpha2 subunit gene from the common cutworm, Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hongliang; Gao, Lu; Hu, Zhen; Liu, Haiyuan; Zhong, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Intensive research on the molecule structures of the gamma-nminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor in agricultural pests has great significance to the mechanism investigation, resistance prevention, and molecular design of novel pesticides. The GABA receptor a2 (SlGABARα2) subunit gene in Spodoptera litura (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was cloned using the technologies of reverse transcription PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The gemonic DNA sequence of SlGABARα2 has 5164 bp with 8 exons and 7 introns that were in accordance with the GT-AG splicing formula. The complete mRNA sequence of SlGABARα2 was 1965 bp, with an open reading frame of 1500 bp encoding a protein of 499 amino acids. The GABA receptor is highly conserved among insects. The conserved regions include several N-glycosylation, Oglycosylation, and phosphorylation sites, as well as 4 transmembrane domains. The identities that SlGABARα2 shared with the GABA receptor a2 subunit of Spodoptera exigua, Heliothis virescens, Chilo suppressalis, Plutella xylostella, Bombyx mori ranged from 99.2% to 87.2% at the amino acid level. The comparative 3-dimensional model of SlGABARα2 showed that its tertiary structure was composed of 4 major α-helixes located at the 4 putative transmembrane domains on one side, with some β-sheets and 1 small α-helix on the other side. SlGABARα2 may be attached to the membrane by 4 α-helixes that bind ions in other conserved domains to transport them through the membrane. The results of quantitative real time PCR demonstrated that SlGABARα2 was expressed in all developmental stages of S. litura. The relative expression level of SlGABARα2 was the lowest in eggs and increased with larval growth, while it declined slightly in pupae and reached the peak in adults. The expressions of SlGABARα2 in larvae varied among different tissues; it was extremely high in the brain but was low in the midgut, epicuticle, Malpighian tube, and fat body. PMID:23909412

  3. Synergistic activation of retinoic acid (RA)-responsive genes and induction of embryonal carcinoma cell differentiation by an RA receptor {alpha} (RAR{alpha})-, RAR{beta}-, or RAR{gamma}-selective ligand in combination with retinoid Z receptor-specific ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, B.; Taneja, R.; Chambon, P.

    1995-12-01

    This research indicates thatn retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-retinoid X receptor (RXR) heterodimers activate transcription of RA-responsive genes and induce cell differentiation of P19 and F9 cells in a ligand-dependent manner. 43 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Cell type and gene-specific activity of the retinoid inverse agonist AGN 193109: divergent effects from agonist at retinoic acid receptor gamma in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Thacher, S M; Nagpal, S; Klein, E S; Arefieg, T; Krasinski, G; DiSepio, D; Agarwal, C; Johnson, A; Eckert, R L; Chandraratna, R A

    1999-04-01

    Retinoids are important regulators of epithelial differentiation. AGN 193109 is a high-affinity antagonist and inverse agonist for the nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Paradoxically, both AGN 193109 and retinoid agonists inhibit the expression of the differentiation marker MRP-8 in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). TTNPB, an RAR agonist, and AGN 193109 mutually antagonize MRP-8 inhibition at both mRNA and protein levels. We find that this antagonism, which is greatest at an AGN 193109:TTNPB ratio of about 10:1, is absent when either compound is in significant excess. The potent RARalpha-specific agonist, AGN 193836, has no effect on MRP-8 regulation. These data indicate that inverse agonists and agonists suppress MRP-8 in NHKs through RARgamma using distinct and mutually inhibitory mechanisms. The activity of AGN 193109 on MRP-8 is cell type specific. In differentiating ECE16-1 cervical cells, TTNPB inhibits while AGN 193109 induces MRP-8 mRNA levels. The effect of AGN 193109 on genes inhibited by retinoid agonists in NHKs is also selective; expression of the differentiation markers transglutaminase 1 and keratin 6 is not down-regulated by AGN 193109 whereas stromelysin-1 expression is suppressed. These results show a complex gene and cell context-specific interplay between agonist and inverse agonist for the regulation of gene expression.

  5. Search for common targets of lithium and valproic acid identifies novel epigenetic effects of lithium on the rat leptin receptor gene

    PubMed Central

    Lee, R S; Pirooznia, M; Guintivano, J; Ly, M; Ewald, E R; Tamashiro, K L; Gould, T D; Moran, T H; Potash, J B

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetics may have an important role in mood stabilizer action. Valproic acid (VPA) is a histone deacetylase inhibitor, and lithium (Li) may have downstream epigenetic actions. To identify genes commonly affected by both mood stabilizers and to assess potential epigenetic mechanisms that may be involved in their mechanism of action, we administered Li (N=12), VPA (N=12), and normal chow (N=12) to Brown Norway rats for 30 days. Genomic DNA and mRNA were extracted from the hippocampus. We used the mRNA to perform gene expression analysis on Affymetrix microarray chips, and for genes commonly regulated by both Li and VPA, we validated expression levels using quantitative real-time PCR. To identify potential mechanisms underlying expression changes, genomic DNA was bisulfite treated for pyrosequencing of key CpG island ‘shores' and promoter regions, and chromatin was prepared from both hippocampal tissue and a hippocampal-derived cell line to assess modifications of histones. For most genes, we found little evidence of DNA methylation changes in response to the medications. However, we detected histone H3 methylation and acetylation in the leptin receptor gene, Lepr, following treatment with both drugs. VPA-mediated effects on histones are well established, whereas the Li effects constitute a novel mechanism of transcriptional derepression for this drug. These data support several shared transcriptional targets of Li and VPA, and provide evidence suggesting leptin signaling as an epigenetic target of two mood stabilizers. Additional work could help clarify whether leptin signaling in the brain has a role in the therapeutic action of Li and VPA in bipolar disorder. PMID:26171981

  6. Retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptor (RLR)-mediated antiviral innate immune responses in the lower respiratory tract: Roles of TRAF3 and TRAF5.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yuki; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Satoh, Tsugumi; Hayakari, Ryo; Furudate, Ken; Xing, Fei; Yoshida, Hidemi; Tanji, Kunikazu; Mizukami, Hiroki; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Ito, Etsuro

    2015-11-13

    Upon viral infection, the cytoplasmic viral sensor retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) recognizes viral RNA to activate antiviral signaling to induce type I interferon (IFN). RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) activate antiviral signaling in a tissue-specific manner. The molecular mechanism underlying antiviral signaling in the respiratory system remains unclear. We studied antiviral signaling in the lower respiratory tract (LRT), which is the site of many harmful viral infections. Epithelial cells of the LRT can be roughly divided into two groups: bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) and pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). These two cell types exhibit different phenotypes; therefore, we hypothesized that these cells may play different roles in antiviral innate immunity. We found that BECs exhibited higher antiviral activity than AECs. TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) has been shown to be a crucial molecule in RLR signaling. The expression levels of TRAF3 and TRAF5, which have conserved domains that are nearly identical, in the LRT were examined. We found that the bronchus exhibited the highest expression levels of TRAF3 and TRAF5 in the LRT. These findings suggest the importance of the bronchus in antiviral innate immunity in the LRT and indicate that TRAF3 and TRAF5 may contribute to RLR signaling. PMID:26454171

  7. Analysis of persistent changes to γ-aminobutyric acid receptor gene expression in Plutella xylostella subjected to sublethal amounts of spinosad.

    PubMed

    Yin, X-H; Wu, Q-J; Zhang, Y-J; Long, Y-H; Wu, X-M; Li, R-Y; Wang, M; Tian, X-L; Jiao, X-G

    2016-01-01

    A multi-generational approach was used to investigate the persistent effects of a sub-lethal dose of spinosad in Plutella xylostella. The susceptibility of various sub-populations of P. xylostella to spinosad and the effects of the insecticide on the gene expression of γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAR) were determined. The results of a leaf dip bioassay showed that the sensitivity of P. xylostella to spinosad decreased across generations. The sub-strains had been previously selected based on a determined LC25 of spinosad. Considering that GABA-gated chloride channels are the primary targets of spinosad, the cDNA of P. xylostella was used to clone GABARα by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The mature peptide cDNA was 1477-bp long and contained a 1449-bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 483 amino acids. The resulting amino acid sequence was used to generate a neighbor-joining dendrogram, and homology search was conducted using NCBI BLAST. The protein had high similarity with the known GABAR sequence from P. xylostella. Subsequent semi-quantitative RT-PCR and real-time PCR analyses indicated that the GABAR transcript levels in the spinosad-resistant strain (RR, 145.82-fold) and in Sub1 strain (selected with LC25 spinosad for one generation) were the highest, followed by those in the spinosad-susceptible strain, the Sub10 strain (selected for ten generations), and the Sub5 strain (selected for five generations). This multi-generational study found significant correlations between spinosad susceptibility and GABAR gene expression, providing insights into the long-term effects of sub-lethal insecticide exposure and its potential to lead to the development of insecticide-resistant insect populations. PMID:27525859

  8. The effect of the Gly16Arg polymorphism of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor gene on plasma free fatty acid levels is modulated by physical activity.

    PubMed

    Meirhaeghe, A; Luan, J; Selberg-Franks, P; Hennings, S; Mitchell, J; Halsall, D; O'Rahilly, S; Wareham, N J

    2001-12-01

    The lipolytic effects of catecholamines are mediated through members of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (BAR-2) family. Previous studies have suggested that genetic variants in the BAR-2 gene may be associated with obesity in some populations. To our knowledge, no studies have directly examined the effects of this polymorphism on circulating nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels. To explore this issue further, a cohort of 604 Caucasian individuals (aged 40-65 yr) was genotyped for a common polymorphism in the BAR-2 gene (Gly16Arg), and the relationships between genotype, body mass index (BMI), NEFA, and lipid levels were examined. Women bearing the Arg16 allele had higher BMI values (P < 0.01) than Gly16Gly women. Women carriers of the Arg16Arg genotype had lower fasting plasma NEFAs (P < 0.01) and greater suppression of NEFAs (P < 0.01) after an oral glucose load than women bearing the Gly16 allele. In multivariate analysis after adjustment for age, sex, and smoking status, the interaction between the BAR-2 genotype and BMI in determining fasting NEFA concentrations was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The availability of objective measures of total energy expenditure in this population permitted the further examination of interactions, particularly that between genotype and physical activity. In the population as a whole, after adjustment for confounding by age, smoking, and BMI, the effect of the Arg16Arg genotype on the suppression of NEFA levels was modified by physical activity level (P for interaction <0.05). These data suggest the existence in this population of a gene-physical activity interaction on NEFA levels.

  9. Epigenetic alteration of p16 and retinoic acid receptor beta genes in the development of epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Rahul; Kumar, Sandeep Sriram; Vaderhobli, Shilpa; Premalata, Chennagiri S; Pallavi, Venkateshaiah Reddihalli; Ramesh, Gawari; Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmi

    2014-09-01

    Silencing of tumor suppressor and tumor-related genes by promoter hypermethylation is one of the major events in ovarian carcinogenesis. In this study, we analyzed aberrant promoter methylation of p16 and RAR-β genes in 134 epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOCs), 23 low malignant potential (LMP) tumors, 26 benign cystadenomas, and 15 normal ovarian tissues. Methylation was investigated by methylation-specific PCR (MSP), and the results were confirmed by bisulfite DNA sequencing. Relative gene expression of p16 and RAR-β was done using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) on 51 EOC cases, 9 LMP tumors, and 7 benign cystadenomas with 5 normal ovarian tissues. Aberrant methylation for p16 and RAR-β was present in 43 % (58/134) and 31 % (41/134) in carcinoma cases, 22 % (05/23) and 52 % (12/23) in LMP tumors, and 42 % (11/26) and 69 % (18/26) in benign cystadenomas. No methylation was observed in any of the normal ovarian tissues. The mRNA expression level of p16 and RAR-β was significantly downregulated in EOC and LMP tumors than the corresponding normal tissues whereas the expression level was normal in benign cystadenomas for p16 and slightly reduced for RAR-β. A significant correlation of p16 promoter methylation was observed with reduced gene expression in EOC. For RAR-β, no significant correlation was observed between promoter methylation and gene expression. Our results suggest that epigenetic alterations of p16 and RAR-β have an important role in ovarian carcinogenesis and that mechanism along with methylation plays a significant role in downregulation of RAR-β gene in ovarian cancer.

  10. Effects of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) and nuclear receptor-regulated genes in fetal and postnatal mouse tissues.

    EPA Science Inventory

    PPARs regulate metabolism and can be activated by environmental contaminants such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). PFOA induces neonatal mortality, developmental delay, and growth deficits in mice. Studies in genetically altered mice showed that PPARa is required for PFOA-induce...

  11. Hepatitis C Virus Frameshift/Alternate Reading Frame Protein Suppresses Interferon Responses Mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptor Retinoic-Acid-Inducible Gene-I

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Bum; Seronello, Scott; Mayer, Wasima; Ojcius, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) actively evades host interferon (IFN) responses but the mechanisms of how it does so are not completely understood. In this study, we present evidence for an HCV factor that contributes to the suppression of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-mediated IFN induction. Expression of frameshift/alternate reading frame protein (F/ARFP) from HCV -2/+1 frame in Huh7 hepatoma cells suppressed type I IFN responses stimulated by HCV RNA pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and poly(IC). The suppression occurred independently of other HCV factors; and activation of interferon stimulated genes, TNFα, IFN-λ1, and IFN-λ2/3 was likewise suppressed by HCV F/ARFP. Point mutations in the full-length HCV sequence (JFH1 genotype 2a strain) were made to introduce premature termination codons in the -2/+1 reading frame coding for F/ARFP while preserving the original reading frame, which enhanced IFNα and IFNβ induction by HCV. The potentiation of IFN response by the F/ARFP mutations was diminished in Huh7.5 cells, which already have a defective RIG-I, and by decreasing RIG-I expression in Huh7 cells. Furthermore, adding F/ARFP back via trans-complementation suppressed IFN induction in the F/ARFP mutant. The F/ARFP mutants, on the other hand, were not resistant to exogenous IFNα. Finally, HCV-infected human liver samples showed significant F/ARFP antibody reactivity, compared to HCV-uninfected control livers. Therefore, HCV F/ARFP likely cooperates with other viral factors to suppress type I and III IFN induction occurring through the RIG-I signaling pathway. This study identifies a novel mechanism of pattern recognition receptor modulation by HCV and suggests a biological function of the HCV alternate reading frame in the modulation of host innate immunity. PMID:27404108

  12. Hepatitis C Virus Frameshift/Alternate Reading Frame Protein Suppresses Interferon Responses Mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptor Retinoic-Acid-Inducible Gene-I.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Bum; Seronello, Scott; Mayer, Wasima; Ojcius, David M

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) actively evades host interferon (IFN) responses but the mechanisms of how it does so are not completely understood. In this study, we present evidence for an HCV factor that contributes to the suppression of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-mediated IFN induction. Expression of frameshift/alternate reading frame protein (F/ARFP) from HCV -2/+1 frame in Huh7 hepatoma cells suppressed type I IFN responses stimulated by HCV RNA pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and poly(IC). The suppression occurred independently of other HCV factors; and activation of interferon stimulated genes, TNFα, IFN-λ1, and IFN-λ2/3 was likewise suppressed by HCV F/ARFP. Point mutations in the full-length HCV sequence (JFH1 genotype 2a strain) were made to introduce premature termination codons in the -2/+1 reading frame coding for F/ARFP while preserving the original reading frame, which enhanced IFNα and IFNβ induction by HCV. The potentiation of IFN response by the F/ARFP mutations was diminished in Huh7.5 cells, which already have a defective RIG-I, and by decreasing RIG-I expression in Huh7 cells. Furthermore, adding F/ARFP back via trans-complementation suppressed IFN induction in the F/ARFP mutant. The F/ARFP mutants, on the other hand, were not resistant to exogenous IFNα. Finally, HCV-infected human liver samples showed significant F/ARFP antibody reactivity, compared to HCV-uninfected control livers. Therefore, HCV F/ARFP likely cooperates with other viral factors to suppress type I and III IFN induction occurring through the RIG-I signaling pathway. This study identifies a novel mechanism of pattern recognition receptor modulation by HCV and suggests a biological function of the HCV alternate reading frame in the modulation of host innate immunity. PMID:27404108

  13. Transcriptional regulation of human retinoic acid receptor-alpha (RAR-{alpha}) by Wilms` tumour gene product

    SciTech Connect

    Goodyer, P.R.; Torban, E.; Dehbi, M.

    1994-09-01

    The Wilms` tumor gene encodes a 47-49 kDa transcription factor expressed in kidney, gonads and mesothelium during embryogenesis. Inherited mutations of WT1 lead to aberrant urogenital development and Wilms` tumor, but the role of WT1 in development is not fully understood. Since the human RAR-{alpha} gene contains a potential WT1 binding site at its 5{prime} end, we studied the effect of WT1 co-transfection on expression of an RAR-{alpha} promoter/CAT reporter construct in COS cells. COS cells were plated at 5X10{sup 5} cells/dish in DMEM with 10% FBS and transfected by the Ca/PO4 method with an expression plasmid containing the full-length WT1 (-/-) cDNA under the control of the CMV promoter, plasmid containing the RAR-{alpha} promoter (-519 to +36)/CAT reporter and TK/growth hormone plasmid to control for efficiency of transfection. CAT/GH activity at 48 hours was inhibited by co-transfection with increasing amounts of WT1 (-/-); maximum inhibition = 5% of control. WT1 co-transfection did not affect expression of TKGH, nor of a CMV-CAT vector. Expression of WT1 protein in tranfected COS cells was demonstrated by Western blotting. Minimal inhibiton of RAR-{alpha}/CAT activity was seen when cells were co-transfected with vectors containing WT1 deletion mutants, alternate WT1 splicing variants, or WT1 (-/-) cDNA bearing a mutation identified in a patient with Drash syndrome. Gel shift assays indicated binding of WT1 to RAR-{alpha} cDNA but not to an RAR-{alpha} deletion mutant lacking the GCGGGGGGCG site. These observations suggest that WT1 may function to regulate RAR-{alpha} expression during normal development.

  14. Associations of blood pressure and hypertension with lead dose measures and polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor and delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, B K; Lee, G S; Stewart, W F; Ahn, K D; Simon, D; Kelsey, K T; Todd, A C; Schwartz, B S

    2001-01-01

    Evidence suggests that lead and selected genes known to modify the toxicokinetics of lead--namely, those for the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD)--may independently influence blood pressure and hypertension risk. We report the relations among ALAD and VDR genotypes, three lead dose measures, and blood pressure and hypertension status in 798 Korean lead workers and 135 controls without occupational exposure to lead. Lead dose was assessed by blood lead, tibia lead measured by X-ray fluorescence, and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-chelatable lead. Among lead workers, 9.9% (n = 79) were heterozygous for the ALAD(2) allele, and there were no ALAD(2) homozygotes; 11.2% (n = 89) had at least one copy of the VDR B allele, and 0.5% (n = 4) had the BB genotype. In linear regression models to control for covariates, VDR genotype (BB and Bb vs. bb), blood lead, tibia lead, and DMSA-chelatable lead were all positive predictors of systolic blood pressure. On average, lead workers with the VDR B allele, mainly heterozygotes, had systolic blood pressures that were 2.7-3.7 mm Hg higher than did workers with the bb genotype. VDR genotype was also associated with diastolic blood pressure; on average, lead workers with the VDR B allele had diastolic blood pressures that were 1.9-2.5 mm Hg higher than did lead workers with the VDR bb genotype (p = 0.04). VDR genotype modified the relation of age with systolic blood pressure; compared to lead workers with the VDR bb genotype, workers with the VDR B allele had larger elevations in blood pressure with increasing age. Lead workers with the VDR B allele also had a higher prevalence of hypertension compared to lead workers with the bb genotype [adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 2.1 (1.0, 4.4), p = 0.05]. None of the lead biomarkers was associated with diastolic blood pressure, and tibia lead was the only lead dose measure that was a significant predictor of hypertension status. In

  15. Gene silencing by nuclear orphan receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Dufau, Maria L

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear orphan receptors represent a large and diverse subgroup in the nuclear receptor superfamily. Although putative ligands for these orphan members remain to be identified, some of these receptors possess intrinsic activating, inhibitory, or dual regulatory functions in development, differentiation, homeostasis, and reproduction. In particular, gene-silencing events elicited by chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFs); dosage-sensitive sex reversal-adrenal hypoplasia congenita critical region on the X chromosome, gene 1 (DAX-1); germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF); short heterodimer partner (SHP); and testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2 and TR4) are among the best characterized. These orphan receptors are critical in controlling basal activities or hormonal responsiveness of numerous target genes. They employ multiple and distinct mechanisms to mediate target gene repression. Complex cross-talk exists between these orphan receptors at their cognate DNA binding elements and an array of steroid?nonsteroid hormone receptors, other transcriptional activators, coactivators and corepressors, histone modification enzyme complexes, and components of basal transcriptional components. Therefore, perturbation induced by these orphan receptors at multiple levels, including DNA binding activities, receptor homo- or heterodimerization, recruitment of cofactor proteins, communication with general transcriptional machinery, and changes at histone acetylation status and chromatin structures, may contribute to silencing of target gene expression in a specific promoter or cell-type context. Moreover, the findings derived from gene-targeting studies have demonstrated the significance of these orphan receptors' function in physiologic settings. Thus, COUP-TFs, DAX-1, GCNF, SHP, and TR2 and 4 are known to be required for multiple physiologic and biologic functions, including neurogenesis and development of the heart and vascular system steroidogenesis and sex

  16. Folate receptor gene variants and neural tube defect occurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Finnell, R.; Greer, K.; Lammer, E.

    1994-09-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence shows that periconceptional use of folic acid supplements may prevent 40-50% of neural tube defects (NTDs). The FDA has subsequently recommended folic acid supplementation of all women of childbearing potential, even though the mechanism by which folic acid prevents NTDs is unknown. We investigated genetic variation of a candidate gene, the 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MeTHF) receptor, that may mediate this preventive effect. The receptor concentrates folate within cells and we have localized its mRNA to neuroepithelial cells during neurulation. Our hypothesis is that dysfunctional 5-MeTHF receptors inadequately concentrate folate intracellularly, predisposing infants to NTDs. We have completed SSCP analysis on 3 of the 4 coding exons of the 5-MeTHF receptor gene of 474 infants participating in a large population-based epidemiological case-control study of NTDs in California; genotyping of another 500 infants is ongoing. Genomic DNA was extracted from residual blood spots from newborn screening samples of cases and controls. Genotyping was done blinded to case status. Polymorphisms have been detected for exons 4 and 5; fourteen percent of the infants have exon 5 polymorphisms. Data will be presented on the prevalence of 5-MeTHF receptor polymorphisms among cases and controls. Relationships among the polymorphisms and NTD occurrence may shed light on how folic acid supplementation prevents NTDs.

  17. Thyroid hormone receptor can modulate retinoic acid-mediated axis formation in frog embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Banker, D E; Eisenman, R N

    1993-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor acts as a hormone-dependent transcriptional transactivator and as a transcriptional repressor in the absence of thyroid hormone. Specifically, thyroid hormone receptor can repress retinoic acid-induced gene expression through interactions with retinoic acid receptor. (Retinoic acid is a potent teratogen in the frog Xenopus laevis, acting at early embryonic stages to interfere with the formation of anterior structures. Endogenous retinoic acid is thought to act in normal anterior-posterior axis formation.) We have previously shown that thyroid hormone receptor RNA (alpha isotype) is expressed and polysome-associated during Xenopus embryogenesis preceding thyroid gland maturation and endogenous thyroid hormone production (D. E. Banker, J. Bigler, and R. N. Eisenman, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5079-5089, 1991). To determine whether thyroid hormone receptor might influence the effects of retinoic acid in early frog development, we have examined the results of ectopic thyroid hormone receptor expression on retinoic acid teratogenesis. We demonstrate that microinjections of full-length thyroid hormone receptor RNA protect injected embryos from retinoic acid teratogenesis. DNA binding is apparently essential to this protective function, as truncated thyroid hormone receptors, lacking DNA-binding domains but including hormone-binding and dimerization domains, do not protect from retinoic acid. We have shown that microinjections of these dominant-interfering thyroid hormone receptors, as well as anti-thyroid hormone receptor antibodies, increase retinoic acid teratogenesis in injected embryos, presumably by inactivating endogenous thyroid hormone receptor. This finding suggests that endogenous thyroid hormone receptors may act to limit retinoic acid sensitivity. On the other hand, after thyroid hormone treatment, ectopic thyroid hormone receptor mediates teratogenesis that is indistinguishable from the dorsoanterior deficiencies produced in retinoic acid

  18. The farnesoid X receptor induces very low density lipoprotein receptor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sirvent, Audrey; Claudel, Thierry; Martin, Geneviève; Brozek, John; Kosykh, Vladimir; Darteil, Raphaël; Hum, Dean W; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Staels, Bart

    2004-05-21

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor activated by bile acids (BAs). In response to ligand-binding, FXR regulates many genes involved in BA, lipid, and lipoprotein metabolism. To identify new FXR target genes, microarray technology was used to profile total RNA extracted from HepG2 cells treated with the natural FXR agonist chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). Interestingly, a significant increase of transcript level of the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) was observed. Our data, resulting from selective FXR activation, FXR RNA silencing and FXR-deficient mice, clearly demonstrate that BAs up-regulate VLDLR transcript levels via a FXR-dependent mechanism in vitro in human and in vivo in mouse liver cells.

  19. A thermodynamic switch modulates abscisic acid receptor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Dupeux, Florine; Santiago, Julia; Betz, Katja; Twycross, Jamie; Park, Sang-Youl; Rodriguez, Lesia; Gonzalez-Guzman, Miguel; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Krasnogor, Natalio; Blackledge, Martin; Holdsworth, Michael; Cutler, Sean R; Rodriguez, Pedro L; Márquez, José Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key hormone regulating plant growth, development and the response to biotic and abiotic stress. ABA binding to pyrabactin resistance (PYR)/PYR1-like (PYL)/Regulatory Component of Abscisic acid Receptor (RCAR) intracellular receptors promotes the formation of stable complexes with certain protein phosphatases type 2C (PP2Cs), leading to the activation of ABA signalling. The PYR/PYL/RCAR family contains 14 genes in Arabidopsis and is currently the largest plant hormone receptor family known; however, it is unclear what functional differentiation exists among receptors. Here, we identify two distinct classes of receptors, dimeric and monomeric, with different intrinsic affinities for ABA and whose differential properties are determined by the oligomeric state of their apo forms. Moreover, we find a residue in PYR1, H60, that is variable between family members and plays a key role in determining oligomeric state. In silico modelling of the ABA activation pathway reveals that monomeric receptors have a competitive advantage for binding to ABA and PP2Cs. This work illustrates how receptor oligomerization can modulate hormonal responses and more generally, the sensitivity of a ligand-dependent signalling system. PMID:21847091

  20. Retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAralpha) Mutations in Human Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Parrado, A; Chomienne, C; Padua, R A

    2000-10-01

    The retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha) plays a central role in the biology of the myeloid cellular compartment. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARalpha locus probably represent the malignant initiating events in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Recent studies that identify novel interactions between RARalpha and the nuclear receptor co-activators and co-repressors, new functions of the oncogenic RARalpha fusion proteins and their catabolism in retinoic acid-induced differentiation, and the availability of new transgenic mice models have provided important insights into our understanding of the mechanisms by which mutant forms of RARalpha can be implicated in the development of leukemia. Novel alterations of the RARalpha gene identified in hematopoietic malignant disorders other than APL, such as myelodysplastic syndromes, non-APL acute myeloid leukemias and B-chronic lymphocytic leukemias, suggest that disruption of the RARalpha gene might predispose to myeloid and lymphoid disorders.

  1. Concordance between isolated cleft palate in mice and alterations within a region including the gene encoding the [beta][sub 3] subunit of the type A [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Culiat, C.T.; Stubbs, L.; Nicholls, R.D.; Montgomery, C.S.; Russell, L.B.; Johnson, D.K. ); Rinchik, E.M. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville )

    1993-06-01

    Genetic and molecular analyses of a number of radiation-induced deletion mutations of the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in mouse chromosome 7 have identified a specific interval on the genetic map associated with a neonatally lethal mutation that results in cleft palate. This interval, closely linked and distal to p, and bracketed by the genes encoding the [alpha][sub 5] and [beta][sub 3] subunits of the type A [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor (Gabra5 and Gabrb3, respectively), contains a gene(s) (cp1; cleft palate 1) necessary for normal palate development. The cp1 interval extends from the distal breakpoint of the prenatally lethal p[sup 83FBFo] deletion to the Gabrb3 locus. Among 20 p deletions tested, there was complete concordance between alterations at the Gabrb3 transcription unit and inability to complement the cleft-palate defect. These mapping data, along with previously described in vivo and in vitro teratological effects of [gamma]-aminobutyric acid or its agonists on palate development, suggest the possibility that a particular type A [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor that includes the [beta][sub 3] subunit may be necessary for normal palate development. The placement of the cp1 gene within a defined segment of the larger D15S12h (p)-D15S9h-1 interval in the mouse suggests that the highly homologous region of the human genome, 15q11-q13, be evaluated for a role(s) in human fetal facial development. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Structure of the human progesterone receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Misrahi, M; Venencie, P Y; Saugier-Veber, P; Sar, S; Dessen, P; Milgrom, E

    1993-11-16

    The complete organization of the human progesterone receptor (hPR) gene has been determined. It spans over 90 kbp and contains eight exons. The first exon encodes the N-terminal part of the receptor. The DNA binding domain is encoded by two exons, each exon corresponding to one zinc finger. The steroid binding domain is encoded by five exons. The nucleotide sequence of 1144 bp of the 5' flanking region has been determined. PMID:8241270

  3. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F.

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Expression of serotonin receptor genes in cranial ganglia.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Naohiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Yamamoto, Kurumi; Kurokawa, Azusa; Narukawa, Masataka; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Misaka, Takumi; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Abe, Keiko

    2016-03-23

    Taste cells release neurotransmitters to gustatory neurons to transmit chemical information they received. Sweet, umami, and bitter taste cells use ATP as a neurotransmitter. However, ATP release from sour taste cells has not been observed so far. Instead, they release serotonin when they are activated by sour/acid stimuli. Thus it is still controversial whether sour taste cells use ATP, serotonin, or both. By reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subsequent in situ hybridization (ISH) analyses, we revealed that of 14 serotonin receptor genes only 5-HT3A and 5-HT3B showed significant/clear signals in a subset of neurons of cranial sensory ganglia in which gustatory neurons reside. Double-fluorescent labeling analyses of ISH for serotonin receptor genes with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) in cranial sensory ganglia of pkd1l3-WGA mice whose sour neural pathway is visualized by the distribution of WGA originating from sour taste cells in the posterior region of the tongue revealed that WGA-positive cranial sensory neurons rarely express either of serotonin receptor gene. These results suggest that serotonin receptors expressed in cranial sensory neurons do not play any role as neurotransmitter receptor from sour taste cells. PMID:26854841

  5. Biological roles and therapeutic potential of hydroxy-carboxylic Acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kashan

    2011-01-01

    In the recent past, deorphanization studies have described intermediates of energy metabolism to activate G protein-coupled receptors and to thereby regulate metabolic functions. GPR81, GPR109A, and GPR109B, formerly known as the nicotinic acid receptor family, are encoded by clustered genes and share a high degree of sequence homology. Recently, hydroxy-carboxylic acids were identified as endogenous ligands of GPR81, GPR109A, and GPR109B, and therefore these receptors have been placed into a novel receptor family of hydroxy-carboxylic acid (HCA) receptors. The HCA(1) receptor (GPR81) is activated by the glycolytic metabolite 2-hydroxy-propionic acid (lactate), the HCA(2) receptor is activated by the ketone body 3-hydroxy-butyric acid, and the HCA(3) receptor (GPR109B) is a receptor for the β-oxidation intermediate 3-hydroxy-octanoic acid. While HCA(1) and HCA(2) receptors are present in most mammalian species, the HCA(3) receptor is exclusively found in humans and higher primates. HCA receptors are expressed in adipose tissue and mediate anti-lipolytic effects in adipocytes through G(i)-type G protein-dependent inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. HCA(2) and HCA(3) inhibit lipolysis during conditions of increased β-oxidation such as prolonged fasting, whereas HCA(1) mediates the anti-lipolytic effects of insulin in the fed state. As HCA(2) is a receptor for the established anti-dyslipidemic drug nicotinic acid, HCA(1) and HCA(3) also represent promising drug targets and several synthetic ligands for HCA receptors have been developed. In this article, we will summarize the deorphanization and pharmacological characterization of HCA receptors. Moreover, we will discuss recent progress in elucidating the physiological and pathophysiological role to further evaluate the therapeutic potential of the HCA receptor family for the treatment of metabolic disease.

  6. Gene Expressions for Signal Transduction under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fukamachi, Toshihiko; Ikeda, Syunsuke; Wang, Xin; Saito, Hiromi; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Although it is now well known that some diseased areas, such as cancer nests, inflammation loci, and infarction areas, are acidified, little is known about cellular signal transduction, gene expression, and cellular functions under acidic conditions. Our group showed that different signal proteins were activated under acidic conditions compared with those observed in a typical medium of around pH 7.4 that has been used until now. Investigations of gene expression under acidic conditions may be crucial to our understanding of signal transduction in acidic diseased areas. In this study, we investigated gene expression in mesothelioma cells cultured at an acidic pH using a DNA microarray technique. After 24 h culture at pH 6.7, expressions of 379 genes were increased more than twofold compared with those in cells cultured at pH 7.5. Genes encoding receptors, signal proteins including transcription factors, and cytokines including growth factors numbered 35, 32, and 17 among the 379 genes, respectively. Since the functions of 78 genes are unknown, it can be argued that cells may have other genes for signaling under acidic conditions. The expressions of 37 of the 379 genes were observed to increase after as little as 2 h. After 24 h culture at pH 6.7, expressions of 412 genes were repressed more than twofold compared with those in cells cultured at pH 7.5, and the 412 genes contained 35, 76, and 7 genes encoding receptors, signal proteins including transcription factors, and cytokines including growth factors, respectively. These results suggest that the signal pathways in acidic diseased areas are different, at least in part, from those examined with cells cultured at a pH of around 7.4. PMID:24705103

  7. Farnesoid X receptor represses hepatic lipase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sirvent, Audrey; Verhoeven, Adrie J M; Jansen, Hans; Kosykh, Vladimir; Darteil, Raphaël J; Hum, Dean W; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Staels, Bart

    2004-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor that regulates gene expression in response to bile acids (BAs). FXR plays a central role in BA, cholesterol, and lipoprotein metabolism. Here, we identify HL, an enzyme involved in the metabolism of remnant and high density lipoproteins, as a novel FXR-regulated gene. The natural FXR ligand, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), downregulates HL gene expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. The nonsteroidal synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 also decreases HL mRNA levels in HepG2 cells and in primary human hepatocytes. Moreover, the decrease of HL mRNA levels after treatment with FXR agonists was associated with a significant decrease in secreted enzymatic activity. In addition, FXR-specific gene silencing using small interfering RNAs demonstrated that CDCA- and GW4064-mediated downregulation of HL transcript levels occurs via an FXR-dependent mechanism. Finally, using transient transfection experiments, it is shown that FXR represses transcriptional activity of a reporter driven by the -698/+13 bp human HL promoter. Taken together, these results identify HL as a new FXR-regulated gene in human liver cells. In view of the role of HL in plasma lipoprotein metabolism, our results further emphasize the central role of FXR in lipid homeostasis.

  8. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M N; Hughes, I A; Gottlieb, B; Pinsky, L

    1994-09-01

    The androgen receptor gene mutations database is a comprehensive listing of mutations published in journals and meetings proceedings. The majority of mutations are point mutations identified in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Information is included regarding the phenotype, the nature and location of the mutations, as well as the effects of the mutations on the androgen binding activity of the receptor. The current version of the database contains 149 entries, of which 114 are unique mutations. The database is available from EMBL (NetServ@EMBL-Heidelberg.DE) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (mc33001@musica.mcgill.ca).

  9. Interspecies variations in Bordetella catecholamine receptor gene regulation and function.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Timothy J; Suhadolc, Ryan J; Armstrong, Sandra K

    2015-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins. PMID:26371128

  10. Interspecies Variations in Bordetella Catecholamine Receptor Gene Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, Timothy J.; Suhadolc, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins. PMID:26371128

  11. Interspecies variations in Bordetella catecholamine receptor gene regulation and function.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Timothy J; Suhadolc, Ryan J; Armstrong, Sandra K

    2015-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins.

  12. Social regulation of cortisol receptor gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Korzan, Wayne J.; Grone, Brian P.; Fernald, Russell D.

    2014-01-01

    In many social species, individuals influence the reproductive capacity of conspecifics. In a well-studied African cichlid fish species, Astatotilapia burtoni, males are either dominant (D) and reproductively competent or non-dominant (ND) and reproductively suppressed as evidenced by reduced gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH1) release, regressed gonads, lower levels of androgens and elevated levels of cortisol. Here, we asked whether androgen and cortisol levels might regulate this reproductive suppression. Astatotilapia burtoni has four glucocorticoid receptors (GR1a, GR1b, GR2 and MR), encoded by three genes, and two androgen receptors (ARα and ARβ), encoded by two genes. We previously showed that ARα and ARβ are expressed in GnRH1 neurons in the preoptic area (POA), which regulates reproduction, and that the mRNA levels of these receptors are regulated by social status. Here, we show that GR1, GR2 and MR mRNAs are also expressed in GnRH1 neurons in the POA, revealing potential mechanisms for both androgens and cortisol to influence reproductive capacity. We measured AR, MR and GR mRNA expression levels in a microdissected region of the POA containing GnRH1 neurons, comparing D and ND males. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), we found D males had higher mRNA levels of ARα, MR, total GR1a and GR2 in the POA compared with ND males. In contrast, ND males had significantly higher levels of GR1b mRNA, a receptor subtype with a reduced transcriptional response to cortisol. Through this novel regulation of receptor type, neurons in the POA of an ND male will be less affected by the higher levels of cortisol typical of low status, suggesting GR receptor type change as a potential adaptive mechanism to mediate high cortisol levels during social suppression. PMID:25013108

  13. Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger-retinoic acid receptor α (PLZF-RARα), an oncogenic transcriptional repressor of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21WAF/CDKN1A) and tumor protein p53 (TP53) genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Young; Koh, Dong-In; Licht, Jonathan D; Kim, Kunhong; Hur, Man-Wook

    2014-07-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger-retinoic acid receptor α (PLZF-RARα) is an oncogene transcriptional repressor that is generated by a chromosomal translocation between the PLZF and RARα genes in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL-type) patients. The molecular interaction between PLZF-RARα and the histone deacetylase corepressor was proposed to be important in leukemogenesis. We found that PLZF-RARα can repress transcription of the p21WAF/CDKN1A gene, which encodes the negative cell cycle regulator p21 by binding to its proximal promoter Sp1-binding GC-boxes 3, 4, 5/6, a retinoic acid response element (RARE), and distal p53-responsive elements (p53REs). PLZF-RARα also acts as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53, RARα, and Sp1. PLZF-RARα interacts with co-repressors such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating histones Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 at the CDKN1A promoter. PLZF-RARα also interacts with the MBD3-NuRD complex, leading to epigenetic silencing of CDKN1A through DNA methylation. Furthermore, PLZF-RARα represses TP53 and increases p53 protein degradation by ubiquitination, further repressing p21 expression. Resultantly, PLZF-RARα promotes cell proliferation and significantly increases the number of cells in S-phase.

  14. Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger-Retinoic Acid Receptor α (PLZF-RARα), an Oncogenic Transcriptional Repressor of Cyclin-dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1A (p21WAF/CDKN1A) and Tumor Protein p53 (TP53) Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Il; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Young; Koh, Dong-In; Licht, Jonathan D.; Kim, Kunhong; Hur, Man-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger-retinoic acid receptor α (PLZF-RARα) is an oncogene transcriptional repressor that is generated by a chromosomal translocation between the PLZF and RARα genes in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL-type) patients. The molecular interaction between PLZF-RARα and the histone deacetylase corepressor was proposed to be important in leukemogenesis. We found that PLZF-RARα can repress transcription of the p21WAF/CDKN1A gene, which encodes the negative cell cycle regulator p21 by binding to its proximal promoter Sp1-binding GC-boxes 3, 4, 5/6, a retinoic acid response element (RARE), and distal p53-responsive elements (p53REs). PLZF-RARα also acts as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53, RARα, and Sp1. PLZF-RARα interacts with co-repressors such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating histones Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 at the CDKN1A promoter. PLZF-RARα also interacts with the MBD3-NuRD complex, leading to epigenetic silencing of CDKN1A through DNA methylation. Furthermore, PLZF-RARα represses TP53 and increases p53 protein degradation by ubiquitination, further repressing p21 expression. Resultantly, PLZF-RARα promotes cell proliferation and significantly increases the number of cells in S-phase. PMID:24821728

  15. Constitutive Effects of Lead on Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Gene Battery and Protection by β-carotene and Ascorbic Acid in Human HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Wageh S; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is an environmental pollutant that can get entry into human body through contaminated foods, drinks, and inhaled air leading to severe biological consequences, and has been responsible for many deaths worldwide. The objectives of this study were 1st to investigate the modulatory effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of Pb on AhR gene battery, which is controlling xenobiotics metabolism. 2nd, trials to reduce Pb-induced adverse effects were done using some phytochemicals like β-carotene or ascorbic acid. Human hepatoma (HepG2) cell lines were exposed to a wide range of Pb concentrations varying from physiological to toxic levels (0 to 10 mg/L) for 24 h. High Pb concentrations (1 to 10 mg/L) significantly reduced phase I (CYP1A1 and 1A2) and phase II (UGT1A6 and NQO1) xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme mRNA expression in a mechanistic manner through the AhR regulation pathway. Additionally, these Pb concentrations induced oxidative stress in HepG2 cells in terms of production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induced heme oxygenase-1 mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent phenomenon. Coexposure of HepG2 cells to physiological concentrations of some micronutrients, like β-carotene (10 μM) or ascorbic acid (0.1 mM), along with Pb (1 mg/L) for 24 h significantly reduced the levels of ROS production and recovered AhR mRNA expression into the normal levels. Thus, consumption of foods rich in these micronutrients may help to reduce the adverse effects of lead in areas with high levels of pollution. PMID:26630500

  16. Constitutive Effects of Lead on Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Gene Battery and Protection by β-carotene and Ascorbic Acid in Human HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Wageh S; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is an environmental pollutant that can get entry into human body through contaminated foods, drinks, and inhaled air leading to severe biological consequences, and has been responsible for many deaths worldwide. The objectives of this study were 1st to investigate the modulatory effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of Pb on AhR gene battery, which is controlling xenobiotics metabolism. 2nd, trials to reduce Pb-induced adverse effects were done using some phytochemicals like β-carotene or ascorbic acid. Human hepatoma (HepG2) cell lines were exposed to a wide range of Pb concentrations varying from physiological to toxic levels (0 to 10 mg/L) for 24 h. High Pb concentrations (1 to 10 mg/L) significantly reduced phase I (CYP1A1 and 1A2) and phase II (UGT1A6 and NQO1) xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme mRNA expression in a mechanistic manner through the AhR regulation pathway. Additionally, these Pb concentrations induced oxidative stress in HepG2 cells in terms of production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induced heme oxygenase-1 mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent phenomenon. Coexposure of HepG2 cells to physiological concentrations of some micronutrients, like β-carotene (10 μM) or ascorbic acid (0.1 mM), along with Pb (1 mg/L) for 24 h significantly reduced the levels of ROS production and recovered AhR mRNA expression into the normal levels. Thus, consumption of foods rich in these micronutrients may help to reduce the adverse effects of lead in areas with high levels of pollution.

  17. A third human retinoic acid receptor, hRAR-. gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Krust, A.; Kastner, Ph.; Petkovich, M.; Zelent, A.; Chambon, P. )

    1989-07-01

    Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are retinoic acid (RA)-inducible enhancer factors belonging to the superfamily of steroid/thyroid nuclear receptors. The authors have previously characterized two human RAR (hRAR-{alpha} and hRAR-{beta}) cDNAs and have recently cloned their murine cognates (mRAR-{alpha} and mRAR-{beta}) together with a third RAR (mRAR-{gamma}) whose RNA was detected predominantly in skin, a well-known target for RA. mRAR-{gamma} cDNA was used here to clone its human counterpart (hRAR-{gamma}) from a T47D breast cancer cell cDNA library. Using a transient transfection assay in HeLa cells and a reporter gene harboring a synthetic RA responsive element, they demonstrate that hRAR-{gamma} cDNA indeed encodes a RA-inducible transcriptional trans-activator. Interestingly, comparisons of the amino acid sequences of all six human and mouse RARs indicate that the interspecies conservation of a given member of the RAR subfamily (either {alpha}, {beta}, or {gamma}) is much higher than the conservation of all three receptors within a given species. These observations indicate that RAR-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} may perform specific functions. They show also that hRAR-{gamma} RNA is the predominant RAR RNA species in human skin, which suggests that hRAR-{gamma} mediates some of the retinoid effects in this tissue.

  18. New Role for Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor-Induced Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 in Histone Modification and Retinoic Acid Receptor α Recruitment to Gene Promoters: Relevance to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Cell Differentiation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Cassinat, B.; Zassadowski, F.; Ferry, C.; Llopis, L.; Bruck, N.; Lainey, E.; Duong, V.; Cras, A.; Despouy, G.; Chourbagi, O.; Beinse, G.; Fenaux, P.; Rochette Egly, C.; Chomienne, C.

    2011-01-01

    The induction of the granulocytic differentiation of leukemic cells by all-trans retinoic acid (RA) has been a major breakthrough in terms of survival for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients. Here we highlight the synergism and the underlying novel mechanism between RA and the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to restore differentiation of RA-refractory APL blasts. First, we show that in RA-refractory APL cells (UF-1 cell line), PML-RA receptor alpha (RARα) is not released from target promoters in response to RA, resulting in the maintenance of chromatin repression. Consequently, RARα cannot be recruited, and the RA target genes are not activated. We then deciphered how the combination of G-CSF and RA successfully restored the activation of RA target genes to levels achieved in RA-sensitive APL cells. We demonstrate that G-CSF restores RARα recruitment to target gene promoters through the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and the subsequent derepression of chromatin. Thus, combinatorial activation of cytokines and RARs potentiates transcriptional activity through epigenetic modifications induced by specific signaling pathways. PMID:21262770

  19. The human glutamate receptor delta 2 gene (GRID2) maps to chromosome 4q22.

    PubMed

    Hu, W; Zuo, J; De Jager, P L; Heintz, N

    1998-01-01

    We isolated the human glutamate receptor delta 2 (GRID2) gene, which has 97.0% identity in amino acid sequence to the mouse glutamate receptor delta 2 (Grid2) gene. We subsequently mapped this gene to human chromosome 4q22 by radiation hybrid mapping and by hybridization to two overlapping human yeast artificial chromosomes that are located in 4q22. The Grid2 gene, which is mutated in lurcher (Lc) mice, maps to mouse chromosome 6. Thus, the mapping of the GRID2 gene to human chromosome 4q22 confirms and refines a region of synteny between mouse and human genomes.

  20. Nutritional Signaling via Free Fatty Acid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Junki; Hasegawa, Sae; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Nakajima, Akira; Kimura, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when demand for energy arises. Dysfunction of energy balance by excess food intake leads to metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFAs) provided by dietary fat are not only important nutrients, but also contribute key physiological functions via FFA receptor (FFAR)-mediated signaling molecules, which depend on FFAs' carbon chain length and the ligand specificity of the receptors. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs are critical for metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and contribute to energy homeostasis. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 and GPR120 improved glucose metabolism and systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the anti-inflammation and energy metabolism effects of short chain FAs have been linked to the activation of GPR41 and GPR43. In this review, we summarize recent progress in research on FFAs and their physiological roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. PMID:27023530

  1. Nutritional Signaling via Free Fatty Acid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Junki; Hasegawa, Sae; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Nakajima, Akira; Kimura, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when demand for energy arises. Dysfunction of energy balance by excess food intake leads to metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFAs) provided by dietary fat are not only important nutrients, but also contribute key physiological functions via FFA receptor (FFAR)-mediated signaling molecules, which depend on FFAs’ carbon chain length and the ligand specificity of the receptors. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs are critical for metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and contribute to energy homeostasis. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 and GPR120 improved glucose metabolism and systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the anti-inflammation and energy metabolism effects of short chain FAs have been linked to the activation of GPR41 and GPR43. In this review, we summarize recent progress in research on FFAs and their physiological roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. PMID:27023530

  2. Ghrelin axis genes, peptides and receptors: recent findings and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Josh, Peter; Cunningham, Peter; Herington, Adrian; Chopin, Lisa

    2011-06-20

    The ghrelin axis consists of the gene products of the ghrelin gene (GHRL), and their receptors, including the classical ghrelin receptor GHSR. While it is well-known that the ghrelin gene encodes the 28 amino acid ghrelin peptide hormone, it is now also clear that the locus encodes a range of other bioactive molecules, including novel peptides and non-coding RNAs. For many of these molecules, the physiological functions and cognate receptor(s) remain to be determined. Emerging research techniques, including proteogenomics, are likely to reveal further ghrelin axis-derived molecules. Studies of the role of ghrelin axis genes, peptides and receptors, therefore, promises to be a fruitful area of basic and clinical research in years to come.

  3. The human [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit [beta]3 and [alpha]5 gene cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13 is rich in highly polymorphic (CA)[sub n] repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Glatt, K.; Lalande, M. ); Sinnett, D. )

    1994-01-01

    The [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA[sub A]) receptor [beta]33 (GABRB3) and [alpha]5 (GABRA5) subunit genes have been localized to the Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome region of chromosome 15q11-q13. GABRB3, which encompasses 250 kb, is located 100 kb proximal of GABRA5, with the two genes arranged in head-to-head transcriptional orientation. In screening 135 kb of cloned DNA within a 260-kb interval extending from within GABRB3 to the 5[prime] end of GABRA5, 10 new (CA), repeats have been identified. Five of these have been analyzed in detail and found to be highly polymorphic, with the polymorphism information content (PIC) ranging from 0.7 to 0.85 and with heterozygosities of 67 to 94%. In the clones from GABRB3/GABRA5 region, therefore, the frequency of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 is 1 per 27 kb. Previous estimates of the density of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 in the human genome have been approximately 10-fold lower. The GABRB3/GABRA5 region appears, therefore, to be enriched for highly informative (CA)[sub n]. This set of closely spaced, short tandem repeat polymorphisms will be useful in the molecular analyses of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and in high-resolution studies of genetic recombination within this region. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  5. Retinoic acid receptors: from molecular mechanisms to cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    di Masi, Alessandra; Leboffe, Loris; De Marinis, Elisabetta; Pagano, Francesca; Cicconi, Laura; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Nervi, Clara

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the major bioactive metabolite of retinol or vitamin A, induces a spectrum of pleiotropic effects in cell growth and differentiation that are relevant for embryonic development and adult physiology. The RA activity is mediated primarily by members of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) subfamily, namely RARα, RARβ and RARγ, which belong to the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. RARs form heterodimers with members of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) subfamily and act as ligand-regulated transcription factors through binding specific RA response elements (RAREs) located in target genes promoters. RARs also have non-genomic effects and activate kinase signaling pathways, which fine-tune the transcription of the RA target genes. The disruption of RA signaling pathways is thought to underlie the etiology of a number of hematological and non-hematological malignancies, including leukemias, skin cancer, head/neck cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, renal cell carcinoma, pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, glioblastoma and neuroblastoma. Of note, RA and its derivatives (retinoids) are employed as potential chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents because of their differentiation, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant effects. In humans, retinoids reverse premalignant epithelial lesions, induce the differentiation of myeloid normal and leukemic cells, and prevent lung, liver, and breast cancer. Here, we provide an overview of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that regulate the RA and retinoid signaling pathways. Moreover, mechanisms through which deregulation of RA signaling pathways ultimately impact on cancer are examined. Finally, the therapeutic effects of retinoids are reported. PMID:25543955

  6. Glutamate receptor-like channels in plants: a role as amino acid sensors in plant defence?

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Plant glutamate receptor-like genes (GLRs) are homologous to the genes for mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), after which they were named, but in the 16 years since their existence was first revealed, progress in elucidating their biological role has been disappointingly slow. Recently, however, studies from a number of laboratories focusing on the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) have thrown new light on the functional properties of some members of the GLR gene family. One important finding has been that plant GLR receptors have a much broader ligand specificity than their mammalian iGluR counterparts, with evidence that some individual GLR receptors can be gated by as many as seven amino acids. These results, together with the ubiquity of their expression throughout the plant, open up the possibility that GLR receptors could have a pervasive role in plants as non-specific amino acid sensors in diverse biological processes. Addressing what one of these roles could be, recent studies examining the wound response and disease susceptibility in GLR knockout mutants have provided evidence that some members of clade 3 of the GLR gene family encode important components of the plant's defence response. Ways in which this family of amino acid receptors might contribute to the plant's ability to respond to an attack from pests and pathogens are discussed. PMID:24991414

  7. EMBO Retinoids 2011: mechanisms, biology and pathology of signaling by retinoic acid and retinoic acid receptors

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Neil J.

    2012-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is one of the principal active metabolites of vitamin A (retinol) which mediates a spectrum of critical physiological and developmental processes. Transcriptional regulation by RA is mediated primarily by members of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) subfamily of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. NRs bind specific genomic DNA sequence motifs and engage coregulators and components of the basal transcription machinery to effect transcriptional regulation at target gene promoters. Disruption of signaling by retinoic acid is thought to underlie the etiology of a number of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases including breast cancer and haematological malignancies. A meeting of international researchers in retinoid signaling was convened in Strasbourg in September 2011 under the auspices of the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO). Retinoids 2011 encompassed myriad mechanistic, biological and pathological aspects of these hormones and their cognate receptors, as well as setting these advances in the context of wider current questions on signaling by members of the NR superfamily. PMID:22438793

  8. T Cell Receptor Gene Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thomas M.; Ragnarsson, Gunnar B.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract T cell-based adoptive immunotherapy has been shown to be a promising treatment for various types of cancer. However, adoptive T cell therapy currently requires the custom isolation and characterization of tumor-specific T cells from each patient—a process that can be not only difficult and time-consuming but also often fails to yield high-avidity T cells, which together have limited the broad application of this approach as a clinical treatment. Employing T cell receptor (TCR) gene therapy as a component of adoptive T cell therapy strategies can overcome many of these obstacles, allowing autologous T cells with a defined specificity to be generated in a much shorter time period. Initial studies using this approach have been hampered by a number of technical difficulties resulting in low TCR expression and acquisition of potentially problematic specificities due to mispairing of introduced TCR chains with endogenous TCR chains. The last several years have seen substantial progress in our understanding of the multiple facets of TCR gene therapy that will have to be properly orchestrated for this strategy to succeed. Here we outline the challenges of TCR gene therapy and the advances that have been made toward realizing the promise of this approach. PMID:19702439

  9. Pharmacology of bile acid receptors: Evolution of bile acids from simple detergents to complex signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Copple, Bryan L; Li, Tiangang

    2016-02-01

    For many years, bile acids were thought to only function as detergents which solubilize fats and facilitate the uptake of fat-soluble vitamins in the intestine. Many early observations; however, demonstrated that bile acids regulate more complex processes, such as bile acids synthesis and immune cell function through activation of signal transduction pathways. These studies were the first to suggest that receptors may exist for bile acids. Ultimately, seminal studies by many investigators led to the discovery of several bile acid-activated receptors including the farnesoid X receptor, the vitamin D receptor, the pregnane X receptor, TGR5, α5 β1 integrin, and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2. Several of these receptors are expressed outside of the gastrointestinal system, indicating that bile acids may have diverse functions throughout the body. Characterization of the functions of these receptors over the last two decades has identified many important roles for these receptors in regulation of bile acid synthesis, transport, and detoxification; regulation of glucose utilization; regulation of fatty acid synthesis and oxidation; regulation of immune cell function; regulation of energy expenditure; and regulation of neural processes such as gastric motility. Through these many functions, bile acids regulate many aspects of digestion ranging from uptake of essential vitamins to proper utilization of nutrients. Accordingly, within a short time period, bile acids moved beyond simple detergents and into the realm of complex signaling molecules. Because of the important processes that bile acids regulate through activation of receptors, drugs that target these receptors are under development for the treatment of several diseases, including cholestatic liver disease and metabolic syndrome. In this review, we will describe the various bile acid receptors, the signal transduction pathways activated by these receptors, and briefly discuss the physiological processes that

  10. Androgen receptor gene polymorphism in zebra species.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideyuki; Langenhorst, Tanya; Ogden, Rob; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2015-09-01

    Androgen receptor genes (AR) have been found to have associations with reproductive development, behavioral traits, and disorders in humans. However, the influence of similar genetic effects on the behavior of other animals is scarce. We examined the loci AR glutamine repeat (ARQ) in 44 Grevy's zebras, 23 plains zebras, and three mountain zebras, and compared them with those of domesticated horses. We observed polymorphism among zebra species and between zebra and horse. As androgens such as testosterone influence aggressiveness, AR polymorphism among equid species may be associated with differences in levels of aggression and tameness. Our findings indicate that it would be useful to conduct further studies focusing on the potential association between AR and personality traits, and to understand domestication of equid species. PMID:26236645

  11. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L

    1997-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 212 to 272. We have expanded the database: (i) by adding a large amount of new data on somatic mutations in prostatic cancer tissue; (ii) by defining a new constitutional phenotype, mild androgen insensitivity (MAI); (iii) by placing additional relevant information on an internet site (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/ ). The database has allowed us to examine the contribution of CpG sites to the multiplicity of reports of the same mutation in different families. The database is also available from EMBL (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker Pro or Word file (MC33@musica,mcgill.ca)

  12. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Vasiliou, D M; Pinsky, L

    1996-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. We have added (if available) data on the androgen binding phenotype of the mutant AR, the clinical phenotype of the affected persons, the family history and whether the pathogenicity of a mutation has been proven. Exonic mutations are now listed in 5'-->3' sequence regardless of type and single base pair changes are presented in codon context. Splice site and intronic mutations are listed separately. The database has allowed us to substantiate and amplify the observation of mutational hot spots within exons encoding the AR androgen binding domain. The database is available from EML (ftp://www.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  13. Anatomical and pharmacological characterization of excitatory amino acid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Monaghan, D.T.

    1985-01-01

    The majority of the excitatory neurotransmission in the vertebrate Central Nervous System is thought to be mediated by acidic amino acid neurotransmitters. However, relatively little is known about the excitatory amino acid receptors and their distribution within the CNS. By analyzing radioligand binding to purified synaptic plasma membranes and to thin tissue sections processed for autoradiography, multiple distinct binding sites were found. These binding sites exhibited the pharmacological properties indicative of the excitatory amino acid receptors, which had been identified by electrophysiological techniques. Specifically, L-(/sup 3/H)-glutamate and D-(/sup 3/H)-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate appear to label N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, L-(/sup 3/H)-glutamate and (/sup 3/H)-kainic acid appear to label kainic acid receptors, and L-(/sup 3/H)-glutamate and (/sup 3/H)-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate appear to label quisqualate receptors. Together, these results confirm the three receptor scheme proposed for excitatory amino acid neurotransmission. These results also show that these transmitter-receptor systems are differentially distributed in the brain, and that the total distribution is consistent with that found by other markers for excitatory amino acid-using neurons.

  14. Farnesoid X Receptor Agonists and Other Bile Acid Signaling Strategies for Treatment of Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Halilbasic, Emina; Fuchs, Claudia; Traussnigg, Stefan; Trauner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) respond to bile acids (BAs) by activating transcriptional networks and/or signaling cascades. These cascades affect the expression of a great number of target genes relevant for BA, cholesterol, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, as well as genes involved in inflammation, fibrosis and carcinogenesis. FXR activation in the liver tissue and beyond, such as the gut-liver axis, kidney and adipose tissue, plays a role in metabolic diseases. These BA receptors activators hold promise to become a new class of drugs to be used in the treatment of chronic liver disease, hepatocellular cancer and extrahepatic inflammatory and metabolic diseases. This review discusses the relevant BA receptors, the new drugs that target BA transport and signaling and their possible applications. PMID:27332721

  15. Bile acid receptor agonist GW4064 regulates PPARγ coactivator-1α expression through estrogen receptor-related receptor α.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Shailendra Kumar Dhar; Singh, Nidhi; Kumari, Rashmi; Mishra, Jay Sharan; Tripathi, Sarita; Banerjee, Priyam; Shah, Priyanka; Kukshal, Vandana; Tyagi, Abdul Malik; Gaikwad, Anil Nilkanth; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Mishra, Durga Prasad; Trivedi, Arun Kumar; Sanyal, Somali; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Ramachandran, Ravishankar; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Bandyopadhyay, Arun; Arora, Ashish; Lundåsen, Thomas; Anakk, Sayee Priyadarshini; Moore, David D; Sanyal, Sabyasachi

    2011-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is induced in energy-starved conditions and is a key regulator of energy homeostasis. This makes PGC-1α an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In our effort to identify new regulators of PGC-1α expression, we found that GW4064, a widely used synthetic agonist for the nuclear bile acid receptor [farnesoid X receptor (FXR)] strongly enhances PGC-1α promoter reporter activity, mRNA, and protein expression. This induction in PGC-1α concomitantly enhances mitochondrial mass and expression of several PGC-1α target genes involved in mitochondrial function. Using FXR-rich or FXR-nonexpressing cell lines and tissues, we found that this effect of GW4064 is not mediated directly by FXR but occurs via activation of estrogen receptor-related receptor α (ERRα). Cell-based, biochemical and biophysical assays indicate GW4064 as an agonist of ERR proteins. Interestingly, FXR disruption alters GW4064 induction of PGC-1α mRNA in a tissue-dependent manner. Using FXR-null [FXR knockout (FXRKO)] mice, we determined that GW4064 induction of PGC-1α expression is not affected in oxidative soleus muscles of FXRKO mice but is compromised in the FXRKO liver. Mechanistic studies to explain these differences revealed that FXR physically interacts with ERR and protects them from repression by the atypical corepressor, small heterodimer partner in liver. Together, this interplay between ERRα-FXR-PGC-1α and small heterodimer partner offers new insights into the biological functions of ERRα and FXR, thus providing a knowledge base for therapeutics in energy balance-related pathophysiology.

  16. A widely used retinoic acid receptor antagonist induces peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activity.

    PubMed

    Schupp, Michael; Curtin, Joshua C; Kim, Roy J; Billin, Andrew N; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2007-05-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are transcription factors whose activity is regulated by the binding of small lipophilic ligands, including hormones, vitamins, and metabolites. Pharmacological NR ligands serve as important therapeutic agents; for example, all-trans retinoic acid, an activating ligand for retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha), is used to treat leukemia. Another RARalpha ligand, (E)-S,S-dioxide-4-(2-(7-(heptyloxy)-3,4-dihydro-4,4-dimethyl-2H-1-benzothiopyran-6-yl)-1-propenyl)-benzoic acid (Ro 41-5253), is a potent antagonist that has been a useful and purportedly specific probe of RARalpha function. Here, we report that Ro 41-5253 also activates the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation and target of widely prescribed antidiabetic thiazolidinediones (TZDs). Ro 41-5253 enhanced differentiation of mouse and human preadipocytes and activated PPARgamma target genes in mature adipocytes. Like the TZDs, Ro 41-5253 also down-regulated PPARgamma protein expression in adipocytes. In addition, Ro 41-5253 activated the PPARgamma-ligand binding domain in transiently transfected HEK293T cells. These effects were not prevented by a potent RARalpha agonist or by depleting cells of RARalpha, indicating that PPARgamma activation was not related to RARalpha antagonism. Indeed, Ro 41-5253 was able to compete with TZD ligands for binding to PPARgamma, suggesting that Ro 41-5253 directly affects PPAR activity. These results vividly demonstrate that pharmacological NR ligands may have "off-target" effects on other NRs. Ro 41-5253 is a PPARgamma agonist as well as an RARalpha antagonist whose pleiotropic effects on NRs may signify a unique spectrum of biological responses.

  17. Castor oil induces laxation and uterus contraction via ricinoleic acid activating prostaglandin EP3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Tunaru, Sorin; Althoff, Till F; Nüsing, Rolf M; Diener, Martin; Offermanns, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Castor oil is one of the oldest drugs. When given orally, it has a laxative effect and induces labor in pregnant females. The effects of castor oil are mediated by ricinoleic acid, a hydroxylated fatty acid released from castor oil by intestinal lipases. Despite the wide-spread use of castor oil in conventional and folk medicine, the molecular mechanism by which ricinoleic acid acts remains unknown. Here we show that the EP(3) prostanoid receptor is specifically activated by ricinoleic acid and that it mediates the pharmacological effects of castor oil. In mice lacking EP(3) receptors, the laxative effect and the uterus contraction induced via ricinoleic acid are absent. Although a conditional deletion of the EP(3) receptor gene in intestinal epithelial cells did not affect castor oil-induced diarrhea, mice lacking EP(3) receptors only in smooth-muscle cells were unresponsive to this drug. Thus, the castor oil metabolite ricinoleic acid activates intestinal and uterine smooth-muscle cells via EP(3) prostanoid receptors. These findings identify the cellular and molecular mechanism underlying the pharmacological effects of castor oil and indicate a role of the EP(3) receptor as a target to induce laxative effects.

  18. Regulation of Expression of Citrate Synthase by the Retinoic Acid Receptor-Related Orphan Receptor α (RORα)

    PubMed Central

    Crumbley, Christine; Wang, Yongjun; Banerjee, Subhashis; Burris, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORα) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors that plays an important role in regulation of the circadian rhythm and metabolism. Mice lacking a functional RORα display a range of metabolic abnormalities including decreased serum cholesterol and plasma triglycerides. Citrate synthase (CS) is a key enzyme of the citric acid cycle that provides energy for cellular function. Additionally, CS plays a critical role in providing citrate derived acetyl-CoA for lipogenesis and cholesterologenesis. Here, we identified a functional RORα response element (RORE) in the promoter of the CS gene. ChIP analysis demonstrates RORα occupancy of the CS promoter and a putative RORE binds to RORα effectively in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and confers RORα responsiveness to a reporter gene in a cotransfection assay. We also observed a decrease in CS gene expression and CS enzymatic activity in the staggerer mouse, which has a mutation of in the Rora gene resulting in nonfunctional RORα protein. Furthermore, we found that SR1001 a RORα inverse agonist eliminated the circadian pattern of expression of CS mRNA in mice. These data suggest that CS is a direct RORα target gene and one mechanism by which RORα regulates lipid metabolism is via regulation of CS expression. PMID:22485150

  19. Motor coordination in mice with hotfoot, Lurcher, and double mutations of the Grid2 gene encoding the delta-2 excitatory amino acid receptor.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, R; Hayzoun, K; Selimi, F; Mariani, J; Strazielle, C

    2003-11-01

    Grid2(ho/ho) is a loss of function gene mutation resulting in abnormal dendritic arborizations of Purkinje cells. These mutants were compared in a series of motor coordination tests requiring balance and equilibrium to nonataxic controls (Grid2(ho/+)) and to a double mutant (Grid2(ho/Lc)) with an inserted Lc mutation. The performance of Grid2(ho/ho) mutant mice was poorer than that of controls on stationary beam, coat hanger, unsteady platform, and rotorod tests. Grid2(ho/Lc) did not differ from Grid2(Lc/+) mice. However, the insertion of the Lc mutation in Grid2(ho/Lc) potentiated the deficits found in Grid2(ho/ho) in stationary beam, unsteady platform, and rotorod tests. These results indicate a deleterious effect of the Lc mutation on Grid2-deficient mice.

  20. Determination of ligand-binding specificity by alternative splicing: Two distinct growth factor receptors encoded by a single gene

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, T.; Bottaro, D.P.; Fleming, T.P.; Smith, C.L.; Chan, A.M.L.; Aaronson, S.A. ); Burgess, W.H. )

    1992-01-01

    Expression cDNA cloning and structural analysis of the human keratinocyte growth factor receptor (KGFR) revealed identity with one of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors encoded by the bek gene (FGFR-2), except for a divergent stretch of 49 amino acids in their extracellular domains. Binding assays demonstrated that the KGFR was a high-affinity receptor for both KGF and acidic FGF, while FGFR-2 showed high affinity for basic and acidic FGF but no detectable binding by KGF. Genomic analysis of the bek gene revealed two alternative exons responsible for the region of divergence between the two receptors. The KGFR transcript was specific to epithelial cells, and it appeared to be differentially regulated with respect to the alternative FGFR-2 transcript. Thus, two growth factor receptors with different ligand-binding specificities and expression patterns are encoded by alternative transcripts of the same gene.

  1. Regulation of vitamin D receptor expression by retinoic acid receptor alpha in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Marchwicka, Aleksandra; Cebrat, Małgorzata; Łaszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Śnieżewski, Łukasz; Brown, Geoffrey; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2016-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by an accumulation of malignant immature myeloid precursors. A very promising way to treat AML is differentiation therapy using either all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D), or the use of both these differentiation-inducing agents. However, the effect of combination treatment varies in different AML cell lines, and this is due to ATRA either down- or up-regulating transcription of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in the cells examined. The mechanism of transcriptional regulation of VDR in response to ATRA has not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) is responsible for regulating VDR transcription in AML cells. We have shown that a VDR transcriptional variant, originating in exon 1a, is regulated by RARα agonists in AML cells. Moreover, in cells with a high basal level of RARα protein, the VDR gene is transcriptionally repressed as long as RARα agonist is absent. In these cells down-regulation of the level of RARα leads to increased expression of VDR. We consider that our findings provide a mechanistic background to explain the different outcomes from treating AML cell lines with a combination of ATRA and 1,25D. PMID:26969398

  2. Gene Transfer and Molecular Cloning of the Human NGF Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Moses V.; Bothwell, Mark A.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Koprowski, Hilary; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Buck, C. Randall; Sehgal, Amita

    1986-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor are important in the development of cells derived from the neural crest. Mouse L cell transformants have been generated that stably express the human NGF receptor gene transfer with total human DNA. Affinity cross-linking, metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, and equilibrium binding with 125I-labeled NGF revealed that this NGF receptor had the same size and binding characteristics as the receptor from human melanoma cells and rat PC12 cells. The sequences encoding the NGF receptor were molecularly cloned using the human Alu repetitive sequence as a probe. A cosmid clone that contained the human NGF receptor gene allowed efficient transfection and expression of the receptor.

  3. Functional Characterization of Soybean Glyma04g39610 as a Brassinosteroid Receptor Gene and Evolutionary Analysis of Soybean Brassinosteroid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Suna; Tao, Ping; Xu, Feng; Wu, Aiping; Huo, Weige; Wang, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BR) play important roles in plant growth and development. Although BR receptors have been intensively studied in Arabidopsis, the BR receptors in soybean remain largely unknown. Here, in addition to the known receptor gene Glyma06g15270 (GmBRI1a), we identified five putative BR receptor genes in the soybean genome: GmBRI1b, GmBRL1a, GmBRL1b, GmBRL2a, and GmBRL2b. Analysis of their expression patterns by quantitative real-time PCR showed that they are ubiquitously expressed in primary roots, lateral roots, stems, leaves, and hypocotyls. We used rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to clone GmBRI1b (Glyma04g39160), and found that the predicted amino acid sequence of GmBRI1b showed high similarity to those of AtBRI1 and pea PsBRI1. Structural modeling of the ectodomain also demonstrated similarities between the BR receptors of soybean and Arabidopsis. GFP-fusion experiments verified that GmBRI1b localizes to the cell membrane. We also explored GmBRI1b function in Arabidopsis through complementation experiments. Ectopic over-expression of GmBRI1b in Arabidopsis BR receptor loss-of-function mutant (bri1-5 bak1-1D) restored hypocotyl growth in etiolated seedlings; increased the growth of stems, leaves, and siliques in light; and rescued the developmental defects in leaves of the bri1-6 mutant, and complemented the responses of BR biosynthesis-related genes in the bri1-5 bak1-D mutant grown in light. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that the six BR receptor genes in soybean resulted from three gene duplication events during evolution. Phylogenetic analysis classified the BR receptors in dicots and monocots into three subclades. Estimation of the synonymous (Ks) and the nonsynonymous substitution rate (Ka) and selection pressure (Ka/Ks) revealed that the Ka/Ks of BR receptor genes from dicots and monocots were less than 1.0, indicating that BR receptor genes in plants experienced purifying selection during evolution. PMID:27338344

  4. Functional Characterization of Soybean Glyma04g39610 as a Brassinosteroid Receptor Gene and Evolutionary Analysis of Soybean Brassinosteroid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Suna; Tao, Ping; Xu, Feng; Wu, Aiping; Huo, Weige; Wang, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BR) play important roles in plant growth and development. Although BR receptors have been intensively studied in Arabidopsis, the BR receptors in soybean remain largely unknown. Here, in addition to the known receptor gene Glyma06g15270 (GmBRI1a), we identified five putative BR receptor genes in the soybean genome: GmBRI1b, GmBRL1a, GmBRL1b, GmBRL2a, and GmBRL2b. Analysis of their expression patterns by quantitative real-time PCR showed that they are ubiquitously expressed in primary roots, lateral roots, stems, leaves, and hypocotyls. We used rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to clone GmBRI1b (Glyma04g39160), and found that the predicted amino acid sequence of GmBRI1b showed high similarity to those of AtBRI1 and pea PsBRI1. Structural modeling of the ectodomain also demonstrated similarities between the BR receptors of soybean and Arabidopsis. GFP-fusion experiments verified that GmBRI1b localizes to the cell membrane. We also explored GmBRI1b function in Arabidopsis through complementation experiments. Ectopic over-expression of GmBRI1b in Arabidopsis BR receptor loss-of-function mutant (bri1-5 bak1-1D) restored hypocotyl growth in etiolated seedlings; increased the growth of stems, leaves, and siliques in light; and rescued the developmental defects in leaves of the bri1-6 mutant, and complemented the responses of BR biosynthesis-related genes in the bri1-5 bak1-D mutant grown in light. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that the six BR receptor genes in soybean resulted from three gene duplication events during evolution. Phylogenetic analysis classified the BR receptors in dicots and monocots into three subclades. Estimation of the synonymous (Ks) and the nonsynonymous substitution rate (Ka) and selection pressure (Ka/Ks) revealed that the Ka/Ks of BR receptor genes from dicots and monocots were less than 1.0, indicating that BR receptor genes in plants experienced purifying selection during evolution. PMID:27338344

  5. Conserved structure and adjacent location of the thrombin receptor and protease-activated receptor 2 genes define a protease-activated receptor gene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, M.; Ishii, K.; Kuo, W. L.; Piper, M.; Connolly, A.; Shi, Y. P.; Wu, R.; Lin, C. C.; Coughlin, S. R.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thrombin is a serine protease that elicits a variety of cellular responses. Molecular cloning of a thrombin receptor revealed a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by a novel proteolytic mechanism. Recently, a second protease-activated receptor was discovered and dubbed PAR2. PAR2 is highly related to the thrombin receptor by sequence and, like the thrombin receptor, is activated by cleavage of its amino terminal exodomain. Also like the thrombin receptor, PAR2 can be activated by the hexapeptide corresponding to its tethered ligand sequence independent of receptor cleavage. Thus, functionally, the thrombin receptor and PAR2 constitute a fledgling receptor family that shares a novel proteolytic activation mechanism. To further explore the relatedness of the two known protease-activated receptors and to examine the possibility that a protease-activated gene cluster might exist, we have compared the structure and chromosomal locations of the thrombin receptor and PAR2 genes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The genomic structures of the two protease-activated receptor genes were determined by analysis of lambda phage, P1 bacteriophage, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) genomic clones. Chromosomal location was determined with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on metaphase chromosomes, and the relative distance separating the two genes was evaluated both by means of two-color FISH and analysis of YACs and BACs containing both genes. RESULTS: Analysis of genomic clones revealed that the two protease-activated receptor genes share a two-exon genomic structure in which the first exon encodes 5'-untranslated sequence and signal peptide, and the second exon encodes the mature receptor protein and 3'-untranslated sequence. The two receptor genes also share a common locus with the two human genes located at 5q13 and the two mouse genes at 13D2, a syntenic region of the mouse genome. These techniques also suggest that the physical distance separating

  6. Dopamine receptor genes: new tools for molecular psychiatry.

    PubMed Central

    Niznik, H B; Van Tol, H H

    1992-01-01

    For over a decade it has been generally assumed that all the pharmacological and biochemical actions of dopamine within the central nervous system and periphery were mediated by two distinct dopamine receptors. These receptors, termed D1 and D2, were defined as those coupled to the stimulation or inhibition of adenylate cyclase, respectively, and by their selectivity and avidity for various drugs and compounds. The concept that two dopamine receptors were sufficient to account for all the effects mediated by dopamine was an oversimplification. Recent molecular biological studies have identified five distinct genes which encode at least eight functional dopamine receptors. The members of the expanded dopamine receptor family, however, can still be codifed by way of the original D1 and D2 receptor dichotomy. These include two genes encoding dopamine D1-like receptors (D1 [D1A]/D5 [D1B]) and three genes encoding D2-like receptors (D2/D3/D4). We review here our recent work on the cloning and characterization of some of the members of the dopamine receptor gene family (D1, D2, D4, D5), their relationship to neuropsychiatric disorders and their potential role in antipsychotic drug action. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1450188

  7. [Antinociceptive effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) through long fatty acid receptor G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40)].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Kazuo; Nishinaka, Takashi; Sato, Naoya; Mankura, Mitsumasa; Koyama, Yutaka; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids, one class of essential nutrients for humans, are an important source of energy and an essential component of cell membranes. They also function as signal transduction molecules in a variety of biological phenomena. The important functional role of fatty acids in both onset and suppression of pain has become increasingly apparent in recent years. Recently, we have also demonstrated that the release of an endogenous opioid peptide, β-endorphin, plays an important role in the induction of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-induced antinociception. It is well known that fatty acids affect intracellular and intercellular signaling as well as the membrane fluidity of neurons. In addition to intracellular actions, unbound free fatty acids (FFAs) can also carry out extracellular signaling by stimulating the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Among these receptors, G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) has been reported to be activated by long-chain fatty acids such as DHA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and arachidonic acid. In the peripheral area, GPR40 is preferentially expressed in pancreatic β-cells and is known to relate to the secretion of hormone and peptides. On the other hand, even though this receptor is widely distributed in the central nervous system, reports studying the role and functions of GPR40 in the brain have not been found. In this review, we summarize the findings of our recent study about the long-chain fatty acid receptor GPR40 as a novel pain regulatory system. PMID:24584021

  8. Enhancement of arachidonic acid signaling pathway by nicotinic acid receptor HM74A

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuting . E-mail: ytang@prdus.jnj.com; Zhou, Lubing; Gunnet, Joseph W.; Wines, Pamela G.; Cryan, Ellen V.; Demarest, Keith T.

    2006-06-23

    HM74A is a G protein-coupled receptor for nicotinic acid (niacin), which has been used clinically to treat dyslipidemia for decades. The molecular mechanisms whereby niacin exerts its pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In addition, the most common side effect in niacin therapy is skin flushing that is caused by prostaglandin release, suggesting that the phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2})/arachidonic acid (AA) pathway is involved. Various eicosanoids have been shown to activate peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) that play a diverse array of roles in lipid metabolism. To further elucidate the potential roles of HM74A in mediating the therapeutic effects and/or side effects of niacin, we sought to explore the signaling events upon HM74A activation. Here we demonstrated that HM74A synergistically enhanced UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner in A431 cells. Activation of HM74A also led to Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization and enhanced bradykinin-promoted Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization through Gi protein. While HM74A increased ERK1/2 activation by the bradykinin receptor, it had no effects on UTP-promoted ERK1/2 activation.Furthermore, UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release was significantly decreased in the presence of both MAPK kinase inhibitor PD 098059 and PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. However, the synergistic effects of HM74A were not dramatically affected by co-treatment with both inhibitors, indicating the cross-talk occurred at the receptor level. Finally, stimulation of A431 cells transiently transfected with PPRE-luciferase with AA significantly induced luciferase activity, mimicking the effects of PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that alteration of AA signaling pathway can regulate gene expression via endogenous PPARs.

  9. Binding of retinoic acid receptor heterodimers to DNA. A role for histones NH2 termini.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, P; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Formstecher, P

    1998-05-15

    The retinoic acid signaling pathway is controlled essentially through two types of nuclear receptors, RARs and RXRs. Ligand dependent activation or repression of retinoid-regulated genes is dependent on the binding of retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/9-cis-retinoic acid receptor (RXR) heterodimers to retinoic acid response element (RARE). Although unliganded RXR/RAR heterodimers bind constitutively to DNA in vitro, a clear in vivo ligand-dependent occupancy of the RARE present in the RARbeta2 gene promoter has been reported (Dey, A., Minucci, S., and Ozato, K. (1994) Mol. Cell. Biol. 14, 8191-8201). Nucleosomes are viewed as general repressors of the transcriptional machinery, in part by preventing the access of transcription factors to DNA. The ability of hRXRalpha/hRARalpha heterodimers to bind to a nucleosomal template in vitro has therefore been examined. The assembly of a fragment from the RARbeta2 gene promoter, which contains a canonical DR5 RARE, into a nucleosome core prevented hRXRalpha/hRARalpha binding to this DNA, in conditions where a strong interaction is observed with a linear DNA template. However, histone tails removal by limited proteolysis and histone hyperacetylation yielded nucleosomal RAREs able to bind to hRXRalpha/hRARalpha heterodimers. These data establish therefore the role of histones NH2 termini as a major impediment to retinoid receptors access to DNA, and identify histone hyperacetylation as a potential physiological regulator of retinoid-induced transcription.

  10. Adenovirus receptors and their implications in gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Li, Xiaoxin; Bangari, Dinesh S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have gained popularity as gene delivery vectors for therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Ad entry into host cells involves specific interactions between cell surface receptors and viral capsid proteins. Several cell surface molecules have been identified as receptors for Ad attachment and entry. Tissue tropism of Ad vectors is greatly influenced by their receptor usage. A variety of strategies have been investigated to modify Ad vector tropism by manipulating the receptor-interacting moieties. Many such strategies are aimed at targeting and/or detargeting of Ad vectors. In this review, we discuss the various cell surface molecules that are implicated as receptors for virus attachment and internalization. Special emphasis is given to Ad types that are utilized as gene delivery vectors. Various strategies to modify Ad tropism using the knowledge of Ad receptors are also discussed. PMID:19647886

  11. The effects of avermectin on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors in the pigeon brain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Jie; Sun, Bao-Hong; Cao, Ye; Yao, Hai-Dong; Qu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Ci; Xu, Shi-Wen; Li, Shu

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of avermectin (AVM) on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors in the pigeon brain. Four groups two-month-old American king pigeons (n=20/group) were fed either a commercial diet or an AVM-supplemented diet (20mg/kg·diet, 40 mg/kg·diet, or 60 mg/kg·diet) for 30, 60, or 90 days. The contents of aspartic acid (ASP), glutamate (GLU), glycine (GLY), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain tissues were determined using ultraviolet high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The expression levels of the GLU and GABA receptor genes were analyzed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results indicate that AVM exposure significantly enhances the contents of GABA, GLY, GLU, and ASP in the cerebrum, cerebellum, and optic lobe. In addition, AVM exposure increases the mRNA expression levels of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR), γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR), N-methyl-d-aspartate 1 receptor (NR1), N-methyl-d-aspartate 2A receptor (NR2A), and N-methyl-d-aspartate 2B receptor (NR2B) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that the most damaged organ was the cerebrum, followed by the cerebellum, and then the optic lobe. These results show that the AVM-induced neurotoxicity may be associated with its effects on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors. The information presented in this study will help supplement the available data for future AVM toxicity studies.

  12. Recognition of Legionella pneumophila nucleic acids by innate immune receptors.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Larissa D; Zamboni, Dario S

    2014-12-01

    Innate immune receptors evolved to sense conserved molecules that are present in microbes or are released during non-physiological conditions. Activation of these receptors is essential for early restriction of microbial infections and generation of adaptive immunity. Among the conserved molecules sensed by innate immune receptors are the nucleic acids, which are abundantly contained in all infectious organisms including virus, bacteria, fungi and parasites. In this review we focus in the innate immune proteins that function to sense nucleic acids from the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila and the importance of these processes to the outcome of the infection.

  13. Receptor-level interrelationships of amino acids and the adequate amino acid type hormones in Tetrahymena: a receptor evolution model.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Darvas, Z

    1986-01-01

    Histidine stimulates the phagocytosis of Tetrahymena to the same extent as histamine, and also stimulates its division, which histamine does not. Tyrosine and diiodotyrosine equally stimulate the growth of the Tetrahymena. Both amino acids inhibit the characteristic influence of the adequate amino acid hormone when added to Tetrahymena culture 72 h in advance of it. Primary interaction with diiodotyrosine and tyrosine notably increases the cellular growth rate. Histamine has a similar, although less notable effect than histidine. In the light of these experimental observations there is reason to postulate that the receptors of the amino acid hormones have developed from amino acid receptors.

  14. Interaction between retinoid acid receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) and neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) in asthma.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Sääf, Annika; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Mandelin, Jami; Pietras, Christina Orsmark; Ezer, Sini; Karisola, Piia; Vendelin, Johanna; Gennäs, Gustav Boije af; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Alenius, Harri; von Mutius, Erika; Doekes, Gert; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Riedler, Josef; van Hage, Marianne; D'Amato, Mauro; Scheynius, Annika; Pershagen, Göran; Kere, Juha; Pulkkinen, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Retinoid acid receptor-related Orphan Receptor Alpha (RORA) was recently identified as a susceptibility gene for asthma in a genome-wide association study. To investigate the impact of RORA on asthma susceptibility, we performed a genetic association study between RORA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the vicinity of the asthma-associated SNP (rs11071559) and asthma-related traits. Because the regulatory region of a previously implicated asthma susceptibility gene, Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1), has predicted elements for RORA binding, we hypothesized that RORA may interact biologically and genetically with NPSR1. 37 RORA SNPs and eight NPSR1 SNPs were genotyped in the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE (2033 children) and the European cross-sectional PARSIFAL study (1120 children). Seven RORA SNPs confined into a 49 kb region were significantly associated with physician-diagnosed childhood asthma. The most significant association with rs7164773 (T/C) was driven by the CC genotype in asthma cases (OR = 2.0, 95%CI 1.36-2.93, p = 0.0003 in BAMSE; and 1.61, 1.18-2.19, p = 0.002 in the combined BAMSE-PARSIFAL datasets, respectively), and strikingly, the risk effect was dependent on the Gln344Arg mutation in NPSR1. In cell models, stimulation of NPSR1 activated a pathway including RORA and other circadian clock genes. Over-expression of RORA decreased NPSR1 promoter activity further suggesting a regulatory loop between these genes. In addition, Rora mRNA expression was lower in the lung tissue of Npsr1 deficient mice compared to wildtype littermates during the early hours of the light period. We conclude that RORA SNPs are associated with childhood asthma and show epistasis with NPSR1, and the interaction between RORA and NPSR1 may be of biological relevance. Combinations of common susceptibility alleles and less common functional polymorphisms may modify the joint risk effects on asthma susceptibility. PMID:23565190

  15. Expression of plasma membrane receptor genes during megakaryocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sijie; Wang, Wenjing; Latchman, Yvette; Gao, Dayong; Aronow, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Megakaryocyte (MK) development is critically informed by plasma membrane-localized receptors that integrate a multiplicity of environmental cues. Given that the current understanding about receptors and ligands involved in megakaryocytopoiesis is based on single targets, we performed a genome-wide search to identify a plasma membrane receptome for developing MKs. We identified 40 transmembrane receptor genes as being upregulated during MK development. Seven of the 40 receptor-associated genes were selected to validate the dataset. These genes included: interleukin-9 receptor (IL9R), transforming growth factor, β receptor II (TGFBR2), interleukin-4 receptor (IL4R), colony stimulating factor-2 receptor-beta (CSFR2B), adiponectin receptor (ADIPOR2), thrombin receptor (F2R), and interleukin-21 receptor (IL21R). RNA and protein analyses confirmed their expression in primary human MKs. Matched ligands to IL9R, TGFBR2, IL4R, CSFR2B, and ADIPOR2 affected megakaryocytopoiesis. IL9 was unique in its ability to increase the number of MKs formed. In contrast, MK colony formation was inhibited by adiponectin, TGF-β, IL4, and GM-CSF. The thrombin-F2R axis affected platelet function, but not MK development, while IL21 had no apparent detectable effects. ADP-induced platelet aggregation was suppressed by IL9, TGF-β, IL4, and adiponectin. Overall, six of seven of the plasma membrane receptors were confirmed to have functional roles in MK and platelet biology. Also, results show for the first time that adiponectin plays a regulatory role in MK development. Together these data support a strong likelihood that the 40 transmembrane genes identified as being upregulated during MK development will be an important resource to the research community for deciphering the complex repertoire of environmental cues regulating megakaryocytopoiesis and/or platelet function. PMID:23321270

  16. A Mollusk Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR) Ortholog Sheds Light on the Evolution of Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Nadendla, Eswar Kumar; Lima, Daniela; Pierzchalski, Keely; Jones, Jace W.; Kane, Maureen; Nishikawa, Jun-Ichi; Hiromori, Youhei; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Santos, Miguel M.; Castro, L. Filipe C.; Bourguet, William

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors that regulate networks of target genes in response to small molecules. There is a strong bias in our knowledge of these receptors because they were mainly characterized in classical model organisms, mostly vertebrates. Therefore, the evolutionary origins of specific ligand-receptor couples still remain elusive. Here we present the identification and characterization of a retinoic acid receptor (RAR) from the mollusk Nucella lapillus (NlRAR). We show that this receptor specifically binds to DNA response elements organized in direct repeats as a heterodimer with retinoid X receptor. Surprisingly, we also find that NlRAR does not bind all-trans retinoic acid or any other retinoid we tested. Furthermore, NlRAR is unable to activate the transcription of reporter genes in response to stimulation by retinoids and to recruit coactivators in the presence of these compounds. Three-dimensional modeling of the ligand-binding domain of NlRAR reveals an overall structure that is similar to vertebrate RARs. However, in the ligand-binding pocket (LBP) of the mollusk receptor, the alteration of several residues interacting with the ligand has apparently led to an overall decrease in the strength of the interaction with the ligand. Accordingly, mutations of NlRAR at key positions within the LBP generate receptors that are responsive to retinoids. Altogether our data suggest that, in mollusks, RAR has lost its affinity for all-trans retinoic acid, highlighting the evolutionary plasticity of its LBP. When put in an evolutionary context, our results reveal new structural and functional features of nuclear receptors validated by millions of years of evolution that were impossible to reveal in model organisms. PMID:25116705

  17. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene: Regulation of Expression.

    PubMed

    Hendy, Geoffrey N; Canaff, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR) has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2-7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes-promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation-as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2) have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the "tumor suppressor" activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2-the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR-the calciostat-is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level. PMID:27679579

  18. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene: Regulation of Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hendy, Geoffrey N.; Canaff, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR) has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5′-untranslated regions (UTRs) that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2–7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes—promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation—as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2) have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the “tumor suppressor” activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2—the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR—the calciostat—is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level. PMID:27679579

  19. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene: Regulation of Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hendy, Geoffrey N.; Canaff, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR) has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5′-untranslated regions (UTRs) that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2–7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes—promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation—as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2) have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the “tumor suppressor” activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2—the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR—the calciostat—is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level.

  20. Comparative Genomics of Natural Killer Cell Receptor Gene Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, James; Walter, Lutz; Trowsdale, John

    2005-01-01

    Many receptors on natural killer (NK) cells recognize major histocompatibility complex class I molecules in order to monitor unhealthy tissues, such as cells infected with viruses, and some tumors. Genes encoding families of NK receptors and related sequences are organized into two main clusters in humans: the natural killer complex on Chromosome 12p13.1, which encodes C-type lectin molecules, and the leukocyte receptor complex on Chromosome 19q13.4, which encodes immunoglobulin superfamily molecules. The composition of these gene clusters differs markedly between closely related species, providing evidence for rapid, lineage-specific expansions or contractions of sets of loci. The choice of NK receptor genes is polarized in the two species most studied, mouse and human. In mouse, the C-type lectin-related Ly49 gene family predominates. Conversely, the single Ly49 sequence is a pseudogene in humans, and the immunoglobulin superfamily KIR gene family is extensive. These different gene sets encode proteins that are comparable in function and genetic diversity, even though they have undergone species-specific expansions. Understanding the biological significance of this curious situation may be aided by studying which NK receptor genes are used in other vertebrates, especially in relation to species-specific differences in genes for major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. PMID:16132082

  1. Mutations in the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Potter, Carol J.; Xiao, Rui; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Kang Ho; Shneider, Benjamin L.; Picarsic, Jennifer L.; Jacobson, Theodora A.; Zhang, Jing; He, Weimin; Liu, Pengfei; Knisely, A. S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lupski, James R.; Plon, Sharon E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Yang, Yaping; Washington, Gabriel C.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Berquist, William E.; Kambham, Neeraja; Singh, Ravinder J.; Xia, Fan; Enns, Gregory M.; Moore, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring prompt diagnosis. Mutations in several different genes can cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, but known genes cannot account for all familial cases. Here we report four individuals from two unrelated families with neonatal cholestasis and mutations in NR1H4, which encodes the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a bile acid-activated nuclear hormone receptor that regulates bile acid metabolism. Clinical features of severe, persistent NR1H4-related cholestasis include neonatal onset with rapid progression to end-stage liver disease, vitamin K-independent coagulopathy, low-to-normal serum gamma-glutamyl transferase activity, elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein and undetectable liver bile salt export pump (ABCB11) expression. Our findings demonstrate a pivotal function for FXR in bile acid homeostasis and liver protection. PMID:26888176

  2. Identification of a null mutation in the human dopamine D4 receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Noethen, M.M.; Cichon, S.; Hebebrand, J.

    1994-09-01

    Dopamine receptors belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors. Five different dopamine receptor genes have thus far been identified. These receptors are classified into two main subfamilies: D1, which includes the D1 and D5 receptors, and D2, which includes the D2, D3, and D4 receptors. The dopamine D4 receptor is of great interest for research into neuropsychiatric disorders and psychopharmacology in light of the fact that it binds the antipsychotic medication clozapine with higher affinity than does any other dopamine receptor. In addition, among the dopamine receptors, the D4 receptor shows a uniquely high degree of genetic variation in the human population. We identified a new 13 bp deletion in exon 1 of the D4 gene. This frameshift creates a terminator codon at amino acid position 98. mRNA isolated from brain tissue of two heterozygous persons showed both alleles to be expressed. The deletion occurs with a frequency of 2% in the German population. One person was identified to be homozygous for the deletion. Interestingly, he has a normal intelligence and did not exhibit a major psychiatric disorder as defined by DSM III-R. The 13 bp deletion is the first mutation resulting in premature translation termination reported for a dopamine receptor gene so far. This mutation is a good candidate to test for potential effects on disease and/or individual response to pharmacotherapy. Association studies in patients with various psychiatric illnesses and differences in response to clozapine are underway.

  3. Effect of the feeding system on the fatty acid composition, expression of the Δ9-desaturase, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha, Gamma, and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 genes in the semitendinous muscle of light lambs of the Rasa Aragonesa breed

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) are receiving increasing attention because of their beneficial effects on human health, with milk and meat products derived from ruminants as important sources of CLA in the human diet. SCD gene is responsible for some of the variation in CLA concentration in adipose tissues, and PPARγ, PPARα and SREBP1 genes are regulator of SCD gene. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the feeding system on fatty acid composition, CLA content and relative gene expression of Δ9-desaturase (SCD), Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARγ), Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha, (PPARα) and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein (SREBP1) in Rasa Aragonesa light lambs in semitendinous muscle. Forty-four single-born male lambs were used to evaluate the effect of the feeding system, varying on an intensity gradient according to the use of concentrates: 1. grazing alfalfa, 2. grazing alfalfa with a supplement for lambs, 3. indoor lambs with grazing ewes and 4. drylot. Results Both grazing systems resulted in a higher concentration of vaccenic acid (VA), CLA, CLA/VA acid ratio, and a lower oleic content, oleic acid (C18:1)/stearic acid (C18:0) ratio, PUFA n-6/n-3 ratio and SCD expression compared to other diets. In addition feeding system affected the fatty acid composition and SCD expression, possibly due to CLA concentration or the PUFA n-6/n-3 ratio. Both expression of the SCD gene and the feeding system were important factors affecting CLA concentration in the animal's semitendinous muscle. PPARγ, PPARα and SREBP1 expression seemed to be unaffected by the feeding system. Although no significant results were found, PPARγ, PPARα and SREBP1 showed similar expression pattern as SCD. Moreover, the correlation results between SCD expression and PPARγ (p < 0.01), as well as SREBP1 (p < 0.01) expression, may suggest that these genes were affecting SCD expression in a different way. Conclusions

  4. A hot spot for hotfoot mutations in the gene encoding the delta2 glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Matsuda, Shinji; Drews, Valerie; Torashima, Takashi; Meisler, Miriam H; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2003-04-01

    The orphan glutamate receptor delta2 is selectively expressed in Purkinje cells and plays a crucial role in cerebellar functions. Recently, ataxia in the hotfoot mouse ho4J was demonstrated to be caused by a deletion in the delta2 receptor gene (Grid2) removing the N-terminal 170 amino acids of the delta2 receptor. To understand how delta2 receptors function, we characterized mutations in eight additional spontaneously occurring hotfoot alleles of Grid2. The mouse Grid2 gene consists of 16 exons, spanning approximately 1.4 Mb. Genomic DNA analysis showed that seven hotfoot mutants had a deletion of one or more exons encoding the N-terminal domain of delta2 receptors. The exception is ho5J, which has a point mutation in exon 12. Deletions in ho7J, ho9J, ho11J and ho12J mice result in the in-frame deletion of between 40 and 95 amino acids. Expression of constructs containing these deletions in HEK293 cells resulted in protein retention in the endoplasmic reticulum or cis-Golgi without transport to the cell surface. Coimmunoprecipitation assays indicated that these deletions also reduce the intermolecular interaction between individual delta2 receptors. These results indicate that the deleted N-terminal regions are crucial for oligomerization of delta2 receptors and their subsequent transport to the cell surface of Purkinje cells. The relatively large size of the Grid2 gene may be one of the reasons why many spontaneous mutations occur in this gene. In addition, the frequent occurrence of in-frame deletions within the N-terminal domain in hotfoot mutants suggests the importance of this domain in the function of delta2 receptors.

  5. Human kininogen gene is transactivated by the farnesoid X receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Annie; Lew, Jane-L; Huang, Li; Yu, Jinghua; Zhang, Theresa; Hrywna, Yaroslav; Thompson, John R; de Pedro, Nuria; Blevins, Richard A; Peláez, Fernando; Wright, Samuel D; Cui, Jisong

    2003-08-01

    Human kininogen belongs to the plasma kallikreinkinin system. High molecular weight kininogen is the precursor for two-chain kinin-free kininogen and bradykinin. It has been shown that the two-chain kinin-free kininogen has the properties of anti-adhesion, anti-platelet aggregation, and anti-thrombosis, whereas bradykinin is a potent vasodilator and mediator of inflammation. In this study we show that the human kininogen gene is strongly up-regulated by agonists of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor for bile acids. In primary human hepatocytes, both the endogenous FXR agonist chenodeoxycholate and synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 increased kininogen mRNA with a maximum induction of 8-10-fold. A more robust induction of kininogen expression was observed in HepG2 cells, where kininogen mRNA was increased by chenodeoxycholate or GW4064 up to 130-140-fold as shown by real time PCR. Northern blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of kininogen expression by FXR agonists. To determine whether kininogen is a direct target of FXR, we examined the sequence of the kininogen promoter and identified a highly conserved FXR response element (inverted repeat, IR-1) in the proximity of the kininogen promoter (-66/-54). FXR/RXRalpha heterodimers specifically bind to this IR-1. A construct of a minimal promoter with the luciferase reporter containing this IR-1 was transactivated by FXR. Deletion or mutation of this IR-1 abolished FXR-mediated promoter activation, indicating that this IR-1 element is responsible for the promoter transactivation by FXR. We conclude that kininogen is a novel and direct target of FXR, and bile acids may play a role in the vasodilation and anti-coagulation processes.

  6. Nuclear retinoic acid receptors: conductors of the retinoic acid symphony during development.

    PubMed

    Samarut, Eric; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2012-01-30

    The vitamin A derivative, retinoic acid (RA), is essential for embryonic development through the activation of cognate nuclear receptors, RARs, which work as ligand dependent regulators of transcription. In vitro studies revealed how RARs control gene expression at the molecular level and now it appears that it is fine-tuned by a phosphorylation code. In addition, several genetic approaches provided valuable insights on the functions of RARs during development and on the influence of other actors such as the enzymes involved in RA synthesis and degradation and other signaling pathways. It appears that RARs are the conductors of the RA signaling symphony through controlling the dynamics and the coordination of the different players and development steps.

  7. Regulation of inflammatory and lipid metabolism genes by eicosapentaenoic acid-rich oil[S

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Peter J.; Bhatia, Sujata K.; Belcher, Leigh A; Hannon, Daniel B.; Thompson, Jerry T.; Vanden Heuvel, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Omega-3-PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are associated with prevention of various aspects of metabolic syndrome. In the present studies, the effects of oil rich in EPA on gene expression and activation of nuclear receptors was examined and compared with other ω3-PUFAs. The EPA-rich oil (EO) altered the expression of FA metabolism genes in THP-1 cells, including stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) and FA desaturase-1 and -2 (FASDS1 and -2). Other ω3-PUFAs resulted in a similar gene expression response for a subset of genes involved in lipid metabolism and inflammation. In reporter assays, EO activated human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and PPARβ/γ with minimal effects on PPARγ, liver X receptor, retinoid X receptor, farnesoid X receptor, and retinoid acid receptor γ (RARγ); these effects were similar to that observed for purified EPA. When serum from a 6 week clinical intervention with dietary supplements containing olive oil (control), DHA, or two levels of EPA were applied to THP-1 cells, the expression of SCD and FADS2 decreased in the cells treated with serum from the ω3-PUFA-supplemented individuals. Taken together, these studies indicate regulation of gene expression by EO that is consistent with treating aspects of dyslipidemia and inflammation. PMID:22556214

  8. Phytanic acid and docosahexaenoic acid increase the metabolism of all-trans-retinoic acid and CYP26 gene expression in intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Lampen, A; Meyer, S; Nau, H

    2001-10-31

    Retinoids are essential for growth and cell differentiation of epithelial tissues. The effects of the food compounds phytol, the phytol metabolite phytanic acid, and the fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on the retinoid signaling pathway in intestinal cells were studied. Phytol inhibited the formation of all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) from dietary retinol in intestinal cells. Phytanic acid, a known retinoic X receptor (RXRalpha) and peroxisome proliferator activating receptor (PPARalpha) activator, also activated PPARdelta, and to a lesser degree PPARgamma, in a transactivation assay. Phytanic acid had no effect on intestinal RA hydroxylase CYP26 (also named P450RAI) gene expression and metabolism of all-trans-RA in intestinal Caco-2 cells. However, in combination with retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-ligands (all-trans-RA or synthetic Am580) phytanic acid enhanced the induction of CYP26 and RA-metabolism in comparison to treatments with all-trans-RA or Am580 alone. Also treatment with DHA did not affect CYP26 gene expression and RA-metabolism but cotreatment of the cells with DHA and all-trans-RA or Am580 enhanced the induction of CYP26, in comparison to the induction caused by all-trans-RA or Am580 alone. This study indicates that food compounds such as phytanic acid and DHA that are RXR-agonists and have an impact on intestinal CYP26 gene expression and metabolism of all-trans-RA in intestinal cells.

  9. Neuropeptide Y receptor gene y6: multiple deaths or resurrections?

    PubMed

    Starbäck, P; Wraith, A; Eriksson, H; Larhammar, D

    2000-10-14

    The neuropeptide Y family of G-protein-coupled receptors consists of five cloned members in mammals. Four genes give rise to functional receptors in all mammals investigated. The y6 gene is a pseudogene in human and pig and is absent in rat, but generates a functional receptor in rabbit and mouse and probably in the collared peccary (Pecari tajacu), a distant relative of the pig family. We report here that the guinea pig y6 gene has a highly distorted nucleotide sequence with multiple frame-shift mutations. One evolutionary scenario may suggest that y6 was inactivated before the divergence of the mammalian orders and subsequently resurrected in some lineages. However, the pseudogene mutations seem to be distinct in human, pig, and guinea pig, arguing for separate inactivation events. In either case, the y6 gene has a quite unusual evolutionary history with multiple independent deaths or resurrections.

  10. Dopamine receptor gene expression by enkephalin neurons in rat forebrain

    SciTech Connect

    Le Moine, C.; Normand, E.; Guitteny, A.F.; Fouque, B.; Teoule, R.; Bloch, B. )

    1990-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed with brain sections from normal, control and haloperidol-treated rats to identify and map the cells expressing the D2 dopamine receptor gene. D2 receptor mRNA was detected with radioactive or biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. D2 receptor mRNA was present in glandular cells of the pituitary intermediate lobe and in neurons of the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, and forebrain, especially in caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and piriform cortex. Hybridization with D2 and preproenkephalin A probes in adjacent sections, as well as combined hybridization with the two probes in the same sections, demonstrated that all detectable enkephalin neurons in the striatum contained the D2 receptor mRNA. Large neurons in caudate putamen, which were unlabeled with the preproenkephalin A probe and which may have been cholinergic, also expressed the D2 receptor gene. Haloperidol treatment (14 or 21 days) provoked an increase in mRNA content for D2 receptor and preproenkephalin A in the striatum. This suggests that the increase in D2 receptor number observed after haloperidol treatment is due to increased activity of the D2 gene. These results indicate that in the striatum, the enkephalin neurons are direct targets for dopamine liberated from mesostriatal neurons.

  11. Retinoic acid-mediated gene expression in transgenic reporter zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Perz-Edwards, A; Hardison, N L; Linney, E

    2001-01-01

    Retinoic acid-mediated gene activation is important for normal vertebrate development. The size and nature of retinoic acid make it difficult to identify the precise cellular location of this signaling molecule throughout an embryo. Additionally, retinoic acid (RA) signaling is regulated by a complex combination of receptors, coactivators, and antagonizing proteins. Thus, in order to integrate these signals and identify regions within a whole developing embryo where cells can respond transcriptionally to retinoic acid, we have used a reporter transgenic approach. We have generated several stable lines of transgenic zebrafish which use retinoic acid response elements to drive fluorescent protein expression. In these zebrafish lines, transgene expression is localized to regions of the neural tube, retina, notochord, somites, heart, pronephric ducts, branchial arches, and jaw muscles in embryos and larvae. Transgene expression can be induced in additional regions of the neural tube and retina as well as the immature notochord, hatching gland, enveloping cell layer, and fin by exposing embryos to retinoic acid. Treatment with retinoic acid synthase inhibitors, citral and diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB), during neurulation, greatly reduces transgene expression. DEAB treatment of embryos at gastrulation phenocopies the embryonic effects of vitamin A deprivation or targeted disruption of the RA synthase retinaldehyde dehydrogenase-2 in other vertebrates. Together these data suggest that the reporter expression we see in zebrafish is dependent upon conserved vertebrate pathways of RA synthesis.

  12. Natural killer cell receptor genes in the family Equidae: not only Ly49.

    PubMed

    Futas, Jan; Horin, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have important functions in immunity. NK recognition in mammals can be mediated through killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and/or killer cell lectin-like Ly49 receptors. Genes encoding highly variable NK cell receptors (NKR) represent rapidly evolving genomic regions. No single conservative model of NKR genes was observed in mammals. Single-copy low polymorphic NKR genes present in one mammalian species may expand into highly polymorphic multigene families in other species. In contrast to other non-rodent mammals, multiple Ly49-like genes appear to exist in the horse, while no functional KIR genes were observed in this species. In this study, Ly49 and KIR were sought and their evolution was characterized in the entire family Equidae. Genomic sequences retrieved showed the presence of at least five highly conserved polymorphic Ly49 genes in horses, asses and zebras. These findings confirmed that the expansion of Ly49 occurred in the entire family. Several KIR-like sequences were also identified in the genome of Equids. Besides a previously identified non-functional KIR-Immunoglobulin-like transcript fusion gene (KIR-ILTA) and two putative pseudogenes, a KIR3DL-like sequence was analyzed. In contrast to previous observations made in the horse, the KIR3DL sequence, genomic organization and mRNA expression suggest that all Equids might produce a functional KIR receptor protein molecule with a single non-mutated immune tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) domain. No evidence for positive selection in the KIR3DL gene was found. Phylogenetic analysis including rhinoceros and tapir genomic DNA and deduced amino acid KIR-related sequences showed differences between families and even between species within the order Perissodactyla. The results suggest that the order Perissodactyla and its family Equidae with expanded Ly49 genes and with a potentially functional KIR gene may represent an interesting model for evolutionary biology of

  13. Natural Killer Cell Receptor Genes in the Family Equidae: Not only Ly49

    PubMed Central

    Futas, Jan; Horin, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have important functions in immunity. NK recognition in mammals can be mediated through killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and/or killer cell lectin-like Ly49 receptors. Genes encoding highly variable NK cell receptors (NKR) represent rapidly evolving genomic regions. No single conservative model of NKR genes was observed in mammals. Single-copy low polymorphic NKR genes present in one mammalian species may expand into highly polymorphic multigene families in other species. In contrast to other non-rodent mammals, multiple Ly49-like genes appear to exist in the horse, while no functional KIR genes were observed in this species. In this study, Ly49 and KIR were sought and their evolution was characterized in the entire family Equidae. Genomic sequences retrieved showed the presence of at least five highly conserved polymorphic Ly49 genes in horses, asses and zebras. These findings confirmed that the expansion of Ly49 occurred in the entire family. Several KIR-like sequences were also identified in the genome of Equids. Besides a previously identified non-functional KIR-Immunoglobulin-like transcript fusion gene (KIR-ILTA) and two putative pseudogenes, a KIR3DL-like sequence was analyzed. In contrast to previous observations made in the horse, the KIR3DL sequence, genomic organization and mRNA expression suggest that all Equids might produce a functional KIR receptor protein molecule with a single non-mutated immune tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) domain. No evidence for positive selection in the KIR3DL gene was found. Phylogenetic analysis including rhinoceros and tapir genomic DNA and deduced amino acid KIR-related sequences showed differences between families and even between species within the order Perissodactyla. The results suggest that the order Perissodactyla and its family Equidae with expanded Ly49 genes and with a potentially functional KIR gene may represent an interesting model for evolutionary biology of

  14. Natural killer cell receptor genes in the family Equidae: not only Ly49.

    PubMed

    Futas, Jan; Horin, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have important functions in immunity. NK recognition in mammals can be mediated through killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and/or killer cell lectin-like Ly49 receptors. Genes encoding highly variable NK cell receptors (NKR) represent rapidly evolving genomic regions. No single conservative model of NKR genes was observed in mammals. Single-copy low polymorphic NKR genes present in one mammalian species may expand into highly polymorphic multigene families in other species. In contrast to other non-rodent mammals, multiple Ly49-like genes appear to exist in the horse, while no functional KIR genes were observed in this species. In this study, Ly49 and KIR were sought and their evolution was characterized in the entire family Equidae. Genomic sequences retrieved showed the presence of at least five highly conserved polymorphic Ly49 genes in horses, asses and zebras. These findings confirmed that the expansion of Ly49 occurred in the entire family. Several KIR-like sequences were also identified in the genome of Equids. Besides a previously identified non-functional KIR-Immunoglobulin-like transcript fusion gene (KIR-ILTA) and two putative pseudogenes, a KIR3DL-like sequence was analyzed. In contrast to previous observations made in the horse, the KIR3DL sequence, genomic organization and mRNA expression suggest that all Equids might produce a functional KIR receptor protein molecule with a single non-mutated immune tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) domain. No evidence for positive selection in the KIR3DL gene was found. Phylogenetic analysis including rhinoceros and tapir genomic DNA and deduced amino acid KIR-related sequences showed differences between families and even between species within the order Perissodactyla. The results suggest that the order Perissodactyla and its family Equidae with expanded Ly49 genes and with a potentially functional KIR gene may represent an interesting model for evolutionary biology of

  15. Comparison of synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors and their gene expression in response to feeding in Ixodes scapularis (Ixodidae) vs. Ornithodoros turicata (Argasidae).

    PubMed

    Egekwu, N; Sonenshine, D E; Garman, H; Barshis, D J; Cox, N; Bissinger, B W; Zhu, J; M Roe, R

    2016-02-01

    Illumina GAII high-throughput sequencing was used to compare expressed genes for female synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors of the soft tick Ornithodoros turicata with the hard tick Ixodes scapularis. Gene ontology molecular level three mapping revealed no significant differences amongst the same categories represented in O. turicata and I. scapularis. Transcripts predicting 22 neuropeptides or their receptors in the O. turicata synganglion were similar to annotations for 23 neuropeptides or receptors previously identified from I scapularis, with minor exceptions. A transcript predicting ecdysis triggering hormone receptor was identified in O. turicata; transcripts encoding for proprotein convertase and glycoprotein B were identified in both species. Transcripts predicting the same neurotransmitter receptors were found in the synganglion of both species. Gene expression of the transcripts showed numerous differences in response to feeding. Major differences were observed in expression of genes believed important in regulating slow vs. rapid feeding, blood water elimination, cuticle synthesis plasticity and in signalling reproductive activity. Although the glutamate receptor was strongly upregulated in both species, the gamma aminobutyric acid receptor, which inhibits glutamate, was upregulated significantly only in I. scapularis. These differences are consistent with the slow vs. rapid action of the pharyngeal pump in the two species.

  16. Comparison of synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors and their gene expression in response to feeding in Ixodes scapularis (Ixodidae) vs. Ornithodoros turicata (Argasidae).

    PubMed

    Egekwu, N; Sonenshine, D E; Garman, H; Barshis, D J; Cox, N; Bissinger, B W; Zhu, J; M Roe, R

    2016-02-01

    Illumina GAII high-throughput sequencing was used to compare expressed genes for female synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors of the soft tick Ornithodoros turicata with the hard tick Ixodes scapularis. Gene ontology molecular level three mapping revealed no significant differences amongst the same categories represented in O. turicata and I. scapularis. Transcripts predicting 22 neuropeptides or their receptors in the O. turicata synganglion were similar to annotations for 23 neuropeptides or receptors previously identified from I scapularis, with minor exceptions. A transcript predicting ecdysis triggering hormone receptor was identified in O. turicata; transcripts encoding for proprotein convertase and glycoprotein B were identified in both species. Transcripts predicting the same neurotransmitter receptors were found in the synganglion of both species. Gene expression of the transcripts showed numerous differences in response to feeding. Major differences were observed in expression of genes believed important in regulating slow vs. rapid feeding, blood water elimination, cuticle synthesis plasticity and in signalling reproductive activity. Although the glutamate receptor was strongly upregulated in both species, the gamma aminobutyric acid receptor, which inhibits glutamate, was upregulated significantly only in I. scapularis. These differences are consistent with the slow vs. rapid action of the pharyngeal pump in the two species. PMID:26783017

  17. Estrogen Receptor beta binds Sp1 and recruits a Corepressor Complex to the Estrogen Receptor alpha Gene Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Bartella, V; Rizza, P; Barone, I; Zito, D; Giordano, F; Giordano, C; Catalano, S; Mauro, L; Sisci, D; Panno, ML; Fuqua, SA; Andò, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    Human estrogen receptors (ERs) alpha and beta are crucially involved in the regulation of mammary growth and development. Normal breast tissues display a prevalently expression of ER beta than ER alpha, which drastically increases during breast tumorogenesis. So, it is reasonable to assume how a dysregulation of the two estrogen receptor subtypes may induce breast cancer development. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the opposite role played by the two estrogen receptors on tumor cell growth remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we have demonstrated that ER beta overexpression in breast cancer cells decreases cell proliferation and down-regulates ER alpha mRNA and protein content along with a concomitant repression of estrogen-regulated genes. Transient transfection experiments, using a vector containing the human ER alpha promoter region, showed that elevated levels of the ER beta down-regulated basal ER alpha promoter activity. Furthermore, side-directed mutagenesis and deletion analysis have revealed that the proximal GC-rich motifs at −223 and −214 is crucial for the ER beta-induced ER alpha down-regulation in breast cancer cells. This occurred through ER beta-Sp1 protein-protein interaction within the ER alpha promoter region and the recruitment of a corepressor complex containing NCoR/SMRT (nuclear receptor corepressor/silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor), accompanied by hypoacetylation of histone H4 and displacement of RNA polymerase II. Silencing of NCoR gene expression by RNA interference reversed the down-regulatory effect of ER beta on ER alpha gene expression and cell proliferation. Our results provide evidence for a novel mechanism by which overexpression of ER beta through NCoR is able to down regulate ER alpha gene expression, thus inhibiting ER alpha’s driving role on breast cancer cell growth. PMID:22622808

  18. Sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene is not a common determinant of male sexual orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Macke, J.P.; Nathans, J.; King, V.L. ); Hu, N.; Hu, S.; Hamer, D.; Bailey, M. ); Brown, T. )

    1993-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that DNA sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene plays a causal role in the development of male sexual orientation, the authors have (1) measured the degree of concordance of androgen receptor alleles in 36 pairs of homosexual brothers, (2) compared the lengths of polyglutamine and polyglycine tracts in the amino-terminal domain of the androgen receptor in a sample of 197 homosexual males and 213 unselected subjects, and (3) screened the entire androgen receptor coding region for sequence variation by PCR and denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and/or single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis in 20 homosexual males with homosexual or bisexual brothers and one homosexual male with no homosexual brothers, and screened the amino-terminal domain of the receptor for sequence variation in an additional 44 homosexual males, 37 of whom had one or more first- or second-degree male relatives who were either homosexual or bisexual. These analyses show that (1) homosexual brothers are as likely to be discordant as concordant for androgen receptor alleles; (2) there are no large-scale differences between the distributions of polyglycine or polyglutamine tract lengths in the homosexual and control groups; and (3) coding region sequence variation is not commonly found within the androgen receptor gene of homosexual men. The DGGE screen identified two rare amino acid substitutions, ser[sup 205] -to-arg and glu[sup 793]-to-asp, the biological significance of which is unknown. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Bile acid receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liyun; Bambha, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    With the high prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and other features of the metabolic syndrome in United States, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has inevitably become a very prevalent chronic liver disease and is now emerging as one of the leading indications for liver transplantation. Insulin resistance and derangement of lipid metabolism, accompanied by activation of the pro-inflammatory response and fibrogenesis, are essential pathways in the development of the more clinically significant form of NAFLD, known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Recent advances in the functional characterization of bile acid receptors, such as farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (TGR) 5, have provided further insight in the pathophysiology of NASH and have led to the development of potential therapeutic targets for NAFLD and NASH. Beyond maintaining bile acid metabolism, FXR and TGR5 also regulate lipid metabolism, maintain glucose homeostasis, increase energy expenditure, and ameliorate hepatic inflammation. These intriguing features have been exploited to develop bile acid analogues to target pathways in NAFLD and NASH pathogenesis. This review provides a brief overview of the pathogenesis of NAFLD and NASH, and then delves into the biological functions of bile acid receptors, particularly with respect to NASH pathogenesis, with a description of the associated experimental data, and, finally, we discuss the prospects of bile acid analogues in the treatment of NAFLD and NASH. PMID:26668692

  20. The Mouse Solitary Odorant Receptor Gene Promoters as Models for the Study of Odorant Receptor Gene Choice

    PubMed Central

    Degl'Innocenti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, several anatomical regions located within the nasal cavity mediate olfaction. Among these, the main olfactory epithelium detects most conventional odorants. Olfactory sensory neurons, provided with cilia exposed to the air, detect volatile chemicals via an extremely large family of seven-transmembrane chemoreceptors named odorant receptors. Their genes are expressed in a monogenic and monoallelic fashion: a single allele of a single odorant receptor gene is transcribed in a given mature neuron, through a still uncharacterized molecular mechanism known as odorant receptor gene choice. Aim Odorant receptor genes are typically arranged in genomic clusters, but a few are isolated (we call them solitary) from the others within a region broader than 1 Mb upstream and downstream with respect to their transcript's coordinates. The study of clustered genes is problematic, because of redundancy and ambiguities in their regulatory elements: we propose to use the solitary genes as simplified models to understand odorant receptor gene choice. Procedures Here we define number and identity of the solitary genes in the mouse genome (C57BL/6J), and assess the conservation of the solitary status in some mammalian orthologs. Furthermore, we locate their putative promoters, predict their homeodomain binding sites (commonly present in the promoters of odorant receptor genes) and compare candidate promoter sequences with those of wild-caught mice. We also provide expression data from histological sections. Results In the mouse genome there are eight intact solitary genes: Olfr19 (M12), Olfr49, Olfr266, Olfr267, Olfr370, Olfr371, Olfr466, Olfr1402; five are conserved as solitary in rat. These genes are all expressed in the main olfactory epithelium of three-day-old mice. The C57BL/6J candidate promoter of Olfr370 has considerably varied compared to its wild-type counterpart. Within the putative promoter for Olfr266 a homeodomain binding site is predicted. As a

  1. Retinoic acid response element in the human alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH3: implications for regulation of retinoic acid synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Duester, G; Shean, M L; McBride, M S; Stewart, M J

    1991-01-01

    Retinoic acid regulation of one member of the human class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family was demonstrated, suggesting that the retinol dehydrogenase function of ADH may play a regulatory role in the biosynthetic pathway for retinoic acid. Promoter activity of human ADH3, but not ADH1 or ADH2, was shown to be activated by retinoic acid in transient transfection assays of Hep3B human hepatoma cells. Deletion mapping experiments identified a region in the ADH3 promoter located between -328 and -272 bp which confers retinoic acid activation. This region was also demonstrated to confer retinoic acid responsiveness on the ADH1 and ADH2 genes in heterologous promoter fusions. Within a 34-bp stretch, the ADH3 retinoic acid response element (RARE) contains two TGACC motifs and one TGAAC motif, both of which exist in RAREs controlling other genes. A block mutation of the TGACC sequence located at -289 to -285 bp eliminated the retinoic acid response. As assayed by gel shift DNA binding studies, the RARE region (-328 to -272 bp) of ADH3 bound the human retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR beta) and was competed for by DNA containing a RARE present in the gene encoding RAR beta. Since ADH catalyzes the conversion of retinol to retinal, which can be further converted to retinoic acid by aldehyde dehydrogenase, these results suggest that retinoic acid activation of ADH3 constitutes a positive feedback loop regulating retinoic acid synthesis. Images PMID:1996113

  2. Characterization of the hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 2 in cats.

    PubMed

    Graff, E C; Norris, O C; Sandey, M; Kemppainen, R J; Judd, R L

    2015-10-01

    The hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 2 (HCA2) belongs to a family of nutrient-sensing receptors that bind β-hydroxybutyrate, an alternative fuel source produced during a negative energy balance. The HCA2 receptor has not been identified or characterized in cats. Therefore, the following were the objectives of this study: (1) identify the feline HCA2 receptor protein sequence and compare against known human and rodent sequences, (2) determine tissue distribution and relative expression in lean, healthy cats, and (3) demonstrate in vitro functionality in feline adipose tissue. Tissues (n = 6) and primary adipocytes (n = 4) were collected from lean, healthy, female cats. The published genomic sequence for cats was used to design primers for polymerase chain reaction isolation of HCA2. Relative tissue distribution was evaluated using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction with RNA isolated from 9 different tissues (spleen, pancreas, lymph node, jejunum, kidney, liver, heart, and subcutaneous and abdominal adipose tissue). Receptor function was evaluated in primary feline adipocyte culture, and changes were compared with basal lipolysis. The in silico predicted feline HCA2 protein sequence exhibited 83.1% and 86.5% amino acid similarity to human and mouse sequences, respectively. The feline HCA2 receptor is predominantly expressed in adipose tissue and spleen. Exposure of feline adipocytes to niacin, a pharmacologic ligand of HCA2, inhibited lipolysis to a similar degree as insulin, a potent lipolytic inhibitor. In conclusion, the feline HCA2 receptor is similar to human and murine receptors in sequence, distribution, and functionality. By gaining a better understanding of the HCA2 receptor in cats, we will be able to better manage feline patients.

  3. Genes involved in Drosophila glutamate receptor expression and localization

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Faith LW; Featherstone, David E

    2005-01-01

    Background A clear picture of the mechanisms controlling glutamate receptor expression, localization, and stability remains elusive, possibly due to an incomplete understanding of the proteins involved. We screened transposon mutants generated by the ongoing Drosophila Gene Disruption Project in an effort to identify the different types of genes required for glutamate receptor cluster development. Results To enrich for non-silent insertions with severe disruptions in glutamate receptor clustering, we identified and focused on homozygous lethal mutants in a collection of 2185 BG and KG transposon mutants generated by the BDGP Gene Disruption Project. 202 lethal mutant lines were individually dissected to expose glutamatergic neuromuscular junctions, stained using antibodies that recognize neuronal membrane and the glutamate receptor subunit GluRIIA, and viewed using laser-scanning confocal microscopy. We identified 57 mutants with qualitative differences in GluRIIA expression and/or localization. 84% of mutants showed loss of receptors and/or clusters; 16% of mutants showed an increase in receptors. Insertion loci encode a variety of protein types, including cytoskeleton proteins and regulators, kinases, phosphatases, ubiquitin ligases, mucins, cell adhesion proteins, transporters, proteins controlling gene expression and protein translation, and proteins of unknown/novel function. Expression pattern analyses and complementation tests, however, suggest that any single mutant – even if a mutant gene is uniquely tagged – must be interpreted with caution until the mutation is validated genetically and phenotypically. Conclusion Our study identified 57 transposon mutants with qualitative differences in glutamate receptor expression and localization. Despite transposon tagging of every insertion locus, extensive validation is needed before one can have confidence in the role of any individual gene. Alternatively, one can focus on the types of genes identified, rather

  4. Carbobenzoxy amino acids: Structural requirements for cholecystokinin receptor antagonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Maton, P.N.; Sutliff, V.E.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    The authors used dispersed acini prepared from guinea pig pancreas to examine 28 carbobenzoxy (CBZ) amino acids for their abilities to function as cholecystokinin receptor antagonists. All amino acid derivatives tested, except for CBZ-alanine, CBZ-glycine, and N alpha-CBZ- lysine, were able to inhibit the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by the C-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin. In general, there was a good correlation between the ability of a carbobenzoxy amino acid to inhibit stimulated amylase secretion and the ability of the amino acid derivative to inhibit binding of /sup 125/I-cholecystokinin. The inhibition of cholecystokinin-stimulated amylase secretion was competitive, fully reversible, and specific for those secretagogues that interact with the cholecystokinin receptor. The potencies with which the various carbobenzoxy amino acids inhibited the action of cholecystokinin varied 100-fold and CBZ-cystine was the most potent cholecystokinin receptor antagonist. This variation in potency was primarily but not exclusively a function of the hydrophobicity of the amino acid side chain.

  5. Dynamic changes in prefrontal cortex gene expression following lysergic acid diethylamide administration.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Charles D; Garcia, Efrain E; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2003-03-17

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a psychoactive drug that transiently alters human perception, behavior, and mood at extremely low doses. Certain aspects of the behavior elicited by acute doses of LSD closely resemble symptoms of mental disorders such as schizophrenia. Characterizing gene expression profiles after LSD will be important for understanding how it alters behavior, and will lead to novel insights into disorders, such as schizophrenia, whose behavioral symptoms resemble the temporary effects of hallucinogenic drugs. We previously identified a small collection of genes within the rat prefrontal cortex that respond to LSD. Many of the products of these genes are involved in the process of synaptic plasticity. In the current report, we present a detailed analysis of the expression of these genes within the brain using RNase protection analysis. We find that the gene response to LSD is quite dynamic. The expression of some genes increases rapidly and decreases rapidly, while other genes change more gradually. Dose-response studies show two classes of expression; gene expression maximally stimulated at lower doses, versus gene expression that continues to rise at the higher doses. The role of the 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptor in mediating the increases in gene expression was examined in a series of experiments using receptor specific antagonists. Most expression increases were due to activation of the 5-HT(2A) receptor, however expression of two genes had neither a 5-HT(1A) nor a 5-HT(2A) receptor component.

  6. Phytanic acid, a novel activator of uncoupling protein-1 gene transcription and brown adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Agatha; Barberá, Maria José; Iglesias, Roser; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2002-01-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a phytol-derived branched-chain fatty acid present in dietary products. Phytanic acid increased uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) mRNA expression in brown adipocytes differentiated in culture. Phytanic acid induced the expression of the UCP1 gene promoter, which was enhanced by co-transfection with a retinoid X receptor (RXR) expression vector but not with other expression vectors driving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha, PPARgamma or a form of RXR devoid of ligand-dependent sensitivity. The effect of phytanic acid on the UCP1 gene required the 5' enhancer region of the gene and the effects of phytanic acid were mediated in an additive manner by three binding sites for RXR. Moreover, phytanic acid activates brown adipocyte differentiation: long-term exposure of brown preadipocytes to phytanic acid promoted the acquisition of the brown adipocyte morphology and caused a co-ordinate induction of the mRNAs for gene markers of brown adipocyte differentiation, such as UCP1, adipocyte lipid-binding protein aP2, lipoprotein lipase, the glucose transporter GLUT4 or subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, phytanic acid is a natural product of phytol metabolism that activates brown adipocyte thermogenic function. It constitutes a potential nutritional signal linking dietary status to adaptive thermogenesis. PMID:11829740

  7. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E; Wang, Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents.

  8. Barley malt increases hindgut and portal butyric acid, modulates gene expression of gut tight junction proteins and Toll-like receptors in rats fed high-fat diets, but high advanced glycation end-products partially attenuate the effects.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yadong; Teixeira, Cristina; Marungruang, Nittaya; Sae-Lim, Watina; Tareke, Eden; Andersson, Roger; Fåk, Frida; Nyman, Margareta

    2015-09-01

    Barley malt, a product of controlled germination, has been shown to produce high levels of butyric acid in the cecum and portal serum of rats and may therefore have anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of the study was to investigate how four barley malts, caramelized and colored malts, 50-malt and 350-malt, differing in functional characteristics concerning beta-glucan content and color, affect short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), barrier function and inflammation in the hindgut of rats fed high-fat diets. Male Wistar rats were given malt-supplemented high-fat diets for four weeks. Low and high-fat diets containing microcrystalline cellulose were incorporated as controls. All diets contained 70 g kg(-1) dietary fiber. The malt-fed groups were found to have had induced higher amounts of butyric and propionic acids in the hindgut and portal serum compared with controls, while cecal succinic acid only increased to a small extent. Fat increased the mRNA expression of tight junction proteins and Toll-like receptors (TLR) in the small intestine and distal colon of the rats, as well as the concentration of some amino acids in the portal plasma, but malt seemed to counteract these adverse effects to some extent. However, the high content of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) in caramelized malt tended to prohibit the positive effects on occludin in the small intestine and plasma amino acids seen with the other malt products. In conclusion, malting seems to be an interesting process for producing foods with positive health effects, but part of these effects may be destroyed if the malt contains a high content of AGE. PMID:26227569

  9. High affinity retinoic acid receptor antagonists: analogs of AGN 193109.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A T; Wang, L; Gillett, S J; Chandraratna, R A

    1999-02-22

    A series of high affinity retinoic acid receptor (RAR) antagonists were prepared based upon the known antagonist AGN 193109 (2). Introduction of various phenyl groups revealed a preference for substitution at the para-position relative to the meta-site. Antagonists with the highest affinities for the RARs possessed hydrophobic groups, however, the presence of polar functionality was also well tolerated.

  10. Mouse T-cell receptor variable gene segment families

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, B.; Kabelitz, D.; Clark, S.P.; Mak, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    All mouse T-cell receptor {alpha}/{delta}, {beta}, and {gamma} variable (Tcra/d-, b-, and g-V) gene segments were aligned to compare the sequences with one another, to group them into subfamilies, and to derive a name which complies with the standard nomenclature. it was necessary to change the names of some V gene segments because they conflicted with those of other segments. The traditional classification into subfamilies was re-evaluated using a much larger pool of sequences. In the mouse, most V gene segments can be grouped into subfamilies of closely related genes with significantly less similarity between different subfamilies. 118 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Growth and gene expression are predominantly controlled by distinct regions of the human IL-4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J J; McReynolds, L J; Keegan, A; Wang, L H; Garfein, E; Rothman, P; Nelms, K; Paul, W E

    1996-02-01

    IL-4 causes hematopoietic cells to proliferate and express a series of genes, including CD23. We examined whether IL-4-mediated growth, as measured by 4PS phosphorylation, and gene induction were similarly controlled. Studies of M12.4.1 cells expressing human IL-4R truncation mutants indicated that the region between amino acids 557-657 is necessary for full gene expression, which correlated with Stat6 DNA binding activity. This region was not required for 4PS phosphorylation. Tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutations in the interval between amino acids 557-657 revealed that as long as one tyrosine remained unmutated, CD23 was fully induced. When all three tyrosines were mutated, the receptor was unable to induce CD23. The results indicate that growth regulation and gene expression are principally controlled by distinct regions of IL-4R.

  12. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role.

  13. Structure-dependent effects of pyridine derivatives on mechanisms of intestinal fatty acid uptake: regulation of nicotinic acid receptor and fatty acid transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Annett; Lang, Roman; Rohm, Barbara; Rubach, Malte; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-07-01

    Pyridines are widely distributed in foods. Nicotinic acid (NA), a carboxylated pyridine derivative, inhibits lipolysis in adipocytes by activation of the orphan NA receptor (HM74A) and is applied to treat hyperlipidemia. However, knowledge on the impact of pyridine derivatives on intestinal lipid metabolism is scarce. This study was performed to identify the structural determinants of pyridines for their effects on fatty acid uptake in enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and to elucidate the mechanisms of action. The impact of 17 pyridine derivatives on fatty acid uptake was tested. Multiple regression analysis revealed the presence of a methyl group to be the structural determinant at 0.1 mM, whereas at 1 mM, the presence of a carboxylic group and the N-methylation presented further structural characteristics to affect the fatty acid uptake. NA, showing a stimulating effect on FA uptake, and N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP), inhibiting FA uptake, were selected for mechanistic studies. Gene expression of the fatty acid transporters CD36, FATP2 and FATP4, and the lipid metabolism regulating transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and PPARγ was up-regulated upon NA treatment. Caco-2 cells were demonstrated to express the low-affinity NA receptor HM74 of which the gene expression was up-regulated upon NA treatment. We hypothesize that the NA-induced fatty acid uptake might result from NA receptor activation and related intracellular signaling cascades. In contrast, MPP increased transepithelial electrical resistance. We therefore conclude that NA and MPP, both sharing the pyridine motif core, exhibit their contrary effects on intestinal FA uptake by activation of different mechanisms.

  14. Structure-dependent effects of pyridine derivatives on mechanisms of intestinal fatty acid uptake: regulation of nicotinic acid receptor and fatty acid transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Annett; Lang, Roman; Rohm, Barbara; Rubach, Malte; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-07-01

    Pyridines are widely distributed in foods. Nicotinic acid (NA), a carboxylated pyridine derivative, inhibits lipolysis in adipocytes by activation of the orphan NA receptor (HM74A) and is applied to treat hyperlipidemia. However, knowledge on the impact of pyridine derivatives on intestinal lipid metabolism is scarce. This study was performed to identify the structural determinants of pyridines for their effects on fatty acid uptake in enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and to elucidate the mechanisms of action. The impact of 17 pyridine derivatives on fatty acid uptake was tested. Multiple regression analysis revealed the presence of a methyl group to be the structural determinant at 0.1 mM, whereas at 1 mM, the presence of a carboxylic group and the N-methylation presented further structural characteristics to affect the fatty acid uptake. NA, showing a stimulating effect on FA uptake, and N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP), inhibiting FA uptake, were selected for mechanistic studies. Gene expression of the fatty acid transporters CD36, FATP2 and FATP4, and the lipid metabolism regulating transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and PPARγ was up-regulated upon NA treatment. Caco-2 cells were demonstrated to express the low-affinity NA receptor HM74 of which the gene expression was up-regulated upon NA treatment. We hypothesize that the NA-induced fatty acid uptake might result from NA receptor activation and related intracellular signaling cascades. In contrast, MPP increased transepithelial electrical resistance. We therefore conclude that NA and MPP, both sharing the pyridine motif core, exhibit their contrary effects on intestinal FA uptake by activation of different mechanisms. PMID:24767308

  15. Transcriptomic analysis of Mandarin fish brain cells infected with infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus with an emphasis on retinoic acid-inducible gene 1-like receptors and apoptosis pathways.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianqin; Fu, Xiaozhe; Li, Ningqiu; Dong, Xingxing; Zhao, Lijuan; Lan, Jiangfeng; Ji, Wei; Zhou, Weidong; Ai, Taoshan; Wu, Shuqin; Lin, Li

    2015-08-01

    Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) has caused significant economic losses in the cultured Mandarin fish (Siniperca chuatsi) industry. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of the viral infection remain poorly understood. In this study, deep RNA sequencing technique was used to analyze the transcriptomic profiles of Mandarin fish brain cells (CPB) at progressive time points after ISKNV infection. A total of 96,206,040 clean data from 98,235,240 sequence reads were obtained. These raw data were assembled into 66,787 unigenes. Among these unigenes, 33,225 and 29,210 had significant hit the Nr and SwissProt databases where they matched 27,537and 19,638 unique protein accessions, respectively. In the samples harvested at 24 or 72 h post of the infection, a total of 10,834 or 7584 genes were differentially expressed in infected CPB cells compared to non-infected cells, including 5445 or 3766 up-regulated genes and 5389 or 3818 down-regulated genes, respectively. In addition, 12 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were validated by quantitative PCR. These DEGs were involved in many pathways of viral pathogenesis. Further analysis of the major DEGs genes involved in the RLRs and apoptosis pathways revealed some interesting findings. In the RLRs pathway, ISKNV infection inhibited the activation of NF-κB via over expression of the IKKB-α and IKKB-β and lessened expression of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK4). In the apoptosis pathway, ISKNV infection could induce apoptosis mainly via tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mediated extrinsic pathway. The cellular apoptosis induced by ISKNV infection was confirmed using annexinV-FITC/PI and DAPI staining methods.

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of Mandarin fish brain cells infected with infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus with an emphasis on retinoic acid-inducible gene 1-like receptors and apoptosis pathways.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianqin; Fu, Xiaozhe; Li, Ningqiu; Dong, Xingxing; Zhao, Lijuan; Lan, Jiangfeng; Ji, Wei; Zhou, Weidong; Ai, Taoshan; Wu, Shuqin; Lin, Li

    2015-08-01

    Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) has caused significant economic losses in the cultured Mandarin fish (Siniperca chuatsi) industry. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of the viral infection remain poorly understood. In this study, deep RNA sequencing technique was used to analyze the transcriptomic profiles of Mandarin fish brain cells (CPB) at progressive time points after ISKNV infection. A total of 96,206,040 clean data from 98,235,240 sequence reads were obtained. These raw data were assembled into 66,787 unigenes. Among these unigenes, 33,225 and 29,210 had significant hit the Nr and SwissProt databases where they matched 27,537and 19,638 unique protein accessions, respectively. In the samples harvested at 24 or 72 h post of the infection, a total of 10,834 or 7584 genes were differentially expressed in infected CPB cells compared to non-infected cells, including 5445 or 3766 up-regulated genes and 5389 or 3818 down-regulated genes, respectively. In addition, 12 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were validated by quantitative PCR. These DEGs were involved in many pathways of viral pathogenesis. Further analysis of the major DEGs genes involved in the RLRs and apoptosis pathways revealed some interesting findings. In the RLRs pathway, ISKNV infection inhibited the activation of NF-κB via over expression of the IKKB-α and IKKB-β and lessened expression of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK4). In the apoptosis pathway, ISKNV infection could induce apoptosis mainly via tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mediated extrinsic pathway. The cellular apoptosis induced by ISKNV infection was confirmed using annexinV-FITC/PI and DAPI staining methods. PMID:25982401

  17. A polymorphism in the nuclear receptor coactivator 7 gene and breast cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Süllner, Julia; Lattrich, Claus; Häring, Julia; Görse, Regina; Ortmann, Olaf; Treeck, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear receptor coactivator 7 (NCoA7) gene codes for an estrogen receptor-associated protein that plays a significant role in the cellular response to estrogens. Given that NCoA7 is expressed in the mammary gland, alterations in this gene may affect breast cancer risk. In this study, we compared the genotype and allele frequencies of the missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1567, located in the coding region of the NCoA7 gene and resulting in an amino acid exchange from asparagine to glutamine, in 305 women with sporadic breast cancer and 346 women without any malignancy. Statistical analysis of the observed frequencies did not reveal a significant difference between the cancer and control groups, nor did a comparison between histological breast cancer subgroups. In conclusion, the results of our phenotype-genotype association study indicate that NCoA7 SNP rs1567 does not affect breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:22740868

  18. A polymorphism in the nuclear receptor coactivator 7 gene and breast cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    SÜLLNER, JULIA; LATTRICH, CLAUS; HÄRING, JULIA; GÖRSE, REGINA; ORTMANN, OLAF; TREECK, OLIVER

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear receptor coactivator 7 (NCoA7) gene codes for an estrogen receptor-associated protein that plays a significant role in the cellular response to estrogens. Given that NCoA7 is expressed in the mammary gland, alterations in this gene may affect breast cancer risk. In this study, we compared the genotype and allele frequencies of the missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1567, located in the coding region of the NCoA7 gene and resulting in an amino acid exchange from asparagine to glutamine, in 305 women with sporadic breast cancer and 346 women without any malignancy. Statistical analysis of the observed frequencies did not reveal a significant difference between the cancer and control groups, nor did a comparison between histological breast cancer subgroups. In conclusion, the results of our phenotype-genotype association study indicate that NCoA7 SNP rs1567 does not affect breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:22740868

  19. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases. PMID:26579439

  20. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lili; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Huang, Wendong

    2015-03-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases. PMID:26579439

  1. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with receptor-binding characteristics in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Blum, K.; Ritchie, T.; Montgomery, A.; Sheridan, P.J. )

    1991-07-01

    The allelic association of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene with the binding characteristics of the D2 dopamine receptor was determined in 66 brains of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects. In a blinded experiment, DNA from the cerebral cortex was treated with the restriction endonuclease Taql and probed with a 1.5-kilobase (kb) digest of a clone (lambda hD2G1) of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene. The binding characteristics (Kd (binding affinity) and Bmax (number of binding sites)) of the D2 dopamine receptor were determined in the caudate nuclei of these brains using tritiated spiperone as the ligand. The adjusted Kd was significantly lower in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic subjects. In subjects with the A1 allele, in whom a high association with alcoholism was found, the Bmax was significantly reduced compared with the Bmax of subjects with the A2 allele. Moreover, a progressively reduced Bmax was found in subjects with A2/A2, A1/A2, and A1/A1 alleles, with subjects with A2/A2 having the highest mean values, and subjects with A1/A1, the lowest. The polymorphic pattern of the D2 dopamine receptor gene and its differential expression of receptors suggests the involvement of the dopaminergic system in conferring susceptibility to at least one subtype of severe alcoholism.

  2. Chemosensory receptor genes in the Oriental tobacco budworm Helicoverpa assulta.

    PubMed

    Xu, W; Papanicolaou, A; Liu, N-Y; Dong, S-L; Anderson, A

    2015-04-01

    The Oriental tobacco budworm (Helicoverpa assulta) is a specialist herbivore moth and its larvae feed on Solanaceous plants. (Z)-9-hexadecenal (Z9-16: Ald) is the major sex pheromone component in H. assulta but the specific pheromone receptor (PR) against Z9-16: Ald has not yet been identified. In the present study, we integrated transcriptomic, bioinformatic and functional characterization approaches to investigate the chemosensory receptor genes of H. assulta. We identified seven potential PRs with 44 olfactory receptors, 18 gustatory receptors and 24 ionotropic receptors, which were further studied by in silico gene expression profile, phylogenetic analysis, reverse transcription PCR and calcium imaging assays. The candidate PR, HassOR13, showed a strong response to the minor sex pheromone component, (Z)-11-hexadecenal, but not the major component, Z9-16: Ald, in calcium imaging assays. This study provides the molecular basis for comparative studies of chemosensory receptors between H. assulta and other Helicoverpa species and will advance our understanding of the evolution and function of Lepidoptera insect chemosensation. PMID:25430896

  3. A human serotonin 1D receptor variant (5HT1D beta) encoded by an intronless gene on chromosome 6.

    PubMed Central

    Demchyshyn, L; Sunahara, R K; Miller, K; Teitler, M; Hoffman, B J; Kennedy, J L; Seeman, P; Van Tol, H H; Niznik, H B

    1992-01-01

    An intronless gene encoding a serotonin receptor (5HT1D beta) has been cloned and functionally expressed in mammalian fibroblast cultures. Based on the deduced amino acid sequence, the gene encodes a 390-amino acid protein displaying considerable homology, within putative transmembrane domains (approximately 75% identity) to the canine and human 5HT1D receptors. Membranes prepared from CHO cells stably expressing the receptor bound [3H]serotonin with high affinity (Kd 4 nM) and displayed a pharmacological profile consistent, but not identical, with that of the characterized serotonin 5HT1D receptor. Most notably, metergoline and serotonergic piperazine derivatives, as a group, display 3- to 8-fold lower affinity for the 5HT1D beta receptor than for the 5HT1D receptor, whereas both receptors display similar affinities for tryptamine derivatives, including the antimigraine drug sumatriptan. Northern blot analysis revealed an mRNA of approximately 5.5 kilobases expressed in human and monkey frontal cortex, medulla, striatum, hippocampus and amygdala but not in cerebellum, olfactory tubercle, and pituitary. The 5HT1D beta gene maps to human chromosome 6. The existence of multiple neuronal 5HT1D-like receptors may help account for some of the complexities associated with [3H]serotonin binding patterns in native membranes. Images PMID:1351684

  4. Farnesoid X receptor agonist reduces serum asymmetric dimethylarginine levels through hepatic dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase-1 gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tonghuan; Chouinard, Michael; Cox, Amy L; Sipes, Philip; Marcelo, Marialuisa; Ficorilli, James; Li, Shuyu; Gao, Hong; Ryan, Timothy P; Michael, M Dodson; Michael, Laura F

    2006-12-29

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR, NR1H4) is a bile acid-responsive nuclear receptor that plays critical roles in the transcriptional regulation genes involved in cholesterol, bile acid, triglyceride, and carbohydrate metabolism. By microarray analysis of hepatic genes from female Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats treated with the FXR agonist GW4064, we have identified dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase-1 (DDAH1) as an FXR target gene. DDAH1 is a key catabolic enzyme of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a major endogenous nitric-oxide synthase inhibitor. Sequence analysis of the DDAH1 gene reveals the presence of an FXR response element (FXRE) located 90 kb downstream of the transcription initiation site and within the first intron. Functional analysis of the putative FXRE demonstrated GW4064 dose-dependent transcriptional activation from the element, and we have demonstrated that the FXRE sequence binds the FXR-RXR heterodimer. In vivo administration of GW4064 to female ZDF rats promoted a dose-dependent and >6-fold increase in hepatic DDAH1 gene expression. The level of serum ADMA was reduced concomitantly. These findings provide a mechanism by which FXR may increase endothelium-derived nitric oxide levels through modulation of serum ADMA levels via direct regulation of hepatic DDAH1 gene expression. Thus, beneficial clinical outcomes of FXR agonist therapy may include prevention of atherosclerosis and improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  5. Evolution of an Expanded Mannose Receptor Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Staines, Karen; Hunt, Lawrence G.; Young, John R.; Butter, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Sequences of peptides from a protein specifically immunoprecipitated by an antibody, KUL01, that recognises chicken macrophages, identified a homologue of the mammalian mannose receptor, MRC1, which we called MRC1L-B. Inspection of the genomic environment of the chicken gene revealed an array of five paralogous genes, MRC1L-A to MRC1L-E, located between conserved flanking genes found either side of the single MRC1 gene in mammals. Transcripts of all five genes were detected in RNA from a macrophage cell line and other RNAs, whose sequences allowed the precise definition of spliced exons, confirming or correcting existing bioinformatic annotation. The confirmed gene structures were used to locate orthologues of all five genes in the genomes of two other avian species and of the painted turtle, all with intact coding sequences. The lizard genome had only three genes, one orthologue of MRC1L-A and two orthologues of the MRC1L-B antigen gene resulting from a recent duplication. The Xenopus genome, like that of most mammals, had only a single MRC1-like gene at the corresponding locus. MRC1L-A and MRC1L-B genes had similar cytoplasmic regions that may be indicative of similar subcellular migration and functions. Cytoplasmic regions of the other three genes were very divergent, possibly indicating the evolution of a new functional repertoire for this family of molecules, which might include novel interactions with pathogens. PMID:25390371

  6. Selection for Genes Encoding Secreted Proteins and Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Robert D.; Gu, Qimin; Goddard, Audrey; Rosenthal, Arnon

    1996-07-01

    Extracellular proteins play an essential role in the formation, differentiation, and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Despite that, the systematic identification of genes encoding these proteins has not been possible. We describe here a highly efficient method to isolate genes encoding secreted and membrane-bound proteins by using a single-step selection in yeast. Application of this method, termed signal peptide selection, to various tissues yielded 559 clones that appear to encode known or novel extracellular proteins. These include members of the transforming growth factor and epidermal growth factor protein families, endocrine hormones, tyrosine kinase receptors, serine/threonine kinase receptors, seven transmembrane receptors, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, plasma proteins, and ion channels. The eventual identification of most, or all, extracellular signaling molecules will advance our understanding of fundamental biological processes and our ability to intervene in disease states.

  7. Characterization of the "CCR5" Chemokine Receptor Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The life cycle of retroviruses is an essential topic of modern cell biology instruction. Furthermore, the process of HIV viral entry into the cell is a question of great interest in basic and clinical biology. This paper describes how students can easily recover their own DNA, amplify a portion of the "CCR5" chemokine receptor gene, characterize…

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of a Toll receptor gene from Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Srisuk, Chutima; Longyant, Siwaporn; Senapin, Saengchan; Sithigorngul, Paisarn; Chaivisuthangkura, Parin

    2014-02-01

    Toll receptors are cell surface molecules acting as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that have been implicated in the signaling pathway of innate immune responses. In this study, the full-length cDNA of a Toll receptor gene of Macrobrachium rosenbergii, designated MrToll, was successfully isolated using designed degenerate primers and the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The MrToll gene sequence contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 2799 nucleotides encoding a protein of 932 amino acid residues. The protein contained distinct structural motifs of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, including an extracellular domain containing 15 leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), a transmembrane segment of 23 amino acids, and a cytoplasmic Toll/interleukin-1R (TIR) domain of 139 residues. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that MrToll and Toll receptor of Marsupenaeus japonicus (MjToll) evolved closely. However, the MrToll ORF demonstrated only 48-49% identity with shrimp Toll1, suggesting that MrToll isolated from a palaemonid shrimp might belong to a novel class of Toll receptors in shrimp. The transcripts of the MrToll gene were constitutively expressed in various tissues, with high levels in hemocytes, the stomach and muscle. A reverse transcriptase PCR assay demonstrated that the expression patterns of MrToll were distinctly modulated after Aeromonas caviae stimulation, with significant enhancement at 3-12 h post-challenge and a decline to basal levels at 24 h post-challenge. In addition, when MrToll-silenced shrimp were challenged with A. caviae, there was a significant increase in mortality and bacterial CFU counts. These results suggest that MrToll might be involved in host innate defense, especially against the pathogen A. caviae.

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of a Toll receptor gene from Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Srisuk, Chutima; Longyant, Siwaporn; Senapin, Saengchan; Sithigorngul, Paisarn; Chaivisuthangkura, Parin

    2014-02-01

    Toll receptors are cell surface molecules acting as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that have been implicated in the signaling pathway of innate immune responses. In this study, the full-length cDNA of a Toll receptor gene of Macrobrachium rosenbergii, designated MrToll, was successfully isolated using designed degenerate primers and the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The MrToll gene sequence contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 2799 nucleotides encoding a protein of 932 amino acid residues. The protein contained distinct structural motifs of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, including an extracellular domain containing 15 leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), a transmembrane segment of 23 amino acids, and a cytoplasmic Toll/interleukin-1R (TIR) domain of 139 residues. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that MrToll and Toll receptor of Marsupenaeus japonicus (MjToll) evolved closely. However, the MrToll ORF demonstrated only 48-49% identity with shrimp Toll1, suggesting that MrToll isolated from a palaemonid shrimp might belong to a novel class of Toll receptors in shrimp. The transcripts of the MrToll gene were constitutively expressed in various tissues, with high levels in hemocytes, the stomach and muscle. A reverse transcriptase PCR assay demonstrated that the expression patterns of MrToll were distinctly modulated after Aeromonas caviae stimulation, with significant enhancement at 3-12 h post-challenge and a decline to basal levels at 24 h post-challenge. In addition, when MrToll-silenced shrimp were challenged with A. caviae, there was a significant increase in mortality and bacterial CFU counts. These results suggest that MrToll might be involved in host innate defense, especially against the pathogen A. caviae. PMID:24398262

  10. Characterization of cDNAs encoding the chick retinoic acid receptor gamma 2 and preferential distribution of retinoic acid receptor gamma transcripts during chick skin development.

    PubMed

    Michaille, J J; Blanchet, S; Kanzler, B; Garnier, J M; Dhouailly, D

    1994-12-01

    Retinoic acid receptors alpha, beta and gamma (RAR alpha, beta and gamma) are ligand-inductible transcriptional activators which belong to the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. At least two major isoforms (1 and 2) of each RAR arise by differential use of two promoters and alternative splicing. In mouse, the three RAR genes are expressed in stage- and tissue-specific patterns during embryonic development. In order to understand the role of the different RARs in chick, RAR gamma 2 cDNAs were isolated from an 8.5-day (stage 35 of Hamburger and Hamilton) chick embryo skin library. The deduced chick RAR gamma 2 amino acid sequence displays uncommon features such as 21 specific amino acid replacements, 12 of them being clustered in the amino-terminal region (domains A2 and B), and a truncated acidic carboxy-terminal region (F domain). However, the pattern of RAR gamma expression in chick embryo resembles that reported in mouse, particularly in skin where RAR gamma expression occurs in both the dermal and epidermal layers at the beginning of feather formation, and is subsequently restricted to the differentiating epidermal cells. Northern blot analysis suggests that different RAR gamma isoforms could be successively required during chick development.

  11. A missense mutation in the Ca-sensing receptor gene causes familial autosomal dominant hypoparathyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Y.M.; Finegold, D.N.; Armitage, M.M.

    1994-09-01

    A large family was identified in which hypoparathyroidism was observed to segregate as an autosomal dominant trait in 3 generations. Linkage analysis using short tandem repeat polymorphisms linked the disease phenotype to chromosomal region 3q13. This region contains a newly identified Ca-sensing receptor (PCAR1) gene. This receptor regulates the secretion of parathyroid hormone from parathyroid cells in response to extracellular ionized Ca concentration ([Ca{sup +2}]). PCR-based single stranded conformational analysis of exonic sequences of the PCAR1 gene revealed an abnormal conformer in exon 3 in affected individuals. Direct sequencing of the amplification product from an affected and an unaffected family member showed an A {yields} G transition at nucleotide 770 of the PCAR1 gene [numbering based on the bovine sequence (Genbank accession number S67307)]. This substitution created a Msp1 restriction site which cosegregated with hypoparathyroidism in this family. This substitution was not observed in unaffected family members, unrelated spouses, or unrelated population controls. This substitution is predicted to result in the replacement of a glutamine residue at amino acid 246 by an arginine residue. The Ca-sensing receptor appears to be a member of the family of seven membrane spanning G-protein linked receptors. The extracellular location of this amino acid substitution appears to produce a gain of function mutation increasing the receptor sensitivity to [Ca{sup +2}] and decreasing the calcium {open_quotes}set point{close_quotes}. This is in contrast to the loss of function mutations observed in the PCAR1 gene in pedigrees with familial hypercalcemic hypocalciuria.

  12. Ligand regulation of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors: implications for development of novel therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Solt, Laura A.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review In the late 1980s, the cloning of several nuclear receptors led to the intense search and isolation of new members of this superfamily. Despite their identification, many of these receptors were dubbed ‘orphan’ receptors, as their physiological ligands remained unknown. Recent reports have presented evidence for one family of orphan receptors, the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors (RORs), in several pathologies, including osteoporosis, several autoimmune diseases, asthma, cancer, diabetes and obesity. The present review summarizes the studies identifying ligands for the RORs and evaluates their role as targets for potential therapeutics. Recent findings Significant progress was made in the initial identification of ligands for the RORs when X-ray crystallographic studies identified several molecules within the ligand-binding pockets of RORα and RORβ. Recently, we identified endogenous and synthetic ligands for RORα and RORγ, thereby solidifying their function as ligand-dependent transcription factors. Summary Recent studies have established roles for the RORs in physiological development and the advent of disease. Identification of ligands for the RORs, both endogenous and synthetic, has established these receptors as attractive new therapeutic targets for the treatment of ROR-related diseases. PMID:20463469

  13. Seizure control by decanoic acid through direct AMPA receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pishan; Augustin, Katrin; Boddum, Kim; Williams, Sophie; Sun, Min; Terschak, John A; Hardege, Jörg D; Chen, Philip E; Walker, Matthew C; Williams, Robin S B

    2016-02-01

    The medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet is an established treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy that increases plasma levels of decanoic acid and ketones. Recently, decanoic acid has been shown to provide seizure control in vivo, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we show that decanoic acid, but not the ketones β-hydroxybutryate or acetone, shows antiseizure activity in two acute ex vivo rat hippocampal slice models of epileptiform activity. To search for a mechanism of decanoic acid, we show it has a strong inhibitory effect on excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurotransmission in hippocampal slices. Using heterologous expression of excitatory ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA subunits in Xenopus oocytes, we show that this effect is through direct AMPA receptor inhibition, a target shared by a recently introduced epilepsy treatment perampanel. Decanoic acid acts as a non-competitive antagonist at therapeutically relevant concentrations, in a voltage- and subunit-dependent manner, and this is sufficient to explain its antiseizure effects. This inhibitory effect is likely to be caused by binding to sites on the M3 helix of the AMPA-GluA2 transmembrane domain; independent from the binding site of perampanel. Together our results indicate that the direct inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission by decanoic acid in the brain contributes to the anti-convulsant effect of the medium chain triglyceride ketogenic diet. PMID:26608744

  14. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor (LPAR) modulators: The current pharmacological toolbox.

    PubMed

    Llona-Minguez, Sabin; Ghassemian, Artin; Helleday, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Lysophosphatidic acids (LPA) are key lipid-signalling molecules that regulate a remarkably diverse set of cellular events, such as motility, chemotaxis, cell cycle progression, viability, and wound healing. The physiological and pathophysiological consequences of LPA signalling are evident and misregulation of LPA signalling can lead to pathologies like cancer, atherosclerosis, ischaemia, and fibrosis. LPA exerts its biological actions mainly through several types of G protein-coupled receptors, some of which display opposing or redundant effects. For this reason, selective LPA receptor small-molecule ligands can shine light on LPA biology and present an exciting opportunity for drug discovery endeavours. This review provides insights into the detailed chemical nature and pharmacological profile of the small-molecules thus far developed as LPA receptor modulators, as well as information on the preparation of key pharmaceuticals. This summary will facilitate future research efforts and nurture collaboration between chemists and biologists working in this emerging field. PMID:25704399

  15. Estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor genes are expressed differentially in mouse embryos during preimplantation development.

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Q; Gorski, J

    1993-01-01

    Estrogen and progesterone play an important role in the development and implantation of preimplantation embryos. However, it is controversial whether these hormones act directly on the embryos. The effects of these hormones depend on the existence of their specific receptors. To determine whether estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor genes are expressed in mouse preimplantation embryos, we examined RNA from embryos at different stages of preimplantation development by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction techniques. ER mRNA was found in oocytes and fertilized eggs. The message level began to decline at the two-cell stage and reached its lowest level at the five- to eight-cell stage. ER mRNA was not detectable at the morula stage but reappeared at the blastocyst stage. Progesterone receptor mRNA was not detectable until the blastocyst stage. The embryonic expression of ER and progesterone receptor genes in the blastocyst suggests a possible functional requirement for ER and progesterone receptor at this stage of development. These results provide a basis for determining the direct role of estrogen and progesterone in preimplantation embryos. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8415723

  16. Regulation of antibacterial defense in the small intestine by the nuclear bile acid receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Takeshi; Moschetta, Antonio; Lee, Youn-Kyoung; Peng, Li; Zhao, Guixiang; Downes, Michael; Yu, Ruth T.; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Repa, Joyce J.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.

    2006-03-01

    Obstruction of bile flow results in bacterial proliferation and mucosal injury in the small intestine that can lead to the translocation of bacteria across the epithelial barrier and systemic infection. These adverse effects of biliary obstruction can be inhibited by administration of bile acids. Here we show that the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor for bile acids, induces genes involved in enteroprotection and inhibits bacterial overgrowth and mucosal injury in ileum caused by bile duct ligation. Mice lacking FXR have increased ileal levels of bacteria and a compromised epithelial barrier. These findings reveal a central role for FXR in protecting the distal small intestine from bacterial invasion and suggest that FXR agonists may prevent epithelial deterioration and bacterial translocation in patients with impaired bile flow. bacteria | biliary obstruction | epithelial barrier | ileum

  17. Role of farnesoid X receptor and bile acids in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Sharon; Ding, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is one of the major causes of liver morbidity and mortality worldwide. Chronic alcohol consumption leads to development of liver pathogenesis encompassing steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and in extreme cases, hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, ALD may also associate with cholestasis. Emerging evidence now suggests that farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and bile acids also play important roles in ALD. In this review, we discuss the effects of alcohol consumption on FXR, bile acids and gut microbiome as well as their impacts on ALD. Moreover, we summarize the findings on FXR, FoxO3a (forkhead box-containing protein class O3a) and PPARα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha) in regulation of autophagy-related gene transcription program and liver injury in response to alcohol exposure. PMID:26579442

  18. Role of farnesoid X receptor and bile acids in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Manley, Sharon; Ding, Wenxing

    2015-03-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is one of the major causes of liver morbidity and mortality worldwide. Chronic alcohol consumption leads to development of liver pathogenesis encompassing steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and in extreme cases, hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, ALD may also associate with cholestasis. Emerging evidence now suggests that farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and bile acids also play important roles in ALD. In this review, we discuss the effects of alcohol consumption on FXR, bile acids and gut microbiome as well as their impacts on ALD. Moreover, we summarize the findings on FXR, FoxO3a (forkhead box-containing protein class O3a) and PPARα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha) in regulation of autophagy-related gene transcription program and liver injury in response to alcohol exposure. PMID:26579442

  19. Gene Expression Control by Glucocorticoid Receptors during Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Andre Machado; Anunciato, Aparecida Kataryna Olimpio; Rosenstock, Tatiana Rosado; Glezer, Isaias

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent anti-inflammatory compounds that have been extensively used in clinical practice for several decades. GC’s effects on inflammation are generally mediated through GC receptors (GRs). Signal transduction through these nuclear receptors leads to dramatic changes in gene expression programs in different cell types, typically due to GR binding to DNA or to transcription modulators. During the last decade, the view of GCs as exclusive anti-inflammatory molecules has been challenged. GR negative interference in pro-inflammatory gene expression was a landmark in terms of molecular mechanisms that suppress immune activity. In fact, GR can induce varied inhibitory molecules, including a negative regulator of Toll-like receptors pathway, or subject key transcription factors, such as NF-κB and AP-1, to a repressor mechanism. In contrast, the expression of some acute-phase proteins and other players of innate immunity generally requires GR signaling. Consequently, GRs must operate context-dependent inhibitory, permissive, or stimulatory effects on host defense signaling triggered by pathogens or tissue damage. This review aims to disclose how contradictory or comparable effects on inflammatory gene expression can depend on pharmacological approach (including selective GC receptor modulators; SEGRMs), cell culture, animal treatment, or transgenic strategies used as models. Although the current view of GR-signaling integrated many advances in the field, some answers to important questions remain elusive. PMID:27148162

  20. CRDB: database of chemosensory receptor gene families in vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dong; Jin, Ke; Wu, Xiaoli; Zhong, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Chemosensory receptors (CR) are crucial for animals to sense the environmental changes and survive on earth. The emergence of whole-genome sequences provides us an opportunity to identify the entire CR gene repertoires. To completely gain more insight into the evolution of CR genes in vertebrates, we identified the nearly all CR genes in 25 vertebrates using homology-based approaches. Among these CR gene repertoires, nearly half of them were identified for the first time in those previously uncharacterized species, such as the guinea pig, giant panda and elephant, etc. Consistent with previous findings, we found that the numbers of CR genes vary extensively among different species, suggesting an extreme form of 'birth-and-death' evolution. For the purpose of facilitating CR gene analysis, we constructed a database with the goals to provide a resource for CR genes annotation and a web tool for exploring their evolutionary patterns. Besides a search engine for the gene extraction from a specific chromosome region, an easy-to-use phylogenetic analysis tool was also provided to facilitate online phylogeny study of CR genes. Our work can provide a rigorous platform for further study on the evolution of CR genes in vertebrates.

  1. Identification of COUP-TFII Orphan Nuclear Receptor as a Retinoic Acid-Activated Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Schoen W; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Zhou, X Edward; Kretschman, Jennifer E; Reynolds, Ross; Vonrhein, Clemens; Xu, Yong; Wang, Liliang; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFI and II) make up the most conserved subfamily of nuclear receptors that play key roles in angiogenesis, neuronal development, organogenesis, cell fate determination, and metabolic homeostasis. Although the biological functions of COUP-TFs have been studied extensively, little is known of their structural features or aspects of ligand regulation. Here we report the ligand-free 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of the human COUP-TFII ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals an autorepressed conformation of the receptor, where helix {alpha}10 is bent into the ligand-binding pocket and the activation function-2 helix is folded into the cofactor binding site, thus preventing the recruitment of coactivators. In contrast, in multiple cell lines, COUP-TFII exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, and ligand binding, substantially reduce the COUP-TFII transcriptional activity. Importantly, retinoid acids are able to promote COUP-TFII to recruit coactivators and activate a COUP-TF reporter construct. Although the concentration needed is higher than the physiological levels of retinoic acids, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, in which ligands activate the receptor by releasing it from the autorepressed conformation.

  2. Differential Gene Expression in GPR40-Overexpressing Pancreatic β-cells Treated with Linoleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In-Su; Yang, So-Young; Han, Joo-Hui; Jung, Sang-Hyuk; Park, Hyun-Soo

    2015-01-01

    "G protein-coupled receptor 40" (GPR40), a receptor for long-chain fatty acids, mediates the stimulation of glucose-induced insulin secretion. We examined the profiles of differential gene expression in GPR40-activated cells treated with linoleic acid, and finally predicted the integral pathways of the cellular mechanism of GPR40-mediated insulinotropic effects. After constructing a GPR40-overexpressing stable cell line (RIN-40) from the rat pancreatic β-cell line RIN-5f, we determined the gene expression profiles of RIN-5f and RIN-40. In total, 1004 genes, the expression of which was altered at least twofold, were selected in RIN-5f versus RIN-40. Moreover, the differential genetic profiles were investigated in RIN-40 cells treated with 30 µM linoleic acid, which resulted in selection of 93 genes in RIN-40 versus RIN-40 treated with linoleic acid. Based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway (KEGG, http://www.genome.jp/kegg/), sets of genes induced differentially by treatment with linoleic acid in RIN-40 cells were found to be related to mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase- and neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction pathways. A gene ontology (GO) study revealed that more than 30% of the genes were associated with signal transduction and cell proliferation. Thus, this study elucidated a gene expression pattern relevant to the signal pathways that are regulated by GPR40 activation during the acute period. Together, these findings increase our mechanistic understanding of endogenous molecules associated with GPR40 function, and provide information useful for identification of a target for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25729276

  3. Autoradiographic mapping of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors in human and guinea pig hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Coupe, M.O.; Mak, J.C.; Yacoub, M.; Oldershaw, P.J.; Barnes, P.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino acid peptide that is a potent coronary vasodilator. Although CGRP is found in high concentrations around coronary arteries, its precise function in the control of coronary vasomotor tone remains unclear. We studied the distribution of specific receptors for CGRP in guinea pig and human hearts and found that the highest concentration of specific receptors for CGRP was in the major coronary arteries, which is consistent with the hypothesis that CGRP is implicated in control of coronary vasomotor tone. Areas of coronary artery with atheroma contained significantly decreased (158 +/- 35 grains/1,000 microns 2 tissue, n = 3) binding sites compared with binding sites in normal arteries (266 +/- 10 grains/1,000 microns 2 tissue, n = 11; p less than 0.001, t test). The decrease in receptors for CGRP around atheroma may predispose these vessels to coronary spasm.

  4. Mu Opioid Receptor Gene: New Point Mutations in Opioid Addicts

    PubMed Central

    Dinarvand, Amin; Goodarzi, Ali; Vousooghi, Nasim; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Dinarvand, Rasoul; Ostadzadeh, Fahimeh; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in mu opioid receptor gene and drug addiction has been shown in various studies. Here, we have evaluated the existence of polymorphisms in exon 3 of this gene in Iranian population and investigated the possible association between these mutations and opioid addiction. Methods 79 opioid-dependent subjects (55 males, 24 females) and 134 non-addict or control individuals (74 males, 60 females) participated in the study. Genomic DNA was extracted from volunteers’ peripheral blood and exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) whose products were then sequenced. Results Three different heterozygote polymorphisms were observed in 3 male individuals: 759T > C and 877G > A mutations were found in 2 control volunteers and 1043G > C substitution was observed in an opioid-addicted subject. Association between genotype and opioid addiction for each mutation was not statistically significant. Discussion It seems that the sample size used in our study is not enough to confirm or reject any association between 759T > C, 877G > A and 1043G > C substitutions in exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene and opioid addiction susceptibility in Iranian population. PMID:25436079

  5. The effect of folic acid on GABA(A)-B 1 receptor subunit.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Kizzy; Kuizon, Salomon; Junaid, Mohammed; Idrissi, Abdeslem El

    2013-01-01

    Autism contains a spectrum of behavioral and cognitive disturbances of childhood development that is manifested by deficits in social interaction, impaired communication, repetitive behavior, and/or restricted interest. Much research has been dedicated to finding the genes that are responsible for autism, but less than 10% of the cases can be attributed to one gene. Autism prevalence has increased in the last decade and there may be environmental components that are leading to this increase. There are reports of disruption of epigenetic mechanisms controlling the regulation of gene expression as probable cause for autism. Folic acid (FA) is prescribed to women during pregnancy, and can cause epigenetic changes. GABAergic pathway is involved in inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and plays a crucial role during early embryonic development. Autism may entail defect or deregulation of the GABAergic receptor pathway in the brain. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (type A) beta 1 receptor (GABRB1) disruption has been implicated in autism. In the present study, we investigated GABRB1 expression in response to FA supplementation in neuronal cells. Western blot analysis showed GABRB1 protein levels increased in the FA-treated cells in a concentration-dependent manner. FA-dependent increased expression of GABRB1 was further confirmed at the mRNA level using quantitative RT-PCR. These results suggest that epigenetic control of gene expression may affect the expression of GABRB1 and disrupt inhibitory synaptic transmission during embryonic development. PMID:23392927

  6. QUANTITATION OF ABERRANT INTERLOCUS T-CELL RECEPTOR REARRANGEMENTS IN MOUSE THYMOCYTES AND THE EFFECT OF THE HERBICIDE 2,4- DICHLOROPHENOXYACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitation of aberrant interlocus T-cell receptor rearrangements in mouse thymocytes and the effect of the herbicide 2,4- Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

    Small studies in human populations have suggested a correlation between the frequency of errors in antigen receptor gene a...

  7. Adenovirus Type 37 Uses Sialic Acid as a Cellular Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Arnberg, Niklas; Edlund, Karin; Kidd, Alistair H.; Wadell, Göran

    2000-01-01

    Two cellular receptors for adenovirus, coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) α2, have recently been identified. In the absence of CAR, MHC-I α2 has been suggested to serve as a cellular attachment protein for subgenus C adenoviruses, while members from all subgenera except subgenus B have been shown to interact with CAR. We have found that adenovirus type 37 (Ad37) attachment to CAR-expressing CHO cells was no better than that to CHO cells lacking CAR expression, suggesting that CAR is not used by Ad37 during attachment. Instead, we have identified sialic acid as a third adenovirus receptor moiety. First, Ad37 attachment to both CAR-expresing CHO cells and MHC-I α2-expressing Daudi cells was sensitive to neuraminidase treatment, which eliminates sialic acid on the cell surface. Second, Ad37 attachment to sialic acid-expressing Pro-5 cells was more than 10-fold stronger than that to the Pro-5 subline Lec2, which is deficient in sialic acid expression. Third, neuraminidase treatment of A549 cells caused a 60% decrease in Ad37 replication in a fluorescent-focus assay. Moreover, the receptor sialoconjugate is most probably a glycoprotein rather than a ganglioside, since Ad37 attachment to sialic acid-expressing Pro-5 cells was sensitive to protease treatment. Ad37 attachment to Pro-5 cells occurs via α(2→3)-linked sialic acid saccharides rather than α(2→6)-linked ones, since (i) α(2→3)-specific but not α(2→6)-specific lectins blocked Ad37 attachment to Pro-5 cells and (ii) pretreatment of Pro-5 cells with α(2→3)-specific neuraminidase resulted in decreased Ad37 binding. Taken together, these results suggest that, unlike Ad5, Ad37 makes use of α(2→3)-linked sialic acid saccharides on glycoproteins for entry instead of using CAR or MHC-I α2. PMID:10590089

  8. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXII: Nomenclature and Classification of Hydroxy-carboxylic Acid Receptors (GPR81, GPR109A, and GPR109B).

    PubMed

    Offermanns, Stefan; Colletti, Steven L; Lovenberg, Timothy W; Semple, Graeme; Wise, Alan; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2011-06-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptors GPR81, GPR109A, and GPR109B share significant sequence homology and form a small group of receptors, each of which is encoded by clustered genes. In recent years, endogenous ligands for all three receptors have been described. These endogenous ligands have in common that they are hydroxy-carboxylic acid metabolites, and we therefore have proposed that this receptor family be named hydroxy-carboxylic acid (HCA) receptors. The HCA(1) receptor (GPR81) is activated by 2-hydroxy-propanoic acid (lactate), the HCA(2) receptor (GPR109A) is a receptor for the ketone body 3-hydroxy-butyric acid, and the HCA(3) receptor (GPR109B) is activated by the β-oxidation intermediate 3-hydroxy-octanoic acid. HCA(1) and HCA(2) receptors are found in most mammalian species, whereas the HCA(3) receptor is present only in higher primates. The three receptors have in common that they are expressed in adipocytes and are coupled to G(i)-type G-proteins mediating antilipolytic effects in fat cells. HCA(2) and HCA(3) receptors are also expressed in a variety of immune cells. HCA(2) is a receptor for the antidyslipidemic drug nicotinic acid (niacin) and related compounds, and there is an increasing number of synthetic ligands mainly targeted at HCA(2) and HCA(3) receptors. The aim of this article is to give an overview on the discovery and pharmacological characterization of HCAs, and to introduce an International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR)-recommended nomenclature. We will also discuss open questions regarding this receptor family as well as their physiological role and therapeutic potential.

  9. Bile acid regulates c-Jun expression through the orphan nuclear receptor SHP induction in gastric cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Won Il; Park, Min Jung; An, Jin Kwang; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Hye Young; Cheong, JaeHun Yang, Ung Suk

    2008-05-02

    Bile reflux is considered to be one of the most important causative factors in gastric carcinogenesis, due to the attendant inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. In this study, we have assessed the molecular mechanisms inherent to the contribution of bile acid to the transcriptional regulation of inflammatory-related genes. In this study, we demonstrated that bile acid induced the expression of the SHP orphan nuclear receptor at the transcriptional level via c-Jun activation. Bile acid also enhanced the protein interaction of NF-{kappa}B and SHP, thereby resulting in an increase in c-Jun expression and the production of the inflammatory cytokine, TNF{alpha}. These results indicate that bile acid performs a critical function in the regulation of the induction of inflammatory-related genes in gastric cells, and that bile acid-mediated gene expression provides a pre-clue for the development of gastric cellular malformation.

  10. Structural and phylogenetic analysis of the MHC class I-like Fc receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kandil, Eman; Ishibashi, Teruo; Kasahara, Masanori

    1995-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium of neonatal mice and rats expresses an Fc receptor that mediates selective uptake of IgG in mothers`milk. This receptor (FcRn), which helps newborn animals to acquire passive immunity, is an MHC class I-like heterodimer made up of a heavy chain and {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin. In the present study, we determined the genomic structure of a mouse gene (FcRn) encoding the heavy of FcRn. The overall exon-intron organization of the Fcrn gene was similar to that of the Fcrn gene, thus providing structural evidence that Fcrn os a bona fide class I gene. The 5{prime}-flanking region of the Fcrn gene contained the binding motifs for two cytokine-inducible transcription factors, NF-IL6 and NF1. However, regulatory elements found in MHC class I genes (enhancer A, enhancer B, and the IFN response element) were absent. Phylogenetic tree analysis suggested that, like the MICA, AZGP1, and CD1 genes, the Fcrn gene diverged form MHC class I genes after the emergence of amphibians but before the split of placental and marsupial mammals. Consistent with this result, Southern blot analysis with a mouse Fcrn cDNA probe detected cross-hybridizing bands in various mammalian species and chickens. Sequence analysis of the Fcrn gene isolated from eight mouse strains showed that the membrane-distal domain of FcRn has at least three amino acid variants. The fact that Fcrn is a single copy gene indicates that it is expressed in both the neonatal intestine and the fetal yolk sac. 74 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The Role of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Genes in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Maj, Carlo; Minelli, Alessandra; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Sacchetti, Emilio; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies revealed two main components in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia, one constituted by common variants determining a distributed polygenic effect and one represented by a large number of heterogeneous rare and highly disruptive mutations. These gene modifications often affect neural transmission and different studies proved an involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenia phenotype. Through the combination of literature information with genomic data from public repositories, we analyzed the current knowledge on the involvement of genetic variations of the human metabotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenia and related endophenotypes. Despite the analysis did not reveal a definitive connection, different suggestive associations have been identified and in particular a relevant role has emerged for GRM3 in affecting specific schizophrenia endophenotypes. This supports the hypothesis that these receptors are directly involved in schizophrenia disorder. PMID:27296644

  12. The Role of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Genes in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Maj, Carlo; Minelli, Alessandra; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Sacchetti, Emilio; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies revealed two main components in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia, one constituted by common variants determining a distributed polygenic effect and one represented by a large number of heterogeneous rare and highly disruptive mutations. These gene modifications often affect neural transmission and different studies proved an involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenia phenotype. Through the combination of literature information with genomic data from public repositories, we analyzed the current knowledge on the involvement of genetic variations of the human metabotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenia and related endophenotypes. Despite the analysis did not reveal a definitive connection, different suggestive associations have been identified and in particular a relevant role has emerged for GRM3 in affecting specific schizophrenia endophenotypes. This supports the hypothesis that these receptors are directly involved in schizophrenia disorder.

  13. The ligand-binding domains of the thyroid hormone/retinoid receptor gene subfamily function in vivo to mediate heterodimerization, gene silencing, and transactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Qi, J S; Desai-Yajnik, V; Greene, M E; Raaka, B M; Samuels, H H

    1995-01-01

    The ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of the thyroid/retinoid receptor gene subfamily contain a series of heptad motifs important for dimeric interactions. This subfamily includes thyroid hormone receptors (T3Rs), all-trans retinoic acid (RA) receptors (RARs), 9-cis RA receptors (RARs and retinoid X receptors [RXRs]), the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor (VDR), and the receptors that modulate the peroxisomal beta-oxidation pathway (PPARs). These receptors bind to their DNA response elements in vitro as heterodimers with the RXRs. Unliganded receptors in vivo, in particular the T3Rs, can mediate gene silencing and ligand converts these receptors into a transcriptionally active form. The in vivo interactions of these receptors with RXR were studied by using a GAL4-RXR chimera containing the yeast GAL4 DNA-binding domain and the LBD of RXR beta. GAL4-RXR activates transcription from GAL4 response elements in the presence of 9-cis RA. Unliganded T3R, which does not bind or activate GAL4 elements, represses the activation of GAL4-RXR by 9-cis RA in HeLa cells. However, addition of T3 alone leads to transcriptional activation. These findings suggest that T3R can repress or activate transcription while tethered to the LBD of GAL4-RXR and that heterodimerization can occur in vivo without stabilization by hormone response elements. Similar ligand-dependent activation was observed in HeLa cells expressing RAR, VDR, or PPAR and in GH4C1 cells from endogenous receptors. Replacement of the last 17 amino acids of the LBD of RXRbeta with the 90-amino-acid transactivating domain of the herpes simplex virus VP16 protein leads to a GAL4 constitutive activator that is repressed by wild-type T3R but not by a ninth heptad mutant that does not form heterodimers. This finding suggests that the ninth heptad or T3R is important for gene silencing and that the LBD of RXR does not exhibit silencing activity. This conclusion was verified with GAL4-LBD chimeras and with wild-type receptors in

  14. Targeted gene delivery mediated by folate-polyethylenimine-block-poly(ethylene glycol) with receptor selectivity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han; Zhu, Jing-Ling; Zeng, Xuan; Jing, Yue; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi

    2009-03-18

    The folate receptor (FR) is a tumor marker overexpressed in large numbers of cancer cells. Folic acid has high affinity to the FR and retains its binding affinity upon derivatization via its gamma-carboxyl. Therefore, in this article, folate-polyethylenimine-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (FOL-PEI-b-PEG) was designed for specific receptor targeted gene delivery. Physicochemical characterizations of resulting FOL-PEI-b-PEG/DNA complexes in terms of agarose gel electrophoresis, particle size, and zeta potential measurements were investigated. The results indicated that FOL-PEI-b-PEG was able to condense plasmid DNA tightly with a suitable particle size. The cytotoxicity study indicated that the copolymer exhibited less toxicity in comparison with that of 25 kDa PEI. Luciferase assay and green fluorescent protein (GFP) detections were also used to confirm that FOL-PEI-b-PEG could be an effective gene vector. Importantly, transfection efficiency of FOL-PEI-b-PEG with free folic acid was much lower than that of the copolymer without free folic acid on FR-positive HeLa cells, suggesting that FOL-PEI-b-PEG has great potential as a targeting gene vector.

  15. Cholestenoic acids regulate motor neuron survival via liver X receptors

    PubMed Central

    Theofilopoulos, Spyridon; Griffiths, William J.; Crick, Peter J.; Yang, Shanzheng; Meljon, Anna; Ogundare, Michael; Kitambi, Satish Srinivas; Lockhart, Andrew; Tuschl, Karin; Clayton, Peter T.; Morris, Andrew A.; Martinez, Adelaida; Reddy, M. Ashwin; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Bassi, Maria T.; Honda, Akira; Mizuochi, Tatsuki; Kimura, Akihiko; Nittono, Hiroshi; De Michele, Giuseppe; Carbone, Rosa; Criscuolo, Chiara; Yau, Joyce L.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Schüle, Rebecca; Schöls, Ludger; Sailer, Andreas W.; Kuhle, Jens; Fraidakis, Matthew J.; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Steffensen, Knut R.; Björkhem, Ingemar; Ernfors, Patrik; Sjövall, Jan; Arenas, Ernest; Wang, Yuqin

    2014-01-01

    Cholestenoic acids are formed as intermediates in metabolism of cholesterol to bile acids, and the biosynthetic enzymes that generate cholestenoic acids are expressed in the mammalian CNS. Here, we evaluated the cholestenoic acid profile of mammalian cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and determined that specific cholestenoic acids activate the liver X receptors (LXRs), enhance islet-1 expression in zebrafish, and increase the number of oculomotor neurons in the developing mouse in vitro and in vivo. While 3β,7α-dihydroxycholest-5-en-26-oic acid (3β,7α-diHCA) promoted motor neuron survival in an LXR-dependent manner, 3β-hydroxy-7-oxocholest-5-en-26-oic acid (3βH,7O-CA) promoted maturation of precursors into islet-1+ cells. Unlike 3β,7α-diHCA and 3βH,7O-CA, 3β-hydroxycholest-5-en-26-oic acid (3β-HCA) caused motor neuron cell loss in mice. Mutations in CYP7B1 or CYP27A1, which encode enzymes involved in cholestenoic acid metabolism, result in different neurological diseases, hereditary spastic paresis type 5 (SPG5) and cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX), respectively. SPG5 is characterized by spastic paresis, and similar symptoms may occur in CTX. Analysis of CSF and plasma from patients with SPG5 revealed an excess of the toxic LXR ligand, 3β-HCA, while patients with CTX and SPG5 exhibited low levels of the survival-promoting LXR ligand 3β,7α-diHCA. Moreover, 3β,7α-diHCA prevented the loss of motor neurons induced by 3β-HCA in the developing mouse midbrain in vivo.Our results indicate that specific cholestenoic acids selectively work on motor neurons, via LXR, to regulate the balance between survival and death. PMID:25271621

  16. Mechanisms of oestrogen receptor (ER) gene regulation in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Most breast cancers are driven by a transcription factor called oestrogen receptor (ER). Understanding the mechanisms of ER activity in breast cancer has been a major research interest and recent genomic advances have revealed extraordinary insights into how ER mediates gene transcription and what occurs during endocrine resistance. This review discusses our current understanding on ER activity, with an emphasis on several evolving, but important areas of ER biology. PMID:26884552

  17. Development of novel silicon-containing inverse agonists of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Hirozumi; Nakamura, Masaharu; Nakamura, Masahiko; Matsumoto, Yotaro; Nakagomi, Madoka; Hashimoto, Yuichi

    2014-03-15

    Retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-related orphan receptors (RORs) regulate a variety of physiological processes, including hepatic gluconeogenesis, lipid metabolism, circadian rhythm and immune function. The RAR agonist: all-trans retinoic acid was reported to be an RORβ inverse agonist, but no information is available regarding ROR activity of its synthetic analogue Am580. Therefore, we screened Am580 and some related tetramethyltetrahydronaphthalene derivatives and carried out structural development studies, including substitution of carbon atoms with silicon, with the aim of creating a potent ROR transcriptional inhibitor. The phenyl amide disila compound 22 showed the most potent ROR-inhibitory activity among the compounds examined. Its activity towards RORα, RORβ and RORγ was increased compared to that of Am580. The IC₅₀ values for RORα, RORβ and RORγ are 1.3, >10 and 4.5 μM, respectively.

  18. Retinoic acid and retinoid receptors: potential chemopreventive and therapeutic role in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Abu, Jafaru; Batuwangala, Madu; Herbert, Karl; Symonds, Paul

    2005-09-01

    Retinoids are natural and synthetic derivatives of vitamin A, which can be obtained from animal products (milk, liver, beef, fish oils, and eggs) and vegetables (carrots, mangos, sweet potatoes, and spinach). Retinoids regulate various important cellular functions in the body through specific nuclear retinoic-acid receptors and retinoid-X receptors, which are encoded by separate genes. Retinoic-acid receptors specifically bind tretinoin and alitretinoin, whereas retinoid-X receptors bind only alitretinoin. Retinoids have long been established as crucial for several essential life processes-healthy growth, vision, maintenance of tissues, reproduction, metabolism, tissue differentiation (normal, premalignant cells, and malignant cells), haemopoiesis, bone development, spermatogenesis, embryogenesis, and overall survival. Therefore, deficiency of vitamin A can lead to various unwanted biological effects. Several experimental and epidemiological studies have shown the antiproliferative activity of retinoids and their potential use in cancer treatment and chemoprevention. Emerging clinical trials have shown the chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive potential of retinoids in cancerous and precancerous conditions of the uterine cervix. In this review, we explore the potential chemopreventive and therapeutic roles of retinoids in preinvasive and invasive cervical neoplasia.

  19. Molecular Characterization of the Aphis gossypii Olfactory Receptor Gene Families

    PubMed Central

    Walker, William B.; Li, Jianhong; Wang, Guirong

    2014-01-01

    The cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover, is a polyphagous pest that inflicts great damage to cotton yields worldwide. Antennal olfaction, which is extremely important for insect survival, mediates key behaviors such as host preference, mate choice, and oviposition site selection. In insects, odor detection is mediated by odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs), which ensure the specificity of the olfactory sensory neuron responses. In this study, our aim is to identify chemosensory receptors in the cotton aphid genome, as a means to uncover olfactory encoding of the polyphagous feeding habits as well as to aid the discovery of new targets for behavioral interference. We identified a total of 45 candidate ORs and 14 IRs in the cotton aphid genome. Among the candidate AgoORs, 9 are apparent pseudogenes, while 19 can be clustered with ORs from the pea aphid, forming 16 AgoOR/ApOR orthologous subgroups. Among the candidate IRs, we identified homologs of the two highly conserved co-receptors IR8a and IR25a; no AgoIR retain the complete glutamic acid binding domain, suggesting that putative AgoIRs bind different ligands. Our results provide the necessary information for functional characterization of the chemosensory receptors of A. gossypii, with potential for new or refined applications of semiochemicals-based control of this pest insect. PMID:24971460

  20. Molecular characterization of the Aphis gossypii olfactory receptor gene families.

    PubMed

    Cao, Depan; Liu, Yang; Walker, William B; Li, Jianhong; Wang, Guirong

    2014-01-01

    The cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover, is a polyphagous pest that inflicts great damage to cotton yields worldwide. Antennal olfaction, which is extremely important for insect survival, mediates key behaviors such as host preference, mate choice, and oviposition site selection. In insects, odor detection is mediated by odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs), which ensure the specificity of the olfactory sensory neuron responses. In this study, our aim is to identify chemosensory receptors in the cotton aphid genome, as a means to uncover olfactory encoding of the polyphagous feeding habits as well as to aid the discovery of new targets for behavioral interference. We identified a total of 45 candidate ORs and 14 IRs in the cotton aphid genome. Among the candidate AgoORs, 9 are apparent pseudogenes, while 19 can be clustered with ORs from the pea aphid, forming 16 AgoOR/ApOR orthologous subgroups. Among the candidate IRs, we identified homologs of the two highly conserved co-receptors IR8a and IR25a; no AgoIR retain the complete glutamic acid binding domain, suggesting that putative AgoIRs bind different ligands. Our results provide the necessary information for functional characterization of the chemosensory receptors of A. gossypii, with potential for new or refined applications of semiochemicals-based control of this pest insect. PMID:24971460

  1. The evolution of bat nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Escalera-Zamudio, Marina; Zepeda-Mendoza, M Lisandra; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Rojas-Anaya, Edith; Méndez-Ojeda, Maria L; Arias, Carlos F; Greenwood, Alex D

    2015-12-01

    We characterized the nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors (TLR) of a New World bat species, the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), and through a comparative molecular evolutionary approach searched for general adaptation patterns among the nucleic acid-sensing TLRs of eight different bats species belonging to three families (Pteropodidae, Vespertilionidae and Phyllostomidae). We found that the bat TLRs are evolving slowly and mostly under purifying selection and that the divergence pattern of such receptors is overall congruent with the species tree, consistent with the evolution of many other mammalian nuclear genes. However, the chiropteran TLRs exhibited unique mutations fixed in ligand-binding sites, some of which involved nonconservative amino acid changes and/or targets of positive selection. Such changes could potentially modify protein function and ligand-binding properties, as some changes were predicted to alter nucleic acid binding motifs in TLR 9. Moreover, evidence for episodic diversifying selection acting specifically upon the bat lineage and sublineages was detected. Thus, the long-term adaptation of chiropterans to a wide variety of environments and ecological niches with different pathogen profiles is likely to have shaped the evolution of the bat TLRs in an order-specific manner. The observed evolutionary patterns provide evidence for potential functional differences between bat and other mammalian TLRs in terms of resistance to specific pathogens or recognition of nucleic acids in general. PMID:26503258

  2. Receptor for protons: First observations on Acid Sensing Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Krishtal, Oleg

    2015-07-01

    The history of ASICs began in 1980 with unexpected observation. The concept of highly selective Na(+) current gated by specific receptors for protons was not easily accepted. It took 16 years to get these receptor/channels cloned and start a new stage in their investigation. "The receptor for protons" became ASIC comprising under this name a family of receptor/channels ubiquitous for mammalian nervous system, both peripheral and central. The role of ASICs as putative nociceptors was suggested almost immediately after their discovery. This role subsequently was proven in many forms of pain-related phenomena. Many other functions of ASICs have been also found or primed for speculations both in physiology and in disease. Despite the width of field and strength of efforts, numerous basic questions are to be answered before we understand how the local changes in pH in the nervous tissue transform into electric and messenger signaling via ASICs as transducers. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'.

  3. Multimodality Imaging of Gene Transfer with a Receptor-Based Reporter Gene

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ron; Parry, Jesse J.; Akers, Walter J.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; El Naqa, Issam M.; Achilefu, Samuel; Edwards, W. Barry; Rogers, Buck E.

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy trials have traditionally used tumor and tissue biopsies for assessing the efficacy of gene transfer. Non-invasive imaging techniques offer a distinct advantage over tissue biopsies in that the magnitude and duration of gene transfer can be monitored repeatedly. Human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) has been used for the nuclear imaging of gene transfer. To extend this concept, we have developed a somatostatin receptor–enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion construct (SSTR2-EGFP) for nuclear and fluorescent multimodality imaging. Methods An adenovirus containing SSTR2-EGFP (AdSSTR2-EGFP) was constructed and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. SCC-9 human squamous cell carcinoma cells were infected with AdEGFP, AdSSTR2, or AdSSTR2-EGFP for in vitro evaluation by saturation binding, internalization, and fluorescence spectroscopy assays. In vivo biodistribution and nano-SPECT imaging studies were conducted with mice bearing SCC-9 tumor xenografts directly injected with AdSSTR2-EGFP or AdSSTR2 to determine the tumor localization of 111In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-Tyr3-octreotate. Fluorescence imaging was conducted in vivo with mice receiving intratumoral injections of AdSSTR2, AdSSTR2-EGFP, or AdEGFP as well as ex vivo with tissues extracted from mice. Results The similarity between AdSSTR2-EGFP and wild-type AdSSTR2 was demonstrated in vitro by the saturation binding and internalization assays, and the fluorescence emission spectra of cells infected with AdSSTR2-EGFP was almost identical to the spectra of cells infected with wild-type AdEGFP. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that the tumor uptake of 111In-DTPA-Tyr3-octreotate was not significantly different (P > 0.05) when tumors (n = 5) were injected with AdSSTR2 or AdSSTR2-EGFP but was significantly greater than the uptake in control tumors. Fluorescence was observed in tumors injected with AdSSTR2-EGFP and AdEGFP in vivo and ex vivo but not in tumors injected with AdSSTR2

  4. Bridging cell surface receptor with nuclear receptors in control of bile acid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuangwei; Ni, Andrew; Feng, Gen-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are traditionally considered as “physiological detergents” for emulsifying hydrophobic lipids and vitamins due to their amphipathic nature. But accumulating clinical and experimental evidence shows an association between disrupted BA homeostasis and various liver disease conditions including hepatitis infection, diabetes and cancer. Consequently, BA homeostasis regulation has become a field of heavy interest and investigation. After identification of the Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) as an endogenous receptor for BAs, several nuclear receptors (SHP, HNF4α, and LRH-1) were also found to be important in regulation of BA homeostasis. Some post-translational modifications of these nuclear receptors have been demonstrated, but their physiological significance is still elusive. Gut secrets FGF15/19 that can activate hepatic FGFR4 and its downstream signaling cascade, leading to repressed hepatic BA biosynthesis. However, the link between the activated kinases and these nuclear receptors is not fully elucidated. Here, we review the recent literature on signal crosstalk in BA homeostasis. PMID:25500873

  5. Molecular cloning, functional expression and pharmacological characterization of a mouse melanocortin receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Desarnaud, F; Labbe, O; Eggerickx, D; Vassart, G; Parmentier, M

    1994-01-01

    We describe the cloning of the mouse HGMP01A gene that encodes a melanocortin receptor functionally distinct from the adrenal cortex corticotropin (adrenocorticotrophic hormone; ACTH) receptor and the melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) receptor expressed in melanoma. The gene encodes a protein of 323 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 35,800 Da, displaying potential sites for N-linked glycosylation and phosphorylation by protein kinase C. An RNAase protection assay detected weak expression in the brain, but not in adrenal gland, skin, or any of the other tissues tested. Stable CHO cell lines expressing over 100,000 receptors per cell were generated. The recombinant receptor binds iodinated [Nle4,D-Phe7]alpha-MSH (NDP-MSH) with an apparent Kd of 700 pM. Displacement of the ligand by a variety of pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides revealed a pharmacological profile distinct from that of the classical ACTH and MSH receptors. NDP-MSH was the most powerful competitor (IC50 1.4 nM), followed by gamma-MSH (IC50 7 nM). alpha-MSH, beta-MSH and ACTH-(1-39) were significantly less potent, with IC50 values of 30, 19 and 21 nM respectively. ACTH-(4-10) was poorly active (IC50 2.4 microM), while corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide (CLIP) and beta-endorphin were totally ineffective. The recombinant receptor was found to stimulate adenylate cyclase. The potency order of the agonists in this assay was consistent with that of the binding displacement assays. This receptor represents the orthologue of the human melanocortin 3 receptor reported recently. The growing family of melanocortin receptors constitute the molecular basis for the variety of actions of melanocortins that have been described over the years. The availability of functionally expressed receptors from the melanocortin family will allow the development of a specific pharmacology, and a better understanding of the function of the pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides. Images Figure 6 PMID

  6. Retinoic acid receptor alpha is associated with tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Henrik J.; Sanchez, Betzabe C.; Mundt, Filip; Forshed, Jenny; Kovacs, Aniko; Panizza, Elena; Hultin-Rosenberg, Lina; Lundgren, Bo; Martens, Ulf; Máthé, Gyöngyvér; Yakhini, Zohar; Helou, Khalil; Krawiec, Kamilla; Kanter, Lena; Hjerpe, Anders; Stål, Olle; Linderholm, Barbro K.; Lehtiö, Janne

    2013-01-01

    About one-third of oestrogen receptor alpha-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen relapse. Here we identify the nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor alpha as a marker of tamoxifen resistance. Using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics, we show that retinoic acid receptor alpha protein networks and levels differ in a tamoxifen-sensitive (MCF7) and a tamoxifen-resistant (LCC2) cell line. High intratumoural retinoic acid receptor alpha protein levels also correlate with reduced relapse-free survival in oestrogen receptor alpha-positive breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen solely. A similar retinoic acid receptor alpha expression pattern is seen in a comparable independent patient cohort. An oestrogen receptor alpha and retinoic acid receptor alpha ligand screening reveals that tamoxifen-resistant LCC2 cells have increased sensitivity to retinoic acid receptor alpha ligands and are less sensitive to oestrogen receptor alpha ligands compared with MCF7 cells. Our data indicate that retinoic acid receptor alpha may be a novel therapeutic target and a predictive factor for oestrogen receptor alpha-positive breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen. PMID:23868472

  7. The nuclear receptor PPARγ individually responds to serotonin- and fatty acid-metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Waku, Tsuyoshi; Shiraki, Takuma; Oyama, Takuji; Maebara, Kanako; Nakamori, Rinna; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), recognizes various synthetic and endogenous ligands by the ligand-binding domain. Fatty-acid metabolites reportedly activate PPARγ through conformational changes of the Ω loop. Here, we report that serotonin metabolites act as endogenous agonists for PPARγ to regulate macrophage function and adipogenesis by directly binding to helix H12. A cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, is a mimetic agonist of these metabolites. Crystallographic analyses revealed that an indole acetate functions as a common moiety for the recognition by the sub-pocket near helix H12. Intriguingly, a serotonin metabolite and a fatty-acid metabolite each bind to distinct sub-pockets, and the PPARγ antagonist, T0070907, blocked the fatty-acid agonism, but not that of the serotonin metabolites. Mutational analyses on receptor-mediated transcription and coactivator binding revealed that each metabolite individually uses coregulator and/or heterodimer interfaces in a ligand-type-specific manner. Furthermore, the inhibition of the serotonin metabolism reduced the expression of the endogenous PPARγ-target gene. Collectively, these results suggest a novel agonism, in which PPARγ functions as a multiple sensor in response to distinct metabolites. PMID:20717101

  8. Oleic acid enhances G protein coupled receptor 43 expression in bovine intramuscular adipocytes but not in subcutaneous adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Chung, K Y; Smith, S B; Choi, S H; Johnson, B J

    2016-05-01

    We hypothesized that fatty acids would differentially affect G protein coupled receptor (GPR) 43 mRNA expression and GPR43 protein concentrations in bovine intramuscular (IM) and subcutaneous (SC) adipocytes. The GPR43 protein was detected in bovine liver, pancreas, and semimembranosus (MUS) muscle in samples taken at slaughter. Similarly, GPR43 protein levels were similar in IM adipose tissue and SM muscle but was barely detectable in SC adipose tissue. Primary cultures of IM and SC stromal vascular cells were isolated from bovine adipose tissues. Oleic acid (100 μ) stimulated PPARγ gene expression and decreased stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) gene expression but had no effect on GPR43 gene expression, which was readily detectable in both IM and SC adipocytes. Differentiation cocktail (Diff; 10 μ insulin, 4 μ dexamethasone, and 10 μ ciglitizone) stimulated CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and PPARγ gene expression in SC but not IM adipocytes, but Diff increased SCD gene expression in both cell types. Linoleic acid (10 µ) increased PPARγ gene expression relative to Diff cocktail in SC adipocytes, whereas linoleic acid and α-linolenic decreased SCD gene expression relative to control adipocytes and adipocytes incubated with Diff ( < 0.05). Increasing concentrations of oleic acid (1, 10, 100, and 500 μM) increased GPR43 protein and mRNA expression in IM but not SC adipocytes. These data indicated that oleic acid alters mRNA and protein concentrations of GPR43 in bovine IM adipocytes. PMID:27285685

  9. Toll-Like Receptor Gene Expression during Trichinella spiralis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sin; Park, Mi Kyung; Yu, Hak Sun

    2015-01-01

    In Trichinella spiralis infection, type 2 helper T (Th2) cell-related and regulatory T (Treg) cell-related immune responses are the most important immune events. In order to clarify which Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are closely associated with these responses, we analyzed the expression of mouse TLR genes in the small intestine and muscle tissue during T. spiralis infection. In addition, the expression of several chemokine- and cytokine-encoding genes, which are related to Th2 and Treg cell mediated immune responses, were analyzed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/TIR-associated proteins (TIRAP) and Toll receptor-associated activator of interferons (TRIF) adapter protein deficient and wild type (WT) mice. The results showed significantly increased TLR4 and TLR9 gene expression in the small intestine after 2 weeks of T. spiralis infection. In the muscle, TLR1, TLR2, TLR5, and TLR9 gene expression significantly increased after 4 weeks of infection. Only the expression of the TLR4 and TLR9 genes was significantly elevated in WT MEF cells after treatment with excretory-secretory (ES) proteins. Gene expression for Th2 chemokine genes were highly enhanced by ES proteins in WT MEF cells, while this elevation was slightly reduced in MyD88/TIRAP-/- MEF cells, and quite substantially decreased in TRIF-/- MEF cells. In contrast, IL-10 and TGF-β expression levels were not elevated in MyD88/TIRAP-/- MEF cells. In conclusion, we suggest that TLR4 and TLR9 might be closely linked to Th2 cell and Treg cell mediated immune responses, although additional data are needed to convincingly prove this observation. PMID:26323841

  10. Membrane bile acid receptor TGR5 predicts good prognosis in ampullary adenocarcinoma patients with hyperbilirubinemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min-Chan; Chen, Yi-Ling; Wang, Tzu-Wen; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Lai, Ming-Derg

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids are potential carcinogens in gastrointestinal cancer, and interact with nuclear and membrane receptors to initiate downstream signaling. The effect of TGR5 [also known as G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1)] on cancer progression is dependent on the tissue where it is activated. In this report, the function of TGR5 expression in cancer was studied using a bioinformatic approach. TGR5 expression in ampullary adenocarcinoma and normal duodenum was compared by western blotting, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). High GPBAR1 gene expression was found to be an indicator of worse prognosis in gastric and breast cancer patients, and an indication of better prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. The level of GPBAR1 gene expression was higher in bile-acid exposed cancer than in other types of cancer, and was increased in well-differentiated ampullary adenocarcinoma. Negative, weak or mild expression of TGR5 was correlated with younger age, higher plasma level of total/direct bilirubin, higher plasma concentration of CA-125, advanced tumor stage and advanced AJCC TNM stage. The disease-specific survival rate was highest in ampullary adenocarcinoma patients with high TGR5 expression and high total bilirubin level. In summary, TGR5 functions as a tumor-suppressor in patients with ampullary adenocarcinoma and preoperative hyperbilirubinemia. Further study of the suppressive mechanism may provide a new therapeutic option for patients with ampullary adenocarcinoma. PMID:27510297

  11. Membrane bile acid receptor TGR5 predicts good prognosis in ampullary adenocarcinoma patients with hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-Chan; Chen, Yi-Ling; Wang, Tzu-Wen; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Lai, Ming-Derg

    2016-10-01

    Bile acids are potential carcinogens in gastrointestinal cancer, and interact with nuclear and membrane receptors to initiate downstream signaling. The effect of TGR5 [also known as G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1)] on cancer progression is dependent on the tissue where it is activated. In this report, the function of TGR5 expression in cancer was studied using a bioinformatic approach. TGR5 expression in ampullary adenocarcinoma and normal duodenum was compared by western blotting, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). High GPBAR1 gene expression was found to be an indicator of worse prognosis in gastric and breast cancer patients, and an indication of better prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. The level of GPBAR1 gene expression was higher in bile‑acid exposed cancer than in other types of cancer, and was increased in well-differentiated ampullary adenocarcinoma. Negative, weak or mild expression of TGR5 was correlated with younger age, higher plasma level of total/direct bilirubin, higher plasma concentration of CA-125, advanced tumor stage and advanced AJCC TNM stage. The disease-specific survival rate was highest in ampullary adenocarcinoma patients with high TGR5 expression and high total bilirubin level. In summary, TGR5 functions as a tumor-suppressor in patients with ampullary adenocarcinoma and preoperative hyperbilirubinemia. Further study of the suppressive mechanism may provide a new therapeutic option for patients with ampullary adenocarcinoma. PMID:27510297

  12. A member of the TGF-beta receptor gene family in the parasitic nematode Brugia pahangi.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Escobar, N; van den Biggelaar, A; Maizels, R

    1997-10-15

    The full length cDNA sequence of a Type I transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) receptor has been isolated from the filarial parasitic nematode Brugia pahangi. This new gene, designated Bp-trk-1, encodes a predicted 645 amino acid sequence with an N-terminal hydrophobic stretch which may act as a signal peptide. The extracellular portion (residues 15-187) is cysteine-rich and has three potential N-glycosylation sites. At positions 250-255 the protein contains the glycine-serine rich motif characteristic of Type I receptors. The closest homologue is a Caenorhabditis elegans gene (Q09488) in cosmid C32D5.2 which shares 67% amino acid identity with Bp-trk-1 in the most conserved kinase domain (aa 259-482). Other type I receptors such as C. elegans daf-1 and Drosophila tkv show 38-53% identity in the same region. Some residues conserved in Drosophila and vertebrates are not present in the B. pahangi sequence. RT-PCR amplification has been used to show that the transcript is expressed in the three main stages of the B. pahangi life cycle: microfilariae, infective larvae and adults. The ligand remains unknown at this time but is likely to be most similar to that for C. elegans Q09488. PMID:9358045

  13. Molecular mechanisms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Norwitz, E R; Jeong, K H; Chin, W W

    1999-01-01

    GnRH plays a critical role in regulating mammalian reproductive development and function. At the level of the anterior pituitary, GnRH binds to the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) on the cell surface of pituitary gonadotropes. Here, it activates intracellular signal transduction pathways to effect both the synthesis and intermittent release of the gonadotropins LH and FSH. These hormones then enter the systemic circulation to regulate gonadal function, including steroid hormone synthesis and gametogenesis. The response of pituitary gonadotropes to GnRH correlates directly with the concentration of GnRHR on the cell surface, which is mediated, at least in part, at the level of gene expression. A number of endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors are known to regulate GnRHR gene expression. This article reviews in detail the role of the GnRHR in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the factors mediating expression of this gene. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate transcription of the GnRHR gene will further our knowledge about the role of this receptor in mammalian reproductive physiology in health and disease.

  14. Histone deacetylases and the nuclear receptor corepressor regulate lytic-latent switch gene 50 in murine gammaherpesvirus 68-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Megan M; Molleston, Jerome M; Canny, Susan; Abou El Hassan, Mohamed; Willert, Erin K; Bremner, Rod; Virgin, Herbert W

    2010-11-01

    Gammaherpesviruses are important oncogenic pathogens that transit between lytic and latent life cycles. Silencing the lytic gene expression program enables the establishment of latency and a lifelong chronic infection of the host. In murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68, γHV68), essential lytic switch gene 50 controls the interchange between lytic and latent gene expression programs. However, negative regulators of gene 50 expression remain largely undefined. We report that the MHV68 lytic cycle is silenced in infected macrophages but not fibroblasts and that histone deacetylases (HDACs) mediate silencing. The HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) acts on the gene 50 promoter to induce lytic replication of MHV68. HDAC3, HDAC4, and the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR) are required for efficient silencing of gene 50 expression. NCoR is critical for transcriptional repression of cellular genes by unliganded nuclear receptors. Retinoic acid, a known ligand for the NCoR complex, derepresses gene 50 expression and enhances MHV68 lytic replication. Moreover, HDAC3, HDAC4, and NCoR act on the gene 50 promoter and are recruited to this promoter in a retinoic acid-responsive manner. We provide the first example of NCoR-mediated, HDAC-dependent regulation of viral gene expression. PMID:20719946

  15. The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit gene: Cloning, mapping, structure, and targeting in mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Orr-Urtreger, A.; Baldini, A.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit is a member of a family of ligand-gated ion channels, and is the only subunit know to bind {alpha}-bungarotoxin in mammalian brain. {alpha}-Bungarotoxin binding sites are known to be more abundant in the hippocampus of mouse strains that are particularly sensitive to nicotine-induced seizures. The {alpha}7 receptor is highly permeable to calcium, which could suggest a role in synaptic plasticity in the nervous system. Auditory gating deficiency, an abnormal response to a second auditory stimulus, is characteristic of schizophrenia. Mouse strains that exhibit a similar gating deficit have reduced hippocampal expression of the {alpha}7 subunit. We have cloned and sequenced the full length cDNA for the mouse {alpha}7 gene (Acra-7) and characterized its gene structure. The murine {alpha}7 shares amino acid identity of 99% and 93% with the rat and human {alpha}7 subunits, respectively. Using an interspecies backcross panel, the murine gene was mapped to chromosome 7 near the p locus, a region syntenic with human chromosome 15; the human gene (CHRNA7) was confirmed to map to 15q13-q14 by FISH. To generate a mouse {alpha}7 mutant by homologous recombination, we have constructed a replacement vector which will delete transmembrane domains II-IV and the cytoplasmic domain from the gene product. Recombinant embryonic stem (ES) cell clones were selected and used to develop mouse chimeras that are currently being bred to obtain germline transmission.

  16. Carbon dioxide receptor genes in cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Anderson, Alisha

    2015-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is important in insect ecology, eliciting a range of behaviours across different species. Interestingly, the numbers of CO2 gustatory receptors (GRs) vary among insect species. In the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, two GRs (DmelGR21a and DmelGR63a) have been shown to detect CO2. In the butterfly, moth, beetle and mosquito species studied so far, three CO2 GR genes have been identified, while in tsetse flies, four CO2 GR genes have been identified. In other species including honeybees, pea aphids, ants, locusts and wasps, no CO2 GR genes have been identified from the genome. These genomic differences may suggest different mechanisms for CO2 detection exist in different insects but, with the exception of Drosophila and mosquitoes, limited attention has been paid to the CO2 GRs in insects. Here, we cloned three putative CO2 GR genes from the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera and performed phylogenetic and expression analysis. All three H. armigera CO2 GRs (HarmGR1, HarmGR2 and HarmGR3) are specifically expressed in labial palps, the CO2-sensing tissue of this moth. HarmGR3 is significantly activated by NaHCO3 when expressed in insect Sf9 cells but HarmGR1 and HarmGR2 are not. This is the first report characterizing the function of lepidopteran CO2 receptors, which contributes to our general understanding of the molecular mechanisms of insect CO2 gustatory receptors.

  17. Role of the retinoic acid receptor-α in HIV-associated nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, Krishna K; Feng, Xiaobei; Chuang, Peter Y; Verma, Vikram; Lu, Ting-Chi; Wang, Jinshan; Jin, Yuanmeng; Farias, Eduardo F; Napoli, Joseph L; Chen, Nan; Kaufman, Lewis; Takano, Tomoko; D'Agati, Vivette D; Klotman, Paul E; He, John C

    2011-03-01

    All-trans retinoic acid protects against the development of HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) in HIV-1 transgenic mice (Tg26). In vitro, all-trans retinoic acid inhibits HIV-induced podocyte proliferation and restores podocyte differentiation markers by activating its receptor-α (RARα). Here, we report that Am580, a water-soluble RARα-specific agonist, attenuated proteinuria, glomerosclerosis, and podocyte proliferation, and restored podocyte differentiation markers in kidneys of Tg26 mice. Furthermore, RARα-/- Tg26 mice developed more severe kidney and podocyte injury than did RARα+/- Tg26 mice. Am580 failed to ameliorate kidney injury in RARα-/- Tg26 mice, confirming our hypothesis that Am580 acts through RARα. Although the expression of RARα-target genes was suppressed in the kidneys of Tg26 mice and of patients with HIVAN, the expression of RARα in the kidney was not different between patients with HIVAN and minimal change disease. However, the tissue levels of retinoic acid were reduced in the kidney cortex and isolated glomeruli of Tg26 mice. Consistent with this, the expression of two key enzymes in the retinoic acid synthetic pathway, retinol dehydrogenase type 1 and 9, and the overall enzymatic activity for retinoic acid synthesis were significantly reduced in the glomeruli of Tg26 mice. Thus, a defect in the endogenous synthesis of retinoic acid contributes to loss of the protection by retinoic acid in HIVAN. Hence, RARα agonists may be potential agents for the treatment of HIVAN.

  18. Role of the Ada adaptor complex in gene activation by the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, A; Almlöf, T; Ford, J; McEwan, I J; Gustafsson, J A; Wright, A P

    1997-01-01

    We have shown that the Ada adaptor complex is important for the gene activation capacity of the glucocorticoid receptor in yeast. The recently isolated human Ada2 protein also increases the potency of the receptor protein in mammalian cells. The Ada pathway is of key significance for the tau1 core transactivation domain (tau1c) of the receptor, which requires Ada for activity in vivo and in vitro. Ada2 can be precipitated from nuclear extracts by a glutathione S-transferase-tau1 fusion protein coupled to agarose beads, and a direct interaction between Ada2 and tau1c can be shown by using purified proteins. This interaction is strongly reduced by a mutation in tau1c that reduces transactivation activity. Mutations affecting the Ada complex do not reverse transcriptional squelching by the tau1 domain, as they do for the VP16 transactivation domain, and thus these powerful acidic activators differ in at least some important aspects of gene activation. Mutations that reduce the activity of the tau1c domain in wild-type yeast strains cause similar reductions in ada mutants that contain little or no Ada activity. Thus, gene activation mechanisms, in addition to the Ada pathway, are involved in the activity of the tau1c domain. PMID:9154805

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF NOVEL FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR 3 GENE MUTATIONS IN ACTINIC CHEILITIS

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Annie; Dekker, Nusi; Jordan, Richard C.K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Activating mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene are responsible for several craniosynostosis and chondrodysplasia syndromes as well as some human cancers including bladder and cervical carcinoma. Despite a high frequency in some benign skin disorders, FGFR3 mutations have not been reported in cutaneous malignancies. Actinic cheilitis (AC) is a sun-induced premalignancy affecting the lower lip that frequently progresses to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The objective of this study was to determine if FGFR3 gene mutations are present in AC and SCC of the lip. Study Design DNA was extracted and purified from micro-dissected, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 20 cases of AC and SCC arising in AC. Exons 7, 15, and 17 were PCR amplified and direct sequenced. Results Four novel somatic mutations in the FGFR3 gene were identified: exon 7 mutation 742C→T (amino acid change R248C), exon 15 mutations 1850A→G (D617G) and 1888G→A (V630M), and exon 17 mutation 2056G→A (E686K). Grade of dysplasia did not correlate with presence of mutations. Conclusion The frequency of FGFR3 receptor mutations suggests a functional role for the FGFR3 receptor in the development of epithelial disorders and perhaps a change may contribute to the pathogenesis of some AC and SCC. PMID:19327639

  20. Inhibitory effects of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 on cellular functions of sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Araki, Mutsumi; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Ozaki, Shuhei; Mori, Shiori; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Honoki, Kanya; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid that interacts with G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA receptor-1 (LPA1) to LPA6). Here, we investigated the effects of LPA signaling via LPA5 on cellular functions of sarcoma cells by generating Lpar5 overexpressing and Lpar5 knockdown cells from rat osteosarcoma and malignant fibrous histiocytoma cells, respectively. The cell motility activity of Lpar5 overexpressing cells was significantly lower, while Lpar5 knockdown cells showed high cell motility, compared with respective controls. Gelatin zymography showed that LPA5 suppressed the activation of matrix metalloproteinase-2. LPA5 also inhibited the cell motility activity of endothelial cells, correlating with the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor genes. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA5 negatively regulates the cellular functions of rat sarcoma cells. PMID:24798396

  1. Evidence of selection at insulin receptor substrate-1 gene loci.

    PubMed

    Yoshiuchi, Issei

    2013-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex disease characterized by insulin resistance and defect of insulin secretion. The worldwide prevalence of T2DM is steadily increasing. T2DM is also significantly associated with obesity, coronary artery disease (CAD), and metabolic syndrome. There is a clear difference in the prevalence of T2DM among populations, and T2DM is highly heritable. Human adaptations to environmental changes in food supply, lifestyle, and geography may have pressured the selection of genes associated with the metabolism of glucose, lipids, carbohydrates, and energy. The insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) gene is considered a major T2DM gene, and common genetic variations near the IRS1 gene were found to be associated with T2DM, insulin resistance, adiposity, and CAD. Here, we aimed to find evidence of selection at the IRS1 gene loci using the HapMap population data. We investigated a 3-step test procedure-Wright's F statistics (Fst), the long-range haplotype (LRH) test, and the integrated haplotype score (iHS) test-to detect selection at the IRS1 gene loci using the HapMap population data. We observed that 1 CAD-associated SNP (rs2943634) and 1 adiposity- and insulin resistance-associated SNP (rs2943650) exhibited high Fst values. We also found selection at the IRS1 gene loci by the LRH test and the iHS test. These findings suggest evidence of selection at the IRS1 gene loci and that further studies should examine the adaptive evolution of T2DM genes. PMID:22797928

  2. Estrogen-related receptors stimulate pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 4 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Ma, Ke; Sadana, Prabodh; Chowdhury, Farhana; Gaillard, Stephanie; Wang, Fang; McDonnell, Donald P; Unterman, Terry G; Elam, Marshall B; Park, Edwards A

    2006-12-29

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and is a key regulatory enzyme in the oxidation of glucose to acetyl-CoA. Phosphorylation of PDC by the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK2 and PDK4) inhibits PDC activity. Expression of the PDK genes is elevated in diabetes, leading to the decreased oxidation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. In these studies we have investigated the transcriptional regulation of the PDK4 gene by the estrogen-related receptors (ERRalpha and ERRgamma). The ERRs are orphan nuclear receptors whose physiological roles include the induction of fatty acid oxidation in heart and muscle. Previously, we found that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1alpha) stimulates the expression of PDK4. Here we report that ERRalpha and ERRgamma stimulate the PDK4 gene in hepatoma cells, suggesting a novel role for ERRs in controlling pyruvate metabolism. In addition, both ERR isoforms recruit PGC-1alpha to the PDK4 promoter. Insulin, which decreases the expression of the PDK4 gene, inhibits the induction of PDK4 by ERRalpha and ERRgamma. The forkhead transcription factor (FoxO1) binds the PDK4 gene and contributes to the induction of PDK4 by ERRs and PGC-1alpha. Insulin suppresses PDK4 expression in part through the dissociation of FoxO1 and PGC-1alpha from the PDK4 promoter. Our data demonstrate a key role for the ERRs in the induction of hepatic PDK4 gene expression. PMID:17079227

  3. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) gene deficiency impairs urine concentration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Shizheng; Gao, Min; Liu, Jia; Jia, Xiao; Han, Qifei; Zheng, Senfeng; Miao, Yifei; Li, Shuo; Weng, Haoyu; Xia, Xuan; Du, Shengnan; Wu, Wanfu; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Guan, Youfei

    2014-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR is mainly expressed in liver and small intestine, where it plays an important role in bile acid, lipid, and glucose metabolism. The kidney also has a high FXR expression level, with its physiological function unknown. Here we demonstrate that FXR is ubiquitously distributed in renal tubules. FXR agonist treatment significantly lowered urine volume and increased urine osmolality, whereas FXR knockout mice exhibited an impaired urine concentrating ability, which led to a polyuria phenotype. We further found that treatment of C57BL/6 mice with chenodeoxycholic acid, an FXR endogenous ligand, significantly up-regulated renal aquaporin 2 (AQP2) expression, whereas FXR gene deficiency markedly reduced AQP2 expression levels in the kidney. In vitro studies showed that the AQP2 gene promoter contained a putative FXR response element site, which can be bound and activated by FXR, resulting in a significant increase of AQP2 transcription in cultured primary inner medullary collecting duct cells. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that FXR plays a critical role in the regulation of urine volume, and its activation increases urinary concentrating capacity mainly via up-regulating its target gene AQP2 expression in the collecting ducts. PMID:24464484

  4. Evolutionary diversification of retinoic acid receptor ligand-binding pocket structure by molecular tinkering

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Nadendla, Eswar Kumar; Studer, Romain A.; Alvarez, Susana; de Lera, Angel R.; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Bourguet, William; Laudet, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGDs) have been classically associated with the origin of evolutionary novelties and the so-called duplication–degeneration–complementation model describes the possible fates of genes after duplication. However, how sequence divergence effectively allows functional changes between gene duplicates is still unclear. In the vertebrate lineage, two rounds of WGDs took place, giving rise to paralogous gene copies observed for many gene families. For the retinoic acid receptors (RARs), for example, which are members of the nuclear hormone receptor (NR) superfamily, a unique ancestral gene has been duplicated resulting in three vertebrate paralogues: RARα, RARβ and RARγ. It has previously been shown that this single ancestral RAR was neofunctionalized to give rise to a larger substrate specificity range in the RARs of extant jawed vertebrates (also called gnathostomes). To understand RAR diversification, the members of the cyclostomes (lamprey and hagfish), jawless vertebrates representing the extant sister group of gnathostomes, provide an intermediate situation and thus allow the characterization of the evolutionary steps that shaped RAR ligand-binding properties following the WGDs. In this study, we assessed the ligand-binding specificity of cyclostome RARs and found that their ligand-binding pockets resemble those of gnathostome RARα and RARβ. In contrast, none of the cyclostome receptors studied showed any RARγ-like specificity. Together, our results suggest that cyclostome RARs cover only a portion of the specificity repertoire of the ancestral gnathostome RARs and indicate that the establishment of ligand-binding specificity was a stepwise event. This iterative process thus provides a rare example for the diversification of receptor–ligand interactions of NRs following WGDs. PMID:27069642

  5. Perilipin, a critical regulator of fat storage and breakdown, is a target gene of estrogen receptor-related receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Akter, Mst. Hasina; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Hirose, Fumiko; Osumi, Takashi

    2008-04-11

    Perilipin is a protein localized on lipid droplet surfaces in adipocytes and steroidogenic cells, playing a central role in regulated lipolysis. Expression of the perilipin gene is markedly induced during adipogenesis. We found that transcription from the perilipin gene promoter is activated by an orphan nuclear receptor, estrogen receptor-related receptor (ERR){alpha}. A response element to this receptor was identified in the promoter region by a gene reporter assay, the electrophoretic-gel mobility-shift assay and the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator (PGC)-1{alpha} enhanced, whereas small heterodimer partner (SHP) repressed, the transactivating function of ERR{alpha} on the promoter. Thus, the perilipin gene expression is regulated by a transcriptional network controlling energy metabolism, substantiating the functional importance of perilipin in the maintenance of body energy balance.

  6. Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} modulates the expression of adipogenesis-related genes during adipocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ijichi, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Yagi, Ken; Okazaki, Yasushi; Inoue, Satoshi . E-mail: INOUE-GER@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-07-06

    Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} (ERR{alpha}) is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates cellular energy metabolism by modulating gene expression involved in fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue. However, the physiological role of ERR{alpha} in adipogenesis and white adipose tissue development has not been well studied. Here, we show that ERR{alpha} and ERR{alpha}-related transcriptional coactivators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) and PGC-1{beta}, can be up-regulated in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes at mRNA levels under the adipogenic differentiation condition including the inducer of cAMP, glucocorticoid, and insulin. Gene knockdown by ERR{alpha}-specific siRNA results in mRNA down-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 4, PPAR{gamma}, and PGC-1{alpha} in 3T3-L1 cells in the adipogenesis medium. ERR{alpha} and PGC-1{beta} mRNA expression can be also up-regulated in another preadipocyte lineage DFAT-D1 cells and a pluripotent mesenchymal cell line C3H10T1/2 under the differentiation condition. Furthermore, stable expression of ERR{alpha} in 3T3-L1 cells up-regulates adipogenic marker genes and promotes triglyceride accumulation during 3T3-L1 differentiation. These results suggest that ERR{alpha} may play a critical role in adipocyte differentiation by modulating the expression of various adipogenesis-related genes.

  7. Hydroxytyrosol Inhibits Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Gene Expression in 3T3-L1 Preadipocyte Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Tutino, Valeria; Orlando, Antonella; Russo, Francesco; Notarnicola, Maria

    2016-02-01

    The 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line is a well characterized cell model for studying the adipocyte status and the molecular mechanisms involved in differentiation of these cells. 3T3-L1 preadipocytes have the ability to synthesize and degrade endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and their differentiation into adipocytes increases the expression of cannabinoid (CB1) and PPAR-γ receptors. Clinically, the blocking stimulation of the endocannabinoid pathway has been one of the first approaches proposed to counteract the obesity and obesity-associated diseases (such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cancer). In this connection, here we studied in cultured 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes the effects of n-3-PUFA, α-Linolenic acid (OM-3), n-6-PUFA, Linoleic acid (OM-6), and hydroxytyrosol (HT) on the expression of CB1 receptor gene and the adipogenesis-related genes PPAR-γ, Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS) and Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL). HT was able to inhibit 3T3-L1 cell differentiation by down-regulating cell proliferation and CB1 receptor gene expression. HT exhibited anti-adipogenic effects, whereas OM-3 and OM-6 exerted an inhibitory action on cell proliferation associated with an induction of the preadipocytes differentiation and CB1 receptor gene expression. Moreover, the expression of FAS and LPL genes resulted increased after treatment with both HT and OM-3 and OM-6. The present study points out that the intake of molecules such as HT, contained in extra virgin olive oil, may be considered also in view of antiobesity and antineoplastic properties by acting directly on the adipose tissue and modulating CB1 receptor gene transcription.

  8. Two isoforms of Xenopus retinoic acid receptor gamma 2 (B) exhibit differential expression and sensitivity to retinoic acid during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Crawford, M J; Liversage, R A; Varmuza, S L

    1995-01-01

    We report the isolation of two retinoic acid receptor isoforms (RAR gamma), which differ only in the 5'untranslated and putative N-terminus A regions. The two isoforms appear to serve as early markers for the presumptive neural axis; however, their expression patterns differ. RAR-gamma 2.1 is first expressed at gastrulation at the dorsal lip and subsequently along the presumptive neural axis. RAR- gamma 2.2 represents the full-length sequence of a receptor cDNA already partially characterized and present as a maternal transcript [Ellinger-Ziegelbauer and Dreyer (1991); Genes Dev 5:94-104, (1993): Mech Dev 41:31-46; Pfeffer and DeRobertis, (1994) Mech Dev: 45:147-153]. Unlike RAR-gamma 2.2, the 2.1 variant is not expressed either in pre-somitic mesoderm or notochord. RAR-gamma 2.1 is strongly expressed in branchial arches and to a lesser extent in the neural floor plate. The two isoforms also exhibit differential sensitivity to retinoic acid. Constitutive expression of RAR gamma 2.2 following neurulation appears to be depressed by treatment with retinoic acid, but domains of highest expression, namely, the head and tail, remain relatively unaffected, as do patterns of expression prior to late neurulation. By contrast, RAR-gamma 2.1 is not transcribed in retinoid-inhibited structures. Using microinjection techniques, we show that changes of RAR-gamma 2.1 expression in presumptive head structures occur as an early and local consequence of retinoic acid administration. Since RAR-gamma 2.1 expression is inhibited by retinoic acid, we tested to see if other treatments that perturb axis formation had any effect. Surprisingly, UV irradiation did not suppress that its inhibition by retinoic acid is not due solely to inhibition of anterior neural development. These experiments demonstrate a new subdivision of isoforms that undergo differential expression during development and that exhibit differential sensitivity to retinoic acid and to UV. This sensitivity and the presence

  9. Pharmacological activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptors regulates erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Ho, Ya-Hsuan; Chiang, Jui-Chung; Li, Meng-Wei; Lin, Shi-Hung; Chen, Wei-Min; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Yu-Nung; Yang, Ya-Jan; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lu, Jenher; Huang, Chang-Jen; Tigyi, Gabor; Yao, Chao-Ling; Lee, Hsinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a growth factor-like phospholipid, regulates numerous physiological functions, including cell proliferation and differentiation. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that LPA activates erythropoiesis by activating the LPA 3 receptor subtype (LPA3) under erythropoietin (EPO) induction. In the present study, we applied a pharmacological approach to further elucidate the functions of LPA receptors during red blood cell (RBC) differentiation. In K562 human erythroleukemia cells, knockdown of LPA2 enhanced erythropoiesis, whereas knockdown of LPA3 inhibited RBC differentiation. In CD34+ human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) and K526 cells, the LPA3 agonist 1-oleoyl-2-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothionate (2S-OMPT) promoted erythropoiesis, whereas the LPA2 agonist dodecyl monophosphate (DMP) and the nonlipid specific agonist GRI977143 (GRI) suppressed this process. In zebrafish embryos, hemoglobin expression was significantly increased by 2S-OMPT treatment but was inhibited by GRI. Furthermore, GRI treatment decreased, whereas 2S-OMPT treatment increased RBC counts and amount of hemoglobin level in adult BALB/c mice. These results indicate that LPA2 and LPA3 play opposing roles during RBC differentiation. The pharmacological activation of LPA receptor subtypes represent a novel strategies for augmenting or inhibiting erythropoiesis. PMID:27244685

  10. Skin Barrier Recovery by Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Antagonist Lobaric Acid.

    PubMed

    Joo, Yeon Ah; Chung, Hyunjin; Yoon, Sohyun; Park, Jong Il; Lee, Ji Eun; Myung, Cheol Hwan; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2016-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) results from gene and environment interactions that lead to a range of immunological abnormalities and breakdown of the skin barrier. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) belongs to a family of G-protein coupled receptors and is expressed in suprabasal layers of the epidermis. PAR2 is activated by both trypsin and a specific agonist peptide, SLIGKV-NH₂ and is involved in both epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and epithelial inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effect of lobaric acid on inflammation, keratinocyte differentiation, and recovery of the skin barrier in hairless mice. Lobaric acid blocked trypsin-induced and SLIGKV-NH2-induced PAR2 activation resulting in decreased mobilization of intracellular Ca²⁺ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid reduced expression of interleukin-8 induced by SLIGKV-NH₂ and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC) induced by tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) and IFN-γ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid also blocked SLIGKV-NH₂-induced activation of ERK, which is a downstream signal of PAR2 in normal human keratinocytes (NHEKs). Treatment with SLIGKV-NH₂ downregulated expression of involucrin, a differentiation marker protein in HaCaT keratinocytes, and upregulated expression of involucrin, transglutamase1 and filaggrin in NHEKs. However, lobaric acid antagonized the effect of SLIGKV-NH₂ in HaCaT keratinocytes and NHEKs. Topical application of lobaric acid accelerated barrier recovery kinetics in a SKH-1 hairless mouse model. These results suggested that lobaric acid is a PAR2 antagonist and could be a possible therapeutic agent for atopic dermatitis. PMID:27169822

  11. Folic acid mediates activation of the pro-oncogene STAT3 via the Folate Receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mariann F; Greibe, Eva; Skovbjerg, Signe; Rohde, Sarah; Kristensen, Anders C M; Jensen, Trine R; Stentoft, Charlotte; Kjær, Karina H; Kronborg, Camilla S; Martensen, Pia M

    2015-07-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a well-described pro-oncogene found constitutively activated in several cancer types. Folates are B vitamins that, when taken up by cells through the Reduced Folate Carrier (RFC), are essential for normal cell growth and replication. Many cancer cells overexpress a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored Folate Receptor α (FRα). The function of FRα in cancer cells is still poorly described, and it has been suggested that transport of folate is not its primary function in these cells. We show here that folic acid and folinic acid can activate STAT3 through FRα in a Janus Kinase (JAK)-dependent manner, and we demonstrate that gp130 functions as a transducing receptor for this signalling. Moreover, folic acid can promote dose dependent cell proliferation in FRα-positive HeLa cells, but not in FRα-negative HEK293 cells. After folic acid treatment of HeLa cells, up-regulation of the STAT3 responsive genes Cyclin A2 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) were verified by qRT-PCR. The identification of this FRα-STAT3 signal transduction pathway activated by folic and folinic acid contributes to the understanding of the involvement of folic acid in preventing neural tube defects as well as in tumour growth. Previously, the role of folates in these diseases has been attributed to their roles as one-carbon unit donors following endocytosis into the cell. Our finding that folic acid can activate STAT3 via FRα adds complexity to the established roles of B9 vitamins in cancer and neural tube defects.

  12. Skin Barrier Recovery by Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Antagonist Lobaric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Yeon Ah; Chung, Hyunjin; Yoon, Sohyun; Park, Jong Il; Lee, Ji Eun; Myung, Cheol Hwan; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) results from gene and environment interactions that lead to a range of immunological abnormalities and breakdown of the skin barrier. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) belongs to a family of G-protein coupled receptors and is expressed in suprabasal layers of the epidermis. PAR2 is activated by both trypsin and a specific agonist peptide, SLIGKV-NH2 and is involved in both epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and epithelial inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effect of lobaric acid on inflammation, keratinocyte differentiation, and recovery of the skin barrier in hairless mice. Lobaric acid blocked trypsin-induced and SLIGKV-NH2-induced PAR2 activation resulting in decreased mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid reduced expression of interleukin-8 induced by SLIGKV-NH2 and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC) induced by tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) and IFN-γ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid also blocked SLIGKV-NH2-induced activation of ERK, which is a downstream signal of PAR2 in normal human keratinocytes (NHEKs). Treatment with SLIGKV-NH2 downregulated expression of involucrin, a differentiation marker protein in HaCaT keratinocytes, and upregulated expression of involucrin, transglutamase1 and filaggrin in NHEKs. However, lobaric acid antagonized the effect of SLIGKV-NH2 in HaCaT keratinocytes and NHEKs. Topical application of lobaric acid accelerated barrier recovery kinetics in a SKH-1 hairless mouse model. These results suggested that lobaric acid is a PAR2 antagonist and could be a possible therapeutic agent for atopic dermatitis. PMID:27169822

  13. Molecular basis for amino acid sensing by family C G-protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wellendorph, P; Bräuner-Osborne, H

    2009-01-01

    Family C of human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is constituted by eight metabotropic glutamate receptors, two γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB1–2) subunits forming the heterodimeric GABAB receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor, three taste1 receptors (T1R1–3), a promiscuous L-α-amino acid receptor G-protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) and seven orphan receptors. Aside from the orphan receptors, the family C GPCRs are dimeric receptors characterized by a large extracellular Venus flytrap domain which bind the endogenous agonists. Except from the GABAB1–2 and T1R2–3 receptor, all receptors are either activated or positively modulated by amino acids. In this review, we outline mutational, biophysical and structural studies which have elucidated the interaction of the amino acids with the Venus flytrap domains, molecular mechanisms of receptor selectivity and the initial steps in receptor activation. PMID:19298394

  14. Leveraging abscisic acid receptors for efficient water use in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Liu, Jinghui; Tischer, Stefanie V; Christmann, Alexander; Windisch, Wilhelm; Schnyder, Hans; Grill, Erwin

    2016-06-14

    Plant growth requires the influx of atmospheric CO2 through stomatal pores, and this carbon uptake for photosynthesis is inherently associated with a large efflux of water vapor. Under water deficit, plants reduce transpiration and are able to improve carbon for water exchange leading to higher water use efficiency (WUE). Whether increased WUE can be achieved without trade-offs in plant growth is debated. The signals mediating the WUE response under water deficit are not fully elucidated but involve the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is perceived by a family of related receptors known to mediate acclimation responses and to reduce transpiration. We now show that enhanced stimulation of ABA signaling via distinct ABA receptors can result in plants constitutively growing at high WUE in the model species Arabidopsis WUE was assessed by three independent approaches involving gravimetric analyses, (13)C discrimination studies of shoots and derived cellulose fractions, and by gas exchange measurements of whole plants and individual leaves. Plants expressing the ABA receptors RCAR6/PYL12 combined up to 40% increased WUE with high growth rates, i.e., are water productive. Water productivity was associated with maintenance of net carbon assimilation by compensatory increases of leaf CO2 gradients, thereby sustaining biomass acquisition. Leaf surface temperatures and growth potentials of plants growing under well-watered conditions were found to be reliable indicators for water productivity. The study shows that ABA receptors can be explored to generate more plant biomass per water transpired, which is a prime goal for a more sustainable water use in agriculture. PMID:27247417

  15. Leveraging abscisic acid receptors for efficient water use in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenyu; Liu, Jinghui; Tischer, Stefanie V.; Christmann, Alexander; Windisch, Wilhelm; Schnyder, Hans; Grill, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth requires the influx of atmospheric CO2 through stomatal pores, and this carbon uptake for photosynthesis is inherently associated with a large efflux of water vapor. Under water deficit, plants reduce transpiration and are able to improve carbon for water exchange leading to higher water use efficiency (WUE). Whether increased WUE can be achieved without trade-offs in plant growth is debated. The signals mediating the WUE response under water deficit are not fully elucidated but involve the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is perceived by a family of related receptors known to mediate acclimation responses and to reduce transpiration. We now show that enhanced stimulation of ABA signaling via distinct ABA receptors can result in plants constitutively growing at high WUE in the model species Arabidopsis. WUE was assessed by three independent approaches involving gravimetric analyses, 13C discrimination studies of shoots and derived cellulose fractions, and by gas exchange measurements of whole plants and individual leaves. Plants expressing the ABA receptors RCAR6/PYL12 combined up to 40% increased WUE with high growth rates, i.e., are water productive. Water productivity was associated with maintenance of net carbon assimilation by compensatory increases of leaf CO2 gradients, thereby sustaining biomass acquisition. Leaf surface temperatures and growth potentials of plants growing under well-watered conditions were found to be reliable indicators for water productivity. The study shows that ABA receptors can be explored to generate more plant biomass per water transpired, which is a prime goal for a more sustainable water use in agriculture. PMID:27247417

  16. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor gene association with cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Niepiekło-Miniewska, Wanda; Kuśnierczyk, Piotr; Havrylyuk, Anna; Kamieniczna, Marzena; Nakonechnyy, Andrij; Chopyak, Valentyna; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition where a testis persists in the abdominal cavity. Thus, due to elevated temperature we may expect induction of aberrant immune reactions depending on genetic constitution of individual. This may be reflected by development of anti-sperm antibodies (ASA) in cryptorchid males. Also, natural killer (NK) cells which belong to innate immunity may control adaptive immunity. Therefore, the gene system encoding polymorphic NK cell immunoglobulin receptors (KIRs) has been studied. 109 prepubertal boys with cryptorchidism and 136 ethnically matched young male donors were selected to study NK cell KIRs. DNA was isolated using automatic Maxwell(®) system from the peripheral venous blood drawn onto anticoagulant. Olerup SSP KIR Genotyping kit including Taq polymerase was used for detection of KIR genes. Human leukocyte antigen-C (HLA-C) groups, C1 and C2 were established using a Olerup SSP KIR HLA Ligand kit. KIR2DL2 (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor two-domain long 2) and KIR2DS2 (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor two-domain short 2) genes were less frequent in patients than in control individuals (corrected p values: 0.0110 and 0.0383, respectively). However, no significant differences were observed between ASA-positive and ASA-negative patients, or between bilateral or unilateral cryptorchidism. No association between KIR ligands C1 and C2, alone or together with KIR2DL2, was found. However, the results suggest that KIR2DL2+/KIR2DS2+ genotype may be, to some extent, protective against cryptorchidism.

  17. Toll-like receptors gene polymorphisms may confer increased susceptibility to breast cancer development.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulos, George E; Saridakis, Vasilios; Karantanos, Theodoros; Michalopoulos, Nikolaos V; Zagouri, Flora; Kontogianni, Panagiota; Lymperi, Maria; Gazouli, Maria; Zografos, George C

    2012-08-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation may be an important event in tumor cell immune evasion. TLR2 and TLR4 gene polymorphisms have been related to increased susceptibility to cancer development in various organs. 261 patients and 480 health individuals were investigated for genotype and allelic frequencies of a 22-bp nucleotide deletion (-196 to -174del) in the promoter of TLR2 gene as well as two polymorphisms causing amino acid substitutions (Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile) in TLR4 gene. As far as (-196 to -174del) in TLR2 gene is concerned ins/del and del/del genotypes and del allele were significantly more frequent in breast cancer patients compared to healthy controls. Considering Asp299Gly replacement of TLR4 gene, Gly carriers (Asp/Gly & Gly/Gly genotype) and Gly allele were overrepresented among the breast cancer cases. The -174 to -196del of TLR2 gene and Asp299Gly of TLR4 gene polymorphisms may confer an increased susceptibility to breast cancer development.

  18. Molecular basis for designing selective modulators of retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activities.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, P

    2001-08-01

    Retinoic acid receptors are ligand-regulated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, which comprises 49 members in the human genome. all-trans retinoic acid and 9-cis retinoic acid receptors (RARs and RXRs) are each encoded by three distinct genes and several isoforms arise from alternative splicing and the use of different promoters. While RXRs are promiscuous dimerization partners of several other nuclear receptors, RARs are active, in-vivo, when associated to RXRs. Retinoids are therefore regulators of multiple physiological processes, from embryogenesis to metabolism. Different combinations of RXR:RAR heterodimers occur as a function of their tissue-specific expression and their activity is mostly conditioned by the activation status of RAR. These heterodimers are defined as non permissive heterodimers, in opposition to permissive dimers whose transcriptional activity may be modulated through RXR and its dimerization partner. The transcriptional activity of these dimers also relies on their ability to recruit nuclear coactivators and corepressors, which function as multi proteic complexes harboring several enzymatic activities (acetylases, kinases). The structure of the ligand bound to the RAR moiety of the dimer, as well as the nature of the DNA sequence to which dimers are bound, dictate the relative affinity of dimers for coactivators and thus its overall transcriptional activity. RARs are also able to repress the activity of unrelated transcription factors such as AP1 and NF-kappa-B, and therefore have potent anti proliferative and anti inflammatory properties. This review summarizes our current view of molecular mechanisms governing these various activities and emphasizes the need for a detailed understanding of how retinoids may dictate transactivating and transrepressive properties of RARs and RXRs, which may be considered as highly valuable therapeutic targets in many diseases such as cancer, skin hyperproliferation and

  19. Retinoic Acid Receptor-Mediated Induction of ABCA1 in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Costet, Philippe; Lalanne, Florent; Gerbod-Giannone, Marie C.; Molina, Jennifer R.; Fu, Xuan; Lund, Erik G.; Gudas, Lorraine J.; Tall, Alan R.

    2003-01-01

    ABCA1, the mutant molecule in Tangier Disease, mediates efflux of cellular cholesterol to apoA-I and is induced by liver X receptor (LXR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) transcription factors. Retinoic acid receptor (RAR) activators (all-trans-retinoic acid [ATRA] and TTNPB) were found to increase ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1) mRNA and protein in macrophages. In cellular cotransfection assays, RARγ/RXR activated the human ABCA1 promoter, via the same direct repeat 4 (DR4) promoter element as LXR/RXR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis in macrophages confirmed the binding of RARγ/RXR to the ABCA1 promoter DR4 element in the presence of ATRA, with weaker binding of RARα/RXR, and no binding of RARβ/RXR. However, in macrophages from RARγ−/− mice, TTNPB still induced ABCA1, in association with marked upregulation of RARα, suggesting that high levels of RARα can compensate for the absence of RARγ. Dose-response experiments with ATRA in mouse primary macrophages showed that other LXR target genes were weakly induced (ABCG1 and SREBP-1c) or not induced (apoE and LXRα). The more specific RAR activator TTNPB did not induce SREBP-1c in mouse primary macrophages or liver. These studies indicate a direct role of RARγ/RXR in induction of macrophage ABCA1. PMID:14560020

  20. Constraint and Adaptation in newt Toll-Like Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Babik, Wiesław; Dudek, Katarzyna; Fijarczyk, Anna; Pabijan, Maciej; Stuglik, Michał; Szkotak, Rafał; Zieliński, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Acute die-offs of amphibian populations worldwide have been linked to the emergence of viral and fungal diseases. Inter and intraspecific immunogenetic differences may influence the outcome of infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are an essential component of innate immunity and also prime acquired defenses. We report the first comprehensive assessment of TLR gene variation for urodele amphibians. The Lissotriton newt TLR repertoire includes representatives of 13 families and is compositionally most similar to that of the anuran Xenopus. Both ancient and recent gene duplications have occurred in urodeles, bringing the total number of TLR genes to at least 21. Purifying selection has predominated the evolution of newt TLRs in both long (∼70 Ma) and medium (∼18 Ma) timescales. However, we find evidence for both purifying and positive selection acting on TLRs in two recently diverged (2–5 Ma) allopatric evolutionary lineages (Lissotriton montandoni and L. vulgaris graecus). Overall, both forms of selection have been stronger in L. v. graecus, while constraint on most TLR genes in L. montandoni appears relaxed. The differences in selection regimes are unlikely to be biased by demographic effects because these were controlled by means of a historical demographic model derived from an independent data set of 62 loci. We infer that TLR genes undergo distinct trajectories of adaptive evolution in closely related amphibian lineages, highlight the potential of TLRs to capture the signatures of different assemblages of pathogenic microorganisms, and suggest differences between lineages in the relative roles of innate and acquired immunity. PMID:25480684

  1. Human T-cell receptor variable gene segment families

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, B.; Kabelitz, D.; Clark, S.P.; Mak, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    Multiple DNA and protein sequence alignments have been constructed for the human T-cell receptor {alpha}/{delta}, {beta}, and {gamma} (TCRA/D, B, and G) variable (V) gene segments. The traditional classification into subfamilies was confirmed using a much larger pool of sequences. For each sequence, a name was derived which complies with the standard nomenclature. The traditional numbering of V gene segments in the order of their discovery was continued and changed when in conflict with names of other segments. By discriminating between alleles at the same locus versus genes from different loci, we were able to reduce the number of more than 150 different TCRBV sequences in the database to a repertoire of only 47 functional TCRBV gene segments. An extension of this analysis to the over 100 TCRAV sequences results in a predicted repertoire of 42 functional TCRAV gene segments. Our alignment revealed two residues that distinguish between the highly homologous V{delta} and V{alpha}, one at a site that in V{sub H} contacts the constant region, the other at the interface between immunoglobulin V{sub H} and V{sub L}. This site may be responsible for restricted pairing between certain V{delta} and V{gamma} chains. On the other hand, V{beta} and V{gamma} appear to be related by the fact that their CDR2 length is increased by four residues as compared with that of V{alpha}/{delta} peptides. 150 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Structure of the human luteinizing hormone-choriogonadotropin receptor gene: unusual promoter and 5' non-coding regions.

    PubMed

    Atger, M; Misrahi, M; Sar, S; Le Flem, L; Dessen, P; Milgrom, E

    1995-06-01

    The complete organization of the human luteinizing hormone-choriogonadotropin (LH/CG) receptor (LH/CGR) gene and the structure of 1591 bp of its 5' flanking region have been determined. This gene spans over 70 kbp and contains 11 exons. The first ten exons and part of the last exon encode the extracellular domain of the receptor while the transmembrane and intracellular domains are encoded by the remaining part of the last exon. The gene encodes a 701 amino acids long preprotein, contrary to a previous report of 699 amino acids. Primer extension experiments and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mapping allowed definition of the transcription initiation site, which is located 1085 bp upstream from the initiation codon. The 5' non-coding region is thus unusually long. The promoter region which is different from the murine LH/CG receptor promoter, contains two putative TATA boxes at positions -34 and -47 and a CAAT box consensus sequence at position -89. A consensus sequence corresponding to a cAMP responsive element is found at position -697. Seven API consensus sequences are also found in the 5' flanking region of the gene. Southern blot experiments demonstrated an informative biallelic polymorphism within the human LH/CG receptor gene locus using BglII endonuclease. The cloning of the human LH/CGR gene and the determination of the organization and structure of its 5' flanking region allow the study of its hormonal, developmental and tissue-specific regulation. Primers and PCR conditions are described for the direct genomic sequencing of all the exons of the gene. This information should facilitate the study of pathological mutations of the receptor.

  3. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Results Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Conclusion Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion. PMID:27455076

  4. Chicken interferons, their receptors and interferon-stimulated genes.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Kate E; Ward, Alister C; Lowenthal, John W; Bean, Andrew G D

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of pathogenic viruses is a serious issue as they pose a constant threat to both the poultry industry and to human health. To prevent these viral infections an understanding of the host-virus response is critical, especially for the development of novel therapeutics. One approach in the control of viral infections would be to boost the immune response through administration of cytokines, such as interferons. However, the innate immune response in chickens is poorly characterised, particularly concerning the interferon pathway. This review will provide an overview of our current understanding of the interferon system of chickens, including their cognate receptors and known interferon-stimulated gene products.

  5. Cardiac gene expression data and in silico analysis provide novel insights into human and mouse taste receptor gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Simon R; Porrello, Enzo R; Stefani, Maurizio; Smith, Nicola J; Molenaar, Peter; dos Remedios, Cristobal G; Thomas, Walter G; Ramialison, Mirana

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are the principal mediators of the sweet, umami, bitter, and fat taste qualities in mammals. Intriguingly, the taste receptors are also expressed outside of the oral cavity, including in the gut, airways, brain, and heart, where they have additional functions and contribute to disease. However, there is little known about the mechanisms governing the transcriptional regulation of taste receptor genes. Following our recent delineation of taste receptors in the heart, we investigated the genomic loci encoding for taste receptors to gain insight into the regulatory mechanisms that drive their expression in the heart. Gene expression analyses of healthy and diseased human and mouse hearts showed coordinated expression for a subset of chromosomally clustered taste receptors. This chromosomal clustering mirrored the cardiac expression profile, suggesting that a common gene regulatory block may control the taste receptor locus. We identified unique domains with strong regulatory potential in the vicinity of taste receptor genes. We also performed de novo motif enrichment in the proximal promoter regions and found several overrepresented DNA motifs in cardiac taste receptor gene promoters corresponding to ubiquitous and cardiac-specific transcription factor binding sites. Thus, combining cardiac gene expression data with bioinformatic analyses, this study has provided insights into the noncoding regulatory landscape for taste GPCRs. These findings also have broader relevance for the study of taste GPCRs outside of the classical gustatory system, where understanding the mechanisms controlling the expression of these receptors may have implications for future therapeutic development.

  6. Cardiac gene expression data and in silico analysis provide novel insights into human and mouse taste receptor gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Simon R; Porrello, Enzo R; Stefani, Maurizio; Smith, Nicola J; Molenaar, Peter; dos Remedios, Cristobal G; Thomas, Walter G; Ramialison, Mirana

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are the principal mediators of the sweet, umami, bitter, and fat taste qualities in mammals. Intriguingly, the taste receptors are also expressed outside of the oral cavity, including in the gut, airways, brain, and heart, where they have additional functions and contribute to disease. However, there is little known about the mechanisms governing the transcriptional regulation of taste receptor genes. Following our recent delineation of taste receptors in the heart, we investigated the genomic loci encoding for taste receptors to gain insight into the regulatory mechanisms that drive their expression in the heart. Gene expression analyses of healthy and diseased human and mouse hearts showed coordinated expression for a subset of chromosomally clustered taste receptors. This chromosomal clustering mirrored the cardiac expression profile, suggesting that a common gene regulatory block may control the taste receptor locus. We identified unique domains with strong regulatory potential in the vicinity of taste receptor genes. We also performed de novo motif enrichment in the proximal promoter regions and found several overrepresented DNA motifs in cardiac taste receptor gene promoters corresponding to ubiquitous and cardiac-specific transcription factor binding sites. Thus, combining cardiac gene expression data with bioinformatic analyses, this study has provided insights into the noncoding regulatory landscape for taste GPCRs. These findings also have broader relevance for the study of taste GPCRs outside of the classical gustatory system, where understanding the mechanisms controlling the expression of these receptors may have implications for future therapeutic development. PMID:25986534

  7. Effects of perfluoroalkyl acids on the function of the thyroid hormone and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Long, Manhai; Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2013-11-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are perfluorinated compounds that widely exist in the environment and can elicit adverse effects including endocrine disruption in humans and animals. This study investigated the effect of seven PFAAs on the thyroid hormone (TH) system assessing the proliferation of the 3,3',5-triiodo-L-thryonine (T3)-dependent rat pituitary GH3 cells using the T-screen assay and the effect on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transactivation in the AhR-luciferase reporter gene bioassay. A dose-dependent impact on GH3 cells was observed in the range 1×10(-9)-1×10(-4) M: seven PFAAs (perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorooctanoic acid, perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnA), and perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA)) inhibited the GH3 cell growth, and four PFAAs (PFOS, PFHxS, PFNA, and PFUnA) antagonized the T3-induced GH3 cell proliferation. At the highest test concentration, PFHxS showed a further increase of the T3-induced GH3 growth. Among the seven tested PFAAs, only PFDoA and PFDA elicited an activating effect on the AhR. In conclusion, PFAAs possess in vitro endocrine-disrupting potential by interfering with TH and AhR functions, which need to be taken into consideration when assessing the impact on human health. PMID:23539207

  8. Salicylic acid receptors activate jasmonic acid signalling through a non-canonical pathway to promote effector-triggered immunity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lijing; Sonbol, Fathi-Mohamed; Huot, Bethany; Gu, Yangnan; Withers, John; Mwimba, Musoki; Yao, Jian; He, Sheng Yang; Dong, Xinnian

    2016-01-01

    It is an apparent conundrum how plants evolved effector-triggered immunity (ETI), involving programmed cell death (PCD), as a major defence mechanism against biotrophic pathogens, because ETI-associated PCD could leave them vulnerable to necrotrophic pathogens that thrive on dead host cells. Interestingly, during ETI, the normally antagonistic defence hormones, salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) associated with defence against biotrophs and necrotrophs respectively, both accumulate to high levels. In this study, we made the surprising finding that JA is a positive regulator of RPS2-mediated ETI. Early induction of JA-responsive genes and de novo JA synthesis following SA accumulation is activated through the SA receptors NPR3 and NPR4, instead of the JA receptor COI1. We provide evidence that NPR3 and NPR4 may mediate this effect by promoting degradation of the JA transcriptional repressor JAZs. This unique interplay between SA and JA offers a possible explanation of how plants can mount defence against a biotrophic pathogen without becoming vulnerable to necrotrophic pathogens. PMID:27725643

  9. FATTY ACIDS MODULATE TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 4 ACTIVATION THROUGH REGULATION OF RECEPTOR DIMERIZATION AND RECRUITMENT INTO LIPID RAFTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The saturated fatty acids acylated on Lipid A of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or bacterial lipoproteins play critical roles in ligand recognition and receptor activation for Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2. The results from our previous studies (J Biol Chem 2003, 2004) demonstrated that saturated ...

  10. Identification of chemical modulators of the constitutive activated receptor (CAR) in a gene expression compendium

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Jones, Carlton; Moore, Tanya; Hester, Susan; Nesnow, Stephen; Auerbach, Scott; Geter, David R.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Thomas, Russell S.; Applegate, Dawn; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Corton, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member constitutive activated receptor (CAR) is activated by structurally diverse drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals leading to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and transport. Chronic activation of CAR increases liver cancer incidence in rodents, whereas suppression of CAR can lead to steatosis and insulin insensitivity. Here, analytical methods were developed to screen for chemical treatments in a gene expression compendium that lead to alteration of CAR activity. A gene expression biomarker signature of 83 CAR-dependent genes was identified using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and CAR-null mice after exposure to three structurally-diverse CAR activators (CITCO, phenobarbital, TCPOBOP). A rank-based algorithm (Running Fisher’s algorithm (p-value ≤ 10-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the CAR biomarker signature and a test set of 28 and 32 comparisons positive or negative, respectively, for CAR activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 97%. The biomarker signature was used to identify chemicals that activate or suppress CAR in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ~1850 comparisons. CAR was activated by 1) activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in wild-type but not AhR-null mice, 2) pregnane X receptor (PXR) activators in wild-type and to lesser extents in PXR-null mice, and 3) activators of PPARα in wild-type and PPARα-null mice. CAR was consistently activated by five conazole fungicides and four perfluorinated compounds. Comparison of effects in wild-type and CAR-null mice showed that the fungicide propiconazole increased liver weight and hepatocyte proliferation in a CAR-dependent manner, whereas the perfluorinated compound perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increased these endpoints in a CAR-independent manner. A number of compounds suppressed CAR coincident with increases in markers of

  11. Evolution of the chicken Toll-like receptor gene family: A story of gene gain and gene loss

    PubMed Central

    Temperley, Nicholas D; Berlin, Sofia; Paton, Ian R; Griffin, Darren K; Burt, David W

    2008-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs) perform a vital role in disease resistance through their recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Recent advances in genomics allow comparison of TLR genes within and between many species. This study takes advantage of the recently sequenced chicken genome to determine the complete chicken TLR repertoire and place it in context of vertebrate genomic evolution. Results The chicken TLR repertoire consists of ten genes. Phylogenetic analyses show that six of these genes have orthologs in mammals and fish, while one is only shared by fish and three appear to be unique to birds. Furthermore the phylogeny shows that TLR1-like genes arose independently in fish, birds and mammals from an ancestral gene also shared by TLR6 and TLR10. All other TLRs were already present prior to the divergence of major vertebrate lineages 550 Mya (million years ago) and have since been lost in certain lineages. Phylogenetic analysis shows the absence of TLRs 8 and 9 in chicken to be the result of gene loss. The notable exception to the tendency of gene loss in TLR evolution is found in chicken TLRs 1 and 2, each of which underwent gene duplication about 147 and 65 Mya, respectively. Conclusion Comparative phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate TLR genes provides insight into their patterns and processes of gene evolution, with examples of both gene gain and gene loss. In addition, these comparisons clarify the nomenclature of TLR genes in vertebrates. PMID:18241342

  12. Update of the androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1999-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 309 to 374 during the past year. We have expanded the database by adding information on AR-interacting proteins; and we have improved the database by identifying those mutation entries that have been updated. Mutations of unknown significance have now been reported in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the AR gene, and in individuals who are somatic mosaics constitutionally. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms, including silent mutations, have been discovered in normal individuals and in individuals with male infertility. A mutation hotspot associated with prostatic cancer has been identified in exon 5. The database is available on the internet (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  13. Insulin receptor gene expression in normal and diseased bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Liu, G W; Zhang, Z G; Wang, J G; Wang, Z; Xu, C; Zhu, X L

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare insulin receptor (IR) gene expression in normal bovine liver (n=7) with samples of liver from cows in the perinatal period with ketosis (n=7) and cows with fatty liver (n=7). Gene expression was determined by internally controlled reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of IR mRNA in the liver of ketotic dairy cows was higher than in cows with fatty liver, but in both disease groups the expression was substantially lower than that in normal liver. Reduced expression of IR mRNA in fatty liver indicates that responses to insulin are markedly decreased, which might be due to insulin resistance. The relatively lower IR mRNA expression in the liver tissue of dairy cows with ketosis might enhance gluconeogenesis and lipid mobilization to relieve energy negative balance.

  14. A reference gene set for chemosensory receptor genes of Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Christopher; Hirsh, Ariana; Bucks, Sascha; Klinner, Christian; Vogel, Heiko; Shukla, Aditi; Mansfield, Jennifer H; Morton, Brian; Hansson, Bill S; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald

    2015-11-01

    The order of Lepidoptera has historically been crucial for chemosensory research, with many important advances coming from the analysis of species like Bombyx mori or the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. Specifically M. sexta has long been a major model species in the field, especially regarding the importance of olfaction in an ecological context, mainly the interaction with its host plants. In recent years transcriptomic data has led to the discovery of members of all major chemosensory receptor families in the species, but the data was fragmentary and incomplete. Here we present the analysis of the newly available high-quality genome data for the species, supplemented by additional transcriptome data to generate a high quality reference gene set for the three major chemosensory receptor gene families, the gustatory (GR), olfactory (OR) and antennal ionotropic receptors (IR). Coupled with gene expression analysis our approach allows association of specific receptor types and behaviors, like pheromone and host detection. The dataset will provide valuable support for future analysis of these essential chemosensory modalities in this species and in Lepidoptera in general. PMID:26365739

  15. Variations in Opioid Receptor Genes in Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Wachman, Elisha M; Hayes, Marie J; Sherva, Richard; Brown, Mark S; Davis, Jonathan M; Farrer, Lindsay A; Nielsen, David A

    2015-01-01

    Background There is significant variability in the severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) due to in-utero opioid exposure. We wanted to determine if single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in key candidate genes contribute to this variability. Methods Full-term opioid-exposed newborns and their mothers (n=86 pairs) were studied. DNA was genotyped for 80 SNPs from 14 genes utilizing a custom designed microarray. The association of each SNP with NAS outcomes was evaluated. Results SNPs in two opioid receptor genes in the infants were associated with worse NAS severity: 1) The PNOC rs732636 A allele (OR=3.8, p=0.004) for treatment with 2 medications and a longer hospital stay (LOS) of 5.8 days (p=0.01), and 2) The OPRK1 rs702764 C allele (OR=4.1, p=0.003) for treatment with 2 medications. The OPRM1 rs1799971 G allele (β= −6.9 days, p=0.02) and COMT rs740603 A allele (β= −5.3 days, p=0.01) were associated with shorter LOS. The OPRD1 rs204076 A allele in the mothers was associated with a longer LOS by 6.6 days (p=0.008). Results were significant point-wise but did not meet the experiment-wide significance level. Conclusions These findings suggest that SNPs in opioid receptor and the PNOC genes are associated with NAS severity. However, further testing in a large sample is warranted. This has important implications for prenatal prediction and personalized treatment regimens for infants at highest risk for severe NAS. PMID:26233486

  16. Retinal pigment epithelial acid lipase activity and lipoprotein receptors: effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Elner, Victor M

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To show that fish oil-derived omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, delivered to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) by circulating low-density lipoproteins (LDL), enhance already considerable RPE lysosomal acid lipase activity, providing for more efficient hydrolysis of intralysosomal RPE lipids, an effect that may help prevent development of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). METHODS: Colorimetric biochemical and histochemical techniques were used to demonstrate RPE acid lipase in situ, in vitro, and after challenge with phagocytic stimuli. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of fluorescently labeled native, aceto-acetylated, and oxidized LDL was studied in vitro and in vivo. LDL effects on RPE lysosomal enzymes were assessed. Lysosomal enzyme activity was compared in RPE cells from monkeys fed diets rich in fish oil to those from control animals and in cultured RPE cells exposed to sera from these monkeys. RESULTS: RPE acid lipase activity was substantial and comparable to that of mononuclear phagocytes. Acid lipase activity increased significantly following phagocytic challenge with photoreceptor outer segment (POS) membranes. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of labeled lipoproteins was determined in vitro. Distinctive uptake of labeled lipoproteins occurred in RPE cells and mononuclear phagocytes in vivo. Native LDL enhanced RPE lysosomal enzyme activity. RPE lysosomal enzymes increased significantly in RPE cells from monkeys fed fish oil-rich diets and in cultured RPE cells exposed to their sera. CONCLUSIONS: RPE cells contain substantial acid lipase for efficient metabolism of lipids imbibed by POS phagocytosis and LDL uptake. Diets rich in fish oil-derived omega-3 fatty acids, by enhancing acid lipase, may reduce RPE lipofuscin accumulation, RPE oxidative damage, and the development of ARMD. PMID:12545699

  17. Oxytocin receptor and vasopressin receptor 1a genes are respectively associated with emotional and cognitive empathy.

    PubMed

    Uzefovsky, F; Shalev, I; Israel, S; Edelman, S; Raz, Y; Mankuta, D; Knafo-Noam, A; Ebstein, R P

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is the ability to recognize and share in the emotions of others. It can be considered a multifaceted concept with cognitive and emotional aspects. Little is known regarding the underlying neurochemistry of empathy and in the current study we used a neurogenetic approach to explore possible brain neurotransmitter pathways contributing to cognitive and emotional empathy. Both the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) and the arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (AVPR1a) genes contribute to social cognition in both animals and humans and hence are prominent candidates for contributing to empathy. The following research examined the associations between polymorphisms in these two genes and individual differences in emotional and cognitive empathy in a sample of 367 young adults. Intriguingly, we found that emotional empathy was associated solely with OXTR, whereas cognitive empathy was associated solely with AVPR1a. Moreover, no interaction was observed between the two genes and measures of empathy. The current findings contribute to our understanding of the distinct neurogenetic pathways involved in cognitive and emotional empathy and underscore the pervasive role of both oxytocin and vasopressin in modulating human emotions.

  18. Ligand-dependent coactivation of the human bile acid receptor FXR by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Savkur, Rajesh S; Thomas, Jeffrey S; Bramlett, Kelli S; Gao, Yunling; Michael, Laura F; Burris, Thomas P

    2005-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) has been shown to play an important role in energy metabolism by coordinating transcriptional programs involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, adaptive thermogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and fatty acid oxidation. PGC-1alpha also plays a crucial role in cholesterol metabolism by serving as a coactivator of the liver X receptor-alpha and inducing the expression of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase. Here, we demonstrate that PGC-1alpha also functions as an effective coactivator of farnesoid X receptor (FXR), the bile acid receptor. Transient cotransfection assays demonstrate that PGC-1alpha enhances ligand-mediated FXR transcription when either full-length FXR or Gal4 DNA binding domain-FXR-ligand binding domain chimeras were analyzed. Mammalian two-hybrid analyses, glutathione S-transferase affinity chromatography and biochemical coactivator recruitment assays demonstrate ligand-dependent interaction between the two proteins both in vivo and in vitro. PGC-1alpha-mediated coactivation of FXR was highly ligand-dependent and absolutely required an intact activation function-2 (AF-2) domain of FXR and the LXXLL motif in PGC-1alpha. The integrity of the charge clamp was required, further illustrating the role of the ligand binding domain of FXR in PGC-1alpha recognition. Together, these results indicate that PGC-1alpha functions as a potent coactivator for FXR and further implicates its role in the regulation of genes that are involved in bile acid and lipid metabolism.

  19. Activation of multiple mitogen-activated protein kinases by recombinant calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, N; Disa, J; Spielman, W S; Brooks, D P; Nambi, P; Aiyar, N

    2000-02-18

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide is a 37-amino-acid neuropeptide and a potent vasodilator. Although calcitonin gene-related peptide has been shown to have a number of effects in a variety of systems, the mechanisms of action and the intracellular signaling pathways, especially the regulation of mitogen-activated protien kinase (MAPK) pathway, is not known. In the present study we investigated the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the regulation of MAPKs in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells stably transfected with a recombinant porcine calcitonin gene-related peptide-1 receptor. Calcitonin gene-related peptide caused a significant dose-dependent increase in cAMP response and the effect was inhibited by calcitonin gene-related peptide(8-37), the calcitonin gene-related peptide-receptor antagonist. Calcitonin gene-related peptide also caused a time- and concentration-dependent increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38 MAPK) activities, with apparently no significant change in cjun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. Forskolin, a direct activator of adenylyl cyclase also stimulated ERK and P38 activities in these cells suggesting the invovement of cAMP in this process. Calcitonin gene-related peptide-stimulated ERK and P38 MAPK activities were inhibited significantly by calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonist, calcitonin gene-related peptide-(8-37) suggesting the involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide-1 receptor. Preincubation of the cells with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor, H89 [¿N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide, hydrochloride¿] inhibited calcitonin gene-related peptide-mediated activation of ERK and p38 kinases. On the other hand, preincubation of the cells with wortmannin ¿[1S-(1alpha,6balpha,9abeta,11alpha, 11bbeta)]-11-(acetyloxy)-1,6b,7,8,9a,10,11, 11b-octahydro-1-(methoxymethyl)-9a,11b-dimethyl-3H-furo[4,3, 2-de]indeno[4,5-h]-2

  20. A novel role for the dioxin receptor in fatty acid metabolism and hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hoon; Wada, Taira; Febbraio, Maria; He, Jinhan; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Lee, Min Jae; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Xie, Wen

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a PAS domain transcription factor previously known as the “dioxin receptor” or “xenobiotic receptor.” The goal of this study is to determine the endobiotic role of AhR in hepatic steatosis. Methods Wild type, constitutively activated AhR (CA-AhR) transgenic, AhR null (AhR-/-), and fatty acid translocase CD36/FAT null (CD36-/-) mice were used to investigate the role of AhR in steatosis and the involvement of CD36 in the steatotic effect of AhR. The promoters of the mouse and human CD36 genes were cloned and their regulation by AhR was analyzed. Results Activation of AhR induced spontaneous hepatic steatosis characterized by the accumulation of triglycerides. The steatotic effect of AhR is likely due to the combined upregulation of CD36 and fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs), suppression of fatty acid oxidation, inhibition of hepatic export of triglycerides, increase in peripheral fat mobilization, and increased hepatic oxidative stress. Promoter analysis established CD36 as a novel transcriptional target of AhR. Activation of AhR in liver cells induced CD36 gene expression and enhanced fatty acid uptake. The steatotic effect of an AhR agonist was inhibited in CD36-/- mice. Conclusions Our study reveals a novel link between AhR-induced steatosis and the expression of CD36. Industrial or military exposures to dioxin and related compounds have been linked to increased prevalence of fatty liver in humans. Results from this study may help to establish AhR and its target CD36 as novel therapeutic and preventive targets for fatty liver disease. PMID:20303349

  1. Medium-chain Fatty Acid-sensing Receptor, GPR84, Is a Proinflammatory Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masakatsu; Takaishi, Sachiko; Nagasaki, Miyuki; Onozawa, Yoshiko; Iino, Ikue; Maeda, Hiroaki; Komai, Tomoaki; Oda, Tomiichiro

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 84 (GPR84) is a putative receptor for medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs), whose pathophysiological roles have not yet been clarified. Here, we show that GPR84 was activated by MCFAs with the hydroxyl group at the 2- or 3-position more effectively than nonhydroxylated MCFAs. We also identified a surrogate agonist, 6-n-octylaminouracil (6-OAU), for GPR84. These potential ligands and the surrogate agonist, 6-OAU, stimulated [35S]GTP binding and accumulated phosphoinositides in a GPR84-dependent manner. The surrogate agonist, 6-OAU, internalized GPR84-EGFP from the cell surface. Both the potential ligands and 6-OAU elicited chemotaxis of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and macrophages and amplified LPS-stimulated production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 from PMNs and TNFα from macrophages. Furthermore, the intravenous injection of 6-OAU raised the blood CXCL1 level in rats, and the inoculation of 6-OAU into the rat air pouch accumulated PMNs and macrophages in the site. Our results indicate a proinflammatory role of GPR84, suggesting that the receptor may be a novel target to treat chronic low grade inflammation associated-disease. PMID:23449982

  2. The dopamine D3 receptor gene and posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Erika J; Mitchell, Karen S; Logue, Mark W; Baldwin, Clinton T; Reardon, Annemarie F; Aiello, Alison; Galea, Sandro; Koenen, Karestan C; Uddin, Monica; Wildman, Derek; Miller, Mark W

    2014-08-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) gene has been implicated in schizophrenia, autism, and substance use-disorders and is related to emotion reactivity, executive functioning, and stress-responding, processes impaired in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The aim of this candidate gene study was to evaluate DRD3 polymorphisms for association with PTSD. The discovery sample was trauma-exposed White, non-Hispanic U.S. veterans and their trauma-exposed intimate partners (N = 491); 60.3% met criteria for lifetime PTSD. The replication sample was 601 trauma-exposed African American participants living in Detroit, Michigan; 23.6% met criteria for lifetime PTSD. Genotyping was based on high-density bead chips. In the discovery sample, 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs2134655, rs201252087, rs4646996, and rs9868039, showed evidence of association with PTSD and withstood correction for multiple testing. The minor alleles were associated with reduced risk for PTSD (OR range = 0.59 to 0.69). In the replication sample, rs2251177, located 149 base pairs away from the most significant SNP in the discovery sample, was nominally associated with PTSD in men (OR = 0.32). Although the precise role of the D3 receptor in PTSD is not yet known, its role in executive functioning and emotional reactivity, and the sensitivity of the dopamine system to environmental stressors could potentially explain this association. PMID:25158632

  3. The Dopamine D3 Receptor Gene and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Erika J.; Mitchell, Karen S.; Logue, Mark W.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Reardon, Annemarie F.; Aiello, Alison; Galea, Sandro; Koenen, Karestan C.; Uddin, Monica; Wildman, Derek; Miller, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) gene has been implicated in schizophrenia, autism, and substance use-disorders and is related to emotion reactivity, executive functioning, and stress-responding, processes impaired in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This aim of this candidate gene study was to evaluate DRD3 polymorphisms for association with PTSD. The discovery sample was trauma-exposed white, non-Hispanic veterans and their trauma-exposed intimate partners (N = 491); 60% met criteria for lifetime PTSD. The replication sample was 601 trauma-exposed African American participants; 24% met criteria for lifetime PTSD. Genotyping was based on high-density bead chips. In the discovery sample, four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs2134655, rs201252087, rs4646996, and rs9868039, showed evidence of association with PTSD and withstood correction for multiple testing. The minor alleles were associated with reduced risk for PTSD (odds ratio range: 0.59 – 0.69). In the replication sample, rs2251177, located 149 base pairs away from the most significant SNP in the discovery sample, was nominally associated with PTSD in men (odds ratio: 0.32). Although the precise role of the D3 receptor in PTSD is not yet known, its role in executive functioning and emotional reactivity, and the sensitivity of the dopamine system to environmental stressors, could potentially explain this association. PMID:25158632

  4. Molecular cloning of the gene encoding the mouse parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor.

    PubMed Central

    McCuaig, K A; Clarke, J C; White, J H

    1994-01-01

    The parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor (PTHR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor containing seven predicted transmembrane domains. We have isolated and characterized recombinant bacteriophage lambda EMBL3 genomic clones containing the mouse PTHR gene, including 10 kilobases of the promoter region. The gene spans > 32 kilobases and is divided into 15 exons, 8 of which contain the transmembrane domains. The PTHR exons containing the predicted membrane-spanning domains are heterogeneous in length and three of the exon-intron boundaries fall within putative transmembrane sequences, suggesting that the exons did not arise from duplication events. This arrangement is closely related to that of the growth hormone releasing factor receptor gene, particularly in the transmembrane region, providing strong evidence that the two genes evolved from a common precursor. Transcription is initiated principally at a series of sites over a 15-base-pair region. The proximal promoter region is highly (G+C)-rich and lacks an apparent TATA box or initiator element homologies but does contain CCGCCC motifs. The presumptive amino acid sequence of the encoded receptor is 99%, 91%, and 76% identical to those of the rat, human, and opossum receptors, respectively. There is no consensus polyadenylation signal in the 3' untranslated region. The poly(A) tail of the PTHR transcript begins 32 bases downstream of a 35-base-long A-rich sequence, suggesting that this region directs polyadenylylation. Images PMID:8197183

  5. Ku proteins function as corepressors to regulate farnesoid X receptor-mediated gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, Masae; Kunimoto, Masaaki; Nishizuka, Makoto; Osada, Shigehiro; Imagawa, Masayoshi

    2009-12-18

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR; NR1H4) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulates the expression of genes involved in enterohepatic circulation and the metabolism of bile acids. Based on functional analyses, nuclear receptors are divided into regions A-F. To explore the cofactors interacting with FXR, we performed a pull-down assay using GST-fused to the N-terminal A/B region and the C region, which are required for the ligand-independent transactivation and DNA-binding, respectively, of FXR, and nuclear extracts from HeLa cells. We identified DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), Ku80, and Ku70 as FXR associated factors. These proteins are known to have an important role in DNA repair, recombination, and transcription. DNA-PKcs mainly interacted with the A/B region of FXR, whereas the Ku proteins interacted with the C region and with the D region (hinge region). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the Ku proteins associated with FXR on the bile salt export pump (BSEP) promoter. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of the Ku proteins decreased the promoter activity and expression of BSEP gene mediated by FXR. These results suggest that the Ku proteins function as corepressors for FXR.

  6. Expression of a Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholine receptor-related gene in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, S.C.; Rosenthal, L.S.; Kammermeyer, K.L.; Potter, M.B.; Nelson, D.J.

    1988-02-01

    The authors isolated Drosophila melanogaster genomic sequences with nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology to subunits of vertebrate acetylcholine receptor by hybridization with a Torpedo acetylcholine receptor subunit cDNA probe. Five introns are present in the portion of the Drosophila gene encoding the unprocessed protein and are positionally conserved relative to the human acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit gene. The Drosophila genomic clone hybridized to salivary gland polytene chromosome 3L within region 64B and was termed AChR64B. A 3-kilobasae poly(A)-containing transcript complementary to the AChR64B clone was readily detectable by RNA blot hybridizations during midembryogenesis, during metamorphosis, and in newly enclosed adults. AChR64B transcripts were localized to the cellular regions of the central nervous system during embryonic, larval, pupal, and adult stages of development. During metamorphosis, a temporal relationship between the morphogenesis of the optic lobe and expression of AChR64B transcripts was observed.

  7. Novel Fc gamma receptor I family gene products in human mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Porges, A J; Redecha, P B; Doebele, R; Pan, L C; Salmon, J E; Kimberly, R P

    1992-01-01

    Unlike the human Fc gamma RII and Fc gamma RIII families, which exhibit considerable diversity at both the nucleic acid and protein levels, the human Fc gamma RI family has only a single recognized product expressed as a 70-kD cell surface receptor with high affinity for monomeric IgG (hFc gamma RIa1). Using both polymerase chain reaction-based amplification and Northern hybridization, we document multiple interferon-gamma-inducible hFc gamma RI RNA transcripts in human mononuclear cells and neutrophils. The sequences of two of these Fc gamma RI related transcripts indicate that they are alternatively spliced products of a second Fc gamma RI family gene, termed Fc gamma RIB. The cDNA derived from the larger of these transcripts, termed hFc gamma RIb1, encodes a surface molecule that is not recognized by Fc gamma RI specific monoclonal antibodies when transfected into COS-7 cells. Unlike the interferon-gamma-inducible hFc gamma RIA gene product, hFc gamma RIb1 does not bind monomeric IgG with high affinity. However, both hFc gamma RIa1 and hFc gamma RIb1 do bind aggregated human IgG. Previously unrecognized diversity within the hFc gamma RI family includes an interferon-gamma-inducible, putative low affinity Fc gamma receptor that may play an important role in the mechanism by which Fc gamma receptors participate in the humoral immune response. Images PMID:1430234

  8. A Novel Point Mutation in the Amino Terminal Domain of the Human Glucocorticoid Receptor (hGR) Gene Enhancing hGR-Mediated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Charmandari, Evangelia; Ichijo, Takamasa; Jubiz, William; Baid, Smita; Zachman, Keith; Chrousos, George P.; Kino, Tomoshige

    2008-01-01

    Context: Interindividual variations in glucocorticoid sensitivity have been associated with manifestations of cortisol excess or deficiency and may be partly explained by polymorphisms in the human glucocorticoid receptor (hGR) gene. We studied a 43-yr-old female, who presented with manifestations consistent with tissue-selective glucocorticoid hypersensitivity. We detected a novel, single, heterozygous nucleotide (G → C) substitution at position 1201 (exon 2) of the hGR gene, which resulted in aspartic acid to histidine substitution at amino acid position 401 in the amino-terminal domain of the hGRα. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of action of the natural mutant receptor hGRαD401H. Methods-Results: Compared with the wild-type hGRα, the mutant receptor hGRαD401H demonstrated a 2.4-fold increase in its ability to transactivate the glucocorticoid-inducible mouse mammary tumor virus promoter in response to dexamethasone but had similar affinity for the ligand (dissociation constant = 6.2 ± 0.6 vs. 6.1 ± 0.6 nm) and time to nuclear translocation (14.75 ± 0.25 vs. 14.25 ± 1.13 min). The mutant receptor hGRαD401H did not exert a dominant positive or negative effect upon the wild-type receptor, it preserved its ability to bind to glucocorticoid response elements, and displayed a normal interaction with the glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1 coactivator. Conclusions: The mutant receptor hGRαD401H enhances the transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid-responsive genes. The presence of the D401H mutation may predispose subjects to obesity, hypertension, and other manifestations of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:18827003

  9. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, P; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, G G

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cellulose. Restriction fragments of the human growth hormone gene were added to determine their ability to inhibit labeled receptor binding to DNA-cellulose. These fragments encompassed nucleotide sequences from about three kilobase pairs upstream to about four kilobase pairs downstream from the transcription initiation site. The thyroid hormone-receptor complex bound preferentially to the 5'-flanking sequences of the growth hormone gene in a region between nucleotide coordinates -290 and -129. The receptor also bound to an analogous promoter region in the human placental lactogen gene, which has 92% nucleotide sequence homology with the growth hormone gene. These binding regions appear to be distinct from those that are recognized by the receptor for glucocorticoids, which stimulate growth hormone gene expression synergistically with thyroid hormone. The presence of thyroid hormone was required for binding of its receptor to the growth hormone gene promoter, suggesting that thyroid hormone renders the receptor capable of recognizing specific gene regions. PMID:3466175

  10. Interaction of polycyclic musks and UV filters with the estrogen receptor (ER), androgen receptor (AR), and progesterone receptor (PR) in reporter gene bioassays.

    PubMed

    Schreurs, Richard H M M; Sonneveld, Edwin; Jansen, Jenny H J; Seinen, Willem; van der Burg, Bart

    2005-02-01

    Two important ingredients of personal care products, namely polycyclic musk fragrances and UV filters, can be found in the environment and in humans. In previous studies, several compounds of both classes have been tested for their interaction with the estrogen receptor. Two polycyclic musk fragrances, namely AHTN and HHCB, turned out to be anti-estrogenic both in vitro and in vivo in a transgenic zebrafish assay. Several UV filters have been shown to exert estrogenic effects in vitro and in some in vivo studies. Here, we assessed the interaction of five polycyclic musk compounds and seven UV filters with the estrogen receptor (ER), androgen receptor (AR), and progesterone (PR) receptor, using sensitive and specific reporter gene cell lines. Four polycyclic musks (AHTN, HHCB, AETT, and AHMI) were found to be antagonists toward the ERbeta, AR and PR. The UV filters that showed estrogenic effects (benzophenone-3, Bp-3; 3-benzylidene camphor, 3-BC; homosalate, HMS; and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, 4-MBC) were found to be antagonists toward the AR and PR. The ERalpha agonistic UV filter octyl-dimethyl-p-aminobenzoic acid (OD-PABA) did not show activity toward the AR and PR. Octyl methoxy cinnamate (OMC) showed weak ERalpha agonism, but potent PR antagonism. Butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane (B-MDM) only showed weak ERalpha agonism and weak AR antagonism. Most effects were observed at relatively high concentrations (above 1 muM); however, the anti-progestagenic effects of the polycyclic musks AHMI and AHTN were detected at concentrations as low as 0.01 muM. The activity of anti-progestagenic xenobiotics at low concentrations indicates the need to undertake more research to find out about the potential endocrine disrupting effects of these compounds in vivo.

  11. GABAA receptor subunit gene expression in human prefrontal cortex: comparison of schizophrenics and controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akbarian, S.; Huntsman, M. M.; Kim, J. J.; Tafazzoli, A.; Potkin, S. G.; Bunney, W. E. Jr; Jones, E. G.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics is hypoactive and displays changes related to inhibitory, GABAergic neurons, and GABAergic synapses. These changes include decreased levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme for GABA synthesis, upregulation of muscimol binding, and downregulation of benzodiazepine binding to GABAA receptors. Studies in the visual cortex of nonhuman primates have demonstrated that gene expression for GAD and for several GABAA receptor subunit polypeptides is under control of neuronal activity, raising the possibility that similar mechanisms in the hypoactive prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics may explain the abnormalities in GAD and in GABAA receptor regulation. In the present study, which is the first of its type on human cerebral cortex, levels of mRNAs for six GABAA receptor subunits (alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5, beta 1, beta 2, gamma 2) and their laminar expression patterns were analyzed in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics and matched controls, using in situ hybridization histochemistry and densitometry. Three types of laminar expression pattern were observed: mRNAs for the alpha 1, beta 2, and gamma 2 subunits, which are the predominant receptor subunits expressed in the mature cortex, were expressed at comparatively high levels by cells of all six cortical layers, but most intensely by cells in lower layer III and layer IV. mRNAs for the alpha 2, alpha 5, and beta 1 subunits were expressed at lower levels; alpha 2 and beta 1 were expressed predominantly by cells in layers II, III, and IV; alpha 5 was expressed predominantly in layers IV, V, and VI. There were no significant changes in overall mRNA levels for any of the receptor subunits in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics, and the laminar expression pattern of all six receptor subunit mRNAs did not differ between schizophrenics and controls. Because gene expression for GABAA receptor subunits is not consistently altered in the prefrontal cortex of

  12. Biosynthesis, biological effects, and receptors of hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) and oxoeicosatetraenoic acids (oxo-ETEs) derived from arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Powell, William S; Rokach, Joshua

    2015-04-01

    Arachidonic acid can be oxygenated by a variety of different enzymes, including lipoxygenases, cyclooxygenases, and cytochrome P450s, and can be converted to a complex mixture of oxygenated products as a result of lipid peroxidation. The initial products in these reactions are hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HpETEs) and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs). Oxoeicosatetraenoic acids (oxo-ETEs) can be formed by the actions of various dehydrogenases on HETEs or by dehydration of HpETEs. Although a large number of different HETEs and oxo-ETEs have been identified, this review will focus principally on 5-oxo-ETE, 5S-HETE, 12S-HETE, and 15S-HETE. Other related arachidonic acid metabolites will also be discussed in less detail. 5-Oxo-ETE is synthesized by oxidation of the 5-lipoxygenase product 5S-HETE by the selective enzyme, 5-hydroxyeicosanoid dehydrogenase. It actions are mediated by the selective OXE receptor, which is highly expressed on eosinophils, suggesting that it may be important in eosinophilic diseases such as asthma. 5-Oxo-ETE also appears to stimulate tumor cell proliferation and may also be involved in cancer. Highly selective and potent OXE receptor antagonists have recently become available and could help to clarify its pathophysiological role. The 12-lipoxygenase product 12S-HETE acts by the GPR31 receptor and promotes tumor cell proliferation and metastasis and could therefore be a promising target in cancer therapy. It may also be involved as a proinflammatory mediator in diabetes. In contrast, 15S-HETE may have a protective effect in cancer. In addition to GPCRs, higher concentration of HETEs and oxo-ETEs can activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and could potentially regulate a variety of processes by this mechanism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Oxygenated metabolism of PUFA: analysis and biological relevance".

  13. Extreme expansion of the olfactory receptor gene repertoire in African elephants and evolutionary dynamics of orthologous gene groups in 13 placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Niimura, Yoshihito; Matsui, Atsushi; Touhara, Kazushige

    2014-09-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) detect odors in the environment, and OR genes constitute the largest multigene family in mammals. Numbers of OR genes vary greatly among species--reflecting the respective species' lifestyles--and this variation is caused by frequent gene gains and losses during evolution. However, whether the extent of gene gains/losses varies among individual gene lineages and what might generate such variation is unknown. To answer these questions, we used a newly developed phylogeny-based method to classify >10,000 intact OR genes from 13 placental mammal species into 781 orthologous gene groups (OGGs); we then compared the OGGs. Interestingly, African elephants had a surprisingly large repertoire (∼ 2000) of functional OR genes encoded in enlarged gene clusters. Additionally, OR gene lineages that experienced more gene duplication had weaker purifying selection, and Class II OR genes have evolved more dynamically than those in Class I. Some OGGs were highly expanded in a lineage-specific manner, while only three OGGs showed complete one-to-one orthology among the 13 species without any gene gains/losses. These three OGGs also exhibited highly conserved amino acid sequences; therefore, ORs in these OGGs may have physiologically important functions common to every placental mammal. This study provides a basis for inferring OR functions from evolutionary trajectory.

  14. Extreme expansion of the olfactory receptor gene repertoire in African elephants and evolutionary dynamics of orthologous gene groups in 13 placental mammals

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Atsushi; Touhara, Kazushige

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) detect odors in the environment, and OR genes constitute the largest multigene family in mammals. Numbers of OR genes vary greatly among species—reflecting the respective species' lifestyles—and this variation is caused by frequent gene gains and losses during evolution. However, whether the extent of gene gains/losses varies among individual gene lineages and what might generate such variation is unknown. To answer these questions, we used a newly developed phylogeny-based method to classify >10,000 intact OR genes from 13 placental mammal species into 781 orthologous gene groups (OGGs); we then compared the OGGs. Interestingly, African elephants had a surprisingly large repertoire (∼2000) of functional OR genes encoded in enlarged gene clusters. Additionally, OR gene lineages that experienced more gene duplication had weaker purifying selection, and Class II OR genes have evolved more dynamically than those in Class I. Some OGGs were highly expanded in a lineage-specific manner, while only three OGGs showed complete one-to-one orthology among the 13 species without any gene gains/losses. These three OGGs also exhibited highly conserved amino acid sequences; therefore, ORs in these OGGs may have physiologically important functions common to every placental mammal. This study provides a basis for inferring OR functions from evolutionary trajectory. PMID:25053675

  15. Tulane virus recognizes sialic acids as cellular receptors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming; Wei, Chao; Huang, Pengwei; Fan, Qiang; Quigley, Christina; Xia, Ming; Fang, Hao; Zhang, Xufu; Zhong, Weiming; Klassen, John S; Jiang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery that human noroviruses (huNoVs) recognize sialic acids (SAs) in addition to histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) pointed to a new direction in studying virus-host interactions during calicivirus infection. HuNoVs remain difficult to study due to the lack of an effective cell culture model. In this study, we demonstrated that Tulane virus (TV), a cultivable primate calicivirus, also recognizes SAs in addition to the previously known TV-HBGA interactions. Evidence supporting this discovery includes that TV virions bound synthetic sialoglycoconjugates (SGCs) and that treatment of TV permissive LLC-MK2 cells with either neuraminidases or SA-binding lectins inhibited TV infectivity. In addition, we found that Maackia amurensis leukoagglutinin (MAL), a lectin that recognizes the α-2,3 linked SAs, bound LLC-MK2 cells, as well as TV, by which MAL promoted TV infectivity in cell culture. Our findings further highlight TV as a valuable surrogate for huNoVs, particularly in studying virus-host interactions that may involve two host carbohydrate receptors or co-receptors for infection. PMID:26146020

  16. Identification of the orphan GPCR, P2Y(10) receptor as the sphingosine-1-phosphate and lysophosphatidic acid receptor.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masanori; Shiraishi, Akira; Tabata, Kenichi; Fujita, Norihisa

    2008-07-11

    Phylogenetic analysis of transmembrane regions of GPCRs using PHYLIP indicated that the orphan receptor P2Y(10) receptor was classified into the cluster consisting nucleotide and lipid receptors. Based on the results, we studied the abilities of nucleotides and lipids to activate the P2Y(10) receptors. As a result, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) evoked intracellular Ca(2+) increases in the CHO cells stably expressing the P2Y(10) fused with a G(16alpha) protein. These Ca(2+) responses were inhibited by S1P receptor and LPA receptor antagonists. The introduction of siRNA designed for P2Y(10) receptor into the P2Y(10)-CHO cells effectively blocked both S1P- and LPA-induced Ca(2+) increases. RT-PCR analysis showed that the mouse P2Y(10) was expressed in reproductive organs, brain, lung and skeletal muscle, suggesting the receptor plays physiological roles throughout the whole body. In conclusion, the P2Y(10) receptor is the first receptor identified as a dual lysophospholipid receptor. PMID:18466763

  17. The effect of vitamin A supplementation on retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) gene expression in Avonex-treated multiple sclerotic patients.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh Honarvar, Niyaz; Harirchian, Mohammad Hossein; Koohdani, Fariba; Siassi, Feridoun; Abdolahi, Mina; Bitarafan, Sama; Salehi, Eisa; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Eshraghian, Mohammad Reza; Saboor-Yarghi, Ali Akbar

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of vitamin A on RORγt and IL-17 gene expression in multiple sclerotic patients. Patients in the vitamin A group received 25,000 IU retinyl palmitate per day, while patients in the placebo group took one capsule of placebo per day for 6 months. Gene expression was measured by real-time PCR at the first and end of the study. The results of this study show that vitamin A downregulates IL-17 and RORγt gene expression. No changes in gene expression occurred in the placebo group. PMID:23868508

  18. The farnesoid X receptor induces fetuin-B gene expression in human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Takeshi; Walczak, Robert; Caron, Sandrine; Duhem, Christian; Vidal, Vincent; Darteil, Raphaël; Staels, Bart

    2007-01-01

    FXR (farnesoid X receptor), a nuclear receptor activated by BAs (bile acids), is a key factor in the regulation of BA, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. The recent development of synthetic FXR agonists and knockout mouse models has accelerated the discovery of FXR target genes. In the present study, we identify human fetuin-B as a novel FXR target gene. Treatment with FXR agonists increased fetuin-B expression in human primary hepatocytes and in the human hepatoma HepG2 cell line. In contrast, fetuin-B expression was not responsive to FXR agonist treatment in murine primary hepatocytes. Fetuin-B induction by FXR agonist was abolished upon FXR knockdown by siRNA (small interfering RNA). In addition to the previously described P1 promoter, we show that the human fetuin-B gene is also transcribed from an alternative promoter, termed P2. Transcription via the P2 promoter was induced by FXR agonist treatment, whereas P1 promoter activity was not sensitive to FXR agonist treatment. Two putative FXR-response elements [IR-1 (inverted repeat-1)] were identified in the region –1.6 kb upstream of the predicted P2 transcriptional start site. Both motifs bound FXR–RXR (retinoid X receptor) complexes in vitro and were activated by FXR in transient transfection reporter assays. Mutations in the IR-1 sites abolished FXR–RXR binding and activation. Taken together, these results identify human fetuin-B as a new FXR target gene in human hepatocytes. PMID:17655523

  19. Assignment of the gene encoding human galanin receptor (GALNR) to 18q23 by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholl, J.; Sutherland, G.R.; Shine, J.

    1995-12-10

    The neuropeptide galanin is widely distributed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems of mammalian, avian, reptilian, and fish species and has a broad range of physiological and behavioral effects. Human galanin is a 30-amino-acid non-C-terminally amidated peptide that potently stimulates growth hormone secretion, inhibits cardiac vagal slowing of heart rate, abolishes sinus arrhythmia, and inhibits postprandial gastrointestinal motility. The actions of galanin are mediated through interaction with specific membrane receptors that are members of the seven transmembrane family of G-protein-coupled receptors. A functional human galanin receptor has recently been cloned, and we report here the localization of the gene encoding this receptor (GALNR) to chromosome 18q23. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Expression of lipases and lipid receptors in sperm storage tubules and possible role of fatty acids in sperm survival in the hen oviduct.

    PubMed

    Huang, A; Isobe, N; Obitsu, T; Yoshimura, Y

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of fatty acids for sperm survival in the sperm storage tubules (SSTs) of the hen oviduct. The mucosa tissues of uterovaginal junction (UVJ) of White Leghorn laying hens with or without artificial insemination using semen from Barred Plymouth Rock roosters were collected. The lipid density in the epithelium of UVJ and SST was analyzed by Sudan black B staining. The expressions of genes encoding lipid receptors and lipases were assayed by polymerase chain reaction in UVJ mucosa and SST cells isolated by laser microdissection. Fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas chromatography, and sperm were cultured with or without the identified predominant fatty acids for 24 hours to examine their effect on sperm viability. The lipid droplets were localized in the epithelium of UVJ mucosa and SSTs. The expression of genes encoding very low-density lipoprotein receptor(VLDLR), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), and fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) were found in SST cells. Expression of genes encoding endothelial lipase (EL), lipase H (LIPH), adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) were found in UVJ. In contrast, only ATGL was found in SST cells, and its expression was significantly upregulated after artificial insemination. In UVJ mucosal tissues, five fatty acids, namely myristic acid (C14), palmitic acid (C16), stearic acid (C18), oleic acid (C18:1n9), and linoleic acid (C18:2n6), were identified as predominant fatty acids. The viability of sperm cultured with 1 mM oleic acid or linoleic acid was significantly higher than the sperm in the control culture without fatty acids. These results suggest that lipids in the SST cells may be degraded by ATGL, and fatty acids including oleic acid and linoleic acid may be released into the SST lumen to support sperm survival. PMID:26777559

  1. The Glu727 Allele of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor Gene is Associated with Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ren-De; Chen, Rui-Xiong; Li, Wen-Rui; Huang, Yu-Liang; Li, Wen-Hu; Cai, Guang-Rong; Zhang, Heng

    2012-01-01

    Background: Published data indicate that thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) activities are associated with osteoporosis in some patients. Aim: This study aimed to elucidate whether a given polymorphism of the TSHR gene is associated with osteoporosis. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty subjects with osteoporosis were recruited in this study. The diagnosis of osteoporosis was performed with quantitative ultrasound system. The TSHR gene polymorphism was examined by polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results: The results showed a nucleotide substitution in the first position of codon 36 of the TSHR gene. The nucleotide substitution was from G to C, leading to a 36D → 36H change (D36H) in the predicted amino acid sequence of the receptor. The change did not show significance between healthy subjects and patients with osteoporosis (P > 0.05). On the other hand, we identified another single nucleotide polymorphism that is a C-to-G substitution at codon 727 (GAC to GAG); its frequency was significantly higher in patients with osteoporosis than that in healthy subjects. Using logistic regression analysis, significant correlation was revealed between the genotype D727E and the serum levels of TSH, or the quantitative ultrasound value of the calcaneal bone. Conclusions: The present study suggests that the genotype D727E of the TSHR, but not the genotype D36H, may be a genetic risk factor for osteoporosis. PMID:22866266

  2. Molecular Characterization and Tissue Distribution of Estrogen Receptor Genes in Domestic Yak

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Mei; Xiong, Xian-Rong; Lan, Dao-liang; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen and its receptors are essential hormones for normal reproductive function in males and females during developmental stage. To better understand the effect of estrogen receptor (ER) gene in yak (Bos grunniens), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out to clone ERα and ERβ genes. Bioinformatics methods were used to analyze the evolutionary relationship between yaks and other species, and real-time PCR was performed to identify the mRNA expression of ERα and ERβ. Sequence analysis showed that the ER open reading frames (ORFs) encoded 596 and 527 amino acid proteins. The yak ERα and ERβ shared 45.3% to 99.5% and 53.9% to 99.1% protein sequence identities with other species homologs, respectively. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that ERα and ERβ were expressed in a variety of tissues, but the expression level of ERα was higher than that of ERβ in all tissues, except testis. The mRNA expression of ERα was highest in the mammary gland, followed by uterus, oviduct, and ovary, and lowest in the liver, kidney, lung, testis, spleen, and heart. The ERβ mRNA level was highest in the ovary; intermediary in the uterus and oviduct; and lowest in the heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, mammary gland, and testis. The identification and tissue distribution of ER genes in yaks provides a foundation for the further study on their biological functions. PMID:25358360

  3. Receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus

    DOEpatents

    Nasrallah, June B.; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Stein, Joshua

    1996-01-01

    Described herein is a S receptor kinase gene (SRK), derived from the S locus in Brassica oleracea, having a extracellular domain highly similar to the secreted product of the S-locus glycoprotein gene.

  4. Acute Overactive Endocannabinoid Signaling Induces Glucose Intolerance, Hepatic Steatosis, and Novel Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, Maxwell A.; Nomura, Daniel K.; Hudak, Carolyn S. S.; Barber, Anne; Casida, John E.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Endocannabinoids regulate energy balance and lipid metabolism by stimulating the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1). Genetic deletion and pharmacological antagonism have shown that CB1 signaling is necessary for the development of obesity and related metabolic disturbances. However, the sufficiency of endogenously produced endocannabinoids to cause hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance, independent of food intake, has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that a single administration of isopropyl dodecylfluorophosphonate (IDFP), perhaps the most potent pharmacological inhibitor of endocannabinoid degradation, increases hepatic triglycerides (TG) and induces insulin resistance in mice. These effects involve increased CB1 signaling, as they are mitigated by pre-administration of a CB1 antagonist (AM251) and in CB1 knockout mice. Despite the strong physiological effects of CB1 on hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism, little is known about the downstream targets responsible for these effects. To elucidate transcriptional targets of CB1 signaling, we performed microarrays on hepatic RNA isolated from DMSO (control), IDFP and AM251/IDFP-treated mice. The gene for the secreted glycoprotein lipocalin 2 (lcn2), which has been implicated in obesity and insulin resistance, was among those most responsive to alterations in CB1 signaling. The expression pattern of IDFP mice segregated from DMSO mice in hierarchal cluster analysis and AM251 pre-administration reduced (>50%) the majority (303 of 533) of the IDFP induced alterations. Pathway analysis revealed that IDFP altered expression of genes involved in lipid, fatty acid and steroid metabolism, the acute phase response, and amino acid metabolism in a CB1-dependent manner. PCR confirmed array results of key target genes in multiple independent experiments. Overall, we show that acute IDFP treatment induces hepatic TG accumulation and insulin resistance, at least in part through the CB1 receptor, and identify novel

  5. Molecular characterization, expression profile, and polymorphism of goose dopamine D1 receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cui; Liu, Yi; Wang, Huiying; Wu, Huali; Gong, Shaoming; He, Daqian

    2014-05-01

    Dopamine D1 receptor (DRD1) is one of the dopamine receptors with seven transmembrane domains that are coupled to the G protein. In the present study, we cloned the full coding region of DRD1 gene by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends from the goose hypothalamus tissues. Results showed that the goose DRD1 cDNA (GenBank: KF156790) contained a 1,356 bp open reading frame encoding a protein 452 amino acid with a molecular weight of 50.52 kDa and a isoelectric point of 6.96. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the deduced amino acid sequence was 71-98% identical to the DRD1 protein of other species, contained seven transmembrane domains and four N-glycosylation sites. A phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that the deduced goose DRD1 protein had a close genetic relationship and evolutional distance with that of duck, chicken, and zebra finch. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis displayed goose DRD1 gene was widely expressed in all detected tissues, including heart, lung, liver, spleen, kidney, breast muscle, duodenum, sebum, pituitary, hypothalamus, ovary and oviduct. Eighteen single nucleotide polymorphisms were indentified in 3,169 bp length of this gene. For G90A mutation, the genotyping analysis of PCR-TspRI-RFLP showed the allele G was in dominance in all detected goose breeds, and the allele frequencies of this polymorphism were significantly different between Chinese goose breeds and foreign breeds (P<0.01). These findings will help us understand the functions of the DRD1 gene and the molecular breeding in geese.

  6. Transcriptional Characterization of Porcine Leptin and Leptin Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Montarelo, Dafne; Fernández, Almudena; Barragán, Carmen; Noguera, Jose L.; Folch, Josep M.; Rodríguez, M. Carmen; Óvilo, Cristina; Silió, Luis; Fernández, Ana I.

    2013-01-01

    The leptin (LEP) and its receptor (LEPR) regulate food intake and energy balance through hypothalamic signaling. However, the LEP-LEPR axis seems to be more complex and its expression regulation has not been well described. In pigs, LEP and LEPR genes have been widely studied due to their relevance. Previous studies reported significant effects of SNPs located in both genes on growth and fatness traits. The aim of this study was to determine the expression profiles of LEP and LEPR across hypothalamic, adipose, hepatic and muscle tissues in Iberian x Landrace backcrossed pigs and to analyze the effects of gene variants on transcript abundance. To our knowledge, non porcine LEPR isoforms have been described rather than LEPRb. A short porcine LEPR isoform (LEPRa), that encodes a protein lacking the intracellular residues responsible of signal transduction, has been identified for the first time. The LEPRb isoform was only quantifiable in hypothalamus while LEPRa appeared widely expressed across tissues, but at higher levels in liver, suggesting that both isoforms would develop different roles. The unique LEP transcript showed expression in backfat and muscle. The effects of gene variants on transcript expression revealed interesting results. The LEPRc.1987C>T polymorphism showed opposite effects on LEPRb and LEPRa hypothalamic expression. In addition, one out of the 16 polymorphisms identified in the LEPR promoter region revealed high differential expression in hepatic LEPRa. These results suggest a LEPR isoform-specific regulation at tissue level. Conversely, non-differential expression of LEP conditional on the analyzed polymorphisms could be detected, indicating that its regulation is likely affected by other mechanisms rather than gene sequence variants. The present study has allowed a transcriptional characterization of LEP and LEPR isoforms on a range of tissues. Their expression patterns seem to indicate that both molecules develop peripheral roles apart from

  7. Transcriptional Characterization of Porcine Leptin and Leptin Receptor Genes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montarelo, Dafne; Fernández, Almudena; Barragán, Carmen; Noguera, Jose L; Folch, Josep M; Rodríguez, M Carmen; Ovilo, Cristina; Silió, Luis; Fernández, Ana I

    2013-01-01

    The leptin (LEP) and its receptor (LEPR) regulate food intake and energy balance through hypothalamic signaling. However, the LEP-LEPR axis seems to be more complex and its expression regulation has not been well described. In pigs, LEP and LEPR genes have been widely studied due to their relevance. Previous studies reported significant effects of SNPs located in both genes on growth and fatness traits. The aim of this study was to determine the expression profiles of LEP and LEPR across hypothalamic, adipose, hepatic and muscle tissues in Iberian x Landrace backcrossed pigs and to analyze the effects of gene variants on transcript abundance. To our knowledge, non porcine LEPR isoforms have been described rather than LEPRb. A short porcine LEPR isoform (LEPRa), that encodes a protein lacking the intracellular residues responsible of signal transduction, has been identified for the first time. The LEPRb isoform was only quantifiable in hypothalamus while LEPRa appeared widely expressed across tissues, but at higher levels in liver, suggesting that both isoforms would develop different roles. The unique LEP transcript showed expression in backfat and muscle. The effects of gene variants on transcript expression revealed interesting results. The LEPRc.1987C>T polymorphism showed opposite effects on LEPRb and LEPRa hypothalamic expression. In addition, one out of the 16 polymorphisms identified in the LEPR promoter region revealed high differential expression in hepatic LEPRa. These results suggest a LEPR isoform-specific regulation at tissue level. Conversely, non-differential expression of LEP conditional on the analyzed polymorphisms could be detected, indicating that its regulation is likely affected by other mechanisms rather than gene sequence variants. The present study has allowed a transcriptional characterization of LEP and LEPR isoforms on a range of tissues. Their expression patterns seem to indicate that both molecules develop peripheral roles apart from

  8. Unliganded Thyroid Hormone Receptor α Regulates Developmental Timing via Gene Repression in Xenopus tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinyoung; Suzuki, Ken-ichi T.; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Shewade, Leena; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR) expression begins early in development in all vertebrates when circulating TH levels are absent or minimal, yet few developmental roles for unliganded TRs have been established. Unliganded TRs are expected to repress TH-response genes, increase tissue responsivity to TH, and regulate the timing of developmental events. Here we examined the role of unliganded TRα in gene repression and development in Xenopus tropicalis. We used transcription activator-like effector nuclease gene disruption technology to generate founder animals with mutations in the TRα gene and bred them to produce F1 offspring with a normal phenotype and a mutant phenotype, characterized by precocious hind limb development. Offspring with a normal phenotype had zero or one disrupted TRα alleles, and tadpoles with the mutant hind limb phenotype had two truncated TRα alleles with frame shift mutations between the two zinc fingers followed by 40–50 mutant amino acids and then an out-of-frame stop codon. We examined TH-response gene expression and early larval development with and without exogenous TH in F1 offspring. As hypothesized, mutant phenotype tadpoles had increased expression of TH-response genes in the absence of TH and impaired induction of these same genes after exogenous TH treatment, compared with normal phenotype animals. Also, mutant hind limb phenotype animals had reduced hind limb and gill responsivity to exogenous TH. Similar results in methimazole-treated tadpoles showed that increased TH-response gene expression and precocious development were not due to early production of TH. These results indicate that unliganded TRα delays developmental progression by repressing TH-response genes. PMID:25456067

  9. Expression of retinoic acid receptor alpha mRNA in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Largman, C; Detmer, K; Corral, J C; Hack, F M; Lawrence, H J

    1989-07-01

    The expression of the newly described human retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) in six nonlymphoid and six lymphoid leukemia cell lines and nine freshly obtained samples of leukemia cells from patients with acute nonlymphoid leukemia was assessed by Northern blot analysis, using a full length cDNA clone of RAR alpha as probe. RAR alpha was expressed in all 12 cell lines and in all fresh leukemia samples as two major transcripts of 2.6 and 3.5 kb in size. Levels of RAR alpha expression and transcript sizes in retinoid-sensitive cells (such as HL60 or fresh promyelocytic leukemia cells) were not different from those in other samples. Moreover, expression of RAR alpha was not significantly modulated by exposure to cis-retinoic acid (cisRA) in either cisRA-responsive or unresponsive cells. By using a 3' fragment of the RAR alpha gene as a probe, we confirmed that the transcripts visualized did not represent the homologous RAR beta gene. RAR alpha appears to be expressed in most human leukemia cells regardless of the type of biologic response to retinoic acid.

  10. Aberrant distribution of junctional complex components in retinoic acid receptor alpha-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sanny S W; Choi, Cindy; Wang, Xiangyuan; Hallock, Loretta; Wolgemuth, Debra J

    2009-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα)-deficient mice are sterile, with abnormalities in the progression of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis. In the present study, we investigated whether defective retinoid signaling involved at least in part, disrupted cell-cell interactions. Hypertonic fixation approaches revealed defects in the integrity of the Sertoli-cell barrier in the tubules of RARα-deficient testes. Dye transfer experiments further revealed that coupling between cells from the basal to adluminal compartments was aberrant. There were also differences in the expression of several known retinoic acid (RA)-responsive genes encoding structural components of tight junctions and gap junctions. Immunostaining demonstrated a delay in the incorporation of zonula occludens (ZO-1), a peripheral component protein of tight junctions, into the Sertoli cell tight junctions. Markedly reduced expression of connexin-40 in mutant pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids was found by in situ hybridization. An ectopic distribution of vimentin and disrupted cyclic expression of vimentin, which is usually tightly regulated during spermiogenesis, was found in RARα-deficient testes at all ages examined. Thus, the specific defects in spermiogenesis in RARα-deficient testes may correlate with a disrupted cyclic expression of RA-responsive structural components, including vimentin, a down-regulation of connexin-40 in spermatogenic cells, and delayed assembly of ZO-1 into Sertoli cell tight junctions. Interestingly, bioinformatic analysis revealed that many genes that are components of tight junctions and gap junctions contained potential retinoic acid response element binding sites. PMID:19937743

  11. G-protein-coupled receptors for neurotransmitter amino acids: C-terminal tails, crowded signalosomes.

    PubMed Central

    El Far, Oussama; Betz, Heinrich

    2002-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a superfamily of highly diverse integral membrane proteins that transduce external signals to different subcellular compartments, including nuclei, via trimeric G-proteins. By differential activation of diffusible G(alpha) and membrane-bound G(beta)gamma subunits, GPCRs might act on both cytoplasmic/intracellular and plasma-membrane-bound effector systems. The coupling efficiency and the plasma membrane localization of GPCRs are regulated by a variety of interacting proteins. In this review, we discuss recently disclosed protein interactions found with the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail regions of two types of presynaptic neurotransmitter receptors, the group III metabotropic glutamate receptors and the gamma-aminobutyric acid type-B receptors (GABA(B)Rs). Calmodulin binding to mGluR7 and other group III mGluRs may provide a Ca(2+)-dependent switch for unidirectional (G(alpha)) versus bidirectional (G(alpha) and G(beta)gamma) signalling to downstream effector proteins. In addition, clustering of mGluR7 by PICK1 (protein interacting with C-kinase 1), a polyspecific PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg1/ZO-1) domain containing synaptic organizer protein, sheds light on how higher-order receptor complexes with regulatory enzymes (or 'signalosomes') could be formed. The interaction of GABA(B)Rs with the adaptor protein 14-3-3 and the transcription factor ATF4 (activating transcription factor 4) suggests novel regulatory pathways for G-protein signalling, cytoskeletal reorganization and nuclear gene expression: processes that may all contribute to synaptic plasticity. PMID:12006104

  12. A constitutive promoter directs expression of the nerve growth factor receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, A.; Patil, N.; Chao, M.

    1988-08-01

    Expression of nerve growth factor receptor is normally restricted to cells derived from the neural crest in a developmentally regulated manner. The authors analyzed promoter sequences for the human nerve growth factor receptor gene and found that the receptor promoter resembles others which are associated with constitutively expressed genes that have housekeeping and growth-related functions. Unlike these other genes, the initiation of transcription occurred at one major site rather than at multiple sites. The constitutive nature of the nerve growth factor receptor promoter may account for the ability of this gene to be transcribed in a diverse number of heterologous cells after gene transfer. The intron-exon structure of the receptor gene indicated that structural features are precisely divided into discrete domains.

  13. Gene cloning, homology comparison and analysis of the main functional structure domains of beta estrogen receptor in Jining Gray goat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-gang; Li, Hong-mei; Wang, Shu-ying; Huang, Li-bo; Guo, Hui-jun

    2014-08-01

    To clarify the molecular evolution and characteristic of beta estrogen receptor (ERβ) gene in Jining Gray goat in China, the entire ERβ gene from Jining Gray goat ovary was amplified, identified and sequenced, and the gene sequences were compared with those of other animals. Functional structural domains and variations in DNA binding domains (DBD) and ligand binding domains (LBD) between Jining Gray goat and Boer goat were analyzed. The results indicate that the ERβ gene in Jining Gray goat includes a 1584bp sequence with a complete open-reading-frame (ORF), encoding a 527 amino acid (aa) receptor protein. Compared to other species, the nucleotide homology is 73.9-98.9% and the amino acid homology is 79.5-98.5%. The main antigenic structural domains lie from the 97th aa to the 286th aa and from the 403rd aa to the 527th aa. The hydrophilicity and the surface probability of the structural domains are distributed throughout a range of amino acids. There are two different amino acids in the DBD and three different amino acids in the LBD between Jining Gray and Boer goats, resulting in dramatically different spatial structures for ERβ protein. These differences may explain the different biological activities of ERβ between the two goat species. This study firstly acquired the whole ERβ gene sequence of Jining Gray goat with a complete open reading frame, and analyzed its gene evolutionary relationship and predicted its mainly functional structural domains, which may very help for further understanding the genome evolution and gene diversity of goat ERβ.

  14. The short-chain fatty acid receptor, FFA2, contributes to gestational glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Miles; Priyadarshini, Medha; Gibbons, Sean M; Angueira, Anthony R; Brodsky, Michael; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Gilbert, Jack A; Lowe, William L; Layden, Brian T

    2015-11-15

    The structure of the human gastrointestinal microbiota can change during pregnancy, which may influence gestational metabolism; however, a mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we observed that in wild-type (WT) mice the relative abundance of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes increased during pregnancy. Along with these changes, short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which are mainly produced through gut microbiota fermentation, significantly changed in both the cecum and peripheral blood throughout gestation in these mice. SCFAs are recognized by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) such as free fatty acid receptor-2 (FFA2), and we have previously demonstrated that the fatty acid receptor-2 gene (Ffar2) expression is higher in pancreatic islets during pregnancy. Using female Ffar2-/- mice, we explored the physiological relevance of signaling through this GPCR and found that Ffar2-deficient female mice developed fasting hyperglycemia and impaired glucose tolerance in the setting of impaired insulin secretion compared with WT mice during, but not before, pregnancy. Insulin tolerance tests were similar in Ffar2-/- and WT mice before and during pregnancy. Next, we examined the role of FFA2 in gestational β-cell mass, observing that Ffar2-/- mice had diminished gestational expansion of β-cells during pregnancy. Interestingly, mouse genotype had no significant impact on the composition of the gut microbiome, but did affect the observed SCFA profiles, suggesting a functional difference in the microbiota. Together, these results suggest a potential link between increased Ffar2 expression in islets and the alteration of circulating SCFA levels, possibly explaining how changes in the gut microbiome contribute to gestational glucose homeostasis. PMID:26394664

  15. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hashizaki, Hikari; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPAR{alpha} in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPAR{alpha} using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPAR{alpha} by GW7647, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPAR{gamma}, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPAR{gamma} is activated. On the other hand, PPAR{alpha} activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Moreover, PPAR{alpha} activation increased the production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPAR{alpha} stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected

  16. Potency of individual bile acids to regulate bile acid synthesis and transport genes in primary human hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Hong; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Lei, Xiaohong; Cui, Julia Yue; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Stephen C; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate their own homeostasis, but the potency of individual bile acids is not known. This study examined the effects of cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on expression of BA synthesis and transport genes in human primary hepatocyte cultures. Hepatocytes were treated with the individual BAs at 10, 30, and 100μM for 48 h, and RNA was extracted for real-time PCR analysis. For the classic pathway of BA synthesis, BAs except for UDCA markedly suppressed CYP7A1 (70-95%), the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid synthesis, but only moderately (35%) down-regulated CYP8B1 at a high concentration of 100μM. BAs had minimal effects on mRNA of two enzymes of the alternative pathway of BA synthesis, namely CYP27A1 and CYP7B1. BAs increased the two major target genes of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), namely the small heterodimer partner (SHP) by fourfold, and markedly induced fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) over 100-fold. The BA uptake transporter Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide was unaffected, whereas the efflux transporter bile salt export pump was increased 15-fold and OSTα/β were increased 10-100-fold by BAs. The expression of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3; sixfold), ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G5 (ABCG5; sixfold), multidrug associated protein-2 (MRP2; twofold), and MRP3 (threefold) were also increased, albeit to lesser degrees. In general, CDCA was the most potent and effective BA in regulating these genes important for BA homeostasis, whereas DCA and CA were intermediate, LCA the least, and UDCA ineffective.

  17. Corticosteroid receptor gene expression is related to sex and social behaviour in a social fish.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Constance M; Rodela, Tammy M; Mileva, Viktoria R; Balshine, Sigal; Gilmour, Kathleen M

    2013-03-01

    Circulating corticosteroids have been related to social status in a variety of species. However, our understanding of corticosteroid receptor expression and its relationship with sociality is still in its infancy. Knowledge of variation in receptor expression is critical to understand the physiological relevance of differences in circulating corticosteroid concentrations. In this study, we examined corticosteroid receptor gene expression in relation to dominance rank, sex, and social behaviour in the highly social cichlid fish, Neolamprologus pulcher. We examined the relative gene expression of the three known teleost corticosteroid receptors: glucocorticoid receptor 1 (GR1), glucocorticoid receptor 2 (GR2), and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in liver and brain tissue of dominant and subordinate N. pulcher males and females. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the N. pulcher gene originally described as GR2, clustered with other teleost GR1 genes, while the originally-described N. pulcher GR1 gene clustered with the GR2 genes of other teleosts. Therefore we propose a change in the original nomenclature of the N. pulcher GRs: GR1 (formerly GR2) and GR2 (formerly GR1) and adopt this new nomenclature throughout this manuscript. Liver MR transcript levels were higher in males than females, and positively related to submissive behaviour. Liver GR2 (formerly GR1) transcript levels were also higher in males than females. Collectively, the results demonstrate sex differences in corticosteroid receptor abundance, and suggest tissue- and receptor-specific roles for corticosteroid receptors in mediating aspects of social behaviour.

  18. Functional evidence for ligand-dependent dissociation of thyroid hormone and retinoic acid receptors from an inhibitory cellular factor.

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, J; Helmer, E; Selmi-Ruby, S; Qi, J S; Au-Fliegner, M; Desai-Yajnik, V; Koudinova, N; Yarm, F; Raaka, B M; Samuels, H H

    1994-01-01

    The ligand-binding domains of thyroid hormone (L-triiodothyronine [T3]) receptors (T3Rs), all-trans retinoic acid (RA) receptors (RARs), and 9-cis RA receptors (RARs and RXRs) contain a series of heptad motifs thought to be important for dimeric interactions. Using a chimera containing amino acids 120 to 392 of chicken T3R alpha (cT3R alpha) positioned between the DNA-binding domain of the yeast GAL4 protein and the potent 90-amino-acid transactivating domain of the herpes simplex virus VP16 protein (GAL4-T3R-VP16), we provide functional evidence that binding of ligand releases T3Rs and RARs from an inhibitory cellular factor. GAL4-T3R-VP16 does not bind T3 and does not activate transcription from a GAL4 reporter when expressed alone but is able to activate transcription when coexpressed with unliganded T3R or RAR. This activation is reversed by T3 or RA, suggesting that these receptors compete with GAL4-T3R-VP16 for a cellular inhibitor and that ligand reverses this effect by dissociating T3R or RAR from the inhibitor. A chimera containing the entire ligand-binding domain of cT3R alpha (amino acids 120 to 408) linked to VP16 [GAL4-T3R(408)-VP16] is activated by unliganded receptor as well as by T3. In contrast, GAL4-T3R containing the amino acid 120 to 408 ligand-binding region without the VP16 domain is activated only by T3. The highly conserved ninth heptad, which is involved in heterodimerization, appears to participate in the receptor-inhibitor interaction, suggesting that the inhibitor is a related member of the receptor gene family. In striking contrast to T3R and RAR, RXR activates GAL4-T3R-VP16 only with its ligand, 9-cis RA, but unliganded RXR does not appear to be the inhibitor suggested by these studies. Further evidence that an orphan receptor may be the inhibitor comes from our finding that COUP-TF inhibits activation of GAL4-T3R-VP16 by unliganded T3R and the activation of GAL4-T3R by T3. These and other results suggest that an inhibitory factor

  19. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1)

    PubMed Central

    Terranova, Christopher; Narla, Sridhar T.; Lee, Yu-Wei; Bard, Jonathan; Parikh, Abhirath; Stachowiak, Ewa K.; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.; Buck, Michael J.; Birkaya, Barbara; Stachowiak, Michal K.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development. PMID:25923916

  20. Cinnabarinic acid, an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, activates type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Fazio, F; Lionetto, L; Molinaro, G; Bertrand, H O; Acher, F; Ngomba, R T; Notartomaso, S; Curini, M; Rosati, O; Scarselli, P; Di Marco, R; Battaglia, G; Bruno, V; Simmaco, M; Pin, J P; Nicoletti, F; Goudet, C

    2012-05-01

    Cinnabarinic acid is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway that meets the structural requirements to interact with glutamate receptors. We found that cinnabarinic acid acts as a partial agonist of type 4 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu4) receptors, with no activity at other mGlu receptor subtypes. We also tested the activity of cinnabarinic acid on native mGlu4 receptors by examining 1) the inhibition of cAMP formation in cultured cerebellar granule cells; 2) protection against excitotoxic neuronal death in mixed cultures of cortical cells; and 3) protection against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine toxicity in mice after local infusion into the external globus pallidus. In all these models, cinnabarinic acid behaved similarly to conventional mGlu4 receptor agonists, and, at least in cultured neurons, the action of low concentrations of cinnabarinic acid was largely attenuated by genetic deletion of mGlu4 receptors. However, high concentrations of cinnabarinic acid were still active in the absence of mGlu4 receptors, suggesting that the compound may have off-target effects. Mutagenesis and molecular modeling experiments showed that cinnabarinic acid acts as an orthosteric agonist interacting with residues of the glutamate binding pocket of mGlu4. Accordingly, cinnabarinic acid did not activate truncated mGlu4 receptors lacking the N-terminal Venus-flytrap domain, as opposed to the mGlu4 receptor enhancer, N-phenyl-7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxamide (PHCCC). Finally, we could detect endogenous cinnabarinic acid in brain tissue and peripheral organs by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Levels increased substantially during inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide. We conclude that cinnabarinic acid is a novel endogenous orthosteric agonist of mGlu4 receptors endowed with neuroprotective activity. PMID:22311707

  1. Structure, mapping and expression of a growth factor inducible gene encoding a putative nuclear hormonal binding receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ryseck, R P; Macdonald-Bravo, H; Mattéi, M G; Ruppert, S; Bravo, R

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized a growth factor inducible gene, N10, encoding a nuclear protein of 601 amino acids with a significant similarity to members of the steroid and thyroid hormone receptor families. The gene is rapidly but transiently induced by several mitogens. Immunoprecipitation studies show that the N10 protein is transiently expressed after stimulation of quiescent cells, presenting a half-life of approximately 30 min. The N10 transcription unit is 8 kb in length, split into seven exons. The exon-intron distribution is in general similar to that of other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, but presents some differences which suggest that N10 belongs to a new family of these molecules. The 5' flanking region contains one DSE which could explain its immediate response to external stimulus. The N10 gene is located in the [F1-F3] region of mouse chromosome 15. Images PMID:2555161

  2. Variants in the vitamin D receptor gene and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wjst, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Background Early lifetime exposure to dietary or supplementary vitamin D has been predicted to be a risk factor for later allergy. Twin studies suggest that response to vitamin D exposure might be influenced by genetic factors. As these effects are primarily mediated through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), single base variants in this gene may be risk factors for asthma or allergy. Results 951 individuals from 224 pedigrees with at least 2 asthmatic children were analyzed for 13 SNPs in the VDR. There was no preferential transmission to children with asthma. In their unaffected sibs, however, one allele in the 5' region was 0.5-fold undertransmitted (p = 0.049), while two other alleles in the 3' terminal region were 2-fold over-transmitted (p = 0.013 and 0.018). An association was also seen with bronchial hyperreactivity against methacholine and with specific immunoglobulin E serum levels. Conclusion The transmission disequilibrium in unaffected sibs of otherwise multiple-affected families seem to be a powerful statistical test. A preferential transmission of vitamin D receptor variants to children with asthma could not be confirmed but raises the possibility of a protective effect for unaffected children. PMID:15651992

  3. Biological characterization of liver fatty acid binding gene from miniature pig liver cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y H; Wang, K F; Zhang, S; Fan, Y N; Guan, W J; Ma, Y H

    2015-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP) are a family of small, highly conserved, cytoplasmic proteins that bind to long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Wuzhishan miniature pig, and then the L-FABP gene was cloned from this cDNA library and an expression vector (pEGFP-N3-L-FABP) was constructed in vitro. This vector was transfected into hepatocytes to test its function. The results of western blotting analysis demonstrated that the L-FABP gene from our full-length enriched cDNA library regulated downstream genes, including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor family in hepatocytes. This study provides a theoretical basis and experimental evidence for the application of L-FABP for the treatment of liver injury. PMID:26345909

  4. Biological characterization of liver fatty acid binding gene from miniature pig liver cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y H; Wang, K F; Zhang, S; Fan, Y N; Guan, W J; Ma, Y H

    2015-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP) are a family of small, highly conserved, cytoplasmic proteins that bind to long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Wuzhishan miniature pig, and then the L-FABP gene was cloned from this cDNA library and an expression vector (pEGFP-N3-L-FABP) was constructed in vitro. This vector was transfected into hepatocytes to test its function. The results of western blotting analysis demonstrated that the L-FABP gene from our full-length enriched cDNA library regulated downstream genes, including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor family in hepatocytes. This study provides a theoretical basis and experimental evidence for the application of L-FABP for the treatment of liver injury.

  5. Progesterone receptor gene variants and risk of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    O'Mara, Tracy A.; Fahey, Paul; Ferguson, Kaltin; Marquart, Louise; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Amant, Frederic; Hall, Per; Liu, Jianjun; Czene, Kamila; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Ahmed, Shahana; Dunning, Alison M.; Gregory, Catherine S.; Shah, Mitul; Webb, Penelope M.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged excessive estrogen exposure unopposed by progesterone is widely accepted to be a risk factor for endometrial cancer development. The physiological function of progesterone is dependent upon the presence of its receptor [progesterone receptor (PGR)] and several studies have reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PGR gene to be associated with endometrial cancer risk. We sought to confirm the associations with endometrial cancer risk previously reported for four different PGR polymorphisms. A maximum of 2888 endometrial cancer cases and 4483 female control subjects from up to three studies were genotyped for four PGR polymorphisms (rs1042838, rs10895068, rs11224561 and rs471767). Logistic regression with adjustment for age, study, ethnicity and body mass index was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and P-values. Of the four SNPs investigated, only rs11224561 in the 3′ region of the PGR gene was found to be significantly associated with endometrial cancer risk. The A allele of the rs11224561 SNP was associated with increased risk of endometrial cancer (OR per allele 1.31; 95% CI 1.12–1.53, P = 0.001, adjusted for age and study), an effect of the same magnitude and direction as reported previously. We have validated the endometrial cancer risk association with a tagSNP in the 3′ untranslated region of PGR previously reported in an Asian population. Replication studies will be required to refine the risk estimate and to establish if this, or a correlated SNP, is the underlying causative variant. PMID:21148628

  6. An Expression Refinement Process Ensures Singular Odorant Receptor Gene Choice.

    PubMed

    Abdus-Saboor, Ishmail; Al Nufal, Mohammed J; Agha, Maha V; Ruinart de Brimont, Marion; Fleischmann, Alexander; Shykind, Benjamin M

    2016-04-25

    Odorant receptor (OR) gene choice in mammals is a paradigmatic example of monogenic and monoallelic transcriptional selection, in which each olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) chooses to express one OR allele from over 1,000 encoded in the genome [1-3]. This process, critical for generation of the circuit from nose to brain [4-6], is thought to occur in two steps: a slow initial phase that randomly activates a single OR allele, followed by a rapid feedback that halts subsequent expression [7-14]. Inherent in this model is a finite failure rate wherein multiple OR alleles may be activated prior to feedback suppression [15, 16]. Confronted with more than one receptor, the neuron would need to activate a refinement mechanism to eliminate multigenic OR expression and resolve unique neuronal identity [16], critical to the generation of the circuit from nose to olfactory bulb. Here we used a genetic approach in mice to reveal a new facet of OR regulation that corrects adventitious activation of multiple OR alleles, restoring monogenic OR expression and unique neuronal identity. Using the tetM71tg model system, in which the M71 OR is expressed in >95% of mature OSNs and potently suppresses the expression of the endogenous OR repertoire [10], we provide clear evidence of a post-selection refinement (PSR) process that winnows down the number of ORs. We further demonstrate that PSR efficiency is linked to OR expression level, suggesting an underlying competitive process and shedding light on OR gene switching and the fundamental mechanism of singular OR choice. PMID:27040780

  7. Obeticholic acid, a synthetic bile acid agonist of the farnesoid X receptor, attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Peggy P.; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids are ligands for the nuclear hormone receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). The bile acid–FXR interaction regulates bile acid synthesis, transport, and cholesterol metabolism. Recently, bile acid–FXR regulation has been reported to play an integral role in both hepatic and intestinal inflammation, and in atherosclerosis. In this study, we found that FXR knockout mice had more disease severity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Obeticholic acid (6α-ethyl-chenodeoxycholic acid, 6-ECDCA), a synthetic FXR agonist, is an orally available drug that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as alcoholic hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and primary biliary cirrhosis. When we treated mice exhibiting established EAE with 6-ECDCA, or the natural FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), clinical disease was ameliorated by (i) suppressing lymphocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine production; (ii) reducing CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cell populations and their expression of negative checkpoint regulators programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1), programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA); (iii) increasing CD8+ T cells and PD1, PDl-1, and BTLA expression; and (iv) reducing VLA-4 expression in both the T- and B-cell populations. Moreover, adoptive transfer of 6-ECDCA– or CDCA-treated donor cells failed to transfer disease in naive recipients. Thus, we show that FXR functions as a negative regulator in neuroinflammation and we highlight that FXR agonists represent a potential previously unidentified therapy for MS. PMID:26811456

  8. Association between the vitamin D receptor gene polymorphism and osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ju; Shang, De-Peng; Yang, Sheng; Fu, Da-Peng; Ling, Hao-Yi; Hou, Shuang-Shuang; Lu, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene for the risk of osteoporosis remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to understand the distribution of various single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the VDR gene and its association with the risk of osteoporosis. In total, 378 subjects without a genetic relationship were recruited to the study between January 2013 and July 2015. The subjects were divided into three groups, which were the normal (n=234), osteoporosis (n=65) and osteoporosis with osteoporotic fracture (n=79) groups. Three pertinent SNPs of the VDR gene rs17879735 (ApaI, Allele A/a, SNP C>A) were examined with polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine (L2-L4), femoral neck, Ward's and Tro was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The distributions of genotype frequencies aa, AA and Aa were 48.68, 42.86 and 8.46%, separately. Following analysis of each site, BMD, body mass index (BMI) and age, BMD for each site was negatively correlated with age (P<0.01) and positively correlated with BMI (P<0.01). Correction analysis revealed that there were significant differences in the Ward's triangle BMD among each genotype (P<0.05), in which the aa genotype exhibited the lower BMD (P<0.05). No significant difference was identified among the different genotypes in the occurrence of osteoporosis with osteoporotic fracture (P>0.05). In conclusion, these indicated that the VDR gene ApaI polymorphisms had an important role in the osteoporosis risk. PMID:27446548

  9. Farnesoid X receptor, the bile acid sensing nuclear receptor, in liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guodong; L. Guo, Grace

    2015-01-01

    The liver is unique in regenerative potential, which could recover the lost mass and function after injury from ischemia and resection. The underlying molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration have been extensively studied in the past using the partial hepatectomy (PH) model in rodents, where 2/3 PH is carried out by removing two lobes. The whole process of liver regeneration is complicated, orchestrated event involving a network of connected interactions, which still remain fully elusive. Bile acids (BAs) are ligands of farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor of ligand-activated transcription factor. FXR has been shown to be highly involved in liver regeneration. BAs and FXR not only interact with each other but also regulate various downstream targets independently during liver regeneration. Moreover, recent findings suggest that tissue-specific FXR also contributes to liver regeneration significantly. These novel findings suggest that FXR has much broader role than regulating BA, cholesterol, lipid and glucose metabolism. Therefore, these researches highlight FXR as an important pharmaceutical target for potential use of FXR ligands to regulate liver regeneration in clinic. This review focuses on the roles of BAs and FXR in liver regeneration and the current underlying molecular mechanisms which contribute to liver regeneration. PMID:26579433

  10. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) Receptor 5 Inhibits B Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling and Antibody Response1

    PubMed Central

    Shotts, Kristin; Donovan, Erin E.; Strauch, Pamela; Pujanauski, Lindsey M.; Victorino, Francisco; Al-Shami, Amin; Fujiwara, Yuko; Tigyi, Gabor; Oravecz, Tamas; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids have emerged as biologically important chemoattractants capable of directing lymphocyte development, trafficking and localization. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a major lysophospholipid found systemically and whose levels are elevated in certain pathological settings such as cancer and infections. Here, we demonstrate that BCR signal transduction by mature murine B cells is inhibited upon LPA engagement of the LPA5 (GPR92) receptor via a Gα12/13 – Arhgef1 pathway. The inhibition of BCR signaling by LPA5 manifests by impaired intracellular calcium store release and most likely by interfering with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activity. We further show that LPA5 also limits antigen-specific induction of CD69 and CD86 expression and that LPA5-deficient B cells display enhanced antibody responses. Thus, these data show that LPA5 negatively regulates BCR signaling, B cell activation and immune response. Our findings extend the influence of lysophospholipids on immune function and suggest that alterations in LPA levels likely influence adaptive humoral immunity. PMID:24890721

  11. Retinoic acid receptors recognize the mouse genome through binding elements with diverse spacing and topology.

    PubMed

    Moutier, Emmanuel; Ye, Tao; Choukrallah, Mohamed-Amin; Urban, Sylvia; Osz, Judit; Chatagnon, Amandine; Delacroix, Laurence; Langer, Diana; Rochel, Natacha; Moras, Dino; Benoit, Gerard; Davidson, Irwin

    2012-07-27

    Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) heterodimerize with retinoid X receptors (RXRs) and bind to RA response elements (RAREs) in the regulatory regions of their target genes. Although previous studies on limited sets of RA-regulated genes have defined canonical RAREs as direct repeats of the consensus RGKTCA separated by 1, 2, or 5 nucleotides (DR1, DR2, DR5), we show that in mouse embryoid bodies or F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, RARs occupy a large repertoire of sites with DR0, DR8, and IR0 (inverted repeat 0) elements. Recombinant RAR-RXR binds these non-canonical spacings in vitro with comparable affinities to DR2 and DR5. Most DR8 elements comprise three half-sites with DR2 and DR0 spacings. This specific half-site organization constitutes a previously unrecognized but frequent signature of RAR binding elements. In functional assays, DR8 and IR0 elements act as independent RAREs, whereas DR0 does not. Our results reveal an unexpected diversity in the spacing and topology of binding elements for the RAR-RXR heterodimer. The differential ability of RAR-RXR bound to DR0 compared to DR2, DR5, and DR8 to mediate RA-dependent transcriptional activation indicates that half-site spacing allosterically regulates RAR function.

  12. RAR-related orphan receptor A (RORA): A new susceptibility gene for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Eftekharian, Mohammad Mahdi; Noroozi, Rezvan; Sayad, Arezou; Sarrafzadeh, Shaghayegh; Toghi, Mehdi; Azimi, Tahereh; Komaki, Alireza; Mazdeh, Mehrdokht; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Taheri, Mohammad; Mirfakhraie, Reza

    2016-10-15

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) is proposed to promote Th17 cells differentiation that play a crucial role in many inflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). The gene is also involved in regulation of inflammatory responses and neuronal cell development. The aim of the present study is to determine if any relation exists between RORA rs11639084 and rs4774388 gene polymorphisms on the individual susceptibility of multiple sclerosis. 410 patients with clinically definite MS and 500 ethnically-matched healthy controls participated in this study. Genotyping was performed using tetra primer-amplification refractory mutation system-PCR (4P-ARMS-PCR) method for the mentioned polymorphisms in the RORA gene. Both variants showed significant differences in allele and genotype distributions between the studied groups. Genotypes were risk associated in additive (P-value of 0.0003 and odds ratio equal to 1.7 (95% CI: 1.27-2.26)), dominant (P-value of <0.0001 and odds ratio equal to 0.55 (95% CI: 0.41-0.73)) and recessive (P-value of 0.04 and odds ratio equal to 0.33 (95% CI: (0.12-0.96)) models for rs11639084. However, the rs4774388 genotypes were risk associated in recessive model with a P-value of 0.036 and an odds ratio of 0.62 (95% CI: (0.4-0.97)). To the best of our knowledge this is the first report concerning the association between RORΑ gene polymorphisms and MS. The further study of RORΑ related pathways and gene networks might result in the better understanding of the pathophysiology of MS and related symptoms.

  13. RAR-related orphan receptor A (RORA): A new susceptibility gene for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Eftekharian, Mohammad Mahdi; Noroozi, Rezvan; Sayad, Arezou; Sarrafzadeh, Shaghayegh; Toghi, Mehdi; Azimi, Tahereh; Komaki, Alireza; Mazdeh, Mehrdokht; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Taheri, Mohammad; Mirfakhraie, Reza

    2016-10-15

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) is proposed to promote Th17 cells differentiation that play a crucial role in many inflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). The gene is also involved in regulation of inflammatory responses and neuronal cell development. The aim of the present study is to determine if any relation exists between RORA rs11639084 and rs4774388 gene polymorphisms on the individual susceptibility of multiple sclerosis. 410 patients with clinically definite MS and 500 ethnically-matched healthy controls participated in this study. Genotyping was performed using tetra primer-amplification refractory mutation system-PCR (4P-ARMS-PCR) method for the mentioned polymorphisms in the RORA gene. Both variants showed significant differences in allele and genotype distributions between the studied groups. Genotypes were risk associated in additive (P-value of 0.0003 and odds ratio equal to 1.7 (95% CI: 1.27-2.26)), dominant (P-value of <0.0001 and odds ratio equal to 0.55 (95% CI: 0.41-0.73)) and recessive (P-value of 0.04 and odds ratio equal to 0.33 (95% CI: (0.12-0.96)) models for rs11639084. However, the rs4774388 genotypes were risk associated in recessive model with a P-value of 0.036 and an odds ratio of 0.62 (95% CI: (0.4-0.97)). To the best of our knowledge this is the first report concerning the association between RORΑ gene polymorphisms and MS. The further study of RORΑ related pathways and gene networks might result in the better understanding of the pathophysiology of MS and related symptoms. PMID:27653902

  14. Differential regulation of bile acid homeostasis by the farnesoid X receptor in liver and intestine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Insook; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Inagaki, Takeshi; Choi, Mihwa; Ito, Shinji; Guo, Grace L; Kliewer, Steven A; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2007-12-01

    Bile acid concentrations are controlled by a feedback regulatory pathway whereby activation of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) represses transcription of both the CYP7A1 gene, encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in the classic bile acid synthesis pathway, and the CYP8B1 gene, required for synthesis of cholic acid. The tissue-specific roles of FXR were examined using liver- and intestine-specific FXR-null models. FXR deficiency in either liver (Fxr DeltaL) or intestine (Fxr DeltaIE) increased bile acid pool size. Treatment with the FXR-selective agonist GW4064 significantly repressed CYP7A1 in Fxr DeltaL mice but not Fxr DeltaIE mice, demonstrating that activation of FXR in intestine but not liver is required for short-term repression of CYP7A1 in liver. This intestinal-specific effect of FXR is likely mediated through induction of the hormone FGF15, which suppresses CYP7A1. In comparison to CYP7A1, FXR-mediated repression of CYP8B1 was more dependent on the presence of FXR in liver and less dependent on its presence in intestine. Consistent with these findings, recombinant FGF15 repressed CYP7A1 mRNA levels without affecting CYP8B1 expression. These data provide evidence that FXR-mediated repression of bile acid synthesis requires the complementary actions of FXR in both liver and intestine and reveal mechanistic differences in feedback repression of CYP7A1 and CYP8B1.

  15. Olfactory receptor genes cooperate with protocadherin genes in human extreme obesity.

    PubMed

    Mariman, Edwin C M; Szklarczyk, Radek; Bouwman, Freek G; Aller, Erik E J G; van Baak, Marleen A; Wang, Ping

    2015-07-01

    Worldwide, the incidence of obesity has increased dramatically over the past decades. More knowledge about the complex etiology of obesity is needed in order to find additional approaches for treatment and prevention. Investigating the exome sequencing data of 30 extremely obese subjects (BMI 45-65 kg/m(2)) shows that predicted damaging missense variants in olfactory receptor genes on chromosome 1q and rare predicted damaging variants in the protocadherin (PCDH) beta-cluster genes on chromosome 5q31, reported in our previous work, co-localize in subjects with extreme obesity. This implies a synergistic effect between genetic variation in these gene clusters in the predisposition to extreme obesity. Evidence for a general involvement of the olfactory transduction pathway on itself could not be found. Bioinformatic analysis indicates a specific involvement of the PCDH beta-cluster genes in controlling tissue development. Further mechanistic insight needs to await the identification of the ligands of the 1q olfactory receptors. Eventually, this may provide the possibility to manipulate food flavor in a way to reduce the risk of overeating and of extreme obesity in genetically predisposed subjects.

  16. Direct activation of GABAA receptors by substances in the organic acid fraction of Japanese sake.

    PubMed

    Izu, Hanae; Shigemori, Kensuke; Eguchi, Masaya; Kawane, Shuhei; Fujii, Shouko; Kitamura, Yuji; Aoshima, Hitoshi; Yamada, Yasue

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the effect of substances present in Japanese sake on the response of ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Sake was fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography. The fraction containing organic acids (OA fraction) showed agonist activities on the GABAA receptor. OA fractions from sake were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS). Of the 64 compounds identified, 13 compounds showed GABAA receptor agonist activities. Especially, l-lactic acid showed high agonist activity and its EC50 value was 37μM. Intraperitoneal injections of l-lactic acid, gluconic acid, and pyruvic acid (10, 10, and 5mg/kg BW, respectively), which showed agonistic activity on the GABAA receptor, led to significant anxiolytic effects during an elevated plus-maze test in mice. PMID:27507485

  17. The Dopamine D2 Receptor Gene, Perceived Parental Support, and Adolescent Loneliness: Longitudinal Evidence for Gene-Environment Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Roekel, Eeske; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Loneliness is a common problem in adolescence. Earlier research focused on genes within the serotonin and oxytocin systems, but no studies have examined the role of dopamine-related genes in loneliness. In the present study, we focused on the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2). Methods: Associations among the DRD2, sex, parental support,…

  18. Bioplex technology: novel synthetic gene delivery pharmaceutical based on peptides anchored to nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Oscar E; Svahn, Mathias G; Törnquist, Elisabeth; Lundin, Karin E; Smith, C I E

    2005-01-01

    Non-viral gene delivery is an important approach in order to establish safe in vivo gene therapy in the clinic. Although viral vectors currently exhibit superior gene transfer efficacy, the safety aspect of viral gene delivery is a concern. In order to improve non-viral in vivo gene delivery we have designed a pharmaceutical platform called Bioplex (biological complex). The concept of Bioplex is to link functional entities via hybridising anchors, such as Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA), directly to naked DNA. In order to promote delivery functional entities consisting of biologically active peptides or carbohydrates, are linked to the PNA anchor. The PNA acts as genetic glue and hybridises with DNA in a sequence specific manner. By using functional entities, which elicit receptor-mediated endocytosis, improved endosomal escape and enhance nuclear entry we wish to improve the transfer of genetic material into the cell. An important aspect is that the functional entities should also have tissue-targeting properties in vivo. Examples of functional entities investigated to date are the Simian virus 40 nuclear localisation signal to improve nuclear uptake and different carbohydrate ligands in order to achieve receptor specific uptake. The delivery system is also endowed with regulatory capability, since the release of functional entities can be controlled. The aim is to create a safe, pharmaceutically defined and stable delivery system for nucleic acids with enhanced transfection properties that can be used in the clinic.

  19. Identification of Hydroxybenzoic Acids as Selective Lactate Receptor (GPR81) Agonists with Antilipolytic Effects.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Curt A; Liu, Changlu; Shelton, Jonathan; Kuei, Chester; Sutton, Steven W; Lovenberg, Timothy W; Carruthers, Nicholas I

    2012-08-01

    Following the characterization of the lactate receptor (GPR81), a focused screening effort afforded 3-hydroxybenzoic acid 1 as a weak agonist of both GPR81 and GPR109a (niacin receptor). An examination of structurally similar arylhydroxy acids led to the identification of 3-chloro-5-hydroxybenzoic acid 2, a selective GPR81 agonist that exhibited favorable in vivo effects on lipolysis in a mouse model of obesity.

  20. Identification of Hydroxybenzoic Acids as Selective Lactate Receptor (GPR81) Agonists with Antilipolytic Effects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Following the characterization of the lactate receptor (GPR81), a focused screening effort afforded 3-hydroxybenzoic acid 1 as a weak agonist of both GPR81 and GPR109a (niacin receptor). An examination of structurally similar arylhydroxy acids led to the identification of 3-chloro-5-hydroxybenzoic acid 2, a selective GPR81 agonist that exhibited favorable in vivo effects on lipolysis in a mouse model of obesity. PMID:24900524

  1. Bidirectional CLOCK/BMAL1-dependent circadian gene regulation by retinoic acid in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Hidenori; Oishi, Katsutaka; Ishida, Norio . E-mail: n.ishida@aist.go.jp

    2006-12-15

    A central circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the mammalian hypothalamus entrains peripheral clocks through both neural and humoral factors. Although candidates for entrainment factors have been described, their details remain obscure. Here, we screened ligands for nuclear receptors that affect CLOCK/BMAL1-dependent transactivation of the mouse Period1 (mPer1) gene in NIH3T3 cells. We found that retinoic acids (RAs) significantly up-regulate mPer1 expression in an E-box-dependent manner. We also found that RAs up-regulate the expression of other E-box-dependent circadian genes such as mPer2, arginine vasopressin (mAVP), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (mPPAR{alpha}). Surprisingly, the effect of RAs on CLOCK/BMAL1 (E-box)-dependent mRNA expression was bidirectional and depended on the presence of exogenous retinoic acid receptor {alpha} (RAR{alpha}). These results suggest that RAs regulate the CLOCK/BMAL1-dependent transcription of circadian genes in a complex manner.

  2. NR4A nuclear receptors mediate carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A gene expression by the rexinoid HX600

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, Michiyasu; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Makishima, Makoto

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The function of RXR heterodimers with NR4 receptors remains unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RXR ligand HX600 induces expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HX600-induced CPT1A expression is mediated by the NR4 receptors, Nur77 and NURR1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CPT1A induction by HX600 is not mediated by de novo protein synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CPT1A could be a target of the Nur77-RXR and NURR1-RXR heterodimers. -- Abstract: Retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily and can be activated by 9-cis retinoic acid (9CRA). RXRs form homodimers and heterodimers with other nuclear receptors such as the retinoic acid receptor and NR4 subfamily nuclear receptors, Nur77 and NURR1. Potential physiological roles of the Nur77-RXR and NURR1-RXR heterodimers have not been elucidated. In this study, we identified a gene regulated by these heterodimers utilizing HX600, a selective RXR agonist for Nur77-RXR and NURR1-RXR. While 9CRA induced many genes, including RAR-target genes, HX600 effectively induced only carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) in human teratocarcinoma NT2/D1 cells, which express RXR{alpha}, Nur77 and NURR1. HX600 also increased CPT1A expression in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and hepatocyte-derived HepG2 cells. Although HX600 induced CPT1A less effectively than 9CRA, overexpression of Nur77 or NURR1 increased the HX600 response to levels similar to 9CRA in NT2/D1 and HEK293 cells. A dominant-negative form of Nur77 or NURR1 repressed the induction of CPT1A by HX600. A protein synthesis inhibitor did not alter HX600-dependent CPT1A induction. Thus, the rexinoid HX600 directly induces expression of CPT1A through a Nur77 or NURR1-mediated mechanism. CPT1A, a gene involved in fatty acid {beta}-oxidation, could be a target of RXR-NR4 receptor heterodimers.

  3. Dominant negative mutant of retinoic acid receptor alpha inhibits retinoic acid-induced P19 cell differentiation by binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Costa, S L; McBurney, M W

    1996-05-25

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a potent inducer of P19 cell differentiation. RA activity is thought to be mediated by nuclear RA receptors (RARs), transcription factors whose activity is dependent on RA. There are three RARs called alpha, beta, and gamma. We created truncated versions of the three RARs and compared their activities as inhibitors of RA-mediated gene transcription and of P19 cell differentiation. Only mutants of the RAR alpha were inhibitory in these assays. A mutant of RAR alpha carrying a 10-amino-acid insert was able to heterodimerize with RXRbeta or with the normal RAR alpha and the inhibitory activity of this mutant was dependent on an intact DNA binding domain. We conclude that dominant negative mutants of RAR alpha act by heterodimerizing with RXRs or RARs and binding to RA response elements on DNA, thereby preventing binding of the normal receptors to those sites. PMID:8635515

  4. Molecular characterization of the leptin receptor gene as a candidate gene in the pulmonary hypertension syndrome in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Bamidele, O; Van As, P; Elferink, M G

    2012-12-15

    Leptin Receptor Gene (LEPR) is a candidate gene in understanding the genetic basis of the Pulmonary Hypertension Syndrome (PHS) in broilers. Identification and evaluation of genetic polymorphisms in LEPR may provide a link between traits like Body Weight (BW) and Total Ventricle weight (TV) to the development of PHS. In this study, primers were designed in exons, upstream and downstream sequences to identify mutations in the LEPR on four broilers selected with respect to the PHS-related traits. About 77% of the 11,820 bp of the LEPR gene covered by the primers were sequenced. No mutations were found between the chickens associating the traits to the occurrence of PHS. However, 42 single nucleotide polymorphisms and four Indels were found between the reference sequences of the red jungle fowl and the experimental population. Ten of these mutations were not previously reported in LEPR at the genomic and transcript sequences (NP_989654.1, ENSGALT00000018009). The 10 mutations include six SNPs in intron regions, two Indels and two non-synonymous SNPs. The two new non-synonymous SNPs; G301A and A1637G, led to amino acid change A89T and N534S, respectively. PMID:23755410

  5. Pharmacogenetics of the β2-Adrenergic Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Victor E.; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Peters, Stephen P.; Bleecker, Eugene R.

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a complex genetic disease with multiple genetic and environmental determinants contributing to the observed variability in response to common anti-asthma therapies. Asthma pharmacogenetic research has focused on multiple candidate genes including the β2-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRβ2) and its effect on individual responses to beta agonist therapy. At present, knowledge about the effects of ADRβ2 variation on therapeutic responses is evolving and should not alter current Asthma Guideline approaches consisting of the use of short acting beta agonists for as-needed symptom based therapy and the use of a regular long-acting beta agonist in combination with inhaled corticosteroid therapy for optimal control of asthma symptoms in those asthmatics who are not controlled on inhaled corticosteroid alone. This approach is based upon studies showing a consistent pharmacogenetic response to regular use of short acting beta agonists (SABA) and less consistent findings in studies evaluating long acting beta agonist (LABA). While emerging pharmacogenetic studies are provocative and should lead to functional approaches, conflicting data with responses to LABA therapy may be caused by factors that include small sample sizes of study populations and differences in experimental design that may limit the conclusions that may be drawn from these clinical trials at the present time. PMID:17996583

  6. Anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Martin J.; Chiuchiolo, Maria J.; Ballon, Douglas; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Aronowitz, Eric; Funato, Kosuke; Tabar, Viviane; Havlicek, David; Fan, Fan; Sondhi, Dolan; Kaminsky, Stephen M.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary intracranial brain tumor in adults with a mean survival of 14 to 15 months. Aberrant activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a significant role in GBM progression, with amplification or overexpression of EGFR in 60% of GBM tumors. To target EGFR expressed by GBM, we have developed a strategy to deliver the coding sequence for cetuximab, an anti-EGFR antibody, directly to the CNS using an adeno-associated virus serotype rh.10 gene transfer vector. The data demonstrates that single, local delivery of an anti-EGFR antibody by an AAVrh.10 vector coding for cetuximab (AAVrh.10Cetmab) reduces GBM tumor growth and increases survival in xenograft mouse models of a human GBM EGFR-expressing cell line and patient-derived GBM. AAVrh10.CetMab-treated mice displayed a reduction in cachexia, a significant decrease in tumor volume and a prolonged survival following therapy. Adeno-associated-directed delivery of a gene encoding a therapeutic anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody may be an effective strategy to treat GBM. PMID:27711187

  7. Hotfoot mouse mutations affect the delta 2 glutamate receptor gene and are allelic to lurcher.

    PubMed

    Lalouette, A; Guénet, J L; Vriz, S

    1998-05-15

    Hotfoot (ho) is a recessive mouse mutation characterized by cerebellar ataxia associated with relatively mild abnormalities of the cerebellum. It has been previously mapped to Chromosome 6, and at least eight independent alleles have been reported. Here we show that the hotfoot phenotype is associated with mutations in the glutamate receptor ionotropic delta2 gene (Grid2). We have identified a 510-bp deletion in the Grid2 coding sequence in the ho4J allele, resulting in a deletion of 170 amino acids of the extracellular domain of the receptor. Analysis of a second allele, hoTgN37INRA, revealed a 4-kb deletion in the Grid2 transcript. The GRID2 protein in these hotfoot mutants probably has a reduced (or null) activity since the phenotype of hotfoot bears similarities with the previously described phenotype of Grid2 knockout mice. The exceptionally high number of independent alleles at the ho locus is an invaluable tool for investigating the function of the glutamate receptor ionotropic delta2 protein, which so far remains largely unknown.

  8. Distinct Phosphorylation Clusters Determine the Signaling Outcome of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 4/G Protein-Coupled Receptor 120.

    PubMed

    Prihandoko, Rudi; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Hudson, Brian D; Butcher, Adrian J; Ulven, Trond; Miller, Ashley M; Tobin, Andrew B; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-05-01

    It is established that long-chain free fatty acids includingω-3 fatty acids mediate an array of biologic responses through members of the free fatty acid (FFA) receptor family, which includes FFA4. However, the signaling mechanisms and modes of regulation of this receptor class remain unclear. Here, we employed mass spectrometry to determine that phosphorylation of mouse (m)FFAR4 occurs at five serine and threonine residues clustered in two separable regions of the C-terminal tail, designated cluster 1 (Thr(347), Thr(349), and Ser(350)) and cluster 2 (Ser(357)and Ser(361)). Mutation of these phosphoacceptor sites to alanine completely prevented phosphorylation of mFFA4 but did not limit receptor coupling to extracellular signal regulated protein kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) activation. Rather, an inhibitor of Gq/11proteins completely prevented receptor signaling to ERK1/2. By contrast, the recruitment of arrestin 3, receptor internalization, and activation of Akt were regulated by mFFA4 phosphorylation. The analysis of mFFA4 phosphorylation-dependent signaling was extended further by selective mutations of the phosphoacceptor sites. Mutations within cluster 2 did not affect agonist activation of Akt but instead significantly compromised receptor internalization and arrestin 3 recruitment. Distinctly, mutation of the phosphoacceptor sites within cluster 1 had no effect on receptor internalization and had a less extensive effect on arrestin 3 recruitment but significantly uncoupled the receptor from Akt activation. These unique observations define differential effects on signaling mediated by phosphorylation at distinct locations. This hallmark feature supports the possibility that the signaling outcome of mFFA4 activation can be determined by the pattern of phosphorylation (phosphorylation barcode) at the C terminus of the receptor.

  9. Dominant negative retinoic acid receptor initiates tumor formation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kupumbati, Tara S; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Marzan, Christine; Farias, Eduardo F; Taneja, Reshma; Mira-y-Lopez, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    Background Retinoic acid suppresses cell growth and promotes cell differentiation, and pharmacological retinoic acid receptor (RAR) activation is anti-tumorigenic. This begs the question of whether chronic physiological RAR activation by endogenous retinoids is likewise anti-tumorigenic. Results To address this question, we generated transgenic mice in which expression of a ligand binding defective dominant negative RARα (RARαG303E) was under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. The transgene was expressed in the lymphoid compartment and in the mammary epithelium. Observation of aging mice revealed that transgenic mice, unlike their wild type littermates, developed B cell lymphomas at high penetrance, with a median latency of 40 weeks. MMTV-RARαG303E lymphomas were high grade Pax-5+, surface H+L Ig negative, CD69+ and BCL6- and cytologically and phenotypically resembled human adult high grade (Burkitt's or lymphoblastic) lymphomas. We postulated that mammary tumors might arise after a long latency period as seen in other transgenic models of breast cancer. We tested this idea by transplanting transgenic epithelium into the cleared fat pads of wild type hosts, thus bypassing lymphomagenesis. At 17 months post-transplantation, a metastatic mammary adenocarcinoma developed in one of four transplanted glands whereas no tumors developed in sixteen of sixteen endogenous glands with wild type epithelium. Conclusion These findings suggest that physiological RAR activity may normally suppress B lymphocyte and mammary epithelial cell growth and that global RAR inactivation is sufficient to initiate a stochastic process of tumor development requiring multiple transforming events. Our work makes available to the research community a new animal resource that should prove useful as an experimental model of aggressive sporadic lymphoma in immunologically uncompromised hosts. We anticipate that it may also prove useful as a model of breast cancer. PMID

  10. Expression of retinoic acid receptors in human endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Kojiro; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Tamura, Mitsutoshi; Niikura, Hitoshi; Takano, Tadao; Yoshinaga, Kohsuke; Nagase, Satoru; Suzuki, Takashi; Ito, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyo; Hayashi, Shin-ichi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2008-02-01

    The retinoids (vitamin A and its biologically active derivatives) are essential for the health and survival of the individual. Several studies have reported a strong rationale for the use of retinoids in cancer treatment and chemoprevention. It has been discovered that expression of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) beta is frequently silenced in epithelial carcinogenesis, which has led to the hypothesis that RAR beta could act as a tumor suppressor. However, the status of RAR beta in human endometrial carcinoma has not been examined. In the present study, we initially studied the effects of retinoic acid on cell proliferation and the expression of RAR alpha, RAR beta, and RAR gamma using AM580 (a RAR-specific agonist) in the Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell line. We also examined the expression of RAR in human eutopic endometrium (30 cases), endometrial hyperplasia (28 cases), and endometrial carcinoma (103 cases) using immunohistochemistry. Finally, we correlated these findings with the clinicopathological parameters. In vitro, cell growth was inhibited and RAR beta and RAR gamma mRNA was significantly induced by AM580, compared with vehicle controls, whereas RAR alpha mRNA was significantly attenuated by AM580, compared with vehicle. RAR beta was detected predominantly in endometrial hyperplasia, compared with endometrial carcinoma. No statistically significant correlation was obtained between the expression of any other RAR subtypes and clinicopathological parameters in human endometrial carcinoma. The results of our study demonstrate that AM580 inhibits cell growth and induces RAR beta mRNA expression in the Ishikawa cell line, and the expression level of RAR beta in endometrial carcinoma is significantly lower than that in endometrial hyperplasia. AM580 might therefore be considered as a potential treatment for endometrial carcinoma.

  11. Pituitary specific retinoid-X receptor ligand interactions with thyroid hormone receptor signaling revealed by high throughput reporter and endogenous gene responses.

    PubMed

    Mengeling, Brenda J; Furlow, J David

    2015-10-01

    Disruption of thyroid hormone (TH) signaling can compromise vital processes both during development and in the adult. We previously reported on high-throughput screening experiments for man-made TH disruptors using a stably integrated line of rat pituitary cells, GH3.TRE-Luc, in which a thyroid hormone receptor (TR) response element drives luciferase (Luc) expression. In these experiments, several retinoid/rexinoid compounds activated the reporter. Here we show that all-trans and 13-cis retinoic acid appear to function through the heterodimer partners of TRs, retinoid-X receptors (RXRs), as RXR antagonists abrogated retinoid-induced activation. The retinoids also induced known endogenous TR target genes, showing good correlation with Luc activity. Synthetic RXR-specific agonists significantly activated all tested TR target genes, but interestingly, retinoid/rexinoid activation was more consistent between genes than the extent of T3-induced activation. In contrast, the retinoids neither activated the Luc reporter construct in transient transfection assays in the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HuH7, nor two of the same T3-induced genes examined in pituitary cells. These data demonstrate the suitability and sensitivity of GH3.TRE-Luc cells for screening chemical compound libraries for TH disruption and suggest that the extent of disruption can vary on a cell type and gene-specific bases, including an underappreciated contribution by RXRs. PMID:26096596

  12. A novel mutation (Arg169Gln) of the cardiac ryanodine receptor gene causing exercise-induced bidirectional ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Chia-Hsiang; Weng, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chao-Yu; Lin, Tin-Kwang; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lai, Ling-Ping; Lin, Jiunn-Lee

    2006-04-01

    An 18-year-old woman presented with exercise induced sudden collapse. Series of cardiac work up revealed no structural cardiac abnormalities. Bidirectional ventricular tachycardia occurred during a treadmill exercise test. Under the impression of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, we screened the cardiac ryanodine receptor gene for mutation. We identified a novel heterozygous mutation at the 169th amino acid (Arg169Gln). This amino acid is highly conserved among many species and this mutation was not present in 50 normal control subjects. This patient was treated with a beta-block with good response. PMID:16517285

  13. Triphenyl phosphate-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish: Potential role of the retinoic acid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Isales, Gregory M.; Hipszer, Rachel A.; Raftery, Tara D.; Chen, Albert; Stapleton, Heather M.; Volz, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Using zebrafish as a model, we previously reported that developmental exposure to triphenyl phosphate (TPP) – a high-production volume organophosphate-based flame retardant – results in dioxin-like cardiac looping impairments that are independent of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Using a pharmacologic approach, the objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) – a nuclear receptor that regulates vertebrate heart morphogenesis – in mediating TPP-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish. We first revealed that static exposure of zebrafish from 5-72 hours post-fertilization (hpf) to TPP in the presence of non-toxic concentrations of an RAR antagonist (BMS493) significantly enhanced TPP-induced toxicity (relative to TPP alone), even though identical non-toxic BMS493 concentrations mitigated retinoic acid (RA)-induced toxicity. BMS493-mediated enhancement of TPP toxicity was not a result of differential TPP uptake or metabolism, as internal embryonic doses of TPP and diphenyl phosphate (DPP) – a primary TPP metabolite - were not different in the presence or absence of BMS493. Using real-time PCR, we then quantified the relative change in expression of cytochrome P450 26a1 (cyp26a1) – a major target gene for RA-induced RAR activation in zebrafish – and found that RA and TPP exposure resulted in a ∼5-fold increase and decrease in cyp26a1 expression, respectively, relative to vehicle-exposed embryos. To address whether TPP may interact with human RARs, we then exposed Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with chimeric human RARα-, RARβ-, or RARγ to TPP in the presence of RA, and found that TPP significantly inhibited RA-induced luciferase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Overall, our findings suggest that zebrafish RARs may be involved in mediating TPP-induced developmental toxicity, a mechanism of action that may have relevance to humans. PMID:25725299

  14. Expression of the human ABCC6 gene is induced by retinoids through the retinoid X receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ratajewski, Marcin; Bartosz, Grzegorz; Pulaski, Lukasz . E-mail: lpulaski@cbm.pan.pl

    2006-12-01

    Mutations in the human ABCC6 gene are responsible for the disease pseudoxanthoma elasticum, although Physiological function or substrate of the gene product (an ABC transporter known also as MRP6) is not known. We found that the expression of this gene in cells of hepatic origin (where this gene is predominantly expressed in the body) is significantly upregulated by retinoids, acting as agonists of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) rather than the retinoid A receptor (RAR). The direct involvement of this nuclear receptor in the transcriptional regulation of ABCC6 gene expression was confirmed by transient transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. This constitutes the first direct proof of previously suggested involvement of nuclear hormone receptors in ABCC6 gene expression and the first identification of a transcription factor which may be relevant to regulation of ABCC6 level in tissues and in some PXE patients.

  15. Structural basis and functions of abscisic acid receptors PYLs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing L.; Jiang, Lun; Xin, Qi; Liu, Yang; Tan, Jian X.; Chen, Zhong Z.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a key role in many developmental processes and responses to adaptive stresses in plants. Recently, a new family of nucleocytoplasmic PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYLs) has been identified as bona fide ABA receptors. PYLs together with protein phosphatases type-2C (PP2Cs), Snf1 (Sucrose-non-fermentation 1)-related kinases subfamily 2 (SnRK2s) and downstream substrates constitute the core ABA signaling network. Generally, PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s kinases by physical interaction and direct dephosphorylation. Upon ABA binding, PYLs change their conformations and then contact and inhibit PP2Cs, thus activating SnRK2s. Here, we reviewed the recent progress in research regarding the structures of the core signaling pathways of ABA, including the (+)-ABA, (−)-ABA and ABA analogs pyrabactin as well as 6AS perception by PYLs, SnRK2s mimicking PYLs in binding PP2Cs. PYLs inhibited PP2Cs in both the presence and absence of ABA and activated SnRK2s. The present review elucidates multiple ABA signal perception and transduction by PYLs, which might shed light on how to design small chemical compounds for improving plant performance in the future. PMID:25745428

  16. Tannic Acid Down-Regulates the Angiotensin Type 1 Receptor Through a MAPK-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yesudas, Rekha; Gumaste, Upendra; Snyder, Russell

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of tannic acid (TA), a hydrolysable polyphenol, on angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) expression in continuously passaged rat liver epithelial cells. Under normal conditions, exposure of cells to TA resulted in the down-regulation of AT1R-specific binding in concentrations ranging from 12.5–100 μg/ml (7.34–58.78 μm) over a time period of 2–24 h with no change in receptor affinity to angiotensin II (AngII). The inhibitory effect of TA on AT1R was specific and reversible. In TA-treated cells, we observed a significant reduction in AngII-mediated intracellular calcium signaling, a finding consistent with receptor down-regulation. Under similar conditions, TA down-regulated AT1R mRNA expression without changing the rate of mRNA degradation, suggesting that TA's effect is mediated through transcriptional inhibition. Cells expressing recombinant AT1R without the native promoter show no change in receptor expression, whereas a pCAT reporter construct possessing the rat AT1R promoter was significantly reduced in activity. Furthermore, TA induced the phosphorylation of MAPK p42/p44. Pretreatment of the cells with a MAPK kinase (MEK)-specific inhibitor PD98059 prevented TA-induced MAPK phosphorylation and down-regulation of the AT1R. Moreover, there was no reduction in AngII-mediated intracellular calcium release upon MEK inhibition, suggesting that TA's observed inhibitory effect is mediated through MEK/MAPK signaling. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that TA inhibits AT1R gene expression and cellular response, suggesting the observed protective effects of dietary polyphenols on cardiovascular conditions may be, in part, through inhibition of AT1R expression. PMID:22322600

  17. Lineage-Specific Loss of Function of Bitter Taste Receptor Genes in Humans and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Go, Yasuhiro; Satta, Yoko; Takenaka, Osamu; Takahata, Naoyuki

    2005-01-01

    Since the process of becoming dead genes or pseudogenes (pseudogenization) is irreversible and can occur rather rapidly under certain environmental circumstances, it is one plausible determinant for characterizing species specificity. To test this evolutionary hypothesis, we analyzed the tempo and mode of duplication and pseudogenization of bitter taste receptor (T2R) genes in humans as well as in 12 nonhuman primates. The results show that primates have accumulated more pseudogenes than mice after their separation from the common ancestor and that lineage-specific pseudogenization becomes more conspicuous in humans than in nonhuman primates. Although positive selection has operated on some amino acids in extracellular domains, functional constraints against T2R genes are more relaxed in primates than in mice and this trend has culminated in the rapid deterioration of the bitter-tasting capability in humans. Since T2R molecules play an important role in avoiding generally bitter toxic and harmful substances, substantial modification of the T2R gene repertoire is likely to reflect different responses to changes in the environment and to result from species-specific food preference during primate evolution. PMID:15744053

  18. Mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene in two Chinese families with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SONG; XU, HAIKUN; AN, WEI; ZHU, DECHUN; LI, DEJUN

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are essential for normal male sex differentiation and are responsible for the normal development of male secondary sexual characteristics at puberty. The physiological effects of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). Mutations in the AR gene are the most common cause of androgen insensitivity syndrome. The present study undertook a genetic analysis of the AR gene in two unrelated families affected by complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) in China. In family 1, a previously reported nonsense mutation (G-to-A; p.W751X) was identified in exon 5 of the AR gene. In addition, a novel missense mutation was detected in exon 6 of the AR gene from family 2; this mutation resulted in a predicted amino acid change from phenylalanine to serine at codon 804 (T-to-C; p.F804S) in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR. Computer simulation of the structural changes generated by the p.F804S substitution revealed marked conformational alterations in the hydrophobic core responsible for the stability and function of the AR-LBD. In conclusion, the present study identified two mutations from two unrelated Chinese families affected by CAIS. The novel mutation (p.F804S) may provide insights into the molecular mechanism underlying CAIS. Furthermore, it expands on the number of mutational hot spots in the international AR mutation database, which may be useful in the future for prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:27284311

  19. Bile acids override steatosis in farnesoid X receptor deficient mice in a model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weibin; Liu, Xijun; Peng, Xiaomin; Xue, Ruyi; Ji, Lingling; Shen, Xizhong; Chen, She; Gu, Jianxin; Zhang, Si

    2014-05-23

    Highlights: • FXR deficiency enhanced MCD diet-induced hepatic fibrosis. • FXR deficiency attenuated MCD diet-induced hepatic steatosis. • FXR deficiency repressed genes involved in fatty acid uptake and triglyceride accumulation. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases, and the pathogenesis is still not well known. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and plays an essential role in maintaining bile acid and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we study the role of FXR in the pathogenesis of NFALD. We found that FXR deficient (FXR{sup −/−}) mice fed methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet had higher serum ALT and AST activities and lower hepatic triglyceride levels than wild-type (WT) mice fed MCD diet. Expression of genes involved in inflammation (VCAM-1) and fibrosis (α-SMA) was increased in FXR{sup −/−} mice fed MCD diet (FXR{sup −/−}/MCD) compared to WT mice fed MCD diet (WT/MCD). Although MCD diet significantly induced hepatic fibrosis in terms of liver histology, FXR{sup −/−}/MCD mice showed less degree of hepatic steatosis than WT/MCD mice. Moreover, FXR deficiency synergistically potentiated the elevation effects of MCD diet on serum and hepatic bile acids levels. The super-physiological concentrations of hepatic bile acids in FXR{sup −/−}/MCD mice inhibited the expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and triglyceride accumulation, which may be an explanation for less steatosis in FXR{sup −/−}/MCD mice in contrast to WT/MCD mice. These results suggest that hepatic bile acids accumulation could override simple steatosis in hepatic injury during the progression of NAFLD and further emphasize the role of FXR in maintaining hepatic bile acid homeostasis in liver disorders and in hepatic protection.

  20. Involvement of the G-protein-coupled receptor 4 in RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Okito, Asuka; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Akiyama, Masako; Ono, Takashi; Morita, Ikuo

    2015-03-06

    Osteoclast activity is enhanced in acidic environments following systemic or local inflammation. However, the regulatory mechanism of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression in osteoblasts under acidic conditions is not fully understood. In the present paper, we detected the mRNA expression of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR) proton sensors GPR4 and GPR65 (T-cell death-associated gene 8, TDAG8), in osteoblasts. RANKL expression and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) level in osteoblasts were up-regulated under acidic culture conditions. Acidosis-induced up-regulation of RANKL was abolished by the protein kinase A inhibitor H89. To clarify the role of GPR4 in RANKL expression, GPR4 gain and loss of function experiments were performed. Gene knockdown and forced expression of GPR4 caused reduction and induction of RANKL expression, respectively. These results suggested that, at least in part, RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment was mediated by cAMP/PKA signaling resulting from GPR4 activation. A comprehensive microarray analysis of gene expression of osteoblasts revealed that, under acidic conditions, the phenotype of osteoblasts was that of an osteoclast supporting cell rather than that of a mineralizing cell. These findings will contribute to a molecular understanding of bone disruption in an acidic environment. - Highlights: • RANKL expression was increased in osteoblasts under acidosis via cAMP/PKA pathway. • GRP4 knockdown resulted in decrease of RANKL expression. • GRP4 overexpression resulted in increase of RANKL expression. • Osteoblast mineralization was reduced under acidic condition.

  1. Characterization of DNA Binding and Retinoic Acid Binding Properties of Retinoic Acid Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Na; Schule, Roland; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Evans, Ronald M.

    1991-05-01

    High-level expression of the full-length human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) α and the DNA binding domain of the RAR in Escherichia coli was achieved by using a T7 RNA polymerase-directed expression system. After induction, full-length RAR protein was produced at an estimated level of 20% of the total bacterial proteins. Both intact RAR molecules and the DNA binding domain bind to the cognate DNA response element with high specificity in the absence of retinoic acid. However, this binding is enhanced to a great extent upon the addition of eukaryotic cell extracts. The factor responsible for this enhancement is heat-sensitive and forms a complex with RAR that binds to DNA and exhibits a distinct migration pattern in the gel-mobility-shift assay. The interaction site of the factor with RAR is localized in the 70-amino acid DNA binding region of RAR. The hormone binding ability of the RARα protein was assayed by a charcoal absorption assay and the RAR protein was found to bind to retinoic acid with a K_d of 2.1 x 10-10 M.

  2. Lipoic acid functionalized amino acids cationic lipids as gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Su, Rong-Chuan; Liu, Qiang; Yi, Wen-Jing; Zheng, Li-Ting; Zhao, Zhi-Gang

    2016-10-01

    A series of reducible cationic lipids 4a-4f with different amino acid polar-head groups were prepared. The novel lipid contains a hydrophobic lipoic acid (LA) moiety, which can be reduced under reductive conditions to release of the encapsulated plasmid DNA. The particle size, zeta potential and cellular uptake of lipoplexes formed with DNA, as well as the transfection efficacy (TE) were characterized. The TE of the cationic lipid based on arginine was especially high, and was 2.5times higher than that of a branched polyethylenimine in the presence of 10% serum.

  3. Association analysis of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma gene polymorphisms with asprin hypersensitivity in asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sun-Hee; Park, Se-Min; Park, Jong-Sook; Jang, An-Soo; Lee, Yong-Mok; Uh, Soo-Taek; Kim, Young Hoon; Choi, In-Seon; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Park, Byeong Lae

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are transcriptional factors activated by ligands of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. The activation of PPARγ regulates inflammation by downregulating the production of Th2 type cytokines and eosinophil function. In addition, a range of natural substances, including arachidonate pathway metabolites such as 15-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid (15-HETE), strongly promote PPARG expression. Therefore, genetic variants of the PPARG gene may be associated with the development of aspirin-intolerant asthma (AIA). We investigated the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the PPARG gene and AIA. Methods Based on the results of an oral aspirin challenge, asthmatics (n=403) were categorized into two groups: those with a decrease in FEV1 of 15% or greater (AIA) or less than 15% (aspirin-tolerant asthma, ATA). We genotyped two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PPARG gene from Korean asthmatics and normal controls (n=449): +34C>G (Pro12Ala) and +82466C>T (His449His). Results Logistic regression analysis showed that +82466C>T and haplotype 1 (CC) were associated with the development of aspirin hypersensitivity in asthmatics (P=0.04). The frequency of the rare allele of +82466C>T was significantly higher in AIA patients than in ATA patients in the recessive model [P=0.04, OR=3.97 (1.08-14.53)]. In addition, the frequency of PPARG haplotype 1 was significantly lower in AIA patients than in ATA patients in the dominant model (OR=0.25, P=0.04). Conclusions The +82466C>T polymorphism and haplotype 1 of the PPARG gene may be linked to increased risk for aspirin hypersensitivity in asthma. PMID:20224667

  4. Vitamin D interferes with transactivation of the growth hormone gene by thyroid hormone and retinoic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Villalba, P; Jimenez-Lara, A M; Aranda, A

    1996-01-01

    The thyroid hormone, retinoic acid (RA), and vitamin D regulate gene expression by binding to similar receptors which act as ligand-inducible transcription factors. Incubation of pituitary GH4C1 cells with nanomolar concentrations of vitamin D markedly reduces the response of the rat growth hormone mRNA to thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) and RA. The stimulation of growth hormone gene expression by both ligands is mediated by a common hormone response element (TREGH) present in the 5'-flanking region of the gene, and the inhibition caused by vitamin D is due to transcriptional interference of the vitamin D receptor on this DNA element. No inhibition of the basal promoter activity by the vitamin was observed. The response to T3 and RA of a heterologous promoter containing this element, the palindromic T3- and RA-responsive sequence TREPAL, or a direct repeat of the same motif is also inhibited by vitamin D. In contrast, vitamin D strongly induces the activity of constructs containing a vitamin D response element, and neither T3 nor RA reduces vitamin D-mediated transactivation. Transfection with an expression vector for the retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR alpha) increases transactivation by T3 and RA but does not abolish the inhibition caused by the vitamin. Gel retardation experiments show that the vitamin D receptor (VDR) as a heterodimer with RXR weakly binds to the T3- and RA-responsive elements. Additionally, VDR displaces binding of T3 and RA receptors in a dose-dependent manner. Our data suggest the formation of TR-VDR and RAR-VDR heterodimers with RXR. The fact that the same response element mediates opposite effects of at least four different nuclear receptors provides a greater complexity and flexibility of the transcriptional responses to their ligands. PMID:8524311

  5. Gene Expression Switching of Receptor Subunits in Human Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Shira, Ossnat; Maor, Ronnie; Chechik, Gal

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic receptors in the human brain consist of multiple protein subunits, many of which have multiple variants, coded by different genes, and are differentially expressed across brain regions and developmental stages. The brain can tune the electrophysiological properties of synapses to regulate plasticity and information processing by switching from one protein variant to another. Such condition-dependent variant switch during development has been demonstrated in several neurotransmitter systems including NMDA and GABA. Here we systematically detect pairs of receptor-subunit variants that switch during the lifetime of the human brain by analyzing postmortem expression data collected in a population of donors at various ages and brain regions measured using microarray and RNA-seq. To further detect variant pairs that co-vary across subjects, we present a method to quantify age-corrected expression correlation in face of strong temporal trends. This is achieved by computing the correlations in the residual expression beyond a cubic-spline model of the population temporal trend, and can be seen as a nonlinear version of partial correlations. Using these methods, we detect multiple new pairs of context dependent variants. For instance, we find a switch from GLRA2 to GLRA3 that differs from the known switch in the rat. We also detect an early switch from HTR1A to HTR5A whose trends are negatively correlated and find that their age-corrected expression is strongly positively correlated. Finally, we observe that GRIN2B switch to GRIN2A occurs mostly during embryonic development, presumably earlier than observed in rodents. These results provide a systematic map of developmental switching in the neurotransmitter systems of the human brain. PMID:26636753

  6. Gene Expression Switching of Receptor Subunits in Human Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shira, Ossnat; Maor, Ronnie; Chechik, Gal

    2015-12-01

    Synaptic receptors in the human brain consist of multiple protein subunits, many of which have multiple variants, coded by different genes, and are differentially expressed across brain regions and developmental stages. The brain can tune the electrophysiological properties of synapses to regulate plasticity and information processing by switching from one protein variant to another. Such condition-dependent variant switch during development has been demonstrated in several neurotransmitter systems including NMDA and GABA. Here we systematically detect pairs of receptor-subunit variants that switch during the lifetime of the human brain by analyzing postmortem expression data collected in a population of donors at various ages and brain regions measured using microarray and RNA-seq. To further detect variant pairs that co-vary across subjects, we present a method to quantify age-corrected expression correlation in face of strong temporal trends. This is achieved by computing the correlations in the residual expression beyond a cubic-spline model of the population temporal trend, and can be seen as a nonlinear version of partial correlations. Using these methods, we detect multiple new pairs of context dependent variants. For instance, we find a switch from GLRA2 to GLRA3 that differs from the known switch in the rat. We also detect an early switch from HTR1A to HTR5A whose trends are negatively correlated and find that their age-corrected expression is strongly positively correlated. Finally, we observe that GRIN2B switch to GRIN2A occurs mostly during embryonic development, presumably earlier than observed in rodents. These results provide a systematic map of developmental switching in the neurotransmitter systems of the human brain.

  7. Identification of Putative Chemosensory Receptor Genes from the Athetis dissimilis Antennal Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Junfeng; Song, Yueqin; Li, Wenliang; Shi, Jie; Wang, Zhenying

    2016-01-01

    Olfaction plays a crucial role in insect population survival and reproduction. Identification of the genes associated with the olfactory system, without the doubt will promote studying the insect chemical communication system. In this study, RNA-seq technology was used to sequence the antennae transcriptome of Athetis dissimilis, an emerging crop pest in China with limited genomic information, with the purpose of identifying the gene set involved in olfactory recognition. Analysis of the transcriptome of female and male antennae generated 13.74 Gb clean reads in total from which 98,001 unigenes were assembled, and 25,930 unigenes were annotated. Total of 60 olfactory receptors (ORs), 18 gustatory receptors (GRs), and 12 ionotropic receptors (IRs) were identified by Blast and sequence similarity analyzes. One obligated olfactory receptor co-receptor (Orco) and four conserved sex pheromone receptors (PRs) were annotated in 60 ORs. Among the putative GRs, five genes (AdisGR1, 6, 7, 8 and 94) clustered in the sugar receptor family, and two genes (AdisGR3 and 93) involved in CO2 detection were identified. Finally, AdisIR8a.1 and AdisIR8a.2 co-receptors were identified in the group of candidate IRs. Furthermore, expression levels of these chemosensory receptor genes in female and male antennae were analyzed by mapping the Illumina reads. PMID:26812239

  8. Structural organization and chromosomal assignment of the human prostacyclin receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Issei; Inoue, Miho

    1995-05-01

    Prostacyclin receptor is a member of the prostanoid receptor family in the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily with seven transmembrane domains. The authors report here the isolation and structural organization of the human prostacyclin receptor gene. Southern blot analysis demonstrated a single copy of the human prostacyclin receptor gene in the human genome. The human prostacyclin receptor gene spanned approximately 7.0 kb and was composed of three exons separated by two introns. The first intron occurred in the 5`-untranslated region, 13 bp upstream to the ATG start codon. The second intron was located at the end of the sixth transmembrane domain, thereby separating it from the downstream coding region and the 3`-untranslated region. By primer extension analysis, the transcription initiation sites were mapped 870-872 bp upstream to the ATG start codon. The 1.2-kb human prostacyclin receptor 5`-flanking region lacked conventional TATA and CCAAT boxes, but it contained several cis-acting regulatory elements including an inverted CCAAT box (Y box) and two copies of SP-1 binding sites. Using human-rodent somatic hybrid cell DNA, the human prostacyclin receptor gene was assigned to human chromosome 19. The present study helps establish the genetic basis for prostacyclin receptor research and provides further insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the prostanoid receptor family. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Most acid-tolerant chickpea mesorhizobia show induction of major chaperone genes upon acid shock.

    PubMed

    Brígido, Clarisse; Oliveira, Solange

    2013-01-01

    Our goals were to evaluate the tolerance of mesorhizobia to acid and alkaline conditions as well as to investigate whether acid tolerance is related to the species or the origin site of the isolates. In addition, to investigate the molecular basis of acid tolerance, the expression of chaperone genes groEL and dnaKJ was analyzed using acid-tolerant and sensitive mesorhizobia. Tolerance to pH 5 and 9 was evaluated in liquid medium for 98 Portuguese chickpea mesorhizobia belonging to four species clusters. All isolates showed high sensitivity to pH 9. In contrast, mesorhizobia revealed high diversity in terms of tolerance to acid stress: 35 % of the isolates were acid sensitive and 45 % were highly tolerant to pH 5 or moderately acidophilic. An association between mesorhizobia tolerance to acid conditions and the origin soil pH was found. Furthermore, significant differences between species clusters regarding tolerance to acidity were obtained. Ten isolates were used to investigate the expression levels of the chaperone genes by northern hybridization. Interestingly, most acid-tolerant isolates displayed induction of the dnaK and groESL genes upon acid shock while the sensitive ones showed repression. This study suggests that acid tolerance in mesorhizobia is related to the pH of the origin soil and to the species cluster of the isolates. Additionally, the transcriptional analysis suggests a relationship between induction of major chaperone genes and higher tolerance to acid pH in mesorhizobia. This is the first report on transcriptional analysis of the major chaperones genes in mesorhizobia under acidity, contributing to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of rhizobia acidity tolerance.

  10. Among the twenty classical L-amino acids, only glutamate directly activates metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Frauli, Mélanie; Neuville, Pascal; Vol, Claire; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Prézeau, Laurent

    2006-02-01

    Under pathophysiological conditions, cellular amino acids can be profusely released from cells into the cerebral interstitial space. Because several class-C G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) display a broad natural ligand spectrum, being sensitive to more than one endogenous ligand, we wondered whether the related metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors could be modulated by various types of L-amino acids, allowing them to sense large increase in extracellular amino acid concentration. Here, the agonist, antagonist and allosteric effects of the twenty classical L-amino acids were evaluated on the eight mGlu receptor subtypes. We show that, in addition to glutamate (Glu), cysteine, aspartate and asparagine also lead to the activation of mGlu3, 4 and 5. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that the effect of these three amino acids did not result from a direct activation of the receptors, but from an indirect action involving Glu-transporters/exchangers. These data first demonstrate that mGlu receptors, unlike other class-C GPCRs, display an extremely high selectivity towards one ligand. Moreover, our results also show that Glu transport systems allow mGlu receptors to sense large increase in the extracellular concentration of some amino acids. Such a system will certainly lead to a large increase in some mGlu receptor activity under pathological conditions, such as seizure, ischemia or other brain injuries. PMID:16310227

  11. Functional analysis of a proline to serine mutation in codon 453 of the thyroid hormone receptor {beta}1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ozata, M.; Suzuki, Satoru; Takeda, Teiji

    1995-10-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding human thyroid hormone receptor {beta}(hTR{beta}) have been associated with generalized resistance to thyroid hormone (GRTH). This disorder is associated with significant behavoral abnormalities. We examined the hTR{beta} gene in a family with members who manifest inappropriately normal TSH, elevated free T{sub 4}, and free and total T{sub 3}. Sequence analysis showed a cytosine to thymine transition at nucleotide 1642 in one allele of the index patient`s genomic DNA. This altered proline to serine at codon 453. The resulting mutant receptor when expressed in vitro bound DNA with high affinity, but the T{sub 3} affinity of the receptor was impaired. The mutant TR demonstrated a dominant negative effect when cotransfected with two isoforms of wild-type receptor and also in the presence of TR variant {alpha}2 in COS-1 cells. Mutations of codon 453 occur more frequently than at other sites, and four different amino acid substitutions have been reported. Significant differences in phenotype occur among affected individuals, varying from normality to moderately severe GRTH. There is no clear correlation between K{sub a} or in vitro function of the mutant receptor, and phenotype. This study extends the association between GRTH and illness, and indicates that early diagnosis and counseling are needed in families with TR{beta}1 abnormalities. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. A novel cytokine-inducible gene CIS encodes an SH2-containing protein that binds to tyrosine-phosphorylated interleukin 3 and erythropoietin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, A; Ohkubo, T; Kiguchi, T; Jenkins, N A; Gilbert, D J; Copeland, N G; Hara, T; Miyajima, A

    1995-01-01

    Cytokines manifest their function through alteration of gene expression. However, target genes for signals from cytokine receptors are largely unknown. We therefore searched for immediate-early cytokine-responsive genes and isolated a novel gene, CIS (cytokine inducible SH2-containing protein) which is induced in hematopoietic cells by a subset of cytokines including interleukin 2 (IL2), IL3, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and erythropoietin (EPO), but not by stem cell factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL6. The CIS message encodes a polypeptide of 257 amino acids that contains an SH2 domain of 96 amino acids in the middle. To clarify the function of CIS in cytokine signal transduction, we expressed CIS in IL3-dependent hematopoietic cell lines under the control of a steroid-inducible promoter. The CIS product stably associated with the tyrosine-phosphorylated beta chain of the IL3 receptor as well as the tyrosine-phosphorylated EPO receptor. Forced expression of CIS by steroid reduced the growth rate of these transformants, suggesting a negative role of CIS in signal transduction. CIS induction requires the membrane-proximal region of the cytoplasmic domain of the EPO receptor as well as that of the common beta chain of the IL3, IL5 and GM-CSF receptor, whereas CIS binds to the receptor that is tyrosine phosphorylated by cytokine stimulation. Thus CIS appears to be a unique regulatory molecule for cytokine signal transduction. Images PMID:7796808

  13. Lithocholic acid decreases expression of bile salt export pump through farnesoid X receptor antagonist activity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinghua; Lo, Jane-L; Huang, Li; Zhao, Annie; Metzger, Edward; Adams, Alan; Meinke, Peter T; Wright, Samuel D; Cui, Jisong

    2002-08-30

    Bile salt export pump (BSEP) is a major bile acid transporter in the liver. Mutations in BSEP result in progressive intrahepatic cholestasis, a severe liver disease that impairs bile flow and causes irreversible liver damage. BSEP is a target for inhibition and down-regulation by drugs and abnormal bile salt metabolites, and such inhibition and down-regulation may result in bile acid retention and intrahepatic cholestasis. In this study, we quantitatively analyzed the regulation of BSEP expression by FXR ligands in primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. We demonstrate that BSEP expression is dramatically regulated by ligands of the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Both the endogenous FXR agonist chenodeoxycholate (CDCA) and synthetic FXR ligand GW4064 effectively increased BSEP mRNA in both cell types. This up-regulation was readily detectable at as early as 3 h, and the ligand potency for BSEP regulation correlates with the intrinsic activity on FXR. These results suggest BSEP as a direct target of FXR and support the recent report that the BSEP promoter is transactivated by FXR. In contrast to CDCA and GW4064, lithocholate (LCA), a hydrophobic bile acid and a potent inducer of cholestasis, strongly decreased BSEP expression. Previous studies did not identify LCA as an FXR antagonist ligand in cells, but we show here that LCA is an FXR antagonist with partial agonist activity in cells. In an in vitro co-activator association assay, LCA decreased CDCA- and GW4064-induced FXR activation with an IC(50) of 1 microm. In HepG2 cells, LCA also effectively antagonized GW4064-enhanced FXR transactivation. These data suggest that the toxic and cholestatic effect of LCA in animals may result from its down-regulation of BSEP through FXR. Taken together, these observations indicate that FXR plays an important role in BSEP gene expression and that FXR ligands may be potential therapeutic drugs for intrahepatic cholestasis.

  14. Classification of Dopamine Receptor Genes in Vertebrates: Nine Subtypes in Osteichthyes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kei; Fontaine, Romain; Pasqualini, Catherine; Vernier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine neurotransmission regulates various brain functions, and its regulatory roles are mediated by two families of G protein-coupled receptors: the D1 and D2 receptor families. In mammals, the D1 family comprises two receptor subtypes (D1 and D5), while the D2 family comprises three receptor subtypes (D2, D3 and D4). Phylogenetic analyses of dopamine receptor genes strongly suggest that the common ancestor of Osteichthyes (bony jawed vertebrates) possessed four subtypes in the D1 family and five subtypes in the D2 family. Mammals have secondarily lost almost half of the ancestral dopamine receptor genes, whereas nonmammalian species kept many of them. Although the mammalian situation is an exception among Osteichthyes, the current classification and characterization of dopamine receptors are based on mammalian features, which have led to confusion in the identification of dopamine receptor subtypes in nonmammalian species. Here we begin by reviewing the history of the discovery of dopamine receptors in vertebrates. The recent genome sequencing of coelacanth, gar and elephant shark led to the proposal of a refined scenario of evolution of dopamine receptor genes. We also discuss a current problem of nomenclature of dopamine receptors. Following the official nomenclature of mammalian dopamine receptors from D1 to D5, we propose to name newly identified receptor subtypes from D6 to D9 in order to facilitate the use of an identical name for orthologous genes among different species. To promote a nomenclature change which allows distinguishing the two dopamine receptor families, a nomenclature consortium is needed. This comparative perspective is crucial to correctly interpret data obtained in animal studies on dopamine-related brain disorders, and more fundamentally, to understand the characteristics of dopamine neurotransmission in vertebrates. PMID:26613258

  15. Parathyroid receptor gene expression by epiphyseal growth plates in rickets and tibial dyschondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Ben-Bassat, S; Genina, O; Lavelin, I; Leach, R M; Pines, M

    1999-03-25

    PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression was evaluated in situ in avian epiphyseal growth plates taken from normal, rachitic and tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) afflicted chicks induced by thiram or by genetic selection. In the normal growth plates, PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression was localized to the maturation zone as demonstrated by the expression of collagen type II (col II), osteopontin (OPN) genes and alkaline phosphatase activity (AP). In TD, either induced by thiram or by genetic selection, normal levels of PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression were observed up to 21 days post-hatch. In rickets, on the other hand, no PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression was observed in the growth plate from day 8 of a vitamin D-deficient diet. In cultured chondrocytes, PTH caused time-dependent down-regulation of its own receptor. These results suggest that alterations in the PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression are associated with rickets but not with TD. The reduction in the PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression in rickets may be due to the high plasma levels of PTH.

  16. Genetic analysis of ryanodine receptor 1 gene and carnitine palmitoyltransferase II gene: an autopsy case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome related to vegetamin.

    PubMed

    Matsusue, Aya; Hara, Kenji; Kageura, Mitsuyoshi; Kashiwagi, Masayuki; Lu, Wang; Ishigami, Akiko; Gotohda, Takako; Tokunaga, Itsuo; Nisimura, Akiyoshi; Sugimura, Tomoko; Kubo, Shin-ichi

    2009-04-01

    We report an autopsy case of a man in his forties who died 2 days after taking an overdose of vegetamin. The autopsy findings were as follows: externally, the upper epidermis of some parts of the body had become loosened. The epidermis was easily detached from the dermis using the fingers. Viscous fluid adhered around the nose and mouth. The brain was edematous and weighed 1520 g. Skeletal muscle was discolored. The urine was a slightly red-tinged yellow. The organs showed congestion. Urine tests: urea nitrogen: 1.95 g/day; creatinine: 0.66 g/day; urine myoglobin: 1100 ng/mL. Blood level of drugs: phenobarbital: 38.2 microg/ml; promethazine: 2.22 microg/ml; chlorpromazine: 0.96 microg/ml. Immunohistochemistry identified myoglobin in the kidney. From these findings, his cause of death was considered to be vegetamin-induced neuroleptic malignant syndrome and rhabdomyolysis. Mutation of the ryanodine receptor 1 gene is associated with malignant hyperthermia. However, there was no mutation which causes amino acid substitution in the three hot-spot regions of the ryanodine receptor 1 gene. Partial deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II is the commonest cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in adults. The subject was found to be heterozygous for an amino acid exchange in exon 4, (1203)G-->A causing a (368)Val-->Ile amino acid substitution. It is necessary to examine other candidate gene mutations. PMID:19269221

  17. Functional characterization of bursicon receptor and genome-wide analysis for identification of genes affected by bursicon receptor RNAi.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hua; Palli, Subba R

    2010-08-01

    Bursicon is an insect neuropeptide hormone that is secreted from the central nervous system into the hemolymph and initiates cuticle tanning. The receptor for bursicon is encoded by the rickets (rk) gene and belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. The bursicon and its receptor regulate cuticle tanning as well as wing expansion after adult eclosion. However, the molecular action of bursicon signaling remains unclear. We utilized RNA interference (RNAi) and microarray to study the function of the bursicon receptor (Tcrk) in the model insect, Tribolium castaneum. The data included here showed that in addition to cuticle tanning and wing expansion reported previously, Tcrk is also required for development and expansion of integumentary structures and adult eclosion. Using custom microarrays, we identified 24 genes that are differentially expressed between Tcrk RNAi and control insects. Knockdown in the expression of one of these genes, TC004091, resulted in the arrest of adult eclosion. Identification of genes that are involved in bursicon receptor mediated biological processes will provide tools for future studies on mechanisms of bursicon action.

  18. Therapeutic role of bile acids and nuclear receptor agonists in fibrosing cholangiopathies.

    PubMed

    Trauner, Michael; Halilbasic, Emina; Kazemi-Shirazi, Lili; Kienbacher, Christian; Staufer, Katharina; Traussnigg, Stefan; Hofer, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory bile duct diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) result in progressive fibrosis of the biliary tract and ultimately cirrhosis of the liver. Since the etiology and pathogenesis of these fibrosing cholangiopathies are still poorly understood, therapeutic options are rather limited at present. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the paradigm therapeutic bile acid and established standard treatment for PBC, but its role for medical therapy of PSC is still under debate. Promising novel bile acid-based therapeutic options include 24-norursodeoxycholic acid, a side chain-shortened C23 homologue of UDCA, and bile acid receptor/farnesoid X receptor agonists (e.g., obeticholic acid) which currently undergo clinical development for fibrosing cholangiopathies such as PBC and PSC. Other nuclear receptors such as vitamin D receptor and fatty acid-activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are also of considerable interest. This review article is a summary of an overview talk given at Falk Symposium 191 on Advances in Pathogenesis and Treatment of Liver Diseases held in London, October 3-4, 2013, and summarizes the recent progress with novel therapeutic bile acids and bile acid derivatives as novel therapies for fibrosing cholangiopathies such as PBC and PSC.

  19. Potent and selective activation of abscisic acid receptors in vivo by mutational stabilization of their agonist-bound conformation

    PubMed Central

    Mosquna, Assaf; Peterson, Francis C.; Park, Sang-Youl; Lozano-Juste, Jorge; Volkman, Brian F.; Cutler, Sean R.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrabactin resistance (PYR) 1 and its relatives belong to a family of soluble abscisic acid (ABA) receptors that inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2C) when in their agonist-stabilized conformation. Given their switch-like properties, we envisioned that mutations that stabilize their agonist-bound conformation could be used to activate signaling in vivo. To identify such mutations, we subjected PYR1 to site-saturation mutagenesis at 39 highly conserved residues that participate in ABA or PP2C contacts. All 741 possible single amino acid substitutions at these sites were tested to identify variants that increase basal PYR1-PP2C interactions, which uncovered activating mutations in 10 residues that preferentially cluster in PYR1's gate loop and C-terminal helix. The mutations cause measurable but incomplete receptor activation in vitro; however, specific triple and quadruple mutant combinations were constructed that promote an agonist-bound conformation, as measured by heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR, and lead to full receptor activation. Moreover, these mutations retain functionality when introduced into divergent family members, and can therefore be used to dissect individual receptor function in vivo, which has been problematic because of redundancy and family size. Expression of activated PYL2 in Arabidopsis seeds activates ABA signaling by a number of measures: modulation of ABA-regulated gene expression, induction of hyperdormancy, and suppression of ABA deficiency phenotypes in the aba2-1 mutant. Our results set the stage for systematic gain-of-function studies of PYR1 and related ABA receptors and reveal that, despite the large number of receptors, activation of a single receptor is sufficient to activate signaling in planta. PMID:22139369

  20. Effects of beer and hop on ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, Hitoshi; Takeda, Katsuichi; Okita, Yoichi; Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Koda, Hirofumi; Kiso, Yoshinobu

    2006-04-01

    Beer induced the response of the ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABA(A) receptors) expressed in Xenopus oocytes, indicating the presence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-like activity. Furthermore, the pentane extract of the beer, hop (Humulus lupulus L.) oil, and myrcenol potentiated the GABA(A) receptor response elicited by GABA. The GABA(A) receptor responses were also potentiated by the addition of aliphatic esters, most of which are reported to be present in beer flavor. Aliphatic esters showed the tendency to decrease in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response with an increase in their carbon chain length. When myrcenol was injected to mice prior to intraperitoneal administration of pentobarbital, the pentobarbital-induced sleeping time of mice increased additionally. Therefore, the beer contained not only GABA-like activity but also the modulator(s) of the GABA(A) receptor response.

  1. Identification of Modulators of the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) in a Mouse Liver Gene Expression Compendium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor family member peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is activated by therapeutic hypolipidemic drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals to regulate genes involved in lipid transport and catabolism. Chronic activation of PPARα in rodents inc...

  2. Allelic association of human dopamine D sub 2 receptor gene in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, K.; Sheridan, P.J.; Montgomery, A.; Jagadeeswaran, P.; Nogami, H.; Briggs, A.H. ); Noble, E.P.; Ritchie, T.; Cohn, J.B. )

    1990-04-18

    In a blinded experiment, the authors report the first allelic association of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene in alcoholism. From 70 brain samples of alcoholics and nonalcoholics, DNA was digested with restriction endonucleases and probed with a clone that contained the entire 3{prime} coding exon, the polyadenylation signal, and approximately 16.4 kilobases of noncoding 3{prime} sequence of the human dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene ({lambda}hD2G1). In the present samples, the presence of A1 allele of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene correctly classified 77% of alcoholics, and its absence classified 72% of nonalcoholics. The polymorphic pattern of this receptor gene suggests that a gene that confers susceptibility to at least one form of alcoholism is located on the q22-q23 region of chromosome 11.

  3. The Free Fatty Acid Receptor G Protein-coupled Receptor 40 (GPR40) Protects from Bone Loss through Inhibition of Osteoclast Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Wauquier, Fabien; Philippe, Claire; Léotoing, Laurent; Mercier, Sylvie; Davicco, Marie-Jeanne; Lebecque, Patrice; Guicheux, Jérôme; Pilet, Paul; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Poitout, Vincent; Alquier, Thierry; Coxam, Véronique; Wittrant, Yohann

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms linking fat intake to bone loss remain unclear. By demonstrating the expression of the free fatty acid receptor G-coupled protein receptor 40 (GPR40) in bone cells, we hypothesized that this receptor may play a role in mediating the effects of fatty acids on bone remodeling. Using micro-CT analysis, we showed that GPR40−/− mice exhibit osteoporotic features suggesting a positive role of GPR40 on bone density. In primary cultures of bone marrow, we showed that GW9508, a GRP40 agonist, abolished bone-resorbing cell differentiation. This alteration of the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation occurred via the inhibition of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway as demonstrated by decrease in gene reporter activity, inhibitor of κB kinase (IKKα/β) activation, inhibitor of κB (IkBα) phosphorylation, and nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFATc1) expression. The GPR40-dependent effect of GW9508 was confirmed using shRNA interference in osteoclast precursors and GPR40−/− primary cell cultures. In addition, in vivo administration of GW9508 counteracted ovariectomy-induced bone loss in wild-type but not GPR40−/− mice, enlightening the obligatory role of the GPR40 receptor. Then, in a context of growing prevalence of metabolic and age-related bone disorders, our results demonstrate for the first time in translational approaches that GPR40 is a relevant target for the design of new nutritional and therapeutic strategies to counter bone complications. PMID:23335512

  4. Data for amino acid alignment of Japanese stingray melanocortin receptors with other gnathostome melanocortin receptor sequences, and the ligand selectivity of Japanese stingray melanocortin receptors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Davis, Perry; Reinick, Christina; Mizusawa, Kanta; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Dores, Robert M

    2016-06-01

    This article contains structure and pharmacological characteristics of melanocortin receptors (MCRs) related to research published in "Characterization of melanocortin receptors from stingray Dasyatis akajei, a cartilaginous fish" (Takahashi et al., 2016) [1]. The amino acid sequences of the stingray, D. akajei, MC1R, MC2R, MC3R, MC4R, and MC5R were aligned with the corresponding melanocortin receptor sequences from the elephant shark, Callorhinchus milii, the dogfish, Squalus acanthias, the goldfish, Carassius auratus, and the mouse, Mus musculus. These alignments provide the basis for phylogenetic analysis of these gnathostome melanocortin receptor sequences. In addition, the Japanese stingray melanocortin receptors were separately expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, and stimulated with stingray ACTH, α-MSH, β-MSH, γ-MSH, δ-MSH, and β-endorphin. The dose response curves reveal the order of ligand selectivity for each stingray MCR. PMID:27408924

  5. Functional analysis of duplicated Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SymRK) genes during nodulation and mycorrhizal infection in soybean (Glycine max).

    PubMed

    Indrasumunar, Arief; Wilde, Julia; Hayashi, Satomi; Li, Dongxue; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2015-03-15

    Association between legumes and rhizobia results in the formation of root nodules, where symbiotic nitrogen fixation occurs. The early stages of this association involve a complex of signalling events between the host and microsymbiont. Several genes dealing with early signal transduction have been cloned, and one of them encodes the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptor kinase (SymRK; also termed NORK). The Symbiosis Receptor Kinase gene is required by legumes to establish a root endosymbiosis with Rhizobium bacteria as well as mycorrhizal fungi. Using degenerate primer and BAC sequencing, we cloned duplicated SymRK homeologues in soybean called GmSymRKα and GmSymRKβ. These duplicated genes have high similarity of nucleotide (96%) and amino acid sequence (95%). Sequence analysis predicted a malectin-like domain within the extracellular domain of both genes. Several putative cis-acting elements were found in promoter regions of GmSymRKα and GmSymRKβ, suggesting a participation in lateral root development, cell division and peribacteroid membrane formation. The mutant of SymRK genes is not available in soybean; therefore, to know the functions of these genes, RNA interference (RNAi) of these duplicated genes was performed. For this purpose, RNAi construct of each gene was generated and introduced into the soybean genome by Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated hairy root transformation. RNAi of GmSymRKβ gene resulted in an increased reduction of nodulation and mycorrhizal infection than RNAi of GmSymRKα, suggesting it has the major activity of the duplicated gene pair. The results from the important crop legume soybean confirm the joint phenotypic action of GmSymRK genes in both mycorrhizal and rhizobial infection seen in model legumes.

  6. Association study of dopamine D3 receptor gene and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.L.; Billett, E.A.; Macciardi, F.M.

    1995-12-18

    Several groups have reported an association between schizophrenia and the MscI polymorphism in the first exon of the dopamine D3 receptor gene (DRD3). We studied this polymorphism using a North American sample (117 patients plus 188 controls) and an Italian sample (97 patients plus 64 controls). In the first part of the study, we compared allele frequencies of schizophrenia patients and unmatched controls and observed a significant difference in the total sample (P = 0.01). The second part of the study involved a case control approach in which each schizophrenia patient was matched to a control of the same sex, and of similar age and ethnic background. The DRD3 allele frequencies of patients and controls revealed no significant difference between the two groups in the Italian (N = 53) or the North American (N = 54) matched populations; however, when these two matched samples were combined, a significant difference was observed (P = 0.026). Our results suggest that the MscI polymorphism may be associated with schizophrenia in the populations studied. 32 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Penguins reduced olfactory receptor genes common to other waterbirds

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qin; Wang, Kai; Lei, Fumin; Yu, Dan; Zhao, Huabin

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell, or olfaction, is fundamental in the life of animals. However, penguins (Aves: Sphenisciformes) possess relatively small olfactory bulbs compared with most other waterbirds such as Procellariiformes and Gaviiformes. To test whether penguins have a reduced reliance on olfaction, we analyzed the draft genome sequences of the two penguins, which diverged at the origin of the order Sphenisciformes; we also examined six closely related species with available genomes, and identified 29 one-to-one orthologous olfactory receptor genes (i.e. ORs) that are putatively functionally conserved and important across the eight birds. To survey the 29 one-to-one orthologous ORs in penguins and their relatives, we newly generated 34 sequences that are missing from the draft genomes. Through the analysis of totaling 378 OR sequences, we found that, of these functionally important ORs common to other waterbirds, penguins have a significantly greater percentage of OR pseudogenes than other waterbirds, suggesting a reduction of olfactory capability. The penguin-specific reduction of olfactory capability arose in the common ancestor of penguins between 23 and 60 Ma, which may have resulted from the aquatic specializations for underwater vision. Our study provides genetic evidence for a possible reduction of reliance on olfaction in penguins. PMID:27527385

  8. Penguins reduced olfactory receptor genes common to other waterbirds.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qin; Wang, Kai; Lei, Fumin; Yu, Dan; Zhao, Huabin

    2016-08-16

    The sense of smell, or olfaction, is fundamental in the life of animals. However, penguins (Aves: Sphenisciformes) possess relatively small olfactory bulbs compared with most other waterbirds such as Procellariiformes and Gaviiformes. To test whether penguins have a reduced reliance on olfaction, we analyzed the draft genome sequences of the two penguins, which diverged at the origin of the order Sphenisciformes; we also examined six closely related species with available genomes, and identified 29 one-to-one orthologous olfactory receptor genes (i.e. ORs) that are putatively functionally conserved and important across the eight birds. To survey the 29 one-to-one orthologous ORs in penguins and their relatives, we newly generated 34 sequences that are missing from the draft genomes. Through the analysis of totaling 378 OR sequences, we found that, of these functionally important ORs common to other waterbirds, penguins have a significantly greater percentage of OR pseudogenes than other waterbirds, suggesting a reduction of olfactory capability. The penguin-specific reduction of olfactory capability arose in the common ancestor of penguins between 23 and 60 Ma, which may have resulted from the aquatic specializations for underwater vision. Our study provides genetic evidence for a possible reduction of reliance on olfaction in penguins.

  9. Penguins reduced olfactory receptor genes common to other waterbirds.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qin; Wang, Kai; Lei, Fumin; Yu, Dan; Zhao, Huabin

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell, or olfaction, is fundamental in the life of animals. However, penguins (Aves: Sphenisciformes) possess relatively small olfactory bulbs compared with most other waterbirds such as Procellariiformes and Gaviiformes. To test whether penguins have a reduced reliance on olfaction, we analyzed the draft genome sequences of the two penguins, which diverged at the origin of the order Sphenisciformes; we also examined six closely related species with available genomes, and identified 29 one-to-one orthologous olfactory receptor genes (i.e. ORs) that are putatively functionally conserved and important across the eight birds. To survey the 29 one-to-one orthologous ORs in penguins and their relatives, we newly generated 34 sequences that are missing from the draft genomes. Through the analysis of totaling 378 OR sequences, we found that, of these functionally important ORs common to other waterbirds, penguins have a significantly greater percentage of OR pseudogenes than other waterbirds, suggesting a reduction of olfactory capability. The penguin-specific reduction of olfactory capability arose in the common ancestor of penguins between 23 and 60 Ma, which may have resulted from the aquatic specializations for underwater vision. Our study provides genetic evidence for a possible reduction of reliance on olfaction in penguins. PMID:27527385

  10. Positive association between a DNA sequence variant in the serotonin 2A receptor gene and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Inayama, Y.; Yoneda, H.; Sakai, T.

    1996-02-16

    Sixty-two patients with schizophrenia and 96 normal controls were investigated for genetic association with restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in the serotonin receptor genes. A positive association between the serotonin 2A receptor gene (HTR2A) and schizophrenia was found, but not between schizophrenia and the serotonin 1A receptor gene. The positive association we report here would suggest that the DNA region with susceptibility to schizophrenia lies in the HTR2A on the long arm of chromosome 13. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  11. Allosteric regulation of the discriminative responsiveness of retinoic acid receptor to natural and synthetic ligands by retinoid X receptor and DNA.

    PubMed

    Mouchon, A; Delmotte, M H; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1999-04-01

    Transcriptional activation by retinoids is mediated through two families of nuclear receptors, all-trans-retinoic acid (RARs) and 9-cis retinoic acid receptors (RXRs). Conformationally restricted retinoids are used to achieve selective activation of RAR isotype alpha, beta or gamma, which reduces side effects in therapeutical applications. Synthetic retinoids mimic some of all-trans retinoic acid biological effects in vivo but interact differently with the ligand binding domain of RARalpha and induce distinct structural transitions of the receptor. In this report, we demonstrate that RAR-selective ligands have distinct quantitative activation properties which are reflected by their abilities to promote interaction of DNA-bound human RXRalpha (hRXRalpha)-hRARalpha heterodimers with the nuclear receptor coactivator (NCoA) SRC-1 in vitro. The hormone response element core motifs spacing defined the relative affinity of liganded heterodimers for two NCoAs, SRC-1 and RIP140. hRXRalpha activating function 2 was critical to confer hRARalpha full responsiveness but not differential sensitivity of hRARalpha to natural or synthetic retinoids. We also provide evidence showing that lysines located in helices 3 and 4, which define part of hRARalpha NCoA binding surface, contribute differently to (i) the transcriptional activity and (ii) the interaction of RXR-RAR heterodimers with SRC-1, when challenged by either natural or RAR-selective retinoids. Thus, ligand structure, DNA, and RXR exert allosteric regulations on hRARalpha conformation organized as a DNA-bound heterodimer. We suggest that the use of physically distinct NCoA binding interfaces may be important in controlling specific genes by conformationally restricted ligands.

  12. Genetic mapping of the beta 1 GABA receptor gene to human chromosome 4, using a tetranucleotide repeat polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, M; Lucas-Derse, S; Bolos, A; O'Brien, S J; Kirkness, E F; Fraser, C M; Goldman, D

    1991-01-01

    As more coding loci for functional human genes are described, there is a growing need to identify DNA polymorphisms in specific genes. By examining DNA sequences within the introns of the beta 1 subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor gene, GABARB1, we found a tetranucleotide repeat sequence (GATA). Amplification of this region by using PCR revealed seven alleles and a high degree of polymorphism (PIC = .75) in human populations. DNAs from the CEPH families were typed for the GABARB1 intron polymorphism and were analyzed with respect to 20 linked markers on chromosome 4. The results permit placement of GABARB1 on the linkage map of chromosome 4, between D4S104 and ALB. These results affirm that sequence analysis of noncoding segments included within or adjacent to functional genes has value as a strategy to detect highly informative polymorphisms. Images Figure 2 PMID:1652891

  13. Developing in vitro reporter gene assays to assess the hormone receptor activities of chemicals frequently detected in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong; Si, Chaozong; Bian, Qian; Chen, Xiaodong; Chen, Liansheng; Wang, Xinru

    2012-08-01

    The present study intended to develop receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene assays to evaluate and compare the estrogen receptor (ER), androgen receptor (AR) and thyroid hormone receptor (TR) activities of target chemicals. Di-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate (DEHP), chlorpyrifos (CPF), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and bisphenol A (BPA) are some of the most common contaminants in drinking water and are frequently detected in China and worldwide. The chemicals were tested at concentrations of 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 times their maximum contaminant level in drinking water. The results showed that BPA possessed various activities on ER, AR and TR. DEHP and CPF could suppress 17β-estradiol or testosterone activity with different potencies, and DEHP possessed weaker anti-thyroid hormone activity. 2,4-D showed no agonist or antagonist activity against these hormone receptors, but it significantly enhanced the activity of testosterone through AR. Furthermore, the mixture of DEHP and CPF exhibited stronger ER and AR antagonist activities than each single component alone, but their combined effects were less than the expected effects based on the additive model. These results implied that the transcription activation mediated by hormone receptors was the potential endocrine-disrupting mechanism of the test chemicals. Our study also provided useful tools for evaluation of their endocrine disrupting activity.

  14. Epigenetic regulation of olfactory receptor gene expression by the Myb-MuvB/dREAM complex.

    PubMed

    Sim, Choon Kiat; Perry, Sarah; Tharadra, Sana Khalid; Lipsick, Joseph S; Ray, Anandasankar

    2012-11-15

    In both mammals and insects, an olfactory neuron will usually select a single olfactory receptor and repress remaining members of large receptor families. Here we show that a conserved multiprotein complex, Myb-MuvB (MMB)/dREAM, plays an important role in mediating neuron-specific expression of the carbon dioxide (CO(2)) receptor genes (Gr63a/Gr21a) in Drosophila. Activity of Myb in the complex is required for expression of Gr63a/Gr21a and acts in opposition to the histone methyltransferase Su(var)3-9. Consistent with this, we observed repressive dimethylated H3K9 modifications at the receptor gene loci, suggesting a mechanism for silencing receptor gene expression. Conversely, other complex members, Mip120 (Myb-interacting protein 120) and E2F2, are required for repression of Gr63a in inappropriate neurons. Misexpression in mutants is accompanied by an increase in the H3K4me3 mark of active chromatin at the receptor gene locus. Nuclei of CO(2) receptor-expressing neurons contain reduced levels of the repressive subunit Mip120 compared with surrounding neurons and increased levels of Myb, suggesting that activity of the complex can be regulated in a cell-specific manner. Our evidence suggests a model in which olfactory receptors are regulated epigenetically and the MMB/dREAM complex plays a critical role in specifying, maintaining, and modulating the receptor-to-neuron map.

  15. Ligand-activated PPARα-dependent DNA demethylation regulates the fatty acid β-oxidation genes in the postnatal liver.

    PubMed

    Ehara, Tatsuya; Kamei, Yasutomi; Yuan, Xunmei; Takahashi, Mayumi; Kanai, Sayaka; Tamura, Erina; Tsujimoto, Kazutaka; Tamiya, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Shimano, Hitoshi; Takai-Igarashi, Takako; Hatada, Izuho; Suganami, Takayoshi; Hashimoto, Koshi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2015-03-01

    The metabolic function of the liver changes sequentially during early life in mammals to adapt to the marked changes in nutritional environment. Accordingly, hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation is activated after birth to produce energy from breast milk lipids. However, how it is induced during the neonatal period is poorly understood. Here we show DNA demethylation and increased mRNA expression of the fatty acid β-oxidation genes in the postnatal mouse liver. The DNA demethylation does not occur in the fetal mouse liver under the physiologic condition, suggesting that it is specific to the neonatal period. Analysis of mice deficient in the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and maternal administration of a PPARα ligand during the gestation and lactation periods reveal that the DNA demethylation is PPARα dependent. We also find that DNA methylation of the fatty acid β-oxidation genes are reduced in the adult human liver relative to the fetal liver. This study represents the first demonstration that the ligand-activated PPARα-dependent DNA demethylation regulates the hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation genes during the neonatal period, thereby highlighting the role of a lipid-sensing nuclear receptor in the gene- and life-stage-specific DNA demethylation of a particular metabolic pathway.

  16. Potentiation of Gamma Aminobutyric Acid Receptors (GABAAR) by Ethanol: How Are Inhibitory Receptors Affected?

    PubMed Central

    Förstera, Benjamin; Castro, Patricio A.; Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Aguayo, Luis G.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the understanding of ethanol actions on the type A γ-aminobutyric acid chloride channel (GABAAR), a member of the pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs). However, the mechanism by which ethanol potentiates the complex is still not fully understood and a number of publications have shown contradictory results. Thus many questions still remain unresolved requiring further studies for a better comprehension of this effect. The present review concentrates on the involvement of GABAAR in the acute actions of ethanol and specifically focuses on the immediate, direct or indirect, synaptic and extra-synaptic modulatory effects. To elaborate on the immediate, direct modulation of GABAAR by acute ethanol exposure, electrophysiological studies investigating the importance of different subunits, and data from receptor mutants will be examined. We will also discuss the nature of the putative binding sites for ethanol based on structural data obtained from other members of the pLGICs family. Finally, we will briefly highlight the glycine gated chloride channel (GlyR), another member of the pLGIC family, as a suitable target for the development of new pharmacological tools. PMID:27199667

  17. From "junk" to gene: curriculum vitae of a primate receptor isoform gene.

    PubMed

    Singer, Silke S; Männel, Daniela N; Hehlgans, Thomas; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2004-08-20

    Exonization of Alu retroposons awakens public opinion, particularly when causing genetic diseases. However, often neglected, alternative "Alu-exons" also carry the potential to greatly enhance genetic diversity by increasing the transcriptome of primates chiefly via alternative splicing.Here, we report a 5' exon generated from one of the two alternative transcripts in human tumor necrosis factor receptor gene type 2 (p75TNFR) that contains an ancient Alu-SINE, which provides an alternative N-terminal protein-coding domain. We follow the primate evolution over the past 63 million years to reconstruct the key events that gave rise to a novel receptor isoform. The Alu integration and start codon formation occurred between 58 and 40 million years ago (MYA) in the common ancestor of anthropoid primates. Yet a functional gene product could not be generated until a novel splice site and an open reading frame were introduced between 40 and 25 MYA on the catarrhine lineage (Old World monkeys including apes).

  18. Identification and Expression Analysis of Putative Chemosensory Receptor Genes in Microplitis mediator by Antennal Transcriptome Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Ning; Peng, Yong; Lu, Zi-Yun; Dhiloo, Khalid Hussain; Gu, Shao-Hua; Li, Rui-Jun; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Zhang, Yong-Jun; Guo, Yu-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Host-seeking, ovipositional behavior and mating of insects are controlled mainly by odor perception through sensory organs such as antennae. Antennal chemoreception is extremely important for insect survival. Several antennal chemosensory receptors are involved in mediating the odor detection in insects, especially the odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs), to ensure the specificity of the olfactory sensory neuron responses. In the present study, we identified the chemosensory receptor gene repertoire of the parasitoid wasp Microplitis mediator, a generalist endoparasitoid that infests more than 40 types of Lepidopterous larvae and is widely distributed in the Palaearctic region. By transcriptome sequencing of male and female antennae we identified 60 candidate odorant receptors, six candidate ionotropic receptors and two gustatory receptors in M. mediator. The full-length sequences of these putative chemosensory receptor genes were obtained by using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR (RACE-PCR) method. We also conducted reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) combined with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for investigating the expression profiles of these chemosensory receptor genes in olfactory and non-olfactory tissues. The tissue- and sex-biased expression patterns may provide insights into the roles of the chemosensory receptor in M. mediator. Our findings support possible future study of the chemosensory behavior of M. mediator at the molecular level. PMID:26078716

  19. Aromatic L-amino acids activate the calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Conigrave, Arthur D; Mun, Hee-Chang; Lok, Hiu-Chuen

    2007-06-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is recognized as a member of class 3 of the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. Members of this subgroup, which have large N-terminal extracellular domains, include receptors that respond specifically to the amino acid glutamate; receptors that respond to the glutamate analogue, gamma-amino butyric acid; and several receptors that act as broad-spectrum amino acid sensors. The CaR is one of these broad-spectrum amino acid sensors that, along with several other members of the subgroup, also responds to extracellular Ca2+. In this mini-review, we consider evidence that the CaR is a sensor of aromatic amino acids, that it has broad-spectrum amino acid sensing properties, that it provides an amino acid binding site in its extracellular N-terminal Venus Fly Trap domain, and that amino acids have a physiological impact on systems in which the CaR is expressed.

  20. Oleocanthal Modulates Estradiol-Induced Gene Expression Involving Estrogen Receptor α.

    PubMed

    Keiler, Annekathrin Martina; Djiogue, Sefirin; Ehrhardt, Tino; Zierau, Oliver; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Halabalaki, Maria; Vollmer, Günter

    2015-09-01

    Oleocanthal is a bioactive compound from olive oil. It has attracted considerable attention as it is anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and has been shown to possess neuroprotective properties in vitro and in vivo. Delineated from its polyphenolic structure, the aim of this study was to characterize oleocanthal towards estrogenic properties. This might contribute to partly explain the beneficial effects described for the Mediterranean diet. Estrogenic properties of oleocanthal were assessed by different methods: a) stimulation of reporter gene activity in MVLN or RNDA cells either expressing estrogen receptor α or β, b) stimulation of luciferase reporter gene activity in U2OS osteosarcoma cells expressing estrogen receptor α or β, and c) elucidation of the impact on estradiol-induced gene expression in U2OS cells transduced with both estrogen receptors. Depending on the cell line origin, oleocanthal inhibited luciferase activity (MVLN, U2OS-estrogen receptor β) or weakly induced reporter gene activity at 10 µM in U2OS-estrogen receptor α cells. However, oleocanthal inhibited stimulation of luciferase activity by estradiol from both estrogen receptors. Oleocanthal, if given alone, did not stimulate gene expression in U2OS cells, but it significantly modulated the response of estradiol. Oleocanthal enhanced the effect of estradiol on the regulation of those genes, which are believed to be regulated through heterodimeric estrogen receptors. As the estrogenic response pattern of oleocanthal is rather unique, we compared the results obtained with oleacein. Oleocanthal binds to both estrogen receptors inducing estradiol-agonistic or antiagonistic effects depending on the cell line. Regarding regulation of gene expression in U2OS-estrogen receptor α/β cells, oleocanthal and oleacein enhanced estradiol-mediated regulation of heterodimer-regulated genes. PMID:26166135

  1. Response to metal stress of Nicotiana langsdorffii plants wild-type and transgenic for the rat glucocorticoid receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Fuoco, Roger; Bogani, Patrizia; Capodaglio, Gabriele; Del Bubba, Massimo; Abollino, Ornella; Giannarelli, Stefania; Spiriti, Maria Michela; Muscatello, Beatrice; Doumett, Saer; Turetta, Clara; Zangrando, Roberta; Zelano, Vincenzo; Buiatti, Marcello

    2013-05-01

    Recently our findings have shown that the integration of the gene coding for the rat gluco-corticoid receptor (GR receptor) in Nicotiana langsdorffii plants induced morphophysiological effects in transgenic plants through the modification of their hormonal pattern. Phytohormones play a key role in plant responses to many different biotic and abiotic stresses since a modified hormonal profile up-regulates the activation of secondary metabolites involved in the response to stress. In this work transgenic GR plants and isogenic wild type genotypes were exposed to metal stress by treating them with 30ppm cadmium(II) or 50ppm chromium(VI). Hormonal patterns along with changes in key response related metabolites were then monitored and compared. Heavy metal up-take was found to be lower in the GR plants. The transgenic plants exhibited higher values of S-abscisic acid (S-ABA) and 3-indole acetic acid (IAA), salicylic acid and total polyphenols, chlorogenic acid and antiradical activity, compared to the untransformed wild type plants. Both Cd and Cr treatments led to an increase in hormone concentrations and secondary metabolites only in wild type plants. Analysis of the results suggests that the stress responses due to changes in the plant's hormonal system may derive from the interaction between the GR receptor and phytosteroids, which are known to play a key role in plant physiology and development.

  2. Diurnal gene expression of lipolytic natriuretic peptide receptors in white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Smith, Julie; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Christoffersen, Christina; Goetze, Jens P

    2015-12-01

    Disruption of the circadian rhythm can lead to obesity and cardiovascular disease. In white adipose tissue, activation of the natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) stimulates lipolysis. We have previously shown that natriuretic peptides are expressed in a circadian manner in the heart, but the temporal expression profile of their cognate receptors has not been examined in white adipose tissue. We therefore collected peri-renal white adipose tissue and serum from WT mice. Tissue mRNA contents of NPRs - NPR-A and NPR-C, the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1, and transcripts involved in lipid metabolism were quantified at 4-h intervals: in the diurnal study, mice were exposed to a period of 12 h light followed by 12 h darkness (n=52). In the circadian study, mice were kept in darkness for 24 h (n=47). Concomitant serum concentrations of free fatty acids, glycerol, triglycerides (TGs), and insulin were measured. Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA contents showed reciprocal circadian profiles (P<0.0001). NPR-A mRNA contents followed a temporal pattern (P=0.01), peaking in the dark (active) period. In contrast, NPR-C mRNA was expressed in an antiphase manner with nadir in the active period (P=0.007). TG concentrations in serum peaked in the active dark period (P=0.003). In conclusion, NPR-A and NPR-C gene expression is associated with the expression of clock genes in white adipose tissue. The reciprocal expression may thus contribute to regulate lipolysis and energy homeostasis in a diurnal manner.

  3. Characterization and expression analysis of somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinase genes from Phalaenopsis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y W; Tsai, Y J; Chen, F C

    2014-12-18

    Somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinase (SERK) genes have been found to be involved in the somatic embryogenesis of several plant species. We identified and characterized 5 PhSERK genes in the Phalaenopsis orchid. The amino acid sequences of PhSERKs and other SERK proteins are highly conserved, with the highest homology observed in the leucine-rich repeat-receptor-like kinase domain. All 5 PhSERKs were expressed in all Phalaenopsis organs examined (root, leaf, shoot apical meristem, and flower), with the strongest expression, particularly for PhSERK1 and 3, in the shoot apical meristem of mature plants. Expression of all PhSERKs was downregulated during early floral bud development and was upregulated gradually until the semi-open flower stage was reached. All 5 PhSERKs were expressed during both seed germination and protocorm-like-body (PLB) development. In germinated seeds, quantitative real-time PCR revealed upregulation of all PhSERKs except PhSERK4 at 1 week and downregulation after 4 weeks. The 5 PhSERKs were differentially expressed in the early stage of PLB development and maintained substantial levels during PLB formation, with PhSERK1 and 5 upregulated 1 week after culture and PhSERK2, 3, and 4 downregulated over this period. Because physical wounding of PLB stimulates secondary PLB formation, the PhSERK5 expression peak at week 3 coincided with visible and fully developed secondary PLBs. PhSERK5 may be important in PLB induction and subsequent development. Our PhSERK expression analysis revealed that these genes have a broad role during orchid plant development.

  4. Characterization of promoter sequence of toll-like receptor genes in Vechur cattle

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, R.; Jayavardhanan, K. K.; Aravindakshan, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the promoter sequence of toll-like receptor (TLR) genes in Vechur cattle, an indigenous breed of Kerala with the sequence of Bos taurus and access the differences that could be attributed to innate immune responses against bovine mastitis. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected from Jugular vein of Vechur cattle, maintained at Vechur cattle conservation center of Kerala Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, using an acid-citrate-dextrose anticoagulant. The genomic DNA was extracted, and polymerase chain reaction was carried out to amplify the promoter region of TLRs. The amplified product of TLR2, 4, and 9 promoter regions was sequenced by Sanger enzymatic DNA sequencing technique. Results: The sequence of promoter region of TLR2 of Vechur cattle with the B. taurus sequence present in GenBank showed 98% similarity and revealed variants for four sequence motifs. The sequence of the promoter region of TLR4 of Vechur cattle revealed 99% similarity with that of B. taurus sequence but not reveals significant variant in motifregions. However, two heterozygous loci were observed from the chromatogram. Promoter sequence of TLR9 gene also showed 99% similarity to B. taurus sequence and revealed variants for four sequence motifs. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that significant variation in the promoter of TLR2 and 9 genes in Vechur cattle breed and may potentially link the influence the innate immunity response against mastitis diseases. PMID:27397987

  5. Mouse muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gamma subunit: cDNA sequence and gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L; LaPolla, R J; Davidson, N

    1986-01-01

    Clones coding for the mouse nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) gamma subunit precursor have been selected from a cDNA library derived from a mouse myogenic cell line and sequenced. The deduced protein sequence consists of a signal peptide of 22 amino acid residues and a mature gamma subunit of 497 amino acid residues. There is a high degree of sequence conservation between this mouse sequence and published human and calf AChR gamma subunits and, after allowing for functional amino acid substitutions, also to the more distantly related chicken and Torpedo AChR gamma subunits. The degree of sequence conservation is especially high in the four putative hydrophobic membrane spanning regions, supporting the assignment of these domains. RNA blot hybridization showed that the mRNA level of the gamma subunit increases by 30 fold or more upon differentiation of the two mouse myogenic cell lines, BC3H-1 and C2C12, suggesting that the primary controls for changes in gene expression during differentiation are at the level of transcription. One cDNA clone was found to correspond to a partially processed nuclear transcript containing two as yet unspliced intervening sequences. Images PMID:3010242

  6. Characterization of salicylic acid-induced genes in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Park, Y-S; Min, H-J; Ryang, S-H; Oh, K-J; Cha, J-S; Kim, H Y; Cho, T-J

    2003-06-01

    Salicylic acid is a messenger molecule in the activation of defense responses in plants. In this study, we isolated four cDNA clones representing salicylic acid-induced genes in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis) by subtractive hybridization. Of the four clones, the BC5-2 clone encodes a putative glucosyltransferase protein. The BC5-3 clone is highly similar to an Arabidopsis gene encoding a putative metal-binding farnesylated protein. The BC6-1 clone is a chitinase gene with similarities to a rapeseed class IV chitinase. Class IV chitinases have deletions in the chitin-binding and catalytic domains and the BC6-1 chitinase has an additional deletion in the catalytic domain. The BCP8-1 clone is most homologous to an Arabidopsis gene that contains a tandem array of two thiJ-like sequences. These four cabbage genes were barely expressed in healthy leaves, but were strongly induced by salicylic acid and benzothiadiazole. Expression of the three genes represented by the BC5-2, BC5-3 and BCP8-1 clones were also induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, a nonhost pathogen that elicits a hypersensitive response in Chinese cabbage. None of these four genes, however, was strongly induced by methyl jasmonate or by ethylene.

  7. Production of γ-linolenic acid and stearidonic acid by Synechococcus sp. PCC7002 containing cyanobacterial fatty acid desaturase genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xuewei; He, Qingfang; Peng, Zhenying; Yu, Jinhui; Bian, Fei; Li, Youzhi; Bi, Yuping

    2016-07-01

    Genetic modification is useful for improving the nutritional qualities of cyanobacteria. To increase the total unsaturated fatty acid content, along with the ratio of ω-3/ω-6 fatty acids, genetic engineering can be used to modify fatty acid metabolism. Synechococcus sp. PCC7002, a fast-growing cyanobacterium, does not contain a Δ6 desaturase gene and is therefore unable to synthesize γ-linolenic acid (GLA) and stearidonic acid (SDA), which are important in human health. In this work, we constructed recombinant vectors Syd6D, Syd15D and Syd6Dd15D to express the Δ15 desaturase and Δ6 desaturase genes from Synechocystis PCC6803 in Synechococcus sp. PCC7002, with the aim of expressing polyunsaturated fatty acids. Overexpression of the Δ15 desaturase gene in Synechococcus resulted in 5.4 times greater accumulation of α-linolenic acid compared with the wild-type while Δ6 desaturase gene expression produced both GLA and SDA. Co-expression of the two genes resulted in low-level accumulation of GLA but much larger amounts of SDA, accounting for as much to 11.64% of the total fatty acid content.

  8. Phenotypical characterization of the rat striatal neurons expressing the D1 dopamine receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Le Moine, C; Normand, E; Bloch, B

    1991-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed in rat brain sections from normal and 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats in order to map and identify the neurons expressing the D1 receptor gene in the striatum and the substantia nigra. Procedures of combined in situ hybridization, allowing the simultaneous detection of two mRNAs in the same section or in adjacent sections, were used to characterize the phenotypes of the neurons expressing the D1 receptor gene. D1 receptor mRNA was found in neurons all over the caudate-putamen, the accumbens nucleus, and the olfactory tubercle but not in the substantia nigra. In the caudate-putamen and accumbens nucleus, most of the neurons containing D1 receptor mRNA were characterized as medium-sized substance P neurons and distinct from those containing D2 receptor mRNA. Nevertheless, 15-20% of the substance P neurons did not contain D1 receptor mRNA. The neurons containing preproenkephalin A mRNA did not contain D1 receptor mRNA but contained D2 receptor mRNA. A small number of cholinergic and somatostatinergic neurons exhibited a weak reaction for D1 receptor mRNA. These results demonstrate that dopamine acts on efferent striatal neurons through expression of distinct receptors--namely, D1 and D2 in separate cell populations (substance P and preproenkephalin A neurons, respectively)--and can also act on nonprojecting neurons through D1 receptor expression. Images PMID:1827915

  9. A nonsense mutation in the LDL receptor gene leads to familial hypercholesterolemia in the Druze sect

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, D.; Meiner, V.; Reshef, A.; Leitersdorf, E. ); Levy, Yishai ); Westhytzen, D.R. van der; Coetzee, G.A. )

    1992-02-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the LDL receptor gene. Here the authors characterize and LDL receptor mutation that is associated with a distinct haplotype and causes FH in the Druze, a small Middle Eastern Islamic sect with a high degree of inbreeding. The mutation was found in FH families from two distinct Druze villages from the Golan Heights (northern Israel). It was not found either in another Druze FH family residing in a different geographical area nor in eight Arab and four Jewish FH heterozygote index cases whose hypercholesterolemia cosegregates with an identical LDL receptor gene haplotype. The mutation, a single-base substitution, results in a termination codon in exon 4 of the LDL receptor gene that encodes for the fourth repeat of the binding domain of the mature receptor. It can be diagnosed by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization of PCR-amplified DNA from FH patients.

  10. Diacylglycerol kinase θ couples farnesoid X receptor-dependent bile acid signalling to Akt activation and glucose homoeostasis in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kai; Sewer, Marion B

    2013-09-01

    DGKs (diacylglycerol kinases) catalyse the conversion of diacylglycerol into PA (phosphatidic acid), a positive modulator of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin). We have found that chenodeoxycholic acid and the synthetic FXR (farnesoid X receptor) ligand GW4064 induce the mRNA and protein expression of DGKθ in the HepG2 cell line and in primary human hepatocytes. Reporter gene studies using 1.5 kB of the DGKθ promoter fused to the luciferase gene revealed that bile acids increase DGKθ transcriptional activity. Mutation of putative FXR-binding sites attenuated the ability of GW4046 to increase DGKθ luciferase activity. Consistent with this finding, ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) assays demonstrated that bile acid signalling increased the recruitment of FXR to the DGKθ promoter. Furthermore, GW4064 evoked a time-dependent increase in the cellular concentration of PA. We also found that GW4064 and PA promote the phosphorylation of mTOR, Akt and FoxO1 (forkhead box O1), and that silencing DGKθ expression significantly abrogated the ability of GW4046 to promote the phosphorylation of these PA-regulated targets. DGKθ was also required for bile-acid-dependent decreased glucose production. Taken together, our results establish DGKθ as a key mediator of bile-acid-stimulated modulation of mTORC2 (mTOR complex 2), the Akt pathway and glucose homoeostasis.

  11. Identification of four novel phosphorylation sites in estrogen receptor α: impact on receptor-dependent gene expression and phosphorylation by protein kinase CK2

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Estrogen receptor α (ERα) phosphorylation is important for estrogen-dependent transcription of ER-dependent genes, ligand-independent receptor activation and endocrine therapy response in breast cancer. However ERα phosphorylation at the previously identified sites does not fully account for these receptor functions. To determine if additional ERα phosphorylation sites exist, COS-1 cells expressing human ERα were labeled with [32P]H3PO4 in vivo and ERα tryptic phosphopeptides were isolated to identify phosphorylation sites. Results Previously uncharacterized phosphorylation sites at serines 46/47, 282, 294, and 559 were identified by manual Edman degradation and phosphoamino acid analysis and confirmed by mutagenesis and phospho-specific antibodies. Antibodies detected phosphorylation of endogenous ERα in MCF-7, MCF-7-LCC2, and Ishikawa cancer cell lines by immunoblot. Mutation of Ser-282 and Ser-559 to alanine (S282A, S559A) resulted in ligand independent activation of ERα as determined by both ERE-driven reporter gene assays and endogenous pS2 gene expression in transiently transfected HeLa cells. Mutation of Ser-46/47 or Ser-294 to alanine markedly reduced estradiol dependent reporter activation. Additionally protein kinase CK2 was identified as a kinase that phosphorylated ERα at S282 and S559 using motif analysis, in vitro kinase assays, and incubation of cells with CK2 kinase inhibitor. Conclusion These novel ERα phosphorylation sites represent new means for modulation of ERα activity. S559 represents the first phosphorylation site identified in the extreme C-terminus (F domain) of a steroid receptor. PMID:20043841

  12. Gene expression of NMDA receptor subunits in the cerebellum of elderly patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Andrea; Koschel, Jiri; Zink, Mathias; Bauer, Manfred; Sommer, Clemens; Frank, Josef; Treutlein, Jens; Schulze, Thomas; Schneider-Axmann, Thomas; Parlapani, Eleni; Rietschel, Marcella; Falkai, Peter; Henn, Fritz A

    2010-03-01

    To determine if NMDA receptor alterations are present in the cerebellum in schizophrenia, we measured NMDA receptor binding and gene expression of the NMDA receptor subunits in a post-mortem study of elderly patients with schizophrenia and non-affected subjects. Furthermore, we assessed influence of genetic variation in the candidate gene neuregulin-1 (NRG1) on the expression of the NMDA receptor in an exploratory study. Post-mortem samples from the cerebellar cortex of ten schizophrenic patients were compared with nine normal subjects. We investigated NMDA receptor binding by receptor autoradiography and gene expression of the NMDA receptor subunits NR1, NR2A, NR2B, NR2C and NR2D by in situ hybridization. For the genetic study, we genotyped the NRG1 polymorphism rs35753505 (SNP8NRG221533). Additionally, we treated rats with the antipsychotics haloperidol or clozapine and assessed cerebellar NMDA receptor binding and gene expression of subunits to examine the effects of antipsychotic treatment. Gene expression of the NR2D subunit was increased in the right cerebellum of schizophrenic patients compared to controls. Individuals carrying at least one C allele of rs35753505 (SNP8NRG221533) showed decreased expression of the NR2C subunit in the right cerebellum, compared to individuals homozygous for the T allele. Correlation with medication parameters and the animal model revealed no treatment effects. In conclusion, increased NR2D expression results in a hyperexcitable NMDA receptor suggesting an adaptive effect due to receptor hypofunction. The decreased NR2C expression in NRG1 risk variant may cause a deficit in NMDA receptor function. This supports the hypothesis of an abnormal glutamatergic neurotransmission in the right cerebellum in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  13. Loss of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-3 enhances cell migration in rat lung tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Mai; Okabe, Kyoko; Yamawaki, Yasuna; Teranishi, Miki; Honoki, Kanya; Mori, Toshio; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Loss of the Lpar3 expression due to aberrant DNA methylation occurred in rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 inhibited cell migration of rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 may act as a negative regulator of rat lung tumor cells. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) indicates several biological effects, such as cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. LPA interacts with G protein-coupled transmembrane LPA receptors. In our previous report, we detected that loss of the LPA receptor-1 (Lpar1) expression is due to its aberrant DNA methylation in rat tumor cell lines. In this study, to assess an involvement of the other LPA receptor, Lpar3, in the pathogenesis of rat lung tumor cells, we measured the expression levels of the Lpar3 gene and its DNA methylation status by reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and bisulfite sequencing analyses, respectively. RLCNR lung adenocarcinoma cells showed reduced expression of the Lpar3, compared with normal lung tissues. In the 5' upstream region of the Lpar3, normal lung tissues were unmethylated. By contrast, RLCNR cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expressions of the Lpar3. Based on these results, we generated the Lpar3-expressing RLCNR-a3 cells and measured the cell migration ability. Interestingly, the cell migration of RLCNR-a3 cells was significantly lower than that of RLCNR cells. This study suggests that loss of the Lpar3 due to aberrant DNA methylation may be involved in the progression of rat lung tumor cells.

  14. Lysophosphatidic acid induces anxiety-like behavior via its receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Misa; Tsukagoshi, Mai; Hashimoto, Tomio; Oka, Jun-Ichiro; Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Yamada, Mitsuhiko

    2015-03-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a potent bioactive lipid mediator with diverse biological properties. We previously found altered expression of the LPA-related genes in rodents after treatment with sertraline, which is widely used to treat anxiety disorders and depression. However, little is known about the behavioral effects of LPA. In the present study, we investigated the behavioral effects of intracerebroventricular injection of LPA in adult mice. LPA did not significantly affect spontaneous locomotor activity, suggesting that LPA does not induce hyperactivity, ataxia, or sedation. We next investigated the emotional effects of LPA via the hole-board test. LPA significantly increased the number of head-dips in a dose- and time-related manner. A significant induction of head-dip counts occurred 15 and 30 min after LPA administration. To clarify the involvement of LPA receptors, we examined the effect of the non-selective LPA1-4 receptor antagonist, 1-bromo-3(S)-hydroxy-4-(palmitoyloxy)butyl-phosphonate (BrP-LPA) co-administered with LPA. BrP-LPA dose-dependently inhibited LPA-induced head-dip counts. We next investigated anxiety-like behavior via the elevated plus-maze test. LPA significantly reduced the percentage of time spent in the open arms and BrP-LPA dose-dependently inhibited this anxiety-like behavior. In conclusion, LPA induced anxiety-like behavior in mice via LPA receptors. Our results suggest that LPA signaling plays an important role in regulating anxiety in mice.

  15. Ribonucleic acid interference induced gene knockdown

    PubMed Central

    Gottumukkala, Sruthima N. V. S.; Dwarakanath, C. D.; Sudarsan, Sabitha

    2013-01-01

    Despite major advances in periodontal regeneration over the past three decades, complete regeneration of the lost periodontium on a regular and predictable basis in humans has still remained elusive. The identification of stem cells in the periodontal ligament together with the growing concept of tissue engineering has opened new vistas in periodontal regenerative medicine. In this regard, ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) opens a new gate way for a novel RNA based approach in periodontal management. This paper aims to summarize the current opinion on the mechanisms underlying RNAi, in vitro and in vivo existing applications in the dental research, which could lead to their future use in periodontal regeneration. PMID:24174717

  16. Effects of oral eicosapentaenoic acid versus docosahexaenoic acid on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have beneficial effects on inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our aim was to assess the effect of a six-week supplementation with either olive oil, EPA, or DHA on gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (...

  17. Isolation and partial characterization of the gene for goose fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Kameda, K; Goodridge, A G

    1991-01-01

    bp of DNA contains G/C-rich sequences including several "GC" boxes corresponding to binding sites for the nuclear transcription factor Sp1. Putative sites for AP-2, C/EBP, and the triiodothyronine and glucocorticoid receptors also were found in this region. A chimeric DNA, containing approximately 1.6 kb of 5'-flanking sequence and 139 bp of untranslated sequence of the goose fatty acid synthase gene ligated to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) gene, was transfected into chick embryo hepatocytes in culture. Cells treated with triiodothyronine contained increased chloramphenicol acetyltransferase and fatty acid synthase activities.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1702426

  18. Identification of microsatellite markers linked to the human leptin receptor gene on chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, J.D.; Friedman, J.M.; Stoffel, M.

    1996-08-15

    This report describes the localization of the human leptin receptor gene to human chromosome 1 using polymerase chain reaction of somatic cell hybrids. Leptin is a secreted protein important in the regulation of body weight. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Gene Expression Signature of DMBA-Induced Hamster Buccal Pouch Carcinomas: Modulation by Chlorophyllin and Ellagic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Vidya Priyadarsini, Ramamurthi; Kumar, Neeraj; Khan, Imran; Thiyagarajan, Paranthaman; Kondaiah, Paturu; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2012-01-01

    Chlorophyllin (CHL), a water-soluble, semi-synthetic derivative of chlorophyll and ellagic acid (EA), a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound in berries, grapes, and nuts have been reported to exert anticancer effects in various human cancer cell lines and in animal tumour models. The present study was undertaken to examine the mechanism underlying chemoprevention and changes in gene expression pattern induced by dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model by whole genome profiling using pangenomic microarrays. In hamsters painted with DMBA, the expression of 1,700 genes was found to be altered significantly relative to control. Dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid modulated the expression profiles of 104 and 37 genes respectively. Microarray analysis also revealed changes in the expression of TGFβ receptors, NF-κB, cyclin D1, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may play a crucial role in the transformation of the normal buccal pouch to a malignant phenotype. This gene expression signature was altered on treatment with chlorophyllin and ellagic acid. Our study has also revealed patterns of gene expression signature specific for chlorophyllin and ellagic acid exposure. Thus dietary chlorophyllin and ellagic acid that can reverse gene expression signature associated with carcinogenesis are novel candidates for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:22485181

  20. Gene expression signature of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch carcinomas: modulation by chlorophyllin and ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    Vidya Priyadarsini, Ramamurthi; Kumar, Neeraj; Khan, Imran; Thiyagarajan, Paranthaman; Kondaiah, Paturu; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2012-01-01

    Chlorophyllin (CHL), a water-soluble, semi-synthetic derivative of chlorophyll and ellagic acid (EA), a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound in berries, grapes, and nuts have been reported to exert anticancer effects in various human cancer cell lines and in animal tumour models. The present study was undertaken to examine the mechanism underlying chemoprevention and changes in gene expression pattern induced by dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model by whole genome profiling using pangenomic microarrays. In hamsters painted with DMBA, the expression of 1,700 genes was found to be altered significantly relative to control. Dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid modulated the expression profiles of 104 and 37 genes respectively. Microarray analysis also revealed changes in the expression of TGFβ receptors, NF-κB, cyclin D1, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may play a crucial role in the transformation of the normal buccal pouch to a malignant phenotype. This gene expression signature was altered on treatment with chlorophyllin and ellagic acid. Our study has also revealed patterns of gene expression signature specific for chlorophyllin and ellagic acid exposure. Thus dietary chlorophyllin and ellagic acid that can reverse gene expression signature associated with carcinogenesis are novel candidates for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:22485181

  1. Induction of intermediate mesoderm by retinoic acid receptor signaling from differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Oeda, Shiho; Hayashi, Yohei; Chan, Techuan; Takasato, Minoru; Aihara, Yuko; Okabayashi, Koji; Ohnuma, Kiyoshi; Asashima, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Renal lineages including kidney are derived from intermediate mesoderm, which are differentiated from a subset of caudal undifferentiated mesoderm. The inductive mechanisms of mammalian intermediate mesoderm and renal lineages are still poorly understood. Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) can be a good in vitro model to reconstitute the developmental pathway of renal lineages and to analyze the mechanisms of the sequential differentiation. We examined the effects of Activin A and retinoic acid (RA) on the induction of intermediate mesoderm from mESCs under defined, serum-free, adherent, monolayer culture conditions. We measured the expression level of intermediate mesodermal marker genes and examined the developmental potential of the differentiated cells into kidney using an ex vivo transplantation assay. Adding Activin A followed by RA to mESC cultures induced the expression of marker genes and proteins for intermediate mesoderm, odd-skipped related 1 (Osr1) and Wilm’s Tumor 1 (Wt1). These differentiated cells integrated into laminin-positive tubular cells and Pax2-positive renal cells in cultured embryonic kidney explants. We demonstrated that intermediate mesodermal marker expression was also induced by RA receptor (RAR) agonist, but not by retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonists. Furthermore, the expression of these markers was decreased by RAR antagonists. We directed the differentiation of mESCs into intermediate mesoderm using Activin A and RA and revealed the role of RAR signaling in this differentiation. These methods and findings will improve our understanding of renal lineage development and could contribute to the regenerative medicine of kidney.

  2. Mutational Characterization of the Bile Acid Receptor TGR5 in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Hov, Johannes R.; Keitel, Verena; Laerdahl, Jon K.; Spomer, Lina; Ellinghaus, Eva; ElSharawy, Abdou; Melum, Espen; Boberg, Kirsten M.; Manke, Thomas; Balschun, Tobias; Schramm, Christoph; Bergquist, Annika; Weismüller, Tobias; Gotthardt, Daniel; Rust, Christian; Henckaerts, Liesbet; Onnie, Clive M.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Sterneck, Martina; Teufel, Andreas; Runz, Heiko; Stiehl, Adolf; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Vatn, Morten H.; Stokkers, Pieter C. F.; Vermeire, Severine; Mathew, Christopher G.; Lie, Benedicte A.; Beuers, Ulrich; Manns, Michael P.; Schreiber, Stefan; Schrumpf, Erik; Häussinger, Dieter; Franke, Andre; Karlsen, Tom H.

    2010-01-01

    Background TGR5, the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1), has been linked to inflammatory pathways as well as bile homeostasis, and could therefore be involved in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) a chronic inflammatory bile duct disease. We aimed to extensively investigate TGR5 sequence variation in PSC, as well as functionally characterize detected variants. Methodology/Principal Findings Complete resequencing of TGR5 was performed in 267 PSC patients and 274 healthy controls. Six nonsynonymous mutations were identified in addition to 16 other novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms. To investigate the impact from the nonsynonymous variants on TGR5, we created a receptor model, and introduced mutated TGR5 constructs into human epithelial cell lines. By using confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and a cAMP-sensitive luciferase assay, five of the nonsynonymous mutations (W83R, V178M, A217P, S272G and Q296X) were found to reduce or abolish TGR5 function. Fine-mapping of the previously reported PSC and UC associated locus at chromosome 2q35 in large patient panels revealed an overall association between the TGR5 single-nucleotide polymorphism rs11554825 and PSC (odds ratio  = 1.14, 95% confidence interval: 1.03–1.26, p = 0.010) and UC (odds ratio  = 1.19, 95% confidence interval 1.11–1.27, p = 8.5×10−7), but strong linkage disequilibrium precluded demarcation of TGR5 from neighboring genes. Conclusions/Significance Resequencing of TGR5 along with functional investigations of novel variants provided unique insight into an important candidate gene for several inflammatory and metabolic conditions. While significant TGR5 associations were detected in both UC and PSC, further studies are needed to conclusively define the role of TGR5 variation in these diseases. PMID:20811628

  3. Specific repertoire of olfactory receptor genes in the male germ cells of several mammalian species

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderhaeghen, P.; Schurmans, S.; Vassart, G.; Parmentier, M.

    1997-02-01

    Olfactory receptors constitute the largest family among G protein-coupled receptors, with up to 1000 members expected. We have previously shown that genes belonging to this family were expressed in the male germ line from both dog and human. We have subsequently demonstrated the presence of one of the corresponding olfactory receptor proteins during dog spermatogenesis and in mature sperm cells. In this study, we investigated whether the unexpected pattern of expression of olfactory receptors in the male germ line was conserved in other mammalian species. Using reverse transcription-PCR with primers specific for the olfactory receptor gene family, about 20 olfactory receptor cDNA fragments were cloned from the testis of each mammalian species tested. As a whole, they displayed no sequence specificity compared to other olfactory receptors, but highly homologous, possibly orthologous, genes were amplified from different species. Finally, their pattern of expression, as determined by RNase protection assay, revealed that many but not all of these receptors were expressed predominantly in testis. The male germ line from each mammalian species tested is thus characterized by a specific repertoire of olfactory receptors, which display a pattern of expression suggestive of their potential implication in the control of sperm maturation, migration, or fertilization. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. The Dopamine D2 Receptor Gene in Lamprey, Its Expression in the Striatum and Cellular Effects of D2 Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Brita; Huerta-Ocampo, Icnelia; Ericsson, Jesper; Stephenson-Jones, Marcus; Pérez-Fernández, Juan; Bolam, J. Paul; Diaz-Heijtz, Rochellys; Grillner, Sten

    2012-01-01

    All basal ganglia subnuclei have recently been identified in lampreys, the phylogenetically oldest group of vertebrates. Furthermore, the interconnectivity of these nuclei is similar to mammals and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive (dopaminergic) fibers have been detected within the input layer, the striatum. Striatal processing is critically dependent on the interplay with the dopamine system, and we explore here whether D2 receptors are expressed in the lamprey striatum and their potential role. We have identified a cDNA encoding the dopamine D2 receptor from the lamprey brain and the deduced protein sequence showed close phylogenetic relationship with other vertebrate D2 receptors, and an almost 100% identity within the transmembrane domains containing the amino acids essential for dopamine binding. There was a strong and distinct expression of D2 receptor mRNA in a subpopulation of striatal neurons, and in the same region tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive synaptic terminals were identified at the ultrastructural level. The synaptic incidence of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive boutons was highest in a region ventrolateral to the compact layer of striatal neurons, a region where most striatal dendrites arborise. Application of a D2 receptor agonist modulates striatal neurons by causing a reduced spike discharge and a diminished post-inhibitory rebound. We conclude that the D2 receptor gene had already evolved in the earliest group of vertebrates, cyclostomes, when they diverged from the main vertebrate line of evolution (560 mya), and that it is expressed in striatum where it exerts similar cellular effects to that in other vertebrates. These results together with our previous published data (Stephenson-Jones et al. 2011, 2012) further emphasize the high degree of conservation of the basal ganglia, also with regard to the indirect loop, and its role as a basic mechanism for action selection in all vertebrates. PMID:22563388

  5. Organization, structure, and expression of the gene encoding the rat substance P receptor.

    PubMed

    Hershey, A D; Dykema, P E; Krause, J E

    1991-03-01

    The gene for the rat substance P receptor has been cloned, its genomic structure determined, and the patterns of mRNA expression extensively analyzed. Unlike many genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors, the protein-coding region of this gene is divided into five exons consisting of 965, 195, 151, 197, and 2,010 base pairs. The substance P receptor gene extends more than 45 kilobases in length, and the splice sites for the exons occur at the borders of the sequences encoding putative membrane-spanning domains. The transcription initiation site has been defined by solution hybridization-nuclease protection and nucleotide sequence analyses, and lies downstream of a conventional TATA sequence. Substance P receptor mRNA levels in various tissues have been quantitated using solution hybridization-nuclease protection assays and were found to comprise from 0.00008 to 0.0016% of total RNA levels. Relatively high levels of substance P receptor mRNA are seen in the urinary bladder and the sublingual salivary gland, whereas moderate levels are observed for the submandibular salivary gland, striatum, hippocampus, midbrain, and olfactory bulb with lower levels in the remainder of the central nervous system and alimentary canal. These results are discussed in relation to the evolutionary role of multiple exons for a G protein-coupled receptor and with regard to the locations and mechanisms of substance P receptor gene expression.

  6. Tomato PYR/PYL/RCAR abscisic acid receptors show high expression in root, differential sensitivity to the abscisic acid agonist quinabactin, and the capability to enhance plant drought resistance.

    PubMed

    González-Guzmán, Miguel; Rodríguez, Lesia; Lorenzo-Orts, Laura; Pons, Clara; Sarrión-Perdigones, Alejandro; Fernández, Maria A; Peirats-Llobet, Marta; Forment, Javier; Moreno-Alvero, Maria; Cutler, Sean R; Albert, Armando; Granell, Antonio; Rodríguez, Pedro L

    2014-08-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a crucial role in the plant's response to both biotic and abiotic stress. Sustainable production of food faces several key challenges, particularly the generation of new varieties with improved water use efficiency and drought tolerance. Different studies have shown the potential applications of Arabidopsis PYR/PYL/RCAR ABA receptors to enhance plant drought resistance. Consequently the functional characterization of orthologous genes in crops holds promise for agriculture. The full set of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) PYR/PYL/RCAR ABA receptors have been identified here. From the 15 putative tomato ABA receptors, 14 of them could be grouped in three subfamilies that correlated well with corresponding Arabidopsis subfamilies. High levels of expression of PYR/PYL/RCAR genes was found in tomato root, and some genes showed predominant expression in leaf and fruit tissues. Functional characterization of tomato receptors was performed through interaction assays with Arabidopsis and tomato clade A protein phosphatase type 2Cs (PP2Cs) as well as phosphatase inhibition studies. Tomato receptors were able to inhibit the activity of clade A PP2Cs differentially in an ABA-dependent manner, and at least three receptors were sensitive to the ABA agonist quinabactin, which inhibited tomato seed germination. Indeed, the chemical activation of ABA signalling induced by quinabactin was able to activate stress-responsive genes. Both dimeric and monomeric tomato receptors were functional in Arabidopsis plant cells, but only overexpression of monomeric-type receptors conferred enhanced drought resistance. In summary, gene expression analyses, and chemical and transgenic approaches revealed distinct properties of tomato PYR/PYL/RCAR ABA receptors that might have biotechnological implications. PMID:24863435

  7. Concomitant Duplications of Opioid Peptide and Receptor Genes before the Origin of Jawed Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sundström, Görel; Dreborg, Susanne; Larhammar, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Background The opioid system is involved in reward and pain mechanisms and consists in mammals of four receptors and several peptides. The peptides are derived from four prepropeptide genes, PENK, PDYN, PNOC and POMC, encoding enkephalins, dynorphins, orphanin/nociceptin and beta-endorphin, respectively. Previously we have described how two rounds of genome doubling (2R) before the origin of jawed vertebrates formed the receptor family. Methodology/Principal Findings Opioid peptide gene family members were investigated using a combination of sequence-based phylogeny and chromosomal locations of the peptide genes in various vertebrates. Several adjacent gene families were investigated similarly. The results show that the ancestral peptide gene gave rise to two additional copies in the genome doublings. The fourth member was generated by a local gene duplication, as the genes encoding POMC and PNOC are located on the same chromosome in the chicken genome and all three teleost genomes that we have studied. A translocation has disrupted this synteny in mammals. The PDYN gene seems to have been lost in chicken, but not in zebra finch. Duplicates of some peptide genes have arisen in the teleost fishes. Within the prepropeptide precursors, peptides have been lost or gained in different lineages. Conclusions/Significance The ancestral peptide and receptor genes were located on the same chromosome and were thus duplicated concomitantly. However, subsequently genetic linkage has been lost. In conclusion, the system of opioid peptides and receptors was largely formed by the genome doublings that took place early in vertebrate evolution. PMID:20463905

  8. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor. PMID:26821052

  9. P2Y2 receptor activation regulates the expression of acetylcholinesterase and acetylcholine receptor genes at vertebrate neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Tung, Edmund K K; Choi, Roy C Y; Siow, Nina L; Jiang, Joy X S; Ling, Karen K Y; Simon, Joseph; Barnard, Eric A; Tsim, Karl W K

    2004-10-01

    At the vertebrate neuromuscular junction (nmj), ATP is known to be coreleased with acetylcholine from the synaptic vesicles. We have previously shown that the P2Y1 receptor is localized at the nmj. Here, we extend the findings to show that another nucleotide receptor, P2Y2, is also localized there and with P2Y1 jointly mediates trophic responses to ATP. The P2Y2 receptor mRNA in rat muscle increased during development and peaked in adulthood. The P2Y2 receptor protein was shown to become restricted to the nmjs during embryonic development, in chick and in rat. In both rat and chick myotubes, P2Y1 and P2Y2 are expressed, increasing with differentiation, but P2Y4 is absent. The P2Y2 agonist UTP stimulated there inositol trisphosphate production and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases, in a dose-dependent manner. These UTP-induced responses were insensitive to the P2Y1-specific antagonist MRS 2179 (2'-deoxy-N6-methyl adenosine 3',5'-diphosphate diammonium salt). In differentiated myotubes, P2Y2 activation induced expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) protein (but not control alpha-tubulin). This was shown to arise from AChE promoter activation, mediated by activation of the transcription factor Elk-1. Two Elk-1-responsive elements, located in intron-1 of the AChE promoter, were found by mutation to act in this gene activation initiated at the P2Y2 receptor and also in that initiated at the P2Y1 receptor. Furthermore, the promoters of different acetylcholine receptor subunits were also stimulated by application of UTP to myotubes. These results indicate that ATP regulates postsynaptic gene expressions via a common pathway triggered by the activation of P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors at the nmjs. PMID:15258260

  10. γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is not an agonist of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Connelly, William M; Errington, Adam C; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound and a drug used clinically to treat the symptoms of narcolepsy. GHB is known to be an agonist of GABAB receptors with millimolar affinity, but also binds with much higher affinity to another site, known as the GHB receptor. While a body of evidence has shown that GHB does not bind to GABAA receptors widely, recent evidence has suggested that the GHB receptor is in fact on extrasynaptic α4β1δ GABAA receptors, where GHB acts as an agonist with an EC50 of 140 nM. We investigated three neuronal cell types that express a tonic GABAA receptor current mediated by extrasynaptic receptors: ventrobasal (VB) thalamic neurons, dentate gyrus granule cells and striatal medium spiny neurons. Using whole-cell voltage clamp in brain slices, we found no evidence that GHB (10 µM) induced any GABAA receptor mediated current in these cell types, nor that it modulated inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, a high concentration of GHB (3 mM) was able to produce a GABAB receptor mediated current, but did not induce any other currents. These results suggest either that GHB is not a high affinity agonist at native α4β1δ receptors, or that these receptors do not exist in classical areas associated with extrasynaptic currents.

  11. Molecular characterization and analysis of a truncated serotonin receptor gene expressed in neural and reproductive tissues of abalone.

    PubMed

    Panasophonkul, Sasiporn; Apisawetakan, Somjai; Cummins, Scott F; York, Patrick S; Degnan, Bernard M; Hanna, Peter J; Saitongdee, Porncharn; Sobhon, Prasert; Sretarugsa, Prapee

    2009-05-01

    In molluscs, the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) has been linked to a variety of biological roles including gamete maturation and spawning. The possible involvement of 5-HT in abalone gamete release was demonstrated by a dose-dependent increase in Haliotis rubra gonad contractile bioactivity following 5-HT stimulation. Physiological functions associated with 5-HT, are mediated through binding to 5-HT receptors. A cDNA encoding a putative 5-HT receptor consisting of 359 amino acids was isolated from the tropical abalone H. asinina, termed 5-HT(1 ha). The 5-HT(1 ha) shares G-protein-coupled receptor motifs with metazoan 5-HT receptors, including predicted transmembrane domains, active sites for protein kinase action, and N-linked glycosylation sites. However, the third intracellular loop of 5-HT(1 ha) is relatively short, and only six transmembrane domains are predicted, implying a truncated receptor. Phylogenetic analysis with known 5-HT receptor genes suggests that 5-HT(1 ha) belongs to the type 1 5-HT receptor family. Expression analysis by RT-PCR showed that 5-HT(1 ha) mRNA was present in all tissues examined, including the neural ganglia and gonad tissues. Immunocytochemistry revealed the presence of 5-HT(1 ha) specifically within the soma of neuronal cells located in the outer cortex of both cerebral and pleuropedal ganglia. In ovarian and testicular tissues, 5-HT(1 ha) immunoreactivity was observed in epithelial cells of the outer capsule and connective tissue of the trabeculae to which the gamete follicles adhere. Whether this receptor transcript is translated to a functional protein needs to be verified, but if so, it could play a role in reproduction.

  12. Two mutational hotspots in the interleukin-2 receptor {gamma} chain gene causing human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, A.E.; Puck, J.M.; Buckley, R.H.

    1995-09-01

    Human severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a syndrome of profoundly impaired cellular and humoral immunity, is most commonly caused by mutations in the X-linked gene for interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor {gamma} chain (IL2RG). For mutational analysis of IL2RG in males with SCID, SSCP screening was followed by DNA sequencing. Of 40 IL2RG mutations found in unrelated SCID patients, 6 were point mutations at the CpG dinucleotide at cDNA 690-691, encoding amino acid R226. This residue lies in the extracellular domain of the protein in a region not previously recognized to be significantly conserved in the cytokine receptor gene family, 11 amino acids upstream from the highly conserved WSXWS motif. Three additional instances of mutation at another CpG dinucleotide at cDNA 879 produced a premature termination signal in the intracellular domain of IL2RG, resulting in loss of the SH2-homologous intracellular domain known to be essential for signaling from the IL-2 receptor complex. Mutations at these two hotspots constitute >20% of the X-linked SCID mutations found by our group and a similar proportion of all reported IL2RG mutations. 41 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Nicotinic Acid Increases Adiponectin Secretion from Differentiated Bovine Preadipocytes through G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Christina; Hosseini, Afshin; Singh, Shiva P.; Regenhard, Petra; Khalilvandi-Behroozyar, Hamed; Sauerwein, Helga; Mielenz, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    The transition period in dairy cows (3 weeks prepartum until 3 weeks postpartum) is associated with substantial mobilization of energy stores, which is often associated with metabolic diseases. Nicotinic acid (NA) is an antilipolytic and lipid-lowering compound used to treat dyslipidaemia in humans, and it also reduces non-esterified fatty acids in cattle. In mice the G-protein coupled receptor 109A (GPR109A) ligand NA positively affects the secretion of adiponectin, an important modulator of glucose and fat metabolism. In cattle, the corresponding data linking NA to adiponectin are missing. Our objective was to examine the effects of NA on adiponectin and AMPK protein abundance and the expression of mRNAs of related genes such as chemerin, an adipokine that enhances adiponectin secretion in vitro. Differentiated bovine adipocytes were incubated with pertussis toxin (PTX) to verify the involvement of GPR signaling, and treated with 10 or 15 µM NA for 12 or 24 h. NA increased adiponectin concentrations (p ≤ 0.001) and the mRNA abundances of GPR109A (p ≤ 0.05) and chemerin (p ≤ 0.01). Pre-incubation with PTX reduced the adiponectin response to NA (p ≤ 0.001). The NA-stimulated secretion of adiponectin and the mRNA expression of chemerin in the bovine adipocytes were suggestive of GPR signaling-dependent improved insulin sensitivity and/or adipocyte metabolism in dairy cows. PMID:25411802

  14. Expression and localization of the omega-3 fatty acid receptor GPR120 in human term placenta.

    PubMed

    Lager, S; Ramirez, V I; Gaccioli, F; Jansson, T; Powell, T L

    2014-07-01

    Fatty acids can function as signaling molecules, acting through receptors in the cytosol or on the cell surface. G-Protein Receptor (GPR)120 is a membrane-bound receptor mediating anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing effects of the omega-3 fatty acid docohexaenoic acid (DHA). GPR120 dysfunction is associated with obesity in humans. Cellular localization of GPR120 and the influence of maternal obesity on GPR120 protein expression in the placenta are unknown. Herein we demonstrate that GPR120 is predominantly expressed in the microvillous membrane (MVM) of human placenta and that the expression level of this receptor in MVM is not altered by maternal body mass index (BMI).

  15. Evolution of T cell receptor genes. Extensive diversity of V beta families in the Mexican axolotl.

    PubMed

    Fellah, J S; Kerfourn, F; Charlemagne, J

    1994-11-15

    We have cloned 36 different rearranged variable regions (V beta) genes encoding the beta-chain of the T cell receptor in an amphibian species, Ambystoma mexicanum (the Mexican axolotl). Eleven different V beta segments were identified, which can be classified into 9 families on the basis of a minimum of 75% nucleotide identity. All the cloned V beta segments have the canonical features of known mammalian and avian V beta, including conserved residues Cys23, Trp34, Arg69, Tyr90, and Cys92. There seems to be a greater genetic distance between the axolotl V beta families than between the different V beta families of any mammalian species examined to date: most of the axolotl V beta s have fewer than 35% identical nucleotides and the less related families (V beta 4 and V beta 8) have no more than 23.2% identity (13.5% at the amino acid level). Despite their great mutual divergence, several axolotl V beta are sequence-related to some mammalian V beta genes, like the human V beta 13 and V beta 20 segments and their murine V beta 8 and V beta 14 homologues. However, the axolotl V beta 8 and V beta 9 families are not significantly related to any other V beta sequence at the nucleotide level and show limited amino acid similarity to mammalian V alpha, V kappa III, or VH sequences. The detection of nine V beta families among 35 randomly cloned V beta segments suggests that the V beta gene repertoire in the axolotl is probably larger than presently estimated. PMID:7963525

  16. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M.

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Fatty acid regulates gene expression and growth of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Chen, Y.; Tjandrawinata, R. R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been proposed that the omega-6 fatty acids increase the rate of tumor growth. Here we test that hypothesis in the PC-3 human prostate tumor. We found that the essential fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA), and the AA metabolite PGE(2) stimulate tumor growth while oleic acid (OA) and the omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) inhibited growth. In examining the role of AA in growth response, we extended our studies to analyze changes in early gene expression induced by AA. We demonstrate that c-fos expression is increased within minutes of addition in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the immediate early gene cox-2 is also increased in the presence of AA in a dose-dependent manner, while the constitutive cox-1 message was not increased. Three hours after exposure to AA, the synthesis of PGE(2) via COX-2 was also increased. Previous studies have demonstrated that AA was primarily delivered by low density lipoprotein (LDL) via its receptor (LDLr). Since it is known that hepatomas, acute myelogenous leukemia and colorectal tumors lack normal cholesterol feedback, we examined the role of the LDLr in growth regulation of the PC-3 prostate cancer cells. Analysis of ldlr mRNA expression and LDLr function demonstrated that human PC-3 prostate cancer cells lack normal feedback regulation. While exogenous LDL caused a significant stimulation of cell growth and PGE(2) synthesis, no change was seen in regulation of the LDLr by LDL. Taken together, these data show that normal cholesterol feedback of ldlr message and protein is lost in prostate cancer. These data suggest that unregulated over-expression of LDLr in tumor cells would permit increased availability of AA, which induces immediate early genes c-fos and cox-2 within minutes of uptake.

  18. Effects of High Fat Feeding and Diabetes on Regression of Atherosclerosis Induced by Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Therapy in LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Willecke, Florian; Yuan, Chujun; Oka, Kazuhiro; Chan, Lawrence; Hu, Yunying; Barnhart, Shelley; Bornfeldt, Karin E.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether a high fat diet (HFD) containing the inflammatory dietary fatty acid palmitate or insulin deficient diabetes altered the remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques in LDL receptor knockout (Ldlr-/-) mice. Cholesterol reduction was achieved by using a helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd) carrying the gene for the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr; HDAd-LDLR). After injection of the HDAd-LDLR, mice consuming either HFD, which led to insulin resistance but not hyperglycemia, or low fat diet (LFD), showed regression compared to baseline. However there was no difference between the two groups in terms of atherosclerotic lesion size, or CD68+ cell and lipid content. Because of the lack of effects of these two diets, we then tested whether viral-mediated cholesterol reduction would lead to defective regression in mice with greater hyperglycemia. In both normoglycemic and streptozotocin (STZ)-treated hyperglycemic mice, HDAd-LDLR significantly reduced plasma cholesterol levels, decreased atherosclerotic lesion size, reduced macrophage area and lipid content, and increased collagen content of plaque in the aortic sinus. However, reductions in anti-inflammatory and ER stress-related genes were less pronounced in STZ-diabetic mice compared to non-diabetic mice. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated Ldlr gene therapy is an effective and simple method to induce atherosclerosis regression in Ldlr-/- mice in different metabolic states. PMID:26046657

  19. Identification of nitrogen-fixing genes and gene clusters from metagenomic library of acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhimin; Guo, Xue; Yin, Huaqun; Liang, Yili; Cong, Jing; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is an essential function of acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial communities. However, most acidophiles in AMD environments are uncultured microorganisms and little is known about the diversity of nitrogen-fixing genes and structure of nif gene cluster in AMD microbial communities. In this study, we used metagenomic sequencing to isolate nif genes in the AMD microbial community from Dexing Copper Mine, China. Meanwhile, a metagenome microarray containing 7,776 large-insertion fosmids was constructed to screen novel nif gene clusters. Metagenomic analyses revealed that 742 sequences were identified as nif genes including structural subunit genes nifH, nifD, nifK and various additional genes. The AMD community is massively dominated by the genus Acidithiobacillus. However, the phylogenetic diversity of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms is much higher than previously thought in the AMD community. Furthermore, a 32.5-kb genomic sequence harboring nif, fix and associated genes was screened by metagenome microarray. Comparative genome analysis indicated that most nif genes in this cluster are most similar to those of Herbaspirillum seropedicae, but the organization of the nif gene cluster had significant differences from H. seropedicae. Sequence analysis and reverse transcription PCR also suggested that distinct transcription units of nif genes exist in this gene cluster. nifQ gene falls into the same transcription unit with fixABCX genes, which have not been reported in other diazotrophs before. All of these results indicated that more novel diazotrophs survive in the AMD community.

  20. Identification of Nitrogen-Fixing Genes and Gene Clusters from Metagenomic Library of Acid Mine Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Huaqun; Liang, Yili; Cong, Jing; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is an essential function of acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial communities. However, most acidophiles in AMD environments are uncultured microorganisms and little is known about the diversity of nitrogen-fixing genes and structure of nif gene cluster in AMD microbial communities. In this study, we used metagenomic sequencing to isolate nif genes in the AMD microbial community from Dexing Copper Mine, China. Meanwhile, a metagenome microarray containing 7,776 large-insertion fosmids was constructed to screen novel nif gene clusters. Metagenomic analyses revealed that 742 sequences were identified as nif genes including structural subunit genes nifH, nifD, nifK and various additional genes. The AMD community is massively dominated by the genus Acidithiobacillus. However, the phylogenetic diversity of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms is much higher than previously thought in the AMD community. Furthermore, a 32.5-kb genomic sequence harboring nif, fix and associated genes was screened by metagenome microarray. Comparative genome analysis indicated that most nif genes in this cluster are most similar to those of Herbaspirillum seropedicae, but the organization of the nif gene cluster had significant differences from H. seropedicae. Sequence analysis and reverse transcription PCR also suggested that distinct transcription units of nif genes exist in this gene cluster. nifQ gene falls into the same transcription unit with fixABCX genes, which have not been reported in other diazotrophs before. All of these results indicated that more novel diazotrophs survive in the AMD community. PMID:24498417

  1. Developmental toxicity of perfluorononanoic acid is dependent on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is one of the predominant perfluoroalkyl acids in the environment and in tissues of humans and wildlife. PFNA strongly activates the mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) in vitro and negatively impacts development ...

  2. REACTIVITY PROFILE OF LIGANDS OF MAMMALIAN RETINOIC ACID RECEPTORS: A PRELIMINARY COREPA ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retinoic acid and associated derivatives comprise a class of endogenous hormones that bind to and activate different families of retinoic acid receptors (RARs, RXRs), and control many aspects of vertebrate development. Identification of potential RAR and RXR ligands is of interes...

  3. Inactivation of the Neurospora Crassa Gene Encoding the Mitochondrial Protein Import Receptor Mom19 by the Technique of ``sheltered Rip''

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, TAA.; Metzenberg, R. L.; Schneider, H.; Lill, R.; Neupert, W.; Nargang, F. E.

    1994-01-01

    We have used a technique referred to as ``sheltered RIP'' (repeat induced point mutation) to create mutants of the mom-19 gene of Neurospora crassa, which encodes an import receptor for nuclear encoded mitochondrial precursor proteins. Sheltered RIP permits the isolation of a mutant gene in one nucleus, even if that gene is essential for the survival of the organism, by sheltering the nucleus carrying the mutant gene in a heterokaryon with an unaffected nucleus. Furthermore, the nucleus harboring the RIPed gene contains a selectable marker so that it is possible to shift nuclear ratios in the heterokaryons to a state in which the nucleus containing the RIPed gene predominates in cultures grown under selective conditions. This results in a condition where the target gene product should be present at very suboptimal levels and allows the study of the mutant phenotype. One allele of mom-19 generated by this method contains 44 transitions resulting in 18 amino acid substitutions. When the heterokaryon containing this allele was grown under conditions favoring the RIPed nucleus, no MOM19 protein was detectable in the mitochondria of the strain. Homokaryotic strains containing the RIPed allele exhibit a complex and extremely slow growth phenotype suggesting that the product of the mom-19 gene is important in N. crassa. PMID:8138148

  4. Amino acid sequence of the alpha subunit of human leukocyte adhesion receptor Mo1 (complement receptor type 3)

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Mo1 (complement receptor type 3, CR3; CD11b/CD18) is an adhesion- promoting human leukocyte surface membrane heterodimer (alpha subunit 155 kD [CD11b] noncovalently linked to a beta subunit of 95 kD [CD18]). The complete amino acid sequence deduced from cDNA of the human alpha subunit is reported. The protein consists of 1,136 amino acids with a long amino-terminal extracytoplasmic domain, a 26-amino acid hydrophobic transmembrane segment, and a 19-carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic domain. The extracytoplasmic region has three putative Ca2+- binding domains with good homology and one with weak homology to the "lock washer" Ca2+-binding consensus sequence. These metal-binding domains explain the divalent cation-dependent functions mediated by Mo1. The alpha subunit is highly homologous to the alpha subunit of leukocyte p150,95 and to a lesser extent, to the alpha subunit of other "integrin" receptors such as fibronectin, vitronectin, and platelet IIb/IIIa receptors in humans and position-specific antigen-2 (PS2) in Drosophila. Mo1 alpha, like p150, contains a unique 187-amino acid stretch NH2-terminal to the metal-binding domains. This region could be involved in some of the specific functions mediated by these leukocyte glycoproteins. PMID:2454931

  5. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human antidiuretic hormone receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Seibold, A.; Brabet, P.; Rosenthal, W.; Birnbaumer, M. )

    1992-11-01

    Applying a genomic DNA-expression approach, the authors cloned the gene and cDNA coding for the human antidiuretic hormone receptor, also called vasopressin V2 receptor' (V2R). The nucleotide sequence of both cloned DNAs provided the information to elucidate the structure of the isolated transcriptional unit. The structure of this gene is unusual in that it is the first G protein-coupled receptor gene that contains two very small intervening sequences, the second of which separates the region encoding the seventh transmembrane region from the rest of the open reading frame. The sequence information was used to synthesize appropriate oligonucleotides to be used as primers in the PCR. The V2R gene was localized by PCR using DNA from hybrid cells as template. The gene was found to reside in the q28-qter portion of the human X chromosome, a region identified as the locus for congential nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Polymorphisms in fatty-acid-metabolism-related genes are associated with colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hoeft, Birgit; Linseisen, Jakob; Beckmann, Lars; Müller-Decker, Karin; Canzian, Federico; Hüsing, Anika; Kaaks, Rudolf; Vogel, Ulla; Jakobsen, Marianne U; Overvad, Kim; Hansen, Rikke D; Knüppel, Sven; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Koumantaki, Yvoni; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Berrino, Franco; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B; van Gils, Carla H; Peeters, Petra H; Dumeaux, Vanessa; Lund, Eiliv; Huerta Castaño, José M; Muñoz, Xavier; Rodriguez, Laudina; Barricarte, Aurelio; Manjer, Jonas; Jirström, Karin; Van Guelpen, Bethany; Hallmans, Göran; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Crowe, Francesca L; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Morois, Sophie; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Chajes, Veronique; Jenab, Mazda; Boffetta, Paolo; Vineis, Paolo; Mouw, Traci; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio; Nieters, Alexandra

    2010-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignant tumor and the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The crucial role of fatty acids for a number of important biological processes suggests a more in-depth analysis of inter-individual differences in fatty acid metabolizing genes as contributing factor to colon carcinogenesis. We examined the association between genetic variability in 43 fatty acid metabolism-related genes and colorectal risk in 1225 CRC cases and 2032 controls participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Three hundred and ninety two single-nucleotide polymorphisms were selected using pairwise tagging with an r(2) cutoff of 0.8 and a minor allele frequency of >5%. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals. Haplotype analysis was performed using a generalized linear model framework. On the genotype level, hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase 15-(NAD) (HPGD), phospholipase A2 group VI (PLA2G6) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 were associated with higher risk for CRC, whereas prostaglandin E receptor 2 (PTGER2) was associated with lower CRC risk. A significant inverse association (P < 0.006) was found for PTGER2 GGG haplotype, whereas HPGD AGGAG and PLA2G3 CT haplotypes were significantly (P < 0.001 and P = 0.003, respectively) associated with higher risk of CRC. Based on these data, we present for the first time the association of HPGD variants with CRC risk. Our results support the key role of prostanoid signaling in colon carcinogenesis and suggest a relevance of genetic variation in fatty acid metabolism-related genes and CRC risk. PMID:20042636

  7. Molecular Characterization of RXR (Retinoid X Receptor) Gene Isoforms from the Bivalve Species Chlamys farreri

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhenmin; Guo, Huihui; Zhang, Yueyue; Jiao, Wenqian; Zhang, Lingling; Wang, Shi; He, Yan; Hu, Xiaoli

    2013-01-01

    Background Bivalves are among the oldest classes of invertebrates, and they exhibit diverse types of sexual patterning. However, our current understanding of the mechanisms of sex determination and differentiation in bivalves remains very limited. The retinoid X receptors (RXRs), which are members of the nuclear receptor family, are involved in sex differentiation in many organisms. Results In the present study, four full-length RXR-encoding cDNAs (CfRXRs) named CfRXRa, CfRXRb, CfRXRc and CfRXRd were retrieved from Zhikong scallop (Chlamys farreri). The four RXRs exhibited the conserved five-domain structure of nuclear receptor superfamily members and differed from each other only in the T-box of the C domain. The three variants, designated T (+4), T (+20) and T (+24), contained insertions of 4, 20 and 24 amino acids, respectively. The entire CfRXR gene is composed of eight exons and seven introns, and the four isoforms are generated via alternative mRNA splicing. Expression analysis showed that all four isoforms were expressed in both the testis and the ovary during the differentiation stage, whereas no expression was detected in the growth, mature or resting stages. This result suggests that CfRXRs are involved in germ cell differentiation in both sexes. The expression of the four isoforms was also detected in other tissues examined, including mantle, gill, digestive gland, and adductor muscle of sexually mature male and female Zhikong scallops, implying the multiple biological functions of CfRXRs. Conclusion Our study presents the first report of RXR isoforms in bivalves. Further investigation of the functional roles of different RXR isoforms may provide deep insights into the regulatory mechanism of sex differentiation in C. farreri. PMID:24066133

  8. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid regulation of gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S D; Jump, D B

    1994-01-01

    We have known for nearly 30 years that dietary polyenoic (n-6) and (n-3) fatty acids potentially inhibit hepatic fatty acid biosynthesis. The teleological explanation for this unique action of PUFAs resides in their ability to suppress the synthesis of (n-9) fatty acids. By inhibiting fatty acid biosynthesis, dietary PUFAs reduce the availability of substrate for delta 9 desaturase (7, 22, 34, 36) and in turn reduce the availability of (n-9) fatty acids for incorporation into plasma membranes. In this way, essential biological processes dependent on essential fatty acids (e.g. reproduction and trans-dermal water loss) continue to operate normally. Therefore, if essential fatty acid intake did not regulate (n-9) fatty acid synthesis, the survival of the organism would be threatened. During the past 20 years, we have gradually elucidated the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which dietary PUFAs modulate fatty acid biosynthesis and (n-9) fatty acid availability. Central to this mechanism has been our ability to determine that dietary PUFAs regulate the transcription of genes coding for lipogenic enzymes (12, 40). The potential mechanisms by which PUFAs govern gene transcription are numerous, and it is unlikely that any one mechanism can fully elucidate the nuclear actions of PUFA. The difficulty in providing a unifying hypothesis at this time stems from: (a) the many metabolic routes taken by PUFAs upon entering the hepatocyte (Figure 1); and (b) the lack of identity of a specific PUFA-regulated trans-acting factor. However, the studies described above indicate that macronutrients, like PUFA, are not only utilized as fuel and structural components of cells, but also serve as important mediators of gene expression (12, 14, 40). As regulators of gene expression, PUFAs (or metabolites) are thought to affect the activity of transcription factors, which in turn target key cis-linked elements associated with specific genes. Whether this targeting involves DNA

  9. Potential mechanisms underlying estrogen-induced expression of the molluscan estrogen receptor (ER) gene.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thi Kim Anh; MacFarlane, Geoff R; Kong, Richard Yuen Chong; O'Connor, Wayne A; Yu, Richard Man Kit

    2016-10-01

    In vertebrates, estrogens and estrogen mimicking chemicals modulate gene expression mainly through a genomic pathway mediated by the estrogen receptors (ERs). Although the existence of an ER orthologue in the mollusc genome has been known for some time, its role in estrogen signalling has yet to be deciphered. This is largely due to its constitutive (ligand-independent) activation and a limited mechanistic understanding of its regulation. To fill this knowledge gap, we cloned and characterised an ER cDNA (sgER) and the 5'-flanking region of the gene from the Sydney rock oyster Saccostrea glomerata. The sgER cDNA is predicted to encode a 477-amino acid protein that contains a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and a ligand-binding domain (LBD) typically conserved among both vertebrate and invertebrate ERs. A comparison of the sgER LBD sequence with those of other ligand-dependent ERs revealed that the sgER LBD is variable at several conserved residues known to be critical for ligand binding and receptor activation. Ligand binding assays using fluorescent-labelled E2 and purified sgER protein confirmed that sgER is devoid of estrogen binding. In silico analysis of the sgER 5'-flanking sequence indicated the presence of three putative estrogen responsive element (ERE) half-sites and several putative sites for ER-interacting transcription factors, suggesting that the sgER promoter may be autoregulated by its own gene product. sgER mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in adult oyster tissues, with the highest expression found in the ovary. Ovarian expression of sgER mRNA was significantly upregulated following in vitro and in vivo exposure to 17β-estradiol (E2). Notably, the activation of sgER expression by E2 in vitro was abolished by the specific ER antagonist ICI 182, 780. To determine whether sgER expression is epigenetically regulated, the in vivo DNA methylation status of the putative proximal promoter in ovarian tissues was assessed using bisulfite genomic sequencing. The

  10. The inimitable kynurenic acid: the roles of different ionotropic receptors in the action of kynurenic acid at a spinal level.

    PubMed

    Tuboly, Gabor; Tar, Lilla; Bohar, Zsuzsanna; Safrany-Fark, Arpad; Petrovszki, Zita; Kekesi, Gabriella; Vecsei, Laszlo; Pardutz, Arpad; Horvath, Gyongyi

    2015-03-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is a neuroactive metabolite that interacts with NMDA, AMPA/kainate and alpha 7 nicotinic receptors. The goal of this study was to clarify the roles of these receptors in the action of KYNA at a spinal level by using highly specific receptor antagonists alone or in triple combinations. Chronic osteoarthritis-like joint pain was induced with monosodium-iodoacetate in male Wistar rats. Mechanical allodynia and motor function were quantified. In the first series we determined the dose-response and time course effects of intrathecally administered KYNA (10-100 μg), D-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5; an NMDA receptor antagonist; 10-200 μg), methyllycaconitine (MLA; an alpha 7 nicotinic receptor antagonist; 100-200 μg) and 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzoquinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX; an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist; 1-20 μg). In the second series, four different triple combinations of MLA, AP5 and NBQX were investigated. Intrathecal administration of KYNA caused a dose-dependent motor impairment and antinociception. The highly specific NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 caused a motor impairment and antinociception with lower potency. High doses of NBQX resulted in significant antinociception with a slight motor impairment, while only the highest dose of MLA gave rise to significant antinociception with a slight motor impairment. After the coadministration of these ligands as combinations, no potentiation was observed. It may be supposed that the effects of KYNA are primarily due to the inhibition of NMDA receptors at both glycine and phencyclidine (PCP) binding sites, and not to the interactions at the different ionotropic receptors, but the mechanisms behind its high bio-efficiency are still unknown.

  11. Unsaturated fatty acids and phytosterols regulate cholesterol transporter genes in Caco-2 and HepG2 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Park, Youngki; Carr, Timothy P

    2013-02-01

    Dietary consumption of phytosterols and certain fatty acids has been shown to reduce cholesterol absorption and plasma cholesterol concentrations. However, it has not been fully elucidated whether phytosterols or fatty acids can alter the expression of cholesterol transporters by functioning as signaling molecules. This study tested the hypothesis that various fatty acids and phytosterols commonly found in the food supply can modulate the expression of transporters including Niemann-Pick C1-like 1, low-density lipoprotein receptor, and scavenger receptor class B type I and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in the intestine and liver. Caco-2 cells were used as models of enterocytes, and HepG2 cells were used as a model of hepatocytes. The cells were treated for 18 hours with 100 μmol/L of a fatty acid, or for 24 hours with 10 μmol/L of 25α-hydroxycholesterol, or 100 μmol/L of cholesterol, sitosterol, and stigmasterol to measure expression of genes involved in cholesterol transport using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Polyunsaturated fatty acids in Caco-2 cells and sterols in HepG2 cells significantly reduced the messenger RNA expression levels of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1, scavenger receptor class B type I, low-density lipoprotein receptor, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase. Importantly, sitosterol and stigmasterol reduced the messenger RNA levels of genes to a similar extent as cholesterol. The data support the hypothesis that unsaturated fatty acid and phytosterols can act as signaling molecules and alter the expression of genes involved in cholesterol transport and metabolism.

  12. Cadmium Induces Retinoic Acid Signaling by Regulating Retinoic Acid Metabolic Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, β,β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1–6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1–6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 μm cadmium in Hepa 1–6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  13. Thymine, adenine and lipoamino acid based gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Ziora, Zyta M; Coles, Daniel J; Lin, I-Chun; Toth, Istvan

    2010-05-14

    A novel class of thymine, adenine and lipoamino acid based non-viral carriers for gene delivery has been developed. Their ability to bind to DNA by hydrogen bonding was confirmed by NMR diffusion, isothermal titration calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy experiments.

  14. Identification of genes for the constant region of rabbit T-cell receptor beta chains.

    PubMed Central

    Angiolillo, A L; Lamoyi, E; Bernstein, K E; Mage, R G

    1985-01-01

    We describe cDNA clones from thymus mRNA of a young rabbit that have sequences highly homologous to the human and murine T-cell receptor beta-chain constant region (C beta). In rabbit, man, and mouse there is a conserved extra cysteine in the constant region that could lead to a free thiol group or alternative disulfide bond formation depending on the locations and total numbers of cysteines in assembled receptor molecules. A cDNA clone (CL ANA 11) with 571 bases 5' of the C beta coding sequence has an open reading frame starting at a methionine codon that encodes 141 amino acids in frame with the C beta sequence. The encoded sequence has no resemblance to known immunoglobulin or beta-chain variable regions or other known proteins. An oligonucleotide probe from the 5' end of the encoded protein hybridizes to an approximately equal to 2-kilobase genomic DNA fragment that contains C beta gene sequences and to an approximately equal to 8-kilobase mRNA species in the thymus mRNA preparation from which the clone was derived. Within the 5' coding sequence there is a stretch of 211 bases containing strings of alternating purines and pyrimidines that may form Z-DNA. The sequence of the last 55 base pairs adjacent to C beta resembles the corresponding segment of mouse cDNA clone 86T3 that contains sequence 5' of the mouse C beta 1 gene. Although the function of a potential protein encoded by the 5' end of CL ANA 11 is unknown, it could play a role in regulation of thymocyte growth and differentiation. Images PMID:2989826

  15. Regulation of bradykinin receptor gene expression in human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Phagoo, S B; Yaqoob, M; Herrera-Martinez, E; McIntyre, P; Jones, C; Burgess, G M

    2000-06-01

    In WI-38 human fibroblasts, interleukin-1 beta and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) increased bradykinin B(1) receptor mRNA, which peaked between 2 and 4 h, remaining elevated for 20 h. Binding of the bradykinin B(1) receptor selective ligand [3H]des-Arg(10)-kallidin, also increased, peaking at 4 h and remaining elevated for 20 h. The B(max) value for [3H]des-Arg(10)-kallidin rose from 280+/-102 fmol/mg (n=3) to 701+/-147 fmol/mg (n=3), but the K(D) value remained unaltered (control, 1.04+/-0.33 nM (n=3); interleukin-1 beta, 0.88+/-0.41 nM (n=3)). The interleukin-1 beta-induced [3H]des-Arg(10)-kallidin binding sites were functional receptors, as bradykinin B(1) receptor agonist-induced responses increased in treated cells. Bradykinin B(2) receptor mRNA and [3H]bradykinin binding were upregulated by interleukin-1 beta, but not TNF-alpha. The effect of interleukin-1 beta on bradykinin B(2) receptors was smaller than for bradykinin B(1) receptors. Cycloheximide prevented interleukin-1 beta-mediated increases in B(1) and B(2) binding, but not mRNA suggesting that de novo synthesis of a transcriptional activator was unnecessary.

  16. Co-regulation of a large and rapidly evolving repertoire of odorant receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Kambere, Marijo B; Lane, Robert P

    2007-01-01

    The olfactory system meets niche- and species-specific demands by an accelerated evolution of its odorant receptor repertoires. In this review, we describe evolutionary processes that have shaped olfactory and vomeronasal receptor gene families in vertebrate genomes. We emphasize three important periods in the evolution of the olfactory system evident by comparative genomics: the adaptation to land in amphibian ancestors, the decline of olfaction in primates, and the delineation of putative pheromone receptors concurrent with rodent speciation. The rapid evolution of odorant receptor genes, the sheer size of the repertoire, as well as their wide distribution in the genome, presents a developmental challenge: how are these ever-changing odorant receptor repertoires coordinated within the olfactory system? A central organizing principle in olfaction is the specialization of sensory neurons resulting from each sensory neuron expressing only ~one odorant receptor allele. In this review, we also discuss this mutually exclusive expression of odorant receptor genes. We have considered several models to account for co-regulation of odorant receptor repertoires, as well as discussed a new hypothesis that invokes important epigenetic properties of the system. PMID:17903278

  17. [Severe type A insulin resistance syndrome due to a mutation in the insulin receptor gene].

    PubMed

    Ros, P; Colino-Alcol, E; Grasso, V; Barbetti, F; Argente, J

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance syndromes without lipodystrophy are an infrequent and heterogeneous group of disorders with variable clinical phenotypes, associate