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Sample records for acid reflux disease

  1. Role of Acid and Weakly Acidic Reflux in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Off Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hea Jung; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Lim, Chul Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gye

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Available data about reflux patterns and symptom determinants in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) subtypes off proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy are lacking. We aimed to evaluate reflux patterns and determinants of symptom perception in patients with GERD off PPI therapy by impedance-pH monitoring. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data in patients diagnosed as GERD based on results of impedance-pH monitoring, endoscopy and/or typical symptoms. The characteristics of acid and weakly acidic reflux were evaluated. Symptomatic and asymptomatic reflux were compared according to GERD subtypes and individual symptoms. Results Forty-two patients (22 males, mean age 46 years) were diagnosed as GERD (17 erosive reflux disease, 9 pH(+) non-erosive reflux disease [NERD], 9 hypersensitive esophagus and 7 symptomatic NERD). A total of 1,725 reflux episodes were detected (855 acid [50%], 857 weakly acidic [50%] and 13 weakly alkaline reflux [< 1%]). Acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and bolus clearance was longer compared with weakly acidic reflux. In terms of globus, weakly acidic reflux was more symptomatic. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed reflux; these associations were more pronounced in erosive reflux disease and symptomatic NERD. The perception of regurgitation was related to acid reflux, while that of globus was more related to weakly acidic reflux. Conclusions In patients not taking PPI, acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and had longer bolus clearance. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed type; however, weakly acidic reflux was associated more with globus. These data suggest a role for impedance-pH data in the evaluation of globus. PMID:22837877

  2. Gastroesophageal reflux disease

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic esophagitis; Reflux esophagitis; GERD; Heartburn - chronic; Dyspepsia - GERD ... into the esophagus. This is called reflux or gastroesophageal reflux. Reflux may cause symptoms. Harsh stomach acids can ...

  3. How reflux causes symptoms: reflux perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Weijenborg, Pim W; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2013-06-01

    In gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms arise due to reflux of gastric content into the oesophagus. However, the relation between magnitude and onset of reflux and symptom generation in GERD patients is far from simple; gastroesophageal reflux occurs several times a day in everyone and the majority of reflux episodes remains asymptomatic. This review aims to address the question how reflux causes symptoms, focussing on factors leading to enhanced reflux perception. We will highlight esophageal sensitivity variance between subtypes of GERD, which is influenced by peripheral sensitization of primary afferents, central sensitization of spinal dorsal horn neurons, impaired mucosal barrier function and genetic factors. We will also discuss the contribution of specific refluxate characteristics to reflux perception, including acidity, and the role of bile, pepsin and gas and proximal extent. Further understanding of reflux perception might improve GERD treatment, especially in current partial responders to therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Integrated acidity and the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Gardner, J D; Rodriguez-Stanley, S; Robinson, M

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that integrated esophageal and gastric acidity values, calculated from 24-h pH recordings, can provide more precise quantitative temporal data than the conventional pH parameters historically associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) investigations. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy results and pH tracings from 20 GERD subjects with > or =10% esophageal acid contact time were studied. Integrated gastric and esophageal acidity were calculated from time-weighted average hydrogen ion concentrations at each second of the 24-h recording period. Integrated esophageal acidity correlated with grade of esophagitis. Two quite distinct GERD subtypes were identified, with either a monophasic or biphasic pattern of integrated esophageal acidity. "Biphasic" subjects differed from "monophasic" subjects in terms of magnitude and pattern of integrated esophageal acidity. Although both groups had significant integrated nocturnal gastric acidity, only the biphasic GERD subjects had concomitant increases in nocturnal integrated esophageal acidity. Esophagitis grade was correlated with magnitude rather than pattern of integrated esophageal acidity, and it was possible to calculate a reflux coefficient that seems to provide an estimate of the quantitative motor disturbance present in GERD. Integrated esophageal and gastric acidity provide quantitative measures of GERD pathophysiology and, compared to conventional pH parameters, should enhance evaluation of therapeutic interventions.

  5. The effect of the speed of eating on acid reflux and symptoms of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Valitova, Elen R; Bayrakçı, Berna; Bor, Serhat

    2013-01-01

    There is a general belief that gastroesophageal reflux attacks appear more frequently after quick meal, which is without powerful scientific basis, and the general advise to patients is to eat slowly. We aimed to determine whether the speed of eating has an impact on reflux attacks and symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients. 24-h intraesophageal pH monitoring was performed to 60 patients with frequent gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms (39 women) in a tertiary referral center. One hour after placing the pH probe, the patients were asked to have the same meal (744 kcal: 37,6% of carbohydrate, 21,2% of protein, and 41,2% of fat) within 5 or 30 minutes in random order for two consecutive days without extubating. The number of reflux episodes, acid exposure time, and the symptoms of 3-h postprandial period were analyzed. Thirty-eight patients had normal and 22 patients had pathologic pH monitoring for a total of 28 hours of measurement period. The number of reflux episodes increased in the 2 nd hour. The fast eating group had less reflux attacks and lower total reflux time in the 1 st hour and an insignificant increase in the 2 nd and 3 rd hours. The number of symptoms was higher following slow eating (113 vs. 100) without reaching significance. Speed of food intake has no significant impact on acidic reflux attacks in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. The classical advice "eat slowly" may not have any scientific basis. However, a similar study on patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease should be performed by combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH to evaluate the place of nonacid or weak acid reflux.

  6. How Acid Reflux Disease Damages Teeth

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Gum Disease and Cardiovascular Health ... other medical conditions, not directly related to your oral health, may be the cause for problems associated in ...

  7. Acid suppressants for managing gastro-oesophageal reflux and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in infants: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jane C; Schneuer, Francisco J; Harrison, Christopher; Trevena, Lyndal; Hiscock, Harriet; Elshaug, Adam G; Nassar, Natasha

    2018-02-22

    To evaluate the diagnosis and management of reflux and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in infants aged <1 year presenting to general practitioners (GPs). A nationally representative, prospective, cross-sectional survey of GP activity in Australia, 2006-2016 (Bettering the Evaluation And Care of Health Study). Annually, a random sample of around 1000 GPs recorded details for 100 consecutive visits with consenting, unidentified patients. Diagnoses of reflux and GORD and their management including prescribing of acid-suppressant medicines (proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine receptor antagonists (H2RAs)) and counselling, advice or education. Of all infants' visits, 512 (2.7%) included a diagnosis of reflux (n=413, 2.2%) or GORD (n=99, 0.5%). From 2006 to 2016, diagnostic rates decreased for reflux and increased for GORD. Prescribing of acid suppressants occurred in 43.6% visits for reflux and 48.5% visits for GORD, similar to rates of counselling, advice or education (reflux: 38.5%, GORD: 43.4% of visits). Prescribing of PPIs increased (statistically significant only for visits for reflux), while prescribing of H2RAs decreased. Overprescribing of acid suppressants to infants may be occurring. In infants, acid-suppressant medicines are no better than placebo and may have significant negative side effects; however, guidelines are inconsistent. Clear, concise and consistent guidance is needed. GPs and parents need to understand what is normal and limitations of medical therapy. We need a greater understanding of the influences on GP prescribing practices, of parents' knowledge and attitudes and of the pressures on parents of infants with these conditions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Acid Reflux

    MedlinePlus

    ... cough; ear, nose and throat problems often avoid detection Risk/Complications GERD can masquerade as other diseases ... DOWNLOADS: WEB | FLYER ] GI Health Centers Colorectal Cancer Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome Obesity Digestive ...

  9. Acid Reflux (GER and GERD) in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Short Bowel Syndrome Smoking and the Digestive System Ulcerative Colitis Viral Gastroenteritis Whipple Disease Your Digestive System & How it Works Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome Acid Reflux ( ...

  10. Proton pump inhibitors improve acid-related dyspepsia in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Motoyasu; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Kawamura, Osamu; Maeda, Masaki; Kuribayashi, Shikou; Nagoshi, Atsuto; Zai, Hiroaki; Moki, Fumitaka; Horikoshi, Tsutomu; Toki, Munetoshi; Sugimoto, Sayaka; Mori, Masatomo

    2007-07-01

    It has been reported that proton pump inhibitors are more effective than H2 receptor antagonists in patients with functional dyspepsia. Dyspeptic symptoms that respond to proton pump inhibitors are classified as acid-related dyspepsia. A new questionnaire for assessing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), the Frequency Scale for Symptoms of GERD, covers the 12 most common symptoms of GERD patients. A quantitative assessment of the changes of reflux symptoms and acid-related dyspepsia was made in GERD patients receiving proton pump inhibitor therapy. Sixty-eight GERD patients receiving proton pump inhibitor therapy completed the questionnaire before and after treatment for 8 weeks. There is a significant positive correlation between reflux symptoms and acid-related dyspepsia before and after therapy (r = 0.569 and r = 0.569; both P's < 0.001) and acid-related dyspepsia in patients with both nonerosive and erosive GERD. We conclude that GERD patients suffer not only from reflux symptoms, but also from acid-related dyspepsia, and proton pump inhibitors improve both types of symptoms.

  11. Small volume acid reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with hiatal hernia is only detectable by pH-metry but not by multichannel intraluminal impedance.

    PubMed

    Weigt, J; Malfertheiner, P

    2013-07-01

    Until now, it is uncertain if the so-called pH-only reflux episodes that consist of a pH drop without evidence of retrograde bolus movement in multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) represent reflux episodes or artifacts. Hiatal hernia (HH) may allow reflux of small volumes to occur that can be detected by pH-metry but not by MII. The aim was to search for a mechanism that can explain pH-only reflux, 20 patients (12 females and 8 males, median age 52 years, interquartile range [IQR]: 40.5-60.75 years) were investigated with MII-pH off PPI. Impedance and pH-metry data were analyzed separately. The differences in detection rate of acid reflux between pH-metry and MII were correlated with the presence of HH. In an in vitro experiment, MII-pH probes were flushed with citric acid in plastic tubes of different size with capillary diameter and diameters of 2.5 mm and 4.5 mm, while recording pH values and impedance. HH was present in six patients and absent in 14 patients. In patients with HH in comparison with patients with absent HH, the difference of acid reflux detection between pH-metry and MII is significantly higher (70%, IQR: 15-88% and 3.6%, IQR: 0-31%, respectively). In vitro all simulated reflux lead to a fall in pH whereas a corresponding decrease in impedance was only recognizable in the 4.5-mm plastic tubes. Acid reflux episodes in patients with HH are more frequently detected by pH-metry than by MII. Small volume reflux that does not lead to a decrease in impedance is the likely explanation for this phenomenon. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  12. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Larrosa Haro, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Physiological gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus and occurs up 2/3 of normal infants; and, it resolves spontaneously around 9-12 months of age. When GER causes symptoms or complications is considered gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and it is associated to growth impairment, anemia, apnea, wheezing or other chronic respiratory symptoms, asthma, recurrent pneumonia or sleeping problems. Diagnosis of GERD implies studies as upper gastrointestinal series, upper endoscopy and 24 h esophageal pH monitoring; special cases may require motility and nuclear medicine studies. GER may be successfully treated with prone elevated position (30-45 degrees), shortening the feeding intervals to 3 h and anti-GER high-viscosity formulas. The regular use of prokinetic drugs is not recommended. The efficacy of proton pump inhibitors and H2 histamine receptor antagonists in the treatment of GERD has been demonstrated in children by diminishing de acid secretion of parietal cells, lowering the gastric contents and decreasing its ability to cause peptic-acid damage to the esophagus or to the respiratory tract. Surgical treatment is indicated in chronic recurrent GERD, usually in children 5 years or older with dependent proton pump inhibitor erosive esophagitis, chronic respiratory disease and in risk-selected cases.

  13. Mucosal integrity and sensitivity to acid in the proximal esophagus in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Weijenborg, Pim W; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A; van den Wijngaard, René M J G J; Verheij, J; Smout, André J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-07-01

    Acid reflux episodes that extend to the proximal esophagus are more likely to be perceived. This suggests that the proximal esophagus is more sensitive to acid than the distal esophagus, which could be caused by impaired mucosal integrity in the proximal esophagus. Our aim was to explore sensitivity to acid and mucosal integrity in different segments of the esophagus. We used a prospective observational study, including 12 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). After stopping acid secretion-inhibiting medication, two procedures were performed: an acid perfusion test and an upper endoscopy with electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and esophageal biopsies. Proximal and distal sensitivity to acid and tissue impedance were measured in vivo, and mucosal permeability and epithelial intercellular spaces at different esophageal levels were measured in vitro. Mean lag time to heartburn perception was much shorter after proximal acid perfusion (0.8 min) than after distal acid perfusion (3.9 min) (P = 0.02). Median in vivo tissue impedance was significantly lower in the distal esophagus (4,563 Ω·m) compared with the proximal esophagus (8,170 Ω·m) (P = 0.002). Transepithelial permeability, as measured by the median fluorescein flux was significantly higher in the distal (2,051 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) than in the proximal segment (368 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) (P = 0.033). Intercellular space ratio and maximum heartburn intensity were not significantly different between the proximal and distal esophagus. In GERD patients off acid secretion-inhibiting medication, acid exposure in the proximal segment of the esophagus provokes symptoms earlier than acid exposure in the distal esophagus, whereas mucosal integrity is impaired more in the distal esophagus. These findings indicate that the enhanced sensitivity to proximal reflux episodes is not explained by increased mucosal permeability. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. The Characteristics of Postprandial Proximal Gastric Acid Pocket in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Liu, Dong; Feng, Cheng; Luo, Yumei; Nian, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xueqin; Zhang, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Background Postprandial proximal gastric acid pocket (PPGAP) plays important roles in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In this study, we analyzed the characteristics of PPGAP in GERD. Material/Methods There were 17 normal participants and 20 GERD patients who completed a gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire (GerdQ) and underwent a gastroscopy, a high-resolution manometry, an esophageal 24-hour pH monitoring, and a station pull-through pH monitoring to assess their symptomatic degree, endoscopic change, acid exposure, and PPGAP. Results PPGAP was present in all participants. Compared with normal participants, the PPGAP in GERD patients was significantly different, thus the disappearing time was significantly later (p<0.001), the lasting time was significantly longer (p<0.001), the length was significantly longer (p<0.001), and the lowest pH and the mean pH were significantly lower (p<0.001). The length of PPGAP in GERD patients was positively correlated with GerdQ score (p<0.05). The disappearing time, the lasting time, and the length of PPGAP in GERD patients was positively correlated with the DeMeester score (p<0.01). The lowest pH and the mean pH of PPGAP in GERD patients was negatively correlated with the DeMeester score (p<0.001). Conclusions PPGAP was generally present. PPGAP in GERD patients had characteristics of long time period, long length, and high acidity. Its length was positively correlated with subjective symptomatic degree. Its period, length, and acidity were positively correlated with the objective acid exposure. PPGAP seems to be the originator of acid reflux events and plays important roles in GERD. PMID:29309401

  15. Pathophysiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    De Giorgi, F; Palmiero, M; Esposito, I; Mosca, F; Cuomo, R

    2006-01-01

    Summary Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a condition in which the reflux of gastric contents into the oesophagus provokes symptoms or complications and impairs quality of life. Typical symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are heartburn and regurgitation but gastro-oesophageal reflux disease has also been related to extra-oesophageal manifestations, such as asthma, chronic cough and laryngitis. The pathogenesis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is multifactorial, involving transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations and other lower oesophageal sphincter pressure abnormalities. As a result, reflux of acid, bile, pepsin and pancreatic enzymes occurs, leading to oesophageal mucosal injury. Other factors contributing to the pathophysiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease include hiatal hernia, impaired oesophageal clearance, delayed gastric emptying and impaired mucosal defensive factors. Hiatal hernia contributes to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease by promoting lower oesophageal sphincter dysfunction. Impaired oesophageal clearance is responsible for prolonged acid exposure of the mucosa. Delayed gastric emptying, resulting in gastric distension, can significantly increase the rate of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations, contributing to postprandial gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. The mucosal defensive factors play an important role against development of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, by neutralizing the backdiffusion of hydrogen ion into the oesophageal tissue. While the pathogenesis of oesophageal symptoms is now well known, the mechanisms underlying extra-oesophageal airway manifestations are still poorly understood. Two hypotheses have been proposed: direct contact of gastric acid with the upper airway and a vago-vagal reflex elicited by acidification of the distal oesophagus, leading to bronchospasm. In conclusion, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease can be considered as the result of a complex interplay of factors

  16. Acidic and neutral liquid ingestion in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Dafne Calsoni; Dantas, Roberto Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Sour acidic liquid has a slower distal esophageal transit than a neutral liquid. Our hypothesis was that an acidic sour bolus has a different ingestion dynamic than a neutral bolus. In 50 healthy volunteers and 29 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), we evaluated the ingestion dynamics of 100 mL of acidic sour liquid (concentrated lemon juice, pH: 3.0) and 100 mL of water (pH: 6.8). The time to ingest the total volume, the number of swallows to ingest the volume, the interval between swallows, the flux of ingestion and the volume ingested in each swallow was measured. In both groups, healthy volunteers and patients in treatment for GERD, the acidic liquid took longer to be ingested, a higher number of swallows, a slower flux of ingestion and a smaller volume in each swallow than the neutral bolus. There was no difference between healthy volunteers and patients with GERD. The ingestion in women was longer than in men for acidic and neutral liquids. Acidic liquid has a different dynamic of ingestion than the neutral liquid, which may be consequence of the slower transit through the distal esophageal body or an anticipation to drink a sour bolus. Patients with GERD have the same prolonged ingestion of the acidic liquid bolus as seen in healthy volunteers.

  17. The effects of obesity on oesophageal function, acid exposure and the symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Anggiansah, R; Sweis, R; Anggiansah, A; Wong, T; Cooper, D; Fox, M

    2013-03-01

    Obese patients have an increased risk of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease; however, the mechanism underlying this association is uncertain. To test the hypothesis that mechanical effects of obesity on oesophageal function increase acid exposure and symptoms. Height, weight and waist circumference (WC) were measured in patients with typical reflux symptoms referred for manometry and 24 h ambulatory pH studies. Symptom severity was assessed by questionnaire. The association between obesity [WC, body mass index (BMI)], oesophageal function, acid exposure and reflux symptoms was assessed. Physiological measurements were obtained from 582 patients (median age 48, 56% female) of whom 406 (70%) completed symptom questionnaires. The prevalence of general obesity was greater in women (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2) ; F 23%:M 16%; P = 0.056), however more men had abdominal obesity (WC ≥ 99 cm (M 41%:F 28%; P = 0.001)). Oesophageal acid exposure increased with obesity (WC: R = 0.284, P < 0.001) and was associated also with lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) pressure, reduced abdominal LOS length and peristaltic dysfunction (all P < 0.001). Univariable regression showed a negative association of WC with both LOS pressure and abdominal LOS length (R = -0.221 and -0.209 respectively; both P < 0.001). However, multivariable analysis demonstrated that the effects of increasing WC on oesophageal function do not explain increased acid reflux in obese patients. Instead, independent effects of obesity and oesophageal dysfunction on acid exposure were present. Reflux symptoms increased with acid exposure (R = 0.300; P < 0.001) and this association explained increased symptom severity in obese patients. Abdominal obesity (waist circumference) is associated with oesophageal dysfunction, increased acid exposure and reflux symptoms; however, this analysis does not support the mechanical hypothesis that the effects of obesity on oesophageal function are the cause of increased acid exposure in obese

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux disease - children

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic esophagitis - children; Reflux esophagitis - children; GERD - children; Heartburn - chronic - children; Dyspepsia - GERD - children ... into the esophagus. This is called reflux or gastroesophageal reflux. In infants, this ring of muscles has not ...

  19. Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Charumathi Raghu; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents into the esophagus causes troublesome symptoms, esophageal injury, and/or complications. Use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) remains the standard therapy for GERD and is effective in most patients. Those whose symptoms are refractory to PPIs should be evaluated further and other treatment options should be considered, according to individual patient characteristics. Response to PPIs could be total (no symptoms), partial (residual breakthrough symptoms), or absent (no change in symptoms). Patients experiencing complete response do not usually need further management. Patients with partial response can be treated surgically or by using emerging endoscopic therapies. Patients who exhibit no response to PPI need further evaluation to rule out other causes. PMID:25274499

  20. Development of food allergies in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with gastric acid suppressive medications.

    PubMed

    Trikha, Anita; Baillargeon, Jacques G; Kuo, Yong-fang; Tan, Alai; Pierson, Karen; Sharma, Gulshan; Wilkinson, Gregg; Bonds, Rana S

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of food allergy has steadily increased, especially in children. Reflux disease, a very common problem in children, is often treated with gastric acid suppressive (GAS) medications which may alter the processing of food allergens, thereby affecting oral mucosal tolerance. The purpose of this study was to determine if use of GAS medications is associated with the occurrence of food allergies in children. Using a large national commercial insurance database, we identified 4724 children aged 0-18 yrs who were diagnosed with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) and treated with GAS medications between January 1, 2008 and September 30, 2009. We then matched 4724 children with GERD not treated with GAS medications and 4724 children without GERD and not treated with GAS medications, at a 1:1 ratio, on age, gender and number of atopic risk factors. Patients were followed for 12 months. In comparison to the referent (children without GERD who received no GAS medications), children with GERD who were treated with GAS were more likely to be diagnosed with a food allergy (Hazard ratio (HR): 3.67, 95% CI 2.15-6.27), as were children with GERD diagnosis but who were not treated with GAS medications (HR: 2.15, 95% CI: 1.21-3.81). A direct comparison of the two GERD cohorts showed that children with GERD who were treated with GAS had a greater risk of food allergy than those with GERD who were untreated (HR, 1.68, 95%CI, 1.15-2.46). Treatment with GAS medications is associated with the occurrence of food allergy, an effect not apparently related to a diagnosis of GERD alone. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Effect of Acid Suppression on Upper Airway Anatomy and Obstruction in Patients with Sleep Apnea and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orr, William C.; Robert, Jennifer J.T.; Houck, John R.; Giddens, Cheryl L.; Tawk, Maroun M.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: This study was designed to assess the effect of acid suppression on upper airway structure and function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Methods: This is a single-site within-subjects design. Twenty five patients with documented mild OSAS and objectively documented GERD via 24-hour pH measurement were included in the study. Patients were studied before and after 8 weeks of treatment with rabeprazole, 20 mg, twice a day. Subjects underwent laryngoscopy, polysomnography, and 24-hour pH monitoring. Subjective assessments of sleep obtained included the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Results: Posterior commissure edema was significantly reduced (p < 0.05), and the Reflux Finding Score was improved (p < 0.07). Objective and subjective sleep parameters were significantly improved, sleep-onset latency was significantly reduced (26.2 vs 11.2, p < 0.05), and sleep-related acid contact time was significantly reduced (8.0% vs 1.7% p < 0.001). There was no significant change in the apnea-hypopnea index. Conclusions: In patients with mild OSAS and documented GERD, acid suppression improves upper airway abnormalities, as well as objective and subjective measures of sleep quality. Aggressive treatment of GERD in patients with OSAS may be helpful in the overall treatment of this select patient population Citation: Orr WC; Robert JJT; Houck JR; Giddens CL; Tawk MM. The effect of acid suppression on upper airway anatomy and obstruction in patients with sleep apnea and gastroesophageal reflux disease. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(4):330-334. PMID:19968010

  2. Characteristics of symptomatic reflux episodes in Japanese proton pump inhibitor-refractory non-erosive reflux disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Kenichiro; Koike, Tomoyuki; Iijima, Katsunori; Saito, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Hiroki; Hatta, Waku; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients. METHODS: Thirty-five NERD patients with persistent symptoms, despite taking rabeprazole 10 mg twice daily for at least 8 wk, were included in this study. All patients underwent 24 h combined impedance - pH on rabeprazole. The symptom index (SI) was considered to be positive if ≥ 50%, and proximal reflux episodes were determined when reflux reached 15 cm above the proximal margin of the lower esophageal sphincter. RESULTS: In 14 (40%) SI-positive patients, with liquid weakly acid reflux, the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms was significantly more frequent in proximal reflux episodes (46.7%) than in distal ones (5.7%) (P < 0.001). With liquid acid reflux, there were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms between proximal reflux episodes (38.5%) and distal ones (20.5%) (NS). With mixed liquid-gas weakly acid reflux, the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms in proximal reflux episodes was significantly more frequent (31.0%) than in distal reflux ones (3.3%) (P < 0.001). With mixed liquid-gas acid reflux, there were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms between proximal reflux episodes (29.4%) and distal ones (14.3%) (NS). CONCLUSION: The proximal extent of weakly acidic liquid and mixed liquid-gas reflux is a major factor associated with reflux perception in SI-positive patients on proton pump inhibitor therapy. PMID:26715820

  3. Esophageal Acidification During Nocturnal Acid-breakthrough with Ilaprazole Versus Omeprazole in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Karyampudi, Arun; Ghoshal, Uday C; Singh, Rajan; Verma, Abhai; Misra, Asha; Saraswat, Vivek A

    2017-04-30

    Though nocturnal acid-breakthrough (NAB) is common in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients, its clinical importance results from esophageal acidification, which has been shown to be uncommon. Ilaprazole, a long-acting proton pump inhibitor, may cause NAB infrequently. Accordingly, we studied prospectively, (1) frequency and degree of esophageal acidification during NAB, and (2) frequency and severity of NAB while on ilaprazole versus omeprazole. Fifty-eight consecutive patients with GERD on once daily ilaprazole, 10 mg (n = 28) or omeprazole, 20 mg (n = 30) for > one month underwent 24-hour impedance-pH monitoring prospectively. NAB was defined as intra-gastric pH < 4 for > one hour during night, and esophageal acidification as pH < 4 for any duration. Nocturnal symptoms (heartburn, regurgitation, and chest pain) were also recorded. Of the 58 patients (age 35.5 [inter-quartile range 26.5-46.0] years, 38 [65.5%], 42 (72.4%) had NAB. Though patients with NAB had lower nocturnal intra-gastric pH than without (2.8 [1.9-4.1] vs 5.7 [4.6-6.8], P < 0.001), frequency and duration of nocturnal esophageal acidification (17/42 vs 4/16, P = 0.360 and 0.0 [0.0-1.0] vs 0.0 [0.0-0.3] minutes, P = 0.260, respectively) and symptoms were comparable (13/42 vs 6/16, P = 0.750). Though ilaprazole was associated with less NABs (1 [range 1-2, n = 19] vs 1 [range 1-3, n = 23], P = 0.010) than omeprazole, the frequency, duration, and mean intra-gastric pH during NAB were comparable (19/28 vs 23/30, P = 0.560; 117 [0-315] vs 159 [69-287] minutes, P = 0.500; 1.02 [0.7-1.4] vs 1.04 [0.44-1.3], P = 0.620, respectively). Though NAB was common while patients were on a proton pump inhibitor, esophageal acidification was uncommon. Frequency and severity of NAB were comparable among patients on ilaprazole and omeprazole, except for the lesser number of NABs with ilaprazole.

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in children.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    Despite the frequency with which antireflux procedures are performed, decisions about gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment remain challenging. Several factors contribute to the difficulties in managing gastroesophageal reflux. First, the distinction between physiologic and pathologic gastroesophageal reflux (gastroesophageal reflux disease-GERD) is not always clear. Second, measures of the extent of gastroesophageal reflux often poorly correlate to symptoms or other complications attributed to reflux in infants and children. A third challenge is that the outcome of antireflux procedures, predominately fundoplications, are relatively poorly characterized. All of these factors contribute to difficulty in knowing when to recommend antireflux surgery. One of the manifestations of the uncertainties surrounding GERD is the high degree of variability in the utilization of pediatric antireflux procedures throughout the United States. Pediatric surgeons are frequently consulted for GERD and fundoplication, uncertainties notwithstanding. Although retrospective series and anecdotal observations support fundoplication in some patients, there are many important questions for which sufficient high-quality data to provide a clear answer is lacking. In spite of this, surgeons need to provide guidance to patients and families while awaiting the development of improved evidence to aid in these recommendations. The purpose of this article is to define what is known and what is uncertain, with an emphasis on the most recent evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Duodenogastric reflux in Chagas' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Troncon, L.E.; Rezende Filho, J.; Iazigi, N.

    1988-10-01

    Increased duodenogastric reflux has been recognized as a cause of gastric mucosa damage. The frequent finding of bile-stained gastric juice and a suggested higher frequency of lesions of the gastric mucosa in patients with Chagas' disease, which is characterized by a marked reduction of myenteric neurons, suggest that impairment of intrinsic innervation of the gut might be associated with increased duodenogastric reflux. Duodenogastric bile reflux was quantified after intravenous injection of 99mtechnetium-HIDA, in 18 patients with chronic Chagas' disease, 12 controls, and 7 patients with Billroth II gastrectomy. All but one of the chagasic patients were submitted to upper digestivemore » tract endoscopy. High reflux values (greater than or equal to 10%) were detected both in chagasic patients and in the controls, but the values for both groups were significantly lower (P less than 0.01) than those obtained for Billroth II patients (median: 55.79%; range: 12.58-87.22%). Reflux values tended to be higher in the Chagas' disease group (median: 8.20%; range: 0.0-29.40%) than in the control group (median: 3.20%; range: 0.0-30.64%), with no statistical difference between the two groups (P greater than 0.10). Chronic gastritis was detected by endoscopy in 12 chagasic patients, benign gastric ulcer in 2 patients, and a pool of bile in the stomach in 11 patients. However, neither the occurrence of gastric lesions nor the finding of bile-stained gastric juice was associated with high reflux values after (99mTc)HIDA injection. This study suggests that lesions of the intramural nervous system of the gut in Chagas' disease do not appear to be associated with abnormally increased duodenogastric reflux.« less

  6. [Prevalence of a pathological DGER (duodeno-gastric-oesophageal reflux) in patients with clinical symptoms of reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Kunsch, S; Linhart, T; Fensterer, H; Adler, G; Gress, T M; Ellenrieder, V

    2008-05-01

    According to recent studies DGER (duodeno-gastric-oesophageal reflux) is considered as an independent risk factor for the development of reflux esophagitis and the Barrett metaplasia. The Bilitec 2000 allows a qualitative and quantitative measurement of DGER in patients with symptoms of reflux disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of DGER in patients with reflux symptoms. 146 patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease were enrolled in this study. Patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, oesophageal manometry and simultaneous 24 h oesophageal pH and bilirubin monitoring. The presence of pathological DGER and its relations to the symptom pattern, distal oesophageal acid exposure and endoscopic findings were analysed. In 74 out of 146 patients (51 %, 39 men, 34 women) a DGER could be detected. Twenty-eight (32 %) of these patients suffered from an isolated DGER, while 46 (32 %) had a combined acid and DGER reflux. An isolated acid reflux was found in additional 28 (19 %) patients. The degrees of both acid and DGER were significantly higher in those patients with oesophageal lesions. 1. There is a high prevalence of DGER in patients with the clinical symptoms of a reflux disease. 2. The combined measurement of acid reflux and DGER helps to better define the cause of reflux symptoms. 3. In analogy to the acid reflux DGER increases with the gravity of oesophageal lesions.

  7. Treatment of uncomplicated reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Labenz, Joachim; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2005-07-28

    Uncomplicated reflux disease comprises the non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and erosive reflux disease (ERD). The objectives of treatment are the adequate control of symptoms with restoration of quality of life, healing of lesions and prevention of relapse. Treatment of NERD consists in the administration of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) for 2-4 wk, although patients with NERD show an overall poorer response to PPI treatment than patients with ERD owing to the fact that patients with NERD do not form a pathophysiologically homogenous group. For long-term management on-demand treatment with a PPI is probably the best option. In patients with ERD, therapy with a standard dose PPI for 4-8 wk is always recommended. Long-term treatment of ERD is applied either intermittently or as continuous maintenance treatment with an attempt to reduce the daily dosage of the PPI (step-down principle). In selected patients requiring long-term PPI treatment, antireflux surgery is an alternative option. In patients with troublesome reflux symptoms and without alarming features empirical PPI therapy is another option for initial management. Therapy should be withdrawn after initial success. In the case of relapse, the long-term care depends on a careful risk assessment and the response to PPI therapy.

  8. Usefulness of baseline impedance in patients with proton pump inhibitor-refractory nonerosive reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Kohata, Yukie; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Watanabe, Toshio; Tominaga, Kazunari; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2015-03-01

    Approximately more than half of patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) do not respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Although NERD is a heterogeneous entity, previous study showed that multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII)-pH monitoring could distinguish reflux-related disease from PPI-refractory NERD. The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of baseline impedance in PPI-refractory NERD patients. We used MII-pH monitoring to analyze reflux parameters, symptom index (SI), and baseline impedance in 37 PPI-refractory NERD patients on PPI. Reflux was divided into acid (nadir pH ≤ 4) and non-acid (nadir pH > 4). Subjects were classified as having reflux-related disease based on abnormal reflux parameters or positive SI (≥ 50%), or non-reflux-related disease, including functional heartburn, based on negative SI with normal reflux parameters. A total of 26 of the 37 subjects were diagnosed with reflux-related disease, including eight with acid-reflux type and 18 with non-acid-reflux type, and nine with functional heartburn and two with pseudohypersalivation. There were no significant differences in the clinical characteristics of the acid-reflux type, non-acid-reflux type, and functional heartburn groups. The baseline impedance value in the acid-reflux type (1245 ± 392 Ω) was significantly lower than that in the non-acid-reflux type (2824 ± 1160 Ω) and functional heartburn (3546 ± 1353 Ω) groups. Baseline impedance values inversely correlated with reflux percent time, acid-reflux time, and acid exposure time. Among patients with PPI-refractory NERD, acid-reflux type was associated with lower baseline impedance compared with non-acid-reflux type and functional heartburn. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Lower esophageal sphincter augmentation by endoscopic injection of dextranomer hyaluronic acid copolymer in a porcine gastroesophageal reflux disease model.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, Abdullah; Emil, Sherif; Laberge, Jean-Martin; Elkady, Sherif; Blumenkrantz, Miriam; Mayrand, Serge; Morinville, Veronique; Nguyen, Van-Hung

    2014-09-01

    We previously demonstrated feasibility, safety, and a reproducible histologic bulking effect after injection of dextranomer hyaluronic acid copolymer (DxHA) into the gastroesophageal junction of rabbits. In the current study, we investigated the potential for DxHA to augment the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in a porcine model of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Twelve Yucatan miniature pigs underwent LES manometry and 24-hour ambulatory pH monitoring at baseline, after cardiomyectomy, and 6weeks after randomization to endoscopic injection of either DxHA or saline at the LES. After necropsy, the foregut, including injection sites, was histologically examined. Pigs in both groups had similar weight progression. Cardiomyectomy induced GERD in all animals, as measured by a rise in the median % of time pH <5 from 0.6 to 11.6 (p=0.02). Endoscopic injection of DxHA resulted in a higher median difference in LES length (1.8cm vs. 0.4cm, p=0.03). In comparison with saline injection, DxHA resulted in 120% increase in LES pressure, and 76% decrease in the mean duration of reflux episodes, but these results were not statistically significant. Injection of DxHA induced a foreign body reaction with fibroblasts and giant cells. Porcine cardiomyectomy is a reproducible animal GERD model. Injection of DxHA may augment the LES, offering a potential therapeutic effect in GERD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Ness-Jensen, Eivind; Lagergren, Jesper

    2017-10-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) develops when reflux of gastric content causes troublesome symptoms or complications. The main symptoms are heartburn and acid regurgitation and complications include oesophagitis, strictures, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. In addition to hereditary influence, GORD is associated with lifestyle factors, mainly obesity. Tobacco smoking is regarded as an aetiological factor of GORD, while alcohol consumption is considered a triggering factor of reflux episodes and not a causal factor. Yet, both tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption can reduce the lower oesophageal sphincter pressure, facilitating reflux. In addition, tobacco smoking reduces the production of saliva rich in bicarbonate, which is important for buffering and clearance of acid in the oesophagus. Alcohol also has a direct noxious effect on the oesophageal mucosa, which predisposes to acidic injury. Tobacco smoking cessation reduces the risk of GORD symptoms and avoidance of alcohol is encouraged in individuals where alcohol consumption triggers reflux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Proton Pump Inhibitors in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Friend or Foe.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, C Prakash

    2017-09-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been redefined, in light of recent advances highlighting GERD phenotypes that respond to PPIs, and fresh revelations of potential risks of long-term PPI therapy. Erosive esophagitis predicts excellent response to PPI therapy, but non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) with abnormal reflux parameters on ambulatory reflux monitoring also demonstrates a similar response. In contrast, response is suboptimal in the absence of abnormal reflux parameters. In this setting, if an alternate appropriate indication for PPI therapy does not coexist, risks may outweigh benefits of PPI therapy. Adverse events from long-term PPI therapy continue to be reported, most based on association rather than cause-and-effect. Appropriate indications need to be established before embarking on long-term PPI therapy. Future research will define true risks of long-term PPI therapy, and develop alternate management options for acid peptic diseases.

  12. Sexual activity does not predispose to reflux episodes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Serhat; Valytova, Elen; Yildirim, Esra; Vardar, Rukiye

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of sexual activity on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an under-recognized concern of patients, and one rarely assessed by physicians. Objective The objective of this article is to determine the influence of sexual activity on the intraesophageal acid exposure and acid reflux events in GERD patients. Methods Twenty-one patients with the diagnosis of GERD were prospectively enrolled. Intraesophageal pH monitoring was recorded for 48 hours with a Bravo capsule. All patients were instructed to have sexual intercourse or abstain in a random order two hours after the same refluxogenic dinner within two consecutive nights. Patients were requested to have sex in the standard “missionary position” and women were warned to avoid abdominal compression. The patients completed a diary reporting the time of the sexual intercourse and GERD symptoms. The percentage of reflux time and acid reflux events were compared in two ways: within 30 and 60 minutes prior to and after sexual intercourse on the day of sexual intercourse and in the same time frame of the day without sexual intercourse. Results Fifteen of 21 GERD patients were analyzed. The percentage of reflux time and number of acid reflux events did not show a significant difference within the 30- and 60-minute periods prior to and after sexual intercourse on the day of sexual intercourse and on the day without sexual intercourse, as well. Conclusion Sexual activity does not predispose to increased intraesophageal acid exposure and acid reflux events. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings in patients who define reflux symptoms during sexual intercourse. PMID:25452843

  13. Comparisons of the distribution of oesophageal acid exposure throughout the sleep period among the different gastro-oesophageal reflux disease groups.

    PubMed

    Dickman, R; Parthasarathy, S; Malagon, I B; Jones, P; Han, B; Powers, J; Fass, R

    2007-07-01

    Nocturnal gastro-oesophageal reflux diseases (GERD) can lead to oesophageal mucosal injury and extra-oesophageal complications. To compare distribution of oesophageal acid exposure during sleep time among patients with non-erosive reflux disease and abnormal pH test (NERD-positive), erosive oesophagitis (EO) and Barrett's oesophagus (BO). Patients underwent endoscopy followed by 24-h oesophageal pH testing. Oesophageal acid exposure was assessed every 2 h of the sleep period (0-2, 2-4, 4-6 and 6-8 h). Each period of 2 h was evaluated for acid reflux parameters. All groups were matched by age, time from last meal and duration of sleep time. Thirty-eight patients were enrolled (NERD-positive, 16; EO, 1.4; and BO, 8). All GERD groups demonstrated higher oesophageal acid exposure in the first vs. second half of the sleep period as determined by percent time pH <4 (BO: 34.7 vs.11.6, EO: 13.5 vs. 6.9, NERD-positive: 8.8 vs. 2.5, all P < 0.01). In general, patients with BO had a significantly higher distribution of oesophageal acid exposure than those with NERD-positive and EO. Oesophageal acid exposure generally declines throughout the sleep period regardless of GERD group, but BO patients demonstrated the greatest decline during the sleep period.

  14. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health ... English Español Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) KidsHealth / For Teens / Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) What's in this article? ...

  15. Lifestyle Intervention in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Ness-Jensen, Eivind; Hveem, Kristian; El-Serag, Hashem; Lagergren, Jesper

    2016-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) affects up to 30% of adults in Western populations and is increasing in prevalence. GERD is associated with lifestyle factors, particularly obesity and tobacco smoking, which also threatens the patient's general health. GERD carries the risk of several adverse outcomes and there is widespread use of potent acid-inhibitors, which are associated with long-term adverse effects. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the role of lifestyle intervention in the treatment of GERD. Literature searches were performed in PubMed (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1980), and the Cochrane Library (no start date) to October 1, 2014. Meta-analyses, systematic reviews, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), and prospective observational studies were included. Weight loss was followed by decreased time with esophageal acid exposure in 2 RCTs (from 5.6% to 3.7% and from 8.0% to 5.5%), and reduced reflux symptoms in prospective observational studies. Tobacco smoking cessation reduced reflux symptoms in normal-weight individuals in a large prospective cohort study (odds ratio, 5.67). In RCTs, late evening meals increased time with supine acid exposure compared with early meals (5.2% point change), and head-of-the-bed elevation decreased time with supine acid exposure compared with a flat position (from 21% to 15%). Weight loss and tobacco smoking cessation should be recommended to GERD patients who are obese and smoke, respectively. Avoiding late evening meals and head-of-the-bed elevation is effective in nocturnal GERD. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: From pathophysiology to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Herbella, Fernando A; Patti, Marco G

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and its implications for treatment. The role of the natural anti-reflux mechanism (lower esophageal sphincter, esophageal peristalsis, diaphragm, and trans-diaphragmatic pressure gradient), mucosal damage, type of refluxate, presence and size of hiatal hernia, Helicobacter pylori infection, and Barrett’s esophagus are reviewed. The conclusions drawn from this review are: (1) the pathophysiology of GERD is multifactorial; (2) because of the pathophysiology of the disease, surgical therapy for GERD is the most appropriate treatment; and (3) the genesis of esophageal adenocarcinoma is associated with GERD. PMID:20698035

  17. Dietary guideline adherence for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common gastrointestinal disease, and the cost of health care and lost productivity due to GERD is extremely high. Recently described side effects of long-term acid suppression have increased the interest in nonpharmacologic methods for alleviating GERD symptoms. We aimed to examine whether GERD patients follow recommended dietary guidelines, and if adherence is associated with the severity and frequency of reflux symptoms. Methods We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study within the Kaiser Permanente Northern California population, comparing 317 GERD patients to 182 asymptomatic population controls. All analyses adjusted for smoking and education. Results GERD patients, even those with moderate to severe symptoms or frequent symptoms, were as likely to consume tomato products and large portion meals as GERD-free controls and were even more likely to consume soft drinks and tea [odds ratio (OR) = 2.01 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-3.61; OR = 2.63 95% CI 1.24-5.59, respectively] and eat fried foods and high fat diet. The only reflux-triggering foods GERD patients were less likely to consume were citrus and alcohol [OR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.35-0.97 for citrus; OR = 0.41 95% CI 0.19-0.87 for 1 + drink/day of alcohol]. The associations were similar when we excluded users of proton pump inhibitors. Conclusions GERD patients consume many putative GERD causing foods as frequently or even more frequently than asymptomatic patients despite reporting symptoms. These findings suggest that, if dietary modification is effective in reducing GERD, substantial opportunities for nonpharmacologic interventions exist for many GERD patients. PMID:25125219

  18. Symptom evaluation in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Modlin, Irvin M; Moss, Steven F

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of the success of therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has thus far been primarily on the basis of the endoscopic evaluation of the ability of drugs to heal esophageal mucosal breaks and to a lesser extent on their ability to decrease the diverse symptoms of acid reflux. However, because most patients with GERD have no visible esophageal lesions using conventional endoscopic methods, this paradigm requires serious reconsideration. As patients with nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) are just as symptomatic as patients with erosions and are no easier to treat the use of endoscopic end points alone, as criteria for determining healing and efficacy of therapy requires reassessment. In addition, the symptoms of GERD are now appreciated to be broad-based, including many extraesophageal symptoms that contribute to the marked reduction in quality of life for GERD patients. For this reason, and because endoscopic criteria cannot be applied to evaluating therapy in NERD, the success of GERD therapy should be judged primarily in terms of diminishment of GERD-related symptoms--a return to the traditional way that patients judge therapeutic success. To objectively determine the success of therapy in GERD, multisymptom GERD questionnaires have been developed. The most promising are those that reflect the numerous types of GERD symptoms, are patient-administered, quantitative, responsive, and have been validated in both NERD and erosive GERD patients. The ReQuest instrument is especially attractive as it records the entire range of GERD symptoms on a daily basis (including also their frequency and intensity) and is responsive to changes with time and with therapy. Symptom-based evaluative tools should greatly aid the objective evaluation of GERD symptoms, monitor precisely how patients respond to therapy and thereby lead to improvements in GERD management.

  19. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Tooth Erosion

    PubMed Central

    Ranjitkar, Sarbin; Kaidonis, John A.; Smales, Roger J.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children and adults, and of “silent refluxers” in particular, increases the responsibility of dentists to be alert to this potentially severe condition when observing unexplained instances of tooth erosion. Although gastroesophageal reflux is a normal physiologic occurrence, excessive gastric and duodenal regurgitation combined with a decrease in normal protective mechanisms, including an adequate production of saliva, may result in many esophageal and extraesophageal adverse conditions. Sleep-related GERD is particularly insidious as the supine position enhances the proximal migration of gastric contents, and normal saliva production is much reduced. Gastric acid will displace saliva easily from tooth surfaces, and proteolytic pepsin will remove protective dental pellicle. Though increasing evidence of associations between GERD and tooth erosion has been shown in both animal and human studies, relatively few clinical studies have been carried out under controlled trial conditions. Suspicion of an endogenous source of acid being associated with observed tooth erosion requires medical referral and management of the patient as the primary method for its prevention and control. PMID:22194748

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: Update on inflammation and symptom perception.

    PubMed

    Altomare, Annamaria; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Cocca, Silvia; Emerenziani, Sara; Cicala, Michele

    2013-10-21

    Although gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder in Western countries, with a significant impact on quality of life and healthcare costs, the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of symptoms remain to be fully elucidated. GERD symptoms and complications may result from a multifactorial mechanism, in which acid and acid-pepsin are the important noxious factors involved. Prolonged contact of the esophageal mucosa with the refluxed content, probably caused by a defective anti-reflux barrier and luminal clearance mechanisms, would appear to be responsible for macroscopically detectable injury to the esophageal squamous epithelium. Receptors on acid-sensitive nerve endings may play a role in nociception and esophageal sensitivity, as suggested in animal models of chronic acid exposure. Meanwhile, specific cytokine and chemokine profiles would appear to underlie the various esophageal phenotypes of GERD, explaining, in part, the genesis of esophagitis in a subset of patients. Despite these findings, which show a significant production of inflammatory mediators and neurotransmitters in the pathogenesis of GERD, the relationship between the hypersensitivity and esophageal inflammation is not clear. Moreover, the large majority of GERD patients (up to 70%) do not develop esophageal erosions, a variant of the condition called non-erosive reflux disease. This summary aims to explore the inflammatory pathway involved in GERD pathogenesis, to better understand the possible distinction between erosive and non-erosive reflux disease patients and to provide new therapeutic approaches.

  1. Knowledge and practice of Brazilian pediatricians on gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Ana Cristina Fontenele; de Freitas, Carla Lima; de Morais, Mauro Batista

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge and practice of pediatricians about infants with physiological reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease. METHODS: 140 pediatricians were interviewed during two scientific events in 2009 and 2010. The questions referred to two clinical cases of infants. One with symptoms of infant regurgitation (physiological reflux) and another with gastroesophageal reflux disease. RESULTS: Among 140 pediatricians, 11.4% (n=16) and 62.1% (n=87) would require investigation tests, respectively for infant regurgitation (physiological reflux) and gastroesophageal reflux disease. A series of upper gastrointestinal exams would be the first requested with a higher frequency. Medication would be prescribed by 18.6% (n=6) in the case of physiological reflux and 87.1% (n=122) in the case of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Prokinetic drugs would be prescribed more frequently than gastric acid secretion inhibitors. Sleeping position would be recommended by 94.2% (n=132) and 92.9% (n=130) of the respondents, respectively for the case of physiological reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease; however, about half of the respondents would recommend the prone position. Only 10 (7.1%) of the pediatricians would exclude the cow's milk protein from the infants' diet. CONCLUSIONS: Approaches different from the international guidelines are often considered appropriate, especially when recommending a different position other than the supine and prescription of medication. In turn, the interviews enable us to infer the right capacity of the pediatricians to distinguish physiologic reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease correctly. PMID:25662014

  2. Clinical characteristics and psychosocial impact of different reflux time in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiann-Hwa; Wen, Shu-Hui; Hsu, Ching-Sheng; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Lin; Wang, Chia-Chi

    2017-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an emerging disease, and can impair quality of life and sleep. This study aimed to investigate whether GERD patients with different timings of reflux symptoms have different clinical characteristics. This study prospectively enrolled individuals who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy during a health checkup. Each participant completed all questionnaires including Reflux Disease Questionnaire, Nighttime GERD questionnaire, Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Combined reflux was defined as the timing of reflux symptoms occurring at both daytime and nighttime. A total of 2604 participants were enrolled. Of them, 651 symptomatic GERD patients, according to the Reflux Disease Questionnaire score, were recruited for final analysis. Of them, 224 (34.4%) had erosive esophagitis on endoscopy. According to the timing of reflux symptoms, 184 (28.3%) were assigned to the daytime reflux group, 71 (10.9%) to the nighttime reflux group, and 396 (60.8%) to the combined reflux group. In post hoc analysis, the combined reflux group had a significantly higher Reflux Disease Questionnaire score than the daytime reflux group (p < 0.0001). Combined and nighttime reflux groups had higher body mass index and longer duration (> 12 years) of education than the daytime reflux group (p < 0.05). There was no difference in Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory scores among three groups. GERD patients with combined daytime and nighttime reflux of have more troublesome symptoms than those with daytime reflux. GERD patients with different timings of reflux symptoms have different clinical characteristics in terms of body mass index and duration of education, but not in terms of esophageal inflammation, quality of sleep, and psychosocial status. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Evolving issues in the management of reflux disease?

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuhong; Hunt, Richard H

    2009-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common chronic disorder often successfully treated, although there are several evolving issues in management. We reviewed the issues related to unmet needs over the past 12 months. A substantial number of patients fail to respond adequately to once or even twice daily proton pump inhibitor (PPI). There is no standard definition of PPI failure in GERD; a universally accepted definition for treatment success is also not available. Differentiation between erosive esophagitis and nonerosive reflux disease can be made but requires endoscopy; but studies still confuse functional heartburn and nonerosive reflux disease, which impacts management. Acid reflux plays an important role in GERD pathogenesis and the precise role of acid requires more studies of differences between erosive esophagitis and nonerosive reflux disease symptom generation and the implication of nocturnal acidification. Several possible mechanisms may explain GERD refractory to PPIs. Management of PPI nonresponders remains a challenge. Objective and precise evaluation of symptoms and treatment response requires study in high-quality trials. New therapeutic approaches are under investigation to answer unmet needs and improve erosive esophagitis healing rates and symptom control.

  4. A novel once daily microparticulate dosage form comprising lansoprazole to prevent nocturnal acid breakthrough in the case of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: preparation, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Alai, Milind; Lin, Wen Jen

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to formulate and evaluate the lansoprazole (LPZ)-loaded microparticles to prevent nocturnal acid breakthrough in the case of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The microparticulate delivery system was prepared by solvent evaporation method using Eudragit RS100 as a matrix polymer followed by enteric coated with Eudragit S100 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate HP55 using spray drying method. The enteric coated microparticles were stable in gastric pH condition. In vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies in male Wistar rats demonstrated that enteric coated microparticles sustained release of LPZ and promoted ulcer healing activity. In other words, the microparticulate dosage form provided effective drug concentration for a longer period as compared to conventional extended release dosage form, and showed sufficient anti-acid secretion activity to treat acid related disorders including the enrichment of nocturnal acid breakthrough event based on a once daily administration.

  5. Increased acid exposure in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease influences cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression in the squamous epithelium of the lower esophagus.

    PubMed

    Hamoui, Nahid; Peters, Jeffrey H; Schneider, Sylke; Uchida, Kazumi; Yang, Dongyun; Vallböhmer, Daniel; Valboehmer, Daniel; Hagen, Jeffrey A; DeMeester, Steven R; DeMeester, Tom R; Danenberg, Kathleen; Danenberg, Peter

    2004-07-01

    Although genetic changes associated with the progression to Barrett esophagus and adenocarcinoma have been identified, changes in gene expression associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease have not been reported. We examined expression levels of several genes important in carcinogenesis and compared expression levels with alterations in esophageal acid exposure. Prospective analysis of 61 patients initially seen with reflux symptoms at a private academic hospital. Paired esophageal biopsy specimens of squamous epithelium 3 cm above the squamocolumnar junction. All patients had 24-hour pH monitoring performed. Cyclooxygenase (COX) 1, COX-2, thymidylate synthase, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), Bcl-2 protein, survivin protein, secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), tetraspan (TSPAN), and caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) messenger RNA expression analysis was performed on snap-frozen, microdissected tissue using a quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction method. Linear regression and the Pearson product moment correlation were used to relate gene expression to parameters of the 24-hour pH record. Expression levels of COX-2 correlated positively with the 24-hour pH score (r = 0.25, P =.05). There was no correlation between the expression of other tested genes and esophageal acid exposure. There was also no significant increase in COX-2 expression in patients with esophagitis or in those who used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. To our knowledge, these data provide among the first reported correlation of genetic changes and increased esophageal acid exposure in patients with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. The changes in gene expression occur before any metaplastic changes in the tissue are apparent, and may in the future be useful in predicting which patients will progress through a metaplasia-dysplasia carcinoma sequence.

  6. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) (and Asthma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... within two to three hours of eating • Decrease caffeine intake • Avoid theophylline (if possible) Your physician may also recommend medications to treat reflux or relieve symptoms. Over-the-counter antacids and H2 blockers may help decrease the effects of stomach acid. Proton pump inhibitors block acid ...

  7. The Mystery and Misery of Acid Reflux in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Mike; Davenport, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    When a child is sick, parents want answers. They want to know what is wrong, what they can do, and how to get their child healthy--pronto. Regrettably, there are some puzzling illnesses affecting children that are surrounded by mystery. One of them is gastroesophageal reflux (GER), otherwise known as acid reflux--or "reflux" for short. Reflux…

  8. Physiology and pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Dean J; Murayama, Kenric M

    2015-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common problems treated by primary care physicians. Almost 20% of the population in the United States experiences occasional regurgitation, heartburn, or retrosternal pain because of GERD. Reflux disease is complex, and the physiology and pathogenesis are still incompletely understood. However, abnormalities of any one or a combination of the three physiologic processes, namely, esophageal motility, lower esophageal sphincter function, and gastric motility or emptying, can lead to GERD. There are many diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to GERD today, but more studies are needed to better understand this complex disease process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: An Emerging Disease in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Khean-Lee; Wong, Choon-Heng

    2006-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been reported to be uncommon among Asians. Although prevalence rates of reflux esophagitis and symptoms of GERD in Asian patients vary, most of the recently published studies have shown an increasing trend, likely due to better awareness and diagnosis as well as to a true increase in the prevalence of the disease. The exact reasons for this increase in prevalence are unclear but must be linked in some way to the dramatic socioeconomic development taking place in the region. Changes in dietary patterns and body mass index have been suggested as underlying reasons. On the other hand the high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Asia and its association with decreased acid secretion and a low prevalence of GERD have also been noted. Another interesting observation is differing rates of GERD among different Asian ethnic groups, indicating a possible genetic susceptibility to GERD. Diagnosis of GERD is usually based on symptoms; many Asian patients, however, do not understand the term “heartburn,” as there is no equivalent term in the major Asian languages. Patients therefore describe their symptoms variously, such as chest discomfort or wind and soreness in the chest. Nonerosive reflux disease appears to be common among Asians. Atypical manifestations of GERD, including noncardiac chest pain, asthma, and laryngitis, appear to be common among Asian patients as well. PMID:28286439

  10. Mosapride for gastroesophageal reflux disease in neurologically impaired patients.

    PubMed

    Komura, Makoto; Kanamori, Yutaka; Tanaka, Yujiro; Kodaka, Tetsuro; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Terawaki, Kan; Suzuki, Kan; Iwanaka, Tadashi

    2017-03-01

    The prokinetic agent cisapride is effective for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in infants and children, but is no longer used for this purpose because of safety concerns. Therefore, other pharmacological agents need to be investigated for efficacy in GERD treatment. In this study, we examined the effectiveness and safety of mosapride for the treatment of neurologically impaired children and adolescents with GERD. Mosapride (0.3 mg/kg/day) was administered to 11 neurologically impaired patients with GERD (five male; median age, 12.3 years). Esophageal acid exposure was measured using esophageal pH monitoring before and at >5 days after the start of mosapride treatment. The pressure and length of the lower esophageal sphincter were compared before and after mosapride treatment. In the 11 patients, median reflux index (percentage of the total monitoring period during which recorded pH was <4.0) was 17.5% (range, 4.4-59%) before and 8.2% (range, 2.8-20.7%) after mosapride treatment (P = 0.02). Median esophageal clearance was 1.0 min/reflux (range, 0.5-2.1 min/reflux) before and 0.7 min/reflux (range, 0.4-1.2 min/reflux) after treatment with mosapride (P = 0.02). The median number of reflux episodes before (219) and after (122) drug treatment did not differ significantly. The decreased reflux index in neurologically impaired patients with GERD is due to mosapride, therefore mosapride may be a candidate for GERD treatment. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  11. Bile Reflux

    MedlinePlus

    ... reflux, the medical term for the backwash of stomach acids into your esophagus. However, bile acid reflux and ... stomach. Bile reflux into the esophagus Bile and stomach acid can reflux into the esophagus when another muscular ...

  12. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, reflux oesophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease in a multiracial Asian population: a prospective, endoscopy based study.

    PubMed

    Rosaida, Modh Said; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2004-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), reflux oesophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) amongst Malaysian patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination. A cross-sectional study on consecutive patients with dyspepsia undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. A large general hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Consecutive patients undergoing endoscopy for upper abdominal discomfort were examined for the presence of reflux oesophagitis, hiatus hernia and Barrett's oesophagus. The diagnosis and classification of reflux oesophagitis was based on the Los Angeles classification. Patients with predominant symptoms of heartburn or acid regurgitation of at least one per month for the past 6 months in the absence of reflux oesophagitis were diagnosed as having NERD. The prevalence of GORD, reflux oesophagitis and NERD were analysed in relation to age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI), presence of hiatus hernia, Helicobacter pylori status, alcohol intake, smoking and level of education. One thousand patients were studied prospectively. Three hundred and eighty-eight patients (38.8%) were diagnosed as having GORD based on either predominant symptoms of heartburn and acid regurgitation and/or findings of reflux oesophagitis. One hundred and thirty-four patients (13.4%) had endoscopic evidence of reflux oesophagitis. Two hundred and fifty-four (65.5%) were diagnosed as having NERD. Hiatus hernia was found in 6.7% and Barrett's oesophagus in 2% of patients. Of our patients with reflux oesophagitis 20.1% had grade C and D oesophagitis. No patients had strictures. Following logistic regression analysis, the independent risk factors for GORD were Indian race (odds ratio (OR), 3.25; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.38-4.45), Malay race (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.16-2.38), BMI > 25 (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.04-1.92), presence of hiatus hernia (OR, 4.21; 95% CI, 2.41-7.36), alcohol consumption (OR, 2.42; 95

  13. Mechanisms of gastro-oesophageal reflux in preterm and term infants with reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Omari, T I; Barnett, C P; Benninga, M A; Lontis, R; Goodchild, L; Haslam, R R; Dent, J; Davidson, G P

    2002-10-01

    Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation (TLOSR) is the predominant mechanism of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in healthy infants but the mechanisms of GOR in infants with GOR disease (GORD) are poorly understood. To measure the occurrence of TLOSR, GOR, and gastric emptying (GE) rate in preterm and term infants with GORD. Thirty six infants were studied and grouped as normals or GORD based on a routine clinical assessment and confirmation of an assessment of GORD by reflux symptom charts and oesophageal pH monitoring. A micromanometric assembly incorporating a micro pH electrode recorded oesophageal motility and pH. GE rate was determined using the (13)C-octanoic acid breath test. TLOSR was the predominant mechanism of GOR, triggering 50-100% of GOR episodes (median 91.5%). Abdominothoracic straining significantly increased the occurrence of GOR in association with TLOSR. In infants with GORD, the number of TLOSRs overall was similar to normals but the proportion of TLOSRs accompanied by acid GOR was significantly higher than in normals (16.5% v 5.7%, respectively; p<0.001). Infants with GORD had a similar GE rate to normals. In infant GORD, acid reflux associated TLOSRs are abnormally common and likely to be a major contributing factor to the pathophysiology of GORD. Infants with GORD do not have delayed GE.

  14. Role of gastroesophageal reflux disease in lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hathorn, Kelly E; Chan, Walter W; Lo, Wai-Kit

    2017-01-01

    Lung transplantation is one of the highest risk solid organ transplant modalities. Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and lung transplant outcomes, including acute and chronic rejection. The aim of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology, evaluation, and management of GERD in lung transplantation, as informed by the most recent publications in the field. The pathophysiology of reflux-induced lung injury includes the effects of aspiration and local immunomodulation in the development of pulmonary decline and histologic rejection, as reflective of allograft injury. Modalities of reflux and esophageal assessment, including ambulatory pH testing, impedance, and esophageal manometry, are discussed, as well as timing of these evaluations relative to transplantation. Finally, antireflux treatments are reviewed, including medical acid suppression and surgical fundoplication, as well as the safety, efficacy, and timing of such treatments relative to transplantation. Our review of the data supports an association between GERD and allograft injury, encouraging a strategy of early diagnosis and aggressive reflux management in lung transplant recipients to improve transplant outcomes. Further studies are needed to explore additional objective measures of reflux and aspiration, better compare medical and surgical antireflux treatment options, extend follow-up times to capture longer-term clinical outcomes, and investigate newer interventions including minimally invasive surgery and advanced endoscopic techniques. PMID:28507913

  15. Evaluation of infantile acid and nonacid gastroesophageal reflux using combined pH monitoring and impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Condino, Adria A; Sondheimer, Judith; Pan, Zhaoxing; Gralla, Jane; Perry, Darryl; O'Connor, Judith A

    2006-01-01

    Characterize the proportion of acid and nonacid esophageal reflux events in young infants with suspected gastroesophageal reflux (GER) using combined pH-multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) monitoring. Determine the symptom index correlation with nonacid reflux and acid reflux events. Prospective study of children, aged 2 weeks to 1 year, referred to The Children's Hospital of Denver Gastroenterology Clinic for evaluation of GER. Exclusion criteria were congenital anomalies or syndromes, cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and pulmonary or cardiac disease. The children were admitted to The Children's Hospital General Clinical Research Center for a 20 hour pH-MII study. Acid suppression was either never used or discontinued 2 weeks before testing. Thirty-four infants were enrolled from February 2004 to February 2005. Ages ranged from 2 months to 11 months, median = 7 (20 females/14 males). One thousand eight hundred ninety reflux events were detected by MII, and 588 reflux events were detected by pH probe alone. The percent of reflux that was acid was 47% (888 events) versus 53% of (1,002 events) nonacid reflux events. The proportion of nonacid reflux decreased with age (P < 0.0001 by Pearson chi test) and with increasing time elapsed from last meal. There were 958 total symptoms evaluated. The most frequently reported symptom was fussiness/pain, which correlated with nonacid reflux events 24.6% and acid reflux 25.2%. The proximal height of a reflux was predictive for symptoms of fussiness/pain, arching, and burping. MII detects more reflux events than pH monitoring alone. The proportion of nonacid reflux to acid reflux events in infants is more similar to adults than previously reported. Combined pH-MII esophageal monitoring identifies more reflux events and improves clinical correlation with symptoms.

  16. Evaluating outcomes of endoscopic full-thickness plication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with impedance monitoring.

    PubMed

    von Renteln, Daniel; Schmidt, Arthur; Riecken, Bettina; Caca, Karel

    2010-05-01

    Endoscopic full-thickness plication allows transmural suturing at the gastroesophageal junction to recreate the antireflux barrier. Multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring (MII) can be used to detect nonacid or weakly acidic reflux, acidic swallows, and esophageal clearance time. This study used MII to evaluate the outcome of endoscopic full-thickness plication. In this study, 12 subsequent patients requiring maintenance proton pump inhibitor therapy underwent endoscopic full-thickness plication for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. With patients off medication, MII was performed before and 6-months after endoscopic full-thickness plication. The total median number of reflux episodes was significantly reduced from 105 to 64 (p = 0.016). The median number of acid reflux episodes decreased from 73 to 43 (p = 0.016). Nonacid reflux episodes decreased from 23 to 21 (p = 0.306). The median bolus clearance time was 12 s before treatment and 11 s at 6 months (p = 0.798). The median acid exposure time was reduced from 6.8% to 3.4% (p = 0.008), and the DeMeester scores were reduced from 19 to 12 (p = 0.008). Endoscopic full-thickness plication significantly reduced total reflux episodes, acid reflux episodes, and total reflux exposure time. The DeMeester scores and total acid exposure time for the distal esophagus were significantly improved. No significant changes in nonacid reflux episodes and median bolus clearance time were encountered.

  17. The impact of intensifying acid suppression on sleep disturbance related to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in primary care.

    PubMed

    Moayyedi, P; Hunt, R; Armstrong, D; Lei, Y; Bukoski, M; White, R

    2013-04-01

    Sleep disturbance is common in patients with GERD but there has been little evaluation of this problem in primary care in patients already taking therapy. To evaluate the impact of administering a questionnaire (PASS test) to identify patients with sleep problems and evaluate the efficacy of esomeprazole to improve sleep disturbance in patients with GERD. This was a primary care based cluster-randomised, open-label study where practices were assigned to intervention or control groups. PASS test failures continued current therapy (control) or were switched to 4 weeks' once-daily esomeprazole 20 or 40 mg (intervention). Patients were evaluated at the end of 4 weeks and the outcomes that were assessed were the sleep questions from the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire and the presence or absence of sleep disturbance from the PASS test questionnaire. A total of 1388 patients with evaluable data at 4 weeks were included in the analysis and 825 reported GERD-related sleep disturbance at baseline. At 4 weeks, 161 of 291 of control patients (55%) reported continued sleep disturbance compared to 120 of 534 (22.5%) of intervention patients [number needed to treat of 3: 95% confidence intervals (CI): 2.5-4]. There was a mean improvement in QOLRAD scores related to sleep in the intervention patients compared to control patients (mean improvement = 4.91; 95% CI: 3.73-6.09). A PASS strategy identifies GERD patients with sleep disturbance in primary care that will benefit from a change in acid-suppressive therapy. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00392002; study code: D9612L00096. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Associations between peripheral vertigo and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Viliušytė, Edita; Macaitytė, Raminta; Vaitkus, Antanas; Rastenytė, Daiva

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesize that peripheral vertigo is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Two mechanisms could be considered – gastric acids may directly irritate the respiratory mucosa and cause inflammation, or Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) could be present and cause local infection. Reflux material (Hydrochloric acid (HCl) and pepsin) could get into the middle ear via Eustachian tube and affect osseous structures directly. Disturbance of ossicles could cause tinnitus, which is more common for peripheral vertigo. H. pylori could also get in the esophagus and in the upper respiratory tract via gastroesophageal reflux, and could cause tympanosclerosis and fixation of ossicles. In our study group, 120 of 153 (78.4%) patients had gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Diagnostic tests of H. pylori (rapid urease test or blood antibody test) were performed for 96 of 120 (80%) patients with GERD and were found positive for 32 of 96 (33.3%) patients. Peripheral vertigo was present in 93 of 120 (77.6%) patients with GERD compared to 33 of 126 (26%) patients without GERD (χ(2)=9.016, p=0.003). H. pylori and peripheral vertigo coexisted in 26 of 126 patients (20.6%) (OR 1.36; 95% CI 0.49-3.74, p=0.55). Our study demonstrated statistically significant association between peripheral vertigo and GERD but not between peripheral vertigo and H. pylori. Further more extensive investigations are needed in order to explore our hypothesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Frazzoni, Marzio; Piccoli, Micaela; Conigliaro, Rita; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Melotti, Gianluigi

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition that develops when the reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus leads to troublesome symptoms and/or complications. Heartburn is the cardinal symptom, often associated with regurgitation. In patients with endoscopy-negative heartburn refractory to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and when the diagnosis of GERD is in question, direct reflux testing by impedance-pH monitoring is warranted. Laparoscopic fundoplication is the standard surgical treatment for GERD. It is highly effective in curing GERD with a 80% success rate at 20-year follow-up. The Nissen fundoplication, consisting of a total (360°) wrap, is the most commonly performed antireflux operation. To reduce postoperative dysphagia and gas bloating, partial fundoplications are also used, including the posterior (Toupet) fundoplication, and the anterior (Dor) fundoplication. Currently, there is consensus to advise laparoscopic fundoplication in PPI-responsive GERD only for those patients who develop untoward side-effects or complications from PPI therapy. PPI resistance is the real challenge in GERD. There is consensus that carefully selected GERD patients refractory to PPI therapy are eligible for laparoscopic fundoplication, provided that objective evidence of reflux as the cause of ongoing symptoms has been obtained. For this purpose, impedance-pH monitoring is regarded as the diagnostic gold standard. PMID:25339814

  20. Reflux episodes and esophageal impedance levels in patients with typical and atypical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Bi Xing; Jiang, Liu Qin; Lin, Lin; Wang, Ying; Wang, Meifeng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To determine the relationship between baseline impedance levels and gastroesophageal reflux, we retrospectively enrolled 110 patients (54 men and 56 female; mean age, 51 ± 14 years) with suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who underwent 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring. Patients were stratified according to symptom (typical or atypical) and reflux types (acid reflux, nonacid reflux [NAR], or no abnormal reflux). Mean nocturnal baseline impedance (MNBI) were measured 3 cm (distal esophagus) and 17 cm (proximal esophagus) above the lower esophageal sphincter. Median distal esophageal MNBI was lower in the acid reflux group (1244 Ω; 647–1969 Ω) than in the NAR (2586 Ω; 1368–3666 Ω) or no abnormal reflux groups (3082 Ω; 2495–4472 Ω; all P < .05). Distal MNBI were negatively correlated with DeMeester score and acid exposure time. Atypical symptoms were more frequently associated with NAR than typical symptoms (P < .01). Among patients with positive symptom-association probability (SAP) for NAR, median proximal MNBI tended to be lower in patients with typical symptoms (median, 3013 Ω; IQR, 2535–3410 Ω) than in those with atypical symptoms (median, 3386 Ω; IQR, 3044–3730 Ω, P = .05). Thus, atypical GERD symptoms were more likely to be associated with NAR. The mucosal integrity of the proximal esophagus might be relatively impaired in GERD patients with typical symptoms for NAR. PMID:28906377

  1. Review article: the clinical influence of Helicobacter pylori in effective acid suppression-implications for the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Martínek, J; Kuzela, L; Spicák, J; Vavrecka, A

    2000-08-01

    The relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and Helicobacter pylori is unclear. Recent data indicate that H. pylori probably exerts a protective effect against GERD. In recent years, the interaction between H. pylori, proton pump inhibitors and GERD has been widely studied. Currently available proton pump inhibitors produce significantly higher intragastric pH in H. pylori-positive patients than in those who are H. pylori negative, and this phenomenon may be clinically relevant. The mechanisms responsible for this difference in efficacy are not fully understood, although there are two major theories. Ammonia, produced by H. pylori, is able to neutralize gastric acid, and thus apparently increase the effect of acid suppressive agents (the 'ammonia theory'). The other theory is that decrease in acid output is due to the development of corpus gastritis during treatment with a proton pump inhibitor (the 'gastritis theory'). Treatment strategies to overcome this lowered sensitivity to acid suppression are to increase the frequency/dose of a proton pump inhibitor or to add an H2-receptor antagonist in the evening-but both have pharmaco-economic implications. An agent that could provide adequate pH control regardless of H. pylori status would be highly beneficial in the treatment of GERD, and may also lower treatment costs.

  2. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Melissas, John; Braghetto, Italo; Molina, Juan Carlos; Silecchia, Gianfranco; Iossa, Angelo; Iannelli, Antonio; Foletto, Mirto

    2015-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and/or hiatus hernia (HH) are one of the most common disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Despite the positive effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) regarding weight loss and improvement in obesity co-morbidities, there are concerns about the development of de novo gastroesophageal reflux disease or worsening the existing GERD after this bariatric operation. Furthermore, controversy exists on the consequences of SG in lower esophageal sphincter function and about the ideal procedure when a hiatus hernia is preoperatively diagnosed or discovered during the laparoscopic SG. This review systematically investigates the incidence, the pathophysiology of GERD and/or HH in morbidly obese individuals before and after SG, and the treatment options for concomitant HH repair during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

  3. Does gastroesophageal reflux increase chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations?

    PubMed

    Iliaz, Sinem; Iliaz, Raim; Onur, Seda Tural; Arici, Serpil; Akyuz, Umit; Karaca, Cetin; Demir, Kadir; Besisik, Fatih; Kaymakoglu, Sabahattin; Akyuz, Filiz

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) has been investigated less than asthma-GER. We aimed to evaluate the presence of GER in patients with COPD and its impact on exacerbations. We included 24 patients with stable mild-moderate stage COPD and 19 volunteers as the control group. We conducted a gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptom questionnaire, gastroscopy, manometry, and an ambulatory 24-h pH-impedance study. According to the GERD questionnaire, only 5 (20.8%) patients with COPD had typical GER symptoms. According to the 24-h pH-impedance study, the mean DeMeester score (DMS) was 38.1 ± 34.6 in the COPD group and 13.3 ± 16.8 in the control group (p = 0.01). The acid reflux (DMS > 14.7) rate was higher in patients with COPD than in controls (73.9% vs 26.3%, p = 0.01). The symptom association probability positivity rate was 17.4% (n = 4) in the COPD group, which was similar to the controls (p = 0.11). The mean proximal extension rate of reflux (Z 17 cm) was 26.4 ± 12.9% in the COPD group. The proximal extent of reflux was positively correlated with the number of COPD exacerbations per year (p = 0.03, r = 0.448). In the motility results, only 2 (20%) patients in the control group had a minor motility disorder. Seventeen (70.8%) patients in the COPD group had a minor motility disorder, and 4 (16.7%) had major motility disorders (p < 0.001). In our study, gastroesophageal reflux was frequent in patients with COPD, but only a quarter had typical reflux symptoms. The proximal extent of reflux may trigger frequent exacerbations of COPD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. COMBINED 24-HOURS ESOPHAGEAL PH MONITORING AND MULTICHANNEL INTRALUMINAL IMPEDANCE FOR COMPARISON OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX IN CHILDREN WITH TYPICAL VERSUS ATYPICAL SYMPTOMS OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Taghavi, Seyed Alireza; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir; Nasri, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    - Gastroesophageal reflux disease is the most common esophageal disorder in pediatrics. - The aim of this study was to compare reflux parameters of typical and atypical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease using 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring and multichannel intraluminal impedance in pediatric population. - In this prospective study, 43 patients aged less than 18 year with suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease were enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups based on the main presenting symptoms (typical versus atypical). Twenty four-hour pH monitoring and multichannel intraluminal impedance were performed in all the patients for comparing these two group regarding association of symptoms and reflux. Number of refluxes, pH related reflux, total reflux time, reflux more than 5 minutes, longest time of the reflux, lowest pH at reflux, reflux index were recorded and compared. Data comparison was done using SPSS. - The mean age of the patients was 5.7±3.4 years and 65.1% were male. Out of 43 patients 24 cases had typical symptoms and 19 had atypical symptoms. The mean reflux events detected by multichannel intraluminal impedance was more than mean reflux events detected by pH monitoring (308.4±115.8 vs 69.7±66.6) with P value of 0.037, which is statistically significant. The mean symptom index and symptom association probability were 35.01% ± 20.78% and 86.42% ± 25.79%, respectively in multichannel intraluminal impedance versus 12.73% ± 12.48% and 45.16% ± 42.29% in pH monitoring (P value <0.001). Number of acid reflux was 46.26±47.16 and 30.9±22.09 for atypical and typical symptoms respectively. The mean symptom index was 18.12% ± 13.101% and 8.30% ± 10.301% in atypical and typical symptoms respectively (P=0.034). Bolus clearance was longer in atypical symptoms compared typical symptoms(P<0.05). - Symptom index was significantly higher in atypical symptoms compared to typical symptoms. Higher number of acid reflux was found in children

  5. Gender differences in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Ter, R B

    2000-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common chronic condition in the United States, affecting as many as 40% of adults. Although questionnaire-based studies have found the prevalence of the disease to be equal in men and women, the relative prevalence of GERD in males and females has yet to be established by quantitative, clinical evaluation. Moreover, preliminary research suggests that there are gender differences in the pathology and symptomatology of GERD, and the increased prevalence of GERD in pregnancy may indicate that sex hormones play a role in the disease. Additional research is necessary to confirm these findings.

  6. An effective and physiological lifestyle change for management of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Mohammad A; Yar, Taley; Gillessen, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly used in the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Some disadvantages of these acid- suppressing drugs circulate and patients ask for alternatives. Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are important cause of reflux. Gastric distension in upper stomach are strongest stimulus for generation of TLESRs and is aggravated by intake of food in between meals. In the light of pathophysiological mechanisms it is suggested that increasing interval between meals and only soft drinks in between will reduce reflux episodes. The hypothesis was tested in 4 patients with endoscopically proven reflux oesophagitis and/or typical reflux symptoms. Three patients followed our advice to eat twice a day, with soft drinks in between. One patient had a light breakfast but increased the interval between lunch and dinner to 8 hours. All cases were relieved from repeated reflux episodes, in 1-2 weeks, without any medication.

  7. Association of Acute Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease With Esophageal Histologic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Kerry B.; Agoston, Agoston T.; Odze, Robert D.; Huo, Xiaofang; Pham, Thai H.; Cipher, Daisha J.; Castell, Donald O.; Genta, Robert M.; Souza, Rhonda F.; Spechler, Stuart J.

    2016-01-01

    Importance The histologic changes associated with acute gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have not been studied prospectively in humans. Recent studies in animals have challenged the traditional notion that reflux esophagitis develops when esophageal surface epithelial cells are exposed to lethal chemical injury from refluxed acid. Objective To evaluate histologic features of esophageal inflammation in acute GERD to study its pathogenesis. Design Patients with reflux esophagitis healed by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) had 24-hour esophageal pH/impedance monitoring and esophagoscopy [including confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE)] with biopsies from non-eroded areas of distal esophagus at baseline (on PPIs), 1 and 2 weeks after stopping PPIs. Enrollment began May 2013, follow-up ended July 2015. Setting Single-site, VA hospital. Participants Patients with prior reflux esophagitis and esophageal healing documented at baseline esophagoscopy. Intervention PPIs stopped for 2 weeks. Main Outcome and Measures Twelve patients (11 men, mean age 57.6±13.1 years) completed the study. Primary outcome was change in esophageal inflammation 2 weeks after stopping the PPI, determined by comparing lymphocyte, eosinophil, and neutrophil infiltrates (each scored on a 0–3 scale) in esophageal biopsies. Also evaluated were changes in epithelial basal cell and papillary hyperplasia, surface erosions, intercellular space width, endoscopic grade of esophagitis, esophageal acid exposure and mucosal impedance (an index of mucosal integrity). Results At 1 and 2 weeks after discontinuation of the PPI, biopsies showed significant increases in intraepithelial lymphocytes, which were predominantly T cells [median 0 (range 0–2) at baseline to 1 (range 1–2) at both 1 and 2 weeks, p<0.01]; neutrophils and eosinophils were few or absent. Biopsies also showed widening of intercellular spaces (confirmed by CLE), and basal cell and papillary hyperplasia developed without surface erosions

  8. Features of gastroesophageal reflux disease in women.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mona; Gerson, Lauren B; Lascar, Runa; Davila, Marta; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2004-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is as common in women as in men, and may present with various symptoms, such as heartburn, regurgitation, dysphagia, or chest pain. In this study, we evaluated the patterns of symptomatic GERD and the spectrum of disease activity in women and compared them to a cohort of disease- and age-matched men. We studied 543 adults, both men and women, referred for evaluation because of symptoms or signs suggestive of GERD. All patients were assessed immediately before testing using a standardized symptom questionnaire. Endoscopic, ambulatory pH, and motility findings were categorized and graded according to their extent and severity. The prevalence, nature, and severity of esophageal symptoms and their relationship to endoscopic disease severity were then analyzed. Comparisons were made between the two groups, i.e., 341 men (mean age 54, age range 25-90) and 202 women (mean age 50, age range 22-80). Heartburn without esophagitis was noted in 38% of men and 55% of women patients. Hiatal hernia was noted in 28% of men and in 26% of women. There were no differences in the magnitude of esophageal acid exposure by pH criteria and motility abnormalities between the two groups. The prevalence of endoscopic stages of GERD (0-IV, Savary-Miller classification) was similar between the two groups (p > 0.1, chi2 test) but women were less likely to harbor Barrett's esophagus (p < 0.05, chi2 test). Quantitative esophageal symptom analysis revealed significantly higher symptom severity scores for heartburn (p < 0.01), regurgitation (p < 0.05), belching (p < 0.01), and nocturnal (p < 0.01) symptoms in women as compared to men. Women also experienced higher symptoms scores of lower abdominal symptoms, such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and constipation (p < 0.01). Among symptomatic adults undergoing evaluation for GERD, women appear to have generally similar patterns of endoscopic severity of GERD as men but they are less likely to harbor Barrett

  9. The diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease cannot be made with barium esophagograms.

    PubMed

    Saleh, C M G; Smout, A J P M; Bredenoord, A J

    2015-02-01

    For over 50 years, barium studies have been used to diagnose gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), but the value of this test is controversial. Our study aimed to determine if barium esophagograms can be used to diagnose GERD. Barium esophagograms and pH-impedance measurement were performed in 20 subjects with reflux symptoms. pH-impedance measurements were used as gold standard for the diagnosis of GERD. Gastro-esophageal reflux measured with the barium study was defined as a positive outcome. 50% of patients presented gastro-esophageal reflux on the barium esophagogram. No significant differences were observed in acid exposure time between subjects with (median: 7.4%; interquartile range, IQR: 8.4%) or without reflux at barium esophagography (median: 5.95%; IQR: 13.05%; p > 0.05). Nor did we find differences in median proximal extent of reflux measured with impedance monitoring between patients with a positive (median: 6.7%; IQR: 1.95%) and negative barium study (median: 7.1%; IQR: 0.68%; p > 0.05). Patients with reflux on barium esophagogram did not have a positive symptom association probability more often than those who did not have reflux at barium esophagography. Lastly, there were no differences in numbers of acid, weakly acidic or total reflux episodes between those with positive or negative barium esophagogram (p > 0.05). No correlations were found between the maximum proximal extent of gastro-esophageal reflux during esophagography and pH-impedance parameters. Presence or absence of gastro-esophageal reflux during barium esophagography does not correlate with incidence or extent of reflux observed during 24-h pH-impedance monitoring and is not of value for the diagnosis of GERD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. [Gastro-esophageal reflux and chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Dirou, S; Germaud, P; Bruley des Varannes, S; Magnan, A; Blanc, F-X

    2015-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) frequently occurs in association with chronic respiratory diseases although the casual link is not always clear. Several pathophysiological and experimental factors are considered to support a role for GERD in respiratory disease. Conversely, respiratory diseases and bronchodilator treatment can themselves exacerbate GERD. When cough or severe asthma is being investigated, GERD does not need to be systematically looked for and a therapeutic test with proton pump inhibitors is not always recommended. pH impedance monitoring is now the reference diagnostic tool to detect non acid reflux, a form of reflux for which proton pump inhibitor treatment is ineffective. Recent data have shown a potential role of GERD in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and bronchiolitis obliterans following lung transplantation, leading to discussions about the place of surgery in this context. However, studies using pH impedance monitoring are still needed to better understand and manage the association between GERD and chronic respiratory diseases. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of decaffeination of coffee on gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Pehl, C; Pfeiffer, A; Wendl, B; Kaess, H

    1997-06-01

    Patients with reflux disease often complain of heartburn after ingestion of coffee. Induction of gastro-oesophageal reflux has been demonstrated by pH-metry following the intake of coffee in healthy volunteers. The reflux was reduced when the coffee had undergone a decaffeination process. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of decaffeination of coffee on reflux in patients with reflux disease. Seventeen reflux patients underwent two osesophageal 3-h pH measurements. The patients received, in a double-blind study design in a randomized order, 300 mL of either regular or decaffeinated coffee together with a standardized breakfast. The fraction time oesophageal pH < 4 was calculated during the three postprandial hours. For regular coffee the fraction time was calculated to a median of 17.9% with a range of 0.7-56.6%. The fraction time was significantly reduced to 3.1% (0-49.9%) after ingestion of decaffeinated coffee. The amount of gastro-oesophageal reflux induced by the intake of regular coffee in patients with reflux disease can be reduce by the decaffeination of coffee.

  12. [Current issues on gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Kim, Jie-Hyun; Kim, Beom Jin; Kim, Sang Wook; Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Yeon Soo; Sung, Hye Young; Oh, Tae-Hoon; Jeong, In Du; Park, Moo In

    2014-09-25

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common problems in gastrointestinal disorders. With the increase in our understanding on the pathophysiology of GERD along with the development of proton pump inhibitors, the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to GERD have changed dramatically over the past decade. However, GERD still poses a problem to many clinicians since the spectrum of the disease has evolved to encompass more challenging presentations such as refractory GERD and extraesophageal manifestations. This has led to significant confusion regarding the optimal approach to these patients. This article aims to discuss current issues on GERD.

  13. [Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Review (GERD)].

    PubMed

    Olmos, Jorge A; Piskorz, María Marta; Vela, Marcelo F

    2016-06-01

    GERD is a highly prevalent disease in our country. It has a deep impact in patient´s quality of life, representing extremely high costs regarding health. The correct understanding of its pathophysiology is crucial for the rational use of diagnoses methods and the implementation of appropriate treatment adjusted to each individual case. In this review we evaluate this disorder based on the best available evidence, focusing in pathophysiological mechanisms, its epidemiology, modern diagnosis methods and current management standards.

  14. [The laryngological complications of the Gastroesophageal Reflux Diseases].

    PubMed

    Skrodzka, Dorota; Wereszczyńska-Siemiatkowska, Urszula; Południewska, Barbara; Kasprowicz, Joanna Beata

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was the quantitative and qualitative assessment of the pathological reflux episodes present in laryngological diseases in relation to GERD. These findings allowed for outlining the relationship between the reported subjective ailments and the disturbances of function and acidic refluxes diagnosed in pH-metric measurements. The study included 40 patients (23 women, 17 men) with clinical laryngological symptoms of GERD (aged 19-63 years, median 42.2): chronic persistent cough, laryngitis, pharyngitis, ulceration of vocal cords, hacking. The patients underwent laryngological check-up (direct laryngoscopy), gastroscopy, 24-hour pH-metry and manometry of the oesophagus. The analysis of the subjective symptoms reported by the patients was done according to the DeMeester's and Likert's scale. The 24-hour abdominal pH-metry was carried out with the use of microDigitrappr MARK III (Synecpol) pH-meter and antymon probe with the reference epidermal electrode. The manometric analysis of the pressure in lower oesophagal sphincter (LES) and the antral function was done with the use of Köenisberg probe integrated with microDigitrapper. In 80% of the patients we observed the presence of pathological acid refluxes and so called high pharyngeal refluxes (the total number of reflux episodes--91 +/- 8.2, the number of reflux episodes lasting longer than 5 minutes--19.6 +/- 4.6, "fraction time" the percentage of pH < 4.0-7.1 +/- 2.9). In this group of patients chronic laryngitis was observed in 50% of cases, chronic hacking--in 31%, persistent pain in the pharynx--in 28.1%, strong cough--in 59.4%. In 18.7% of the patients with the pathological recurrent reflux of gastro-intestinal content to the oesophagus we observed inflammatory changes of various extent in gastroscopy. We found a strong causal relationship between cough and hacking and the pathological GERD (time interval 5 min, Wiener's indicator SI > or = 75%). 1. The achieved results confirm the significant

  15. COX-2 mRNA expression is significantly increased in acid-exposed compared to nonexposed squamous epithelium in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lurje, Georg; Vallbohmer, Daniel; Collet, Peter H; Xi, Huan; Baldus, Stephan E; Brabender, Jan; Metzger, Ralf; Heitmann, Michaela; Neiss, Susanne; Drebber, Ute; Holscher, Arnulf H; Schneider, Paul M

    2007-09-01

    Little is known about the role of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the development of Barrett's metaplasia. The objectives of this study were to further analyze COX-2 mRNA expression in patients with GERD compared to Barrett's esophagus (BE) and Barrett's cancer (BC). Tissue samples from 110 patients with GERD (n = 43), BE (n = 20), and BC (n = 47) were obtained in routine upper GI endoscopy. Expression levels of COX-2 were measured by quantitative real-time reverse trancriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Also, 24-h pH monitoring was performed in all patients of the GERD study group and the DeMeester composite score was used to match COX-2 mRNA expression with the severity of acid exposure in the lower esophagus. COX-2 mRNA is progressively upregulated within the metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma (MDA) sequence (p = 0.001). COX-2 levels of the squamous epithelium in the distal esophagus from patients with GERD and a pathologic mean DeMeester score (>14.72) were significantly higher than in patients with normal DeMeester scores (p = 0.01). In summary our findings suggest that alterations in COX-2 mRNA expression occur independently of endoscopic or histologic signs of GERD in the acid-exposed squamous epithelium of the distal esophagus. However, this early COX-2 increase in GERD is further upregulated within the MDA sequence for yet unknown reasons.

  16. Biomarkers for Reflux Disease: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Kia, Leila; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) encompasses an array of disorders unified by the reflux of gastric contents. Owing to the multitude of potential disease manifestations, both esophageal and extra-esophageal, no single biomarker can capture the disease spectrum, making it more plausible that there be a set of GERD biomarkers, each quantifying specific aspects of GERD-related pathology. This review aimed to comprehensively search the literature on biomarkers of GERD, specifically in relation to endoscopically negative esophageal disease and excluding conventional pH-impedance monitoring. Methods We searched PubMed and Embase databases from January 1st, 1996 to June 10th, 2015 for biomarkers of GERD and abstracts from recent international gastroenterology meetings. Results Of 1937 citations retrieved, 72 were included. Histopathologic biomarkers, baseline impedance, and serologic assays are some of the candidate biomarkers reviewed. The most unifying concept was of manifestations of impaired esophageal mucosal integrity, evident by increased ionic and molecular permeability, and/or destruction of tight junctions. Conclusions Impaired mucosal integrity quantified by baseline mucosal impedance, proteolytic fragments of junctional proteins, or histopathological features, has emerged as a promising GERD biomarker. PMID:26404867

  17. New and Future Drug Development for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maradey-Romero, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Medical therapy remains the most popular treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Whilst interest in drug development for GERD has declined over the last few years primarily due to the conversion of most proton pump inhibitor (PPI)'s to generic and over the counter compounds, there are still numerous areas of unmet needs in GERD. Drug development has been focused on potent histamine type 2 receptor antagonist's, extended release PPI's, PPI combination, potassium-competitive acid blockers, transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation reducers, prokinetics, mucosal protectants and esophageal pain modulators. It is likely that the aforementioned compounds will be niched for specific areas of unmet need in GERD, rather than compete with the presently available anti-reflux therapies. PMID:24466441

  18. New and future drug development for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Maradey-Romero, Carla; Fass, Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    Medical therapy remains the most popular treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Whilst interest in drug development for GERD has declined over the last few years primarily due to the conversion of most proton pump inhibitor (PPI)'s to generic and over the counter compounds, there are still numerous areas of unmet needs in GERD. Drug development has been focused on potent histamine type 2 receptor antagonist's, extended release PPI's, PPI combination, potassium-competitive acid blockers, transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation reducers, prokinetics, mucosal protectants and esophageal pain modulators. It is likely that the aforementioned compounds will be niched for specific areas of unmet need in GERD, rather than compete with the presently available anti-reflux therapies.

  19. Association between respiratory events and nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux events in patients with coexisting obstructive sleep apnea and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Jaimchariyatam, Nattapong; Tantipornsinchai, Warangkana; Desudchit, Tayard; Gonlachanvit, Sutep

    2016-06-01

    Literature has addressed the increased prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Significant improvement of GERD has been found after OSA treatment. However, precise mechanisms underlying this correlation remain unclear. We examined the association between nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and sleep events in patients with coexisting OSA and GERD. A case-crossover study among 12 patients with coexisting moderate-severe OSA and GERD was conducted. Participants underwent simultaneous polysomnography and esophageal impedance and pH monitoring. GER subtypes (ie, acid reflux, non-acid reflux) were defined as outcomes. Respective control time points were selected in all eligible control periods. Each sleep event was assessed individually. Estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were analyzed. A p-value of < 0.05 was considered significant. Patients were determined as moderate to severe OSA (respiratory disturbance index of 42.66 [±22.09]). There were a total of 50 GER episodes, 22 acid reflux and 28 non-acid reflux. Arousals and awakenings were significantly associated with subsequent GER events. The OR for GER following an arousal was 2.31 (95% CI 1.39-3.68; p < 0.001) and following an awakening was 3.71 (95% CI 1.81-7.63; p < 0.001). GER events were significantly less likely to occur after other respiratory events (OR 0.38 [95% CI 0.18-0.82]; p = 0.01). No sleep events followed GER events (p > 0.05). Both awakening and arousal appear to precipitate any subtype of GER events in patients with coexisting GERD and moderate to severe OSA. However, GER events were significantly less likely to occur after other respiratory events and did not appear to cause sleep-related events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Defective triggering of secondary peristalsis in patients with non-erosive reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Kotoyori, Makoto; Tanaka, Yuriko; Kawami, Noriyuki; Sano, Hirohito; Takubo, Kaiyo; Sakamoto, Choitsu; Holloway, Richard H

    2007-12-01

    The pathophysiology of non-erosive reflux disease is poorly understood. Triggering of secondary peristalsis is impaired in patients with erosive esophagitis but data in patients with non-erosive reflux disease are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference in esophageal motility between patients with non-erosive reflux disease and healthy subjects. Twenty patients with non-erosive reflux disease, with reflux symptoms occurring more than twice per week, and 20 healthy subjects of comparable age and sex underwent esophageal manometry. Primary peristalsis was tested with 10 swallows of a 5-mL water bolus. Secondary peristalsis was triggered by esophageal distention using a 20-mL air bolus, which was injected rapidly into the mid-esophagus. After 20 s, each stimulus was followed by a dry swallow to clear any residual air and then each stimulus was repeated five times. Basal lower esophageal sphincter pressure, pressure wave amplitude in the upper, middle and lower esophagus, wave velocity and the rates of successful primary peristalsis were similar in non-erosive reflux disease patients and controls. The rate of triggering of secondary peristalsis in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (median 20%, interquartile range 0-40%) was significantly lower (P < 0.0001) than that in healthy subjects (90%, 70-100%). When secondary peristalsis occurred in patients with non-erosive reflux disease, however, there were no differences in the amplitude and velocity of secondary peristalsis between the groups. Triggering of secondary peristalsis is defective in non-erosive reflux disease. This could lead to prolongation of the contact time between refluxed gastric acid and esophageal mucosa thereby leading to symptoms.

  1. Symptom characteristics and psychosomatic profiles in different spectrum of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chul-Hyun; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Baeg, Myong Ki; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Cho, Yu Kyung; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Kyu Yong

    2014-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is diagnosed based on symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation but is a heterogeneous condition which can be subclassified according to endoscopy and esophageal reflux monitoring. The aim of this study was to identify differences in demographic characteristics and reflux symptom patterns among patients with various spectrum of GERD. Patients having weekly heartburn or acid regurgitation were classified into four pathophysiological subgroups according to endoscopy and pH monitoring: reflux esophagitis (RE), endoscopy-negative reflux disease with pathological reflux (PR+), hypersensitive esophagus (HE), and normal acid exposure with negative symptom association (pH-). A total of 195 patients were enrolled. The numbers of patients in the subgroups were: RE, 39.0%; PR+, 20.0%; HE, 10.3%; and pH-, 30.8%. Grossly, reflux symptom patterns and relieving/exacerbating factors did not differ between subgroups. Prevalence of extraesophageal syndrome was higher in patients with PR+ than in other groups. Overlapping functional dyspepsia was common in all groups. The SCL-90-R depression score was higher in PR+ patients than in RE patients (p<0.05). Demographic characteristics and reflux symptom patterns cannot differentiate pH- group from GERD subtypes. Esophageal pH monitoring could be considered for the initial evaluation of GERD in the tertiary referral setting.

  2. Dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): is there any correlation?

    PubMed

    Simadibrata, Marcellus

    2009-10-01

    Dyspepsia is a syndrome characterized by symptoms and signs of upper gastrointestinal tract and the adjacent organs. It is estimated that 25% of the community have symptoms of dyspepsia syndrome. One-third of patients who visit general physician practices are patients with dyspepsia syndrome; and half of patients who visit gastroenterologists are also patients with dyspepsia syndrome. Dyspepsia syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are very prevalent in the community throughout the world.Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is more and more commonly found in daily medical practice. Until now,the natural history of disease on GERD and dyspepsia is hardly understood, even though many scientists studied both conditions and there are frequently overlapping. In an individual, GERD and dyspepsia may occur simultaneously and therefore they are hardly to be discriminated.The management of GERD is performed in keeping with Indonesia and Asia Pacific consensus, life-style modification and administering the acid suppression agents (Proton pump inhibitor (drug of choice), H2-receptor antagonist, etc),prokinetic agents (Cisapride, domperidone, etc). Life-style modification shall be performed as follows, i.e. sleep with 30-45 degree elevated head or upper chest, do not avoid sour beverages, chocolate, coffee or alcohol, avoid fat and various fried foods, sour food, less stress, stop smoking, small but frequent feeding, etc. There is a correlation between dyspepsia syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease(GERD), particularly between the functional dyspepsia and non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux (NERD). More appropriate definition is necessary to differentiate the dyspepsia syndrome and GERD. Further studies are needed to establish distinct definition and criteria between dyspepsia syndrome and GERD.

  3. Association of Acute Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease With Esophageal Histologic Changes.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Kerry B; Agoston, Agoston T; Odze, Robert D; Huo, Xiaofang; Pham, Thai H; Cipher, Daisha J; Castell, Donald O; Genta, Robert M; Souza, Rhonda F; Spechler, Stuart J

    2016-05-17

    The histologic changes associated with acute gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have not been studied prospectively in humans. Recent studies in animals have challenged the traditional notion that reflux esophagitis develops when esophageal surface epithelial cells are exposed to lethal chemical injury from refluxed acid. To evaluate histologic features of esophageal inflammation in acute GERD to study its pathogenesis. Patients from the Dallas Veterans Affairs Medical Center who had reflux esophagitis successfully treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) began 24-hour esophageal pH and impedance monitoring and esophagoscopy (including confocal laser endomicroscopy [CLE]) with biopsies from noneroded areas of distal esophagus at baseline (taking PPIs) and at 1 week and 2 weeks after stopping the PPI medication. Enrollment began May 2013 and follow-up ended July 2015. PPIs stopped for 2 weeks. Twelve patients (men, 11; mean age, 57.6 year [SD, 13.1]) completed the study. Primary outcome was change in esophageal inflammation 2 weeks after stopping the PPI medication, determined by comparing lymphocyte, eosinophil, and neutrophil infiltrates (each scored on a 0-3 scale) in esophageal biopsies. Also evaluated were changes in epithelial basal cell and papillary hyperplasia, surface erosions, intercellular space width, endoscopic grade of esophagitis, esophageal acid exposure, and mucosal impedance (an index of mucosal integrity). At 1 week and 2 weeks after discontinuation of PPIs, biopsies showed significant increases in intraepithelial lymphocytes, which were predominantly T cells (median [range]: 0 (0-2) at baseline vs 1 (1-2) at both 1 week [P = .005] and 2 weeks [P = .002]); neutrophils and eosinophils were few or absent. Biopsies also showed widening of intercellular spaces (confirmed by CLE), and basal cell and papillary hyperplasia developed without surface erosions. Two weeks after stopping the PPI medication, esophageal acid exposure increased

  4. Acid Reflux Directly Causes Sleep Disturbances in Rat with Chronic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Kenichi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Tsukahara, Takuya; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Watanabe, Toshio; Urade, Yoshihiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is strongly associated with sleep disturbances. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy improves subjective but not objective sleep parameters in patients with GERD. This study aimed to investigate the association between GERD and sleep, and the effect of PPI on sleep by using a rat model of chronic acid reflux esophagitis. Methods Acid reflux esophagitis was induced by ligating the transitional region between the forestomach and the glandular portion and then wrapping the duodenum near the pylorus. Rats underwent surgery for implantation of electrodes for electroencephalogram and electromyogram recordings, and they were transferred to a soundproof recording chamber. Polygraphic recordings were scored by using 10-s epochs for wake, rapid eye movement sleep, and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. To examine the role of acid reflux, rats were subcutaneously administered a PPI, omeprazole, at a dose of 20 mg/kg once daily. Results Rats with reflux esophagitis presented with several erosions, ulcers, and mucosal thickening with basal hyperplasia and marked inflammatory infiltration. The reflux esophagitis group showed a 34.0% increase in wake (232.2±11.4 min and 173.3±7.4 min in the reflux esophagitis and control groups, respectively; p<0.01) accompanied by a reduction in NREM sleep during light period, an increase in sleep fragmentation, and more frequent stage transitions. The use of omeprazole significantly improved sleep disturbances caused by reflux esophagitis, and this effect was not observed when the PPI was withdrawn. Conclusions Acid reflux directly causes sleep disturbances in rats with chronic esophagitis. PMID:25215524

  5. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease in preschool children with asthma].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yukinori; Kameda, Makoto; Nishikido, Tomoki; Takamatu, Isamu; Doi, Satoru

    2008-05-01

    In pediatric intractable asthma, there is occasionally an association with GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). It is not clear in which cases GERD should be suspected or how effective the GERD therapy is in treating the asthma. Twenty-seven preschool children (<6 years of age) suffering from recurrent asthma attack in spite of asthma therapy underwent 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring. We examined retrospectively the incidence of GERD and the effectiveness of famotidine in GERD positive patients. 18 of the 27 patients (66.7%) had positive results (GERD positive group). In 12 of the 15 patients (80%) who underwent GERD therapy (famotidine), respiratory symptoms were decreased. In the GERD positive group, the incidence of acid reflux during waking hours was more frequent than during sleeping hours. In 8 of 12 patients (66.7%) in whom famotidine was effective, cough and wheeze often occurred during the daytime and corresponded with the time when acid reflux must commonly occurred. We conclude that children suffering from recurrent asthma attack in spite of asthma therapy must be examined for the presence of GERD.

  6. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: exaggerations, evidence and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Cristina Targa; Carvalho, Elisa de; Sdepanian, Vera Lucia; Morais, Mauro Batista de; Vieira, Mário César; Silva, Luciana Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    there are many questions and little evidence regarding the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children. The association between GERD and cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA), overuse of abdominal ultrasonography for the diagnosis of GERD, and excessive pharmacological treatment, especially proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are some aspects that need clarification. This review aimed to establish the current scientific evidence for the diagnosis and treatment of GERD in children. a search was conducted in the MEDLINE, PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, and Cochrane Library electronic databases, using the following keywords: gastroesophageal reflux; gastroesophageal reflux disease; proton-pump inhibitors; and prokinetics; in different age groups of the pediatric age range; up to May of 2013. abdominal ultrasonography should not be recommended to investigate gastroesophageal reflux (GER). Simultaneous treatment of GERD and CMPA often results in unnecessary use of medication or elimination diet. There is insufficient evidence for the prescription of prokinetics to all patients with GER/GERD. There is little evidence to support acid suppression in the first year of life, to treat nonspecific symptoms suggestive of GERD. Conservative treatment has many benefits and with low cost and no side-effects. there have been few randomized controlled trials that assessed the management of GERD in children and no examination can be considered the gold standard for GERD diagnosis. For these reasons, there are exaggerations in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease, which need to be corrected. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Endoscopic therapies of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Atif; Salinas, Vanessa; Filipi, Charles J

    2006-01-01

    The high prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Western societies has accelerated the need for new modalities of treatment. Currently, medical and surgical therapies are widely accepted among patients and physicians. New potent antisecretory drugs and the development of minimally invasive surgery for the management of GERD are at present the pivotal and largely accepted approaches to treatment. The minimally invasive treatment revolution, however, has stimulated several new endoscopic techniques for GERD. Up to now, the data is limited and further studies are necessary to compare the advantages and disadvantages of the various endoscopic techniques to medical and laparoscopic management of GERD. New journal articles and abstracts are continuously being published. The Food and Drug Administration has approved 3 modalities, thus gastroenterologists and surgeons are beginning to apply these techniques. Further trials and device refinements will assist clinicians. This article will present an overview of the various techniques that are currently on study. This review will report the efficacy and durability of various endoscopic therapies for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The potential for widespread use of these techniques will also be discussed. Articles and abstracts published in English on this topic were retrieved from Pubmed. Due to limited number of studies and remarkable differences between various trials, strict criteria were not used for the pooled data presented, however, an effort was made to avoid bias by including only studies that used off-PPI scoring as baseline and intent to treat. PMID:16718747

  8. A review of pharmacotherapy for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

    PubMed

    Savarino, Edoardo; Zentilin, Patrizia; Marabotto, Elisa; Bodini, Giorgia; Della Coletta, Marco; Frazzoni, Marzio; de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Tolone, Salvatore; Pellegatta, Gaia; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2017-09-01

    Medical therapy of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is based on the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) as first choice treatment. Despite their effectiveness, about 20-30% of patients report an inadequate response and alternative drugs are required. Areas covered: This review provides an overview of current pharmacotherapy for treating GERD by showing the results of PPIs, reflux inhibitors, antidepressants and mucosa protective medications. Expert opinion: Medical therapy of GERD does not definitely cure the disease, because even PPIs are not able to change the key factors responsible for it. However, they remain the mainstay of medical treatment, allowing us to alleviate symptoms, heal esophagitis and prevent complications in the majority of cases. Nevertheless, many patients do not respond, because acid does not play any pathogenetic role. Prokinetics and reflux inhibitors have the potential to control motor abnormalities, but the results of clinical trials are inconsistent. Antidepressant drugs are effective in specific subgroups of NERD patients with visceral hypersensitivity, but larger, controlled clinical studies are necessary. Protective drugs or medical devices have been recently adopted to reinforce mucosal resistance and preliminary trials have confirmed their efficacy either combined with or as add-on medication to PPIs in refractory patients.

  9. Gastroesophageal Reflux Management with the LINX® System for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Following Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Desart, Kenneth; Rossidis, Georgios; Michel, Michael; Lux, Tamara; Ben-David, Kfir

    2015-10-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has gained significant popularity in the USA, and consequently resulted in patients experiencing new-onset gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) following this bariatric procedure. Patients with GERD refractory to medical therapy present a more challenging situation limiting the surgical options to further treat the de novo GERD symptoms since the gastric fundus to perform a fundoplication is no longer an option. The aim of this study is to determine if the LINX® magnetic sphincter augmentation system is a safe and effective option for patients with new gastroesophageal reflux disease following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. This study was conducted at the University Medical Center. This is a retrospective review of seven consecutive patients who had a laparoscopic LINX® magnetic sphincter device placement for patients with refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy between July 2014 and April 2015. All patients were noted to have self-reported greatly improved gastroesophageal reflux symptoms 2-4 weeks after their procedure. They were all noted to have statistically significant improved severity and frequency of their reflux, regurgitation, epigastric pain, sensation of fullness, dysphagia, and cough symptoms in their postoperative GERD symptoms compared with their preoperative evaluation. This is the first reported pilot case series, illustrating that the LINX® device is a safe and effective option in patients with de novo refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease after a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy despite appropriate weight loss.

  10. Varying marginal ulcer rates in patients undergoing laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity versus gastroesophageal reflux disease: is the acid pocket to blame?

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Megan M; Kallies, Kara J; Mathiason, Michelle A; Kothari, Shanu N

    2013-01-01

    Nissen fundoplication failure rates are increased in obese patients; however, conversion to laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) can resolve or improve gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms. Acid pockets near the gastroesophageal junction may influence these surgical outcomes. Our objective was to compare the outcomes for patients who underwent LRYGB for morbid obesity (MO) versus GERD. A retrospective review of our institution's bariatric database was completed. Statistical analysis included t test and χ(2) test. LRYGBs were performed from 2001-2011 for MO and 2009-2010 for GERD. Eighty-three percent of patients in the GERD group had undergone previous antireflux surgery. The median time from initial presentation to LRYGB was significantly shorter in the GERD versus the MO group (105 days versus 241 days; P = .009). There was an increased rate of marginal ulcers in the GERD group compared with the MO group, at 50% versus 4.5%, respectively (P = .001). Stomal stenosis was also increased in the GERD group compared with the MO group, at 8.3% and .7%, respectively (P = .091). There were no in-hospital or 30-day mortalities. Patients undergoing LRYGB for GERD had a shorter interval to surgery and an increased rate of marginal ulcers compared with those undergoing LRYGB for MO. Operative time was longest among patients in the GERD group. The acid pocket may explain the increased ulcer rate in the GERD population. Use of a smaller sized pouch may improve this outcome. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. In the Clinic. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Harnik, Ian G

    2015-07-07

    This issue provides a clinical overview of gastroesophageal reflux disease, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic.

  12. Patterns of reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease in pediatric population of New South Wales.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sarath Kumar; Cohen, Ralph Clinton; Karpelowsky, Jonathan Saul

    2017-02-01

    This study is to determine the association of ambulatory pH monitoring (24hr pH) with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and its other investigations. The clinical and epidemiological profiles of subjects referred for reflux disorders are also studied. Symptoms or group of symptoms, profiles and prior investigations of 1259 consecutive pediatric subjects (with 1332 24hr pH studies performed) referred for evaluation of reflux disorders between 1988 and 2012 were retrospectively studied. Chi-square or fisher exact test was used for hypothesis testing, student t-test for the comparison of means and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test for comparing medians of continuous variables. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), defined as reflux causing major symptoms and complications, was diagnosed in 57.5% subjects of the total sample. Forty-three percent were girls and 56.7% were boys. The most common age group was between 4 months and 2 years (51.2%). Vomiting (64.4%) and irritability (74%) were the most common symptoms with the neurological conditions (23.2%) being the most frequent underlying condition. The parameters used in 24hr pH were significantly higher in those diagnosed with GERD (P < 0.0001). The prevalence of GERD was found to be significantly higher when both gastrointestinal and respiratory symptoms were present (P = 0.008) at 66.4% than when compared with gastrointestinal (56.5%) and respiratory (52.2%) symptoms in isolation. Symptoms alone were not reliable in diagnosing GERD. Only 57.5% had GERD among patients referred for reflux disorders. 24hr pH is reliable and should be considered routine in reflux disorders, as it identifies patients with pathologic reflux and avoids a needless surgery. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  13. Twenty-four-hour esophageal impedance-pH monitoring in healthy preterm neonates: rate and characteristics of acid, weakly acidic, and weakly alkaline gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    López-Alonso, Manuel; Moya, Maria Jose; Cabo, Jose Antonio; Ribas, Juan; del Carmen Macías, Maria; Silny, Jiry; Sifrim, Daniel

    2006-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a physiologic process and is considered pathologic (gastroesophageal reflux disease) when it causes symptoms or results in complications. It is common in preterm infants and occurs in healthy neonates. Twenty-four-hour pH monitoring commonly is used in children for diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease, and abnormal reflux is considered with detection of increased esophageal acid exposure. However, in neonates, relatively few gastroesophageal reflux episodes cause esophageal acidification to pH < 4. Premature infants receive frequent feeds, which can induce a weaker acid secretory response than that observed in older infants and adults. As a consequence, gastric pH may be > 4 for prolonged periods, and reflux of gastric contents might be less acidic or even alkaline. Esophageal impedance monitoring can detect weakly acidic and even alkaline gastroesophageal reflux. The role of weakly acidic reflux in the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease in preterm infants is not clear. To date, studies that have used impedance-pH in neonates assessed the association between nonacid reflux and cardiorespiratory symptoms, but no impedance data from healthy preterm neonates have been available to determine whether those symptomatic neonates had an increased number of weakly acidic reflux episodes or increased reactivity to a physiologic number of reflux events. Our aim with this study was to provide impedance-pH values for acid, weakly acidic, and weakly alkaline reflux from healthy preterm neonates. Esophageal impedance was recorded for 24 hours in 21 asymptomatic preterm neonates by replacing the conventional feeding tube with a specially designed feeding tube that included 9 impedance electrodes (8 French). All neonates were asymptomatic, with spontaneous breathing. Reflux monitoring was performed after comprehensive explanation and on receipt of written parental consent. Esophageal and gastric pH were monitored using a separate

  14. Different risk factors between reflux symptoms and mucosal injury in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Chung-Hsien; Hsieh, Tsung-Cheng; Hsiao, Tsung-Hsien; Wang, Pin-Chao; Tseng, Tai-Chung; Lin, Hans Hsienhong; Wang, Chia-Chi

    2015-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is diagnosed based on typical symptoms in clinical practice. It can be divided into two groups using endoscopy: erosive and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD). This study aims to determine the risk factors of reflux symptoms and mucosal injury. This was a two-step case-control study derived from a cohort of 998 individuals having the data of reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ) and endoscopic findings. Those with minor reflux symptoms were excluded. The first step compared symptomatic GERD patients with healthy controls. The 2(nd) step compared patients with erosive esophagitis with healthy controls. In this study, the prevalence of symptomatic GERD and erosive esophagitis were 163 (16.3%) and 166 (16.6%), respectively. A total of 507 asymptomatic individuals without mucosal injury of the esophagus on endoscopy were selected as healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, multivariate analyses showed that symptomatic GERD patients had a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia [odds ratio (OR), 1.83; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-2.96] and obesity (OR, 1.85; 95% CI 1.08-3.02). By contrast, male sex (OR, 2.24; 95% CI 1.42-3.52), positive Campylo-like organism (CLO) test (OR, 0.56; 95% CI 0.37-0.84), and hiatus hernia (OR, 14.36; 95% CI 3.05-67.6) were associated with erosive esophagitis. In conclusion, obesity and hypertriglyceridemia were associated with reflux symptoms. By contrast, male sex, negative infection of Helicobacter pylori, and hiatus hernia were associated with mucosal injury. Our results suggested that risk factors of reflux symptoms or mucosal injury might be different in GERD patients. The underlying mechanism awaits further studies to clarify. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  15. Distinction between patients with non-erosive reflux disease and functional heartburn

    PubMed Central

    Giacchino, Maria; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2013-01-01

    Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and functional heartburn (FH) are two different clinical entities and the clear distinction between the two forms is actually possible thanks to the use of impedance-pH monitoring. NERD is the more common manifestation of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), one of the most widespread chronic gastrointestinal disorders in Western countries. The absence of visible lesions on endoscopy and the presence of troublesome reflux-associated (to acid, weakly acidic or non-acid reflux) symptoms are the two key factors for the definition of NERD. FH is an exclusive diagnosis and is defined by the Rome III criteria as a burning retrosternal discomfort, excluding GERD and esophageal motility disorders as a cause of the symptom. FH does not have any type of reflux underlying symptoms and psychological factors seem to be more expressed in FH patients than in patients with reflux-provoked disturbances. The aim of our review is to report the state-of-the-art knowledge about NERD and FH, to clarify their features and differences and to stimulate new research in this field. PMID:24714313

  16. DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Maria Aparecida Coelho de Arruda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is probably one of the most prevalent diseases in the world that also compromises the quality of life of the affected significantly. Its incidence in Brazil is 12%, corresponding to 20 million individuals. Objective To update the GERD management and the new trends on diagnosis and treatment, reviewing the international and Brazilian experience on it. Method The literature review was based on papers published on Medline/Pubmed, SciELO, Lilacs, Embase and Cochrane crossing the following headings: gastroesophageal reflux disease, diagnosis, clinical treatment, surgery, fundoplication. Results Various factors are involved on GERD physiopathology, the most important being the transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Clinical manifestations are heartburn, regurgitation (typical symptoms), cough, chest pain, asthma, hoarseness and throat clearing (atypical symptoms), which may be followed or not by typical symptoms. GERD patients may present complications such as peptic stenosis, hemorrhage, and Barrett's esophagus, which is the most important predisposing factor to adenocarcinoma. The GERD diagnosis must be based on the anamnesis and the symptoms must be evaluated in terms of duration, intensity, frequency, triggering and relief factors, pattern of evolution and impact on the patient's quality of life. The diagnosis requires confirmation with different exams. The goal of the clinical treatment is to relieve the symptoms and surgical treatment is indicated for patients who require continued drug use, with intolerance to prolonged clinical treatment and with GERD complications. Conclusion GERD is a major digestive health problem and affect 12% of Brazilian people. The anamnesis is fundamental for the diagnosis of GERD, with special analysis of the typical and atypical symptoms (duration, intensity, frequency, triggering and relief factors, evolution and impact on the life quality). High digestive endoscopy and

  17. Diagnostic value of dilated intercellular space and histopathologic scores in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, R; Zhang, H; Zhou, L; Lu, J; Xue, Y; Wang, Y; Yan, X; Lin, L; Lin, S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the diagnostic value of histopathologic score and the dilated intercellular space (DIS) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and functional heartburn (FH). Participants with GERD symptoms including reflux esophagitis, non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), Barrett's esophagus (BE), functional heartburn (FH), along with a control group with atypical GERD-like symptom (Sym-C), and asymptomatic healthy volunteers (H-C) were administered GERD questionnaire, and subjected to endoscopy and biopsies, as well as 24-hour pH-impedance monitoring. Biopsies were evaluated using standards from the 2011 Esohisto Project after Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. DIS was measured quantitatively under light microscopy. Among the total of 565 participants with qualified biopsy specimens, the mean DIS of the reflux esophagitis (RE) group was significantly wider compared with the other five groups. DIS in patients with GERD-like symptoms was significantly wider compared with the H-C. No significant differences were observed between NERD and FH. Results from 24-hour pH-impedance monitoring indicated that only the DIS of patients with acid reflux or the amount of acid reflux episodes in patients with DIS was significantly wider compared with patients with nonacid reflux or patients without DIS (P < 0.001). With DIS = 0.9 μm as the cutoff value, the sensitivity and specificity were 62.6% and 54.1%, respectively. Using the total histopathologic score > 3 as the diagnostic criterion, the sensitivity and specificity were 71.7% and 47.4%. DIS is closely associated with GERD and acid reflux. The diagnostic value of histological scores in lower esophagus in GERD is very similar to that of the quantitative measurement of DIS. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  18. Extra-esophageal gastroesophageal reflux disease and asthma: understanding this interplay.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rishi D; Vaezi, Michael F

    2015-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition that develops when there is reflux of stomach contents, which typically manifests as heartburn and regurgitation. These esophageal symptoms are well recognized; however, there are extra-esophageal manifestations of GERD, which include asthma, chronic cough, laryngitis and sinusitis. With the rising incidence of asthma, there is increasing interest in identifying how GERD impacts asthma development and therapy. Due to the poor sensitivity of endoscopy and pH monitoring, empiric therapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is now considered the initial diagnostic step in patients suspected of having GERD-related symptoms. If unresponsive, diagnostic testing with pH monitoring off therapy and/or impedance/pH monitoring on therapy, may be reasonable in order to assess for baseline presence of reflux with the former and exclude continued acid or weakly acid reflux with the latter tests. PPI-unresponsive asthmatics, without overt regurgitation, usually have either no reflux or causes other than GERD. In this group, PPI therapy should be discontinued. In those with GERD as a contributing factor acid suppressive therapy should be continued as well as optimally treating other etiologies requiring concomitant treatment. Surgical fundoplication is rarely needed but in those with a large hiatal hernia, moderate-to-severe reflux by pH monitoring surgery might be helpful in eliminating the need for high-dose acid suppressive therapy.

  19. Diet and gastroesophageal reflux disease: role in pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sajiv; Richter, Joel E

    2017-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disease that presents with a variety of symptoms including heartburn and acid regurgitation. Although dietary modification is currently regarded as first-line therapy for the disease, the role of diet in the pathogenesis and management of GERD is still poorly understood. The present article aims to review recent literature that examines the relationship of diet and GERD. Increased awareness of medications side effects and widespread overuse has brought nonpharmacological therapies to the forefront for the management of GERD. Recent findings have established the important role of nutrition for the managements of symptoms of GERD. Increasing scientific evidence has produced objective data on the role of certain trigger foods, whereas population studies endorse decreased reflux symptoms by following certain diets. Obesity has been linked with increased symptoms of GERD as well. Furthermore, the importance of lifestyle techniques such as head of bed elevation and increased meal to sleep time may provide nonpharmacologic methods for effective symptom control in GERD. We provide a comprehensive review on the association between diet and its role in the development and management of GERD.

  20. Pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease: new understanding in a new era.

    PubMed

    Herregods, T V K; Bredenoord, A J; Smout, A J P M

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has increased in the last decades and it is now one of the most common chronic diseases. Throughout time our insight in the pathophysiology of GERD has been characterized by remarkable back and forth swings, often prompted by new investigational techniques. Even today, the pathophysiology of GERD is not fully understood but it is now recognized to be a multifactorial disease. Among the factors that have been shown to be involved in the provocation or increase of reflux, are sliding hiatus hernia, low lower esophageal sphincter pressure, transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation, the acid pocket, obesity, increased distensibility of the esophagogastric junction, prolonged esophageal clearance, and delayed gastric emptying. Moreover, multiple mechanisms influence the perception of GERD symptoms, such as the acidity of the refluxate, its proximal extent, the presence of gas in the refluxate, duodenogastroesophageal reflux, longitudinal muscle contraction, mucosal integrity, and peripheral and central sensitization. Understanding the pathophysiology of GERD is important for future targets for therapy as proton pump inhibitor-refractory GERD symptoms remain a common problem. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms leading to reflux and the factors influencing perception, in the light of historical developments. It is clear that further research remains necessary despite the recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of GERD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The influence of the speed of food intake on multichannel impedance in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bor, Serhat; Bayrakci, Berna; Erdogan, Askin; Yildirim, Esra; Vardar, Rukiye

    2013-10-01

    There is a general belief that gastro-oesophageal reflux increases after meals and especially following a rapid intake. To evaluate the impact of rapid vs. slow food intake on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) patients. Forty-six GORD patients with heartburn and / or acid regurgitation once a week or more often common were included in this study. Participants were asked to eat the same standard meal within either 5 or 30 minutes under observation in a random order on 2 consecutive days. A total of 28 hours of recording were obtained by intraoesophageal impedance pH and number of liquid and mixed reflux episodes within 3 hours of the slow- and fast-eating postprandial periods were calculated. While all patients defined GORD symptoms, 10 (21.7%) had pathological 24-h intraoesophageal impedance measurement, 15 (32.6%) had pathological DeMeester and 21.7% had erosive oesophagitis. No difference has been shown according to the eating speed when all reflux episodes were taken together (754 vs. 733). Speed of food intake also did not have an impact on patients with normal vs. pathological 24-h intraoesophageal impedance or erosive vs. non-erosive. During the first postprandial hour, approximately half of the reflux events were non-acid, compared to 34.2% during the second hour and 26.8% during the third hour (p < 0.001). The number of acid reflux episodes was significantly higher than non-acid reflux especially during the second and third hours and in total for 3 hours. This first study addressing the effect of eating speed on reflux episodes in GORD patients did not support the general belief that reflux increases following fast eating. Acid and non-acid reflux were similar at the first postprandial hour, then acid reflux episodes were predominantly higher, which implicate the importance of acid pockets.

  2. Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Moscow.

    PubMed

    Bor, S; Lazebnik, L B; Kitapcioglu, G; Manannikof, I; Vasiliev, Y

    2016-01-01

    Limited data exist to determine the prevalence and clinical spectrum of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the Russian population, which might be different from those in Western countries. This study was performed in Moscow on randomized 1065 adults aged ≥ 15 years. A validated reflux questionnaire comprising 72 questions and an additional 29 sub-questions were used. The questions assessed (heartburn and regurgitation) and related (dyspepsia, dysphagia, odynophagia and chest pain) symptoms, the triggering factors of these symptoms, family history and data on demographic and socioeconomic features. GERD was defined as heartburn and/or regurgitation once a week or common. Of the 1065 participants, 42.1% were male and 57.9% were female. The prevalences of frequent and occasional symptoms were 17.6 and 22.1% for heartburn and 17.5 and 21.8% for regurgitation, respectively, over the last 12 months. The prevalence of GERD was found to be 23.6%. The rate of GERD was significantly higher in females than in males (15.4 vs. 29.5%, P < 0.001) and significantly increased as the age of the participants increased (P = 0.011). GERD was present in 20.4% of smokers, 24.2% of coffee drinkers, 21.5% of alcohol consumers and 45.9% of stressed participants. Although the rate of alcohol consumers was lower in those with GERD compared with those without GERD, the rate of coffee drinkers and stressed participants was higher among those with GERD. The rate of additional symptoms was higher even in participants complaining of regurgitation/heartburn rarely, compared with those without complaints. Using the same questionnaire, which makes it possible to compare the present results with those from different countries, we found the prevalence of GERD in Moscow to be 23.6%, one of highest in the Western populations. The rates of heartburn and regurgitation were found to be similar, which constitutes a different result than has been found in similar studies. Additional symptoms should

  3. Acid and non-acid reflux during physiotherapy in young children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Doumit, Michael; Krishnan, Usha; Jaffé, Adam; Belessis, Yvonne

    2012-02-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux (GOR) may contribute to lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). There is conflicting evidence regarding the effect of chest physiotherapy (CPT) in the head-down position on GOR. Furthermore, there is currently no evidence on the impact of physiotherapy on GOR as assessed by pH-multichannel intraluminal impedance (pH-MII). (1) To characterize GOR in young children with CF. (2) To determine whether the head-down position during physiotherapy exacerbates GOR. Children were studied using pH-MII monitoring over 24-hr, during which they received two 20-min sessions of CPT. One session was performed in "modified" drainage positions with no head-down tilt and the alternate session in "gravity-assisted" drainage positions, which included 20° head-down tilt. Twenty children with CF (8 males), median age 12 months (range 8-34) were recruited. A total of 1,374 reflux episodes were detected in all children, of which 869 (63%) were acid and 505 (37%) were non-acid. Seventy-two percent of the episodes migrated proximally. During CPT, there was no significant difference between total number of reflux episodes in the modified or gravity-assisted positions, median [inter-quartile range (IQR)] 1 (0-2.5) compared to 1 (0.75-3) episode, respectively, P = 0.63. There was also no significant difference between the number of reflux episodes which migrated proximally, median (IQR) 1 (0-2) compared to 0 (0-2) episodes, respectively, P = 0.75. In young children with CF, GOR is primarily acidic and proximal migration is common. Physiotherapy in the head-down position does not appear to exacerbate GOR. The impact of GOR on lung disease remains to be elucidated. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Atrial fibrillation and gastroesophageal reflux disease: the cardiogastric interaction.

    PubMed

    Linz, Dominik; Hohl, Mathias; Vollmar, Johanna; Ukena, Christian; Mahfoud, Felix; Böhm, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Multiple conditions like hypertension, heart failure, diabetes, sleep apnoea, and obesity play a role for the initiation and perpetuation of AF. Recently, a potential association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and AF development has been proposed due to the close anatomic vicinity of the oesophagus and the left atrium. As an understanding of the association between acid reflux disease and AF may be important in the global multimodal treatment strategy to further improve outcomes in a subset of patients with AF, we discuss potential atrial arrhythmogenic mechanisms in patients with GERD, such as gastric and subsequent systemic inflammation, impaired autonomic stimulation, mechanical irritation due to anatomical proximity of the left atrium and the oesophagus, as well as common comorbidities like obesity and sleep-disordered breathing. Data on GERD and oesophageal lesions after AF-ablation procedures will be reviewed. Treatment of GERD to avoid AF or to reduce AF burden might represent a future treatment perspective but needs to be scrutinized in prospective trials. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Upper aerodigestive tract disorders and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Bianchini, Chiara; Zuolo, Michele; Feo, Carlo Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of symptoms and diseases of the upper aerodigestive tract are associated to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). These disorders comprise a large variety of conditions such as asthma, chronic otitis media and sinusitis, chronic cough, and laryngeal disorders including paroxysmal laryngospasm. Laryngo-pharyngeal reflux disease is an extraoesophageal variant of GORD that can affect the larynx and pharynx. Despite numerous research efforts, the diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux often remains elusive, unproven and controversial, and its treatment is then still empiric. Aim of this paper is to review the current literature on upper aerodigestive tract disorders in relation to pathologic gastro-oesophageal reflux, focusing in particular on the pathophysiology base and results of the surgical treatment of GORD. PMID:25685756

  6. [Current Status of Translational Research on Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    PubMed

    Jeong, In Du; Park, Moo In

    2016-09-25

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the incidence of some of its complications have risen strikingly over the last few decades. With the increase in our understanding of the pathophysiology of GERD along with the development of proton pump inhibitors, the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to GERD have changed dramatically over the past decade. However, GERD still poses a problem to many clinicians since the spectrum of the disease has evolved to encompass more challenging presentations such as refractory GERD and extra-esophageal manifestations. The aim of this article is to provide a review of available current translational research on GERD. This review includes acid pocket, ambulatory pH monitoring, impedance pH monitoring, mucosa impedance, and high resolution manometry. This article discusses current translational research on GERD.

  7. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Douglas A.; Kubo, Ai; Levin, T.R.; Block, Gladys; Habel, Laurel; Rumore, Gregory; Quesenberry, Charles; Buffler, Patricia; Parsonnet, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Background Gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori is a proposed protective factor against gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but little population-based data exist and other data conflict. Methods We conducted a community-based case-control study that compared GERD-free subjects with two groups: 1) subjects with a physician-assigned GERD diagnosis and 2) general population subjects with self-described weekly GERD symptoms. Subjects completed interviews, GERD questionnaires, and antibody testing for Helicobacter pylori and its cagA protein. Results Serologic data was available for 301 physician-assigned GERD patients, 81 general population patients with GERD symptoms, and 175 subjects from the general population without GERD. Physician-assigned GERD patients were less likely to have Helicobacter pylori antibodies than GERD-free population controls (odds ratio [OR] = 0.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15-0.47); there was also an inverse association between Helicobacter pylori and GERD symptom severity (OR=0.18, 95%CI 0.08-0.41; severe or very severe symptoms) and GERD frequency (OR=0.18, 95%CI 0.09-0.38; for symptoms at least weekly). The association was stronger among persons with erosive GERD and was similar between Helicobacter pylori positive subjects with and without cagA. There was no association among persons who were cagA positive, but Helicobacter pylori negative. Similar findings were found in analyses of population members with self-described GERD symptoms. Conclusions Helicobacter pylori antibody status was inversely associated with a GERD diagnosis and GERD symptoms in a community-based population. PMID:19250510

  8. Saliva transit in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Cassiani, R A; Mota, G A; Aprile, L R O; Dantas, R O

    2015-10-01

    Saliva is an important factor in the neutralization of the acidity of the refluxed material that comes from the stomach to the esophagus. The impairment of saliva transit from oral cavity to distal esophagus may be one of the causes of esophagitis and symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). With the scintigraphic method, the transit of 2 mL of artificial saliva was measured in 30 patients with GERD and 26 controls. The patients with GERD had symptoms of heartburn and acid regurgitation, a 24-hour pH monitoring with more than 4.2% of the time with pH below four, 26 with erosive esophagitis, and four with non-erosive reflux disease. Fourteen had mild dysphagia for solid foods. Twenty-one patients had normal esophageal manometry, and nine had ineffective esophageal motility. They were 15 men and 15 women, aged 21-61 years, mean 39 years. The control group had 14 men and 12 women, aged 19-61 years, mean 35 years. The subjects swallowed in the sitting and supine position 2 mL of artificial saliva labeled with 18 MBq of (99m) Technetium phytate. The time of saliva transit was measured from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, and the transit through proximal, middle, and distal esophageal body. There was no difference between patients and controls in the time for saliva to go from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, and from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, in the sitting and supine positions. In distal esophagus in the sitting position, the saliva transit duration was shorter in patients with GERD (3.0 ± 0.8 seconds) than in controls (7.6 ± 1.7 seconds, P = 0.03). In conclusion, the saliva transit from oral cavity to the esophageal-gastric transition in patients with GERD has the same duration than in controls. Saliva transit through the distal esophageal body is faster in patients with GERD than controls. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the

  9. Epithelial Thickness is a Marker of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Vieth, Michael; Mastracci, Luca; Vakil, Nimish; Dent, John; Wernersson, Börje; Baldycheva, Irina; Wissmar, Jenny; Ruth, Magnus; Fiocca, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    Histologic criteria have been refined for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We aimed to evaluate these criteria for the assessment of GERD and to measure interassessor agreement. We performed a post hoc analysis of data from the Diamond study (NCT 00291746), conducted in Europe and Canada on adults with frequent upper gastrointestinal symptoms who had not taken a proton pump inhibitor in the previous 2 months. GERD was diagnosed based on the presence of 1 or more of the following: reflux esophagitis, pathologic esophageal acid exposure, and/or positive symptom-acid association probability. Nonerosive reflux disease was defined as the presence of pathologic esophageal acid exposure and/or a positive symptom-acid association probability, but no reflux esophagitis. Biopsies collected from 336 patients from 0.5 cm and 2.0 cm above the Z line were evaluable; they were analyzed independently at pathology centers in Germany and Italy (biopsies from 258 and 195 patients, respectively). The primary outcomes were the accuracy of histologic criteria for the diagnosis of GERD, defined by endoscopy and pH monitoring, and interassessor agreement on histologic criteria. At the assessment site for basal cell layer thickness, total epithelial thickness was the best-performing criterion for diagnosis of investigation-defined GERD; it also identified nonerosive reflux disease, reflux esophagitis, and pathologic esophageal acid exposure at 0.5 cm and 2.0 cm above the Z line. Basal cell layer thickness and presence of dilated intercellular spaces did not identify patients with GERD. Among the criteria tested, the best agreement between assessments carried out at the 2 pathology centers was for total epithelial thickness at 0.5 cm and 2.0 cm above the Z line. Based on an analysis of 336 patients with frequent upper gastrointestinal symptoms, total epithelial thickness is a robust histologic marker for GERD. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier

  10. Gender difference in gastro-esophageal reflux diseases.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Kiyotaka; Iijima, Katsunori; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-02-07

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen sharply in western countries over the past 4 decades. This type of cancer is considered to follow a transitional process that goes from gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) to Barrett's esophagus (BE, a metaplastic condition of the distal esophagus), a precursor lesion and ultimately adenocarcinoma. This spectrum of GERD is strongly predominant in males due to an unidentified mechanism. Several epidemiologic studies have described that the prevalence of GERD, BE and EAC in women is closely related to reproductive status, which suggests a possible association with the estrogen level. Recently, we revealed in an in vivo study that the inactivation of mast cells by the anti-inflammatory function of estrogen may account for the gender difference in the GERD spectrum. Other studies have described the contribution of female steroid hormones to the gender difference in these diseases. Estrogen is reported to modulate the metabolism of fat, and obesity is a main risk factor of GERDs. Moreover, estrogen could confer esophageal epithelial resistance to causative refluxate. These functions of estrogen might explain the approximately 20-year delay in the incidence of BE and the subsequent development of EAC in women compared to men, and this effect may be responsible for the male predominance. However, some observational studies demonstrated that hormone replacement therapy exerts controversial effects in GERD patients. Nevertheless, the estrogen-related endocrine milieu may prevent disease progression toward carcinogenesis in GERD patients. The development of innovative alternatives to conventional acid suppressors may become possible by clarifying the mechanisms of estrogen.

  11. Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Celiac Disease Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Celiac Disease and Reproductive ...

  12. Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Children & Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Celiac Disease Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Celiac Disease and Reproductive ...

  13. Sex and Gender Differences in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Gwang Ha

    2016-01-01

    It is important to understand sex and gender-related differences in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) because gender-related biologic factors might lead to better prevention and therapy. Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) affects more women than men. GERD symptoms are more frequent in patients with NERD than in those with reflux esophagitis. However, men suffer pathologic diseases such as reflux esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) more frequently than women. The prevalence of reflux esophagitis is significantly increased with age in women, especially after their 50s. The mean age of EAC incidence in women is higher than in men, suggesting a role of estrogen in delaying the onset of BE and EAC. In a chronic rat reflux esophagitis model, nitric oxide was found to be an aggravating factor of esophageal injury in a male-predominant way. In addition, the expression of esophageal occludin, a tight junction protein that plays an important role in the esophageal defense mechanism, was up-regulated in women. This explains the male predominance of reflux esophagitis and delayed incidence of BE or EAC in women. Moreover, the symptoms such as heartburn, regurgitation, and extra-esophageal symptoms have been more frequently reported by women than by men, suggesting that sex and gender play a role in symptom perception. Differential sensitivity with augmented symptoms in women might have diagnostic and therapeutic influence. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that hormone replacement therapy has a protective effect against esophageal cancer. However, an anti-inflammatory role of estrogen remains compelling, which means further study is necessary in this area. PMID:27703114

  14. Schatzki's rings do not protect against acid reflux and may decrease esophageal acid clearance.

    PubMed

    Winters, George R; Maydonovitch, Corinne L; Wong, Roy K H

    2003-02-01

    Schatzki's rings (SR) are a common cause of intermittent solid food dysphagia, but their etiology is unclear. Many believe they are related to acid reflux, hypothesizing that the rings act as a protective barrier against further reflux. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dilation of SR affected the degree of acid reflux. Twenty patients participated in the study. All patients underwent esophageal manometry and 24-hr pH monitoring off all acid inhibitory medications before and two weeks after esophageal dilation. No significant differences were noted in any of the reflux parameters measured before and after dilation. However, there was a trend toward reduction in symptom score in all patients, a decrease in Johnson-DeMeester score, and a decrease in supine reflux time in patients with thick SR after dilation. There was no correlation between ring diameter and the presence or absence of reflux. In conclusion, Schatzki's rings do not prevent esophageal reflux, and they may act to decrease esophageal acid clearance, especially in the supine position, thereby increasing esophageal acid exposure.

  15. Proton pump inhibitor-refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Mermelstein, Joseph; Chait Mermelstein, Alanna; Chait, Maxwell M

    2018-01-01

    A significant percentage of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) will not respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. The causes of PPI-refractory GERD are numerous and diverse, and include adherence, persistent acid, functional disorders, nonacid reflux, and PPI bioavailability. The evaluation should start with a symptom assessment and may progress to imaging, endoscopy, and monitoring of esophageal pH, impedance, and bilirubin. There are a variety of pharmacologic and procedural interventions that should be selected based on the underlying mechanism of PPI failure. Pharmacologic treatments can include antacids, prokinetics, alginates, bile acid binders, reflux inhibitors, and antidepressants. Procedural options include laparoscopic fundoplication and LINX as well as endoscopic procedures, such as transoral incisionless fundoplication and Stretta. Several alternative and complementary treatments of possible benefit also exist. PMID:29606884

  16. Use of the Montreal global definition as an assessment of quality of life in reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, R A; Macgill, A; Parkman, H P; Friedenberg, F K

    2012-08-01

    According to the Montreal Consensus Group's classification, gastroesophageal reflux disease develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications such as esophagitis. The characteristic gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms included in this statement are retrosternal burning and regurgitation. Troublesome is meant to imply that these symptoms impact on the well-being of affected individuals; in essence, quality of life (QOL). Whether heartburn and regurgitation symptoms would be characterized as more troublesome in those with confirmed pathologic acid reflux was determined. A second purpose was to assess how well troublesome scores correlated with the results of a validated, disease-specific QOL instrument. Subjects who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with 48-hour wireless esophageal pH testing off proton pump inhibitor therapy were interviewed. Esophagitis on EGD or pH < 4.0 for ≥4.5% of time over the 2-day period was considered positive for acid reflux. Assessment of how troublesome their symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation were made using separate 0-100 visual analog scales (VAS). Subjects were then asked to complete the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) 25-item questionnaire. Sixty-seven patients (21 males, 46 females) with mean age 47.8 ± 15.6 years were identified. Forty (59.7%) had an EGD or pH study positive for acid reflux. Overall 35/40 (87.5%) complained of either heartburn or regurgitation. There was no difference (P= 0.80) in heartburn VAS troublesome ratings for those with (54.0 ± 43.9) and without (56.7 ± 37.6) confirmed acid reflux. The same was true for regurgitation VAS troublesome ratings (P= 0.62). Likewise, mean QOLRAD scores did not differ between those with and without confirmed acid reflux by pH or EGD (4.5 ± 1.7 vs. 4.3 ± 1.7; P= 0.61). There was a moderately strong inverse correlation between patient self-rated VAS troublesome scores for both heartburn and

  17. Unmet Needs in the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dickman, Ram; Maradey-Romero, Carla; Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Fass, Ronnie

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent gastrointestinal disorder. Proton pump inhibitors have profoundly revolutionized the treatment of GERD. However, several areas of unmet need persist despite marked improvements in the therapeutic management of GERD. These include the advanced grades of erosive esophagitis, nonerosive reflux disease, maintenance treatment of erosive esophagitis, refractory GERD, postprandial heartburn, atypical and extraesophageal manifestations of GERD, Barrett’s esophagus, chronic protein pump inhibitor treatment, and post-bariatric surgery GERD. Consequently, any future development of novel therapeutic modalities for GERD (medical, endoscopic, or surgical), would likely focus on the aforementioned areas of unmet need. PMID:26130628

  18. Investigation of pepsin in tears of children with laryngopharyngeal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Di Nardo, Giovanni; Plateroti, Rocco; Rossi, Paolo; Plateroti, Andrea Maria; Mariani, Paola; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    Numerous investigations postulated that laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is implicated in the pathogenesis of various upper airway inflammatory diseases as sinusitis or dacryostenosis. The presence of pepsin in tears might be confirmed the presuntive hypothesis of the arrival in the nasolacrimal ducts and precorneal tears film through the laryngopharyngeal reflux of either gastric acid or stomach secretions (pepsin) with inflammatory potentialities. The aim of this preliminary study was to identify the presence or absence of pepsin in the tears collected from children with a high suspicion of LPR who underwent 24-h pH (MII-pH) monitoring to confirm the disease. This study enrolled 20 patients suffering from symptoms of laryngopharyngeal reflux that underwent 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII)-pH monitoring to confirm the disease. The findings of the study group were compared with those of a control group of patients with negative pH monitoring. The quantitative analysis of human pepsin concentration in the tear samples was performed by ELISA method in both groups. Four children (20%) of the study group showed pepsin in the tears. All of the subjects belonging to the control group were negative for its presence. No difference differences in the total number of reflux episodes and the number of weakly basic reflux in the pepsin positive patients vs. pepsin negative children were present. 20% of the children with diagnosed LPR showed pepsin in the tears. Our specific investigation might provide information regarding sinusitis or dacryostenosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of aging and acid reflux on esophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Kawami, Noriyuki; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Sano, Hirohito; Tanaka, Yuriko; Sakamoto, Choitsu

    2015-01-01

    It is generally thought that esophageal motility decreases with age; however, a decrease in esophageal motility may also be caused by esophagitis. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of aging and acid reflux on esophageal motility. 40 young (under 45) healthy subjects (HS), 40 elderly (over 65) HS, and 40 elderly (over 65) patients with mild reflux esophagitis (RE), underwent esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM). Lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP), primary peristalsis (PP), and secondary peristalsis (SP) were evaluated. There was no difference in the LESP and also in the success rate of PP between young and elderly HS or between elderly HS and RE. There was no difference in the distal contractile integral (DCI) of PP and SP between the young and elderly HS, but in the elderly RE, it was significantly lower than in the elderly HS. There was no difference in the success rate of SP between elderly HS and RE, but in elderly HS it was significantly lower than in young HS. Aging may cause a decrease in the success rate of SP, and acid reflux itself may cause a decrease of the DCI in PP and SP. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and non-digestive tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying

    2015-05-01

    Over the past decade, incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) showed an increasing trend resulting from factors, including lifestyle and dietary habits; however, both etiology and pathological mechanisms remain controversial. GERD occurs as a result of a variety of mechanisms and there is no single factor. Symptoms of GERD are often non-typical, with a likelihood of being overlooked by non-gastroenterology professionals. Therefore, improving GERD awareness in non-gastroenterology practitioners, along with early diagnosis and treatment, provide potential benefit to clinicians and patients alike. Increasing evidence suggests GERD has specific connections with a variety of non-digestive tract conditions, may contribute an aggravating compounding effect on other diseases, prolong hospitalization, and increase subsequent medical costs. This review considers and emphasizes the association between GERD and non-digestive tract conditions, including atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, primary pulmonary fibrosis and energy metabolism related to diet.

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: recent advances and its association with sleep.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jung Hwan

    2016-09-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is prevalent in Asia as well as in Western countries. Sleep disturbance and breathing disorders during sleep are becoming increasingly prevalent, and they are commonly associated with GERD. The relationship between GERD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is still questionable, and it has expanded to include Barrett's esophagus. Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) symptoms might be clinically important in the explanation of this association. The therapy for reflux symptoms has resulted in improved subjective sleep parameters and enhanced sleep quality, thus supporting a direct relationship between GERD and sleep disturbance. This review discusses the epidemiology of sleep disturbances in GERD patients; the causative relationship between GERD and OSA, even though it remains an area of controversy; and the possible role of nGER in sleep problems. It also provides an update on the current state of knowledge linking GERD and sleep. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. Effect of cisapride on secondary peristalsis in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Holloway, R H; Penagini, R; Schoeman, M N; Dent, J

    1999-03-01

    Improvement of esophageal acid clearance appears to be an important effect of cisapride in the treatment of reflux disease. The mechanism underlying this effect is not clear. Esophageal peristalsis is a major component of the acid clearance process. In normal subjects secondary peristalsis is an important mechanism of esophageal acid clearance during sleep, and this response appears to be impaired in patients with reflux esophagitis. The effects of cisapride on secondary peristalsis are not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cisapride on the triggering and characteristics of secondary peristalsis in patients with reflux esophagitis. In 17 patients with reflux esophagitis and impaired secondary peristalsis cisapride, 10 mg q.i.d., or placebo were administered in a randomized double blind, crossover design for 4 days separated by a 4-7 day washout period. On the fourth day of treatment, primary peristalsis and secondary peristalsis in response to 10- and 20-ml air boluses were assessed. Secondary peristaltic success and amplitude were greater with the 20-ml bolus than with the 10-ml bolus. However, cisapride had no effect on either secondary peristaltic success or amplitude. Cisapride also had no effect on primary peristalsis or basal LES pressure. The improvement in esophageal acid clearance by cisapride is not explainable by improvement in secondary peristalsis.

  3. A Causal Relationship Between Cough and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Has Been Established: a Pro/Con Debate

    PubMed Central

    Kahrilas, Peter J.; Smith, Jaclyn A.; Dicpinigaitis, Peter V.

    2014-01-01

    Along with upper airway cough syndrome (formerly, postnasal drip syndrome) and eosinophilic airway inflammation (asthma, non-asthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is generally considered among the most common etiologies of chronic cough. Indeed, cough management guidelines published by numerous respiratory societies worldwide recommend evaluation and treatment of GERD as an integral component of the diagnostic/therapeutic algorithm for the management of chronic cough. However, a significant number of patients with chronic cough presumed due to GERD do not report improvement despite aggressive acid-suppressive therapy. Some of these refractory cases may be due to the recently appreciated entity of non-acid or weakly acidic reflux. Further contributing to the controversy are recent studies demonstrating that patients with chronic cough do not have excessive reflux events relative to healthy volunteers. Although a temporal relationship between cough and reflux events has been suggested by studies utilizing impedance-pH monitoring of reflux events and objective cough recording, consensus is lacking in terms of whether this temporal relationship proves a causal link between reflux and cough. The 4th American Cough Conference, held in New York in June, 2013, provided an ideal forum for the debate of this issue between two internationally recognized experts in the field of reflux and chronic cough. PMID:24221340

  4. [Comparison of surgical patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus].

    PubMed

    Zsolt, Simonka; Paszt, Attila; Géczi, Tibor; Abrahám, Szabolcs; Tóth, Illés; Horváth, Zoltán; Pieler, József; Tajti, János; Varga, Akos; Tiszlavicz, László; Németh, István; Izbéki, Ferenc; Rosztóczy, András; Wittmann, Tibor; Lázár, György

    2014-10-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is the only known precursor of adenocarcinoma occuring in the lower third of the esophagus. According to statistics, severity and elapsed time of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are major pathogenetic factors in the development of Barrett's esophagus. In a retrospective study between 2001 and 2008, we compared the preoperative results (signs and sympthoms, 24 hour pH manometry, esophageal manometry, Bilitec) and treatment efficacy of 176 GERD patients and 78 BE patients, who have undergone laparoscopic Nissen procedure for reflux disease. The two groups of patients had similar demographic features, and elapsed time of reflux sympthoms were also equal. Both groups were admitted for surgery after a median time of 1.5 years (19.87 vs. 19.20 months) of ineffective medical (proton pump inhibitors) treatment. Preoperative functional tests showed a more severe presence of acid reflux in the BE group (DeMeester score 18.9 versus 41.9, p < 0.001). On the other hand, mano-metry - despite confirming lower esophageal sphincter (LES) damage - did not show difference between the two groups (12.10 vs. 12.57 mmHg, p = 0.892). We did not experience any mortality cases with laparoscopic antireflux procedures, although in two cases we had to convert during the operation (1 due to extensive adhesions, and 1 due to injury to the spleen). 3 months after the procedure - according to Visick score - both groups experienced a significant decrease, or lapse in reflux complaints (group I: 73%, group II: 81% of patients), LES functions improved (17.58 vs.18.70 mmHg), and the frequency and exposition of acid reflux decreased (DeMeester score 7.73 vs. 12.72). The severity of abnormal acid reflux occuring parallel with the incompetent function of the damaged LES triggers not only inflammation in the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ), but also metaplastic process, and the development of Barrett's esophagus. Laparoscopic Nissen procedure for reflux disease can further

  5. Nocturnal Gastroesophageal Reflux Revisited by Impedance-pH Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Blondeau, Kathleen; Mertens, Veerle; Tack, Jan; Sifrim, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Impedance-pH monitoring allows detailed characterization of gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal activity associated with reflux. We assessed the characteristics of nocturnal reflux and esophageal activity preceding and following reflux. Methods Impedance-pH tracings from 11 healthy subjects and 76 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease off acid-suppressive therapy were analyzed. Characteristics of nocturnal supine reflux, time distribution and esophageal activity seen on impedance at 2 minute intervals preceding and following reflux were described. Results Patients had more nocturnal reflux events than healthy subjects (8 [4-12] vs 2 [1-5], P = 0.002), with lower proportion of weakly acidic reflux (57% [35-78] vs 80% [60-100], P = 0.044). Nocturnal reflux was mainly liquid (80%) and reached the proximal esophagus more often in patients (6% vs 0%, P = 0.047). Acid reflux predominated in the first 2 hours (66%) and weakly acidic reflux in the last 3 hours (70%) of the night. Most nocturnal reflux was preceded by aboral flows and cleared by short lasting volume clearance. In patients, prolonged chemical clearance was associated with less esophageal activity. Conclusions Nocturnal weakly acidic reflux is as common as acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, and predominates later in the night. Impedance-pH can predict prolonged chemical clearance after nocturnal acid reflux. PMID:21602991

  6. Oral implications in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Evelyn Vega; Aps, Johan K M; Martens, Luc C

    2008-10-01

    To emphasize oral complications in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Interest of pediatricians to conduct an orodental examination or to include a dental examination performed by a dentist should be encouraged, as dental erosion, for instance, may be present in these children. Dental caries, dental erosion, mucosal lesions and oral bacterial load have been studied extensively in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease, but there is no sound consensus about the impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease on oral health parameters. Gastroesophageal reflux and oral health deserve to be better understood and recognized by medical staff, pediatricians in particular. Literature on this subject contains many case reports and some cross-sectional studies, resulting in confusing conclusions for clinicians and researchers. Dental caries, dental erosion, mucosal lesions and oral bacterial load are the most frequently studied items in these kinds of study. Dental erosion seems to be an oral finding that should be studied in depth in these children, as conflicting results have been reported in literature, the latter being the result of the use of different indexes to collect clinical data.

  7. Short-term Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    van Pinxteren, Bart; Numans, Mattijs E; Lau, Joseph; de Wit, Niek J; Hungin, A Pali S; Bonis, Peter A L

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the efficacy of acid suppressant drugs in the empirical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and in the treatment of endoscopy-negative reflux disease (ENRD). DESIGN medline, embase, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register were searched. Bibliographies were reviewed. SETTING Studies were eligible that compared the short-term use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) with each other or with placebo in adults with GERD who were enrolled irrespective of endoscopic findings (empirical cases) or in whom endoscopy showed no signs of esophagitis (endoscopy-negative cases). MEASUREMENTS Of 1,408 studies, only 13 could be included for meta-analysis. Data on 3,433 patients empirically treated for GERD and 2,520 patients treated for ENRD were extracted. The primary endpoint was relief of heartburn. MAIN RESULTS In the empirical treatment of GERD, the summary relative risk (sRR) for symptom relief from H2RAs versus placebo was 0.77 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.60 to 0.99). RR in the only placebo-controlled PPI trial was 0.35 (95% CI, 0.26 to 0.46). The sRR for standard dose PPIs versus H2RAs was 0.55 (95% CI, 0.44 to 0.68). In treatment of ENRD, both PPIs (sRR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.79) and H2RAs (sRR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.62 to 0.97) were superior to placebo, and PPIs were superior to H2RAs (sRR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.70 to 0.95). CONCLUSIONS Acid suppressant therapy (with a PPI or an H2RA) is more effective than placebo for short-term relief of heartburn in patients with persistent symptoms who are treated empirically for GERD and in those in whom esophagitis was excluded after endoscopy. The benefit of PPIs compared with H2RAs is more pronounced in patients treated empirically. PMID:12950485

  8. Impacts of endoscopic gastroesophageal flap valve grading on pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kai-Chi; Wu, Jia-Feng; Hsu, Wei-Chung; Lin, Bor-Ru; Chen, Huey-Ling; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal flap valve (GEFV) endoscopic grading is reported to be associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in adults; however its role in pediatric groups remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the significance of GEFV grading and the associations to multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring (MII-pH) in children with GERD. A total of 48 children with GERD symptoms who received esophagogastroduodenoscopy and MII-pH monitoring were enrolled. The degree of GEFV was graded from I to IV according to the Hill classification, and classified into two groups: normal GEFV (Hill grades I and II), and abnormal GEFV (Hill grades III and VI). Endoscopic findings and MII-pH monitoring were analyzed among the groups. Thirty-six patients had normal GEFV while 12 had abnormal GEFV. The presence of erosive esophagitis was significantly more common in the patients with abnormal GEFV (p = 0.037, OR 9.84, 95% CI 1.15-84.42). Pathological acidic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) determined by MII-pH was more prevalent in the patients with loosened GEFV geometry (p = 0.01, OR 7.0, 95% CI 1.67-27.38). There were significant positive correlations between GEFV Hill grading I to IV and the severity of erosive esophagitis (r = 0.49, p<0.001), percentage of supine acid reflux (r = 0.37, p = 0.009), percentage of total acid reflux (r = 0.3284, p = 0.023), and DeMeester score (r = 0.36, p = 0.01) detected by pH monitoring. In the impedance study, GEFV Hill grading also positively correlated to median number of acid reflux events (r = 0.3015, p = 0.037). GEFV dysfunction highly associated with acid GER and severe erosive esophagitis. An abnormal GEFV is a sign of acid GER in children.

  9. Definition of nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux for studies on respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Emilsson, Össur Ingi; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Ólafsson, Ísleifur; Cook, Elizabeth; Júlíusson, Sigurður; Berg, Sören; Nordang, Leif; Björnsson, Einar Stefán; Guðlaugsdóttir, Sunna; Guðmundsdóttir, Anna Soffía; Janson, Christer; Gislason, Thorarinn

    2016-01-01

    Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) has been associated with respiratory diseases. Our aim was to study a questionnaire method to identify nGER subjects with respiratory involvement in a general population. A subgroup of Icelandic participants in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III (ECRHS III) reporting symptoms of nGER (n  =  48) as well as age and gender paired controls (n  =  42) were studied further by a structured interview, questionnaires, laryngeal fibrescopy, and exhaled breath condensate. A subgroup underwent 24-h oesophageal pH impedance (24-h MII-pH) measurements. Symptoms of nGER were assessed with a modified version of the reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ), where symptoms were divided into daytime and nocturnal. A report of nGER both at baseline and at follow-up was defined as persistent nGER. Participants reporting persistent nGER had significantly more signs of laryngopharyngeal reflux according to the reflux finding score than those without nGER (Mean ± SD: 5.1 ± 2.3 vs. 3.9 ± 2.2, p  =  0.02). Of the 16 persistent nGER subjects that underwent 24-h MII-pH, 11 had abnormal gastroesophageal reflux, but none of three control subjects (69% vs. 0%). Pepsin was more commonly found in exhaled breath condensate in the nGER group (67% vs. 45%, p  =  0.04). Participants with nGER symptoms at least once a month, reported on two occasions, had a high level of positive 24-h MII-pH measurements, laryngeal inflammation and pepsin in exhaled breath condensate. This nGER definition identified a representable group for studies on nGER and respiratory diseases in a general population.

  10. A causal relationship between cough and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been established: a pro/con debate.

    PubMed

    Kahrilas, Peter J; Smith, Jaclyn A; Dicpinigaitis, Peter V

    2014-02-01

    Along with upper airway cough syndrome (formerly, postnasal drip syndrome) and eosinophilic airway inflammation (asthma, nonasthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is generally considered among the most common etiologies of chronic cough. Indeed, cough management guidelines published by numerous respiratory societies worldwide recommend evaluation and treatment of GERD as an integral component of the diagnostic/therapeutic algorithm for the management of chronic cough. However, a significant number of patients with chronic cough presumed due to GERD do not report improvement despite aggressive acid-suppressive therapy. Some of these refractory cases may be due to the recently appreciated entity of nonacid or weakly acidic reflux. Further contributing to the controversy are recent studies that demonstrate that patients with chronic cough do not have excessive reflux events relative to healthy volunteers. Although a temporal relationship between cough and reflux events has been suggested by studies utilizing impedance-pH monitoring of reflux events and objective cough recording, consensus is lacking in terms of whether this temporal relationship proves a causal link between reflux and cough. The fourth American Cough Conference (New York, June 2013) provided an ideal forum for the debate of this issue between two internationally recognized experts in the field of reflux and chronic cough.

  11. Effect of fasting on laryngopharyngeal reflux disease in male subjects.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Abdul-latif; Nassar, Jihad; Dowli, Alexander; Al Zaghal, Zeid; Sabri, Alain

    2012-11-01

    To address the effect of fasting on laryngopharyngeal reflux disease (LPRD). A total of 22 male subjects have been recruited for this study. Subjects with vocal fold pathologies, recent history of upper respiratory tract infection or laryngeal manipulation were excluded. Demographic data included age and history of smoking. All subjects were evaluated while fasting for at least 12 h and non-fasting. By non-fasting we mean that they ate and drank during the day at their discretion with no reservation. The abstention from water and or food intake during the non-fasting period extended from few minutes to 3 h. All subjects were evaluated at the same time during the day. The evaluation consisted of a laryngeal examination and the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). The Reflux Finding Score (RFS) was used to report on the reflux laryngeal findings. Subjects were considered to have LPRD if either the RSI or the RFS were positive (>9 RSI, >7 RFS). There was a non-significant increase in the total prevalence of LPRD while fasting compared to non-fasting (32 vs. 50 % while fasting, p value 0.361). In the RSI, the most common symptoms while non-fasting and fasting were throat clearing (64 vs. 68 %), postnasal drip (45 vs. 59 %) and globus sensation (36 vs. 50 %). The average score of all the three increased significantly while fasting. For the RFS the most common laryngeal findings in the non-fasting group versus the fasting group were erythema (77 vs. 68 %), thick endolaryngeal mucus (77 vs. 77 %) and posterior commissure hypertrophy (55 vs. 64 %). Fasting results in a nonsignificant increase in laryngopharyngeal reflux disease. The increase can be hypothetically explained on the change in eating habits and the known alterations in gastric secretions during Ramadan. Fasting subjects must be alert to the effect of LPRD on their throat and voice in particular.

  12. Review article: The laryngological manifestations of reflux disease; why the scepticism?

    PubMed

    Mahieu, H F

    2007-12-01

    Despite increasing clinical and experimental evidence of its existence, otolaryngological manifestations of reflux disease remain controversial, concerning diagnosis as well as treatment. Proper understanding of laryngopharyngeal reflux disease (LPRD). Review of literature. Scepticism concerning LPRD is based upon differences between gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and LPRD; lack of specificity and sensitivity of diagnostic tests to confirm LPRD; non-specificity of laryngological symptoms, which are difficult to distinguish from other causes of upper respiratory tract inflammation; non-specificity of laryngological signs in laryngoscopy, with high intra- and inter-observer variability in evaluation; diagnosis of LPRD is essentially only based on a combination of diagnostic signs and symptoms, which cannot be attributed to other pathology; slow, or sometimes lack of, response of LPRD symptoms to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medication and lack of evidence concerning efficacy of PPIs in placebo-controlled trials. LPRD remains a diagnosis by exclusion and resolution of symptoms following 4-month trial of 40 mg PPI twice daily is, for all practical purposes, considered proof of the initial diagnosis. However, non-response does not exclude LPRD as PPIs have no influence on noxious non-acid components of the refluxate.

  13. Unmet treatment needs of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Asia: gastroesophageal reflux disease in Asia Pacific survey.

    PubMed

    Goh, Khean Lee; Choi, Myung Gyu; Hsu, William Ping I; Chun, Hoon Jai; Mahachai, Varocha; Kachintorn, Udom; Leelakusolvong, Somchai; Kim, Nayoung; Rani, Abdul Aziz; Wong, Benjamin Cy; Wu, Justin; Chiu, Cheng Tang; Chu, Romeo; Shetty, Vikram; Bocobo, Joseph C; Chan, Melchor M; Lin, Jaw Town

    2014-12-01

    Data on patient satisfaction with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are scarce in Asia. The perspectives of Asian patients with GERD and their satisfaction with PPI therapy were investigated. The GERD in Asia Pacific Survey (GAPS) was conducted from December 2011 to March 2012. Patients aged 21-55 years with self-reported doctor-diagnosed GERD, who had experienced symptoms in the previous 12 months, and were currently taking PPIs were enrolled. After a pilot study, a questionnaire was completed by respondents from six Asian countries during face-to-face interviews. A total of 450 patients with GERD participated in the GAPS. Although the respondents generally complied with treatment, response to therapy was only partially successful. Most respondents indicated that PPIs eliminated pain (72%), took effect within 30 min (76%), provided sustained relief (73%), and provided nocturnal relief (77%). However, 45% of respondents reported limited improvement in nocturnal symptoms, and 49% continued to take adjunctive therapy to manage their symptoms. After treatment, respondent's "well-being" had improved. However, GERD still had a negative impact on well-being for 76% of respondents after treatment, compared with 94% before treatment. Asian patients reported a negative impact of GERD on their daily lives. Many respondents continued to experience symptoms despite reporting good compliance with PPI therapy, emphasizing the shortcomings of currently available therapy for GERD. This survey is the first to highlight Asian patients' perspectives of GERD and PPI therapy, and provides a platform for further evaluation. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Quality of life, patient satisfaction, and disease burden in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease with or without laryngopharyngeal reflux symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gong, Eun Jeong; Choi, Kee Don; Jung, Hye-Kyung; Youn, Young Hoon; Min, Byung-Hoon; Song, Kyung Ho; Huh, Kyu Chan

    2017-07-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have decreased health-related quality of life (HRQL). The quality of life in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) symptoms is also significantly impaired. However, the impact of LPR symptoms on HRQL in GERD patients has not been studied. A nationwide, random-sample, and face-to-face survey of 300 Korean patients with GERD was conducted from January to March 2013. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms were assessed using the Rome III questionnaire, LPR symptoms using the reflux symptom index, and HRQL using the EuroQol five dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire. A structured questionnaire on patient satisfaction, sickness-related absences, and health-related work productivity was also used. Among the 300 patients with GERD, 150 had LPR symptoms. The mean EQ-5D index was lower in patients with GERD and LPR symptoms than in those without LPR (0.88 vs 0.91, P = 0.002). A linear regression model showed that the severity of LPR symptoms was related to decreased HRQL and was independent of age, marital status, body mass index, or household income. The overall satisfaction rate regarding treatment was lower in patients with GERD and LPR (40.0% vs 69.1%, P = 0.040). GERD patients with LPR symptoms reported greater sickness-related absent hours per week (0.36 vs 0.02 h, P = 0.016) and greater percentages of overall work impairment than those without LPR (31.1% vs 20.8%, P < 0.001). Gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with LPR symptoms have a poorer HRQL, a lower satisfaction rate, and a greater disease burden than those without LPR. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Improvement of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Japanese patients with spinal kyphotic deformity who underwent surgical spinal correction.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Hasegawa, Tomohiko; Nishino, Masafumi; Sahara, Shu; Uotani, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Kagami, Takuma; Sugimoto, Ken; Yamato, Yu; Togawa, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Sho; Hoshino, Hironobu; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Furuta, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Spinal kyphotic deformity occasionally results in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The effects of acid reflux on the esophagus in kyphotic patients are unclear, however, and it is unknown whether acid reflux, endoscopic GERD, and reflux-related symptoms improve following surgical spinal correction in these patients. Herein, we investigated the characteristics of GERD in kyphotic patients and the improvement in GERD following surgical correction. In 48 patients with severe kyphotic deformity scheduled for surgical spinal correction, we conducted esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 24-h pH monitoring and three questionnaire surveys, including the frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (FSSG). We repeated these measurements after surgical correction and compared pre- and post-surgery values. Of 48 patients, 70.8% [95% CI: 55.9-83.0%, 34/48] had endoscopically evaluated esophageal mucosal injury. Regarding pH before surgery, 64.9% (CI: 47.5-79.8%, 24/37) had abnormal acid reflux (intraesophageal pH < 4 more than 5% of the time). FSSG score was significantly associated with the severity of GERD, and the positive rate was 52.6% (CI: 35.8-69.0%, 20/38). Following surgical correction, esophageal mucosal injury improved endoscopically in 90% of patients, and median total FSSG score significantly decreased from 8 (0-30) to 5 (0-19) (P = 0.005). Regarding pH after surgery, prevalence of abnormal acid reflux decreased from 66.7% (95% CI: 41.0-86.7%) to 33.3% (95% CI: 13.3-59.0%) (P = 0.045). Surgical spinal correction in kyphosis patients improves not only kyphotic deformity-related disorders but also esophageal mucosal injury, abnormal acid reflux, and reflux-related symptoms. © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  16. Noncompliance is an impact factor in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Gerson; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado P

    2014-09-01

    The basis of pharmacological treatment of the gastroesophageal reflux disease is the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) which provide effective gastric acid secretion blockade. However, PPI therapy failure may occur in up to 42% of patients. The main causes for therapeutic failure are non-acid or weakly acid reflux, genotypic differences, presence of comorbidities, wrong diagnosis and lack of treatment compliance. Noncompliance is an important issue and should be carefully observed. Several studies addressed patient compliance and 20-50% of patients may present lack of compliance to the PPI prescribed. When symptoms persist depite adherence has been confirmed, it is recommended to substitute the prescribed PPI to another of the same class or alternatively, prescription of a double dose of the same drug. When even so the symptoms persist, other causes of failure should be assigned. In particular cases of PPI failure, fundoplication surgery may be indicated.

  17. The effects of a weakly acidic meal on gastric buffering and postprandial gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Ravi, K; Francis, D L; See, J A; Geno, D M; Katzka, D A

    2011-09-01

    Exclusion of the meal during ambulatory pH monitoring presumes that a meal completely buffers gastric acid and reflux of acidic food content cannot be distinguished from gastric acid. However, the ability of a meal to completely buffer gastric acid remains unclear. To determine the effect of a weakly acid meal on gastric buffering and oesophageal acid exposure. Patients undergoing multichannel intraluminal impedance pH studies were given a standard weakly acidic meal (pH = 5.9). Gastric and oesophageal pH was measured during the meal and in 15 min intervals for 2 h postprandially. The study included 30 patients, with pathological acid reflux detected in 18 patients. Complete gastric buffering occurred in seven patients (23%) and was lost in all patients within 75 min of the meal. Oesophageal acid was detected in 33% of patients within 30 min of the meal and 81% of patients during the 2 h postprandial period. Postprandial oesophageal acid exposure was greater in patients with pathological acid reflux (9 ± 2.7% vs. 1.7 ± 0.8% P = 0.05) with a trend towards more incomplete gastric acid buffering and significant differences when measuring weak acid reflux (pH 4-5). Acid reflux rarely occurred in the absence of gastric acid, with gastric acid present in 74 of 79 (94%) fifteen minute postprandial intervals with acid reflux. The ability of a meal to buffer gastric acid is poor. Early postprandial oesophageal acid reflux occurs in a substantial proportion of patients. Addition of a weakly acidic or pH neutral meal to ambulatory pH monitoring may unmask early postprandial acid reflux and provide data on gastric acid buffering. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Belching during gastroscopy and its association with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, B S; Lee, S H; Jang, D K; Chung, K H; Hwang, J H; Jang, S E; Cha, B H; Ryu, J K; Kim, Y-T

    2016-05-01

    Belching may result from transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation; therefore, it has been proposed that belching may be a manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This study was conducted to investigate the frequency of belching during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and its association with GERD. A retrospective review was performed on prospectively collected clinical and endoscopic data from 404 subjects who underwent EGD without sedation from December 2012 to May 2013 in a training hospital in Korea. All detectable belching events during endoscopy were counted. Frequency and severity of belching events were compared between the group with and without GERD using an ordinal logistic regression model. There were 145 GERD patients (26 erosive reflux disease and 119 nonerosive reflux disease [NERD]). In the multivariable analysis, GERD was significantly associated with a higher frequency of belching events (odds ratio = 6.59, P < 0.001). Central obesity, female, and younger age were also risk factors for frequent belching during EGD. Subgroup analyses were performed in subjects without erosive reflux disease (n = 378) and NERD (n = 293). NERD was also a predictive factor for frequent belching during EGD (odds ratio = 6.61, P < 0.001), and the frequency of belching was significantly correlated with GERD severity according to the Los Angeles classification (P < 0.05). Frequent belching during EGD was associated with GERD, including NERD. Future research should focus on its adjuvant role in the diagnosis of GERD/NERD and the necessity for applying differentiated endoscopy strategies for GERD patients, leading to less discomfort during EGD in patients at risk for intolerability. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  19. Non-Erosive Reflux Disease Manifested Exclusively by Protracted Hiccups

    PubMed Central

    Esparza, Edgar A; Cervantes-Sodi, María

    2010-01-01

    Hiccups are a benign physiological feature affecting almost everyone at one time or another. They tend to be short-lived and do not affect quality of life; however, there are various pathologies that may present with long-lasting hiccups. These are grouped into 3 categories according to their duration: acute, persistent and intractable or protracted hiccups. Intractable hiccups last longer than 2 months and are usually associated with more severe conditions. The association between intractable hiccups and reflux disease has not been previously documented by objective methods. This report describes the case of a 23-year-old female who presented with protracted hiccups; all other organic pathologies were ruled out, and endoscopy and conventional pH-metry confirmed a diagnosis of non-erosive reflux disease as the unique cause. PMID:21103425

  20. Dilated intercellular spaces and chronic cough as an extra-oesophageal manifestation of gastrooesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Roy C

    2011-06-01

    Chronic cough is one of the extra-oesophageal manifestations of gastrooesophageal reflux disease (GORD). It is presumed to occur either directly by microaspiration of acidic gastric contents into the airway or indirectly by a reflex triggered by contact of acidic refluxates with the oesophageal epithelium in GORD. How contact of the oesophageal epithelium with acidic refluxates promotes sensitization for chronic cough is unknown, but like heartburn, which is a necessary accompaniment, it requires acid activation of nociceptors within the oesophageal mucosa. Dilated intercellular spaces within the oesophageal epithelium, a reflection of an increase in paracellular permeability, is a histopathologic feature of both erosive and non-erosive forms of GORD. Since it correlates with the symptom of heartburn, it is hypothesized herein that the increase in paracellular permeability to acid reflected by dilated intercellular spaces in oesophageal epithelium also serves as mediator of the signals that produce the reflex-induced sensitization for cough--a sensitization that can occur centrally within the medullary Nucleus Tractus Solitarius or peripherally within the tracheobronchial tree. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The diagnostic value of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms and detection of pepsin and bile acids in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and exhaled breath condensate for identifying lung transplantation patients with GERD-induced aspiration.

    PubMed

    Reder, Nicholas P; Davis, Christopher S; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Fisichella, P Marco

    2014-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is thought to lead to aspiration and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome after lung transplantation. Unfortunately, the identification of patients with GERD who aspirate still lacks clear diagnostic indicators. The authors hypothesized that symptoms of GERD and detection of pepsin and bile acids in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) are effective for identifying lung transplantation patients with GERD-induced aspiration. From November 2009 to November 2010, 85 lung transplantation patients undergoing surveillance bronchoscopy were prospectively enrolled. For these patients, self-reported symptoms of GERD were correlated with levels of pepsin and bile acids in BAL and EBC and with GERD status assessed by 24-h pH monitoring. The sensitivity and specificity of pepsin and bile acids in BAL and EBC also were compared with the presence of GERD in 24-h pH monitoring. The typical symptoms of GERD (heartburn and regurgitation) had modest sensitivity and specificity for detecting GERD and aspiration. The atypical symptoms of GERD (aspiration and bronchitis) showed better identification of aspiration as measured by detection of pepsin and bile acids in BAL. The sensitivity and specificity of pepsin in BAL compared with GERD by 24-h pH monitoring were respectively 60 and 45 %, whereas the sensitivity and specificity of bile acids in BAL were 67 and 80 %. These data indicate that the measurement of pepsin and bile acids in BAL can provide additional data for identifying lung transplantation patients at risk for GERD-induced aspiration compared with symptoms or 24-h pH monitoring alone. These results support a diagnostic role for detecting markers of aspiration in BAL, but this must be validated in larger studies.

  2. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in typical and atypical GERD: roles of gastroesophageal acid refluxes and esophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Patcharatrakul, Tanisa; Gonlachanvit, Sutep

    2014-02-01

    To determine the roles of gastroesophageal acid reflux (GER) and esophageal dysmotility on typical and atypical GERD symptoms. Two hundred thirty-six patients (159 females, age 47 ± 14 years) with typical and atypical GERD symptom(s) for > 3 months underwent standard water perfused esophageal manometry (EM) and 24 h esophageal pH studies during off therapy. Eighty seven and 93 patients had positive lower esophageal pH tests and abnormal EM, respectively. Patients with positive lower esophageal pH test were significantly older (50 ± 13 vs 45 ± 13 years, P < 0.005) and had higher prevalence of acid regurgitation symptoms than patients with negative test (56/87 vs 72/149, P < 0.05). Patients with positive upper esophageal pH test (n = 67) also had significantly higher prevalence of acid regurgitation symptoms (43/67 vs 74/152, P < 0.05). Prevalence of other upper gastrointestinal and respiratory symptoms were similar between patients with positive and negative upper and lower pH test. Patients with abnormal EM were significantly older (49 ± 14 vs 45 ± 13 years, P < 0.05) and had higher prevalence of chronic cough than patients with normal EM(30/93 vs 26/143, P < 0.05). In patients with positive pH tests, the prevalence of dysphagia, chronic cough, and hoarseness of voice were significantly higher in patients with abnormal than those with normal EM (18/31 vs 18/56, P < 0.05; 12/31 vs 6/56, P < 0.005 and 19/31 vs 18/56, P < 0.01, respectively). Whereas in patients with negative lower pH tests, only the prevalence of heartburn was significantly lower in patients with normal than those with abnormal EM (26/87 vs 30/62, P < 0.05). Acid regurgitation but not heartburn was associated with GER. Esophageal dysmotility had no significant effect on acid regurgitation symptom but associated with chronic cough, hoarseness of voice, and dysphagia only in patients with abnormal esophageal acid exposure. © 2013

  3. Burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, R; Yan, X; Ma, X-Q; Cao, Y; Wallander, M-A; Johansson, S; He, J

    2009-02-01

    Data on the impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in Asian countries are scarce. This study evaluated the impact of GERD on HRQL in Shanghai, China. One thousand two hundred adult inhabitants of Shanghai, selected using randomized cluster sampling. Participants completed Mandarin versions of the Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ), GERD impact scale, quality of life in reflux and dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire and short-form-36 (SF-36). GERD was defined as heartburn and/or regurgitation of any frequency during the 1-week recall period of the RDQ. A clinically meaningful impairment of HRQL was defined as a statistically significant decrease of >or=0.5 points in a QOLRAD dimension or >or=5 points in an SF-36 dimension. Overall, 1034 subjects completed the survey (86.2% response rate); 919 responses were suitable for analysis. The prevalence of GERD was 6.2%. GERD was associated with meaningfully impaired HRQL in the QOLRAD dimensions of vitality, eating/drinking and emotional well-being, but not sleep or physical/social functioning, and in all SF-36 dimensions except social functioning. Respondents with GERD experienced eating and drinking problems (47%), sleep impairment (32%) and reduced work productivity (32%). GERD has a clinically meaningful impact on HRQL in Shanghai, China.

  4. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Branislav; Filipovic, Branka; Mutavdzin, Slavica; Zdravkovic, Marija; Gligorijevic, Tatjana; Paunovic, Jovana; Arsic, Marina

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate autonomic nervous function in patients with a diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). METHODS: The investigation was performed on 29 patients (14 men), aged 18-80 years (51.14 ± 18.34), who were referred to our Neurocardiology Laboratory at the Clinical and Hospital Center “Bezanijska Kosa” with a diagnosis of GERD. One hundred sixteen healthy volunteers matched in age and sex with the examinees served as the control group. The study protocol included the evaluation of autonomic function and hemodynamic status, short-term heart rate variability (HRV) analysis, 24 h ambulatory ECG monitoring with long-term HRV analysis and 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. RESULTS: Pathologic results of cardiovascular reflex test were more common among patients with reflux compared to the control group. Severe autonomic dysfunction was detected in 44.4% of patients and in 7.9% of controls (P < 0.001). Parameters of short-term analysis of RR variability, which are the indicators of vagal activity, had lower values in patients with GERD than in the control group. Long-term HRV analysis of time-domain parameters indicated lower values in patients with reflux disease when compared to the control group. Power spectral analysis of long-term HRV revealed lower low- and high-frequency values. Detailed 24 h ambulatory blood pressure analysis showed significantly higher values of systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure in the reflux group than in the control group. CONCLUSION: Patients with GERD have distortion of sympathetic and parasympathetic components of the autonomic nervous system, but impaired parasympathetic function appears more congruent to GERD. PMID:26078576

  5. Review article: the pathophysiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease - oesophageal manifestations.

    PubMed

    Castell, D O; Murray, J A; Tutuian, R; Orlando, R C; Arnold, R

    2004-12-01

    The pathogenesis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is multifactorial, involving transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) as well as other lower oesophageal sphincter (LES) pressure abnormalities. GERD is associated with a decrease in LES pressure, which can be provoked by factors such as foods (fat, chocolate, etc.), alcohol, smoking and medications. These factors have also been shown to increase TLESRs. As a result, reflux of acid, bile, pepsin and pancreatic enzymes occurs, leading to oesophageal mucosal injury, which can potentially progress to oesophageal adenocarcinoma in a minority of patients with Barrett's metaplasia. In addition, duodenogastric contents can also contribute to oesophageal injury. Other factors contributing to the pathophysiology of GERD include hiatal hernia, poor oesophageal clearance, delayed gastric emptying and impaired mucosal defensive factors. Hiatal hernia has a permissive role in the pathogenesis of reflux oesophagitis by promoting LES dysfunction. Delayed gastric emptying, resulting in gastric distension, can significantly increase the rate of TLESRs, contributing to postprandial GER. The mucosal defensive factors have an important role in GERD. When excessive acid causes a breakdown in oesophageal epithelial defenses, epithelial resistance may be reduced. Nocturnal GERD is associated with prolonged acid exposure and proximal extent of acid contact, which elevates the risk for oesophageal damage and GERD-related complications. In sum, GERD is a complex problem caused by many factors that are exacerbated when the patient is in the supine position.

  6. Effect of liquid meals with different volumes on gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Keng-Liang; Rayner, Christopher K; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chiu, King-Wah; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Chiu, Cheng-Tang

    2014-03-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are often advised to avoid large meals, based on their complaints of increased symptoms after eating too much, and epidemiological evidence of a link between high volume intake and the presence of GERD. However, the precise effects of meal volume on gastroesophageal reflux have not been well studied. We aimed to clarify the effect of meal volume on acid regurgitation and symptoms in patients with GERD. Fifteen patients (10 female, 5 male; mean 54 ± 10 years old) with GERD were studied twice each in random order, during 24 h ambulatory pH monitoring. On one day, they consumed a 600 mL liquid test meal three times (breakfast, lunch, and dinner), and on the other, they consumed a 300 mL test meal six times (breakfast, snack, lunch, snack, dinner, and snack). Gastric fundus and antral areas and antral contractions were measured by transabdominal ultrasound. Symptoms were recorded using questionnaires. During the 600 mL regimen, there were more reflux episodes (17 ± 4 vs 10 ± 2, P = 0.03) and a greater total acid reflux time (12.5 ± 5.9% vs 5.5 ± 3.6%; P = 0.045) than the 300 mL regimen. Both the cross-sectional area of the gastric fundus (P = 0.024) and the number of antral contractions (P = 0.014) were greater for the 600 mL regimen. Larger meals are associated with distension of the gastric fundus and an increase in gastroesophageal reflux when compared with smaller, more frequent meals.

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and tooth erosion: SEPAHAN systematic review no. 10

    PubMed Central

    Firouzei, Malih Sadat; Khazaei, Saber; Afghari, Parastoo; Savabi, Ghazal; Savabi, Omid; Keshteli, Ammar Hassanzadeh; Adibi, Peyman

    2011-01-01

    Many systemic diseases affect oral health. The aim of this research was to conduct a systematic review on the association between dental erosion (DE) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the effect of saliva's flow rate, buffering capacity and oral microbial changes caused by GERD. All descriptive, analytical studies up to December 2011 that have relevant objectives, proper sampling method and sufficient results were included by searching PubMed and Scopus electronic data bases. Fifteen studies were selected according to our inclusion criteria (10 in adult and 5 in children population). There was a strong association between DE and GERD in the adult population, and the relationship in the children population was found to be of less importance. Early diagnosis and treatment of refluxed acid in both age groups through lifestyle changes and medications can prevent further damage and tooth loss. PMID:23372604

  8. Impact of obesity treatment on gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abraham; Kim, Aram; Sanossian, Cassandra; Francois, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a frequently encountered disorder. Obesity is an important risk factor for GERD, and there are several pathophysiologic mechanisms linking the two conditions. For obese patients with GERD, much of the treatment effort is focused on weight loss and its consistent benefit to symptoms, while there is a relative lack of evidence regarding outcomes after novel or even standard medical therapy is offered to this population. Physicians are hesitant to recommend operative anti-reflux therapy to obese patients due to the potentially higher risks and decreased efficacy, and these patients instead are often considered for bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgical approaches are broadening, and each technique has emerging evidence regarding its effect on both the risk and outcome of GERD. Furthermore, combined anti-reflux and bariatric options are now being offered to obese patients with GERD. However, currently Roux-en-Y gastric bypass remains the most effective surgical treatment option in this population, due to its consistent benefits in both weight loss and GERD itself. This article aims to review the impact of both conservative and aggressive approaches of obesity treatment on GERD. PMID:26819528

  9. Recent advances in diagnostic testing for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rishi D; Vaezi, Michael F

    2017-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has a large economic burden with important complications that include esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, and adenocarcinoma. Despite endoscopy, validated patient questionnaires, and traditional ambulatory pH monitoring, the diagnosis of GERD continues to be challenging. Areas covered: This review will explore the difficulties in diagnosing GERD with a focus on new developments, ranging from basic fundamental changes (histology and immunohistochemistry) to direct patient care (narrow-band imaging, impedance, and response to anti-reflux surgery). We searched PubMed using the noted keywords. We included data from full-text articles published in English. Further relevant articles were identified from the reference lists of review articles. Expert commentary: Important advances in novel parameters in intraluminal impedance monitoring such as baseline impedance monitoring has created some insight into alternative diagnostic strategies in GERD. Recent advances in endoscopic assessment of esophageal epithelial integrity via mucosal impedance measurement is questioning the paradigm of prolonged ambulatory testing for GERD. The future of reflux diagnosis may very well be without the need for currently employed technologies and could be as simple as assessing changes in epithelia integrity as a surrogate marker for GERD. However, future studies must validate such an approach.

  10. Impact of obesity treatment on gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abraham; Kim, Aram; Sanossian, Cassandra; Francois, Fritz

    2016-01-28

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a frequently encountered disorder. Obesity is an important risk factor for GERD, and there are several pathophysiologic mechanisms linking the two conditions. For obese patients with GERD, much of the treatment effort is focused on weight loss and its consistent benefit to symptoms, while there is a relative lack of evidence regarding outcomes after novel or even standard medical therapy is offered to this population. Physicians are hesitant to recommend operative anti-reflux therapy to obese patients due to the potentially higher risks and decreased efficacy, and these patients instead are often considered for bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgical approaches are broadening, and each technique has emerging evidence regarding its effect on both the risk and outcome of GERD. Furthermore, combined anti-reflux and bariatric options are now being offered to obese patients with GERD. However, currently Roux-en-Y gastric bypass remains the most effective surgical treatment option in this population, due to its consistent benefits in both weight loss and GERD itself. This article aims to review the impact of both conservative and aggressive approaches of obesity treatment on GERD.

  11. Economic evaluations of gastroesophageal reflux disease medical management.

    PubMed

    Gawron, Andrew J; French, Dustin D; Pandolfino, John E; Howden, Colin W

    2014-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) contributes to substantial medication use and costs worldwide. Economic evaluations provide insight into the value of healthcare, taking into account cost, quality, and benefits of particular treatments. Our objectives were to systematically review the existing literature to identify economic evaluations of GERD management strategies, to assess the scientific quality of these reports, and to summarize the economic outcomes of these evaluations. We identified economic evaluations and cost studies of GERD management strategies by searching PubMed and the UK NHS Economic Evaluation Database via the Cochrane Library. Searching was restricted to articles in English-language journals from July 2003 to July 2013. Cost-identification articles were excluded from the final analysis. Eighteen articles were included in the final analysis; 61 % of these met all criteria for quality reporting. Overall, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy was preferred (most effective and least costly) as empiric therapy for patients with reflux symptoms, except in patient populations with high Helicobacter pylori prevalence (>40 %). Initial empiric PPI therapy (vs. initial endoscopy stratification or H. pylori testing) is likely the most cost-effective initial strategy for patients with typical GERD symptoms. Surgery may be cost effective in patients with chronic GERD symptoms at time horizons of 3-10 years. Endoscopic anti-reflux procedures were not cost effective based on available data. Further economic evaluations should adhere to standard reporting measures of cost estimates and outcomes, and should attempt to account for and compare the large heterogeneity of patient phenotypes and treatment effects seen with anti-reflux therapies.

  12. [A study of extraesophageal presentations in gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao-shen; Xu, Xiao-rong; Zou, Duo-wu; Xie, Wei-fen; Yu, Xiao-feng; Chen, Xi-mei; Lin, Yong; Xia, Jun; Zhu, Feng-shang; Wen, Wu; Su, Tun

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this prospective multi-center study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of extraesophageal reflux disorders (EED) in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients and the therapeutic effect of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) on EED. We investigated GERD patients in 4 hospitals in Shanghai in a same time period. These patients were diagnosed as GERD by finding reflux esophagitis (RE) on endoscopy or with abnormal reflux during 24 h esophageal pH monitoring. Typical GERD symptoms and EED symptoms were evaluated by questionnaire. Patients with EED symptoms underwent videolaryngoscopy and abnormalities were recorded. Totally 200 subjects were enrolled in this study. Among them 95 patients complained of EED. The RE cases were 134 in number and EED occurred in 65 of the RE patients. The commonest presenting symptom of EED was globus or foreign body feeling in the throat (27%), followed by cough, soar throat and hoarseness. Asthma was a rare symptom, the occurrence being 21%, 16%, 11% and 3% respectively. The rate of typical GERD symptoms existing in EED group was 56%. The severity of EED symptoms showed no significant difference between RE and NERD patients. Abnormalities were found in 58% of subjects with EED on laryngoscopy, the occurrence of arytenoids medial wall erythema/edema was 25%, vocal cord erythema/edema was 32%, posterior pharyngeal wall cobble stoning was 20%, and 42% of the patients showed no abnormalities on laryngoscopy. Higher dosage PPI therapy showed effects on the relief of EED, and the relief rate was 95% after 8 weeks of treatment. Our results suggest that a significant part of GERD patients suffered from EED, and value of laryngoscopy and 24 h pH monitoring is limited for the diagnosis of EED. Higher dosage of PPI was effective for the treatment of EED.

  13. Effects of omeprazole or anti-reflux surgery on lower oesophageal sphincter characteristics and oesophageal acid exposure over 10 years.

    PubMed

    Emken, Birgitte-Elise G; Lundell, Lars R; Wallin, Lene; Myrvold, Helge E; Engström, Cecilia; Montgomery, Madeleine; Malm, Anders R; Lind, Tore; Hatlebakk, Jan G

    2017-01-01

    To compare the effect of anti-reflux surgery (ARS) versus proton pump inhibitor therapy on lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) function and oesophageal acid exposure in patients with chronic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) over a decade of follow-up. In this randomised, prospective, multicentre study we compared LOS pressure profiles, as well as oesophageal exposure to acid, at baseline and at 1 and 10 years after randomisation to either open ARS (n = 137) or long-term treatment with omeprazole (OME) 20-60 mg daily (n = 108). Median LOS resting pressure and abdominal length increased significantly and remained elevated in patients operated on with ARS, as opposed to those on OME. The proportion of total time (%) with oesophageal pH <4.0 decreased significantly in both the surgical and medical groups, and was significantly lower after 1 year in patients treated with ARS versus OME. After 10 years, oesophageal acid exposure was normalised in both groups, with no significant differences, and bilirubin exposure was within normal limits. After 10 years, patients with or without Barrett's oesophagus did not differ in acid reflux control between the two treatment options. Open ARS and OME were both effective in normalising acid reflux into the oesophagus even when studied over a period of 10 years. Anatomically and functionally the LOS was repaired durably by surgery, with increased resting pressure and abdominal length.

  14. Asia-Pacific consensus on the management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: an update focusing on refractory reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Fock, Kwong Ming; Talley, Nicholas; Goh, Khean Lee; Sugano, Kentaro; Katelaris, Peter; Holtmann, Gerald; Pandolfino, John E; Sharma, Prateek; Ang, Tiing Leong; Hongo, Michio; Wu, Justin; Chen, Minhu; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Law, Ngai Moh; Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Zhang, Jun; Ho, Khek Yu; Sollano, Jose; Rani, Abdul Aziz; Kositchaiwat, Chomsri; Bhatia, Shobna

    2016-09-01

    Since the publication of the Asia-Pacific consensus on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in 2008, there has been further scientific advancement in this field. This updated consensus focuses on proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus. A steering committee identified three areas to address: (1) burden of disease and diagnosis of reflux disease; (2) proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease; (3) Barrett's oesophagus. Three working groups formulated draft statements with supporting evidence. Discussions were done via email before a final face-to-face discussion. We used a Delphi consensus process, with a 70% agreement threshold, using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria to categorise the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. A total of 32 statements were proposed and 31 were accepted by consensus. A rise in the prevalence rates of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in Asia was noted, with the majority being non-erosive reflux disease. Overweight and obesity contributed to the rise. Proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease was recognised to be common. A distinction was made between refractory symptoms and refractory reflux disease, with clarification of the roles of endoscopy and functional testing summarised in two algorithms. The definition of Barrett's oesophagus was revised such that a minimum length of 1 cm was required and the presence of intestinal metaplasia no longer necessary. We recommended the use of standardised endoscopic reporting and advocated endoscopic therapy for confirmed dysplasia and early cancer. These guidelines standardise the management of patients with refractory gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus in the Asia-Pacific region. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Kandulski, Arne; Wex, Thomas; Mönkemüller, Klaus; Kuester, Doerthe; Fry, Lucia C; Roessner, Albert; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2010-09-01

    The proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is activated by serine proteases and has been demonstrated to induce proinflammatory and neuroinflammatory effects. It is considered to alter transepithelial resistance and mediates visceral hypersensitivity. This study aimed to evaluate the expression of PAR-2 in human esophageal mucosa of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in relation to mucosal alterations. The study included 123 patients with GERD stratified to erosive reflux disease (n=50), non-erosive reflux disease (n=46), and reflux-negative patients as controls (n=27). Endoscopic and histopathological characterization was performed according to the Los Angeles classification and modified Ismail-Beigi criteria, respectively. PAR-2 expression was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The gene expression levels of interleukin (IL)-8 were determined by quantitative RT-PCR and correlated to PAR-2 expression in each patient. Performing in vitro studies, esophageal squamous cell lines (KYSE 150, KYSE 450) were incubated, adjusted to different pH (7.0, 6.0, and 5.0), and exposed to bile acids and PAR-2-activation peptide (SLIGKV-NH(2)). PAR-2 gene expression was 7- to 10-fold upregulated (P<0.0001) in the mucosa of patients with GERD and correlated positively with IL-8 expression and with histomorphological alterations (dilated intercellular spaces, papillary elongation, basal cell hyperplasia (BCH); P<0.01). Immunohistochemistry showed an intense staining of PAR-2 throughout all epithelial layers in patients with GERD compared with controls (P=0.0005). In vitro studies revealed a 1.5- to 20-fold induction of PAR-2 gene expression in esophageal squamous cells by acidified medium (P<0.01), but not by additional bile acids. The activation of PAR-2 leads to expression and secretion of IL-8. This study provides evidence of the functional importance of PAR-2-mediated pathways in the pathogenesis of GERD and GERD

  16. The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease among hospital employees.

    PubMed

    Ercelep, O B; Caglar, E; Dobrucali, A

    2014-07-01

    Quantitative estimate of the actual prevalence of the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is difficult to obtain because most of the patients with heartburn have intermittent symptoms. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of typical and atypical symptoms suggesting GERD to investigate the association of habits and social conditions reported to lead to reflux in the employees of hospital. A total of 2037 collected forms were assessed. The prevalence of GERD was found to be 21.7% (442). The prevalence of symptoms other than heartburn in employees with and without GERD symptoms were 6.6% versus 3.4% (P < 0.05) for asthma, 27.6% versus 8.3% (P < 0.001) for night cough, 50% versus 19.5% (P < 0.001) for noncardiac chest pain. Dyspeptic complaints were found to be significantly higher among GERD patients (P < 0.001). By multiple logistic regression analysis, female gender (odds ratio [OR] 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.60, P = 0.027), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug medication (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.03-1.60, P = 0.021) and body mass index over 30 (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.60-3.18, P < 0.001) were independent risk factors associated with GERD symptoms. GERD is a common health problem in Turkey, and its prevalence is similar to that of Western populations with different symptom profiles. Female gender, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and body mass index >30 kg/m(2) were independent risk factors associated with GERD symptoms. Age, alcohol, coffee, tea, and tobacco smoking do not seem to be risk factors for reflux. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  17. Impacts of Endoscopic Gastroesophageal Flap Valve Grading on Pediatric Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kai-Chi; Wu, Jia-Feng; Hsu, Wei-Chung; Lin, Bor-Ru; Chen, Huey-Ling; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal flap valve (GEFV) endoscopic grading is reported to be associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in adults; however its role in pediatric groups remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the significance of GEFV grading and the associations to multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring (MII-pH) in children with GERD. Methods A total of 48 children with GERD symptoms who received esophagogastroduodenoscopy and MII-pH monitoring were enrolled. The degree of GEFV was graded from I to IV according to the Hill classification, and classified into two groups: normal GEFV (Hill grades I and II), and abnormal GEFV (Hill grades III and VI). Endoscopic findings and MII-pH monitoring were analyzed among the groups. Results Thirty-six patients had normal GEFV while 12 had abnormal GEFV. The presence of erosive esophagitis was significantly more common in the patients with abnormal GEFV (p = 0.037, OR 9.84, 95% CI 1.15–84.42). Pathological acidic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) determined by MII-pH was more prevalent in the patients with loosened GEFV geometry (p = 0.01, OR 7.0, 95% CI 1.67–27.38). There were significant positive correlations between GEFV Hill grading I to IV and the severity of erosive esophagitis (r = 0.49, p<0.001), percentage of supine acid reflux (r = 0.37, p = 0.009), percentage of total acid reflux (r = 0.3284, p = 0.023), and DeMeester score (r = 0.36, p = 0.01) detected by pH monitoring. In the impedance study, GEFV Hill grading also positively correlated to median number of acid reflux events (r = 0.3015, p = 0.037). Conclusions GEFV dysfunction highly associated with acid GER and severe erosive esophagitis. An abnormal GEFV is a sign of acid GER in children. PMID:25233350

  18. Dental Erosion in Children with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, Patricia Alves Drummond; Paiva, Saul Martins; De Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães; Auad, Sheyla Márcia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) on dental erosion (DE) in children and analyze the association between dental erosion and diet, oral hygiene, and sociodemographic characteristics. This case-control study encompassed 43 two- to 14-year-olds diagnosed positive for GERD by the 24-hour pH monitoring, paired by age group with 136 healthy controls, in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. DE was assessed by one calibrated examiner using the O'Sullivan index. A questionnaire was self-administered by parents collecting information regarding sociodemographics, oral hygiene, and dietary habits. Dental erosion experience was compared between the groups, and a stratified analysis was performed (P<0.05). Dental erosion was diagnosed in 10.6 percent (N equals 19) of all the children; 25.6 percent (N equals 11) of GERD children and 5.9 percent (N equals eight) of children without GERD, P=0.001). Dental erosion was not associated with dietary consumption or sociodemographic characteristics in both groups (P≥0.05). Children who used adult toothpaste had a 5.79 higher chance of having dental erosion in the group with GERD. Children diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease were at an increased risk of having dental erosion when compared to healthy subjects; among the GERD children, dental erosion was associated with the use of adult toothpaste.

  19. Misdiagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease as epileptic seizures in children.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Ayşe Kaçar; Canpolat, Mehmet; Karacabey, Neslihan; Gumus, Hakan; Kumandas, Sefer; Doğanay, Selim; Arslan, Duran; Per, Hüseyin

    2016-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can mimic epileptic seizure, and may be misdiagnosed as epilepsy. On the other hand, GERD can be more commonly seen in children with neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy (CP); this co-incidence may complicate the management of patients by mimicking refractory seizures. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the clinical features, definite diagnoses and treatment approaches of the patients with clinically suspected GERD who were referred to the division of pediatric neurology with a suspected diagnosis of epileptic seizure. We also aimed to investigate the occurrence of GERD in children with epilepsy and/or CP. Fifty-seven children who had a final diagnosis of GERD but were initially suspected of having epileptic seizures were assessed prospectively. All patients were assigned to 3 groups according to definite diagnoses as follows: patients with only GERD who were misdiagnosed as having epileptic seizure (group 1: n=16; 28.1%), those with comorbidity of epilepsy and GERD (group 2: n=21; 36.8%), and those with the coexistence of GERD with epilepsy and CP (group 3: n=20; 35.1%). Five patients (8.8%) did not respond to anti-reflux treatment and laparoscopic reflux surgery was performed. The positive effect of GERD therapy on paroxysmal nonepileptic events was observed in 51/57 (89.5%) patients. GERD is one of the important causes of paroxysmal nonepileptic events. In addition, GERD must be kept in mind at the initial diagnosis and also in the long-term management of patients with neurological disorders such as epilepsy and CP. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Western blotting in the diagnosis of duodenal-biliary and pancreaticobiliary refluxes in biliary diseases.

    PubMed

    Xian, Guo-Zhe; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Chen, Chun-Chih; Su, Yang

    2009-12-01

    Currently adopted diagnostic methods for duodenal-biliary and pancreaticobiliary refluxes carry many flaws, so the incidence of the two refluxes demands further larger sample size studies. This study aimed to evaluate Western blotting for the diagnosis of refluxes in biliary diseases. An oral radionuclide 99mTc-DTPA test (radionuclide, RN) was conducted for the observation of duodenal-biliary reflux prior to measuring bile radioactivity and Western blotting for detecting bile enterokinase (EK). Pancreaticobiliary reflux was assessed by biochemical and Western blotting tests for biliary amylase activity and trypsin-1, respectively. In accordance with bile sample origin, our samples were classified into ductal bile and gall bile groups; based on each individual biliary disease, we further classified the ductal bile group into five sub-groups, and the gall bile group into four sub-groups. Western blotting was conducted to assess the two refluxes in biliary diseases. Consistencies were noted between EK and RN tests when diagnosing duodenal-biliary reflux (P<0.001). The amylase and trypsin-1 tests also showed consistency in diagnosing pancreaticobiliary reflux (P<0.001). Amylase and lipase levels within gall and ductal bile were strongly correlated (P<0.05). In the common bile duct pigment stone group, the EK and trypsin-1 positive rates were found to be insignificant (P>0.05); in the common bile duct cyst group, the EK positive rate was significantly lower than the trypsin-1 positive rate (P<0.05). Western blotting can accurately reflect duodenal-biliary and pancreaticobiliary refluxes. EK has greater sensitivity than RN for duodenal-biliary reflux. The majority of biliary amylase and lipase comes from the pancreas in all biliary diseases; pancreaticobiliary reflux is the predominant source in the common bile duct cyst group and duodenal-biliary reflux is responsible for the ductal pigment stone group.

  1. Heartburn during sleep: a clinical marker of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in morbidly obese patients.

    PubMed

    Fornari, F; Madalosso, C A S; Callegari-Jacques, S M; Gurski, R R

    2009-02-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and morbid obesity are entities with increasing prevalence. New clinical strategies are cornerstones for their management. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of heartburn during sleep (HDS) and whether this symptom predicts the presence of objective GORD parameters and increased heartburn perception in morbidly obese patients. Ninety-one consecutive morbidly obese patients underwent clinical evaluation, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and oesophageal pH monitoring. HDS was characterized when patients replied positively to the question, 'Does heartburn wake you from sleep?'. A General Score for Heartburn (GSH) ranging between 0 and 5 was assessed with the question 'How bad is your heartburn?'. HDS was reported by 33 patients (36%). More patients with HDS had abnormal acid contact time or reflux oesophagitis than patients without HDS (94%vs 57%, P < 0.001). HDS had a positive predictive value of 94% (0.95 CI 82-98), sensitivity of 48% (0.95 CI 37-60%) and specificity of 93% (0.95 CI 77-98%) for detection of GORD. A higher proportion of patients with HDS perceived heartburn preceded by acid reflux in diurnal (39%vs 9%; P < 0.001) periods during pH-metry. HDS patients showed higher GSH (2.4 +/- 0.5 vs 1.7 +/- 0.4; P < 0.0001) compared with patients who denied HDS but reported diurnal heartburn. HDS occurs in a significant minority of patients with morbid obesity and has high positive predictive value for GORD. Symptomatic reflux during the sleep seems to be a marker of increased heartburn perception in this population.

  2. Critical appraisal of Rome IV criteria: hypersensitive esophagus does belong to gastroesophageal reflux disease spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; Frazzoni, Marzio; de Bortoli, Nicola; Tolone, Salvatore; Martinucci, Irene; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2018-01-01

    The Rome IV Committee introduced a major change in the classification of functional gastrointestinal disorders, proposing a more restrictive definition of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It was suggested that hypersensitive esophagus (HE) may sit more firmly within the functional realm. It was suggested that GERD diagnosis should be based upon abnormal acid exposure time (AET) only, implying no advantage of impedance-pH over pH monitoring. Symptom association probability (SAP), symptom index (SI) and heartburn relief with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy were regarded as unreliable, whereas a lack of response to PPI was considered as evidence of functional heartburn. These assumptions are contradicted by numerous studies showing the clinical relevance of weakly acidic refluxes and the diagnostic utility of SAP, SI and new impedance parameters, namely the post-reflux swallow-induced peristaltic wave (PSPW) index and the mean nocturnal baseline impedance (MNBI). The PSPW index and MNBI provide significant diagnostic advantage, particularly in patients with normal AET who can be classified as HE when both parameters are abnormal, even though SAP and SI are negative. Visceral pain modulators are recommended by the Rome IV Committee despite scanty evidence of efficacy, but a positive outcome with medical or surgical anti-reflux treatment has been reported by several studies of HE patients. Therefore, we believe that patients with endoscopy-negative heartburn should be investigated by means of impedance-pH monitoring with analysis of PSPW index and MNBI: such an approach provides accurate identification of HE cases, who remain, in our opinion, within the realm of GERD and should be treated accordingly. PMID:29333061

  3. Addition of prokinetics to PPI therapy in gastroesophageal reflux disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Li-Hua; Chen, Wei-Xu; Qian, Li-Juan; Li, Shuo; Gu, Min; Shi, Rui-Hua

    2014-03-07

    To investigate the efficacy of adding prokinetics to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Knowledge databases (prior to October 2013) were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared therapeutic efficacy of PPI alone (single therapy) or PPI plus prokinetics (combined therapy) for GERD. The primary outcome of those selected trials was complete or partial relief of non-erosive reflux disease symptoms or mucosal healing in erosive reflux esophagitis. Using the test of heterogeneity, we established a fixed or random effects model where the risk ratio was the primary readout for measuring efficacy. Twelve RCTs including 2403 patients in total were enrolled in this study. Combined therapy was not associated with significant relief of symptoms or alterations in endoscopic response relative to single therapy (95%CI: 1.0-1.2, P = 0.05; 95%CI: 0.66-2.61, P = 0.44). However, combined therapy was associated with a greater symptom score change (95%CI: 2.14-3.02, P < 0.00001). Although there was a reduction in the number of reflux episodes in GERD [95%CI: -5.96-(-1.78), P = 0.0003] with the combined therapy, there was no significant effect on acid exposure time (95%CI: -0.37-0.60, P = 0.65). The proportion of patients with adverse effects undergoing combined therapy was significantly higher than for PPI therapy alone (95%CI: 1.06-1.36, P = 0.005) when the difference between 5-HT receptor agonist and PPI combined therapy and single therapy (95%CI: 0.84-1.39, P = 0.53) was excluded. Combined therapy may partially improve patient quality of life, but has no significant effect on symptom or endoscopic response of GERD.

  4. LINX®, a novel treatment for patients with refractory asthma complicated by gastroesophageal reflux disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sriratanaviriyakul, Narin; Kivler, Celeste; Vidovszky, Tamas J; Yoneda, Ken Y; Kenyon, Nicholas J; Murin, Susan; Louie, Samuel

    2016-05-24

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is one of the most common comorbidities in patients with asthma. Gastroesophageal reflux disease can be linked to difficult-to-control asthma. Current management includes gastric acid suppression therapy and surgical antireflux procedures. The LINX® procedure is a novel surgical treatment for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease refractory to medical therapy. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of successful treatment of refractory asthma secondary to gastroesophageal reflux disease using the LINX® procedure. Our patient was a 22-year-old white woman who met the American Thoracic Society criteria for refractory asthma that had remained poorly controlled for 5 years despite progressive escalation to step 6 treatment as recommended by National Institutes of Health-National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines, including high-dose oral corticosteroids, high-dose inhaled corticosteroid plus long-acting β2-agonist, leukotriene receptor antagonist, and monthly omalizumab. Separate trials with azithromycin therapy and roflumilast did not improve her asthma control, nor did bronchial thermoplasty help. Additional consultations with two other university health systems left the patient with few treatment options for asthma, which included cyclophosphamide. Instead, the patient underwent a LINX® procedure after failure of maximal medical therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease with the additional aim of improving asthma control. After she underwent LINX® treatment, her asthma improved dramatically and was no longer refractory. She had normal exhaled nitric oxide levels and loss of peripheral eosinophilia after LINX® treatment. Prednisone was discontinued without loss of asthma control. The only immediate adverse effects due to the LINX® procedure were bloating, nausea, and vomiting. LINX® is a viable alternative to the Nissen fundoplication procedure for the treatment of patients with

  5. Alginate controls heartburn in patients with erosive and nonerosive reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Edoardo; de Bortoli, Nicola; Zentilin, Patrizia; Martinucci, Irene; Bruzzone, Luca; Furnari, Manuele; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2012-08-28

    To evaluate the effect of a novel alginate-based compound, Faringel, in modifying reflux characteristics and controlling symptoms. In this prospective, open-label study, 40 patients reporting heartburn and regurgitation with proven reflux disease (i.e., positive impedance-pH test/evidence of erosive esophagitis at upper endoscopy) underwent 2 h impedance-pH testing after eating a refluxogenic meal. They were studied for 1 h under basal conditions and 1 h after taking 10 mL Faringel. In both sessions, measurements were obtained in right lateral and supine decubitus positions. Patients also completed a validated questionnaire consisting of a 2-item 5-point (0-4) Likert scale and a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS) in order to evaluate the efficacy of Faringel in symptom relief. Tolerability of the treatment was assessed using a 6-point Likert scale ranging from very good (1) to very poor (6). Faringel decreased significantly (P < 0.001), in both the right lateral and supine decubitus positions, esophageal acid exposure time [median 10 (25th-75th percentil 6-16) vs 5.8 (4-10) and 16 (11-19) vs 7.5 (5-11), respectively] and acid refluxes [5 (3-8) vs 1 (1-1) and 6 (4-8) vs 2 (1-2), respectively], but increased significantly (P < 0.01) the number of nonacid reflux events compared with baseline [2 (1-3) vs 3 (2-5) and 3 (2-4) vs 6 (3-8), respectively]. Percentage of proximal migration decreased in both decubitus positions (60% vs 32% and 64% vs 35%, respectively; P < 0.001). Faringel was significantly effective in controlling heartburn, based on both the Likert scale [3.1 (range 1-4) vs 0.9 (0-2); P < 0.001] and VAS score [7.1 (3-9.8) vs 2 (0.1-4.8); P < 0.001], but it had less success against regurgitation, based on both the Likert scale [2.6 (1-4) vs 2.2 (1-4); P = not significant (NS)] and VAS score [5.6 (2-9.6) vs 3.9 (1-8.8); P = NS]. Overall, the tolerability of Faringel was very good 5 (2-6), with only two patients reporting modest adverse events (i.e., nausea and

  6. Reflux in Children

    MedlinePlus

    What are reflux (GER) and GERD? The esophagus is the tube that carries food from your mouth to your stomach. If your child has reflux, his or ... into the esophagus. Another name for reflux is gastroesophageal reflux (GER). GERD stands for gastroesophageal reflux disease. It ...

  7. Reflux in Infants

    MedlinePlus

    What are reflux (GER) and GERD? The esophagus is the tube that carries food from your mouth to your stomach. If your baby has reflux, his or ... into the esophagus. Another name for reflux is gastroesophageal reflux (GER). GERD stands for gastroesophageal reflux disease. It ...

  8. The Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) in the Islamic Republic of Iran: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Delavari, Alireza; Moradi, Ghobad; Birjandi, Fariba; Elahi, Elham; Saberifiroozi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common, chronic disease worldwide. The weekly prevalence of reflux in developed countriesis 10% to 48%. It has previously been reported as 5% in Asian countries, but new reports show a higher level in both Asian and Arab countries. In Iran, reflux has increased over the last two decades. There are few studies concerning the prevalence of reflux in Iran. This study aims to review reports about the prevalence of reflux in Iran, as it may be different in various parts of the country. By evaluation of the existing articles, this study will reach a general conclusion about the reflux prevalence in Iran. METHODS This was a qualitative, systematic review that estimated the prevalence rate of reflux in Iran. In August 2010, we reviewed all electronic database published studies that concerned the epidemiology of reflux prevalence in Iran by searching PubMed, Scientific Information Database (SID), Iran Medex, and Magiran. RESULTS In our search, using specified key words and selection criteria, 15 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in the study. CONCLUSION According to the results, the data related to the estimated prevalence in Iran have a wide range. The weekly prevalence rate of 21.2% in the Tehran study is the best estimate for reflux in Iran. It seems that reflux is more common in Iran when compared to other Asian countries, and similar to reflux in Western countries. Due to the absence of comprehensive studies in Iran, we recommend that researchers conduct accurate, comprehensive, multi-dimensional studies in order to estimate reflux prevalence and its burden in Iran. PMID:24829629

  9. Systematic review: questionnaires for assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bolier, E A; Kessing, B F; Smout, A J; Bredenoord, A J

    2015-01-01

    Numerous questionnaires with a wide variety of characteristics have been developed for the assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Four well-defined dimensions are noticeable in these GERD questionnaires, which are symptoms, response to treatment, diagnosis, and burden on the quality of life of GERD patients. The aim of this review is to develop a complete overview of all available questionnaires, categorized per dimension of the assessment of GERD. A systematic search of the literature up to January 2013 using the Pubmed database and the Embase database, and search of references and conference abstract books were conducted. A total number of 65 questionnaires were extracted and evaluated. Thirty-nine questionnaires were found applicable for the assessment of GERD symptoms, three of which are generic gastrointestinal questionnaires. For the assessment of response to treatment, 14 questionnaires were considered applicable. Seven questionnaires with diagnostic purposes were found. In the assessment of quality of life in GERD patients, 18 questionnaires were found and evaluated. Twenty questionnaires were found to be used for more than one assessment dimension, and eight questionnaires were found for GERD assessment in infants and/or children. A wide variety of GERD questionnaires is available, of which the majority is used for assessment of GERD symptoms. Questionnaires differ in aspects such as design, validation and translations. Also, numerous multidimensional questionnaires are available, of which the Reflux Disease Questionnaire is widely applicable. We provided an overview of GERD questionnaires to aid investigators and clinicians in their search for the most appropriate questionnaire for their specific purposes. © 2013 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  10. Gastroesophageal reflux disease after diagnostic endoscopy in the clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Zschau, Nora B; Andrews, Jane M; Holloway, Richard H; Schoeman, Mark N; Lange, Kylie; Tam, William CE; Holtmann, Gerald J

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the outcome of patients with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) referred for endoscopy at 2 and 6 mo post endoscopy. METHODS: Consecutive patients referred for upper endoscopy for assessment of GERD symptoms at two large metropolitan hospitals were invited to participate in a 6-mo non-interventional (observational) study. The two institutions are situated in geographically and socially disparate areas. Data collection was by self-completion of questionnaires including the patient assessment of upper gastrointestinal disorders symptoms severity and from hospital records. Endoscopic finding using the Los-Angeles classification, symptom severity and it’s clinically relevant improvement as change of at least 25%, therapy and socio-demographic factors were assessed. RESULTS: Baseline data were available for 266 patients and 2-mo and 6-mo follow-up data for 128 and 108 patients respectively. At baseline, 128 patients had erosive and 138 non-erosive reflux disease. Allmost all patient had proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy in the past. Overall, patients with non-erosive GERD at the index endoscopy had significantly more severe symptoms as compared to patients with erosive or even complicated GERD while there was no difference with regard to medication. After 2 and 6 mo there was a small, but statistically significant improvement in symptom severity (7.02 ± 5.5 vs 5.9 ± 5.4 and 5.5 ± 5.4 respectively); however, the majority of patients continued to have symptoms (i.e., after 6 mo 81% with GERD symptoms). Advantaged socioeconomic status as well as being unemployed was associated with greater improvement. CONCLUSION: The majority of GORD patients receive PPI therapy before being referred for endoscopy even though many have symptoms that do not sufficiently respond to PPI therapy. PMID:23674853

  11. Role of tight junction proteins in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mönkemüller, Klaus; Wex, Thomas; Kuester, Doerthe; Fry, Lucia C; Kandulski, Arne; Kropf, Siegfried; Roessner, Albert; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2012-09-20

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with impaired epithelial barrier function that is regulated by cell-cell contacts. The aim of the study was to investigate the expression pattern of selected components involved in the formation of tight junctions in relation to GERD. Eighty-four patients with GERD-related symptoms with endoscopic signs (erosive: n = 47) or without them (non-erosive: n = 37) as well as 26 patients lacking GERD-specific symptoms as controls were included. Endoscopic and histological characterization of esophagitis was performed according to the Los Angeles and adapted Ismeil-Beigi criteria, respectively. Mucosal biopsies from distal esophagus were taken for analysis by histopathology, immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of five genes encoding tight junction components [Occludin, Claudin-1, -2, Zona occludens (ZO-1, -2)]. Histopathology confirmed GERD-specific alterations as dilated intercellular spaces in the esophageal mucosa of patients with GERD compared to controls (P < 0.05). Claudin-1 and -2 were 2- to 6-fold upregulation on transcript (P < 0.01) and in part on protein level (P < 0.015) in GERD, while subgroup analysis of revealed this upregulation for ERD only. In both erosive and non-erosive reflux disease, expression levels of Occludin and ZO-1,-2 were not significantly affected. Notably, the induced expression of both claudins did not correlate with histopathological parameters (basal cell hyperplasia, dilated intercellular spaces) in patients with GERD. Taken together, the missing correlation between the expression of tight junction-related components and histomorphological GERD-specific alterations does not support a major role of the five proteins studied in the pathogenesis of GERD.

  12. Role of tight junction proteins in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with impaired epithelial barrier function that is regulated by cell-cell contacts. The aim of the study was to investigate the expression pattern of selected components involved in the formation of tight junctions in relation to GERD. Methods Eighty-four patients with GERD-related symptoms with endoscopic signs (erosive: n = 47) or without them (non-erosive: n = 37) as well as 26 patients lacking GERD-specific symptoms as controls were included. Endoscopic and histological characterization of esophagitis was performed according to the Los Angeles and adapted Ismeil-Beigi criteria, respectively. Mucosal biopsies from distal esophagus were taken for analysis by histopathology, immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of five genes encoding tight junction components [Occludin, Claudin-1, -2, Zona occludens (ZO-1, -2)]. Results Histopathology confirmed GERD-specific alterations as dilated intercellular spaces in the esophageal mucosa of patients with GERD compared to controls (P < 0.05). Claudin-1 and −2 were 2- to 6-fold upregulation on transcript (P < 0.01) and in part on protein level (P < 0.015) in GERD, while subgroup analysis of revealed this upregulation for ERD only. In both erosive and non-erosive reflux disease, expression levels of Occludin and ZO-1,-2 were not significantly affected. Notably, the induced expression of both claudins did not correlate with histopathological parameters (basal cell hyperplasia, dilated intercellular spaces) in patients with GERD. Conclusions Taken together, the missing correlation between the expression of tight junction-related components and histomorphological GERD-specific alterations does not support a major role of the five proteins studied in the pathogenesis of GERD. PMID:22994974

  13. The Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) in the Islamic Republic of Iran: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Delavari, Alireza; Moradi, Ghobad; Birjandi, Fariba; Elahi, Elham; Saberifiroozi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common, chronic disease worldwide. The weekly prevalence of reflux in developed countriesis 10% to 48%. It has previously been reported as 5% in Asian countries, but new reports show a higher level in both Asian and Arab countries. In Iran, reflux has increased over the last two decades. There are few studies concerning the prevalence of refluxin Iran. This study aims to review reports about the prevalence of reflux in Iran, as it may be different in various parts of the country. By evaluation of the existing articles, this study will reach a general conclusion about the reflux prevalence in Iran. METHODS This was a qualitative, systematic review that estimated the prevalence rate of reflux in Iran. In August 2010, we reviewed all electronic database published studies that concerned the epidemiology of reflux prevalence in Iran by searching PubMed, Scientific Information Database (SID), Iran Medex, and Magiran. RESULTS In our search, using specified key words and selection criteria, 15 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in the study. CONCLUSION According to the results, the data related to the estimated prevalencein Iran have a wide range. The weekly prevalence rate of 21.2% in the Tehran study is the best estimate for reflux in Iran. It seems that reflux is more common in Iran when compared to other Asian countries, and similar to reflux in Western countries. Due to the absence of comprehensive studies in Iran, we recommend that researchers conduct accurate, comprehensive, multi-dimensional studies in order to estimate reflux prevalence and its burden inIran.

  14. Managing peptic ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux disease in elderly Chinese patients--focus on esomeprazole.

    PubMed

    Tang, Raymond S Y; Wu, Justin C Y

    2013-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are not uncommon in elderly patients. Clinical presentations of these acid-related disorders may be atypical in the geriatric population. Older individuals are at increased risk for poor outcomes in complicated PUD and for development of GERD complications. Multiple risk factors (eg, Helicobacter pylori [HP], use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], aspirin) contribute to the development of PUD. Recent data has shown that HP-negative, NSAID-negative idiopathic peptic ulcers are on the rise and carry a higher risk of recurrent ulcer bleeding and mortality. Effective management of PUD in the geriatric population relies on identification and modification of treatable risk factors. Elderly patients with GERD often require long-term acid suppressive therapy. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) including esomeprazole are effective in the treatment of reflux esophagitis, maintenance of GERD symptomatic control, and management of PUD as well as its complications. Potential safety concerns of long-term PPI use have been reported in the literature. Clinicians should balance the risks and benefits before committing elderly patients to long-term PPI therapy.

  15. A physiologic approach to laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, J G; Trus, T L; Branum, G D; Waring, J P; Wood, W C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined indications, evaluations, and outcomes after laparoscopic fundoplication in patients with gastroesophageal reflux through this single-institution study. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Laparoscopic fundoplication has been performed for less than 5 years, yet the early and intermediate results suggest that this operation is safe and equivalent in efficacy to open techniques of antireflux surgery. METHODS: Over a 4-year period, 300 patients underwent laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (252) or laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication (48) for gastroesophageal reflux refractory to medical therapy or requiring daily therapy with omeprazole or high-dose H2 antagonists. Preoperative evaluation included symptom assessment, esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 24-hour pH evaluation, and esophageal motility study. Physiologic follow-up included 24-hour pH study and esophageal motility study performed 6 weeks and 1 to 3 years after operation. RESULTS: The most frequent indication for surgery was the presence of residual typical and atypical gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (64%) despite standard doses of proton pump inhibitors. At preoperative evaluation, 51% of patients had erosive esophagitis, stricture, or Barrett's metaplasia. Ninety-eight percent of patients had an abnormal 24-hour pH study. Seventeen percent had impaired esophageal motility and 2% had aperistalsis. There were four conversions to open fundoplication (adhesions, three; large liver, one). Intraoperative technical difficulties occurred in 19(6%) patients and were dealt with intraoperatively in all but 1 patient (bleeding from enlarged left liver lobe). Minor complications occurred in 6% and major complications in 2%. There was no mortality. Median follow-up was 17 months. One year after operation, heartburn was absent in 93%. Four percent took occasional H2 antagonists, and 3% were back on daily therapy. Atypical reflux symptoms (e.g., asthma, hoarseness, chest pain, or cough) were eliminated

  16. Endoscopic treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: the new kid on the block.

    PubMed

    Haringsma, J; Siersema, P D; Kuipers, E J

    2003-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a common disease entity with approximately 7% of European adults experiencing significant daily symptoms. The impact of reflux disease on the quality of life is considerable. Complications of reflux disease include oesophagitis, stricture, Barrett's and pulmonary symptoms. Most patients can be adequately managed by treatment with a proton-pump inhibitor. However, symptom relapse is common after cessation of therapy, thus many patients are committed to life-long therapy. Until recently, anti-reflux surgery was the single therapeutic alternative. Now, novel endoscopic techniques have become available to treat patients suffering from reflux disease. Application of these techniques is challenging. Update on new endoscopic techniques for treatment of reflux discase. Currently available endoscopic techniques include endoscopic suturing, radiofrequency ablation and biopolymer injection. Interventions typically take 30-40 min and can be performed under conscious sedation. First reports describe successful reduction of symptoms. Six months after therapy. reportedly 58%-85% of patients are off proton-pump inhibition. Yet, there are conflicting results on 24-h pH measurement and insufficient data on the mechanism of altered oesophageal motility. Long-term data are not yet available. In our series of over 50 procedures, no serious complications have occurred. Endoscopic treatment of reflux disease is feasible and safe. Techniques reduce both symptoms and medication use associated with the disease, albeit with an uncertain long-term outcome. As pursuit of this technology is appealing, techniques are being introduced before thorough comparison and evaluation of therapeutic benefit have been completed. Comparative studies between conventional anti-reflux treatment and various luminal anti-reflux therapies are needed and long-term efficacy remains to be established.

  17. Review of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Punjabi, Paawan; Hira, Angela; Prasad, Shanti; Wang, Xiangbing; Chokhavatia, Sita

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews the known pathophysiological mechanisms of comorbid gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the diabetic patient, discusses therapeutic options in care, and provides an approach to its evaluation and management. We searched for review articles published in the past 10 years through a PubMed search using the filters diabetes mellitus, GERD, pathophysiology, and management. The search only yielded a handful of articles, so we independently included relevant studies from these review articles along with related citations as suggested by PubMed. We found diabetic patients are more prone to developing GERD and may present with atypical manifestations. A number of mechanisms have been proposed to elucidate the connection between these two diseases. Studies involving treatment options for comorbid disease suggest conflicting drug-drug interactions. Currently, there are no published guidelines specifically for the evaluation and management of GERD in the diabetic patient. Although there are several proposed mechanisms for the higher prevalence of GERD in the diabetic patient, this complex interrelationship requires further research. Understanding the pathophysiology will help direct diagnostic evaluation. In our review, we propose a management algorithm for GERD in the diabetic patient. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Obesity and gastroesophageal reflux: quantifying the association between body mass index, esophageal acid exposure, and lower esophageal sphincter status in a large series of patients with reflux symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ayazi, Shahin; Hagen, Jeffrey A; Chan, Linda S; DeMeester, Steven R; Lin, Molly W; Ayazi, Ali; Leers, Jessica M; Oezcelik, Arzu; Banki, Farzaneh; Lipham, John C; DeMeester, Tom R; Crookes, Peter F

    2009-08-01

    Obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are increasingly important health problems. Previous studies of the relationship between obesity and GERD focus on indirect manifestations of GERD. Little is known about the association between obesity and objectively measured esophageal acid exposure. The aim of this study is to quantify the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and 24-h esophageal pH measurements and the status of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in patients with reflux symptoms. Data of 1,659 patients (50% male, mean age 51 +/- 14) referred for assessment of GERD symptoms between 1998 and 2008 were analyzed. These subjects underwent 24-h pH monitoring off medication and esophageal manometry. The relationship of BMI to 24-h esophageal pH measurements and LES status was studied using linear regression and multiple regression analysis. The difference of each acid exposure component was also assessed among four BMI subgroups (underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese) using analysis of variance and covariance. Increasing BMI was positively correlated with increasing esophageal acid exposure (adjusted R (2) = 0.13 for the composite pH score). The prevalence of a defective LES was higher in patients with higher BMI (p < 0.0001). Compared to patients with normal weight, obese patients are more than twice as likely to have a mechanically defective LES [OR = 2.12(1.63-2.75)]. An increase in body mass index is associated with an increase in esophageal acid exposure, whether BMI was examined as a continuous or as a categorical variable; 13% of the variation in esophageal acid exposure may be attributable to variation in BMI.

  19. [The frequency and clinical aspects of extraesophageal syndromes in elderly patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Tsukanov, V V; Kasparov, E V; Onuchina, E V; Vasyutin, A V; Butorin, N N; Amelchugova, O S; Tonkikh, Yu L

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of extraesophageal syndromes in elderly patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This cross-sectional study was conducted to compare the clinical manifestations of GERD in 1100 patients aged 60 to 75 years and in 453 patients aged 36 to 60 years. A control group consisted of 154 elderly patients without GERD and 178 mature-aged patients without this condition. GERD was diagnosed via analysis of its symptoms, esophagogastroduodenoscopy, and 24-hour pH monitoring on the basis of the Montreal consensus guidelines. Extraesophageal syndromes were detected actively using the current methods accepted to treat lung, heart, and ENT diseases and a simultaneous gastroesophageal examination. Chronic cough, asthma, chronic laryngitis, cardialgias and cardiac arrhythmias were much more common in elderly patients with GERD than in those without this condition and prevalent in patients with erosive esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus as compared with those with non-erosive reflux disease. The mature-aged patients were recorded to have similar but less pronounced trends. The authors proposed an algorithm for the management of patients with extraesophageal manifestations of GERD, the important aspect of which was two-month acid-suppressive therapy used as both diagnostic testing and empirical treatment for this pathology. The extraesophageal manifestations of GERD in elderly patients are a serious clinical problem calling for considerable attention.

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in the Greek general population: prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Spantideas, Nikolaos; Drosou, Eirini; Bougea, Anastasia; Assimakopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Population-based data regarding the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Greece are very poor. This study estimated the prevalence of GERD symptoms and their risk factors in the Greek adult population. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was answered by a randomly selected population of 340 subjects. The question regarding “heartburn, chest pain, indigestion, or stomach acid coming up” as included in the Reflux Symptom Index was used for prevalence assessment. Results The monthly prevalence of GERD symptoms was found to be 52.0% in the Greek general population, with no statistically significant difference between the two sexes (P>0.05). The age group of 65–79 years showed a higher prevalence rate of GERD. Symptom severity was found to be mild (59.3%) or moderate (27.1%). The number of cigarettes smoked daily (but not smoking duration) as well as the number of alcoholic drinks consumed daily (but not the duration of alcohol drinking) were found to be related to GERD symptoms. No reported concomitant disease or medication was found to be related with GERD symptoms. Conclusion The prevalence of GERD symptoms in the Greek general population was found to be 52.0%. Tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking but not concomitant disease or medications were found to be related with GERD symptoms. PMID:27382324

  1. Efficacy and safety of once-daily esomeprazole for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in neonatal patients.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Geoffrey; Wenzl, Tobias G; Thomson, Michael; Omari, Taher; Barker, Peter; Lundborg, Per; Illueca, Marta

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of proton pump inhibitors in infants aged <1 year with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter study, neonates (premature to 1 month corrected age; n = 52) with signs and symptoms of GERD received esomeprazole 0.5 mg/kg or placebo once daily for up to 14 days. Change from baseline in the total number of GERD symptoms (from video monitoring) and GERD-related signs (from cardiorespiratory monitoring) was assessed with simultaneous esophageal pH, impedance, cardiorespiratory, and 8-hour video monitoring. There were no significant differences between the esomeprazole and placebo groups in the percentage change from baseline in the total number of GERD-related signs and symptoms (-14.7% vs -14.1%, respectively). Mean change from baseline in total number of reflux episodes was not significantly different between esomeprazole and placebo (-7.43 vs -0.2, respectively); however, the percentage of time pH was <4.0 and the number of acidic reflux episodes >5 minutes in duration was significantly decreased with esomeprazole vs placebo (-10.7 vs 2.2 and -5.5 vs 1.0, respectively; P ≤ .0017). The number of patients with adverse events was similar between treatment groups. Signs and symptoms of GERD traditionally attributed to acidic reflux in neonates were not significantly altered by esomeprazole treatment. Esomeprazole was well tolerated and reduced esophageal acid exposure and the number of acidic reflux events in neonates. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and odds of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Busch, Evan L; Zevallos, Jose P; Olshan, Andrew F

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to excess gastric acid resulting from gastroesophageal reflux disease, also known as acid reflux or heartburn, might contribute to initiation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, particularly laryngeal cancer. Prior epidemiologic studies have reported inconsistent results. We sought to clarify this relationship using an observational study with a larger available sample size and better-characterized exposure information than most prior studies. A population-based case-control study of head and neck cancer in North Carolina with 1,340 newly diagnosed cases and 1,378 controls matched on age, race, and sex. We used unconditional logistic regression to examine associations between self-reported heartburn and development of overall head and neck cancer as well as development of cancer at specific tumor sites. Subgroup analysis by smoking and alcoholic drinking status was used to make comparisons with a previous study that used a similar study design. Overall, an increased odds of head and neck cancer was not associated with either self-reported history of heartburn symptoms (odds ratio = 0.85; 95% confidence interval 0.68, 1.06) or self-reported medical diagnosis of GERD (OR = 0.89; 95% CI 0.71, 1.11). These patterns held for specific tumor sites. For laryngopharyngeal cancer, we did not detect any associations regardless of joint smoking and alcoholic drinking status. Gastroesophageal reflux does not appear to play a role in development of head and neck cancer. 3b. Laryngoscope, 126:1091-1096, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and morbid obesity: To sleeve or not to sleeve?

    PubMed Central

    Rebecchi, Fabrizio; Allaix, Marco E; Patti, Marco G; Schlottmann, Francisco; Morino, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has reached wide popularity during the last 15 years, due to the limited morbidity and mortality rates, and the very good weight loss results and effects on comorbid conditions. However, there are concerns regarding the effects of LSG on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The interpretation of the current evidence is challenged by the fact that the LSG technique is not standardized, and most studies investigate the presence of GERD by assessing symptoms and the use of acid reducing medications only. A few studies objectively investigated gastroesophageal function and the reflux profile by esophageal manometry and 24-h pH monitoring, reporting postoperative normalization of esophageal acid exposure in up to 85% of patients with preoperative GERD, and occurrence of de novo GERD in about 5% of cases. There is increasing evidence showing the key role of the surgical technique on the incidence of postoperative GERD. Main technical issues are a relative narrowing of the mid portion of the gastric sleeve, a redundant upper part of the sleeve (both depending on the angle under which the sleeve is stapled), and the presence of a hiatal hernia. Concomitant hiatal hernia repair is recommended. To date, either medical therapy with proton pump inhibitors or conversion of LSG to laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass are the available options for the management of GERD after LSG. Recently, new minimally invasive approaches have been proposed in patients with GERD and hypotensive LES: the LINX® Reflux Management System procedure and the Stretta® procedure. Large studies are needed to assess the safety and long-term efficacy of these new approaches. In conclusion, the recent publication of pH monitoring data and the new insights in the association between sleeve morphology and GERD control have led to a wider acceptance of LSG as bariatric procedure also in obese patients with GERD, as recently stated in the 5th International Consensus

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and morbid obesity: To sleeve or not to sleeve?

    PubMed

    Rebecchi, Fabrizio; Allaix, Marco E; Patti, Marco G; Schlottmann, Francisco; Morino, Mario

    2017-04-07

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has reached wide popularity during the last 15 years, due to the limited morbidity and mortality rates, and the very good weight loss results and effects on comorbid conditions. However, there are concerns regarding the effects of LSG on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The interpretation of the current evidence is challenged by the fact that the LSG technique is not standardized, and most studies investigate the presence of GERD by assessing symptoms and the use of acid reducing medications only. A few studies objectively investigated gastroesophageal function and the reflux profile by esophageal manometry and 24-h pH monitoring, reporting postoperative normalization of esophageal acid exposure in up to 85% of patients with preoperative GERD, and occurrence of de novo GERD in about 5% of cases. There is increasing evidence showing the key role of the surgical technique on the incidence of postoperative GERD. Main technical issues are a relative narrowing of the mid portion of the gastric sleeve, a redundant upper part of the sleeve (both depending on the angle under which the sleeve is stapled), and the presence of a hiatal hernia. Concomitant hiatal hernia repair is recommended. To date, either medical therapy with proton pump inhibitors or conversion of LSG to laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass are the available options for the management of GERD after LSG. Recently, new minimally invasive approaches have been proposed in patients with GERD and hypotensive LES: the LINX ® Reflux Management System procedure and the Stretta ® procedure. Large studies are needed to assess the safety and long-term efficacy of these new approaches. In conclusion, the recent publication of pH monitoring data and the new insights in the association between sleeve morphology and GERD control have led to a wider acceptance of LSG as bariatric procedure also in obese patients with GERD, as recently stated in the 5 th International

  5. Managing gastroesophageal reflux disease in children: The role of endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Goldani, Helena AS; Nunes, Daltro LA; Ferreira, Cristina T

    2012-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a growing problem in the pediatric population and recent advances in diagnostics and therapeutics have improved their management, particularly the use of esophago-gastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Most of the current knowledge is derived from studies in adults; however there are distinct features between infant onset and adult onset GERD. Children are not just little adults and attention must be given to the stages of growth and development and how these stages impact the disease management. Although there is a lack of a gold standard test to diagnose GERD in children, EGD with biopsy is essential to assess the type and severity of tissue damage. To date, the role of endoscopy in adults and children has been to assess the extent of esophagitis and detect metaplastic changes complicating GERD; however the current knowledge points another role for the EGD with biopsy that is to rule out other potential causes of esophagitis in patients with GERD symptoms such as eosinophilic esophagitis. This review highlights special considerations about the role of EGD in the management of children with GERD. PMID:22912907

  6. Features of symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Triadafilopoulos, G; Sharma, R

    1997-11-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is considered common in the elderly and may present with various symptoms, such as heartburn, regurgitation, dysphagia, or chest pain. In this study, we evaluated the patterns of symptomatic GERD and the spectrum of disease activity in the elderly. We prospectively studied 476 predominantly male veterans who were referred for upper endoscopy because of symptoms or signs suggestive of upper gastrointestinal disease. All patients were interviewed immediately before the procedure by a physician who used a standardized symptom questionnaire. Endoscopic findings were categorized and graded according to their extent and severity. The prevalence, nature, and severity of esophageal symptoms and their relationship to endoscopic disease severity were then analyzed. Comparisons were made between two age groups, the young (age less than 65 yr old, mean age 55 yr, age range 30-65 yr), and the elderly (more than 66 yr old, mean age 72 yr, age range 66-90 yr). Heartburn without esophagitis was noted in 28% of young and 24% of elderly patients. Hiatal hernia without esophagitis was noted in 15 % of young and 18% of the elderly. The prevalence of various stages of GERD was similar in the two groups (p > 0.1, chi2 test; odds ratio: 0.983; 95% CI: 0.651-1.48). Quantitative esophageal symptom analysis revealed remarkably similar symptom severity scores for both groups for GERD stages I-IV, as well as for symptomatic controls. However, elderly patients with Barrett's esophagus were significantly less symptomatic than the young (symptom index 2.4 +/- 0.6 vs. 4.88 +/- 1.01, p < 0.02). Among symptomatic adults undergoing upper endoscopy, the elderly appear to have prevalence rates, patterns, and features of symptomatic GERD that are generally similar to those of their younger counterparts. Nevertheless, the severity of symptoms in the subgroup of elderly with Barrett's esophagus is significantly less than in the young and may contribute to poor or

  7. Factors associated with residual gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in patients receiving proton pump inhibitor maintenance therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kawara, Fumiaki; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Morita, Yoshinori; Uda, Atsushi; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Saito, Masaya; Ooi, Makoto; Ishida, Tsukasa; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Shiei; Okuno, Tatsuya; Yano, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Masaru; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Hayakumo, Takanobu; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Hirano, Takeshi; Hirai, Midori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    AIM To elucidate the factors associated with residual gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms in patients receiving proton pump inhibitor (PPI) maintenance therapy in clinical practice. METHODS The study included 39 GERD patients receiving maintenance PPI therapy. Residual symptoms were assessed using the Frequency Scale for Symptoms of GERD (FSSG) questionnaire and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). The relationships between the FSSG score and patient background factors, including the CYP2C19 genotype, were analyzed. RESULTS The FSSG scores ranged from 1 to 28 points (median score: 7.5 points), and 19 patients (48.7%) had a score of 8 points or more. The patients’ GSRS scores were significantly correlated with their FSSG scores (correlation coefficient = 0.47, P < 0.005). In erosive esophagitis patients, the FSSG scores of the CYP2C19 rapid metabolizers (RMs) were significantly higher than the scores of the poor metabolizers and intermediate metabolizers (total scores: 16.7 ± 8.6 vs 7.8 ± 5.4, P < 0.05; acid reflux-related symptom scores: 12 ± 1.9 vs 2.5 ± 0.8, P < 0.005). In contrast, the FSSG scores of the CYP2C19 RMs in the non-erosive reflux disease patients were significantly lower than those of the other patients (total scores: 5.5 ± 1.0 vs 11.8 ± 6.3, P < 0.05; dysmotility symptom-related scores: 1.0 ± 0.4 vs 6.0 ± 0.8, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION Approximately half of the GERD patients receiving maintenance PPI therapy had residual symptoms associated with a lower quality of life, and the CYP2C19 genotype appeared to be associated with these residual symptoms. PMID:28373773

  8. Factors associated with residual gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in patients receiving proton pump inhibitor maintenance therapy.

    PubMed

    Kawara, Fumiaki; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Morita, Yoshinori; Uda, Atsushi; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Saito, Masaya; Ooi, Makoto; Ishida, Tsukasa; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Shiei; Okuno, Tatsuya; Yano, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Masaru; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Hayakumo, Takanobu; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Hirano, Takeshi; Hirai, Midori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2017-03-21

    To elucidate the factors associated with residual gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms in patients receiving proton pump inhibitor (PPI) maintenance therapy in clinical practice. The study included 39 GERD patients receiving maintenance PPI therapy. Residual symptoms were assessed using the Frequency Scale for Symptoms of GERD (FSSG) questionnaire and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). The relationships between the FSSG score and patient background factors, including the CYP2C19 genotype, were analyzed. The FSSG scores ranged from 1 to 28 points (median score: 7.5 points), and 19 patients (48.7%) had a score of 8 points or more. The patients' GSRS scores were significantly correlated with their FSSG scores (correlation coefficient = 0.47, P < 0.005). In erosive esophagitis patients, the FSSG scores of the CYP2C19 rapid metabolizers (RMs) were significantly higher than the scores of the poor metabolizers and intermediate metabolizers (total scores: 16.7 ± 8.6 vs 7.8 ± 5.4, P < 0.05; acid reflux-related symptom scores: 12 ± 1.9 vs 2.5 ± 0.8, P < 0.005). In contrast, the FSSG scores of the CYP2C19 RMs in the non-erosive reflux disease patients were significantly lower than those of the other patients (total scores: 5.5 ± 1.0 vs 11.8 ± 6.3, P < 0.05; dysmotility symptom-related scores: 1.0 ± 0.4 vs 6.0 ± 0.8, P < 0.01). Approximately half of the GERD patients receiving maintenance PPI therapy had residual symptoms associated with a lower quality of life, and the CYP2C19 genotype appeared to be associated with these residual symptoms.

  9. Wireless esophageal pH capsule for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease: a multicenter clinical study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Jun; Gan, Tian; Wang, Lei; Liao, Zhuan; Tao, Xiao-Hong; Shen, Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Yan

    2014-10-28

    To investigate the feasibility and safety of pH capsule to monitor pH in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Ninety-one patients with symptoms suggestive of GERD were enrolled in this study, 46 of whom were randomized to the pH capsule group; the remaining 45 patients used the conventional catheter and pH capsule simultaneously. The pH data and traces were recorded via automatic analysis, and capsule detachment was assessed using X-ray images. All of the patients were required to complete a questionnaire regarding tolerance with the capsule. The capsules were successfully attached on the first attempt, and no early detachment of the capsules was observed. Compared to the 24-h pH data recorded with the conventional catheter, the data collected with the pH capsule showed no significant differences in 24-h esophageal acid exposure. The measurements of esophageal acid exposure over 24 h collected with the two devices showed a significant correlation (r(2) = 0.996, P < 0.001). Capsule detachment occurred spontaneously in 89 patients, and 2 capsules required endoscopic removal due to chest pain. The capsule was associated with less interference with daily activity. The wireless pH capsule provides a feasible and safe method for monitoring gastroesophageal reflux and therefore may serve as an important tool for diagnosing GERD.

  10. [Efficacy comparison of laparoscopic Nissen, Toupet and Dor fundoplication in the treatment of hiatal hernia complicated with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Su, Fuzeng; Zhang, Cheng; Ke, Limu; Wang, Zhi; Li, Yiliang; Li, Huiling; Du, Zhi

    2016-09-25

    To compare the efficacy and safety among laparoscopic Nissen, Toupet and Dor fundoplication in the treatment of hiatal hernia complicated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Clinical data of 276 patients of hiatal hernia complicated with GERD undergoing operation in our hospital from December 2012 to January 2015 were retrospectively analyzed, including 149 patients of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (Nissen group), 41 of laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication (Toupet group), and 86 patients of laparoscopic Dor fundoplication (Dor group). Esophageal reflux status, esophageal manometry, GERD Q rating scale, and postoperative recovery were compare among the three groups. Reflux status was improved significantly in the three groups after operation(all P<0.05),except that the efficacy in reducing reflux episodes and reflux longest time was not obvious in Toupet group(P>0.05). There were no significant differences in postoperative reflux time, acid reflux time ratio, reflux longest time ratio, DeMeester score among the three groups (all P>0.05). Pairwise comparison showed that Dor group was significantly better than Toupet group in reducing the number of reflux episode(14.36±10.58 vs. 29.83±19.71) and long-reflux (0.64±0.21 vs. 6.20±3.48)(both P<0.05), but Nissen group was better than these two groups in reducing the number of long-reflux (0.38±0.16, P<0.05). As compared to pre-operation, the postoperative esophageal sphincter pressure and residual pressure increased significantly, and the relaxation rate reduced significantly (all P<0.05), while the episode of ineffective swallowing increased significantly in Toupet group (11.25±2.04 vs. 6.36±3.26, P<0.05). The contrast in esophageal manometry between Toupet and Dor group showed that Dor group was better than Toupet group in the recovery of lower esophageal sphincter pressure (mean resting breathing) [(20.69±13.95) mmHg vs.(12.91±6.89) mmHg] and the decrease of ineffective swallowing [9.15±6.44 vs. 11

  11. A review of esomeprazole in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

    PubMed Central

    Kalaitzakis, Evangelos; Björnsson, Einar

    2007-01-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the drugs of choice for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Esomeprazole is the latest PPI and was developed as the S-isomer of omeprazole as an attempt to improve its pharmacokinetic properties. Esomeprazole has been reported to have a somewhat higher potency in acid inhibition than other PPIs. Despite some controversy, data from clinical trials and meta-analyses indicate that esomeprazole 40 mg od for up to 8 weeks provided higher rates of healing of erosive GERD and a greater proportion of patients with sustained resolution of heartburn, than omeprazole 20 mg, lansoprazole 30 mg, or pantoprazole 40 mg od. Esomeprazole 20 mg od has also been shown to be more effective in maintaining healing of erosive GERD compared with lansoprazole 15 mg od or pantoprazole 20 mg od. However, it is not clear whether these statistically significant differences are of major clinical importance. Esomeprazole 20 mg od is superior to placebo for treatment of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) but clinical trials have not shown any significant differences in efficacy between esomeprazole 20 mg and omeprazole 20 mg or pantoprazole 20 mg od. Lastly, although esomeprazole treatment in GERD has been reported to result in improvement of health-related quality of life (QoL) indices, no clinical trials have evaluated the possible differential effects of different PPIs on QoL in GERD. PMID:18472988

  12. Mucosal Protective Compounds in the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. A Position Paper Based on Evidence of the Romanian Society of Neurogastroenterology.

    PubMed

    Surdea-Blaga, Teodora; Băncilă, Ion; Dobru, Daniela; Drug, Vasile; Frățilă, Ovidiu; Goldiș, Adrian; Grad, Simona M; Mureșan, Crina; Nedelcu, Laurențiu; Porr, Paul J; Sporea, Ioan; Dumitrascu, Dan L

    2016-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) therapy is challenging and suppression of acid secretion or prokinetics do not cure all cases. Some drugs with protective action on the esophageal mucosa have been used alternatively or in association with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and/or prokinetics. The Romanian Society of Neurogastroenterology undertook an Evidence-Based analysis, from which this position paper evolved. We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed until October 2015, using the terms: sucralfate, guaiazulene, gaiazulene, dimethicone, alginate, antacids and gastroesophageal reflux. Forty-seven papers were included and analyzed. Several statements were elaborated regarding the use of these drugs in GERD. The evidence and recommendations were discussed between the authors. There is evidence in the medical literature suggesting the benefit of these drugs in GERD. In patients with persistent or mild reflux symptoms antacids rapidly relieve heartburn. Alginate-antacid combination is superior both over placebo and antacids to treat mild reflux symptoms, and can be used to treat persistent reflux symptoms despite acid suppressant therapy. Sucralfate is superior over placebo in alleviating GERD symptoms and can be used as maintenance therapy. Guaiazulene-dimethicone improves the quality of life in patients with GERD. Drugs used to protect the esophageal mucosa against acid are useful in alleviating chronic heartburn, especially in patients with mild reflux symptoms.

  13. Oral pH in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Sujatha, S; Jalihal, Umesh; Devi, Yashoda; Rakesh, N; Chauhan, Pallavi; Sharma, Shivani

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to compare surface pH in various parts of the oral cavity between patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and healthy controls. Using a flat pH meter sensor, fixed electrode pen type digital pH meter, oral pH levels were assessed at different mucosal sites among 34 GERD patients and 32 healthy controls. Salivary flow rates and buffering capacity were also assessed in them. A thorough oral examination was performed to screen for any oral and dental changes. A significantly lower pH of 6.65 ± 0.13 (mean ± SD) was found in the GERD group compared to control group 7.23 ± 0.12 (p < 0.05). Least pH was found in the floor of the mouth 6.594 ± 0.17 and highest in the lower labial mucosa among the GERD patients. Salivary flow rate and buffering capacity were low in these patients. Significant changes were noticed in the hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity among the GERD group. Oral mucosal pH is altered in GERD patients and may contribute to effects on the oral cavity.

  14. Food allergy in children with refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Yukselen, Ayfer; Celtik, Coskun

    2016-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and food allergy are frequent disorders of childhood. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of food allergy in children with refractory GERD. A total of 151 children resistant to pharmacologic GERD treatment underwent skin prick test, specific immunoglobulin E, eosinophil count, atopy patch test (APT), and oral food challenge, and were then divided into three groups according to the results of oral milk challenge and allergy work-up: group A1, positive oral milk challenge and positive IgE-mediated allergy test; group A2, positive milk challenge and negative IgE-mediated allergy test; and group B, negative oral milk challenge and negative allergy tests. There were 35, 30 and 86 patients in group A1, group A2 and group B, respectively. A total of 28 of 35 patients in group A1 had cow's milk allergy and the other seven patients had egg allergy. APT positivity was more common in group A2. Endoscopic esophagitis was observed in six group A1 patients and in four group A2 patients. Bloody stools, atopic dermatitis and recurrent wheezing episodes were significantly more common in group A1 than in group A2 and group B (P < 0.001, for both). Cow's milk allergy was observed frequently in children resistant to pharmacologic GERD treatment. Combined skin prick and specific IgE tests, APT and oral food challenge is essential for avoidance of unnecessary elimination diet. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  15. The Effect of Ineffective Esophageal Motility on Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, Shingo; Matsumura, Tomoaki; Ohta, Yuki; Hamanaka, Shinsaku; Ishigami, Hideaki; Taida, Takashi; Okimoto, Kenichiro; Saito, Keiko; Maruoka, Daisuke; Nakagawa, Tomoo; Katsuno, Tatsuro; Fujie, Mai; Kikuchi, Atsuko; Arai, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) is the most common gastrointestinal motility disorder. Studies have reported that IEM is related to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, the relationship between IEM and GERD remains uncertain. This study aims to clarify this relationship retrospectively. We analyzed 195 subjects who underwent high-resolution manometry between January 2011 and September 2016. Of these subjects, 72 had normal esophageal motility (NEM) and 26 had IEM. We investigated differences in the clinical characteristics, severity and duration of GERD symptoms, and comorbid extra-esophageal symptoms of the subjects. Comorbid extra-esophageal symptoms were assessed with the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale questionnaire. Investigation-defined GERD was diagnosed when erosive esophagitis or abnormal multichannel intraluminal impedance was present. We found no significant difference in the prevalence of IEM between patients with and without GERD (37.5 and 21.1%, respectively; p = 0.174). There were no differences in age, gender, body mass index, presence of hiatal hernia, or duration of GERD between the groups. Compared to patients with NEM, those with IEM were significantly less likely to have comorbid extra-esophageal symptoms (p < 0.05). There is no association between IEM and GERD. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. [ESPECIALLY CHRONIC RHINOSINUSITIS ASSOCIATED WITH GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Temnikova, I V; Onuchina, E V; Subbotina, M V; Kozlova, N A

    2015-01-01

    to study the clinical and laboratory features of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The study involved 87 patients with complaints of difficulty in nasal breathing and 30 healthy volunteers with no pathology ENT and GERD. The diagnosis of CRS met the criteria EPOS 2012. Diagnosis of GERD was performed based on the recommendations of the Montreal consensus. All investigated conducted a survey for the presence of esophageal and extraesophageal manifestations of GERD, fibroesophagogastroduodenoscopy, LOR examination with the use of endoscopes, rhinoscopy, laryngoscopy, computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses, pH-metry mucous secretions of the nose and pharynx using visual test - strips, microbiological examination of discharge from the middle of the nose stroke. Association of CRS with GERD with GERD compared with impaired nasal breathing inflammatory and non-inflammatory genesis in the absence of GERD and healthy volunteers accompanied by a large variety and frequency of symptoms, endoscopic signs of laryngitis back, reducing the pH of the pharynx, the change in quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the microflora of the nasal mucosa and paranasal sinuses.

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in COPD: links and risks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Annemarie L; Goldstein, Roger S

    2015-01-01

    COPD is a long-term condition associated with considerable disability with a clinical course characterized by episodes of worsening respiratory signs and symptoms associated with exacerbations. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common gastrointestinal conditions in the general population and has emerged as a comorbidity of COPD. GERD may be diagnosed by both symptomatic approaches (including both typical and atypical symptoms) and objective measurements. Based on a mix of diagnostic approaches, the prevalence of GERD in COPD ranges from 17% to 78%. Although GERD is usually confined to the lower esophagus in some individuals, it may be associated with pulmonary microaspiration of gastric contents. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to GERD in COPD originate from gastroesophageal dysfunction, including altered pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (which normally protect against GERD) and changes in esophageal motility. Proposed respiratory contributions to the development of GERD include respiratory medications that may alter esophageal sphincter tone and changes in respiratory mechanics, with increased lung hyperinflation compromising the antireflux barrier. Although the specific cause and effect relationship between GERD and COPD has not been fully elucidated, GERD may influence lung disease severity and has been identified as a significant predictor of acute exacerbations of COPD. Further clinical effects could include a poorer health-related quality of life and an increased cost in health care, although these factors require further clarification. There are both medical and surgical options available for the treatment of GERD in COPD and while extensive studies in this population have not been undertaken, this comorbidity may be amenable to treatment.

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in COPD: links and risks

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Annemarie L; Goldstein, Roger S

    2015-01-01

    COPD is a long-term condition associated with considerable disability with a clinical course characterized by episodes of worsening respiratory signs and symptoms associated with exacerbations. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common gastrointestinal conditions in the general population and has emerged as a comorbidity of COPD. GERD may be diagnosed by both symptomatic approaches (including both typical and atypical symptoms) and objective measurements. Based on a mix of diagnostic approaches, the prevalence of GERD in COPD ranges from 17% to 78%. Although GERD is usually confined to the lower esophagus in some individuals, it may be associated with pulmonary microaspiration of gastric contents. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to GERD in COPD originate from gastroesophageal dysfunction, including altered pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (which normally protect against GERD) and changes in esophageal motility. Proposed respiratory contributions to the development of GERD include respiratory medications that may alter esophageal sphincter tone and changes in respiratory mechanics, with increased lung hyperinflation compromising the antireflux barrier. Although the specific cause and effect relationship between GERD and COPD has not been fully elucidated, GERD may influence lung disease severity and has been identified as a significant predictor of acute exacerbations of COPD. Further clinical effects could include a poorer health-related quality of life and an increased cost in health care, although these factors require further clarification. There are both medical and surgical options available for the treatment of GERD in COPD and while extensive studies in this population have not been undertaken, this comorbidity may be amenable to treatment. PMID:26392769

  19. The added value of quantitative analysis of on-therapy impedance-pH parameters in distinguishing refractory non-erosive reflux disease from functional heartburn.

    PubMed

    Frazzoni, M; Conigliaro, R; Mirante, V G; Melotti, G

    2012-02-01

    By analysis of symptom-reflux association, endoscopy-negative refractory heartburn can be related to acid/non-acid refluxes with impedance-pH monitoring. Unfortunately, patients frequently do not report symptoms during the test. We aimed to assess the contribution of quantitative analysis of impedance-pH parameters added to symptom-reflux association in evaluating patients with endoscopy-negative heartburn refractory to high-dose proton pump inhibitor therapy. The symptom association probability (SAP), the symptom index (SI), the esophageal acid exposure time and the number of distal and proximal refluxes were assessed at on-therapy impedance-pH monitoring. Relationships with hiatal hernia and manometric findings were also evaluated. Eighty patients were prospectively studied. Refractory heartburn was more frequently related to reflux by a positive SAP/SI and/or abnormal impedance-pH parameters (52/80 cases) (65%) than by a positive SAP/SI only (38/80 cases) (47%) (P = 0.038). In patients with refractory non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) defined by a positive SAP/SI and/or abnormal impedance-pH parameters, the prevalence of hiatal hernia was significantly higher (56%vs 21%, P = 0.007) and the mean lower esophageal sphincter tone was significantly lower (18.7 vs 25.8 mmHg, P = 0.005) than in those (35%) with reflux-unrelated, i.e., functional heartburn (FH). On the contrary, no significant difference was observed subdividing patients according to a positive SAP/SI only. Quantitative analysis of impedance-pH parameters added to symptom-reflux association allows a subdivision of refractory-heartburn patients into refractory NERD and FH which is substantiated by pathophysiological findings and which restricts the diagnosis of FH to one third of cases. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Current concepts of otitis media in adults as a reflux-related disease.

    PubMed

    Sone, Michihiko; Kato, Toshinari; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2013-08-01

    To review the findings of otitis media in adults in relation to supraesophageal reflux of gastrointestinal contents and summarize current concepts. Literature published in English-language journals from 2001 to the present identified by searching electronic databases (MEDLINE and Web of Science). Clinical articles that contained the terms reflux, ear, otitis media, and adult and relevant animal studies. Findings of searchable case reports and results of animal studies were included. Current findings were reviewed for the following points: 1) proposed effect of reflux, 2) prevalence and characteristics, 3) risk factors, and 4) treatment. Published literature concerning reflux and otitis media in adults is limited to clinical case series. Reflux is likely present in a significant number of adult cases with otitis media and may lead to Eustachian tube dysfunction in such subjects. Reflux in adult subjects with otitis media is potentially different from the physiologic events observed in children, but the causal link between them remains unclear. Evaluation of more cases that could be diagnosed as reflux-induced otitis media is necessary for better understanding of the disease entity.

  1. Surgical management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jancelewicz, Tim; Lopez, Monica E; Downard, Cynthia D; Islam, Saleem; Baird, Robert; Rangel, Shawn J; Williams, Regan F; Arnold, Meghan A; Lal, Dave; Renaud, Elizabeth; Grabowski, Julia; Dasgupta, Roshni; Austin, Mary; Shelton, Julia; Cameron, Danielle; Goldin, Adam B

    2017-08-01

    The goal of this systematic review by the American Pediatric Surgical Association Outcomes and Evidence-Based Practice Committee was to derive recommendations from the medical literature regarding the surgical treatment of pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Five questions were addressed by searching the MEDLINE, Cochrane, Embase, Central, and National Guideline Clearinghouse databases using relevant search terms. Consensus recommendations were derived for each question based on the best available evidence. There was insufficient evidence to formulate recommendations for all questions. Fundoplication does not affect the rate of hospitalization for aspiration pneumonia, apnea, or reflux-related symptoms. Fundoplication is effective in reducing all parameters of esophageal acid exposure without altering esophageal motility. Laparoscopic fundoplication may be comparable to open fundoplication with regard to short-term clinical outcomes. Partial fundoplication and complete fundoplication are comparable in effectiveness for subjective control of GERD. Fundoplication may benefit GERD patients with asthma, but may not improve outcomes in patients with neurologic impairment or esophageal atresia. Overall GERD recurrence rates are likely below 20%. High-quality evidence is lacking regarding the surgical management of GERD in the pediatric population. Definitive conclusions regarding the effectiveness of fundoplication are limited by patient heterogeneity and lack of a standardized outcomes reporting framework. Systematic review of level 1-4 studies. Level 1-4 (mainly level 3-4). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Prevention for gastroesophageal reflux disease after gastric restriction interventions].

    PubMed

    Fishman, M B; Chie, Ma; Muzhikov, S P

    2014-01-01

    The article analyzed the results of surgery using tree gastric restriction laparoscopic operations which led to high possibility of the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Laparoscopic stomach length resection was performed in 327 (68.1%) out of 480 (62.1%) patients. Laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery took place in 142 (29.5%) cases and laparoscopic biliary-pancreatic bypass surgery--in 11 (2.3%). The diagnosis of GERD was established in 193 (40.2%) patients before the operation and it was usually accompanied by hernia of the esophageal opening (HEO). The patients were arranged in 4 groups. The first group had operations using the standard method and it included 287 (59.8%) patients without any signs of GERD or HEO. The patients of the second group (84 (17.5%) had signs of GERD and HEO and standard operations with a hernia removal and cruroraphy were carried out. The patients of the third group 109 (22.7%) had initial signs of GERD and the standard method was used for them. The developed method was applied for patients of the fourth group (132 (27.5%). All the operations were completed by antireflux valve formation, but in the cases of GERD and HEO presence, they accomplished by hernia removal, cruroraphy. After performing standard operations, the signs of GERD were noted in 51.5% of cases. Thus, patients of the first group (148 (51.5%) had the signs of GERD. It was noted, that the signs of GERD were presented in patients of the second group (79 (94%) and it numbered 97 (89%) patients of the third group. In the case of the fourth group, signs of GERD were in 14 (10.6%) patients.

  3. Characteristics of Sleep Disturbances in Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Iwakura, Narika; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Shiba, Masatsugu; Ochi, Masahiro; Fukuda, Takashi; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Watanabe, Toshio; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is strongly associated with sleep disturbances; however, the detailed differences in the characteristics of sleep disturbances between GERD and non-GERD patients are unknown. The aim of the present study was to analyze the clinical characteristics as well as health-related quality of life in GERD and non-GERD patients with sleep disturbances. Methods Three hundred and fifty patients, including 124 patients with GERD and 226 patients without GERD, completed a self-administered questionnaire that evaluated clinical information. The Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and 8-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-8) were also used. Sleep disturbance was considered to be present if the PSQI was >5.5. Results The prevalence of sleep disturbances was significantly higher in the GERD patients (66/124, 53.9%) than in the non-GERD patients (89/226, 39.3%). Depression and anxiety were significantly more common in the subjects with sleep disturbances than in those without sleep disturbances, although there were no differences between the GERD and non-GERD patients. Among the subjects with sleep disturbances, daytime sleepiness was more common in the GERD patients than in the non-GERD patients. The subjects with sleep disturbances had a poorer health-related quality of life. The physical components of quality of life were impaired, particularly in the GERD patients with sleep disturbances. Conclusion GERD patients with sleep disturbances commonly experience daytime sleepiness and an impaired health-related quality of life, especially in terms of physical components.

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with diabetes: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Mariko; Miwa, Takashi; Kawai, Takashi; Odawara, Masato

    2015-03-01

    Some studies report that complications of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occur more frequently in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) than in non-diabetic patients. This study used transnasal endoscopy to elucidate the current status of concurrent GERD in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to examine the associations between intraesophageal pressure and GERD, as well as other neuropathic conditions. The study included 57 outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mean age was 67 years and the duration of DM was 13 years. The mean hemoglobin A1c was 6.8%. Transnasal endoscopic evaluation items were (i) the presence or absence of esophagitis and its severity; (ii) intraesophageal pressure; and (iii) Helicobacter pylori status, which was evaluated by endoscopic findings, such as the presence or absence of gastritis and peptic ulcer, and by urea breath test. Of 57 patients, 24 (42.1%) were given a diagnosis of GERD based on endoscopy. Patients with concurrent GERD were younger, had shorter duration of DM, and were taller and heavier. Interestingly, no difference in body mass index was observed. There was no significant association between the presence of concurrent GERD and diabetic complications, including peripheral neuropathy, and infection or non-infection with H. pylori. Although there was no significant association between the presence of concurrent GERD and intraesophageal pressure values, we found aging, reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, and the presence of autonomic nerve symptoms to correlate with reduced intraesophageal pressure. The results of this study could be used to answer the question of whether or not endoscopic GERD is a diabetic complication; however, further study is required. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Foods Inducing Typical Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Jung Wan; Joo, Moon Kyung; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lee, Beom Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Byun, Kwan Soo; Bak, Young-Tae

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Several specific foods are known to precipitate gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms and GERD patients are usually advised to avoid such foods. However, foods consumed daily are quite variable according to regions, cultures, etc. This study was done to elucidate the food items which induce typical GERD symptoms in Korean patients. Methods One hundred and twenty-six Korean patients with weekly typical GERD symptoms were asked to mark all food items that induced typical GERD symptoms from a list containing 152 typical foods consumed daily in Korea. All patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy followed by 24-hour ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring. The definition of “GERD” was if either of the 2 studies revealed evidence of GERD, and “possible GERD” if both studies were negative. Results One hundred and twenty-six cases (51 GERD and 75 possible GERD) were enrolled. In 19 (37.3%) of 51 GERD cases and in 17 (22.7%) of 75 possible GERD cases, foods inducing typical GERD symptoms were identified. In the GERD group (n = 19), frequent symptom-inducers were hot spicy stews, rice cakes, ramen noodles, fried foods, and topokki. In the possible GERD group (n = 17), frequent symptom-inducers were hot spicy stews, fried foods, doughnuts, breads, ramen noodles, coffee, pizza, topokki, rice cakes, champon noodles, and hotdogs. Conclusions In one-third of GERD patients, foods inducing typical symptoms were identified. Hot spicy stews, rice cakes, ramen noodles, fried foods, and topokki were the foods frequently inducing typical symptoms in Korea. The list of foods frequently inducing typical GERD symptoms needs to be modified based on their own local experiences. PMID:28147346

  6. Foods Inducing Typical Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jung Wan; Joo, Moon Kyung; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lee, Beom Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Byun, Kwan Soo; Bak, Young-Tae

    2017-07-30

    Several specific foods are known to precipitate gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms and GERD patients are usually advised to avoid such foods. However, foods consumed daily are quite variable according to regions, cultures, etc. This study was done to elucidate the food items which induce typical GERD symptoms in Korean patients. One hundred and twenty-six Korean patients with weekly typical GERD symptoms were asked to mark all food items that induced typical GERD symptoms from a list containing 152 typical foods consumed daily in Korea. All patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy followed by 24-hour ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring. The definition of "GERD" was if either of the 2 studies revealed evidence of GERD, and "possible GERD" if both studies were negative. One hundred and twenty-six cases (51 GERD and 75 possible GERD) were enrolled. In 19 (37.3%) of 51 GERD cases and in 17 (22.7%) of 75 possible GERD cases, foods inducing typical GERD symptoms were identified. In the GERD group (n = 19), frequent symptom-inducers were hot spicy stews, rice cakes, ramen noodles, fried foods, and topokki. In the possible GERD group (n = 17), frequent symptom-inducers were hot spicy stews, fried foods, doughnuts, breads, ramen noodles, coffee, pizza, topokki, rice cakes, champon noodles, and hotdogs. In one-third of GERD patients, foods inducing typical symptoms were identified. Hot spicy stews, rice cakes, ramen noodles, fried foods, and topokki were the foods frequently inducing typical symptoms in Korea. The list of foods frequently inducing typical GERD symptoms needs to be modified based on their own local experiences.

  7. [Post-cholecystectomy condition: duodeno-gastric reflux and bile acid concentration in the gastric juice].

    PubMed

    Koelsch, K A; Kühne, C; Zemlin, C

    1979-07-01

    In cholecystectomized patients highly significantly more frequently a duodenogastric reflux was found than in a group of patients with a healthy abdomen and a group of patients with cholelithiasis. The average concentration of bile acid in the gastric juice was after the removal of the gall-bladder manifoldly higher than in the control groups. The number of patients with concentrated reflux was also highly significantly larger than in patients with cholelithiasis not operated on and in patients with a healthy abdomen. Despite the high reflux rate and the high concentration of the bile acids influencing on the mucous membrane of the stomach the number of patients with ulcera ventriculi was not significantly larger than in a group of not cholecystectomized persons. These observations plead for the fact that the bile acids in the duodenogastric reflux alone are not to be regarded as an ulcerogenic agent, but that perhaps other components of the duodenal juice have to be considered as causes of lesions of the gastric mucous membrane.

  8. Work productivity and activity impairment in gastroesophageal reflux disease in Korean full-time employees: a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Shin, Woon Geon; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Gwang Ha; Shim, Ki-Nam; Kim, Jeong Wook; Kim, Jin Il; Kim, Jae Gyu; Kim, Jae J; Yim, Da-Hae; Park, Sue K; Park, Soo-Heon

    2012-04-01

    The costs of gastroesophageal reflux disease have not been assessed in Asia, even though the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease is gradually increasing. We evaluated work presenteeism and absenteeism as indirect costs of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Korea. This was a cross-sectional and multicentre study using patient-reported outcome instruments. A total of 1009 full-time employees who visited the gastrointestinal department for any reason (281 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and 728 controls) were included. Main outcomes were presenteeism and absenteeism measured as work productivity loss and monetary cost per week. Absenteeism and presenteeism were significantly higher in the gastroesophageal reflux disease than the control group (1.49% vs. 0.46%, P=0.0010; 34.13% vs. 9.23%, P<0.0001). Loss of work productivity was significantly greater in the gastroesophageal reflux disease than the control group (33.09% vs. 9.02%; P<0.0001). This loss of work productivity difference between the two groups represented an additional productivity loss of 11.7h/week in the gastroesophageal reflux disease group compared with the control group. Assuming average hourly wages of $14.12, the weekly burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease reached $165.07 per person. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was associated with substantial work productivity loss, mainly due to presenteeism rather than absenteeism, in Korean full-time employees. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Prospective study of polydimethylsiloxane vs dextranomer/hyaluronic acid injection for treatment of vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Moore, Katherine; Bolduc, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    Endoscopic injection of a bulking agent is becoming a first-line treatment for low grade vesicoureteral reflux. We prospectively compared the efficacy of 2 such products commercially available in Canada. A total of 275 patients with documented grade I to V vesicoureteral reflux were prospectively enrolled in a comparative study between April 2005 and February 2011 to be randomly treated endoscopically with either polydimethylsiloxane (Macroplastique®) or dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (Deflux®). Of the ureters 202 were treated with polydimethylsiloxane and 197 with dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer. Patients were followed with voiding cystourethrography at 3 months and renal ultrasonography at 3 months and at 1 year. Median followup was 4.3 years. The primary outcome was surgical success (resolution vs nonresolution), and secondary outcomes included occurrence of adverse events. Vesicoureteral reflux was fully corrected in 182 of 202 ureters (90%) treated with polydimethylsiloxane, compared to 159 of 197 (81%) treated with dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (p <0.05). Obstruction was found in 5 ureters. Univariate and multivariate analyses did not allow identification of any characteristics that could explain the significant difference in the success rates except for the type of product used. We present the largest known prospective evaluation comparing 2 bulking agents for the treatment of vesicoureteral reflux. Endoscopic injection of polydimethylsiloxane resulted in a better success rate than dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer. The rate of resolution obtained with the latter is lower than those previously published due to the inclusion of high grade reflux. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical characteristics and effectiveness of lansoprazole in Japanese patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Miwa, Hiroto; Sanada, Katsuyuki; Miyata, Koji; Haruma, Ken

    2014-04-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) frequently have symptoms of dyspepsia in addition to reflux symptoms. Treatment options for dyspepsia are not standardized. The aim of this study was to clarify the therapeutic effect of lansoprazole on dyspepsia in Japanese patients with GERD. GERD patients with dyspepsia were enrolled and treated with lansoprazole 15 or 30 mg once daily for 4 weeks. Reflux and dyspeptic symptoms were assessed by questionnaires before treatment, and 2 and 4 weeks after the start of lansoprazole treatment. In the effectiveness analysis set (n = 12,653), heartburn was reported by 91.6 % of patients at study enrollment. Postprandial fullness was the most frequently reported dyspepsia symptom at the start of the study, reported by 79.0 % of enrolled patients. After 4 weeks of lansoprazole treatment, heartburn symptoms were improved in 75.7 % of patients and symptoms of postprandial fullness were improved in 68.7 % of patients. The therapeutic effect of low and high doses of lansoprazole on dyspepsia, as well as on reflux symptoms, was approximately 10 % higher in patients with endoscopy-confirmed erosive esophagitis (60.1-82.2 %), than in patients with non-erosive reflux diseases (53.0-73.3 %). Lansoprazole was well tolerated. In this large-scale clinical study, lansoprazole effectively relieved dyspepsia in addition to reflux symptoms in patients with GERD.

  11. Ratio between proximal/distal gastroesophageal reflux does not discriminate abnormal proximal reflux.

    PubMed

    Neto, Sebastião Carlos Pannocchia; Herbella, Fernando A M; Silva, Luciana C; Patti, Marco G

    2014-04-01

    The threshold for pathologic proximal acid reflux is a controversial topic. Most values previously published are based on absolute numbers. We hypothesized that a relative value representing the quantitative relation between the amount of acid reflux that reaches proximal levels and the amount of distal reflux would be a more adequate parameter for defining pathologic proximal reflux. We studied 20 healthy volunteers (median age 30 years, 70 % women) without gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); 50 patients (median age 51 years, 60 % women) with esophageal symptoms of GERD (heartburn, regurgitation); and 50 patients (median age 49 years, 60 % women) with extra-esophageal symptoms of GERD. All individuals underwent manometry and dual-probe pH monitoring. GERD was defined as a DeMeester score >14.7. The proximal/distal reflux ratio was calculated for all six parameters that constitute the DeMeester score. Absolute numbers for proximal reflux were not different for the three groups except for the number of episodes of reflux, which was higher for patients with GERD and esophageal symptoms than for patients with GERD and extra-esophageal symptoms (p = 0.007). The number of episodes of distal reflux reaching proximal levels was significantly higher in volunteers than in all patients with GERD and significantly higher in patients with GERD and esophageal symptoms than in those with extra-esophageal symptoms. Our results suggest that the proximal/distal reflux ratio is not a good normative value for defining proximal reflux.

  12. Psychological modulation in patients surgically intervened for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lara, F J Pérez; Carranque, G; Oehling, H; Hernández, J M; Oliva, H

    2014-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been related with certain psychological dimensions. The influence of mood, emotional intelligence, and perceived quality of life on clinical symptoms and outcome of antireflux surgery was evaluated in GERD patients with and without hiatal hernia. The study included 61 patients who were diagnosed with GERD between 2003 and 2008: 16 of them without hiatal hernia (group A) and 45 of them with hiatal hernia (group B). All of these patients had undergone laparoscopic antireflux surgery. Patients were clinically examined and evaluated with the following instruments: Short Form (SF)-36 Health Survey, Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale, and Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS)-24. Proportions were compared by using the chi-squared test; averages were compared by using the Student's t-test (with Bonferroni's correction). In general, our patients intervened for GERD showed results lower than normal or close to the lower limit of normal in the administered tests. Patients in the group without hernia were younger (P < 0.001) and with lower American Society of Anaesthesiologists risk. They showed higher scores in the SF-36 dimensions: Physical Functioning, Physical Role and Emotional Role, and lower scores in the Social Role (P < 0.001). They showed lower scores in the Emotional dimension of Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (P = 0.0068) and worse results in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression subscales of Anxiety (P < 0.001) and Depression (not significant). Men in the group without hernia showed higher scores than men in the group with hernia in the TMMS subscales corresponding to Emotional Clarity and Emotional Repair (P < 0.001). Women in the group with hernia showed higher scores than women in the group without hernia regarding Emotional Clarity (P = 0.0012). GERD patients showed poor results in all the tests, and patients without hiatal hernia compared with patients with hernia showed

  13. The prevalence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease and esophageal dysmotility in Chinese patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Hobson, Anthony Robert; Shang, Zhan Min; Pei, Yan Xiang; Gao, Yan; Wang, Jian Xin; Huang, Wan Nong

    2015-02-19

    The cause of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) remains unknown, yet gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is highly prevalent in this population. GERD prevalence was studied, and esophageal function tests (EFT) were assessed in Chinese IPF patients. We prospectively studied 69 IPF patients who undertook both stationary High Resolution esophageal Manometry/Impedance (HRiM) and 24-hour esophageal Multi-Channel Intraluminal Impedance with pH Recordings (MII/pH). Patients were divided into GERD+ and GERD- groups according to pH results. Controls were HRiM treated healthy volunteers, and patients without IPF received HRiM and MII/pH diagnosed with GERD. 69 IPF patients, 62 healthy volunteers, and 88 IPF negative GERD patients were selected. GERD prevalence in IPF was 43/69 (62.3%), and 58.1% of patients presented with at least one typical symptom. Symptoms had a sensitivity of 58.1%, a specificity of 61.6%, a positive predictive value of 71.4% and a negative predictive of 47.1%. Compared with healthy volunteers, IPF patients had significantly decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP), upper esophageal sphincter pressure (UESP) and complete bolus transit rate (CBTR). By contrast, IPF patients had increased total bolus transit time and prevalence of weak peristalsis. MII/pH showed that one third of IPF patients had abnormal distal and proximal reflux, especially non-acid reflux. Compared with GERD patients without IPF, GERD patients with IPF had significantly decreased CBTR and UESP with increased bolus exposure time. GERD prevalence in IPF was high, but symptoms alone were an unreliable predictor of reflux. IPF patients had lower LESP and UESP, impaired esophageal peristalsis and bolus clearance function with more proximal reflux events.

  14. Oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing prevent gastrooesophageal reflux disease in dogs after oesophageal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ji-Gang; Liu, Quan-Xing; Den, Xu-Feng; Min, Jia-Xin

    2014-12-14

    To examine the efficiency of oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing technique in decreasing the rate of postoperative gastrooesophageal reflux disease in a dog model. We operated on 10 dogs in this study. First, we resected a 5-cm portion of the distal oesophagus and then restored the continuity of the oesophageal and gastric walls by end-to-end anastomosis. A group of five dogs was subjected to the oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing technique, whereas another group (control) of five dogs was subjected to the stapling technique after oesophagectomy. The symptom of gastrooesophageal reflux was recorded by 24-h pH oesophageal monitoring. Endoscopy and barium swallow examination were performed on all dogs. Anastomotic leakage was observed by X-ray imaging, whereas benign anastomotic stricture and mucosal damage were observed by endoscopy. None of the 10 dogs experienced anastomotic leakage after oesophagectomy. Four dogs in the new technology group resumed regular feeding, whereas only two of the dogs in the control group tolerated solid food intake. pH monitoring demonstrated that 25% of the dogs in the experimental group exhibited reflux and that none had mucosal damage consistent with reflux. Conversely, both reflux and mucosal damage were observed in all dogs in the control group. The oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing technique can improve the postoperative quality of life through the long-term elimination of reflux oesophagitis and decreased stricture formation after primary oesophageal anastomosis.

  15. Oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing prevent gastrooesophageal reflux disease in dogs after oesophageal anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ji-Gang; Liu, Quan-Xing; Den, Xu-Feng; Min, Jia-Xin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To examine the efficiency of oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing technique in decreasing the rate of postoperative gastrooesophageal reflux disease in a dog model. METHODS: We operated on 10 dogs in this study. First, we resected a 5-cm portion of the distal oesophagus and then restored the continuity of the oesophageal and gastric walls by end-to-end anastomosis. A group of five dogs was subjected to the oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing technique, whereas another group (control) of five dogs was subjected to the stapling technique after oesophagectomy. The symptom of gastrooesophageal reflux was recorded by 24-h pH oesophageal monitoring. Endoscopy and barium swallow examination were performed on all dogs. Anastomotic leakage was observed by X-ray imaging, whereas benign anastomotic stricture and mucosal damage were observed by endoscopy. RESULTS: None of the 10 dogs experienced anastomotic leakage after oesophagectomy. Four dogs in the new technology group resumed regular feeding, whereas only two of the dogs in the control group tolerated solid food intake. pH monitoring demonstrated that 25% of the dogs in the experimental group exhibited reflux and that none had mucosal damage consistent with reflux. Conversely, both reflux and mucosal damage were observed in all dogs in the control group. CONCLUSION: The oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing technique can improve the postoperative quality of life through the long-term elimination of reflux oesophagitis and decreased stricture formation after primary oesophageal anastomosis. PMID:25516655

  16. Gaviscon and domperidon responsive apnea episodes associated with gastro-esophageal reflux disease in twins.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Huseyin; Eren, Abdulkadir; Kara, Semra

    2015-01-01

    The possible pathophysiology of the relationship between gastro-esophageal reflux disease and apnea of prematurity has been widely investigated. Various physiological protective reflex responses provide a plausible biological link between gastro-esophageal reflux and apnea of prematurity. It is uncertain whether or not there is a causal relationship between the two diseases. PATIENT'S FINDINGS: Twins were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit due to feeding problems. Physical examination was normal except for reticulated, blueviolet skin changes. Short apneic attacks occurred on the first day in twin 1 and on the second day in twin 2, and these were initially treated by stimulation and increased ambient O2 concentration. Then, we conducted methylxanthine and continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Laboratory and radiological analysis were normal. As gastro-esophageal reflux disease was thought to be the causes of the treatment-refractory apnea, therapy with gaviscon and domperidon was begun for both cases. Apneic attacks did not recur after gaviscon and domperidon therapy. Pharmacological therapy for gastro-esophageal reflux disease has not definitively been shown to be effective in improving symptoms and hence, should be reserved especially for infants with treatment refractory apnea episodes suspected as being gastro-esophageal reflux in premature infants.

  17. Randomized controlled trial of transoral incisionless fundoplication vs. proton pump inhibitors for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Witteman, Bart P L; Conchillo, Jose M; Rinsma, Nicolaas F; Betzel, Bark; Peeters, Andrea; Koek, Ger H; Stassen, Laurents P S; Bouvy, Nicole D

    2015-04-01

    Transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) was developed in an attempt to create a minimally invasive endoscopic procedure that mimics antireflux surgery. The objective of this trial was to evaluate effectiveness of TIF compared with proton pump inhibition in a population consisting of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients controlled with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) who opted for an endoscopic intervention over lifelong drug dependence. Patients with chronic GERD were randomized (2:1) for TIF or continuation of PPI therapy. American Society of Anesthesiologists >2, body mass index >35 kg/m(2), hiatal hernia >2 cm, and esophageal motility disorders were exclusion criteria. Primary outcome measure was GERD-related quality of life. Secondary outcome measures were esophageal acid exposure, number of reflux episodes, PPI usage, appearance of the gastroesophageal valve, and healing of reflux esophagitis. Crossover for the PPI group was allowed after 6 months. A total of 60 patients (TIF n=40, PPI n=20, mean body mass index 26 kg/m(2), 37 male) were included. At 6 months, GERD symptoms were more improved in the TIF group compared with the PPI group (P<0.001), with a similar improvement of distal esophageal acid exposure (P=0.228) compared with baseline. The pH normalization for TIF group and PPI group was 50% and 63%, respectively. All patients allocated for PPI treatment opted for crossover. At 12 months, quality of life remained improved after TIF compared with baseline (P<0.05), but no improvement in esophageal acid exposure compared with baseline was found (P=0.171) and normalization of pH was accomplished in only 29% in conjunction with deteriorated valve appearances at endoscopy and resumption of PPIs in 61%. Although TIF resulted in an improved GERD-related quality of life and produced a short-term improvement of the antireflux barrier in a selected group of GERD patients, no long-term objective reflux control was achieved.

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux disease as an etiology of sleep disturbance in subjects with insomnia and minimal reflux symptoms: a pilot study of prevalence and response to therapy.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Nicholas J; Madanick, Ryan D; Alattar, Maha; Morgan, Douglas R; Davis, Paris H; Galanko, Joseph A; Spacek, Melissa B; Vaughn, Bradley V

    2008-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a well-recognized cause of impaired sleep in patients with frequent GERD symptoms, as well as those with sleep apnea. GERD's role in sleep disturbance of minimally symptomatic patients with poor sleep quality is less clear. We aimed to define the prevalence of GERD-related sleep disturbance in minimally-symptomatic subjects with demonstrated insomnia, and to assess the changes in sleep efficiency in these subjects after vigorous acid suppression. We recruited subjects aged 18-75 years reporting at least 6 months of insomnia, and sleep difficulty at least three nights per week. Subjects with a BMI > 30, a history of snoring or ongoing use of proton pump inhibitor or H2 receptor antagonist were excluded. Subjects underwent concurrent sleep study with dual channel 24-h pH study. Sleep efficiency, defined as the percentage of time after sleep initiation that the subject actually slept, and spontaneous arousal index, defined as the number of arousals per hour, were calculated. Those with a sleep study demonstrating poor sleep quality (sleep efficiency of < 83%, and > 10 arousals/h for those aged < 45, and > 15 for those who were 45 or older) and no obstructive sleep apnea were treated with rabeprazole 20 mg PO BID x 14 days. After 14 days, the subjects underwent repeat sleep study with pH monitoring. The GERD Symptom Assessment Scale (GSAS), the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ) were administered to subjects at study inception and after 2 weeks of therapy. Twenty-four subjects reporting insomnia were enrolled, and 20 met criteria for disordered sleep and no OSA. Seventeen completed both the first and second studies, and 16 were adequate for analysis. Baseline GSAS demonstrated trivial or no reflux symptoms in the cohort (no subject scored > 8 out of 45 on GSAS, corresponding to a median rating of reflux symptoms of "not at all"). Four of 16 subjects (25%) demonstrated

  19. Proton pump inhibitors in gastroesophageal reflux disease: "a custom-tailored therapeutic regimen".

    PubMed

    Sobrino-Cossío, Sergio; López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Remes-Troche, José María; Galvis-García, Elymir Soraya; Soto-Pérez, Julio César; Teramoto-Matsubara, Oscar; Morales-Arámbula, Miguel; Orozco-Gamiz, Antonio; Tamayo de-la-Cuesta, José Luis; Mateos, Gualberto; Jiménez, Arturo; Sáez, Adolfo; Vargas, José Antonio

    2012-07-01

    The Montreal Definition and Classification divides Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) into esophageal symptomatic syndromes (and with mucosal damage) and extraesophageal syndromes (with acid established association and proposed association). In typical GERD symptoms, an 8-week treatment with PPIs is satisfactory in most cases (> 90%). Response rates to PPIs in GERD are highly variable, as they also rely on an appropriate clinical diagnosis of the disease; endoscopy differentiates the macroscopic GERD phenotype. The non-erosive variety (50-70% prevalence) has a different symptomatic response rate, as gastric acid is not the sole etiology of symptoms. The possible explanations of treatment failure include treatment adherence, PPI metabolism alterations and characteristics, and inadequate diagnosis. Refractory symptoms are related to gastric content neutralization by the chronic use of PPIs.Extraesophageal manifestations are associated with other pathophysiological mechanisms where an autonomic nervous system disturbance gives rise to symptoms. In these clinical entities, the relationship between symptoms and acid needs to be established in order to determine the use of PPIs, or consider other drugs. In other words, so as to "custom-tailor the best-fitting therapy" we need to answer the questions for whom, for what, how and for how long. Finally, PPI safety and tolerability are factors to be considered in elderly patients requiring chronic PPI use, who usually have chronic concomitant illnesses.

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux disease after peroral endoscopic myotomy: Analysis of clinical, procedural and functional factors, associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease and esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Familiari, Pietro; Greco, Santi; Gigante, Giovanni; Calì, Anna; Boškoski, Ivo; Onder, Graziano; Perri, Vincenzo; Costamagna, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) does not include any antireflux procedure, resulting in a certain risk of iatrogenic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of iatrogenic GERD after POEM and identify preoperative, perioperative and postoperative factors associated with GERD. All patients treated at a single center who had a complete GERD evaluation after POEM were included in the study. Demographics, preoperative and follow-up data, results of functional studies and procedural data were collected and analyzed. A total of 103 patients (mean age 46.6 years, 47 males) were included. Postoperative altered esophageal acid exposure was attested in 52 patients (50.5%). A total of 19 patients (18.4%) had heartburn and 21 had esophagitis (20.4%). Overall, a clinically relevant GERD (altered esophageal acid exposure, associated with heartburn and/or esophagitis) was diagnosed in 30 patients (29.1%). Correlation between the severity of esophageal acid exposure with heartburn and esophagitis after POEM was found. Patients with heartburn had a lower postoperative 4-second integrated relaxation pressure compared to patients without symptoms (7.6 ± 3.8 mmHg vs 10.01 ± 4.4 mmHg, p<0.05). No correlations were identified with patient sex, age, postoperative body mass index, esophageal shape (sigmoid vs non sigmoid), lower esophageal sphincter pressure, length of myotomy, previous therapies and type of achalasia at high-resolution manometry. Preoperative, perioperative or postoperative factors minimally correlated with GERD after POEM. Clinically relevant GERD was identified in less than one-third of patients, but all patients were well controlled with medical therapy. © 2015 The Authors Digestive Endoscopy © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  1. Potential benefits of pH 8.8 alkaline drinking water as an adjunct in the treatment of reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Koufman, Jamie A; Johnston, Nikki

    2012-07-01

    At the cellular level, tissue-bound pepsin is fundamental to the pathophysiologic mechanism of reflux disease, and although the thresholds for laryngeal damage in laryngopharyngeal reflux and for esophageal damage in gastroesophageal reflux disease differ, both forms of damage are due to pepsin, which requires acid for its activation. In addition, human pepsin remains stable at pH 7.4 and may be reactivated by hydrogen ions from any source. Thus, most tap and bottled waters (typically pH 6.7 to 7.4) would not be expected to affect pepsin stability. The purposes of these in vitro studies were to investigate whether artesian well water containing natural bicarbonate (pH 8.8) might irreversibly denature (inactivate) human pepsin, and to establish its potential acid-buffering capacity. Laboratory studies were performed to determine whether human pepsin was inactivated by pH 8.8 alkaline water. In addition, the buffering capacity of the alkaline water was measured and compared to that of the two most popular commercially available bottled waters. The pH 8.8 alkaline water irreversibly inactivated human pepsin (in vitro), and its hydrochloric acid-buffering capacity far exceeded that of the conventional-pH waters. Unlike conventional drinking water, pH 8.8 alkaline water instantly denatures pepsin, rendering it permanently inactive. In addition, it has good acid-buffering capacity. Thus, the consumption of alkaline water may have therapeutic benefits for patients with reflux disease.

  2. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Time Covering Eradication for All Patients Infected with Helicobacter pylori in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Uotani, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Andoh, Akira; Furuta, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has increased in Japan since the end of the 20th century due to changes in environmental factors, such as a decreased infection rate of Helicobacter pylori and increased ability of acid secretion in the Japanese population. In 2013, the Japanese health insurance system started to cover eradication treatment for all patients infected with H. pylori to prevent gastric cancer, suggesting we may soon be able to completely eradicate this infection in Japan. Re-clarification of the clinical characteristics of GERD in Japan is therefore required in time covering the eradication for all patients infected with H. pylori. In Japan, more than half of GERD patients exhibit non-erosive reflux disease, and a majority of erosive esophagitis (RE) cases have mild severity of GERD (Los Angeles classification of grades A and B). The prevalence of RE in H. pylori-positive patients is relatively low (4.1%) compared to the general Japanese population (7.6-10.6%). In multivariate analysis to evaluate a risk of RE development, a risk in H. pylori-positive patients is elevated in those with mild gastric mucosal atrophy (C-I and C-II according to the Kimura-Takemoto classification, OR 12.14, 95% CI 1.28-115.26, p = 0.03) or with hiatal hernia (OR 5.24, 95% CI 1.80-15.22, p < 0.01). Here, we provide a comprehensive review of GERD in Japan, including associations between GERD and H. pylori infection, low-dose-aspirin-induced GERD, and pharmacological treatment for GERD. The recent decrease in the rate of H. pylori infection and increase in the proportion of elderly persons might have increased the prevalence of GERD in Japan. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Accuracy of diagnosing gastroesophageal reflux disease by GerdQ, esophageal impedance monitoring and histology.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li Ya; Wang, Ye; Lu, Jing Jing; Lin, Lin; Cui, Rong Li; Zhang, He Jun; Xue, Yan; Ding, Shi Gang; Lin, San Ren

    2014-05-01

    To assess the performance of self-assessment gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire (GerdQ), 24-h impedance monitoring, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) test and intercellular space of esophageal mucosal epithelial cells in the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Patients with symptoms suspected of GERD were administered the GerdQ and underwent endoscopy (measurement of intercellular space in the biopsy specimen sampling at 2 cm above the Z-line) and 24-h impedance pH monitoring, together with a 2-week experimental treatment with esomeprazole. A total of 636 patients were included for the final analysis, including 352 with GERD. The sensitivity and specificity of GerdQ and 24-h impedance monitoring for diagnosing GERD were 57.7% and 48.9%, and 66.4% and 43.3%, respectively. The sensitivity of 24-h impedance pH monitoring increased to 93.7%. The sensitivity and specificity of dilated intercellular spaces (DIS) (≥0.9 μm) for diagnosing GERD were 61.2% and 56.1%, respectively, whereas those for PPI test were 70.5% and 44.4%. GerdQ score or PPI test alone cannot accurately diagnose GERD in a Chinese population suspected of GERD. A definitive diagnosis of GERD still depends on endoscopy or 24-h pH monitoring. 24-h impedance pH monitoring may increase the sensitivity for diagnosing GERD by 20%; however, when used alone, it results in poor specificity in patients without acid suppressive therapy. © 2014 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Decreased risk for microscopic colitis and inflammatory bowel disease among patients with reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, A; Turner, K O; Genta, R M

    2018-03-31

    Previous studies have found an increased risk for microscopic colitis (MC) associated with proton pump inhibitors. In patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD), proton pump inhibitors have been associated with an increased risk for IBD flares and impaired outcomes. The aim of this study was to test the epidemiological associations between gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and MC, UC or CD in a large database. The Miraca Life Sciences Database is a national electronic repository of histopathological records of patients distributed throughout the entire USA. A case-control study evaluated whether the presence of Barrett's metaplasia, erosive oesophagitis on endoscopy or histological signs of reflux oesophagitis, clinical diagnosis of GERD or any GERD type affected the occurrence of MC, UC or CD among 228 506 subjects undergoing bidirectional endoscopy. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to calculate ORs and their 95% CI for the risk of MC, UC or CD associated with various types of GERD and were adjusted for age, sex and presence of Helicobacter pylori. The analysis revealed an inverse relationship between GERD and different types of inflammatory bowel disease. The inverse relationships applied similarly to MC (mean = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.58-0.66), UC (mean = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.81-0.97) and CD (mean = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.69-0.85). It also applied to different forms of GERD, with a trend towards more pronounced inverse relationships associated with Barrett's metaplasia or erosive oesophagitis than clinical diagnosis of GERD. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is inversely associated with all forms of inflammatory bowel disease, such as MC, UC, or CD. Published 2018. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. [Study in oral cavity alterations in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Maria Carolina Canteras Scarillo Falotico; Lerco, Mauro Masson; Henry, Maria Aparecida Coelho de Arruda

    2008-01-01

    The gastroesophageal reflux disease, which has become highly and increasingly incident, may be manifested by typical (pyrosis and regurgitation) and atypical (pulmonary, otorhinolaryngological and buccal) symptoms. To analyze alterations in the oral cavity patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. One hundred patients were studied being 50 gastroesophageal reflux disease patients (group 1) and 50 controls (group 2). All patients were submitted to an oral clinical exam and specific survey. Patients in group 1 were submitted to upper endoscopy, manometry and esophageal pH monitoring. The upper endoscopy revealed esophagitis in all patients, 20 erosive esophagitis, 30 no-erosive esophagitis and 38 hiatal hernia. Average pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter was 11 +/- 4,8 mm Hg and of the upper esophageal sphincter 75 +/- 26,5 mm Hg. In 42 patients of group 1 (84%) pathological gastroesophageal reflux was observed. Clinical exams revealed: dental erosions in group 1: 273 faces and in group 2: 5 tooth decays in group 1: 23 and 115 in group 2; abrasion in group 1: 58 and in group 2: 95; attrition wear: 408 in group 1 and 224 in group 2. The most damages was the palatine face. In group 1, 21 patients complained about frequent episodes of canker sores, 35 of tooth sensibility, 26 of burning mouth and 42 of sour taste in the mouth. In group 2 the complaints were observed in lower number of patients. Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease present higher incidence of dental erosion, canker sores, mouth burning sensation, sensitivity and sour taste than controls. Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease show lower incidence of tooth decays as compared to controls.

  6. Helicobacter pylori eradication improves pre-existing reflux esophagitis in patients with duodenal ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Ishiki, Kuniharu; Mizuno, Motowo; Take, Susumu; Nagahara, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Tomowo; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Kenji; Oguma, Keiji; Shiratori, Yasushi

    2004-06-01

    There has been significant controversy over the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and reflux esophagitis. We investigated the effects of eradicating H. pylori on the reflux esophagitis found in patients with peptic ulcers. Prospective posteradication evaluations were conducted yearly in 162 H. pylori-positive patients who had reflux esophagitis together with peptic ulcer disease (4 women and 158 men, mean age = 49.1 yr). The Los Angeles classification of the patients' esophagitis was: grade A, 90; grade B, 63; and grade C, 9. The follow-up evaluations began 1 to 2 months after completion of the eradication treatment (mean time of follow-up = 22 mo), and consisted of endoscopy and an interview focusing on heartburn. Six patients were withdrawn from the study because of adverse drug reactions or a failure to regularly keep their appointments. After eradication therapy, we observed endoscopically that reflux esophagitis had improved in 87 (55.8%) of the 156 patients. The improvement rate was significantly higher in patients cured of infection (60.8%) than in those with persistent H. pylori infection (38.9%) (P = 0.04). Body mass index (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.76-0.97), cure of infection (3.68, 95% CI = 1.56-8.69), the absence of a hiatal hernia (3.90, 95% CI = 1.83-8.28), and an ulcer located in the duodenum (2.75, 95% CI = 1.33-5.70) were identified as significant independent factors for the improvement of reflux esophagitis. In patients with reflux esophagitis associated with duodenal ulcer, a significant improvement in pre-existing reflux esophagitis was noted after H. pylori eradication.

  7. Effects of anxiety and depression in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Kessing, Boudewijn F; Bredenoord, Albert J; Saleh, Caroline M G; Smout, André J P M

    2015-06-01

    Increased levels of anxiety and depression have been associated with esophageal hyperalgesia and an increased risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We investigated the effects of anxiety and depression on GERD symptoms and the perception of reflux episodes in a well-characterized group of patients. We performed a prospective study of 225 consecutive patients who had symptoms of GERD evaluated. Patients underwent ambulatory 24-hour pH impedance monitoring, and levels of anxiety and depression were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. GERD was diagnosed in 147 patients (78 patients had functional heartburn); 36 patients were hypersensitive to gastroesophageal reflux. Among patients with GERD, increased levels of anxiety were associated with more severe retrosternal pain and retrosternal burning. Furthermore, increased levels of anxiety and depression each were associated with lower scores of the mental component of quality of life questionnaire. Levels of anxiety or depression were not associated with the number of reflux symptoms reported during 24-hour pH impedance monitoring or with the number of symptoms associated with a reflux event. Among GERD patients with hypersensitivity to reflux, levels of anxiety and depression and decreases in quality of life were similar to those of other patients with GERD. Patients with functional heartburn had higher levels of anxiety than patients with GERD. In patients with GERD, increased levels of anxiety are associated with increased severity of retrosternal pain and heartburn and reduced quality of life. Patients with GERD with hypersensitivity to gastroesophageal reflux have similar levels of anxiety and similar quality-of-life scores as other patients with GERD. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The evolution of proton pump inhibitors for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Elizabeth A; Pallentino, Julia; Miller, Sally K; VanBeuge, Susan S

    2010-12-01

    This article reviews the diagnosis and current treatment options for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) available to nurse practitioners, with a focus on advances in proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Review of scientific literature and clinical management guidelines for GERD treatment and PPI therapy from the PubMed database, Google Scholar, and other World Wide Web resources. A number of safe and effective treatment options exist for GERD. Recent developments in PPI technology may begin to address unmet needs in PPI therapy. GERD is commonly diagnosed and treated by nurse practitioners in the primary care setting. Acid suppression therapy is the primary medical therapy for GERD. PPI therapy provides symptomatic relief of heartburn and regurgitation, as well as effective healing and maintenance of erosive esophagitis. Newer PPIs lengthen the duration of acid suppression and allow for more flexibility in dosing, which may improve medication adherence and decrease episodes of acid breakthrough. ©2010 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2010 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  9. Japanese apricot improves symptoms of gastrointestinal dysmotility associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Maekita, Takao; Kato, Jun; Enomoto, Shotaro; Yoshida, Takeichi; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Hanamitsu, Toshiko; Inoue, Izumi; Maeda, Yoshimasa; Moribata, Kosaku; Muraki, Yosuke; Shingaki, Naoki; Deguchi, Hisanobu; Ueda, Kazuki; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Tamai, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao

    2015-07-14

    To investigate the effects of Japanese apricot (JA) consumption on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-related symptoms. Participants included individuals living in Minabe-cho, a well-known JA-growing region, who received specific medical check-ups by the local community health service in 2010. GERD-related symptoms were examined in 1303 Japanese individuals using a validated questionnaire, the Frequency Scale for Symptoms of GERD (FSSG), which consists of 7 questions associated with acid reflux symptoms and 5 questions asking about gastrointestinal dysmotility symptoms. Each question was answered using a 4-point scale, with higher scores indicating more severe GERD-related symptoms. Subjects were divided into two groups according to their intake of dried and pickled JA: daily intake (≥ 1 JA daily) (392 subjects) and none or occasional intake (< 1 JA daily) (911 subjects). FSSG scores were compared between subjects who consumed JA daily and those who did not. Next, subjects were stratified by age, gender and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) status for subanalyses. Those who ate JA daily were significantly older than those who did not (60.6 ± 10.5 years vs 56.0 ± 11.0 years, P < 0.001). Total FSSG scores were significantly lower in subjects with daily JA intake than in those with none or only occasional intake (2.13 ± 3.14 vs 2.70 ± 3.82, P = 0.005). In particular, subjects who consumed JA daily showed significantly improved FSSG dysmotility scores compared with subjects who did not (1.05 ± 1.58 vs 1.46 ± 2.11, P < 0.001). In contrast, the FSSG reflux score did not differ between subjects with and without daily intake of JA (1.08 ± 1.90 vs 1.24 ± 2.11, P = 0.177). Subanalysis indicated that improvement in dysmotility by JA intake was specifically observed in non-elderly (1.24 ± 1.68 vs 1.62 ± 2.22, P = 0.005) and H. pylori-negative subjects (0.99 ± 1.58 vs 1.57 ± 2.06, P < 0.001). GERD patients (total FSSG score ≥ 8) were less frequently observed

  10. Anti-reflux surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... reflux - discharge Heartburn - what to ask your doctor Surgical wound care - open Images Hiatal hernia repair - series Hiatal hernia - x-ray References Abbas AE. The management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. In: Cameron JL, Cameron ...

  11. Gastroesophageal reflux - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic esophagitis - discharge; Reflux esophagitis - discharge; GERD - discharge; Heartburn - chronic - discharge ... You have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a condition in which food or liquid travels backwards from the stomach into the ...

  12. Adverse outcomes associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease are rare following an apparent life-threatening event.

    PubMed

    Zimbric, Gabrielle; Bonkowsky, Joshua L; Jackson, W Daniel; Maloney, Christopher G; Srivastava, Rajendu

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate for adverse outcomes associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) following an apparent life-threatening event (ALTE) and potential risk factors of these outcomes. Retrospective cohort study of well-appearing infants (<12 months) admitted for ALTE. Patients were followed for adverse outcomes associated with GERD (including aspiration pneumonia, failure-to-thrive, or anti-reflux surgery), second ALTE, or death. Risk factors evaluated included: age, prematurity, gender, previous event, diagnosis of GERD, gastrointestinal (GI) testing positive for gastroesophageal reflux, length of stay (LOS), and neurologic impairment diagnosed in follow-up. Four hundred sixty-nine patients met inclusion criteria, mean age was 45 days, 110 (22%) were premature. Patients were followed for an average of 7.8 years; 3.8% of all patients had an adverse outcome associated with GERD. The only significant risk factors were a longer LOS, and development of neurological impairment. A diagnosis of GERD and positive reflux testing during the initial hospitalization were not associated with adverse outcomes associated with GERD. Adverse outcomes associated with GERD are rare following an ALTE. Patients who developed neurological impairment and a longer initial LOS were at higher risk for developing these outcomes. Positive testing for gastroesophageal reflux during hospitalization for ALTE did not predict adverse outcomes associated with GERD. Copyright © 2012 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  13. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in the Asian Countries

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Sang Woo

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection, a common infection in many countries, is related to the clinical course of upper gastrointestinal diseases. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common esophageal disease in Western countries and its prevalence is increasing in Asian countries. The pathophysiology of GERD is multifactorial. Although no single factor has been isolated as the cause of GERD, a negative association between the prevalence of H. pylori and the severity of GERD, including Barrett's esophagus, has been demonstrated in epidemiological studies. The high prevalence of H. pylori infection affects the incidence of GERD in Asian countries. In the subjects with East Asian CagA-positive strains, acid injury may be minimized by hypochlorhydria from pangastritis and gastric atrophy. Additionally, host genetic factors may affect the development of GERD. The interactions between genetic factors and the virulence of H. pylori infection may be the reason for the low prevalence of GERD in Asian countries. H. pylori eradication is not considered pivotal in GERD exacerbation based on evidence from Western studies. A recent meta-analysis demonstrated that eradication therapy of H. pylori was related to a higher risk of developing de novo GERD in Asian studies. H. pylori infection remains an inconclusive and important issue in GERD in Asian countries. PMID:25642246

  14. Impact of hiatal hernia on histological pattern of non-erosive reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Gatopoulou, Anthie; Mimidis, Konstantinos; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Polychronidis, Alexandros; Lyratzopoulos, Nikolaos; Sivridis, Efthimios; Minopoulos, Georgios

    2005-01-09

    Hiatus hernia (HH) has major pathophysiological effects favoring gastroesophageal reflux and hence contributing to esophageal mucosa injury, especially in patients with severe gastroesophageal disease. However, prospective studies investigating the impact of HH on the esophageal mucosa in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) are lacking. This study evaluated the association between the presence of (HH) and the histological findings in symptomatic patients with NERD. Fifty consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were enrolled. After conventional endoscopy, Lugol solution was applied and biopsy specimens were obtained. Histological parameters including basal zone hyperplasia, papillary length and cellular infiltration were evaluated. The chi-square test with Yates' correlation was used for comparing discrete parameters between groups. However, Fisher's exact probability test was used where the expected frequencies were lower than 5. Wilcoxon's test for unpaired samples was preferred in cases of semi-quantitative parameters. The presence of HH along with more severe findings (0.01

    reflux disease and NERD in the presence of HH. The presence of HH is correlated with more severe endoscopy findings, and predisposes for severe histological abnormality in cases of NERD.

  15. Increased expression of eotaxin-3 distinguishes between eosinophilic esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Baishali; Carlsten, James; Sabo, Edmond; Kethu, Sripathi; Meitner, Patricia; Tavares, Rosemarie; Jakate, Shriram; Mangray, Shamlal; Aswad, Bassam; Resnick, Murray B

    2007-12-01

    Differentiating eosinophilic esophagitis from gastroesophageal reflux disease is important given their pathogenetic differences and responses to therapy. Eotaxins are a family of chemokines important for activation and recruitment of eosinophils mediated by their receptor, chemokine receptor-3 (CCR-3). Interleukin 5 (IL-5) is a key cytokine involved in many steps of eosinophil production and recruitment. The aim of this study was to compare the messenger RNA expression of the eotaxins, CCR-3, and IL-5 between well-characterized groups of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, and healthy individuals. This was a retrospective study using esophageal biopsies from 33 patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, 20 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, and 17 healthy controls. Parameters studied included demographic features, presenting symptoms, endoscopic findings, histopathologic features, and messenger RNA levels of eotaxins 1, 2, and 3, CCR-3, and IL-5 by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Patients with eosinophilic esophagitis were predominantly males (M/F=3:1), with a mean age of 15.9 years and a mean eosinophil count of 55 per x400 high-power field. Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease had a mean age of 31.5 years and a mean eosinophil count of 5.8 per high-power field. Total intraepithelial eosinophil and lymphocyte counts, the presence of superficial eosinophil clusters, microabscesses, and basal cell hyperplasia were all significantly associated with eosinophilic esophagitis as opposed to gastroesophageal reflux disease (P<.0001). The mean expression levels of eotaxin-3 were markedly elevated in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis as compared with the gastroesophageal reflux disease and healthy control groups (731+/-276, 31+/-12, and 1.5+/-0.4 pg/ng beta-actin, respectively; P<.001). Mean expression levels of eotaxins 1 and 2, IL-5

  16. Canadian Digestive Health Foundation Public Impact Series: gastroesophageal reflux disease in Canada: incidence, prevalence, and direct and indirect economic impact.

    PubMed

    Fedorak, Richard N; Veldhuyzen van Zanten, Sander; Bridges, Ron

    2010-07-01

    The Canadian Digestive Health Foundation initiated a scientific program to assess the incidence, prevalence, mortality and economic impact of digestive disorders across Canada. The current article presents the updated findings from the study concerning gastroesophageal reflux disease - a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications (Montreal definition).

  17. Canadian Digestive Health Foundation Public Impact Series: Gastroesophageal reflux disease in Canada: Incidence, prevalence, and direct and indirect economic impact

    PubMed Central

    Fedorak, Richard N; van Zanten, Sander Veldhuyzen; Bridges, Ron

    2010-01-01

    The Canadian Digestive Health Foundation initiated a scientific program to assess the incidence, prevalence, mortality and economic impact of digestive disorders across Canada. The current article presents the updated findings from the study concerning gastroesophageal reflux disease – a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications (Montreal definition). PMID:20652158

  18. Electrical stimulation for gastroesophageal reflux disease: current state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sharon E; Soffer, Edy

    2016-01-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who are not satisfied with acid suppression therapy can benefit primarily from fundoplication, a surgical intervention. Fundoplication has been the standard surgical procedure for GERD. It is effective but is associated with adverse effects, resulting in a declining number of interventions, creating a need for alternative interventions that are effective, yet have a better adverse effect profile. One such alternative involves the application of electrical stimulation to the lower esophageal sphincter. A number of animal studies showed that such stimulation can increase resting lower esophageal sphincter pressure. An acute human study confirmed this effect, and was followed by two open-label studies, with a follow-up of up to 3 years. Results thus far show that the therapy is associated with a significant improvement in symptoms, a significant reduction in esophageal acid exposure, and a very good safety profile. This review will describe the evolution of electrical stimulation therapy for GERD, as well as the safety and efficacy of this intervention. PMID:26834494

  19. Efficacy of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate treatment in gastroesophageal reflux disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Higuera-de-la-Tijera, Fátima

    2018-03-14

    Proton pump inhibitors are the most effective medical therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease, but their onset of action may be slow. To assess the available literature regarding the efficacy of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate in gastroesophageal reflux patients. A systematic review was conducted. A systematic literature search starting from 2000. Reviewed manuscripts concerning the effectiveness of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate treatment in gastroesophageal reflux disease were reviewed and the data were extracted. Data were subsequently analyzed with descriptive statistics. This review included information of four studies. Two trials compared the efficacy of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate versus omeprazole. One study compared the efficacy of once-daily morning or nighttime dosing. And another study compared omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate/alginate versus omeprazole. In total, there was no difference between omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate and omeprazole. However, there is a trend towards more sustained response and a greater proportion of patients with sustained total relief by 30 minutes with omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate. Omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate therapy is not more effective than omeprazole in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, data obtained suggest that it can have a more sustained response and sustained total relief.

  20. Relief of Night-time Symptoms Associated With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Following 4 Weeks of Treatment With Pantoprazole Magnesium: The Mexican Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Working Group.

    PubMed

    López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Orr, William; Vargas-Romero, José Antonio; Remes-Troche, José María; Morales-Arámbula, Miguel; Soto-Pérez, Julio César; Mateos-Pérez, Gualberto; Sobrino-Cossío, Sergio; Teramoto-Matsubara, Oscar; López-Colombo, Aurelio; Orozco-Gamiz, Antonio; Saez-Ríos, Adolfo; Arellano-Plancarte, Araceli; Chiu-Ugalde, Jazmin; Tholen, Anne; Horbach, Silke; Lundberg, Lars; Fass, Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of pantoprazole magnesium (pantoprazole-Mg) 40 mg in the relief of esophageal and extra-esophageal symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), particularly night-time symptoms. Patients (aged 18-50 years) with 3-month history of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation plus at least one other symptom in the last week were enrolled in a nationwide, prospective and observational study in Mexico. Patients received pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg once daily during 4 weeks. Symptoms were assessed through a physician-administered structured interview and the patient-completed ReQuest in Practice™ questionnaire. Night-time GERD was defined as arousal from sleep during the night due to GERD-associated symptoms. Out of 4,343 patients included at basal visit, 3,665 were considered for the effectiveness per protocol analysis. At baseline, patients had a median of 8 GERD related symptoms. Patients with night-time GERD symptoms (42.7%) were more likely to have extra-esophageal symptoms (P < 0.001) than other GERD patients. Pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg once daily for 4 weeks improved a broad range of GERD-associated symptoms from baseline (80% reduction on physicians assessments; 68-77% reduction on ReQuest in Practice™ dimensions), including both day- and night-time GERD symptoms; improvements were the greatest for extra-esophageal symptoms in patients with night-time symptoms. Pantoprazole-Mg was well tolerated. Pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg significantly improved a broad range of esophageal and extra-esophageal GERD related symptoms including sleep disturbances, as well as well-being, in patients with daytime or night-time GERD, making it a good option for patients with GERD, especially when extra-esophageal and night-time symptoms are present.

  1. Relief of Night-time Symptoms Associated With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Following 4 Weeks of Treatment With Pantoprazole Magnesium: The Mexican Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Orr, William; Vargas-Romero, José Antonio; Remes-Troche, José María; Morales-Arámbula, Miguel; Soto-Pérez, Julio César; Mateos-Pérez, Gualberto; Sobrino-Cossío, Sergio; Teramoto-Matsubara, Oscar; López-Colombo, Aurelio; Orozco-Gamiz, Antonio; Saez-Ríos, Adolfo; Arellano-Plancarte, Araceli; Chiu-Ugalde, Jazmin; Tholen, Anne; Horbach, Silke; Lundberg, Lars; Fass, Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of pantoprazole magnesium (pantoprazole-Mg) 40 mg in the relief of esophageal and extra-esophageal symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), particularly night-time symptoms. Methods Patients (aged 18-50 years) with 3-month history of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation plus at least one other symptom in the last week were enrolled in a nationwide, prospective and observational study in Mexico. Patients received pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg once daily during 4 weeks. Symptoms were assessed through a physician-administered structured interview and the patient-completed ReQuest in Practice™ questionnaire. Night-time GERD was defined as arousal from sleep during the night due to GERD-associated symptoms. Results Out of 4,343 patients included at basal visit, 3,665 were considered for the effectiveness per protocol analysis. At baseline, patients had a median of 8 GERD related symptoms. Patients with night-time GERD symptoms (42.7%) were more likely to have extra-esophageal symptoms (P < 0.001) than other GERD patients. Pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg once daily for 4 weeks improved a broad range of GERD-associated symptoms from baseline (80% reduction on physicians assessments; 68-77% reduction on ReQuest in Practice™ dimensions), including both day- and night-time GERD symptoms; improvements were the greatest for extra-esophageal symptoms in patients with night-time symptoms. Pantoprazole-Mg was well tolerated. Conclusions Pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg significantly improved a broad range of esophageal and extra-esophageal GERD related symptoms including sleep disturbances, as well as well-being, in patients with daytime or night-time GERD, making it a good option for patients with GERD, especially when extra-esophageal and night-time symptoms are present. PMID:24466446

  2. Associations of Circulating Gut Hormone and Adipocytokine Levels with the Spectrum of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ping-Huei; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Liou, Jyh-Ming; Lee, Yi-Chia; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Lin, Jaw-Town; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective The pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is complex and poorly understood. We aim to investigate the association of various circulating peptide hormones with heterogenous manifestations of GERD. Methods One hundred and four patients that had experienced typical GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation) for at least 3 episodes per week in the past 3 months were enrolled. All patients received a baseline assessment of symptom severity and frequency with the Reflux Disease Questionnaire and an upper endoscopy to classify GERD into erosive esophagitis (EE, n = 67), non-erosive esophagitis (NE, n = 37), and Barrett’s esophagus (BE, n = 8). Fifty asymptomatic subjects with an endoscopically normal esophagus were recruited as the control group. Complete anthropometric measures and blood biochemistry were obtained and fasting serum levels of adipocytokines (adiponectin and leptin) and gut hormones (ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY)) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in all subjects. Results All circulating peptide hormone levels were not statistically different between the GERD and control groups. However, GERD patients appeared to have lower PYY levels [median (25th-75th percentile), 80.1 (49.8–108.3) vs. 99.4 (65.8–131.9) pg/ml, p = 0.057] compared with control subjects. Among the GERD patients, ghrelin levels were inversely associated with the frequency and severity of acid regurgitation. In male GERD patients, EE was associated with significantly higher PYY levels [107.0 (55.0–120.8) vs. 32.8 (28.7–84.5) pg/ml, p = 0.026] but lower adiponectin levels [6.7 (5.6–9.3) vs. 9.9 (9.6–10.6) μg/ml, p = 0.034] than NE. Patients with BE had significantly lower adiponectin levels [6.0 (5.1–9.2) vs. 9.2 (7.1–11.2) μg/ml, p = 0.026] than those without BE. Conclusions Humoral derangement of circulating peptide hormones might participate in inflammation and symptom perception in patients suffering from GERD

  3. Associations of Circulating Gut Hormone and Adipocytokine Levels with the Spectrum of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ping-Huei; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Liou, Jyh-Ming; Lee, Yi-Chia; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Lin, Jaw-Town; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is complex and poorly understood. We aim to investigate the association of various circulating peptide hormones with heterogenous manifestations of GERD. One hundred and four patients that had experienced typical GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation) for at least 3 episodes per week in the past 3 months were enrolled. All patients received a baseline assessment of symptom severity and frequency with the Reflux Disease Questionnaire and an upper endoscopy to classify GERD into erosive esophagitis (EE, n = 67), non-erosive esophagitis (NE, n = 37), and Barrett's esophagus (BE, n = 8). Fifty asymptomatic subjects with an endoscopically normal esophagus were recruited as the control group. Complete anthropometric measures and blood biochemistry were obtained and fasting serum levels of adipocytokines (adiponectin and leptin) and gut hormones (ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY)) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in all subjects. All circulating peptide hormone levels were not statistically different between the GERD and control groups. However, GERD patients appeared to have lower PYY levels [median (25th-75th percentile), 80.1 (49.8-108.3) vs. 99.4 (65.8-131.9) pg/ml, p = 0.057] compared with control subjects. Among the GERD patients, ghrelin levels were inversely associated with the frequency and severity of acid regurgitation. In male GERD patients, EE was associated with significantly higher PYY levels [107.0 (55.0-120.8) vs. 32.8 (28.7-84.5) pg/ml, p = 0.026] but lower adiponectin levels [6.7 (5.6-9.3) vs. 9.9 (9.6-10.6) μg/ml, p = 0.034] than NE. Patients with BE had significantly lower adiponectin levels [6.0 (5.1-9.2) vs. 9.2 (7.1-11.2) μg/ml, p = 0.026] than those without BE. Humoral derangement of circulating peptide hormones might participate in inflammation and symptom perception in patients suffering from GERD. Further studies to clarify the exact role of these hormones

  4. Pulmonary Disease Secondary to Reflux Mimicking Interstitial Pneumonia in Systemic Sclerosis: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Ricardo Azêdo de Luca; Mazolli Veiga, Nathalia; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Mocarzel, Luis Otávio Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a complex disease due to the variety of clinical presentations, often superimposed on other conditions, related or not to the connective tissue. We report a 43-year-old Brazilian woman with limited systemic sclerosis and pulmonary symptoms secondary to gastroesophageal reflux disease, with a clinical presentation similar to a diffuse interstitial lung disease. Because of the frequency of interstitial lung injury due to systemic sclerosis, this was an important differential diagnosis, which could be excluded after optimized treatment of reflux disease, with clinical and radiological improvement. Clinical management of patients with collagen diseases requires clinician skills to identify the natural history and understand its nuances. This is a common situation in clinical practice, but with a few discussions in international literature. PMID:26885429

  5. Acid gastroesophageal reflux in convalescent preterm infants: effect of posture and relationship to apnea.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ravindra Y; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Hannam, Simon; Greenough, Anne

    2007-11-01

    Concerns regarding gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and associated apnea episodes result in some practitioners having convalescent, prematurely born infants sleep in the prone position. We have tested the hypothesis that such infants would not suffer from clinically important acid GER or associated apnea episodes more in the supine compared with the prone position. Lower esophageal pH was measured and videopolysomnographic recordings of nasal airflow, chest and abdominal wall movements, electrocardiographic activity, and oxygen saturation were made on two successive days of 21 premature infants (median gestational age 28 wk) at a median postmenstrual age (PMA) of 36 wk. On each day, the infants were studied prone and supine. The acid reflux index was higher in the supine compared with the prone position (median 3% versus 0%, p = 0.002), but was low in both positions. The number of obstructive apnea episodes per hour was higher in the supine position (p = 0.008). There were, however, no statistically significant correlations between the amount of acid GER and the number of either obstructive or total apnea episodes in either the supine or prone position. Supine compared with prone sleeping neither increases clinically important acid GER nor obstructive apnea episodes associated with acid GER in asymptomatic, convalescent, prematurely born infants.

  6. Reflux of Anterior Spinal Artery Predicts Recurrent Posterior Circulation Stroke in Bilateral Vertebral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Kosuke; Handa, Akira; Kurosaki, Yoshitaka; Lo, Benjamin; Yamagata, Sen

    2015-11-01

    Predictive value of reflux of anterior spinal artery for recurrent posterior circulation ischemia in bilateral vertebral arteries steno-occlusive disease was evaluated. We retrospectively reviewed 55 patients with symptomatic posterior circulation stroke caused by bilateral stenotic (>70%) lesions of the vertebral artery. We investigated any correlation of clinical and angiographic characteristics including collateral flow patterns, with recurrent stroke. Risk factors for poor 3-month functional outcome were also evaluated. Recurrent posterior circulation stroke was observed in 15 (27.3%) patients. Multivariable analysis using Cox proportional hazards model showed anterior spinal artery reflux as a significant risk factor for stroke recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio, 19.3 [95% confidence interval, 5.35-69.9]; P<0.001). Anterior spinal artery reflux was also correlated with poor functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale score, 3-6; adjusted odds ratio, 7.41 [95% confidence interval, 1.24-44.4]; P=0.028). In patients with symptomatic bilateral vertebral artery occlusive disease, anterior spinal artery reflux predicted recurrent posterior circulation stroke and poor functional outcome. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Medicinal Plants for Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Review of Animal and Human Studies.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Mehdi; Karegar-Borzi, Hossein; Karimi, Mehrdad; Rahimi, Roja

    2017-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a prevalent gastrointestinal disease that causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications. The major therapeutic strategy for GERD focuses mainly on symptom alleviation using proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which does not produce a perfect response in all patients. An approach with new therapeutic agents for GERD seems to be essential. The aim of this study was to review animal and human studies investigating the effect of medicinal plants in GERD as well as mechanisms underlying their therapeutic effects. Medline, Scopus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for animal or human studies. The data collected covered January 1966-October 2015. A total of 22 studies were included in this review, of which nine were animal studies and 13 were human studies. Ceratonia siliqua as a medicinal plant and rikkunshito as a multicomponent herbal preparation were the most frequently studied herbal medicines in GERD. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities were the main mechanisms demonstrated in animal studies for ameliorating the effects of medicinal plants in GERD. Other mechanisms include downregulation of genes encoding inflammatory proteins, improvement of barrier function and gastric mucus, a decrease in gastric acid, and induction of tonic contractions of the lower esophageal sphincter. All herbal preparations used in human studies have led to the alleviation of symptoms related to GERD. Myrtus communis and Cydonia oblonga showed marked reduction in GERD symptoms comparable to omeprazole. The therapeutic effect of Cydonia oblonga persisted after discontinuation of the drug. Tongjlang and rikkunshito showed therapeutic effects for non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) where PPIs failed to show a promising effect. Studies on Ceratonia siliqua have been solely focused on regurgitation in infants, and a remarkable decrease in the number of regurgitations was demonstrated. The multiple mechanisms of action

  8. Short-term and long-term effect of diaphragm biofeedback training in gastroesophageal reflux disease: an open-label, pilot, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Sun, X; Shang, W; Wang, Z; Liu, X; Fang, X; Ke, M

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of diaphragm biofeedback training (DBT) for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A total of 40 patients with GERD treated at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital between September 2004 and July 2006 were randomized to receive DBT and rabeprazole proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or rabeprazole alone. The DBT + rabeprazole group received DBT during the 8-week initial treatment; the rabeprazole group did not. During the 6-month follow up, all patients took acid suppression according to their reflux symptoms, and the patients in the DBT + rabeprazole group were required to continue DBT. The primary outcome (used for power analysis) was the amount of acid suppression used at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were reflux symptoms, health-related quality of life (HRQL), and esophageal motility differences after the 8-week treatment compared with baseline. Acid suppression usage significantly decreased in the DBT + rabeprazole group compared with the rabeprazole group at 6 months (P < 0.05). At 8 weeks, reflux symptoms and GERD-HRQL were significantly improved in both groups (P < 0.05), without difference between them. Crural diaphragm tension (CDT) and gastroesophageal junction pressure (GEJP) significantly increased in the DBT + rabeprazole group (P < 0.05), but without change in lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure. There was no significant change in CDT, GEJP, and LES pressure compared with baseline in the rabeprazole group. In conclusion, long-term DBT could reduce acid suppression usage by enhancing the anti-reflux barrier, providing a non-pharmacological maintenance therapy and reducing medical costs for patients with GERD. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  9. Prevalence and demographic determinants of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the Turkish general population: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mungan, Zeynel

    2012-08-01

    We aimed to establish the prevalence and demographic determinants of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the Turkish general population using the Turkish version of the gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire. A total of 8143 volunteers (mean age: 38.5 (13.3) years; 52.3% males) were included in this cross-sectional questionnaire study conducted via face-to-face administration of the questionnaire forms including items on sociodemographic features, past history of gastric disorders, gastroesophageal reflux disease, the influence of reflux symptoms on patients' lives, physician visits, diagnostic tests, and reflux medications. A past history of gastric symptoms was reported in half of the population. More female participants (p<0.001) had a past history of gastric symptoms that yielded a previous diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease in 19.1% of the population. The likelihood of gastroesophageal reflux disease was low in the majority (75.3%) of the subjects evaluated. Gastroesophageal reflux disease with an inconveniencing or disrupting impact on the patient's life was present in 17.9% and 6.8% of the population. Total gastroesophageal reflux disease-questionnaire scores and reflux prevalence were higher in older age groups (p<0.001). Females were more likely to have gastroesophageal reflux disease prevalence based on reflux symptoms. The impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease on sleep and psychological/emotional well-being was more pronounced in older and female patients, whereas the impact on eating/drinking behaviors and physical-social activities was more marked among females independent of their age (p<0.001). Reflux prevalence was higher in subjects from East Anatolia, Central Anatolia, Mediterranean, and Black Sea regions of Turkey (p<0.001 for each). Prevalence and demographic determinants of gastroesophageal reflux disease are compatible with the profile of the disease in the other Western populations, with a predilection for females and

  10. Diurnal variation in the chemical clearance of acid gastroesophageal reflux in infants.

    PubMed

    Woodley, Frederick W; Fernandez, Soledad; Mousa, Hayat

    2007-01-01

    Clearance of acid gastroesophageal reflux is biphasic. During volume clearance, refluxed material is cleared from the esophagus by peristalsis, and during chemical clearance, acidified esophageal mucosa is neutralized by saliva and possibly secretions from the esophageal lumen. In this study, we examined the effects of feeding on the durations of volume clearance and chemical clearance. Combined pH/multichannel intraluminal impedance tracings from 12 symptomatic infants (median age, 20 weeks) were analyzed. Acid gastroesophageal reflux episodes having both volume clearance and chemical clearance components were grouped into 1 of 4 feeding cycle phases (feeding, first hour postprandial, second hour postprandial, and fasting). Mean duration of volume clearance and chemical clearance was 7.0 +/- 2.3 and 36.3 +/- 8.5 minutes (P = .001), respectively, per patient and 24.7 +/- 2.7 and 127.5 +/- 10.7 seconds (P < .0001), respectively, per episode. Whereas volume clearance did not change throughout the feeding cycle, chemical clearance was significantly prolonged during fasting (132.2 +/- 18.4 seconds) compared with feeding (13.5 +/- 4.1 seconds, P = .0046) and 1st postprandial (64.0 +/- 19.4 seconds, P = .0333). Statistical analysis failed to demonstrate a significant relationship between nadir pH and chemical clearance (P = .3104) or between chemical clearance and the interaction between nadir pH and feeding cycle. Chemical clearance is significantly prolonged during fasting in infants. Falling pH alone cannot explain declining chemical clearance efficiency during later postprandial periods. We speculate that inefficient chemical clearance during fasting is likely due to reduced efficiency of acid clearance mechanisms that could include salivation, swallowing, peristalsis, and/or intraluminal secretion.

  11. Electroacupuncture to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Han, Gajin; Leem, Jungtae; Lee, Hojung; Lee, Junhee

    2016-05-17

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease lowers the quality of life and increases medical costs. Electroacupuncture has been used to ease symptoms and improve gastrointestinal motility in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. The main purposes of this study are to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this procedure. This is a protocol for a randomized, patient-blinded, assessor-blinded, sham-controlled trial. Sixty participants with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, who have previously undergone standard treatment, will be recruited from August 2015 at Kyung Hee University Korean Medicine Hospital. The participants will be allocated to either the electroacupuncture (n = 30) or the sham electroacupuncture group (n = 30); the allocation will be concealed from both the participants and the assessors. The EA group will undergo penetrating acupuncture at 18 fixed points and two optional points chosen using the pattern identification for gastroesophageal reflux disease. Electrical stimulation will be applied at some of the acupoints. The sham electroacupuncture group will undergo nonpenetrating acupuncture without electrical stimulation at 18 nonspecific points, each of which will be only 2 cm away from the true acupoints used in the electroacupuncture group. In both groups, the procedure will be performed using the Park device. The treatment will last for 6 weeks (with two sessions each week), and the outcome will be evaluated at baseline, 3 weeks, and 6 weeks. The primary outcome will be the proportion of responders with adequate symptom relief, whereas the secondary outcomes will comprise the results of the Nepean dyspepsia index; the Korean gastrointestinal symptom rating scale; the EQ-5D™; levels of gastrin, motilin, and inflammatory cytokines; the perceived stress scale; the qi-stagnation questionnaire; the patient global impression of change; and the spleen qi deficiency questionnaire. The results of this trial will provide information

  12. Reliability of breath-alcohol analysis in individuals with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Kechagias, S; Jönsson, K A; Franzén, T; Andersson, L; Jones, A W

    1999-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is widespread in the population among all age groups and in both sexes. The reliability of breath alcohol analysis in subjects suffering from GERD is unknown. We investigated the relationship between breath-alcohol concentration (BrAC) and blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) in 5 male and 5 female subjects all suffering from severe gastroesophageal reflux disease and scheduled for antireflux surgery. Each subject served in two experiments in random order about 1-2 weeks apart. Both times they drank the same dose of ethanol (approximately 0.3 g/kg) as either beer, white wine, or vodka mixed with orange juice before venous blood and end-expired breath samples were obtained at 5-10 min intervals for 4 h. An attempt was made to provoke gastroesophageal reflux in one of the drinking experiments by applying an abdominal compression belt. Blood-ethanol concentration was determined by headspace gas chromatography and breath-ethanol was measured with an electrochemical instrument (Alcolmeter SD-400) or a quantitative infrared analyzer (Data-Master). During the absorption of alcohol, which occurred during the first 90 min after the start of drinking, BrAC (mg/210 L) tended to be the same or higher than venous BAC (mg/dL). In the post-peak phase, the BAC always exceeded BrAC. Four of the 10 subjects definitely experienced gastric reflux during the study although this did not result in widely deviant BrAC readings compared with BAC when sampling occurred at 5-min intervals. We conclude that the risk of alcohol erupting from the stomach into the mouth owing to gastric reflux and falsely increasing the result of an evidential breath-alcohol test is highly improbable.

  13. The effect of itopride combined with lansoprazole in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Chun, Byung-Joon; Lee, Dong-Soo

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the efficacy of adding a prokinetic agent to proton pump inhibitors (PPI) for the treatment of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) disease. A prospective, randomized open trial comparing lansoprazole plus itopride to lansoprazole single therapy was performed for 12 weeks. Sixty-four patients with a reflux finding score (RFS) >7 and a reflux symptom index (RSI) >13 were enrolled and received either lansoprazole 30 mg once daily with itopride 50 mg three times daily or lansoprazole 30 mg once daily for 12 weeks. RSI and RFS were completed at baseline, after 6 weeks, and after 12 weeks. During the treatment period, RSI and RFS were significantly improved compared with the pretreatment scores in both study groups. Reductions of total RSI and globus symptom were significantly higher in the lansoprazole plus itopride group compared to the lansoprazole group. In the RFS, however, there were no significant differences between the two groups. In conclusion, itopride in addition to PPI did not show any superior RFS improvement compared to PPI single therapy, but was helpful in speeding up relief of reflux symptoms in LPR patients. Thus, itopride may be considered as the secondary additive agent in the PPI treatment of LPR patients.

  14. Validation and Diagnostic Usefulness of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire in a Primary Care Level in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Zavala-Gonzáles, Miguel Angel; Azamar-Jacome, Amyra Ali; Meixueiro-Daza, Arturo; de la Medina, Antonio Ramos; Reyes-Huerta J, Job; Roesch-Dietlen, Federico; Remes-Troche, José María

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Different non-invasive diagnostics strategies have been used to assess patients with gastroesophageal reflux. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) questionnaire (GerdQ) is a 6-item, easy to use questionnaire that was developed primarily as a diagnostic tool for GERD in primary care. Our aim was to validate and assess diagnostic utility of GerdQ questionnaire in Mexican patients in the primary care setting. Methods The study was performed in 3 phases: (1) a questionnaire translation and comprehension study (n = 20), (2) are a reproducibility and validation study (50 patients and 50 controls) and (3) a study to assess the clinical utility in 252 subjects with GERD symptoms. Diagnostic accuracy was calculated using endoscopy and/or pH-metry as the gold standard. Results Internal consistency measured by the Cronbach’s α coefficient was 0.81 for patients and 0.90 for healthy controls, with a mixed coefficient of 0.93. Reproducibility for GerdQ was very good and its discriminating validity was 88%. Most of the patients with erosive reflux and non-erosive reflux with abnormal pH-metry had scores > 8, meanwhile most of the patients with functional heartburn and hypersensitive esophagus had < 8. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of GerdQ com -pared to the gold standard were 72%, 72% and 87%, respectively. Conclusions In Mexico, the GerdQ questionnaire Spanish validated version is useful for GERD diagnosis in the primary care setting. PMID:25273118

  15. Quantitative analysis of tooth surface loss associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease: a longitudinal clinical study.

    PubMed

    Tantbirojn, Daranee; Pintado, Maria R; Versluis, Antheunis; Dunn, Carol; Delong, Ralph

    2012-03-01

    Acid regurgitation resulting from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) causes dissolution of tooth structure. The authors conducted a longitudinal clinical study to measure tooth surface loss associated with GERD. The authors made replicas of dental impressions obtained from 12 participants with GERD and six control participants at baseline and six months. Using an optical scanner, they digitized the tooth surfaces of these replicas. They then analyzed the volume of tooth surface loss and characterized it as noncontact erosion or erosion/attrition. Mean (standard deviation) volume loss per tooth in participants with GERD (0.18 [0.12] cubic millimeter) was significantly higher than that in control participants (0.06 [0.03] mm(3); t test; P < .013). Nine participants with GERD exhibited tooth surface loss with characteristics of erosion (noncontact erosion in three participants, erosion/attrition in eight participants). Tooth surface loss in participants with GERD was significantly greater than that in control participants. The pattern of surface loss was characteristic of erosion in noncontact areas and around contact areas. Anterior and posterior teeth of participants with GERD were affected by erosive tooth wear. In addition, the amount of erosive tooth wear on occlusal surfaces was twice as high when there was evidence of attrition.

  16. The role of combined 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring in the evaluation of children with gastrointestinal symptoms suggesting gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Hojsak, I; Ivković, L; Trbojević, T; Pavić, I; Jadrešin, O; Mišak, Z; Kolaček, S

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (pH-MII) monitoring in the diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children who presented with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in comparison with the results of pH-metry alone and endoscopy. All children who underwent pH-MII monitoring due to GI symptoms, suggestive of GERD, from October 2013 to October 2015 in Children's Hospital Zagreb, were retrospectively enrolled in the study. The cohort was divided into three groups according to age - group 1: children <1 year of age; group 2: 1-9 years of age; and group 3: ≥9 years of age. One hundred thirty-three patients met our inclusion criteria (73 female/60 male; mean age 9.2 years [0.19-18.0]). Gastro-esophageal reflux disease was determined in 44 of 133 patients (33.1%) by pH-MII and only in 21 of 133 patients (15.8%) by pH-metry alone. Endoscopy was performed in 77 (57.9%) children and esophagitis was found in 32/77 (41.6%). The finding of esophagitis significantly correlated with the number of total reflux episodes (coef. 0.42, p < 0.001), acidic (coef. 0.26, p = 0.02), weakly acidic (coef. 0.3, p = 0.008) and non-acidic (coef. 0.26, p = 0.02) reflux episodes detected by pH-MII; but, no correlation was found to reflux episodes detected by pH-metry alone (coef. 0.21, p = 0.07). Compared with pH-metry alone, pH-MII performed significantly better in the detection of GERD in all age groups. On the basis of our data, pH-MII had a strong correlation with endoscopically confirmed esophagitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Uygur and Han Chinese adults in Urumqi.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chun-Yan; Zhou, Yong-Li; Yan, Rong; Mu, Ni-La; Gao, Bao-Hua; Wu, Fang-Xiong; Luo, Jin-Yan

    2012-12-28

    To investigate the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and its related risk factors in Uygur and Han Chinese adult in Urumqi, China. A population-based cross-sectional survey was undertaken in a total of 972 Uygur (684 male and 288 female) aged from 24 to 61 and 1023 Han Chinese (752 male and 271 female) aged from 23 to 63 years. All participants were recruited from the residents who visited hospital for health examination from November 2011 to May 2012. Each participant signed an informed consent and completed a GERD questionnaire (Gerd Q) and a lifestyle-food frequency questionnaire survey. Participants whose Gerd Q score was ≥ 8 and met one of the following requirements would be enrolled into this research: (1) being diagnosed with erosive esophagitis (EE) or Barrett's esophagus (BE) by endoscopy; (2) negative manifestation under endoscopy (non-erosive reflux disease, NERD) with abnormal acid reflux revealed by 24-h esophageal pH monitoring; and (3) suffering from typical heartburn and regurgitation with positive result of proton pump inhibitor test. According to Gerd Q scoring criteria, 340 cases of Uygur and 286 cases of Han Chinese were defined as GERD. GERD incidence in Uygur was significantly higher than in Han Chinese (35% vs 28%, χ(2) = 11.09, P < 0.005), Gerd Q score in Uygur was higher than in Han Chinese (7.85 ± 3.1 vs 7.15 ± 2.9, P < 0.005), and Gerd Q total score in Uygur male was higher than in female (8.15 ± 2.8 vs 6.85 ± 2.5, P < 0.005). According to normalized methods, 304 (31%) cases of Uygur were diagnosed with GERD, including 89 cases of EE, 185 cases of NERD and 30 cases of BE; 256 (25%) cases of Han Chinese were diagnosed with GERD, including 90 cases of EE, 140 cases of NERD and 26 cases of BE. GERD incidence in Uygur was significantly higher than in Han Chinese (31% vs 25%, χ(2) = 9.34, P < 0.005) while the incidences were higher in males of both groups than in females (26% vs 5% in Uygur, χ(2) = 35.95, P < 0

  18. Incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Uygur and Han Chinese adults in Urumqi

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Chun-Yan; Zhou, Yong-Li; Yan, Rong; Mu, Ni-La; Gao, Bao-Hua; Wu, Fang-Xiong; Luo, Jin-Yan

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and its related risk factors in Uygur and Han Chinese adult in Urumqi, China. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional survey was undertaken in a total of 972 Uygur (684 male and 288 female) aged from 24 to 61 and 1023 Han Chinese (752 male and 271 female) aged from 23 to 63 years. All participants were recruited from the residents who visited hospital for health examination from November 2011 to May 2012. Each participant signed an informed consent and completed a GERD questionnaire (Gerd Q) and a lifestyle-food frequency questionnaire survey. Participants whose Gerd Q score was ≥ 8 and met one of the following requirements would be enrolled into this research: (1) being diagnosed with erosive esophagitis (EE) or Barrett’s esophagus (BE) by endoscopy; (2) negative manifestation under endoscopy (non-erosive reflux disease, NERD) with abnormal acid reflux revealed by 24-h esophageal pH monitoring; and (3) suffering from typical heartburn and regurgitation with positive result of proton pump inhibitor test. RESULTS: According to Gerd Q scoring criteria, 340 cases of Uygur and 286 cases of Han Chinese were defined as GERD. GERD incidence in Uygur was significantly higher than in Han Chinese (35% vs 28%, χ2 = 11.09, P < 0.005), Gerd Q score in Uygur was higher than in Han Chinese (7.85 ± 3.1 vs 7.15 ± 2.9, P < 0.005), and Gerd Q total score in Uygur male was higher than in female (8.15 ± 2.8 vs 6.85 ± 2.5, P < 0.005). According to normalized methods, 304 (31%) cases of Uygur were diagnosed with GERD, including 89 cases of EE, 185 cases of NERD and 30 cases of BE; 256 (25%) cases of Han Chinese were diagnosed with GERD, including 90 cases of EE, 140 cases of NERD and 26 cases of BE. GERD incidence in Uygur was significantly higher than in Han Chinese (31% vs 25%, χ2 = 9.34, P < 0.005) while the incidences were higher in males of both groups than in females (26% vs 5% in Uygur, χ2

  19. An Evidence-Based Approach to the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Patti, Marco G

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is prevalent worldwide, particularly in developed countries. It is estimated that the prevalence of GERD in the United States is approximately 20% and that it is increasing because of the epidemic of obesity. To review the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of GERD. A search of PubMed was conducted for the years spanning 1985 to 2015 and included the following terms: heartburn, regurgitation, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, cough, aspiration, laryngitis, GERD, GORD, endoscopy, manometry, pH monitoring, proton pump inhibitors, open fundoplication, and laparoscopic fundoplication. Only articles in English were included. Lifestyle modifications, proton pump inhibitors, and laparoscopic fundoplication are proven treatment modalities for GERD. Endoscopic procedures have not been proven as effective. A Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the procedure of choice when GERD and morbid obesity coexist. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a highly prevalent disease. Once the diagnosis has been established, the best results are obtained by a multidisciplinary team with the goal of individualizing treatment for patients.

  20. Surface Microstructural Changes and Release of Ions from Dental Metal Alloy Removable Prostheses in Patients Suffering from Acid Reflux.

    PubMed

    Borg, William; Cassar, Glenn; Camilleri, Liberato; Attard, Nikolai; Camilleri, Josette

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the surface microstructural changes and the release of ions from metal alloys used in removable dental prostheses and the potential effects of acidic reflux found in patients suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Thirty-seven (37) patients were recruited. Data were gathered through a questionnaire and clinical examination. Samples of metal alloy from the dentures and patient's saliva were collected. GERD was confirmed using the GerdQ questionnaire. Denture samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), while salivary samples were tested for trace metal ions using inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Characterization of denture samples revealed the presence of nickel, cobalt, and chromium. Nickel-chromium exhibited an etched surface appearance, while cobalt-chromium exhibited no noticeable surface microstructural changes. Higher mean salivary levels of chromium and cobalt in patients wearing any metal alloy-based denture and of chromium and nickel in patients wearing Ni-Cr prostheses were found to be significant. No differences were found in salivary metal ion levels of patients suffering from GERD. Nickel-chromium alloy is prone to acid etching in the oral cavity, while cobalt-chromium alloy appears to be more resistant. Cobalt, chromium, and nickel are leached in saliva of patients using cast removable prostheses. The impact of gastric acid on metal ion release from dental metal alloys deserves further investigations. This preliminary study suggests that metal-based removable prostheses leach trace metal ions in saliva. Nickel-chromium-based dentures exhibit an etched appearance unrelated to GERD. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. Technical problems produced by the Bravo pH test in nonerosive reflux disease patients.

    PubMed

    de Hoyos, Andrés; Esparza, Edgar Alain

    2010-07-07

    To evaluate the technical failures of the Bravo pH test in a population with nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease. Over the course of a year, we prospectively studied a population of 66 nonerosive reflux disease patients who received a Bravo pH test. The number and frequency of all technical failures were documented, quantified and analyzed. A total of 66 patients, with a mean age of 41.7 years, were studied. Technical failures occurred in 15.15% of the sample. The most frequent failures were due to poor data reception (4.5%), early dislodgement (4.5%) and capsule removal (6.1%). The Bravo capsule pH test involves a low but non-negligible rate of technical problems, a fact that must always be considered by physicians.

  2. [Feeding disorders, ALTE syndrome, Sandifer syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease in the course of food hypersensitivity in 8-month old infant].

    PubMed

    Iwańczak, Barbara; Mowszet, Krystyna; Iwańczak, Franciszek

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes the occurrence of feeding disorders, atopic dermatitis, life-threatening symptoms, Sandifer syndrome, and gastroesophageal reflux disease in 8-month old infant in the course of food hypersensitivity. Used in the treatment of cow's milk protein hydrolysates with a considerable degree of hydrolysis, omeprazole, Cisapride. It was not until the introduction of elemental diet based on free amino acids resulted in the withdrawal of life-threatening child's symptoms.

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease: the importance of obesity and gender.

    PubMed

    Basoglu, Ozen K; Vardar, Rukiye; Tasbakan, Mehmet Sezai; Ucar, Zeynep Zeren; Ayik, Sibel; Kose, Timur; Bor, Serhat

    2015-05-01

    It is claimed that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) increases in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of GERD in patients with OSAS and primary snoring and identify OSAS-related risk factors associated with GERD. In this prospective, cross-sectional, multicenter study, in total 1,104 patients were recruited for polysomnography: 147 subjects were in non-OSAS (primary snoring) and 957 patients were in OSAS group. All patients completed a validated GERD questionnaire. Demographic, anthropometric characteristics, and medical history were recorded. The prevalence of GERD was similar in OSAS (38.9%) and non-OSAS (32.0%) groups (p = 0.064). There was no difference in terms of major gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms (heartburn/acid regurgitation) between non-OSAS and mild, moderate, and severe OSAS groups. The prevalence of GERD was increased in female OSAS patients (46.6%) compared to males (35.7%) (p = 0.002). In OSAS patients with GERD, body mass index was greater (34.0 ± 7.0 vs. 33.1 ± 6.8, p = 0.049), waist (115.5 ± 13.9 vs. 113.1 ± 13.4, p = 0.007) and hip (117.9 ± 13.7 vs. 114.2 ± 12.8, p < 0.0001) circumferences were larger, and Epworth sleepiness scores were higher (10.3 ± 6.0 vs. 8.8 ± 5.6, p < 0.0001) than OSAS patients without GERD. Multivariate analysis showed that GERD was significantly associated with female gender, hip circumference, and daytime sleepiness. In this large cohort, the prevalence of GERD was significantly increased in those with primary snoring and OSAS compared to the general population, but severity of OSAS did not influence GERD prevalence. The present results suggest that OSAS was not likely a causative factor but female gender, obesity, and sleepiness were related with prevalence of GERD in OSAS patients.

  4. Psychiatric disorders affect outcomes of antireflux operations for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Velanovich, V; Karmy-Jones, R

    2001-02-01

    Most of the information used to determine a patient's candidacy for antireflux surgery has centered on physiologic measurements of esophageal functioning and quantitative assessment of acid reflux. Unfortunately, little attention has been paid to the study of psychosocial factors that could affect outcomes. The purpose of this study was to establish whether concomitant psychiatric disorders might affect the symptomatic outcomes of antireflux surgery. We retrospectively reviewed a prospectively gathered database of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who underwent either open or laparoscopic antireflux surgery. A history of a psychiatric disorder was considered to be present if the patient had been previously diagnosed with a DSM-IV psychiatric diagnosis and was being medically treated for it. Preoperatively, patients were evaluated with the symptom severity questionnaire, the GERD-HRQL (best score 0, worst score 50). Later in the series, patients were also evaluated with the generic quality-of-life questionnaire, the SF-36 (best score 100, worst score 0). After antireflux surgery, patients completed both questionnaires 6 weeks postoperatively. A total of 94 patients underwent antireflux surgery. Seventy-seven of them had laparoscopic antireflux surgery (either Nissen or Toupet fundoplication), and 17 had open antireflux surgery (Nissen, Toupet, Collis-Nissen, or Belsey fundoplications). Nine patients had psychiatric disorders (five major depression, four anxiety disorders). At 6-week follow-up, 95.3% of patients without psychiatric disorders were satisfied with surgery, as compared to 11.1% of patients with psychiatric disorders (p < 0.000001). Patients satisfied with surgery had a median SF-36 mental health domain score of 76, as compared to a score of 36 for patients dissatisfied with surgery (p = 0.0002). Patients without psychiatric disorders showed improvement in the median total GERD-HRQL score from 27 preoperatively to 1 postoperatively (p

  5. Investigation of relationships among gastroesophageal reflux disease subtypes using narrow band imaging magnifying endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Liu, Dong; Ma, Shi-Yang; Zhang, Jun

    2013-12-07

    To investigate the relationships among subtypes of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) using narrow band imaging (NBI) magnifying endoscopy. A reflux disease questionnaire was used to screen 120 patients representing the three subtypes of GERD (n = 40 for each subtypes): nonerosive reflux disease (NERD), reflux esophagitis (RE) and Barrett's esophagus (BE). NBI magnifying endoscopic procedure was performed on the patients as well as on 40 healthy controls. The demographic and clinical characteristics, and NBI magnifying endoscopic features, were recorded and compared among the groups. Targeted biopsy and histopathological examination were conducted if there were any abnormalities. SPSS 18.0 software was used for all statistical analysis. Compared with healthy controls, a significantly higher proportion of GERD patients had increased number of intrapapillary capillary loops (IPCLs) (78.3% vs 20%, P < 0.05), presence of microerosions (41.7% vs 0%, P < 0.05), and a non-round pit pattern below the squamocolumnar junction (88.3% vs 30%, P < 0.05). The maximum (228 ± 4.8 vs 144 ± 4.7, P < 0.05), minimum (171 ± 3.8 vs 103 ± 4.4, P < 0.05), and average (199 ± 3.9 vs 119 ± 3.9, P < 0.05) numbers of IPCLs/field were also significantly greater in GERD patients. However, comparison among groups of the three subtypes showed no significant differences or any linear trend, except that microerosions were present in 60% of the RE patients, but in only 35% and 30% of the NERD and BE patients, respectively (P < 0.05). Patients with GERD, irrespective of subtype, have similar micro changes in the distal esophagus. The three forms of the disease are probably independent of each other. © 2013 Baishideng Publishing Group Co., Limited. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigation of relationships among gastroesophageal reflux disease subtypes using narrow band imaging magnifying endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jing; Liu, Dong; Ma, Shi-Yang; Zhang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationships among subtypes of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) using narrow band imaging (NBI) magnifying endoscopy. METHODS: A reflux disease questionnaire was used to screen 120 patients representing the three subtypes of GERD (n = 40 for each subtypes): nonerosive reflux disease (NERD), reflux esophagitis (RE) and Barrett’s esophagus (BE). NBI magnifying endoscopic procedure was performed on the patients as well as on 40 healthy controls. The demographic and clinical characteristics, and NBI magnifying endoscopic features, were recorded and compared among the groups. Targeted biopsy and histopathological examination were conducted if there were any abnormalities. SPSS 18.0 software was used for all statistical analysis. RESULTS: Compared with healthy controls, a significantly higher proportion of GERD patients had increased number of intrapapillary capillary loops (IPCLs) (78.3% vs 20%, P < 0.05), presence of microerosions (41.7% vs 0%, P < 0.05), and a non-round pit pattern below the squamocolumnar junction (88.3% vs 30%, P < 0.05). The maximum (228 ± 4.8 vs 144 ± 4.7, P < 0.05), minimum (171 ± 3.8 vs 103 ± 4.4, P < 0.05), and average (199 ± 3.9 vs 119 ± 3.9, P < 0.05) numbers of IPCLs/field were also significantly greater in GERD patients. However, comparison among groups of the three subtypes showed no significant differences or any linear trend, except that microerosions were present in 60% of the RE patients, but in only 35% and 30% of the NERD and BE patients, respectively (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Patients with GERD, irrespective of subtype, have similar micro changes in the distal esophagus. The three forms of the disease are probably independent of each other. PMID:24363532

  7. Esophageal mucosal integrity improves after laparoscopic antireflux surgery in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mauritz, Femke A; Rinsma, Nicolaas F; van Heurn, Ernest L W; Sloots, Cornelius E J; Siersema, Peter D; Houwen, Roderick H J; van der Zee, David C; Masclee, Ad A M; Conchillo, José M; Van Herwaarden-Lindeboom, Maud Y A

    2017-07-01

    Esophageal intraluminal baseline impedance reflects the conductivity of the esophageal mucosa and may be an instrument for in vivo evaluation of mucosal integrity in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS) is a well-established treatment option for children with proton pump inhibitory (PPI) therapy resistant GERD. The effect of LARS in children on baseline impedance has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of LARS on baseline impedance in children with GERD. This is a prospective, multicenter, nationwide cohort study (Dutch national trial registry: NTR2934) including 25 patients [12 males, median age 6 (range 2-18) years] with PPI-resistant GERD scheduled to undergo LARS. Twenty-four hour multichannel intraluminal impedance pH monitoring (MII-pH monitoring) was performed before and 3 months after LARS. Baseline impedance was evaluated during consecutive 2-h intervals in the 24-h tracings. LARS reduced acid exposure time from 8.5 % (6.0-16.2 %) to 0.8 % (0.2-2.8 %), p < 0.001. Distal baseline impedance increased after LARS from 2445 Ω (1147-3277 Ω) to 3792 Ω (3087-4700 Ω), p < 0.001. Preoperative baseline impedance strongly correlated with acid exposure time (r -0.76, p < 0.001); however, no association between symptomatic outcome and baseline impedance was identified. LARS significantly increased baseline impedance likely reflecting recovery of mucosal integrity. As the change in baseline impedance was not associated with the clinical outcome of LARS, other factors besides mucosal integrity may contribute to symptom perception in children with GERD.

  8. Full-thickness myotomy is associated with higher rate of postoperative gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Hong; Tan, Yu-Yong; Zhu, Hong-Yi; Li, Chen-Jie; Liu, De-Liang

    2016-11-14

    To compare long-term occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) between two different types of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for achalasia. We included all patients with achalasia who underwent POEM at our hospital from August 2011 to October 2012 and had complete GERD evaluation with ≥ 3 years of follow-up. They were divided into circular or full-thickness myotomy groups according to the depth of myotomy. Demographics, Eckardt score, manometry results, 24-h pH monitoring, and GERD symptoms were recorded and compared between the two groups. We studied 56 patients (32 circular myotomy and 24 full-thickness myotomy) with complete GERD evaluation. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of treatment success (defined as Eckardt score ≤ 3), postoperative Eckardt score, mean basal lower esophageal sphincter pressure, and 4-s integrated relaxation pressure (4sIRP). Postoperative abnormal esophageal acid exposure was found in 25 patients (44.6%). A total of 13 patients (23.2%) had GERD symptoms and 12 had esophagitis (21.4%). Clinically relevant GERD (abnormal esophageal acid exposure associated with GERD symptoms and/or esophagitis) was diagnosed in 13 patients (23.2%). Multivariate analysis revealed that full-thickness myotomy and low level of postoperative 4sIRP were predictive factors for clinically relevant GERD. Efficacy and manometry are comparable between achalasia patients treated with circular or full-thickness myotomy. But patients with full-thickness myotomy and low postoperative 4sIRP have more GERD.

  9. Exhaled breath condensate pH and cysteinyl leukotriens in patients with chronic cough secondary to acid gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Heffler, Enrico; Crimi, Claudia; Brussino, Luisa; Nicola, Stefania; Sichili, Stefania; Dughera, Luca; Rolla, Giovanni; Crimi, Nunzio

    2016-12-22

    Chronic cough is one of the most common clinical problems and it may be secondary to different stimuli and diseases, including low-level physical and chemical stimulation of the esophageal-bronchial reflex, suggestive of cough-reflex hyperresponsiveness, in patients with gastroesophageal reflux; however, it is still debated whether gastroesophageal reflux could induce airway inflammation and acidification. The aim of this study was to investigate airway pH and cysteynil-leukotrienes (Cys-LTs) concentration (a marker of airway inflammation) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC). Patients with chronic cough and for which all known causes, excluding gastroesophageal reflux, had been investigated and ruled out, were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent 24 h pH monitoring, and EBC was collected to assess pH and Cys-LTs concentration. Forty-five patients were included in the study and those with gastroesophageal reflux had significantly lower EBC-pH and higher concentration of EBC-Cys-LTs. There was a linear inverse correlation between EBC-pH values and EBC-Cys-LTs logarithmically transformed, and a multivariate analysis confirmed that the only significant determinat variable of EBC-Cys-LTs was the presence of gastroesophageal reflux. This study adds knowledge on possible mechanisms related to chronic cough associated with gastroesophageal reflux, which seems to be strictly dependent on airway acidification and the production of Cys-LTs, therefore suggesting an underlying neurogenic inflammation with tachykinins involvement.

  10. Revaluation of the efficacy of magnetic sphincter augmentation for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongke; Dong, Dinghui; Liu, Zhengwen; He, Shuixiang; Hu, Liangshuo; Lv, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a prevalent disease which severely impacts the quality of life of the patients. The surgical options are limited to such patients who are not satisfied with medical therapies. Magnetic sphincter augmentation (MSA) is a new antireflux surgical technique for treating GERD, which could physiologically reinforce the lower esophageal sphincter by magnetic force. Many clinical and animal studies have focused on this new therapy. The purpose of this work was to review the feasibility, efficacy and safety of MSA as a new treatment for GERD. We performed a PubMed database search for the MSA and GERD-related studies between 2008 and September 22, 2015. One animal study, two case reports and fifteen clinical studies were identified in this review. The MSA device reinforces the lower esophageal sphincter to antireflux via magnetic force. The feasibility of this laparoscopic technique has been proved by the experimental and clinical studies. The clinical studies demonstrate that MSA treatment could effectively reduce the percent time of esophageal acid exposure (pH < 4) and improve the GERD health-related quality of life score. The operation time of MSA is shorter than that of the Nissen fundoplication, and the efficacy of MSA treatment is equal to that of fundoplication. The most frequent postoperative complication is dysphagia, and the majority of them could be self-resolved with conservative treatment. MSA (or LINX) devices provide an alternative surgical option for the patients who had failed in medical therapy. This review of the current literatures demonstrates that MSA is as effective as the medical and conventional surgical therapies. In the future, MSA will play a more important role in the treatment of GERD because of its unique advantage.

  11. Non-nutritive sucking for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in preterm and low birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Psaila, Kim; Foster, Jann P; Richards, Robyn; Jeffery, Heather E

    2014-10-15

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is commonly diagnosed in the neonatal population (DiPietro 1994), and generally causes few or no symptoms (Vandenplas 2009). Conversely, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) refers to GOR that causes troublesome symptoms with or without complications such as damage to the oesophagus (Vandenplas 2009). Currently there is no evidence to support the range of measures recommended to help alleviate acid reflux experienced by infants. Non-nutritive sucking (NNS) has been used as an intervention to modulate neonatal state behaviours through its pacifying effects such as decrease infant fussiness and crying during feeds (Boiron 2007; Pickler 2004). To determine if NNS reduces GORD in preterm infants (less than 37 weeks' gestation) and low birth weight (less than 2500 g) infants, three months of age and less, with signs or symptoms suggestive of GORD, or infants with a diagnosis of GORD. We performed computerised searches of the electronic databases of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 9, 2013), MEDLINE (1966 to September 2013), CINAHL (1982 to September 2013), and EMBASE (1988 to September 2013). We applied no language restrictions. Controlled trials using random or quasi-random allocation of preterm infants (less than 37 weeks' gestation) and low birth weight (less than 2500 g) infants three months of age and less with signs or symptoms suggestive of GORD, or infants with a diagnosis of GORD. We included studies reported only by abstracts, and cluster and cross-over randomised trials. Two review authors independently reviewed and selected trials from searches, assessed and rated study quality and extracted relevant data. We identified two studies from the initial search. After further review, we excluded both studies. We identified no studies examining the effects of NNS for GORD in preterm and low birth weight infants There was insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of NNS for GORD

  12. Contribution of immunomodulators to gastroesophageal reflux disease and its complications: stromal cells, interleukin 4, and adiponectin.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Chen, Xiaoxin Luke; Shaker, Anisa; Oshima, Tadayuki; Shan, Jing; Miwa, Hiroto; Feng, Cheng; Zhang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has become the most commonly seen gastrointestinal disorder in outpatient clinics. In the United States, around 20% of the general population experience heartburn on a weekly basis. Although clinical complaints can be mild or moderate, patients with GERD may develop further complications, such as peptic strictures, Barrett's esophagus (BE), and even esophageal adenocarcinoma. Pathologically, GERD is developed as a result of chronic and enhanced exposure of the esophageal epithelium to noxious gastric refluxate. In this review article, we provide an overview of GERD and then focus on the roles of stromal cells, interleukin 4, and adiponectin in GERD and BE. The importance of inflammation and immunomodulators in GERD pathogenesis is highlighted. Targeting the immunomodulators or inflammation in general may improve the therapeutic outcome of GERD, in particular, in those refractory to proton pump inhibitors. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  13. Contribution of immunomodulators to gastroesophageal reflux disease and its complications: stromal cells, interleukin 4, and adiponection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Chen, Xiaoxin; Shaker, Anisa; Oshima, Tadayuki; Shan, Jing; Miwa, Hiroto; Feng, Cheng; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has become the most commonly seen gastrointestinal disorder in outpatient clinics. In the United States, around 20% of the general population experience heartburn on a weekly basis. Although clinical complaints can be mild or moderate, patients with GERD may develop further complications, such as peptic strictures, Barrett's esophagus (BE), and even esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Pathologically, GERD is developed as a result of chronic and enhanced exposure of the esophageal epithelium to noxious gastric refluxate. In this review article, we provide an overview of GERD, and then focus on the roles of stromal cells, interleukin 4 (IL-4), and adiponectin in GERD and BE. The importance of inflammation and immunomodulators in GERD pathogenesis is highlighted. Targeting the immunomodulators or inflammation in general may improve the therapeutic outcome of GERD, in particular, in those refractory to proton pump inhibitors. PMID:27441783

  14. Neuro-regulation of lower esophageal sphincter function as treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Anupender Singh; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2008-01-01

    The junction between the esophagus and the stomach is a specialized region, composed of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and its adjacent anatomical structures, the gastric sling and crural diaphragm. Together these structures work in a coordinated manner to allow ingested food into the stomach while preventing reflux of gastric contents across the esophago-gastric junction (EGJ) into the esophagus. The same zone also permits retrograde passage of air and gastric contents into esophagus during belching and vomiting. The precise coordination required to execute such a complicated task is achieved by a finely-regulated high-pressure zone. This zone keeps the junction between esophagus and stomach continuously closed, but is still able to relax briefly via input from inhibitory neurons that are responsible for its innervation. Alterations of the structure and function of the EGJ and the LES may predispose to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). PMID:18286675

  15. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in an 8-year-old boy: a case study.

    PubMed

    Jonasson, Anna K; Knaap, Simone F C

    2006-01-01

    To present the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease found in a pediatric patient, to discuss the importance of a detailed case history, and to bring forward some of the most important clues, both verbal and nonverbal, that can lead to the diagnosis. An 8-year-old boy was brought to a chiropractic clinic by his mother complaining of headache and neck pain. Based on the history and physical examination, a diagnosis of cervicogenic headache was made. Treatment consisted of chiropractic manipulation of the upper cervical spine in combination with cranial treatment was applied in addition to dietary advice. The headache returned and the patient was then referred to a colleague for a second opinion. Based on a detailed history, gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed and the patient was referred to a specialist for suitable treatment. Because of the position as first-line health practitioners, it is inevitable that doctors of chiropractic will be faced with complaints of a nonbiomechanical nature. It is important to recognize conditions, such as gastroesophageal reflux, at an early stage and to refer appropriately.

  16. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations Are Influenced by Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Bigatao, Amilcar M; Herbella, Fernando A M; Del Grande, Leonardo M; Nascimento, Oliver A; Jardim, Jose R; Patti, Marco G

    2018-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with different pulmonary diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Whether GERD is contributory to COPD severity remains unclear. This study aims to evaluate the contribution of GERD to the clinical manifestation of COPD based on ventilatory parameters and yearly clinical exacerbations. We studied 48 patients (56% females, age 66 years) with COPD. All patients underwent high-resolution manometry and esophageal pH monitoring. The patients were separated into two groups according to the presence of GERD. GERD was present in 21 (44%) patients. GERD + and GERD - groups did not differ in regard to gender, age, and body mass index. Pulmonary parameters were not different in the absence or presence of GERD. The number of yearly exacerbations was higher in patients GERD+. The severity of GERD (as measured by DeMeester score) correlated with the number of exacerbations. Our results show the following: 1) GERD does not influence pulmonary parameters and 2) GERD is associated with a higher number of annual clinical exacerbations. We believe GERD must be objectively tested in patients with COPD because the prevalence of GERD in these patients is underestimated when only symptoms are considered. GERD treatment might decrease the frequency of episodes of exacerbation.

  17. Progression of chronic kidney disease in children with vesicoureteral reflux: the North American Pediatric Renal Trials Collaborative Studies Database.

    PubMed

    Novak, Thomas E; Mathews, Ranjiv; Martz, Karen; Neu, Alicia

    2009-10-01

    We describe a cohort of children with chronic kidney disease due to vesicoureteral reflux. We compared the rate of progression to end stage renal disease in those patients to the rate in children with another cause of chronic kidney disease and identified potential risk factors for progression. We performed a retrospective cohort study using data from the North American Pediatric Renal Trials and Collaborative Studies Registry. Patients with vesicoureteral reflux as a cause of chronic kidney disease were compared to 2 other diagnostic cohorts. The 3 groups were compared with respect to baseline characteristics and progression to end stage renal disease based on diagnostic category. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors for progression to end stage renal disease using Cox proportional hazards regression model. Data on 6,981 patients were available for analysis. Patients with vesicoureteral reflux as a cause of chronic kidney disease had a significantly slower rate of progression to end stage renal disease than patients with renal aplasia, hypoplasia or dysplasia and all other causes (log rank p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis of risk factors for progression to end stage renal disease in patients with vesicoureteral reflux as the cause of chronic kidney disease we found that, in addition to older age and more advanced chronic kidney disease stage, a history of urinary tract infection at registration was significantly associated with an increased risk of progression. Children with vesicoureteral reflux had a slower rate of progression to end stage renal disease than children with another cause of chronic kidney disease even after controlling for multiple possible confounders. In children with vesicoureteral reflux as the cause of chronic kidney disease older age, higher chronic kidney disease stage and history of urinary tract infection are significantly associated with the risk of progression to end stage renal disease.

  18. Association between gastroesophageal reflux disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wijarnpreecha, Karn; Panjawatanan, Panadeekarn; Thongprayoon, Charat; Jaruvongvanich, Veeravich; Ungprasert, Patompong

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim: The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been demonstrated in recent epidemiologic studies although the results were inconsistent. This meta-analysis was conducted to summarize all available data and to estimate the risk of NAFLD among patients with GERD. Materials and Methods: Comprehensive literature review was conducted using MEDLINE and EMBASE database from inception through November 2016, to identify studies that compared the risk of NAFLD among patients with GERD versus those without GERD. Effect estimates from each study were extracted and combined using the random-effect, generic inverse variance method of DerSimonian and Laird. Results: Eight studies (four cross-sectional studies and four case–control studies) with 31,322 participants met the eligibility criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The risk of NAFLD among patients with GERD was significantly higher than those without GERD with the pooled odds ratio of 2.07 (95% confidence interval, 1.54–2.79). The statistical heterogeneity was high with an I2 of 87%. Conclusions: A significantly increased risk of NAFLD among patients with GERD was observed in this meta-analysis. PMID:29205182

  19. Non-pharmacological intervention for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in primary care.

    PubMed

    Dibley, Lesley B; Norton, Christine; Jones, Roger

    2010-12-01

    Up to 50% of patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) have persistent symptoms despite taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) regularly. Lifestyle advice is available to patients, but no previous UK study has tested a behavioural change intervention to help patients self-manage their symptoms. To determine whether a primary care, nurse-led intervention to address behaviours that promote GORD symptoms results in symptom improvement, an increased sense of control, and a reduced requirement for prescribed medication. A group intervention focusing on diet and stress was delivered to patients with reflux symptoms, recruited in rural general practices. General practice in England. Forty-two subjects (male 19, female 23) aged 31-86 years took part. Pre- and post-intervention data were gathered using the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ), the GORD Impact Scale (GIS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD). There was a significant improvement (BIPQ P<0.001, GIS P = 0.008) 3 months after the intervention. There was no reduction in PPI use or change in HAD score. The greatest improvements were demonstrated in domains measuring the patient's sense of control, perception of symptoms, and understanding of reflux. Patients reported benefits including understanding relevant anatomy and physiology, learning behavioural techniques to change eating patterns and manage stress, identifying actual and potential triggers, and developing and executing action plans. An education programme for GORD enhances self-management, brings perceived symptom improvement, and promotes a sense of control at 3 months. This type of behavioural intervention, alongside medical management, could improve symptom control for reflux patients with refractory symptoms and should be the subject of a controlled trial.

  20. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Cross-Sectional Study Demonstrating Rising Prevalence in a Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Tan, Victoria Ping-Yi; Wong, Benjamin ChunYu; Wong, Wai Man; Leung, Wai Keung; Tong, Daniel; Yuen, Man Fung; Fass, Ronnie

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is consistently lower in the Chinese than in white populations. Population-based data tracking the time trend of GERD prevalence in Chinese subjects is conflicting. This study examines the population prevalence, risk factors, and time trend associated with GERD in a Chinese population. A population-based cross-sectional study utilizing a validated GERD questionnaire administered by a telephone survey was performed on 3360 Chinese subjects from Hong Kong. GERD prevalence rates in 2011 were compared with prevalence rates in 2002 and 2006. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to determine the risk factors associated with weekly GERD. A total of 2074 subjects (mean age, 48.1±18.2 y; range 18 to 94; 63.1% female) completed the survey (response rate 61.7%). The prevalence of GERD as defined by the Montreal definition was 3.8%. The prevalence of weekly GERD had increased by 1.3% between 2002 and 2011, which represents an at least 50% relative increase (P<0.0005). A diagnosis of weekly GERD was associated with noncardiac chest pain [odds ratio (OR), 1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.034-2.9; P=0.037], dyspepsia (OR, 5.1; 95% CI, 3.0-8.8; P<0.005), and an acid feeling in the stomach (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.8-5.1). GERD rates in the ethnic Chinese have risen over the last decade. Despite this, variables associated with a survey diagnosis of GERD remain ostensibly unchanged. GERD research in East Asia should focus on the factors driving the rapid rise in prevalence rates and the association with more atypical symptoms of GERD.

  1. Vagotomy, antrectomy, and Roux-en-Y diversion for complex reoperative gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Ellis, F H; Gibb, S P

    1994-10-01

    Failure of conventional surgical therapy for treatment of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) taxes the ingenuity of the esophageal surgeon. This study defines the role of vagotomy, antrectomy, and Roux-en-Y diversion coupled, when necessary, with resection of the esophagogastric junction as an alternative to other surgical procedures currently employed for these complicated cases. Currently, the operation in question rarely is performed in the United States. Other procedures, such as interposition of short or long segments of intestine and total esophagectomy with gastric pull-up, are preferred. However, surgeons from Scandinavia, Great Britain, and Europe have published widely on the subject, some even preferring its use as a primary procedure in GERD. This report reviews the indications and results of the operation in 36 patients who underwent operation between January 1970 and January 1994. Follow-up evaluation was available for review in 33 patients observed from 1 to 20 years postoperatively (average, 6 2/3 years). Of these patients, 32 had undergone 66 previous operative procedures on the distal esophagus and stomach ranging from 1 to 6 per patient. There were no hospital deaths, but complications developed in nine patients (25%); only half of these complications were major. Of patients available for follow-up, 85% were improved by the operation, 24 of the 33 having excellent or good results. The operation of vagotomy, antrectomy, and Roux-en-Y diversion, embodying the principles of acid suppression and alkaline diversion, has proved to be a successful alternative to other operative procedures currently favored in the United States for the treatment of the complex reoperative patient with GERD.

  2. The utility of oesophageal pH monitoring in diagnosing gastroesophageal reflux disease-related chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Rybka, Aleksandra; Malesa, Kamila; Radlińska, Olga; Krakowiak, Karolina; Grabczak, Elżbieta M; Dąbrowska, Marta; Chazan, Ryszarda

    2014-01-01

    Chronic cough is a common medical complaint, which may deteriorate patients' quality of life and cause many complications. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the frequent reasons for chronic cough. Oesophageal pH monitoring is one of the diagnostic methods performed to confirm diagnosis of GERD-related cough. The aim of the study was to analyse the utility of oesophageal pH monitoring in diagnosing GERD-related cough and to identify the most sensitive pH monitoring parameters for diagnosing GERD-related cough. 24-hour oesophageal pH monitoring was performed in 204 patients suffering from chronic cough. The group consisted of 65% females and the median age was 59 years. An acid reflux episode was defined as a rapid drop in pH to a value below 4 for at least 12 seconds. The diagnosis of GERD was based on total fraction time of pH < 4, upright or supine fraction time of pH < 4, or DeMeester score. The diagnosis of GERD-related cough was made if cough episodes, marked by the patients, appeared within 2 minutes after the reflux. The association between reflux episode and appearance of cough was analysed using two parameters: symptom index (SI ≥ 50%) and/or symptom association probability (SAP ≥ 95%). Based on results of pH monitoring, 135 patients (135/204, 66%) were diagnosed with GERD. Among them, 117 patients (117/135, 87%) were diagnosed based on DeMeester score. Among patients with GERD, 61 patients met the criteria of GERD-related cough (61/135, 45%), i.e. 30% of the group as a whole. Thirty-six patients (36/61, 59%) were diagnosed based on SAP, 12 patients (20%) based on SI, and 13 (21%) based on both parameters. Spearman rank correlation coefficient for SAP ≥ 95% and SI ≥ 50% was 0.46 (p < 0.05). Based on pH monitoring results, GERD was diagnosed twice as often as GERD-related cough. SAP index is more sensitive than SI for the diagnosis of GERD-related cough.

  3. Time Trends of Gastro-esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) and Peptic Ulcer Disease (PUD) in Iran.

    PubMed

    Sepanlou, Sg; Khademi, H; Abdollahzadeh, N; Noori, F; Malekzadeh, F; Malekzadeh, R

    2010-09-01

    BACKGROUND Epidemiology of diseases changes over time with changes in socio-economic status, culture and health care systems. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and peptic ulcer disease (PUD) are among the diseases whose epidemiology has changed over the past few decades in the west. Studies addressing the trend of GERD and PUD occurrence in Iran are lacking. We aimed to look at the time trends of GERD and PUD in a referral endoscopy clinic in Tehran, Iran. METHODS All patients with dyspeptic symptoms who underwent upper GI endoscopy from 1993 to 2005 (inclusive) in a tertiary outpatient GI referral center in Tehran were enrolled. Erosive esophagitis (EE, used as a proxy for GERD as a whole), PUD, rapid urease test (RUT) status and demographic characteristics were recorded from the endoscopy reports according to the year the endoscopy was performed. RESULTS Over a period of 13 years, 8,029 endoscopic examinations were performed. The most common endoscopic diagnosis was EE that occurred in 4,808 patients (59.8%) followed by duodenal ulcer in 2,188 (27.3%) and gastric ulcer in 88 (1.1%). Over 13 years (1995-2005), the proportion of EE increased from 14.1% in 1993 to 75.1% in 2005 among dyspeptic patients in this referral clinic. The proportion of each grade of GERD according to the Los Angeles classification was as follows: GERD-A 76.0%, GERD-B 20.9%, GERD-C 2.8% and GERD-D 0.3%. RUT positivity decreased from 71.4% to 9.5% during the study period. CONCLUSION This study shows a remarkable increase in EE with a concomitant decrease in PUD and RUT positivity among dyspeptic patients in Tehran over a decade. This change in trend is important for future health care planning.

  4. Proximal and distal gastro-oesophageal reflux in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Annemarie L; Button, Brenda M; Denehy, Linda; Roberts, Stuart J; Bamford, Tiffany L; Ellis, Samantha J; Mu, Fi-Tjen; Heine, Ralf G; Stirling, Robert G; Wilson, John W

    2014-02-01

    The aims of this observational study were (i) to examine the prevalence of symptomatic and clinically silent proximal and distal gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or bronchiectasis, (ii) the presence of gastric aspiration, and (iii) to explore the possible clinical significance of this comorbidity in these conditions. Twenty-seven participants with COPD, 27 with bronchiectasis and 17 control subjects completed reflux symptom evaluation and dual-channel 24 h oesophageal pH monitoring. In those with lung disease, pepsin levels in sputum samples were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, with disease severity (lung function and high-resolution computed tomography) also measured. The prevalence of GOR in COPD was 37%, in bronchiectasis was 40% and in control subjects was 18% (P = 0.005). Of those diagnosed with GOR, clinically silent reflux was detected in 20% of participants with COPD and 42% with bronchiectasis. While pepsin was found in 33% of COPD and 26% of bronchiectasis participants, the presence of pepsin in sputum was not related to a diagnosis of GOR based on oesophageal pH monitoring in either condition. Neither a diagnosis of GOR nor the presence of pepsin was associated with increased severity of lung disease in COPD or bronchiectasis. The prevalence of GOR in COPD or bronchiectasis is twice that of the control population, and the diagnosis could not be based on symptoms alone. Pepsin was detected in sputum in COPD and bronchiectasis, suggesting a possible role of pulmonary aspiration, which requires further exploration. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  5. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease associated with duodenogastroesophageal reflux in patients with biliary pathology: the specific features of the course and esophagogastroduodenal microbial biocenosis].

    PubMed

    Dzhulai, G S; Sekareva, E V; Chervinets, V M; Mikhailova, E S; Dzhulai, T E

    2014-01-01

    To study the specific features of the clinical course of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) associated with duodenogastroesophageal reflux (DGER) in patients with chronic acalculous cholecystitis (CAC) and cholelithiasis (CL), as well as qualitative and quantitative characteristics. The clinical, morphological, motor tonic characteristics of the esophagogastroduodenal area, mucosal microbial biocenosis in the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum were studied in detail in 83 patients with GERD that was associated with DGER and ran concurrently with CAC or CL. Impaired duodenal propulsive activity as a concomitance of the signs of gastrostasis and duodenal dyskinesia with dyscoordination of both anthroduodenal and duodenojejunal propulsion and with the development of duodenogastric reflux and DGER, which in turn determine esophageal and gastric pH values is shown to be of importance in CAC and CL, which match GERD. Abnormal microbiocenosis in the upper digestive tract is characterized by the higher quantitative and qualitative content of the mucous microflora. Opportunistic microorganisms exhibit cytotoxic, hemolytic, lecithinase, caseinolytic, urease, and RNAase activities. The found specific features of the course of GERD associated with DGER in patients with biliary tract abnormalities lead us to search for novel therapeutic approaches based on the correction of digestive motor tonic disorders and abnormal microbiocenoses of the mucous flora in the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum.

  6. The Relationship of the Post-reflux Swallow-induced Peristaltic Wave Index and Esophageal Baseline Impedance with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young Kyu; Lee, Joon Seong; Lee, Tae Hee; Hong, Su Jin; Park, Sang Joon; Jeon, Seong Ran; Kim, Hyun Gun; Kim, Jin-Oh

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims The post-reflux swallow-induced peristaltic wave (PSPW) index and esophageal baseline impedance (BI) are novel impedance parameters used to evaluate esophageal chemical clearance and mucosal integrity. However, their relationship with reflux symptoms is not known. We aim to evaluate the correlations of PSPW index and esophageal BI with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms. Methods We performed a retrospective review of multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH (MII-pH) tracings in patients with suspected GERD. Reflux symptoms were also analyzed from checklists using ordinal scales. The PSPW index and esophageal BIs in 6 spots (z1–z6) were measured. Bivariate (Spearman) correlation was used to analyze the relationship between the PSPW index or esophageal BI, and the degree of GERD symptoms measured. Results The MII-pH records of 143 patients were analyzed. The PSPW index was significantly lower in patients who had heartburn and negatively correlated with the degree of heartburn (r = −0.186, P < 0.05). On the contrary, the PSPW index was not significantly correlated with the degree of dysphagia (r = −0.013, P = 0.874). Distal esophageal BI was not significantly correlated with heartburn, but negatively correlated with the degree of dysphagia (z3: r = −0.328, z4: r = −0.361, z5: r = −0.316, z6: r = −0.273; P < 0.05). Conclusions These findings suggest that delayed chemical clearance of the esophagus may induce heartburn, but that it is not related to dysphagia. However, a lack of esophageal mucosal integrity may be related to dysphagia. PMID:28044052

  7. Comparison of central and intraesophageal factors between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients and those with GERD-related noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, M; Simantov, R; Yair, M; Leitman, M; Blatt, A; Scapa, E; Broide, E

    2012-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) causes a wide range of symptoms. Some patients present with typical symptoms such as heartburn and regurgitation and others with atypical symptoms such as chest pain. The mechanism responsible for the varying clinical presentation of GERD is still not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate differences in central and local intraesophageal factors between patients with typical GERD symptoms and those with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). Patients presenting with typical and atypical symptoms suspicious of GERD underwent upper endoscopy and 24-hour pH monitoring with four sensors, each positioned at a different esophageal level. All patients completed GERD symptom, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Symptom Stress Rating questionnaires. From January 2006 to December 2009, 50 patients were recruited, 29 with typical symptoms, and 21 with NCCP. Patients with proven GERD and NCCP had higher proximal extension of acid during reflux episodes than patients with typical symptoms. They were found to be older, had a shorter history of symptom onset, worse anxiety scores, and more endoscopic findings compatible with gastritis. Proximal extension of acid during the reflux episodes in patients with GERD presenting with NCCP may play a role in symptom generation. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  8. Increased TRPV1 gene expression in esophageal mucosa of patients with non-erosive and erosive reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Guarino, M P L; Cheng, L; Ma, J; Harnett, K; Biancani, P; Altomare, A; Panzera, F; Behar, J; Cicala, M

    2010-07-01

    Transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subfamily member-1 (TRPV1) may play a role in esophageal perception. TRPV1 mRNA and protein expression were examined in the esophageal mucosa of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and erosive esophagitis (EE) patients and correlated to esophageal acid exposure. Seventeen NERD patients, eight EE patients and 10 healthy subjects underwent endoscopy after a 3-week washout from proton pump inhibitors or H2 antagonists. Biopsies, obtained from the distal esophagus, were used for conventional histology, for Western blot analysis and/or quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Overall 13 NERD patients, four EE patients and five controls underwent ambulatory pH-testing. TRPV1 expression was increased in all NERD and EE patients, as measured by Western blot analysis (0.65 +/- 0.07 and 0.8 +/- 0.05 VS 0.34 +/- 0.04 in controls; P < 0.01) and by qPCR (1.98 +/- 0.21 and 2.52 +/- 0.46 VS 1.00 +/- 0.06; P < 0.01). Neutrophilic infiltration, in the mucosa, was detected only in EE patients. Non-erosive reflux disease and EE patients presented increased TRPV1 receptors mRNA and protein, although no correlation with acid exposure was demonstrated. Increased TRPV1 in the esophageal mucosa may contribute to symptoms both in NERD and EE patients and possibly account for peripheral mechanisms responsible for esophageal hypersensitivity in NERD patients.

  9. Saliva variations in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Campisi, G; Lo Russo, L; Di Liberto, C; Di Nicola, F; Butera, D; Vigneri, S; Compilato, D; Lo Muzio, L; Di Fede, O

    2008-04-01

    The protective role of saliva in the case of oesophageal exposition to gastric acid has long been studied but some contradictions still remain. The main end-point of this study was to evaluate if a qualitative and quantitative alteration in salivary secretion exists in patients affected by GERD. One hundred and twenty patients (T group) with clinically and endoscopically diagnosed GERD, and 98 healthy subjects (C group) have been evaluated; salivary tests (i.e. basal flow rate, stimulated flow rate, pH, [Na(+)] and [K(+)]) were performed, socio-demographical variables and oral GERD-related symptoms were taken into account. SPSS 10.5 software was used for statistical univariate and multivariate analyses. GERD patients and controls were found to have a similar basal flow rate but different stimulated salivary function [T group mean value 0.989 ml/min (+/-0.48718) vs. C group 1.2197 ml/min (+/-0.6108), pH [T group mean value 8.935 (+/-0.471) vs. C group 7.879 (+/-0.526)] and a higher K(+) concentration. In GERD patients we also registered a significant association with xerostomia [69/120 (57.5%) vs. 28/98 (28.7%)] and an oral burning sensation [58/120 (48.3%) vs. 19/98 (19.3%)]. Our findings assess that salivary secretion is altered in GERD patients and highlight the need for further investigations in order to define the role of saliva in the etiopathogenesis of GERD.

  10. Recurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease correlated with a short dinner-to-bedtime interval.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae Hoon; Kang, Ho Suk; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup; Jin, Choon Jo

    2014-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be classified into erosive reflux disease (ERD) and nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD). We aimed to compare the recurrence rates of ERD and NERD and determine the risk factors related to the recurrence. This prospective study comprised 337 consecutive adults who completed questionnaires on their GERD symptoms, height, weight, sleeping position, dinner time, and bedtime. During upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, the presence of a hiatal hernia and mucosal breaks in the low esophagus, esophageal length (the distance between the Z-line and the incisors), and the esophageal length-to-height ratio were recorded. Recurrence was diagnosed when the patient required additional proton pump inhibitor medication after initial recovery with 4-8 weeks of treatment. Recurrence was experienced by 47 (26.0%) of 181 GERD patients. The recurrence rate did not differ between the 48 ERD (27.1%) and 133 NERD (25.6%) patients (P = 0.849). Of the various factors studied, recurrence was found to be correlated with a dinner-to-bedtime interval of less than 3 h (P = 0.002), globus sensation (P = 0.031), and old age (P = 0.047). Logistic regression analysis revealed that a short interval between dinner and bedtime was the only factor significantly related to the recurrence (P = 0.002). Both ERD and NERD patients who sleep within 3 h after eating have a higher risk of GERD recurrence. Our findings highlight the impact of a short dinner-to-bedtime interval on the recurrence of GERD (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: KCT0000134). © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Motility Disorders in Women, Gastroparesis, and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Zia, Jasmine K; Heitkemper, Margaret M

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews the sex differences in upper gastrointestinal (GI) motility for both healthy and common dysmotility conditions. It focuses on gastroesophageal reflux disease and other esophageal motor disorders for the esophagus and on gastroparesis and accelerated gastric emptying for the stomach. It also describes differences in upper GI motility signs and symptoms during each female hormonal stage (ie, menstrual cycle, pregnancy, perimenopause, menopause) for both healthy participants and those suffering from one of the aforementioned upper GI dysmotility conditions. More research still needs to be conducted to better understand sex differences in upper GI motility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Evaluating an effectiveness of surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease combined with hiatal hernia].

    PubMed

    Mozharovskiy, V V; Tsyganov, A A; Mozharovskiy, K V; Tarasov, A A

    To assess an effectiveness of surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) combined with hiatal hernia (HH). The trial included 96 patients with GERD and HH who were divided into 2 groups. The principal difference between groups was the use of surgery in the main group and therapeutic treatment in the comparison group. The effectiveness of surgical treatment is superior to therapeutic treatment of GERD by more than 2.5 times. HH combined with GERD is an indication for surgical treatment. Fundoplication cuff should not lead to angular and rotational esophageal deformation. Nissen procedure in Donahue modification (Short Floppy Nissen) simulates optimally the geometry of esophago-gastric junction and His angle.

  13. Microcirculatory changes in the canine oesophageal mucosa during experimental reflux oesophagitis: comparison of the effects of acid and bile.

    PubMed

    Szentpáli, K; Erös, G; Kaszaki, J; Tiszlavicz, L; Lázár, G; Wolfárd, A; Balogh, A; Boros, M

    2003-10-01

    The response of the oesophageal microcirculation to luminal damaging agents may play an important role in reflux-induced mucosal injury. We characterized the microcirculatory consequences of exposure to bile with or without hydrochloric acid, and determined the changes in the constitutive nitric oxide synthase and inducible nitric oxide synthase activities in a canine model of acute reflux oesophagitis. Group 1 served as a saline-treated control, while groups 2-4 were exposed for 3 h to bile alone, to hydrochloric acid, or to bile + hydrochloric acid, respectively. The mucosal microcirculation was observed continuously by means of intravital videomicroscopy with an orthogonal polarization spectral imaging technique. Myeloperoxidase, constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthase activities were measured via tissue biopsies, while the degree of mucosal damage was evaluated histologically. Bile evoked deep tissue damage and leucocyte accumulation in the mucosa and muscle layer. The capillary red blood cell velocity and the relative vessel area increased significantly (P < 0.05). The constitutive NO synthase activity was decreased, and the inducible NO synthase activity was increased significantly. In the hydrochloric acid-treated group the functional capillary density decreased, the mucosal damage was less severe, the constitutive NO synthase activity did not change, whereas the inducible NO synthase activity was increased significantly. The constitutive NO synthase activity did not change after the bile + hydrochloric acid treatment either. Reflux components induce characteristic microcirculatory alterations. The structural damage and leucocyte invasion are accompanied by bile-induced constitutive NO synthase inhibition when hydrochloric acid production is suppressed.

  14. No association of coffee consumption with gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, reflux esophagitis, and non-erosive reflux disease: a cross-sectional study of 8,013 healthy subjects in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Takeshi; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Kodashima, Shinya; Takahashi, Yu; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Oka, Masashi; Mitsushima, Toru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Probably due to caffeine-induced gastric acid secretion, negative effects of coffee upon various upper-gastrointestinal diseases have been precariously accepted, despite the inadequate epidemiological evidence. Our aim is to evaluate the effect of coffee consumption on four major acid-related diseases: gastric ulcer (GU), duodenal ulcer (DU), reflux esophagitis (RE), and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) based on the large-scale multivariate analysis. Of the 9,517 healthy adults, GU, DU, and RE were diagnosed by endoscopy, and NERD was diagnosed by the symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation without esophageal erosion. Associations between coffee consumption and the four disorders were evaluated, together with age, gender, body mass index (BMI), Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection status, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, and alcohol. We further performed meta-analysis using the random effects model to redefine the relationship between coffee intake and peptic ulcer disease. The eligible 8,013 study subjects comprised of 5,451 coffee drinkers and 2,562 non-coffee drinkers. By univariate analysis, age, BMI, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, and alcohol showed significant associations with coffee consumption. By multiple logistic regression analysis, positively correlated factors with significance were HP infection, current smoking, BMI, and pepsinogen I/II ratio for GU; HP infection, pepsinogen I/II ratio, and current smoking for DU; HP non-infection, male, BMI, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, age, and alcohol for RE; younger age, smoking, and female for NERD. The meta-analyses could detect any association of coffee consumption with neither GU nor DU. In conclusion, there are no significant relationship between coffee consumption and the four major acid-related upper gastrointestinal disorders.

  15. No Association of Coffee Consumption with Gastric Ulcer, Duodenal Ulcer, Reflux Esophagitis, and Non-Erosive Reflux Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study of 8,013 Healthy Subjects in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shimamoto, Takeshi; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Kodashima, Shinya; Takahashi, Yu; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Oka, Masashi; Mitsushima, Toru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Probably due to caffeine-induced gastric acid secretion, negative effects of coffee upon various upper-gastrointestinal diseases have been precariously accepted, despite the inadequate epidemiological evidence. Our aim is to evaluate the effect of coffee consumption on four major acid-related diseases: gastric ulcer (GU), duodenal ulcer (DU), reflux esophagitis (RE), and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) based on the large-scale multivariate analysis. Of the 9,517 healthy adults, GU, DU, and RE were diagnosed by endoscopy, and NERD was diagnosed by the symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation without esophageal erosion. Associations between coffee consumption and the four disorders were evaluated, together with age, gender, body mass index (BMI), Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection status, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, and alcohol. We further performed meta-analysis using the random effects model to redefine the relationship between coffee intake and peptic ulcer disease. The eligible 8,013 study subjects comprised of 5,451 coffee drinkers and 2,562 non-coffee drinkers. By univariate analysis, age, BMI, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, and alcohol showed significant associations with coffee consumption. By multiple logistic regression analysis, positively correlated factors with significance were HP infection, current smoking, BMI, and pepsinogen I/II ratio for GU; HP infection, pepsinogen I/II ratio, and current smoking for DU; HP non-infection, male, BMI, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, age, and alcohol for RE; younger age, smoking, and female for NERD. The meta-analyses could detect any association of coffee consumption with neither GU nor DU. In conclusion, there are no significant relationship between coffee consumption and the four major acid-related upper gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23776588

  16. Anxiety and depression in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and their effect on quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Jun; Jiang, Hong-Mei; Hou, Xiao-Hua; Song, Jun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the role of psychological factors in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and their effect on quality of life (QoL) of GERD patients. METHODS: A total of 279 consecutive patients with typical symptoms and 100 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. All of the participants were evaluated with the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (ZSAS), the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (ZSDS) and the SF-36 questionnaire. The scores for anxiety, depression and QoL of the two groups were analyzed. The correlation between psychological factors and QoL was also analyzed. RESULTS: Compared with healthy controls (34.70 ± 8.00), the scores of ZSAS in the non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) group (48.27 ± 10.34) and the reflux esophagitis (RE) group (45.38 ± 10.27) were significantly higher (P < 0.001). The mean ZSAS score of the NERD group was significantly higher than that of the RE group (P = 0.01). Compared with healthy controls (37.61 ± 8.44), the mean ZSDS scores were significantly higher in the NERD group (49.65 ± 11.09, P < 0.001) and the RE group (46.76 ± 11.83, P < 0.001). All dimensions of the SF-36 form were negatively correlated with the SAS and SDS scores in patients with NERD and RE (P < 0.05). According to the SF-36 form, vitality, mental health and social functioning were significantly correlated with symptoms of depression in patients with NERD and RE. General health was obviously affected by symptoms of depression in patients with NERD (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Anxiety and depression may play an important role in the occurrence of GERD and especially that of NERD. The QoL of patients with GERD is reduced by anxiety and depression. PMID:25892882

  17. Weight Loss Can Lead to Resolution of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms: A Prospective Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mandeep; Lee, Jaehoon; Gupta, Neil; Gaddam, Srinivas; Smith, Bryan K.; Wani, Sachin B.; Sullivan, Debra K.; Rastogi, Amit; Bansal, Ajay; Donnelly, Joseph E.; Sharma, Prateek

    2013-01-01

    Objective Weight gain is an important risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); however, whether weight loss can lead to resolution of GERD symptoms is not clear. Our aim was to measure the impact of weight loss on GERD symptoms. Design and Methods In a prospective cohort study at a tertiary referral center, overweight/obese subjects (BMI 25-39.9 kg/m2) were enrolled in a structured weight loss program. Weight loss strategies included dietary modifications, increased physical activity and behavioral changes. At baseline and at 6 months, BMI and waist circumference were measured and all participants completed a validated reflux disease questionnaire. Results A total of 332 adult subjects, mean age 46 years and 66% women were prospectively enrolled. At baseline, the mean body weight, BMI, and waist circumference were 101 (±18) kg, 35 (±5) kg/m2 and 103 (±13) cm. At 6 months, majority of the subjects (97%) lost weight (average weight loss: 13 ± 7.7 kg) and as compared with baseline, there was a significant decrease in the overall prevalence of GERD (15 vs. 37%; P < 0.01) and the mean GERD symptom score (1.8 vs. 5.5; P < 0.01). Overall, 81% of the subjects had reduction in GERD symptom scores; 65% had complete resolution and 15% had partial resolution of reflux symptoms. There was a significant correlation between % body weight loss and reduction in GERD symptom scores (r = 0.17, P < 0.05). Conclusions In conclusion, the overall prevalence of GERD symptoms is high (37%) in overweight and obese subjects. A structured weight loss program can lead to complete resolution of GERD symptoms in the majority of these subjects. PMID:23532991

  18. Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and effects of esomeprazole on the quality of life related to reflux and dyspepsia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Namikoshi, Tamehachi; Harada, Kazuhiro; Hatta, Hidekazu; Tokura, Takehiko; Oshiro, Yoshiyuki; Nishizaki, Tetsuichi; Obata, Takahiro; Mori, Masahiro; Fueki, Takaaki; Fujimoto, Sohachi; Haruna, Yoshisuke; Kuwabara, Atsunori; Yorimitsu, Daisuke; Ihoriya, Chieko; Kadoya, Hiroyuki; Itano, Seiji; Fujimoto, Yasuo; Komai, Norio; Sasaki, Tamaki; Kashihara, Naoki

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms has not been investigated in patients on maintenance hemodialysis in Japan, and few studies have reported the effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in hemodialysis patients with GERD symptoms. Here, we investigated the prevalence of GERD symptoms and the effects of the PPI esomeprazole on the quality of life related to reflux and dyspepsia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. This was a cross-sectional/cohort study of hemodialysis outpatients implemented in 10 Japanese medical facilities from October 2012 to March 2014. The trial was registered in the UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN000009124). Forty-one of 385 patients (11%) reported GERD symptoms on the Global Overall Symptom (GOS) questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the independent prognostic factors for GERD symptoms as a history of gastric ulcer and use of sevelamer hydrochloride or calcium polystyrene sulfonate. Participants with GERD symptoms completed the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia, Japanese version (QOLRAD-J) questionnaire and were assigned to receive 4-week esomeprazole treatment (20 mg/day). This PPI therapy significantly improved all QOLRAD-J domains in the full analysis set (n = 28) and improved the GERD symptoms listed in the GOS questionnaire. Significantly impaired disease-specific quality of life (QOL) in the QOLRAD-J domains was observed in 44.4-74.1% of patients who had symptoms before treatment. The mean GOS and QOLRAD-J scores correlated significantly. Therapy with 20 mg/day esomeprazole appears to be efficacious for improving disease-specific QOL and GERD symptoms in Japanese patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

  19. Dextranomer/hyaluronic acid endoscopic injection is effective in the treatment of intermediate and high grade vesicoureteral reflux in patients with complete duplex systems.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, Manuela; Mohanan, Nochiparambil; Puri, Prem

    2013-05-01

    Endoscopic subureteral injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid has become an established alternative to long-term antibiotic prophylaxis or surgical treatment for vesicoureteral reflux. We evaluated the effectiveness of endoscopic injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid in intermediate and high grade vesicoureteral reflux in patients with complete duplex collecting systems. A total of 123 children underwent endoscopic correction of intermediate or high grade vesicoureteral reflux using injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid into complete duplex systems between 2001 and 2010. Vesicoureteral reflux was diagnosed by voiding cystourethrogram, and dimercapto-succinic acid scan was performed to evaluate the presence of renal scarring. Followup ultrasound and voiding cystourethrogram were performed 3 months after the outpatient procedure and renal ultrasound thereafter every 2 years. Mean followup was 6.7 years. Complete duplex systems were unilateral in 110 patients and bilateral in 13. Reflux severity in the 136 refluxing units was grade II in 1 (0.7%), III in 52 (38.2%), IV in 61 (44.9%) and V in 22 (16.2%). Dimercapto-succinic acid scan revealed renal functional abnormalities in 63 children (51.2%). Vesicoureteral reflux resolved after the first endoscopic injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid in 93 ureters (68.4%), after a second injection in 35 (25.7%) and after a third injection in 8 (5.9%). Febrile urinary tract infection developed in 5 patients (4.1%) during followup. No patient required ureteral reimplantation or experienced significant complications. Our results confirm the safety and efficacy of endoscopic injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid in eradicating intermediate and high grade vesicoureteral reflux in patients with complete duplex systems. We recommend this minimally invasive, 15-minute outpatient procedure as a viable option for treating intermediate and high grade vesicoureteral reflux in patients with complete duplex collecting systems

  20. Non-linear associations between laryngo-pharyngeal symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: clues from artificial intelligence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, E

    2006-01-01

    Summary The relationship between the different symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease remain markedly obscure due to the high underlying non-linearity and the lack of studies focusing on the problem. Aim of this study was to evaluate the hidden relationships between the triad of symptoms related to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease using advanced mathematical techniques, borrowed from the artificial intelligence field, in a cohort of patients with oesophagitis. A total of 388 patients (from 60 centres) with endoscopic evidence of oesophagitis were recruited. The severity of oesophagitis was scored by means of the Savary-Miller classification. PST algorithm was employed. This study shows that laryngo-pharyngeal symptoms related to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are correlated even if in a non-linear way. PMID:17345935

  1. What is the place of empirical proton pump inhibitor testing in the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease? (Description, duration, and dosage).

    PubMed

    Vardar, Rukiye; Keskin, Muharrem

    2017-12-01

    Empirical acid suppression tests that are performed with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are used to detect both the presence of acid-related gastrointestinal symptoms and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In comparison to other diagnostic methods, it is non-invasive, easily applicable, and cost-effective in the diagnosis of GERD. In addition to typical reflux symptoms, it can also be used for diagnostic purposes in patients with non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). If the symptom response is 50% and above when obtained using the PPI test in patients with NCCP, it can be considered as positive and the treatment should be continued sensitivity of the PPI test in patients with typical symptoms of GERD is 27%-89%, while its specificity is 35%-83%. Although there are differences related to the duration and dosage of the PPI test, a significant difference has not been found according to the type of PPI. When PPI test sensitivity and specificity were calculated by cumulatively evaluating the data regarding the PPI test in the literature, a sensitivity of 82.3% and specificity of 51.5% was obtained. It has been found that high doses of PPI were mostly used in studies, and the duration of the median test was 14 days. As a result, the sensitivity of PPI trial test is good, but the specificity is low in the diagnosis of GERD in patients with typical reflux symptoms.

  2. Motility characteristics in the transition zone in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GORD) patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Wen; Xie, Chen-Xi; Wu, Kai-Ming; Chen, Min-Hu; Xiao, Ying-Lian

    2016-08-30

    Defects in distal oesophageal peristalsis was thought to be an indication of incomplete bolus transit (BT). However, the role of transition zone (TZ) defects in the BT in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) patients needs clarification. The aim of this study was to assess the TZ defects in GORD patients and to explore the relationship between TZ defects and BT. One hundred and two patients with reflux symptoms and 20 healthy adults were included in the study. All subjects underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, high resolution impedance manometry (HRiM) and 24-h ambulatory multichannel impedance-pH (MII-pH) monitoring. Patients were subgrouped into reflux oesophagitis (RE), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), hypersensitive oesophagus (HO) and functional heartburn (FH) classified following MII-pH monitoring. Oesophageal pressure topography was analysed to define TZ defects by spatial or temporal TZ measurements exceeding 2 cm or 1 s, weak and fragmented swallows were excluded, and the association between TZ and BT was investigated. Following liquid swallows, there were no significant differences in TZ delay time and TZ length between groups (RE: 1.75 s (1.32-2.17) and 2.50 cm (2.40-3.20); NERD: 1.60 s (1.10-2.00) and 2.20 cm (2.10-2.65); HO: 1.60 s (1.30-1.80) and 2.70 cm (2.30-3.00); FH: 1.55 s (1.20-2.17) and 3.10 cm (2.25-5.00); Healthy volunteers: 1.50 s (1.20-1.90) and 2.30 cm (2.10-3.00). However, individuals with TZ defects had lower complete BT rates compared with those without TZ defects (p < 0.001). There were also significantly more incomplete BT in patients with RE, HO and FH than in healthy controls (p < 0.05). In GORD patients, TZ defects correlated with proximal bolus retention in the corresponding area independent of distal weak peristalsis.

  3. Early results of magnetic sphincter augmentation versus fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Aiolfi, Alberto; Asti, Emanuele; Bernardi, Daniele; Bonitta, Gianluca; Rausa, Emanuele; Siboni, Stefano; Bonavina, Luigi

    2018-04-01

    Laparoscopic Nissen and Toupet fundoplication (LF) are currently considered gold-standard surgical treatment for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation (MSA) is an innovative surgical procedure that has been showed to be effective to control GERD symptoms and to reduce esophageal acid exposure. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare early outcomes of LF and MSA. PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane databases were consulted matching the terms "Gastroesophageal reflux or heartburn", "LINX or magnetic sphincter augmentation" and "fundoplication". Pooled effect measures were calculated using an inverse-variance weighted or Mantel-Haenszel in random effects meta-analysis. Heterogeneity was evaluated using I 2 -index and Cochrane Q-test. Meta-regression was used to address the effect of potential confounders. Seven observational cohort studies, published between 2014 and 2017, matched the inclusion criteria. Overall, 1211 patients, 686 MSA and 525 LF, were included. Postoperative morbidity ranged from 0 to 3% in the MSA group and from 0 to 7% in the LF group, and there was no mortality. Dysphagia requiring endoscopic dilatation occurred in 9.3% and 6.6% of patients respectively (OR = 1.56, 95% CI = 0.61-3.95, p = 0.119). The pooled OR of gas/bloat symptoms, ability to vomit, and ability to belch were 0.39 (95% CI 0.25-0.61; p < 0.001), 10.10 (95% CI 5.33-19.15; p < 0.001), and 5.53 (95% CI 3.73-8.19; p < 0.001), respectively. The postoperative GERD-HRQL was similar (p = 0.101). The pooled OR of PPI suspension, endoscopic dilation, and reoperation were similar in the two patients groups (p = 0.548, p = 0.119, p = 0.183, respectively). Both anti-reflux procedures are safe and effective up to 1-year follow-up. PPI suspension rate, dysphagia requiring endoscopic dilatation, and disease-related quality of life are similar in the two patient groups. MSA is associated with less

  4. Single center experience with endoscopic subureteral dextranomer/hyaluronic acid injection as first line treatment in 1,551 children with intermediate and high grade vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Puri, Prem; Kutasy, Balazs; Colhoun, Eric; Hunziker, Manuela

    2012-10-01

    In recent years the endoscopic injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid has become an established alternative to long-term antibiotic prophylaxis and the surgical management of vesicoureteral reflux. We determined the safety and effectiveness of the endoscopic injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid as first line treatment for high grade vesicoureteral reflux. Between 2001 and 2010, 1,551 children (496 male, 1,055 female, median age 1.6 years) underwent endoscopic correction of intermediate and high grade vesicoureteral reflux using dextranomer/hyaluronic acid soon after the diagnosis of vesicoureteral reflux on initial voiding cystourethrogram. Vesicoureteral reflux was unilateral in 761 children and bilateral in 790. Renal scarring was detected in 369 (26.7%) of the 1,384 patients who underwent dimercapto-succinic acid imaging. Reflux grade in the 2,341 ureters was II in 98 (4.2%), III in 1,340 (57.3%), IV in 818 (34.9%) and V in 85 (3.6%). Followup ultrasound and voiding cystourethrogram were performed 3 months after the outpatient procedure, and renal ultrasound was performed annually thereafter. Patients were followed for 3 months to 10 years (median 5.6 years). Vesicoureteral reflux resolved after the first, second and third endoscopic injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid in 2,039 (87.1%), 264 (11.3%) and 38 (1.6%) ureters, respectively. Febrile urinary tract infections developed during followup in 69 (4.6%) patients. None of the patients in the series needed reimplantation of ureters or experienced any significant complications. Our results confirm the safety and efficacy of the endoscopic injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid in the eradication of high grade vesicoureteral reflux. We recommend this 15-minute outpatient procedure as the first line of treatment for high grade vesicoureteral reflux. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Indications of 24-h esophageal pH monitoring, capsule pH monitoring, combined pH monitoring with multichannel impedance, esophageal manometry, radiology and scintigraphy in gastroesophageal reflux disease?

    PubMed

    Vardar, Rukiye; Keskin, Muharrem

    2017-12-01

    Ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring is an essential method in patients exhibiting signs of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) to make an objective diagnosis. Intra-esophageal pH monitoring is important in patients who are non-responsive to medications and in those with extraesophageal symptoms, particularly in NERD, before surgical interventions. With the help of the wireless capsule pH monitoring, measurements can be made under more physiological conditions as well as longer recordings can be performed because the investigation can be better tolerated by patients. Ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring can be detected within normal limits in 17%-31.4% of the patients with endoscopic esophagitis; therefore, normal pH monitoring cannot exclude the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Multi-channel intraluminal impedance pH (MII-pH) technology have been developed and currently the most sensitive tool to evaluate patients with both typical and atypical reflux symptoms. The sensitivity of a pH catheter test is 58% for the detection of acid reflux compared with MII-pH monitoring; further, its sensitivity is 28% for the detection of weak acid reflux compared with MII-pH monitoring. By adding impedance to pH catheter in patients with reflux symptoms, particularly in those receiving PPIs, it has been demonstrated that higher rates of diagnoses and symptom analyses can be obtained than those using only pH catheter. Esophageal manometry is used in the evaluation of patients with functional dysphagia and unexplained noncardiac chest pain and prior to antireflux surgery. The use of esophageal manometry is suitable for the detection of esophageal motor patterns and extreme motor abnormalities (e.g., achalasia and extreme hypomotility). Esophageal manometry and ambulatory pH monitoring are often used in assessments prior to laparoscopic antireflux surgery and in patients with reflux symptoms refractory to medical treatment. Although the esophageal motility is

  6. Consumer use of over-the-counter proton pump inhibitors in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Imran; Waghray, Abhijeet; Waghray, Nisheet; Dong, Chunrong; Wolfe, M Michael

    2014-06-01

    Optimal administration of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) requires consideration of meal timing. Since becoming available over the counter (OTC), no studies have assessed treatment patterns and symptom control in OTC consumers. The objective of this study was to survey dosing patterns and symptom control in OTC and prescription PPI users. Patients at five clinics were surveyed regarding diagnosis of GERD, use of OTC or prescription PPIs, information on time of day dosing, demographics, and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptom Assessment Scale (GSAS; 2001, Johnson & Johnson). Of the 1,959 patients surveyed, 610 (31%) used PPIs for GERD. Of these, 190 (31%) and 223 (37%) received prescriptions from gastroenterologists (GIs) and primary care physicians (PCPs), respectively; 197 (32%) purchased OTC PPIs. Of the patients prescribed PPIs by GIs, 71% were optimal users, whereas 47% of patients receiving prescriptions from PCPs and 39% of consumers used PPIs optimally (P<0.001 compared with GIs). GSAS symptom, frequency, and severity scores were significantly better in patients prescribed PPIs by GIs (all P<0.001, GI compared with PCP and consumer). GSAS symptom, frequency, and severity scores were also significantly better in patients using PPIs optimally (P<0.001 for all parameters) compared with those taking PPIs suboptimally or excessively. Patients receiving prescription PPI from a GI are more likely to be optimal users with better symptom control. Conversely, consumers are more likely to be suboptimal users with inadequate symptom control.

  7. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for severe gastroesophageal reflux disease: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    DeMaria, E J; Siuta, M; Widmeyer, J; Zfass, A M

    1997-03-01

    The advent of the laparoscopic approach to Nissen fundoplication has led to a resurgence in enthusiasm for the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, controversy exists as to which subgroups of GERD patients are best treated surgically. The relative success of treatment with medical and surgical intervention in terms of both symptom control and objective resolution of esophageal injury must be weighed against the relative costs of each therapeutic strategy in both the short and long term, given that GERD tends to be a lifelong disorder. The following is the transcribed text of a debate held at the Medical College of Virginia as part of a continuing medical education program in which the statement "Laparoscopic antireflux surgery is superior to medical treatment for severe gastroesophageal reflux disease" was contested. Representatives from the departments of surgery and gastroenterology provided arguments supporting their respective sides of this issue. The purpose was not to promote polarization in treatment selection, but to review the available data in a forum that could promote development of a rational algorithm for clinical decision-making in patients with GERD who might benefit from antireflux surgery. Final comments from the authors are provided in an attempt to synthesize the arguments into a reasonable strategy for individual case management.

  8. Emerging dilemmas in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Kahrilas, Peter; Yadlapati, Rena; Roman, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is common, but less so than widely reported because of inconsistencies in definition. In clinical practice, the diagnosis is usually based on a symptom assessment without testing, and the extent of diagnostic testing pursued should be limited to that which guides management or which protects the patient from the risks of a potentially morbid treatment or an undetected early (or imminent) esophageal adenocarcinoma or which does both. When testing is pursued, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most useful initial diagnostic test because it evaluates for the major potential morbidities (Barrett’s, stricture, and cancer) associated with GERD and facilitates the identification of some alternative diagnostic possibilities such as eosinophilic esophagitis. However, endoscopy is insensitive for diagnosing GERD because most patients with GERD have non-erosive reflux disease, a persistent diagnostic dilemma. Although many studies have tried to objectify the diagnosis of GERD with improved technology, this is ultimately a pragmatic diagnosis based on response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, and, in the end, response to PPI therapy becomes the major indication for continued PPI therapy. Conversely, in the absence of objective criteria for GERD and the absence of apparent clinical benefit, PPI therapy is not indicated and should be discontinued. PPIs are well tolerated and safe, but nothing is perfectly safe, and in the absence of measurable benefit, even a miniscule risk dominates the risk-benefit assessment. PMID:29034088

  9. The role of interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms and Helicobacter pylori in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Akçil, Gülhan; Doğan, İbrahim; Cengiz, Mustafa; Engin, Evren Doruk; Doğan, Mehmet; Ünal, Selahattin; Çırak, Meltem Yalınay; Dursun, Ayşe

    2014-12-01

    Our aim is to assess the relationship between interleukin 1β (IL-1 β), (-511,-31 alleles), interleukin 1RN (IL-RN), Helicobacter pylori (HP) status and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) diagnosed by pH monitoring in the Turkish population. A Total of 100 consecutive patients with GERD were enrolled in the study. Genotypes of IL-1β (-511,-31), IL-1RN gene polymorphisms and HP status of the patients were analyzed. While thirty-two patients were diagnosed as esophagitis with varying severity the remaining patients had no esophagitis. Seventy six participants were positive for HP and the remaining patients were negative. The difference between erosive and non-erosive groups was statistically significant when we compared IL-1β (-511) but no difference regarding IL-1β (-31) and IL-1RN variations. We also analyzed T/T, C/T and C/C alleles and the difference was significant statistically in T/T allele between patients with and without erosive GERD 1 (3.1%) vs. 12 (17.9%), respectively with a p value<0.05. But C/C, C/T alleles of (-511), (-31) and IL-1RN polymorphisms were not statistically significant between the groups. IL-1β genetic polymorphisms may take part in the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  10. Effectiveness of a transluminal endoscopic fundoplication for the treatment of pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Stephanie; Jarboe, Marcus D; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2012-03-01

    Although laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the standard surgical treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), surgical complications and post-operative pain are not uncommon, especially for those patients who are neurologically impaired (NI) or undergoing re-operative procedures. To address this challenge, we utilized the transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) procedure to treat GERD via an endoscopic approach. Eleven TIF patients were included with an average age of 16.5 ± 5.1 years and weight of 45.7 ± 13.3 kg. NI was present in nine patients (82%), including a predominant number of patients with a history of seizures and gastrostomy tube feeding. Five patients had a history of a previous failed fundoplication requiring a re-operative procedure (45%). A retrospective chart review evaluated patient outcomes and post-operative complications. The length of the TIF procedure was 113.3 ± 31.3 min with minimal blood loss. The length of stay was 1.2 ± 0.4 days, although one TIF patient was re-admitted for endoscopic clipping for gastric bleeding. At a follow-up of 8.2 ± 4.2 months, TIF effectively resolved GERD in 10 out of 11 children. A few of the patient's families reported complaints of gagging or dysphagia (30%, 3/11); however it was difficult to determine if complaints were due the procedures itself or baseline NI. All patients who had a follow-up upper GI or pH probe study showed no evidence of reflux. One TIF patient had no recurrent reflux but required an esophago-gastric disconnection for retching. The TIF procedure can complement the current surgically and medically available options for children with GERD, especially in complicated patients such as those with NI. However, complications including hemorrhage emphasize the potential risk of the procedure. Further studies with more patients and a longer follow-up course must be conducted to better assess efficacy.

  11. Improved control of hypertension following laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiwei; Chen, Meiping; Wu, Jimin; Song, Qing; Yan, Chao; Du, Xing; Wang, Zhonggao

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to determine whether successful laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can improve the control of hypertension. We conducted an observational study of GERD patients with hypertension. The esophageal and gastroesophageal symptoms of these patients were successfully treated with laparoscopic fundoplication, as measured by the reduced GERD symptoms and proton pump inhibitor consumption. A hypertension control scale was used to classify the use of antihypertensive medications and the quality of blood pressure control before and after anti-reflux surgery.Wilcoxon signed-ranks test was used for the statistical analyses. Seventy GERD patients were included in the analysis and followed up for a mean period of 3.5 ± 1.4 years. Prior to surgery, all participating patients were taking at least one class of antihypertensive medication, and 56 patients (80%) had intermittently high blood pressure. After surgery, the mean number of antihypertensive medication classes per patient was significantly reduced from 1.61 ± 0.77 pre-procedure to 1.27 ± 0.88 post-procedure (P < 0.001). The blood pressure of 48 of the 56 cases (86%) with preoperative intermittent high blood pressure returned to normal post procedure. A total of 50 patients (71%) recorded improvements on the hypertension control scale, with the overall mean score decreasing from 3.1 ± 1.0 preprocedure to 1.4 ± 1.0 post-procedure (P < 0.001). Therefore, successful laparoscopic fundoplication may result in better blood pressure control in some hypertensive GERD patients. This result suggests a possible connection between gastroesophageal reflux and hypertension.

  12. The Diagnostic Significance of Coapplying a Rabeprazole Test with the SF-36 for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Feng; Jiang, Yuanxi; Wang, Chen; Yao, Liwen; Wu, Ping; Tong, Yili; Sun, Huihui; Xu, Shuchang

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a diversity disease that affects life quality of people in the world. Due to the complicated pathogenesis and variations in clinical manifestations, there is still no true gold standard for GERD diagnosis, and it is still difficult to diagnose this disease in some patients. The proton pump inhibitor's diagnostic test (the PPI test) is noninvasive, of low cost, tied to treatment, and widely accepted. Our aim is to evaluate the diagnostic significance of coapplying a rabeprazole test with the SF-36 for GERD in this study. Our study shows that the SF-36 in combination with the rabeprazole test can screen GERD patients and increase the sensitivity and specificity of GERD diagnosis through reference to the change in SF-36 score before and after the treatment (65 in the trial). PMID:23533388

  13. Children with cystic fibrosis have prolonged chemical clearance of acid reflux compared to symptomatic children without cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Woodley, Frederick W; Machado, Rodrigo S; Hayes, Don; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Kaul, Ajay; Skaggs, Beth; McCoy, Karen; Patel, Alpa; Mousa, Hayat

    2014-03-01

    Few studies compare gastroesophageal reflux (GER) parameters of cystic fibrosis (CF) children and symptomatic non-CF children. We aimed to compare the impedance-pH (IMP-pH) parameters for these two groups and to test the hypothesis that prolonged acid exposure in CF patients is due to delayed chemical clearance (CC). IMP-pH tracings from 16 CF children (median 8.2 years) and 16 symptomatic non-CF children (median 8.3 years) were analyzed. Software was used to generate IMP-pH reports and parameter data were extracted. IMP-pH was used to calculate the mean CC for each patient. pH studies showed no difference in acid GER (AGER) frequency (p = 0.587); however, mean AGER duration, duration of longest AGER, AGER index, and DeMeester scores were all significantly higher for CF patients. IMP showed no difference in GER frequency [neither acidic (p = 0.918) nor non-acidic (p = 0.277)], but total bolus clearance was more efficient in CF patients (p = 0.049). A larger percentage of total GER reached the proximal esophagus in non-CF children (p = 0.039). Analyses of two-phase AGER episodes showed that these events were more acidic (p = 0.003) and the CC phase was significantly prolonged in the CF cohort (p = 0.001). Compared to symptomatic non-CF children, CF children do not have more frequent reflux. Actually, they have better bolus clearance efficiency following reflux and may even have better control over the number of GER episodes that reach the proximal esophagus. CC of AGER, however, is significantly prolonged in the CF cohort, likely due to hyperacidity of refluxed gastric contents.

  14. Laryngopharyngeal reflux: a prospective analysis of a 34 item symptom questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Papakonstantinou, L; Leslie, P; Gray, J; Chadwick, T; Hudson, M; Wilson, J A

    2009-10-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux is increasingly diagnosed, but both its symptoms and relationship to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease remain confused. (i) To assess symptoms in potential laryngopharyngeal reflux patients according to a comprehensive symptom list based on both a gastro-oesophageal reflux questionnaire and a laryngopharyngeal reflux questionnaire. (ii) To assess whether there are statistically discrete symptom clusters which might map to specific syndromes e.g. globus pharynges. Prospective single cohort questionnaire survey. A 34-item questionnaire comprising all symptoms identifiable on (i) the original 25-item Gastroesophageal Symptom Assessment Scale (GSAS) and (ii) the nine Reflux Symptom Index (RSI) items, 'unbundled' as necessary, were administered to 62 ENT clinic attenders. Descriptive, correlation and cluster analysis was performed. All but two of the combined 34-symptom list were endorsed by at least 20% of 62 patients. Certain symptoms which the Reflux Symptom Index groups as a single item were only weakly correlated. No specific symptom clusters were identified. Neither the most popular 'lower' oesophageal (GSAS) nor the 'throat' reflux (RSI) questionnaire adequately captures the full range of potential reflux symptoms regularly encountered in otolaryngology patients: inadequate evaluation of patients' symptoms may have contributed to the ongoing uncertainty about the role of acid or pepsin suppression. A more comprehensive reflux questionnaire is needed to characterise the true reflux correlations of laryngopharyngeal symptoms, and offer a symptom-specific measure of response to placebo and anti-reflux therapy.

  15. Prevalence and predictors of columnar lined esophagus in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients undergoing upper endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Gokulakrishnan; Singh, Mandeep; Gupta, Neil; Gaddam, Srinivas; Giacchino, Maria; Wani, Sachin B; Moloney, Brian; Higbee, April D; Rastogi, Amit; Bansal, Ajay; Sharma, Prateek

    2012-11-01

    Chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a risk factor for Barrett's esophagus (BE), the most important surrogate marker for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). The need to document the presence of intestinal metaplasia in esophageal biopsies from a columnar lined esophagus (CLE) to diagnose BE is debated. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the prevalence and risk factors of CLE in a large cohort of GERD patients undergoing upper endoscopy. Consecutive patients presenting to the endoscopy unit at a tertiary referral center for their index upper endoscopy for evaluation of GERD symptoms were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. Patients were asked to complete a validated GERD questionnaire that documents the onset of GERD symptoms (heartburn and acid regurgitation) and grades the frequency and severity of symptoms experienced over the past year. Demographic information, body mass index, and use of aspirin/nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs were recorded. Endoscopic details including length of CLE, presence and size of hiatal hernia were noted. Patients with CLE (cases) were compared with those without CLE (controls) using Fischer's exact test and t-test. All factors that were statistically significant (P<0.05) were then entered into stepwise logistic regression to evaluate for independent predictors of CLE. A total of 1058 patients with GERD symptoms were prospectively enrolled. On index endoscopy, the prevalence of CLE was 23.3%, whereas of CLE with documented intestinal metaplasia was 14.1%. On univariate analysis, male gender, Caucasian race, heartburn duration of >5 years, presence and size of hiatal hernia were significantly associated with the presence of CLE compared with controls (P<0.05). On multivariate analysis, heartburn duration >5 years (odds ratio (OR): 1.50, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-2.09, P=0.01), Caucasian race (OR: 2.40, 95% CI: 1.42-4.03, P=0.001), and hiatal hernia (OR: 2.07, 95% CI

  16. Role of E-cadherin in the Pathogenesis of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jovov, Biljana; Que, Jianwen; Tobey, Nelia A.; Djukic, Zorka; Hogan, Brigid L.M.; Orlando, Roy C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES An early event in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an acid-induced increase in junctional (paracellular) permeability in esophageal epithelium (EE). The molecular events that account for this change are unknown. E-cadherin is a junctional protein important in barrier function in EE. Therefore, defects in barrier function in EE were sought in GERD as well as whether their presence correlated with abnormalities in e-cadherin. METHODS Endoscopic biopsies of EE from GERD (n = 20; male 10; female 10; mean age 50 ± 10 years) and subjects with a healthy esophagus (controls; n = 23; male 11; female 12; mean age 51 ± 11 years) were evaluated in mini-Ussing chambers and by western blot and immunochemistry; and serum analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A role for e-cadherin was also assessed using a unique conditional knockout of e-cadherin in adult mouse esophagus. RESULTS EE from GERD patients had lower electrical resistance and higher fluorescein flux than EE from controls; and the findings in GERD associated with cleavage of e-cadherin. Cleavage of e-cadherin in GERD was documented in EE by the presence of a 35-kDa, C-terminal fragment of the molecule on western blot and by an increase in soluble N-terminal fragments of the molecule in serum. Activation of the membrane metalloproteinase, A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase (ADAM-10), was identified as a likely cause for cleavage of e-cadherin by western blot and immunostaining and a role for e-cadherin in the increased junctional permeability in EE from GERD supported by showing increased permeability after deletion of e-cadherin in mouse EE. CONCLUSIONS The EE in GERD has increased junctional permeability and this is in association with proteolytic cleavage of e-cadherin. As loss of e-cadherin can, alone, account for the increase in junctional permeability, cleavage of e-cadherin likely represents a critical molecular event in the pathogenesis of GERD, and

  17. [Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic gastritis as extra-esophageal factors in gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Vucelić, Boris; Mesihović, Rusmir; Bratović, Ismet; Vanis, Nenad; Gribajcević, Mehmed; Selak, Ivan

    2003-01-01

    Some substances, for example amoniac, that appear during an infection caused by Helicobacter Pylori (HP), can neutralise acid. It is assumed that a HP infection can attribute to the worsening of GERB disease with antral predominant gastritis and a defensive factor eith corpus-predominant gastrytis or esofagitis. The aim of this study is to ascertain the role of HP infection in the modification of GORD through a prospective study, that is to see does a HP infection prospectively influence the disease or not, with a special focus on symptomatology with pathohistological findings of the antrum and the corpus of the gaster through a monitoring period of 12 months. 50 patients of the main group were involved in this prospective study with symptoms of GORD, or that eventually had a black stool. A control group of 47 patients was formed that had Gerb positive symptomatology, identical to the first group. During endoscopic act eventual changes in oesophagus in view of GORD, so they have been graduated according to Sawary-Millerov graduation from 1991: via Standard Olympus byoptic tongs byoptic specimens were taken with changes in view of GORD, and corpus and antrum mucosac of gaster and they were put into 2% formalin, so analyses has been done at Institute for pathology in Sarajevo. A special attention has been made to the graduation of gastritis, so Sydney classification has been followed. A modification lasted for four weeks since dg has been made, so two groups were formed, one with eradicated HP and second with HP presence. In the second part of this study both groups were followed without treatment in the period of 12 months, meaning that the natural course of illness has been followed up. The results of tests of significant differences between treated and control group after 12 months gr. I Sawary-Miller: normal differences n.s. (t = 0.122); chronic differences n.s. (t = 0.724), reflux esophagitis difference n.s.t = 0.733). Tests of differences between treated and

  18. Randomized study of lafutidine vs lansoprazole in patients with mild gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Ryuta; Okada, Hiroyuki; Kawano, Seiji; Komazawa, Yoshinori; Yoshinaga, Fumiya; Nagata, Shinji; Inoue, Masafumi; Komatsu, Hirohisa; Onogawa, Seiji; Kushiyama, Yoshinori; Mukai, Shinichi; Todo, Hiroko; Okanobu, Hideharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Tanaka, Shinji; Haruma, Ken; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare the clinical efficacy of the second-generation H2RA lafutidine with that of lansoprazole in Japanese patients with mild gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). METHODS: Patients with symptoms of GERD and a diagnosis of grade A reflux esophagitis (according to the Los Angeles classification) were randomized to receive lafutidine (10 mg, twice daily) or lansoprazole (30 mg, once daily) for an initial 8 wk, followed by maintenance treatment comprising half-doses of the assigned drug for 24 wk. The primary endpoint was the frequency and severity of heartburn during initial and maintenance treatment. The secondary endpoints were the sum score of questions 2 and 3 in the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS), and the satisfaction score. RESULTS: Between April 2012 and March 2013, a total of 53 patients were enrolled, of whom 24 and 29 received lafutidine and lansoprazole, respectively. After 8 wk, the frequency and severity of heartburn was significantly reduced in both groups. However, lafutidine was significantly inferior to lansoprazole with regard to the severity of heartburn during initial and maintenance treatment (P = 0.016). The sum score of questions 2 and 3 in the GSRS, and satisfaction scores were also significantly worse in the lafutidine group than the lansoprazole group (P = 0.0068 and P = 0.0048, respectively). CONCLUSION: The clinical efficacy of lafutidine was inferior to that of lansoprazole, even in Japanese patients with mild GERD. PMID:27340360

  19. Randomized study of lafutidine vs lansoprazole in patients with mild gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Ryuta; Okada, Hiroyuki; Kawano, Seiji; Komazawa, Yoshinori; Yoshinaga, Fumiya; Nagata, Shinji; Inoue, Masafumi; Komatsu, Hirohisa; Onogawa, Seiji; Kushiyama, Yoshinori; Mukai, Shinichi; Todo, Hiroko; Okanobu, Hideharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Tanaka, Shinji; Haruma, Ken; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-06-21

    To compare the clinical efficacy of the second-generation H2RA lafutidine with that of lansoprazole in Japanese patients with mild gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Patients with symptoms of GERD and a diagnosis of grade A reflux esophagitis (according to the Los Angeles classification) were randomized to receive lafutidine (10 mg, twice daily) or lansoprazole (30 mg, once daily) for an initial 8 wk, followed by maintenance treatment comprising half-doses of the assigned drug for 24 wk. The primary endpoint was the frequency and severity of heartburn during initial and maintenance treatment. The secondary endpoints were the sum score of questions 2 and 3 in the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS), and the satisfaction score. Between April 2012 and March 2013, a total of 53 patients were enrolled, of whom 24 and 29 received lafutidine and lansoprazole, respectively. After 8 wk, the frequency and severity of heartburn was significantly reduced in both groups. However, lafutidine was significantly inferior to lansoprazole with regard to the severity of heartburn during initial and maintenance treatment (P = 0.016). The sum score of questions 2 and 3 in the GSRS, and satisfaction scores were also significantly worse in the lafutidine group than the lansoprazole group (P = 0.0068 and P = 0.0048, respectively). The clinical efficacy of lafutidine was inferior to that of lansoprazole, even in Japanese patients with mild GERD.

  20. Zonulin is not increased in the cardiac and esophageal mucosa of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Wex, Thomas; Mönkemüller, Klaus; Kuester, Doerthe; Fry, Lucia; Kandulski, Arne; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Human Zonulin, related to the Zonula occludens toxin of Vibrio cholerae, regulates intestinal permeability and is induced in inflammatory disorders of the lower GI tract. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with an impairment of epithelial barrier function. Here, we studied expression of zonulin in the gastroesophageal mucosa of 58 patients with typical reflux symptoms and 27 asymptomatic controls. During endoscopy, multiple biopsies from gastroesophageal mucosa were obtained for routine histopathology (Helicobacter pylori-status, inflammation) and gene expression analysis (immunohistochemistry, ELISA). Patients with GERD presented with typical histopathological alterations like elongation of papillae (P=0.015), basal cell hyperplasia (P<0.001) and dilatation of intercellular spaces (P=0.002). Zonulin was found to be expressed ubiquitously in gastroesophageal mucosa. Mucosal levels in controls ranged between 2.2 and 3.7 ng/microg total protein. Mean values were significantly higher in antrum (3.3+/-1.7 ng/microg) than cardia (2.7+/-1.2n g/microg) and esophagus (2.2+/-1.3 ng/microg) (P<0.001), but did not differ between GERD and controls for cardia and esophageal mucosa. Immunohistochemistry revealed that predominantly epithelial cells but not stromal cells contribute to the zonulin expression in gastroesophageal mucosa. In conclusion, despite its established role for intestinal permeability, Zonulin seems not to be involved in the regulation of epithelial barrier function in relation to GERD.

  1. The Study of Oral Liquid Microcrystallization in Children with Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    SPINEI, AURELIA; PICOS, ALINA MONICA; ROMANCIUC, INA; BERAR, ANTONELA; MIHAILESCU, ANA MARIA

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim. Patients with disabilities have a higher prevalence of caries and dental erosions than general population. This particularity may be assessed by the study of microcrystallization of saliva. We investigated the oral liquid microcrystallization in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a condition associated with dental erosions. Material and methods. 54 children have been clinically examined: 27 children suffering from GERD with ages between 13 and 15, were included in the study group, and 27 healthy children - the control group. The study of crystallographic changes of the oral liquid was performed using the method developed by Shatohina, Razumov SN, Shabalin VN (2006) with the scanning electron microscope VEGA TESCAN TS 5130 MM. Results The degree of microcrystalization of the oral liquid in children with GERD was considerably reduced, (1.73±0.11 points) and was lower than in children in the control group (3.22±0.16 points) (p<0.01, RR=2). The degree of microcrystallization of oral liquid in children with GERD was 1.86 times lower than in healthy children. This was correlated with the duration of gastroesophageal reflux. Conclusion The study of structural particularities of dehydrated droplet of oral liquid in children with GERD has elucidated a number of markers of the changes produced in the oral cavity. These can be used in the screening research in prevention of caries and dental erosions. PMID:26528035

  2. Benefits of massage therapy for infants with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Neu, Madalynn; Pan, Zhaoxing; Workman, Rachel; Marcheggiani-Howard, Cassandra; Furuta, Glenn; Laudenslager, Mark L

    2014-10-01

    This randomized controlled pilot trial was conducted to evaluate the clinical efficacy of massage therapy (MT) for relief of symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The hypothesis was that, when compared to infants who received nonmassage therapy, infants who received MT would display fewer GERD symptoms, greater weight gain, greater amount of sleep, lower cortisol levels before and after treatment, and lower daily (area under the curve [AUC]) cortisol secretion. Participants were 36 infants born at term, 4-10 weeks of age at enrollment, healthy except for a diagnosis of GERD by their pediatrician, and with a score of at least 16 on the Infant Gastroesophageal Reflux Questionnaire-Revised (I-GERQ-R). Infants were randomized to receive either MT or a nonmassage sham treatment in their homes for 30 min twice a week for 6 weeks. Data collectors and parents were blind to study condition. GERD symptoms decreased in both groups and weight increased. Pretreatment salivary cortisol levels decreased significantly over time in the massage group while increasing in the nonmassage group. Daily cortisol level also decreased in the massage group and increased in the nonmassage group, but the difference was not significant. MT administered by a professional therapist did not affect symptoms of GERD differently than a sham treatment but did decrease infant stress as measured by cortisol. Research focusing on stress reduction in infants with GERD and multimodal treatments addressing GERD symptoms may yield the most effective treatment. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. Evidence-based appraisal in laparoscopic Nissen and Toupet fundoplications for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Cheng-Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Xiang-Min; Jiang, Dao-Zhen; Liu, Sheng; Qiu, Ming

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate the optimal surgical procedure for gastroesophageal reflux disease. METHODS: The electronic databases of Medline, Elsevier, Springerlink and Embase over the last 16 years were searched. All clinical trials involved in the outcomes of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) and laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication (LTF) were identified. The data of assessment in benefits and adverse results of LNF and LTF were extracted and compared using meta-analysis. RESULTS: We ultimately identified a total of 32 references reporting nine randomized controlled trials, eight prospective cohort trials and 15 retrospective trials. These studies reported a total of 6236 patients, of whom 4252 (68.18%) underwent LNF and 1984 (31.82%) underwent LTF. There were no differences between LNF and LTF in patients’ satisfaction, perioperative complications, postoperative heartburn, reflux recurrence and re-operation. Both LNF and LTF enhanced the function of lower esophageal sphincter and improved esophagitis. The postoperative dysphagia, gas-bloating syndrome, inability to belch and the need for dilatation after LNF were more common than after LTF. Subgroup analyses showed that dysphagia after LNF and LTF was similar in patients with normal esophageal peristalsis (EP), but occurred more frequently in patients with weak EP after LNF than after LTF. Furthermore, patients with normal EP after LNF still had a higher risk of developing dysphagia than did patients with abnormal EP after LTF. CONCLUSION: Compared with LNF, LTF offers equivalent symptom relief and reduces adverse results. PMID:20572311

  4. Is analysis of lower esophageal sphincter vector volumes of value in diagnosing gastroesophageal reflux disease?

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Robert E.; Perdue, Christopher L.; Awad, Ziad T.; Watson, Patrice; Selima, Mohamed; Davis, Richard E.; Filipi, Charles J.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: With successful surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), there is interest in understanding the anti-reflux barrier and its mechanisms of failure. To date, the potential use of vector volumes to predict the DeMeester score has not been adequately explored. METHODS: 627 patients in the referral database received esophageal manometry and ambulatory 24-hour pHmonitoring. Study data included LES resting pressure (LESP), overall LES length (OL) and abdominal length (AL), total vector volume (TVV) and intrabdominal vector volume (IVV). RESULTS: In cases where LESP, TVV or IVV were all below normal, there was an 81.4% probability of a positive DeMeester score. In cases where all three were normal, there was an 86.9% probability that the DeMeester score would be negative. Receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) for LESP, TVV and IVV were nearly identical and indicated no useful cut-off values. Logistic regression demonstrated that LESP and IVV had the strongest association with a positive DeMeester score; however, the regression formula was only 76.1% accurate. CONCLUSION: While the indices based on TVV, IVV and LESP are more sensitive and specific, respectively, than any single measurement, the measurement of vector volumes does not add significantly to the diagnosis of GERD. PMID:12508377

  5. Insights into the genetics of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and GERD-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Böhmer, A C; Schumacher, J

    2017-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with obesity and hiatal hernia, and often precedes the development of Barrett's esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). Epidemiological studies show that the global prevalence of GERD is increasing. GERD is a multifactorial disease with a complex genetic architecture. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided initial insights into the genetic background of GERD. The present review summarizes current knowledge of the genetics of GERD and a possible genetic overlap between GERD and BE and EA. The review discusses genes and cellular pathways that have been implicated through GWAS, and provides an outlook on how future molecular research will enhance understanding of GERD pathophysiology. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2005-2014.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Denise O; Oh, Gi-Taik; O'Donnell, Francis L; Clark, Leslie L

    2015-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common condition among adults that can cause symptoms such as frequent heartburn, substernal chest pain, and regurgitation of food. During 2005-2014, a total of 137,081 active component service members had an incident (first-ever) diagnosis of GERD (incidence rate: 101.3 per 10,000 person-years). Incidence rates were higher than their respective counterparts among females, black and white non-Hispanics, service members in the Coast Guard and Air Force, officers, and those in healthcare occupations. Rates increased monotonically with increasing age groups. Most GERD cases (79.2%) were uncomplicated GERD; however, 20.8% were identified as having a symptom or complication linked to their GERD diagnosis. Lifestyle changes, medication, and prevention of serious complications should be emphasized among individuals diagnosed with GERD, particularly those at risk for severe disease.

  7. The Effect of Ramelteon on Heartburn Symptoms of Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Chronic Insomnia: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Jha, Lokesh K; Fass, Ronnie; Gadam, Rakshith; Maradey-Romero, Carla; Nasrollah, Laya; Hershcovici, Tiberiu; Quan, Stuart F; Dickman, Ram

    2016-02-01

    There is a bidirectional relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and sleep. It has been demonstrated that antireflux treatment can improve sleep quality in GERD patients with nighttime reflux. Patients with heartburn and/or regurgitation ≥3 times/week and insomnia for ≥3 months were included. Patients were assessed at baseline with the demographic, GERD symptom assessment scale, Epworth sleepiness scale, Berlin sleep apnea, Pittsburgh sleep quality index, and the Insomnia severity index questionnaires. Subjects underwent an upper endoscopy followed by pH testing. Subsequently, subjects were randomized, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, to receive either ramelteon 8 mg or placebo before bedtime for 4 weeks. During the last week of treatment, subjects completed a daily GERD symptom and sleep diary and underwent actigraphy. Sixteen patients completed the study, 8 in each arm (mean age and M/F were 48.5 vs. 57.8 y, and 8/0 vs. 6/2, respectively). Patients who received ramelteon demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in symptom score as compared with those who received placebo for daytime heartburn (-42% vs. -29%), nighttime heartburn (-42% vs. 78%), 24-hour heartburn (-42% vs. -3%), and 24-hour acid regurgitation (-26% vs. 19%) (all P<0.05). Insomnia severity index score was significantly reduced in patients receiving ramelteon as compared with placebo (-46% vs. -5%, P<0.05). Ramelteon group also demonstrated a significant improvement in sleep efficiency and sleep latency, as compared with placebo, P<0.05). No significant adverse events were observed with ramelteon. Ramelteon significantly improved symptoms in patients with GERD. In addition, ramelteon significantly improved patients' sleep experience. Further studies are needed in the future (NCT01128582).

  8. On the Opening of Thick Walled Elastic Tubes: A Fluid-Structure Model for Acid Reflux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sudip; Kahrilas, Peter

    2005-11-01

    A coupled fluid-structure mathematical model was developed to quantify rapid opening of thick-walled elastic tubes, a phenomenon underlying biological flows such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The wall was modeled using non-linear finite deformation theory to predict space-time radial distention of an axisymmetric tube with luminal fluid flow. Anisotropic azimuthal and longitudinal muscle-induced stresses were incorporated, and interstitial material properties were assumed isotropic and linearly elastic. Fluid flow was modeled using lubrication theory with inertial correction. Opening and flow were driven by a specified inflow pressure and zero pressure gradient was specified at outflow. No-slip and surface force balance were applied at the fluid-wall interface. Viscoelasticity was modeled with ad hoc damping and the evolution of the tube geometry was predicted at mid-layer. A potentially important discovery was made when applied to studies of initiation of opening with GERD: while material stiffness is of minor consequence, small changes in resting lumen distension (˜2 mm diameter) may be a sensitive distinguishing feature of the disease.

  9. Assessment of desmosomal components (desmoglein 1-3, plakoglobin) in cardia mucosa in relation to gastroesophageal reflux disease and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Wex, Thomas; Kuester, Doerthe; Mönkemüller, Klaus; Stahr, Antje; Fry, Lucia C; Kandulski, Arne; Kropf, Siegfried; Roessner, Albert; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is associated with impaired epithelial barrier function and abnormal expression of proteins forming cell-cell contacts by tight junctions and desmosomes in distal esophageal squamous mucosa. Although gastroesophageal reflux disease and Helicobacter pylori are both associated with chronic inflammation of the adjacent cardia mucosa, it is not known whether these lead to derangements of the desmosomal complexes. Here, we assessed the expression of 4 proteins (plakoglobin and desmoglein 1, 2, and 3) forming epithelial desmosomal complexes by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry in biopsies from 67 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and 23 gastroesophageal reflux disease-negative controls. Plakoglobin and desmoglein 2 were ubiquitously expressed in all samples, whereas desmoglein 1 and 3 were not expressed in cardia mucosa. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was specifically associated with elevated transcript levels of desmoglein 2 and plakoglobin. These were significantly increased from 2.0- to 2.7-fold in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease compared with controls (P < .01), and significantly increased immunohistochemical scores for both proteins were observed (P < .05) as well. The combined presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and Helicobacter pylori infection had no additional effect on desmosomal gene expression. Taken together, the up-regulation of plakoglobin and desmoglein 2 in cardia mucosa of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease supports the concept that the "transition zone" between distal esophagus and proximal stomach is affected by gastroesophageal reflux disease as well, and architectural and molecular changes in the desmosomal compartment contribute to the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the cardia mucosa. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ureteroneocystostomy after failed dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer injection for vesicoureteral reflux treatment.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Pinto, João; Osório, Angélica; Pereira, Joana; Sousa, Catarina; de Castro, João Luís Ribeiro; Réis, Armando

    2013-10-01

    To report our experience of open ureteroneocystostomy after failed endoscopic treatment. Clinical charts of 787 children who entered our dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (DxHA) endoscopic injection program for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) treatment between May 2000 and December 2009 were reviewed. Fifty-one of these patients were submitted to open ureteroneocystostomy for complete resolution of VUR. Twenty-eight patients (55%) were female. Median age at surgery was 65 months (range: 26-182). Median time going from first endoscopic injection until open surgery was 13 months (range 1-58). Surgical ureteral reimplantation was bilateral in 62.7% of the cases. Of a total of 83 operated ureters, nine were duplex ureters, nine were megaureters, six were ectopic, and two had periureteral diverticulum. Mean operative time was 70 min (range 45-120 min). There were no intra-operative complications. Follow-up VCUG showed complete resolution of VUR in 98% of patients. There was only one right-sided grade III VUR that persisted after bilateral reimplantation. It resolved with a single subureteral DxHA injection. Ureteroneocystostomy after a failed endoscopic treatment can achieve successful results in a high percentage of patients with minimal complications. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Apnea is not prolonged by acid gastroesophageal reflux in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Di Fiore, Juliann M; Arko, Marina; Whitehouse, Meghan; Kimball, Amy; Martin, Richard J

    2005-11-01

    To examine the temporal relationship between apnea and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and to assess the effect of GER on apnea duration. A total of 119 preterm infants underwent 12-hour cardiorespiratory monitoring studies using respiratory inductance plethysmography, heart rate, oxygen saturation (SaO2), and esophageal pH. The studies were scored for GER (pH <4 for > or =5 seconds) and apnea > or =15 seconds or > or =10 seconds that occurred within 30 seconds of GER. Apnea > or =10 seconds was used to assess whether GER would prolong apnea duration. There were 6255 episodes of GER. Only 1% of GER episodes were associated with apnea > or =15 seconds, and there was no difference in apnea rate before, during, or after GER. There was also no difference in rate of apnea > or =10 seconds before versus during GER; however, there was a decrease in apnea rate immediately after GER. The presence of GER during apnea did not prolong apnea duration, and GER had no effect on the lowest SaO2 or heart rate during apnea. There is no evidence of a temporal relationship between acid-based GER and apnea in preterm infants. In addition, GER does not prolong apnea duration and does not exacerbate the resultant decrease in heart rate and SaO2.

  12. Correlation of endoscopic severity of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) with Body Mass Index (BMI).

    PubMed

    Zafar, Shamail; Israr ul Haq; Butt, Anjum Rasheed; Shafiq, Fuad; Mirza, Huda G; Ameed-ur-Rehman

    2007-02-01

    To assess the correlation of endoscopic severity of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) with Body Mass Index (BMI). Cross-sectional/analytical. Ghurki Trust Teaching Hospital and Surgimed Hospital, Lahore, from September 2004 to March 2006. This study was conducted on 203 patients, who presented with upper GI symptoms. Patients who fulfilled the symptom criteria were referred for endoscopy. Classification of GERD was done according to LA Grading classification system. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated as Body Weight (BW) in kilograms (kg) divided by the square of the body height (BH) in meter (m2). Patient data was analyzed using SPSS 12 software. Statistical evaluation was done using non-parametric Wilcoxon's-sign Rank test. P-value < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Distribution of GERD was as follows: GERD-A subjects 65 (32%), GERD B subjects 72 (35.4%), GERD-C subjects 23 (11.3%), GERD-D subjects 10 (4.92%), while Non-Erosive Reflux Disease (NERD) was present in 33 subjects (16.2%). Mean BMI was 27+/-5.02 SD (range of 18.2-38.3). BMI of patients having NERD was in normal range but patients who were having advanced disease i.e. Grade C-D were in obese range of BMI, while those who were having LA grade A-B were in overweight BMI range. When regrouped as mild GERD (grade A-B) and NERD versus severe GERD (grade C-D), there was a strong significant correlation between severity of GERD and BMI, as detected by Wilcoxon's signed Rank test (p=0.001). Higher BMI seems to be associated with higher degree of endoscopic GERD severity.

  13. The impact of comorbid gastroesophageal reflux disease on endoscopic sinus surgery quality-of-life outcomes.

    PubMed

    DeConde, Adam S; Mace, Jess C; Smith, Timothy L

    2014-08-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are common entities that overlap in patient demographics. The pathophysiologic role of GERD has yet to be elucidated, but it is postulated that extraesophageal reflux may contribute to worsening symptoms of CRS. This study seeks to investigate whether patients with CRS with and without a history of GERD experience comparable quality-of-life (QOL) improvement after endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). An adult cohort (n = 229) with medically refractory CRS was prospectively assessed following ESS using 3 disease-specific QOL constructs. A patient subset with a history of comorbid GERD was retrospectively identified (n = 72) and preoperative and postoperative QOL were compared to patients without GERD (n = 157). Patients with comorbid GERD and CRS were comparable across all baseline patient characteristics (p > 0.050) with the exception of patients with a history of GERD; those patients were less likely to have undergone allergy testing (p < 0.002) and were older (53.8 years vs 47.6; p < 0.002). Similarly, baseline objective and subjective measures of disease were comparable between patients with CRS with and without GERD (p > 0.050). Both groups experienced significant QOL improvement across all QOL constructs (p ≤ 0.021), and no difference was detected in the magnitude of that improvement between patients with and without a history of GERD (p > 0.050). Similarly, patients on active medical therapy for GERD (n = 49) had QOL gains comparable to patients not reporting GERD medical therapy (p > 0.050). Patients electing ESS for CRS with and without comorbid GERD have comparable baseline characteristics and QOL outcomes following surgery. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  14. Laparoscopic Surgical Treatment of Severe Obesity Combined with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Pilot Randomized Two-Arm Controlled Clinical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ospanov, Oral B.; Orekeshova, Akzhunis M.; Fursov, Roman A.; Yelemesov, Aset A.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are serious medical, social, and economic problems of modern society. A pilot randomized two-arm controlled clinical study was conducted to compare laparoscopic plication of the greater gastric curvature combined with Nissen fundoplication (LFN+LGP) versus only Nissen fundoplication (LFN). The…

  15. Is motility impaired in the entire upper gastrointestinal tract in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease?

    PubMed

    Lundell, L; Myers, J C; Jamieson, G G

    1996-02-01

    Although the pathogenesis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is multifactorial, abnormal function of the lower oesophageal sphincter has been established, and in some cases motility defects in the oesophageal body has been described. In some patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease delayed gastric emptying has also been observed. Oesophageal and gastric motor function, as evaluated by use of scintigraphy and manometry, were studied concomitantly in 105 patients with chronic, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease before and after antireflux surgery. In a subgroup of these patients (n = 29) similar data were retrieved also at 2.7 years after antireflux surgery. Impaired oesophageal motor function expressed as delayed transit of a labelled bolus was closely associated with motor dysfunction also recorded in the stomach as determined by delayed emptying of labelled solid food items. A similar relationship was found when oesophageal motor dysfunction was characterized as the frequency of failed primary peristalses after water swallows during manometry. When the 105 patients were studied half a year after an antireflux operation, noncorrelation between oesophageal and gastric motor function could be recorded. These data further substantiate the view that gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is associated with a disturbed motor function within the entire upper gastrointestinal tract.

  16. Protective effects of Artemisia campestris extract against gastric acid reflux-induced esophageal mucosa injuries.

    PubMed

    Jabri, Mohamed-Amine; Tounsi, Haifa; Abdellaoui, Afifa; Marzouki, Lamjed; Sebai, Hichem

    2018-03-01

    Artemisia campestris L. has been widely used in alternative medicine to treat digestive system diseases, particularly gastroesophageal disorders. In the present investigation, we studied the putative protective effect of Artemisia campestris aqueous extract (ACAE) against gastro-esophageal reflux (GER)-induced esophagitis in rats. The experimental ophagitis was induced by the ligation of the pylorus as well as the junction between the forestomach and the corpus. We firstly found that ACAE administration at 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, b.w., p.o. significantly protected GER-induced macroscopic and histological injuries in the esophagus tissue. Our extract also counteracted GER-induced esophagus lipoperoxidation, restored the depletion of antioxidant enzyme activities such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) as well as thiol groups levels. Furthermore, we showed that acute GER provoked an increase in esophagus mucosa hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), free iron and calcium levels, whereas ACAE treatment reversed all GER-induced intracellular mediators' disturbances. In conclusion, we suggested that ACAE had potent protective effects against esophagitis due, in part, to its antioxidant properties as well as its opposite effect on some intracellular mediators. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Predicting the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors in patients with non-erosive reflux disease before therapy using dual-channel 24-h esophageal pH monitoring.

    PubMed

    Shimatani, Tomohiko; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Nishino, Masafumi; Adachi, Kyoichi; Furuta, Kenji; Ito, Masanori; Kurosawa, Susumu; Manabe, Noriaki; Mannen, Kotaro; Hongo, Michio; Chiba, Tsutomu; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2012-05-01

    We aimed to determine whether reflux- and symptom-related parameters can predict the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). Twenty-seven NERD patients who had experienced heartburn more than once a week within the previous month were enrolled. Intraesophageal pH before therapy was measured simultaneously at 5 and 15 cm above the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) for 24 h. The PPI rabeprazole was administered at a dose of 10 mg once daily for 4 weeks. In the event that heartburn was not relieved, the dose was increased to 10 mg twice daily for an additional 2 weeks, and again to 20 mg twice daily for another 2 weeks. Univariate analysis demonstrated no significant associations between any reflux- or symptom-related parameters at either site and complete heartburn relief after 4 weeks, or cumulative complete heartburn relief after 8 weeks. However, post-hoc analysis demonstrated more satisfactory heartburn relief after 4 weeks in patients with a high symptom index compared with those with a low symptom index, at 5 cm above the EGJ (P = 0.009). Cumulative satisfactory heartburn relief after 8 weeks was also greater in patients with a high total number of acid reflux episodes compared with those with a low total number of episodes, at 15 cm above the EGJ (P = 0.037). Pre-therapeutic pH monitoring in the lower and mid-esophagus is useful for predicting the efficacy of PPI in NERD patients. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Incidence and Pattern of Dental Erosion in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Anupama; Raja Khan, Sulthan Ibrahim; Vaitheeswaran, Nandinee

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a very common condition whose consequences of are localized not only in the esophagus; extra-esophageal involvement has frequently been reported. The aim of the study is to examine the incidence and pattern of dental erosion in GERD patients. Methodology: A total of 50 patients were recruited in this study (control -25 and GERD -25). All participants diagnosed having GERD by the endoscopic examination by their gastroenterologist are included. The patients were examined for dental erosion and will be quantified using Basic erosive wear examination index. Results: The results showed that the incidence of dental erosion was 88% as compared to 32% in the control group which was found to be statistically significant. PMID:29284953

  19. Low back pain and gastroesophageal reflux in patients with COPD: the disease in the breath

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Bruno; Marelli, Fabiola; Morabito, Bruno; Sacconi, Beatrice; Caiazzo, Philippe; Castagna, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    COPD is a worsening condition that leads to a pathologic degeneration of the respiratory system. It represents one of the most important causes of mortality and morbidity in the world, and it is characterized by the presence of associated comorbidity. This article analyzes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and low back pain (LBP) in patients with COPD and tries to produce anatomo-clinical considerations on the reasons of the presence of these comorbidities. The considerations of the authors are based on the anatomic functions and characteristics of the respiratory diaphragm that are not always considered, from which elements useful to comprehend the symptomatic status of the patient can be deduced, finally improving the therapeutic approach. The information contained in the article can be of help to the clinician and for physiotherapy, and to all health professionals who gravitate around the patient’s care, improving the approach to the diaphragm muscle. PMID:29403270

  20. Aerophagia and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients using Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: A Preliminary Observation

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Mystkowski, Sue K.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Aerophagia is a complication of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for sleep disordered breathing (SDB), whereupon air is forced into the stomach and bowel. Associated discomfort can result in CPAP discontinuation. We hypothesize that aerophagia is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) via mechanisms involving GERD related lower esophageal sphincter (LES) compromise. Methods: Twenty-two subjects with aerophagia and 22 controls, matched for age, gender, and body mass index, who were being treated with CPAP for SDB were compared in regard to clinical aspects of GERD, GERD associated habits, SDB severity as measured by polysomnography, and mean CPAP pressure. Results: More subjects with aerophagia had symptoms of GERD (77.3% vs. 36.4%; p < 0.01) and were on GERD related medications (45.5% vs. 18.2%, p < 0.05) than controls. Regarding polysomnography, mean oxygen saturation percentages were lower in the aerophagia group than controls (95.0% vs. 96.5%, p < 0.05). No other differences were observed, including mean CPAP pressures. No one in the aerophagia group (vs. 27.3% of the control group) was a current tobacco user (p < 0.01). There was no difference in caffeine or alcohol use between the 2 groups. Conclusions: These results imply aerophagia is associated with GERD symptoms and GERD related medication use. This finding suggests a relationship between GERD related LES pathophysiology and the development of aerophagia in patients with SDB treated with CPAP. Citation: Watson NF; Mystkowski SK. Aerophagia and gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients using continuous positive airway pressure: a preliminary observation. J Clin Sleep Med 2008;4(5):434–438. PMID:18853700

  1. Influence of capsaicin infusion on secondary peristalsis in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chih-Hsun; Lei, Wei-Yi; Hung, Jui-Sheng; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Lin; Pace, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine whether capsaicin infusion could influence heartburn perception and secondary peristalsis in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). METHODS Secondary peristalsis was performed with slow and rapid mid-esophageal injections of air in 10 patients with GERD. In a first protocol, saline and capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce infusions were randomly performed, whereas 2 consecutive sessions of capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce infusions were performed in a second protocol. Tested solutions including 5 mL of red pepper sauce diluted with 15 mL of saline and 20 mL of 0.9% saline were infused into the mid-esophagus via the manometric catheter at a rate of 10 mL/min with a randomized and double-blind fashion. During each study protocol, perception of heartburn, threshold volumes and peristaltic parameters for secondary peristalsis were analyzed and compared between different stimuli. RESULTS Infusion of capsaicin significantly increased heartburn perception in patients with GERD (P < 0.001), whereas repeated capsaicin infusion significantly reduced heartburn perception (P = 0.003). Acute capsaicin infusion decreased threshold volume of secondary peristalsis (P = 0.001) and increased its frequency (P = 0.01) during rapid air injection. The prevalence of GERD patients with successive secondary peristalsis during slow air injection significantly increased after capsaicin infusion (P = 0.001). Repeated capsaicin infusion increased threshold volume of secondary peristalsis (P = 0.002) and reduced the frequency of secondary peristalsis (P = 0.02) during rapid air injection. CONCLUSION Acute esophageal exposure to capsaicin enhances heartburn sensation and promotes secondary peristalsis in gastroesophageal reflux disease, but repetitive capsaicin infusion reverses these effects. PMID:28018112

  2. Overlap of Dyspepsia in Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Impact of Clinical, Metabolic, and Psychosocial Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ching-Sheng; Wen, Shu-Hui; Hung, Jui-Sheng; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Lei, Wei-Yi; Pace, Fabio; Chen, Chien-Lin

    2017-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and dyspepsia are highly prevalent in the general population with significant symptom overlap, while the interaction between both remains poorly understood. To examine whether GERD overlapping dyspepsia would have an impact on clinical and psychological features as compared with GERD alone. We performed a cross-sectional study in a GERD cohort (n = 868) that was previously recruited from a population-based GERD survey (n = 2752). We compared the clinical and psychological factors between patients with and without dyspeptic symptoms "epigastric pain or burning." All participants were evaluated with Reflux Disease Questionnaire score, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score, Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire score, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory score. Endoscopic findings were classified according to the Los Angeles classification. Among the GERD population, 107 subjects had overlapping "epigastric pain or burning" (GERD-D), and 761 did not have these symptoms (GERD alone). GERD-D subjects had more severe GERD symptoms and were more often associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) (OR 3.54, 95% CI 1.92-6.52) as compared subjects with GERD alone. In addition, GERD-D subjects had lower quality of sleep (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.01-1.21), higher depression (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02-1.10), lower blood pressure (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.22-0.95), and higher serum total cholesterol levels (OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.36-5.67) than GERD alone. GERD-D subjects are characterized with worsening clinical symptoms as well as higher psychosocial, IBS, and metabolic comorbidities, but less erosive esophagitis. Our results indicate that clinical awareness of such overlapping condition would help optimize the management of GERD in clinical practice.

  3. The association between gastroesophageal reflux disease and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    San Giorgi, Michel R M; Helder, Herman M; Lindeman, Robbert-Jan S; de Bock, Geertruida H; Dikkers, Frederik G

    2016-10-01

    Antireflux therapy is incorporated in many treatment protocols for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) because gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) is thought to worsen the disease course of RRP. It is unclear if GERD really aggravates the disease course. The aims of this systematic review were to 1) evaluate incidence of GERD among RRP patients and 2) report if GERD changes the clinical course or tissue properties of RRP. A search was conducted in PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar, following the methods of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Articles with original data, published after January 1, 1990, on RRP with GERD as a determinant were eligible. There was no language restriction. Data on study design, study population, statistics, outcomes (incidence and influence of GERD), and risk of bias were collected and evaluated following PRISMA protocols. Of 1,277 articles, 19 were selected. Gastroesophageal reflux was objectified in 25% to 100% of RRP patients. Subjective GERD was present in 0% to 70% of patients. There is no proof that GERD aggravated the clinical course or tissue properties of RRP, as measured by the number of surgeries, severity scoring systems, or dysplasia. One study did find a higher chance of web formation in patients with anterior or posterior glottic papillomas who did not receive antireflux therapy, but these results should be interpreted with care due to the study's quality. There is insufficient proof that GERD does or does not aggravate the clinical course or tissue properties of RRP. Laryngoscope, 126:2330-2339, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Clinical, metabolic, and psychological characteristics in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease overlap with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ching-Sheng; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Wen, Shu-Hui; Wang, Chia-Chi; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Chen, Jiann-Hwa; Lei, Wei-Yi; Orr, William C; Fabio, Pace; Chen, Chien-Lin

    2015-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are highly prevalent in the general population, with significant symptom overlap, whereas the interaction between both remains poorly understood. We aim to identify the clinical and psychological factors that contribute toward the overlap of GERD and IBS. We carried out a case-control study among 806 GERD and 176 IBS patients from a health check-up cohort (n=2604). All participants were evaluated using the Reflux Disease Questionnaire score, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score, the Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire score, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory score. Endoscopic findings were classified according to the Los Angeles classification. IBS was diagnosed on the basis of Rome III criteria, and metabolic syndrome was defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III definition. Among the study population, 727 individuals had GERD, 97 individuals had IBS, and 79 individuals had a diagnosis of both GERD and IBS (GERD-I). GERD-I patients had more severe GERD symptoms compared with patients with GERD or IBS alone (P<0.0001). Moreover, GERD-I patients had more frequent healthcare-seeking behavior, decreased quality of sleep, and higher depression scores than patients with GERD (P<0.0001) or IBS alone (P<0.05). In addition, GERD-I patients had lower blood pressure, waist-to-hip ratio, and higher serum high-density lipoprotein levels than those with GERD alone (P<0.05). GERD patients overlapping with IBS have different clinical and psychological profiles than those with GERD or IBS alone. Our study suggests that awareness of these symptom presentations will help optimize the treatment of these conditions.

  5. Heartburn and regurgitation have different impacts on life quality of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shou-Wu; Lien, Han-Chung; Lee, Teng-Yu; Yang, Sheng-Shun; Yeh, Hong-Jeh; Chang, Chi-Sen

    2014-09-14

    To investigate the impact of heartburn and regurgitation on the quality of life among patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Data from patients with GERD, who were diagnosed according to the Montreal definition, were collected between January 2009 and July 2010. The enrolled patients were assigned to a heartburn or a regurgitation group, and further assigned to an erosive esophagitis (EE) or a non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) subgroup, depending on the predominant symptoms and endoscopic findings, respectively. The general demographic data, the scores of the modified Chinese version of the GERDQ and the Short-form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire scores of these groups of patients were compared. About 108 patients were classified in the heartburn group and 124 in the regurgitation group. The basic characteristics of the two groups were similar, except for male predominance in the regurgitation group. Patients in the heartburn group had more sleep interruptions (22.3% daily vs 4.8% daily, P = 0.021), more eating or drinking problems (27.8% daily vs 9.7% daily, P = 0.008), more work interferences (11.2% daily vs none, P = 0.011), and lower SF-36 scores (57.68 vs 64.69, P = 0.042), than patients in the regurgitation group did. Individuals with NERD in the regurgitation group had more impaired daily activities than those with EE did. GERD patients with heartburn or regurgitation predominant had similar demographics, but those with heartburn predominant had more severely impaired daily activities and lower general health scores. The NERD cases had more severely impaired daily activity and lower scores than the EE ones did.

  6. Risk of acute myocardial infarction in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease: A nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lei, Wei-Yi; Wang, Jen-Hung; Wen, Shu-Hui; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Hung, Jui-Sheng; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Orr, William C; Chen, Chien-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disease which can cause troublesome symptoms and affect quality of life. In addition to esophageal complications, GERD may also be a risk factor for extra-esophageal complications. Both GERD and coronary artery disease (CAD) can cause chest pain and frequently co-exist. However, the association between GERD and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remain unclear. The purpose of the study was to compare the incidence of acute myocardial infarction in GERD patients with an age-, gender-, and comorbidity matched population free of GERD. We also examine the association of the risk of AMI and the use of acid suppressing agents in GERD patients. We identified patients with GERD from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The study cohort comprised 54,422 newly diagnosed GERD patients; 269,572 randomly selected age-, gender-, comorbidity-matched subjects comprised the comparison cohort. Patients with any prior CAD, AMI or peripheral arterial disease were excluded. Incidence of new AMI was studied in both groups. A total 1,236 (0.5%) of the patients from the control group and 371 (0.7%) patients from the GERD group experienced AMI during a mean follow-up period of 3.3 years. Based on Cox proportional-hazard model analysis, GERD was independently associated with increased risk of developing AMI (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.48; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.31-1.66, P < 0.001). Within the GERD group, patients who were prescribed proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for more than one year had slightly decreased the risk of developing AMI, compared with those without taking PPIs (HR = 0.57; 95% CI: 0.31-1.04, P = 0.066). This large population-based study demonstrates an association between GERD and future development of AMI, however, PPIs use only achieved marginal significance in reducing the occurrence of AMI in GERD patients. Further prospective studies are needed to evaluate whether anti-reflux medication may reduce the

  7. Cost Effectiveness of Routine Duodenal Biopsy Analysis for Celiac Disease During Endoscopy for Gastroesophageal Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Janie J.; Thanataveerat, Anusorn; Green, Peter HR; Lebwohl, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Some patients with refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) actually have undiagnosed celiac disease. These patients often undergo esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) to determine the etiology and severity of GERD. Performing routine duodenal biopsy analysis during EGD could identify those with celiac disease. We evaluated the cost effectiveness of this approach. Methods We performed a systematic search of MEDLINE database to identify publications through March 2014 on patients who were 40 years old and underwent duodenal biopsy analysis during EGD for GERD. Data collected were used to construct a decision tree to calculate cost effectiveness of EGD with and without celiac disease tests. Results Among 10,000 patients with refractory GERD who underwent EGD, we predicted a biopsy strategy would detect 70% of patients with celiac disease, if the prevalence of celiac disease was 1% in this cohort. Biopsy analysis at the start of the EGD procedure would increase the remaining quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) by 0.0032, and increase the lifetime cost by $389/patient. Compared with no biopsy, the biopsy strategy cost $55,692.86/case of celiac disease detected, and $121,875/QALY gained. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio for the biopsy strategy met the threshold of <$50,000/QALY when 1 of the following parameters were met: when the utility of living with GERD was <.88, when the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with refractory GERD was >1.8%, when biopsy analysis detected celiac disease with >98.1% specificity, when the cost of a gluten-free diet was <$645.85/y, or if the cost of proton pump inhibitor therapy was >$5874.01/y. Conclusion Based on base-case values, it is not cost effective to perform biopsy analysis to detect celiac disease in patients undergoing EGD for refractory GERD. However, the approach becomes cost effective when the prevalence of celiac disease in this population is 1.8% or greater. PMID:25818076

  8. Laparoscopic surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with impaired esophageal peristalsis: total or partial fundoplication?

    PubMed

    Chrysos, Emmanuel; Tsiaoussis, John; Zoras, Odysseus John; Athanasakis, Elias; Mantides, Apostolos; Katsamouris, Asterios; Xynos, Evaghelos

    2003-07-01

    It has been proposed that partial fundoplication is associated with less incidence of postoperative dysphagia and consequently is more suitable for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and impaired esophageal body motility. The aim of this study was to assess whether outcomes of Toupet fundoplication (TF) are better than those of Nissen-Rossetti fundoplication (NF) in patients with GERD and low-amplitude esophageal peristalsis. Thirty-three consecutive patients with proved GERD and amplitude of peristalsis at 5 cm proximal to lower esophageal sphincter (LES) less than 30 mmHg were randomly allocated to undergo either TF (19 patients: 11 men, 8 women; mean age: 61.7 +/- 8.7 SD years) or NF (14 patients: 7 men, 7 women; mean age: 59.2 +/- 11.5 years), both by the laparoscopic approach. Pre- and postoperative assessment included clinical questionnaires, esophageal radiology, esophageal transit time study, endoscopy, stationary manometry, and 24-hour ambulatory esophageal pH testing. Duration of operation was significantly prolonged in the TF arm (TF: 90 +/- 12 minutes versus NF: 67 +/- 15 minutes; p < 0.001). At 3 months postoperatively, the incidences of dysphagia (grades I, II, III) and gas-bloat syndrome were higher after NF than after TF (NF: 57% versus TF: 16%; p < 0.01 and NF: 50% versus TF: 21%; p = 0.02, respectively), but decreased to the same level in both groups at the 1-year followup (NF: 14% versus TF: 16% and NF: 21% versus TF: 16%, respectively). At 3 months postoperatively, patients with NF presented with significantly increased LES pressure than those with TF (p = 0.02), although LES pressure significantly increased after surgery in both groups, as compared with preoperative values. Amplitude of esophageal peristalsis at 5 cm proximal to LES increased postoperatively to the same extent in both groups (TF, preoperatively: 21 +/- 6 mmHg versus postoperatively: 39 +/- 12 mmHg; p < 0.001, and NF, preoperatively: 20 +/- 8 mmHg versus

  9. [The novel approaches to the rehabilitation of the patients presenting with gastroesophageal reflux disease and co-morbid pathology].

    PubMed

    Komleva, N E; Marjanovsky, A A; Danilov, A N; Agasarov, L G

    This paper was designed to discuss the problems of co-morbidity and approaches to the rehabilitation of the patients presenting with gastroesophageal reflux disease and a concomitant pathology and to analyze the issues concerning the possible vertebro-visceral correlations inherent in the diseases of the internal organs. To evaluate the vertebro-neurological status of the thoracic segment of the vertebral column in the patients suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease and to further improve the methods for their treatment taking into consideration the concomitant pathology, if any. A total of 290 patients at the age varying from 25 to 60 (mean 44,3±11,3) years with the non-erosive form of gastroesophageal reflux disease were examined in the phase of its exacerbation. They included 132 (45.5%) men and 158 (54.5%) women. The duration of the disease averaged 13.1±3.3 years and that of the exacerbation period 1.2±0.5 months. All the patients underwent the vertebro-neurological examination. The visual analog scale was used to obtain the subjective characteristics of the pain syndrome associated with thoracalgia The quality of life of the patients was estimated based on the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (scores of MOS SF-36). To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approach to the treatment of the gastroesophageal reflux disease, the 260 participants of the study were randomly allocated to two groups, the main and control ones. The latter group was comprised of 130 patients given the standard treatment including the use of histamine H2-receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors, stimulators of the motility of the gastrointestinal tract, alginates, and other drugs, as indicated. The former group consisted of the remaining 130 patients undergoing the standard course of pharmacopuncture to correct the functional disorders in the thoracic segment of the vertebral column. The medications of choice for the purpose were the anti-homotoxic agents, such as

  10. Current trends in dextranomer hyaluronic acid copolymer (Deflux) injection technique for endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Andrew J; Arlen, Angela M; Lackgren, Goran

    2014-08-01

    To determine the current preferred injection technique(s) for endoscopic management of pediatric vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Since the approval of dextranomer hyaluronic acid copolymer (Dx/HA) in 2001, injection methods have evolved and now include the hydrodistention implantation technique (HIT) and double HIT as well as subureteral transurethral injection (STING) method. In July 2012, 278 pediatric urologists in the United States were contacted to complete a 15-question survey regarding Dx/HA injection technique(s) currently used in their practice. Fifty board-certified pediatric urologists completed the survey for a response rate of 18%. Most respondents (60%) were in a single-specialty group practice, and 12% were affiliated with an academic- or university-based practice. Respondents reported seeing a mean of 159 pediatric patients (range, 40-400 patients) with VUR annually, and 94% used Dx/HA ≥4 times in the past year. Forty-seven respondents (94%) reported using double HIT over the course of their career compared with 36 (72%) for STING and 30 (60%) for HIT (P <.05). Double HIT gained widespread acceptance between 2007 and 2008, paralleled by a decline in use of other injection techniques. A significantly higher percentage currently perform double HIT (92%) compared with either STING (24%) or HIT (34%; P <.001). Respondents reported the use of double HIT 15 times more often than STING technique and 5 times more often than HIT during the past 12 months (P <.001). The double HIT method is currently the most commonly performed technique for endoscopic correction of VUR by pediatric urologists in the United States. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of heartburn and acid reflux on the severity of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Simerpal Kaur; Maltepe, Caroline; Koren, Gideon

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heartburn (HB) and acid reflux (RF) in the non-pregnant population can cause nausea and vomiting; therefore, it is plausible that in women with nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP), HB/RF may increase the severity of symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether HB/RF during pregnancy contribute to increased severity of NVP. METHODS: A prospectively collected cohort of women who were experiencing NVP and HB, RF or both (n=194) was studied. The Pregnancy-Unique Quantification of Emesis and Nausea (PUQE) scale and its Well-being scale was used to compare the severity of the study cohort’s symptoms. This cohort was compared with a group of women experiencing NVP but no HB/RF (n=188). Multiple linear regression was used to control for the effects of confounding factors. RESULTS: Women with HB/RF reported higher PUQE scores (9.6±2.6) compared with controls (8.9±2.6) (P=0.02). Similarly, Well-being scores for women experiencing HB/RF were lower (4.3±2.1) compared with controls (4.9±2.0) (P=0.01). Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that increased PUQE scores (P=0.003) and decreased Well-being scores (P=0.005) were due to the presence of HB/RF as opposed to confounding factors such as pre-existing gastrointestinal conditions/symptoms, hyperemesis gravidarum in previous pregnancies and comorbidities. CONCLUSION: The present cohort study is the first to demonstrate that HB/RF are associated with increased severity of NVP. Managing HB/RF may improve the severity of NVP. PMID:19373420

  12. Prevalence and risk factors of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Qashqai migrating nomads, southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Mostaghni, Ahmad; Mehrabani, Davood; Khademolhosseini, Farnaz; Masoumi, Seyed Jalil; Moradi, Fariba; Zare, Najaf; Saberi-Firoozi, Mehdi

    2009-02-28

    To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms in Qashqai migrating nomads with a different life style in Fars province, southern Iran. In summer 2006, 748 Qashqai migrating nomads aged 25 years or more were enrolled using a multiple-stage stratified cluster random sampling method. A questionnaire consisting of demographic characteristics, lifestyle and GERD symptoms (heartburn, regurgitation, chest pain, dysphagia, hoarseness and cough) as completed for each subject. The questionnaire was completed in 717 subjects. The prevalence rate of GERD, defined as reflux occurring at least one time per week in the preceding year, was 33% (237 subjects). The prevalence was higher in older individuals (36.0% vs 28.9%, P < 0.05) and in those with other gastrointestinal complaints (51.0% vs 27.8%, P < 0.001), but not different in obese and non-obese subjects. It was also higher in those consuming fruits and vegetables more than once a week (36.2% vs 17.3%, P < 0.001). GERD had a positive correlation with smoking (42.1% vs 27.8%, P < 0.001), but a negative relation with non-alcoholic beverages. The association between GERD and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) consumption was also significant (40.2% vs 25.4%, P < 0.001). The prevalence of GERD (33%) is very high in Qashqai migrating nomads which may be due to a lower socioeconomic and educational level of these people and difference in the life style. Older age, frequent consumption of fruits and vegetables, smoking and NSAIDs are risk factors for GERD in this population.

  13. PECULIARITIES OF QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Mirijanyan, G

    2018-01-01

    Many studies showed, that quality of life (QL ) is affected in case of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Numerous questionnaires with a wide variety of characteristics have been developed for the assessment of GERD. The current study aimed to determine the QL changes of patients with GERD. The sample consisted of 100 patients with GERD. We also formed control group, which consist of 50 practical healthy patients (without GERD). In case group we formed two subgroups- GERD with Esophagitis and GERD without Esophagitis. For QL measure we used SF-36 questionnaire. In case group 58 patients were male and 42 were female. GERD without Esophagitis subgroup included 71 cases, 41 of which were diagnosed in men and 30 in women. The mean age of this subgroup was 35.3±5.2 years. The second clinical subgroup is gastroesophageal reflux, with eosophthalic patients, which consisted of 29 cases. 17 patients in this subgroup were male and 12 female. The mean age of this subgroup was 35,4±5,3 years. The most affected subscales of patients with GERD were "Role physical functioning", "General health", "Role emotional functioning" comparing with control group according SF-36 questionnaire. In the case of GERD without an esophagus, the most affected were "Role physical functioning" and "Role emotional functioning" subscales. Regardless of the type of subgroup, QL "Bodily pain" and "General health" subscal's scores were lowIn case group patients, who have BMI>25 kg/m2 have lower scores of QL compared to the group GERD BMI<25kg/m2.

  14. GERD questionnaire for diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chunlertrith, K; Noiprasit, A; Foocharoen, C; Mairiang, P; Sukeepaisarnjaroen, W; Sangchan, A; Sawadpanitch, K

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is clinically-identified in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The GERD-questionnaire (GERD-Q) score is a sensitive, non-invasive, diagnostic screening tool for diagnosis of GERD in general patients, but it has been not investigated for use in SSc. Our aim was to evaluate the proper cut-off GERD-Q score, sensitivity and specificity for a diagnosis of GERD in SSc patients. A cross-sectional study using the GERD-Q was performed during May 2012-January 2013 on patients over 18 with the diffuse SSc subset. Both esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) and 24-hr pH-monitoring (24hr-pH) were performed as the gold standard tests for both symptomatic and asymptomatic GERD. A total of 75 SSc patients completed the GERD-Q, EGD and 24hr-pH. We identified 22 males (29.3%), 53 females (70.7%) with a mean age of 54.2 years. The respective number of symptomatic and asymptomatic GERD was 69 and 6 cases. For a GERD diagnosis, a cut-off GERD-Q score of 4 provided the best balance between sensitivity and specificity (96.9% and 50%, respectively). Of 48 participants (69.6%) with symptomatic GERD (i.e. positive for both EGD and 24hr-pH), 65 (94.2%) were positive for either EGD or 24hr-pH, and 4 (5.8%) were negative for both EGD and 24hr-pH. A respective majority (83%) vs. one-third of the asymptomatic group had reflux as detected by 24hr-pH vs. A GERD-Q score of 4 or higher indicates a high sensitivity for a diagnosis of GERD in SSc. It can thus be used as a non-invasive screening tool for diagnosing GERD in cases where EGD and 24hr-pH are unavailable.

  15. Atrial fibrillation in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Roman, Crina; Bruley des Varannes, Stanislas; Muresan, Lucian; Picos, Alina; Dumitrascu, Dan L

    2014-07-28

    To analyze the potential relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the development of atrial fibrillation (AF). Using the key words "atrial fibrillation and gastroesophageal reflux", "atrial fibrillation and esophagitis, peptic", "atrial fibrillation and hernia, hiatal" the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, OVIDSP, WILEY databases were screened for relevant publications on GERD and AF in adults between January 1972-December 2013. Studies written in languages other than English or French, studies not performed in humans, reviews, case reports, abstracts, conference presentations, letters to the editor, editorials, comments and opinions were not taken into consideration. Articles treating the subject of radiofrequency ablation of AF and the consecutive development of GERD were also excluded. Two thousand one hundred sixty-one titles were found of which 8 articles met the inclusion criteria. The presence of AF in patients with GERD was reported to be between 0.62%-14%, higher compared to those without GERD. Epidemiological data provided by these observational studies showed that patients with GERD, especially those with more severe GERD-related symptoms, had an increased risk of developing AF compared with those without GERD, but a causal relationship between GERD and AF could not be established based on these studies. The mechanisms of AF as a consequence of GERD remain largely unknown, with inflammation and vagal stimulation playing a possible role in the development of these disorders. Treatment with proton pomp inhibitors may improve symptoms related to AF and facilitate conversion to sinus rhythm. Although links between AF and GERD exist, large randomized clinical studies are required for a better understanding of the relationship between these two entities.

  16. Diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): an Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Poddar, Ujjal

    2013-01-08

    NEED AND PURPOSE: The scarcity of literature and lack of published guidelines on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) from India, have necessitated this review. A literature search in PubMed was conducted with regard to epidemiology, clinical features, investigation and management of GERD in children. English language studies published full over the last 20 years were considered and relevant information was extracted. Nearly half of all healthy babies regurgitate at least once a day by 4 months of age and this subsides in 90% of them by 1 year. In contrast, GERD prevalence increases with age and by adolescence it is similar to adults (20%). While regurgitation in infancy does not need investigation or therapy, empirical proton pump inhibitor (PPI) for 4 weeks is justified in older children with classical GERD symptoms. There is no gold-standard investigation for GERD. A pH study with or without impedance is useful in extraesophageal manifestations and endoscopy in esophagitis. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) play a pivotal role in the management of GERD and its long-term use has been shown to be safe in children. Antireflux surgery plays a minor role due to, its associated morbidity and high failure rate, especially in the high risk group who needs it most. Regurgitation in infancy need not be investigated unless there are warning features. Empirical PPI therapy is justified in older children and adolescents with typical reflux symptoms. pH study in extraesophageal manifestations and endoscopy for esophagitis are the investigations of choice. PPI is the mainstay of therapy in GERD.

  17. Endoscopic Injection of Dextranomer/Hyaluronic Acid as First-Line Treatment in 851 Consecutive Children with High-Grade Vesicoureteral Reflux: Efficacy and Long-Term Results.

    PubMed

    Friedmacher, Florian; Colhoun, Eric; Puri, Prem

    2018-03-15

    Endoscopic injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic is widely acknowledged as first-line treatment of lower grade vesicoureteral reflux. Our objective was to demonstrate its long-term efficacy and safety in eradicating high-grade reflux. Eight-hundred-fifty-one children (518 girls, 333 boys), median age 2.3 years (2 months-13.7 years), underwent endoscopic correction of high-grade vesicoureteral reflux using dextranomer/hyaluronic acid. Reflux was unilateral in 415 cases and bilateral in 436, comprising 1,287 refluxing units: grade IV in 1,153 (89.6%) and grade V in 134 (10.4%). 99m technetium-dimercaptosuccinic acid imaging identified renal scarring in 317 (37.3%) patients. Follow-up ultrasound and voiding cystourethrogram were performed 3 months post intervention and renal ultrasound annually thereafter. Median follow-up was 8.5 years (6 months-16 years). Overall resolution rate after the first endoscopic injection was 895/1,287 (69.5%): 70.4% in grade IV and 61.9% in grade V, respectively. Reflux resolved after a second injection in 259 (20.1%) and after a third in 133 (10.4%). Persistent reflux after initial treatment was significantly more common in infants <1 year and in cases with renal scarring. No significant postoperative complications occurred and none required ureteral reimplantation. Following reflux resolution, 43 (5.1%) children developed febrile urinary tract infections: 24 (55.8%) in the first, 15 (34.9%) in the second and 4 (9.3%) after ≥3 years. Of these, 6 had reflux recurrence and 8 demonstrated neocontralateral grade III reflux, which was successfully treated with single endoscopic injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid. Endoscopic injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid is an efficient and safe long-term treatment for grade IV and V vesicoureteral reflux, which can be easily repeated in cases of failure with a high subsequent resolution rate. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier

  18. An Evidence-based Review of Medicinal Herbs for the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD).

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Ayda; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali; Long, Chunlin; Pasalar, Mehdi

    2017-10-10

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common diseases in society, affecting up to 40% of the population. It has major impact on the quality of life and a high burden on medical expenditure. In this work, herbs used by ancient Iranians to treat GERD have been introduced. Different well-known Persian textbooks and recent electronic databases were searched to explore the treatment of GERD and the pharmacological mechanisms of the identified medicinal plants. GERD has been known for many centuries, and many herbal remedies for its treatment have been elucidated in traditional medical literature. We found 25 medicinal herbs in Persian medicine books and searched for evidence to support them in the current literature. Although their active components or the mechanism of action were not known by the ancient Persians at that time, their persistent use during different centuries might indicate their effectiveness. Owing to their potential, medicinal herbs are a viable option for the treatment of diseases like GERD even today. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. The Reflux Improvement and Monitoring (TRIM) Program Is Associated With Symptom Improvement and Weight Reduction for Patients With Obesity and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Yadlapati, Rena; Pandolfino, John E; Alexeeva, Olga; Gregory, Dyanna L; Craven, Meredith R; Liebovitz, David; Lichten, Abbey; Seger, Erin; Workman, Moira; St Peter, Nora; Craft, Jenna; Doerfler, Bethany; Keswani, Rajesh N

    2018-01-01

    Current healthcare systems do not effectively promote weight reduction in patients with obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The Reflux Improvement and Monitoring (TRIM) program provides personalized, multidisciplinary, health education and monitoring over 6 months. In this study we aimed to (i) measure the effectiveness of TRIM on GERD symptoms, quality of life, and weight, and (ii) examine patient health beliefs related to TRIM. This prospective mixed methods feasibility study was performed at a single center between September 2015 and February 2017, and included adult patients with GERD and a body mass index ≥30 kg/m 2 . Quantitative analysis consisted of a pre- to post-intervention analysis of TRIM participants (+TRIM Cohort) and a multivariable longitudinal mixed model analysis of +TRIM vs. patients who declined TRIM (-TRIM Cohort). Primary outcomes were change in patient-reported GERD symptom severity (GerdQ) and quality of life (GerdQ-DI), and change in percent excess body weight (%EBW). Qualitative analysis was based on two focus groups of TRIM participants. Among the +TRIM cohort (n=52), mean baseline GerdQ scores (8.7±2.9) decreased at 3 months (7.5±2.2; P<0.01) and 6 months (7.4±1.9; P=0.02). Mean GerdQ-DI scores decreased, but did not reach statistical significance. Compared with the -TRIM cohort (n=89), reduction in %EBW was significantly greater at 3, 6, and 12 months among the +TRIM cohort (n=52). In qualitative analysis, patients unanimously appreciated the multidisciplinary approach and utilized weight loss effectively to improve GERD symptoms. In this mixed methods feasibility study, participation in TRIM was associated with symptom improvement, weight reduction, and patient engagement.

  20. The association between gastroesophageal reflux disease with sleep quality, depression, and anxiety in a cohort study of Australian men.

    PubMed

    On, Zhi Xiang; Grant, Janet; Shi, Zumin; Taylor, Anne W; Wittert, Gary A; Tully, Phillip J; Hayley, Amie C; Martin, Sean

    2017-06-01

    Previous clinical studies have demonstrated a relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with anxiety and depression; however, few population-based studies have controlled for sleep disorders. The current study aimed to assess the relationship between GERD and anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders in a community-based sample of Australian men. Participants comprised a subset of 1612 men (mean age: 60.7 years, range: 35-80) who participated in the Men Androgen Inflammation Lifestyle Environment and Stress Study during the years 2001-2012, who had complete GERD measures (Gastresophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire), and were not taking medications known to impact gastrointestinal function (excluding drugs taken for acid-related disorders). Current depression and anxiety were defined by (i) physician diagnosis, (ii) symptoms of depression (Beck Depression Inventory and Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale) or anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), and/or current depressive or anxiolytic medication use. Previous depression was indicated by past depressive diagnoses/medication use. Data on sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and obstructive sleep apnea were collected along with several health, lifestyle, and medical factors, and these were systematically evaluated in both univariate and multivariable analyses. Overall, 13.7% (n = 221) men had clinically significant GERD symptoms. In the adjusted models, an association between GERD and anxiety (odds ratio [OR] 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-6.8) and poor sleep quality (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.2-2.9) was observed; however, no effect was observed for current depression (OR 1.5; 95% CI 0.8-2.7). After removing poor sleep quality from the model, an independent association between current depression (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.7-3.8) and current anxiety (OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.8-6.0) and GERD was observed, but not for previous depression (OR 1.4; 95% CI 0.7-2.8). In this sample of urban-dwelling men

  1. Time trends in cost of caring for people with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bloom, B S; Jayadevappa, R; Wahl, P; Cacciamanni, J

    2001-08-01

    Increasing acceptance of the many permutations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has led to diverse study of the disease and its effects. The goal of this study was to estimate medical care costs attributable to a defined GERD population over time. A retrospective cohort control design was used. All participants were identified from the database of a managed care organization serving 300,000 people in the northeastern United States. The index population (n = 600) was defined as anyone who obtained medical services during 1997 or 1998, for any International Classification of Diseases (ninth revision, Clinical Modification) codes suggestive of GERD, and/or anyone who received at least one prescription and one refill for antisecretory or GERD medications during at least two 3-month periods in 1997 or 1998. A matched cohort (n = 600) without any diagnosis of GERD was randomly selected as a control group. Both populations were observed restrospectively from January 1, 1990 through December 31, 1998. The cost of treating GERD averaged around $510 per year, about 15% of all medical costs for those with GERD. Treating people with GERD was about 2-fold more costly than treating those without GERD, a marginal cost of $1500 to $2000 per annum. Although GERD is a low-cost disease to treat, the cost of treating people with GERD is subtantially greater than that for a comparable population without GERD. Two explanations may account for the large difference of costs between the study populations. First, the GERD group may be sicker than the control group. Disease severity variables and diagnoses associated with GERD were more commonly diagnosed in the GERD group. Second, an additional disease that is not treated appropriately increases the cost of treatment geometrically for all diseases.

  2. A study on the efficacy of rebamipide for patients with proton pump inhibitor-refractory non-erosive reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kyoichi; Furuta, Kenji; Miwa, Hiroto; Oshima, Tadayuki; Miki, Masaharu; Komazawa, Yoshinori; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Furuta, Takahisa; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimatani, Tomohiko; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2012-06-01

    Reflux symptoms in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) cannot be easily controlled by treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The anti-inflammatory function of rebamipide may be effective for protecting the esophageal mucosa. This prospective randomized multicenter placebo-controlled study was performed to clarify the efficacy of rebamipide for NERD patients whose reflux symptoms were refractory to PPI treatment. One hundred forty-nine patients were enrolled on the basis of a QUEST score of over 6 and absence of endoscopically proven esophageal mucosal breaks. All the patients were initially administered 15 mg of lansoprazole for 4 weeks, and the symptoms were then assessed using QUEST and GSRS. PPI-refractory patients were randomly assigned to administration of rebamipide or placebo t.i.d. for 4 weeks. Three of the 149 patients were lost to follow-up, and 60 among the remaining 146 patients were found to be PPI-refractory. Among these PPI-refractory patients, 31 were randomly assigned to a rebamipide group and 29 to a placebo group. At the end of drug administration, the QUEST and GSRS scores did not differ between the rebamipide and placebo groups, although a significantly higher proportion of patients in the rebamipide group showed amelioration of abdominal pain and diarrhea. Administration of rebamipide cannot effectively control reflux symptoms in NERD patients whose symptoms are refractory to PPI therapy.

  3. The Effects of Baclofen for the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shujie; Shi, Shengying; Chen, Feng; Lin, Jingming

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Baclofen can relieve gastroesophageal reflux-related symptoms in healthy subjects and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients by reducing the incidence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of baclofen for the treatment of GERD. Methods. We systematically searched randomized controlled trials published prior to November 2013 from PubMed, Medline, Embase, ScienceDirect, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the Cochrane Central Register of Randomized Controlled Trials. We performed a meta-analysis of all eligible trials. Results. Nine studies were identified with a total of 283 GERD patients and healthy subjects. Comparative analysis provided high quality data supporting the ability of baclofen to promote a short-term decrease in the number of reflux episodes per patient, the average length of reflux episodes, and the incidence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. No serious adverse events or death events were reported, and there were no significant differences in the overall adverse events between baclofen and placebo. All reported side effects of baclofen were of mild-to-moderate intensity, and the drug was well tolerated. Conclusion. Abundant evidence suggests that baclofen may be a useful approach for the treatment of GERD patients; however, a larger well-designed research study would further confirm this recommendation. PMID:25389436

  4. Endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux in children with subureteral dextranomer/hyaluronic acid injection: a single-centre, 7-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Biočíc, Mihovil; Todoríc, Jakov; Budimir, Dražen; Roíc, Andrea Cvitkovíc; Pogorelíc, Zenon; Juríc, Ivo; Šušnjar, Tomislav

    2012-01-01

    Background The goals of medical intervention in patients with vesicoureteral reflux are to allow normal renal growth, prevent infections and pyelonephritis, and prevent renal failure. We present our experience with endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux in children by subureteral dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer injection. Methods Under cystoscopic guidance, dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer underneath the intravesical portion of the ureter in a subureteral or submucosal location was injected in patients undergoing endoscopic correction of vesicoureteral reflux. Results A total of 282 patients (120 boys and 162 girls) underwent the procedure. There were 396 refluxed ureters altogether. The mean age of patients was 4.9 years. The mean overall follow-up period was 44 months. Among the 396 ureters treated, 76% were cured with a single injection. A second and third injection raised the cure rate to 93% and 94%, respectively. Twenty-two (6%) ureters failed all 3 injections, and were converted to open surgery. Conclusion Endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux can be recommended as a first-line therapy for most cases of vesicoureteral reflux, because of the short hospital stay, absence of complications and the high success rate. PMID:22854114

  5. Renal tissue oxygenation in children with chronic kidney disease due to vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Chehade, Hassib; Milani, Bastien; Ansaloni, Annalisa; Anex, Christiane; Bassi, Isabelle; Piskunowicz, Maciej; Stuber, Matthias; Cachat, Francois; Burnier, Michel; Pruijm, Menno

    2016-11-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is a frequent cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. Using blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI), we measured cortical and medullary oxygenation in children with CKD due to VUR and compared the results to those obtained on healthy controls. The study population comprised 37 children (19 with CKD due to VUR and 18 healthy age-matched controls). BOLD-MRI was performed before and after furosemide treatment. MR images were analyzed with the region-of-interest (ROI) technique to assess the mean R2* values (=1/T2*) of the cortex and medulla of each kidney and with the concentric object (CO) technique that divides renal parenchyma in 12 equal layers. R2* values were significantly lower (corresponding to higher oxygenation) in the cortex and medulla of kidneys of children with CKD due to VUR than in those of the healthy controls (cortex 16.4 ± 1.4 vs. 17.2 ± 1.6 s(-1) , respectively; medulla 28.4 ± 3.2 vs. 30.3 ± 1.9 s(-1) , respectively; P < 0.05), and furosemide-induced changes in medullary R2* were smaller in the former than in the latter (-5.7 ± 3.0 vs. -6.9 ± 3.4 s(-1), respectively; P < 0.05). Similar results were found with the CO technique. In children with a history of unilateral reflux (n = 9), the non-affected contralateral kidneys presented similar R2* values as the diseased kidneys, but their response to furosemide was significantly larger (-7.4 ± 3.2 vs. -5.7 ± 3.0, respectively; P = 0.05). Chronic kidney disease due to VUR is not associated with kidney tissue hypoxia in children. The significantly larger furosemide-induced decrease in medullary R2* levels in the healthy group and unaffected contralateral kidneys of the VUR group points towards more intense renal sodium transport in these kidneys.

  6. The oesophagus and cough: laryngo-pharyngeal reflux, microaspiration and vagal reflexes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is generally considered to be one of the commonest causes of chronic cough, however randomised controlled trials of proton pump inhibitors have often failed to support this notion. This article reviews the most recent studies investigating the mechanisms thought to link reflux and cough, namely laryngo-pharyngeal reflux, micro-aspiration and neuronal cross-organ sensitisation. How recent evidence might shed light on the failure of acid suppressing therapies and suggest new approaches to treating reflux related cough are also discussed. PMID:23590893

  7. Systematic review: frequency and reasons for consultation for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Hungin, A P S; Hill, C; Raghunath, A

    2009-08-15

    Upper gastrointestinal symptoms impose a substantial illness burden and management costs. Understanding perceptions and reasons for seeking healthcare is a prerequisite for meeting patients' needs effectively. To review systematically findings on consultation frequencies for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and dyspepsia and patients' reasons for consultation. Systematic literature searches. Reported consultation rates ranged from 5.4% to 56% for GERD and from 26% to 70% for dyspepsia. Consultation for GERD was associated with increased symptom severity and frequency, interference with social activities, sleep disturbance, lack of timetabled work, higher levels of comorbidity, depression, anxiety, phobia, somatization and obsessionality. Some consulted because of fears that their symptoms represented serious disease; others avoided consultation because of this. Inconsistent associations were seen with medication use. Patients were less likely to consult if they felt that their doctor would trivialize their symptoms. Few factors were consistently associated with dyspepsia consultation. However, lower socio-economic status and Helicobacter pylori infection were associated with increased consultation. Patients' perceptions of their condition, comorbid factors and external reasons such as work and social factors are related to consultation rates for GERD. Awareness of these factors can guide the clinician towards a more effective strategy than one based on drug therapy alone.

  8. Increased risk of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Fan, W-C; Ou, S-M; Feng, J-Y; Hu, Y-W; Yeh, C-M; Su, V Y-F; Hu, L-Y; Chien, S-H; Su, W-J; Chen, T-J; Liu, C-J

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested a close correlation between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and various respiratory disorders. However, the association between GERD and tuberculosis (TB) remains unexplored. Using data retrieved from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database from 2000 to 2009, this longitudinal nationwide cohort study included a total of 63,930 patients with GERD and controls matched by age, sex and comorbidities. Risk factors associated with the development of pulmonary TB (PTB) were investigated. Active PTB was documented in 65 (0.20%) patients with GERD and 41 (0.13%) matched cohorts within 1 year of GERD diagnosis. The incidence rate of PTB in the GERD group and the matched cohort was respectively 24.1 and 15.2 cases per 10,000 person-years. In multivariate analysis, GERD was an independent risk factor for PTB (adjusted HR 1.63, 95%CI 1.10-2.40, P = 0.015). Among patients with GERD, independent predictors for PTB included older age, male sex, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and exposure to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Patients with GERD have a significantly increased risk of PTB within 1 year of GERD diagnosis. Exposure to PPIs is an independent predictor for PTB among patients with GERD.

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Ohio Medicaid patients: practice patterns and temporal trends.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Gregory S; Mourad, William A; Koroukian, Siran M

    2004-01-01

    There is a paucity of data about the use of procedures and prescription medications in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in actual clinical practice. Outpatient Ohio Medicaid claims from 1994 to 1998 were searched to identify patients with an initial diagnosis of GERD along with associated prescriptions and gastrointestinal procedures. Complications of GERD and comorbid illnesses were also determined. A total of 5579 patients were identified. Histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RA's) were prescribed in 59%, followed by proton pump inhibitors (PPI's) (30%) and prokinetic drugs (17%). PPI's were more frequently prescribed to patients with GERD-related complications, peptic ulcer disease and major comorbidities, and patients who received PPI's were also more likely to undergo upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The frequencies of upper endoscopy and barium studies were 20% and 11% respectively, with no change over the study period. There was an increased frequency of PPI therapy (17-43%) and decreased frequency of H2RA therapy (72-47%) from 1994 to 1998 which persisted after adjusting for potential differences in case mix. In this population-based study, prescription of PPI's increased over time which likely reflected changes in clinician practice rather than patient mix. Despite a greater awareness of GERD complications, use of upper endoscopy did not increase. Although the cohort consists of predominantly low socioeconomic status, female patients, further studies should be conducted in other populations to confirm these findings.

  10. The prevalence of sexual behavior disorders in patients with treated and untreated gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Iovino, Paola; Pascariello, Annalisa; Limongelli, Paolo; Tremolaterra, Fabrizio; Consalvo, Danilo; Sabbatini, Francesco; Amato, Giuseppe; Ciacci, Carolina

    2007-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic disease. Sexual behavior is often altered in chronic illness. The aim of this study was to evaluate sexual behavior in patients affected with GERD before and after medical or surgical treatment in comparison to healthy controls (HC). Upper GI endoscopy and 24-h ambulatory pH testing were performed to confirm GERD in symptomatic patients. GERD patients completed an anonymous questionnaire on sexual life before and after medical or surgical treatment. Compared with HC, untreated patients with GERD showed more frequent difficulty in attaining orgasm and painful intercourse. GERD patients after surgical treatment had significantly more difficulty in attaining orgasm, while after continuous medical treatment GERD patients compared with HC had significantly more difficulty in attaining orgasm, higher painful intercourse, lower sexual desire, and perceived more frequently that the partner was unhelpful. When compared with untreated conditions, GERD patients after surgical treatment had a significant improvement in attaining orgasm and in painful intercourse but a significant decrease in sexual desire, a lower satisfaction with their sexual life, and a higher prevalence of an unhelpful partner, whereas GERD patients after medical treatment had a decrease in all indices of sexual behavior. Untreated GERD is associated with disorders in sexual behavior. Compared with HC, only the surgical group partially improved after treatment.

  11. A pilot study of Helicobacter pylori genotypes and cytokine gene polymorphisms in reflux oesophagitis and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Akdogan, R A; Ozgur, O; Gucuyeter, S; Kaklikkaya, N; Cobanoglu, U; Aydin, F

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes various diseases such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. While majority of the people infected with H. pylori is asymptomatic, 15-20 % of them develop such diseases. The main factors, which determine the development of H. pylori related diseases might be bacterial virulence, host genetic and environmental factors.The aim of this study was to reveal the factors that play a role in the disease development in patients with reflux esophagitis and peptic ulcer, infected with Helicobacter pylori. Environmental factors such as medical agents, smoking and body mass index were evaluated. The factors specific to bacteria such as vacA, CagA, babA and iceA virulence genotypes and the host factors such as IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, interferon-γ, TNF-α, ve TGF-β1 gene polymorphisms were compared between the two groups.H. pylori infected twenty five patients with reflux esophagitis and peptic ulcer were enrolled in the study. There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding environmental factors. IL-2 -330T +166T (p=0.037) and IL10 -1082A; -819C (p=0.049) gene polymorphisms were significantly more common in the group of patients with peptic ulcer compared to the group with reflux esophagitis. In both groups of patients, either with reflux esophagitis or peptic ulcer, multiple H. pylori virulence genotypes (cagA, vacA, babA) (mean values 74 %, 78 %, 54 % respectively) were observed.In this study, we revealed that cytokine gene polymorphisms may play a role in the development peptic ulcer while H. pylori virulence genotypes seem to be crucial for the development of associated diseases (Tab. 4, Ref. 51).

  12. [Reflux nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Sabra, R

    1990-08-01

    A corticopapillary scar is a frequent finding on urography in patients with vesicoureteral reflux. It is considered a typical sign of so-called reflux nepropathy. It develops most frequently in children aged 5-7 years and has a negative impact on the growth of the kidney. In its development three factors participate: ureterovesical reflux, intrarenal reflux associated with so-called refluxing papillas and urinary infection. The inflammatory cicatrical process may affect the whole kidney--small shrivelled kidney--or only a portion of the kidney. The development of scars is explained by the so-called bing-bang theory according to which all refluxing papillae are affected at the same time by the first urinary infection. This position develops in particular in case of inadequate treatment of acute pyelonephritis, Deformity of normal papillae caused by various factors explains, however, the development of renal scars in children aged 8-12 years or even in adults. The growing kidney tolerates poorly not only urinary infections and scar formation but also hydrodynamic disorders associated with vesicoureteral reflux. Therefore it is important to diagnose and treat vesicoureteral reflux already at an early age. For the time being it is important o consider asymptomatic bacteriuria and any urinary infection in children a clinical marker calling for examination for the possible presence of vesicoureteral reflux.

  13. [Scientific foundations for medical treatment based on modifying diet, lifestyle habits, and patient attitudes in chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Csendes, Attila; Burdiles, Patricio

    2007-02-01

    In most patients with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease, treatment is medical. Among the main elements involved in treatment are general dietary measures, lifestyle habits, and patients' attitudes to symptom control. The present article summarizes the scientific foundations that support these measures: head elevation during nighttime sleep, smoking cessation, losing weight, avoiding rigorous exercise, and reducing or eliminating alcohol consumption. Dietary therapy is mainly based on avoiding fatty foods, chocolate, coffee, mint, and irritating fizzy drinks. Although each patient's response to these measures is highly individual, the mechanisms through which symptoms are reproduced is gradually becoming clearer: a large percentage of patients with uncomplicated gastroesophageal reflux disease will gain considerable relief simply by eliminating some of these habits.

  14. Enhanced expression of interleukin-8 and activation of nuclear factor kappa-B in endoscopy-negative gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Isomoto, Hajime; Saenko, Vladimir A; Kanazawa, Yusei; Nishi, Yoshito; Ohtsuru, Akira; Inoue, Kenichiro; Akazawa, Yuko; Takeshima, Fuminao; Omagari, Katsuhisa; Miyazaki, Masanobu; Mizuta, Yohei; Murata, Ikuo; Yamashita, Shunichi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2004-04-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) mediates neutrophil trafficking via its receptors. Recent studies have shown that IL-8 is likely involved in the development and progression of erosive reflux esophagitis (RE), yet little is known about its implication in endoscopy-negative gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The purpose of this study was to determine IL-8 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels in endoscopy-negative GERD, along with assessment of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation, which upregulates IL-8 expression. We studied 31 patients with endoscopy-negative GERD, 15 patients with erosive RE, and 15 asymptomatic controls. Paired biopsy samples were taken from the esophagus 3 cm above the gastroesophageal junction; one biopsy was snap-frozen for measurement of IL-8 mRNA levels by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and another was formalin-fixed for histopathological evaluation. In nine endoscopy-negative GERD patients, the IL-8 mRNA expression levels were measured before and 8 wk after treatment with lansoprazole. We also sampled additional specimens for NF-kappaB-DNA binding assay and immunohistochemical analyses of NF-kappaB p65 and p50 subunits, IL-8 and specific IL-8 receptor, CXCR-1. The relative IL-8 mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in esophageal mucosa of patients with endoscopy-negative GERD than those of the controls. The presence of basal zone hyperplasia and intraepithelial neutrophils, histopathological hallmarks of GERD, were associated with higher levels of IL-8 mRNA. Lansoprazole treatment significantly reduced the IL-8 mRNA expression levels. The esophageal epithelium of patients with GERD showed intense immunoreactivity for IL-8, and expressed CXCR-1 antigen. We found NF-kappaB activation in esophageal mucosa in GERD patients and the NF-kappaB subunits were localized predominantly in the nuclei of IL-8-expressing cells. Our results demonstrate enhanced mucosal expression of IL-8 in incipient GERD even

  15. A 2008 questionnaire-based survey of gastroesophageal reflux disease and related diseases by physicians in East Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Shin-ichi; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Sollano, Jose D; Zhu, Qi; Kachintorn, Udom; Rani, Abdul Aziz; Hahm, Ki-Baik; Joh, Takashi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Naito, Yuji; Takeuchi, Koji; Furuta, Kenji; Terano, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common gastrointestinal disease. This study was designed to examine current epidemiology, diagnosis, management, and treatment of patients diagnosed with GERD by surveying physicians in several East Asian countries. A questionnaire-based survey was completed in six countries including China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, and Thailand between July 2008 and December 2008. In total, 876 physicians participated in the study. Most physicians in all countries, except Japan, frequently used international guidelines for the care of GERD patients, whereas approximately half of Japanese physicians did not use such guidelines. GERD was common among many patients, but Barrett's esophagus, particularly the long-segmental type, was rare. The incidence of esophageal cancer, particularly adenocarcinoma, was high in China, but low in other countries. Most physicians diagnosed GERD based on symptoms, followed by endoscopy in Japan and Korea, or in other countries, by the proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) test. Heartburn was recognized as the chief complaint in all countries except Korea. Most physicians in all countries used PPI as the first-line of treatment for GERD. Increasing the PPI dose was the treatment of choice for PPI-refractory erosive esophagitis in Korea, the Philippines, and Thailand. In contrast, in other countries, physicians used a combination of PPI and other drugs to treat PPI-refractory erosive esophagitis. Prescription of antidepressant drugs increased for PPI-refractory nonerosive reflux disease compared with PPI-refractory erosive esophagitis. The findings in the present survey are useful to understand the current epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of GERD in East Asian countries. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Excessive crying and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in infants: misalignment of biology and culture.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela S

    2005-01-01

    Excessive crying is the most common problem presenting to the doctor in the first months of life in western industrialised societies, affecting up to 30% of infants. There has been an exponential increase in the diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in babies who cry excessively over the past few decades, and many parents believe their crying infant "has reflux". This paper proposes that culturocentric assumptions have confused interpretation of research into GORD, and re-examines the findings of GORD research from the perspective of evolutionary biology. Evolutionary biologists argue that the human infant is an exterogestate foetus for at least the first six months of life, dependent on maternal co-regulation for optimal physiological function. However, infant-care practices in western industrialised societies shifted towards an emphasis on infant autonomy at the time of the Industrial Revolution. From the perspective of evolutionary biology, a misalignment between western culture and the biological expectations of the infant developed over two million years of evolution may result in excessive crying in less adapted babies. The key biocultural factors that impact on infant distress are feeding management, parental responsiveness, sensory nourishment and sleep management. When the concept of the human infant as an exterogestate foetus is integrated with the findings of GORD research, a hypothesis and its corollary emerge. This hypothesis proposes that infant GORD is a physiological manifestation of misalignment between biology and culture, and proposes, as a corollary, that if the impact of biocultural factors upon the physiology of otherwise well crying babies is not addressed in the first months of life, populations of infants who cry excessively may be predisposed to GORD after three to four months of age. If this hypothesis is correct, an integrated clinical approach to crying babies less than three to four months of age that considers feeding

  17. Lower Esophageal Sphincter Augmentation for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: The Safety of a Modern Implant.

    PubMed

    Smith, C Daniel; Ganz, Robert A; Lipham, John C; Bell, Reginald C; Rattner, David W

    2017-06-01

    Use of the magnetic sphincter augmentation device (MSAD) for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is increasing. As this innovative treatment for GERD gains widespread use and adoption, an assessment of its safety since U.S. market introduction is presented. Events were collected from the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database, which reports events submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of suspected device-associated deaths, serious injuries, and malfunctions. The reporting period was from March 22, 2012 (FDA approval) through May 31, 2016, and included only events occurring in the United States. Additional information was provided by the manufacturer, allowing calculation of implant rates and durations. An estimated 3283 patients underwent magnetic sphincter augmentation (165 surgeons at 191 institutions). The median implant duration was 1.4 years, with 1016 patients implanted for at least 2 years. No deaths, life-threatening events, or device malfunctions were reported. The overall rate of device removal was 2.7% (89/3283). The most common reasons for device removal were dysphagia (52/89) and persistent reflux symptoms (19/89). Removal for erosion and migration was 0.15% (5/3283) and 0% (0/3283), respectively. There were no perforations. Of the device removals, 57.3% (51/89) occurred <1 year after implant, 30.3% (27/89) between 1 and 2 years, and 12.4% (11/89) >2 years after implant. The rate of device removal and erosion with an implant duration >2 years were 1.1% (11/1016) and 0.1% (1/1016), respectively. All device removals and erosions were managed nonemergently, with no complications or long-term consequences. During a 4-year period in more than 3000 patients, no unanticipated MSAD complications have emerged, and there is no data to suggest a trend of increased events over time. The presentation and management of device-related issues have been less complicated than revisions for laparoscopic fundoplication or other

  18. Overlap of symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome in the general population.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Sanne; Jensen, Trine Holm; Henriksen, Susanne Lund; Haastrup, Peter Fentz; Larsen, Pia Veldt; Søndergaard, Jens; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg

    2015-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common functional gastrointestinal conditions with significant impact on the daily lives of individuals. The objective was to investigate the prevalence and overlap of the three conditions in a Western general population. A nationwide study of 100,000 individuals 20 years and above, randomly selected in the general population. A web-based questionnaire survey formed the basis of this study. Questions regarding FD and IBS were extracted from the ROME III adult questionnaire. Questions regarding GERD were developed based on the Montreal definition. Prevalence estimates for GERD, FD IBS were calculated in total and for each sex separately and for four age groups. A Venn diagram was constructed, illustrating the overlap between the three conditions. The overall response rate was 52.2%. The prevalence of GERD, FD and IBS was 11.2%, 7.7% and 10.5%, respectively, and overlap between two or three of these conditions was seen among 6.5% of the respondents. Among individuals meeting the criteria of one or more of the conditions GERD, FD and IBS, 30.7% had overlap between two or all three conditions. GERD, FD and IBS are common conditions in the general population and the overlap between these conditions is also quite common. When diagnosing patients with GERD, FD and IBS, physicians should keep in mind that these patients could be suffering from more than one of these conditions.

  19. Chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease shares genetic background with esophageal adenocarcinoma and Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Gharahkhani, Puya; Tung, Joyce; Hinds, David; Mishra, Aniket; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Whiteman, David C.; MacGregor, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) is a rapidly fatal cancer with rising incidence in the developed world. Most EAs arise in a metaplastic epithelium, Barrett's esophagus (BE), which is associated with greatly increased risk of EA. One of the key risk factors for both BE and EA is chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This study used the linkage disequilibrium (LD) score regression and genomic profile risk scoring approaches to investigate the contribution of multiple common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to the risk of GERD, and the extent of genetic overlap between GERD and BE or EA. Using LD score regression, we estimated an overall phenotypic variance of 7% (95% CI 3–11%) for GERD explained by all the genotyped SNPs. A genetic correlation of 77% (s.e. = 24%, P = 0.0012) between GERD and BE and 88% between GERD and EA (s.e. = 25%, P = 0.0004) was estimated using the LD score regression approach. Results from the genomic profile risk scoring approach, as a robustness check, were broadly similar to those from the LD score regression. This study provides the first evidence for a polygenic basis for GERD and supports for a polygenic overlap between GERD and BE, and GERD and EA. PMID:26704365

  20. Effect of Proton Pump Inhibitors in Bronchiectatic Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Byungkyu; Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Chang Min; Hwang, Jae Jin; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-07-25

    Bronchiectasis is aggravated by gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) owing to micro aspiration. Some researchers note the effect of antireflux surgery in bronchiectasis with GERD. However, few have investigated the effects of medical antireflux therapy. We investigated the effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in bronchiectasis with GERD. From March 2003 to May 2015, the clinical records of patients who had bronchiectasis with GERD were reviewed. Patients underwent an initial pulmonary function test (PFT) and chest computed tomography when diagnosed with bronchiectasis. One group with typical GERD symptoms was treated with PPIs, while the other group was not. Both groups underwent PFTs within six months after completing PPI therapy. Population characteristics and associations were compared between the groups. Two hundred and fifty-seven patients (124 male, 133 female; mean age 67.6±10.0 years) were included. There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of forced vital capacity (FVC; p=0.239), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1; p=0.555), or FEV1/FVC (p=0.374) after PPI therapy. However, there were significant improvements in FVC (p=0.002) and FEV1 (p=0.006) in patients with high BMI in the PPI treatment group. PPIs have no effect on the pulmonary function in patients with bronchiectasis and GERD. However, PPIs were noted to produce improvements in lung function in patients with bronchiectasis and high BMI.

  1. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and overall and Cause-specific Mortality: A Prospective Study of 50000 Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Khademi, Hooman; Poutschi, Hossein; Khoshnia, Masoud; Norouzi, Alireza; Amiriani, Taghi; Sohrabpour, Amir Ali; Aliasgari, Ali; Jafari, Elham; Semnani, Shahryar; Abnet, Christian C.; Pharaoh, Paul D.; Brennan, Paul; Kamangar, Farin; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Only a few studies in Western countries have investigated the association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and mortality at the general population level and they have shown mixed results. This study investigated the association between GERD symptoms and overall and cause-specific mortality in a large prospective population-based study in Golestan Province, Iran. METHODS Baseline data on frequency, onset time, and patient-perceived severity of GERD symptoms were available for 50001 participants in the Golestan Cohort Study (GCS). We identified 3107 deaths (including 1146 circulatory and 470 cancer-related) with an average follow-up of 6.4 years and calculated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for multiple potential confounders. RESULTS Severe daily symptoms (defined as symptoms interfering with daily work or causing nighttime awakenings on a daily bases, reported by 4.3% of participants) were associated with cancer mortality (HR 1.48, 95% CI: 1.04-2.05). This increase was too small to noticeably affect overall mortality. Mortality was not associated with onset time or frequency of GERD and was not increased with mild to moderate symptoms. CONCLUSION We have observed an association with GERD and increased cancer mortality in a small group of individuals that had severe symptoms. Most patients with mild to moderate GERD can be re-assured that their symptoms are not associated with increased mortality. PMID:24872865

  2. A novel endoscopic submucosal dissection technique for proton pump inhibitor-refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Ota, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Harada, Satoshi; Edogawa, Shoko; Kojima, Yuichi; Inoue, Takuya; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2014-12-01

    Although drug treatment is the usual first-line therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), not all patients receive satisfactory relief from drug therapy, alone. We developed an endoscopic fundoplication technique using endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD); the technique is referred to as ESD for GERD (ESD-G). This study investigated the safety and efficacy of this novel technique in patients with drug-refractory GERD. ESD-G narrows the hiatal opening through ESD of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) mucosa. For safety reasons, the range of mucosal resection was limited to half (1/2 or 1/4 +1/4) of the circumference of the EGJ lumen. ESD-G was performed on 13 patients with proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-refractory GERD. GERD symptoms, PPI dose, and 24-h esophageal pH monitoring results were compared before and 6 months after the procedure. Results. In 12 cases, symptoms significantly improved after ESD-G. Five patients demonstrated improved esophagitis, three were able to discontinue PPI therapy, and three were able to reduce their PPI dosage following surgery. The esophageal pH <4 holding time ratio was also decreased after ESD-G. Conclusions. ESD-G may be useful for PPI-refractory GERD patients.

  3. Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in a country with a high occurrence of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Serhat; Kitapcioglu, Gul; Kasap, Elmas

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with additional symptoms, relationship with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) of this country-wide study. METHODS Data from 3214 adults were obtained with validated questionnaire. Eight hundred and forty-one subjects were randomized to be tested for H. pylori via the urea breath test. "Frequent symptoms" were defined heartburn and/or regurgitation occurring at least weekly. RESULTS The prevalence of GERD was 22.8%, frequent and occasional heartburn were 9.3%-12.7%, regurgitation were 16.6%-18.7%, respectively. Body mass index (BMI) ≤ 18.5 showed a prevalence of 15%, BMI > 30 was 28.5%. The GERD prevalence was higher in women (26.2%) than men (18.9%) (P < 0001). Overall prevalence of H. pylori was 75.7%. The prevalence was 77.1% in subjects without symptoms vs 71.4% in subjects with GERD (χ2 = 2.6, P = 0.27). Underprivileged with the lowest income people exhibit a higher risk. CONCLUSION GERD is common in Turkey which reflects both Western and Eastern lifestyles with high rate of H. pylori. The presence of H. pylori had no effect on either the prevalence or the symptom profile of GERD. Subjects showing classical symptoms occasionally exhibit more additional symptoms compared with those without classical symptoms. PMID:28210089

  4. Overlap of functional heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bellini, Massimo; Savarino, Edoardo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Blandizzi, Corrado; Marchi, Santino

    2013-01-01

    Several studies indicate a significant degree of overlap between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Likewise, both functional heartburn (FH) and IBS are functional digestive disorders that may occur in the same patients. However, data establishing a solid link between FH and IBS are lacking, mainly because the clinical definition of FH has undergone substantial changes over the years. The available literature on the overlap between GERD or FH and IBS highlights considerable heterogeneity in terms of the criteria and diagnostic procedures used to assess heartburn and IBS. In particular, several epidemiological studies included patients with concomitant IBS and GERD without any attempt to distinguish FH (as defined by the Rome III criteria) from GERD via pathophysiological investigations. Independent of these critical issues, there is preliminary evidence supporting a significant degree of FH-IBS overlap. This underscores the need for studies based on updated diagnostic criteria and accurate pathophysiological classifications, particularly to distinguish FH from GERD. This distinction would represent an essential starting point to achieving a better understanding of pathophysiology in the subclasses of patients with GERD and FH and properly assessing the different degrees of overlap between IBS and the subcategories of heartburn.The present review article intends to appraise and critically discuss current evidence supporting a possible concomitance of GERD or FH with IBS in the same patients and to highlight the pathophysiological relationships between these disorders. PMID:24124323

  5. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and gastroesophageal reflux disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Oor, Jelmer E; Roks, David J; Ünlü, Çagdas; Hazebroek, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    The effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) on the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) remains unclear. We aimed to outline the currently available literature. All relevant databases were searched for publications examining the effect of laparoscopic SG on GERD. Primary outcome measure was change in prevalence of GERD symptoms, antireflux medication use, and esophageal function tests. Secondary outcomes were prevalence of new-onset GERD and esophagitis. Thirty-three articles were included. Eleven studies used questionnaires to assess changes in the prevalence of GERD symptoms, with a risk difference in prevalence of 4.3%. Eight studies used esophageal function tests, with paradoxical results. Pooled incidence of new-onset GERD symptoms was 20%, with a strong suggestion of heterogeneity. New-onset esophagitis ranged from 6.3% to 63.3%. Because of high heterogeneity among available studies and paradoxical outcomes of objective esophageal function tests, the exact effect of laparoscopic SG on the prevalence of GERD remains unanswered. Surgeons should carefully evaluate preoperative GERD symptoms when choosing the proper bariatric technique. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Overlap of functional heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bellini, Massimo; Savarino, Edoardo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Blandizzi, Corrado; Marchi, Santino

    2013-09-21

    Several studies indicate a significant degree of overlap between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Likewise, both functional heartburn (FH) and IBS are functional digestive disorders that may occur in the same patients. However, data establishing a solid link between FH and IBS are lacking, mainly because the clinical definition of FH has undergone substantial changes over the years. The available literature on the overlap between GERD or FH and IBS highlights considerable heterogeneity in terms of the criteria and diagnostic procedures used to assess heartburn and IBS. In particular, several epidemiological studies included patients with concomitant IBS and GERD without any attempt to distinguish FH (as defined by the Rome III criteria) from GERD via pathophysiological investigations. Independent of these critical issues, there is preliminary evidence supporting a significant degree of FH-IBS overlap. This underscores the need for studies based on updated diagnostic criteria and accurate pathophysiological classifications, particularly to distinguish FH from GERD. This distinction would represent an essential starting point to achieving a better understanding of pathophysiology in the subclasses of patients with GERD and FH and properly assessing the different degrees of overlap between IBS and the subcategories of heartburn.The present review article intends to appraise and critically discuss current evidence supporting a possible concomitance of GERD or FH with IBS in the same patients and to highlight the pathophysiological relationships between these disorders.

  7. The role of diet in the overlap between gastroesophageal reflux disease and functional dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Chirila, Ioan; Morariu, Ionela Daniela; Barboi, Oana Bogdana; Drug, Vasile Liviu

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of functional dyspepsia partially overlaps with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and this suggests common pathogenic mechanisms. The role of diet in these conditions is still under investigation. The present study evaluated the type of diet associated with functional dyspepsia and GERD. A representative sample of subjects was invited to the family doctors' office, and an interview-based questionnaire was administered to diagnose functional dyspepsia and GERD (using Rome III and Montreal criteria, respectively) and to evaluate eating habits and the frequency of food intake. Correlation and regressions were used for statistical analyses, and the results were presented as odds ratio and 95% confidence interval. In total, 184 subjects participated in a 4-month study. Functional dyspepsia was present in 7.6%, and GERD was present in 31.0%. The predictors for dyspepsia were low educational level (22.4, 3.3-150.1, p=0.001), consumption of canned food, and the use of alcoholic drinks at least weekly. The predictors for GERD were advanced age and the use of canned food (13.9, 3.6-53.9, p<0.001) or fast food (4.6, 1.7-12.1, p=0.002). This study provides new data on the overlap of GERD and functional dyspepsia and reveals that these disorders may be associated with the consumption of canned food, fast food, and alcoholic beverages.

  8. Anesthetic management of the SRS™ Endoscopic Stapling System for gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Topuz, Ufuk; Umutoglu, Tarik; Bakan, Mefkur; Ozturk, Erdogan

    2013-01-14

    The SRS(TM) Endoscopic Stapling System (Medigus, Tel Aviv, Israel) is a new tool capable of creating a totally endoscopic fundoplication, combined with an endoscope, endoscopic ultrasound and a surgical stapler. SRS(TM) endoscopic stapling for gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a minimally invasive, outpatient procedure, which requires general anesthesia with positive-pressure ventilation. Keeping the patient on positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) may minimize the pressure gradient between the esophagus and the mediastinum, as well as help to prevent air from leaking around the screws and causing pneumomediastinum. In addition, in patients with hiatal hernia, higher PEEP levels may be required to increase intra-thoracic pressure and to force the stomach to slide into the abdomen for ease of endoscopy. We advise smoother emergence from anesthesia, taking precautions for retching, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), while coughing and gagging during extubation and PONV may affect the success of the procedure. Total intravenous anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil seems to be a good choice for these reasons.

  9. Anesthetic management of the SRSTM endoscopic stapling system for gastro-esophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Topuz, Ufuk; Umutoglu, Tarik; Bakan, Mefkur; Ozturk, Erdogan

    2013-01-01

    The SRSTM Endoscopic Stapling System (Medigus, Tel Aviv, Israel) is a new tool capable of creating a totally endoscopic fundoplication, combined with an endoscope, endoscopic ultrasound and a surgical stapler. SRSTM endoscopic stapling for gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a minimally invasive, outpatient procedure, which requires general anesthesia with positive-pressure ventilation. Keeping the patient on positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) may minimize the pressure gradient between the esophagus and the mediastinum, as well as help to prevent air from leaking around the screws and causing pneumomediastinum. In addition, in patients with hiatal hernia, higher PEEP levels may be required to increase intra-thoracic pressure and to force the stomach to slide into the abdomen for ease of endoscopy. We advise smoother emergence from anesthesia, taking precautions for retching, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), while coughing and gagging during extubation and PONV may affect the success of the procedure. Total intravenous anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil seems to be a good choice for these reasons. PMID:23345959

  10. Familial trends of inheritance in gastro esophageal reflux disease, Barrett's esophagus and Barrett's adenocarcinoma: 20 families.

    PubMed

    Sappati Biyyani, R S; Chessler, L; McCain, E; Nelson, K; Fahmy, N; King, J

    2007-01-01

    We reported four families with familial Barrett's esophagus (FBE) in 1993. This follow-up study includes an additional 16 families with FBE, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and BE-related adenocarcinoma (BEAC) highlighting the familial trends of inheritance. A retrospective survey of endoscopic and histopathological reports on 95 confirmed cases of BE from 1975 to 2005 was performed and a detailed family history was obtained. Five representative pedigrees from a total of 20 are discussed here. These 20 families represent one of the largest cohorts studied over three decades from a single institution. Familial BE is more common than previously thought and the prevalence of GERD, BE and BEAC in these families is distinctly higher than with sporadic cases. The conditions appear to be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion with incomplete penetrance. Hence diligence in taking family history with BE patients is critical since the endoscopic screening of relatives is warranted in FBE. Earlier diagnosis and surveillance of FBE should hopefully improve outcomes.

  11. Initial experience with a novel resection and plication (RAP) method for acid reflux: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Benias, Petros C; D'Souza, Lionel; Lan, Gloria; Gluckman, Craig; Inamdar, Sumant; Trindade, Arvind J; Miller, Larry S; Carr-Locke, David L

    2018-04-01

     Current endoscopic therapies for gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD) are limited by technical complexity, and/or cost. We sought to evaluate the success of a novel resection and plication (RAP) anti-reflux procedure.  RAP was performed on 10 patients with GERD refractory to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. RAP consists of semi-circumferential mucosectomy along with full-thickness plication of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and cardia. We assessed the technical success and safety as well as followed GERD-Health Related Quality of Life (GERD-HRQL) scores and medication usage. All patients underwent RAP without adverse events and were discharged on the same day. Only half of the patients required general anesthesia. Follow-up ranged from 5 to 24 months (median 9 months) and all patients had a significant improvement in their GERD-HRQL scores ( P  < 0.0001, 95 % CI 19.3 - 25.3). 8 of 10 eliminated their daily PPI dependence.  The RAP method has potential as an effective anti-reflux option. Its main advantages include a short procedure time, simple approach using readily available equipment, and possible avoidance of general anesthesia.

  12. A Clinicopathologic Study of Oral Changes in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, Gastritis, and Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Vinesh, E; Masthan, Kmk; Kumar, M Sathish; Jeyapriya, S Marytresa; Babu, Aravindha; Thinakaran, Meera

    2016-11-01

    The aim and objectives of this study are to identify oral changes in certain gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, namely gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), ulcerative colitis, gastritis, and to evaluate these oral symptoms as indicators for assessing GI disorders. In this study, the oral manifestations of various GI disorders were assessed in a varying age group of 250 patients in Government Stanley Medical College and Hospital, Chennai. Out of 250 patients, 142 were affected by GERD, 99 were affected by gastritis, and 9 patients were affected by ulcerative colitis. Of these patients, 177 were males and 73 were females. Evaluation of patients with gastritis revealed that 66.7% affected with gingivitis, 19.2% with dental erosion on the palatal and lingual aspects of maxillary and mandibular teeth predominantly in the anterior region, 10.1% with periodontitis, 2% with gingival erythema. Among the patients with GERD, 44% of the cases showed dental erosion, 25.5% periodontitis, 9.9% gingivitis, 5.7% gingival erythema, 2.8% palatal erythema, 2.1% gingival ulcers, glossitis 2%, 1.4% floor of the mouth erythema, and 0.7% erythema of the tongue. Patients with ulcerative colitis showed 44.4% of gingival erythema, 33.3% of dental erosions, and 22.2% of gingival ulcers and periodontitis. In our study of 250 patients, oral manifestations were observed in 88% of the patients. Both soft tissue and hard tissue changes were evident. There was a high correlation between various GI disease and dental erosion, erythema at various sites of the oral cavity, oral ulcers, gingivitis, periodontitis, and glossitis. Careful evaluation of oral cavity may unveil many GI disorders and help the patient by providing early diagnosis, which further facilitates the prognosis.

  13. Patients' experiences of illness, operation and outcome with reference to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Gunilla; Larsson, Sylvia; Johnsson, Folke; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2002-11-01

    Describing the illness-story from a patient perspective could increase understanding of living with a chronic disease for health professionals and others, facilitate decision-making about treatment and enhance information about the outcome from a patient perspective. To illuminate patients' illness experiences of having a gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), going through surgery and the outcome. Twelve patients were interviewed 5 years after having had the operation; six patients had had fundoplication via laparoscopy and six via open surgery. Each patient was asked to talk openly about their experiences, thoughts, feelings and consequences of living with the illness, going through surgery and the period from surgery to the day of interview. A qualitative content analysis was performed concerning the context of the data and its meaning. Three central categories were identified and nine subcategories: living with GORD- symptoms of the disease affecting daily living, taking medicines, work, family and social life; concerns related to surgery- decision-making about the operation, influence by physicians; life after the operation- outcomes and consequences, side-effects and complications of the operation, sick leave, information and sharing experiences with future patients. All patients were free from symptoms of the illness after surgery independent of type of surgery, but side-effects from surgical treatment varied individually. Interviewees would have liked information concerning side-effects after surgery from previous patients. This study contributes to knowledge about patients' long-term suffering, their control of symptoms and how they have tried to cure themselves, but also about their concerns about surgery and the importance of surgical treatment to their quality of life. They wanted information about treatment, outcome and consequences, not only from a health care perspective but also from previous patients having had the same treatment.

  14. Exposure of airway epithelium to bile acids associated with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms: a relation to transforming growth factor-beta1 production and fibroblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Perng, Diahn-Warng; Chang, Kuo-Ting; Su, Kang-Cheng; Wu, Yu-Chung; Wu, Mo-Tzu; Hsu, Wen-Hu; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Lee, Yu-Chin

    2007-11-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is common in patients with various airway diseases. Airway epithelial cells can release growth factors that promote fibroblast proliferation. Exposure of airway epithelium to bile acids may induce a fibrotic response. To determine how bile acids interact with airway epithelium; particularly, whether transforming growth factor-beta1 secretion and fibroblast proliferation are affected. Induced sputum from patients with asthma, GER, or asthma associated with GER symptoms, or from healthy control subjects was collected. Total bile acids were measured by a spectrophotometric enzymatic assay. The major components of bile acids, chenodeoxycholic acid (CD) and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCD), were used to stimulate primary airway epithelial cells. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were applied for messenger RNA expression and signal pathway analysis, respectively. Conditioned medium following CD stimulation was coincubated with fibroblasts for proliferation study. The amount of total bile acids in induced sputum was significantly higher in patients with GER and asthma-associated GER symptoms compared to that of healthy control subjects (p<0.005). CD, but not GCD, significantly induced TGF-beta1 production. TGF-beta1 messenger RNA expression was 2.5-fold increased compared to unstimulated cells. This occurred via p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and activating transcription factor-2 activation. Pretreatment with dexamethasone inhibited TGF-beta1 production at both messenger RNA and protein levels by inhibiting p38 MAP kinase phosphorylation. Conditioned medium from CD-treated epithelial cells enhanced fibroblast proliferation. Aspiration of bile acids may induce airway fibrosis through the production of TGF-beta1 and fibroblast proliferation. Early intervention to attenuate these processes may reduce fibrogenesis in various airway diseases associated with GER.

  15. Discovery of agonists of cannabinoid receptor 1 with restricted central nervous system penetration aimed for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Plowright, Alleyn T; Nilsson, Karolina; Antonsson, Madeleine; Amin, Kosrat; Broddefalk, Johan; Jensen, Jörgen; Lehmann, Anders; Jin, Shujuan; St-Onge, Stephane; Tomaszewski, Mirosław J; Tremblay, Maxime; Walpole, Christopher; Wei, Zhongyong; Yang, Hua; Ulander, Johan

    2013-01-10

    Agonists of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) have been suggested as possible treatments for a range of medical disorders including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). While centrally acting cannabinoid agonists are known to produce psychotropic effects, it has been suggested that the CB1 receptors in the periphery could play a significant role in reducing reflux. A moderately potent and highly lipophilic series of 2-aminobenzamides was identified through focused screening of GPCR libraries. Development of this series focused on improving potency and efficacy at the CB1 receptor, reducing lipophilicity and limiting the central nervous system (CNS) exposure while maintaining good oral absorption. Improvement of the series led to compounds having excellent potency at the CB1 receptor and high levels of agonism, good physical and pharmacokinetic properties, and low penetration into the CNS. A range of compounds demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibition of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations in a dog model.

  16. Continuous versus bolus intragastric tube feeding for preterm and low birth weight infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Richards, Robyn; Foster, Jann P; Psaila, Kim

    2014-07-17

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a particularly common condition in preterm and low birth weight infants. These infants are also more likely to have excessive regurgitation, as they do not have a fully developed antireflux mechanism. Preterm and low birth weight infants who are unable to suck oral feeds are required to be fed via an intragastric tube for varying lengths of time. Intragastric tube feeding can be delivered by the intermittent bolus or continuous feeding method. Use of continuous or intermittent bolus intragastric feeding may have a positive or negative effect on the incidence or severity of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. To determine whether continuous or intermittent bolus intragastric tube feeding reduces the number of episodes and the duration of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in preterm and low birth weight infants.We intended to perform subgroup analyses for gestational age; birth weight; age in days from birth at full enteral feeding via intragastric tube (breast vs bottle); frequency of intermittent bolus feed; and type of medication for treatment of GORD (only if medication prescribed and given similarly to both intervention groups). We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Group as described in The Cochrane Library (www.thecochranelibrary.com) to search for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2013, Issue 9), MEDLINE (1966 to September 2013), EMBASE (1980 to September 2013) and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (1982 to September 2013). We also searched previous reviews, including cross-references, abstracts and conference and symposia proceedings of the Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand and the Pediatric Academic Societies (American Pediatric Society/Society for Pediatric Research and European Society for Paediatric Research) from 1990 to 2012. Published and unpublished RCTs and quasi

  17. The Effect of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy with Concomitant Hiatal Hernia Repair on Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in the Morbidly Obese.

    PubMed

    Samakar, Kamran; McKenzie, Travis J; Tavakkoli, Ali; Vernon, Ashley H; Robinson, Malcolm K; Shikora, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    The effect of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is controversial. Although concomitant hiatal hernia repair (HHR) at the time of LSG is common and advocated by many, there are few data on the outcomes of GERD symptoms in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of concomitant HHR on GERD symptoms in morbidly obese patients undergoing LSG. A single institution, multi-surgeon, prospectively maintained database was examined to identify patients who underwent LSG and concomitant HHR from December 2010 to October 2013. Patient characteristics, operative details, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed. Standardized patient questionnaires administered both pre- and postoperatively were utilized. Primary endpoints included subjective reflux symptoms and the need for antisecretory therapy. Weight loss was considered a secondary endpoint. Fifty-eight patients were identified meeting inclusion criteria (LSG + HHR), with a mean follow-up of 97.5 weeks (range 44-172 weeks). The mean age of the cohort was 49.5 ± 11.2 years, with 74.1 % being female. Mean preoperative BMI was 44.2 ± 6.6 kg/m(2). Preoperative upper gastrointestinal contrast series was performed in all patients and demonstrated a hiatal hernia in 34.5 % of patients and reflux in 15.5 % of patients. Preoperatively, 44.8 % (n = 26) of patients reported subjective symptoms of reflux and/or required daily antisecretory therapy [Corrected]. After LSG + HHR, 34.6 % of symptomatic patients had resolution of their symptoms off therapy while the rest remained symptomatic and required daily antisecretory therapy; 84.4 % of patients that were asymptomatic preoperatively remained asymptomatic after surgery. New onset reflux symptoms requiring daily antisecretory therapy was seen in 15.6 % of patients who were previously asymptomatic. Post surgical weight loss did not correlate with the presence or resolution of reflux symptoms. Based

  18. Management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in primary care: a European observational study.

    PubMed

    Gisbert, Javier P; Cooper, Alun; Karagiannis, Dimitrios; Hatlebakk, Jan; Agréus, Lars; Jablonowski, Helmut; Tafalla, Monica

    2009-11-01

    To describe the management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in primary care, as part of the RANGE (Retrospective ANalysis of GERD) study. Over 4 months, at 134 primary care practices in six European countries, 12 815 patients consulted for GERD-related reasons. A random selection of these patients was invited to enter the study. Data were then collected retrospectively (from the initial consultation) and prospectively (from a follow-up visit). This included information on GERD diagnosis, symptoms and complications, medication use and healthcare resource utilisation. Of 12 815 patients who underwent consultation for GERD-related reasons, 2678 were randomly selected and accepted the invitation to participate in the study. Across countries, 28-47% of patients reported a significant GERD symptom load at initial consultation. Thereafter, 30-100% of patients were prescribed a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), but a significant GERD symptom load was still experienced by 15-30% (all patients combined) at follow-up (median 5.0-7.5 months after initial consultation). In the majority of patients (65-88%), no diagnostic procedures were performed between initial consultation and follow-up. During the follow-up period, the most common form of healthcare utilisation comprised additional GERD-related consultations with a physician. The findings of this pan-European study indicate that current management of primary care patients with GERD is far from optimal, and accounts for a marked burden on patients and healthcare systems alike. A more structured approach to GERD management, by tailoring treatment according to the impact of the disease, may reduce this burden.

  19. Prevalence of allergic rhinitis and asthma in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mahdavinia, Mahboobeh; Bishehsari, Faraz; Hayat, Waqas; Codispoti, Christopher D; Sarrafi, Shahram; Husain, Inna; Mehta, Arpita; Benhammuda, Mohamed; Tobin, Mary C; Bandi, Sindhura; LoSavio, Philip S; Jeffe, Jill S; Palmisano, Erica L; Schleimer, Robert P; Batra, Pete S

    2016-08-01

    An association between chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been previously reported; however, the underlying factors linking CRS and GERD remain to be elucidated. To assess the association of GERD and CRS using prospective and retrospective approaches. The retrospective study comprised a large cohort of CRS cases, whereas the prospective arm evaluated a series of CRS cases and controls. In the retrospective arm of the study, of the 1066 patients with CRS, 112 (10.5%) had GERD. Among patients with CRS, GERD was associated with higher body mass index, older age, and female sex. The odds ratios (ORs) for asthma and allergic rhinitis in the CRS group with GERD compared with the CRS group without GERD were 2.89 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.905-4.389) and 2.021 (95% CI, 1.035-3.947). Furthermore, GERD was associated with a greater duration of CRS. Ninety patients with CRS and 81 controls were enrolled in the prospective arm of the study. In the CRS group, GERD was associated with asthma (OR, 4.77; 95% CI, 1.27-18.01). Patients with CRS and GERD had a longer duration and a younger age at onset of CRS. In controls, no association was found between GERD and asthma (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.09-5.19) or allergic rhinitis (OR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.05-2.59). Patients with CRS and GERD are more likely to have atopic conditions and asthma when compared with patients with CRS but without GERD. One of the potential explanations of this link is that comorbid GERD and atopic disease are potential risk factors for development of CRS. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of anthropometric measures and serum leptin on severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, N A; Montasser, I F; Bioumy, E E; Saad, W E

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the impact of obesity, determined by different anthropometric measures, on clinical and endoscopic severity of GERD and the relation between serum leptin and clinical and endoscopic severity of GERD in Egyptian patients. The study was carried out at Ain Shams University Hospitals and Theodor Bilharz Research Institute, Cairo, Egypt. A total of 60 patients with clinically and endoscopically evident gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were enrolled in this study as well as 20 healthy subjects matched for age and gender serving as the control group. Patients were divided according to their body mass index (BMI) into two groups: group 1 (n = 30): overweight and obese (BMI ≥ 25 and/or waist-to-height ratio [WHtR] ≥ 0.5) and group 2 (n = 30): normal weight (BMI ≥ 18 to < 25 and/or WHtR ≥ 0.4 to < 0.5). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, anthropometric measures, and symptom severity score questionnaire were done for all patients. Serum leptin hormone was assessed for patients and control groups.The evidence revealed statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of different anthropometric measures (P < 0.00) except the height (P < 0.9), abdominal fat depot equations (P < 0.00), endoscopic findings according to Los Angeles classification (P < 0.001), symptom severity score (P < 0.00), and serum leptin hormone (43.96 ± 23.50 in group 1 vs. 7.5133 ± 8.18294 in group 2 and 6.98 ± 5.90 in the control group) (P = 0.00). Obesity in general and central (abdominal) obesity specifically has significant impact on clinical and endoscopic severity of GERD. Increased leptin hormone level is associated with clinical and endoscopic severity of GERD. Future trial on larger number of patients is emphasized. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  1. Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk for gastroesophageal reflux disease among urban African Americans.

    PubMed

    Natalini, J; Palit, A; Sankineni, A; Friedenberg, F K

    2015-07-01

    An association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) has been reported. Studies have not been population-based and have failed to include a representative sample of African American subjects. The aim of the study was to determine if DM is independently associated with GERD among urban African Americans. Single-center, population-based survey utilizing a complex, stratified sampling design. To obtain a simple random sample of the entire African American community, targeted survey zones and hand-delivered invitations were identified. Participating subjects had to be self-described African American, age ≥18. Surveys were completed at a computer terminal assisted by a research coordinator. Four hundred nineteen subjects (weighted sample size of 21 264 [20 888-23 930]). GERD prevalence was 23.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 23.2-23.9). GERD prevalence was 41.5 % in those with DM versus 20.6 % for those without (P < 0.001). Those with GERD had DM longer but had lower glycohemoglobin levels. The prevalence of ≥2 DM comorbidities was higher in those with GERD (odds ratio [OR] = 2.06; 95% CI 1.71-2.48). In the final model, age >40, DM, increasing body mass index, harmful drinking, and increasing smoking dependence were independently associated with GERD. For DM, there was significant effect modification by gender. In males, the risk was (OR = 4.63; 95% CI 3.96-5.40), while in females, the risk was markedly attenuated (OR = 1.79; 95% CI 1.61-2.00). Among urban African Americans, there is an independent association between DM and GERD that appears to be stronger in men. More information is needed to understand this association. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  2. Prevalence of allergic rhinitis and asthma in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavinia, Mahboobeh; Bishehsari, Faraz; Hayat, Waqas; Codispoti, Christopher D.; Sarrafi, Shahram; Husain, Inna; Mehta, Arpita; Benhammuda, Mohamed; Tobin, Mary C.; Bandi, Sindhura; LoSavio, Philip S.; Jeffe, Jill S.; Palmisano, Erica L.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Batra, Pete S.

    2017-01-01

    Background An association between chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been previously reported; however, the underlying factors linking CRS and GERD remain to be elucidated. Objective To assess the association of GERD and CRS using prospective and retrospective approaches. Methods The retrospective study comprised a large cohort of CRS cases, whereas the prospective arm evaluated a series of CRS cases and controls. Results In the retrospective arm of the study, of the 1066 patients with CRS, 112 (10.5%) had GERD. Among patients with CRS, GERD was associated with higher body mass index, older age, and female sex. The odds ratios (ORs) for asthma and allergic rhinitis in the CRS group with GERD compared with the CRS group without GERD were 2.89 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.905–4.389) and 2.021 (95% CI, 1.035–3.947). Furthermore, GERD was associated with a greater duration of CRS. Ninety patients with CRS and 81 controls were enrolled in the prospective arm of the study. In the CRS group, GERD was associated with asthma (OR, 4.77; 95% CI, 1.27–18.01). Patients with CRS and GERD had a longer duration and a younger age at onset of CRS. In controls, no association was found between GERD and asthma (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.09–5.19) or allergic rhinitis (OR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.05–2.59). Conclusion Patients with CRS and GERD are more likely to have atopic conditions and asthma when compared with patients with CRS but without GERD. One of the potential explanations of this link is that comorbid GERD and atopic disease are potential risk factors for development of CRS. PMID:27283453

  3. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for gastroesophageal reflux disease 2015.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Habu, Yasuki; Oshima, Tadayuki; Manabe, Noriaki; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Nagahara, Akihito; Kawamura, Osamu; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Ozawa, Soji; Ashida, Kiyoshi; Ohara, Shuichi; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Adachi, Kyoichi; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Miwa, Hiroto; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Kusano, Motoyasu; Hoshihara, Yoshio; Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Haruma, Ken; Hongo, Michio; Sugano, Kentaro; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-08-01

    As an increase in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been reported in Japan, and public interest in GERD has been increasing, the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology published the Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for GERD (1st edition) in 2009. Six years have passed since its publication, and there have been a large number of reports in Japan concerning the epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment, and Barrett's esophagus during this period. By incorporating the contents of these reports, the guidelines were completely revised, and a new edition was published in October 2015. The revised edition consists of eight items: epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, internal treatment, surgical treatment, esophagitis after surgery of the upper gastrointestinal tract, extraesophageal symptoms, and Barrett's esophagus. This paper summarizes these guidelines, particularly the parts related to the treatment for GERD. In the present revision, aggressive proton pump inhibitor (PPI) maintenance therapy is recommended for severe erosive GERD, and on-demand therapy or continuous maintenance therapy is recommended for mild erosive GERD or PPI-responsive non-erosive GERD. Moreover, PPI-resistant GERD (insufficient symptomatic improvement and/or esophageal mucosal break persisting despite the administration of PPI at a standard dose for 8 weeks) is defined, and a standard-dose PPI twice a day, change in PPI, change in the PPI timing of dosing, addition of a prokinetic drug, addition of rikkunshito (traditional Japanese herbal medicine), and addition of histamine H2-receptor antagonist are recommended for its treatment. If no improvement is observed even after these treatments, pathophysiological evaluation with esophageal impedance-pH monitoring or esophageal manometry at an expert facility for diseases of the esophagus is recommended.

  4. The Italian validation of the Montreal Global definition and classification of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Pace, Fabio; Bazzoli, Franco; Fiocca, Roberto; Di Mario, Francesco; Savarino, Vincenzo; Vigneri, Sergio; Vakil, Nimish

    2009-04-01

    Recently, a Global definition and a classification of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were developed by Montreal Consensus Group, composed of international expert gastroenterologists. Guidelines and consensus documents are, however, infrequently accepted and adopted at a local level. The aim of this study was to measure the acceptance of Montreal Global definition of GERD consensus document by specialists in a single country (Italy) and to measure the linguistic, scientific, and practical differences between the international consensus document and the Italian version. A 2-day meeting was held in June 2007 in Rome, Italy, attended by 147 Italian physicians who were experts in gastroenterology. They reviewed the individual original statements in their Italian translation and then voted on the statement using the scoring system used by the Montreal Consensus Group (6-point Likert scale). Voting was performed at baseline and after an analytical discussion on each statement, led by six internationally renowned experts. Consensus was defined as an agreement with a statement by at least two-thirds of the group. Results were compared with the Montreal statements. The level of consensus was already extremely high at the first vote (>90% with the two-thirds threshold). The level of agreement at the second vote increased slightly. The maximum variation between two votes was 33% (of increase from first to second round, 59-92%). The high level of agreement could be because of both the general acceptance of Montreal Consensus by scientific community, and the new scientific evidences published after the Montreal report, which fit with the original statements. This study is the first national linguistic validation of the Montreal Global definition of GERD and is also proof of its scientific validity, based on the same methodology used to create the Montreal statements. It also suggests that evidence-based International disease classification systems can be applied to local

  5. A two-cohort feasibility study on polyglycolic acid yarn implantation for abolition of saphenous vein reflux.

    PubMed

    Proebstle, Thomas M; Kleis-Fischer, Bettina; Möhler, Thomas; Goeckeritz, Oliver; Franklin, Ian J; Almeida, Jose I

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a polyglycolic acid (PGA) yarn implant for nonthermal ablation of saphenous vein reflux. In two consecutive cohort studies (TAHOE I and TAHOE II), the feasibility of abolition of great saphenous vein (GSV) reflux by implantation of a PGA yarn was tested under ultrasound guidance in 51 and 30 patients, respectively. The use of tumescent local anesthesia was not required. Graduated compression stockings and thrombosis prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin were used for 2 weeks after intervention in the first study only. Of 81 enrolled patients, 77 (95%) were available at 6-month follow-up. Complete occlusion of the treated GSV was confirmed by duplex ultrasound in all patients except one patient at day 1. In TAHOE II, closure was preserved in a higher percentage of patients at 6 weeks, with 96.4% vs 82.0% in TAHOE I. The 6-month Kaplan-Meier estimated occlusion rates for TAHOE I and TAHOE II were 68% (95% confidence interval [CI], 54%-79%) and 69% (95% CI, 49%-82%), respectively, with an estimated combined occlusion rate of 69% (95% CI, 57%-76%). Kaplan-Meier analysis yielded a combined reflux-free rate of 85% (95% CI, 75%-91%) at 3 months of follow-up and a rate of 81% (95% CI, 71%-88%) at 6 months of follow-up. Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) improved from a combined mean of 4.6 ± 3.1 at baseline to 2.1 ± 2.2 and 1.6 ± 1.9 at 3 and 6 months, respectively (P < .0001 for 3- and 6-month results). In TAHOE II, four patients with venous ulcers healed at an average of 1.3 months after treatment. First-in-human use of an endovenous PGA yarn implant for occlusion of refluxing GSVs proved to be feasible, with no serious adverse events. However, recanalization was observed during a period of 6 months in 31% of patients. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Diagnosing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease or lactose intolerance in babies who cry a lot in the first few months overlooks feeding problems.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-04-01

    This paper explores two areas in which the translation of research into practice may be improved in the management of cry-fuss behaviours in the first few months of life. Firstly, babies who cry excessively are often prescribed proton pump inhibitors, despite evidence that gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is very rarely a cause. The inaccuracy of commonly used explanatory mechanisms, the side-effects of acid-suppressive medications, and the failure to identify treatable problems, including feeding difficulty when the diagnosis of 'reflux' is applied, are discussed. Secondly, crying breastfed babies are still prescribed lactase or lactose-free formula, despite evidence that the problem of functional lactose overload is one of breastfeeding management. The mechanisms and management of functional lactose overload are discussed. These two problems of research translation need to be addressed because failure to identify and manage other causes of cry-fuss problems, including feeding difficulty, may have adverse outcomes for a small but significant minority of families. © 2013 The Author. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  7. Increased TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels are associated only with the esophageal reflux symptoms, but not with the extraesophageal reflux symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Joo; Kim, Nayoung; Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-08-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor and proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) have been implicated in the mechanism of acid-induced inflammation in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We aimed to evaluate TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels in the GERD patients and their relationship with endoscopic findings and reflux symptoms.Sixteen healthy controls, 45 patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD), and 14 nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) patients received endoscopy and completed questionnaires. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR) of TRPV1, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), PAR2, and interleukin (IL)-8 were performed in the distal esophagus specimen.The levels of TRPV1, GDNF, NGF, PAR2, and IL-8 mRNA expression were highest in the ERD group followed by NERD and control groups and the differences between control and ERD groups were statistically significant. Within the ERD group, patients with grade B in Los Angeles (LA) classification showed significantly higher levels of TRPV1, GDNF, and NGF mRNA expression than those with grade A. Presence of reflux symptoms was associated with significant higher levels of TRPV1, PAR2, and IL-8. Notably not extraesophageal but esophageal reflux symptoms were significantly associated with them.Upregulation of TRPV1 and PAR2 pathways might play a role in the development of distal esophageal inflammation and reflux symptoms. And extraesophageal reflux symptoms might not be associated with these processes.

  8. Influence of central apnea in the preterm newborn with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Morán, Edgardo; Morales-Fuentes, Gerardo Alfonso; Inzunza-González, Jesús Alejandro; Cedillo-Ley, Ivonne; Gerardo-del Hoyo, Moisés; Silva-Ramírez, Horacio

    2011-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux occurs frequently in newborns. A relationship has been suspected between reflux and apnea of prematurity. The objective of this study is to determine this relationship, owing to the fact that premature newborns have immaturity of structures, especially esophageal smooth muscle. We conducted a longitudinal, analytical, comparative, and observational case/control study. The study was carried out at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and in the Gastrointestinal Physiology Department of the Hospital Español (Mexico City) between January 2002 and December 2004. We included 22 patients: 11 females and 11 males. Mean age was 17.8 ± 8.4 days. Premature newborns represented 72.72% (n = 16). Mean gestational age was 33.1 ± 4.18 weeks. All cases were suspicious for central apnea except for three patients with a mixed cause of apnea. All were submitted to a 24-h pHmetry and a simultaneous polysomnography. Polysomnography was positive in 59% (n = 13) and pHmetry was positive in 50% (n = 11). Prematurity had a strong positive relation with central apnea of the newborn (odds ratio: 15 (p = 0.0154)). Odds ratio for association of central apnea and gastroesophageal reflux was 3.2 (p = 0.2037). We demonstrate that central apnea in the premature newborn is not a cause of gastroesophageal reflux. However, these patients are more likely to have gastroesophageal reflux in the first days of extrauterine life. It is recommended to exclude pathological gastroesophageal reflux when the newborn presents a clinical scenario compatible with central apnea.

  9. Don't eat tomatoes: patient's self-reported experiences of causes of symptoms in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Dibley, Lesley B; Norton, Christine; Jones, Roger

    2010-08-01

    About 30-50% of patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) experience refractory symptoms despite taking proton pump inhibitors regularly. Epidemiology studies suggest lifestyle risks, but these are under-represented in existing guidelines. The potential for changes to positively impact on symptoms may be underestimated. Lifestyle advice currently appears to be ineffective. To inform the future design of a behaviour change intervention aimed at improving symptoms for patients with GORD, by exploring patient understanding and experiences of lifestyle influences on GORD symptoms. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 23 patients (12 women and 11 men) aged 30-86 years, aiming to identify lifestyle influences perceived by patients to affect their symptoms. Patients reported a wide range of daily influences on their symptoms, including diet, drinking with a meal, body position, alcohol, gaining weight, stress and anxiety. Dietary influences included types of food eaten and eating pattern-including speed of eating and meal size. Many foods were identified as troublesome, but not all foods affected all patients. Eating late and daytime tiredness were not recognized as causes or consequences of night-time reflux. Patients stated that daily living patterns affected their reflux symptoms, but influences were highly variable between respondents. Lifestyle factors appear to combine in unique patterns for individuals, but GORD patients may not be able to identify potential triggers and make changes for themselves. A behaviour change intervention might prove beneficial to these patients.

  10. 2014 SSAT State-of-the-Art Conference: advances in diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Perry, Kyle A; Pham, Thai H; Spechler, Stuart J; Hunter, John G; Melvin, W Scott; Velanovich, Vic

    2015-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease affects at least 10 % of people in Western societies and produces troublesome symptoms and impairs patients' quality of life. The effective management of GERD is imperative as the diagnosis places a significant cost burden on the United States healthcare system with annual direct cost estimates exceeding 9 billion dollars annually. While effective for many patients, 30-40 % of patients receiving medical therapy with proton pump inhibitors experience troublesome breakthrough symptoms, and recent evidence suggests that this therapy subjects patients to increased risk of complications. Given the high cost of PPI therapy, patients are showing a decrease in willingness to continue with a therapy that provides incomplete relief; however, due to inconsistent outcomes and concern for procedure-related side effects following surgery, only 1 % of the GERD population undergoes anti-reflux surgery annually. The discrepancy between the number of patients who experience suboptimal medical treatment and the number considered for anti-reflux surgery indicates a large therapeutic gap in the management of GERD. The objective of the SSAT State-of-the-Art Conference was to examine technologic advances in the diagnosis and treatment of GERD and to evaluate the ways in which we assess the outcomes of these therapies to provide optimal patient care.

  11. Prevalence of dental erosion among people with gastroesophageal reflux disease in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhao; Liu, Jingming; Chen, Su; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Zhenting

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is typically diagnosed based on symptoms of regurgitation and heartburn, although it may also manifest as asthma-like symptoms, laryngitis, or dental erosion. The purpose of this prospective, cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of dental erosion in people with GERD and to evaluate the association between GERD and dental erosion. The presence, severity, and pattern of dental erosion was assessed in 51 participants with GERD and 50 participants without GERD using the Smith and Knight tooth wear index. Medical, dietary, and dental histories were collected by questionnaire. Factors potentially related to dental erosion, including GERD, were evaluated by logistic regression. Dental erosion was observed in 31 (60.8%) participants with GERD and 14 (28%) participants without GERD. Bivariate analysis revealed that participants with GERD were more likely to experience dental erosion (crude odds ratio [cOR]: 2.74; 95% CI: 1.19, 6.32) than participants without GERD. Multivariate analysis also revealed that participants with GERD had a higher risk of dental erosion (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 3.97; 95% CI: 1.45, 10.89). Consumption of grains and legumes, the most frequently consumed foods in China, did not correlate with dental erosion. However, carbonated beverage consumption was significantly associated with GERD and dental erosion (aOR: 3.34; 95% CI: 1.01, 11.04; P=.04). GERD was positively correlated with dental erosion. Carbonated beverage consumption can increase the risk of both GERD and dental erosion. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Is Associated With an Increased Rate of Acute Rejection in Lung Transplant Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Shah, N.S.; Force, S.D.; Mitchell, P.O.; Lin, E.; Lawrence, E.C.; Easley, K.; Qian, J.; Ramirez, A.; Neujahr, D.C.; Gal, A.; Leeper, K.; Pelaez, A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Gastric fundoplication (GF) for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may protect against the progression of chronic rejection in lung transplant (LT) recipients. However, the association of GERD with acute rejection episodes (ARE) is uncertain. This study sought to identify if ARE were linked to GERD in LT patients. Methods This single-center retrospective observational study, of patients transplanted from January 1, 2000, to January 31, 2009, correlated results of pH probe testing for GERD with ARE (≥International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation A1 or B1). We compared the rates of ARE among patients with GERD (DeMeester Score > 14.7) versus without GERD as number of ARE per 1,000 patient-days after LT. Patients undergoing GF prior to LT were excluded. Results The analysis included 60 LT subjects and 9,249 patient-days: 33 with GERD versus 27 without GERD. We observed 51 ARE among 60 LT recipients. The rate of ARE was highest among patients with GERD: 8.49 versus 2.58, an incidence density ratio (IDR) of 3.29 (P = .00016). Upon multivariate negative binomial regression modeling, only GERD was associated with ARE (IDR 2.15; P = .009). Furthermore, GERD was associated with multiple ARE (36.4% vs 0%; P < .0001) and earlier onset compared with patients without GERD: ARE proportion at 2 months was 0.55 versus 0.26 P = .004). Conclusion In LT recipients, GERD was associated with a higher rate, multiple events, and earlier onset of ARE. The efficacy of GF to reduce ARE among patients with GERD needs further evaluation. PMID:20832573

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux disease management according to contemporary international guidelines: a translational study.

    PubMed

    Pace, Fabio; Riegler, Gabriele; de Leone, Annalisa; Dominici, Patrizia; Grossi, Enzo

    2011-03-07

    To test the Genval recommendations and the usefulness of a short trial of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in the initial management and maintenance treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients. Five hundred and seventy seven patients with heartburn were recruited. After completing a psychometric tool to assess quality of life (PGWBI) and a previously validated GERD symptom questionnaire (QUID), patients were grouped into those with esophagitis (EE, n = 306) or without mucosal damage (NERD, n = 271) according to endoscopy results. The study started with a 2-wk period of high dose omeprazole (omeprazole test); patients responding to this PPI test entered an acute phase (3 mo) of treatment with any PPI at the standard dose. Finally, those patients with a favorable response to the standard PPI dose were maintained on a half PPI dose for a further 3-mo period. The test was positive in 519 (89.9%) patients, with a greater response in EE patients (96.4%) compared with NERD patients (82.6%) (P = 0.011). Both the percentage of completely asymptomatic patients, at 3 and 6 mo, and the reduction in heartburn intensity were significantly higher in the EE compared with NERD patients (P < 0.01). Finally, the mean PGWBI score was significantly decreased before and increased after therapy in both subgroups when compared with the mean value in a reference Italian population. Our study confirms the validity of the Genval guidelines in the management of GERD patients. In addition, we observed that the overall response to PPI therapy is lower in NERD compared to EE patients.

  14. Gastroesophageal reflux disease among population of Arar City, Northern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alsulobi, Anwar Matar; el-Fetoh, Nagah Mohamed Abo; Alenezi, Sara Ghazi Eid; Alanazi, Razan Ahmed; Alenazy, Rawan Hamdan Salem; Alenzy, Fryail Aied Lafi; Alenzi, Amthal Alturqi; Al Hazmy, Aisha Melfy; Albathaly, Kholoud Obeid; Alruwaili, Rehab Jazem Fattal; Alanazi, Ibtisam Matan; Alghamdi, Ebtihal Ahmad Ali; Alanazi, Maryam Saeed; Aienzi, Najah Owaed

    2017-01-01

    Background During the recent decade, several studies about prevalence of symptom-based GERD have revealed increase of its prevalence. In addition to the highly disturbing typical symptoms, it has a series of known consequences and may affect the quality of life. Objective To determine the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) as well as their main characteristics and risk factors among the population of Arar City, Northern Saudi Arabia. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out on a sample of 302 individuals from population of Arar city from October 01, 2016 to May 30, 2017, using a researcher made questionnaire and checklist. The questionnaire was administrated in online method. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 22, using descriptive statistics and Chi-Square test. Results total prevalence of GERD among the studied respondent