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Sample records for acid reflux events

  1. Pediatric Acid Reflux and GERD in Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Share Reflux and GERD : Teen GERD Pediatric Acid Reflux and GERD in Teens If you’re ... And here’s the better news: Most kids with acid reflux are able to lead normal, active, healthy ...

  2. Mechanisms of acid reflux associated with cigarette smoking.

    PubMed Central

    Kahrilas, P J; Gupta, R R

    1990-01-01

    Studies were done to evaluate the lower oesophageal sphincter function of chronic smokers compared with non-smokers and to ascertain the acute effects of smoking on the sphincter and the occurrence of acid reflux. All subjects (non-smokers, asymptomatic cigarette smokers, and smokers with oesophagitis) were studied postprandially with a lower oesophageal sphincter sleeve assembly, distal oesophageal pH electrode, and submental electromyographic electrodes. The two groups of cigarette smokers then smoked three cigarettes in succession before being recorded for an additional hour. As a group, the cigarette smokers had significantly lower lower oesophageal sphincter pressure compared with non-smokers but the sphincter was not further compromised by acutely smoking cigarettes. Cigarette smoking did, however, acutely increase the rate at which acid reflux events occurred. The mechanisms of acid reflux during cigarette smoking were mainly dependent upon the coexistence of diminished lower oesophageal sphincter pressure. Fewer than half of reflux events occurred by transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations. The majority of acid reflux occurred with coughing or deep inspiration during which abrupt increases in intra-abdominal pressure overpowered a feeble sphincter. We conclude that cigarette smoking probably exacerbates reflux disease by directly provoking acid reflux and perhaps by a long lasting reduction of lower oesophageal sphincter pressure. PMID:2318431

  3. Do you Suffer from Heartburn or Acid Reflux?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have acid reflux disease or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). 1 Are You Suffering from Heartburn? Acid reflux happens when the ring of muscle between the esophagus and stomach does not work well. The muscle usually opens when food is ...

  4. Lower pH values of weakly acidic refluxes as determinants of heartburn perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with normal esophageal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    de Bortoli, N; Martinucci, I; Savarino, E; Franchi, R; Bertani, L; Russo, S; Ceccarelli, L; Costa, F; Bellini, M; Blandizzi, C; Savarino, V; Marchi, S

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel impedance pH monitoring has shown that weakly acidic refluxes are able to generate heartburn. However, data on the role of different pH values, ranging between 4 and 7, in the generation of them are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different pH values of weakly acidic refluxes play a differential role in provoking reflux symptoms in endoscopy-negative patients with physiological esophageal acid exposure time and positive symptom index and symptom association probability for weakly acidic refluxes. One hundred and forty-three consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, nonresponders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), were allowed a washout from PPIs before undergoing: upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and multichannel impedance pH monitoring. In patients with both symptom index and symptom association probability positive for weakly acidic reflux, each weakly acidic reflux was evaluated considering exact pH value, extension, physical characteristics, and correlation with heartburn. Forty-five patients with normal acid exposure time and positive symptom association probability for weakly acidic reflux were identified. The number of refluxes not heartburn related was higher than those heartburn related. In all distal and proximal liquid refluxes, as well as in distal mixed refluxes, the mean pH value of reflux events associated with heartburn was significantly lower than that not associated. This condition was not confirmed for proximal mixed refluxes. Overall, a low pH of weakly acidic reflux represents a determinant factor in provoking heartburn. This observation contributes to better understand the pathophysiology of symptoms generated by weakly acidic refluxes, paving the way toward the search for different therapeutic approaches to this peculiar condition of esophageal hypersensitivity. PMID:25212408

  5. Sleep and nocturnal acid reflux in normal subjects and patients with reflux oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Freidin, N; Fisher, M J; Taylor, W; Boyd, D; Surratt, P; McCallum, R W; Mittal, R K

    1991-01-01

    Nocturnal gastro-oesophageal reflux may be important in the pathogenesis of reflux oesophagitis. This study aimed to determine whether: (1) gastro-oesophageal reflux occurs during sleep in patients with reflux oesophagitis and, if so, to explore the mechanism, and (2) the sleep pattern of patients with oesophagitis is different from that of control subjects. After a standard evening meal, simultaneous manometric, oesophageal pH, and polysomnographic recordings were obtained in 11 patients with endoscopic oesophagitis and 11 control subjects. Patients with gastrooesophageal reflux disease had significantly more total reflux episodes throughout the nocturnal monitoring period than control subjects (105 v 6). Ninety two of 105 episodes of gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients occurred during the awake state and 10 during sleep stage II. A number of reflux episodes occurred during brief periods of arousal from the various sleep stages. Of the 105 reflux events recorded in patients, 42 were induced by transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation, 20 by stress reflux, 22 by free reflux mechanisms, and in 21 the mechanism was unclear. The sleep pattern and the time spent in each sleep stage was not different between the two groups. It is concluded that the awake state is crucial for the occurrence of nocturnal reflux episodes in normal subjects as well as in patients with reflux oesophagitis and that the difference between the frequency of gastro-oesophageal reflux between normal subjects and patients cannot be explained by different sleep patterns. PMID:1752454

  6. The Mystery and Misery of Acid Reflux in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Mike; Davenport, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    When a child is sick, parents want answers. They want to know what is wrong, what they can do, and how to get their child healthy--pronto. Regrettably, there are some puzzling illnesses affecting children that are surrounded by mystery. One of them is gastroesophageal reflux (GER), otherwise known as acid reflux--or "reflux" for short. Reflux…

  7. Effects of ranitidine and cisapride on acid reflux and oesophageal motility in patients with reflux oesophagitis: a 24 hour ambulatory combined pH and manometry study.

    PubMed

    Inauen, W; Emde, C; Weber, B; Armstrong, D; Bettschen, H U; Huber, T; Scheurer, U; Blum, A L; Halter, F; Merki, H S

    1993-08-01

    The effect of ranitidine and cisapride on acid reflux and oesophageal motility was investigated in 18 patients with endoscopically verified erosive reflux oesophagitis. Each patient was treated with placebo, ranitidine (150 mg twice daily), and ranitidine (150 mg twice daily) plus cisapride (20 mg twice daily) in a double blind, double dummy, within subject, three way cross over design. Oesophageal acidity and motility were monitored under ambulatory conditions for 24 hours on the fourth day of treatment, after a wash out period of 10 days during which patients received only antacids for relief of symptoms. Acid reflux was monitored by a pH electrode located 5 cm above the lower oesophageal sphincter. Intraoesophageal pressure was simultaneously recorded from four transducers placed 20, 15, 10, and 5 cm above the lower oesophageal sphincter. Upright reflux was three times higher than supine reflux (median (range) 13.3 (3.7-35.0)% v 3.7 (0-37.6)% of the time with pH < 4.0, p < 0.01, n = 18). Compared with placebo, ranitidine decreased total reflux (from 10.0 (3.2-32.6)% to 6.4 (1.2-22.9)%, p < 0.01), upright reflux (p < 0.05), supine reflux (p < 0.001), and postprandial reflux (p < 0.01), but did not affect oesophageal motility. The combination of ranitidine with cisapride further diminished the acid reflux found with ranitidine--that is, cisapride led to an additional reduction of total reflux (from 6.4 (1.2-22.9)% to 3.7 (1.0-12.7)%, p < 0.01), supine reflux (p < 0.05), and postprandial reflux (p < 0.05). Cisapride also reduced both the number (p<0.01) and duration (p<0.05) of reflux episodes and significantly increased amplitude, duration, and propagation velocity of oesophageal contractions (p<0.05) but did not affect the number of contractions. The findings show that the 30% reduction of oesophageal acid exposure achieved by a conventional dose of ranitidine (150 mg twice daily) can be improved to more than 60% by combination with cisapride (20 mg twice daily

  8. Correlation between gastric acid secretion and severity of acid reflux in children.

    PubMed

    Kalach, Nicolas; Badran, Abdul Monem; Jaffray, Patrick; Campeotto, Florence; Benhamou, Pierre Henri; Dupont, Christophe

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to systematically evaluate gastric acid output in children with long-lasting gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) in order to assess its mechanism and the need for anti-acid treatment. The investigation was carried out in 20 males and 10 females, aged 7.5 +/- 3.8 years, with prolonged (>15 months) clinical manifestations of GER. All underwent routine ambulatory 24-h esophageal pH-monitoring and measurement of gastric acid secretion including gastric basal (BAO) (micromol/kg/h), maximal (MAO) and peak acid outputs (PAO) after pentagastrin (6 microg/kg sec) stimulation. Children with heartburn or abdominal pain underwent upper fiber-endoscopy. In group A (moderate GER, n=12), patients had a normal reflux index (pH<4 below 5.2% of total recording time) despite abnormal Euler and Byrne scoring (median 57, 95% confidence interval 53.5-73.4). In group B (severe GER, n=18, among whom 5 were with grade III esophagitis), reflux index was >5.2%. When considering all children, esophageal pH (%) was significantly correlated with MAO and PAO, r=0.33, p=0.05 and r=0.37, p=0.04, respectively. Children of group B exhibited significantly higher BAO (75, 53.96-137.81), MAO (468, 394.1-671.3) and PAO (617, 518.8-782.3) than those of group A, BAO (27, 10.8-38.5), MAO (266, 243.2-348.2) and PAO (387, 322.5-452.7), p<0.05). The five children of group B with severe esophagitis exhibited significantly higher BAO, MAO and PAO than the other 13 children from the same group and those of group A, p<0.05. Children with long-lasting and severe GER hyper-secrete gastric acid. Individual variations in gastric acid secretion probably account for variations in gastric acid inhibitor requirements. Anti-secretory treatment is justified in children with long-lasting GER and high pH-metric reflux index. PMID:12718363

  9. The mode of action alginic acid compound in the reduction of gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Malmud, L S; Charkes, N D; Littlefield, J; Reilley, J; Stern, H; Rosenberg, R; Fisher, R S

    1979-10-01

    This study was designed to evaluate quantitatively the mode of action of alginic acid compound (AAC) in the treatment of patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy using an orall administered Tc-99m sulfur colloid solution was used to demonstrate that AAC decreased significantly the gastroesophageal reflux index from (9.9 +/- 1.3) % to (6.5 +/- 0.8) % (p less than 0.05). No alteration of lower esophageal sphincter pressure was observed. After ACC was suitably labeled with Sr-87m, a dual-nuclide scintigraphic technique was used to show that most (greater than 75%) of the AAC was located in the upper half of the stomach in both normal subjects and patients with gastroesophageal reflux. In those subjects in whom reflux did occur after treatment with AAC, the Sr-87m-AAC refluxed into the esophagus preferentially compared with the liquid containing Tc-99m sulfur colloid. These findings suggest that AAC dimishes gastroesophageal reflux by means of its foaming, floating, and viscous properties. PMID:231639

  10. Increased tachykinin levels in induced sputum from asthmatic and cough patients with acid reflux

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Robert N; Johnston, Brian T; Ardill, Joy E S; Heaney, Liam G; McGarvey, Lorcan P A

    2007-01-01

    Background Acid reflux may aggravate airway disease including asthma and chronic cough. One postulated mechanism concerns a vagally‐mediated oesophageal‐tracheobronchial reflex with airway sensory nerve activation and tachykinin release. Aim To test the hypothesis that patients with airways disease and reflux have higher airway tachykinin levels than those without reflux. Methods Thirty‐two patients with airways disease (16 with mild asthma and 16 non‐asthmatic subjects with chronic cough) underwent 24 h oesophageal pH monitoring. Acid reflux was defined as increased total oesophageal acid exposure (% total time pH <4 of >4.9% at the distal probe). All subjects underwent sputum induction. Differential cell counts and concentrations of substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA), albumin and α2‐macroglobulin were determined. Results SP and NKA levels were significantly higher in patients with reflux than in those without (SP: 1434 (680) pg/ml vs 906 (593) pg/ml, p = 0.026; NKA: 81 (33) pg/ml vs 52 (36) pg/ml, p = 0.03). Significantly higher tachykinin levels were also found in asthmatic patients with reflux than in asthmatic patients without reflux (SP: 1508 (781) pg/ml vs 737 (512) pg/ml, p = 0.035; NKA: median (interquartile range 108 (85–120) pg/ml vs 75 (2–98) pg/ml, p = 0.02). In patients with asthma there was a significant positive correlation between distal oesophageal acid exposure and SP levels (r = 0.59, p = 0.01) and NKA levels (r = 0.56, p = 0.02). Non‐significant increases in SP and NKA were measured in patients with cough with reflux (SP: 1534.71 (711) pg/ml vs 1089 (606) pg/ml, p = 0.20; NKA: 56 (43) pg/ml vs 49 (17) pg/ml, p = 0.71). No significant difference in differential cell counts or any other biochemical parameter was noted between study groups. Conclusion This study demonstrates increased airway tachykinin levels in patients with asthma and cough patients with

  11. New developments in reflux-associated cough.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jaclyn; Woodcock, Ashley; Houghton, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is generally considered one of the three main causes of chronic cough, along with asthma and nasal disease. The diagnosis of GORD is often based upon a successful trial of anti-acid treatment however GORD is a complex condition taking many forms. Only recently have studies started to address the different types of GORD in patients with chronic cough and how these may infer the mechanisms linking these common conditions. GORD can be assessed in a number of ways; whilst endoscopy provides evidence of oesophagitis (i.e. erosive disease), 24-h ambulatory oesophageal pH monitoring may demonstrate abnormal oesophageal acid exposure in the absence of oesophageal damage (i.e. non-erosive disease). The development of oesophageal impedance monitoring now allows the assessment of all reflux events (regardless of degree of acidity) and further classification of reflux by the proximal extension e.g. to upper oesophagus or even pharynx. Chronic cough patients may still be considered to have GORD if there is a significant temporal association between reflux events and coughing. Recent studies have examined the relationships between cough and reflux events, the roles of distal and proximal/pharyngeal reflux and also micro-aspiration in chronic cough patients. Increasing evidence suggests a significant proportion of patients display statistical associations between reflux and cough events, in the absence of an excessive numbers of reflux events either within or outside of the oesophagus. PMID:20024660

  12. Gastroesophageal Reflux in Children and Adolescents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language URL Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Children & Teens View or Print All Sections Definition and Facts ... Training & Career Development Research at NIDDK Research Resources Technology Advancement & Transfer Meetings & Events Health Information Diabetes Digestive ...

  13. Nitrate and nitrosative chemistry within Barrett’s oesophagus during acid reflux

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, H; Iijima, K; Scobie, G; Fyfe, V; McColl, K E L

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims: When saliva, with its high nitrite content derived from the enterosalivary recirculation of dietary nitrate, meets acidic gastric juice, the nitrite is converted to nitrous acid, nitrosative species, and nitric oxide. In healthy volunteers this potentially mutagenic chemistry is focused at the gastric cardia. We have studied the location of this luminal chemistry in Barrett’s patients during acid reflux. Methods: Ten Barrett’s patients were studied before and after administration of 2 mmol nitrate. Using microdialysis probes we measured nitrite, ascorbic acid, total vitamin C, and thiocyanate concentrations and pH simultaneously in the proximal oesophagus, Barrett’s segment, hiatal sac, proximal stomach, and distal stomach. In a subgroup, real time nitric oxide concentrations were also measured. Results: During acid reflux, Barrett’s segment was the anatomical site with maximal potential for acid catalysed nitrosation, with its median concentration of nitrite exceeding that of ascorbic acid in two of 10 subjects before nitrate and in four of nine after nitrate. Thiocyanate, which catalyses acid nitrosation, was abundant at all anatomical sites. On entering the acidic Barrett’s segment, there was a substantial fall in nitrite and the lowest ascorbic acid to total vitamin C ratio, indicative of reduction of salivary nitrite to nitric oxide at this anatomical site. Episodes of acid reflux were observed to generate nitric oxide concentrations of up to 60 μM within the Barrett’s segment. Conclusion: The interaction between acidic gastric refluxate and nitrite rich saliva activates potentially mutagenic luminal nitrosative chemistry within Barrett’s oesophagus. PMID:16227357

  14. Alginic acid decreases postprandial upright gastroesophageal reflux. Comparison with equal-strength antacid.

    PubMed

    Castell, D O; Dalton, C B; Becker, D; Sinclair, J; Castell, J A

    1992-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that (alginic) acid may have a preferential effect on reflux in the upright position. We evaluated the effect of a compound containing alginic acid plus antacid (extra-strength Gaviscon) versus active control antacid with equal acid-neutralizing capacity on intraesophageal acid exposure following a high-fat meal (61% fat: sausage, egg, and biscuit). In random sequence, each of the 10 volunteers received either alginic acid-antacid or control antacid immediately following and 1, 2, and 3 hr after the meal. The sequence was repeated for both test drugs in the supine and upright positions with constant pH monitoring. Alginic acid-antacid significantly decreased postprandial reflux in the upright position compared to an equal amount of antacid. This effect did not occur in the supine position. These findings support the hypothesis that alginic acid is primarily effective in the upright position and the clinical observations of the effectiveness of alginic acid on daytime reflux symptoms. PMID:1551350

  15. Mucosal integrity and sensitivity to acid in the proximal esophagus in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Weijenborg, Pim W; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A; van den Wijngaard, René M J G J; Verheij, J; Smout, André J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-07-01

    Acid reflux episodes that extend to the proximal esophagus are more likely to be perceived. This suggests that the proximal esophagus is more sensitive to acid than the distal esophagus, which could be caused by impaired mucosal integrity in the proximal esophagus. Our aim was to explore sensitivity to acid and mucosal integrity in different segments of the esophagus. We used a prospective observational study, including 12 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). After stopping acid secretion-inhibiting medication, two procedures were performed: an acid perfusion test and an upper endoscopy with electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and esophageal biopsies. Proximal and distal sensitivity to acid and tissue impedance were measured in vivo, and mucosal permeability and epithelial intercellular spaces at different esophageal levels were measured in vitro. Mean lag time to heartburn perception was much shorter after proximal acid perfusion (0.8 min) than after distal acid perfusion (3.9 min) (P = 0.02). Median in vivo tissue impedance was significantly lower in the distal esophagus (4,563 Ω·m) compared with the proximal esophagus (8,170 Ω·m) (P = 0.002). Transepithelial permeability, as measured by the median fluorescein flux was significantly higher in the distal (2,051 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) than in the proximal segment (368 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) (P = 0.033). Intercellular space ratio and maximum heartburn intensity were not significantly different between the proximal and distal esophagus. In GERD patients off acid secretion-inhibiting medication, acid exposure in the proximal segment of the esophagus provokes symptoms earlier than acid exposure in the distal esophagus, whereas mucosal integrity is impaired more in the distal esophagus. These findings indicate that the enhanced sensitivity to proximal reflux episodes is not explained by increased mucosal permeability. PMID:27198192

  16. Review article: alginate-raft formulations in the treatment of heartburn and acid reflux.

    PubMed

    Mandel, K G; Daggy, B P; Brodie, D A; Jacoby, H I

    2000-06-01

    Alginate-based raft-forming formulations have been marketed word-wide for over 30 years under various brand names, including Gaviscon. They are used for the symptomatic treatment of heartburn and oesophagitis, and appear to act by a unique mechanism which differs from that of traditional antacids. In the presence of gastric acid, alginates precipitate, forming a gel. Alginate-based raft-forming formulations usually contain sodium or potassium bicarbonate; in the presence of gastric acid, the bicarbonate is converted to carbon dioxide which becomes entrapped within the gel precipitate, converting it into a foam which floats on the surface of the gastric contents, much like a raft on water. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that alginate-based rafts can entrap carbon dioxide, as well as antacid components contained in some formulations, thus providing a relatively pH-neutral barrier. Several studies have demonstrated that the alginate raft can preferentially move into the oesophagus in place, or ahead, of acidic gastric contents during episodes of gastro-oesophageal reflux; some studies further suggest that the raft can act as a physical barrier to reduce reflux episodes. Although some alginate-based formulations also contain antacid components which can provide significant acid neutralization capacity, the efficacy of these formulations to reduce heartburn symptoms does not appear to be totally dependent on the neutralization of bulk gastric contents. The strength of the alginate raft is dependant on several factors, including the amount of carbon dioxide generated and entrapped in the raft, the molecular properties of the alginate, and the presence of aluminium or calcium in the antacid components of the formulation. Raft formation occurs rapidly, often within a few seconds of dosing; hence alginate-containing antacids are comparable to traditional antacids for speed of onset of relief. Since the raft can be retained in the stomach for several

  17. Protective Effects of Chlorogenic Acid against Experimental Reflux Esophagitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Woo; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal reflux of gastric contents causes esophageal mucosal damage and inflammation. Recent studies show that oxygen-derived free radicals mediate mucosal damage in reflux esophagitis (RE). Chlorogenic acid (CGA), an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid, is one of the most abundant polyphenols in the human diet and possesses anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anti-oxidant activities. In this context, we investigated the effects of CGA against experimental RE in rats. RE was produced by ligating the transitional region between the forestomach and the glandular portion and covering the duodenum near the pylorus ring with a small piece of catheter. CGA (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg) and omeprazole (positive control, 10 mg/kg) were administered orally 48 h after the RE operation for 12 days. CGA reduced the severity of esophageal lesions, and this beneficial effect was confirmed by histopathological observations. CGA reduced esophageal lipid peroxidation and increased the reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio. CGA attenuated increases in the serum level of tumor necrosis factor-α, and expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 protein. CGA alleviates RE-induced mucosal injury, and this protection is associated with reduced oxidative stress and the anti-inflammatory properties of CGA. PMID:25414772

  18. Acid Reflux

    MedlinePlus

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  19. A novel once daily microparticulate dosage form comprising lansoprazole to prevent nocturnal acid breakthrough in the case of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: preparation, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Alai, Milind; Lin, Wen Jen

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to formulate and evaluate the lansoprazole (LPZ)-loaded microparticles to prevent nocturnal acid breakthrough in the case of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The microparticulate delivery system was prepared by solvent evaporation method using Eudragit RS100 as a matrix polymer followed by enteric coated with Eudragit S100 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate HP55 using spray drying method. The enteric coated microparticles were stable in gastric pH condition. In vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies in male Wistar rats demonstrated that enteric coated microparticles sustained release of LPZ and promoted ulcer healing activity. In other words, the microparticulate dosage form provided effective drug concentration for a longer period as compared to conventional extended release dosage form, and showed sufficient anti-acid secretion activity to treat acid related disorders including the enrichment of nocturnal acid breakthrough event based on a once daily administration. PMID:23294453

  20. Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux by Endoscopic Injection of Dextranomer/Hyaluronic Acid in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Timothy W; Lacy, John M; Preston, David M

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old man presented for evaluation after discovery of a left bladder-wall tumor. He underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) operation for treatment of low-grade, Ta urothelial cancer of the bladder. The patient developed recurrent disease and returned to the operating room for repeat TURBT, circumcision, and administration of intravesical mitomycin C. The patient developed balanitis xerotica obliterans 4 years post-circumcision, requiring self-dilation with a catheter. He subsequently developed 3 consecutive episodes of left-sided pyelonephritis. Further investigation with voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) revealed Grade 3, left-sided vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Due to existing comorbidities, the patient elected treatment with endoscopic dextranomer/hyaluronic acid injection. A post-operative VCUG demonstrated complete resolution of left-sided VUR. This patient has remained symptom free for 8 months post-injection, with no episodes of pyelonephritis. PMID:27162514

  1. Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux by Endoscopic Injection of Dextranomer/Hyaluronic Acid in Adults.

    PubMed

    Stark, Timothy W; Lacy, John M; Preston, David M

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old man presented for evaluation after discovery of a left bladder-wall tumor. He underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) operation for treatment of low-grade, Ta urothelial cancer of the bladder. The patient developed recurrent disease and returned to the operating room for repeat TURBT, circumcision, and administration of intravesical mitomycin C. The patient developed balanitis xerotica obliterans 4 years post-circumcision, requiring self-dilation with a catheter. He subsequently developed 3 consecutive episodes of left-sided pyelonephritis. Further investigation with voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) revealed Grade 3, left-sided vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Due to existing comorbidities, the patient elected treatment with endoscopic dextranomer/hyaluronic acid injection. A post-operative VCUG demonstrated complete resolution of left-sided VUR. This patient has remained symptom free for 8 months post-injection, with no episodes of pyelonephritis. PMID:27162514

  2. [Update on gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Serra Pueyo, Jordi

    2014-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a highly frequent disorder classically characterized by the presence of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation that improves with drug therapy that reduces acid content in the stomach. However, especially in patients with non-erosive disease, response to proton pump inhibitors is unsatisfactory in approximately 1 out of 3 patients, and consequently, in these patients, it is important to establish a definitive diagnosis and an alternative therapeutic strategy. In the last few years, advances have been made in knowledge of the physiopathology of reflux, such as identification of the role of the acid pocket in producing reflux, technological advances that allow differentiation among acid reflux, non-acid reflux and slightly acid reflux, and advances in the treatment of reflux with drugs that attempt to act on the barrier function of the esophagogastric junction. PMID:24355558

  3. Knowledge and practice of Brazilian pediatricians on gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Ana Cristina Fontenele; de Freitas, Carla Lima; de Morais, Mauro Batista

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge and practice of pediatricians about infants with physiological reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease. METHODS: 140 pediatricians were interviewed during two scientific events in 2009 and 2010. The questions referred to two clinical cases of infants. One with symptoms of infant regurgitation (physiological reflux) and another with gastroesophageal reflux disease. RESULTS: Among 140 pediatricians, 11.4% (n=16) and 62.1% (n=87) would require investigation tests, respectively for infant regurgitation (physiological reflux) and gastroesophageal reflux disease. A series of upper gastrointestinal exams would be the first requested with a higher frequency. Medication would be prescribed by 18.6% (n=6) in the case of physiological reflux and 87.1% (n=122) in the case of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Prokinetic drugs would be prescribed more frequently than gastric acid secretion inhibitors. Sleeping position would be recommended by 94.2% (n=132) and 92.9% (n=130) of the respondents, respectively for the case of physiological reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease; however, about half of the respondents would recommend the prone position. Only 10 (7.1%) of the pediatricians would exclude the cow's milk protein from the infants' diet. CONCLUSIONS: Approaches different from the international guidelines are often considered appropriate, especially when recommending a different position other than the supine and prescription of medication. In turn, the interviews enable us to infer the right capacity of the pediatricians to distinguish physiologic reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease correctly. PMID:25662014

  4. Prevalence of acid reflux in functional dyspepsia and its association with symptom profile

    PubMed Central

    Tack, J; Caenepeel, P; Arts, J; Lee, K-J; Sifrim, D; Janssens, J

    2005-01-01

    Aim: A subset of functional dyspepsia patients respond to acid suppressive therapy, but the prevalence of non-erosive reflux disease in functional dyspepsia and its relevance to symptoms have never been established. The aim of the present study was to study 24 hour pH monitoring in consecutive functional dyspepsia patients. Methods: A total of 247 patients with dyspeptic symptoms (166 women, mean age 44 (SEM 1) year), with a negative upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and without dominant symptoms of heartburn participated in the study. In all patients, the severity of dyspeptic symptoms and the presence of heartburn was assessed by a questionnaire and a 24 hour oesophageal pH monitoring study was performed. All patients underwent a gastric emptying breath test and in 113 a gastric barostat study was performed. Results: Abnormal pH monitoring (acid exposure >5% of time) was found in 58 patients (23%). Of 21 patients with a positive heartburn questionnaire, 76% had pathological pH monitoring, while this was the case in only 18.5% of patients with a negative heartburn questionnaire. Demographic characteristics and the prevalence of other pathophysiological mechanisms did not differ between heartburn negative patients with normal or abnormal acid exposure. Pathological acid exposure in heartburn negative patients was associated with the presence of epigastric pain (65 v 84%, p<0.005) and of moderate or severe pain (48 v 69%, p = 0.005). Conclusion: Pathological oesophageal acid exposure is only present in a subset of heartburn negative functional dyspepsia patients, which are characterised by a higher prevalence of epigastric pain. PMID:15972301

  5. Optimal treatment of laryngopharyngeal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinucci, Irene; Savarino, Edoardo; Nacci, Andrea; Romeo, Salvatore Osvaldo; Bellini, Massimo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Fattori, Bruno; Marchi, Santino

    2013-01-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux is defined as the reflux of gastric content into larynx and pharynx. A large number of data suggest the growing prevalence of laryngopharyngeal symptoms in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, laryngopharyngeal reflux is a multifactorial syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease is not the only cause involved in its pathogenesis. Current critical issues in diagnosing laryngopharyngeal reflux are many nonspecific laryngeal symptoms and signs, and poor sensitivity and specificity of all currently available diagnostic tests. Although it is a pragmatic clinical strategy to start with empiric trials of proton pump inhibitors, many patients with suspected laryngopharyngeal reflux have persistent symptoms despite maximal acid suppression therapy. Overall, there are scant conflicting results to assess the effect of reflux treatments (including dietary and lifestyle modification, medical treatment, antireflux surgery) on laryngopharyngeal reflux. The present review is aimed at critically discussing the current treatment options in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux, and provides a perspective on the development of new therapies. PMID:24179671

  6. Endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux in children with subureteral dextranomer/hyaluronic acid injection: a single-centre, 7-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Biočíc, Mihovil; Todoríc, Jakov; Budimir, Dražen; Roíc, Andrea Cvitkovíc; Pogorelíc, Zenon; Juríc, Ivo; Šušnjar, Tomislav

    2012-01-01

    Background The goals of medical intervention in patients with vesicoureteral reflux are to allow normal renal growth, prevent infections and pyelonephritis, and prevent renal failure. We present our experience with endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux in children by subureteral dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer injection. Methods Under cystoscopic guidance, dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer underneath the intravesical portion of the ureter in a subureteral or submucosal location was injected in patients undergoing endoscopic correction of vesicoureteral reflux. Results A total of 282 patients (120 boys and 162 girls) underwent the procedure. There were 396 refluxed ureters altogether. The mean age of patients was 4.9 years. The mean overall follow-up period was 44 months. Among the 396 ureters treated, 76% were cured with a single injection. A second and third injection raised the cure rate to 93% and 94%, respectively. Twenty-two (6%) ureters failed all 3 injections, and were converted to open surgery. Conclusion Endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux can be recommended as a first-line therapy for most cases of vesicoureteral reflux, because of the short hospital stay, absence of complications and the high success rate. PMID:22854114

  7. Outcomes in patients with nonerosive reflux disease treated with a proton pump inhibitor and alginic acid ± glycyrrhetinic acid and anthocyanosides

    PubMed Central

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Gatti, Mario; Rapacioli, Giuliana; Ivaldi, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of alginic acid alone versus alginic acid combined with low doses of pure glycyrrhetinic acid and bilberry anthocyanosides as an addon to conventional proton pump inhibitor therapy in relieving symptoms associated with nonerosive reflux disease. Methods This prospective, randomized, 8-week, open-label trial was conducted at two centers. Sixty-three patients with persistent symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease and normal upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were eligible for the study. Patients in group A (n = 31) were treated with pantoprazole and a formula (Mirgeal®) containing alginic acid and low doses of pure glycyrrhetinic acid + standardized Vaccinium myrtillus extract for 4 weeks, then crossed over to the multi-ingredient formula for a further 4 weeks. Patients in group B (n = 32) were treated pantoprazole and alginic acid alone twice daily, then crossed over to alginic acid twice daily for a further 4 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by medical evaluation of a symptom relief score, estimated using a visual analog scale (0–10). Side effects, tolerability, and compliance were also assessed. Results Of the 63 patients enrolled in the study, 58 (29 in group A and 29 in group B) completed the 8-week trial. The baseline characteristics were comparable between the two groups. During the study, significant differences were recorded in symptom scores for both groups. In group A, symptoms of chest pain, heartburn, and abdominal swelling were less serious than in group B. Treatment A was better tolerated, did not induce hypertension, and had fewer side effects than treatment B. No significant differences in compliance were found between the two groups. Conclusion Use of low doses of pure glycyrrhetinic acid + bilberry anthocyanosides, together with alginic acid as addon therapy, substantially improves symptoms in patients with nonerosive reflux disease without increasing side effects or worsening

  8. [Reflux nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Sabra, R

    1990-08-01

    A corticopapillary scar is a frequent finding on urography in patients with vesicoureteral reflux. It is considered a typical sign of so-called reflux nepropathy. It develops most frequently in children aged 5-7 years and has a negative impact on the growth of the kidney. In its development three factors participate: ureterovesical reflux, intrarenal reflux associated with so-called refluxing papillas and urinary infection. The inflammatory cicatrical process may affect the whole kidney--small shrivelled kidney--or only a portion of the kidney. The development of scars is explained by the so-called bing-bang theory according to which all refluxing papillae are affected at the same time by the first urinary infection. This position develops in particular in case of inadequate treatment of acute pyelonephritis, Deformity of normal papillae caused by various factors explains, however, the development of renal scars in children aged 8-12 years or even in adults. The growing kidney tolerates poorly not only urinary infections and scar formation but also hydrodynamic disorders associated with vesicoureteral reflux. Therefore it is important to diagnose and treat vesicoureteral reflux already at an early age. For the time being it is important o consider asymptomatic bacteriuria and any urinary infection in children a clinical marker calling for examination for the possible presence of vesicoureteral reflux. PMID:2136469

  9. Outcome of nonerosive gastro-esophageal reflux disease patients with pathological acid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Fabio; Pallotta, Stefano; Manes, Gianpiero; de Leone, Annalisa; Zentilin, Patrizia; Russo, Luigi; Savarino, Vincenzo; Neri, Matteo; Grossi, Enzo; Cuomo, Rosario

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To assess the management and outcome of nonerosive gastro-esophageal reflux disease (NERD) patients who were identified retrospectively, after a 5-year follow-up. METHODS: We included patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms who had a negative endoscopy result and pathological 24-h esophageal pH-monitoring while off therapy. We interviewed them after an average period of 5 years (range 3.5-7 years) by means of a structured questionnaire to assess presence of GERD symptoms, related therapy, updated endoscopic data and other features. We assessed predictors of esophagitis development by means of univariate and multivariate statistical analysis. RESULTS: 260 patients (137 women) were included. Predominant GERD symptoms were heartburn and regurgitation in 103/260 (40%). 70% received a maintenance treatment, which was proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in 55% of cases. An average number of 1.5 symptomatic relapses per patient/year of follow-up were observed. A progression to erosive gastro-esophageal reflux disease (ERD) was found in 58/193 (30.0%) of patients undergoing repeat endoscopy; 72% of these were Los Angeles grade A-B. CONCLUSION: This study shows that progression to ERD occurs in about 5% of NERD cases per year, despite therapy. Only two factors consistently and independently influence progression: smoking and absence of PPI therapy. PMID:19960567

  10. A Case of Apparent Life-Threatening Event: Comorbid Gastric Volvulus Associated Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Epilepsy in a 4-Month-Old Boy.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yoshihiko; Horiike, Masaki; Tatsumi, Ako; Sakamoto, Haruko; Fujino, Hisanori; Sumimoto, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Most isolated episodes of apparent life-threatening events (ALTEs) do not lead to the diagnosis of serious conditions, and their prognoses are generally benign. However, recurrent ALTEs are often associated with a risk of future serious adverse events and should be evaluated for appropriate management. Here we present ALTE case in which gastric volvulus associated gastroesophageal reflux disease was detected as an etiology initially, followed by the detection of epilepsy as another etiology. Clinicians should consider possibility of two or more etiologies in a single recurrent ALTE case. PMID:27293941

  11. A Case of Apparent Life-Threatening Event: Comorbid Gastric Volvulus Associated Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Epilepsy in a 4-Month-Old Boy

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Yoshihiko; Horiike, Masaki; Tatsumi, Ako; Sakamoto, Haruko; Fujino, Hisanori; Sumimoto, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Most isolated episodes of apparent life-threatening events (ALTEs) do not lead to the diagnosis of serious conditions, and their prognoses are generally benign. However, recurrent ALTEs are often associated with a risk of future serious adverse events and should be evaluated for appropriate management. Here we present ALTE case in which gastric volvulus associated gastroesophageal reflux disease was detected as an etiology initially, followed by the detection of epilepsy as another etiology. Clinicians should consider possibility of two or more etiologies in a single recurrent ALTE case. PMID:27293941

  12. The influence of the speed of food intake on multichannel impedance in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Serhat; Bayrakci, Berna; Yildirim, Esra; Vardar, Rukiye

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a general belief that gastro-oesophageal reflux increases after meals and especially following a rapid intake. Objective To evaluate the impact of rapid vs. slow food intake on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) patients. Materials and methods Forty-six GORD patients with heartburn and / or acid regurgitation once a week or more often common were included in this study. Participants were asked to eat the same standard meal within either 5 or 30 minutes under observation in a random order on 2 consecutive days. A total of 28 hours of recording were obtained by intraoesophageal impedance pH and number of liquid and mixed reflux episodes within 3 hours of the slow- and fast-eating postprandial periods were calculated. Results While all patients defined GORD symptoms, 10 (21.7%) had pathological 24-h intraoesophageal impedance measurement, 15 (32.6%) had pathological DeMeester and 21.7% had erosive oesophagitis. No difference has been shown according to the eating speed when all reflux episodes were taken together (754 vs. 733). Speed of food intake also did not have an impact on patients with normal vs. pathological 24-h intraoesophageal impedance or erosive vs. non-erosive. During the first postprandial hour, approximately half of the reflux events were non-acid, compared to 34.2% during the second hour and 26.8% during the third hour (p < 0.001). The number of acid reflux episodes was significantly higher than non-acid reflux especially during the second and third hours and in total for 3 hours. Conclusions This first study addressing the effect of eating speed on reflux episodes in GORD patients did not support the general belief that reflux increases following fast eating. Acid and non-acid reflux were similar at the first postprandial hour, then acid reflux episodes were predominantly higher, which implicate the importance of acid pockets. PMID:24917982

  13. Characteristics of nighttime reflux assessed using multichannel intraluminal impedance pH monitoring and a portable electroencephalograph.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Y; Kohata, Y; Nakahara, K; Tanigawa, T; Yamagami, H; Shiba, M; Watanabe, K; Tominaga, K; Watanabe, T; Arakawa, T

    2016-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is strongly associated with sleep disturbances. Although the mechanisms of this association have not been fully elucidated, nighttime reflux plays a central role. However, the detailed characteristics of nighttime reflux occurring during sleep are unknown. The aim of the present study was to examine the characteristics and prevalence of nighttime reflux in the natural sleep environment of GERD patients. Seventeen patients experiencing daily moderate-to-severe heartburn and/or regurgitation were studied using multichannel intraluminal impedance pH monitoring and electroencephalography off-proton pump inhibitor treatment. Nighttime reflux was divided based on reflux type (liquid or gas), acidity (acidic, weakly acidic, or alkaline) and extent (distal only or proximal migration) according to the standard criteria. Nighttime phases were divided as follows: recumbent-awake before falling asleep, nonrapid eye movement, rapid eye movement, awakening from sleep, and post-awakening in the morning. Among 184 nighttime refluxes, 43 (23%) occurred during recumbent-awake before falling asleep, 28 (15%) during nonrapid eye movement, 14 (8%) during rapid eye movement, 86 (46%) during awakening from sleep, and 13 (7%) during post-awakening in the morning. Liquid reflux was more common in awakening during sleep (92%), nonrapid eye movement (100%), and rapid eye movement (100%) compared with awakening before falling asleep (68%). The prevalence of proximal migration was significantly lower in nonrapid eye movement and rapid eye movement than in the other phases. There were no differences in acidity and bolus clearance time among the phases. Thirteen (65%) of 20 events with GERD symptoms had nighttime reflux, suggesting that only 7.1% (13 of 184) of nighttime refluxes were symptomatic. Nighttime reflux was observed in 48 (11%) of 425 awakening episodes during sleep. Different reflux patterns at each phase during nighttime might explain the

  14. Prospective Acid Reflux Study of Iran (PARSI): Methodology and study design

    PubMed Central

    Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Razjouyan, Hadi; Alimohamadi, Seyed Maysam; Mamarabadi, Mansoureh; Ghotbi, Mohamad-Hamed; Mostajabi, Pardis; Sohrabpour, Amir-Ali; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Abedi, Behnoush; Mofid, Azadeh; Nouraie, Mehdi; Tofangchiha, Shahnaz; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2007-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common and chronic disorder but long term, prospective studies of the fate of patients seeking medical advice are scarce. This is especially prominent when looking at non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients. Methods We designed a prospective cohort to assess the long term outcome of GERD patients referring to gastroenterologists. Consecutive consenting patients, 15 years of age and older, presenting with symptoms suggestive of GERD referring to our outpatient clinics undergo a 30 minute interview. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is performed for them with protocol biopsies and blood samples are drawn. Patients are then treated according to a set protocol and followed regularly either in person or by telephone for at least 10 years. Discussion Our data show that such a study is feasible and follow-ups, which are the main concern, can be done in a fairly reliable way to collect data. The results of this study will help to clarify the course of various subgroups of GERD patients after coming to medical attention and their response to treatment considering different variables. In addition, the basic symptoms and biological database will fuel further molecular epidemiologic studies. PMID:18028533

  15. Animal model of acid-reflux esophagitis: pathogenic roles of acid/pepsin, prostaglandins, and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Koji; Nagahama, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Esophagitis was induced in rats within 3 h by ligating both the pylorus and transitional region between the forestomach and glandular portion under ether anesthesia. This esophageal injury was prevented by the administration of acid suppressants and antipepsin drug and aggravated by exogenous pepsin. Damage was also aggravated by pretreatment with indomethacin and the selective COX-1 but not COX-2 inhibitor, whereas PGE2 showed a biphasic effect depending on the dose; a protection at low doses, and an aggravation at high doses, with both being mediated by EP1 receptors. Various amino acids also affected this esophagitis in different ways; L-alanine and L-glutamine had a deleterious effect, while L-arginine and glycine were highly protective, both due to yet unidentified mechanisms. It is assumed that acid/pepsin plays a major pathogenic role in this model of esophagitis; PGs derived from COX-1 are involved in mucosal defense of the esophagus; and some amino acids are protective against esophagitis. These findings also suggest a novel therapeutic approach in the treatment of esophagitis, in addition to acid suppressant therapy. The model introduced may be useful to test the protective effects of drugs on esophagitis and investigate the mucosal defense mechanism in the esophagus. PMID:24672789

  16. Dickkopf-1, the Wnt antagonist, is induced by acidic pH and mediates epithelial cellular senescence in human reflux esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Lyros, Orestis; Rafiee, Parvaneh; Nie, Linghui; Medda, Rituparna; Jovanovic, Nebojsa; Schmidt, Jamie; Mackinnon, Alexander; Venu, Nanda

    2014-01-01

    Squamous esophageal epithelium adapts to acid reflux-mediated injury by proliferation and differentiation via signal transduction pathways. Induction of the Wnt antagonist Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1) is involved in tissue repair during inflammation and cellular injury. In this study, we aimed to identify the biological role of Dkk1 in human reflux esophagitis with respect to cell growth and regulation of Wnt signaling. Esophageal biopsies from reflux-esophagitis patients (n = 15) and healthy individuals (n = 10) were characterized in terms of Dkk1 expression. The role of Dkk1 in response to acid-mediated epithelial injury was analyzed by cellular assays in vitro utilizing squamous esophageal epithelial cell lines (EPC1-hTERT, EPC2-hTERT, and HEEC). Dkk1 was significantly overexpressed in human reflux-esophagitis tissue compared with healthy esophageal mucosa at transcriptional and translational levels. After acute and chronic acid (pH 4) exposure, esophageal squamous epithelial cell lines expressed and secreted high levels of Dkk1 in response to stress-associated DNA injury. High extracellular levels of human recombinant Dkk1 inhibited epithelial cell growth and induced cellular senescence in vitro, as demonstrated by reduced cell proliferation, G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, elevated senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, and upregulation of p16. Acid pulsing induced Dkk1-mediated senescence, which was directly linked to the ability of Dkk1 to antagonize the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. In healthy esophageal mucosa, Dkk1 expression was associated with low expression of transcriptionally active β-catenin, while in reflux-esophagitis tissue, Dkk1 overexpression correlated with increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity and p16 upregulation. The data indicate that, in human reflux esophagitis, Dkk1 functions as a secreted growth inhibitor by suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling and promoting cellular senescence. These findings suggest a significant

  17. Size-controlled synthesis and formation mechanism of manganese oxide OMS-2 nanowires under reflux conditions with KMnO4 and inorganic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qin; Cheng, Xiaodi; Qiu, Guohong; Liu, Fan; Feng, Xionghan

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a simplified approach for size-controlled synthesis of manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2) nanowires using potassium permanganate (KMnO4) and different inorganic acids (HCl, HNO3, and H2SO4) under reflux conditions. The morphology and nanostructure of the synthesized products are characterized by X-ray diffraction, Ar adsorption, and electron microscopy analysis, in order to elucidate the controlling effects of acid concentration and type as well as the formation mechanism of OMS-2 nanowires. The concentration of inorganic acid is a crucial factor controlling the phase of the synthesized products. OMS-2 nanowires are obtained with HCl at the concentration ≥0.96 mol/L or with HNO3 and H2SO4 at the concentrations ≥0.72 mol/L. Differently, the type of inorganic acid effectively determines the particle size of OMS-2 nanowires. When the acid is changed from HCl to HNO3 and H2SO4 in the reflux system, the average length of OMS-2 declines significantly by 60-70% (1104-442 and 339 nm), with minor decreased in the average width (43-39 and 34 nm). The formation of OMS-2 nanowires under reflux conditions with KMnO4 and inorganic acids involves a two-step process, i.e., the initial formation of layered manganese oxides, and subsequent transformation to OMS-2 via a dissolution-recrystallization process under acidic conditions. The proposed reflux route provides an alternative approach for synthesizing OMS-2 nanowires as well as other porous nano-crystalline OMS materials.

  18. On the Opening of Thick Walled Elastic Tubes: A Fluid-Structure Model for Acid Reflux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sudip; Kahrilas, Peter

    2005-11-01

    A coupled fluid-structure mathematical model was developed to quantify rapid opening of thick-walled elastic tubes, a phenomenon underlying biological flows such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The wall was modeled using non-linear finite deformation theory to predict space-time radial distention of an axisymmetric tube with luminal fluid flow. Anisotropic azimuthal and longitudinal muscle-induced stresses were incorporated, and interstitial material properties were assumed isotropic and linearly elastic. Fluid flow was modeled using lubrication theory with inertial correction. Opening and flow were driven by a specified inflow pressure and zero pressure gradient was specified at outflow. No-slip and surface force balance were applied at the fluid-wall interface. Viscoelasticity was modeled with ad hoc damping and the evolution of the tube geometry was predicted at mid-layer. A potentially important discovery was made when applied to studies of initiation of opening with GERD: while material stiffness is of minor consequence, small changes in resting lumen distension (˜2 mm diameter) may be a sensitive distinguishing feature of the disease.

  19. Characteristics of symptomatic reflux episodes in Japanese proton pump inhibitor-refractory non-erosive reflux disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Kenichiro; Koike, Tomoyuki; Iijima, Katsunori; Saito, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Hiroki; Hatta, Waku; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients. METHODS: Thirty-five NERD patients with persistent symptoms, despite taking rabeprazole 10 mg twice daily for at least 8 wk, were included in this study. All patients underwent 24 h combined impedance - pH on rabeprazole. The symptom index (SI) was considered to be positive if ≥ 50%, and proximal reflux episodes were determined when reflux reached 15 cm above the proximal margin of the lower esophageal sphincter. RESULTS: In 14 (40%) SI-positive patients, with liquid weakly acid reflux, the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms was significantly more frequent in proximal reflux episodes (46.7%) than in distal ones (5.7%) (P < 0.001). With liquid acid reflux, there were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms between proximal reflux episodes (38.5%) and distal ones (20.5%) (NS). With mixed liquid-gas weakly acid reflux, the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms in proximal reflux episodes was significantly more frequent (31.0%) than in distal reflux ones (3.3%) (P < 0.001). With mixed liquid-gas acid reflux, there were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms between proximal reflux episodes (29.4%) and distal ones (14.3%) (NS). CONCLUSION: The proximal extent of weakly acidic liquid and mixed liquid-gas reflux is a major factor associated with reflux perception in SI-positive patients on proton pump inhibitor therapy. PMID:26715820

  20. 2015 David Y. Graham Lecture: The First Two Decades Of Eosinophilic Esophagitis-From Acid Reflux To Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Ikuo

    2016-06-01

    Collaborative efforts by pediatric and adult gastroenterologists, allergists, dieticians, and pathologists have brought about marked progress in the recognition, understanding, and management of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) over the past two decades. Once an esoteric diagnosis, EoE is now increasingly identified as a major cause of morbidity, afflicting both children and adults. The detection of mucosal eosinophils has evolved from a diagnostic feature of acid reflux to a biomarker of food sensitization of the esophagus. Translational studies and murine models have elucidated Th-2 immune pathways in EoE, inspiring the development of targeted biologic therapeutics. At the same time, validation of patient-reported outcomes and endoscopic end points has facilitated the implementation of clinical trials of novel therapeutics. Ongoing investigations have elucidated the importance of "looking beneath the surface" of the epithelium, focusing greater attention on the impact of esophageal remodeling in the clinical consequences of EoE. Elimination diets continue to gain popularity as an intriguing, highly effective, and non-pharmacologic therapy that lends credence to the concept that EoE is a food-driven, immunologic disorder. PMID:27068720

  1. [The effect of pH and amount of antacids on bile acid binding in a quasi-natural reflux milieu].

    PubMed

    Kurtz, W; Güldütuna, S; Leuschner, U

    1991-05-01

    Bile acid adsorption may be one therapeutical mechanism of antacids. Little is known about the effect of pH and amount of antacid on bile acid adsorption. Therefore we carried out the following investigations using a lattice [correction of lettuce] layer antacid as a model substance. 5 ml of "quasi-natural reflux milieu" were mixed with 0.5, 1 or 2 ml of hydrotalcite and adjusted to pH 3, 5 or 7. The highest total bile acid adsorption was found at pH 3, the degree of bile acid adsorption correlated with bile acid lipophilicity, i.e. the most lipophilic and toxic bile acids are adsorbed best. High adsorption of lipophilic and particularly toxic bile acids even at low gastric pH may help to explain the good therapeutic effect of low-dose antacids in gastric ulcer. PMID:1950032

  2. Laryngopharyngeal reflux and Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Taner; Bajin, Münir Demir; Günaydın, Rıza Önder; Özer, Serdar; Sözen, Tevfik

    2014-01-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) occurs when gastric contents pass the upper esophageal sphincter, causing symptoms such as hoarseness, sore throat, coughing, excess throat mucus, and globus. The pattern of reflux is different in LPR and gastroesophageal reflux. LPR usually occurs during the daytime in the upright position whereas gastroesophageal reflux disease more often occurs in the supine position at night-time or during sleep. Ambulatory 24-h double pH-probe monitoring is the gold standard diagnostic tool for LPR. Acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor on a long-term basis is the mainstay of treatment. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is found in many sites including laryngeal mucosa and interarytenoid region. In this paper, we aim to present the relationship between LPR and H. pylori and review the current literature. PMID:25083069

  3. Gastroesophageal Reflux in Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reflux (GER) and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) in Children and Teens ... findings through its clearinghouses and education programs to increase knowledge and understanding about health ...

  4. Pilot study of longitudinal ultrasonic sensor for dynamic volumetric assessment of gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuexin; Sadowski, Daniel C; Mintchev, Martin P

    2010-01-01

    In patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), esophageal symptoms are traditionally diagnosed by monitoring the contact time between the reflux content and the esophagus using multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH (MII-pH) catheters. However, esophageal catheter for quantifying the volume of reflux content is still lacking. The present work proposes an innovative method to develop a longitudinal ultrasonic catheter and an information extraction system for reflux event detection and reflux volume estimation. Gastroesophageal model that mimics reflux events was developed to test the proposed catheter. Ultrasonic sensing was evaluated by simulating different volumes of reflux. The obtained signals showed good consistency in detecting reflux events and measuring reflux volume. During an in vivo human testing, a MII-pH catheter was used simultaneously to compare the ultrasonic output. Both in vitro and in vivo human testing results demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing the proposed method for gastroesophageal reflux (GER) detection and reflux volume estimation. PMID:21097205

  5. Esophageal Impedance Monitoring for Gastroesophageal Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Hayat M.; Rosen, Rachel; Woodley, Frederick W.; Orsi, Marina; Armas, Daneila; Faure, Christophe; Fortunato, John; O'Connor, Judith; Skaggs, Beth; Nurko, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Dual pH-multichannel intraluminal impedance (pH-MII) is a sensitive tool for evaluating overall gastroesophageal reflux disease, and particularly for permitting detection of nonacid reflux events. pH-MII technology is especially useful in the postprandial period or at other times when gastric contents are nonacidic. pH-MII was recently recognized by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition and the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition as being superior to pH monitoring alone for evaluation of the temporal relation between symptoms and gastroesophageal reflux. In children, pHMII is useful to correlate symptoms with reflux (particularly nonacid reflux), to quantify reflux during tube feedings and the postprandial period, and to assess efficacy of antireflux therapy. This clinical review is simply an evidence-based overview addressing the indications, limitations, and recommended protocol for the clinical use of pH-MII in children. PMID:21240010

  6. Composition of gastro-oesophageal refluxate.

    PubMed Central

    Gotley, D C; Morgan, A P; Ball, D; Owen, R W; Cooper, M J

    1991-01-01

    Fifty two patients with abnormal acid gastro-oesophageal reflux were studied by simultaneous oesophageal pH monitoring and continuous aspiration for 16 hours. Aspirates (from discrete two hour periods) were analysed for volume, pH, bile acids (conjugated and unconjugated), trypsin, and pepsin. The results were compared with pH changes and degree of oesophagitis. Patients with oesophagitis had greater acid reflux than those without, but patients with stricture and Barrett's oesophagus had similar acid reflux to those with uncomplicated erosive oesophagitis. Pepsin concentrations were highest in patients with stricture and Barrett's oesophagus particularly during nocturnal periods. Conjugated bile acids were detected in 75% of patients, mainly during the night, but only 2% of aspirates contained concentrations likely to be cytotoxic. Unconjugated bile acids were not detected, and trypsin was seldom found. Reflux oesophagitis is caused by acid and pepsin. Bile acids and trypsin are probably unimportant. PMID:1955160

  7. Efficacy of dextranomer hyaluronic acid and polyacrylamide hydrogel in endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Anne-Sophie; Morin, Fannie; Cloutier, Jonathan; Moore, Katherine; Bolduc, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Various bulking agents are available for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) endoscopic treatment, but their inconsistent success rates and costs are concerns for urologists. Recently, polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAHG) has been shown to have a good overall success rate, which seems comparable to dextranomer hyaluronic acid (Dx/HA), currently the most popular bulking agent. Our objective was to compare the short-term success rate of PAHG and Dx/HA for VUR endoscopic treatment in children. Methods: We performed a prospective non-randomized study using PAHG and Dx/HA to treat VUR grades I to IV in pediatric patients. All patients underwent endoscopic sub-ureteric injection of PAHG or Dx/HA, using the double-HIT technique, followed by a 3-month postoperative renal ultrasound and voiding cystourethrogram. Treatment success was defined as the absence of de novo or worsening hydronephrosis and absence of VUR. Results: A total of 90 pediatric patients underwent an endoscopic injection: 45 patients (78 ureters) with PAHG and 45 patients (71 ureters) with Dx/HA. The mean injected volume of PAHG and Dx/HA was 1.1 mL and 1.0 mL, respectively. The overall success rate 3 months after a single treatment was 73.1% for PAHG and 77.5% for Dx/HA. Postoperatively, 1 patient in each group presented with acute pyelonephritis and 2 patients in the Dx/HA group developed symptomatic ureteral obstruction. Conclusion: Success rates of PAGH and Dx/HA in endoscopic injections for VUR treatment were comparable. The rate of resolution obtained with Dx/HA was equivalent to those previously published. The lower cost of PAHG makes it an interesting option. PMID:26225173

  8. Anti-reflux surgery - children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... enable JavaScript. Your child had surgery to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD is a condition that causes acid, food, or ... IPEG guidelines for the surgical treatment of pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A . ...

  9. Bile acid reflux contributes to development of esophageal adenocarcinoma via activation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase Cgamma2 and NADPH oxidase NOX5-S.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jie; Behar, Jose; Wands, Jack; Resnick, Murray; Wang, Li Juan; Delellis, Ronald A; Lambeth, David; Cao, Weibiao

    2010-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease complicated by Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a major risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). However, the mechanisms of the progression from BE to EA are not fully understood. Besides acid reflux, bile acid reflux may also play an important role in the progression from BE to EA. In this study, we examined the role of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and a novel NADPH oxidase NOX5-S in bile acid-induced increase in cell proliferation. We found that taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) significantly increased NOX5-S expression, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production, and cell proliferation in EA cells. The TDCA-induced increase in cell proliferation was significantly reduced by U73122, an inhibitor of PI-PLC. PI-PLCbeta1, PI-PLCbeta3, PI-PLCbeta4, PI-PLCgamma1, and PI-PLCgamma2, but not PI-PLCbeta2 and PI-PLCdelta1, were detectable in FLO cells by Western blot analysis. Knockdown of PI-PLCgamma2 or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 2 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase with small interfering RNAs (siRNA) significantly decreased TDCA-induced NOX5-S expression, H(2)O(2) production, and cell proliferation. In contrast, knockdown of PI-PLCbeta1, PI-PLCbeta3, PI-PLCbeta4, PI-PLCgamma1, or ERK1 MAP kinase had no significant effect. TDCA significantly increased ERK2 phosphorylation, an increase that was reduced by U73122 or PI-PLCgamma2 siRNA. We conclude that TDCA-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and cell proliferation may depend on sequential activation of PI-PLCgamma2 and ERK2 MAP kinase in EA cells. It is possible that bile acid reflux present in patients with BE may increase reactive oxygen species production and cell proliferation via activation of PI-PLCgamma2, ERK2 MAP kinase, and NADPH oxidase NOX5-S, thereby contributing to the development of EA. PMID:20086178

  10. Relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux and airway diseases: the airway reflux paradigm.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Galván, Adalberto; Hart, Simon P; Morice, Alyn H

    2011-04-01

    Our understanding of the relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux and respiratory disease has recently undergone important changes. The previous paradigm of airway reflux as synonymous with the classic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) causing heartburn has been overturned. Numerous epidemiological studies have shown a highly significant association of the acid, liquid, and gaseous reflux of GORD with conditions such as laryngeal diseases, chronic rhinosinusitis, treatment resistant asthma, COPD and even idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, it has become clear from studies on cough hypersensitivity syndrome that much reflux of importance in the airways has been missed, since it is either non- or weakly acid and gaseous in composition. The evidence for such a relationship relies on the clinical history pointing to symptom associations with known precipitants of reflux. The tools for the diagnosis of extra-oesophageal reflux, in contrast to the oesophageal reflux of GORD, lack sensitivity and reproducibility. Unfortunately, methodology for detecting such reflux is only just becoming available and much additional work is required to properly delineate its role. PMID:21459504

  11. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Larrosa Haro, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Physiological gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus and occurs up 2/3 of normal infants; and, it resolves spontaneously around 9-12 months of age. When GER causes symptoms or complications is considered gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and it is associated to growth impairment, anemia, apnea, wheezing or other chronic respiratory symptoms, asthma, recurrent pneumonia or sleeping problems. Diagnosis of GERD implies studies as upper gastrointestinal series, upper endoscopy and 24 h esophageal pH monitoring; special cases may require motility and nuclear medicine studies. GER may be successfully treated with prone elevated position (30-45 degrees), shortening the feeding intervals to 3 h and anti-GER high-viscosity formulas. The regular use of prokinetic drugs is not recommended. The efficacy of proton pump inhibitors and H2 histamine receptor antagonists in the treatment of GERD has been demonstrated in children by diminishing de acid secretion of parietal cells, lowering the gastric contents and decreasing its ability to cause peptic-acid damage to the esophagus or to the respiratory tract. Surgical treatment is indicated in chronic recurrent GERD, usually in children 5 years or older with dependent proton pump inhibitor erosive esophagitis, chronic respiratory disease and in risk-selected cases. PMID:22352129

  12. Effect of Different pH Criteria on Dual-sensor pH Monitoring in the Evaluation of Supraesophageal Gastric Reflux in Children

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Eric; Rosen, Rachel; Nurko, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim Existing tests for supraesophageal gastric reflux (SEGR) that focus on pH drops <4 in the proximal esophagus have had limited sensitivity and specificity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of newly proposed pH criteria on SEGR detection. Patients and Methods Twenty-four-hour dual-sensor pH tracings of 32 patients were reviewed. Proximal esophageal pH data were evaluated according to the conventional definition of pH drop <4 and 2 proposed definitions: pH drop <5.5 while upright and <5.0 while supine and pH drop of >10% from a running baseline. For each potential SEGR event, the preceding 1-minute window was examined for corresponding distal acid reflux. Results Of the 542 distal acid reflux events detected, 200 were associated with a proximal pH drop <4; this number increased to 295 using the definition of proximal pH drop <5.5 (upright)/<5.0 (supine) and 301 using the definition of proximal pH drop >10%. A proportion of proximal events, however, was not associated with distal acid reflux: 21 of 200 (10.5%) proximal pH <4 events, 119 of 414 (29%) proximal pH <5.5 (upright)/<5.0 (supine) events, and 272 of 573 (47%) proximal pH drop >10% events lacked a preceding or simultaneous drop in distal pH <4. Conclusions Although the use of more liberal pH criteria increased the diagnostic yield for SEGR events with dual-sensor monitoring, a significant proportion of proximal pH events did not correlate with distal acid reflux. These events could represent either false-positive measurements or association with weakly acid reflux. PMID:21206381

  13. Most asthmatics have gastroesophageal reflux with or without bronchodilator therapy.

    PubMed

    Sontag, S J; O'Connell, S; Khandelwal, S; Miller, T; Nemchausky, B; Schnell, T G; Serlovsky, R

    1990-09-01

    The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux and asthma has not been clearly defined. We measured the lower esophageal sphincter pressures and studied gastroesophageal reflux patterns over 24 hours using an ambulatory Gastroreflux Recorder (Del Mar Avionics, Irvine, CA) in 44 controls and 104 consecutive adult asthmatics. The presence or absence of reflux symptoms was not used as a selection criterion for asthmatics. All asthmatics had discrete episodes of diffuse wheezing and documented reversible airway obstruction of at least 20%. Patients underwent reflux testing while receiving, if any, their usual asthmatic medications: 71.2% required chronic bronchodilators and 28.8% required no bronchodilators. Compared with controls, asthmatics had significantly decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressures, greater esophageal acid exposure times, more frequent reflux episodes, and longer clearance times in both the upright and supine positions (P less than 0.0001 for all parameters tested). There were no differences in any of the measured reflux parameters between asthmatics who required bronchodilators and those who did not. Thus, the decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressures and increased levels of acid reflux in asthmatics were not entirely caused by the effects of bronchodilator therapy. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis generated reflux values that discriminated asthmatics from controls. More than 80% of adult asthmatics have abnormal gastroesophageal reflux. We conclude that most adult asthmatics, regardless of the use of bronchodilator therapy, have abnormal gastroesophageal reflux manifested by increased reflux frequency, delayed acid clearance during the day and night, and diminished lower esophageal sphincter pressures. PMID:2379769

  14. Gastroesophageal reflux in infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001134.htm Gastroesophageal reflux in infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Gastroesophageal reflux occurs when stomach contents leak backward from the ...

  15. Gastroesophageal reflux - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic esophagitis - discharge; Reflux esophagitis - discharge; GERD - discharge; Heartburn - chronic - discharge ... You have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a condition in which food or liquid travels backwards from the stomach to the ...

  16. Gastroesophageal Reflux in Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding how Crohn’s Disease treatments affect children’s gut microbiome Jun 10, 2016 See additional news » Related Conditions & Diseases Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER) and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) ...

  17. Gaviscon Double Action Liquid (antacid & alginate) is more effective than antacid in controlling postprandial esophageal acid exposure in GERD patients; a double-blind crossover study

    PubMed Central

    De Ruigh, Annemijn; Roman, Sabine; Chen, Joan; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that Gaviscon Double Action Liquid (a combination alginate-antacid) administered postprandially co-localizes with the acid pocket, the ‘reservoir’ for postprandial acid reflux. Aim This study compared the effectiveness of Gaviscon Double Action Liquid to an equivalent strength antacid without alginate in controlling postprandial acid reflux in GERD patients. Methods 14 GERD patients undertook two 3.5-hour high-resolution manometry/pH-impedance studies during which they ate a standardized meal. In a double-blinded randomized crossover design they then took Gaviscon or CVS brand antacid, each with ~18 mmol/l acid neutralizing capacity. The primary outcome was distal esophageal acid exposure; secondary outcomes were number of reflux events, proximal extent of reflux, nadir pH of the refluxate, mechanism of reflux, and reflux symptoms scored with a validated instrument. Results 10 patients completed the study. Gaviscon studies had significantly less distal esophageal acid exposure and greater nadir refluxate pH in the 30–150 minute postprandial period than antacid studies. There were no differences in the number of reflux events (acid or weakly acidic) or the number of proximal reflux events (15–17 cm above the LES) with either study medication. Conclusions Gaviscon Double Action Liquid was more effective than an antacid without alginate in controlling postprandial esophageal acid exposure. However, the number and spatial distribution of reflux events within the esophagus were similar. This suggests that Gaviscon main effectiveness related to its co-localization with and displacement/neutralization of the post-prandial acid pocket, rather than preventing reflux. PMID:25041141

  18. Laryngopharyngeal reflux in patients with reflux esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yung-Chih; Wang, Pa-Chun; Lin, Jun-Chen

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) in patients with reflux esophagitis and disclose factors contributing to the development of LPR. METHODS: A total of 167 patients who proved to have reflux esophagitis by endoscopy were enrolled. They received laryngoscopy to grade the reflux findings for the diagnosis of LPR. We used validated questionnaires to identify the presence of laryngopharyngeal symptoms, and stringent criteria of inclusion to increase the specificity of laryngoscopic findings. The data of patients were analyzed statistically to find out factors related to LPR. RESULTS: The prevalence rate of LPR in studied subjects with reflux esophagitis was 23.9%. Age, hoarseness and hiatus hernia were factors significantly associated with LPR. In 23 patients with a hiatus hernia, the group with LPR was found to have a lower trend of esophagitis grading. CONCLUSION: Laryngopharyngeal reflux is present in patients with reflux esophagitis, and three predicting factors were identified. However, the development of LPR might be different from that of reflux esophagitis. The importance of hiatus hernia deserves further study. PMID:18680233

  19. [Non-erosive reflux disease: NERD].

    PubMed

    Kasugai, Kunio; Funaki, Yasushi; Ebi, Masahide; Ogasawara, Naotaka; Sasaki, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) is characterized by the absence of esophageal mucosal damage during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, despite the presence of typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux, such as heartburn and acid reflux. In addition, acid reflux is known to have only a minor effect on the pathophysiological mechanism of NERD. For this reason, NERD patients who receive proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which are the first-line therapy for GERD, show a low symptom improvement rate, and almost 50% of NERD patients fail to respond to standard acid-suppression therapy that uses PPIs. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the pathophysiology of NERD and to create the therapeutic strategy for each patients. PMID:26165065

  20. The influence of dust events on precipitation acidity in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dan; Wang, Shigong; Xia, Junrong; Meng, Xiaoyan; Shang, Kezheng; Xie, Yueyu; Wang, Ruibin

    2013-11-01

    Acid rain and dust events are both serious environmental problems striking China nowadays. This study investigates the distribution and change of precipitation pH and discusses the influence of dust events on precipitation acidity qualitatively and quantitatively in China. Acid rain exhibits remarkable regionality with strong acidic in South China and the acidity gradually decreases from the South to the North. This distribution is decided not only by the concentration of SO2 in atmosphere but also has relationship to the occurrence of dust events. Comparing the monthly changes of precipitation pH in the semiarid region (which is influenced by dust events) with those in the humid region (which is acid rain areas), it is found that the variation trends are just opposite in the two regions and there is an obvious peak value of pH in spring in semiarid region which coincides with the increase of dust event days. Chemical analysis results of precipitation in Lanzhou (a semiarid city intruded by dust events frequently, especially in spring) indicate that the ratio of Ca2+ plus Mg2+ concentrations (indicators of soil dust) to the total cation concentrations is the highest in spring, and the Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations are 1.8 and 1.9 times higher in spring than in summer respectively. The acidity of precipitation can be restrained by dust events qualitatively by increasing alkaline materials in the atmosphere and precipitation. The analysis of daily dust events and precipitation data at 6 stations in Northwest China indicates that the pH of precipitation influenced by dust events is greater than the precipitation not influenced by dust events. The increase degrees are different between different stations and have lagging effects. The direct increases are from 0.03 to 0.91 for the precipitation pH. Dust events can promote the precipitation pH to a certain extent quantitatively.

  1. Glucagon and gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Drane, W E; Haggar, A M; Engel, M A

    1984-04-01

    Using radionuclide gastroesophageal reflux techniques, the effect of glucagon on the occurrence of spontaneous gastroesophageal reflux was tested in 24 normal, asymptomatic volunteers, who served as their own controls. Before glucagon administration, spontaneous gastroesophageal reflux did not occur in any of the volunteers. After 1 mg of glucagon was given, gastroesophageal reflux occurred in two (8%) of the 24 volunteers. Gastroesophageal reflux did not occur after the administration of high-density barium sulfate and an effervescent agent to simulate the circumstances of a routine double-contrast upper gastrointestinal examination. Although the effect of glucagon may facilitate gastroesophageal reflux in a small percentage of normal individuals, most do not exhibit spontaneous gastroesophageal reflux, either before or after glucagon administration. PMID:6608226

  2. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and gastro-oesophageal reflux in neurologically impaired children

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Mike; Rao, Prithviraj; Rawat, David; Wenzl, Tobias G

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) feeding on gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in a group of these children using combined intraluminal pH and multiple intraluminal impedance (pH/MII). METHODS: Ten neurologically impaired children underwent 12 h combined pH/MII procedures at least 1 d before and at least 12 d after PEG placement. METHODS: Prior to PEG placement (pre-PEG) a total of 183 GOR episodes were detected, 156 (85.2%) were non-acidic. After PEG placement (post-PEG) a total of 355 episodes were detected, 182 (51.3%) were non-acidic. The total number of distal acid reflux events statistically significantly increased post-PEG placement (pre-PEG total 27, post-PEG total 173, P = 0.028) and the mean distal pH decreased by 1.1 units. The distal reflux index therefore also significantly increased post-PEG [pre-PEG 0.25 (0-2), post-PEG 2.95 (0-40)]. Average proximal pH was lower post-PEG but the within subject difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.058). Median number of non-acid GOR, average reflux height, total acid clearance time and total bolus clearance time were all lower pre-PEG, but not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: PEG placement increases GOR episodes in neurologically impaired children. PMID:21245991

  3. Intravenous radionuclide cystography for the detection of vesicorenal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Pollet, J.E.; Sharp, P.F.; Smith, F.W.; Davidson, A.I.; Miller, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    Intravenous radionuclide cystography using a single intravenous injection of 99mtechnetium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, provides information on individual kidney function, coarse anatomy and vesicorenal reflux. This study investigates the effectiveness of intravenous radionuclide cystography in detecting reflux. In 58 children intravenous radionuclide cystography detected 53 ureters with reflux compared to 32 detected by voiding cystography. This difference was investigated further with patients in whom other test suggested reflux. While there was no statistically significant difference for patients having pyelonephritis or hydronephrosis, intravenous radionuclide cystography detected significantly more ureters with reflux in patients with abnormal ureteral orifices or infected urine and, therefore, predisposed to reflux. Intravenous radionuclide cystography is a more comprehensive and sensitive test for vesicorenal reflux than voiding cystography.

  4. Randomized clinical trial: effect of the 5-HT4 receptor agonist revexepride on reflux parameters in patients with persistent reflux symptoms despite PPI treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tack, J; Zerbib, F; Blondeau, K; des Varannes, S B; Piessevaux, H; Borovicka, J; Mion, F; Fox, M; Bredenoord, A J; Louis, H; Dedrie, S; Hoppenbrouwers, M; Meulemans, A; Rykx, A; Thielemans, L; Ruth, M

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately, 20–30% of patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) experience persistent symptoms despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). These patients may have underlying dysmotility; therefore, targeting gastric motor dysfunction in addition to acid inhibition may represent a new therapeutic avenue. The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacodynamic effect of the prokinetic agent revexepride (a 5-HT4 receptor agonist) in patients with GERD who have persistent symptoms despite treatment with a PPI. Methods This was a phase II, exploratory, multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group study in patients with GERD who experienced persistent symptoms while taking a stable dose of PPIs (http://ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01370863). Patients were randomized to either revexepride (0.5 mg, three times daily) or matching placebo for 4 weeks. Reflux events and associated characteristics were assessed by pH/impedance monitoring and disease symptoms were assessed using electronic diaries and questionnaires. Key Results In total, 67 patients were enrolled in the study. There were no significant differences between study arms in the number, the mean proximal extent or the bolus clearance times of liquid-containing reflux events. Changes from baseline in the number of heartburn, regurgitation, and other symptom events were minimal for each treatment group and no clear trends were observed. Conclusions & Inferences No clear differences were seen in reflux parameters between the placebo and revexepride groups. PMID:25530111

  5. Vesicoureteral Reflux

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  6. Effect of Gaviscon Infant on gastro-oesophageal reflux in infants assessed by combined intraluminal impedance/pH

    PubMed Central

    Del Buono, R; Wenzl, T; Ball, G; Keady, S; Thomson, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Gaviscon Infant (GI) has been recommended for gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in infants. Its efficacy has not been examined with a physiologically appropriate denominator to define the degree of GOR. Aim: To investigate the influence of Gaviscon Infant on GOR in infants using combined pH and intraluminal impedance measurement. Methods: Twenty infants (mean age 163.5 days, range 34–319 days) exclusively bottle fed, with symptoms clinically suggestive of GOR, underwent 24 hour studies of intra-oesophageal 6 channel impedance and dual channel pH monitoring, during which six random administrations (3+3) of Gaviscon Infant (625 mg in 225 ml milk) or placebo (mannitol and Solvito N, 625 mg in 225 ml milk) were given in a double blind fashion. Impedance/pH reflux data were recorded and analysed blind by one observer. Results: The median number of reflux events/hour (1.58 v 1.68), acid reflux events/hour (0.26 v 0.43), minimum distal or proximal pH, total acid clearance time per hour (time with pH below pH 4), and total reflux duration per hour were not significantly different after GI than after placebo. Reflux height was marginally lower after GI (median 66.6% v 77.3% oesophageal length) compared with placebo. Conclusions: Results showed a marginal but significant difference between Gaviscon Infant and placebo in average reflux height, and raises questions regarding any perceived clinical benefit of its use. PMID:15851425

  7. [Gastroesophageal reflux in infants: myths and realities].

    PubMed

    Baudon, J-J

    2009-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common problem in infants but the distinction between GER and GER disease remains difficult. Clinical manifestations such as vomiting, poor weight gain, respiratory disorders, and apneas do always not correlate with the demonstration of reflux episodes. Premature infants frequently suffer from reflux but correlations with apneas are also poor. Esophagitis is a complication suggested in infants experiencing pain but reflux by itself can induce pain as well. The "gold" diagnosis test is pH recording; however, overlap between normal and abnormal indices is obvious. Impedance measurement demonstrates more reflux episodes but non-acid reflux harm is not established. GER disease is probably self-limited in most infants, although it is impossible to predict whether some of them continue to have GER in adult life. The treatment raises doubts concerning indications and efficacy. Overprescription is frequent in infants with regurgitations. Nonpharmacological treatment - small-volume thickened milk and correct positioning - should be the first-line treatment. Prokinetic drugs have not proved their efficacy. Among anti-acid drugs, proton pump inhibitors are the best choice, but their indications are not very clearly established for infants. On the other hand, considerable variations of their metabolism due to the patients' age and genetic factors can explain variations in therapeutic effects. PMID:19303264

  8. Gastro-oesophageal reflux in children.

    PubMed

    Taminiau, J A

    1997-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux in children is different in several aspects from in adults. Pathophysiologically, 50% of reflux episodes are due to increased abdominal pressure which overcomes the lower oesophageal sphincter pressure. This pathophysiological abnormality disappears in children at the age of 1.5-2 years. Treatment is therefore different and aimed at thickening the gastric contents to inhibit reflux (Nutrition, Gaviscon, Algicon). The child is placed in the anti-Trendelburg position when asleep. No further investigation or intensification of treatment is necessary in young children under the age of 2 years unless complications are present. With complicated gastro-oesophageal reflux, treatment in children is comparable to that in adults; the effects of H2 antagonists and proton-pump inhibitors are identical. Long-term complications of gastro-oesophageal reflux are rare. In the near sudden death syndrome or acute life-threatening events in infants due to total sphincter relaxation aspiration is possible and should be prevented. Optimal treatment and monitoring are mandatory. In mentally handicapped children rumination is more prominent than gastro-oesophageal reflux. It is difficult to distinguish between vomiting, regurgitation and rumination. Treatment of oesophagitis might improve quality of life. When clear eosinophilic oesophagitis is observed food allergy should be considered and appropriately treated. PMID:9200301

  9. Vesicoureteric reflux in children.

    PubMed

    Tullus, Kjell

    2015-01-24

    Vesicoureteric reflux is defined as the retrograde passage of urine from the bladder into one or both ureters and often up to the kidneys, and mainly affects babies and infants. In severe cases dilatation of the ureter, renal pelvis, and calyces might be seen. Traditionally it was thought that only a low percentage of children have vesicoureteric reflux, but studies have suggested as many as 25-40% are affected. Guidelines recommend that the number of investigations for vesicoureteric reflux in children who have had a febrile urinary tract infection be reduced, but this approach is controversial. The recommendations also suggest that prophylactic antibiotics and surgery should be avoided in children with non-severe vesicoureteric reflux. In this Seminar I present data on the management of children with vesicoureteric reflux and give suggestions on how to navigate this difficult area. PMID:25164069

  10. Prospective, randomized, and active controlled study of the efficacy of alginic acid and antacid in the treatment of patients with endoscopy-negative reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Lai, I-Rue; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Lin, Jaw-Town

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of a compound containing alginic acid plus antacid (Topaal®) compared to equal-strength antacid (Nacid®) in patients with endoscopy-negative reflux disease (ENRD). METHODS: A total of 121 patients with ENRD were randomized to receive Topaal® (65 patients) or Nacid® (56 patients) for 6 weeks, with a consultation every 3 weeks. The primary end-point assessment was the change in the severity of heartburn as evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) at 6 weeks. The secondary end-point assessments were the VAS at 3 weeks, the change of frequency of the reflux symptom, the change of quality of life and the adverse effects. RESULTS: Demographics of randomized subjects in each treatment group were comparable except that the Topaal® group included more males. The baseline characteristics between the groups were similar. After 6 weeks of treatment, the reduction of VAS of heartburn was more prominent in the Topaal® group (-6.29 cm vs -4.11 cm). At the 3rd week, Topaal® group showed greater reduction of VAS for heartburn (P = 0.0016), regurgitation (P = 0.0006), vomiting (P  = 0.0373), and belching (P  <0.0001). The patients of the Topaal® group had lower frequency of heartburn (P  = 0.0015) and pain (P   = 0.0163) at the end of the 6-week treatment period. From the doctor’s point of view, the Topaal® group also showed significant reduction in the severity of heartburn (P   = 0.0020), regurgitation (P   = 0.0081), vomiting (P  = 0.0182), and belching (P   = 0.0018) at the end of the treatment. The improvement of the quality of life was more remarkable in the Topaal® group at the end of the 6-week treatment period (P  < 0.0001). For the adverse effect, there was no difference in both the groups. CONCLUSION: Topaal® is more effective than Nacid® for the treatment of symptoms presented by patients with ENRD. PMID:16521188

  11. Guidelines on gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Niaz, Saad Khalid; Quraishy, Muhammed Saeed; Taj, Muhammad Ali; Abid, Shahab; Alam, Altaf; Nawaz, Arif Amir; Ali Shah, Syed Hasnain; Khan, Ijaz Muhammed; Memon, Abdul Rauf; Zuberi, Bader Fiaz; Tayyab, Ghayasun Nabi; Malik, Kashif; Mirza, Shakeel; Abbas, Zaigham

    2015-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common acid-related disorder encountered during clinical practice in Pakistan and is associated with significant impairment of health-related quality of life. A number of guidelines and recommendations for the diagnosis and management of GERD have been published in different countries, but a Pakistani accepted directive by the standards of evidence-based medicine is still lacking. Our aim was to create an understanding of the natural history and presentations of reflux disease; evaluating possible treatment options available for the patients with complex and uncomplicated reflux ailments with the development of current and up to date evidence based endorsement, relevant to the needs of Pakistani health care providers in order to treat oesophageal manifestations of GERD. In order to make such guidelines, a comprehensive literature search was conducted with pertinent evidence reviewed, and quality of relevant data assessed. The resultant conclusions were based on the best available evidence and expert opinion of the authors of technical review panel. PMID:26028389

  12. Reflux Revisited: Advancing the Role of Pepsin

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Karna Dev; Strugala, Vicki; Dettmar, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is mediated principally by acid. Today, we recognise reflux reaches beyond the esophagus, where pepsin, not acid, causes damage. Extraesophageal reflux occurs both as liquid and probably aerosol, the latter with a further reach. Pepsin is stable up to pH 7 and regains activity after reacidification. The enzyme adheres to laryngeal cells, depletes its defences, and causes further damage internally after its endocytosis. Extraesophageal reflux can today be detected by recognising pharyngeal acidification using a miniaturised pH probe and by the identification of pepsin in saliva and in exhaled breath condensate by a rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay. Proton pump inhibitors do not help the majority with extraesophageal reflux but specifically formulated alginates, which sieve pepsin, give benefit. These new insights may lead to the development of novel drugs that dramatically reduce pepsinogen secretion, block the effects of adherent pepsin, and give corresponding clinical benefit. “For now we see through a glass, darkly.” —First epistle, Chapter 13, Corinthians PMID:22242022

  13. Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation for Gastroesophageal Reflux at 5 Years: Final Results of a Pilot Study Show Long-Term Acid Reduction and Symptom Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Saino, Greta; Bonavina, Luigi; Lipham, John C.; Dunn, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: As previously reported, the magnetic sphincter augmentation device (MSAD) preserves gastric anatomy and results in less severe side effects than traditional antireflux surgery. The final 5-year results of a pilot study are reported here. Patients and Methods: A prospective, multicenter study evaluated safety and efficacy of the MSAD for 5 years. Prior to MSAD placement, patients had abnormal esophageal acid and symptoms poorly controlled by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Patients served as their own control, which allowed comparison between baseline and postoperative measurements to determine individual treatment effect. At 5 years, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-Health Related Quality of Life (HRQL) questionnaire score, esophageal pH, PPI use, and complications were evaluated. Results: Between February 2007 and October 2008, 44 patients (26 males) had an MSAD implanted by laparoscopy, and 33 patients were followed up at 5 years. Mean total percentage of time with pH <4 was 11.9% at baseline and 4.6% at 5 years (P < .001), with 85% of patients achieving pH normalization or at least a 50% reduction. Mean total GERD-HRQL score improved significantly from 25.7 to 2.9 (P < .001) when comparing baseline and 5 years, and 93.9% of patients had at least a 50% reduction in total score compared with baseline. Complete discontinuation of PPIs was achieved by 87.8% of patients. No complications occurred in the long term, including no device erosions or migrations at any point. Conclusions: Based on long-term reduction in esophageal acid, symptom improvement, and no late complications, this study shows the relative safety and efficacy of magnetic sphincter augmentation for GERD. PMID:26437027

  14. Reflux and Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reflux and Lung Disease Proper Hydration Sodium Dangers Plant-Based Diets Why Breakfast Matters Patients & Visitors Giving For Professionals About Us Treatment & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make an Appointment Make a Donation ...

  15. The Efficacy of the Upright Position on Gastro-Esophageal Reflux and Reflux-Related Respiratory Symptoms in Infants With Chronic Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woo Jin; Yang, Hyeon Jong; Min, Taek Ki; Jeon, You Hoon; Lee, Hae Won; Lee, Jun Sung

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Gastro-esophageal reflux (GER), particularly non-acid reflux, is common in infants and is a known cause of chronic respiratory symptoms in infancy. Recent guidelines recommended empirical acid suppression therapy and the head-up position in patients with suspected GER. However, the efficacy of the upright position in relieving GER and reflux-related respiratory symptoms in infants is unclear. We conducted this study to investigate the efficacy of the upright position on GER and reflux-related respiratory symptoms in infants with chronic respiratory symptoms. Methods Thirty-two infants (21 male; median age, 5 months; range, 0 to 19 months) with unexplained chronic respiratory symptoms underwent multi-channel intraluminal esophageal impedance and pH monitoring. We retrospectively compared the frequencies of GER and reflux-related symptoms according to body position. Results A mean of 3.30 episodes of reflux per hour was detected. Overall, refluxes were more frequent during the postprandial period than the emptying period (3.77 vs. 2.79 episodes/hour, respectively; P=0.01). Although there was no significant difference in the total refluxes per hour between the upright and recumbent positions (6.12 vs. 3.77 episodes, P=0.10), reflux-related respiratory symptoms per reflux were significantly fewer in infants kept in an upright position than in a recumbent position during the postprandial period (3.07% vs. 14.75%, P=0.016). Non-acid reflux was the predominant type of reflux in infants, regardless of body position or meal time. Conclusions The upright position may reduce reflux-related respiratory symptoms, rather than reflux frequency. Thus, it may be a useful non-pharmacological treatment for infantile GER disease resistant to acid suppressants. PMID:22211166

  16. The otolaryngologic manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): a clinical investigation of 225 patients using ambulatory 24-hour pH monitoring and an experimental investigation of the role of acid and pepsin in the development of laryngeal injury.

    PubMed

    Koufman, J A

    1991-04-01

    Occult (silent) gastroesophageal reflux disease (GER, GERD) is believed to be an important etiologic factor in the development of many inflammatory and neoplastic disorders of the upper aerodigestive tract. In order ot test this hypothesis, a human study and an animal study were performed. The human study consisted primarily of applying a new diagnostic technique (double-probe pH monitoring) to a population of otolaryngology patients with GERD to determine the incidence of overt and occult GERD. The animal study consisted of experiments to evaluate the potential damaging effects of intermittent GER on the larynx. Two hundred twenty-five consecutive patients with otolaryngologic disorders having suspected GERD evaluated from 1985 through 1988 are reported. Ambulatory 24-hour intraesophageal pH monitoring was performed in 197; of those, 81% underwent double-probe pH monitoring, with the second pH probe being placed in the hypopharynx at the laryngeal inlet. Seventy percent of the patients also underwent barium esophagography with videofluoroscopy. The patient population was divided into seven diagnostic subgroups: carcinoma of the larynx (n = 31), laryngeal and tracheal stenosis (n = 33), reflux laryngitis (n = 61), globus pharyngeus (n = 27), dysphagia (n = 25), chronic cough (n = 30), and a group with miscellaneous disorders (n = 18). The most common symptoms were hoarseness (71%), cough (51%), globus (47%), and throat clearing (42%). Only 43% of the patients had gastrointestinal symptoms (heartburn or acid regurgitation). Thus, by traditional symptomatology, GER was occult or silent in the majority of the study population. Twenty-eight patients (12%) refused or could not tolerate pH monitoring. Of the patients undergoing diagnostic pH monitoring, 62% had abnormal esophageal pH studies, and 30% demonstrated reflux into the pharynx. The results of diagnostic pH monitoring for each of the subgroups were as follows (percentage with abnormal studies): carcinoma (71

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux diagnosed by occlusal splint tintion.

    PubMed

    Cebrián-Carretero, José Luis; López-Arcas-Calleja, José María

    2006-01-01

    The gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease is a very frequent digestive disorder, mainly characterised by the reflux of the gastric acidic content to the esophage in abnormal quantities. There are different situations that favour this situation but almost in all of them rely an incompetence of the esophagic sphincter. The clinical consequences are many, including oral manifestations. Among all of them the most frequent is the esophagitis followed by symptoms at the pharynx or larynx and finally, the oral cavity. At this level fundamentally we will find enamel and oral mucosa erosions. We report the case of a patient who was indirectly diagnosed of her esophague disease by the observation of the alterations in the occlusal splint induced by the gastric reflux. We review the literature concerning the above topic and its possible association with the miofascial syndrome. PMID:16388289

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux in cirrhotic patients without esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Cui, Pei-Lin; Lv, Dong; Yao, Shi-Wei; Xu, You-Qing; Yang, Zhao-Xu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the esophageal motility and abnormal acid and bile reflux incidence in cirrhotic patients without esophageal varices (EV). METHODS: Seventy-eight patients with liver cirrhosis without EV confirmed by upper gastroesophageal endoscopy and 30 healthy control volunteers were prospectively enrolled in this study. All the patients were evaluated using a modified protocol including Child-Pugh score, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, esophageal manometry, simultaneous ambulatory 24-h esophageal pH and bilirubin monitoring. All the patients and volunteers accepted the manometric study. RESULTS: In the liver cirrhosis group, lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP, 15.32 ± 2.91 mmHg), peristaltic amplitude (PA, 61.41 ± 10.52 mmHg), peristaltic duration (PD, 5.32 ± 1.22 s), and peristaltic velocity (PV, 5.22 ± 1.11 cm/s) were all significantly abnormal in comparison with those in the control group (P < 0.05), and LESP was negatively correlated with Child-Pugh score. The incidence of reflux esophagitis (RE) and pathologic reflux was 37.18% and 55.13%, respectively (vs control, P < 0.05). And the incidence of isolated abnormal acid reflux, bile reflux and mixed reflux was 12.82%, 14.10% and 28.21% in patients with liver cirrhosis without EV. CONCLUSION: Cirrhotic patients without EV presented esophageal motor disorders and mixed acid and bile reflux was the main pattern; the cirrhosis itself was an important causative factor. PMID:21483637

  19. A study of photocatalytic graphene–TiO{sub 2} synthesis via peroxo titanic acid refluxed sol

    SciTech Connect

    Low, Wasu; Boonamnuayvitaya, Virote

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} synthesized via PTA as a precursor demonstrates exclusively anatase phase. • The TEM image of GR–TiO{sub 2} (PTA) demonstrates that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are successfully loaded onto graphene sheet. • The specific surface area seems to increase with increasing weight ratio of graphene oxide. It was observed that GR–TiO{sub 2} showed higher adsorption compared to bare TiO{sub 2} (PTA). • The GR–TiO{sub 2} (PTA, 1:50) catalyst showed higher photocatalytic activity than any other catalyst. - Abstract: In the present work, graphene–TiO{sub 2} (GR–TiO{sub 2}) photocatalyst with various weight ratios of graphene was synthesized using peroxo titanic acid solution (PTA) as a precursor for TiO{sub 2}. Graphene oxide prepared by Hummer's method was converted to graphene under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in ethanol–water solvent for 48 h. The as-prepared GR–TiO{sub 2} composites were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV–vis spectrophotometry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The automated potentiostat was applied to measure the photocurrent generations of prepared catalysts. The photocatalytic activities of GR–TiO{sub 2} (PTA) catalysts were determined by measuring the percentage methylene blue (MB) degradation. The results showed that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were successfully loaded onto graphene sheet and the surface area of catalysts increased with increasing weight ratio of graphene. In addition, GR–TiO{sub 2} (PTA, 1:50) exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity among the catalysts under UV and visible light irradiation. The adsorption edge of GR–TiO{sub 2} was shifted to a longer wavelength of 400 nm in comparison with that of pure TiO{sub 2} (PTA). The increase in the photocatalytic performance of GR–TiO{sub 2} (PTA) catalyst may be attributed to the increase in surface area, the extension of light absorption in

  20. Helicobacter pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Michele; Cadeddu, Federica; Villa, Massimo; Attinà, Grazia Maria; Muzi, Marco Gallinella; Nigro, Casimiro; Rulli, Francesco; Farinon, Attilio M

    2008-01-01

    Background The nature of the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and reflux oesophagitis is still not clear. To investigate the correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and GERD taking into account endoscopic, pH-metric and histopathological data. Methods Between January 2001 and January 2003 a prospective study was performed in 146 patients with GERD in order to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection at gastric mucosa; further the value of the De Meester score endoscopic, manometric and pH-metric parameters, i.e. reflux episodes, pathological reflux episodes and extent of oesophageal acid exposure, of the patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection were studied and statistically compared. Finally, univariate analysis of the above mentioned data were performed in order to evaluate the statistical correlation with reflux esophagitis. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups, HP infected and HP negative patients, regarding age, gender and type of symptoms. There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding severity of symptoms and manometric parameters. The value of the De Meester score and the ph-metric parameters were similar in both groups. On univariate analysis, we observed that hiatal hernia (p = 0,01), LES size (p = 0,05), oesophageal wave length (p = 0,01) and pathological reflux number (p = 0,05) were significantly related to the presence of reflux oesophagitis. Conclusion Based on these findings, it seems that there is no significant evidence for an important role for H. pylori infection in the development of GERD and erosive esophagitis. Nevertheless, current data do not provide sufficient evidence to define the relationship between HP and GERD. Further assessments in prospective large studies are warranted. PMID:18601740

  1. Extra-Esophageal Manifestations of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Controversies Between Epidemiology and Clicnic

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Hamid; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is widely associated with asthma, chronic cough, and laryngitis. Many studies have focused on acidic reflux; however, acid is just one of many factors that can cause pulmonary injury. The discrepancy between the high frequency of GERD in asthmatic patients and the ineffective reflux therapy outcomes in these patients suggests that GERD may cause injury through other mechanisms, such as pepsinogen, pepsin, bile salts, or other components of reflux materials, instead of the acid. Research using appropriate and innovative methodologies to investigate these potential inflammatory agents in patients with GERD is required to determine the underlying factors associated with pulmonary disorders in these patients. PMID:23166570

  2. Gastroesophageal reflux - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100181.htm Gastroesophageal reflux - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics GERD A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  3. Multiple Glass Transitions and Freezing Events of Aqueous Citric Acid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Calorimetric and optical cryo-microscope measurements of 10–64 wt % citric acid (CA) solutions subjected to moderate (3 K/min) and slow (0.5 and 0.1 K/min) cooling/warming rates and also to quenching/moderate warming between 320 and 133 K are presented. Depending on solution concentration and cooling rate, the obtained thermograms show one freezing event and from one to three liquid–glass transitions upon cooling and from one to six liquid–glass and reverse glass–liquid transitions, one or two freezing events, and one melting event upon warming of frozen/glassy CA/H2O. The multiple freezing events and glass transitions pertain to the mother CA/H2O solution itself and two freeze-concentrated solution regions, FCS1 and FCS2, of different concentrations. The FCS1 and FCS2 (or FCS22) are formed during the freezing of CA/H2O upon cooling and/or during the freezing upon warming of partly glassy or entirely glassy mother CA/H2O. The formation of two FCS1 and FCS22 regions during the freezing upon warming to our best knowledge has never been reported before. Using an optical cryo-microscope, we are able to observe the formation of a continuous ice framework (IF) and its morphology and reciprocal distribution of IF/(FCS1 + FCS2). Our results provide a new look at the freezing and glass transition behavior of aqueous solutions and can be used for the optimization of lyophilization and freezing of foods and biopharmaceutical formulations, among many other applications where freezing plays a crucial role. PMID:25482069

  4. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Children with Interstitial Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Dziekiewicz, M A; Karolewska-Bochenek, K; Dembiński, Ł; Gawronska, A; Krenke, K; Lange, J; Banasiuk, M; Kuchar, E; Kulus, M; Albrecht, P; Banaszkiewicz, A

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is common in adult patients with interstitial lung disease. However, no data currently exist regarding the prevalence and characteristics of the disease in pediatric patients with interstitial lung disease. The aim of the present study was to prospectively assess the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and characterize its features in children with interstitial lung disease. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was established based on 24 h pH-impedance monitoring (MII-pH). Gastroesophageal reflux episodes (GERs) were classified according to widely recognized criteria as acid, weakly acid, weakly alkaline, or proximal. Eighteen consecutive patients (15 boys, aged 0.2-11.6 years) were enrolled in the study. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed in a half (9/18) of children. A thousand GERs were detected by MII-pH (median 53.5; IQR 39.0-75.5). Of these, 585 (58.5 %) episodes were acidic, 407 (40.7 %) were weakly acidic, and eight (0.8 %) were weakly alkaline. There were 637 (63.7 %) proximal GERs. The patients in whom gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed had a significantly higher number of proximal and total GERs. We conclude that the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with interstitial lung disease is high; thus, the disease should be considered regardless of presenting clinical symptoms. A high frequency of non-acid and proximal GERs makes the MII-pH method a preferable choice for the detection of reflux episodes in this patient population. PMID:27068927

  5. Liquid in the gastroesophageal segment promotes reflux, but compliance does not: a mathematical modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sudip K.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Brasseur, James G.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical force relationships that distinguish normal from chronic reflux at sphincter opening are poorly understood and difficult to measure in vivo. Our aim was to apply physics-based computer simulations to determine mechanical pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux. A mathematical model of the gastroesophageal segment (GES) was developed, incorporating the primary anatomical and physiomechanical elements that drive GES opening and reflux. In vivo data were used to quantify muscle stiffness, sphincter tone, and gastric pressure. The liquid lining the mucosa was modeled as an “effective liquid film” between the mucosa and a manometric catheter. Newton's second law was solved mathematically, and the space-time details of opening and reflux were predicted for systematic variations in gastric pressure increase, film thickness, muscle stiffness, and tone. “Reflux” was defined as “2 ml of refluxate entering the esophagus within 1 s.” GES opening and reflux were different events. Both were sensitive to changes in gastric pressure and sphincter tone. Reflux initiation was extremely sensitive to the liquid film thickness; the protective function of the sphincter was destroyed with only 0.4 mm of liquid in the GES. Compliance had no effect on reflux initiation, but affected reflux volume. The presence of abnormal levels of liquid within the collapsed GES can greatly increase the probability for reflux, suggesting a mechanical mechanism that may differentiate normal reflux from gastroesophageal reflux disease. Compliance does not affect the probability for reflux, but affects reflux volume once it occurs. Opening without reflux suggests the existence of “gastroesophageal pooling” in the distal esophagus, with clinical implications. PMID:18718998

  6. LINX® Reflux Management System in chronic gastroesophageal reflux: a novel effective technology for restoring the natural barrier to reflux

    PubMed Central

    Saino, Greta; Lipham, John C.; DeMeester, Tom R.

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) results from incompetency of the lower esophageal sphincter that allows the contents of the stomach to reflux into the esophagus, the airways, and the mouth. The disease affects about 10% of the western population and has a profound negative impact on quality of life. The majority of patients are successfully treated with proton-pump inhibitors, but up to 40% have incomplete relief of symptoms even after dose adjustment. The laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication represents the surgical gold standard, but is largely underused because of the level of technical difficulty and the prevalence of side effects. These factors have contributed to the propensity of patients to continue with medical therapy despite inadequate symptom control and complications of the disease. As a consequence, a significant ‘therapy gap’ in the treatment of GERD remains evident in current clinical practice. The LINX® Reflux Management System (Torax Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA) is designed to provide a permanent solution to GERD by augmenting the sphincter barrier with a standardized, reproducible laparoscopic procedure that does not alter gastric anatomy and is easily reversible. Two single-group trials confirmed that a magnetic device designed to augment the lower esophageal sphincter can be safely and effectively implanted using a standard laparoscopic approach. The device decreased esophageal acid exposure, improved reflux symptoms and quality of life, and allowed cessation of proton-pump inhibitors in the majority of patients. PMID:23814607

  7. Role of duodenogastroesophageal reflux in the pathogenesis of esophageal mucosal injury and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-rong; Li, Zhao-shen; Zou, Duo-wu; Xu, Guo-ming; Ye, Ping; Sun, Zhen-xing; Wang, Qing; Zeng, Yan-jun

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) usually suffer from acid reflux and duo-denogastroesophageal reflux (DGER) simultaneously. The question of whether DGER has an important effect on the development of GERD remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of DGER in the pathogenesis of GERD and its value for the diagnosis of nonerosive reflux disease (NERD). METHODS GERD was initially diagnosed using the reflux disease questionnaire. For further diagnosis, results of the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (excluding a diagnosis of Barrett’s esophagus) were considered in conjunction with simultaneous 24 h esophageal pH and bilirubin monitoring. RESULTS According to endoscopic findings, 95 patients (43 men, 50±10 years of age) were divided into two groups: the reflux esophagitis (RE) group (n=51) and the NERD group (n=44). Three DGER parameters, the percentage of time with absorbance greater than 0.14, the total number of reflux episodes and the number of bile reflux episodes lasting longer than 5 min, were evaluated in the study. For the RE group, the values of the DGER parameters (19.05%±23.44%, 30.56±34.04 and 5.90±6.37, respectively) were significantly higher than those of the NERD group (7.26%±11.08%, 15.68±20.92 and 2.59±3.57, respectively, P<0.05 for all) but no significant difference was found in acid reflux. Of NERD patients, 18.5% were diagnosed with simple DGER. The positive diagnosis rate of NERD could be significantly elevated from 65.9% to 84.1% (P<0.05), if bilirubin monitoring was employed in diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS DGER may occur independently but plays an important role in the development of RE and GERD symptoms. Simultaneous 24 h esophageal pH and bilirubin monitoring is superior to simple pH monitoring in helping identify patients at risk for NERD. PMID:16482234

  8. Respiratory disease and the oesophagus: reflux, reflexes and microaspiration.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Lesley A; Lee, Augustine S; Badri, Huda; DeVault, Kenneth R; Smith, Jaclyn A

    2016-08-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux is associated with a wide range of respiratory disorders, including asthma, isolated chronic cough, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Reflux can be substantial and reach the proximal margins of the oesophagus in some individuals with specific pulmonary diseases, suggesting that this association is more than a coincidence. Proximal oesophageal reflux in particular has led to concern that microaspiration might have an important, possibly even causal, role in respiratory disease. Interestingly, reflux is not always accompanied by typical reflux symptoms, such as heartburn and/or regurgitation, leading many clinicians to empirically treat for possible gastro-oesophageal reflux. Indeed, costs associated with use of acid suppressants in pulmonary disease far outweigh those in typical GERD, despite little evidence of therapeutic benefit in clinical trials. This Review comprehensively examines the possible mechanisms that might link pulmonary disease and oesophageal reflux, highlighting the gaps in current knowledge and limitations of previous research, and helping to shed light on the frequent failure of antireflux treatments in pulmonary disease. PMID:27381074

  9. Symptomatic reflux disease: the present, the past and the future

    PubMed Central

    Boeckxstaens, Guy; El-Serag, Hashem B; Smout, André J P M; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of GORD and its complications is increasing along with the exponentially increasing problem of obesity. Of particular concern is the relationship between central adiposity and GORD complications, including oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Driven by progressive insight into the epidemiology and pathophysiology of GORD, the earlier belief that increased gastroesophageal reflux mainly results from one dominant mechanism has been replaced by acceptance that GORD is multifactorial. Instigating factors, such as obesity, age, genetics, pregnancy and trauma may all contribute to mechanical impairment of the oesophagogastric junction resulting in pathological reflux and accompanying syndromes. Progression of the disease by exacerbating and perpetuating factors such as obesity, neuromuscular dysfunction and oesophageal fibrosis ultimately lead to development of an overt hiatal hernia. The latter is now accepted as a central player, impacting on most mechanisms underlying gastroesophageal reflux (low sphincter pressure, transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation, oesophageal clearance and acid pocket position), explaining its association with more severe disease and mucosal damage. Since the introduction of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), clinical management of GORD has markedly changed, shifting the therapeutic challenge from mucosal healing to reduction of PPI-resistant symptoms. In parallel, it became clear that reflux symptoms may result from weakly acidic or non-acid reflux, insight that has triggered the search for new compounds or minimally invasive procedures to reduce all types of reflux. In summary, our view on GORD has evolved enormously compared to that of the past, and without doubt will impact on how to deal with GORD in the future. PMID:24607936

  10. Alginate controls heartburn in patients with erosive and nonerosive reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Savarino, Edoardo; de Bortoli, Nicola; Zentilin, Patrizia; Martinucci, Irene; Bruzzone, Luca; Furnari, Manuele; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of a novel alginate-based compound, Faringel, in modifying reflux characteristics and controlling symptoms. METHODS: In this prospective, open-label study, 40 patients reporting heartburn and regurgitation with proven reflux disease (i.e., positive impedance-pH test/evidence of erosive esophagitis at upper endoscopy) underwent 2 h impedance-pH testing after eating a refluxogenic meal. They were studied for 1 h under basal conditions and 1 h after taking 10 mL Faringel. In both sessions, measurements were obtained in right lateral and supine decubitus positions. Patients also completed a validated questionnaire consisting of a 2-item 5-point (0-4) Likert scale and a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS) in order to evaluate the efficacy of Faringel in symptom relief. Tolerability of the treatment was assessed using a 6-point Likert scale ranging from very good (1) to very poor (6). RESULTS: Faringel decreased significantly (P < 0.001), in both the right lateral and supine decubitus positions, esophageal acid exposure time [median 10 (25th-75th percentil 6-16) vs 5.8 (4-10) and 16 (11-19) vs 7.5 (5-11), respectively] and acid refluxes [5 (3-8) vs 1 (1-1) and 6 (4-8) vs 2 (1-2), respectively], but increased significantly (P < 0.01) the number of nonacid reflux events compared with baseline [2 (1-3) vs 3 (2-5) and 3 (2-4) vs 6 (3-8), respectively]. Percentage of proximal migration decreased in both decubitus positions (60% vs 32% and 64% vs 35%, respectively; P < 0.001). Faringel was significantly effective in controlling heartburn, based on both the Likert scale [3.1 (range 1-4) vs 0.9 (0-2); P < 0.001] and VAS score [7.1 (3-9.8) vs 2 (0.1-4.8); P < 0.001], but it had less success against regurgitation, based on both the Likert scale [2.6 (1-4) vs 2.2 (1-4); P = not significant (NS)] and VAS score [5.6 (2-9.6) vs 3.9 (1-8.8); P = NS]. Overall, the tolerability of Faringel was very good 5 (2-6), with only two patients reporting modest adverse

  11. Impacts of Endoscopic Gastroesophageal Flap Valve Grading on Pediatric Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kai-Chi; Wu, Jia-Feng; Hsu, Wei-Chung; Lin, Bor-Ru; Chen, Huey-Ling; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal flap valve (GEFV) endoscopic grading is reported to be associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in adults; however its role in pediatric groups remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the significance of GEFV grading and the associations to multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring (MII-pH) in children with GERD. Methods A total of 48 children with GERD symptoms who received esophagogastroduodenoscopy and MII-pH monitoring were enrolled. The degree of GEFV was graded from I to IV according to the Hill classification, and classified into two groups: normal GEFV (Hill grades I and II), and abnormal GEFV (Hill grades III and VI). Endoscopic findings and MII-pH monitoring were analyzed among the groups. Results Thirty-six patients had normal GEFV while 12 had abnormal GEFV. The presence of erosive esophagitis was significantly more common in the patients with abnormal GEFV (p = 0.037, OR 9.84, 95% CI 1.15–84.42). Pathological acidic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) determined by MII-pH was more prevalent in the patients with loosened GEFV geometry (p = 0.01, OR 7.0, 95% CI 1.67–27.38). There were significant positive correlations between GEFV Hill grading I to IV and the severity of erosive esophagitis (r = 0.49, p<0.001), percentage of supine acid reflux (r = 0.37, p = 0.009), percentage of total acid reflux (r = 0.3284, p = 0.023), and DeMeester score (r = 0.36, p = 0.01) detected by pH monitoring. In the impedance study, GEFV Hill grading also positively correlated to median number of acid reflux events (r = 0.3015, p = 0.037). Conclusions GEFV dysfunction highly associated with acid GER and severe erosive esophagitis. An abnormal GEFV is a sign of acid GER in children. PMID:25233350

  12. Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Charumathi Raghu; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents into the esophagus causes troublesome symptoms, esophageal injury, and/or complications. Use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) remains the standard therapy for GERD and is effective in most patients. Those whose symptoms are refractory to PPIs should be evaluated further and other treatment options should be considered, according to individual patient characteristics. Response to PPIs could be total (no symptoms), partial (residual breakthrough symptoms), or absent (no change in symptoms). Patients experiencing complete response do not usually need further management. Patients with partial response can be treated surgically or by using emerging endoscopic therapies. Patients who exhibit no response to PPI need further evaluation to rule out other causes. PMID:25274499

  13. Effects of refluxate pH values on duodenogastroesophageal reflux-induced esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Peng; Li, Jian-Sheng; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Lian-Feng; Chen, Rong-Zhong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effects of duodenogastric juice pH on the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). METHODS: An animal model of duodenogastroesophageal reflux was established using Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats undergoing esophagoduodenostomy (ED). The development of EAC was investigated in rats exposed to duodenogastric juice of different pH. The rats were divided into three groups: low-pH group (group A), high-pH group (group B) and a sham-operated group as a control (group C) (n = 30 rats in each group). The incidence of esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia and EAC was observed 40 wk after the treatment. RESULTS: The incidence rate of esophagitis, BE, intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia and EAC was higher in groups A and B compared with the control group after 40 wk (P < 0.01), being 96% and 100% (P > 0.05), 88% and 82.4% (P > 0.05), 20% and 52.1% (P < 0.05), and 8% and 39% (P < 0.05), respectively. CONCLUSION: Non-acidic refluxate increases the occurrence of intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia and EAC while the low-pH gastric juice exerts a protective effect in the presence of duodenal juice. The non-acid reflux is particularly important in the progression from BE to cancer. Therefore, control of duodenal reflux may be an important prophylaxis for EAC. PMID:21799654

  14. Gastroesophageal reflux: a potential asthma trigger.

    PubMed

    Harding, Susan M

    2005-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a potential trigger of asthma. Approximately 77% of asthmatics report heartburn. GER is a risk factor for asthma-related hospitalization and oral steroid burst use. Asthmatics may be predisposed to GER development because of a high prevalence of hiatal hernia and autonomic dysregulation and an increased pressure gradient between the abdominal cavity and the thorax, over-riding the lower esophageal sphincter pressure barrier. Asthma medications may potentiate GER. Potential mechanisms of esophageal acid-induced bronchoconstriction include a vagally mediated reflex, local axonal reflexes, heightened bronchial reactivity, and microaspiration, all resulting in neurogenic inflammation. Anti-reflux therapy improves asthma symptoms in approximately 70% of asthmatics with GER. A 3-month empiric trial of twice-daily proton pump inhibitor given 30 to 60 minutes before breakfast and dinner can identify asthmatics who have GER as a trigger of their asthma. PMID:15579368

  15. Gastroesophageal Reflux Affects Sleep Quality in Snoring Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Woodley, Frederick W; Skaggs, Beth; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Eneli, Ihuoma; Splaingard, Mark; Mousa, Hayat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the quality of sleep in snoring obese children without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); and to study the possible relationship between sleep interruption and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in snoring obese children. Methods Study subjects included 13 snoring obese children who were referred to our sleep lab for possible sleep-disordered breathing. Patients underwent multichannel intraluminal impedance and esophageal pH monitoring with simultaneous polysomnography. Exclusion criteria included history of fundoplication, cystic fibrosis, and infants under the age of 2 years. Significant association between arousals and awakenings with previous reflux were defined by symptom-association probability using 2-minute intervals. Results Sleep efficiency ranged from 67-97% (median 81%). A total of 111 reflux episodes (90% acidic) were detected during sleep, but there were more episodes per hour during awake periods after sleep onset than during sleep (median 2.3 vs. 0.6, p=0.04). There were 279 total awakenings during the sleep study; 56 (20.1%) of them in 9 patients (69.2%) were preceded by reflux episodes (55 acid, 1 non-acid). In 5 patients (38.5%), awakenings were significantly associated with reflux. Conclusion The data suggest that acid GER causes sleep interruptions in obese children who have symptoms of snoring or restless sleep and without evidence of OSA. PMID:27066445

  16. Nebulization reflux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, V. G.; Cofer, W. R., III

    1986-01-01

    A nebulization reflux concentrator for removing trace gas contaminants from a sample gas is described. Sample gas from a gas supply is drawn by a suction source into a vessel. The gas enters the vessel through an atomizing nozzle, thereby atomizing and entraining a scrubbing liquid solvent drawn through a siphon tube from a scrubbing liquid reservoir. The gas and entrained liquid rise through a concentrator and impinge upon a solvent phobic filter, whereby purified gas exits through the filter housing and contaminated liquid coalesces on the solvent phobic filter and falls into the reservoir.

  17. [Primary vesicoureteral reflux].

    PubMed

    Stein, R; Ziesel, C; Rubenwolf, P; Beetz, R

    2013-01-01

    The never ending discussion about the diagnostics and treatment of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) now includes arguments for diagnostic nihilism as well as invasive diagnostics and therapy, which is reminiscent of the debate on prostate cancer in adulthood. The common goal of all currently competing diagnostic strategies and approaches is the prevention of renal scars by the most effective and least burdensome approach. There is a difference between acquired pyelonephritic scars with VUR (acquired reflux nephropathy) and congenital reflux nephropathy (primary dysplasia) which cannot be influenced by any therapy.The VUR can be verified by conventional radiological voiding cystourethrography (VCUG), by urosonography, radionuclide cystography or even by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The guidelines of the European Association of Urology/European Society for Paediatric Urology (EAU/ESPU) recommend radiological screening for VUR after the first febrile urinary tract infection. Significant risk factors in patients with VUR are recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) and parenchymal scarring and the patients should undergo patient and risk-adapted therapy. Infants with dilating reflux have a higher risk of renal scarring than those without dilatation of the renal pelvis. Bladder dysfunction or dysfunctional elimination syndrome represents a well-known but previously neglected risk factor in combination with VUR and should be treated prior to any surgical intervention as far as is possible.Certainly not every patient with VUR needs therapy. The current treatment strategies take into account age and gender, the presence of dysplastic or pyelonephritic renal scars, the clinical symptoms, bladder dysfunction and frequency and severity of recurrent UTI as criteria for the therapy decision. The use of an antibacterial prophylaxis as well as the duration is controversially discussed. Endoscopic therapy can be a good alternative to antibacterial prophylaxis or a surveillance

  18. Diagnosis and Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Infants and Children.

    PubMed

    Baird, Drew C; Harker, Dausen J; Karmes, Aaron S

    2015-10-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux is defined as the passage of stomach contents into the esophagus with or without accompanied regurgitation (spitting up) and vomiting. It is a normal physiologic process that occurs throughout the day in infants and less often in children and adolescents. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is reflux that causes troublesome symptoms or leads to medical complications. The diagnoses of gastroesophageal reflux and GERD are based on the history and physical examination. Diagnostic tests, such as endoscopy, barium study, multiple intraluminal impedance, and pH monitoring, are reserved for when there are atypical symptoms, warning signs, doubts about the diagnosis, or suspected complications or treatment failure. In infants, most regurgitation resolves by 12 months of age and does not require treatment. Reflux in infants may be treated with body position changes while awake, lower-volume feedings, thickening agents (i.e., rice cereal), antiregurgitant formula, extensively hydrolyzed or amino acid formulas, and, in breastfed infants, eliminating cow's milk and eggs from the mother's diet. Lifestyle changes to treat reflux in children and adolescents include sleeping position changes; weight loss; and avoiding smoking, alcohol, and late evening meals. Histamine H2 receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors are the principal medical therapies for GERD. They are effective in infants, based on low-quality evidence, and in children and adolescents, based on low- to moderate-quality evidence. Surgical treatment is available, but should be considered only when medical therapy is unsuccessful or is not tolerated. PMID:26554410

  19. Simulated Reflux Decreases Vocal Fold Epithelial Barrier Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Elizabeth; Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi

    2010-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The vocal fold epithelium provides a barrier to the entry of inhaled and systemic challenges. However, the location of the epithelium makes it vulnerable to damage. Past research suggests, but does not directly demonstrate, that exposure to gastric reflux adversely affects the function of the epithelial barrier. Understanding the nature of reflux-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction is necessary to better recognize the mechanisms for vocal fold susceptibility to this disease. Therefore, we examined the effects of physiologically relevant reflux challenges on vocal fold transepithelial resistance and gross epithelial and subepithelial appearance. Study Design Ex vivo, mixed design with between-group and repeated-measures analyses. Methods Healthy, native porcine vocal folds (N = 52) were exposed to physiologically relevant acidic pepsin, acid-only, or pepsin-only challenges and examined with electrophysiology and light microscopy. For all challenges, vocal folds exposed to a neutral pH served as control. Results Acidic pepsin and acid-only challenges, but not pepsin-only or control challenges significantly reduced transepithelial resistance within 30 minutes. Reductions in transepithelial resistance were irreversible. Challenge exposure produced minimal gross changes in vocal fold epithelial or subepithelial appearance as evidenced by light microscopy. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that acidic environments characteristic of gastric reflux compromise epithelial barrier function without gross structural changes. In healthy, native vocal folds, reductions in transepithelial resistance could reflect reflux-related epithelial disruption. These results might guide the development of pharmacologic and therapeutic recommendations for patients with reflux, such as continued acid-suppression therapy and patient antireflux behavioral education. PMID:20564752

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: A long term relationship

    PubMed Central

    Gnanapandithan, Karthik; Popkin, Joel H.; Devadoss, Ramprakash; Martin, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a dreaded disease of uncertain etiology and no available cure. It is still unclear if a causal relationship exists between gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) and IPF, but studies have shown an increased prevalence of acid reflux in patients with IPF. We describe a patient with achalasia and GER who went on to develop IPF. She underwent a rapidly worsening course punctuated by acute exacerbations of IPF, despite best efforts to manage the acid GER. We also reviewed the literature on the role of GER in the etiology and progression of IPF and the impact of antireflux measures on its course. PMID:27222783

  1. How many cases of laryngopharyngeal reflux suspected by laryngoscopy are gastroesophageal reflux disease-related?

    PubMed Central

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Nacci, Andrea; Savarino, Edoardo; Martinucci, Irene; Bellini, Massimo; Fattori, Bruno; Ceccarelli, Linda; Costa, Francesco; Mumolo, Maria Gloria; Ricchiuti, Angelo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Berrettini, Stefano; Marchi, Santino

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients with a laryngoscopic diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). METHODS: Between May 2011 and October 2011, 41 consecutive patients with laryngopharyngeal symptoms (LPS) and laryngoscopic diagnosis of LPR were empirically treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for at least 8 wk, and the therapeutic outcome was assessed through validated questionnaires (GERD impact scale, GIS; visual analogue scale, VAS). LPR diagnosis was performed by ear, nose and throat specialists using the reflux finding score (RFS) and reflux symptom index (RSI). After a 16-d wash-out from PPIs, all patients underwent an upper endoscopy, stationary esophageal manometry, 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH (MII-pH) esophageal monitoring. A positive correlation between LPR diagnosis and GERD was supposed based on the presence of esophagitis (ERD), pathological acid exposure time (AET) in the absence of esophageal erosions (NERD), and a positive correlation between symptoms and refluxes (hypersensitive esophagus, HE). RESULTS: The male/female ratio was 0.52 (14/27), the mean age ± SD was 51.5 ± 12.7 years, and the mean body mass index was 25.7 ± 3.4 kg/m2. All subjects reported one or more LPS. Twenty-five out of 41 patients also had typical GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or regurgitation). The most frequent laryngoscopic findings were posterior laryngeal hyperemia (38/41), linear indentation in the medial edge of the vocal fold (31/41), vocal fold nodules (6/41) and diffuse infraglottic oedema (25/41). The GIS analysis showed that 10/41 patients reported symptom relief with PPI therapy (P < 0.05); conversely, 23/41 did not report any clinical improvement. At the same time, the VAS analysis showed a significant reduction in typical GERD symptoms after PPI therapy (P < 0.001). A significant reduction in LPS symptoms. On the other hand, such result was not recorded for LPS. Esophagitis was

  2. [Morphology of the gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Daum, Ondřej; Kokošková, Bohuslava; Švajdler, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The present definition of gastroesophageal reflux disease is based on clinical criteria that are difficult to reproduce accurately. Pathologists are supposed to confirm the presence of morphological changes induced by gastroesophageal reflux. Traditional evaluation of injury, inflammatory and reactive changes of esophageal squamous epithelium lacks both sufficient sensitivity and specificity, and thus the modern diagnostic focuses on chronic metaplastic changes of esophageal mucosa defined as any mucosal type proximal to the upper border of oxyntic mucosa (also called fundic mucosa of the stomach). In the setting of gastroesophageal reflux the esophageal mucosa, under normal conditions lined with squamous epithelium, undergoes columnar metaplasia. According to morphology and immunophenotype of columnar cells, the columnar metaplasia may be further subdivided to oxyntocardiac mucosa, cardiac mucosa, intestinal metaplasia, and an intermediate type of cardiac mucosa expressing intestinal transcription factor CDX2, but devoid of goblet cells. The latter two mucosal types are currently thought to represent the most probable candidates for neoplastic transformation, whereas oxyntocardiac mucosa is believed to represent a stable compensatory change with no risk of further progression. An evaluation of dysplastic changes (intraepithelial neoplasia) in the setting of columnar lined esophagus necessitates correlation with the second opinion of a GI expert to prevent potentially harmful under- or over-treatment of the patient. Regarding invasive adenocarcinoma, the pathologist should avoid overdiagnosis of the infiltration of the space between the two layers of columnar lined esophagus - associated split muscularis mucosae as invasion of submucosa, as it is associated with different prognosis. Critical evaluation of the real impact of acid suppression on neoplastic transformation in the setting of gastroesophageal reflux disease may represent the greatest challenge for future

  3. Gastroesophageal reflux: clinical presentations, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Waterfall, W E; Craven, M A; Allen, C J

    1986-01-01

    Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux occurs daily in an estimated 7% of adults and weekly or monthly in 29%. Untreated it can lead to esophageal erosions, ulceration and stricture formation. The pathogenesis is often multifactorial: defects in the function of the lower esophageal sphincter, esophageal clearance mechanisms and gastric emptying combine to produce frequent lengthy periods during which the lower esophagus is bathed in regurgitated acid. In most patients reflux disease is easily recognized as recurrent heartburn, regurgitation or dysphagia, or a combination. When acute chest pain or respiratory illness is the primary presenting complaint the patient needs particularly careful investigation to determine whether the symptoms are due to a primary cardiac or respiratory condition, are secondary to gastroesophageal reflux alone or represent a combination of disorders. Endoscopy with biopsy and long-term pH monitoring are the most reliable ways of determining whether reflux disease is present. Additional investigations, such as exercise testing, cardiac catheterization or inhalation challenge, may be needed in patients with cardiac or respiratory symptoms. Treatment should follow a stepped-care approach and in most patients should begin with changes in lifestyle, including dietary manipulation, reducing alcohol and cigarette consumption, and raising the head of the bed, together with appropriate use of antacids or alginate-antacid combinations. H2-receptor antagonists and agents to improve both gastric emptying and the tone of the lower esophageal sphincter may be added in sequence. Most patients will respond well to this regimen. Surgery should be considered only for those with intractable symptoms or with complications (e.g., stricture formation, bleeding, development of dysplastic epithelium in those with Barrett's esophagus, or secondary pulmonary disease that does not respond to medical management). It is successful in 85% of well-selected patients and

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux: clinical presentations, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, W E; Craven, M A; Allen, C J

    1986-11-15

    Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux occurs daily in an estimated 7% of adults and weekly or monthly in 29%. Untreated it can lead to esophageal erosions, ulceration and stricture formation. The pathogenesis is often multifactorial: defects in the function of the lower esophageal sphincter, esophageal clearance mechanisms and gastric emptying combine to produce frequent lengthy periods during which the lower esophagus is bathed in regurgitated acid. In most patients reflux disease is easily recognized as recurrent heartburn, regurgitation or dysphagia, or a combination. When acute chest pain or respiratory illness is the primary presenting complaint the patient needs particularly careful investigation to determine whether the symptoms are due to a primary cardiac or respiratory condition, are secondary to gastroesophageal reflux alone or represent a combination of disorders. Endoscopy with biopsy and long-term pH monitoring are the most reliable ways of determining whether reflux disease is present. Additional investigations, such as exercise testing, cardiac catheterization or inhalation challenge, may be needed in patients with cardiac or respiratory symptoms. Treatment should follow a stepped-care approach and in most patients should begin with changes in lifestyle, including dietary manipulation, reducing alcohol and cigarette consumption, and raising the head of the bed, together with appropriate use of antacids or alginate-antacid combinations. H2-receptor antagonists and agents to improve both gastric emptying and the tone of the lower esophageal sphincter may be added in sequence. Most patients will respond well to this regimen. Surgery should be considered only for those with intractable symptoms or with complications (e.g., stricture formation, bleeding, development of dysplastic epithelium in those with Barrett's esophagus, or secondary pulmonary disease that does not respond to medical management). It is successful in 85% of well-selected patients and

  5. Reflux solar receiver design considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diver, R. B.

    Reflux heat-pipe and pool-boiler receivers are being developed to improve upon the performance and life of directly-illuminated tube receiver technology used in previous successful demonstrations of dish-Stirling systems. The design of a reflux receiver involves engineering tradeoffs. In this paper, on-sun performance measurements of the Sandia pool-boiler receiver are compared with results from the reflux receiver thermal analysis model, AEETES. Flux and performance implications of various design options are analyzed and discussed.

  6. Uric Acid and Cardiovascular Events: A Mendelian Randomization Study.

    PubMed

    Kleber, Marcus E; Delgado, Graciela; Grammer, Tanja B; Silbernagel, Günther; Huang, Jie; Krämer, Bernhard K; Ritz, Eberhard; März, Winfried

    2015-11-01

    Obesity and diets rich in uric acid-raising components appear to account for the increased prevalence of hyperuricemia in Westernized populations. Prevalence rates of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, CKD, and cardiovascular disease are also increasing. We used Mendelian randomization to examine whether uric acid is an independent and causal cardiovascular risk factor. Serum uric acid was measured in 3315 patients of the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study. We calculated a weighted genetic risk score (GRS) for uric acid concentration based on eight uric acid-regulating single nucleotide polymorphisms. Causal odds ratios and causal hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using a two-stage regression estimate with the GRS as the instrumental variable to examine associations with cardiometabolic phenotypes (cross-sectional) and mortality (prospectively) by logistic regression and Cox regression, respectively. Our GRS was not consistently associated with any biochemical marker except for uric acid, arguing against pleiotropy. Uric acid was associated with a range of prevalent diseases, including coronary artery disease. Uric acid and the GRS were both associated with cardiovascular death and sudden cardiac death. In a multivariate model adjusted for factors including medication, causal HRs corresponding to each 1-mg/dl increase in genetically predicted uric acid concentration were significant for cardiovascular death (HR, 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.12 to 2.81) and sudden cardiac death (HR, 2.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.16 to 5.00). These results suggest that high uric acid is causally related to adverse cardiovascular outcomes, especially sudden cardiac death. PMID:25788527

  7. [Impact of reflux on the kidney].

    PubMed

    Mollard, P; Louis, D; Basset, T

    1984-03-01

    Description of the reflux nephropathy. Pyelonephritis lesions are undoubtedly linked to the vesico-ureteric reflux. The role of the intra-renal reflux ( Hodson ) and the Big Bang Theory ( Ransley ) are discussed as the data from animal experiments. The role of the sterile reflux and of the segmental hypoplasia is relatively less important. The actual management of vesico-ureteric reflux treatment is questioned. PMID:6736930

  8. Gastric emptying of solid food in patients with gastroesophageal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, S.; Eggli, D.; Van Nostrand, D.; Johnson, L.

    1985-05-01

    While delayed solid gastric emptying (GE) has been reported in patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER), the relationship of GE to daytime and/or nighttime reflux patterns, and the severity of endoscopic esophagitis are unknown. The authors measured GE in a study population of symptomatic patients (n=33) with abnormal 24 hour pH monitoring (24 hr pH). The study population was divided into two groups by esophagoscopy; those with (E+=22); and 2) those without (E-=11) erosive esophagitis and/or Barrett's esophagus. GE was measured in all patients and in 15 normal volunteers (NL) by the in vivo labelling of chicken liver with Tc-99m-SC, which was in turn diced into 1 cm. cubes and given in 7 1/2 oz. of beef stew. Upright one minute anterior and posterior digital images were obtained every 15 min. for 2.5 hours. 24 hour pH was divided into daytime (upright) and nighttime (supine) segments, and acid exposure was defined as % time pH < 4 for that posture. There was no correlation between GE T 1/2 and acid exposure, daytime or nighttime, for the patient population as a whole. However, patients with the longest GE T1/2 tended to have severe daytime reflux. The authors rarely found delayed solid food gastric emptying in patients with reflux; moreover, they found no association between GE and either diurnal reflux patterns on 24 hr pH or the severity of endoscopic esophagitis.

  9. Current Pharmacological Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao-Kuang; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Wang, Sophie S. W.; Lu, Chien-Yu; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Su, Yu-Chung; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Wu, Deng-Chyang

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a common disorder with troublesome symptoms caused by reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus, has adverse impact on quality of life. A variety of medications have been used in GERD treatment, and acid suppression therapy is the mainstay of treatment for GERD. Although proton pump inhibitor is the most potent acid suppressant and provides good efficacy in esophagitis healing and symptom relief, about one-third of patients with GERD still have persistent symptoms with poor response to standard dose PPI. Antacids, alginate, histamine type-2 receptor antagonists, and prokinetic agents are usually used as add-on therapy to PPI in clinical practice. Development of novel therapeutic agents has focused on the underlying mechanisms of GERD, such as transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation, motility disorder, mucosal protection, and esophageal hypersensitivity. Newer formulations of PPI with faster and longer duration of action and potassium-competitive acid blocker, a newer acid suppressant, have also been investigated in clinical trials. In this review, we summarize the current and developing therapeutic agents for GERD treatment. PMID:23878534

  10. Increased TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels are associated only with the esophageal reflux symptoms, but not with the extraesophageal reflux symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Joo; Kim, Nayoung; Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor and proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) have been implicated in the mechanism of acid-induced inflammation in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We aimed to evaluate TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels in the GERD patients and their relationship with endoscopic findings and reflux symptoms. Sixteen healthy controls, 45 patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD), and 14 nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) patients received endoscopy and completed questionnaires. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR) of TRPV1, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), PAR2, and interleukin (IL)-8 were performed in the distal esophagus specimen. The levels of TRPV1, GDNF, NGF, PAR2, and IL-8 mRNA expression were highest in the ERD group followed by NERD and control groups and the differences between control and ERD groups were statistically significant. Within the ERD group, patients with grade B in Los Angeles (LA) classification showed significantly higher levels of TRPV1, GDNF, and NGF mRNA expression than those with grade A. Presence of reflux symptoms was associated with significant higher levels of TRPV1, PAR2, and IL-8. Notably not extraesophageal but esophageal reflux symptoms were significantly associated with them. Upregulation of TRPV1 and PAR2 pathways might play a role in the development of distal esophageal inflammation and reflux symptoms. And extraesophageal reflux symptoms might not be associated with these processes. PMID:27512850

  11. Anti-reflux surgery - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach). Problems with these muscles can lead to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This surgery can also be done ... laparoscopic antireflux operations in infants and children for ... American Pediatric Surgery Association. J Pediatr Surg . ...

  12. Vesicoureteral reflux in the primate IV: does reflux harm the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.A.; Fischman, N.H.; Thomas, R.

    1982-09-01

    It has been said that vesicoureteral reflux causes renal scarring because of intrarenal reflux. We studied reflux in the monkey because of its similarity to man, especially in regard to the incidence of vesicoureteral reflux and chronic pyelonephritis. High pressure moderate grade reflux was produced and renal function followed by means of quantitative renal camera studies using /sup 131/I hippuran. There was no change in renal function from sterile reflux even when intrarenal reflux occurred. When, however, infection was introduced, renal function decreased. We concluded that sterile moderate vesicoureteral or intrarenal reflux does not harm the kidney.

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in children.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    Despite the frequency with which antireflux procedures are performed, decisions about gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment remain challenging. Several factors contribute to the difficulties in managing gastroesophageal reflux. First, the distinction between physiologic and pathologic gastroesophageal reflux (gastroesophageal reflux disease-GERD) is not always clear. Second, measures of the extent of gastroesophageal reflux often poorly correlate to symptoms or other complications attributed to reflux in infants and children. A third challenge is that the outcome of antireflux procedures, predominately fundoplications, are relatively poorly characterized. All of these factors contribute to difficulty in knowing when to recommend antireflux surgery. One of the manifestations of the uncertainties surrounding GERD is the high degree of variability in the utilization of pediatric antireflux procedures throughout the United States. Pediatric surgeons are frequently consulted for GERD and fundoplication, uncertainties notwithstanding. Although retrospective series and anecdotal observations support fundoplication in some patients, there are many important questions for which sufficient high-quality data to provide a clear answer is lacking. In spite of this, surgeons need to provide guidance to patients and families while awaiting the development of improved evidence to aid in these recommendations. The purpose of this article is to define what is known and what is uncertain, with an emphasis on the most recent evidence. PMID:27521711

  14. Acid Reflux (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease) in Adults (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... sphincter. The most common surgical treatment is the laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. This procedure involves wrapping the upper ... Ovaska JT. Comparison of long-term outcome of laparoscopic and conventional nissen fundoplication: a prospective randomized study ...

  15. Role of altered esophageal intraluminal baseline impedance levels in patients with gatroesophageal reflux disease refractory to proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liuqin; Ye, Bixing; Lin, Lin; Wang, Ying; Wang, Meifeng

    2016-08-01

    Numerous studies have investigated utility of esophageal intraluminal baseline impedance levels (BILs) in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, effect of BILs in refractory GERD (RGERD) has not been well investigated. The aim of this study is to evaluate role of BILs in RGERD patients. Total 62 subjects with refractory gastroesophageal reflux symptoms underwent 24-hour impedance-pH monitoring and gastroendoscopy. Distal BILs in acid reflux type were significantly lower than those in nonacid reflux type and functional heartburn (FH) group. Distal BILs of reflux esophagitis (RE) patients were lower than those of nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) patients, while there were no statistical significance between 2 groups. Patients with severe esophagitis had lower distal BILs than those with mild esophagitis and NERD patients, and patients with severe esophagitis in acid reflux type had the lowest distal BILs. Distal BILs were significantly negatively correlated with DeMeester score, episodes of acid reflux, and acid exposure time, but no correlated with episodes of nonacid reflux. Characteristics of BILs in RGERD patients were similar with those in GERD patients, but might be more complicated. Evaluating BILs in RGERD patients could achieve a better understanding of pathophysiology in RGERD. PMID:27537561

  16. [How to deal with gastroesophageal reflux in childhood].

    PubMed

    Schuler Barazzoni, M; Belli, D C; Schäppi, M

    2006-02-22

    Gastroesophageal reflux is frequent source of consultation at the paediatrician's room, although most GER resolve spontaneously in infancy. In most cases, after a thorough anamnesis and a full physical examination prokinetic and anti-acid medications are started, as well as postural change, without the assistance of a specialist. When reflux is complicated by either oesophagitis, respiratory symptoms, failure to thrive or when the above treatment fail, further investigations need to be undertaken. Their option will depend on the clinical presentation. Rarely GER will lead to surgery. PMID:16562534

  17. New techniques in measuring nonacidic esophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Vaezi, M F; Shay, S S

    2001-07-01

    New techniques in esophageal monitoring are allowing for better differentiation in the role of different gastric refluxates in esophageal mucosal damage and patient symptoms. The Bilitec 2001 (Synectics, Stockholm, Sweden) is a portable spectrophotometer that measures bilirubin as a surrogate marker for bile reflux and multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) (Sandhill Scientific Inc, Highlands Ranch, CO) is a new technique allowing measurement of esophageal volume refluxate. Both techniques assess the role of nonacidic esophageal reflux. Despite their novel approach in assessing nonacid reflux, both methods have limitations. Future studies in this area, however, will prove beneficial in identifying their role in diagnosis and management of patients with suspected nonacid reflux disease. PMID:11568871

  18. Genetics of Vesicoureteral Reflux.

    PubMed

    Nino, F; Ilari, M; Noviello, C; Santoro, L; Rätsch, I M; Martino, A; Cobellis, G

    2016-02-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the retrograde passage of urine from the bladder to the upper urinary tract. It is the most common congenital urological anomaly affecting 1-2% of children and 30-40% of patients with urinary tract infections. VUR is a major risk factor for pyelonephritic scarring and chronic renal failure in children. It is the result of a shortened intravesical ureter with an enlarged or malpositioned ureteric orifice. An ectopic embryonal ureteric budding development is implicated in the pathogenesis of VUR, which is a complex genetic developmental disorder. Many genes are involved in the ureteric budding formation and subsequently in the urinary tract and kidney development. Previous studies demonstrate an heterogeneous genetic pattern of VUR. In fact no single major locus or gene for primary VUR has been identified. It is likely that different forms of VUR with different genetic determinantes are present. Moreover genetic studies of syndromes with associated VUR have revealed several possible candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis of VUR and related urinary tract malformations. Mutations in genes essential for urinary tract morphogenesis are linked to numerous congenital syndromes, and in most of those VUR is a feature. The Authors provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the VUR. The different genes and signaling pathways controlling the embryonal urinary tract development are analyzed. A better understanding of VUR genetic bases could improve the management of this condition in children. PMID:27013925

  19. Genetics of Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Ninoa, F.; Ilaria, M.; Noviello, C.; Santoro, L.; Rätsch, I.M.; Martino, A.; Cobellis, G.

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the retrograde passage of urine from the bladder to the upper urinary tract. It is the most common congenital urological anomaly affecting 1-2% of children and 30-40% of patients with urinary tract infections. VUR is a major risk factor for pyelonephritic scarring and chronic renal failure in children. It is the result of a shortened intravesical ureter with an enlarged or malpositioned ureteric orifice. An ectopic embryonal ureteric budding development is implicated in the pathogenesis of VUR, which is a complex genetic developmental disorder. Many genes are involved in the ureteric budding formation and subsequently in the urinary tract and kidney development. Previous studies demonstrate an heterogeneous genetic pattern of VUR. In fact no single major locus or gene for primary VUR has been identified. It is likely that different forms of VUR with different genetic determinantes are present. Moreover genetic studies of syndromes with associated VUR have revealed several possible candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis of VUR and related urinary tract malformations. Mutations in genes essential for urinary tract morphogenesis are linked to numerous congenital syndromes, and in most of those VUR is a feature. The Authors provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the VUR. The different genes and signaling pathways controlling the embryonal urinary tract development are analyzed. A better understanding of VUR genetic bases could improve the management of this condition in children. PMID:27013925

  20. The evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux before and after medical therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.

    1981-07-01

    Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is a quantitative technique that can be employed to detect and quantitate gastroesophageal reflux before and after the application of therapeutic modalities, including change in body position, bethanechol, atropine, antacids, and antacid-alginate compounds. Five groups of 10-15 patients each were studied before and after using each therapeutic modality and before and after atropine. The results were compared to the patient's symptomatology and to the acid reflux test. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy was performed following oral administration of 300 microCi 99mTc-sulfur colloid in 300 ml acidified orange juice. Thirty-second gamma camera images were obtained as the gastroesophageal gradient was increased from approximately 10 to 35 mm Hg at 5 mm Hg increments using an inflatable abdominal binder. Data were processed using a digital computer. Reflux was reduced by change in position from recumbent to upright, and by the use of subcutaneous bethanechol, oral antacid, or oral antacidalginate compound. Atropine increased reflux. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is more sensitive than fluoroscopy, correlates well with clinical symptomatology, and is a reliable and convenient technique for the quantitative estimation of reflux before and after therapy.

  1. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia due to gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Rong; Xu, Xue-Feng; Zhou, Chun-Ju; Yang, Hai-Ming; Zhao, Shun-Ying

    2015-06-01

    The most common causes of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) are connective tissue diseases, organ transplantation, drug reaction, and infections. Although rare, BOOP due to gastroesophageal reflux (GER) has been reported in adults but not to date in pediatric patients. This study describes 2 pediatric patients who developed GER and BOOP. One patient had superior mesenteric artery syndrome and Helicobacter pylori infection, and the other had a gastroduodenal ulcer with reflux esophagitis. Respiratory symptoms occurred concurrently or after gastrointestinal symptoms. Monitoring of esophageal pH for 24 hours revealed pathologic acid reflux. Lung biopsy findings confirmed BOOP. No other causes of BOOP were observed in these 2 patients. Both patients were cured with antireflux therapy and corticosteroids. To our knowledge, this is the first case report to implicate GER as a reversible cause of BOOP in children. PMID:25986021

  2. Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux in Noncystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Annemarie L.; Button, Brenda M.; Denehy, Linda; Wilson, John W.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical presentation of noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis may be complicated by concomitant conditions, including gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR). Increased acidic GOR is principally caused by gastro-oesophageal junction incompetence and may arise from lower oesophageal sphincter hypotension, including transient relaxations, hiatus hernia, and oesophageal dysmotility. Specific pathophysiological features which are characteristic of respiratory diseases including coughing may further increase the risk of GOR in bronchiectasis. Reflux may impact on lung disease severity by two mechanisms, reflex bronchoconstriction and pulmonary microaspiration. Symptomatic and clinically silent reflux has been detected in bronchiectasis, with the prevalence of 26 to 75%. The cause and effect relationship has not been established, but preliminary reports suggest that GOR may influence the severity of bronchiectasis. Further studies examining the implications of GOR in this condition, including its effect across the disease spectrum using a combination of diagnostic tools, will clarify the clinical significance of this comorbidity. PMID:22135740

  3. Pathogenesis and current management of gastrooesophageal-reflux-related asthma.

    PubMed

    Menes, T; Lelcuk, S; Spivak, H

    2000-08-01

    In the past decade the use of proton pump inhibitors on the one hand, and an aggressive surgical approach on the other hand have revolutionised the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Many studies have suggested that the successful management of GORD results in improvement of the symptoms of asthma which coexist in many of these patients. In this paper we review the pathogenesis and the medical and surgical treatment of GOR-related asthma. Both anti-reflux operations and anti-acid medications improve GORD and GOR-related asthma. Although anti-reflux surgery is superior to H2 blockers, there are not sufficient data to evaluate proton pump inhibitors compared with operation in controlling the symptoms of asthma. PMID:11003425

  4. Duodenogastric reflux in Chagas' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Troncon, L.E.; Rezende Filho, J.; Iazigi, N.

    1988-10-01

    Increased duodenogastric reflux has been recognized as a cause of gastric mucosa damage. The frequent finding of bile-stained gastric juice and a suggested higher frequency of lesions of the gastric mucosa in patients with Chagas' disease, which is characterized by a marked reduction of myenteric neurons, suggest that impairment of intrinsic innervation of the gut might be associated with increased duodenogastric reflux. Duodenogastric bile reflux was quantified after intravenous injection of 99mtechnetium-HIDA, in 18 patients with chronic Chagas' disease, 12 controls, and 7 patients with Billroth II gastrectomy. All but one of the chagasic patients were submitted to upper digestive tract endoscopy. High reflux values (greater than or equal to 10%) were detected both in chagasic patients and in the controls, but the values for both groups were significantly lower (P less than 0.01) than those obtained for Billroth II patients (median: 55.79%; range: 12.58-87.22%). Reflux values tended to be higher in the Chagas' disease group (median: 8.20%; range: 0.0-29.40%) than in the control group (median: 3.20%; range: 0.0-30.64%), with no statistical difference between the two groups (P greater than 0.10). Chronic gastritis was detected by endoscopy in 12 chagasic patients, benign gastric ulcer in 2 patients, and a pool of bile in the stomach in 11 patients. However, neither the occurrence of gastric lesions nor the finding of bile-stained gastric juice was associated with high reflux values after (99mTc)HIDA injection. This study suggests that lesions of the intramural nervous system of the gut in Chagas' disease do not appear to be associated with abnormally increased duodenogastric reflux.

  5. Stillage reflux in food waste ethanol fermentation and its by-product accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongzhi; Yang, Jian; Jia, Yan; Wang, Qunhui; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    Raw materials and pollution control are key issues for the ethanol fermentation industry. To address these concerns, food waste was selected as fermentation substrate, and stillage reflux was carried out in this study. Reflux was used seven times during fermentation. Corresponding ethanol and reducing sugar were detected. Accumulation of by-products, such as organic acid, sodium chloride, and glycerol, was investigated. Lactic acid was observed to accumulate up to 120g/L, and sodium chloride reached 0.14mol/L. Other by-products did not accumulate. The first five cycles of reflux increased ethanol concentration, which prolonged fermentation time. Further increases in reflux time negatively influenced ethanol fermentation. Single-factor analysis with lactic acid and sodium chloride demonstrated that both factors affected ethanol fermentation, but lactic acid induced more effects. PMID:26974357

  6. Multivariate analysis of pathophysiological factors in reflux oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Cadiot, G; Bruhat, A; Rigaud, D; Coste, T; Vuagnat, A; Benyedder, Y; Vallot, T; Le Guludec, D; Mignon, M

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reflux oesophagitis is considered a multifactorial disease, but the respective roles of the main factors involved in its pathophysiology have not been clearly established. AIMS: To attempt to assign these roles by means of a multivariate logistic regression analysis of the main parameters associated with reflux oesophagitis. PATIENTS: Eighty seven patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease were studied: 41 without oesophagitis and 46 with reflux oesophagitis grade 1 to 3. METHODS: (1) Monovariate comparison of patients' characteristics and of parameters derived from in hospital 24 hour oesophageal pH monitoring, oesophageal manometry, double isotope gastric emptying studies, and basal and pentagastrin stimulated gastric acid and pepsin output determinations, between patients with and without oesophagitis. (2) Multivariate logistic regression analysis including the parameters significant in the monovariate analysis. RESULTS: Among the 16 significant parameters from monovariate analysis, three significant independent parameters were identified by multivariate logistic regression analysis: number of refluxes lasting more than five minutes, reflecting oesophageal acid clearance (p = 0.002); basal lower oesophageal sphincter pressure (p = 0.008); and peak acid output (p = 0.012). These three parameters were not correlated with each other. The multivariate model was highly discriminant (correct classification of 81.3% of the cases (95% confidence intervals 0.723, 0.903). Risk for oesophagitis increased as a function of the tercile threshold values of the three parameters. Odds ratios of the three parameters for oesophagitis risk were similar, regardless of whether they were calculated when the patients were compared as a function of oesophagitis grade or the presence or absence of oesophagitis. CONCLUSIONS: This multivariate approach adds evidence that impaired oesophageal acid clearance and hypotonic lower oesophageal sphincter are the two major

  7. Laryngopharyngeal Reflux in Children with Chronic Otitis Media with Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Górecka-Tuteja, Anna; Jastrzębska, Izabela; Składzień, Jacek; Fyderek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the characteristic properties of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in children with otitis media with effusion (OME) using 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance combined with dual-probe (pharyngeal and esophageal) pH-metry. Methods Children aged 7–10 years of age with OME underwent 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance pH-metry. The upper pH sensor was situated 1 cm above the upper esophageal sphincter, and the lower pH sensor was placed 3–5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. Parents were asked to complete the gastroesophageal reflux assessment of symptoms in a pediatrics questionnaire. Results Twenty-eight children were enrolled; LPR was detected in 19 (67.9%) children. The criteria of the LPR diagnosis was the presence of at least one supraesophageal episode with a pH < 5.0 and a change in the pH value measured from the initial level at the upper sensor of > 0.2. In total, 64 episodes were observed. Assessment of all LPR episodes showed the presence of 246 episodes in the entire study. A considerable predominance of weakly acidic episodes (87.8%) was noted; there were 6.5% acidic episodes, and weakly alkaline episodes reached 5.7%. Pathological GER was noted in 10 (35.7%) subjects. Acid GER was detected in 8 children, 2 of whom demonstrated non-acidic reflux. In the LPR-negative patients, no pathological GER was confirmed with the exception of a single case of non-acidic reflux. Conclusions LPR was frequently noted in the group of children with OME, and it might be an important risk factor in this common disease. PMID:27193974

  8. Resolving bile reflux by lanreotide in patients with Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy.

    PubMed

    Moubax, K; Mana, F; Urbain, D

    2014-12-01

    Reflux into the esophagus after partial or total gastrectomy is a well known problem. Even a Roux-en-Y reconstruction is not always a definitive solution. Bile reflux might occur and cause disabling symptoms, unresponsive to the classic anti-acid or anti-reflux therapy. Endoscopy and a Tc-99m-BrIDA hepatobiliary (HIDA) scan can be used to make the diagnosis. Clinical studies have shown that lanreotide (somatuline), which strongly inhibits many gastro-intestinal hormones, reduces the bile salts outputs. We present a case of a patient with bile reflux after Roux-en-Y. After administration of lanreotide he had a good clinical improvement and mucosal healing on endoscopy. Lanreotide can be a good treatment option for bile reflux when classic treatment fails, but clinical trials with more patients will have to confirm this. PMID:25682623

  9. Gastroesophageal Reflux in Children and Adolescents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding how Crohn’s Disease treatments affect children’s gut microbiome Jun 10, 2016 See additional news » Related Conditions & Diseases Barrett's Esophagus Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER) and Gastroesophageal Reflux ...

  10. Gastro-oesophageal reflux — initial experience with a radiotelemetry system for prolonged oesophageal pH monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Collins, B J; Spence, R A J; Parks, T G; Love, A H G

    1985-01-01

    A radiotelemetry system has been used to monitor gastro-oesophageal reflux over a prolonged period in 27 asymptomatic control subjects and in 15 patients with reflux symptoms. In control subjects, the frequency of reflux episodes (pH < 5) ranged from 0.1 - 0.7 per hour of recording (median 0.36) by day, and from 0 - 1.0 per hour (median 0.12) by night. The duration of reflux (pH < 5) per hour of recording ranged from 0.4 - 5.4 minutes (median 2.1) by day and from 0 - 5.1 minutes (median 0.27) by night. Patients with reflux symptoms had more frequent episodes of daytime reflux and a longer duration of daytime reflux than control subjects. The frequency and duration of nocturnal reflux were similar in patients and in control subjects. Of two patients with Barrett's metaplasia of the lower oesophagus, one had markedly increased frequency and duration of both daytime and nocturnal acid reflux, while the other had only a moderate increase in the frequency of daytime reflux episodes. PMID:4095805

  11. Effect of alginate and alginate-cimetidine combination therapy on stimulated postprandial gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Washington, N; Denton, G

    1995-11-01

    This randomized, single-blind cross-over study compared the effectiveness of a conventional alginate reflux barrier formulation (20 mL single dose of Liquid Gaviscon; sodium alginate, sodium bicarbonate, calcium carbonate) with a 20 mL single dose of an alginate-cimetidine combination formulation (Algitec Suspension; sodium alginate, cimetidine) in the suppression of food and acid reflux into the oesophagus after a test meal in 12 healthy volunteers. Subjects were fasted overnight before the study. A pH electrode and gamma detector were accurately positioned 5 cm above the cardia. The volunteers received a 99mTc-labelled meal designed to provoke reflux and then either remained untreated, or 30 min later were given either Algitec Suspension or Liquid Gaviscon. Reflux of both food and acid into the oesophagus was measured for 3 h. There was a seven day wash-out period between each treatment. Food reflux in the control group was 22,878 +/- 14,385 counts x 10(3) and this was significantly suppressed by both Liquid Gaviscon (174 +/- 128 (s.e.) counts x 10(3); P = 0.003); however, although the reduction of food reflux to 3812 +/- 2322 counts x 10(3) observed after Algitec treatment was considerable, this did not reach statistical significance (P > 0.05) due to the large intersubject variation. Liquid Gaviscon was significantly better at reducing food reflux than Algitec (P = 0.001). Gaviscon also significantly reduced acid reflux when compared with the control group (1.08 +/- 0.73 vs 5.87 +/- 3.27% recording time oesophageal pH < 4, respectively) (P = 0.03). The slight reduction in acid reflux after Algitec treatment (3.25 +/- 1.82% recording time oesophageal pH < 4) also did not reach statistical significance. The difference between Algitec and Gaviscon treatment was also not significant. PMID:8708979

  12. Dietary guideline adherence for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common gastrointestinal disease, and the cost of health care and lost productivity due to GERD is extremely high. Recently described side effects of long-term acid suppression have increased the interest in nonpharmacologic methods for alleviating GERD symptoms. We aimed to examine whether GERD patients follow recommended dietary guidelines, and if adherence is associated with the severity and frequency of reflux symptoms. Methods We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study within the Kaiser Permanente Northern California population, comparing 317 GERD patients to 182 asymptomatic population controls. All analyses adjusted for smoking and education. Results GERD patients, even those with moderate to severe symptoms or frequent symptoms, were as likely to consume tomato products and large portion meals as GERD-free controls and were even more likely to consume soft drinks and tea [odds ratio (OR) = 2.01 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-3.61; OR = 2.63 95% CI 1.24-5.59, respectively] and eat fried foods and high fat diet. The only reflux-triggering foods GERD patients were less likely to consume were citrus and alcohol [OR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.35-0.97 for citrus; OR = 0.41 95% CI 0.19-0.87 for 1 + drink/day of alcohol]. The associations were similar when we excluded users of proton pump inhibitors. Conclusions GERD patients consume many putative GERD causing foods as frequently or even more frequently than asymptomatic patients despite reporting symptoms. These findings suggest that, if dietary modification is effective in reducing GERD, substantial opportunities for nonpharmacologic interventions exist for many GERD patients. PMID:25125219

  13. Acid-neutralizing scenario after the Cretaceous-Tertiary impact event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruoka, Teruyuki; Koeberl, Christian

    2003-06-01

    Acid rain from the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary impact event should have caused significant damage to freshwater life, but only minor extinctions of freshwater species are actually observed. We propose a mechanism to neutralize the acid using larnite (β-Ca2SiO4), produced as a result of the specific lithology at the Chicxulub impact site. The impact vapor plume must have been enriched in calcium from the carbonate-rich target, leading to the crystallization of larnite. The acid-neutralizing capacity of the larnite grains would have been high enough to consume acid produced after the K-T event within several hours, reducing it to a level at which freshwater life would not have been affected, even if all the acid had precipitated instantaneously after the K-T impact. This scenario can explain some of the extinction selectivity at the K-T boundary.

  14. Glacial Acetic Acid Adverse Events: Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Doles, William; Wilkerson, Garrett; Morrison, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    Glacial acetic acid is a dangerous chemical that has been associated with several adverse drug events involving patients over recent years. When diluted to the proper concentration, acetic acid solutions have a variety of medicinal uses. Unfortunately, despite warnings, the improper dilution of concentrated glacial acetic acid has resulted in severe burns and other related morbidities. We report on 2 additional case reports of adverse drug events involving glacial acetic acid as well as a review of the literature. A summary of published case reports is provided, including the intended and actual concentration of glacial acetic acid involved, the indication for use, degree of exposure, and resultant outcome. Strategies that have been recommended to improve patient safety are summarized within the context of the key elements of the medication use process. PMID:26448660

  15. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: A review of surgical decision making

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Maureen; Afaneh, Cheguevara; Benhuri, Daniel; Antonacci, Caroline; Abelson, Jonathan; Zarnegar, Rasa

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a very common disorder with increasing prevalence. It is estimated that up to 20%-25% of Americans experience symptoms of GERD weekly. Excessive reflux of acidic often with alkaline bile salt gastric and duodenal contents results in a multitude of symptoms for the patient including heartburn, regurgitation, cough, and dysphagia. There are also associated complications of GERD including erosive esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus, stricture and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. While first line treatments for GERD involve mainly lifestyle and non-surgical therapies, surgical interventions have proven to be effective in appropriate circumstances. Anti-reflux operations are aimed at creating an effective barrier to reflux at the gastroesophageal junction and thus attempt to improve physiologic and mechanical issues that may be involved in the pathogenesis of GERD. The decision for surgical intervention in the treatment of GERD, moreover, requires an objective confirmation of the diagnosis. Confirmation is achieved using various preoperative evaluations including: ambulatory pH monitoring, esophageal manometry, upper endoscopy (esophagogastroduodenoscopy) and barium swallow. Upon confirmation of the diagnosis and with appropriate patient criteria met, an anti-reflux operation is a good alternative to prolonged medical therapy. Currently, minimally invasive gastro-esophageal fundoplication is the gold standard for surgical intervention of GERD. Our review outlines the many factors that are involved in surgical decision-making. We will review the prominent features that reflect appropriate anti-reflux surgery and present suggestions that are pertinent to surgical practices, based on evidence-based studies. PMID:26843915

  16. Associations between peripheral vertigo and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Viliušytė, Edita; Macaitytė, Raminta; Vaitkus, Antanas; Rastenytė, Daiva

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesize that peripheral vertigo is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Two mechanisms could be considered – gastric acids may directly irritate the respiratory mucosa and cause inflammation, or Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) could be present and cause local infection. Reflux material (Hydrochloric acid (HCl) and pepsin) could get into the middle ear via Eustachian tube and affect osseous structures directly. Disturbance of ossicles could cause tinnitus, which is more common for peripheral vertigo. H. pylori could also get in the esophagus and in the upper respiratory tract via gastroesophageal reflux, and could cause tympanosclerosis and fixation of ossicles. In our study group, 120 of 153 (78.4%) patients had gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Diagnostic tests of H. pylori (rapid urease test or blood antibody test) were performed for 96 of 120 (80%) patients with GERD and were found positive for 32 of 96 (33.3%) patients. Peripheral vertigo was present in 93 of 120 (77.6%) patients with GERD compared to 33 of 126 (26%) patients without GERD (χ(2)=9.016, p=0.003). H. pylori and peripheral vertigo coexisted in 26 of 126 patients (20.6%) (OR 1.36; 95% CI 0.49-3.74, p=0.55). Our study demonstrated statistically significant association between peripheral vertigo and GERD but not between peripheral vertigo and H. pylori. Further more extensive investigations are needed in order to explore our hypothesis. PMID:26115947

  17. The effect of famotidine on gastroesophageal and duodeno-gastro-esophageal refluxes in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Ying; Dai, Ning; Zhao, Lan; Wang, Jian-Guo; Si, Jian-Ming

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of famotidine on gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and duodeno-gastro-esophageal reflux (DGER) and to explore it's possible mechanisms. To identify the relevant factors of the reflux. METHODS: Ninteen critically ill patients were consecutively enrolled in the study. Dynamic 24 h monitoring of GER and DGER before and after administration of famotidine was performed. The parameters of gastric residual volume,multiple organ disorder syndrome (MODS) score, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score and PEEP were recorded. Paired t test; Wilcoxon signed ranks test and Univariate analysis with Spearman's rank correlation were applied to analyse the data. RESULTS: Statistical significance of longest acid reflux, reflux time of pH < 4 and fraction time of acid reflux was observed in ten critically ill patients before and after administration. P value is 0.037, 0.005, 0.005 respectively. Significance change of all bile reflux parameters was observed before and after administration. P value is 0.007, 0.024, 0.005, 0.007, 0.005. GER has positive correlation with APACHE II score and gastric residual volume with correlation coefficient of 0.720, 0.932 respectively. CONCLUSION: GER and DGER are much improved after the administration of famotidine. GER is correlated with APACHE II score and gastric residual volume. PMID:12532466

  18. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Treating Wisely.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J Lane; Pruett, Kellner L

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is commonly managed in both primary and secondary care settings, as this condition occurs in patients of all ages and has a wide variety of clinical presentations. However, evidence suggests that GERD is commonly overdiagnosed and overtreated. Adherence to guidelines may help reduce the harms of overdiagnosis. PMID:27154891

  19. The Angelchik prosthesis for gastro-oesophageal reflux: symptomatic and objective assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, R. M.; Temple, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with intractable gastro-oesophageal reflux were treated by insertion of the Angelchik antireflux prosthesis. Good symptomatic relief was achieved in over 80% of patients reviewed up to 28 months after operation and there was marked resolution of oesophagitis as seen on endoscopy. Oesophageal manometry and pH studies performed preoperatively and at 3 and 12 months after operation, showed a significant increase in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure with decreased acid reflux. Some technical problems were encountered, but the prosthesis is potentially a simple and effective means of controlling gastro-oesophageal reflux. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4051424

  20. Anti-reflux surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need the following tests: Blood tests ( complete blood count , electrolytes , or liver tests). Esophageal manometry (to measure pressures in the esophagus) or pH monitoring (to see how much stomach acid is ...

  1. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... foods garlic and onions mint flavorings spicy foods tomato-based foods, like spaghetti sauce, chili, and pizza ... Regurgitation is when food and liquid containing stomach acid comes back up into the throat or mouth.) ...

  2. Gastroesophageal reflux - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... only your head may not help.) Drug Treatment Antacids can help neutralize your stomach acid. They do ... irritation in your esophagus. Common side effects of antacids include diarrhea or constipation. Other over-the-counter ...

  3. Endoscopic Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux in Children in Kosova

    PubMed Central

    Berisha, Murat; Hyseni, Nexhmi; Statovci, Sejdi; Grajqevci, Salih; Xhiha, Butrint

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children has been treated with subureteric deflux injection of Deflux (dextranomer hyaluronic acid copolymer) since 2009. The aim of this study was to analyze the results of endoscopic treatment of VUR in our clinic. Methods: Between March 2009 and December 2013, fifty-five children underwent endoscopic subureteral injection of Deflux in 78 ureters. Two months postoperatively voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) was performed. This study examined the disappearance of VUR and urinary tract infection (UTI) as well as the quality of life during long-term follow-up. Results: The study included 55 patients (40 females and 15 males) with 78 refluxing ureters. There were 22 refluxed ureters altogether and 33 children had a unilateral reflux (two duplicated systems). All patients were treated, from the age 6 months up to 12 years old. The mean age of patients was 5.2 years. There has been no complications, but with few recurrences. In 6 patients (16.6%), endoscopic treatment with deflux was done twice, while in three patients (8.5%), the endoscopic treatment with deflux was performed three times, because of recurrence. Conclusion: We recommend the use of endoscopic Deflux injection as first line treatment for children with VUR. Endoscopic subureteral injection of Deflux is a minimally invasive method for VUR treatment in pediatric patients and is associated with low morbidity. PMID:25132708

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and patterns of reflux in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis using hypopharyngeal multichannel intraluminal impedance.

    PubMed

    Hoppo, T; Komatsu, Y; Jobe, B A

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a diffuse fibrotic lung disease of unknown etiology. The association between IPF and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been suggested. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of GERD and assess the proximity of reflux events in patients with histologically proven IPF using hypopharyngeal multichannel intraluminal impedance (HMII). This is a retrospective review of prospectively collected data from patients with histologically confirmed IPF (via lung biopsy) who underwent objective esophageal physiology testing including high-resolution manometry and HMII. Defective lower esophageal sphincter (LES) was defined as either LES pressure of <5.0 mmHg, total length of LES of <2.4 cm, or intra-abdominal length of LES of <0.9 cm. Abnormal esophageal motility was considered present when failed swallows ≥30% and/or mean wave amplitude <30 mmHg was present. HMII used a specialized impedance catheter to directly measure laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and full column reflux (reflux 2 cm distal to the upper esophageal sphincter). Based on the previous study of healthy subjects, abnormal proximal exposure was considered present when LPR ≥1/day and/or full column reflux ≥5/day were present. From October 2009 to June 2011, 46 patients were identified as having pulmonary fibrosis and sufficient HMII data. Of 46, 10 patients were excluded because of concomitant connective tissue diseases, and 8 patients were excluded because they had undergone lung transplantation, which may impact the patterns of reflux. The remaining 28 patients with histologically confirmed IPF (male 16, female 12) were included in this study. Mean age and BMI were 60.4 years (range, 41-78) and 28.4 (range, 21.1-38.1), respectively. All patients except one were symptomatic; 23 (82%) patients had concomitant typical GERD symptoms such as heartburn, whereas 4 (14%) patients had isolated pulmonary symptoms such as cough. Esophageal

  5. Sleeve gastrectomy with anti-reflux procedures

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Sergio; Lacombe, Arnaldo; de Aquino, Caio Gustavo Gaspar; Malzoni, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Sleeve gastrectomy is the fastest growing surgical procedure to treat obesity in the world but it may cause or worsen gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article originally aimed to describe the addition of anti-reflux procedures (removal of periesophageal fats pads, hiatoplasty, a small plication and fixation of the gastric remnant in position) to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and to report early and late results. Methods Eighty-eight obese patients that also presented symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease were submitted to sleeve gastrectomy with anti-reflux procedures. Fifty of them were also submitted to a transit bipartition. The weight loss of these patients was compared to consecutive 360 patients previously submitted to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and to 1,140 submitted to sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms were specifically inquired in all anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy patients and compared to the results of the same questionnaire applied to 50 sleeve gastrectomy patients and 60 sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition patients that also presented preoperative symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Results In terms of weight loss, excess of body mass index loss percentage after anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy is not inferior to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition is not inferior to sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition. Anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy did not add morbidity but significantly diminished gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and the use of proton pump inhibitors to treat this condition. Conclusion The addition of anti-reflux procedures, such as hiatoplasty and cardioplication, to the usual sleeve gastrectomy did not add morbidity neither worsened the weight loss but significantly reduced the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms as well as the use of proton pump inhibitors. PMID:25295447

  6. Novel surgical options for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Jenny; Soffer, Edy

    2015-07-01

    There are limited options to patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who are not satisfied with acid suppression therapy. Fundoplication, the standard surgical procedure for GERD, is effective but is associated with adverse side effects and has thus been performed less frequently, creating a need for alternative surgical interventions that are effective, yet less invasive and reversible. Lately, two such interventions were developed: the magnetic sphincter augmentation and electrical stimulation of the lower esophageal sphincter. Human studies describing safety and efficacy over a follow-up period of a number of years have been published, documenting efficacy and safety of these interventions. Future studies should clarify the role of these procedures in the spectrum of GERD therapy. PMID:25947638

  7. Endoscopic Treatment of Refractory Gastroesohageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Hee; Park, Pil Won; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2013-01-01

    Though efficient acid suppression with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) remains the mainstay of treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), some of the patients showed refractory response to PPIs, necessitating further intervention. After increasing dose of PPIs and other kinds of pharmacological intervention adopting prokinetics or others, variable endoscopic treatments are introduced for the treatment of these refractory cases. The detailed introduction regarding endoscopic treatment for GERD is forwarded in this review article. Implantation of reabsorbable or synthetic materials in the distal esophagus was tried in vain and is expelled from the market due to limited efficacy and serious complication. Radiofrequency energy delivery (Stretta) and transoral incisionless fundoplication (EsophyX) are actively tried currently. PMID:23767031

  8. Distinction between patients with non-erosive reflux disease and functional heartburn

    PubMed Central

    Giacchino, Maria; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2013-01-01

    Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and functional heartburn (FH) are two different clinical entities and the clear distinction between the two forms is actually possible thanks to the use of impedance-pH monitoring. NERD is the more common manifestation of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), one of the most widespread chronic gastrointestinal disorders in Western countries. The absence of visible lesions on endoscopy and the presence of troublesome reflux-associated (to acid, weakly acidic or non-acid reflux) symptoms are the two key factors for the definition of NERD. FH is an exclusive diagnosis and is defined by the Rome III criteria as a burning retrosternal discomfort, excluding GERD and esophageal motility disorders as a cause of the symptom. FH does not have any type of reflux underlying symptoms and psychological factors seem to be more expressed in FH patients than in patients with reflux-provoked disturbances. The aim of our review is to report the state-of-the-art knowledge about NERD and FH, to clarify their features and differences and to stimulate new research in this field. PMID:24714313

  9. Republished: Symptomatic reflux disease: the present, the past and the future

    PubMed Central

    Boeckxstaens, Guy; El-Serag, Hashem B; Smout, André J P M; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of GORD and its complications is increasing along with the exponentially increasing problem of obesity. Of particular concern is the relationship between central adiposity and GORD complications, including oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Driven by progressive insight into the epidemiology and pathophysiology of GORD, the earlier belief that increased gastroesophageal reflux mainly results from one dominant mechanism has been replaced by acceptance that GORD is multifactorial. Instigating factors, such as obesity, age, genetics, pregnancy and trauma may all contribute to mechanical impairment of the oesophagogastric junction resulting in pathological reflux and accompanying syndromes. Progression of the disease by exacerbating and perpetuating factors such as obesity, neuromuscular dysfunction and oesophageal fibrosis ultimately lead to development of an overt hiatal hernia. The latter is now accepted as a central player, impacting on most mechanisms underlying gastroesophageal reflux (low sphincter pressure, transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation, oesophageal clearance and acid pocket position), explaining its association with more severe disease and mucosal damage. Since the introduction of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), clinical management of GORD has markedly changed, shifting the therapeutic challenge from mucosal healing to reduction of PPI-resistant symptoms. In parallel, it became clear that reflux symptoms may result from weakly acidic or non-acid reflux, insight that has triggered the search for new compounds or minimally invasive procedures to reduce all types of reflux. In summary, our view on GORD has evolved enormously compared to that of the past, and without doubt will impact on how to deal with GORD in the future. PMID:25583739

  10. Gastroesophageal reflux in the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Hillemeier, C

    2000-10-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is relatively common in adolescence. The severity of gastrointestinal symptoms associated with gastroesophageal reflux varies from an occasional burp to persistent emesis. Evaluation of most of these patients reveals no definable anatomic, metabolic, infectious, or neurologic etiology. The clinical determination of a cause-and-effect relationship between GER and other disorders, including associated respiratory disease, is often difficult and must be approached with considerable caution. Tests that merely document the presence of GER add little to the diagnosis. The adolescent with GER often has persistent symptoms of esophagitis that lead to appropriate intervention. Understanding the capabilities and limitations of the various diagnostic maneuvers available to assess GER is important to avoid subjecting these patients to invasive, costly, and inappropriate testing. This article includes a general discussion of physiology, diagnostic evaluation, and therapy of GER, followed by a review of respiratory and other complications. PMID:11060560

  11. Transdermal nicotine patches do not cause clinically significant gastroesophageal reflux or esophageal motor disorders.

    PubMed

    Wright, R A; Goldsmith, L J; Ameen, V; D'Angelo, A; Kirby, S L; Prakash, S

    1999-12-01

    Transdermal nicotine delivery systems are widely used in smoking cessation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether common symptoms of pyrosis and dyspepsia associated with these patches are related to gastroesophageal reflux or esophageal dysmotility. Twenty-seven paid volunteer cigarette smokers (> 15 cigarettes/day) without symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease participated in this single-blinded, placebo-controlled study. Twenty subjects completed the study. Subjects underwent three sequential 24-h intraesophageal pH/motor studies (Synectics model T32342084, Shore View, MN). The pH/motility probe was positioned 5 cm above the manometrically determined LES. A placebo patch was applied for the first 24-h study and a 15-mg nicotine patch (Nicotrol) was applied for the initial 16 h (removed for remaining 8 h) of the second 24-h period. A 21-mg nicotine patch (Nicoderm) was applied for another 24-h study period. All subjects consumed an identical, defined diet documented by meal receipts, and refrained from smoking and tobacco use throughout the study periods (CO breath test confirmation). The Wilcoxon, paired t-test, exact McNemar statistical methods were used. The results showed that there were no significant differences in reflux symptoms (pyrosis, chest pain, nausea, dysphagia), supine gastroesophageal reflux (number of episodes, duration, or cumulative acid exposure), or the total number of reflux episodes between placebo and nicotine patch treatment periods. The number of post-prandial upright acid reflux episodes (p = 004) and number of upright acid reflux episodes lasting more than 5 min (p = 0.007) were statistically higher with the placebo patch compared to the active nicotine patches. No differences in intraesophageal pH or motility indices were noted between the two transdermal nicotine patches (Nicotrol, Nicoderm). It was concluded that dyspeptic symptoms in subjects utilizing transdermal nicotine patches are not related to

  12. Increased TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels are associated only with the esophageal reflux symptoms, but not with the extraesophageal reflux symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Joo; Kim, Nayoung; Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-08-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor and proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) have been implicated in the mechanism of acid-induced inflammation in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We aimed to evaluate TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels in the GERD patients and their relationship with endoscopic findings and reflux symptoms.Sixteen healthy controls, 45 patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD), and 14 nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) patients received endoscopy and completed questionnaires. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR) of TRPV1, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), PAR2, and interleukin (IL)-8 were performed in the distal esophagus specimen.The levels of TRPV1, GDNF, NGF, PAR2, and IL-8 mRNA expression were highest in the ERD group followed by NERD and control groups and the differences between control and ERD groups were statistically significant. Within the ERD group, patients with grade B in Los Angeles (LA) classification showed significantly higher levels of TRPV1, GDNF, and NGF mRNA expression than those with grade A. Presence of reflux symptoms was associated with significant higher levels of TRPV1, PAR2, and IL-8. Notably not extraesophageal but esophageal reflux symptoms were significantly associated with them.Upregulation of TRPV1 and PAR2 pathways might play a role in the development of distal esophageal inflammation and reflux symptoms. And extraesophageal reflux symptoms might not be associated with these processes. PMID:27512850

  13. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  14. Functional heartburn has more in common with functional dyspepsia than with non-erosive reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Savarino, E; Pohl, D; Zentilin, P; Dulbecco, P; Sammito, G; Sconfienza, L; Vigneri, S; Camerini, G; Tutuian, R; Savarino, V

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Functional dyspepsia and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) are prevalent gastrointestinal conditions with accumulating evidence regarding an overlap between the two. Still, patients with NERD represent a very heterogeneous group and limited data on dyspeptic symptoms in various subgroups of NERD are available. Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of dyspeptic symptoms in patients with NERD subclassified by using 24 h impedance-pH monitoring (MII-pH). Methods: Patients with typical reflux symptoms and normal endoscopy underwent impedance-pH monitoring off proton pump inhibitor treatment. Oesophageal acid exposure time (AET), type of acid and non-acid reflux episodes, and symptom association probability (SAP) were calculated. A validated dyspepsia questionnaire was used to quantify dyspeptic symptoms prior to reflux monitoring. Results: Of 200 patients with NERD (105 female; median age, 48 years), 81 (41%) had an abnormal oesophageal AET (NERD pH-POS), 65 (32%) had normal oesophageal AET and positive SAP for acid and/or non-acid reflux (hypersensitive oesophagus), and 54 (27%) had normal oesophageal AET and negative SAP (functional heartburn). Patients with functional heartburn had more frequent (p<0.01) postprandial fullness, bloating, early satiety and nausea compared to patients with NERD pH-POS and hypersensitive oesophagus. Conclusion: The increased prevalence of dyspeptic symptoms in patients with functional heartburn reinforces the concept that functional gastrointestinal disorders extend beyond the boundaries suggested by the anatomical location of symptoms. This should be regarded as a further argument to test patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in order to separate patients with functional heartburn from patients with NERD in whom symptoms are associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux. PMID:19460766

  15. An investigation of lower oesophageal redox potentials in gastro-oesophageal reflux patients and healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Washington, N; Steele, R J; Wright, J W; Bush, D; McIntosh, S L; Wilkinson, S; Washington, C

    1997-11-01

    Oesophageal electrical properties are thought to be important in the development of gastro-esophageal reflux. This study simultaneously monitored the intraoesophageal pH and redox potentials in 18 patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms and 15 asymptomatic controls, for a 24 h period. The pH and redox electrodes were positioned 5 cm proximal to the lower oesophageal sphincter, the position of which had been determined by manometry. Since significantly different behaviour was observed during the day and night, the data were divided into periods of waking and sleeping. Data were analysed for acid reflux (pH < 4) and transients in the redox potential-time curve. Both patients and normal subjects showed negative redox transients which were more frequent and pronounced at night than during the day, and which were uncorrelated with acid reflux. The only parameter which was significantly different between normal and refluxing groups was the amount of nocturnal redox activity, which was lower in refluxing subjects than in normals. Some possible hypotheses for these observations, and the origin of the redox species, are discussed. PMID:9413869

  16. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy to assess the severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease. [/sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid

    SciTech Connect

    Menin, R.A.; Malmud, L.S.; Petersen, R.P.; Maier, W.P.; Fisher, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-six (36) patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux were studied. Symptoms of heartburn, regurgitation, and dysphagia were scored as to their severity and compared to quantitative tests of gastroesophageal reflux. Patients were studied with the acid reflux test, fiberoptic endoscopy, exophageal mucosal biopsy with a pinch forceps, esophageal manometry, and radioisotopic gastroesophgeal scintigraphy. Symptoms were scored according to an arbitrary grading system as mild, moderate, or severe. There were significant correlations between symptoms scores and both the degree of endoscopic esophagitis and the gastroesophageal reflux indices as measured by the radioisotopic scintiscan, but not with the degree of histologic esophagitis or lower esophageal sphincter pressure. Review of the findings suggest the following profile for patients who might require antireflux surgery: severe symptoms; presence of endoscopic esophagitis; resting lower esophageal sphincter pressure below 10 mmHg; and gastroesophageal reflux index above 10%.

  17. Pulmonary manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Gaude, Gajanan S.

    2009-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may cause, trigger or exacerbate many pulmonary diseases. The physiological link between GERD and pulmonary disease has been extensively studied in chronic cough and asthma. A primary care physician often encounters patients with extra esophageal manifestations of GERD in the absence of heartburn. Patients may present with symptoms involving the pulmonary system; noncardiac chest pain; and ear, nose and throat disorders. Local irritation in the esophagus can cause symptoms that vary from indigestion, like chest discomfort and abdominal pain, to coughing and wheezing. If the gastric acid reaches the back of the throat, it may cause a bitter taste in the mouth and/or aspiration of the gastric acid into the lungs. The acid can cause throat irritation, postnasal drip and hoarseness, as well as recurrent cough, chest congestion and lung inflammation leading to asthma and/or bronchitis/ pneumonia. This clinical review examines the potential pathophysiological mechanisms of pulmonary manifestations of GERD. It also reviews relevant clinical information concerning GERD-related chronic cough and asthma. Finally, a potential management strategy for GERD in pulmonary patients is discussed. PMID:19641641

  18. N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-N,2-dimethyl-8-{[(4R)-5-methyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-chromen-4-yl]amino}imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-6-carboxamide (PF-03716556), a novel, potent, and selective acid pump antagonist for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hiroki; Tonai-Kachi, Hiroko; Ochi, Yasuo; Taniguchi, Yasuhito; Ohshiro, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Aihara, Takeshi; Hirao, Akiko; Kato, Teruhisa; Sakakibara, Minoru; Kurebayashi, Yoichi

    2009-02-01

    Inhibition of H(+),K(+)-ATPase is accepted as the most effective way of controlling gastric acid secretion. However, current acid suppressant therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease, using histamine H(2) receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors, does not fully meet the needs of all patients because of their mechanism of action. This study sought to characterize the in vitro and in vivo pharmacology of a novel acid pump antagonist, N-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-N,2-dimethyl-8-{[(4R)-5-methyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-chromen-4-yl]amino}imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-6-carboxamide (PF-03716556), and to compare it with other acid suppressants. Porcine, canine, and human recombinant gastric H(+),K(+)-ATPase activities were measured by ion-leaky and ion-tight assay. The affinities for a range of receptors, ion channels, and enzymes were determined to analyze selectivity profile. Acid secretion in Ghosh-Schild rats and Heidenhain pouch dogs were measured by titrating perfusate and gastric juice samples. PF-03716556 demonstrated 3-fold greater inhibitory activity than 5,6-dimethyl-2-(4-fluorophenylamino)-4-(1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-2-yl)pyrimidine (revaprazan), the only acid pump antagonist that has been available on the market, in ion-tight assay. The compound did not display any species differences, exhibiting highly selective profile including the canine kidney Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. Kinetics experiments revealed that PF-03716556 has a competitive and reversible mode of action. More rapid onset of action than 5-methoxy-2-{[(4-methoxy-3,5-dimethyl-2-pyridyl)methyl]-sulfinyl}-benzimidazole (omeprazole) and 3-fold greater potency than revaprazan were observed in Ghosh-Schild rats and Heidenhain pouch dogs. PF-03716556, a novel acid pump antagonist, could improve upon or even replace current pharmacological treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:18981288

  19. Gastric reflux is a significant causative factor of tooth erosion.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, W P; Furuholm, J; Gudmundsson, K; Theodórs, A; Meurman, J H

    2009-05-01

    Dental erosion is caused by dietary or gastric acid. This study aimed to examine the location and severity of tooth erosion with respect to causative factors, and to determine whether the clinical pattern of erosion reflected the dominant etiological factor. The study involved 249 Icelandic individuals and included: a detailed medical history; clinical oral examination; salivary sampling, and analysis for flow rate, pH, and buffering capacity. Reflux was assessed in 91 individuals by gastroscopy, esophageal manometry, and 24-hour esophageal-pH monitoring. Reflux symptoms were reported by 36.5% individuals. Manometry results were abnormal in 8% of study participants, abnormal esophageal pH in 17.7%, and a pathological 24-hour pH recording in 21.3%. 3.6% were positive for Helicobacter pylori. Normal salivary flow was found in 92%, but low salivary buffering (10.4%) was associated with erosion into dentin (P < 0.05). Significant associations were found between erosion and diagnosed reflux disease (OR 2.772; P < 0.005) and daily consumption of acidic drinks (OR 2.232; P < 0.005). PMID:19493884

  20. Editorial: Reflux While Running: Something to Belch About.

    PubMed

    Carlson, D A; Hirano, I

    2016-07-01

    Running is the most popular form of exercise in the United States. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is common during exercise and may affect performance. Previous studies have focused on increased intra-abdominal pressure as a major determinant of acid reflux during physical exertion. In this issue, Herregods et al. examined the mechanisms of GER in healthy volunteers using simultaneous high-resolution manometry and pH impedance testing performed while running. Novel observations afforded by the utilization of state-of-the-art technology include the importance of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation ("belch reflex") and transient formation of hiatal hernia during exercise. The findings are provocative and lend credence to commonsense strategies to minimize the consequences of belching in runners. PMID:27356820

  1. The management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Keung, Charlotte; Hebbard, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY If there are no features of serious disease, suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease can be initially managed with a trial of a proton pump inhibitor for 4–8 weeks. This should be taken 30–60 minutes before food for optimal effect. Once symptoms are controlled, attempt to withdraw acid suppression therapy. If symptoms recur, use the minimum dose that controls symptoms. Patients who have severe erosive oesophagitis, scleroderma oesophagus or Barrett’s oesophagus require long-term treatment with a proton pump inhibitor. Lifestyle modification strategies can help gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Weight loss has the strongest evidence for efficacy. Further investigation and a specialist referral are required if there is no response to proton pump inhibitor therapy. Atypical symptoms or signs of serious disease also need investigation. PMID:27041798

  2. [Gaviscon in reflux symptoms. Results of a drug monitoring study].

    PubMed

    Hutt, H J; Tauber, O; Flach, D

    1990-10-30

    335 general practitioners participated in an observational study of the alginic acid-containing antacid preparation Gaviscon over a period of eight months. In this period, 2927 patients with reflux disease were treated. Some 62.3% of the patients were treated for six to eight days. Both the tablet and suspension forms of the drug were considered to be effective by both physician and patient in more than 94% of the cases. Drug toleration was also considered good in more than 95% of the cases. The taste of Gaviscon was described as good by 54.7% of the patients, and acceptable by 33.5%. Pregnant women with reflux symptoms were observed in a separate group (n = 52). PMID:2258131

  3. The management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Keung, Charlotte; Hebbard, Geoffrey

    2016-02-01

    If there are no features of serious disease, suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease can be initially managed with a trial of a proton pump inhibitor for 4-8 weeks. This should be taken 30-60 minutes before food for optimal effect. Once symptoms are controlled, attempt to withdraw acid suppression therapy. If symptoms recur, use the minimum dose that controls symptoms. Patients who have severe erosive oesophagitis, scleroderma oesophagus or Barrett's oesophagus require long-term treatment with a proton pump inhibitor. Lifestyle modification strategies can help gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Weight loss has the strongest evidence for efficacy. Further investigation and a specialist referral are required if there is no response to proton pump inhibitor therapy. Atypical symptoms or signs of serious disease also need investigation. PMID:27041798

  4. Feeding and Reflux: A Parent & Professional Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, William J.; Martorana, Pamela; Vitello, Louise; Eicher, Peggy S.; LaCour, Tricia

    2008-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) as a cause of an infant or child's refusal to eat is becoming better recognized. However, the many more subtle influences that reflux can have on feeding are less often recognized. Although vomiting after meals is the classic presentation, infants and children may present with a variety of more subtle symptoms less…

  5. How Acid Reflux Disease Damages Teeth

    MedlinePlus

    ... an advanced stage of destruction." The potential of hydrogen, or pH, is a standard way to measure ... January 2012 Related Articles: Tooth Erosion Sports and Energy Drinks Responsible for Irreversible Damage to Teeth What ...

  6. Surgical Webcast for Treatment of Acid Reflux

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... gastroenterologist. And you might describe what sort of test the gastroenterologist would initiate for the patient. Well ... up enough. But we’ll be able to test that as we get it repaired. So we ...

  7. [Quantifying intestino-esophageal reflux with a fiberoptic bilirubin detection probe].

    PubMed

    Stein, H J; Kraemer, S J; Feussner, H; Siewert, J R

    1994-05-01

    Currently available methods to assess reflux of duodenal contents into the esophagus are cumbersome, unphysiologic, and inaccurate. The role of intestino-esophageal reflux has therefore been controversial. We assessed intestino-esophageal reflux using a new system which allows prolonged intraesophageal measurement of bilirubin, the major pigment of bile. Measurements were made with a newly developed fiber-optic sensor electrode connected to a portable data processing unit (BILITEC 2000, Synectics Medical Inc., Sweden). Light absorption was measured at the absorption peak of bilirubin and a reference point. Studies were performed in 9 subjects without esophagitis, 9 subjects with esophagitis and primary reflux disease and 7 subjects with erosive esophagitis after a total or subtotal gastrectomy. The fiberoptic electrode was placed 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. In vitro studies showed linear correlations between absorbance measurements obtained with the BILITEC-unit and known bilirubin and bile acid concentrations, respectively (p < 0.01). Compared to both other groups, light absorption was markedly increased in the subjects who had esophagitis after a total or subtotal gastrectomy (p < 0.05) indicating severe biliary reflux. An increase in bilirubin absorption occurred particularly during the post-prandial and supine periodes (p < 0.01). A Roux-en-Y biliary diversion procedure completely abolished bile reflux in 2 of these patients. These data indicate that ambulatory 24-hour fiberoptic measurement of bilirubin in the esophagus is feasible and allows quantitation of intestino-esophageal reflux. Intestino-esophageal reflux occurs particularly during the postprandial period and the early morning hours in patients who had a previous subtotal or total gastrectomy. PMID:8073796

  8. Feasibility of closed Fe(II)/Fe(III) system for product-reflux in Nitrox process

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, M.; Ishida, T.

    1981-03-10

    A concept of closed reflux system for stable isotope fractionation by chemical exchange method has been introduced. In a closed system a chemical agent used to convert one chemical species of an isotopic exchange reaction into the other at the product end is regenerated on site by means of an electrochemical or thermal process. It offers a convenience of eliminating the needs for transporting chemicals to and from the site and an advantage of allowing leniency in the degree of completeness of the reflux reaction. Feasibility of use of Fe(II) salt solutions in a closed reflux system for the Nitrox process for /sup 15/N fractionation has been studied. Two of such systems, FeSO/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and Fe(ClO/sub 4/)/sub 2/ in HClO/sub 4/, are adopted for packed column operation. For both systems, the rate of reduction of nitric acid increases with increasing acid concentration, the solubility of the salts decreases with the increasing acid concentration, and the reflux reaction can be made to go to completion. Evaluation of such a closed reflux system will have to include that of performance of regenerative process.

  9. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms not responding to proton pump inhibitor: GERD, NERD, NARD, esophageal hypersensitivity or dyspepsia?

    PubMed Central

    Bashashati, Mohammad; Hejazi, Reza A; Andrews, Christopher N; Storr, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common gastrointestinal process that can generate symptoms of heartburn and chest pain. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the gold standard for the treatment of GER; however, a substantial group of GER patients fail to respond to PPIs. In the past, it was believed that acid reflux into the esophagus causes all, or at least the majority, of symptoms attributed to GER, with both erosive esophagitis and nonerosive outcomes. However, with modern testing techniques it has been shown that, in addition to acid reflux, the reflux of nonacid gastric and duodenal contents into the esophagus may also induce GER symptoms. It remains unknown how weakly acidic or alkaline refluxate with a pH similar to a normal diet induces GER symptoms. Esophageal hypersensitivity or functional dyspepsia with superimposed heartburn may be other mechanisms of symptom generation, often completely unrelated to GER. Detailed studies investigating the pathophysiology of esophageal hypersensitivity are not conclusive, and definitions of the various disease states may overlap and are often confusing. The authors aim to clarify the pathophysiology, definition, diagnostic techniques and medical treatment of patients with heartburn symptoms who fail PPI therapy. PMID:24719900

  10. Numerical analysis of seawater circulation in carbonate platforms: II. The dynamic interaction between geothermal and brine reflux circulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, G.D.; Whitaker, F.F.; Smart, P.L.; Sanford, W.E.

    2004-01-01

    Density-driven seawater circulation may occur in carbonate platforms due to geothermal heating and / or reflux of water of elevated salinity. In geothermal circulation lateral contrasts in temperature between seawater and platform groundwaters warmed by the geothermal heat flux result in upward convective flow, with colder seawater drawn into the platform at depth. With reflux circulation, platform-top waters concentrated by evaporation flow downward, displacing less dense underlying groundwaters. We have used a variable density groundwater flow model to examine the pattern, magnitude and interaction of these two different circulation mechanisms, for mesosaline platform-top waters (50???) and brines concentrated up to saturation with respect to gypsum (150???) and halite (246???). Geothermal circulation, most active around the platform margin, becomes restricted and eventually shut-off by reflux of brines from the platform interior towards the margin. The persistence of geothermal circulation is dependent on the rate of brine reflux, which is proportional to the concentration of platform-top brines and also critically dependent on the magnitude and distribution of permeability. Low permeability evaporites can severely restrict reflux whereas high permeability units in hydraulic continuity enhance brine transport. Reduction in permeability with depth and anisotropy of permeability (kv < < kh) focuses flow laterally in the shallow subsurface (<1 km), resulting in a horizontally elongated brine plume. Aquifer porosity and dispersivity are relatively minor controls on reflux. Platform brines can entrain surficial seawater when brine generating conditions cease but the platform-top remains submerged, a variant of reflux we term "latent reflux". Brines concentrated up to gypsum saturation have relatively long residence times of at least 100 times the duration of the reflux event. They thus represent a long-term control on post-reflux groundwater circulation, and

  11. Conservative surgical treatment of reflux esophagitis and esophageal stricture.

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, J L; Wright, R S; Edwards, W H; Sawyers, J L

    1975-01-01

    During a recent 3-year period, 17 consecutive patients were seen with advanced fibrotic esophageal strictures secondary to alkaline-acid-pepsin reflux. From detailed preoperative evaluations alone it was impossible to determine whether therapy should consist of excisional surgery, esophagogastroplasty or intra-operative dilatation with correction of reflux. Only at operation could the length, extent, degree and severity of the stricture be fully determined. Each of the 17 patients was treated by controlled dilatation, coupled with an antireflux procedure. This simplified approach proved successful on strictures thought preoperatively to be undilatable. It appears that this conservative approach is applicable to many advanced strictures and excisional and plastic procedures should be reserved for those cases that prove unyielding to intraoperative dilatation. The true appraisal of a reflux stricture and the choice of surgical procedure is best determined at the operating table. Images Fig. 5A. Fig. 5B. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. Fig. 16. Fig. 17. Fig. 18. Fig. 19. Fig. 20. Fig. 21. PMID:1130874

  12. [Anti-reflux surgery: indications, principles and contribution of laparoscopy].

    PubMed

    Cadière, G B

    1994-01-01

    Surgery is indicated when gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is resistant to medical treatment. Manometry, upper GI series, pH-metry, gastric emptying studies and gastric acid sampling are performed in order to demonstrate that GORD is caused by a deficient gastro-oesophageal valve mechanism, and hence that surgical treatment will be beneficial. The surgical principle is restoring an anti-reflux barrier by recreating a sufficient pressure gradient in the distal oesophagus, and by correcting the gastro-oesophageal Hiss. Nissen' fundoplication is probably the most efficient anti-reflux procedure. However, it can cause dysphagia, gas bloating and inability to burp. One hundred and fifty-six laparoscopic Nissen fundoplications have been performed by the author. Operating time average 120 min. No perioperative death was observed. There were 3 conversions to laparotomy and 4 peroperative complications: 1 gastric perforation, 2 lesions of the pleura and 1 liver laceration. Four postoperative complications occurred: 1 pneumonia, 1 necrosis of the wrap, 1 small bowel perforation and 1 obstruction due to migration of the entire stomach into the chest. Hospitalisation time ranged between 2 and 14 days (median 2), with a follow up of a median of 10 months. Long-term postoperative complications were: 1 recurrent heartburn 6 months postoperatively and 2 severe dysphagia. PMID:8191168

  13. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  14. Laparoscopic Anti-Reflux (GERD) Surgery

    MedlinePlus

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  15. Role for Ion Transport in Porcine Vocal Fold Epithelial Defense to Acid Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Erickson-Levendoski, Elizabeth; Sivasankar, M. Preeti

    2012-01-01

    Objective The vocal fold epithelium is routinely exposed to gastric contents, including acid and pepsin, during laryngopharyngeal reflux events. The epithelium may possess intrinsic defenses to reflux. The first objective of the current study was to examine whether vocal fold epithelial ion transport is one potential mechanism of defense to gastric contents. The second objective was to determine whether ion transport in response to gastric contents is associated with the secretion of bicarbonate. Study Design Prospective design in excised porcine larynges. Setting Laboratory. Subjects and Methods Porcine vocal folds (N = 56) were exposed on the luminal surface to acid, pepsin, or sham challenges. Ion transport at baseline and following challenge exposure was measured using electrophysiological techniques. To examine specific ion transport mechanisms, vocal folds were pretreated with either a sodium channel blocker or bicarbonate channel blocker. Results Within 60 seconds of acid but not pepsin exposure, there was a significant increase in ion transport. This rapid increase in ion transport was transient and related to bicarbonate secretion. Conclusion The current data suggest that porcine vocal folds immediately increase bicarbonate secretion following exposure to acid. Bicarbonate secretion may act to neutralize acid. These findings contribute to the identification of the mechanisms underlying vocal fold defense to reflux and offer implications for the development of treatments for reflux-induced vocal fold injury. PMID:22086905

  16. Utility scores for vesicoureteral reflux and anti-reflux surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Caleb; Routh, Jonathan C.; Logvinenko, Tanya; Rosoklija, Ilina; Kokorowski, Paul; Prosser, Lisa A.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Management of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) continues to be controversial. In conditions of uncertainty, decision analytic techniques such as cost-utility analysis (CUA) can help to structure the decision-making process. However, CUA analyses require a “utility,” a value between 0 (death) and 1 (perfect health) corresponding to the quality of life associated with a health state. Ideally, utility values are elicited directly from representative community samples, but utilities have not been rigorously measured for pediatric urology conditions. Objectives To elicit utility scores for VUR and open anti-reflux surgery (ARS) from a representative, well-characterized community sample of adults who have been parents. Methods Cross-sectional survey of nationally representative adults who had ever been parents. Each respondent saw one of four descriptions of VUR, with or without continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP) and occurrence of febrile urinary tract infection (UTI). A 6-week postoperative health state following ARS was also assessed. We used the time trade-off (TTO) method to elicit utility scores. Factors associated with utility score were assessed with a multivariate linear regression model. Results The survey was completed by 1200 individuals. Data were weighted to adjust for demographic differences between responders and non-responders. Mean age was 52 ± 15 years, 44% were male, and 68% were White. In terms of education, 29% had a college degree or higher. The mean utility score for VUR overall was 0.82 ± 0.28. VUR utility scores did not differ significantly based on inclusion of CAP or UTI in the health state description (p=0.21). The 6-week postoperative period garnered a utility of 0.71 ± 0.43. Discussion Our results showed that VUR has a mean utility score of 0.82, which indicates that the community perceives this condition to be a substantial burden. For comparison, conditions with similar utility scores include compensated hepatitis

  17. The role of gastroesophageal reflux in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Ganesh

    2003-08-18

    Fibroblast foci are indicative of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and appear to be a cellular attempt to repair the damaged alveolus. Although this progressive, often fatal, clinical syndrome is thought to be dependent on alveolar injury of unknown origin, significant clinical and preclinical evidence points to gastric acid as a causative harmful agent. Graded instillation of various forms of acid in several animal models resulted in aspiration-induced lung injury, including pulmonary fibrosis in pigs. Moreover, compelling clinical data suggest that a high percentage of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis also experience abnormal esophageal acid exposure, without necessarily experiencing the typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Aggressive, long-term therapeutic trials of patients with GERD and evaluation of the therapeutic effects on pulmonary disease will allow determination of the real influences of abnormal esophageal acid exposure in the development of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:12928077

  18. Use of the Montreal global definition as an assessment of quality of life in reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, R A; Macgill, A; Parkman, H P; Friedenberg, F K

    2012-08-01

    According to the Montreal Consensus Group's classification, gastroesophageal reflux disease develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications such as esophagitis. The characteristic gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms included in this statement are retrosternal burning and regurgitation. Troublesome is meant to imply that these symptoms impact on the well-being of affected individuals; in essence, quality of life (QOL). Whether heartburn and regurgitation symptoms would be characterized as more troublesome in those with confirmed pathologic acid reflux was determined. A second purpose was to assess how well troublesome scores correlated with the results of a validated, disease-specific QOL instrument. Subjects who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with 48-hour wireless esophageal pH testing off proton pump inhibitor therapy were interviewed. Esophagitis on EGD or pH < 4.0 for ≥4.5% of time over the 2-day period was considered positive for acid reflux. Assessment of how troublesome their symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation were made using separate 0-100 visual analog scales (VAS). Subjects were then asked to complete the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) 25-item questionnaire. Sixty-seven patients (21 males, 46 females) with mean age 47.8 ± 15.6 years were identified. Forty (59.7%) had an EGD or pH study positive for acid reflux. Overall 35/40 (87.5%) complained of either heartburn or regurgitation. There was no difference (P= 0.80) in heartburn VAS troublesome ratings for those with (54.0 ± 43.9) and without (56.7 ± 37.6) confirmed acid reflux. The same was true for regurgitation VAS troublesome ratings (P= 0.62). Likewise, mean QOLRAD scores did not differ between those with and without confirmed acid reflux by pH or EGD (4.5 ± 1.7 vs. 4.3 ± 1.7; P= 0.61). There was a moderately strong inverse correlation between patient self-rated VAS troublesome scores for both heartburn and

  19. Usefulness of mycophenolic acid monitoring with PETINIA for prediction of adverse events in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Ham, Ji Yeon; Jung, Hee-Yeon; Choi, Ji-Young; Park, Sun-Hee; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kim, Hyung-Kee; Huh, Seung; Kim, Chan-Duck; Won, Dong Il; Song, Kyung Eun; Cho, Jang-Hee

    2016-07-01

    Background Therapeutic drug monitoring of mycophenolic acid (MPA) is required to optimize the immunosuppressive effect and minimize toxicity. We validated a new particle-enhanced turbidimetric inhibition immunoassay (PETINIA) for the determination of MPA levels and evaluated the relationship of MPA trough level with drug-related adverse events. Methods PETENIA and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were used to determine MPA concentrations from 54 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). Agreement between PETINIA and LC-MS results was assessed by Passing-Bablok regression and the Bland-Altman plot method. The association of adverse events with MPA trough level obtained by PETINIA was analyzed. Results PETINIA revealed a good agreement with the LC-MS; Regression analysis gave an equation of y = 1.27x - 0.12 (r(2) = 0.975, p < 0.001). PETINIA showed a systemic positive bias with a mean difference of 0.66 mg/L compared to LC-MS. However, the magnitude of the positive bias decreased to 0.44 mg/L within the therapeutic range of MPA. Multiple logistic regression showed that MPA trough level determined by PETINIA was an independent risk factor for adverse events (odds ratio 2.28, 95% CI 1.25-4.16, p = 0.007). MPA trough level predicted adverse events with a sensitivity of 77.8% and a specificity of 86.7% using a cut-off level of 5.25 mg/L. Conclusions Good correlation between the two methods indicates that PETINIA is an acceptable method for the monitoring of MPA therapeutic levels. Furthermore, MPA trough level obtained by PETINIA is a useful monitoring tool to minimize toxicity in KTRs. PMID:26981890

  20. Comparative study of different venous reflux duplex quantitation parameters.

    PubMed

    Valentín, L I; Valentín, W H

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare different quantitation parameters of venous reflux by duplex scan in different venous disease manifestations. Duplex scan is a new modality to quantify venous reflux. Several studies propose different parameters. In addition, there is controversy about the importance of deep and superficial involvement in different disease manifestations. It is not clear whether there is an increased venous reflux associated with varied clinical stages. Venous conditions were classified in seven stages and their differences for several quantitation variables studied. Most quantitation variables, such as average and peak velocity, average and peak flow, and reflux volume disclosed significantly increased reflux from normal, pain only, and edema group to varicose vein, with or without edema, to lipodermatosclerosis and ulcer groups at every location in the lower extremity. Reflux time was not as consistent as other variables. Totalization of the results of every parameter for the whole extremity points to an increased reflux from pain only to edema and from lipodermatosclerosis to ulcer group. Chronic edema is not usually associated with increased venous reflux. The greater saphenous vein (superficial system) seems to be the main contributor to reflux in all stages of disease. Different quantitation methods of venous reflux are equivalent. Increased deep and superficial reflux and its totalization are associated with a more advanced disease stage. Reflux time may be the least useful variable. Chronic edema is frequently not associated with venous reflux. Greater saphenectomy may be the most useful intervention, even in the presence of deep vein reflux. PMID:10496498

  1. Time esophageal pH < 4 overestimates the prevalence of pathologic esophageal reflux in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gerson, Lauren B; Triadafilopoulos, George; Sahbaie, Peyman; Young, Winston; Sloan, Sheldon; Robinson, Malcolm; Miner, Philip B; Gardner, Jerry D

    2008-01-01

    Background A Stanford University study reported that in asymptomatic GERD patients who were being treated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), 50% had pathologic esophageal acid exposure. Aim We considered the possibility that the high prevalence of pathologic esophageal reflux might simply have resulted from calculating acidity as time pH < 4. Methods We calculated integrated acidity and time pH < 4 from the 49 recordings of 24-hour gastric and esophageal pH from the Stanford study as well as from another study of 57 GERD subjects, 26 of whom were treated for 8 days with 20 mg omeprazole or 20 mg rabeprazole in a 2-way crossover fashion. Results The prevalence of pathologic 24-hour esophageal reflux in both studies was significantly higher when measured as time pH < 4 than when measured as integrated acidity. This difference was entirely attributable to a difference between the two measures during the nocturnal period. Nocturnal gastric acid breakthrough was not a useful predictor of pathologic nocturnal esophageal reflux. Conclusion In GERD subjects treated with a PPI, measuring time esophageal pH < 4 will significantly overestimate the prevalence of pathologic esophageal acid exposure over 24 hours and during the nocturnal period. PMID:18498663

  2. Is the severity of gastroesophageal reflux dependent on hiatus hernia size?

    PubMed Central

    Franzén, Thomas; Tibbling, Lita

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine if the severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease is dependent on the size of a hiatus hernia. METHODS: Seventy-five patients with either a small (n = 25), medium (n = 25) or large (n = 25) hiatus hernia (assessed by high resolution esophageal manometry) were investigated using 24-h esophageal monitoring and a self-assessed symptom questionnaire. The questionnaire comprised the following items, each graded from 0 to 3 according to severity: heartburn; pharyngeal burning sensation; acid regurgitation; and chest pain. RESULTS: The percentage total reflux time was significantly longer in the group with hernia of 5 cm or more compared with the group with a hernia of < 3 cm (P < 0.002), and the group with a hernia of 3 to < 5 cm (P < 0.04). Pharyngeal burning sensation, heartburn and acid regurgitation were more common with large hernias than small hernias, but the frequency of chest pain was similar in all three hernia groups. CONCLUSION: Patients with a large hiatus hernia are more prone to have pathological gastroesophageal reflux and to have more acid symptoms than patients with a small hiatus hernia. However, it is unlikely that patients with an absence of acid symptoms will have pathological reflux regardless of hernia size. PMID:24587634

  3. Pulsatile exposure to simulated reflux leads to changes in gene expression in a 3D model of oesophageal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Green, Nicola H; Nicholls, Zoe; Heath, Paul R; Cooper-Knock, Jonathan; Corfe, Bernard M; MacNeil, Sheila; Bury, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Oesophageal exposure to duodenogastroesophageal refluxate is implicated in the development of Barrett's metaplasia (BM), with increased risk of progression to oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The literature proposes that reflux exposure activates NF-κB, driving the aberrant expression of intestine-specific caudal-related homeobox (CDX) genes. However, early events in the pathogenesis of BM from normal epithelium are poorly understood. To investigate this, our study subjected a 3D model of the normal human oesophageal mucosa to repeated, pulsatile exposure to specific bile components and examined changes in gene expression. Initial 2D experiments with a range of bile salts observed that taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDC) impacted upon NF-κB activation without causing cell death. Informed by this, the 3D oesophageal model was repeatedly exposed to TCDC in the presence and absence of acid, and the epithelial cells underwent gene expression profiling. We identified ∼300 differentially expressed genes following each treatment, with a large and significant overlap between treatments. Enrichment analysis (Broad GSEA, DAVID and Metacore™; GeneGo Inc) identified multiple gene sets related to cell signalling, inflammation, proliferation, differentiation and cell adhesion. Specifically NF-κB activation, Wnt signalling, cell adhesion and targets for the transcription factors PTF1A and HNF4α were highlighted. Our data suggest that HNF4α isoform switching may be an early event in Barrett's pathogenesis. CDX1/2 targets were, however, not enriched, suggesting that although CDX1/2 activation reportedly plays a role in BM development, it may not be an initial event. Our findings highlight new areas for investigation in the earliest stages of BM pathogenesis of oesophageal diseases and new potential therapeutic targets. PMID:24713057

  4. Anatomy of reflux: a growing health problem affecting structures of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Lipan, Michael J; Reidenberg, Joy S; Laitman, Jeffrey T

    2006-11-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) are sibling diseases that are a modern-day plague. Millions of Americans suffer from their sequelae, ranging from subtle annoyances to life-threatening illnesses such as asthma, sleep apnea, and cancer. Indeed, the recognized prevalence of GERD alone has increased threefold throughout the 1990s. Knowledge of the precise etiologies for GERD and LPR is becoming essential for proper treatment. This review focuses on the anatomical, physiological, neurobiological, and cellular aspects of these diseases. By definition, gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus; when excessive and damaging to the esophageal mucosa, GERD results. Reflux that advances to the laryngopharynx and, subsequently, to other regions of the head and neck such as the larynx, oral cavity, nasopharynx, nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and even middle ear results in LPR. While GERD has long been identified as a source of esophageal disease, LPR has only recently been implicated in causing head and neck problems. Recent research has identified four anatomical/physiological "barriers" that serve as guardians to prevent the cranial incursion of reflux: the gastroesophageal junction, esophageal motor function and acid clearance, the upper esophageal sphincter, and pharyngeal and laryngeal mucosal resistance. Sequential failure of all four barriers is necessary to produce LPR. While it has become apparent that GER must precede both GERD and LPR, the head and neck distribution of the latter clearly separates these diseases as distinct entities warranting specialized focus and treatment. PMID:17109421

  5. Endoscopic Options for Gastroesophageal Reflux: Where Are We Now and What Does the Future Hold?

    PubMed

    Triadafilopoulos, George

    2016-09-01

    Early in the twenty-first century, novel endoscopic techniques were introduced for the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease, providing minimally invasive ways to eliminate pharmacologic acid inhibition and avoid the need for anti-reflux surgery. These techniques do not significantly alter the anatomy of the gastroesophageal junction, minimizing short- and long-term adverse effects, such as dysphagia and bloating. After extensive clinical testing, many endoscopic therapies were abandoned due to either lack of durable efficacy or unfavorable safety profile. Today, only four such therapies remain clinically available, each with variable levels of clinical validation and market penetration. This review will provide an assessment of these endoscopic therapies, highlighting their respective strengths and weaknesses and their present and future applicability to patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:27424219

  6. Current Diagnosis and Management of Suspected Reflux Symptoms Refractory to Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Suspected reflux symptoms that are refractory to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are rapidly becoming the most common presentation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients seen in gastroenterology clinics. These patients are a heterogeneous group, differing in symptom frequency and severity, PPI dosing regimens, and responses to therapy (from partial to absent). Before testing, the physician needs to question the patient carefully about PPI compliance and the timing of drug intake in relation to meals. Switching PPIs or doubling the dose is the next step, but only 20% to 25% of the group refractory to PPIs will respond. The first diagnostic test should be upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. In more than 90% of cases, the results will be normal, but persistent esophagitis may suggest pill esophagitis, eosinophilic esophagitis, or rarer diseases, such as lichen planus, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, or genotype variants of PPI metabolism. If the endoscopy results are normal, esophageal manometry and especially reflux testing should follow. Whether patients should be tested on or off PPI therapy is controversial. Most physicians prefer to test patients off PPIs to identify whether abnormal acid reflux is even present; if it is not, PPIs can be stopped and other diagnoses sought. Testing patients on PPI therapy allows nonacid reflux to be identified, but more than 50% of patients have a normal test result, leaving the clinician with a conundrum—whether to stop PPIs or continue them because the GERD is being treated adequately. Alternative diagnoses in patients with refractory GERD and normal reflux testing include achalasia, eosinophilic esophagitis, gastroparesis, rumination, and aerophagia. However, more than 50% will be given the diagnosis of functional heartburn, a visceral hypersensitivity syndrome. Treating patients with PPI-refractory GERD–like symptoms can be difficult and frustrating. Any of the following may help: a histamine-2 receptor antagonist

  7. Pharyngonasal reflux: spectrum and significance in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Oestreich, A E; Dunbar, J S

    1984-05-01

    The radiographic and clinical findings of 57 infants and children demonstrating pharyngonasal reflux during barium swallow were reviewed. Pharyngonasal reflux is most frequent in the first 3 months of life and may occur in children with apneic episodes. Clinical symptoms in this group of children generally clear, even when reflux is severe. Pharyngonasal reflux may be associated with prematurity, neuromuscular disease, velopharyngeal incoordination, and other conditions but is usually of no consequence in very young infants. PMID:6609573

  8. New Developments in Extraesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saritas Yuksel, Elif

    2012-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can present with a wide variety of extraesophageal symptoms that are usually difficult to diagnose because of the absence of typical GERD symptoms (ie, regurgitation or heartburn). The diagnostic process is further complicated by the lack of a definitive test for identifying GERD as the cause of extraesophageal reflux symptoms. Due to the low predictive value of upper endoscopy and pH testing—as well as the lack of reliability of the symptom index and symptom association probability—extraesophageal reflux disease is still an area of investigation. This paper discusses recent developments in this field, with special emphasis on new diagnostic modalities and treatment options. PMID:23483833

  9. Part 1: Vesicoureteral reflux treatment: the past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Hensle, Terry W; Grogg, Amy L

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to provide clinicians with highlights of key findings pertaining to our current understanding and treatment of the condition of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). This includes a review of the disease, patient characteristics, current treatment options, challenges for managed care and patients, and opportunities for improvements in care. This is not intended as a comprehensive review of VUR. This manuscript does, however, serve to introduce three additional manuscripts contained within this supplement. The first article in this series is designed to provide the clinician with real-world data pertaining to treatment patterns and outcomes in patients with VUR (Examining pediatric vesicoureteral reflux: a real-world evaluation of treatment patterns and outcomes: Hensle TW, Hyun G, Grogg AL, Eaddy M). The second article considers the efficacy of prophylactic antibiotics in reducing the likelihood of urinary tract infections (UTIs) when compared with endoscopic injection with dextranomer/hyaluronic acid (Endoscopic injection versus antibiotic prophylaxis in the reduction of urinary tract infection in patients with vesicoureteral reflux: Elder JS, Shah MB, Batiste LR, et al.). The third article explores the role medication noncompliance plays in contributing to antibiotic resistance, the consequences associated with resistance (longer lasting illness and costs), and the difficulties with resistance specific to UTI pathogens in children (Considerations regarding the medical management of VUR: what have we really learned?: Koyle MA, Caldamone A). This supplement is intended to provide the clinician with valuable information regarding the treatment patterns, the role of compliance, and the efficacy of treatments for pediatric patients with VUR. PMID:17931478

  10. Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER), and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) in Adults

    MedlinePlus

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  11. Upper esophageal sphincter during transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation: effects of reflux content and posture.

    PubMed

    Babaei, Arash; Bhargava, Valmik; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2010-05-01

    Although some studies show that the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contracts during transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR), others show that it relaxes. We hypothesized that the posture of the subject and constituents of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) may determine the type of UES response during the TLESR. High-resolution manometry and esophageal pH/impedance recording were performed in 10 healthy volunteers in the right recumbent (1 h) and upright (1 h) positions following the ingestion of a 1,000-Kcal meal. The UES pressure response during TLESR and constituents of GER (liquid, air, and pH) were determined. 109 TLESRs (58 upright and 51 recumbent) were analyzed. The majority of TLESRs were associated with GER (91% upright and 88% recumbent) events. UES relaxation was the predominant response during upright position (81% of TLESRs), and it was characteristically associated with presence of air in the reflux (92%). On the other hand, UES contraction was the predominant response during recumbent position (82% of TLESRs), and it was mainly associated with liquid reflux (71%). The rate of esophageal pressure increase (dP/dt) during the GER, but not the pH, had major influence on the type of UES response during TLESR. The dP/dt during air reflux (127 +/- 39 mmHg/s) was significantly higher than liquid reflux (31 +/- 6 mmHg/s, P < 0.0001). We concluded that the nature of UES response during TLESR, relaxation or contraction, is related to the posture and the constituents of GER. We propose that the rapid rate of esophageal pressure increase associated with air reflux determines the UES relaxation response to GER. PMID:20167874

  12. Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Lalonde, Stefan V; Planavsky, Noah J; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lyons, Timothy W; Mojzsis, Stephen J; Rouxel, Olivier J; Barley, Mark E; Rosìere, Carlos; Fralick, Phillip W; Kump, Lee R; Bekker, Andrey

    2011-10-20

    The enrichment of redox-sensitive trace metals in ancient marine sedimentary rocks has been used to determine the timing of the oxidation of the Earth's land surface. Chromium (Cr) is among the emerging proxies for tracking the effects of atmospheric oxygenation on continental weathering; this is because its supply to the oceans is dominated by terrestrial processes that can be recorded in the Cr isotope composition of Precambrian iron formations. However, the factors controlling past and present seawater Cr isotope composition are poorly understood. Here we provide an independent and complementary record of marine Cr supply, in the form of Cr concentrations and authigenic enrichment in iron-rich sedimentary rocks. Our data suggest that Cr was largely immobile on land until around 2.48 Gyr ago, but within the 160 Myr that followed--and synchronous with independent evidence for oxygenation associated with the Great Oxidation Event (see, for example, refs 4-6)--marked excursions in Cr content and Cr/Ti ratios indicate that Cr was solubilized at a scale unrivalled in history. As Cr isotope fractionations at that time were muted, Cr must have been mobilized predominantly in reduced, Cr(III), form. We demonstrate that only the oxidation of an abundant and previously stable crustal pyrite reservoir by aerobic-respiring, chemolithoautotrophic bacteria could have generated the degree of acidity required to solubilize Cr(III) from ultramafic source rocks and residual soils. This profound shift in weathering regimes beginning at 2.48 Gyr ago constitutes the earliest known geochemical evidence for acidophilic aerobes and the resulting acid rock drainage, and accounts for independent evidence of an increased supply of dissolved sulphate and sulphide-hosted trace elements to the oceans around that time. Our model adds to amassing evidence that the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary was marked by a substantial shift in terrestrial geochemistry and biology. PMID:22012395

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of patients with nonacid gastroesophageal reflux-induced chronic cough

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xianghuai; Yu, Li; Chen, Qiang; Lv, Hanjing; Qiu, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is one of the most common causes of chronic cough, and chronic cough due to GER represents a subtype of GER-related diseases. Gastroesophageal reflux-induced chronic cough (GERC) can be divided into two subgroups based on the pH of the GER. Nonacid GERC is less common than acid GERC, and its diagnosis and treatment strategy have not been standardized. However, nonacid GERC usually presents with its unique set of characteristics and features upon diagnosis and treatment in the clinic. Although the underlying molecular mechanism of nonacid GERC is not fully understood, it is considered to be associated with reflux theory, reflex theory and airway hypersensitivity. Multi-channel intraluminal impedance combined with pH monitoring is a promising new technique that can detect both acid and nonacid reflux, and our findings as well as those of others have shown its usefulness in diagnosing nonacid GERC. Development of new diagnostic techniques has led to an increased rate of nonacid GERC diagnosis. We summarize our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of nonacid GERC and provide a guide for future therapeutic approaches. PMID:26759577

  14. Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease in Healthy Older Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kie Young

    2012-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) in otherwise healthy older children and adolescents is commonly encountered in pediatric clinics and poses a complex treatment problem involving changes of diets and lifestyle. After an initial history taking and a physical examination, typical symptoms of GERD in older children and adolescenct are initially treated with the trials of acid suppressants. With an increase of severe cases, more and more GERD children have been evaluated with endoscopy, which helps to delineate an erosive esophagitis from a non-erosive reflux disease as they are presumed to have different pathogenesis. For the pediatric patients without a significant underlying disease, a reflux esophagitis can be treated adequately with acid suppressants. Recently, the rapid increase of children who are taking anti-reflux medication has brought up a serious alarm among pediatricians. Some at risk pediatric patients with recurrent and/or chronic GERD have been linked to adulthood GERD. In this paper, pediatric GERD with and without erosive esophagitis was reviewed along with treatment options and issues specifically for the otherwise healthy older children and adolescents in the primary clinics or the secondary hospitals. PMID:24010091

  15. Elevated circulating branched chain amino acids are an early event in pancreatic adenocarcinoma development

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Peter; Torrence, Margaret E.; Fiske, Brian P.; Yuan, Chen; Bao, Ying; Townsend, Mary K.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Davidson, Shawn M.; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Yang, Annan; Dayton, Talya L.; Ogino, Shuji; Stampfer, Meir J.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Qian, Zhi Rong; Rubinson, Douglas A.; Ma, Jing; Sesso, Howard D.; Gaziano, John Michael; Cochrane, Barbara B.; Liu, Simin; Wactawski–Wende, Jean; Manson, JoAnn E.; Pollak, Michael N.; Kimmelman, Alec C.; Souza, Amanda; Pierce, Kerry; Wang, Thomas J.; Gerszten, Robert E.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; Wolpin, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Most patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are diagnosed with advanced disease and survive less than 12 months1. PDAC has been linked with obesity and glucose intolerance2-4, but whether changes in circulating metabolites are associated with early cancer progression is unknown. To better understand metabolic derangements associated with early disease, we profiled metabolites in prediagnostic plasma from pancreatic cancer cases and matched controls from four prospective cohort studies. We find that elevated plasma levels of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are associated with a greater than 2–fold increased risk of future pancreatic cancer diagnosis. This elevated risk was independent of known predisposing factors, with the strongest association observed among subjects with samples collected 2 to 5 years prior to diagnosis when occult disease is likely present. We show that plasma BCAAs are also elevated in mice with early stage pancreatic cancers driven by mutant Kras expression, and that breakdown of tissue protein accounts for the increase in plasma BCAAs that accompanies early stage disease. Together, these findings suggest that increased whole–body protein breakdown is an early event in development of PDAC. PMID:25261994

  16. Reflux Laryngitis: Correlation between the Symptoms Findings and Indirect Laryngoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Carlos Eduardo Dilen da; Niedermeier, Bruno Taccola; Portinho, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The indirect laryngoscopy has an important role in the characterization of reflux laryngitis. Although many findings are nonspecific, some strongly suggest that the inflammation is the cause of reflux. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between reflux symptoms and the findings of indirect laryngoscopy. Methods We evaluated 27 patients with symptoms of pharyngolaryngeal reflux disease. Results Laryngoscopy demonstrated in all patients the presence of hypertrophy of the posterior commissure and laryngeal edema. The most frequent symptoms were the presence of dry cough and foreign body sensation. Conclusion There was a correlation between the findings at laryngoscopy and symptoms of reflux. PMID:26157498

  17. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Pech, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    The new guideline for reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus offers some news in diagnosis and therapy. Especially in the endoscopic treatment of early neoplasia in Barrett's oesophagus the combination of endoscopic resection and ablation (e. g. radiofrequency ablation) has now been established. PMID:26445259

  18. Gallic acid induced apoptotic events in HCT-15 colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Aruna Priyadharshni; Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Mandal, Mahitosh; Supriyanto, Eko; Muhamad, Ida Idayu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory action of diet-derived phenolic compound gallic acid (GA) against HCT-15 colon cancer cells. METHODS: The antiproliferative effect of GA against colon cancer cells was determined by performing thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The colony forming ability of GA treated colon cancer cells was evaluated using the colony forming assay. The cell cycle changes induced by GA in HCT-15 cells were analyzed by propidium iodide staining. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential of HCT-15 exposed to GA was assessed using 2’,7’-dichlorfluorescein-diacetate and rhodamine-123 respectively, with the help of flow cytometry. Morphological changes caused by GA treatment in the colon cancer cells were identified by scanning electron microscope and photomicrograph examination. Apoptosis was confirmed using flow cytometric analysis of GA treated HCT-15 cells after staining with Yo-Pro-1. RESULTS: MTT assay results illustrated that GA has an inhibitory effect on HCT-15 cells with IC50 value of 740 μmol/L. A time-dependent inhibition of colony formation was evident with GA treatment. Cell cycle arrest was evident from the accumulation of GA treated HCT-15 cells at sub-G1 phase (0.98 ± 1.03 vs 58.01 ± 2.05) with increasing exposure time. Flow cytometric analysis of GA treated HCT-15 cells depicted early events associated with apoptosis like lipid layer breakage and fall in mitochondrial membrane potential apart from an increase in the generation of ROS which were in a time dependent manner. SEM and photomicrograph images of the GA-treated cells displayed membrane blebbing and cell shrinking characteristics of apoptosis. Further apoptosis confirmation by Yo-Pro-1 staining also showed the time-dependent increase of apoptotic cells after treatment. CONCLUSION: These results show that GA induced ROS dependent apoptosis and inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells. PMID:27099438

  19. GPR84 and TREM-1 Signaling Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Reflux Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aziz, Heba; Schneider, Mathias; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kassem, Abdel Meguid; Khailah, Saleem; Müller, Jürgen; Eldeen, Hadeel Gamal; Khairy, Ahmed; Khayyal, Mohamed T; Shcherbakova, Anastasiia; Efferth, Thomas; Ulrich-Merzenich, Gudrun

    2015-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common disorders in gastroenterology. Patients present with or without increased acid exposure indicating a nonuniform etiology. Thus, the common treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) fails to control symptoms in up to 40% of patients. To further elucidate the pathophysiology of the condition and explore new treatment targets, transcriptomics, proteomics and histological methods were applied to a surgically induced subchronic reflux esophagitis model in Wistar rats after treatment with either omeprazole (PPI) or STW5, a herbal preparation shown to ameliorate esophagitis without affecting refluxate pH. The normal human esophageal squamous cell line HET-1A and human endoscopic biopsies were used to confirm our findings to the G-protein–coupled receptor (GPR) 84 in human tissue. Both treatments reduced reflux-induced macroscopic and microscopic lesions of the esophagi as well as known proinflammatory cytokines. Proteomic and transcriptomic analyses identified CINC1–3, MIP-1/3α, MIG, RANTES and interleukin (IL)-1β as prominent mediators in GERD. Most regulated cyto-/chemokines are linked to the TREM-1 signaling pathway. The fatty acid receptor GPR84 was upregulated in esophagitis but significantly decreased in treated groups, a finding supported by Western blot and immunohistochemistry in both rat tissue and HET-1A cells. GPR84 was also found to be significantly upregulated in patients with grade B reflux esophagitis. The expression of GPR84 in esophageal tissue and its potential involvement in GERD are reported for the first time. IL-8 (CINC1–3) and the TREM-1 signaling pathway are proposed, besides GPR84, to play an important role in the pathogenesis of GERD.org PMID:26650186

  20. An investigation into the effect of cimetidine pre-treatment on raft formation of an anti-reflux agent.

    PubMed

    Washington, N; Wilson, C G; Williams, D L; Robertson, C

    1993-10-01

    It is now becoming common practice to co-administer H2-receptor antagonists and anti-reflux agents in the treatment of reflux oesophagitis. The mechanism by which anti-reflux agents achieve flotation requires a small amount of gastric acid to be present in the stomach. This study investigated whether an anti-reflux agent would remain effective after the decrease in acid secretion produced by a typical clinical dosage regimen of cimetidine (400 mg q.d.s., 7 days). Gastric distribution and residence of a meal and an anti-reflux agent were assessed in 12 normal subjects using gamma scintigraphy. The area under the gastric and fundal emptying curves demonstrated that Liquid Gaviscon (sodium alginate compound) had a significantly greater gastric residence than the meal, both during the control period and after cimetidine pretreatment, and that the majority of the Gaviscon was located in the fundus. The distribution of Gaviscon into the fundus was not affected by cimetidine pretreatment. Cimetidine pre-treatment slightly, but not significantly, increased the time for half the meal and the Gaviscon to empty from the stomach. The results suggest that the mechanism of action of Liquid Gaviscon is not compromised by concurrent H2-antagonist therapy. PMID:8280824

  1. Evaluation of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Using the Bravo Capsule pH System

    PubMed Central

    Lawenko, Rona Marie A; Lee, Yeong Yeh

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disease predominantly seen in the West but there is a rising trend in Asia. Ambulatory 24-hour catheter-based pH monitoring has been the de facto gold standard test for GERD that correlates symptoms with acid reflux episodes. However, drawbacks such as patients’ discomfort, and catheter displacement render the test as cumbersome and error-prone. The Bravo pH wireless system is designed to be user-friendly and has an added advantage of prolonged pH monitoring. The system is comparable to the catheter-based pH monitoring system in terms of diagnostic yield and symptom-reflux association. Indications include evaluation of patients with refractory GERD symptoms and prior to anti-reflux surgery. Bravo utilizes a wireless pH-sensing capsule with a complete prepackaged system, and a data processing software. The capsule may be positioned indirectly using endoscopic or manometric landmarks or under direct endoscopic guidance. Optimal threshold cut-off values are yet to be standardized but based on available studies, for the Asian population, it may be recommended for total % time pH < 4 of 5.8 over 48 hours. Cost is a limitation but capsule placement is relatively safe although technical failures may be seen in small percentage of cases. PMID:26717929

  2. Evaluation of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Using the Bravo Capsule pH System.

    PubMed

    Lawenko, Rona Marie A; Lee, Yeong Yeh

    2016-01-31

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disease predominantly seen in the West but there is a rising trend in Asia. Ambulatory 24-hour catheter-based pH monitoring has been the de facto gold standard test for GERD that correlates symptoms with acid reflux episodes. However, drawbacks such as patients' discomfort, and catheter displacement render the test as cumbersome and error-prone. The Bravo pH wireless system is designed to be user-friendly and has an added advantage of prolonged pH monitoring. The system is comparable to the catheter-based pH monitoring system in terms of diagnostic yield and symptom-reflux association. Indications include evaluation of patients with refractory GERD symptoms and prior to anti-reflux surgery. Bravo utilizes a wireless pH-sensing capsule with a complete prepackaged system, and a data processing software. The capsule may be positioned indirectly using endoscopic or manometric landmarks or under direct endoscopic guidance. Optimal threshold cut-off values are yet to be standardized but based on available studies, for the Asian population, it may be recommended for total % time pH < 4 of 5.8 over 48 hours. Cost is a limitation but capsule placement is relatively safe although technical failures may be seen in small percentage of cases. PMID:26717929

  3. Sphincter of Oddi hypomotility and its relationship with duodenal-biliary reflux, plasma motilin and serum gastrin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Wang, Bing; Su, Yang; Jin, Jun-Zhe; Kong, Jing; Wang, Hao-Lin

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To detect whether patients with a T tube after cholecystectomy and choledochotomy have duodenal-biliary reflux by measuring the radioactivity of Tc99m-labeled diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) in the bile and whether the patients with duodenal-biliary reflux have sphincter of Oddi hypomotility, by measuring the level of plasma and serum gastrin of the patients. Finally to if there is close relationship among sphincter of Oddi hypomotility, duodenal-biliary reflux and gastrointestinal peptides. METHODS: Forty-five patients with a T tube after cholecystectomy and choledochotomy were divided into reflux group and control group. The level of plasma and serum gastrin of the patients and of 12 healthy volunteers were measured by radioimmunoassay. Thirty-four were selected randomly to undergo choledochoscope manometry. Sphincter of Oddi basal pressure (SOBP), amplitude (SOCA), frequency of contractions (SOF), duration of contractions (SOD), duodenal pressure (DP) and common bile duct pressure (CBDP) were scored and analyzed. RESULTS: Sixteen (35.6%) patients were detected to have duodenal-biliary reflux. SOBP, SOCA and CBDP in the reflux group were much lower than the control group (t = 5.254, 3.438 and 3.527, P < 0.001). SOD of the reflux group was shorter than the control group (t = 2.049, P < 0.05). The level of serum gastrin and plasma motilin of the reflux group was much lower than the control group (t = -2.230 and -2.235, P < 0.05). There was positive correlation between the level of plasma motilin and SOBP and between the level of serum gastrin and SOBP and CBDP. CONCLUSION: About 35.9% of the patients with a T tube after cholecystectomy and choledochotomy have duodenal-biliary reflux. Most of them have sphincter of Oddi hypomotility and the decreased level of plasma motilin and serum gastrin. The disorder of gastrointestinal hormone secretion may result in sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. There is a close relationship between sphincter of Oddi

  4. Lower esophageal sphincter injections for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Watson, Thomas J; Peters, Jeffrey H

    2005-08-01

    . Outcomes to date have been assessed over the short to medium term; long-term outcome studies are lacking. The durability of response, therefore, remains largely unknown, as does the incidence of any long-term complications or side effects. A postmarket study to assess the long-term safety and durability of Enteryx therapy up to 36 months is under way, as required by the FDA, with a target enrollment of 300 patients. Detailed cost analyses have yet to be reported. Such data are important not only for comparing the various endoluminal therapies but also for comparison to standard medical therapy and antireflux surgery. At present, no randomized trials are completed that compare injection therapies to other accepted treatments of GERD. The ability to perform fundoplication safely and effectively after failed LES injection therapy is not well known, in that the number of subsequent surgical cases is small and the results largely anecdotal to date. Likewise, the ability to use LES injection as salvage therapy after failed fundoplication has not been tested. The data regarding endoluminal injection therapies are similar to those after endoscopic plication and radiofrequency application to the LES, in that a definite symptomatic response is observed, but the objective documentation of diminished esophageal acid exposure lags behind. Esophageal acid exposure is normalized in a minority of treated subjects and improved in an additional subgroup, whereas the rate of symptomatic response exceeds these objective improvements. The reasons for this disconnect are the subject of much speculation and controversy. A placebo effect has been discussed, but clearly more factors are at play. Perhaps a study effect also is important, in that patients enrolled in clinical trials for GERD control may be more likely to modify their dietary and lifestyle habits in an effort to bring about symptom relief. Maybe the understanding of the perception of reflux events is lacking, and these endoluminal

  5. Surgical Management of Pediatric Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Hope T.; Kane, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is common in the pediatric population. Most cases represent physiologic GER and as the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) matures and a solid diet is introduced, many of these patients (>65%) experience spontaneous resolution of symptoms by two years of age. Those who continue to have symptoms and develop complications such as failure to thrive, secondary respiratory disease, and others are classified as having gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Goals of GERD treatment include the resolution of symptoms and prevention of complications. Treatment options to achieve these goals include dietary or behavioral modifications, pharmacologic intervention, and surgical therapy. This paper will review the clinical presentation of GERD and discuss options for surgical management and outcomes in these patients. PMID:23762041

  6. [Alginates in therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Avdeev, V G

    2015-01-01

    This article presents evidence of the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and highlights its main treatment options. Among its medications, particular emphasis is laid on alginates and their main mechanisms of action are described. There is information on the efficacy of alginates, including the alginate-antacid Gaviscon Double Action, in treating GERD. Recommendations for how to administer these drugs are given. PMID:26155630

  7. [Pathology of non-reflux esophagitides].

    PubMed

    Daum, Ondřej; Dubová, Magdaléna; Švajdler, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The topic of non-reflux esophagitides is partially hidden in the shadow cast by the huge and modern entity of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Histological investigation alone is often insufficient to reach the correct diagnosis without a correlation of the microscopic picture with clinical presentation, endoscopic gross appearance, personal and pharmacological history of the patient, results of hematological, serological, immunological and microbiological examinations. Due to their low-prevalence, individual types of non-reflux esophagitides are not routinely encountered in routine biopsies. Furthermore, the plethora of etiological agents present with only a limited range of reaction patterns, and thus a single histological picture may be common for more agents. Conversely, one cause may be associated with more morphological patterns. Due to these circumstances the pathological diagnostic management should follow a settled algorithm to prevent an inadequate narrowing of the histopathologist´s view. Histologic findings forming the base of this algorithm include distribution and type of inflammatory infiltrate, appearance of epithelial changes, and (in some cases) even the presence of causative agent in histological slides. PMID:27108553

  8. Perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early pathogenesis event of drug induced liver injury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Makoto; Miyake, Manami; Sato, Hiroko; Masutomi, Naoya; Tsutsui, Naohisa; Adam, Klaus-Peter; Alexander, Danny C.; Lawton, Kay A.; Milburn, Michael V.; Ryals, John A.; Wulff, Jacob E.; Guo, Lining

    2013-04-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant consideration for drug development. Current preclinical DILI assessment relying on histopathology and clinical chemistry has limitations in sensitivity and discordance with human. To gain insights on DILI pathogenesis and identify potential biomarkers for improved DILI detection, we performed untargeted metabolomic analyses on rats treated with thirteen known hepatotoxins causing various types of DILI: necrosis (acetaminophen, bendazac, cyclosporine A, carbon tetrachloride, ethionine), cholestasis (methapyrilene and naphthylisothiocyanate), steatosis (tetracycline and ticlopidine), and idiosyncratic (carbamazepine, chlorzoxasone, flutamide, and nimesulide) at two doses and two time points. Statistical analysis and pathway mapping of the nearly 1900 metabolites profiled in the plasma, urine, and liver revealed diverse time and dose dependent metabolic cascades leading to DILI by the hepatotoxins. The most consistent change induced by the hepatotoxins, detectable even at the early time point/low dose, was the significant elevations of a panel of bile acids in the plasma and urine, suggesting that DILI impaired hepatic bile acid uptake from the circulation. Furthermore, bile acid amidation in the hepatocytes was altered depending on the severity of the hepatotoxin-induced oxidative stress. The alteration of the bile acids was most evident by the necrosis and cholestasis hepatotoxins, with more subtle effects by the steatosis and idiosyncratic hepatotoxins. Taking together, our data suggest that the perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early event of DILI. Upon further validation, selected bile acids in the circulation could be potentially used as sensitive and early DILI preclinical biomarkers. - Highlights: ► We used metabolomics to gain insights on drug induced liver injury (DILI) in rats. ► We profiled rats treated with thirteen hepatotoxins at two doses and two time points. ► The toxins decreased the

  9. Renal Agenesis with Full Length Ipsilateral Refluxing Ureter.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dilip Kumar; Chandra, Vipin; Banerjee, Manju

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral renal agenesis with vesicoureteral reflux in the ipsilateral full length ureter is a rare phenomenon. Herein we report a case of 10-year old boy who presented with recurrent urinary tract infections. No renal tissue was identified on left side in various imaging studies. Micturating cystourethrogram (MCUG) showed left sided refluxing and blind ending ureter. Left ureterectomy was done because of recurrent UTI in the refluxing system. PMID:27170916

  10. Renal Agenesis with Full Length Ipsilateral Refluxing Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Vipin; Banerjee, Manju

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral renal agenesis with vesicoureteral reflux in the ipsilateral full length ureter is a rare phenomenon. Herein we report a case of 10-year old boy who presented with recurrent urinary tract infections. No renal tissue was identified on left side in various imaging studies. Micturating cystourethrogram (MCUG) showed left sided refluxing and blind ending ureter. Left ureterectomy was done because of recurrent UTI in the refluxing system. PMID:27170916

  11. Perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early pathogenesis event of drug induced liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Makoto; Miyake, Manami; Sato, Hiroko; Masutomi, Naoya; Tsutsui, Naohisa; Adam, Klaus-Peter; Alexander, Danny C; Lawton, Kay A; Milburn, Michael V; Ryals, John A; Wulff, Jacob E; Guo, Lining

    2013-04-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant consideration for drug development. Current preclinical DILI assessment relying on histopathology and clinical chemistry has limitations in sensitivity and discordance with human. To gain insights on DILI pathogenesis and identify potential biomarkers for improved DILI detection, we performed untargeted metabolomic analyses on rats treated with thirteen known hepatotoxins causing various types of DILI: necrosis (acetaminophen, bendazac, cyclosporine A, carbon tetrachloride, ethionine), cholestasis (methapyrilene and naphthylisothiocyanate), steatosis (tetracycline and ticlopidine), and idiosyncratic (carbamazepine, chlorzoxasone, flutamide, and nimesulide) at two doses and two time points. Statistical analysis and pathway mapping of the nearly 1900 metabolites profiled in the plasma, urine, and liver revealed diverse time and dose dependent metabolic cascades leading to DILI by the hepatotoxins. The most consistent change induced by the hepatotoxins, detectable even at the early time point/low dose, was the significant elevations of a panel of bile acids in the plasma and urine, suggesting that DILI impaired hepatic bile acid uptake from the circulation. Furthermore, bile acid amidation in the hepatocytes was altered depending on the severity of the hepatotoxin-induced oxidative stress. The alteration of the bile acids was most evident by the necrosis and cholestasis hepatotoxins, with more subtle effects by the steatosis and idiosyncratic hepatotoxins. Taking together, our data suggest that the perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early event of DILI. Upon further validation, selected bile acids in the circulation could be potentially used as sensitive and early DILI preclinical biomarkers. PMID:23360887

  12. Application of the sealed-reflux dissolution system to 100-gram samples

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales de Duval, R.M.; Dahlby, J.W.; Lovell, A.P.

    1980-12-01

    We adapted the sealed-reflux dissolution system (described in Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory report LA-5576) to dissolve up to 100 g of refractory materials. The simplified pressurized-acid system was enlarged to accommodate a greater volume of acid and refractory materials. The acid and sample materials are heated between 150 and 190/sup 0/C at a pressure of 0.14 to 0.20 MPa (20-29 psi). We also describe a second system for dissolving up to 5 g of refractory materials at 150/sup 0/C and a pressure of 0.6 MPa (80 psi).

  13. Inflammation and specialized intestinal metaplasia of cardiac mucosa is a manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed Central

    Oberg, S; Peters, J H; DeMeester, T R; Chandrasoma, P; Hagen, J A; Ireland, A P; Ritter, M P; Mason, R J; Crookes, P; Bremner, C G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that cardiac mucosa, carditis, and specialized intestinal metaplasia at an endoscopically normal-appearing cardia are manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: In the absence of esophageal mucosal injury, the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease currently rests on 24-hour pH monitoring. Histologic examination of the esophagus is not useful. The recent identification of specialized intestinal metaplasia at the cardia, along with the observation that it occurs in inflamed cardiac mucosa, led the authors to focus on the type and condition of the mucosa at the gastroesophageal junction and its relation to gastroesophageal reflux disease. METHODS: Three hundred thirty-four consecutive patients with symptoms of foregut disease, no evidence of columnar-lined esophagus, and no history of gastric or esophageal surgery were evaluated by 1) endoscopic biopsies above, at, and below the gastroesophageal junction; 2) esophageal motility; and 3) 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring. The patients were divided into groups depending on the histologic presence of cardiac epithelium with and without inflammation or associated intestinal metaplasia. Markers of gastroesophageal reflux disease were compared between groups (i.e., lower esophageal sphincter characteristics, esophageal acid exposure, the presence of endoscopic erosive esophagitis, and hiatal hernia). RESULTS: When cardiac epithelium was found, it was inflamed in 96% of the patients. The presence of cardiac epithelium and carditis was associated with deterioration of lower esophageal sphincter characteristics and increased esophageal acid exposure. Esophagitis occurred more commonly in patients with carditis whose sphincter, on manometry, was structurally defective. Specialized intestinal metaplasia at the cardia was only seen in inflamed cardiac mucosa, and its prevalence increased both with increasing acid exposure and with

  14. Comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the Practice of Otorhinolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Heloisa Sobreira; Pinto, José Antonio; Zavanela, Adma Roberta; Cavallini, André Freitas; Freitas, Gabriel Santos; Garcia, Fabiola Esteves

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  The Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease has a prevalence of ∼12% of the urban population in Brazil. Koufman proposed the term to designate Laryngeal Pharyngeal Reflux (LPR) symptoms, signs or tissue damage resulting from aggression of the gastrointestinal contents in the upper aerodigestive tract. Belafsky et al proposed a score that points to inflammatory laryngeal signs through videolaryngoscopic findings, the Reflux Finding Score (RFS). Moreover, in 2002, they published the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). Objective  The objective of this study is to provide a comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the practice of Otorhinolaryngology. Methods  Our study involved a total of 135 patients who visited the Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT) clinic Núcleo de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço de São Paulo between April 2014 and May 2015 with suspected LPR. We excluded nine patients and the study group was 126 patients. All patients were ranked by their RSI and RFS scores. Results  The study group consisted of 126 patients (88 women and 38 men). Their main complaints were cough (40.4%), globus (21.4%), dysphonia (19.8%), throat clearing (15.8%), postnasal drip (3.17%), snoring (1.5%), dysphagia (1.5%), cacosmia (0.7%), and regurgitation (1.5%). The RSI ranges from 13 to 42 with a mean of 20.7 (SD = 6.67). The RFS ranged from 3 to 19 with a mean of 9.53 (SD = 2.64). Conclusion  The RSI and RFS can easily be included in ENT routines as objective parameters, with low cost and high practicality. Based on the clinical index, the specialist can evaluate the need for further tests.

  15. Full-thickness gastroplication for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease: short-term results of a feasibility clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kaindlstorfer, Adolf; Koch, Oliver O; Berger, Johannes; Uwe Asche, Kai; Pointner, Rudolph

    2012-12-01

    This was a prospective study that evaluates subjective and objective patient parameters 3 months after full-thickness gastroplication. Forty-one patients with documented gastroesophageal reflux disease and persistent symptoms despite medical treatment, without radiologic visible hiatal hernia, were enrolled in the study and underwent endoscopic full-thickness gastroplication with one or more plicator implants. Evaluation of Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index, symptoms typically related to reflux, gas bloat, and bowel dysfunction and esophageal manometry, and impedance-pH monitoring were performed at baseline and 3 months after the procedure. The mean Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index score, and general and reflux-specific scores improved significantly (P<0.01), and gas bloat-specific symptom scores and bowel dysfunction-specific symptom scores were reduced (P<0.05) on follow-up. The numbers of total, acid, proximal, upright, and recumbent reflux episodes were all reduced (P<0.01). Manometric data remained almost unchanged. DeMeester score reduced nonsignificantly (P<0.098). 21.6% of the patients were on proton-pump inhibitor medication on a daily basis after the procedure. There was only 1 postprocedure incident (bleeding) that required intervention. In conclusion, endoscopic full-thickness plication is a safe and well-tolerated procedure that significantly improves quality of life and eliminates gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in the majority of patients, without side effects seen after laparoscopic fundoplication. PMID:23238376

  16. Bile reflux gastritis and Barrett's oesophagus: further evidence of a role for duodenogastro-oesophageal reflux?

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, M; Neville, P; Mapstone, N; Moayyedi, P; Axon, A

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—There is increasing evidence that reflux of bile plays a part in the pathogenesis of Barrett's oesophagus. Bile injury to the gastric mucosa results in a "chemical" gastritis in which oedema and intestinal metaplasia are prominent.
AIM—To determine if patients with Barrett's oesophagus have more bile related changes in antral mucosa than patients with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) or non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD).
PATIENTS AND METHODS—Patients were identified by a retrospective search of pathology records and those with a clinically confirmed diagnosis of either Barrett's oesophagus or reflux oesophagitis who had oesophageal and gastric biopsies taken at the same endoscopy and had no evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection entered the study. Control biopsies were taken from H pylori negative NUD patients. Antral biopsies were examined "blind" to clinical group and graded for a series of histological features from which the "reflux gastritis score" (RGS) and "bile reflux index" (BRI) could be calculated. The reproducibility of these histological scores was tested by a second pathologist.
RESULTS—There were 100 patients with Barrett's, 61 with GORD, and 50 with NUD. The RGSs did not differ between groups. BRI values in the Barrett's group were significantly higher than those in GORD subjects (p=0.014) which in turn were higher than those in NUD patients (p=0.037). Similarly, the frequency of high BRI values (>14) was significantly greater in the Barrett's group (29/100; 29%) than in the GORD (9/61; 14.8%) or NUD (4/50; 8%) group. However, agreement on BRI values was "poor", indicating limited applicability of this approach.
CONCLUSION—Patients with Barrett's oesophagus have more evidence of bile related gastritis than subjects with uncomplicated GORD or NUD. The presence of bile in the refluxate could be a factor in both the development of "specialised" intestinal metaplasia and malignancy in the oesophagus

  17. Role of Saliva in Esophageal Defense: Implications in Patients With Nonerosive Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yandrapu, Harathi; Marcinkiewicz, Marek; Poplawski, Cezary; Han, Kyung; Zbroch, Tomasz; Goldin, George; Sarosiek, Irene; Namiot, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background: It has been previously demonstrated that patients with reflux esophagitis exhibit a significant impairment in the secretion of salivary protective components versus controls. However, the secretion of salivary protective factors in patients with nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) is not explored. The authors therefore studied the secretion of salivary volume, pH, bicarbonate, nonbicarbonate glycoconjugate, protein, epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α) and prostaglandin E2 in patients with NERD and compared with the corresponding values in controls (CTRL). Methods: Salivary secretion was collected during basal condition, mastication and intraesophageal mechanical (tubing, balloon) and chemical (initial saline, acid, acid/pepsin, final saline) stimulations, respectively, mimicking the natural gastroesophageal reflux. Results: Salivary volume, protein and TGF-α outputs in patients with NERD were significantly higher than CTRL during intraesophageal mechanical (P < 0.05) and chemical stimulations (P < 0.05). Salivary bicarbonate was significantly higher in NERD than CTRL group during intraesophageal stimulation with both acid/pepsin (P < 0.05) and saline (P < 0.01). Salivary glycoconjugate secretion was significantly higher in the NERD group than the CTRL group during chewing (P < 0.05), mechanical (P < 0.05) and chemical stimulation (P < 0.01). Salivary EGF secretion was higher in patients with NERD during mechanical stimulation (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Patients with NERD demonstrated a significantly stronger salivary secretory response in terms of volume, bicarbonate, glycoconjugate, protein, EGF and TGF-α than asymptomatic controls. This enhanced salivary esophagoprotection is potentially mediating resistance to the development of endoscopic mucosal changes by gastroesophageal reflux. PMID:25789686

  18. Gender difference in gastro-esophageal reflux diseases

    PubMed Central

    Asanuma, Kiyotaka; Iijima, Katsunori; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen sharply in western countries over the past 4 decades. This type of cancer is considered to follow a transitional process that goes from gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) to Barrett’s esophagus (BE, a metaplastic condition of the distal esophagus), a precursor lesion and ultimately adenocarcinoma. This spectrum of GERD is strongly predominant in males due to an unidentified mechanism. Several epidemiologic studies have described that the prevalence of GERD, BE and EAC in women is closely related to reproductive status, which suggests a possible association with the estrogen level. Recently, we revealed in an in vivo study that the inactivation of mast cells by the anti-inflammatory function of estrogen may account for the gender difference in the GERD spectrum. Other studies have described the contribution of female steroid hormones to the gender difference in these diseases. Estrogen is reported to modulate the metabolism of fat, and obesity is a main risk factor of GERDs. Moreover, estrogen could confer esophageal epithelial resistance to causative refluxate. These functions of estrogen might explain the approximately 20-year delay in the incidence of BE and the subsequent development of EAC in women compared to men, and this effect may be responsible for the male predominance. However, some observational studies demonstrated that hormone replacement therapy exerts controversial effects in GERD patients. Nevertheless, the estrogen-related endocrine milieu may prevent disease progression toward carcinogenesis in GERD patients. The development of innovative alternatives to conventional acid suppressors may become possible by clarifying the mechanisms of estrogen. PMID:26855539

  19. Efficacy of Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsin-Hsiao S.; Gbadegesin, Rasheed A.; Foreman, John W.; Nagaraj, Shashi K.; Wigfall, Delbert R.; Wiener, John S.; Routh, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Controversy exists regarding the use of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis vs observation in the management of children with vesicoureteral reflux. The reported effectiveness of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis in children with reflux varies widely. We determined whether the aggregated evidence supports use of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis in children with vesicoureteral reflux. Materials and Methods We searched the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, clinicaltrials.gov, MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, Google Scholar and recently presented meeting abstracts for reports in any language. Bibliographies of included studies were then hand searched for any missed articles. The study protocol was prospectively registered at PROSPERO (No. CRD42014009639). Reports were assessed and data abstracted in duplicate, with differences resolved by consensus. Risk of bias was assessed using standardized instruments. Results We identified 1,547 studies, of which 8 are included in the metaanalysis. Pooled results demonstrated that continuous antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduced the risk of recurrent febrile or symptomatic urinary tract infection (pooled OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42–0.96) but, if urinary tract infection occurred, increased the risk of antibiotic resistant organism (pooled OR 8.75, 95% CI 3.52–21.73). A decrease in new renal scarring was not associated with continuous antibiotic prophylaxis use. Adverse events were similar between the 2 groups. Significant heterogeneity existed between studies (I2 50%, p = 0.03), specifically between those trials with significant risk of bias (eg unclear protocol descriptions and/or lack of blinding). Conclusions Compared to no treatment, continuous antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduced the risk of febrile and symptomatic urinary tract infections in children with vesicoureteral reflux, although it increased the risk of infection due to antibiotic resistant bacteria. Continuous antibiotic prophylaxis did not significantly

  20. Reflux composition influences the level of NF-κB activation and upstream kinase preference in oesophageal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    McAdam, E; Haboubi, H N; Griffiths, A P; Baxter, J N; Spencer-Harty, S; Davies, C; Jenkins, G J

    2015-02-01

    Oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OA) incidence is rising and prognosis is poor. Understanding the molecular basis of this malignancy is key to finding new prevention and treatment strategies. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is the primary cause of OA, usually managed with acid suppression therapy. However, this often does little to control carcinogenic bile acid reflux. The transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of OA and its activity is associated with a poor response to chemotherapy, making it an attractive therapeutic target. We sought to decipher the role of different bile acids in NF-κB activation in oesophageal cell lines using short, physiologically relevant exposure times. The effect of an acidic or neutral extracellular pH was investigated concurrently, to mimic in vivo conditions associated with or without acid suppression. We found that some bile acids activated NF-κB to a greater extent when combined with acid, whereas others did so in its absence, at neutral pH. The precise composition of an individual's reflux, coupled with whether they are taking acid suppressants may therefore dictate the extent of NF-κB activation in the oesophagus, and hence the likelihood of histological progression and chemotherapy success. Regardless of pH, the kinase inhibitor of κB kinase was pivotal in mediating reflux induced NF-κB activation. Its importance was confirmed further as its increased activation was associated with histological progression in patient samples. We identified further kinases important in acid or bile induced NF-κB signalling in oesophageal cells, which may provide suitable targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24931696

  1. Elevation of urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein after cardiac catheterization related to cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Sugaya, Takeshi; Matsui, Katsuomi; Hisamichi, Mikako; Shibagaki, Yugo; Miyake, Fumihiko; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Contrast medium (CM) induces tubular hypoxia via endothelial damage due to direct cytotoxicity or viscosity. Urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) increases along with tubular hypoxia and may be a detector of systemic circulation injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of detecting increases in urinary L-FABP levels due to administration of CM, as a prognostic biomarker for cardiovascular disease in patients without occurrence of CM-induced nephropathy undergoing cardiac catheterization procedure (CCP). Methods Retrospective longitudinal analyses of the relationship between urinary L-FABP levels and occurrence of cardiovascular events were performed (n=29). Urinary L-FABP was measured by ELISA before CCP, and at 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after CCP. Results Urinary L-FABP levels were significantly higher at 12 hours (P<0.05) and 24 hours (P<0.005) after CCP compared with before CCP, only in the patients with occurrence of cardiovascular events (n=17), but not in those without cardiovascular events (n=12). The parameter with the largest area under the curve (0.816) for predicting the occurrence of cardiovascular events was the change in urinary L-FABP at 24 hours after CCP. The difference in urinary L-FABP levels (ΔL-FABP ≥11.0 μg/g creatinine) between before CCP and at 24 hours after CCP was a risk factor for the occurrence of cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 4.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.27–19.13; P=0.021). Conclusion Measurement of urinary L-FABP before CCP and at 24 hours after CCP in patients with mild to moderate renal dysfunction may be an important indicator for risk stratification of onset of cardiovascular events. PMID:26316797

  2. Evaluation and management of patients with symptoms after anti-reflux surgery.

    PubMed

    Lin, D C; Chun, C L; Triadafilopoulos, G

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been an increase in the number of anti-reflux operations being performed. This is mostly due to the use of laparoscopic techniques, the increasing prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the population, and the increasing unwillingness of patients to take acid suppressive medications for life. Laparoscopic fundoplication is now widely available in both academic and community hospitals, has a limited length of stay and postoperative recovery time, and is associated with excellent outcomes in carefully selected patients. Although the operation has low mortality and postoperative morbidity, it is associated with late postoperative complications, such as gas bloat syndrome, dysphagia, diarrhea, and recurrent GERD symptoms. This review summarizes the diagnostic evaluation and appropriate management of such postoperative complications. If a reoperation is needed, it should be performed by experienced foregut surgeons. PMID:23826861

  3. Measurement of respiratory morbidity in general practice in the United Kingdom during the acid transport event of January 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, J.; Fleming, D.; Williams, M.; McInnes, G.

    1989-02-01

    The Weekly Returns System of the Royal College of General Practitioners was used to assess the effect on respiratory illness of the acid transport event that occurred during January 1985. The pollution event, as assessed by SO/sub 2/ and smoke levels measured at pollution monitoring stations within and without the affected area showed only modest rises in SO/sub 2/ levels, which were less than levels that occurred 4 years earlier. January is the peak time of year for reporting of acute respiratory episodes, and the minor increase in pollution was not reflected in any rise in respiratory morbidity, both for all ages and for different age bands. There was a rise in rates for children up to the age of 14, but this was seen each year and in both polluted and nonpolluted areas. This was probably due to children returning to school after the winter vacation and the subsequent spread of viral infections. The limitations of the two data sets in this analysis are discussed, including the relative insensitivity of weekly data in picking out a short-lived event, the distribution of the practices and pollution monitoring stations, and the effect of the extreme cold weather and the coal miners' strike on domestic coal burning during this event.

  4. Investigation of extraesophageal gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukali, Emmanouela; Sifrim, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The most common extraesophageal manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) include chronic cough, asthma and laryngitis. There are two mechanisms proposed to explain extraesophageal syndromes caused by GERD. The first one is a direct way via irritation and/or microaspiration and the second one is an indirect, vagally mediated way. The investigation of extraesophageal manifestations of GERD is difficult and the empirical therapy with proton pump inhibitors usually double dose for at least three months is still the most common approach. PMID:24714277

  5. Early membrane events induced by salicylic acid in motor cells of the Mimosa pudica pulvinus.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Saed; Rocher, Françoise; Bonmort, Janine; Fleurat-Lessard, Pierrette; Roblin, Gabriel

    2013-04-01

    Salicylic acid (o-hydroxy benzoic acid) (SA) induced a rapid dose-dependent membrane hyperpolarization (within seconds) and a modification of the proton secretion (within minutes) of Mimosa pudica pulvinar cells at concentrations higher than 0.1mM. Observations on plasma membrane vesicles isolated from pulvinar tissues showed that SA acted directly at the membrane level through a protonophore action as suggested by the inhibition of the proton gradient and the lack of effect on H(+)-ATPase catalytic activity. Comparative data obtained with protonophores (carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone and 2,4-dinitrophenol) and inhibitors of ATPases (vanadate, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, and diethylstilbestrol) corroborated this conclusion. Consequently, the collapse of the proton motive force led to an impairment in membrane functioning. This impairment is illustrated by the inhibition of the ion-driven turgor-mediated seismonastic reaction of the pulvinus following SA treatment. SA acted in a specific manner as its biosynthetic precursor benzoic acid induced much milder effects and the m- and p-OH benzoic acid derivatives did not trigger similar characteristic effects. Therefore, SA may be considered both a membrane signal molecule and a metabolic effector following its uptake in the cells. PMID:23487303

  6. The Relationship Between Gastroesophageal Reflux and Chronic Unexplained Cough in Children.

    PubMed

    Pavić, Ivan; Čepin-Bogović, Jasna; Hojsak, Iva

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between chronic cough and acid or weakly acid gastroesophageal reflux (GER) determined by 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring and to assess whether the association is age dependent. Overall 150 children (mean age 7.5 years; range 0.3-18.0 years; male/female 90/60) were enrolled. Median of 87.5% (0% to 100%) of all cough episodes were associated with reflux; 9% (0% to 100%) with acidic and 60% (0% to 100%) with weakly acidic episodes. In 52 children (34.7%), all cough episodes were associated with GER (100% association). Children younger than 2 years had significantly higher number of cough episodes associated with total (P = .03) and weakly acidic GER (P = .01). Binary logistic regression confirmed that only increase in age decreases the risk for complete (100%) association between cough episode and GER. Cough is significantly associated with weakly acidic GER and children of younger age are at higher risk. PMID:26324664

  7. Analytical Investigation of a Reflux Boiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, William E.; Young, Fred M.; Chambers, Terrence L.

    1996-01-01

    A thermal model of a single Ultralight Fabric Reflux Tube (UFRT) was constructed and tested against data for an array of such tubes tested in the NASA-JSC facility. Modifications to the single fin model were necessary to accommodate the change in radiation shape factors due to adjacent tubes. There was good agreement between the test data and data generated for the same cases by the thermal model. The thermal model was also used to generate single and linear array data for the lunar environment (the primary difference between the test and lunar data was due to lunar gravity). The model was also used to optimize the linear spacing of the reflux tubes in an array. The optimal spacing of the tubes was recommended to be about 5 tube diameters based on maximizing the heat transfer per unit mass. The model also showed that the thermal conductivity of the Nextel fabric was the major limitation to the heat transfer. This led to a suggestion that the feasibility of jacketing the Nextel fiber bundles with copper strands be investigated. This jacketing arrangement was estimated to be able to double the thermal conductivity of the fabric at a volume concentration of about 12-14%. Doubling the thermal conductivity of the fabric would double the amount of heat transferred at the same steam saturation temperature.

  8. Gastro-oesophageal reflux and the migrating motor complex.

    PubMed Central

    Gill, R C; Kellow, J E; Wingate, D L

    1987-01-01

    Distal oesophageal pH and gastroduodenal motor activity were recorded simultaneously throughout nocturnal (23 30-08 30 h) and diurnal (08 30-17 30 h) periods of fasting in seven healthy subjects. At night, episodes of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) accounted for 1.2 +/- 0.7% of recording time. Periods of gastric motor activity, representing the gastric component of the migrating motor complex (MMC), recurred every 78 +/- 31 min during the night and were interspersed with periods of gastric motor quiescence. Nocturnal episodes of GOR during periods of gastric motor activity were of longer duration (p less than 0.001) and more frequent (p less than 0.005) than during periods of gastric motor quiescence. At night, periodic gastric motor activity was thus correlated (p less than 0.001) with an increase in the duration and number of GOR episodes and associated with a 100-fold increase in oesophageal acid exposure. During the day, the gastric component of the MMC, recurring every 131 +/- 64 min, was correlated (p less than 0.02) with an increase in the duration and number of GOR episodes, and a three fold increase in oesophageal acid exposure. Further, 89% of nocturnal, and 83% of diurnal gastric MMCs were temporally associated with episodes of GOR. We conclude that fasting episodes of GOR occur coincidentally with the gastric component of the MMC. PMID:3666559

  9. Current pharmacological management of gastro-esophageal reflux in children: an evidence-based systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tighe, Mark P; Afzal, Nadeem A; Bevan, Amanda; Beattie, R Mark

    2009-01-01

    domperidone or metoclopramide. More evidence is needed before other anti-reflux medications can be recommended. For older children, acid suppression is the mainstay of treatment. The largest evidence base supports the early use of H(2) receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors. PMID:19445547

  10. Effect of omeprazole 20 mg twice daily on duodenogastric and gastro-oesophageal bile reflux in Barrett's oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, R; Anggiansah, A; Manifold, D; Owen, W; Owen, W

    1998-01-01

    Background—Both acid and duodenal contents are thought to be responsible for the mucosal damage in Barrett's oesophagus, a condition often treated medically. However, little is known about the effect of omeprazole on duodenogastric reflux (DGR) and duodenogastro-oesophageal reflux (DGOR).
Aims—To study the effect of omeprazole 20 mg twice daily on DGR and DGOR, using the technique of ambulatory bilirubin monitoring.
Methods—Twenty three patients with Barrett's oesophagus underwent manometry followed by 24 hour oesophageal and gastric pH monitoring. In conjunction with pH monitoring, 11 patients (group 1) underwent oesophageal bilirubin monitoring and 12 patients (group 2) underwent gastric bilirubin monitoring, both before and during treatment with omeprazole 20 mg twice daily.
Results—In both groups there was a significant reduction in oesophageal acid (pH<4) reflux (p<0.005) and a significant increase in the time gastric pH was above 4 (p<0.005). In group 1, median total oesophageal bilirubin exposure was significantly reduced from 28.9% to 2.4% (p<0.005). In group 2, median total gastric bilirubin exposure was significantly reduced from 24.9% to 7.2% (p<0.005). 
Conclusions—Treatment of Barrett's oesophagus with omeprazole 20 mg twice daily results in a notable reduction in the exposure of the oesophagus to both acid and duodenal contents. In addition, delivery of duodenal contents to the upper gastric body is reduced. 

 Keywords: bilirubin monitoring; Barrett's oesophagus; omeprazole; pH monitoring; duodenogastric reflux; duodenogastro-oesophageal reflux PMID:9824338

  11. Frequency distribution of gastro esophageal reflux disease in inhalation injury: A historical cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Karbasi, Ashraf; Aliannejad, Rasoul; Ghanei, Mostafa; Sanamy, Mehran Noory; Alaeddini, Farshid; Harandi, Ali Amini

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is no data on the prevalence and the association of gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD) with toxic fume inhalation. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the frequency distribution of GERD symptoms among the individuals with mild respiratory disorder due to the past history of toxic fume exposure to sulfur mustard (SM). Materials and Methods: In a historical cohort study, subjects were randomly selected from 7000 patients in a database of all those who had a history of previous exposure to a single high dose of SM gas during war. The control group was randomly selected from adjacent neighbors of the patients, and two healthy male subjects were chosen per patient. In this study, we used the validated Persian translation of Mayo Gastroesophageal Reflux Questionnaire to assess the frequency distribution of reflux disease. Results: Relative frequency of GERD symptoms, was found to be significantly higher in the inhalation injury patients with an odds ratio of 8.30 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.73-14.55), and after adjustment for cigarette smoking, tea consumption, age, and body mass index, aspirin and chronic cough the odds ratio was found to be 4.41 (95% CI: 1.61-12.07). Conclusion: The most important finding of our study was the major GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation once or more per week) among the individuals with the past history of exposure to SM toxic gas is substantially higher (4.4-fold) than normal populations. PMID:26622251

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in 9/11 survivors and workers: insights gained from tragic losses.

    PubMed

    Sayuk, Gregory S; Drossman, Douglas A

    2011-11-01

    Survivors of the 2001 World Trade Center (WTC) attacks and the individuals who volunteered for the rescue and recovery efforts remain substantially burdened by psychological trauma and respiratory illnesses related to the environmental exposures. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS) are also reported at higher rates than expected among this population. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and exposures to the caustic aerosolized debris of the WTC are explored in further detail as potential mechanisms underlying these GERS experiences in WTC Registry participants. Recent work by Li and colleagues suggests that the WTC experience is associated with increases in GER independent of asthma and PTSD diagnoses. However, this association may be more complex since over-representation of hypersensitive non-acid reflux subjects and failure to completely capture psychiatric comorbidity may also contribute to our understanding of these findings. Nonetheless, the WTC Registry offers a unique study population, and detailed psychologic profiling and physiologic testing of participants may promote greater insight into gastroesophageal reflux pathohysiology. PMID:22056575

  13. Risk factors for renal scarring in children with primary vesicoureteral reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mir, Sevgi; Ertan, Pelin; Ozkayin, Nese

    2013-01-01

    To determine the incidence of renal scarring among patients with primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and the possible risk factor(s), we studied 90 children (60 girls and 30 boys) with VUR followed in the Pediatric Nephrology Unit at the Ege University Hospital from 1998 to 2003. All the patients were assessed for VUR grade by voiding cystoureterography and for presence of renal scarring by (99 m) technetium dimercapto-succinic acid scintigraphy. All infants with VUR were given low-dose prophylactic antibiotics and followed-up until resolution of the reflux. Grade of reflux and number of urinary tract infection (UTI) episodes (≥3) were found to be statistically significant risk factors for renal scarring (P <0.05). However, gender, familial history and laterality of the disease were not found to be statistically significant risk factors (P >0.05). Similarly, there was no statistically significant difference of frequency of renal scarring among the different age groups (P >0.05). We conclude that recurrences of UTI and VUR severity are significant risk factors for renal scarring in children with VUR. Therefore, identification of VUR at an early age may offer the opportunity to prevent episodes of UTI and possible formation of renal scars that may result in end-stage renal failure. PMID:23354192

  14. Neutronic analysis of the 1D and 1E banks reflux detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-12-21

    Two H Canyon neutron monitoring systems for early detection of postulated abnormal reflux conditions in the Second Uranium Cycle 1E and 1D Mixer-Settle Banks have been designed and built. Monte Carlo neutron transport simulations using the general purpose, general geometry, n-particle MCNP code have been performed to model expected response of the monitoring systems to varying conditions.The confirmatory studies documented herein conclude that the 1E and 1D neutron monitoring systems are able to achieve adequate neutron count rates for various neutron source and detector configurations, thereby eliminating excessive integration count time. Neutron count rate sensitivity studies are also performed. Conversely, the transport studies concluded that the neutron count rates are statistically insensitive to nitric acid content in the aqueous region and to the transition region length. These studies conclude that the 1E and 1D neutron monitoring systems are able to predict the postulated reflux conditions for all examined perturbations in the neutron source and detector configurations. In the cases examined, the relative change in the neutron count rates due to postulated transitions from normal {sup 235}U concentration levels to reflux levels remain satisfactory detectable.

  15. The RIVUR Trial: Profile and Baseline Clinical Associations of Children With Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Hoberman, Alejandro; Mattoo, Tej K.; Mathews, Ranjiv; Keren, Ron; Chesney, Russell W.; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Greenfield, Saul P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is diagnosed in ∼30% to 40% of children who have imaging studies after urinary tract infections (UTIs). Our goal is to characterize children enrolled in the Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR) trial and to compare our study cohort with those from previously published studies. METHODS: RIVUR investigators from 19 pediatric sites in the United States recruited 607 children with grade I through IV VUR. Children were enrolled after a first or second UTI. This cross-sectional report of baseline data includes extensive clinical, parental report, and imaging study results. RESULTS: RIVUR recruited 607 children (558 girls, 49 boys) with grade I (11%), II (42%), III (38%), or IV (8%) reflux. The median age was 12 months, and most children (91%) were enrolled after their first UTI. The UTI leading to enrollment was both febrile and symptomatic for 323 children, febrile only in 197 children, and symptomatic only in 86. Renal involvement at baseline as documented by a 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid scan was uncommon with cortical defects identified in 89 (15%) children. Bladder and bowel dysfunction was identified in 71 (56%) of 126 toilet-trained subjects assessed. CONCLUSIONS: RIVUR is the largest prospective, randomized trial for children with primary VUR to date, comparing prophylaxis with placebo. The study sample comprises patients from 19 pediatric clinical sites in the United States, whose demographic and clinical characteristics may differ from those of children enrolled in previous trials from other countries. PMID:23753091

  16. Addition of prokinetics to PPI therapy in gastroesophageal reflux disease: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Li-Hua; Chen, Wei-Xu; Qian, Li-Juan; Li, Shuo; Gu, Min; Shi, Rui-Hua

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy of adding prokinetics to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). METHODS: PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Knowledge databases (prior to October 2013) were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared therapeutic efficacy of PPI alone (single therapy) or PPI plus prokinetics (combined therapy) for GERD. The primary outcome of those selected trials was complete or partial relief of non-erosive reflux disease symptoms or mucosal healing in erosive reflux esophagitis. Using the test of heterogeneity, we established a fixed or random effects model where the risk ratio was the primary readout for measuring efficacy. RESULTS: Twelve RCTs including 2403 patients in total were enrolled in this study. Combined therapy was not associated with significant relief of symptoms or alterations in endoscopic response relative to single therapy (95%CI: 1.0-1.2, P = 0.05; 95%CI: 0.66-2.61, P = 0.44). However, combined therapy was associated with a greater symptom score change (95%CI: 2.14-3.02, P < 0.00001). Although there was a reduction in the number of reflux episodes in GERD [95%CI: -5.96-(-1.78), P = 0.0003] with the combined therapy, there was no significant effect on acid exposure time (95%CI: -0.37-0.60, P = 0.65). The proportion of patients with adverse effects undergoing combined therapy was significantly higher than for PPI therapy alone (95%CI: 1.06-1.36, P = 0.005) when the difference between 5-HT receptor agonist and PPI combined therapy and single therapy (95%CI: 0.84-1.39, P = 0.53) was excluded. CONCLUSION: Combined therapy may partially improve patient quality of life, but has no significant effect on symptom or endoscopic response of GERD. PMID:24605040

  17. [Results of conservative treatment for regressive vesicoureteral reflux in childhood].

    PubMed

    Popadiuk, S; Korzon, M; Plata, K

    1995-09-01

    The study involved 112 children with 169 confirmed vesicoureteric reflux grades I, II, III. During anti-bacterial treatment which lasted at last two years, spontaneous regression occurred in 82% of the vesicoureteral reflux. Renal scars were observed in 8% of the cases. Initially urinary tract infection was diagnosed in 84% of the children. This figure was reduced to 8% after anti-bacterial treatment. 54% of the observed children had associated diseases (anaemia, chronic enteropathy, bronchitis and pneumonia). The results confirmed the efficiency of anti-bacterial treatment in children with vesicoureteral reflux grades I, II, III. PMID:8650025

  18. Intrarenal Reflux: Diagnosis at Contrast-Enhanced Voiding Urosonography.

    PubMed

    Colleran, Gabrielle C; Barnewolt, Carol E; Chow, Jeanne S; Paltiel, Harriet J

    2016-08-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is a childhood condition that is usually diagnosed by fluoroscopic voiding cystourethrography (VCUG). Intrarenal reflux (IRR) of infected urine is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of reflux-associated pyelonephritis and subsequent parenchymal scarring and is traditionally depicted by fluoroscopic VCUG. This case series describes the phenomenon of IRR occurring in association with VUR in 4 children as depicted by contrast-enhanced voiding urosonography. The ability of contrast-enhanced voiding urosonography to show IRR when it occurs in conjunction with VUR compares favorably to that of fluoroscopic VCUG. PMID:27371375

  19. [Vesico-ureteral reflux in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Fanos, V; Khoory, B J; Vecchini, S; Pedrolli, A; Pizzini, C; Benini, D

    1998-01-01

    Vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) is the most frequent uropathy involving 1-2% of children. Genetics, familiarity, race gender and age intervene in the pathogenesis of VUR. In particular, neonatal VUR seems to represent a specific entity. Different factors determine a renal damage due to RVU: direct action of VUR (back pression), urinary tract infection (UTI), inflammatory mechanisms and renal dysplasia. Micturing cystourethrography and nuclear cystography are currently performed for the diagnosis of VUR, being ultrasound examination aspecific. Functional parameters are now investigated in association with new morphologic studies. The strict relationship of VUR and UTI is discussed. The treatment (medical, surgical) of VUR is not well established, although some guidelines can be suggested. Finally an adequate support must be given to the family for an optimal management. PMID:9973804

  20. Spontaneous enterogastric reflux gastritis and esophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gowen, G F

    1985-01-01

    Enterogastric reflux gastritis and esophagitis is best known after gastric resections and pyloroplasty but it also occurs spontaneously in the nonoperated patient. Forty-two patients are presented who meet the criteria for the diagnosis: constant burning epigastric pain, worse after meals, unrelieved by antacids and diet; endoscopic demonstration of a gastric bile pool; endoscopic biopsy proof of gastritis and esophagitis; and hypochlorhydria. Patients with mild and moderate stages of the disease can benefit from metoclopramide therapy which improves the gastric emptying mechanism. Of the surgical patients with intractable symptoms, 90% were women, 90% had marked hypochlorhydria, 83% had biliary disease, current or remote, and 50% had anemia. With vagotomy, antrectomy, and Roux-Y anastomosis 45-60 cm downstream, the clinical response has been most encouraging. PMID:3970596

  1. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and gastroesophageal reflux

    PubMed Central

    Stenard, Fabien; Iannelli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the only effective procedure that provides long-term sustained weight loss. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) has emerged over the last few years to be an ideal bariatric procedure because it has several advantages compared to more complex bariatric procedures, including avoiding an intestinal bypass. However, several published follow-up studies report an increased rate of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) after a SG. GERD is described as either de novo or as being caused by aggravation of preexisting symptoms. However, the literature on this topic is ambivalent despite the potentially increased rate of GERDs that may occur after this common bariatric procedure. This article reviews the mechanisms responsible for GERD in obese subjects as well as the results after a SG with respect to GERD. Future directions for clinical research are discussed along with the current surgical options for morbidly obese patients with GERD and undergoing bariatric surgery. PMID:26420961

  2. In the Clinic. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Harnik, Ian G

    2015-07-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of gastroesophageal reflux disease, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:26148292

  3. Persistent reflux symptoms cause anxiety, depression, and mental health and sleep disorders in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoshihide; Kamiya, Takeshi; Senoo, Kyouji; Tsuchida, Kenji; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Kojima, Hisayo; Yamashita, Hiroaki; Yamakawa, Yoshihiro; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Ozeki, Tomonori; Endo, Masatsugu; Nakanishi, Kazuhisa; Sando, Motoki; Inagaki, Yusuke; Shikano, Michiko; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Katsumi, Kohei; Joh, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Some patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease experience persistent reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy. These symptoms reduce their health-related quality of life. Our aims were to evaluate the relationship between proton pump inhibitor efficacy and health-related quality of life and to evaluate predictive factors affecting treatment response in Japanese patients. Using the gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire, 145 gastroesophageal reflux disease patients undergoing proton pump inhibitor therapy were evaluated and classified as responders or partial-responders. Their health-related quality of life was then evaluated using the 8-item Short Form Health Survey, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaires. Sixty-nine patients (47.6%) were partial responders. These patients had significantly lower scores than responders in 5/8 subscales and in the mental health component summary of the 8-item Short Form Health Survey. Partial responders had significantly higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, including anxiety and depression scores, than those of responders. Non-erosive reflux disease and double proton pump inhibitor doses were predictive factors of partial responders. Persistent reflux symptoms, despite proton pump inhibitor therapy, caused mental health disorders, sleep disorders, and psychological distress in Japanese gastroesophageal reflux disease patients. PMID:27499583

  4. Evaluation of Gastroesophageal Reflux by Combined Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance and pH Monitoring and Esophageal Motility Patterns in Children with Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Tong, Stanley; Mallitt, Kylie-Ann; Krishnan, Usha

    2016-08-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal dysmotility are common in patients with esophageal atresia (EA). The aim of this study was to evaluate GERD and esophageal motility patterns in children with EA using combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH (MII-pH) monitoring and high-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM), respectively. The reflux patterns seen in EA patients were also compared with a control group of normal children with suspected GERD. Methods A retrospective chart review was done on 35 patients with EA and 35 age- and sex-matched normal controls with suspected GERD, who had undergone 24-hour MII-pH monitoring. Impedance data were compared between both cohorts. Eight of the EA patients also underwent HREM. Results In the EA cohort, the median age was 53 months, with 21 males, and 71.4% had Type C EA. A total of 85.7% of the EA cohort and 40% of the control group were on proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy during the MII-pH study. There was no significant difference in the total retrograde bolus movements (RBMs) between the EA cohort (1,457) and the control group (1,482). Acidic RBMs was significantly lower in the EA group (208) compared with the control group (689), p = 0.0008. Nonacid reflux index (NARI) was significantly higher in EA children (1.1; 0.0-7.8) compared with controls (0.6; 0.0-5.7), p = 0.0046. In EA patients, only 335/1,183 (28%) total symptom occurrences were associated with RBM. The mean distal baseline impedance (DBI) was significantly lower in EA (1,029.6 [410.9 SD] Ω) compared with controls (2,998.2 [1028.8 SD] Ω) with suspected GERD, p < 0.0001. By logistic regression, only PPI use had a significant effect on DBI, p < 0.0001. HREM was abnormal in all eight EA patients. Four out of eight EA patients had a different peristaltic pattern for their solid swallows compared with their liquid swallows in HREM. Conclusions MII-pH testing allowed increased detection of nonacid

  5. Identification of okadaic acid-induced phosphorylation events by a mass spectrometry approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Jennifer J. . E-mail: Jennifer.Hill@nrc.gc.ca; Callaghan, Deborah A.; Ding Wen; Kelly, John F.; Chakravarthy, Balu R.

    2006-04-14

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a widely used small-molecule phosphatase inhibitor that is thought to selectively inhibit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Multiple studies have demonstrated that PP2A activity is compromised in Brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Thus, we set out to determine changes in phosphorylation that occur upon OA treatment of neuronal cells. Utilizing isotope-coded affinity tags and mass spectrometry analysis, we determined the relative abundance of proteins in a phosphoprotein enriched fraction from control and OA-treated primary cortical neurons. We identified many proteins whose phosphorylation state is regulated by OA, including glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta}, collapsin-response mediator proteins (DRP-2, DPYSL-5, and CRMP-4), and the B subunit of PP2A itself. Most interestingly, we have found that complexin 2, an important regulator of neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity, is phosphorylated at serine 93 upon OA treatment of neurons. This is First report of a phosphorylation site on complexin 2.

  6. Retinoic Acid-Dependent Signaling Pathways and Lineage Events in the Developing Mouse Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Rebecca Lee Yean; Finnell, Richard H.; Dollé, Pascal; Niederreither, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Studies in avian models have demonstrated an involvement of retinoid signaling in early neural tube patterning. The roles of this signaling pathway at later stages of spinal cord development are only partly characterized. Here we use Raldh2-null mouse mutants rescued from early embryonic lethality to study the consequences of lack of endogenous retinoic acid (RA) in the differentiating spinal cord. Mid-gestation RA deficiency produces prominent structural and molecular deficiencies in dorsal regions of the spinal cord. While targets of Wnt signaling in the dorsal neuronal lineage are unaltered, reductions in Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) and Notch signaling are clearly observed. We further provide evidence that endogenous RA is capable of driving stem cell differentiation. Raldh2 deficiency results in a decreased number of spinal cord derived neurospheres, which exhibit a reduced differentiation potential. Raldh2-null neurospheres have a decreased number of cells expressing the neuronal marker β-III-tubulin, while the nestin-positive cell population is increased. Hence, in vivo retinoid deficiency impaired neural stem cell growth. We propose that RA has separable functions in the developing spinal cord to (i) maintain high levels of FGF and Notch signaling and (ii) drive stem cell differentiation, thus restricting both the numbers and the pluripotent character of neural stem cells. PMID:22396766

  7. A comparison of gastro-oesophageal reflux in volunteers assessed by ambulatory pH and gamma monitoring after treatment with either Liquid Gaviscon or Algicon Suspension.

    PubMed

    Washington, N; Greaves, J L; Iftikhar, S Y

    1992-10-01

    This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of single doses of either Liquid Gaviscon or Algicon Suspension in the suppression of food and acid reflux into the oesophagus after a test meal in volunteers. After the pH electrode and gamma detector were positioned 5 cm above the cardia, the volunteers received a refluxogenic radiolabelled meal. The subjects then remained untreated, or thirty minutes later they were given a dose of unlabelled Algicon Suspension, or Liquid Gaviscon and a recording was made for a minimum of 3 hours. Allocation to the treatment group was randomized with the cross-overs performed 1 week apart. Liquid Gaviscon suppressed gastro-oesophageal reflux of both food and acid whereas only an insignificant reduction in reflux was seen after Algicon Suspension. The oesophageal pH remained below 4 for 3.21 +/- 0.92% (S.E.M.) of the recording period in the control study, 0.88 +/- 0.33 after Gaviscon and 2.91 +/- 0.68 after Algicon. The reflux of food was reduced from 17,070 x 10(3) +/- 4713 x 10(3) counts in the control study to 224 x 10(3) +/- 93 x 10(3) counts after the Gaviscon and 16,080 x 10(3) +/- 7131 x 10(3) counts after Algicon. The suppression of reflux by Liquid Gaviscon was significantly better than that produced by Algicon Suspension. PMID:1420749

  8. An old dietary regimen as a new lifestyle change for Gastro esophageal reflux disease: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Mohammad Akram; Mahfouz, Salah Al-Din Mahmoud; Selim, Noor Ahmed; Yar, Taley; Gillessen, Anton

    2015-09-01

    Treatment of gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is becoming a challenge for medical profession. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly recommended but many disadvantages of these drugs are being reported, particularly when used for long term. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are important cause of acid reflux. Gastric distention in upper stomach is the strongest stimulus for generation of TLESRs and is aggravated by intake of food in between meals. In an earlier cases report, two meals a day with intake of only fluids in between was suggested as a remedy for GERD. Present pilot study was conducted on 20 patients with endoscopically proven reflux esophagitis (Los Angles Grade a, b or c), who followed our advice to take meal twice a day with consumption of only soft drinks (fruit juices, tea, coffee, water, etc) in between and no medication for two weeks. On 14th day 15 patients (75%) were free of reflux symptoms, 2 (10%) had partial improvement and 3 (15%) reported no difference. It is concluded that two meals a day with intake of only fluids in between, whenever the patient feels hungry or thirsty, is a useful dietary regimen for the management of GERD. Further investigations are needed to confirm the benefits of this physiological lifestyle change. PMID:26408867

  9. Highly selective laparoscopic vagotomy in the management of duodenal ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux: the technique and results in 150 patients.

    PubMed

    Awad, W; Loehnert, C; Yarmuch, G J

    1997-11-01

    Highly selective vagotomy is the surgical treatment of choice for duodenal ulcer. It is the procedure that best maintains digestive anatomy and physiology with very few side effects, and widely performed all over the world. It has also been employed to treat gastroesophageal reflux for its many advantages: it reduces gastric acid output; it permits easy access to the gastroesophageal junction, assuring a precise, secure fundoplication. We have been using this technique in open surgery since 1978. This prospective study reproduces with laparoscopic guidance, the same technique we used to employ in open surgery. The purpose is to analyze the laparoscopic procedure and discuss the results in 150 patients who were treated between March 1992 and August 1996. This series deals with 36 patients with duodenal ulcer, 80 with gastroesophageal reflux and 34 who presented both. All the duodenal ulcer patients were treated successfully, with no recurrences to date. Recurrences have been recorded in two complex cases of gastroesophageal reflux. The remaining patients show no clinical evidence of reflux and present normal endoscopic findings, esophageal manometric studies and 24-hour esophageal pH measurements. Laparoscopic surgery with this technique appears to be an interesting alternative to prolonged medical treatment of these diseases in certain refractory patients. PMID:9534356

  10. Interactions between gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Molina-Infante, Javier; van Rhijn, Bram D

    2015-10-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is the most common oesophageal disorder, whereas eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease unresponsive to PPI therapy. Updated guidelines in 2011 described proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE), a novel phenotype in EoE patients who were responsive to PPIs. This article aims to update the complex interplay between GORD, EoE and PPIs. Oesophageal mucosal integrity is diffusely impaired in EoE and PPI-REE patients. PPI-REE might occur with either normal or pathological pH monitoring. The genetic hallmark of EoE is overlapped in PPI-REE, but not in GORD. PPIs can partially restore epithelial integrity and reverse allergic inflammation gene expression in PPI-REE. Acid hypersensitivity in EoE patients may explain symptomatic but not histological response on PPIs. Unsolved issues with PPI-REE are whether oesophageal barrier impairment is the cause or the effect of oesophageal eosinophilia and whether PPIs primarily targets barrier integrity or oesophageal inflammation. PMID:26552774

  11. Upper aerodigestive tract disorders and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Bianchini, Chiara; Zuolo, Michele; Feo, Carlo Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of symptoms and diseases of the upper aerodigestive tract are associated to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). These disorders comprise a large variety of conditions such as asthma, chronic otitis media and sinusitis, chronic cough, and laryngeal disorders including paroxysmal laryngospasm. Laryngo-pharyngeal reflux disease is an extraoesophageal variant of GORD that can affect the larynx and pharynx. Despite numerous research efforts, the diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux often remains elusive, unproven and controversial, and its treatment is then still empiric. Aim of this paper is to review the current literature on upper aerodigestive tract disorders in relation to pathologic gastro-oesophageal reflux, focusing in particular on the pathophysiology base and results of the surgical treatment of GORD. PMID:25685756

  12. How to Approach Laryngopharyngeal Reflux: An Otolaryngology Perspective.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Vaninder K; Akst, Lee M

    2016-08-01

    In the otolaryngology practice, there is a rising concern with the current diagnosis and management of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). The implication of LPR in many common head and neck symptoms, along with the rising cost of empiric therapy and no overall improvement in patient symptoms, has established a need to review what are indeed laryngopharyngeal complaints secondary to reflux and what are not. This article reviews the otolaryngologist's approach to LPR, the various ways diagnosis is made, and the guidelines that inform the current trends in otolaryngology management of LPR. The goal of this article is to recognize that reflux can be the cause of a variety of laryngopharyngeal complaints seen within an otolaryngology practice, but when empiric therapy does not improve symptoms, consideration should be given to other non-reflux causes. PMID:27417389

  13. Acute dopamine depletion with branched chain amino acids decreases auditory top-down event-related potentials in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Andres H; Goldberg, Terry E; Hassoun, Youssef; Bates, John A; Nassauer, Katharine W; Sevy, Serge; Opgen-Rhein, Carolin; Malhotra, Anil K

    2009-06-01

    Cerebral dopamine homeostasis has been implicated in a wide range of cognitive processes and is of great pathophysiological importance in schizophrenia. A novel approach to study cognitive effects of dopamine is to deplete its cerebral levels with branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) that acutely lower dopamine precursor amino acid availability. Here, we studied the effects of acute dopamine depletion on early and late attentive cortical processing. Auditory event-related potential (ERP) components N2 and P3 were investigated using high-density electroencephalography in 22 healthy male subjects after receiving BCAAs or placebo in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. Total free serum prolactin was also determined as a surrogate marker of cerebral dopamine depletion. Acute dopamine depletion increased free plasma prolactin and significantly reduced prefrontal ERP components N2 and P3. Subcomponent analysis of N2 revealed a significant attenuation of early attentive N2b over prefrontal scalp sites. As a proof of concept, these results strongly suggest that BCAAs are acting on basic information processing. Dopaminergic neurotransmission seems to be involved in auditory top-down processing as indexed by prefrontal N2 and P3 reductions during dopamine depletion. In healthy subjects, intact early cortical top-down processing can be acutely dysregulated by ingestion of BCAAs. We discuss the potential impact of these findings on schizophrenia research. PMID:19356906

  14. Design and testing of ultralite fabric reflux tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Pauley, K.A.; Antoniak, Z.I.; King, L.L.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of Ultralite Fabric Reflux Tubes intended to provide thermal control for a Lunar Colony. The Ultralite Fabric Reflux Tubes, under this phase of development, are constructed of thin-walled copper liners overwrapped with aluminoborosilicate fabric. These devices were constructed and tested in air at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and subsequently taken to the NASA Johnson Space Center for thermal vacuum experimentation.

  15. Gastroesophageal reflux in infants and children. Recognition and treatment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D G; Jolley, S G

    1981-10-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is common in infants and children and is associated with a broad spectrum of symptoms and disease. The majority of young patients with reflux can be managed nonoperatively because growth and time usually bring maturation of the antireflux mechanisms. We feel that operation is justified and indicated for the child with complications of reflux that are not reversed by a six-week medical trial, and children with stricture or infants with reflux-related apnea should have operation without delay. In our experience, analysis of the 24-hour esophageal pH tracing has proved most useful to correlate respiratory symptoms with reflux. The Nissen fundoplication is the most effective and the most reliable antireflux procedure, but it must be constructed loosely to minimize the side effects of dysphagia and gas bloating. Because the population at risk for reflux disease has approximately a 50 per cent incidence of significant associated medical problems, morbidity and mortality from some of these problems is inevitable. There should be little or no mortality associated with the antireflux operation itself. PMID:7313926

  16. [Function of oesophagus and gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Höhne, S; Wachter, R; Merkel, N; Hesse, V; Finke, R

    2014-04-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER) has a special meaning for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Twelve voluntary patients with CF up to the age of 25 underwent an oesophageal manometry and a 24-hour impedance-pH monitoring. These patients were without symptoms of GER. The examination proved an acid GER in 42 %. In the total population the frequency is ≤ 10 %. In 11 of 12 patients a pathologically low pressure of the lower oesophageal sphincter (LES) was found. No significant correlations between the DeMeester score and the pressure of the LES, the reflux and respiratory symptomatology, the lung function as well as the quality of life could be proven. However, there was a significant correlation between the DeMeester score and the acid clearance time. 37 % of the registered cough pushes were related to a GER, of which 78 % were associated with an acid GER. Therefore, coughing in patients with CF must not necessarily be caused by the underlying disease. The timely detection of a pathological GER in patients with CF, but without symptoms of GER, and its prompt therapy could protect the lung function. PMID:24718938

  17. DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Maria Aparecida Coelho de Arruda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is probably one of the most prevalent diseases in the world that also compromises the quality of life of the affected significantly. Its incidence in Brazil is 12%, corresponding to 20 million individuals. Objective To update the GERD management and the new trends on diagnosis and treatment, reviewing the international and Brazilian experience on it. Method The literature review was based on papers published on Medline/Pubmed, SciELO, Lilacs, Embase and Cochrane crossing the following headings: gastroesophageal reflux disease, diagnosis, clinical treatment, surgery, fundoplication. Results Various factors are involved on GERD physiopathology, the most important being the transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Clinical manifestations are heartburn, regurgitation (typical symptoms), cough, chest pain, asthma, hoarseness and throat clearing (atypical symptoms), which may be followed or not by typical symptoms. GERD patients may present complications such as peptic stenosis, hemorrhage, and Barrett's esophagus, which is the most important predisposing factor to adenocarcinoma. The GERD diagnosis must be based on the anamnesis and the symptoms must be evaluated in terms of duration, intensity, frequency, triggering and relief factors, pattern of evolution and impact on the patient's quality of life. The diagnosis requires confirmation with different exams. The goal of the clinical treatment is to relieve the symptoms and surgical treatment is indicated for patients who require continued drug use, with intolerance to prolonged clinical treatment and with GERD complications. Conclusion GERD is a major digestive health problem and affect 12% of Brazilian people. The anamnesis is fundamental for the diagnosis of GERD, with special analysis of the typical and atypical symptoms (duration, intensity, frequency, triggering and relief factors, evolution and impact on the life quality). High digestive endoscopy and

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux and congenital gastrointestinal malformations.

    PubMed

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D'Angelo, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Centorrino, Antonio; Scalfari, Gianfranco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo

    2015-07-28

    Although the outcome of newborns with surgical congenital diseases (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia; esophageal atresia; omphalocele; gastroschisis) has improved rapidly with recent advances in perinatal intensive care and surgery, infant survivors often require intensive treatment after birth, have prolonged hospitalizations, and, after discharge, may have long-term sequelae including gastro-intestinal comorbidities, above all, gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This condition involves the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a well-recognized condition, typical of infants, with an incidence of 85%, which usually resolves after physiological maturation of the lower esophageal sphincter and lengthening of the intra-abdominal esophagus, in the first few months after birth. Although the exact cause of abnormal esophageal function in congenital defects is not clearly understood, it has been hypothesized that common (increased intra-abdominal pressure after closure of the abdominal defect) and/or specific (e.g., motility disturbance of the upper gastrointestinal tract, damage of esophageal peristaltic pump) pathological mechanisms may play a role in the etiology of GER in patients with birth defects. Improvement of knowledge could positively impact the long-term prognosis of patients with surgical congenital diseases. The present manuscript provides a literature review focused on pathological and clinical characteristics of GER in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for congenital abdominal malformations. PMID:26229394

  19. Mild fetal hydronephrosis indicating vesicoureteric reflux.

    PubMed Central

    Marra, G; Barbieri, G; Moioli, C; Assael, B M; Grumieri, G; Caccamo, M L

    1994-01-01

    The management of neonates with mild hydronephrosis diagnosed antenatally is still debated. Although some of these infants are normal, it is recognised that others will have mild obstruction of the ureteropelvic junction or vesicoureteric reflux (VUR). A prospective study was performed in all newborn infants with an antenatal diagnosis of mild hydronephrosis (47 babies, 62 kidneys) born over a two year period in order to assess the frequency of VUR. Voiding cystography in 14 patients with 21 renal units showed VUR. Two patients underwent surgery and the VUR resolved; the other 12 received medical treatment. Repeat cystography was scheduled for 12-18 months later, when a high rate of spontaneous cure was observed. The remaining patients were monitored by ultrasonography but only in one case did hydronephrosis deteriorate because of the presence of severe ureteropelvic junction obstruction. It is concluded that mild dilatation of the pelvis might be an expression of a potentially severe malformation such as VUR, and a careful follow up of these cases is mandatory. Images PMID:7802758

  20. TNXB mutations can cause vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Gbadegesin, Rasheed A; Brophy, Patrick D; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Hall, Gentzon; Gupta, Indra R; Hains, David; Bartkowiak, Bartlomeij; Rabinovich, C Egla; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Homstad, Alison; Westreich, Katherine; Wu, Guanghong; Liu, Yutao; Holanda, Danniele; Clarke, Jason; Lavin, Peter; Selim, Angelica; Miller, Sara; Wiener, John S; Ross, Sherry S; Foreman, John; Rotimi, Charles; Winn, Michelle P

    2013-07-01

    Primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the most common congenital anomaly of the kidney and the urinary tract, and it is a major risk factor for pyelonephritic scarring and CKD in children. Although twin studies support the heritability of VUR, specific genetic causes remain elusive. We performed a sequential genome-wide linkage study and whole-exome sequencing in a family with hereditary VUR. We obtained a significant multipoint parametric logarithm of odds score of 3.3 on chromosome 6p, and whole-exome sequencing identified a deleterious heterozygous mutation (T3257I) in the gene encoding tenascin XB (TNXB in 6p21.3). This mutation segregated with disease in the affected family as well as with a pathogenic G1331R change in another family. Fibroblast cell lines carrying the T3257I mutation exhibited a reduction in both cell motility and phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase expression, suggesting a defect in the focal adhesions that link the cell cytoplasm to the extracellular matrix. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the human uroepithelial lining of the ureterovesical junction expresses TNXB, suggesting that TNXB may be important for generating tensile forces that close the ureterovesical junction during voiding. Taken together, these results suggest that mutations in TNXB can cause hereditary VUR. PMID:23620400

  1. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Medical or Surgical Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Liakakos, Theodore; Karamanolis, George; Patapis, Paul; Misiakos, Evangelos P.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common condition with increasing prevalence worldwide. The disease encompasses a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms and disorders from simple heartburn without esophagitis to erosive esophagitis with severe complications, such as esophageal strictures and intestinal metaplasia. Diagnosis is based mainly on ambulatory esophageal pH testing and endoscopy. There has been a long-standing debate about the best treatment approach for this troublesome disease. Methods and Results. Medical treatment with PPIs has an excellent efficacy in reversing the symptoms of GERD, but they should be taken for life, and long-term side effects do exist. However, patients who desire a permanent cure and have severe complications or cannot tolerate long-term treatment with PPIs are candidates for surgical treatment. Laparoscopic antireflux surgery achieves a significant symptom control, increased patient satisfaction, and complete withdrawal of antireflux medications, in the majority of patients. Conclusion. Surgical treatment should be reserved mainly for young patients seeking permanent results. However, the choice of the treatment schedule should be individualized for every patient. It is up to the patient, the physician and the surgeon to decide the best treatment option for individual cases. PMID:20069112

  2. Gastroesophageal reflux and congenital gastrointestinal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D’Angelo, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Centorrino, Antonio; Scalfari, Gianfranco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Although the outcome of newborns with surgical congenital diseases (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia; esophageal atresia; omphalocele; gastroschisis) has improved rapidly with recent advances in perinatal intensive care and surgery, infant survivors often require intensive treatment after birth, have prolonged hospitalizations, and, after discharge, may have long-term sequelae including gastro-intestinal comorbidities, above all, gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This condition involves the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a well-recognized condition, typical of infants, with an incidence of 85%, which usually resolves after physiological maturation of the lower esophageal sphincter and lengthening of the intra-abdominal esophagus, in the first few months after birth. Although the exact cause of abnormal esophageal function in congenital defects is not clearly understood, it has been hypothesized that common (increased intra-abdominal pressure after closure of the abdominal defect) and/or specific (e.g., motility disturbance of the upper gastrointestinal tract, damage of esophageal peristaltic pump) pathological mechanisms may play a role in the etiology of GER in patients with birth defects. Improvement of knowledge could positively impact the long-term prognosis of patients with surgical congenital diseases. The present manuscript provides a literature review focused on pathological and clinical characteristics of GER in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for congenital abdominal malformations. PMID:26229394

  3. Enterogastric reflux and gastric clearance of refluxate in normal subjects and in patients with and without bile vomiting following peptic ulcer surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, C.; Hulks, G.; Cuschieri, A.

    1986-11-01

    A noninvasive scintigraphic technique was used to estimate enterogastric reflux and subsequent gastric evacuation of refluxate in 35 normal, healthy subjects and 55 patients previously treated by vagotomy or partial gastrectomy. Reflux was provoked by a milk drink and quantitated by counting 99Tcm-EHIDA activity within the gastric area during gamma camera imaging. Seven normal subjects (20%) showed reflux of 5-18% of initial activity (mean: 10%), with peak values occurring at 5-30 minutes (mean: 14 minutes) following the milk. Gastric evacuation of activity in these subjects was monoexponential (r = 0.993, T1/2 = 24.1 minutes). Reflux occurred more frequently than normal in patients with truncal vagotomy and drainage (22/28 patients) and partial gastrectomy (20/21 patients). All of 16 patients with Billroth II anastomoses exhibited reflux, which was excessive compared with refluxing normal subjects (mean: 25%; p less than 0.01) and occurred later into the study (mean: 34 minutes; p less than 0.01). Ten of 11 asymptomatic patients showed reflux of similar amounts of activity (mean: 21%) compared with 16 patients who complained of bile vomiting (mean: 22%). However, asymptomatic patients exhibited gastric evacuation of refluxate at a rate similar to that of refluxing normal subjects, while bile vomiters showed significant gastric retention of refluxate at 25-30 minutes following peak gastric activity (p less than 0.05). This result confirms that post-operative bile vomiting is essentially a problem of gastric emptying.

  4. Molecular composition and size distribution of sugars, sugar-alcohols and carboxylic acids in airborne particles during a severe urban haze event caused by wheat straw burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gehui; Chen, Chunlei; Li, Jianjun; Zhou, Bianhong; Xie, Mingjie; Hu, Shuyuan; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Chen, Yan

    2011-05-01

    Molecular compositions and size distributions of water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC, i.e., sugars, sugar-alcohols and carboxylic acids) in particles from urban air of Nanjing, China during a severe haze event caused by field burning of wheat straw were characterized and compared with those in the summer and autumn non-haze periods. During the haze event levoglucosan (4030 ng m -3) was the most abundant compound among the measured WSOC, followed by succinic acid, malic acid, glycerol, arabitol and glucose, being different from those in the non-haze samples, in which sucrose or azelaic acid showed a second highest concentration, although levoglucosan was the highest. The measured WSOC in the haze event were 2-20 times more than those in the non-hazy days. Size distribution results showed that there was no significant change in the compound peaks in coarse mode (>2.1 μm) with respect to the haze and non-haze samples, but a large difference in the fine fraction (<2.1 μm) was found with a sharp increase during the hazy days mostly due to the increased emissions of wheat straw burning. Molecular compositions of organic compounds in the fresh smoke particles from wheat straw burning demonstrate that sharply increased concentrations of glycerol and succinic and malic acids in the fine particles during the haze event were mainly derived from the field burning of wheat straw, although the sources of glucose and related sugar-alcohols whose concentrations significantly increased in the fine haze samples are unclear. Compared to that in the fresh smoke particles of wheat straw burning an increase in relative abundance of succinic acid to levoglucosan during the haze event suggests a significant production of secondary organic aerosols during transport of the smoke plumes.

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux/laryngopharyngeal reflux disease: a critical analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kotby, M N; Hassan, O; El-Makhzangy, Aly M N; Farahat, M; Milad, P

    2010-02-01

    Despite the wealth of publications on the topic of gastroesophageal reflux and its variants, there are still many unsettled questions before one accepts the prevalent cult of "reflux disease". This study is summarizing the results of the critical analysis of the literature, 436 articles,during the last 30 years. The golden test to identify the patient group suffering from this rather common phenomenon is still lacking. The claimed extra-esophageal manifestations especially in the larynx are non-specific and may be caused by other factors well-known within the domain of vocology. The response to therapeutic intervention still lacks serious well-controlled studies to allow drawing reasonable conclusions. An outstanding feature of the publications is that most of them fall in the category of "review". It seems that there is a tendency to perpetuate the concept without objective criticism. Following the analysis, a recommendation for anew plan of original well-controlled multi-center studies is highlighted. PMID:20033194

  6. Should the Reflex Be Reflux? Throat Symptoms and Alternative Explanations.

    PubMed

    Francis, David O; Vaezi, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Although laryngopharyngeal reflux, also known as extraesophageal reflux (EER), was codified more than 25 years ago, it has not been characterized fully. There is no sensitive and specific diagnostic test, and its symptoms often are nonspecific and overlap with those of other conditions commonly seen in primary care and specialist practices. Otolaryngologists have an important role in the evaluation and management of these patients--they must investigate persistent reflux-attributed symptoms by direct visualization of the upper airway and larynx, and, in some circumstances, the esophagus. It is of utmost importance to rule out the possibility of malignancy, which often presents with symptoms similar to those of EER. Once cancer is excluded, many benign upper airway conditions also can masquerade as, and often incorrectly are attributed to, EER. Although reflux is a potential etiologic factor for upper-airway symptoms, it is important not to reflexively blame reflux. We discuss other etiologies that should be considered carefully for persistent symptoms. PMID:25264272

  7. Multidimensional voice analysis of reflux laryngitis patients.

    PubMed

    Pribuisienë, Rûta; Uloza, Virgilijus; Saferis, Viktoras

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze and quantify the voice characteristics of reflux laryngitis (RL) patients and to determine the most important voice tests and voice-quality parameters in the functional diagnostics of RL. The voices of 83 RL patients and 31 persons in the control group were evaluated. Vocal function was assessed using a multidimensional set of video laryngostroboscopic, perceptual, acoustic, aerodynamic and subjective measurements according to the protocol elaborated by the Committee on Phoniatrics of the European Laryngological Society. The mean values of the hoarseness visual analogue scale assessment and voice handicap index were significantly higher (P<0.05) in the group of RL patients as compared to the controls. Objective voice assessment revealed a significant increase in mean values of jitter, shimmer and normalized noise energy (NNE), along with a significant decrease in pitch range, maximum frequency, phonetogram area (S) and maximum phonation time (MPT) in RL patients, both in the male and female subgroups. According to the results of discriminant analysis, the NNE, MPT, S and intensity range were determined as an optimum set for functional diagnostics of RL. The derived function (equation) makes it possible to assign the person to the group of RL patients with an accuracy of 86.7%. The sensitivity and specificity of eight voice parameters were found to be higher than 50%. The results of the present study demonstrate a reduction of phonation capabilities and voice quality in RL patients. Multidimensional voice evaluation makes it possible to detect significant differences in mean values of perceptual, subjective and objective voice quality parameters between RL patients and controls groups. Therefore, multidimensional voice analysis is an important tool in the functional diagnostics of RL. PMID:15004705

  8. AEETES: A solar reflux receiver thermal performance numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, R. E., Jr.

    1991-12-01

    Reflux solar receivers for dish-Stirling electric power generation systems are currently being investigated by several companies and laboratories. In support of these efforts, the AEETES thermal performance numerical model has been developed to predict thermal performance of pool-boiler and heat-pipe reflux receivers. The formulation of the AEETES numerical model, which is applicable to axisymmetric geometries with asymmetric incident fluxes, is presented in detail. Thermal efficiency predictions agree to within 4.1 percent with test data from on-sun tests of a pool-boiler reflux receiver. Predicted absorber and sidewall temperatures agree with thermocouple data to within 3.3. percent and 7.3 percent, respectively. The importance of accounting for the asymmetric incident fluxes is demonstrated in comparisons with predictions using azimuthally averaged variables. The predicted receiver heat losses are characterized in terms of convective, solar and infrared radiative, and conductive heat transfer mechanisms.

  9. [Voice disturbances in young children with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Viaz'menov, E O; Radtsig, E Iu; Bogomil'skiĭ, M R; Vodolazov, S Iu; Poliudov, S A; Myzin, A V

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study voice disturbances in young children with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Diagnostic algorithm included direct transnasal examination of the larynx using an Olympus fibroscope (Japan), fibrogastroduodenoscopy, 24-hour potentiometry, biopsy of oesophageal mucosa, and acoustic analysis of the voice. A total of 26 children at the age from 8 months to 3 years with voice disturbances were examined, including 12 children below one year, 5 between 1 and 2 years, and 9 between 2 and 3 years. The main signs of laryngoesophageal reflux were dysphonia, oedema, hyperemia, and altered light reflex of mucous membrane of arytenoid cartilages, interarytenoid space, and vocal cords. It is concluded that voice disturbances are the most common symptoms of laryngoesophageal reflux in young children which necessitates the earliest possible endoscopic study of the larynx in all cases of dysphonia. PMID:20517277

  10. [Vesicoureteric reflux in children: many questions still unanswered].

    PubMed

    Zieg, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) is the most common congenital anomaly of the uropoetic system. The gold standard for its diagnosis is the voiding cystourethrogram. Sonographic cystourethrography is an alternative method for reflux detection, but it is still not used routinely. Static scintigraphy enables us to diagnose renal scarring reflux nephropathy (RN). While congenital RN is a result of prenatal kidney injury, acquired RN results from pyelonephritis-induced renal damage.Risk factors for RN include VUR, recurrent APN, lower urinary tract dysfunction and delay in treatment of febrile urinary tract infection. Management of children after APN with VUR consists of antibiotic prophylaxy, surgery or surveillance only. The conclusions of performed studies are controversial, thus unified guidelines for the management of patients with VUR are not available. PMID:27256146

  11. Association Between Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease After Pneumatic Balloon Dilatation and Clinical Course in Patients With Achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yang Won; Lee, Jin Hee; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Kim, Jae J; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is known to be associated with lower post-treatment lower esophageal sphincter pressure in patients with achalasia. This study aimed to elucidate whether GERD after pneumatic balloon dilatation (PD) has a prognostic role and to investigate how the clinical course of GERD is. Methods A total of 79 consecutive patients who were first diagnosed with primary achalasia and underwent PD as an initial treatment were included in this retrospective study. Single PD was performed using a 3.0 cm balloon. The patients were divided into two groups: 1) who developed GERD after PD (GERD group) and 2) who did not develop GERD after PD (non-GERD group). GERD was defined as pathological acid exposure, reflux esophagitis or typical reflux symptoms. Results Twenty one patients (26.6%) developed GERD after PD during follow-up. There were no significant differences between the two groups in demographic or clinical factors including pre- and post-treatment manometric results. All patients in GERD group were well responsive to maintenance proton pump inhibitor therapy including on demand therapy or did not require maintenance. During a median follow-up of 17.8 months (interquartile range, 7.1–42.7 months), achalasia recurred in 15 patients (19.0%). However, the incidence of recurrence did not differ according to the occurrence of GERD after PD. Conclusions GERD often occurs after even a single PD for achalasia. However, GERD after PD is well responsive to PPI therapy. Our data suggest that GERD after PD during follow-up does not appear to have a prognostic role. PMID:24840373

  12. Scintigraphy in laryngopharyngeal and gastroesophageal reflux disease: A definitive diagnostic test?

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Gregory L; Beattie, John; Ing, Alvin; Falk, SE; Magee, Michael; Burton, Leticia; Van der Wall, Hans

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the utility of scintigraphic studies in predicting response to laparoscopic fundoplication (LF) for chronic laryngopharyngeal reflux symptoms. METHODS: Patients with upper aero-digestive symptoms that remained undiagnosed after a period of 2 mo were studied with conventional pH and manometric studies. Patients mainly complained of cough, sore throat, dysphonia and globus. These patients were imaged after ingestion of 99m-technetium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid. Studies were quantified with time activity curves over the pharynx, upper and lower oesophagus and background. Late studies of the lungs were obtained for aspiration. Patients underwent LF with post-operative review at 3 mo after surgery. RESULTS: Thirty four patients (20 F, 14 M) with an average age of 57 years and average duration of symptoms of 4.8 years were studied. Twenty four hour pH and manometry studies were abnormal in all patients. On scintigraphy, 27/34 patients demonstrated pharyngeal contamination and a rising or flat pharyngeal curve. Lung aspiration was evident in 50% of patients. There was evidence of pulmonary aspiration in 17 of 34 patients in the delayed study (50%). Pharyngeal contamination was found in 27 patients. All patients with aspiration showed pharyngeal contamination. In the 17 patients with aspiration, graphical time activity curve showed rising activity in the pharynx in 9 patients and a flat curve in 8 patients. In those 17 patients without pulmonary aspiration, 29% (5 patients) had either a rising or flat pharyngeal graph. A rising or flat curve predicted aspiration with a positive predictive value of 77% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Over 90% of patients reported a satisfactory symptomatic response to LF with an acceptable side-effect profile. CONCLUSION: Scintigraphic reflux studies offer a good screening tool for pharyngeal contamination and aspiration in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25834329

  13. Esophageal Bolus Transit in Newborns with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms: A Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance Study

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Stefania Alfonsina; Maggiora, Elena; Locatelli, Emanuela; Indrio, Flavia; Bertino, Enrico; Coscia, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate bolus transit during esophageal swallow (ES) and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) events and to investigate the relationship between the characteristics of ES and GER events in a population of term and preterm newborns with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Methods The study population consisted of term and preterm newborns referred to combined multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) and pH monitoring for GERD symptoms. The frequency and characteristics of ES and GER events were assessed by two independent investigators. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results Fifty-four newborns (23 preterm) were included in the analyses. Median bolus head advancing time corrected for esophageal length (BHATc) was shorter during mealtime than during the postprandial period (median, interquartile range): 0.20 (0.15-0.29) s/cm vs. 0.47 (0.39-0.64) s/cm, p<0.001. Median bolus presence time (BPT) was prolonged during mealtime: 4.71(3.49-6.27) s vs. 2.66 (1.82-3.73) s, p<0.001. Higher BHATc (p=0.03) and prolonged BPT (p<0.001) were observed in preterm newborns during the postprandial period. A significant positive correlation between BHATc and bolus clearance time was also observed (ρ=0.33, p=0.016). Conclusion The analysis of ES and GER events at the same time by MII provides useful information to better understand the physiopathology of GERD. In particular, the analysis of BHATc during the postprandial period could help clinicians identify newborns with prolonged esophageal clearance time due to impaired esophageal motility, which could allow for more accurate recommendations regarding further tests and treatment. PMID:26770898

  14. Correlation of the location of superficial Barrett’s esophageal adenocarcinoma (s-BEA) with the direction of gastroesophageal reflux

    PubMed Central

    Omae, Masami; Fujisaki, Junko; Shimizu, Tomoki; Horiuchi, Yusuke; Ishiyama, Akiyoshi; Yoshio, Toshiyuki; Hirasawa, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Yorimasa; Tsuchida, Tomohiro; Igarashi, Masahiro; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Superficial Barrett’s esophageal adenocarcinoma (s-BEA) in Barrett’s esophagus frequently occurs in the right wall of the esophagus. Our aim was to examine the correlation between the location of s-BEA and the direction of acid and non-acid reflux in patients with Barrett’s esophagus. Patients and methods: We performed 24-h pH monitoring in 33 s-BEA patients using a pH catheter with eight sensors. One sensor was located at the 6 o’clock position in the lower esophagus and sensors 1 – 8 were arranged counterclockwise at the same level. The catheter was positioned at the same level as the s-BEA. We measured the maximal total duration of acid (MTD-A) and non-acid (MTD-NA) reflux. When the direction of MTD-A and MTD-NA coincided with the location of the s-BEA, the case was defined as coincidental and we calculated the rate of coincidence, and the probability of the rate of coincidence was estimated with 95 % confidence intervals (95 %CI). Results: Among the 33 cases of s-BEA examined, the rate of coincidence of both MTD-A and MTD-NA was 24/33 (72.7 %) (95 %CI 0.54 – 0.87). The rate of coincidence of either MTD-A or MTD-NA was 30/33 (90.9 %) (95 %CI 0.76 – 0.98). Conclusions: Our study revealed that the location of s-BEA mostly corresponds to the direction of MTD-A or MTD-NA. Accurate observation of the distribution of acid or non-acid reflux by pH monitoring would aid early detection of s-BEA by endoscopy.

  15. Late Carboniferous-early Permian events in the Trans-European Suture Zone: Tectonic and acid magmatic evidence from Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żelaźniewicz, A.; Oberc-Dziedzic, T.; Fanning, C. M.; Protas, A.; Muszyński, A.

    2016-04-01

    The Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) links the East and West European Platforms. It is concealed under Meso-Cenozoic cover. Available seismic data show that the lower crustal layer in the TESZ is an attenuated, ~ 200 km wide, SW margin of Baltica. The attenuation occurred when Rodinia broke-up, which gave rise to evolution of the thinned, thus relatively unstable margin of Baltica. It accommodated accretions during Phanerozoic events. We focus on acid magmatism, specifically granitoid, observed close to the SW border of the TESZ in Poland. This border is defined by the Dolsk Fault Zone (DFZ) and the Kraków-Lubliniec Fault Zone (KLFZ) on which dextral wrenching developed as a result of the Variscan collision between Laurussia and Gondwana. The granitoids at the DFZ and KLFZ were dated at ~ 300 Ma. In the Variscan foreland that overlaps the TESZ, orogenic thickening continued to ~ 307-306 Ma, possibly contributed to melting of the thickened upper continental crust (εNd300 = - 6.0 to - 4.5) and triggered the tectonically controlled magmatism. The wrenching on the TESZ border faults caused tensional openings in the basement, which promoted magmatic centers with extrusions of rhyolites and extensive ignimbrites. The Chrzypsko-Paproć and Małopolska magmatic centers were developed at the DFZ and KLFZ, respectively. The magmatic edifices commenced at ~ 302 Ma with relatively poorly evolved granites, which carried both suprasubduction and anorogenic signatures, then followed by more evolved volcanic rocks (up to 293 Ma). Their geochemistry and inherited zircons suggest that the felsic magmas were mainly derived from upper crustal rocks, with some mantle additions, which included Sveconorwegian and older Baltican components. The complex TESZ, with Baltica basement in the lower crust, was susceptible to transient effects of mantle upwelling that occurred by the end of the Variscan orogeny and resulted in an episode of the "flare-up" magmatism in the North German

  16. [Dyspepsia, Ulcer Disease – Helicobacter pylori, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    PubMed

    Wirth, Hans-Peter

    2016-06-01

    Prevalence of H. pylori (HP) is declining, whereas reflux disease and the proportion of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAR) to HP-induced ulcers increase. Eradication heals HP-ulcer disease, interrupts cancerous progression and can improve dyspeptic symptoms. NSAR-ulcers heal under proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy but tend to recur after reexposition. Anticoagulants and antiplatlet agents increase the risk additionally. PPI reduces NSAR-ulcer recurrence. Reflux patients with severe inflammation and complications often need long-term therapy. Barrett’s esophagus patients are at risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27269775

  17. Unmet Needs in the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dickman, Ram; Maradey-Romero, Carla; Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Fass, Ronnie

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent gastrointestinal disorder. Proton pump inhibitors have profoundly revolutionized the treatment of GERD. However, several areas of unmet need persist despite marked improvements in the therapeutic management of GERD. These include the advanced grades of erosive esophagitis, nonerosive reflux disease, maintenance treatment of erosive esophagitis, refractory GERD, postprandial heartburn, atypical and extraesophageal manifestations of GERD, Barrett’s esophagus, chronic protein pump inhibitor treatment, and post-bariatric surgery GERD. Consequently, any future development of novel therapeutic modalities for GERD (medical, endoscopic, or surgical), would likely focus on the aforementioned areas of unmet need. PMID:26130628

  18. Critical Assessment of Endoscopic Techniques for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wai-Kit; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Over the past 2 decades, a number of new endoscopic techniques have been developed for management of gastroesophageal (GE) reflux disease symptoms as alternatives to medical management and surgical fundoplication. These devices include application of radiofrequency treatment (Stretta), endoscopic plication (EndoCinch, Plicator, Esophyx, MUSE), and injection of bulking agents (Enteryx, Gatekeeper, Plexiglas, Duragel). Their goal was symptom relief through reduction of tissue compliance and enhancement of anatomic resistance at the GE junction. In this review, we critically assess the research behind the efficacy, safety, and durability of these treatments to better understand their roles in contemporary GE reflux disease management. PMID:26241152

  19. [Value of long-term ambulatory pH-metry in the assessment of patients with reflux esophagitis].

    PubMed

    Tomás-Ridocci, M; Molina, R; Monforte, A; Peña, A; Mora, F; Benages, A; Bernal, J C

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze different reflux-patterns by 24-hour ambulatory pH-metry and to correlate them with clinical symptoms and intensity of esophagitis. 115 patients (50 males/65 females) with a median age of 47 +/- 16 years, typical reflux symptoms have been studied and classified attending to the grade of esophagitis microscopically only 17 cases and endoscopically (grade I = 29, grade II = 44 and grade III/IV = 25 patients). Demeester's score has been used for clinical evaluation. Ambulatory pH-metry has been done with a Holter Synectics Digitrapper MK II, which registered intraesophageal pH-variations every 4 seconds during 24 hours. 28 normal subjects (13 males/15 females) with a median age of 51 +/- 16 years are referred as the control group. Clinical symptoms became more intensified when pH-metric alterations resulted more evident. Thoracic pain was noted in 12 from 115 patients, increasing its frequency in parallel fashion to that of the degree of esophagitis (6% in grade 0, 9% in grades I/II and 20% in grades II/IV). With increasing grades of esophagitis all parameters departed from normality, with significant differences between median values of the different parameters (to the exception of reflux episodes) when comparing patients with low-grade esophagitis (O/I) and high-grade esophagitis (II/III/IV). There is an excellent correlation between severity of esophagitis and % of time to acid exposure (Spearman's correlation coefficient). Only 5% of the patients with esophagitis presented normal pH-metry values and corresponded to esophagitis grade O/I. No patient had only a night reflux pattern, but 10% of our patients had only a day reflux pattern, the mixed pattern being the most frequent one (85%). The fact that 82% of our patients with microscopical esophagitis had a pathological pH-metry recommends the use this method in patients with clinical reflux symptoms and with normal endoscopy. PMID:8129988

  20. A New Pathologic Assessment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: The Squamo-Oxyntic Gap.

    PubMed

    Chandrasoma, Parakrama; DeMeester, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is delayed by the lack of uniform histopathologic criteria for diagnosis. The only practical value of pathology is the assessment of columnar lined esophagus (CLO). As a result, GORD is treated with acid suppressive drug therapy until there is a failure to control symptoms and/or advanced adenocarcinoma develops. The reasons why there is a failure of pathologic diagnosis are two false dogmas that result in two widely believed fundamental errors. These are the belief that cardiac epithelium normally lines the proximal stomach (1) and that the gastroesophageal junction (GOJ) is defined by the proximal limit of rugal folds (2). When these false dogmas are eradicated by existing powerful evidence, the pathology of GERD falls into the following stages, all defined by histology: (a) The normal state where the esophageal squamous epithelium transitions at the GOJ to gastric oxyntic epithelium with no intervening cardiac epithelium; (b) cardiac metaplasia of the squamous epithelium due to exposure to gastric juice results in cephalad movement of the squamo-columnar junction (SCJ). This creates the squamo-oxyntic gap and the dilated distal esophagus, which is distal to the endoscopic GOJ. The length of the squamo-oxyntic gap in the dilated distal esophagus is concordant with the shortening of the abdominal segment of the lower esophageal sphincter (LOS); (c) in the early stages, the gap is <5 mm and the LOS retains its competence. Reflux is uncommon and patients are asymptomatic; (d) the squamo-oxyntic gap increases in length, concordant with the amount of shortening of the LOS, which becomes increasingly incompetent. At a gap length of 5-15 mm, reflux is sufficient to cause symptoms, but in most patients, symptoms are controllable and the patients are normal at endoscopy. The gap is entirely within the dilated distal esophagus, which is mistaken by present criteria for proximal stomach. (e) The last stage of GORD is when

  1. Vesicoureteral reflux in young children: a study of radiometric thermometry as detection modality using an ex vivo porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Svein; Klemetsen, Øystein; Birkelund, Yngve

    2012-09-01

    Microwave radiometry is evaluated for renal thermometry tailored to detect the pediatric condition of vesicoureteral urine reflux (VUR) from the bladder through the ureter into the kidney. Prior to a potential reflux event, the urine is heated within the bladder by an external body contacting a hyperthermia applicator to generate a fluidic contrast temperature relative to normal body temperature. A single band, miniaturized radiometer (operating at 3.5 GHz) is connected to an electromagnetic-interference-shielded and suction-coupled elliptical antenna to receive thermal radiation from an ex vivo porcine phantom model. Brightness (radiometric) and fiberoptic temperature data are recorded for varying urine phantom reflux volumes (20-40 mL) and contrast temperatures ranging from 2 to 10 °C within the kidney phantom. The kidney phantom itself is located at 40 mm depth (skin-to-kidney center distance) and surrounded by the porcine phantom. Radiometric step responses to injection of urine simulant by a syringe are shown to be highly correlated with in situ kidney temperatures measured by fiberoptic probes. Statistically, the performance of the VUR detecting scheme is evaluated by error probabilities of making a wrong decision. Laboratory testing of the radiometric system supports the feasibility of passive non-invasive kidney thermometry for the detection of VUR classified within the two highest grades

  2. Vesicoureteral reflux in young children: a study of radiometric thermometry as detection modality using an ex vivo porcine model.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Svein; Klemetsen, Øystein; Birkelund, Yngve

    2012-09-01

    Microwave radiometry is evaluated for renal thermometry tailored to detect the pediatric condition of vesicoureteral urine reflux (VUR) from the bladder through the ureter into the kidney. Prior to a potential reflux event, the urine is heated within the bladder by an external body contacting a hyperthermia applicator to generate a fluidic contrast temperature relative to normal body temperature. A single band, miniaturized radiometer (operating at 3.5 GHz) is connected to an electromagnetic-interference-shielded and suction-coupled elliptical antenna to receive thermal radiation from an ex vivo porcine phantom model. Brightness (radiometric) and fiberoptic temperature data are recorded for varying urine phantom reflux volumes (20-40 mL) and contrast temperatures ranging from 2 to 10 °C within the kidney phantom. The kidney phantom itself is located at 40 mm depth (skin-to-kidney center distance) and surrounded by the porcine phantom. Radiometric step responses to injection of urine simulant by a syringe are shown to be highly correlated with in situ kidney temperatures measured by fiberoptic probes. Statistically, the performance of the VUR detecting scheme is evaluated by error probabilities of making a wrong decision. Laboratory testing of the radiometric system supports the feasibility of passive non-invasive kidney thermometry for the detection of VUR classified within the two highest grades. PMID:22892477

  3. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Refractory to Proton Pump Inhibitors and the Effects of Switching to 20 mg Esomeprazole on Reflux Symptoms and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, Fuminao; Hashiguchi, Keiichi; Onitsuka, Yasunori; Tanigawa, Ken; Minami, Hitomi; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Shiozawa, Ken; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Taura, Naota; Ohnita, Ken; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Isomoto, Hajime; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may deteriorate patient quality of life (QOL) despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Material/Methods Nineteen Japanese institutions were surveyed to determine the clinical characteristics and QOL of patients with refractory GERD. Those patients treated with a conventional PPI were switched to 20 mg esomeprazole for 4 weeks. Symptoms and QOL were assessed using Global Overall Symptom and Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) questionnaires at baseline and at 2 and/or 4 weeks of esomeprazole treatment. Results Of 120 patients who completed the survey, 58 (48.3%) had refractory GERD. Of these, 69.0% were aged ≥65 years, 79.3% were prescribed a PPI at a standard or high dose, and 22.4% were prescribed a PPI together with another drug. After switching to esomeprazole, patients reported significant improvements in heartburn, acid regurgitation, and excessive belching at 2 weeks using a symptom diary, as well as the total score, reflux, abdominal pain, and indigestion, which were assessed using the GSRS at 4 weeks. Conclusions About half of Japanese patients with GERD may be refractory to conventional PPIs. Their reflux-related symptoms are often severe and may impair QOL. Switching to esomeprazole could be used to improve their symptoms and QOL. PMID:26719012

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in the Greek general population: prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Spantideas, Nikolaos; Drosou, Eirini; Bougea, Anastasia; Assimakopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Population-based data regarding the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Greece are very poor. This study estimated the prevalence of GERD symptoms and their risk factors in the Greek adult population. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was answered by a randomly selected population of 340 subjects. The question regarding “heartburn, chest pain, indigestion, or stomach acid coming up” as included in the Reflux Symptom Index was used for prevalence assessment. Results The monthly prevalence of GERD symptoms was found to be 52.0% in the Greek general population, with no statistically significant difference between the two sexes (P>0.05). The age group of 65–79 years showed a higher prevalence rate of GERD. Symptom severity was found to be mild (59.3%) or moderate (27.1%). The number of cigarettes smoked daily (but not smoking duration) as well as the number of alcoholic drinks consumed daily (but not the duration of alcohol drinking) were found to be related to GERD symptoms. No reported concomitant disease or medication was found to be related with GERD symptoms. Conclusion The prevalence of GERD symptoms in the Greek general population was found to be 52.0%. Tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking but not concomitant disease or medications were found to be related with GERD symptoms. PMID:27382324

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux demonstrated by hepatobiliary imaging in scleroderma

    SciTech Connect

    Sawaf, N.W.; Orzel, J.A.; Weiland, F.L.

    1987-03-01

    Radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging was performed on a patient with a longstanding history of scleroderma who presented with abdominal pain suggestive of biliary disease. Cystic duct patency was documented after 10 min with tracer accumulation in the second portion of the duodenum which failed to progress consistent with the duodenal hypomotility of scleroderma. The patient was given intravenous Kinevac resulting in gastroesophageal reflux of radionuclide.

  6. [Severe interstitial lung disease from pathologic gastroesophageal reflux in children].

    PubMed

    Ahrens, P; Weimer, B; Hofmann, D

    1999-07-01

    Interstitial lung diseases comprise a heterogeneous group of pulmonary conditions that cause restrictive lung disease of poor prognosis, especially if growth failure, pulmonary hypertension and fibrosis appears. We report on the case of a girl of 11 years of age who suffered from severe nonallergic asthma in early childhood and who developed severe interstitial pulmonary disease caused by gastro-oesophageal reflux at the age of 8 years. This diagnosis was established by lung biopsy, bronchoalveolar lavage and a high amount of lipid-laden alveolar macrophages, 2-level pH measurement and oesophageal biopsy. Because therapy with oral and inhaled steroids failed and Omeprazol showed benificial effects, hemifundoplication according to THAL was performed. At present the lung function is clearly normal and there is no need of any medicaments. Following the history, we can assume the pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux to be the cause of the disease. It is important to state that there were no typical symptoms at any time pointing to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. The development of pulmonary disease by pathological reflux is very often caused by "silent aspiration". Very typically there are no symptoms such as vomiting, heartburn and pain but only signs of chronic lung disease. PMID:10444954

  7. Gastroesophageal Reflux and Altered Motility in Lung Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Castor, John M; Wood, Richard K.; Muir, Andrew J.; Palmer, Scott M.; Shimpi, Rahul A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lung transplantation has become an effective therapeutic option for selected patients with end stage lung disease. Long-term survival is limited by chronic rejection manifest as bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). The aspiration of gastric contents has been implicated as a causative or additive factor leading to BOS. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and altered foregut motility are common both before and after lung transplantation. Further, the normal defense mechanisms against reflux are impaired in the allograft. Recent studies using biomarkers of aspiration have added to previous association studies to provide a growing body of evidence supporting the link between rejection and GER. Further, the addition of high-resolution manometry (HRM) and impedance technology to characterize bolus transit and the presence and extent of reflux regardless of pH might better identify at-risk patients. Although additional prospective studies are needed, fundoplication appears useful in the prevention or treatment of post-transplant BOS. Purpose This review will highlight the existing literature on the relationship of gastroesophageal reflux and altered motility to lung transplant rejection, particularly BOS. The article will conclude with a discussion of the evaluation and management of patients undergoing lung transplantation at our center. PMID:20507544

  8. Gastric-jejunum pouch side-to-end anastomosis: a novel and safe operation of gastrojejunostomy for preventing reflux gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yongkuan; Gong, Jiaqing; Gan, Wei; Zhou, Jun; Huang, Ling; Wang, Yonghua; Luo, Guode; Song, Yaning

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to introduce a simple operation method of gastrojejunostomy for preventing reflux esophagitis --gastric-jejunum pouch side-to-end anastomosis. Methods: Based on Billroth II anastomosis (Billroth II) method, we designed a new technique of anastomosis between stomach wall and jejunal pouch. The technique was named gastric-jejunum pouch side-end anastomosis. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data which was collected from March 2012 to February 2014. Among all the recruited 66 patients, 51 gastric cancer patients and 7 pyloric obstruction patients were implemented with hand-assisted laparoscopic distal gastrectomy plus D2 lymph node dissection. The remaining 8 patients were malignant pyloric obstruction; they were treated with small exploratory incision on the upper abdomen and distal gastric partial transection. All the patients were treated with gastric-jejunum pouch side-to-end anastomosis. Results: The surgical incision was small, the operative time was short, their bleeding volume was little, the recovery time of the bowel function and hospitalization time was relatively short. Postoperatively, there was neither mortality and gastroparesis, nor anastomotic leakage and jejunal pouch leakage. Minor postoperative complications were detected followed up for 12 months, no acid reflux and reflux esophagitis symptoms was reported. Conclusions: Gastric -jejunum pouch side-to-end anastomosis is a simple operation technique with highly surgical safety. PMID:26131135

  9. Betulinic acid, a bioactive pentacyclic triterpenoid, inhibits skeletal-related events induced by breast cancer bone metastases and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Se Young; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Ki Rim; Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lee, Chang Ki; Park, Kwang-Kyun Chung, Won-Yoon

    2014-03-01

    Many breast cancer patients experience bone metastases and suffer skeletal complications. The present study provides evidence on the protective and therapeutic potential of betulinic acid on cancer-associated bone diseases. Betulinic acid is a naturally occurring triterpenoid with the beneficial activity to limit the progression and severity of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, and obesity. We first investigated its effect on breast cancer cells, osteoblastic cells, and osteoclasts in the vicious cycle of osteolytic bone metastasis. Betulinic acid reduced cell viability and the production of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), a major osteolytic factor, in MDA-MB-231 human metastatic breast cancer cells stimulated with or without tumor growth factor-β. Betulinic acid blocked an increase in the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin ratio by downregulating RANKL protein expression in PTHrP-treated human osteoblastic cells. In addition, betulinic acid inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in murine bone marrow macrophages and decreased the production of resorbed area in plates with a bone biomimetic synthetic surface by suppressing the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and cathepsin K in RANKL-induced osteoclasts. Furthermore, oral administration of betulinic acid inhibited bone loss in mice intra-tibially inoculated with breast cancer cells and in ovariectomized mice causing estrogen deprivation, as supported by the restored bone morphometric parameters and serum bone turnover markers. Taken together, these findings suggest that betulinic acid may have the potential to prevent bone loss in patients with bone metastases and cancer treatment-induced estrogen deficiency. - Highlights: • Betulinic acid reduced PTHrP production in human metastatic breast cancer cells. • Betulinic acid blocked RANKL/OPG ratio in PTHrP-stimulated human osteoblastic cells. • Betulinic

  10. Definition of nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux for studies on respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Emilsson, Össur Ingi; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Ólafsson, Ísleifur; Cook, Elizabeth; Júlíusson, Sigurður; Berg, Sören; Nordang, Leif; Björnsson, Einar Stefán; Guðlaugsdóttir, Sunna; Guðmundsdóttir, Anna Soffía; Janson, Christer; Gislason, Thorarinn

    2016-05-01

    Objective Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) has been associated with respiratory diseases. Our aim was to study a questionnaire method to identify nGER subjects with respiratory involvement in a general population. Material and methods A subgroup of Icelandic participants in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III (ECRHS III) reporting symptoms of nGER (n  =  48) as well as age and gender paired controls (n  =  42) were studied further by a structured interview, questionnaires, laryngeal fibrescopy, and exhaled breath condensate. A subgroup underwent 24-h oesophageal pH impedance (24-h MII-pH) measurements. Symptoms of nGER were assessed with a modified version of the reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ), where symptoms were divided into daytime and nocturnal. A report of nGER both at baseline and at follow-up was defined as persistent nGER. Results Participants reporting persistent nGER had significantly more signs of laryngopharyngeal reflux according to the reflux finding score than those without nGER (Mean ± SD: 5.1 ± 2.3 vs. 3.9 ± 2.2, p  =  0.02). Of the 16 persistent nGER subjects that underwent 24-h MII-pH, 11 had abnormal gastroesophageal reflux, but none of three control subjects (69% vs. 0%). Pepsin was more commonly found in exhaled breath condensate in the nGER group (67% vs. 45%, p  =  0.04). Conclusions Participants with nGER symptoms at least once a month, reported on two occasions, had a high level of positive 24-h MII-pH measurements, laryngeal inflammation and pepsin in exhaled breath condensate. This nGER definition identified a representable group for studies on nGER and respiratory diseases in a general population. PMID:26825677

  11. Anti-reflux mucosectomy for gastroesophageal reflux disease in the absence of hiatus hernia: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Haruhiro; Ito, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Haruo; Sato, Chiaki; Sato, Hiroki; Phalanusitthepha, Chainarong; Hayee, Bu’Hussain; Eleftheriadis, Nikolas; Kudo, Shin-ei

    2014-01-01

    Background In our previous case report of circumferential mucosal resection for short-segment Barrett’s esophagus with high-grade dysplasia, symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) were significantly improved. This observation suggests that anti-reflux mucosectomy (ARMS) could represent an effective anti-reflux procedure, with the advantage that no artificial devices or prostheses would be left in situ. Methods In this pilot study, 10 patients with treatment-refractory GERD received ARMS, 2 of whom circumferential, and the remaining 8 crescentic. Results Key symptoms of GERD improved significantly after ARMS. In the DeMeester score, mean heartburn score decreased from 2.7 to 0.3 (P=0.0011), regurgitation score from 2.5 to 0.3 (P=0.0022), and total score from 5.2 to 0.67 (P=0.0011). At endoscopic examination, the flap valve grade decreased from 3.2 to 1.2 (P=0.0152). In 24-h esophageal pH monitoring the fraction of time at pH <4 improved from 29.1% to 3.1% (P=0.1). Fraction time absorbance more than >0.14 of bile reflux was controlled from 52% to 4% (P=0.05). In 2 cases of total circumferential resection, repeat balloon dilation was necessary to control stenosis. In all cases, proton pump inhibitor prescription could be discontinued with no ill effects. Conclusion This initial case series demonstrated the potential anti-reflux effect of ARMS, with a crescentic mucosal resection appearing adequate. Further longitudinal study of patients without sliding hiatus hernia will be required to establish ARMS as an effective technique to control GERD in this setting. PMID:25330784

  12. Characterization of major ripening events during softening in grape: turgor, sugar accumulation, abscisic acid metabolism, colour development, and their relationship with growth

    PubMed Central

    Castellarin, Simone D.; Gambetta, Gregory A.; Wada, Hiroshi; Krasnow, Mark N.; Cramer, Grant R.; Peterlunger, Enrico; Shackel, Kenneth A.; Matthews, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Along with sugar accumulation and colour development, softening is an important physiological change during the onset of ripening in fruits. In this work, we investigated the relationships among major events during softening in grape (Vitis vinifera L.) by quantifying elasticity in individual berries. In addition, we delayed softening and inhibited sugar accumulation using a mechanical growth-preventing treatment in order to identify processes that are sugar and/or growth dependent. Ripening processes commenced on various days after anthesis, but always at similarly low elasticity and turgor. Much of the softening occurred in the absence of other changes in berry physiology investigated here. Several genes encoding key cell wall-modifying enzymes were not up-regulated until softening was largely completed, suggesting softening may result primarily from decreases in turgor. Similarly, there was no decrease in solute potential, increase in sugar concentration, or colour development until elasticity and turgor were near minimum values, and these processes were inhibited when berry growth was prevented. Increases in abscisic acid occurred early during softening and in the absence of significant expression of the V. vinifera 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenases. However, these increases were coincident with decreases in the abscisic acid catabolite diphasic acid, indicating that initial increases in abscisic acid may result from decreases in catabolism and/or exogenous import. These data suggest that softening, decreases in turgor, and increases in abscisic acid represent some of the earliest events during the onset of ripening. Later, physical growth, further increases in abscisic acid, and the accumulation of sugar are integral for colour development. PMID:26590311

  13. Characterization of major ripening events during softening in grape: turgor, sugar accumulation, abscisic acid metabolism, colour development, and their relationship with growth.

    PubMed

    Castellarin, Simone D; Gambetta, Gregory A; Wada, Hiroshi; Krasnow, Mark N; Cramer, Grant R; Peterlunger, Enrico; Shackel, Kenneth A; Matthews, Mark A

    2016-02-01

    Along with sugar accumulation and colour development, softening is an important physiological change during the onset of ripening in fruits. In this work, we investigated the relationships among major events during softening in grape (Vitis vinifera L.) by quantifying elasticity in individual berries. In addition, we delayed softening and inhibited sugar accumulation using a mechanical growth-preventing treatment in order to identify processes that are sugar and/or growth dependent. Ripening processes commenced on various days after anthesis, but always at similarly low elasticity and turgor. Much of the softening occurred in the absence of other changes in berry physiology investigated here. Several genes encoding key cell wall-modifying enzymes were not up-regulated until softening was largely completed, suggesting softening may result primarily from decreases in turgor. Similarly, there was no decrease in solute potential, increase in sugar concentration, or colour development until elasticity and turgor were near minimum values, and these processes were inhibited when berry growth was prevented. Increases in abscisic acid occurred early during softening and in the absence of significant expression of the V. vinifera 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenases. However, these increases were coincident with decreases in the abscisic acid catabolite diphasic acid, indicating that initial increases in abscisic acid may result from decreases in catabolism and/or exogenous import. These data suggest that softening, decreases in turgor, and increases in abscisic acid represent some of the earliest events during the onset of ripening. Later, physical growth, further increases in abscisic acid, and the accumulation of sugar are integral for colour development. PMID:26590311

  14. Myrtus communis L. Freeze-Dried Aqueous Extract Versus Omeprazol in Gastrointestinal Reflux Disease: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Zohalinezhad, Mohammad E; Hosseini-Asl, Mohammad Kazem; Akrami, Rahimeh; Nimrouzi, Majid; Salehi, Alireza; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2016-01-01

    The current work assessed a pharmaceutical dosage form of Myrtus communis L. (myrtle) in reflux disease compared with omeprazol via a 6-week double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial. Forty-five participants were assigned randomly to 3 groups as A (myrtle berries freeze-dried aqueous extract, 1000 mg/d), B (omeprazol capsules, 20 mg/d), and C (A and B). The assessment at the beginning and the end of the study was done by using a standardized questionnaire of frequency scale for the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (FSSG). In all groups, both reflux and dyspeptic scores significantly decreased in comparison with the respective baselines. Concerning each group, significant changes were found in FSSG, dysmotility-like symptoms and acid reflux related scores. No significant differences were observed between all groups in final FSSG total scores (FSSG2). Further studies with more precise design and larger sample size may lead to a better outcome to suggest the preparation as an alternative intervention. PMID:26045552

  15. [Esophageal reflux disease--comments on confusion in terminology, diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Lukás, K; Hep, A

    1999-05-01

    Oesophageal reflux disease is a serious condition with an impact on the entire population. The provoking factor of the disease is gastroesophageal reflux which itself is not a disease but a normal physiological process. Reflux is described as pathological it is damages the oesophagus and respiratory tract. Oesophageal reflux disease develpomeps when antiferlux mechanisms fail, it is the consequence of impaired motility where the crucial role is played by dysfunction of the lower oesophageal sphincter. The most frequent consequence and manifestation of gastrooesophageal reflux is reflux oesophagitis which may be macroscopically obvious (endoscopically positive) or detectable only on histological examination (endoscopically negative--microscopic). Symptoms of reflux disease do not correlate with the severity of the disease. Some cases of roflux eosophagitis may be symptom-free. The diagnosis of oesophageal reflux disease is based in particular on an aimed case-history, endoscopy, histology and pH-metry. An open problem remains the relationship of reflux disease and the presence of Helicobacter pylori infection. In tratment either selective treatment (one drug) is used or graded (upward or downward) treatment. The upward therapeutic strategy (strating treatment with proton pump inhibitors) is as a rule economically more effective than the traditional downward strategy (strating treatment with less intensely acting drugs). Tretment is of long-term (maintenance treatment) which may be medicamentous or surgical. In oesophageal reflux disease there still remain controversial areas which must be elcudated as its incidence is rising and it is considered a disease of the 21st century. PMID:15641256

  16. Temporal sequence of events during the initiation process in Escherichia coli deoxyribonucleic acid replication: roles of the dnaA and dnaC gene products and ribonucleic acid polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Zyskind, J W; Deen, L T; Smith, D W

    1977-01-01

    Three thermosensitive deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) initiation mutants of Escherichia coli exposed to the restrictive temperature for one to two generations were examined for the ability to reinitiate DNA replication after returning to the permissive temperature in the presence of rifampin, chloramphenicol, or nalidixic acid. Reinitiation in the dnaA mutant was inhibited by rifampin but not by chloramphenicol, whereas renitiation was not inhibited by rifampin but not by chloramphenicol, whereas reinitiation was not inhibited in two dnaC mutants by either rifampin or chloramphenicol. To observe the rifampin inhibition, the antibiotic must be added at least 10 min before return to the permissive temperature. The rifampin inhibition of reinitiation was not observed when a rifampin-resistant ribonucleic acid ((RNA) polymerase gene was introduced into the dnaA mutant, demonstrating that RNA polymerase synthesizes one or more RNA species required for the initation of DNA replication (origin-RNA). Reinitiation at 30 degrees C was not inhibited by streptolydigin in a stretolydigin-sensitive dnaA muntant. Incubation in the presence of nalidixic acid prevented subsequent reinitiation in the dnaC28 mutant but did not inhibit reinitiation in the dnaA5 muntant. These results demonstrate that the dnaA gene product acts before or during the synthesis of an origin-RNA, RNA polymerase synthesizes this origin RNA, and the dnaC gene product is involved in a step after this RNA synthesis event. Furthermore, these results suggest that the dnaC gene product is involved in the first deoxyribounucleotide polymerization event wheareas the dnaA gene product acts prior to this event. A model is presented describing the temporal sequence of events that occur during initiation of a round of DNA replication, based on results in this and the accompanying paper. PMID:321429

  17. A Mechanistic Study of a-Amino Acid-N-Carboxy Anhydride Polymerization: Comparing Initiation and Termination Events in High Vacuum and Traditional Polymerization Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Pickel, Deanna L; Politakos, Nikolaos; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Messman, Jamie M

    2009-01-01

    High-vacuum polymerization of -amino acid-N-carboxyanhydride (NCAs) affords polymers with controlled molecular weights and narrow polydispersities, however a comprehensive study of the end-group composition of the resulting poly(amino acid)s has not yet been performed. This reveals crucial information, as the end-groups are indicative of both the polymerization mechanism (i.e., initiation event) as well as the termination pathways. To this end, poly(O-benzyl-L-tyrosine) initiated by 1,6-diaminohexane was synthesized and subsequently characterized by MALDI-TOF MS, NALDI -TOF MS and 13C NMR spectroscopy to ascertain the end-group structure. Polymers were prepared by both high vacuum and glove box techniques in DMF/THF. Preparation of poly(O-benzyl-L-tyrosine) by high vacuum techniques yielded a polymer initiated exclusively by the normal amine mechanism, and termination by reaction with DMF was observed. In contrast, polymers prepared in the glove box were initiated by the normal amine and activated monomer mechanisms, and several termination products are evident. To our knowledge, this is the first rigorous and comparative analysis of the end-group structure, and it demonstrates the advantage of high vacuum techniques for polymerization of NCAs for the preparation of well-defined poly(amino acid)s with end-group fidelity.

  18. Double-blind crossover study of ranitidine and ebrotidine in gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Sito, E; Thor, P J; M[aczka, M; Lorens, K; Konturek, S J; Maj, A

    1993-09-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is multifactorial disorder in which acid exposure has a central role in the mucosal damage, and the mainstay of medical treatment is the suppression of gastric acid secretion justifying the use of H2 receptors antagonists. In our study we compared the effects of ranitidine and ebrotidine, a novel H2 antagonist with gastroprotective properties, on the motor, pH and endoscopic aspects of GERD in randomized cross-over trial in humans. Twenty patients with endoscopic evidence of erosive esophagitis were included in the study. Esophageal manometry and 24-hour pH-metry were done with the use Synectics (Sweden) systems. The same examinations were repeated after 20 days period of treatment with either ranitidine or ebrotidine, given in single dose 300 and 800 mg (nocte) respectively. The pressure within the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in the untreated and treated with ebrotidine or ranitidine patients remained lowered. Patients with GERD showed increase in duration and decrease in amplitude and propagation of peristaltic waves in the esophageal body which were not improved after treatment. Complete healing after 40 days of treatment was comparable with ebrotidine and ranitidine and averaged about 40%. The pH-metry showed improvement in treated patients in the reflux frequency and time pH below 4, ranitidine being more effective than ebrotidine. It can be concluded that GERD patients showed weaker primary peristalsis unrelated to LES pressure and treatment. Treatment with ebrotidine or ranitidine reduced significantly the endoscopic and self-assessment score, ebrotidine and ranitidine being equally effective in healing of esophageal mucosal lesions. PMID:8241527

  19. [Differencial diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease -- eosinophilic esophagitis: case report].

    PubMed

    Franzius, M; Stolte, M; Porschen, R

    2005-04-01

    We report on a 22-year-old man with dysphagia and repeated bolus impaction in the esophagus for 10 years. Bolus impactions were frequently mobilised using an endoscope. At endoscopy, esophagitis IV degrees was described. After treatment with omeprazol there was no improvement. The patient was submitted to our hospital for fundoplication. pH-metry demonstrated an increased reflux. At endoscopy of the esophagus, we found red stripes which did not show the typical appearance of erosions. Manometry and X-ray films of the esophagus did not reveal any pathological findings. In combination with anamnesis, symptoms, and endoscopy, the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis was documented by histology. After administration of oral corticosteroids a rapid improvement of the clinical symptoms was observed. The diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis should be kept in mind in patients with chronic symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux persisting despite medical therapy, pathological pH-metry and repeated bolus impactions. PMID:15830305

  20. Hot electrons transverse refluxing in ultraintense laser-solid interactions.

    PubMed

    Buffechoux, S; Psikal, J; Nakatsutsumi, M; Romagnani, L; Andreev, A; Zeil, K; Amin, M; Antici, P; Burris-Mog, T; Compant-La-Fontaine, A; d'Humières, E; Fourmaux, S; Gaillard, S; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Kraft, S; Mancic, A; Plaisir, C; Sarri, G; Tarisien, M; Toncian, T; Schramm, U; Tampo, M; Audebert, P; Willi, O; Cowan, T E; Pépin, H; Tikhonchuk, V; Borghesi, M; Fuchs, J

    2010-07-01

    We have analyzed the coupling of ultraintense lasers (at ∼2×10{19}  W/cm{2}) with solid foils of limited transverse extent (∼10  s of μm) by monitoring the electrons and ions emitted from the target. We observe that reducing the target surface area allows electrons at the target surface to be reflected from the target edges during or shortly after the laser pulse. This transverse refluxing can maintain a hotter, denser and more homogeneous electron sheath around the target for a longer time. Consequently, when transverse refluxing takes places within the acceleration time of associated ions, we observe increased maximum proton energies (up to threefold), increased laser-to-ion conversion efficiency (up to a factor 30), and reduced divergence which bodes well for a number of applications. PMID:20867457

  1. Extra-Esophageal Pepsin from Stomach Refluxate Promoted Tonsil Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Jeong, Han-Sin; Kim, Kyung Mi; Lee, Ye Jin; Jung, Myeong Hee; Park, Jung Je; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux is associated with numerous pathologic conditions of the upper aerodigestive tract. Gastric pepsin within reflux contributes to immunologic reactions in the tonsil. In this study, we aimed to find the relationships between pepsin and tonsillar hypertrophy. Methods and finding We explored the notion whether tonsillar hypertrophy was due to pepsin-mediated gastric reflux in tonsil hypertrophy. Fifty-four children with tonsil hypertrophy and 30 adults with tonsillitis were recruited before surgical treatment. Blood and tonsil tissues from each patient were harvested for analysis of changes in lymphocyte and macrophage numbers coupled with histological and biochemical analysis. Pepsin was expressed at different levels in tonsil tissues from each tonsillar hypertrophy. Pepsin-positive cells were found in the crypt epithelium, surrounding the lymphoid follicle with developing fibrosis, and also surrounding the lymphoid follicle that faced the crypt. And also, pepsin staining was well correlated with damaged tonsillar squamous epithelium and TGF-β1 and iNOS expression in the tonsil section. In addition, pepsin and TGF-β1-positive cells were co-localized with CD68-positive cells in the crypt and surrounding germinal centers. In comparison of macrophage responsiveness to pepsin, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were noticeably larger in the presence of activated pepsin in the child group. Furthermore, CD11c and CD163-positive cells were significantly increased by activated pepsin. However, this was not seen for the culture of PBMNCs from the adult group. Conclusions The lymphocytes and monocytes are in a highly proliferative state in the tonsillar hypertrophy and associated with increased expression of pro-inflammatory factors as a result of exposure to stomach reflux pepsin. PMID:27058240

  2. Recent reflux receiver developments under the US DOE program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andraka, C. E.; Diver, R. B.; Moreno, J. B.; Moss, T. A.; Adkins, D. R.

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Thermal Program, through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), is cooperating with industry to commercialize dish-Stirling technology. Sandia and the DOE have actively encouraged the use of liquid metal reflux receivers in these systems to improve efficiency and lower the levelized cost of electricity. The reflux receiver uses two-phase heat transfer as a 'thermal transformer' to transfer heat from a parabolic tracking-concentrator to the heater heads of the Stirling engine. The two-phase system leads to a higher available input temperature, lower thermal stresses, longer life, and independent design of the absorber and engine sections. Two embodiments of reflux receivers have been investigated: Pool boilers and heat pipes. Several pool-boiler reflux receivers have been successfully demonstrated on sun at up to 64 kWt throughput at SNL. In addition, a bench-scale device was operated for 7500 hours to investigate materials compatibility and boiling stability. Significant progress has also been made on heat pipe receiver technology. Sintered metal wick heat pipes have been investigated extensively for application to 7.5 kWe and 25 kWe systems. One test article has amassed over 1800 hours of on-sun operation. Another was limit tested at Sandia to 65 kWt throughput. These devices incorporate a nickel-powder thick wick structure with condensate return directly to the wick surface. Circumferential tubular arteries are optionally employed to improve the operating margin. In addition, DOE has begun a development program for advanced wick structures capable of supporting the Utility Scale Joint Venture Program, requiring up to 100 kWt throughput. Promising technologies include a brazed stainless steel powdered metal wick and a stainless steel metal felt wick. Bench-scale testing has been encouraging, and on-sun testing is expected this fall. Prototype gas-fired hybrid solar receivers have also been demonstrated.

  3. Role of Sleep Apnea and Gastroesophageal Reflux in Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Linda

    2016-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome are conditions that practitioners have been encouraged to evaluate and treat as part of a comprehensive approach to achieving asthma control. In this review, the author looks at the evidence linking these two conditions as factors that may impact difficult-to-control asthma and looks critically at the evidence suggesting that evaluation and treatment of these conditions when present impacts asthma control. PMID:27401619

  4. Design and testing of Ultralite Fabric Reflux Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Pauley, K.A.; Antoniak, Z.I.; King, L.L.; Hollenberg, G.W. )

    1993-01-10

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of Ultralite Tubes intended to provide thermal management for habitat modules in a lunar colony. The Ultralite Fabric Reflux Tubes, under this phase of development, are constructed of thin-walled copper liners overwrapped with aluminoborosilicate fabric. These devices were constructed and tested in air at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and subsequently taken to the NASA Johnson Space Center for thermal vacuum experimentation.

  5. Design and minimum reflux calculations for multicomponent reactive distillation columns

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, D.; Doherty, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    A new set of transformed composition variables is introduced to simplify the design equations for single-feed, multicomponent reactive distillation columns. Based on these equations, a general method of calculating minimum reflux ratios for reactive distillation columns is presented. The new composition variables are also used to derive simple relationships between the dependent design variables, which are not evident when the design equations are written in terms of mole fractions.

  6. Recent reflux receiver developments under the US DOE program

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, C.E.; Diver, R.B.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Adkins, D.R.

    1994-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Thermal Program, through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), is cooperating with industry to commercialize dish-Stirling technology. Sandia and the DOE have actively encouraged the use of liquid metal reflux receivers in these systems to improve efficiency and lower the levelized cost of electricity. The reflux receiver uses two-phase heat transfer as a {open_quotes}thermal transformer{close_quotes} to transfer heat from a parabolic tracking-concentrator to the heater heads of the Stirling engine. The two-phase system leads to a higher available input temperature, lower thermal stresses, longer life, and independent design of the absorber and engine sections. Two embodiments of reflux receivers have been investigated: Pool boilers and heat pipes. Several pool-boiler reflux receivers have been successfully demonstrated on sun at up to 64 kWt throughput at SNL. In addition, a bench-scale device was operated for 7500 hours to investigate materials compatibility and boiling stability. Significant progress has also been made on heat pipe receiver technology. Sintered metal wick heat pipes have been investigated extensively for application to 7.5 kWe and 25 kWe systems. One test article has a massed over 1800 hours of on-sun operation. Another was limit tested at Sandia to 65 kWt throughput. These devices incorporate a nickel-powder thick wick structure with condensate return directly to the wick surface. Circumferential tubular arteries are optionally employed to improve the operating margin. In addition, DOE has begun a development program for advanced wick structures capable of supporting the Utility Scale Joint Venture Program, requiring up to 100 kWt throughput. Promising technologies include a brazed stainless steel powdered metal wick and a stainless steel metal felt wick. Bench-scale testing has been encouraging, and on-sun testing is expected this fall. Prototype gas-fired hybrid solar receivers have also been.

  7. Integrative Treatment of Reflux and Functional Dyspepsia in Children

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Ann Ming; Golianu, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and functional dyspepsia (FD) are common problems in the pediatric population, with up to 7% of school-age children and up to 8% of adolescents suffering from epigastric pain, heartburn, and regurgitation. Reflux is defined as the passage of stomach contents into the esophagus, while GERD refers to reflux symptoms that are associated with symptoms or complications—such as pain, asthma, aspiration pneumonia, or chronic cough. FD, as defined by the Rome III classification, is a persistent upper abdominal pain or discomfort, not related to bowel movements, and without any organic cause, that is present for at least two months prior to diagnosis. Endoscopic examination is typically negative in FD, whereas patients with GERD may have evidence of esophagitis or gastritis either grossly or microscopically. Up to 70% of children with dyspepsia exhibit delayed gastric emptying. Treatment of GERD and FD requires an integrative approach that may include pharmacologic therapy, treating concurrent constipation, botanicals, mind body techniques, improving sleep hygiene, increasing physical activity, and traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture. PMID:27417471

  8. Tower microneedle minimizes vitreal reflux in intravitreal injection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Yeol; You, Yong Sung; Lee, Sung Ho; Jung, Hyungil

    2013-10-01

    Intravitreal injection is widely used for easy control of drug levels in posterior segment of the eye by injecting the drug directly with hypodermic needles. Patients, however, often experience complications from intravitreal injection due to repeated injections, increased intraocular pressure, and infection. In addition, injected drug reflux after intravitreal injection makes it challenging to maintain predetermined drug dose due to the drug loss through backward effusions. Here, we described that the Tower Microneedle can reduce initial reflux and bleb formation due to its smaller outer diameter compared to a traditional hypodermic needle. Furthermore, we use phenylephrine hydrochloride for pupil expansion and demonstrated that Tower Microneedle induced similar pupil expansions using only half the drug volume, in the same period of time, compared to the 31 Gauge hypodermic needle. Consequently, Tower Microneedle achieves the same therapeutic effect in the vitreous body using fewer drugs than a traditional hypodermic needle due to the decreased backward drug effusion. Tower Microneedle described herein holds great promise for intravitreal injection with less reflux and lower drug dosage. PMID:23666517

  9. Frequency of gastroesophageal reflux in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A M; al Karawi, M A; Shariq, S; Mohamed, A E

    1993-10-01

    Twenty-five adult patients with liver cirrhosis, and another 30 patients with no liver disease but referred with symptoms suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux disease were selected at random. Twenty-four hour ambulatory intra-esophageal pH measurement and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were carried out on all patients recruited. Applying the former test, 16 (64%) of the patients with liver cirrhosis have gastroesophageal reflux disease. This figure is comparable with the 70% (21/30) rate recorded in the group of dyspeptic patients clinically thought to have the disorder. A positive endoscopic diagnosis was much lower at 12% and 23%, respectively. No significant differences were observed among liver disease patients when they were subdivided in accordance with the etiology of liver cirrhosis and the grade of esophageal varices. We conclude that gastroesophageal reflux disease occurs at a high frequency (64%) in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension, irrespective of the etiology of cirrhosis and the grade of esophageal varices. It is therefore considered to be the main cause of esophagitis in these patients, and that it might play a role in initiating a variceal bleeding episode. The latter hypothesis needs further evaluation. PMID:8270239

  10. Impact of obesity treatment on gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abraham; Kim, Aram; Sanossian, Cassandra; Francois, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a frequently encountered disorder. Obesity is an important risk factor for GERD, and there are several pathophysiologic mechanisms linking the two conditions. For obese patients with GERD, much of the treatment effort is focused on weight loss and its consistent benefit to symptoms, while there is a relative lack of evidence regarding outcomes after novel or even standard medical therapy is offered to this population. Physicians are hesitant to recommend operative anti-reflux therapy to obese patients due to the potentially higher risks and decreased efficacy, and these patients instead are often considered for bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgical approaches are broadening, and each technique has emerging evidence regarding its effect on both the risk and outcome of GERD. Furthermore, combined anti-reflux and bariatric options are now being offered to obese patients with GERD. However, currently Roux-en-Y gastric bypass remains the most effective surgical treatment option in this population, due to its consistent benefits in both weight loss and GERD itself. This article aims to review the impact of both conservative and aggressive approaches of obesity treatment on GERD. PMID:26819528

  11. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease: pathophysiology, diagnosis and drug therapy].

    PubMed

    Boermeester, M A; van Sandick, J W; van Lanschot, J J; Boeckxstaens, G E; Tytgat, G N; Obertop, H

    1998-06-01

    The principal mechanism leading to gastro-oesophageal reflux is an increased frequency of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations; other factors are oesophageal hypersensitivity to gastric juice, hiatus hernia, and possible duodenal reflux. Patients with classical symptoms such as heartburn and regurgitation may be treated pharmaceutically combined with life style counselling. If the symptoms have not improved after 6 to 12 weeks, endoscopical examination is performed and, if necessary, 24-hour pH monitoring, barium radiographing and manometry. In the case of atypical symptoms such as dysphagia, laryngitis, asthma and chest pain, there is more reason to pursue diagnostic testing. In patients with dysphagia endoscopy is indicated to exclude malignancy. Drug treatment can be subdivided into antacids, H2 receptor antagonists, cytoprotective agents, prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. In general practice a step-up approach to treatment is preferable, while for specialist treatment a stepdown approach is more (cost-)effective. Drawbacks of medical treatment are considerable frequency of recurrence of oesophagitis, persistence of regurgitation in 'volume refluxers' and controversial data on the possible development of (pre)malignant lesions of oesophagus and stomach. Surgical treatment is a good alternative for patients with persistent severe regurgitation during medical therapy and for young patients who prefer surgery to lifelong medication. Patients with Barrett's oesophagus should undergo regular endoscopic biopsy surveillance. PMID:9752035

  12. Does surgery correct esophageal motor dysfunction in gastroesophageal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.O.; Pope, C.E.; Gannan, R.M.; Allen, F.D.; Velasco, N.; Hill, L.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high incidence of dysphagia in patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) but no evidence of peptic stricture suggests esophageal motor dysfunction. Conventional methods for detecting dysfunction (radiologic and manometric examinations) often fail to detect abnormality in these patients. Radionuclide transit (RT), a new method for detecting esophageal motor dysfunction, was used to prospectively assess function in 29 patients with symptomatic GER uncomplicated by stricture before and three months after antireflux surgery (HILL). The preoperative incidence of dysphagia and esophageal dysfunction was 73% and 52%, respectively. During operation (Hill repair), intraoperative measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure was performed and the LESP raised to levels between 45 and 55 mmHg. The preoperative lower esophageal sphincter pressure was raised from a mean of 8.6 mmHg, to mean of 18.5 mmHg after operation. No patient has free reflux after operation. Postoperative studies on 20 patients demonstrated persistence of all preoperative esophageal dysfunction despite loss of dysphagia. RT has demonstrated a disorder of esophageal motor function in 52% of patients with symptomatic GER that may be responsible for impaired esophageal clearance. This abnormality is not contraindication to surgery. The results indicate that construction of an effective barrier to reflex corrects symptoms of reflux, even in the presence of impaired esophageal transit. Radionuclide transit is a safe noninvasive test for assessment of esophageal function.

  13. Vascular composition data supporting the role of N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the prevention of cardiovascular disease events

    PubMed Central

    Ohwada, Takayuki; Yokokawa, Tetsuro; Kanno, Yuki; Hotsuki, Yu; Sakamoto, Takayuki; Watanabe, Kenichi; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are thought to have protective effects against cardiovascular disease. Here, we report the relationship between serum PUFA concentrations and plaque composition, as evaluated by virtual histology-intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS). Consecutive patients (n=61) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were pre-operatively examined using VH-IVUS to assess the composition of culprit plaques. Gray-scale IVUS and VH-IVUS data of fibrous, fibro-fatty, necrotic core, and dense calcium regions of plaques were estimated at the minimal luminal area sites of culprit lesions. Serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and PUFAs, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and arachidonic acid (AA), were compared between patients with (ACS, n=27) and without acute coronary syndrome (non-ACS, n=34) before PCI. Multiple logistic regression analysis of the data showed that EPA/AA under the median was more highly associated with ACS than hsCRP over the median. In addition, EPA/AA was negatively correlated with the percentage of fibrous plaque regions and EPA/AA and DHA/AA were positively correlated with the percentage of dense calcium regions in plaques. Furthermore, the correlation index of EPA/AA was the most highly (R=0.513) correlated with the percentage of dense calcium regions in plaques. PMID:27222841

  14. Vascular composition data supporting the role of N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the prevention of cardiovascular disease events.

    PubMed

    Ohwada, Takayuki; Yokokawa, Tetsuro; Kanno, Yuki; Hotsuki, Yu; Sakamoto, Takayuki; Watanabe, Kenichi; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-06-01

    N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are thought to have protective effects against cardiovascular disease. Here, we report the relationship between serum PUFA concentrations and plaque composition, as evaluated by virtual histology-intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS). Consecutive patients (n=61) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were pre-operatively examined using VH-IVUS to assess the composition of culprit plaques. Gray-scale IVUS and VH-IVUS data of fibrous, fibro-fatty, necrotic core, and dense calcium regions of plaques were estimated at the minimal luminal area sites of culprit lesions. Serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and PUFAs, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and arachidonic acid (AA), were compared between patients with (ACS, n=27) and without acute coronary syndrome (non-ACS, n=34) before PCI. Multiple logistic regression analysis of the data showed that EPA/AA under the median was more highly associated with ACS than hsCRP over the median. In addition, EPA/AA was negatively correlated with the percentage of fibrous plaque regions and EPA/AA and DHA/AA were positively correlated with the percentage of dense calcium regions in plaques. Furthermore, the correlation index of EPA/AA was the most highly (R=0.513) correlated with the percentage of dense calcium regions in plaques. PMID:27222841

  15. Quality Of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) Questionnaire in Iranian Patients with GERD: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Tofangchiha, S; Razjouyan, H; Nasseri-Moghaddam, S

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) affect health-related quality of life (HRQOL). When a questionnaire is translated into a new language, linguistic validation is necessary, yet insufficient, unless the psychometric characteristics have been verified. The aim of this study is to document the translation and psychometric validation of the Persian translation of the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire. METHODS After translation and cultural adaptation of QOLRAD to Persian, fifty patients with clinical GERD from the Prospective Acid Reflux Study of Iran (PARSI) database who had at least one of the symptoms of acid regurgitation, heartburn, non-cardiac chest pain, or dysphagia for at least four weeks over the past three months completed the QOLRAD and Short Form Health Survey-36 (SF-36). After two weeks, QOLRAD was again completed by the patients. Cronbach alpha and Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) were used to test reliability and Pearson correlation was used to compare the dimensions of SF-36 and QOLRAD. RESULTS The translation was approved by MAPI Research Institute. Fifty patients completed the SF-36 and QOLRAD questionnaires at the first visit. Mean (SD) age of the participants was 38.4 (14.6) years and 68% were females. The internal consistency and reliability of QOLRAD ranged from 0.78–0.92. The test-retest reliability of QOLRAD was from 0.87–0.93. Relevant QOLRAD domains significantly correlated with the majority of SF-36 domains, with the exception of sleep disturbance. CONCLUSION The psychometric characteristics of the Persian translation of QOLRAD were found to be good, with satisfactory reliability and validity. PMID:25197518

  16. Embryology and anatomy of the vesicoureteric junction with special reference to the etiology of vesicoureteral reflux

    PubMed Central

    Radmayr, Christian; Schwentner, Christian; Lunacek, Andreas; Karatzas, Anastasios; Oswald, Josef

    2009-01-01

    Concerning the ureterovesical junction – the region most important for the anti-reflux mechanism – there is still a lot of misunderstanding and misinterpretation with regard to normal fetal development. Data are scarce on possible causes of primary vesicoureteral reflux and on involved mechanisms of the so-called maturation process of refluxing ureteral endings. The ratio of the intravesical ureteral length to the ureteral diameter is obviously lower than assumed so far, as clearly revealed by some studies. Therefore it can be doubted that the length and course of the intravesical ureter is of sole importance in the prevention of reflux. Additionally refluxing intravesical ureteral endings present with dysplasia, atrophy, and architectural derangement of smooth muscle fibers. Besides, a pathologically increased matrix remodeling combined with deprivation of the intramural nerve supply has been confirmed. Consequently, symmetrical narrowing of the very distal ureteral smooth muscle coat creating the active valve mechanism to defend reflux is not achievable. It is apparent that primary congenital vesicoureteral reflux seems to be the result of an abnormality within the ureterovesical junction with an insufficient muscular wrap. Nature is believed to establish much more sophisticated mechanisms than the so-called passive anti-reflux mechanism. Remodeling processes within the ureterovesical junction of refluxing ureteral endings support that maturation itself is nothing else than wound or defect healing and not a restitution of a morphological normal ureterovesical junction. Lacking the nerve supply a restoration of any muscular structure can not be achieved. PMID:21789071

  17. [Gastroesophageal reflux after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. Scintigraphic study in 51 patients].

    PubMed

    Blanchi, A; Bour, B; Tassy, D

    1993-11-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux and pneumonia are complications of enteral feeding. We report our experience of a scintigraphic technique in 51 patients fed by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. The technique was very well tolerated; only one patient (2 percent) had vagal discomfort. A quantitative isotopic study using Tc 99 m labelled enteral infusion demonstrated episodes of reflux in 26 patients (51 percent). The reflux was greater than 6 percent of recording time in 15 patients. All patients with pneumonia had positive scintigraphy. Our study suggests that reflux is frequent after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and constant in patients with pneumonia. PMID:8302778

  18. Japanese apricot improves symptoms of gastrointestinal dysmotility associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Maekita, Takao; Kato, Jun; Enomoto, Shotaro; Yoshida, Takeichi; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Hanamitsu, Toshiko; Inoue, Izumi; Maeda, Yoshimasa; Moribata, Kosaku; Muraki, Yosuke; Shingaki, Naoki; Deguchi, Hisanobu; Ueda, Kazuki; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Tamai, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of Japanese apricot (JA) consumption on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-related symptoms. METHODS: Participants included individuals living in Minabe-cho, a well-known JA-growing region, who received specific medical check-ups by the local community health service in 2010. GERD-related symptoms were examined in 1303 Japanese individuals using a validated questionnaire, the Frequency Scale for Symptoms of GERD (FSSG), which consists of 7 questions associated with acid reflux symptoms and 5 questions asking about gastrointestinal dysmotility symptoms. Each question was answered using a 4-point scale, with higher scores indicating more severe GERD-related symptoms. Subjects were divided into two groups according to their intake of dried and pickled JA: daily intake (≥ 1 JA daily) (392 subjects) and none or occasional intake (< 1 JA daily) (911 subjects). FSSG scores were compared between subjects who consumed JA daily and those who did not. Next, subjects were stratified by age, gender and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) status for subanalyses. RESULTS: Those who ate JA daily were significantly older than those who did not (60.6 ± 10.5 years vs 56.0 ± 11.0 years, P < 0.001). Total FSSG scores were significantly lower in subjects with daily JA intake than in those with none or only occasional intake (2.13 ± 3.14 vs 2.70 ± 3.82, P = 0.005). In particular, subjects who consumed JA daily showed significantly improved FSSG dysmotility scores compared with subjects who did not (1.05 ± 1.58 vs 1.46 ± 2.11, P < 0.001). In contrast, the FSSG reflux score did not differ between subjects with and without daily intake of JA (1.08 ± 1.90 vs 1.24 ± 2.11, P = 0.177). Subanalysis indicated that improvement in dysmotility by JA intake was specifically observed in non-elderly (1.24 ± 1.68 vs 1.62 ± 2.22, P = 0.005) and H. pylori-negative subjects (0.99 ± 1.58 vs 1.57 ± 2.06, P < 0.001). GERD patients (total FSSG score ≥ 8) were

  19. Esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms before and after oral IQoroR training

    PubMed Central

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita; Franzén, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether muscle training with an oral IQoroR screen (IQS) improves esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms. METHODS: A total of 43 adult patients (21 women and 22 men) were consecutively referred to a swallowing center for the treatment and investigation of long-lasting nonstenotic esophageal dysphagia. Hiatal hernia was confirmed by radiologic examination in 21 patients before enrollment in the study (group A; median age 52 years, range: 19-85 years). No hiatal hernia was detected by radiologic examination in the remaining 22 patients (group B; median age 57 years, range: 22-85 years). Before and after training with an oral IQS for 6-8 mo, the patients were evaluated using a symptom questionnaire (esophageal dysphagia and acid chest symptoms; score 0-3), visual analogue scale (ability to swallow food: score 0-100), lip force test (≥ 15 N), velopharyngeal closure test (≥ 10 s), orofacial motor tests, and an oral sensory test. Another twelve patients (median age 53 years, range: 22-68 years) with hiatal hernia were evaluated using oral IQS traction maneuvers with pressure recordings of the upper esophageal sphincter and hiatus canal as assessed by high-resolution manometry. RESULTS: Esophageal dysphagia was present in all 43 patients at entry, and 98% of patients showed improvement after IQS training [mean score (range): 2.5 (1-3) vs 0.9 (0-2), P < 0.001]. Symptoms of reflux were reported before training in 86% of the patients who showed improvement at follow-up [1.7 (0-3) vs 0.5 (0-2), P < 0.001). The visual analogue scale scores were classified as pathologic in all 43 patients, and 100% showed improvement after IQS training [71 (30-100) vs 22 (0-50), P < 0.001]. No significant difference in symptom frequency was found between groups A and B before or after IQS training. The lip force test [31 N (12-80 N) vs 54 N (27-116), P < 0.001] and velopharyngeal closure test values [28 s (5-74 s) vs 34 s (13-80 s), P < 0.001] were significantly higher

  20. Effects of carob-bean gum thickened formulas on infants’ reflux and tolerance indices

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, Miglena; Manios, Yannis; Rasheva, Niya; Pancheva, Ruzha; Dimitrova, Elena; Schaafsma, Anne

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of carob-bean gum (CBG) thickened-formulas on reflux and tolerance indices in infants with gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). METHODS: Fifty-six eligible infants (1-6 mo old) were randomly allocated to receive for two weeks a formula with either 0.33 g/100 mL (Formula A) or 0.45 g/100 mL (Formula B) of cold soluble CBG galactomannans respectively, or a formula with 0.45 g/100 mL of hot soluble CBG galactomannans (Formula C). No control group receiving standard formula was included in the study. Data on the following indices were obtained both at baseline and follow-up from all study participants: 24 h esophageal pH monitoring indices, anthropometrical indices (i.e., body weight and length) and tolerance indices (i.e., frequency of colics; type and frequency of defecations). From the eligible infants, forty seven were included in an intention-to-treat analysis to examine the effects of the two-week trial on esophageal 24 h pH monitoring, growth and tolerance indices. Repeated Measures ANOVA was used to examine the research hypothesis. RESULTS: Regarding changes in 24 h pH monitoring indices, significant decreases from baseline to follow-up were observed in the “Boix Ochoa Score” (i.e., an index of esophageal acid exposure), in the total number of visible refluxes and in all symptoms related indices due to acid reflux only for infants provided with Formula A, while no significant changes were observed for infants provided with Formulas B and C. In addition, the significant decreases observed in two symptoms related pH monitoring indices (i.e., “Symptom index for reflux” and “Percentage of all reflux”) for infants provided with Formula A were also found to differentiate significantly compared to the changes observed in the other two groups (P = 0.048 and P = 0.014 respectively). Concerning changes in anthropometric indices, body weight significantly increased among infants provided with Formulas A and C, but not for infants provided

  1. Laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis at a single centre.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Ganesh; Morrow, Ellen; Collins, Bridget F; Ho, Lawrence A T; Hinojosa, Marcelo W; Hayes, Jennifer M; Spada, Carolyn A; Oelschlager, Brant; Li, Chenxiang; Yow, Eric; Anstrom, Kevin J; Mart, Dylan; Xiao, Keliang; Pellegrini, Carlos A

    2016-09-01

    We sought to assess whether laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery (LARS) is associated with decreased rates of disease progression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).The study was a retrospective single-centre study of IPF patients with worsening symptoms and pulmonary function despite antacid treatment for abnormal acid gastro-oesophageal reflux. The period of exposure to LARS was September 1998 to December 2012. The primary end-point was a longitudinal change in forced vital capacity (FVC) % predicted in the pre- versus post-surgery periods.27 patients with progressive IPF underwent LARS. At time of surgery, the mean age was 65 years and mean FVC was 71.7% pred. Using a regression model, the estimated benefit of surgery in FVC % pred over 1 year was 5.7% (95% CI -0.9-12.2%, p=0.088) with estimated benefit in FVC of 0.22 L (95% CI -0.06-0.49 L, p=0.12). Mean DeMeester scores decreased from 42 to 4 (p<0.01). There were no deaths in the 90 days following surgery and 81.5% of participants were alive 2 years after surgery.Patients with IPF tolerated the LARS well. There were no statistically significant differences in rates of FVC decline pre- and post-LARS over 1 year; a possible trend toward stabilisation in observed FVC warrants prospective studies. The ongoing prospective randomised controlled trial will hopefully provide further insights regarding the safety and potential efficacy of LARS in IPF. PMID:27492835

  2. Gastric reflux is an independent risk factor for laryngopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Langevin, Scott M.; Michaud, Dominique S.; Marsit, Carmen J.; Nelson, Heather H.; Birnbaum, Ariel E.; Eliot, Melissa; Christensen, Brock C.; McClean, Michael D.; Kelsey, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Gastric reflux can reach into the upper airway, inducing cellular damage in the epithelial lining. This condition is believed to be a risk factor for development of laryngopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LPSCC), although the literature is conflicting. Methods To better clarify this relationship, we assessed the association of self-reported heartburn history and medication use among 631 LPSCC patients and 1234 control subjects (frequency-matched on age, gender and town of residence) enrolled as part of a population-based case-control study of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in the greater Boston area. Results After adjusting for age, gender, race, smoking, alcohol consumption, HPV16 seropositivity, education and body mass index, subjects reporting a history of frequent heartburn and who were neither a heavy smoker nor heavy drinker had a significantly elevated risk of LPSCC (OR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.00–3.16). Among those with a history of heartburn, there was an inverse association between antacid use and LPSCC relative to those never taking heartburn medication (OR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.38–0.93) that remained consistent when analyzed by smoking/drinking status, HPV16 status, or by primary tumor site. Conclusions Our data show that gastric reflux is an independent risk factor for squamous cancers of the pharynx and larynx. Further studies are needed to clarify the possible chemopreventive role of antacid use for patients with gastric reflux. Impact Elucidation of additional risk factors for head and neck cancer can allow for risk stratification and inform surveillance of high-risk patients. PMID:23703970

  3. Webs of the lower esophagus: a complication of gastroesophageal reflux?

    PubMed

    Weaver, J W; Kaude, J V; Hamlin, D J

    1984-02-01

    Seven patients with webs within 6 cm of the gastroesophageal junction were identified from 5109 barium studies of the esophagus covering a 10-year period (incidence, 0.14%). These webs were clearly distinct from the B-ring at the gastroesophageal junction itself. Demographic, social, and clinical factors for these patients are reviewed and compared with those of 26 cervical-web patients diagnosed in the same 10-year period, 26 control thoracic esophagogram patients and 26 control cervical esophagogram patients. Five of the seven patients with lower esophageal webs had gastroesophageal reflux. PMID:6607592

  4. A contained sealed reflux dissolution apparatus for plutonium materials

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, R.D.; Mitchell, W.G.; Leahy, C.K.; Narayanan, U.I.; Lewis, K.

    1991-12-01

    A containment apparatus has been designed and a procedure developed which permits the overnight operation in a tornado prone area of the sealed reflux dissolution system for the dissolution of hard-to-dissolve plutonium containing materials. A historical review of the development of the apparatus and the procedure used at the New Brunswick Laboratory is presented. The detailed operating procedure, the engineering drawings necessary to fabricate the apparatus, and the Safety Analysis Report containing a worst-case, single occurrence failure analysis are provided in the Appendices. 3 refs.

  5. Urinary tract infection in the setting of vesicoureteral reflux

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Roig, Michael L.; Kirsch, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the most common underlying etiology responsible for febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs) or pyelonephritis in children. Along with the morbidity of pyelonephritis, long-term sequelae of recurrent renal infections include renal scarring, proteinuria, and hypertension. Treatment is directed toward the prevention of recurrent infection through use of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis during a period of observation for spontaneous resolution or by surgical correction. In children, bowel and bladder dysfunction (BBD) plays a significant role in the occurrence of UTI and the rate of VUR resolution. Effective treatment of BBD leads to higher rates of spontaneous resolution and decreased risk of UTI. PMID:27408706

  6. The Role of Gastroesophageal Reflux and Microaspiration in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joyce S.

    2014-01-01

    There has been controversy regarding the relationship between gastroesophageal reflux, microaspiration, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). In the last decade, there is increasing evidence supporting a relationship between gastroesophageal reflux, microaspiration, and IPF. Specifically, gastroesophageal reflux is common in IPF, is often asymptomatic in this population, and may impact disease progression and the natural history of IPF. More intriguing are the data suggesting that treatment of gastroesophageal reflux, either medical or surgical, may slow disease progression, as measured by change in forced vital capacity, and improve survival in IPF. Despite the growing evidence, there are still many gaps in our understanding of this relationship. Some of the major gaps include the discrepancy between the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux in the general population compared to the prevalence of IPF, the unclear causative agent leading to injury, the lack of reliable methods to evaluate for gastroesophageal reflux and microaspiration, and the role of treatment. Further research, including a randomized controlled trial of anti-reflux therapy, needs to be done to clarify the relationship between gastroesophageal reflux, microaspiration, and IPF. PMID:24729673

  7. A Preliminary Study Into the Significance of Intrarenal Reflux in BK Virus Nephropathy After Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kawanishi, Kunio; Honda, Kazuho; Koike, Junki; Hattori, Motoshi; Fuchinoue, Shouhei; Tanabe, Kazunari; Oda, Hideaki; Nagashima, Yoji

    2016-01-01

    Background The BK virus typically colonizes the lower urinary tract and is the causative agent in BK virus nephropathy (BKVN), which can progress to allograft dysfunction and graft loss. Urinary reflux in kidney allografts is induced by vesicoureteral reflux or disturbances in intrarenal reflux (IRR), believed to be associated with BKVN. This study was designed to elucidate the relationship between BKVN and IRR. Methods We examined 30 renal transplant recipients histologically diagnosed with BKVN using anti-Simian virus 40 immunohistochemistry and 60 clinically matched control recipients. The BKVN patients were divided into stable (n = 12) and progressive (n = 18) groups according to allograft kidney function 1 year after diagnosis. Histological rejection scores according to the pathological classification of rejection in renal allografts (Banff classification), histological BKVN stages, and histological polyomavirus load levels (pvl) proposed by the Banff working group were evaluated. The IRR was quantified by histological reflux scores defined with retention and reflux of immunostained Tamm-Horsfall protein in renal tubules and glomeruli. Results Higher reflux scores were observed in the BKVN group compared with that in the control group. No differences in clinical parameters were observed between the BKVN and control groups. Reflux scores and pvl were significantly higher in the progressive group than in the stable BKVN group with no significant difference in BK stage observed between groups. Reflux scores were found to be significantly correlated with pvl. Conclusions Our preliminary study suggested that IRR might be a predisposing and prognostic factor in BKVN.

  8. Gavage-related reflux in rats: identification, pathogenesis, and toxicological implications (review).

    PubMed

    Damsch, Siegrid; Eichenbaum, Gary; Tonelli, Alfred; Lammens, Lieve; Van den Bulck, Kathleen; Feyen, Bianca; Vandenberghe, John; Megens, Anton; Knight, Elaine; Kelley, Michael

    2011-02-01

    After oral gavage dosing of rats, reflux may occur, resulting in serious respiratory effects and mortality. Published information on gavage-related reflux is limited, as it has not yet been a focus of research. Nevertheless, it represents a recurrent challenge in daily toxicology practice of oral gavage dosing. The absence of clear guidance and criteria for the identification and management of reflux-induced effects can limit the ability to properly interpret toxicity study results. The review presented herein includes an overview of experimental data from gavage studies in rats, in which reflux was observed, and provides a comprehensive analysis of the literature on reflux in general and the different potential pathways contributing to gavage-related reflux in rats. The article aims to increase the awareness and understanding of the pathogenesis of gavage-related reflux and provides guidance on identification of potential risk factors, as well as interpretation of histological changes and their toxicological relevance. Furthermore, differentiation of reflux-induced effects from direct compound-related toxicity and from gavage errors is addressed in particular, and the importance of nasal histology is discussed. PMID:21422261

  9. Water chemistry and ecotoxicity of an acid mine drainage-affected stream in subtropical China during a major flood event.

    PubMed

    Lin, C; Wu, Y; Lu, W; Chen, A; Liu, Y

    2007-04-01

    Field and laboratory work was carried out to investigate the chemistry and ecotoxicity of stream water affected by acid mine drainage in a tributary catchment of the Pearl River in subtropical China during a major flood that corresponded to a return period of 100 years. The results indicate that stream water was affected by acid mine drainage from the Dabaoshan mine at least to a distance of 25 km downstream of the mine water discharge point. It appears that H(+) generated from sulfide oxidation in the waste rock dumps was readily available for exporting. The amount of H(+) being discharged into the receiving stream depended on the volume of out-flowing waters. However, there was a lag time for the discharges of the metals. This may be attributed to the slower release of metals, relative to H(+), because it might take more time for the dissolution of heavy metal-bearing compounds, particularly the sparsely soluble jarosites. Fe, Zn and Al were the major metals of potential toxicity contained in the AMD-affected stream water, followed by Mn, Cu, Pb, As, Cd and Ni. The concentrations of these metals in the water decreased rapidly down the stream. This corresponds with an increase in the concentrations of reactive heavy metal fractions in benthic mud down the stream, reflecting the precipitation of heavy metal compounds with increasing pH and their subsequent deposition in the streambed. Toxicity tests show that the AMD-affected stream water at 3.5 km downstream of the discharge point was highly toxic to the test organism. At 25 km downstream of the discharge point where stream water pH was as high as 5.75, marked toxic responses of the test organism were still observed. PMID:16979817

  10. MicroRNA Mediates DNA De-methylation Events Triggered By Retinoic Acid During Neuroblastoma Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sudipto; Foley, Niamh; Bryan, Kenneth; Watters, Karen M; Bray, Isabella; Murphy, Derek M; Buckley, Patrick G; Stallings, Raymond L

    2010-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an often fatal pediatric cancer arising from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system. 13-Cis retinoic acid is included in the treatment regime for patients with high-risk disease, and a similar derivative, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) causes neuroblastoma cell lines to undergo differentiation. The molecular signaling pathways involved with ATRA induced differentiation are complex, and the role that DNA methylation changes might play are unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the genome-wide effects of ATRA on DNA methylation using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation applied to microarrays representing all known promoter and CpG islands. 402 gene promoters became demethylated, while 88 were hypermethylated post-ATRA. mRNA expression microarrays revealed that 82 of the demethylated genes were over-expressed by >2 fold, while 13 of the hyper methylated genes were under-expressed. Gene ontology analysis indicated that de-methylated and re-expressed genes were enriched for signal transduction pathways, including NOS1, which is required for neural cell differentiation. As a potential mechanism for the DNA methylation changes, we demonstrate the down-regulation of methyltransferases, DNMT1 and DNMT3B, along with the up-regulation of endogenous microRNAs targeting them. Ectopic over-expression of miR-152, targeting DNMT1, also negatively impacted cell invasiveness and anchorage independent growth, contributing in part to the differentiated phenotype. We conclude that functionally important, miRNA-mediated DNA de-methylation changes contribute to the process of ATRA induced differentiation resulting in the activation of NOS1, a critical determinant of neural cell differentiation. Our findings illustrate the plasticity and dynamic nature of the epigenome during cancer cell differentiation. PMID:20841484

  11. Gastroplasty with partial or total plication for gastroesophageal reflux: manometric and pH-metric postoperative studies.

    PubMed

    París, F; Tomás-Ridocci, M; Benages, A; Zarza, A G; Molina, R; Padilla, J; Mora, F; Borro, J M; Moreno, E

    1982-06-01

    From January, 1975, to December, 1980, 83 patients with sliding hiatal hernia, gastroesophageal reflux, or both were treated using a modified Collis gastroplasty associated with either partial or total gastric application. When partial plication was used, the five-year clinical results were considered satisfactory in 27 out of 35 patients (77%). When total plication was used, the results were satisfactory in 41 out of 46 patients (89%) after follow-up ranging from 12 to 60 months (average, 36 months), but no symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux reappeared in any patient. In patients undergoing partial plication, the mean preoperative high-pressure zone of 11.20 +/- 8.19 mm Hg increased after operation to 17.31 +/- 10.50 mm Hg, but in the second postoperative studies the value decreased to 13.69 +/- 7.24 mm Hg. When 360 degrees plication was used, the preoperative value of the high-pressure zone--9.36 +/- 4.80 mm Hg--increased after operation to 17.70 +/- 7.53 mm Hg but did not decrease significantly in the second postoperative studies: 16.46 +/- 7.99 mm Hg. When partial plication was used, the positivity of the abdominal compression test was 9 and 28% in the early and late postoperative studies, respectively. Using total plication, the percentage of positivity in the early and late postoperative periods was 0 and 2%, respectively. Concerning the acid reflux test, when partial plication was used, the test was positive in 3 out of 27 patients (11%) in the early postoperative studies and in 7 out of 30 (23%) one year later. For the total plication procedure, the percentage of positive tests was null in the first control and 3% in the second postoperative studies. PMID:7092381

  12. Acid-Catalyzed Isomerization of Carvone to Carvacrol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjonaas, Richard A.; Mattingly, Shawn P.

    2005-01-01

    The acid-catalyzed isomerization of carvone to carvacrol, first reported by Ritter and Ginsburg, is especially well suited with a permanent-magnet FT instrument. The acid-catalyzed isomerization of carvone to carvacrol produced a 61% yield after a three hour reflux with 30% aqueous sulfuric acid.

  13. Exploring the physiologic role of human gastroesophageal reflux by analyzing time‐series data from 24‐h gastric and esophageal pH recordings

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Luo; Mu, John C.; Sloan, Sheldon; Miner, Philip B.; Gardner, Jerry D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Our previous finding of a fractal pattern for gastric pH and esophageal pH plus the statistical association of sequential pH values for up to 2 h led to our hypothesis that the fractal pattern encodes information regarding gastric acidity and that depending on the value of gastric acidity, the esophagus can signal the stomach to alter gastric acidity by influencing gastric secretion of acid or bicarbonate. Under our hypothesis values of gastric pH should provide information regarding values of esophageal pH and vice versa. We used vector autoregression, a theory‐free set of inter‐related linear regressions used to measure relationships that can change over time, to analyze data from 24‐h recordings of gastric pH and esophageal pH. We found that in pH records from normal subjects, as well as from subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease alone and after treatment with a proton pump inhibitor, gastric pH values provided important information regarding subsequent values of esophageal pH and values of esophageal pH provided important information regarding subsequent values of gastric pH. The ability of gastric pH and esophageal pH to provide information regarding subsequent values of each other was reduced in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease compared to normal subjects. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that depending on the value of gastric acidity, the esophagus can signal the stomach to alter gastric acidity, and that this ability is impaired in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25347850

  14. Distribution of photoassimilates in the pea plant: chronology of events in non-fertilized ovaries and effects of gibberellic acid.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, S; Bier, D; Estruch, J J; Beltrán, J P

    1989-12-01

    The short-lived isotope(11)C (t1/2=20.4 min) has been used to study assimilate distribution in intact pea plants (Pisum sativum L.). Radiolabel was measured at the leaf fed with(11)CO2 (feed-leaf), at the ovary of the flower subtended by this leaf, and in shoot apex and roots of individual plants. Considerable(11)C-radiolabel was detected in the young ovaries during the first days after anthesis. Thereafter, when the ovaries stopped growing the uptake of(11)C rapidly decreased. At this developmental stage only apex and roots were competing for the photoassimilates. Fertilization, however, restored the strong sink activity of the ovaries. The same effect could be achieved by applying gibberellic acid to non-fertilized ovaries. About 2 h after treatment the residual(11)C-radiolabel entering the ovary started to increase and, at about the same time, the ovary resumed growth. Feed-leaf photosynthesis, as well as export of(11)C-radiolabel out of the leaf, was not changed by the treatment. The(11)C experiments show the dynamic behaviour of the sinks during developmental stages from the day of anthesis until 5 d later and demonstrate that phytohormones may play an important role in regulating carbon distribution. PMID:24201844

  15. Theoretical foundations for quantitative paleogenetics. III - The molecular divergence of nucleic acids and proteins for the case of genetic events of unequal probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, R.; Pearl, D.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical equations are derived for molecular divergence with respect to gene and protein structure in the presence of genetic events with unequal probabilities: amino acid and base compositions, the frequencies of nucleotide replacements, the usage of degenerate codons, the distribution of fixed base replacements within codons and the distribution of fixed base replacements among codons. Results are presented in the form of tables relating the probabilities of given numbers of codon base changes with respect to the original codon for the alpha hemoglobin, beta hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochrome c and parvalbumin group gene families. Application of the calculations to the rabbit alpha and beta hemoglobin mRNAs and proteins indicates that the genes are separated by about 425 fixed based replacements distributed over 114 codon sites, which is a factor of two greater than previous estimates. The theoretical results also suggest that many more base replacements are required to effect a given gene or protein structural change than previously believed.

  16. [Gastric emptying in reflux esophagitis. Effect of metoclopramide and cinitapride].

    PubMed

    Monés, J; Espinós, J C; Carrió, I; Calabuig, R; Vilardell, F

    1989-09-30

    The gastric emptying of solids was evaluated with radionuclide techniques in 16 patients with reflux esophagitis, demonstrated by two of the following methods: endoscopy, pathology, and/or pH measurement. The percentage of radionuclide remaining within the stomach was 80.8 +/- 17% after 45 minutes, 63.3 +/- 10% after 75 minutes, and 48.8 +/- 19% after 105 minutes, with a half time (T1/2) of gastric emptying of 103.4 +/- 6 minutes. These results showed significant differences in T1/2 with those from a control group of healthy individuals, the gastric emptying being slower in patients with esophagitis (103.4 min vs 85.3 min; p less than 0.01). Subsequently, a double blind study to assess the effect of metoclopramide and cinitapride on gastric emptying in patients with reflux esophagitis was carried out. Cinitapride accelerated the gastric emptying of solids with statistically significant differences when compared with placebo (84 min vs 104 min, p less than 0.05). In this study, metoclopramide showed a tendency to accelerate gastric emptying, although it did not achieve a significant difference with placebo. PMID:2691780

  17. Pharmacological therapy of gastroesophageal reflux in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Monari, Caterina; Martini, Silvia; Aceti, Arianna; Faldella, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Although gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a very common phenomenon among preterm infants, its therapeutic management is still an issue of debate among neonatologists. A step-wise approach should be advisable, firstly promoting nonpharmacological interventions and limiting drugs to selected infants unresponsive to the conservative measures or who are suffering from severe GER with clinical complications. Despite of this, a concerning pharmacological overtreatment has been increasingly reported. Most of the antireflux drugs, however, have not been specifically assessed in preterm infants; moreover, serious adverse effects have been noticed in association to their administration. This review mainly aims to draw the state of the art regarding the pharmacological management of GER in preterm infants, analyzing the best piecies of evidence currently available on the most prescribed anti-reflux drugs. Although further trials are required, sodium alginate-based formulations might be considered promising; however, data regarding their safety are still limited. Few piecies of evidence on the efficacy of histamine-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors in preterm infants with GER are currently available. Nevertheless, a significantly increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and infections has been largely reported in association with their use, thereby leading to an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio. The efficacy of metoclopramide in GER's improvement still needs to be clarified. Other prokinetic agents, such as domperidone and erythromycin, have been reported to be ineffective, whereas cisapride has been withdrawn due to its remarkable cardiac adverse effects. PMID:23878533

  18. Pharmacological Therapy of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Monari, Caterina; Martini, Silvia; Aceti, Arianna; Faldella, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Although gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a very common phenomenon among preterm infants, its therapeutic management is still an issue of debate among neonatologists. A step-wise approach should be advisable, firstly promoting nonpharmacological interventions and limiting drugs to selected infants unresponsive to the conservative measures or who are suffering from severe GER with clinical complications. Despite of this, a concerning pharmacological overtreatment has been increasingly reported. Most of the antireflux drugs, however, have not been specifically assessed in preterm infants; moreover, serious adverse effects have been noticed in association to their administration. This review mainly aims to draw the state of the art regarding the pharmacological management of GER in preterm infants, analyzing the best piecies of evidence currently available on the most prescribed anti-reflux drugs. Although further trials are required, sodium alginate-based formulations might be considered promising; however, data regarding their safety are still limited. Few piecies of evidence on the efficacy of histamine-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors in preterm infants with GER are currently available. Nevertheless, a significantly increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and infections has been largely reported in association with their use, thereby leading to an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio. The efficacy of metoclopramide in GER's improvement still needs to be clarified. Other prokinetic agents, such as domperidone and erythromycin, have been reported to be ineffective, whereas cisapride has been withdrawn due to its remarkable cardiac adverse effects. PMID:23878533

  19. Laparoscopic hiatal herniorrhaphy with posterior fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Barr, L L

    1998-12-01

    Complications and side effects following laparoscopic antireflux procedures are common. This article describes an alternative laparoscopic technique to prevent gastroesophageal reflux. This method consists of posterior approximation of the diaphragmatic crura followed by a posterior fundoplication of approximately 270 degrees wrap. In avoiding the 360 degree wrap and obtaining length from the longitudinal axis of the stomach, it is not necessary to take down the gastrosplenic vessels. The principle of the procedure is to accentuate the cardioesophageal angle of His. No sutures are placed in the esophagus. While this article primarily concerns technique, it also constitutes a brief report on the first 50 patients who have been followed up for 1 year or more. All patients but one are free of reflux symptoms and have discontinued taking all medication. There has been no dysphagia to liquids, and solid food dysphagia has not lasted >1 month. Bloating from gas is minimal, as most patients are able to burp early in their recovery. An outcome paper describing preoperative and postoperative objective testing and evaluation is in process. PMID:9864104

  20. Diagnosis and Anti-Reflux Therapy for GERD with Respiratory Symptoms: A Study Using Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance-pH Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Wu, Jimin; Hu, Zhiwei; Yan, Chao; Gao, Xiang; Liang, Weitao; Liu, Diangang; Li, Fei; Wang, Zhonggao

    2016-01-01

    Stretta procedure (0 vs. 19.4%, p = 0.006). Conclusions MII-pH monitoring effectively detected respiratory-related predictive parameters, including total/proximal reflux episodes and symptom correlations. We found that GERD patients with respiratory symptoms exhibited more proximal and total reflux episodes but not more acid-related episodes, as determined by MII-pH monitoring. Thus, such monitoring could be useful for diagnosing atypical GERD patients with respiratory symptoms. Furthermore, LTF exhibited a more significant effect on controlling typical symptoms in all GERD patients and reducing the recurrence rate than the Stretta procedure in patients with respiratory symptoms. PMID:27532103

  1. Electrical stimulation for gastroesophageal reflux disease: current state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sharon E; Soffer, Edy

    2016-01-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who are not satisfied with acid suppression therapy can benefit primarily from fundoplication, a surgical intervention. Fundoplication has been the standard surgical procedure for GERD. It is effective but is associated with adverse effects, resulting in a declining number of interventions, creating a need for alternative interventions that are effective, yet have a better adverse effect profile. One such alternative involves the application of electrical stimulation to the lower esophageal sphincter. A number of animal studies showed that such stimulation can increase resting lower esophageal sphincter pressure. An acute human study confirmed this effect, and was followed by two open-label studies, with a follow-up of up to 3 years. Results thus far show that the therapy is associated with a significant improvement in symptoms, a significant reduction in esophageal acid exposure, and a very good safety profile. This review will describe the evolution of electrical stimulation therapy for GERD, as well as the safety and efficacy of this intervention. PMID:26834494

  2. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Application Improved Early Growth, Net Photosynthesis, and Associated Physio-Biochemical Events in Maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Liu, Jianhua; Ashraf, Umair; Li, Gaoke; Li, Yuliang; Lu, Wenjia; Gao, Lei; Han, Fuguang; Hu, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an endogenous signaling molecule and involved in growth regulations and plant development, however, a little information is available on the consequences of exogenous GABA application on growth, development, and associated physio-biochemical processes in maize. The present study examined the GABA-induced regulations in early growth, net photosynthetic rate, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and enzymatic activities in three maize cultivars, i.e., Yuecainuo 6, Zhengtian 68, and Yuecainuo 2. Two levels of GABA, i.e., 0 mg L(-1) and 50 mg L(-1), in solution form, with total application volume of 100 ml per pot containing 15 maize seedlings were exogenously applied. Results revealed that exogenous GABA application improved seedling growth in terms of seedling length and biomass accumulation in all maize cultivars at both 3 and 7 days after treatment (DAT). It also promoted net photosynthesis and variably affected gas exchange attributes, i.e., stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (Tr), as well as leaves SPAD value. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation [in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA)] under GABA treated maize seedlings were also remained variable; however, osmolyte accumulation (protein and proline) and activities of anti-oxidants enzymes, i.e., super-oxide dismutase and peroxidase were also affected differently at both 3 and 7 DAT in all maize cultivars. Furthermore, enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase were improved. These results suggest the involvement of GABA in various physio-metablical mechanisms which might lead to improvement in morphological growth of maize. In future, research is still needed at molecular and genetic levels to unravel the involvement of GABA-mediated regulations in growth and its associated physio-biochemical mechanisms. PMID:27446149

  3. Serum Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 4 Is a Predictor of Cardiovascular Events in End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Furuhashi, Masato; Ishimura, Shutaro; Ota, Hideki; Hayashi, Manabu; Nishitani, Takahiro; Tanaka, Marenao; Yoshida, Hideaki; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.; Miura, Tetsuji

    2011-01-01

    Background Fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4/A-FABP/aP2), a lipid chaperone, is expressed in both adipocytes and macrophages. Recent studies have shown that FABP4 is secreted from adipocytes and that FABP4 level is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. However, little is known about the impact of FABP4 concentrations on prognosis. We tested the hypothesis that FABP4 level predicts prognosis of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a group at high risk for atherosclerosis-associated morbidity and mortality. Methods and Results Biochemical markers including FABP4 were determined in 61 ESRD patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD). Serum FABP4 level in females (404.2±30.5 ng/ml) was significantly higher than that in males (315.8±30.0 ng/ml), and the levels in ESRD patients were about 20-times higher than those in age-, gender- and body mass index (BMI)-matched control subjects with normal renal function. FABP4 level was decreased by 57.2% after HD and was positively correlated with blood pressure, BMI, and levels of lipids and insulin. Multiple regression analysis indicated that HD duration, BMI, and triglycerides level were independent determinants for FABP4 level. ESRD patients with high FABP4 levels had higher cardiovascular mortality during the 7-year follow-up period. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis showed that logarithmically transformed FABP4 level was an independent predictor of cardiovascular death adjusted for age, gender, HD duration, BMI, and triglycerides level (hazard ratio, 7.75; 95% CI, 1.05–25.31). Conclusion These findings suggest that FABP4 level, being related to adiposity and metabolic disorders, is a novel predictor of cardiovascular mortality in ESRD. PMID:22102888

  4. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Application Improved Early Growth, Net Photosynthesis, and Associated Physio-Biochemical Events in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wu; Liu, Jianhua; Ashraf, Umair; Li, Gaoke; Li, Yuliang; Lu, Wenjia; Gao, Lei; Han, Fuguang; Hu, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an endogenous signaling molecule and involved in growth regulations and plant development, however, a little information is available on the consequences of exogenous GABA application on growth, development, and associated physio-biochemical processes in maize. The present study examined the GABA-induced regulations in early growth, net photosynthetic rate, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and enzymatic activities in three maize cultivars, i.e., Yuecainuo 6, Zhengtian 68, and Yuecainuo 2. Two levels of GABA, i.e., 0 mg L-1 and 50 mg L-1, in solution form, with total application volume of 100 ml per pot containing 15 maize seedlings were exogenously applied. Results revealed that exogenous GABA application improved seedling growth in terms of seedling length and biomass accumulation in all maize cultivars at both 3 and 7 days after treatment (DAT). It also promoted net photosynthesis and variably affected gas exchange attributes, i.e., stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (Tr), as well as leaves SPAD value. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation [in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA)] under GABA treated maize seedlings were also remained variable; however, osmolyte accumulation (protein and proline) and activities of anti-oxidants enzymes, i.e., super-oxide dismutase and peroxidase were also affected differently at both 3 and 7 DAT in all maize cultivars. Furthermore, enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase were improved. These results suggest the involvement of GABA in various physio-metablical mechanisms which might lead to improvement in morphological growth of maize. In future, research is still needed at molecular and genetic levels to unravel the involvement of GABA-mediated regulations in growth and its associated physio-biochemical mechanisms. PMID:27446149

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction: a crucial event in okadaic acid (ICV) induced memory impairment and apoptotic cell death in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Pradeep K; Tota, Santoshkumar; Shukla, Rakesh; Ali, Shakir; Najmi, Abul Kalam; Nath, Chandishwar

    2011-12-01

    Mitochondrial abnormalities have been identified in a large proportion of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently we have reported that intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of okadaic acid (OKA) causes memory impairment in rat. However involvement of mitochondrial function in OKA induced memory impairment and neuronal damage has not been determined. OKA (200 ng) was administered by ICV route. After 13th day of OKA administration memory function was evaluated by Morris Water Maze test. Following completion of behavioral studies on 16th day, mitochondrial membrane potential, Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species were evaluated in mitochondrial preparation of cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum of rat brain. While ATP, mitochondrial activity, lipid peroxidation and nitrite were investigated in synaptosomal preparation of rat brain areas. The activities and mRNA expression of apoptotic factors, caspase-3 and caspase-9, were studied in rat brain regions. The neuronal damage was also confirmed by histopathological study. OKA treated rats showed memory impairment including increased Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP and mitochondrial activity in mitochondrial preparation. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and nitrite in synaptosomal preparations. Preventive treatment daily for 13 days with antidementic drugs, donepezil (5 mg/kg, p.o) and memantine (10 mg/kg, p.o), significantly attenuated OKA induced mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptotic cell death, memory impairment and histological changes. Mitochondrial dysfunction appeared as a key factor in OKA induced memory impairment and apoptotic cell death. This study indicates that clinically used antidementic drugs are effective against OKA induced adverse changes at behavioral, cellular, and histological levels and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:21893081

  6. Understanding, avoiding, and treating potential adverse events following the use of injectable poly-L-lactic acid for facial and nonfacial volumization.

    PubMed

    Vleggaar, Danny; Fitzgerald, Rebecca; Lorenc, Z Paul

    2014-04-01

    Injection-related adverse events (AEs) may occur with the use of any injectable substance, including all commercially available fillers. The most common of these AEs include discomfort, bruising, edema, and erythema, which are generally transient and resolve spontaneously. The majority of AEs widely felt to be associated with poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) are papules, nodules, and granulomas. Papules and nodules, which are histologically distinct from granulomas, tend to arise several weeks after injection, are generally palpable, asymptomatic, and nonvisible, and will typically resolve on their own, but can be camouflaged with the use of hyaluronic acid. They generally result from suboptimal product reconstitution or placement and, as such, their incidence can be minimized by improved injection methodology. In contrast, true inflammatory granulomas are very rare (incidence 0.01%-0.1%), seem to be systemic in nature, and represent an overabundance of host reaction to PLLA. Granulomas may become apparent months or years post-injection and may persist and grow over time. Their treatment is geared toward halting the increased secretion of interstitial substances and invasion of cells, and may include the administration of steroids and antimetabolites such as 5-fluorouracil. PMID:24719076

  7. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Rhei Rhizoma and Coptidis Rhizoma Mixture on Reflux Esophagitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, O Jun; Kim, Min Yeong; Shin, Sung Ho; Lee, Ah Reum; Lee, Joo Young; Seo, Bu-il; Shin, Mi-Rae; Choi, Hyun Gyu; Kim, Jeong Ah; Min, Byung Sun; Kim, Gyo-Nam; Noh, Jeong Sook; Rhee, Man Hee; Roh, Seong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of the combined extract of Rhei rhizoma and Coptidis rhizoma (RC-mix) in experimental model of acute reflux esophagitis. The antioxidant activity was assessed by in vitro 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) assays. RC-mix was given at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg body weight 2 h prior to induction of reflux esophagitis (RE). After 5 h, the effects of RC-mix treated rats were compared with those of normal and control rats. The representative flavonoid contents of RC-mix, such as sennoside A, epiberberine, coptisine, palmatine, and berberine, were detected using HPLC. The elevated esophageal mucosa damage was markedly ameliorated by RC-mix treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the administration of RC-mix reduced the increase of serum reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxynitrite (ONOO−). The improvement of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) levels were marked in the group given RC-mix. Moreover, the elevation of inflammatory mediators and cytokines by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in control rats decreased by RC-mix pretreatment. These results indicate that RC-mix treatment reduces the pathological states of esophagitis via regulating NF-κB mediated inflammation related to oxidative stress. PMID:27239206

  8. (n-3) Fatty acid content of red blood cells does not predict risk of future cardiovascular events following an acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aarsetoey, Hildegunn; Pönitz, Volker; Grundt, Heidi; Staines, Harry; Harris, William S; Nilsen, Dennis W T

    2009-03-01

    A reduced risk of fatal coronary artery disease has been associated with a high intake of (n-3) fatty acids (FA) and a direct cardioprotective effect by their incorporation into myocardial cells has been suggested. Based on these observations, the omega-3 index (eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid in cell membranes of RBC expressed as percent of total FA) has been suggested as a new risk marker for cardiac death. In this study, our aim was to evaluate the omega-3 index as a prognostic risk marker following hospitalization with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The omega-3 index was measured at admission in 460 patients with an ACS as defined by Troponin-T (TnT) > or = 0.02 microg/L. During a 2-y follow-up, recurrent myocardial infarctions (MI) (defined as TnT > 0.05 microg/L with a typical MI presentation) and cardiac and all-cause mortality were registered. Cox regression analyses were used to relate the risk of new events to the quartiles of the omega-3 index at inclusion. After correction for age, sex, previous heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, brain natriuretic peptide, creatinine, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerol, homocysteine, BMI, and medication, there was no significant reduction in risk for all-cause mortality, cardiac death, or MI with increasing values of the index. In conclusion, we could not confirm the omega-3 index as a useful prognostic risk marker following an ACS. PMID:19158216

  9. Associations of Circulating Gut Hormone and Adipocytokine Levels with the Spectrum of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ping-Huei; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Liou, Jyh-Ming; Lee, Yi-Chia; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Lin, Jaw-Town; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective The pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is complex and poorly understood. We aim to investigate the association of various circulating peptide hormones with heterogenous manifestations of GERD. Methods One hundred and four patients that had experienced typical GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation) for at least 3 episodes per week in the past 3 months were enrolled. All patients received a baseline assessment of symptom severity and frequency with the Reflux Disease Questionnaire and an upper endoscopy to classify GERD into erosive esophagitis (EE, n = 67), non-erosive esophagitis (NE, n = 37), and Barrett’s esophagus (BE, n = 8). Fifty asymptomatic subjects with an endoscopically normal esophagus were recruited as the control group. Complete anthropometric measures and blood biochemistry were obtained and fasting serum levels of adipocytokines (adiponectin and leptin) and gut hormones (ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY)) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in all subjects. Results All circulating peptide hormone levels were not statistically different between the GERD and control groups. However, GERD patients appeared to have lower PYY levels [median (25th-75th percentile), 80.1 (49.8–108.3) vs. 99.4 (65.8–131.9) pg/ml, p = 0.057] compared with control subjects. Among the GERD patients, ghrelin levels were inversely associated with the frequency and severity of acid regurgitation. In male GERD patients, EE was associated with significantly higher PYY levels [107.0 (55.0–120.8) vs. 32.8 (28.7–84.5) pg/ml, p = 0.026] but lower adiponectin levels [6.7 (5.6–9.3) vs. 9.9 (9.6–10.6) μg/ml, p = 0.034] than NE. Patients with BE had significantly lower adiponectin levels [6.0 (5.1–9.2) vs. 9.2 (7.1–11.2) μg/ml, p = 0.026] than those without BE. Conclusions Humoral derangement of circulating peptide hormones might participate in inflammation and symptom perception in patients suffering from GERD

  10. Histological features of the gastric mucosa in children with primary bile reflux gastritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bile reflux is one of the primary factors involved in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal lesions in patients with chronic gastritis; however, little is known about the exact histological features of bile reflux and its contributions to gastric mucosal lesions in this disease, especially in children with primary bile reflux gastritis (BRG). The aim of this study was to investigate the classic histological changes of the gastric mucosa in children with primary BRG. Methods The Bilitec 2000 was used for 24 h monitoring of gastric bile in 59 children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. The histological characteristics of the gastric mucosa were examined and scored. Results Thirteen of the 59 patients had a helicobacter pylori infection and were excluded; therefore, 46 cases were included in this study. The positive rate of pathological duodenogastric reflux was significantly higher in patients with foveolar hyperplasia than those without foveolar hyperplasia; however, the rate was significantly lower in patients with vascular congestion than those without vascular congestion. The longest reflux time and the total percentage time of bile reflux were significantly lower in patients with vascular congestion than those without vascular congestion. A total of 9 types of histological changes were analyzed using a binary logistic regression. Foveolar hyperplasia and vascular congestion in the superficial layer became significant variables in the last step of the stepwise regression. Conclusions Foveolar hyperplasia was associated with the severity of bile reflux, suggesting that it is a histological feature of primary BRG in children, while vascular congestion may be a protective factor. PMID:22289498

  11. No Association of Coffee Consumption with Gastric Ulcer, Duodenal Ulcer, Reflux Esophagitis, and Non-Erosive Reflux Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study of 8,013 Healthy Subjects in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shimamoto, Takeshi; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Kodashima, Shinya; Takahashi, Yu; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Oka, Masashi; Mitsushima, Toru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Probably due to caffeine-induced gastric acid secretion, negative effects of coffee upon various upper-gastrointestinal diseases have been precariously accepted, despite the inadequate epidemiological evidence. Our aim is to evaluate the effect of coffee consumption on four major acid-related diseases: gastric ulcer (GU), duodenal ulcer (DU), reflux esophagitis (RE), and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) based on the large-scale multivariate analysis. Of the 9,517 healthy adults, GU, DU, and RE were diagnosed by endoscopy, and NERD was diagnosed by the symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation without esophageal erosion. Associations between coffee consumption and the four disorders were evaluated, together with age, gender, body mass index (BMI), Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection status, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, and alcohol. We further performed meta-analysis using the random effects model to redefine the relationship between coffee intake and peptic ulcer disease. The eligible 8,013 study subjects comprised of 5,451 coffee drinkers and 2,562 non-coffee drinkers. By univariate analysis, age, BMI, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, and alcohol showed significant associations with coffee consumption. By multiple logistic regression analysis, positively correlated factors with significance were HP infection, current smoking, BMI, and pepsinogen I/II ratio for GU; HP infection, pepsinogen I/II ratio, and current smoking for DU; HP non-infection, male, BMI, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, age, and alcohol for RE; younger age, smoking, and female for NERD. The meta-analyses could detect any association of coffee consumption with neither GU nor DU. In conclusion, there are no significant relationship between coffee consumption and the four major acid-related upper gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23776588

  12. Antacids and Acid Reducers: OTC Relief for Heartburn and Acid Reflux

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease, you shouldn’t use an antacid containing calcium carbonate or aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate unless your doctor recommends it. Talk to your doctor before taking a proton pump inhibitor if: You are a ... reduce calcium absorption from foods and supplements and may increase ...

  13. [VESICOURETERAL REFLUX INTO SMALL KIDNEY DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC PARADIGM].

    PubMed

    Korol'kova, I A; Kolobova, L M; Dutov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The causes of renal size reductionin children by 20 percent or more from the age norm include abnormalities of urodynamics of upper (UUT) and lower (LUT) urinary tract, combined with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and infra-vesical obstruction (IVO). Several issues regarding diagnosis and choice of treatment in children with small kidneys depending on the severity of functional abnormalities and the presence of comorbidities still remain controversial. 101 children with small kidneys accounting for 3.1% of the entire number of urologic patients admitted to the clinic were followed for 25 years. 78 (77.2%) patients were simultaneously diagnosed as having ipsilateral vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) (2.4% of the total number of hospitalized children). Moreover, contralateral VUR was found in 63% of patients. In 5.1% of children, anomalies of the contralateral kidney were identified: lumbar dystopia (3.8%), duplication of the renal pelvis and ureter (1.3%). Combination with IVO was found in 25.5% of cases. 75 (96%) children with vesicoureteral reflux into the small kidney were operated on. Reconstructive plastic surgery was made in 72 (92%) those patients. Indications for conservative management were identified in patients with intermittent VUR of I-II degree into small kidney or both kidneys. In case of detection of IVO, initial surgery was carried out to eliminate the obstruction. Conservative therapy was aimed at getting rid of the inflammatory process, restoring the function of kidney and bladder, and at the treatment of concomitant vulvovaginitis. In the absence of positive results of 6-8 months of conservative treatment or in case of the negative clinical course, the operation was considered justified. Indications for antireflux surgery were the failure of conservative therapy for intermittent VUR into small kidney or both kidneys, the presence of VUR of III-V degree into one or both kidneys. In cases of bilateral VUR antireflux surgery was performed simultaneously

  14. Testing of Stirling engine solar reflux heat-pipe receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Rawlinson, S.; Cordeiro, P.; Dudley, V.; Moss, T.

    1993-07-01

    Alkali metal heat-pipe receivers have been identified as a desirable interface to couple a Stirling-cycle engine with a parabolic dish solar concentrator. The reflux receiver provides power nearly isothermally to the engine heater heads while de-coupling the heater head design from the solar absorber surface design. The independent design of the receiver and engine heater head leads to high system efficiency. Heat pipe reflux receivers have been demonstrated at approximately 30 kW{sub t} power throughput by others. This size is suitable fm engine output powers up to 10 kW{sub e}. Several 25-kW{sub e}, Stirling-cycle engines exist, as well as designs for 75-kW{sub t} parabolic dish solar concentrators. The extension of heat pipe technology from 30 kW{sub t} to 75 kW{sub t} is not trivial. Heat pipe designs are pushed to their limits, and it is critical to understand the flux profiles expected from the dish, and the local performance of the wick structure. Sandia has developed instrumentation to monitor and control the operation of heat pipe reflux receivers to test their throughput limits, and analytical models to evaluate receiver designs. In the past 1.5 years, several heat pipe receivers have been tested on Sandia`s test bed concentrators (TBC`s) and 60-kW{sub t} solar furnace. A screen-wick heat pipe developed by Dynatherm was tested to 27.5 kW{sub t} throughput. A Cummins Power Generation (CPG)/Thermacore 30-kW{sub t} heat pipe was pushed to a throughput of 41 kW{sub t} to verify design models. A Sandia-design screen-wick and artery 75-kW{sub t} heat pipe and a CPG/Thermacore 75-kW{sub t} sintered-wick heat pipe were also limit tested on the TBC. This report reviews the design of these receivers, and compares test results with model predictions.

  15. The Lewis acid catalyzed synthesis of hyperbranched Oligo(glycerol-diacid)s in aprotic polar media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lewis-acid, titanium (IV) butoxide (15% (w/w; catalyst/reactants)), was used to catalyze the condensation of 0.05 mol glycerol with 0.10 mol of either succinic acid, glutaric acid, or azelaic acid to produce oligomers. The reactions were refluxed in dilute solutions of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) o...

  16. Test results from a full-scale sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, J. B.; Andraka, C. E.; Diver, R. B.; Ginn, W. C.; Dudley, V.; Rawlinson, K. S.

    1990-01-01

    A sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver has been tested on a nominal 75 kW sub t parabolic-dish concentrator. The purpose was to demonstrate the feasibility of reflux-receiver technology for application to Stirling-engine dish-electric systems. In this application, pool boilers (and more generally liquid-metal reflux receivers) have a number of advantages over directly-illuminated tube receivers. The advantages, to be discussed, include more uniform temperature, which results in longer lifetime and higher temperature available to the engine.

  17. Test results from a full-scale sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.B.; Andraka, C.E.; Diver, R.B.; Ginn, W.C.; Dudley, V.; Rawlinson, K.S.

    1990-01-01

    A sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver has been tested on a nominal 75-kW{sub t} parabolic-dish concentrator. The purpose was to demonstrate the feasibility of reflux-receiver technology for application to Stirling-engine dish-electric systems. In this application, pool boilers (and more generally liquid-metal reflux receivers) have a number of advantages over directly-illuminated tube receivers. The advantages, to be discussed, include more uniform temperature, which results in longer lifetime and higher temperature available to the engine. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  18. Trans-thoracic peri-oesophageal adjustable band for intractable reflux

    PubMed Central

    Kusel, Mark Simon X.; Tan, Jeremy T.H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastric bands for obesity have the beneficial side-effect of improving reflux symptoms in patients; however placement of these on patients with multiple prior abdominal surgeries can be challenging. Presentation of case We present two cases where gastric bands were placed in a peri-oesophageal position via a left thoracotomy due to multiple previous abdominal surgeries in an attempt to treat their intractable reflux. Discussion At three month follow up, both patients have reported improvement in their symptoms of GORD. Conclusion A peri-oesophageal position adjustable gastric band is a possible solution for patients with intractable reflux and hostile abdomens. PMID:26279259

  19. Surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease with Gaucher disease type 2.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Hiroyuki; Shimono, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Aya; Fujii, Takayuki; Yasuda, Saneyuki; Koyano, Kosuke; Jinnai, Wataru; Kondo, Sonoko; Kondo, Takeo; Kusaka, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal storage disease, is sometimes complicated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The present patient was a 136-day-old Japanese boy with Gaucher disease type 2. Enzyme replacement therapy and chemical chaperone therapy were successful for the skin disorders, joint contractures, hepatosplenomegaly and thrombocytopenia, but he also had GERD. Accordingly, a Nissen fundoplication with gastrostomy was performed. There was no vulnerability of organs, easy bleeding or difficulty of maintaining the visual field because of hepatosplenomegaly during operation. In the perioperative period, there was no prolonged wound healing or infection. GERD was improved. In the near future, the number of long-term survivors of Gaucher disease will increase due to improvements in medical therapy. Therefore, it is expected that the number of patients requiring fundoplication will also increase. In patients with successful medical therapy, surgical fundoplication can be safely and effectively performed. PMID:26842663

  20. Current Medical Diagnosis and Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux in Children

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Orcun; Ipekci, Tumay; Aydogdu, Ozgu; Yucel, Selcuk

    2013-01-01

    Vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) is presented in approximately %1 of children and is associated with an increased risk of pyelonephritis and renal scarring. Despite its prevalence and morbidity, many aspects of VUR diagnosis and treatment are controversial. We objectively assessed the published data; the data base for many current diagnoses and treatment patterns of VUR is limited. Recent studies have focused on developed determination of VUR-related renal morbidity, improved stratification tools that children would benefit most from which VUR treatment option, and improved reporting of the long-term outcomes of VUR treatments in children who are at risk for VUR. In this review, the advances in the diagnosis and treatment of VUR will be accompanied by the current guidelines. PMID:24719807

  1. A physiologic approach to laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, J G; Trus, T L; Branum, G D; Waring, J P; Wood, W C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined indications, evaluations, and outcomes after laparoscopic fundoplication in patients with gastroesophageal reflux through this single-institution study. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Laparoscopic fundoplication has been performed for less than 5 years, yet the early and intermediate results suggest that this operation is safe and equivalent in efficacy to open techniques of antireflux surgery. METHODS: Over a 4-year period, 300 patients underwent laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (252) or laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication (48) for gastroesophageal reflux refractory to medical therapy or requiring daily therapy with omeprazole or high-dose H2 antagonists. Preoperative evaluation included symptom assessment, esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 24-hour pH evaluation, and esophageal motility study. Physiologic follow-up included 24-hour pH study and esophageal motility study performed 6 weeks and 1 to 3 years after operation. RESULTS: The most frequent indication for surgery was the presence of residual typical and atypical gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (64%) despite standard doses of proton pump inhibitors. At preoperative evaluation, 51% of patients had erosive esophagitis, stricture, or Barrett's metaplasia. Ninety-eight percent of patients had an abnormal 24-hour pH study. Seventeen percent had impaired esophageal motility and 2% had aperistalsis. There were four conversions to open fundoplication (adhesions, three; large liver, one). Intraoperative technical difficulties occurred in 19(6%) patients and were dealt with intraoperatively in all but 1 patient (bleeding from enlarged left liver lobe). Minor complications occurred in 6% and major complications in 2%. There was no mortality. Median follow-up was 17 months. One year after operation, heartburn was absent in 93%. Four percent took occasional H2 antagonists, and 3% were back on daily therapy. Atypical reflux symptoms (e.g., asthma, hoarseness, chest pain, or cough) were eliminated

  2. Chronic Cough, Reflux, Postnasal Drip Syndrome, and the Otolaryngologist

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester, Deborah C.; Karkos, Petros D.; Vaughan, Casey; Johnston, James; Dwivedi, Raghav C.; Atkinson, Helen; Kortequee, Shah

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Chronic cough is a multifactorial symptom that requires multidisciplinary approach. Over the last years, general practitioners refer increasingly more chronic cough patients directly to the otolaryngologist. The aim of this paper is to highlight the issues in diagnosis and management of chronic cough patients from the otolaryngologist perspective. Design. Literature review. Results. Gastroesophageal reflux and postnasal drip syndrome remain one of the most common causes of chronic cough. Better diagnostic modalities, noninvasive tests, and high technology radiological and endoscopic innovations have made diagnosis of these difficult-to-treat patients relatively easier. Multidisciplinary assessment has also meant that at least some of these cases can be dealt with confidently in one stop clinics. Conclusions. As the number of referrals of chronic cough patients to an Ear Nose Throat Clinic increases, the otolaryngologist plays a pivotal role in managing these difficult cases. PMID:22577385

  3. Effect of stellate ganglion block on laryngopharyngeal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Hye Jung; Lee, Mi Soon; Ahn, Ki Ryang; Kim, Chun Sook; Kang, Kyu Sik; Yoo, Sie Hyeon; Chung, Jin Hun; Kim, Nan-Seol; Seo, Yong Han; Gong, Hyung Youn; Lee, Yong Man

    2013-01-01

    Background Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) disease has many symptoms such as globus pharyngeus, excessive throat clearing and hoarseness. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of stellate ganglion block (SGB) in addition to proton pump inhibitors (PPI) on LPR. Methods Fifty patients complaining of more than 3 typical LPR symptoms for over 3 months were enrolled in the study. The P group took PPI for 8 weeks. The SP group took PPI and interwent a series of 8 SGB procedure once a week during the period of treatment. The blocks were performed one at a time unilaterally on the right and left stellate ganglions by injecting 1% mepivacaine 6 ml. We evaluated the reflux symptom index (RSI) before treatment and following 4 weeks and 8 weeks of treatment in both groups. Results After 4 weeks of treatment, the RSI of the P group decreased, but not significantly, to 16.6 ± 6.8 compared with the baseline value of 19.2 ± 2.7 (P = 0.093), whereas the RSI of the SP group decreased significantly to 9.8 ± 3.3 compared with the baseline value of 19.0 ± 4.7 (P = 0.000). After 8 weeks of treatment, the RSI of the P group decreased significantly to 13.7 ± 6.7 (P = 0.001) and the RSI of the SP group also decreased significantly to 7.7 ± 3.4 (P = 0.000). There were significant differences in the RSI between the two groups after 4 weeks (P = 0.000) and 8 weeks (P = 0.001) of treatment. Conclusions The symptoms of LPR improved earlier when PPI therapy was combined with SGB compared with PPI therapy alone. PMID:23741567

  4. Bioelectric Impedance Analysis in the Diagnosis of Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, Meral Torun; Alaygut, Demet; Turkmen, Mehmet; Soylu, Alper; Kavukcu, Salih

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is a common abnormality of the urinary tract in childhood. Objectives: As urine enters the ureters and renal pelvis during voiding in vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), we hypothesized that change in body water composition before and after voiding may be less different in children with VUR. Patients and Methods: Patients were grouped as those with VUR (Group 1) and without VUR (Group 2). Bioelectric impedance analysis was performed before and after voiding, and third space fluid (TSF) (L), percent of total body fluid (TBF%), extracellular fluid (ECF%), and intracellular fluid (ICF%) were recorded. After change of TSF, TBF, ECF, ICF (ΔTSF, ΔTBF%, ΔECF%, ΔICF%), urine volume (mL), and urine volume/body weight (mL/kg) were calculated. Groups 1 and 2 were compared for these parameters. In addition, pre- and post-voiding body fluid values were compared in each group. Results: TBF%, ECF%, ICF%, and TSF in both pre- and post-voiding states and ΔTBF%, ΔECF%, ΔICF%, and ΔTSF after voiding were not different between groups. However, while post-voiding TBF%, ECF% was significantly decreased in Group 1 (64.5 ± 8.1 vs 63.7 ± 7.2, P = 0.013 for TBF%), there was not post-voiding change in TSF in the same group. On the other hand, there was also a significant TSF decrease in Group 2. Conclusions: Bladder and ureter can be considered as the third space. Thus, we think that BIA has been useful in discriminating children with VUR as there was no decreased in patients with VUR, although there was decreased TSF in patients without VUR. However, further studies are needed to increase the accuracy of this hypothesis. PMID:26396698

  5. Systematic review: questionnaires for assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bolier, E A; Kessing, B F; Smout, A J; Bredenoord, A J

    2015-01-01

    Numerous questionnaires with a wide variety of characteristics have been developed for the assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Four well-defined dimensions are noticeable in these GERD questionnaires, which are symptoms, response to treatment, diagnosis, and burden on the quality of life of GERD patients. The aim of this review is to develop a complete overview of all available questionnaires, categorized per dimension of the assessment of GERD. A systematic search of the literature up to January 2013 using the Pubmed database and the Embase database, and search of references and conference abstract books were conducted. A total number of 65 questionnaires were extracted and evaluated. Thirty-nine questionnaires were found applicable for the assessment of GERD symptoms, three of which are generic gastrointestinal questionnaires. For the assessment of response to treatment, 14 questionnaires were considered applicable. Seven questionnaires with diagnostic purposes were found. In the assessment of quality of life in GERD patients, 18 questionnaires were found and evaluated. Twenty questionnaires were found to be used for more than one assessment dimension, and eight questionnaires were found for GERD assessment in infants and/or children. A wide variety of GERD questionnaires is available, of which the majority is used for assessment of GERD symptoms. Questionnaires differ in aspects such as design, validation and translations. Also, numerous multidimensional questionnaires are available, of which the Reflux Disease Questionnaire is widely applicable. We provided an overview of GERD questionnaires to aid investigators and clinicians in their search for the most appropriate questionnaire for their specific purposes. PMID:24344627

  6. Relief of Night-time Symptoms Associated With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Following 4 Weeks of Treatment With Pantoprazole Magnesium: The Mexican Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Orr, William; Vargas-Romero, José Antonio; Remes-Troche, José María; Morales-Arámbula, Miguel; Soto-Pérez, Julio César; Mateos-Pérez, Gualberto; Sobrino-Cossío, Sergio; Teramoto-Matsubara, Oscar; López-Colombo, Aurelio; Orozco-Gamiz, Antonio; Saez-Ríos, Adolfo; Arellano-Plancarte, Araceli; Chiu-Ugalde, Jazmin; Tholen, Anne; Horbach, Silke; Lundberg, Lars; Fass, Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of pantoprazole magnesium (pantoprazole-Mg) 40 mg in the relief of esophageal and extra-esophageal symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), particularly night-time symptoms. Methods Patients (aged 18-50 years) with 3-month history of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation plus at least one other symptom in the last week were enrolled in a nationwide, prospective and observational study in Mexico. Patients received pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg once daily during 4 weeks. Symptoms were assessed through a physician-administered structured interview and the patient-completed ReQuest in Practice™ questionnaire. Night-time GERD was defined as arousal from sleep during the night due to GERD-associated symptoms. Results Out of 4,343 patients included at basal visit, 3,665 were considered for the effectiveness per protocol analysis. At baseline, patients had a median of 8 GERD related symptoms. Patients with night-time GERD symptoms (42.7%) were more likely to have extra-esophageal symptoms (P < 0.001) than other GERD patients. Pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg once daily for 4 weeks improved a broad range of GERD-associated symptoms from baseline (80% reduction on physicians assessments; 68-77% reduction on ReQuest in Practice™ dimensions), including both day- and night-time GERD symptoms; improvements were the greatest for extra-esophageal symptoms in patients with night-time symptoms. Pantoprazole-Mg was well tolerated. Conclusions Pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg significantly improved a broad range of esophageal and extra-esophageal GERD related symptoms including sleep disturbances, as well as well-being, in patients with daytime or night-time GERD, making it a good option for patients with GERD, especially when extra-esophageal and night-time symptoms are present. PMID:24466446

  7. [Functional activity of alveolar macrophages in patients with bronchial asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Liamina, S V; Kalish, S V; Malysheva, E V; Iurenev, G L; Malyshev, I Iu

    2013-01-01

    Combination of bronchial asthma (BA) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a widespread clinical situation. The two pathologies are known to influence each other leading to disturbances in immune responsiveness. We studied phenotypes and phenotypic plasticity of immune cells (alveolar macrophages) in patients with BA and GERD. It was shown that BA and GERD are largely associated with AM of proinflammatory M2 and anti-inflammatory M1 phenotypes respectively. Population of AM with MI phenotype increases in patients having both BA and GERD compared with that in BA alone. In vitro experiments showed that acidic milieu promotes shifting the phenotype toward the predominance of M1, i.e. simulates the situation characteristic of GERD. Combination of BA and GERD narrows the interval within which AM can change MI phenotype (i.e. makes them more "rigid") but broadens the range in which they can change M2 phenotype. Also, GERD promotes the development of morphological rigidity of AM. Patients with BA given steroid therapy undergo inversion of phenotypic plasticity of AM. These data characterize the immunological component of BA and/or GERD pathogenesis. They help to better understand mechanisms of development of broncho-pulmonary pathology in GERD patients and can be used to work out new methods for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:24417067

  8. Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a Patient With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Five-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Moretto, G; Pupo, Y M; Bueno, Aln; Araujo, F O

    2016-01-01

    Tooth wear is a multifactorial process that is a growing concern in dentistry. This phenomenon can be caused by mechanical (attrition, abrasion, or abfraction) or chemical (erosion) processes. Etiologic factors in dental erosion can be due to changes in behavior, an unbalanced diet, or gastrointestinal disorders such as acid regurgitation, which may influence the salivary flow rate and buffering capacity of saliva. This case report describes an esthetic rehabilitation of a patient with gastroesophageal reflux and dental erosion, with a treatment rationale that includes the use of a diagnostic template and five-year follow-up. This technique, presented here in a clinical case with moderate enamel loss, integrates an additive wax-up and a direct intraoral bis-acryl resin mock-up. Lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) laminate veneers were fabricated with the heatpress technique. They were veneered with a layering ceramic (IPS e.max Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent) to improve the appearance of the incisal edge. The case demonstrated the success of veneers as an effective, conservative, and esthetic treatment for patients with this pathology. PMID:26449592

  9. The effect of omeprazole pre-treatment on rafts formed by reflux suppressant tablets containing alginate.

    PubMed

    Dettmar, P W; Little, S L; Baxter, T

    2005-01-01

    Alginate-based reflux suppressant preparations provide symptom relief by forming a physical barrier on top of the stomach contents in the form of a neutral floating gel or raft. This study investigated whether reduced acidity in the stomach brought about by omeprazole pre-treatment affected the formation and gastric residence time of alginate rafts. It was a balanced, cross-over study in 12 healthy non-patient volunteers following a single dose of two indium-111-labelled alginate tablets in the presence or absence of 3 days' pre-treatment with omeprazole. Raft formation and gastric residence, in the presence of a technetium-99m-labelled meal, were assessed by gamma scintigraphy for 3 h after alginate tablet administration. The relative raft-forming ability of alginate tablets after omeprazole compared with alginate tablets alone was 0.950 with 95% confidence intervals of 0.882 and 1.018. Pre-treatment and co-administration with omeprazole has no significant effect on the raft-forming ability of alginate tablets. PMID:15938591

  10. Practical approach to screen vesicoureteral reflux after a first urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Fuente, María Álvarez; Costa, Talía Sainz; García, Begoña Santiago; Serrano, Marcelina Algar; Alonso, Manuel Sosa; Luján, Esther Aleo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is a common pediatric urologic disorder. After the first urinary tract infection (UTI), imaging studies are recommended, starting with a renal ultrasound (RUS). Voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan are the other main radiologic studies used to detect VUR. We evaluated the use of RUS as a screening method for VUR in children below 2 years of age, in order to avoid unnecessary VCUG. Materials and Methods: Medical records and imaging studies of infants (<2 years) who had their first UTI in a 6 year period were retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated the sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values of RUS and DMSA for diagnosing VUR. Results: Among 155 children (51% males) with their first UTI, 148 RUS were performed, 128 VCUG and 29 DMSA. VUR was detected in 21% patients; 14.5% low grade and 6.5% high grade. One hundred and twenty-one patients underwent both RUS and VCUG, 101 RUS were normal and 20 abnormal. Of the normal RUS 98% had no or low grade VUR. Among those with an abnormality on RUS 30% had high grade VUR (P < 0.001). Conclusions: After the first UTI in infants (<2 years) RUS is a good screening method for VUR. Among such shildren with a normal RUS, we do not recommend VCUG or DMSA. In our opinion, VCUG should be performed only in patients with abnormal findings in RUS or in recurrent UTI. PMID:25378818

  11. Electroesophagogram in gastroesophageal reflux disease with a new theory on the pathogenesis of its electric changes

    PubMed Central

    Shafik, Ahmed; El-Sibai, Olfat; Shafik, Ismail; Shafik, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Background In view of the disturbed esophageal peristaltic activity and abnormal esophageal motility in gastroesophageal reflux disease, (GERD), we investigated the hypothesis that these changes result from a disordered myoelectric activity of the esophagus. Methods The electric activity of the esophagus (electroesophagogram, EEG) was studied in 27 patients with GERD (16 men, 11 women, mean age 42.6 ± 5.2 years) and 10 healthy volunteers as controls (6 men, 4 women, mean age 41.4 ± 4.9 years). According to the Feussner scoring system, 7 patients had a mild (score 1), 10 a moderate (score 2) and 10 a severe (score 3) stage of the disease. One electrode was applied to the upper third and a second to the lower third of the esophagus, and the electric activity was recorded. The test was repeated after the upper electrode had been moved to the mid-esophagus. Results The EEG of the healthy volunteers showed slow waves and exhibited the same frequency, amplitude and conduction velocity from the 2 electrodes of the individual subject, regardless of their location in the upper, middle or lower esophagus. Action potentials occurred randomly. In GERD patients, score 1 exhibited electric waves' variables similar to those of the healthy volunteers. In score 2, the waves recorded irregular rhythm and lower variables than the controls. Score 3 showed a "silent" EEG without waves. Conclusion The electric activity in GERD exhibited 3 different patterns depending on the stages of GERD. Score 1 exhibited a normal EEG which apparently denotes normal esophageal motility. Score 2 recorded irregular electric waves variables which are presumably indicative of decreased esophageal motility and reflux clearance. In score 3, a "silent" EEG was recorded with probably no acid clearance. It is postulated that the interstitial cells of Cajal which are the electric activity generators, are involved in the inflammatory process of GERD. Destruction of these cells appears to occur in grades that

  12. Modified pressure cooker technique: An easier way to control onyx reflux.

    PubMed

    Abud, Daniel Giansante; de Castro-Afonso, Luis Henrique; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Colli, Benedicto Oscar

    2016-06-01

    The use of onyx enabled the treatment of various intracranial vascular diseases more effectively than cyanoacrylate. The pressure cooker technique allowed definitive control of reflux and was made possible via detachable microcatheters. We present a variation of this technique called the modified pressure cooker to make reflux control easier and more reproducible and thus simplifying the procedure. We also extended the application of the technique to other diseases beyond arteriovenous malformations including dural arteriovenous fistulas and hypervascular tumors. PMID:26944607

  13. Numerical modelling of geothermal and reflux circulation in Enewetak Atoll: Implications for dolomitization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, G.; Whitaker, F.; Smart, P.; Sanford, W.

    2000-01-01

    Two types of regional-scale seawater circulation have been proposed to explain the formation of Enewetak Atoll dolomites: geothermal and reflux circulation. We have used a finite element groundwater flow model to examine the pattern, magnitude and dynamic interaction of these two different circulation mechanisms in Enewetak Atoll. Geothermal circulation is concentrated around the atoll-margin whereas refluxing mesosaline brines flow from the atoll interior towards the margin to restrict and eventually shut off geothermal circulation. Refluxing brines of 36-80??? can account for the salinity signature recorded in dolomite fluid inclusions. Distributions of fluid flux and Mg mass-balance calculations suggest that both geothermal and reflux circulation mechanisms could account for the observed distribution of dolomite in Enewetak Atoll. Furthermore, the atoll interior may be extensively dolomitized as observed in other atolls. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.Two types of regional-scale seawater circulation have been proposed to explain the formation of Enewetak Atoll dolomites: geothermal and reflux circulation. We have used a finite element groundwater flow model to examine the pattern, magnitude and dynamic interaction of these two different circulation mechanisms in Enewetak Atoll. Geothermal circulation is concentrated around the atoll-margin whereas refluxing mesosaline brines flow from the atoll interior towards the margin to restrict and eventually shut off geothermal circulation. Refluxing brines of 36-80 per mil can account for the salinity signature recorded in dolomite fluid inclusions. Distributions of fluid flux and Mg mass-balance calculations suggest that both geothermal and reflux circulation mechanisms could account for the observed distribution of dolomite in Enewetak Atoll. Furthermore, the atoll interior may be extensively dolomitized as observed in other atolls.

  14. [Primary vesico-uretero-renal reflux in adults: therapeutic outcome. Apropos of 68 cases].

    PubMed

    Desgrez, J P; Baaklini, J; Ba, M; Verges, J

    1984-02-01

    The authors compare two series of adult patients presenting with primary vesico-uretero-renal reflux. The first series was treated before 1974, and the second, over the past ten years. The salient feature of this comparison is the reduction in the number of renal failures. More systematic investigation of the reflux highlights a greater number of cases which will evolve without further impairment of renal function. This point has a considerable bearing on operative indications. PMID:6529197

  15. Esophageal Functional Changes in Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome and Their Impact on Laryngopharyngeal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yue; Ye, Jing-Ying; Han, De-Min; Zheng, Li; Cao, Xin; Zhang, Yu-Huan; Ding, Xiu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) disease have a high comorbidity rate, but the potential causal relation between the two diseases remains unclear. Our objectives were to investigate the esophageal functional changes in OSAHS patients and determine whether OSAHS affects LPR by affecting esophageal functions. Methods: Thirty-six OSAHS patients and 10 healthy controls underwent 24-h double-probed combined esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring simultaneously with polysomnography. High-resolution impedance manometry was applied to obtain a detailed evaluation of pharyngeal and esophageal motility. Results: There were 13 OSAHS patients (36.1%) without LPR (OSAHS group) and 23 (63.9%) with both OSAHS and LPR (OSAHS and LPR group). Significant differences were found in the onset velocity of liquid swallows (OVL, P = 0.029) and the percent relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) during viscous swallows (P = 0.049) between the OSAHS and control groups. The percent relaxation of LES during viscous swallows was found to be negatively correlated with upright distal acid percent time (P = 0.016, R = −0.507), and OVL was found to be negatively correlated with recumbent distal acid percent time (P = 0.006, R = −0.557) in the OSAHS and LPR group. Conclusions: OSAHS patients experience esophageal functional changes, and linear correlations were found between the changed esophageal functional parameters and reflux indicators, which might be the reason that LPR showed a high comorbidity with OSAHS and why the severity of the two diseases is correlated. PMID:26265608

  16. A Single Institution's First 100 Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Anti-Reflux Fundoplications: Where Are They 20 Years Later?

    PubMed

    Sadowitz, Benjamin D; Luberice, Kenneth; Bowman, Ty A; Viso, Alexandra M; Ayala, Daniel E; Ross, Sharona B; Rosemurgy, Alexander S

    2015-08-01

    Although anti-reflux surgery has been used liberally over the past decades for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), few studies report follow-up after 10 years. This study was undertaken to report follow-up on 100 consecutive GERD patients up to 22 years after utilizing a laparoscopic fundoplication. Hundred consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic fundoplication for GERD were prospectively followed beginning in 1992. The frequency and severity of symptoms before and after laparoscopic fundoplication were scored on a Likert scale (1 = never/none to 10 = always/very bothersome). Median data are reported. Of the 100 patients who underwent laparoscopic fundoplication for their GERD, nine were reoperations. Twenty-six patients are deceased on average 11 years after their fundoplications. Seventy-four patients are alive, with 27 patients, actively followed for 19 years after their fundoplications. At most recent follow-up, patients experienced long-term amelioration of symptom frequency and severity after fundoplication (e.g., heartburn frequency = 8-2, severity = 8-1; P < 0.01 for each). Eighty-four per cent of patients rated their symptom frequency as less than once per month. Eighty-eight per cent of patients were satisfied with their postoperative results, and 95 per cent of patients confirmed they would have the operation again knowing what they know now. Long-term follow-up documents high patient satisfaction and durable symptomatic relief up to two decades after laparoscopic fundoplication for GERD. Patients should seek this operation not only for symptomatic relief, but to mitigate the deleterious effects of long-term acid exposure and anti-acid therapy. PMID:26215241

  17. Effect of reflux ratio on COD and nitrogen removals from coke plant wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Shi, X L; Hu, X B; Wang, Z; Ding, L L; Ren, H Q

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory-scale anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic-moving bed biofilm reactor (A1-A2-O-MBBR) system was undertaken to treat coke plant wastewaters from two different factories (wastewater A and B). Wastewater B had higher BOD5/COD ratio and COD/TN ratio than wastewater A. The effects of reflux ratios on COD, TN and NH3-N removals were studied. Results indicated that, with the reflux ratio increased from 2 to 5, COD removals of wastewater A and wastewater B increased from 57.4% to 72.6% and 78.2% to 88.6%, respectively. Meanwhile, TN removals were also increased accompanying reflux ratio rise, from 53.1% to 74.4% for wastewater A and 64.2% to 83.5% for wastewater B. At the same reflux ratio, compared with wastewater A, higher COD and TN removal efficiencies were observed in wastewater B, which had higher BOD5/COD and COD/TN ratio. Reflux ratio had no significant influence on NH3-N removal; 99.0% of the overall NH3-N removal efficiency was achieved by the system for both coke plant wastewaters at any tested reflux ratio. MBBR was effective in NH3-N removal, and about 95% of the NH3-N was removed in the MBBR. PMID:20555197

  18. Ultrafine metal particles immobilized on styrene/acrylic acid copolymer particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, Hisashi; Hamamoto, Shiro; Nishiyama, Fumitaka; Yasuda, Hajime

    1995-04-01

    Ultrafine metal particles immobilized on styrene/acrylic acid copolymer fine particles were produced by reducing the copolymer particles-metal ion complexes or refluxing an ethanol solution of metal ions in the presence of copolymer particles. The size of metal particles formed by reduction of the complex is smaller than that by reflux of the metal ion solution and depends on the amount of metal ions immobilized.

  19. Reflux Brines and Saline Groundwater, Murray Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, I.; Weaver, T. R.; Swane, I.

    2001-12-01

    Groundwater in the Murray Basin typically becomes more saline along its flowpaths; however, geochemical data, particularly Br/Cl ratios, indicate limited dissolution of salt from the aquifer is occurring. In the southern Murray Basin, recharge of groundwater to the deeper aquifers (Renmark Formation) is generally considered to occur at the highlands at the south basin margin while recharge to the shallow unconfined Parilla Sands aquifer occurs across much of the region. Regionally, discharge of groundwater occurs within the centre of the basin in zones of salt lakes. Groundwater in the regional recharge area of the southern Murray Basin shows dramatic variations in salinity (TDS contents ranging from 650 to >100,000 mg/L) over distances of a few kilometres in both shallow and deep aquifers. While the variation in topography is low (<70 m over 15,000 km2), local recharge and discharge processes control groundwater composition. Fresher groundwater underlies sand ridges that contain freshwater lakes located above the water table. The high salinity areas underlie a major palaeochannel, the Douglas Depression, which forms a topographic low. This depression contains abundant salt lakes and playas that represent local discharge sites for shallow groundwater. Stable isotope data show that the water in the high salinity zones underwent evaporation. Major element data (particularly Mg/Ca/SO4 ratios) indicate that the saline groundwaters have precipitated gypsum. Together the data indicate that brines produced in these saline lakes reflux into the underlying aquifers to depths of up to 180 m. In the semi-arid environment of SE Australia, reflux brines in both local and regional discharge areas are important in controlling the distribution of salinity in the Murray Basin as a whole. The observation that both shallow and deep aquifers show similar chemical trends implies that there is significant vertical interconnection throughout the basin. The confining layers are thin

  20. Modeling the detectability of vesicoureteral reflux using microwave radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F.; De Luca, Valeria; Bardati, Fernando; Snow, Brent W.; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2010-09-01

    We present the modeling efforts on antenna design, frequency selection and receiver sensitivity estimation to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) using microwave (MW) radiometry as warm urine from the bladder maintained at fever range temperature using a MW hyperthermia device reflows into the kidneys. The radiometer center frequency (fc), frequency band (Δf) and aperture radius (ra) of the physical antenna for kidney temperature monitoring are determined using a simplified universal antenna model with a circular aperture. Anatomical information extracted from the computed tomography (CT) images of children aged 4-6 years is used to construct a layered 3D tissue model. Radiometric antenna efficiency is evaluated in terms of the ratio of the power collected from the target at depth to the total power received by the antenna (η). The power ratio of the theoretical antenna is used to design a microstrip log spiral antenna with directional radiation pattern over fc ± Δf/2. Power received by the log spiral from the deep target is enhanced using a thin low-loss dielectric matching layer. A cylindrical metal cup is proposed to shield the antenna from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Transient thermal simulations are carried out to determine the minimum detectable change in the antenna brightness temperature (δTB) for 15-25 mL urine refluxes at 40-42 °C located 35 mm from the skin surface. Theoretical antenna simulations indicate maximum η over 1.1-1.6 GHz for ra = 30-40 mm. Simulations of the 35 mm radius tapered log spiral yielded a higher power ratio over fc ± Δf/2 for the 35-40 mm deep targets in the presence of an optimal matching layer. Radiometric temperature calculations indicate δTB >= 0.1 K for the 15 mL urine at 40 °C and 35 mm depth. Higher η and δTB were observed for the antenna and matching layer inside the metal cup. Reflection measurements of the log spiral in a saline phantom are in agreement with the simulation data. The numerical study

  1. Modeling the detectability of vesicoureteral reflux using microwave radiometry.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F; De Luca, Valeria; Bardati, Fernando; Snow, Brent W; Stauffer, Paul R

    2010-09-21

    We present the modeling efforts on antenna design, frequency selection and receiver sensitivity estimation to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) using microwave (MW) radiometry as warm urine from the bladder maintained at fever range temperature using a MW hyperthermia device reflows into the kidneys. The radiometer center frequency (f(c)), frequency band (Deltaf) and aperture radius (r(a)) of the physical antenna for kidney temperature monitoring are determined using a simplified universal antenna model with a circular aperture. Anatomical information extracted from the computed tomography (CT) images of children aged 4-6 years is used to construct a layered 3D tissue model. Radiometric antenna efficiency is evaluated in terms of the ratio of the power collected from the target at depth to the total power received by the antenna (eta). The power ratio of the theoretical antenna is used to design a microstrip log spiral antenna with directional radiation pattern over f(c) +/- Deltaf/2. Power received by the log spiral from the deep target is enhanced using a thin low-loss dielectric matching layer. A cylindrical metal cup is proposed to shield the antenna from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Transient thermal simulations are carried out to determine the minimum detectable change in the antenna brightness temperature (deltaT(B)) for 15-25 mL urine refluxes at 40-42 degrees C located 35 mm from the skin surface. Theoretical antenna simulations indicate maximum eta over 1.1-1.6 GHz for r(a) = 30-40 mm. Simulations of the 35 mm radius tapered log spiral yielded a higher power ratio over f(c) +/- Deltaf/2 for the 35-40 mm deep targets in the presence of an optimal matching layer. Radiometric temperature calculations indicate deltaT(B) 0.1 K for the 15 mL urine at 40 degrees C and 35 mm depth. Higher eta and deltaT(B) were observed for the antenna and matching layer inside the metal cup. Reflection measurements of the log spiral in a saline phantom are in agreement

  2. Modeling the Detectability of Vesicoureteral Reflux using Microwave Radiometry

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F.; De Luca, Valeria; Bardati, Fernando; Snow, Brent W.; Stauffer, Paul R

    2010-01-01

    We present the modeling efforts on antenna design, frequency selection and receiver sensitivity estimation to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) using microwave (MW) radiometry as the warm urine from the bladder maintained at fever range temperature using a MW hyperthermia device reflows into the kidneys. Radiometer center frequency (fc), frequency band (Δf), and aperture radius (ra) of the physical antenna for kidney temperature monitoring are determined using a simplified universal antenna model with circular aperture. Anatomical information extracted from computed tomography (CT) images of children age 4–6 years is used to construct a layered 3D tissue model. Radiometric antenna efficiency is evaluated in terms of the ratio between the power collected from the target at depth and the total power received by the antenna (η). Power ratio of the theoretical antenna is used to design a microstrip log spiral antenna with directional radiation pattern over fc ± Δf/2. Power received by the log spiral from the deep target is enhanced using a thin low-loss dielectric matching layer. A cylindrical metal cup is proposed to shield the antenna from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Transient thermal simulations are carried out to determine the minimum detectable change in antenna brightness temperature (δTB) for 15–25 mL urine refluxes at 40–42°C located 35 mm from the skin surface. Theoretical antenna simulations indicate maximum η over 1.1–1.6 GHz for ra = 30–40 mm. Simulations of the 35 mm radius tapered log spiral yielded higher power ratio over fc ± Δf/2 for the 35–40 mm deep targets in the presence of an optimal matching layer. Radiometric temperature calculations indicate δTB ≥ 0.1 K for the 15 mL urine at 40°C and 35 mm depth. Higher η and δTB were observed for the antenna and matching layer inside the metal cup. Reflection measurements of the log spiral in saline phantom are in agreement with the simulation data. Numerical study suggests

  3. Lack of correlation between extended pH monitoring and scintigraphy in the evaluation of infants with gastroesophageal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Tolia, V.; Calhoun, J.A.; Kuhns, L.R.; Kauffman, R.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Sixty-nine infants younger than 1 year of age, with symptoms of persistent vomiting, recurrent choking, apnea, persistent cough, or stridor, were evaluated for gastroesophageal reflux. All infants underwent extended intraesophageal pH monitoring for 16 to 24 hours as well as gastroesophageal scintigraphy with technetium 99m sulfur colloid to study the correlation between the two tests. Forty-eight infants exhibited reflux with extended pH monitoring whereas 46 infants showed reflux with scintigraphy. However, the diagnosis of reflux in individual patients by extended pH monitoring corresponded poorly with the diagnosis of reflux in the same patients by scintigraphy. Similarly, no correlation was observed between extended pH monitoring and scintigraphy results, whether expressed as percent gastric emptying or as gastroesophageal reflux ratio. We conclude that extended pH monitoring and scintigraphy measure different pathophysiologic phenomena and detect reflux under different conditions. The ability of these tests to detect reflux may be complementary and they may be of greatest value when used together to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic evaluation. Extended pH monitoring and scintigraphy should not be used interchangeably to monitor gastroesophageal reflux.

  4. Numerical modeling of dish-Stirling reflux solar receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, R. E.

    Using reflux solar receivers to collect solar energy for dish-Stirling electric power generation systems is currently being investigated by several organizations, including Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. In support of this program, Sandia has developed two numerical models describing the energy transfer within and thermal performance of pool-boiler and heat-pipe receivers. Both models are applicable to axisymmetric geometries and they both consider the radiative and convective energy transfer within the receiver cavity, the conductive and convective energy transfer within the receiver cavity, the conductive and convective energy transfer from the receiver housing, and the energy transfer to the receiver working fluid. In these models, the radiative transfer within the receiver is analyzed using a two-band (solar and infrared) net-radiation formulation for enclosure radiation. Empirical convective correlations describe the convective heat transfer from the cavity to the surroundings. The primary difference between the models is the level of detail in modeling the heat conduction through the receiver walls. The more detailed model uses a two-dimensional finite control volume method, whereas the simpler model uses a one-dimensional thermal resistance approach.

  5. Ultralight Fabric Reflux Tube (UFRT) Thermal/Vacuum Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurlbert, K. M.; Ewert, M. K.; Graf, J. P.; Keller, J. R.; Pauley, K. A.; Guenther, R. J.; Antoniak, Z. I.

    1996-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal control systems are essential to provide the necessary environment for the crew and equipment to function adequately on space missions. The Ultralight Fabric Reflux Tube (UFRT) was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as a lightweight radiator concept to be used on planetary-type missions (e.g., Moon, Mars). The UFRT consists of a thin-walled tube (acting as the fluid boundary), overwrapped with a low-mass ceramic fabric (acting as the primary pressure boundary). The tubes are placed in an array in the vertical position with the evaporators at the lower end. Heat is added to the evaporators, which vaporizes the working fluid. The vapor travels to the condenser end above and cools as heat is radiated to the environment. The fluid condensed on the tube wall is then returned to the evaporator by gravity. The primary objectives for the fiscal year 1994 program included the design and fabrication of prototype UFRTs and thermal/vacuum chamber testing of these test articles. Six UFRTS, with improved titanium liners, were successfully manufactured and provided to the Johnson Space Center in July 1994. Five were tested in a thermal/vacuum chamber in September 1994. Data obtained to characterize the performance of the UFRTs under simulated lunar conditions demonstrated the design concept successfully. In addition, a trade study showed that an optimized/improved UFRT could achieve as much as a 25% mass savings in the heat rejection subsystem of future planetary-type thermal control systems.

  6. Gastroesophageal reflux in critically ill children: a review.

    PubMed

    Solana García, Maria José; López-Herce Cid, Jesús; Sánchez Sánchez, César

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is very common in children due to immaturity of the antireflux barrier. In critically ill patients there is also a high incidence due to a partial or complete loss of pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter though other factors, such as the use of nasogastric tubes, treatment with adrenergic agonists, bronchodilators, or opiates and mechanical ventilation, can further increase the risk of GER. Vomiting and regurgitation are the most common manifestations in infants and are considered pathological when they have repercussions on the nutritional status. In critically ill children, damage to the esophageal mucosa predisposes to digestive tract hemorrhage and nosocomial pneumonia secondary to repeated microaspiration. GER is mainly alkaline in children, as is also the case in critically ill pediatric patients. pH-metry combined with multichannel intraluminal impedance is therefore the technique of choice for diagnosis. The proton pump inhibitors are the drugs of choice for the treatment of GER because they have a greater effect, longer duration of action, and a good safety profile. PMID:23431462

  7. Gastroesophageal Reflux in Critically Ill Children: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Solana García, Maria José; López-Herce Cid, Jesús; Sánchez Sánchez, César

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is very common in children due to immaturity of the antireflux barrier. In critically ill patients there is also a high incidence due to a partial or complete loss of pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter though other factors, such as the use of nasogastric tubes, treatment with adrenergic agonists, bronchodilators, or opiates and mechanical ventilation, can further increase the risk of GER. Vomiting and regurgitation are the most common manifestations in infants and are considered pathological when they have repercussions on the nutritional status. In critically ill children, damage to the esophageal mucosa predisposes to digestive tract hemorrhage and nosocomial pneumonia secondary to repeated microaspiration. GER is mainly alkaline in children, as is also the case in critically ill pediatric patients. pH-metry combined with multichannel intraluminal impedance is therefore the technique of choice for diagnosis. The proton pump inhibitors are the drugs of choice for the treatment of GER because they have a greater effect, longer duration of action, and a good safety profile. PMID:23431462

  8. Numerical modeling of dish-Stirling reflux solar receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Using reflux solar receivers to collect solar energy for dish-Stirling electric power generation systems is currently being investigated by several organizations, including Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. In support of this program, Sandia has developed two numerical models describing the energy transfer within and thermal performance of pool-boiler and heat-pipe receivers. Both models are applicable to axisymmetric geometries and they both consider the radiative and convective energy transfer within the receiver cavity, the conductive and convective energy transfer within the receiver cavity, the conductive and convective energy transfer from the receiver housing, and the energy transfer to the receiver working fluid. In these models, the radiative transfer within the receiver is analyzed using a two-band (solar and infrared) net-radiation formulation for enclosure radiation. Empirical convective correlations describe the convective heat transfer from the cavity to the surroundings. The primary difference between the models is the level of detail in modeling the heat conduction through the receiver walls. The more detailed model uses a two-dimensional finite control volume method, whereas the simpler model uses a one-dimensional thermal resistance approach. 20 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Vesicoureteral reflux in infants with isolated antenatal hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Phan, Véronique; Traubici, Jeffrey; Hershenfield, Brian; Stephens, Derek; Rosenblum, Norman D; Geary, Denis F

    2003-12-01

    Standardized evaluation of all newborns with antenatally recognized hydronephrosis (ANH) at The Hospital for Sick Children (HSC) has included voiding cystourethrography (VCUG). This paper reviews this protocol to determine: (1) the prevalence of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in isolated ANH and (2) the value of performing VCUG in cases of mild hydronephrosis, defined as renal pelvis dilatation <10 mm on postnatal ultrasonography (US). A retrospective chart review was performed on infants referred with ANH. The inclusion criterion was isolated ANH. Exclusion criteria were (1) presence of additional genitourinary abnormalities and (2) no VCUG. Pelviectasis was categorized according to the anteroposterior diameter of the renal pelvis. There were 111 infants with isolated ANH. All except 3 underwent VCUG. There were 68 children (63%) with normal postnatal US or mild pelviectasis (<10 mm). VUR was detected in 16 patients, of whom 10 had mild or absent pelvic dilatation. There was no correlation between the degree of pelviectasis on postnatal US and the presence or severity of VUR ( P=0.567 and P=0.802). VUR was detected in 15% of children with isolated ANH, many of whom had normal postnatal US or mild postnatal pelviectasis. VCUG is the only reliable test for detecting postnatal VUR. PMID:14586679

  10. The treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease with laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication: prospective evaluation of 100 patients with "typical" symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, J H; DeMeester, T R; Crookes, P; Oberg, S; de Vos Shoop, M; Hagen, J A; Bremner, C G

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate prospectively the outcome of laparoscopic fundoplication in a large cohort of patients with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The development of laparoscopic fundoplication over the past several years has resulted in renewed interest in the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). METHODS: One hundred patients with typical symptoms of GERD were studied. The study was limited to patients with positive 24-hour pH studies and "typical" symptoms of GERD. Laparoscopic fundoplication was performed when clinical assessment suggested adequate esophageal motility and length. Outcome measures included assessment of the relief of the primary symptom responsible for surgery; the patient's and the physician's evaluation of outcome; quality of life evaluation; repeated upper endoscopy in 30 patients with presurgical esophagitis; and postsurgical physiologic studies in 28 unselected patients, consisting of 24-hour esophageal pH and lower esophageal sphincter manometry. RESULTS: Relief of the primary symptom responsible for surgery was achieved in 96% of patients at a mean follow-up of 21 months. Seventy-one patients were asymptomatic, 24 had minor gastrointestinal symptoms not requiring medical therapy, 3 had gastrointestinal symptoms requiring medical therapy, and 2 were worsened by the procedure. Eighty-three patients considered themselves cured, 11 were improved, and 1 was worse. Occasional difficulty swallowing not present before surgery occurred in 7 patients at 3 months, and decreased to 2 patients by 12 months after surgery. There were no deaths. Clinically significant complications occurred in four patients. Median hospital stay was 3 days, decreasing from 6.3 in the first 10 patients to 2.3 in the last 10 patients. Endoscopic esophagitis healed in 28 of 30 patients who had presurgical esophagitis and returned for follow-up endoscopy. Twenty-four-hour esophageal acid exposure had returned to

  11. A Review of New Surgical and Endoscopic Therapies for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the United States today is binary, with the majority of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease being treated with antisecre-tory medications and a minority of patients, typically those with volume regurgitation, undergoing Nissen fundoplication. However, there has been increasing dissatisfaction with proton pump inhibitor therapy among a significant number of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease owing to cost, side effects, and refractory symptoms, and there has been a general reluctance to undergo surgical fundoplication due to its attendant side-effect profile. As a result, a therapy gap exists for many patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Alternative techniques are available for these gap patients, including 2 endoscopic fundoplication techniques, an endoscopic radiofrequency energy delivery technique, and 2 minimally invasive surgical procedures. These alternative techniques have been extensively evaluated; however, there are limitations to published studies, including arbitrary definitions of success, variable efficacy measurements, deficient reporting tools, inconsistent study designs, inconsistent lengths of follow-up postintervention, and lack of comparison data across techniques. Although all of the techniques appear to be safe, the endoscopic techniques lack demonstrable reflux control and show variable symptom improvement and variable decreases in proton pump inhibitor use. The surgical techniques are more robust, with evidence for adequate reflux control, symptom improvement, and decreased proton pump inhibitor use; however, these techniques are more difficult to perform and are more intrusive. Additionally, these alternative techniques have only been studied in patients with relatively normal anatomy. The field of gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment is in need of consistent definitions of efficacy, standardized study design and outcome measurements, and improved reporting

  12. A Review of New Surgical and Endoscopic Therapies for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the United States today is binary, with the majority of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease being treated with antisecre-tory medications and a minority of patients, typically those with volume regurgitation, undergoing Nissen fundoplication. However, there has been increasing dissatisfaction with proton pump inhibitor therapy among a significant number of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease owing to cost, side effects, and refractory symptoms, and there has been a general reluctance to undergo surgical fundoplication due to its attendant side-effect profile. As a result, a therapy gap exists for many patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Alternative techniques are available for these gap patients, including 2 endoscopic fundoplication techniques, an endoscopic radiofrequency energy delivery technique, and 2 minimally invasive surgical procedures. These alternative techniques have been extensively evaluated; however, there are limitations to published studies, including arbitrary definitions of success, variable efficacy measurements, deficient reporting tools, inconsistent study designs, inconsistent lengths of follow-up postintervention, and lack of comparison data across techniques. Although all of the techniques appear to be safe, the endoscopic techniques lack demonstrable reflux control and show variable symptom improvement and variable decreases in proton pump inhibitor use. The surgical techniques are more robust, with evidence for adequate reflux control, symptom improvement, and decreased proton pump inhibitor use; however, these techniques are more difficult to perform and are more intrusive. Additionally, these alternative techniques have only been studied in patients with relatively normal anatomy. The field of gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment is in need of consistent definitions of efficacy, standardized study design and outcome measurements, and improved reporting

  13. Assessment of the Safety and Efficacy of a Raft-Forming Alginate Reflux Suppressant (Liquid Gaviscon) for the Treatment of Heartburn during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Strugala, Vicki; Bassin, Julian; Swales, Valerie S.; Lindow, Stephen W.; Dettmar, Peter W.; Thomas, Edward C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER) and the symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation are common in pregnancy. These symptoms are transient and mostly resolve postpartum but have a negative impact on quality of life. Here, we present a prospective clinical evaluation of the safety and efficacy of an alginate raft-forming oral suspension that is licensed for use in pregnancy. The study was a multicentre, prospective, open-label, and baseline-controlled study of Liquid Gaviscon (LG) in the treatment of heartburn in pregnant women with current symptoms of heartburn and/or reflux requiring treatment (recruited 144). The efficacy of the study medication was rated by the investigator (primary endpoint) and patient. Treatment was deemed to be a success in 91% of patients as judged by the investigator (95% CI 85.0–95.3) and 90% (95% CI 84.1–94.8) when assessed by the patient themselves. Very few adverse events or serious adverse events were reported that were considered to be related to the study medication, and these were consistent with the normal population incidences. Serum sodium levels remained unchanged. This prospective open-label study in a large number of pregnant women has shown that LG is both safe and highly efficacious in the treatment of heartburn and GER symptoms in pregnancy. PMID:23209926

  14. Assessment of the Safety and Efficacy of a Raft-Forming Alginate Reflux Suppressant (Liquid Gaviscon) for the Treatment of Heartburn during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Strugala, Vicki; Bassin, Julian; Swales, Valerie S; Lindow, Stephen W; Dettmar, Peter W; Thomas, Edward C M

    2012-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER) and the symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation are common in pregnancy. These symptoms are transient and mostly resolve postpartum but have a negative impact on quality of life. Here, we present a prospective clinical evaluation of the safety and efficacy of an alginate raft-forming oral suspension that is licensed for use in pregnancy. The study was a multicentre, prospective, open-label, and baseline-controlled study of Liquid Gaviscon (LG) in the treatment of heartburn in pregnant women with current symptoms of heartburn and/or reflux requiring treatment (recruited 144). The efficacy of the study medication was rated by the investigator (primary endpoint) and patient. Treatment was deemed to be a success in 91% of patients as judged by the investigator (95% CI 85.0-95.3) and 90% (95% CI 84.1-94.8) when assessed by the patient themselves. Very few adverse events or serious adverse events were reported that were considered to be related to the study medication, and these were consistent with the normal population incidences. Serum sodium levels remained unchanged. This prospective open-label study in a large number of pregnant women has shown that LG is both safe and highly efficacious in the treatment of heartburn and GER symptoms in pregnancy. PMID:23209926

  15. Upregulation of miRNA-143, -145, -192, and -194 in esophageal epithelial cells upon acidic bile salt stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bus, P; Siersema, P D; Verbeek, R E; van Baal, J W P M

    2014-08-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a metaplastic condition of the distal esophagus that occurs because of chronic gastroesophageal reflux. Previous studies have identified BE-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) in comparison with normal squamous epithelium (SQ). We hypothesized that BE-specific miRNAs could be induced in esophageal SQ cells by exposure to acid and/or bile salts. We aimed to determine whether BE-specific miRNAs are upregulated in an esophageal SQ cell line (Het-1A) in an environment with acid and/or bile salts and whether this is nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) dependent. Acid and/or bile salt incubations were performed in Het-1A cells. Experiments were performed with or without inhibiting the NF-κB pathway. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine expression of miRNA-143, -145, -192, -194, cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX2), mucin 2 (MUC2), and sex determining region Y-box 9. For validation, we determined levels of these miRNAs in biopsies from patients with reflux esophagitis and normal SQ. Significantly increased expression levels of miRNA-143 (2.7-fold), -145 (2.6-fold), -192 (2.0-fold), -194 (2.2-fold), COX2, MUC2, and sex determining region Y-box 9 were found upon acidic bile salt incubation, but not upon acid or bile salt alone. NF-κB pathway inhibition significantly decreased miRNA-143, -192, -194, COX2, and MUC2 expression. Additionally, miRNA-143, -145 and -194 expression was increased in reflux esophagitis biopsies compared with normal SQ, but no changes were found in miRNA-192 expression. Our findings suggest that upregulation of BE-specific miRNAs by acidic bile may be an early event in the transition of SQ to BE and that their expression is partly regulated by the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24006894

  16. Impaired Esophageal Mucosal Integrity May Play a Causative Role in Patients With Nongastroesophageal Reflux Disease–Related Noncardiac Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yang Won; Choi, Kyu; Pyo, Jeung Hui; Son, Hee Jung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Baseline impedance (BI) measurement can be used to evaluate the status of the esophageal mucosa integrity. We hypothesized that impaired esophageal mucosal integrity may play a causative role in patients with nongastroesophageal reflux disease (non-GERD)–related noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). This retrospective study analyzed 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH testing data from 77 patients with NCCP and 5 healthy volunteers. BI was calculated at 3 cm (distal esophagus) and 17 cm (proximal esophagus) above the lower esophageal sphincter. GERD was defined by the presence of pathologic acid exposure or reflux esophagitis. Among the 77 patients with NCCP, 16 (20.8%) were classified into the GERD-related NCCP group and 61 (79.2%) into the non-GERD-related NCCP group. BI (median, interquartile range) of the non-GERD-related NCCP group was lower than the control group at the proximal esophagus (2507 Ω, 2156–3217 vs 3855 Ω, 3238–4182, P = 0.001) but was similar at the distal esophagus. The GERD-related NCCP group showed lower BI than the control group at both the distal and proximal esophagus (2024 Ω, 1619–2308 vs 3203 Ω, 2366–3774, P = 0.007 and 2272 Ω, 1896–2908 vs 3855 Ω, 3238–4182, P = 0.003, respectively). At the distal esophagus, BI was lower in the GERD-related NCCP group than the non-GERD-related NCCP group (P = 0.002), whereas it did not differ between the 2 groups at the proximal esophagus. In conclusion, the mucosal integrity is impaired at the proximal esophagus in patients with non-GERD-related NCCP, which might be the pathogenic mechanism of NCCP. PMID:26705212

  17. Impaired Esophageal Mucosal Integrity May Play a Causative Role in Patients With Nongastroesophageal Reflux Disease-Related Noncardiac Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Min, Yang Won; Choi, Kyu; Pyo, Jeung Hui; Son, Hee Jung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-12-01

    Baseline impedance (BI) measurement can be used to evaluate the status of the esophageal mucosa integrity. We hypothesized that impaired esophageal mucosal integrity may play a causative role in patients with nongastroesophageal reflux disease (non-GERD)-related noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). This retrospective study analyzed 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH testing data from 77 patients with NCCP and 5 healthy volunteers. BI was calculated at 3 cm (distal esophagus) and 17 cm (proximal esophagus) above the lower esophageal sphincter. GERD was defined by the presence of pathologic acid exposure or reflux esophagitis. Among the 77 patients with NCCP, 16 (20.8%) were classified into the GERD-related NCCP group and 61 (79.2%) into the non-GERD-related NCCP group. BI (median, interquartile range) of the non-GERD-related NCCP group was lower than the control group at the proximal esophagus (2507 Ω, 2156-3217 vs 3855 Ω, 3238-4182, P = 0.001) but was similar at the distal esophagus. The GERD-related NCCP group showed lower BI than the control group at both the distal and proximal esophagus (2024 Ω, 1619-2308 vs 3203 Ω, 2366-3774, P = 0.007 and 2272 Ω, 1896-2908 vs 3855 Ω, 3238-4182, P = 0.003, respectively). At the distal esophagus, BI was lower in the GERD-related NCCP group than the non-GERD-related NCCP group (P = 0.002), whereas it did not differ between the 2 groups at the proximal esophagus. In conclusion, the mucosal integrity is impaired at the proximal esophagus in patients with non-GERD-related NCCP, which might be the pathogenic mechanism of NCCP. PMID:26705212

  18. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Is Associated With an Increased Rate of Acute Rejection in Lung Transplant Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Shah, N.S.; Force, S.D.; Mitchell, P.O.; Lin, E.; Lawrence, E.C.; Easley, K.; Qian, J.; Ramirez, A.; Neujahr, D.C.; Gal, A.; Leeper, K.; Pelaez, A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Gastric fundoplication (GF) for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may protect against the progression of chronic rejection in lung transplant (LT) recipients. However, the association of GERD with acute rejection episodes (ARE) is uncertain. This study sought to identify if ARE were linked to GERD in LT patients. Methods This single-center retrospective observational study, of patients transplanted from January 1, 2000, to January 31, 2009, correlated results of pH probe testing for GERD with ARE (≥International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation A1 or B1). We compared the rates of ARE among patients with GERD (DeMeester Score > 14.7) versus without GERD as number of ARE per 1,000 patient-days after LT. Patients undergoing GF prior to LT were excluded. Results The analysis included 60 LT subjects and 9,249 patient-days: 33 with GERD versus 27 without GERD. We observed 51 ARE among 60 LT recipients. The rate of ARE was highest among patients with GERD: 8.49 versus 2.58, an incidence density ratio (IDR) of 3.29 (P = .00016). Upon multivariate negative binomial regression modeling, only GERD was associated with ARE (IDR 2.15; P = .009). Furthermore, GERD was associated with multiple ARE (36.4% vs 0%; P < .0001) and earlier onset compared with patients without GERD: ARE proportion at 2 months was 0.55 versus 0.26 P = .004). Conclusion In LT recipients, GERD was associated with a higher rate, multiple events, and earlier onset of ARE. The efficacy of GF to reduce ARE among patients with GERD needs further evaluation. PMID:20832573

  19. Ambulatory monitoring of oesophageal pH in reflux oesophagitis using a portable radiotelemetry system.

    PubMed Central

    Branicki, F J; Evans, D F; Ogilvie, A L; Atkinson, M; Hardcastle, J D

    1982-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux has been assessed in 10 symptomatic patients and 10 asymptomatic normal subjects during a study period of 24 hours at work and in the home using a newly developed pH sensitive radiotelemetry capsule and a portable receiving system. Oesophageal pH was continuously monitored by the tethered radiotelemetry capsule and recorded with a portable receiver and a 24-hour cassette recorder, allowing the patient complete freedom of movement so that ambulatory studies could be undertaken during a normal working day. The number and duration of reflux episodes was greater in symptomatic patients than normal subjects during 24-hour studies at home (p less than 0.002). In both groups, reflux occurred more during the day than at night (p less than 0.01). Patients refluxed significantly more at home than when they were in hospital (p less than 0.01). Ambulatory outpatient oesophageal pH monitoring may be useful in the management of patients with atypical symptoms and may demonstrate significant reflux when inpatient investigations and endoscopy findings show minimal abnormality. PMID:7129208

  20. Empiric treatment of children with gastroesophageal reflux-like symptoms: Effect of proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Mehmet; Yamaç, Pınar; Baysoy, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is an important cause of morbidity in childhood. Although various diagnostic methods are available, short course of empiric treatment with a proton pump inhibitor is widely used in adults as a diagnostic test. Data about empiric treatment is scarce in children. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of empiric treatment of reflux-like symptoms in children. Pediatric gastroenterology outpatient files were searched and patients with a diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux were found. Patient complaints, history and the treatments provided were recorded. Treatment naive patients older than 2 years of age with symptoms suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux were selected and included if they were given empiric treatment with a proton pump inhibitor. Empiric treatment was found to be effective in 78% of patients. Treatment response tended to be better in children older than 5 years of age. Of the 22 non-responders 9 underwent endoscopy and pathological findings were discovered in 7 of them. Treatment of children with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms with a proton pump inhibitor might significantly decrease the need for extensive evaluations. However it is important to investigate non-responders to empiric therapy, as it seems there might be high probability of pathological findings. PMID:27411415

  1. Physician Preference is a Major Factor in Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Olivia T.; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Kurzrock, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Known factors affecting the management of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) include reflux grade, infection frequency, age and gender. We hypothesized that provider preference is highly associated with management. Methods Utilizing the national billing database, Faculty Practice Solutions Center (FPSC), a multivariable logistic regression model was applied to analyze the association of pediatric urologist treatment patterns, patient age, gender, uni- or bilateral disease, insurance type, presence of nephropathy and race with the type of VUR treatment a patient would receive. Results We identified 59 pediatric urologists who managed 7,882 new reflux patients from 2009 to 2011. There was wide variation in surgical utilization between surgeons (mean 50%) but minimal change for each surgeon (5%) over the 3-year period. For every 100 new reflux patients, surgeon median utilization of reimplant and Deflux was 26% and 20%, respectively. Age ranked highest in predicting surgical vs. non-surgical management. A surgeon’s historic Deflux utilization rate ranked highest in predicting surgery type. Older age, female gender and white race also increased the odds of Deflux utilization over reimplant. Conclusions A surgeon’s historic Deflux utilization was the most important predictor of VUR surgery type. Although data on reflux grade was not available, analysis of patient and surgeon characteristics suggests that surgeon preference is the first or second most critical factor in determining a patient’s treatment. PMID:25099082

  2. Effect of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy on gastro-esophageal reflux in mechanically-ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Douzinas, Emmanuel E; Tsapalos, Andreas; Dimitrakopoulos, Antonios; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Rapidis, Alexandros D; Roussos, Charis

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) on gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in mechanically-ventilated patients. METHODS : In a prospective, randomized, controlled study 36 patients with recurrent or persistent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and GER > 6% were divided into PEG group (n = 16) or non-PEG group (n  = 20). Another 11 ventilated patients without reflux (GER < 3%) served as control group. Esophageal pH-metry was performed by the “pull through” method at baseline, 2 and 7 d after PEG. Patients were strictly followed up for semi-recumbent position and control of gastric nutrient residue. RESULTS: A significant decrease of median (range) reflux was observed in PEG group from 7.8 (6.2 - 15.6) at baseline to 2.7 (0 - 10.4) on d 7 post-gastrostomy (P < 0.01), while the reflux increased from 9 (6.2 - 22) to 10.8 (6.3 - 36.6) (P < 0.01) in non-PEG group. A significant correlation between GER (%) and the stay of nasogastric tube was detected (r = 0.56, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Gastrostomy when combined with semi-recumbent position and absence of nutrient gastric residue reduces the gastroesophageal reflux in ventilated patients. PMID:16440428

  3. Review article: gastro-oesophageal reflux disease--the health economic implications.

    PubMed

    Mason, J; Hungin, A P S

    2005-08-01

    For the vast majority of patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease appropriate care involves the management of symptoms with lifestyle advice and drugs. However, there is dissension about the appropriate use of endoscopy, whether drugs should be stepped up or down according to potency, how long drugs should be used for, the role of lifestyle advice, and, related to this, the role of patients' lifestyle choices. This exploration of the economics of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease reviews its cost burden to the UK, assesses published economic models for their strengths and weaknesses and examines current recommendations for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease management from a socioeconomic perspective. Drugs prescribed predominantly for dyspepsia cost the UK National Health Service a projected pound sterling 625 million in 2004, 7% of the primary care prescribing budget. When general practitioners consultations, endoscopies, over-the-counter sales and sickness absences are included the UK cost rises to pound sterling 1.5 billion: approximately half of this cost can be ascribed to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Emphasis upon regular review and stepping down treatment (while maintaining adequate symptom relief) is both clinically appropriate and resource efficient. Other cost-effectiveness issues largely lack objective answers because investment in treatment for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease depends upon how much more, at the margin, society wishes to invest for further but diminishing symptom relief. PMID:16042656

  4. Is pepsin detected in the saliva of patients who experience pharyngeal reflux?

    PubMed Central

    Printza, A; Speletas, M; Triaridis, S; Wilson, J

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate if pepsin is detected, with an activity assay, in the saliva of patients with a clinical diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and can therefore be used as a diagnostic marker of laryngopharyngeal reflux. Study design: Pilot, prospective study. Methods: Adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of LPR collected whole saliva samples on regular intervals for a day, and upon experiencing symptoms attributed to LPR. Patients were selected on the basis of presence of severe symptoms and laryngoscopic findings of laryngopharyngeal reflux and symptoms of gastroesopharyngeal reflux. They reported voice disorders, dysphagia, throat clearing, excessive secretions, breathing difficulties, cough, globus sensation and throat pain. Control participants reported the absence of pharyngeal and laryngeal symptoms and of symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. Saliva samples were assayed with fibrinogen on an agarose gel plate. The detection of pepsin was based on the presence of peptic activity which was qualitatively evaluated. Results: The control participants had negative assays. No saliva samples from the LPR patients, collected at regular sampling, tested positive for pepsin. All the samples collected at the presence of symptoms and following regurgitation episodes tested negative for pepsin. Saliva samples pH ranged from 7 to 8. Conclusions: Pepsin was not detected, with an activity assay, in the saliva of patients with a clinical diagnosis of LPR. A concentration method might be more sensitive although saliva and swallowing physiology renders the detection of pepsin in the saliva difficult. PMID:19582210

  5. In-vivo anti-reflux and raft properties of alginates.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J R; Korman, M G; Nicholson, L; Chan, J G

    1990-12-01

    The comparative efficacy of two alginate-containing anti-reflux preparations (Gaviscon, Algicon) was assessed in a single blind crossover study of 20 patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. The clinical efficacy study was preceded by two studies in healthy volunteers to assess the intragastric effects of Algicon and Gaviscon by pH measurement, endoscopic visualization and gamma scintigraphy. Algicon and Gaviscon were shown to form a raft in the fasting and fed human stomach, with Algicon alone having a potent antacid effect below and within the raft. Both Algicon and Gaviscon liquids significantly reduced the frequency and severity of reflux symptoms from baseline when given at their recommended doses (10 ml and 20 ml four times daily, respectively). There were no significant differences between Algicon and Gaviscon, although 12 patients preferred Algicon (vs 5 for Gaviscon) for control of reflux symptoms. It was concluded that both Algicon and Gaviscon were effective for the symptomatic control of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. PMID:2129648

  6. Effect of electrical stimulation of the lower esophageal sphincter in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients refractory to proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Soffer, Edy; Rodríguez, Leonardo; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gómez, Beatriz; Neto, Manoel G; Crowell, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of lower esophageal sphincter (LES)-electrical stimulation therapy (EST) in a subgroup of patients that reported only partial response to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) therapy, compared to a group of patient with complete response. METHODS: Bipolar stitch electrodes were laparoscopically placed in the LES and connected to an implantable pulse generator (EndoStim BV, the Hague, the Netherlands), placed subcutaneously in the anterior abdominal wall. Stimulation at 20 Hz, 215 μsec, 3-8 mAmp in 30 min sessions was delivered starting on day 1 post-implant. Patients were evaluated using gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-HRQL, symptom diaries; esophageal pH and esophageal manometry before and up to 24 mo after therapy and results were compared between partial and complete responders. RESULTS: Twenty-three patients with GERD on LES-EST were enrolled and received continuous per-protocol stimulation through 12 mo and 21 patients completed 24 mo of therapy. Of the 23 patients, 16 (8 male, mean age 52.1 ± 12 years) had incomplete response to PPIs prior to LES-EST, while 7 patients (5 male, mean age 52.7 ± 4.7) had complete response to PPIs. In the sub-group with incomplete response to PPIs, median (IQR) composite GERD-HRQL score improved significantly from 9.5 (9.0-10.0) at baseline on-PPI and 24.0 (20.8-26.3) at baseline off-PPI to 2.5 (0.0-4.0) at 12-mo and 0.0 (0.0-2.5) at 24-mo follow-up (P < 0.05 compared to on-and off-PPI at baseline). Median (IQR) % 24-h esophageal pH < 4.0 at baseline in this sub-group improved significantly from 9.8% (7.8-11.5) at baseline to 3.0% (1.9-6.3) at 12 mo (P < 0.001) and 4.6% (2.0-5.8) at 24 mo follow-up (P < 0.01). At their 24-mo follow-up, 9/11 patients in this sub-group were completely free of PPI use. These results were comparable to the sub-group that reported complete response to PPI therapy at baseline. No unanticipated implantation or stimulation-related adverse events, or any untoward sensation

  7. Structural analysis of a reflux pool-boiler solar receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, E. L.; Stone, C. M.

    1991-06-01

    Coupled thermal-structural finite element calculations of a reflux pool-boiler solar receiver were performed to characterize the operating stresses and to address issues affecting the service life of the receiver. Analyses performed using shell elements provided information for receiver material selection and design optimization. Calculations based on linear elastic fracture mechanics principles were performed using continuum elements to assess the vulnerability of a seam-weld to fatigue crack growth. All calculations were performed using ABAQUS, a general purpose finite element code, and elements specifically formulated for coupled thermal-structural analysis. Two materials were evaluated: 316L SS and Haynes 230 alloys. The receiver response was simulated for a combination of structural and thermal loads that represent the startup and operating conditions of the receiver. For both materials, maximum stresses in the receiver developed shortly after startup due to uneven temperature distribution across the receiver surface. The largest effective stress was near yield in the 316L SS receiver and below 39 percent of yield in the Haynes 230 receiver. The calculations demonstrated that stress reductions of over 25 percent could be obtained by reducing the aft dome thickness to one closer to the absorber. The fatigue calculations demonstrated that the stress distribution near the seam-weld notch depends primarily on the structural load created by internal pressurization of the receiver rather than the thermal, indicating that the thermal loads can be neglected when assessing the stress intensity near the seam-weld notch. The stress intensity factor, computed using the J-integral method and crack opening-displacement field equations, was significantly below the fatigue threshold for most steels. The calculations indicated that the weld notch was always loaded in compression, a condition which is not conducive to fatigue crack growth.

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in COPD: links and risks

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Annemarie L; Goldstein, Roger S

    2015-01-01

    COPD is a long-term condition associated with considerable disability with a clinical course characterized by episodes of worsening respiratory signs and symptoms associated with exacerbations. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common gastrointestinal conditions in the general population and has emerged as a comorbidity of COPD. GERD may be diagnosed by both symptomatic approaches (including both typical and atypical symptoms) and objective measurements. Based on a mix of diagnostic approaches, the prevalence of GERD in COPD ranges from 17% to 78%. Although GERD is usually confined to the lower esophagus in some individuals, it may be associated with pulmonary microaspiration of gastric contents. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to GERD in COPD originate from gastroesophageal dysfunction, including altered pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (which normally protect against GERD) and changes in esophageal motility. Proposed respiratory contributions to the development of GERD include respiratory medications that may alter esophageal sphincter tone and changes in respiratory mechanics, with increased lung hyperinflation compromising the antireflux barrier. Although the specific cause and effect relationship between GERD and COPD has not been fully elucidated, GERD may influence lung disease severity and has been identified as a significant predictor of acute exacerbations of COPD. Further clinical effects could include a poorer health-related quality of life and an increased cost in health care, although these factors require further clarification. There are both medical and surgical options available for the treatment of GERD in COPD and while extensive studies in this population have not been undertaken, this comorbidity may be amenable to treatment. PMID:26392769

  9. Gastroesophageal Reflux is Not Associated with Dental Erosion in Children

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Yvette K.; Heyman, Melvin B.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Dalal, Deepal H.; Wojcicki, Janet M.; Clark, Ann L.; Rechmann, Beate; Rechmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Dental erosion is a complication of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in adults; in children, it is not clear if GER has a role in dental pathologic conditions. Dietary intake, oral hygiene, high bacterial load, and decreased salivary flow might contribute independently to GER development or dental erosion, but their potential involvement in dental erosion from GER is not understood. We investigated the prevalence of dental erosion among children with and without GER symptoms, and whether salivary flow rate or bacterial load contribute to location-specific dental erosion. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 59 children (ages 9–17 y) with symptoms of GER and 20 asymptomatic children (controls); all completed a questionnaire on dietary exposure. Permanent teeth were examined for erosion into dentin, erosion locations, and affected surfaces. The dentist was not aware of GER status, nor was the gastroenterologist aware of dental status. Stimulated salivary flow was measured and salivary bacterial load was calculated for total bacteria, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Results Controlling for age, dietary intake, and oral hygiene, there was no association between GER symptoms and dental erosion, by tooth location or affected surface. Salivary flow did not correlate with GER symptoms or erosion. Erosion location and surface were independent of total bacteria and levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Conclusions Location-specific dental erosion is not associated with GER, salivary flow, or bacterial load. Prospective studies are required to determine the pathogenesis of GER-associated dental erosion and the relationship between dental caries to GER and dental erosion. PMID:21820389

  10. Risk factors of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Shiraz, southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saberi-Firoozi, Mehdi; Khademolhosseini, Farnaz; Yousefi, Maryam; Mehrabani, Davood; Zare, Najaf; Heydari, Seyed Taghi

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in a healthy general population in relation to demographic, lifestyle and health-seeking behaviors in Shiraz, southern Iran. METHODS: A total of 1978 subjects aged > 35 years who referred to Gastroenterohepatology Research Center and who completed a questionnaire consisting of 27 questions for GERD in relation to demographic, lifestyle and health-seeking behaviors were included in this study for a period of five months. The validity and reliability of the questionnaire were determined. RESULTS: The prevalence of GERD was 15.4%, which was higher in females (17.3%), in rural areas (19.8%), and in illiterate subjects (21.5%) and those with a mean age of 50.25 years. The prevalence was significantly lower in subjects having fried food (14.8%), and fruit and vegetables (14.6%). More symptoms were noticed in subjects consuming pickles (22.1%), taking aspirin (21%) and in subjects with psychological distresses (27.2%) and headaches (22%). The correlation was statistically significant between GERD and halitosis (18.3%), dyspepsia (30.6%), anxiety (19.5%), nightmares (23.9%) and restlessness (18.5%). Their health seeking behavior showed that there was a significant restriction of diet (20%), consumption of herbal medicine (19%), using over-the-counter drugs (29.9%) and consulting with physicians (24.8%). Presence of GERD symptoms was also significantly related to a previous family history of the disease (22.3%). CONCLUSION: GERD is more common in females, rural and illiterate subjects and correlated with consumption of pickles, occurrence of headache, psychological distress, dyspepsia, halitosis, anxiety, nightmare and restlessness, and a family history of GERD and aspirin intake, but the correlation was negative with consumption of fat and fiber intake. PMID:17907293

  11. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in COPD: links and risks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Annemarie L; Goldstein, Roger S

    2015-01-01

    COPD is a long-term condition associated with considerable disability with a clinical course characterized by episodes of worsening respiratory signs and symptoms associated with exacerbations. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common gastrointestinal conditions in the general population and has emerged as a comorbidity of COPD. GERD may be diagnosed by both symptomatic approaches (including both typical and atypical symptoms) and objective measurements. Based on a mix of diagnostic approaches, the prevalence of GERD in COPD ranges from 17% to 78%. Although GERD is usually confined to the lower esophagus in some individuals, it may be associated with pulmonary microaspiration of gastric contents. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to GERD in COPD originate from gastroesophageal dysfunction, including altered pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (which normally protect against GERD) and changes in esophageal motility. Proposed respiratory contributions to the development of GERD include respiratory medications that may alter esophageal sphincter tone and changes in respiratory mechanics, with increased lung hyperinflation compromising the antireflux barrier. Although the specific cause and effect relationship between GERD and COPD has not been fully elucidated, GERD may influence lung disease severity and has been identified as a significant predictor of acute exacerbations of COPD. Further clinical effects could include a poorer health-related quality of life and an increased cost in health care, although these factors require further clarification. There are both medical and surgical options available for the treatment of GERD in COPD and while extensive studies in this population have not been undertaken, this comorbidity may be amenable to treatment. PMID:26392769

  12. Structural analysis of a reflux pool-boiler solar receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Stone, C.M.

    1991-06-01

    Coupled thermal-structural finite element calculations of a reflux pool-boiler solar receiver were performed to characterize the operating stresses and to address issues affecting the service life of the receiver. Analyses performed using shell elements provided information for receiver material selection and design optimization. Calculations based on linear elastic fracture mechanics principles were performed using continuum elements to assess the vulnerability of a seam-weld to fatigue crack growth. All calculations were performed using ABAQUS, a general purpose finite element code, and elements specifically formulated for coupled thermal-structural analysis. Two materials were evaluated: 316L SS and Haynes 230 alloys. The receiver response was simulated for a combination of structural and thermal loads that represent the startup and operating conditions of the receiver. For both materials, maximum stresses in the receiver developed shortly after startup due to uneven temperature distribution across the receiver surface. The largest effective stress was near yield in the 316L SS receiver and below 39 percent of yield in the Haynes 230 receiver. The calculations demonstrated that stress reductions of over 25 percent could be obtained by reducing the aft dome thickness to one closer to the absorber. The fatigue calculations demonstrated that the stress distribution near the seam-weld notch depends primarily on the structural load created by internal pressurization of the receiver rather than the thermal, indicating that the thermal loads can be neglected when assessing the stress intensity near the seam-weld notch. The stress intensity factor, computed using the J-integral method and crack opening-displacement field equations, was significantly below the fatigue threshold for most steels. The calculations indicated that the weld notch was always loaded in compression, a condition which is not conducive to fatigue crack growth. 15 refs., 30 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Dietary habits and gastroesophageal reflux disease in preschool children

    PubMed Central

    Choi, You Jin; Ha, Eun Kyo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the relationship between dietary habits and childhood gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in preschool children. Methods We performed a questionnaire study to analyze the relationship between dietary habits and GERD in 85 preschool children with GERD and 117 healthy children of the same age. Results Irregular and picky eating were more p–revalent in the GERD group than in the control group (odds ratio [OR], 4.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37–12.54 and OR, 4.96; 95% CI, 1.88–13.14, respectively). The snack preferences and the late night eating habits were significantly more prevalent in the GERD group than in the control group (OR, 3.83; 95% CI, 1.23–11.87 and OR, 9.51; 95% CI, 2.55–35.49, respectively). A preference for liquid foods was significantly more prevalent in the GERD group (OR, 9.51; 95% CI, 2.548–35.485). The dinner-to-bedtime interval was significantly shorter in the GERD group than in the control group (157.06±48.47 vs. 174.62±55.10, P=0.020). In addition, the time between dinner and bedtime was shorter than 3 hours in 47 children (55.3%) of the GERD group and 44 (37.6%) of the control group. This difference was statistical significance (P=0.015). Conclusion Dietary habits such as picky and irregular eating, snack preference, a preference of liquid foods, late night eating, and a shorter dinner-to-bedtime interval had a significant correlation with GERD. Further large-scale studies are necessary to confirm our results. PMID:27588031

  14. A comparison of the efficacy of the alginate preparation, Gaviscon Advance, with placebo in the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Chatfield, S

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of the sodium alginate preparation, Gaviscon Advance, with placebo in the relief of symptoms of reflux oesophagitis. This was a randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, multicentre study conducted at 13 GP centres in the UK. Patients aged between 18 and 70 years, who had experienced symptoms of reflux oesophagitis within the previous 24 h, and on two other occasions within the previous week, were recruited into the study. Patients were evaluated at baseline, and then reassessed after two and four weeks of treatment with sodium alginate or placebo, for symptoms of reflux oesophagitis in the previous 24 h. Patients were required to fill out a diary card twice daily, from which frequency and severity of symptoms were assessed, and the percentage of symptom-free days and nights calculated. Of the 100 patients recruited into the study, 98 received medication (safety population; placebo, n = 50; sodium alginate, n = 48) and 94 were eligible for inclusion in the intention-to-treat (ITT) population (placebo, n = 48; sodium alginate, n = 46). For this population, sodium alginate was assessed as significantly superior by both investigators and patients at week two (p < 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively) and at week four (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Significantly more patients in the safety population on placebo withdrew from the study (40%) compared with sodium alginate (21%; p = 0.04), due primarily to lack of effect and adverse events. The sodium alginate preparation demonstrated a superior efficacy compared with placebo, which was achieved in a more acceptable volume of medication than a previous standard preparation, Liquid Gaviscon. The reduced dosage volume of the 'new' preparation (Gaviscon Advance) may be expected to improve patient compliance, and thereby increase treatment efficacy. PMID:10621921

  15. Role of gastric acid secretion in the pathogenesis of Barrett's esophageal cancer in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Koike, Tomoyuki; Ohara, Shuichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2009-06-01

    The acidity of the refluxate into the esophagus is an important factor not only for reflux esophagitis, but also for Barrett's esophagus and the development of Barrett's esophageal cancer. On the other hand, H. pylori infection is thought to prevent reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus by causing atrophic gastritis, which in turn decreases gastric acid secretion. Moreover, the preservation of gastric acid secretion may be important for the development of gastroesophageal junction cancer, including Barrett's esophageal cancer, irrespective of the H. pylori infection status. An increase in gastric acid secretion in Japanese populations has been predicted based on a decreasing rate of H. pylori infection and the westernization of eating habits in Japan; this, in turn, may lead to an increase in the prevalence of Barrett's esophageal cancer in Japan in the future. PMID:26192284

  16. Unexpected nasal changes in rats related to reflux after gavage dosing.

    PubMed

    Damsch, Siegrid; Eichenbaum, Gary; Looszova, Adriana; Lammens, Lieve; Feyen, Bianca; Van den Bulck, Kathleen; Knight, Elaine; Kelley, Michael; Tonelli, Alfred

    2011-02-01

    In a three-week oral gavage toxicity study in rats, a high incidence of respiratory symptoms and high mortality was noted in compound-dosed rats only. Because of audible respiration, an effect in the upper respiratory tract was suspected and the nasal cavity was included for examination. Histology revealed extensive necrosis and purulent inflammation within the nasal passages, indicative of direct irritation. Since posterior nasal regions were most affected, with food material present within the inflammatory exudates, reflux and retrograde aspiration of irritant material (possibly stomach contents with test formulation) into the nasal cavity were suspected. Lowering the dose volume and fasting the rats prior to gavage dosing substantially reduced the respiratory effects and mortality. The current article focuses on the histological changes in the nasal cavity indicative of gavage-related reflux and provides guidance on differentiation between technical gavage error and gavage-related reflux. PMID:21422260

  17. Floral aroma improvement of Muscat spirits by packed column distillation with variable internal reflux.

    PubMed

    Matias-Guiu, Pau; Rodríguez-Bencomo, Juan José; Orriols, Ignacio; Pérez-Correa, José Ricardo; López, Francisco

    2016-12-15

    The organoleptic quality of wine distillates depends on raw materials and the distillation process. Previous work has shown that rectification columns in batch distillation with fixed reflux rate are useful to obtain distillates or distillate fractions with enhanced organoleptic characteristics. This study explores variable reflux rate operating strategies to increase the levels of terpenic compounds in specific distillate fractions to emphasize its floral aroma. Based on chemical and sensory analyses, two distillate heart sub-fractions obtained with the best operating strategy found, were compared with a distillate obtained in a traditional alembic. Results have shown that a drastic reduction of the reflux rate at an early stage of the heart cut produced a distillate heart sub-fraction with a higher concentration of terpenic compounds and lower levels of negative aroma compounds. Therefore, this sub-fraction presented a much more noticeable floral aroma than the distillate obtained with a traditional alembic. PMID:27451153

  18. Vesicoureteral Reflux in the Child with Lazy Bladder Syndrome: The Infrequent Voider

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Marco; Torelli, Fabrizio; Blanco, Salvatore; Fortuna, Flavio; Baruffi, Marco

    2008-01-01

    The Infrequent Voider Syndrome or Lazy Bladder Syndrome in children is characterized by a large capacity bladder, frequently associated with a significant volume of residual urine. Usually these patients arrive at medical examination with a history of recurrent urinary infections but without anomalies in the upper urinary tract. We report about a young girl affected by one-sided 2° degree vesico-ureteral reflux due to Lazy Bladder Syndrome that had never been diagnosed before. This patient has been submitted to a prompt bladder training and seems presently to have at last gained a physiological micturition after 9 months of follow-up, without actual evidence of vesicoureteral reflux. Therefore we must stress that it is prominently important considering about infrequent micturition in a paediatric case history or a large capacity bladder, possible presence of bladder dysfunction and vesicoureteral reflux too. PMID:18615185

  19. The effect of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: A parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Menne, Dieter; Schütze, Kurt; Vieth, Michael; Goergens, Reiner; Malfertheiner, Peter; Leodolter, Andreas; Fried, Michael; Fox, Mark R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to resolve controversy regarding the effects of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy and H. pylori infection in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Design A randomized, double-blind, multicentre trial was performed in patients presenting with reflux symptoms. H. pylori-positive patients were randomized to receive either antibiotics or placebo for 7 days. H. pylori-negative patient controls received placebo. All received esomeprazole 20 mg b.d. for 7 days, followed by 40 mg o.d. to complete an 8-week course, and were followed up for 32 weeks by telephone. Results In this study, 198/589 (34%) patients were H. pylori-positive and 113 H. pylori-negative patients served as controls. Baseline endoscopy revealed 63% Los Angeles grade 0A and 37% Los Angeles grade BCD oesophagitis with no difference between patient groups. Symptom improvement on esomeprazole was seen in 89%. H. pylori eradication was successful in 82%. H. pylori eradication had no effect on symptomatic relapse (hazard ratio 1.15, 95% CI 0.74–1.8; p = 0.5). Overall, H. pylori-positive patients had a lower probability of relapse compared to H. pylori-negative controls (hazard ratio 0.6, 95% CI 0.43–0.85; p = 0.004). Relapse hazard was modulated also by oesophagitis grade (BCD vs. 0A, hazard ratio 2.1, 95% CI 1.5–3.0). Conclusion Relapse of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms after a course of high dose acid suppression took longer for H. pylori-positive patients than H. pylori-negative controls; however eradication therapy had no effect on the risk of relapse; ClincialTrials.gov number, NCT00574925. PMID:24917966

  20. Inhibitory Effect of Nasal Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation on Gastroesophageal Reflux.

    PubMed

    Cantin, Danny; Djeddi, Djamal; Carrière, Vincent; Samson, Nathalie; Nault, Stéphanie; Jia, Wan Lu; Beck, Jennifer; Praud, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive intermittent positive pressure ventilation can lead to esophageal insufflations and in turn to gastric distension. The fact that the latter induces transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter implies that it may increase gastroesophageal refluxes. We previously reported that nasal Pressure Support Ventilation (nPSV), contrary to nasal Neurally-Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (nNAVA), triggers active inspiratory laryngeal closure. This suggests that esophageal insufflations are more frequent in nPSV than in nNAVA. The objectives of the present study were to test the hypotheses that: i) gastroesophageal refluxes are increased during nPSV compared to both control condition and nNAVA; ii) esophageal insufflations occur more frequently during nPSV than nNAVA. Polysomnographic recordings and esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance pHmetry were performed in nine chronically instrumented newborn lambs to study gastroesophageal refluxes, esophageal insufflations, states of alertness, laryngeal closure and respiration. Recordings were repeated without sedation in control condition, nPSV (15/4 cmH2O) and nNAVA (~ 15/4 cmH2O). The number of gastroesophageal refluxes recorded over six hours, expressed as median (interquartile range), decreased during both nPSV (1 (0, 3)) and nNAVA [1 (0, 3)] compared to control condition (5 (3, 10)), (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, the esophageal insufflation index did not differ between nPSV (40 (11, 61) h-1) and nNAVA (10 (9, 56) h-1) (p = 0.8). In conclusion, nPSV and nNAVA similarly inhibit gastroesophageal refluxes in healthy newborn lambs at pressures that do not lead to gastric distension. In addition, the occurrence of esophageal insufflations is not significantly different between nPSV and nNAVA. The strong inhibitory effect of nIPPV on gastroesophageal refluxes appears identical to that reported with nasal continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26785264

  1. Inhibitory Effect of Nasal Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation on Gastroesophageal Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, Danny; Djeddi, Djamal; Carrière, Vincent; Samson, Nathalie; Nault, Stéphanie; Jia, Wan Lu; Beck, Jennifer; Praud, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive intermittent positive pressure ventilation can lead to esophageal insufflations and in turn to gastric distension. The fact that the latter induces transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter implies that it may increase gastroesophageal refluxes. We previously reported that nasal Pressure Support Ventilation (nPSV), contrary to nasal Neurally-Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (nNAVA), triggers active inspiratory laryngeal closure. This suggests that esophageal insufflations are more frequent in nPSV than in nNAVA. The objectives of the present study were to test the hypotheses that: i) gastroesophageal refluxes are increased during nPSV compared to both control condition and nNAVA; ii) esophageal insufflations occur more frequently during nPSV than nNAVA. Polysomnographic recordings and esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance pHmetry were performed in nine chronically instrumented newborn lambs to study gastroesophageal refluxes, esophageal insufflations, states of alertness, laryngeal closure and respiration. Recordings were repeated without sedation in control condition, nPSV (15/4 cmH2O) and nNAVA (~ 15/4 cmH2O). The number of gastroesophageal refluxes recorded over six hours, expressed as median (interquartile range), decreased during both nPSV (1 (0, 3)) and nNAVA [1 (0, 3)] compared to control condition (5 (3, 10)), (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, the esophageal insufflation index did not differ between nPSV (40 (11, 61) h-1) and nNAVA (10 (9, 56) h-1) (p = 0.8). In conclusion, nPSV and nNAVA similarly inhibit gastroesophageal refluxes in healthy newborn lambs at pressures that do not lead to gastric distension. In addition, the occurrence of esophageal insufflations is not significantly different between nPSV and nNAVA. The strong inhibitory effect of nIPPV on gastroesophageal refluxes appears identical to that reported with nasal continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26785264

  2. Reflux heat-pipe solar receivers for dish-electric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andraka, Charles E.; Diver, Richard B.

    Electrical generation by solar means may be undertaken more efficiently through the use of a gravity-assisted 'reflux' heat pipe receiver combining a heat engine with a paraboloidal dish concentrator. In the reflux heat-pipe solar energy receiver, concentrated solar radiation causes a low melting-point liquid metal to evaporate; the vapor then flows to the engine interface heat exchanger, where it condenses and releases the latent heat. The condensate is returned to the receiver-absorber by gravity and distributed by capillary forces through a wick that lines the receiver.

  3. [Pharyngolaryngeal reflux as one of the causes of chronic excretory otitis media].

    PubMed

    Petrova, L G; Chaĭkovskiĭ, V V; Rybak, P R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the relationship between chronic secretory otitis media (CSOM) and pharyngolaryngeal reflux (PLR). A total of 43 patients aged between 3 to 19 years presenting with CSOM were available for the examination. PLR was confirmed in 36 (83.7%) patients. A relapse of CSOM after a course of otorhinolaryngological and gastroenterological treatment developed in 6 (14.0%) patients. It is concluded that antireflux therapy should be a constituent component of CSOM therapy concomitant with gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:23528458

  4. Aqueous based reflux method for green synthesis of nanostructures: Application in CZTS synthesis.

    PubMed

    Aditha, Sai Kiran; Kurdekar, Aditya Dileep; Chunduri, L A Avinash; Patnaik, Sandeep; Kamisetti, Venkataramaniah

    2016-01-01

    The aqueous based reflux method useful for the green synthesis of nanostructures is described in detail. In this method, the parameters: the order of addition of precursors, the time of the reflux and the cooling rate should be optimized in order to obtain the desired phase and morphology of the nanostructures. The application of this method is discussed with reference to the synthesis of CZTS nanoparticles which have great potential as an absorber material in the photovoltaic devices. The highlights of this method are:•Simple.•Low cost.•Aqueous based. PMID:27408826

  5. Gastro-oesophageal reflux in young babies: who should be treated?

    PubMed

    Puntis, John W

    2015-10-01

    Recent guidelines focus on a non-interventionist approach to management of gastro-oesophageal reflux in infancy and emphasise the importance of explanation, reassurance and simple measures such as attention to feeding. Relying on clinical history alone leads to over diagnosis of disease, and widely used medications are often ineffective for symptom relief and carry significant risk of harm. The association between vomiting in infancy and other problems such as crying and poor feeding should not be interpreted as implying causality. When there are strong pointers to underlying gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, invasive investigations are required in order to formulate appropriate intervention. PMID:25755169

  6. Vesicoureteral Reflux, a Scarred kidney, and Minimal Proteinuria: An Unusual Cause of Adult Secondary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sandal, Shaifali; Khanna, Apurv

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension affects about 65 million individuals in the United States. In adult patients, primary aldosteronism and renovascular causes are described as most prevalent. Vesicoureteral reflux as a cause of hypertension, while commonly described in pediatric populations, is less prevalent in the adult population especially in the absence of proteinuria. We present the case of a 31-year-old female presenting with early onset hypertension. Workup for renovascular hypertension was unrevealing. She was found to have right-sided vesicoureteral reflux with a unilateral scarred kidney. Patient underwent a nephrectomy with marked improvement in blood pressure control. PMID:22110521

  7. Prevesical Calcification and Hydronephrosis in a Girl Treated for Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Sarah; van der Horst, Eric H. J. R.; Verbeke, Jonathan I. M. L.; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2016-01-01

    The endoscopic STING procedure using Deflux is a common and minimal invasive treatment for vesicoureteral reflux. Herein we present the case of an 11-year-old girl with loin pain and de novo hydronephrosis and megaureter on the left. Ultrasound and plain abdominal X-ray demonstrated a calcification at the ureterovesical junction. She had been treated with Deflux injections 5 years before. The clinical quiz addresses the differential diagnosis, workup, and pathogenesis of calcifications at the ureterovesical junction following endoscopic reflux therapy. PMID:27408905

  8. The current evidence based medical management of vesicoureteral reflux: The Sickkids protocol

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Sumit; Khoury, Antoine E.

    2007-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux is a common clinical entity and is one of the keystones of the establishment of pediatric urology as a urological subspeciality. There has been continued evolution in the management of vesicoureteral reflux as new insights are gained on its role in renal damage. The optimal treatment algorithm remains controversial. This review aims to highlight the current literature on VUR and its association with urinary tract infections and renal damage. The protocol of management of a child with VUR followed at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto is described. PMID:19718297

  9. Proton pump inhibitor for non-erosive reflux disease: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji-Xiang; Ji, Meng-Yao; Song, Jia; Lei, Hong-Bo; Qiu, Shi; Wang, Jing; Ai, Ming-Hua; Wang, Jun; Lv, Xiao-Guang; Yang, Zi-Rong; Dong, Wei-Guo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy, safety and influential factors of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment for non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). METHODS: PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were searched up to April 2013 to identify eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that probed into the efficacy, safety and influential factors of PPI treatment for NERD. The rates of symptomatic relief and adverse events were measured as the outcomes. After RCT selection, assessment and data collection, the pooled RRs and 95%CI were calculated. This meta-analysis was performed using the Stata 12.0 software (Stata Corporation, College Station, Texas, United States). The level of evidence was estimated by the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. RESULTS: Seventeen RCTs including 6072 patients met the inclusion criteria. The results of the meta-analysis showed that PPI treatment was significantly superior to H2 receptor antagonists (H2RA) treatment (RR = 1.629, 95%CI: 1.422-1.867, P = 0.000) and placebo (RR = 1.903, 95%CI: 1.573-2.302, P = 0.000) for the symptomatic relief of NERD. However, there were no obvious differences between PPI and H2RA (RR = 0.928, 95%CI: 0.776-1.110, P = 0.414) or PPI and the placebo (RR = 1.000, 95%CI: 0.896-1.116, P = 0.997) regarding the rate of adverse events. The overall rate of symptomatic relief of PPI against NERD was 51.4% (95%CI: 0.433-0.595, P = 0.000), and relief was influenced by hiatal hernia (P = 0.030). The adverse rate of PPI against NERD was 21.0% (95%CI: 0.152-0.208, P = 0.000), and was affected by hiatal hernia (P = 0.081) and drinking (P = 0.053). CONCLUSION: PPI overmatched H2RA on symptomatic relief rate but not on adverse rate for NERD. Its relief rate and adverse rate were influenced by hiatal hernia and drinking. PMID:24363534

  10. Clinical and pH-metric characteristics of gastro-oesophageal reflux secondary to cows' milk protein allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Cavataio, F; Iacono, G; Montalto, G; Soresi, M; Tumminello, M; Carroccio, A

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: The primary aim was to assess whether there were differences in symptoms, laboratory data, and oesophageal pH-metry between infants with primary gastro-oesophageal reflux and those with reflux secondary to cows' milk protein allergy (CMPA). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 96 infants (mean(SD) age 7.8(2.0) months) with either primary gastro-oesophageal reflux, reflux with CMPA, CMPA only, or none of these (controls) were studied. Symptoms, immunochemical data, and oesophageal pH were compared between the four groups and the effect of a cows' milk protein-free diet on the severity of symptoms was also assessed. RESULTS: 14 out of 47(30%) infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux had CMPA. These infants had similar symptoms to those with primary gastro-oesophageal reflux but higher concentrations of total IgE and circulating eosinophils (p < 0.005) and IgG anti-beta lactoglobulin (p < 0.003). A progressive constant reduction in oesophageal pH at the end of a feed, which continued up to the next feed, was seen in 12 out of 14 patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux secondary to CMPA and in 24 of 25 infants with CMPA only. No infants with primary gastro-oesophageal reflux and none of the controls had this pattern. A cows' milk protein-free diet was associated with a significant improvement in symptoms only in infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux with CMPA. CONCLUSION: A characteristic oesophageal pH pattern is useful in distinguishing infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux associated with CMPA. PMID:8813871

  11. Association of Visceral Fat Area, Smoking, and Alcohol Consumption with Reflux Esophagitis and Barrett's Esophagus in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Juntaro; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Kobayakawa, Masao; Inadomi, John M.; Takayama, Michiyo; Makino, Kanako; Iwao, Yasushi; Sugino, Yoshinori; Kanai, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Background Central obesity has been suggested as a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of visceral fat area and other lifestyle factors with reflux esophagitis or Barrett’s esophagus in Japanese population. Methods Individuals who received thorough medical examinations including the measurement of visceral fat area by abdominal computed tomography were enrolled. Factors associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis, the severity of reflux esophagitis, or the presence of Barrett’s esophagus were determined using multivariable logistic regression models. Results A total of 2608 individuals were eligible for the analyses. Visceral fat area was associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis both in men (odds ratio, 1.21 per 50 cm2; 95% confident interval, 1.01 to 1.46) and women (odds ratio, 2.31 per 50 cm2; 95% confident interval, 1.57 to 3.40). Current smoking and serum levels of triglyceride were also associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis in men. However, significant association between visceral fat area and the severity of reflux esophagitis or the presence of Barrett’s esophagus was not shown. In men, excessive alcohol consumption on a drinking day, but not the frequency of alcohol drinking, was associated with both the severity of reflux esophagitis (odds ratio, 2.13; 95% confident interval, 1.03 to 4.41) and the presence of Barrett’s esophagus (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% confident interval, 1.14 to 2.56). Conclusion Visceral fat area was independently associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis, but not with the presence of Barrett’s esophagus. On the other hand, quantity of alcohol consumption could play a role in the development of severe reflux esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus in Japanese population. PMID:26225858

  12. Psychological modulation in patients surgically intervened for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lara, F J Pérez; Carranque, G; Oehling, H; Hernández, J M; Oliva, H

    2014-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been related with certain psychological dimensions. The influence of mood, emotional intelligence, and perceived quality of life on clinical symptoms and outcome of antireflux surgery was evaluated in GERD patients with and without hiatal hernia. The study included 61 patients who were diagnosed with GERD between 2003 and 2008: 16 of them without hiatal hernia (group A) and 45 of them with hiatal hernia (group B). All of these patients had undergone laparoscopic antireflux surgery. Patients were clinically examined and evaluated with the following instruments: Short Form (SF)-36 Health Survey, Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale, and Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS)-24. Proportions were compared by using the chi-squared test; averages were compared by using the Student's t-test (with Bonferroni's correction). In general, our patients intervened for GERD showed results lower than normal or close to the lower limit of normal in the administered tests. Patients in the group without hernia were younger (P < 0.001) and with lower American Society of Anaesthesiologists risk. They showed higher scores in the SF-36 dimensions: Physical Functioning, Physical Role and Emotional Role, and lower scores in the Social Role (P < 0.001). They showed lower scores in the Emotional dimension of Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (P = 0.0068) and worse results in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression subscales of Anxiety (P < 0.001) and Depression (not significant). Men in the group without hernia showed higher scores than men in the group with hernia in the TMMS subscales corresponding to Emotional Clarity and Emotional Repair (P < 0.001). Women in the group with hernia showed higher scores than women in the group without hernia regarding Emotional Clarity (P = 0.0012). GERD patients showed poor results in all the tests, and patients without hiatal hernia compared with patients with hernia showed

  13. Event Perception

    PubMed Central

    Radvansky, Gabriel; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Events are central elements of human experience. Formally, they can be individuated in terms of the entities that compose them, the features of those entities, and the relations amongst entities. Psychologically, representations of events capture their spatiotemporal location, the people and objects involved, and the relations between these elements. Here, we present an account of the nature of psychological representations of events and how they are constructed and updated. Event representations are like images in that they are isomorphic to the situations they represent. However, they are like models or language in that they are constructed of components rather than being holistic. Also, they are partial representations that leave out some elements and abstract others. Representations of individual events are informed by schematic knowledge about general classes of events. Event representations are constructed in a process that segments continuous activity into discrete events. The construction of a series of event representations forms a basis for predicting the future, planning for that future, and imagining alternatives. PMID:23082236

  14. Dental erosions and other extra-oesophageal symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: Evidence, treatment response and areas of uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Extra-oesophageal symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) are often studied, but remain a subject of debate. It has been clearly shown that there is a relationship between the extra-oesophageal symptoms chronic cough, asthma, laryngitis and dental erosion and GORD. Literature is abundant concerning reflux-related cough and reflux-related asthma, but much less is known about reflux-related dental erosions. The prevalence of dental erosion in GORD and vice versa, the prevalence of GORD in patients with dental erosion is high but the exact mechanism of reflux-induced tooth wear erosion is still under review. PMID:25922676

  15. Diagnosing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease or lactose intolerance in babies who cry a lot in the first few months overlooks feeding problems.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-04-01

    This paper explores two areas in which the translation of research into practice may be improved in the management of cry-fuss behaviours in the first few months of life. Firstly, babies who cry excessively are often prescribed proton pump inhibitors, despite evidence that gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is very rarely a cause. The inaccuracy of commonly used explanatory mechanisms, the side-effects of acid-suppressive medications, and the failure to identify treatable problems, including feeding difficulty when the diagnosis of 'reflux' is applied, are discussed. Secondly, crying breastfed babies are still prescribed lactase or lactose-free formula, despite evidence that the problem of functional lactose overload is one of breastfeeding management. The mechanisms and management of functional lactose overload are discussed. These two problems of research translation need to be addressed because failure to identify and manage other causes of cry-fuss problems, including feeding difficulty, may have adverse outcomes for a small but significant minority of families. PMID:23495859

  16. Comparison of a dimethicone/antacid (Asilone gel) with an alginate/antacid (Gaviscon liquid) in the management of reflux oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Smart, H L; Atkinson, M

    1990-09-01

    Fifty-three patients with symptomatic reflux oesophagitis were entered into a single centre randomized study comparing the effects of a dimethicone/antacid (Asilone Gel) and an alginate/antacid (Gaviscon liquid) on symptoms and endoscopic changes over an 8-week period. Both treatments significantly improved heartburn, acid regurgitation and flatulence. Dimethicone/antacid but not alginate/antacid, produced a significant improvement in oesophagitis, oesophageal ulceration and histological grade of inflammation over the 8-week treatment period so that 14 patients treated with dimethicone/antacid and 10 with alginate/antacid had normal endoscopic oesophageal appearances at the end of the study. The difference in improvement between the two patient groups did not reach significance however, except for dimethicone/antacid improving histological changes (P less than 0.05). These findings suggest that dimethicone/antacid and alginate/antacid are equally effective in treating symptomatic reflux oesophagitis although dimethicone/antacid may have an advantage in improving oesophageal histological appearances. PMID:2213800

  17. Reflux heat-pipe solar receivers for dish-electric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andraka, Charles E.; Diver, Richard B.

    1988-04-01

    The feasibility of competitive, modular bulk electric power from the sun may be greatly enhanced by the use of a reflux heat pipe receiver to combine a heat engine with a paraboloidal dish concentrator. This combination represents a potential improvement over previous successful demonstrations of dish-electric technology in terms of enhanced performance, lower cost, longer life, and greater flexibility in engine design. In the reflux (i.e., gravity assisted) heat pipe receiver, concentrated solar radiation causes liquid metal (sodium, potassium, or NaK) to evaporate. The vapor flows to the engine interface heat exchanger, where it condenses and releases the latent heat. The condensate is returned to the receiver absorber by gravity (refluxing), and distributed over the surface by gravity and/or capillary forces in a wick lining the receiver. It is essentially an adaptation of heat pipe technology to the peculiar requirements of concentrated solar flux, and provides many advantages over conventional heated tub receiver technology. This overview paper describes the current status and future plans for the U.S. Solar Thermal Program reflux receiver development program at Sandia National Laboratories. Current work includes conventional mesh wick receivers, sintered metal wicks, and pool boiler receivers. The relative design merits and concerns of the different approaches and technology development test plans are discussed.

  18. Clinical Utility of Bronchoalveolar Lavage Pepsin in Diagnosis of Gastroesophageal Reflux among Wheezy Infants.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Ahmed Fathi; El-Desoky, Tarek; Fathi, Khalid; Elkashef, Wagdy Fawzi; Zaki, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is no gold standard test for diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) associated infantile wheezing. Objectives. To evaluate the value of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) pepsin assay in diagnosis of GERD in wheezy infants. Methods. Fifty-two wheezy infants were evaluated for GERD using esophageal combined impedance-pH (MII-pH) monitoring, esophagogastroduodenoscopy with esophageal biopsies, and BAL pepsin. Tracheobronchial aspirates from 10 healthy infants planned for surgery without history of respiratory problems were examined for pepsin. Results. Wheezy infants with silent reflux and wheezy infants with typical GERD symptoms but normal MII-pH had significantly higher BAL pepsin compared to healthy control (45.3 ± 8.6 and 42.8 ± 8 versus 29 ± 2.6, P < 0.0001 and P = 0.011, resp.). BAL pepsin had sensitivity (61.7%, 72 %, and 70%) and specificity (55.5%, 52.9%, and 53%) to diagnose GERD associated infantile wheeze compared to abnormal MII-pH, reflux esophagitis, and lipid laden macrophage index, respectively. Conclusion. A stepwise approach for assessment of GERD in wheezy infants is advised. In those with silent reflux, a trial of antireflux therapy is warranted with no need for further pepsin assay. But when combined MII-pH is negative despite the presence of typical GERD symptoms, pepsin assay will be needed to rule out GERD related aspiration. PMID:27516725

  19. Apparent G syndrome presenting as neck and upper limb dystonia and severe gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Williams, C A; Frias, J L

    1987-10-01

    We have studied a 3-month-old boy with severe gastroesophageal reflux, feeding difficulties, neck and upper limb dystonia, abnormal ears, normal genitalia, and anatomically apparently normal larynx and trachea. Initially diagnosed as suffering from Sandifer "syndrome," he was treated with a gastrostomy and Nissen fundoplication. However, his characteristic facial appearance subsequently led to the diagnosis of G syndrome. PMID:3425612

  20. Effects of reflux laryngitis on non-nutritive swallowing in newborn lambs.

    PubMed

    Brisebois, Simon; Samson, Nathalie; Fortier, Pierre-Hugues; Doueik, Alexandre A; Carreau, Anne-Marie; Praud, Jean-Paul

    2014-08-15

    Reflux laryngitis in infants may be involved not only in laryngeal disorders, but also in disorders of cardiorespiratory control through its impact on laryngeal function. Our objective was to study the effect of reflux laryngitis on non-nutritive swallowing (NNS) and NNS-breathing coordination. Two groups of six newborn lambs, randomized into laryngitis and control groups, were surgically instrumented for recording states of alertness, swallowing and cardiorespiratory variables without sedation. A mild to moderate reflux laryngitis was induced in lambs from the experimental group. A significant decrease in the number of NNS bursts and apneas was observed in the laryngitis group in active sleep (p=0.03). In addition, lower heart and respiratory rates, as well as prolonged apnea duration (p<0.0001) were observed. No physiologically significant alterations in NNS-breathing coordination were observed in the laryngitis group. We conclude that a mild to moderate reflux laryngitis alters NNS burst frequency and autonomous control of cardiac activity and respiration in lambs. PMID:24893350

  1. Clinical Utility of Bronchoalveolar Lavage Pepsin in Diagnosis of Gastroesophageal Reflux among Wheezy Infants

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Ahmed Fathi; El-Desoky, Tarek; Fathi, Khalid; Elkashef, Wagdy Fawzi

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is no gold standard test for diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) associated infantile wheezing. Objectives. To evaluate the value of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) pepsin assay in diagnosis of GERD in wheezy infants. Methods. Fifty-two wheezy infants were evaluated for GERD using esophageal combined impedance-pH (MII-pH) monitoring, esophagogastroduodenoscopy with esophageal biopsies, and BAL pepsin. Tracheobronchial aspirates from 10 healthy infants planned for surgery without history of respiratory problems were examined for pepsin. Results. Wheezy infants with silent reflux and wheezy infants with typical GERD symptoms but normal MII-pH had significantly higher BAL pepsin compared to healthy control (45.3 ± 8.6 and 42.8 ± 8 versus 29 ± 2.6, P < 0.0001 and P = 0.011, resp.). BAL pepsin had sensitivity (61.7%, 72 %, and 70%) and specificity (55.5%, 52.9%, and 53%) to diagnose GERD associated infantile wheeze compared to abnormal MII-pH, reflux esophagitis, and lipid laden macrophage index, respectively. Conclusion. A stepwise approach for assessment of GERD in wheezy infants is advised. In those with silent reflux, a trial of antireflux therapy is warranted with no need for further pepsin assay. But when combined MII-pH is negative despite the presence of typical GERD symptoms, pepsin assay will be needed to rule out GERD related aspiration. PMID:27516725

  2. Reasons of PEG failure to eliminate gastroesophageal reflux in mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Douzinas, Emmanuel E; Andrianakis, Ilias; Livaditi, Olga; Bakos, Dimitrios; Flevari, Katerina; Goutas, Nikos; Vlachodimitropoulos, Dimitrios; Tasoulis, Marios-Konstantinos; Betrosian, Alex P

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate factors predicting failure of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) to eliminate gastroesophageal reflux (GER). METHODS: Twenty-nine consecutive mechanically ventilated patients were investigated. Patients were evaluated for GER by pH-metry pre-PEG and on the 7th post-PEG day. Endoscopic and histologic evidence of reflux esophagitis was also carried out. A beneficial response to PEG was considered when pH-metry on the 7th post-PEG day showed that GER was below 4%. RESULTS: Seventeen patients responded (RESP group) and 12 did not respond (N-RESP) to PEG. The mean age, sex, weight and APACHE II score were similar in both groups. GER (%) values were similar in both groups at baseline, but were significantly reduced in the RESP group compared with the N-RESP group on the 7th post-PEG day [2.5 (0.6-3.8) vs 8.1 (7.4-9.2, P < 0.001)]. Reflux esophagitis and the gastroesophageal flap valve (GEFV) grading differed significantly between the two groups (P = 0.031 and P = 0.020, respectively). Histology revealed no significant differences between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic grading of GEFV and the presence of severe reflux esophagitis are predisposing factors for failure of PEG to reduce GER in mechanically ventilated patients. PMID:19916176

  3. Impact of hiatal hernia on histological pattern of non-erosive reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Hiatus hernia (HH) has major pathophysiological effects favoring gastroesophageal reflux and hence contributing to esophageal mucosa injury, especially in patients with severe gastroesophageal disease. However, prospective studies investigating the impact of HH on the esophageal mucosa in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) are lacking. This study evaluated the association between the presence of (HH) and the histological findings in symptomatic patients with NERD. Methods Fifty consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were enrolled. After conventional endoscopy, Lugol solution was applied and biopsy specimens were obtained. Histological parameters including basal zone hyperplasia, papillary length and cellular infiltration were evaluated. The chi-square test with Yates' correlation was used for comparing discrete parameters between groups. However, Fisher's exact probability test was used where the expected frequencies were lower than 5. Wilcoxon's test for unpaired samples was preferred in cases of semi-quantitative parameters. Results The presence of HH along with more severe findings (0.01

    reflux disease and NERD in the presence of HH. Conclusion The presence of HH is correlated with more severe endoscopy findings, and predisposes for severe histological abnormality in cases of NERD. PMID:15638947

  4. Reflux heat-pipe solar receiver for a Stirling dish-electric system

    SciTech Connect

    Ziph, B.; Godett, T.M.; Diver, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of competitive, modular bulk electric power from the sun is enhanced by the use of a reflux heat-pipe receiver to combine a Stirling engine with a paraboloidal dish concentrator. This combination represents a potential improvement over previous successful demonstrations of Stirling dish-electric technology in terms of enhanced performance, lower cost, and longer life. In the reflux (i.e. gravity assisted) heat-pipe receiver, concentrated solar radiation causes liquid sodium to evaporate, the vapor flows to the Stirling engine heaters where it condenses on the heater tubes. The condensate is returned to and distributed over the receiver by gravity (refluxing) and by capillary forces in a wick lining the receiver. It is essentially an adaptation of sodium heat pipe technology to the peculiar requirements of concentrated solar flux and provides many potential advantages over conventional tube receiver technology. This paper describes the preliminary design of a reflux heat-pipe solar receiver to match the STM4-120 variable swashplate Stirling engine to a Test Bed Concentrator at Sandia National Laboratories Distributed Receiver Test Facility. Performance analysis and other design considerations are presented and discussed.

  5. VERTICAL GASTRECTOMY AND GASTRIC BYPASS IN ROUX-EN-Y INDUCE POSTOPERATIVE GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE?

    PubMed Central

    NASSIF, Paulo Afonso Nunes; MALAFAIA, Osvaldo; RIBAS-FILHO, Jurandir Marcondes; CZECZKO, Nicolau Gregori; GARCIA, Rodrigo Ferreira; ARIEDE, Bruno Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Background The association between obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease has a high incidence and may be present in half of obese patients with surgical indication. Bariatric operations can also induce reflux alone - differently from BMI factors - and its mechanisms are dependent on the type of procedure performed. Objective To perform a literature review comparing the two procedures currently most used for surgical treatment of obesity and analyze their relationship with the advent of pre-existing reflux disease or its appearance only in postoperative period. Method The literature was reviewed in virtual database Medline/PubMed, SciELO, Lilacs, Embase and Cochrane crossing the following MeSH descriptors: gastric bypass AND / OR anastomosis, Roux-en-Y AND / OR gastroesophageal reflux AND / OR gastroenterostomy AND / OR gastrectomy AND / OR obesity AND / OR bariatric surgery AND / OR postoperative period. A total of 135 relevant references were considered but only 30 were used in this article. Also was added the experience of the authors of this article in handling these techniques on this field. Conclusion The structural changes caused by surgical technique in vertical gastrectomy shows greater commitment of antireflux mechanisms predisposing the induction of GERD postoperatively compared to the surgical technique performed in the gastrointestinal Bypass Roux-en-Y. PMID:25409970

  6. Diagnosis of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Using Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo; Joseph, Arun A; Gross, Lisa; Ghadimi, Michael; Frahm, Jens; Beham, Alexander W

    2015-01-01

    A small angle (His angle) between the oesophagus and the fundus of the stomach is considered to act as flap valve and anti-reflux barrier. A wide angle results in dysfunction of the oesophagogastric junction and subsequently in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Here, we used real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 50 ms resolution (20 frames per second) in 12 volunteers and 12 patients with GERD to assess transport of pineapple juice through the oesophagogastric junction and reflux during Valsalva. We found that the intra-abdominal part of the oesophagus was bended towards the left side resulting in an angle of 75.3 ± 17.4, which was significantly larger during Valsava (P = 0.017). Reflux and several underlying pathologies were detected in 11 out of 12 patients. Our data visualize oesophagogastric junction physiology and disprove the flap valve hypothesis. Further, non-invasive real-time MRI has considerable potential for the diagnosis of causative pathologies leading to GERD. PMID:26175205

  7. [CONTRAST ENHANCED VOIDING UROSONOGRAPHY (CEVUS) IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF VESICOURETERAL REFLUX].

    PubMed

    Roić, Goran; Roić, Andrea Cvitković; Palcić, Iva; Grmoja, Tonći; Batos, Ana Tripalo

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is one of the most common urinary tract anomalies in children and can be associated with reflux nephropathy (RN). Some patients with RN develop chronic kidney disease, hypertension and a small number of patients progress to end-stage renal disease. Early detection of children with these clinical characteristics should be the goal of clinical, biochemical, and radiological evaluation of patients presenting with prenatal hydronephrosis or febrile urinary tract infection. The goals of imaging procedure in general are to confirm the diagnosis suspected with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity, to aid treatment and allow prognosis. The diagnosis of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) is a relatively straightforward and well-established procedure. There is increasing awareness of the risks of radiation exposure and invasivness of VUR investigation which can be unpleasant experience for both child and parents. Currently, contrast enhanced voiding urosonography (ceVUS) is a radiation free, highly sensitive imaging modality for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and urethral imaging in children. It employs ultrasound technology (contrast-specific software) in combination with commercially available second generation ultrasound contrast administered intravesically via a bladder catheter. PMID:27290813

  8. Preoperative endoscopy may reduce the need for revisional surgery for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Madhok, B M; Carr, W R J; McCormack, C; Boyle, M; Jennings, N; Schroeder, N; Balupuri, S; Small, P K

    2016-08-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a safe and effective bariatric operation, but postoperative reflux symptoms can sometimes necessitate revisional surgery. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the preferred operation in morbidly obese patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. In 2011, we introduced preoperative endoscopy to assess for hiatus hernia or evidence of oesophagitis in conjunction with an assessment of gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms for all patients undergoing bariatric surgery with a view to avoid sleeve gastrectomy for these patients. A prospectively maintained database was used to identify patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy before and after we changed the unit policy. The need for revisional surgery in patients with troublesome gastro-oesophageal reflux disease was examined. Prior to 2011, 130 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy, and 11 (8.5%) of them required conversion to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for symptomatic reflux disease. Following the policy change, 284 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy, and to date, only five (1.8%) have required revisional surgery (p = 0.001). Baseline demographics were comparable between the groups, and average follow-up period was 47 and 33 months, respectively, for each group. Preoperative endoscopy and a detailed clinical history regarding gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms may improve patient selection for sleeve gastrectomy. Avoiding sleeve gastrectomy in patients with reflux disease and/or hiatus hernia may reduce the incidence of revisional surgery. PMID:27400631

  9. [Transitory (evening) venous reflux in patients with intracutaneous varicosity and medicamentous correction thereof].

    PubMed

    Tsukanov, Yu T; Nikolaichuk, A I

    2016-01-01

    The authors carried out a study aimed at revealing transitory refluxes along the great saphenous vein (GSV) in patients with intracutaneous varicosity, and at investigating the possibility of removing them by means of preparations of micronized purified flavonoid fraction (MPFF). The study included a total of one hundred and forty-seven 21-to-47-year-old (mean age 31±4.4 years) women presenting with cutaneous varicosity (class C1s). The duration of skin manifestations amounted to 9.4±3.9 years (varying from 4 to 24 years). Telangiectasias were present in 69 (46.9%) women, 36 (24.5%) women had reticular varicosity, and 42 (28.6%) a combination thereof. An author-devised test was used with prolonged orthostatic load consisting in carrying ultrasound duplex scanning twice: in the evening after 6 p. m. and in the morning before 10 a.m., assessing the evening and morning parameters of the GSV, as well as the increment of the diameter of the vein at evening measurement as compared with the morning indices. Women with transitory refluxes along the GSV (n=59) underwent treatment with MPFF preparations (Detralex, Servier) during 60 days at a daily dose of 1,000 mg. The morning examination showed that there was no reflux along the GSV. The evening examination revealed refluxes along the GSV of various pattern and extent in 59 (40.1 %). All the 59 patients with evening refluxes presented complaints for increased fatigability, heaviness in the lower limbs by the end of the day. After 2 months of treatment, of the 59 women with initial reflux, 38 (64.4%) patients had no reflux and in 21 (35.6%) the extent of reflux decreased more than twofold. The evening diameter of the GSV decreased from 5.7 mm (95% CI 4.0-7.1) to 5.2 mm (95% CI 5.5-6.5) and the orthostatic gradient decreased from 0.9 mm (95% CD 0.6-1.3) to 0.6 mm (95% CI 0.4-0.8), p=0.000001. The initial complaints for heaviness in the legs after treatment disappeared in 76.6% of patients (50 of 59 subjects); in 9 women

  10. Protective effects of D-002 on experimentally induced gastroesophageal reflux in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zamora, Zullyt; Molina, Vivian; Mas, Rosa; Ravelo, Yazmin; Perez, Yohany; Oyarzabal, Ambar

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of beeswax alcohols (D-002) on the esophageal damage induced by gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in rats. METHODS: Sixty male rats were randomized into six groups (10 rats/group): a negative control and five groups with experimentally induced GER: a positive vehicle control, three treated with D-002 (25, 100 and 200 mg/kg, respectively), and one with omeprazole 10 mg/kg. All treatments were given by gastric gavage. One hour after dosing, GER was produced by simultaneous ligation of the pyloric end and the forestomach. Esophageal lesions index (ELI), gastric secretion volume and acidity, and esophageal malondialdehyde (MDA) and sulfhydryl (SH) group concentrations were measured. Statistical significance was considered at P < 0.05. RESULTS: As compared to the negative control, the positive control group exhibited increased ELI (5.2 ± 0.33 vs 0 ± 0, P = 0.0003), gastric secretion volume (2.69 ± 0.09 vs 0.1 ± 0.0, P = 0.0003) and acidity (238 ± 19.37 vs 120.0 ± 5.77, P = 0.001), and esophageal concentrations of MDA (2.56 ± 0.1 vs 1.76 ± 0.28, P = 0.001) and SH groups (1.02 ± 0.05 vs 0.56 ± 0.08, P = 0.0003). D-002 (25, 100 and 200 mg/kg) reduced ELI (3.36 ± 0.31, 2.90 ± 0.46 and 2.8 ± 0.23, respectively) vs the positive control (5.2 ± 0.33) (P = 0.004; P = 0.002; P = 0.001, respectively). There were no significant changes in acidity with D-002 treatment, and only the highest dose reduced the volume of the gastric secretion (1.92 ± 0.25) vs the positive control (2.69 ± 0.09, P = 0.013). D-002 (25, 100 and 200 mg/kg) lowered the esophageal MDA (2.05 ± 0.16, 1.98 ± 0.22 and 1.93 ± 0.22, respectively) (P = 0.01; P = 0.03; P = 0.03, respectively) and SH group concentration (0.87 ± 0.06, 0.79 ± 0.08 and 0.77 ± 0.06, respectively) (P = 0.04; P = 0.04; P = 0.02) vs the positive control (2.56 ± 0.10 and 1.02 ± 0.05, respectively). Omeprazole decreased ELI (2.54 ± 0.47), gastric secretion volume (1.97 ± 0.14) and acidity

  11. A Bama Minipig Model of Laryngopharyngeal Reflux and the Change of Laryngopharyngeal Mucosal Ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guijian; Zhang, Zhenyu; Diao, Chunyan; Jiang, Jun; Zheng, Shuying; Liu, Yulan

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims To establish an animal model of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and study the effect of LPR on the laryngopharyngeal mucosal ultrastructure. Methods Ten Bama minipigs were randomly divided into control group and stent group. Every pig underwent endoscope, and baseline pH was monitored for 4 hours at laryngopharynx and distal esophagus, then specimens from laryngopharyngeal mucosa were biopsied. For the control group, these procedures were repeated on the 14th day. In the stent group, a custom-designed esophageal stent suit was implanted into esophagus, laryngopharyngeal and distal esophageal pH monitoring lasted for 2 hours, then stent suit was removed 3 days later. At last, the same procedures were done as the control group on the 14th day. Specimens were observed under transmission electron microscope to measure the intercellular space and desmosome number. Results In the control group, there was no laryngopharyngeal reflux on the first day and 14th day. Before the stent was implanted, there was also no laryngopharyngeal reflux in the stent group. In both 2 hours and 14 days after stent implantation, the num -ber of reflux, reflux time, and percentage time of pH < 4.0 were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in the stent group. There was no difference in intercellular space and desmosomes in the control group between baseline and 14th day. In the stent group, intercellular space of laryngopharyngeal mucosa was significantly increased (0.37 μm vs 0.96 μm, P = 0.008), and the number of desmosomes was significantly decreased (20.25 vs 9.5, P = 0.003). Conclusions A Bama minipig model of LPR was established by implanting a custom-designed stent suit. LPR might destroy the laryngophar yngeal mucosal barrier. PMID:25843072

  12. Impact of self-reported Gastroesophageal reflux disease in subjects from COPDGene cohort

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The coexistence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and COPD has been recognized, but there has been no comprehensive evaluation of the impact of GERD on COPD-related health status and patient-centered outcomes. Methods Cross-sectional and longitudinal study of 4,483 participants in the COPDGene cohort who met GOLD criteria for COPD. Physician-diagnosed GERD was ascertained by questionnaire. Clinical features, spirometry and imaging were compared between COPD subjects without versus with GERD. We evaluated the relationship between GERD and symptoms, exacerbations and markers of microaspiration in univariate and multivariate models. Associations were additionally tested for the confounding effect of covariates associated with a diagnosis of GERD and the use of proton-pump inhibitor medications (PPIs). To determine whether GERD is simply a marker for the presence of other conditions independently associated with worse COPD outcomes, we also tested models incorporating a GERD propensity score. Results GERD was reported by 29% of subjects with female predominance. Subjects with GERD were more likely to have chronic bronchitis symptoms, higher prevalence of prior cardiovascular events (combined myocardial infarction, coronary artery disease and stroke 21.3% vs. 13.4.0%, p < 0.0001). Subjects with GERD also had more severe dyspnea (MMRC score 2.2 vs. 1.8, p < 0.0001), and poorer quality of life (QOL) scores (St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) total score 41.8 vs. 34.9, p < 0.0001; SF36 Physical Component Score 38.2 vs. 41.4, p < 0.0001). In multivariate models, a significant relationship was detected between GERD and SGRQ (3.4 points difference, p < 0.001) and frequent exacerbations at baseline (≥2 exacerbation per annum at inclusion OR 1.40, p = 0.006). During a mean follow-up time of two years, GERD was also associated with frequent (≥2/year exacerbations OR 1.40, p = 0.006), even in models in which PPIs

  13. The effects of acid treatment on the thermoelectric power of multiwalled carbon nanotubes synthesized by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, Corey A.; Carroll, David L.

    2013-08-01

    Acid treatment of carbon nanotubes is a post synthesis processing step used to clean carbon nanotubes. We show that exposure of the nanotubes to oxygen rich reagents including nitric and sulfuric acid results in an increase of the thermoelectric power. Improving dispersion through the use of the surfactant triton-x results in a further increase in TEP of up to 21%. Additionally, refluxing in an oxygen rich acidic solution results in improved dispersion and an increased TEP. These results indicate that improved dispersion of the nanotubes by either sonication or reflux leads to increased oxygenation and thermopower.

  14. Treatment Options for GERD or Acid Reflux Disease: A Review of the Research for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery might help you. How does surgery for GERD work? In a fundoplication, the top part of your ... how well endoscopic treatments (EndoCinch™, Stretta®, and EsophyX™) work to control the symptoms of GERD. What are the side effects of endoscopic treatments? ...

  15. Choosing a Proton Pump Inhibitor (PPI) to Treat Heartburn, Acid Reflux & GERD

    MedlinePlus

    ... scientific review by the Oregon Health and Science University-based Drug Effectiveness Review Project. This is a summary of a longer, more detailed report you can find at www.CRBestBuyDrugs.org . Generic Name & Dose Brand Name (or generic) 1 Cost Per Month 2 Dexlansoprazole 30 mg sustained-release ...

  16. Treatment Options for GERD or Acid Reflux Disease: A Review of the Research for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... consider when choosing a treatment: The benefits and risks of each treatment. The cost of each treatment. Which treatment best fits your likes, dislikes, and values. What are the costs of treatment? The cost ...

  17. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of a new aluminium-free paediatric alginate preparation and placebo in infants with recurrent gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Miller, S

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy and safety of a new aluminium-free formulation of alginate with placebo in infants with recurrent gastro-oesophageal reflux. This was a double-blind, randomised, parallel-group study conducted at 25 centres in the UK. Of the 90 paediatric patients recruited in a general practice setting, 42 were randomised to receive alginate and 48 to receive placebo. Infants were assessed before treatment and again after seven and 14 days of treatment. Analyses were based on the last, valid, non-missing observation for each variable for the intent-to-treat (ITT) population of 42 alginate and 46 placebo patients. For the primary efficacy measure (number of vomitting/regurgitation episodes), alginate was significantly superior to placebo (p = 0.009). For the secondary efficacy measure (severity of vomiting), a trend in favour of alginate was observed (p = 0.061). Patients receiving alginate achieved superior assessments of treatment outcome by both investigators (p = 0.008) and parent/guardians (p = 0.002) alike. In addition, alginate achieved a significantly greater reduction in the mean severity of vomiting episodes recorded in a daily diary compared with placebo (p = 0.027) and resulted in more patients having at least 10% symptom-free days (p = 0.027). For none of the variables measured did placebo have a superior effect. More than one-half of all patients experienced some adverse event, although no statistically significant differences were observed between the two treatment groups (p > 0.1), and adverse events accounted for withdrawal in only 12.5% of the patients (alginate, n = 4; placebo, n = 7). Aluminium-free alginate demonstrated superior efficacy over placebo in treating recurrent gastro-oesophageal reflux in paediatric patients. The safety profile of alginate was similar to that of placebo. PMID:10621922

  18. On the isomerization of ent-kaurenic acid.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Julio; Aparicio, Rosa; Villasmil, Thayded; Peña, Alexis; Usubillaga, Alfredo

    2011-07-01

    Kaurenic acid (1a) is a tetracyclic diterpene that has an exocyclic double bond at delta16. Isokaurenic acid (2a) has an endocyclic delta15double bond. This compound has been isolated from Espeletia tenore (Espeletinae), a resinous plant from the Venezuelan Andes, but its occurrence is rare. In order to obtain a larger amount of 2a, the isomerization of la, which is easily obtained from other Espeletinae, was tried. Kaurenic acid methyl ester (1b) was treated with dil. HCl in CH3Cl/EtOH, after 6 h under reflux a yield of 41.5% isokaurenic acid methyl ester (2b) was obtained but 35.7% 16alpha-ethoxy-kauran-19-oic acid methyl ester (3b) had formed as a byproduct. Treating 1b with CF3COOH in refluxing CH2Cl2 permitted to obtain a yield of 66.6% of 2b in 4 h and only traces of 16alpha-hydroxy-kauran-19-oic acid methyl ester (3a) as a byproduct. Both isomers were separated on a silica gel column impregnated with 20% AgNO3. Treating 2b with KOH in refluxing DMSO yielded pure isokaurenic acid, no back isomerization was observed. PMID:21834227

  19. Long-lasting cytoprotection after pentadecapeptide BPC 157, ranitidine, sucralfate or cholestyramine application in reflux oesophagitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Jadrijevic, S; Seiwerth, S; Sosa, T; Deskovic, S; Perovic, D; Aralica, G; Grabarevic, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagic, V; Turkovic, B; Ziger, T; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Zoricic, I; Sebecic, B; Patrlj, L; Kocman, B; Sarlija, M; Mikus, D; Separovic, J; Hanzevacki, M; Gjurasin, M; Miklic, P

    1999-12-01

    Recently, the effectiveness of pentadecapeptide BPC 157 and other anti-ulcer agents, called 'direct cytoprotection', was evidenced in totally gastrectomized rats duodenum challenged with cysteamine 24 h after surgery, and sacrificed 24 h after ulcerogen application. The further focus was on the possibility that this effect could be seen over a more prolonged period (1, 2, 4 weeks), and in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract (i.e. oesophagus). After the removal of the stomach, the oesophagus and jejunum were joined by a termino-lateral anastomosis. The animals were euthanized 7, 14 or 28 d after surgery, when oesophagitis was blindly assessed both macroscopically (percentage of ulcerations areas) and microscopically (percentage of areas of ulcers, regeneration and hyperplasia; number of inflammatory cells - polymorphonuclear and mononuclear). Starting 24 h after surgery, the medication was continuously given in the drinking water, in a volume of 12.5 mL/rat daily, until euthanasia at the end of the observation period, i.e. 7, 14, 28 d following surgery. Based on previous experiments, the doses of agents were daily calculated per kg b.w. as follows: BPC 157 125 mg or 125 ng, cholestyramine 2.5 mg, ranitidine 125 mg, sucralfate 725 mg, whereas controls received 72.5 mL x kg(-1) water. In support of these initial findings, and considering gastrectomized acid-free rats as an ideal model for long-term cytoprotective studies as well, pentadecapeptide BPC 157 markedly attenuated termino-lateral oesophagojejunal anastomosis-reflux oesophagitis also over a quite prolonged period. This efficacy was only partly shared by other anti-ulcer agents. After 1-week-old oesophagitis (microscopical assessment), but not after 2 or 4 weeks, less damaged mucosa was noted in rats drinking ranitidine or sucralfate compared to controls. Similar effectiveness was noted for cholestyramine. The obtained results were supported also by inflammatory cell assessment. Compared with control

  20. A stepwise protocol for the treatment of refractory gastroesophageal reflux-induced chronic cough

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xianghuai; Lv, Hanjing; Yu, Li; Chen, Qiang; Liang, Siwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Refractory gastroesophageal reflux-induced chronic cough (GERC) is difficult to manage. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of a novel stepwise protocol for treating this condition. Methods A total of 103 consecutive patients with suspected refractory reflux-induced chronic cough failing to a standard anti-reflux therapy were treated with a stepwise therapy. Treatment commences with high-dose omeprazole and, if necessary, is escalated to subsequent sequential treatment with ranitidine and finally baclofen. The primary end-point was overall cough resolution, and the secondary end-point was cough resolution after each treatment step. Results High-dose omeprazole eliminated or improved cough in 28.1% of patients (n=29). Further stepwise of treatment with the addition of ranitide yielded a favorable response in an additional 12.6% (n=13) of patients, and subsequent escalation to baclofen provoked response in another 36.9% (n=38) of patients. Overall, this stepwise protocol was successful in 77.6% (n=80) of patients. The diurnal cough symptom score fell from 3 [1] to 1 [0] (Z=6.316, P=0.000), and the nocturnal cough symptom score decreased from 1 [1] to 0 [1] (Z=–4.511, P=0.000), with a corresponding reduction in the Gastroesophageal Reflux Diagnostic Questionnaire score from 8.6±1.7 to 6.8±0.7 (t=3.612, P=0.000). Conversely, the cough threshold C2 to capsaicin was increased from 0.49 (0.49) µmol/L to 1.95 (2.92) µmol/L (Z=–5.892, P=0.000), and the cough threshold C5 was increased from 1.95 (2.92) µmol/L to 7.8 (5.85) µmol/L (Z=–5.171, P=0.000). Conclusions Sequential stepwise anti-reflux therapy is a useful therapeutic strategy for refractory reflux-induced chronic cough. PMID:26904227

  1. Effects of reflux ratio and feed conditions for the purification of bioethanol in a continuous distillation column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasan, Y. K.; Abdullah, M. A.; Bhat, A. H.

    2014-10-01

    Continuous distillation column was used for the purification of bioethanol from fermentation of molasses using Saccharomyces cerevisia. Bioethanol produced was at 8.32% (v/v) level. The efficiency of continuous distillation process was evaluated based on reflux ratio, and feed condition. The lab results were validated using COFE simulation Software. The analyses showed that both reflux ratio and feed condition had significant effects on the distillation process. Stages increased from 1.79 to 2.26 as the reflux ratio was decreased from 90% to 45% and the saturated feed produced lower mole fraction of desired product. We concluded that the lower reflux ratio with cold feed condition was suitable for higher mole fraction of top product.

  2. Surgical correction of main stem reflux in the superficial venous system: does it improve the blood flow of incompetent perforating veins?

    PubMed

    Al-Mulhim, Abdulrahman Saleh; El-Hoseiny, Hamdoun; Al-Mulhim, Faisal Mohammed; Bayameen, Omar; Sami, Mohamad Mahmoud; Abdulaziz, Khalid; Raslan, Mahmoud; Al-Shewy, Ali; Al-Malt, Majid

    2003-07-01

    Fifty-seven limbs (33 patients) with chronic venous ulceration were selected for this study. The criterion for selection was the presence of isolated superficial venous reflux. Long saphenous vein reflux alone was observed in 39 (68.4%) limbs, short saphenous vein reflux alone in 4 (7.0%) limbs, and both long and short saphenous vein reflux in 14 (24.6%) limbs. Surgical correction of the refluxing saphenous system has allowed 46 (80.7%) ulcers to heal. The healing rates for all the ulcerated legs that had long saphenous vein reflux, short saphenous vein reflux, or a combination of the two were 85.4%, 75.0%, and 66.7%, respectively. Incompetent perforating veins (IPVs) were observed in 51 (89.5%) limbs; 74.5% of them regained their competence postoperatively (189 preoperatively vs. 59 postoperatively; p < 0.001), with a significant reduction in their mean diameter (p < 0.001). IPVs remained in 13 (25.5%) limbs: 3 limbs with persistent reflux in the tributaries of the saphenous system, 1 limb with a fixed ankle joint, and nine limbs with no evidence of macrovascular venous disease. In patients with a competent deep venous system, reflux in perforating veins is often abolished after eradication of saphenous reflux. PMID:14509507

  3. Alleviation of harmful effect in stillage reflux in food waste ethanol fermentation based on metabolic and side-product accumulation regulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongzhi; Yang, Jian; Jia, Yan; Wang, Qunhui; Ma, Xiaoyu; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    Stillage reflux fermentation in food waste ethanol fermentation could reduce sewage discharge but exert a harmful effect because of side-product accumulation. In this study, regulation methods based on metabolic regulation and side-product alleviation were conducted. Result demonstrated that controlling the proper oxidation-reduction potential value (-150mV to -250mV) could reduce the harmful effect, improve ethanol yield by 21%, and reduce fermentation time by 20%. The methods of adding calcium carbonate to adjust the accumulated lactic acid showed that ethanol yield increased by 17.3%, and fermentation time decreased by 20%. The accumulated glyceal also shows that these two methods can reduce the harmful effect. Fermentation time lasted for seven times without effect, and metabolic regulation had a better effect than side-product regulation. PMID:27394991

  4. The effect of refluxing on the alkoxide-based sodium potassium niobate sol-gel system: Thermal and spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Anirban; Bould, Jonathan; Londesborough, Michael G.S.; Milne, Steven J.

    2011-02-15

    A study on the effects of prolonged heating under reflux conditions of up to 70 h on alkoxides of sodium, potassium and niobium dissolved in 2-methoxyethanol for the synthesis of sols of composition Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3} (NKN) has been carried out using combined thermogravimetric-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses. Extended refluxing increases the homogeneity of the Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3} (NKN) system. Spectroscopic analyses on the non-refluxed and 70 h refluxed NKN gels reveal the existence of inorganic hydrated carbonates and bicarbonates, which we propose arise from the hydration and carbonation of the samples on standing in air. The X-ray diffraction patterns of these two types of gels show orthorhombic NKN phase evolutions at higher temperatures. -- Graphical abstract: Total organic evolution plots over time for NKN dried gels obtained under different refluxing times show different thermochemical behaviours and these were investigated by thermal and spectroscopic analysis tools to find a correlation between the extent of -M-O-M- chain link formation and the amount of solvent vapour (methoxyethanol) evolution. Display Omitted Research highlights: > Prolonged refluxing of sol-gel NKN precursor solutions improves final properties of an NKN system. > An NKN process thermo-chemistry with thermal and spectroscopic analysis tools was explored. > An FTIR of NKN gels reveals tendency of NKN systems for rehydration and recarbonation on standing.

  5. Pulmonary Disease Secondary to Reflux Mimicking Interstitial Pneumonia in Systemic Sclerosis: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Ricardo Azêdo de Luca; Mazolli Veiga, Nathalia; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Mocarzel, Luis Otávio Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a complex disease due to the variety of clinical presentations, often superimposed on other conditions, related or not to the connective tissue. We report a 43-year-old Brazilian woman with limited systemic sclerosis and pulmonary symptoms secondary to gastroesophageal reflux disease, with a clinical presentation similar to a diffuse interstitial lung disease. Because of the frequency of interstitial lung injury due to systemic sclerosis, this was an important differential diagnosis, which could be excluded after optimized treatment of reflux disease, with clinical and radiological improvement. Clinical management of patients with collagen diseases requires clinician skills to identify the natural history and understand its nuances. This is a common situation in clinical practice, but with a few discussions in international literature. PMID:26885429

  6. Pulmonary Disease Secondary to Reflux Mimicking Interstitial Pneumonia in Systemic Sclerosis: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Montes, Ricardo Azêdo de Luca; Mazolli Veiga, Nathalia; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Mocarzel, Luis Otávio Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a complex disease due to the variety of clinical presentations, often superimposed on other conditions, related or not to the connective tissue. We report a 43-year-old Brazilian woman with limited systemic sclerosis and pulmonary symptoms secondary to gastroesophageal reflux disease, with a clinical presentation similar to a diffuse interstitial lung disease. Because of the frequency of interstitial lung injury due to systemic sclerosis, this was an important differential diagnosis, which could be excluded after optimized treatment of reflux disease, with clinical and radiological improvement. Clinical management of patients with collagen diseases requires clinician skills to identify the natural history and understand its nuances. This is a common situation in clinical practice, but with a few discussions in international literature. PMID:26885429

  7. Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication for Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic, progressive, and costly medical condition affecting a substantial proportion of the world population, predominantly the Western population. The available treatment options for patients with refractory GERD symptoms are limited to either laparoscopic surgery with significant sequelae or potentially lifelong, high-dose proton pump inhibitor therapy. The restoration of the antireflux competence of the gastroesophageal junction at the anatomic and physiologic levels is critical for the effective long-term treatment of GERD. Transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) surgery is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective treatment that has yielded significant symptomatic improvement in patients with medically refractory GERD symptoms. In this review article, we have summarized case series and reports describing the role of TIF for patients with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. The reported indications, techniques, complications, and success rates are also discussed. PMID:26878326

  8. [Simultaneous long-term measurement of duodenogastric reflux and gastroduodenal motility].

    PubMed

    Thomas, H; Wilhelm, L; Petermann, J; Rosenbaum, K D; Lorenz, D

    1997-06-01

    We combined a newly developed ambulatory fiberoptic system for detecting intragastric bilirubin (Bilitec 2000, Synectics Medical Inc., Sweden) with prolonged measurement of gastroduodenal motility in 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients followed BI resection. Circadian intragastric bilirubin exposure and the total number of tremendous changes of bilirubin absorption (more than 20%, over a period of at least 5 min) were significantly increased in the BI-resected patients (P < 0.05). In patients the interdigestive motility cycle (IMC) was characterized by the appearance of several types of abnormally propagated phase III activity fronts. Of the tremendous increases of bilirubin absorption in the patient group, 90.1% were associated with abnormally propagated phase III activity fronts. In cases of increased duodenogastric reflux, the combination of ambulatory intragastric bilirubin measurement and long-term manometry seems to be feasible to assess motility and reflux simultaneously. PMID:9324442

  9. Refluxed electrons direct laser acceleration in ultrahigh laser and relativistic critical density plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhu, B.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhou, W. M.; Gu, Y. Q.; Cao, L. H.

    2015-01-15

    Refluxed electrons direct laser acceleration is proposed so as to generate a high-charge energetic electron beam. When a laser pulse is incident on a relativistic critical density target, the rising edge of the pulse heats the target and the sheath fields on the both sides of the target reflux some electrons inside the expanding target. These electrons can be trapped and accelerated due to the self-transparency and the negative longitudinal electrostatic field in the expanding target. Some of the electrons can be accelerated to energies exceeding the ponderomotive limit 1/2a{sub 0}{sup 2}mc{sup 2}. Effective temperature significantly above the ponderomotive scaling is observed. Furthermore, due to the limited expanding length, the laser propagating instabilities are suppressed in the interaction. Thus, high collimated beams with tens of μC charge can be generated.

  10. Defatting technique for two ground spices using simple reflux apparatus: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Dent, R G

    1982-09-01

    A solvent defatting technique was tested for 2 spices which require the same extraction process but different defatting agents. For turmeric, which uses isopropanol as the defatting agent, recoveries of rodent hair and insect fragments were not significantly different from those in the original collaborative study, and this technique is recommended as an alternative to AOAC method 44.122(a). However, for oregano, which uses chloroform as the defatting agent, recoveries of insect fragments were significantly lower by the reflux method. An alternative chloroform pretreatment for oregano, therefore, is not recommended for AOAC 44.122(b). It is suggested that reflux action defatting techniques be considered during the developmental stages of new methods. The technique has been adopted official first action for turmeric. PMID:7130080

  11. Neuro-regulation of lower esophageal sphincter function as treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Anupender Singh; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2008-01-01

    The junction between the esophagus and the stomach is a specialized region, composed of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and its adjacent anatomical structures, the gastric sling and crural diaphragm. Together these structures work in a coordinated manner to allow ingested food into the stomach while preventing reflux of gastric contents across the esophago-gastric junction (EGJ) into the esophagus. The same zone also permits retrograde passage of air and gastric contents into esophagus during belching and vomiting. The precise coordination required to execute such a complicated task is achieved by a finely-regulated high-pressure zone. This zone keeps the junction between esophagus and stomach continuously closed, but is still able to relax briefly via input from inhibitory neurons that are responsible for its innervation. Alterations of the structure and function of the EGJ and the LES may predispose to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). PMID:18286675

  12. Reflux condensation of pure vapors with and without a noncondensable gas inside plain and enhanced tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelmessih, A.N.; Rabas, T.J.; Panchal, C.B.

    1997-06-01

    Estimates of the surface-area and vapor-release reductions are obtained when commercially available enhanced tubes (spirally ribbed) replace plain tubes in a reflux unit condensing pure organic vapors with different concentrations of a noncondensable gas. This investigation was undertaken because there are no existing data and/or prediction methods that are applicable for these shell-and-tube condensers commonly used in the process industries. To obtain these estimates, existing design methods published in the open literature were used. The major findings are that (1) surface-area reductions can almost approach the single-phase heat transfer enhancement level, and (2) vapor-release reductions can approach a factor of four. The important implication is that enhanced tubes appear to be very cost effective for addressing the recovery of volatile organic vapors (VOCs), and for a vast number of different reflux-condenser applications.

  13. Visceral artery embolization after endoscopic injection of Enteryx for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Helo, Naseem; Wu, Alex; Moon, Eunice; Wang, Weiping

    2014-09-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be difficult to manage medically and may require endoscopic or surgical interventions. The Enteryx procedure was designed to enhance the gastroesophageal barrier function by endoscopic injection of a copolymer into the lower esophageal sphincter. We present a rare case of a patient who was found to have migration of the copolymer into the celiac trunk and bilateral renal arteries during a work-up for persistent intermittent hematuria, which began shortly after Enteryx therapy for GERD. PMID:25426247

  14. The role of the 5-hydroxytryptamine pathway in reflux-induced esophageal mucosal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dysfunction of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) signaling pathway can lead to gastrointestinal motility and secretion abnormalities and to visceral hypersensitivity. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of 5-HT in reflux-induced esophageal mucosal injury. Methods Fifty 8-week-old male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into a gastroesophageal reflux (GER) model group (30 rats) and a sham surgery control group (20 rats). Four weeks after surgery, the esophageal mucosa was collected for histological evaluation, 5-HT concentrations, and 5-HT selective reuptake transporter (SERT) mRNA and 5-HT4 receptor (5-HT4R) protein expressions. Results Twenty-seven rats in the GER model group survived, and three rats died. Histologically, in the GER model group, 20 rats had reflux esophagitis (RE group), and 7 rats had non-erosive reflux disease (NERD group). The 5-HT levels in the esophageal tissue from the RE group were significantly higher than those from the control and NERD groups. Both the RE and NERD groups showed significant increases in SERT mRNA expression of the esophageal mucosa than that of the controls, and the SERT mRNA level in the RE group was significantly higher than that in the NERD group. The 5-HT4R protein level of the esophageal mucosa in the RE group was significantly lower than that in the controls and the NERD group. Conclusions We conclude that a 5-HT signaling pathway disorder could be a major factor in the pathogenesis of GER and RE. PMID:23092450

  15. Randomized, prospective double-blind trial of metoclopramide and placebo for gastroesophageal reflux in infants.

    PubMed

    Tolia, V; Calhoun, J; Kuhns, L; Kauffman, R E

    1989-07-01

    The effect of metoclopramide on gastroesophageal reflux was studied in 30 infants less than 1 year of age. Gastroesophageal reflux was documented in all infants by extended pH monitoring before enrollment in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive metoclopramide 0.1 mg/kg or placebo four times a day, 1/2 hour before feeding for 1 week, followed by the alternate regimen for 1 week. The infants were reevaluated with extended pH monitoring and scintigraphy after 4 to 7 days of each treatment. A symptom score was derived by determining the average number of occurrences of all symptoms recorded daily by parents on a symptom checklist during pretreatment, placebo, and metoclopramide treatment periods. There was a difference between pretreatment evaluation and placebo periods with respect to daily symptom scores (p less than 0.005), reflecting a significant placebo response. However, no difference in scintigraphic study was found between placebo and metoclopramide periods. A significant difference between placebo and metoclopramide periods was noted in the percentage of time esophageal pH was less than 4.0 (p less than 0.001). However, although metoclopramide decreased the proportion of time esophageal pH was less than 4.0, pH remained less than 4.0 for more than 5% of the time in most patients. Substratification of the total group into infants younger and older than 3 months revealed that older infants had greater average daily weight gain during the metoclopramide treatment period (34.3 gm/day) than in the placebo treatment period (6.6 gm/day, p = 0.05). We conclude that metoclopramide in the dosage 0.1 mg/kg four times daily reduces reflux in infants and may be useful for infants with poor weight gain and other serious complications of gastroesophageal reflux. PMID:2661788

  16. Cisapride treatment for gastro-oesophageal reflux in children: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, R E; Augood, C; MacLennan, S; Logan, S

    2000-12-01

    The aim of the systematic review was to determine the effect of cisapride compared with placebo or other non-surgical therapies for the treatment of symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux in children. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Science Citation Index and reference lists for randomized controlled trials which compared cisapride with placebo or other non-surgical therapy in children. We included only trials which reported reflux-related symptoms as an outcome, provided that cisapride was administered orally for at least I week. Seven trials (286 children in total) compared cisapride with placebo. Two trials reported good concealment of treatment allocation. The pooled odds ratio for the 'same or worse' symptoms was 0.34 (95% CI 0.10, 1.19). There was substantial heterogeneity between studies (P < 0.00001) and the funnel plot was asymmetrical. Adverse effects (mainly diarrhoea) were not significantly increased with cisapride (pooled odds ratio (OR) 1.80: 0.87, 3.70). The reflux index was significantly reduced in children treated with cisapride (weighted mean difference -6.49: -10.13, -2.85). One study (50 children) compared cisapride with gaviscon plus carobel: the OR for the 'same or worse' symptoms was 3.26 (0.93, 11.38). There was no clear evidence that cisapride reduced symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux. As smaller, poorer quality studies were biased in favour of a positive treatment effect, the pooled OR overestimated the potential benefits of cisapride. There was some evidence to suggest that gaviscon plus carobel may be a more effective option than cisapride. PMID:11115025

  17. Managing gastroesophageal reflux disease – comparative efficacy and outcomes of dexlansoprazole MR

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Jeanetta W; Peura, David A

    2015-01-01

    The management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been revolutionized with the development of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Unfortunately, due to the inherent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of conventional PPIs, many patients continue to suffer from symptoms related to GERD despite appropriate use of PPIs. Dexlansoprazole MR is a PPI with a unique dual delayed-release delivery system that has been designed to address the unmet needs in GERD management. Specifically, dexlansoprazole MR addresses limitations with short plasma half-life and need for meal-associated dosing, characteristic of conventional PPIs. In addition, dexlansoprazole MR has been shown to be effective in several specific clinical situations. These include coadministration with clopidogrel, healing of all grades of erosive esophagitis, improvement in reflux-related quality of life, step down to once-per-day dosing, and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections. Furthermore, dexlansoprazole MR has been found to induce symptom improvement in patients with nonerosive esophageal reflux disease, nocturnal heartburn and GERD-related sleep disturbance, and regurgitation. Overall, dexlansoprazole MR is a unique and useful tool in the management of GERD. PMID:26586949

  18. [Laparoscopic interventions in gastroesophageal reflux--a cost-benefit analysis].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, K H; Tigges, H; Heimbucher, J; Freys, S M; Thiede, A

    1997-01-01

    On the basis of a cost analysis of conservative and surgical therapy of gastroesophageal reflux disease in 70 patients health economic aspects are discussed. In a prospective documented series of reflux patients a retrolective analysis of medication cost and duration of conservative therapy is performed. In addition, the costs for surgical therapy including preoperative diagnostic workup, cost during hospitalization as well as costs for complications with necessary additional treatment and readmissions are assessed. For the conservative treatment of 70 reflux patients a total of more than DM < 700,000 had to be spent during preoperative 5 years. A major part of this sum was spent for patients who needed to increase the initial 20 mg dosage of Omeprazol within 5 years. A mean of approximately DM 2,000 per patient was spent for conservative treatment. Surgical treatment without complications was calculated with DM 5,425 per case. However, in 7 patients complications occurred causing prolonged or even rehospitalization with necessary further treatment summing up to about DM 486,000 for surgical therapy in 70 patients including complications. Cost relevant factors are therefore in conservative treatment patients who need increasing dosages, while, in surgical treatment, the cost relevant patients are those with complications and necessary additional treatment. PMID:9499529

  19. Effects of Omeprazole Over Voice Quality in Muscle Tension Dysphonia Patients With Laryngopharyngeal Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Kandogan, Tolga; Aksoy, Gökce; Dalgic, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Backround Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is the backflow of stomach contents above upper esophageal sphincter, into the pharynx, larynx, and upper aerodigestive system. Objectives In this study, effects of omeprazole over voice quality in muscle tension dysphonia with laryngopharyngeal reflux was ınvestigated. Patients and Methods Nine patients, 7 males and 2 females, aged between 27-43 (mean age:31) were included to this study. The diagnosis of muscle tension dysphonia with LPR was established by video laryngoscopy, rigid scope 70º. The laryngeal changes related with LPR were evaluated according to Reflux Finding Score. The patients received omeprazole 20 mg twice a day for a period of 6 months. None of the patients received voice therapy. Vocal hygiene guidelines were also explained to the patients. Objective and subjective voice parameters (Jitter, shimmer, NHR, Voice Handicap Index, and Auditive analysis; Roughness, breathiness, and hoarseness) were evaluated in this study. Results After treatment with omeprazol, all the parameters showed an improvement in voice quality, but only VHI (P = 0) and shimmer (P = 0,018) are statistically significant. Conclusions For FD patients with LPR condition, we highly recommend that LPR treatment should be part of the treatment plan. PMID:23483094

  20. Differences in the risk factors of reflux esophagitis according to age in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, C H; Kim, K O; Baek, I H; Choi, M H; Jang, H J; Kae, S H; Kim, J B; Baik, G H; Shin, W G; Kim, K H; Kim, H Y

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Korea has been believed to be low, but the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Korea is expected to increase because of the longer life expectancy and more ingestion of westernized food. The aim of this study was to report differences in the risk factors of reflux esophagitis (RE) according to age in Korea. We prospectively recruited the subjects who had RE among those who visited a health promotion center for upper gastrointestinal cancer surveillance at Hallym Medical Center (five institutions) between January 2008 and February 2009. The enrolled study participants comprised 742 subjects with RE and 1484 healthy controls. The independent risk factors of RE in young and adult group were male sex, smoking, coffee, body mass index ≥ 25, hiatal hernia, and Helicobacter pylori negativity. The risk factors of RE in elderly group were smoking, coffee, and hiatal hernia. The risk factors for RE according to age group were found to differ. In elderly group, Helicobacter pylori infection was not a significant protective factor contrary to young and adult groups. PMID:23009198

  1. Laparoscopic Nissen Rossetti fundoplication: Possibility towards day care anti-reflux surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Bharatam, Kaundinya Kiran; Raj, Rajiv; Subramanian, Jayantan Bhaskar; Vasudevan, Anjana; Bodduluri, Sudeep; Sriraman, K.B.; Abineshwar, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As we proceed towards more and more day care surgeries we always need to choose patients and procedures within a great deal of safety margin. Anti reflux surgeries are gaining more popularity and awareness and Laparoscopic Nissen Rosetti fundoplication is a safe and effective method of performing them. Methods and observations Our case series of 25 patients who underwent day care Laparoscopic Nissen Rossetti fundoplication done over a period of 3 years suggests the feasibility and safety of performing day care anti reflux surgeries with no complications. Discussion Surgical outcomes of procedure are unaffected and the main challenge faced remains pain relief and which can be effectively tackled by local blocks or plain NSAIDs. Results Laparoscopic Nissen Rossetti fundoplication is a safe procedure to be offered as day care anti-reflux surgery. We encourage more studies in this regards with appropriate blinding to enforce its possibility as day care surgery and help patients with early recovery and decreasing cost of surgeries. PMID:26594356

  2. Reproducibility and intragastric variation of duodenogastric reflux using ambulatory gastric bilirubin monitoring.

    PubMed

    Manifold, D K; Anggiansah, A; Marshall, R E; Owen, W J

    2001-01-01

    Duodenogastric reflux has long been considered to be important in the pathogenesis of many gastric disorders that exhibit regional variation within the stomach. Ambulatory gastric bilirubin monitoring is a new technique and, although extensively validated, reproducibility and gastric regional variation have not been specifically addressed. Fourteen patients with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and 12 healthy subjects underwent 24-h ambulatory gastric bilirubin monitoring with the bilirubin sensor in the upper stomach. Gastric bilirubin monitoring with two simultaneous bilirubin probes, one in the upper stomach and the other in the antrum, was performed on a separate occasion. Gastric bilirubin exposure in the initial and repeat studies showed a good correlation (R = 0.60, P < 0.01). Gastric bilirubin exposure in the upper stomach and the antrum showed a high degree of correlation (R = 0.90, P < 0.01). In conclusion, reproducible results are obtained with ambulatory gastric bilirubin monitoring and duodenogastric reflux does not exhibit significant regional variation within the stomach. PMID:11270798

  3. [Assessment of duodenogastric reflux 24h variability in subjects with functional dyspepsia].

    PubMed

    Romanowski, Marek; Chojnacki, Jan; Gil, Jerzy; Piotrowski, Wojciech

    2004-01-01

    Symptoms of functional dyspepsia demonstrate significant variability, among others dependently on the time of the day and on consumed meals. The aim of the study was to find out whether duodenogastric reflux is observed in subjects with nonulcer (NUD) and dysmotor dyspepsia (DD) and whether its intensification changes within 24 h. Investigations comprised 25 subjects with NUD and 25 with DD, aged 19-43 years after exclusion of other diseases and H. pylori infection. The gastric content of bilirubin was registered with Bilitec 2000 Synectics Medical. Duodenogastric reflux episodes were observed in both groups but their intensification and 24h dynamics were differentiated. In subjects with DD total reflux index was significantly higher than in those with NUD (mean=18.0+/-9.5% and mean=6.3+/-4.1%; p<0.05). These differences were particularly visible in after meal (mean=21.2+/-7.9% and mean=10.4+/-6.6%; p<0.01) and night time (mean=8.7+/-3.6% and mean=2.9+/-0.9%; p<0.01). The results of the study indicate that bilimetry may be useful in differentiation of the form of dyspepsia and in selection of rational therapy. PMID:15603369

  4. The role of hot electron refluxing in laser-generated K-alpha sources

    SciTech Connect

    Neumayer, P.; Aurand, B.; Basko, M.; Ecker, B.; Gibbon, P.; Karmakar, A.; Hochhaus, D. C.; Kazakov, E.; Kuehl, T.; Labaune, C.; Rosmej, O.; Tauschwitz, An.

    2010-10-15

    A study of the contribution of refluxing electrons in the production of K-alpha radiation from high-intensity laser irradiated thin targets has been performed. Thin copper foils both freestanding, and backed by a thick substrate were irradiated with laser pulses of energies around 100 J at intensities ranging from below 10{sup 17} to above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. At high laser intensities we find a strong reduction in the K-alpha yield from targets backed by the substrate. The observed yield reduction is in good agreement with a simple model using hot electron spectra from particle-in-cell simulations or directly inferred from the measured bremsstrahlung emission and can therefore be interpreted as due to the suppression of hot electron refluxing. The study shows that refluxing electrons play a dominant role in high-intensity laser driven K- alpha generation and have to be taken into account in designing targets for laser driven high-flux K-alpha sources.

  5. Reflux esophagitis triggered after Helicobacter pylori eradication: a noteworthy demerit of eradication therapy among the Japanese?

    PubMed

    Iijima, Katsunori; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    In the February 2013 Revision of Insured Medical Treatment, bacterial eradication for all Helicobacter pylori-positive individuals in Japan was covered under the insurance scheme. However, reflux esophagitis is believed to occur in approximately 10% of Japanese patients who undergo eradication therapy. Hence, the risk of reflux esophagitis among such cases should be carefully considered, particularly in the treatment for H. pylori-positive patients who are otherwise healthy. The eradication of H. pylori in cases of H. pylori-positive gastritis markedly suppresses gastric inflammation, and inhibits gastric mucosal atrophy and its progression to intestinal metaplasia. In a long-term follow-up study (10-20 years), eradication treatment was found to reduce the risk of subsequent gastric cancer. However, the fact that eradication-induced reflux esophagitis could increase the long-term risk of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma should also be considered in the Japanese pop