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Sample records for acid reflux events

  1. Pediatric Acid Reflux and GERD in Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Share Reflux and GERD : Teen GERD Pediatric Acid Reflux and GERD in Teens If you’re ... And here’s the better news: Most kids with acid reflux are able to lead normal, active, healthy ...

  2. Do you Suffer from Heartburn or Acid Reflux?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have acid reflux disease or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). 1 Are You Suffering from Heartburn? Acid reflux happens when the ring of muscle between the esophagus and stomach does not work well. The muscle usually opens when food is ...

  3. Lower pH values of weakly acidic refluxes as determinants of heartburn perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with normal esophageal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    de Bortoli, N; Martinucci, I; Savarino, E; Franchi, R; Bertani, L; Russo, S; Ceccarelli, L; Costa, F; Bellini, M; Blandizzi, C; Savarino, V; Marchi, S

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel impedance pH monitoring has shown that weakly acidic refluxes are able to generate heartburn. However, data on the role of different pH values, ranging between 4 and 7, in the generation of them are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different pH values of weakly acidic refluxes play a differential role in provoking reflux symptoms in endoscopy-negative patients with physiological esophageal acid exposure time and positive symptom index and symptom association probability for weakly acidic refluxes. One hundred and forty-three consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, nonresponders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), were allowed a washout from PPIs before undergoing: upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and multichannel impedance pH monitoring. In patients with both symptom index and symptom association probability positive for weakly acidic reflux, each weakly acidic reflux was evaluated considering exact pH value, extension, physical characteristics, and correlation with heartburn. Forty-five patients with normal acid exposure time and positive symptom association probability for weakly acidic reflux were identified. The number of refluxes not heartburn related was higher than those heartburn related. In all distal and proximal liquid refluxes, as well as in distal mixed refluxes, the mean pH value of reflux events associated with heartburn was significantly lower than that not associated. This condition was not confirmed for proximal mixed refluxes. Overall, a low pH of weakly acidic reflux represents a determinant factor in provoking heartburn. This observation contributes to better understand the pathophysiology of symptoms generated by weakly acidic refluxes, paving the way toward the search for different therapeutic approaches to this peculiar condition of esophageal hypersensitivity.

  4. The Mystery and Misery of Acid Reflux in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Mike; Davenport, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    When a child is sick, parents want answers. They want to know what is wrong, what they can do, and how to get their child healthy--pronto. Regrettably, there are some puzzling illnesses affecting children that are surrounded by mystery. One of them is gastroesophageal reflux (GER), otherwise known as acid reflux--or "reflux" for short. Reflux…

  5. Liquid-containing Refluxes and Acid Refluxes May Be Less Frequent in the Japanese Population Than in Other Populations: Normal Values of 24-hour Esophageal Impedance and pH Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Osamu; Kohata, Yukie; Kawami, Noriyuki; Iida, Hiroshi; Kawada, Akiyo; Hosaka, Hiroko; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Kuribayashi, Shiko; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Inamori, Masahiko; Kusano, Motoyasu; Hongo, Micho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Twenty-four-hour esophageal impedance and pH monitoring allows detection of all types of reflux episodes and is considered the best technique for identifying gastroesophageal refluxes. However, normative data for the Japanese population are lacking. This multicenter study aimed to establish the normal range of 24-hour esophageal impedance and pH data both in the distal and the proximal esophagus in Japanese subjects. Methods Forty-two healthy volunteers (25 men and 17 women) with a mean ± standard deviation age of 33.3 ± 12.4 years (range: 22–72 years) underwent a combined 24-hour esophageal impedance and pH monitoring. According to the physical and pH properties, distal or proximal esophageal reflux events were categorized. Results Median 45 reflux events occurred in 24 hours, and the 95th percentile was 85 events. Unlike previous reports, liquid-containing reflux events are median 25/24 hours with the 95th percentile of 62/24 hours. Acidic reflux events were median 11/24 hours with the 95th percentile of 39/24 hours. Non-acidic gas reflux events were median 15/24 hours with the 95th percentile of 39/24 hours. Proximal reflux events accounted for 80% of the total reflux events and were mainly non-acidic gas refluxes. About 19% of liquid and mixed refluxes reached the proximal esophagus. Conclusions Unlike previous studies, liquid-containing and acidic reflux events may be less frequent in the Japanese population. Non-acidic gas reflux events may be frequent and a cause of frequent proximal reflux events. This study provides important normative data for 24-hour impedance and pH monitoring in both the distal and the proximal esophagus in the Japanese population. PMID:27247103

  6. Dental erosion and acid reflux disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Lazarchik, David A; Frazier, Kevin B

    2009-01-01

    Dental erosion can be difficult to detect, especially in the early stages when lesions are subtle and can be easily overlooked. Patients often are not aware of erosion until the dentition has sustained severe damage that requires extensive and expensive dental rehabilitation. The pH of stomach acid is much lower than the critical pH of enamel dissolution; therefore, reflux of stomach contents into the oral cavity over an extended period of time can cause severe loss of tooth structure. Dental treatment for reflux-induced erosion should focus not only on appropriate restoration but also on all available preventive measures, such as neutralization of acid and remineralization or strengthening of enamel against acid attack. Dentists must maintain a high degree of suspicion for reflux-induced erosion whenever a patient displays symptoms of acid reflux disease or a pattern of erosion that suggests an intrinsic source of acid exposure.

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux disease

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic esophagitis; Reflux esophagitis; GERD; Heartburn - chronic; Dyspepsia - GERD ... into the esophagus. This is called reflux or gastroesophageal reflux. Reflux may cause symptoms. Harsh stomach acids can ...

  8. Terminating motor events for TLESR are influenced by the presence and distribution of refluxate.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi, Shiko; Massey, Benson T; Hafeezullah, Muhammad; Perera, Lilani; Hussaini, Syed Q; Tatro, Linda; Darling, Ronald J; Franco, Rose; Shaker, Reza

    2009-07-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR) is frequently associated with reflux events and terminates with a primary or secondary peristaltic wave. However, it is unclear whether the presence and properties of the refluxate affect TLESR-termination events. The aims of this study were to determine the pattern of terminating esophageal motor activity after TLESR in healthy subjects and factors affecting the type of terminating motor event. Fifteen healthy subjects (7 men, age 18-56) were studied. High-resolution manometry and impedance/pH monitoring were performed simultaneously in supine position for 2 h after subjects took a 1,000-kcal meal (Awake Study). This procedure was repeated during the night under polysomnographic recording for 6-8 h after consuming a 1,000-kcal meal (Sleep Study). We categorized three types of TLESR-terminating motor events, primary peristalsis (PP), full secondary contraction (FSC), which propagated the entire esophagus, and partial secondary contractions (PSC), which started distal to the upper esophageal sphincter. Overall, 289 TLESR events were found. The percentages of TLESR events terminated by PP, FSC, and PSC were 22%, 14%, and 64%, respectively. TLESR events terminated by PP were less likely to be accompanied by reflux events. TLESR events terminated by FSC were significantly more likely to have evidence for proximal esophageal reflux and esophago-pharyngeal reflux. Findings were similar in awake and sleep states. We concluded that, in healthy recumbent subjects, the most common TLESR-termination event is a secondary contraction, rather than PP. Presence and distribution of the refluxate is a major influence on the type of terminating contraction.

  9. Acid Reflux Directly Causes Sleep Disturbances in Rat with Chronic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Kenichi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Tsukahara, Takuya; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Watanabe, Toshio; Urade, Yoshihiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is strongly associated with sleep disturbances. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy improves subjective but not objective sleep parameters in patients with GERD. This study aimed to investigate the association between GERD and sleep, and the effect of PPI on sleep by using a rat model of chronic acid reflux esophagitis. Methods Acid reflux esophagitis was induced by ligating the transitional region between the forestomach and the glandular portion and then wrapping the duodenum near the pylorus. Rats underwent surgery for implantation of electrodes for electroencephalogram and electromyogram recordings, and they were transferred to a soundproof recording chamber. Polygraphic recordings were scored by using 10-s epochs for wake, rapid eye movement sleep, and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. To examine the role of acid reflux, rats were subcutaneously administered a PPI, omeprazole, at a dose of 20 mg/kg once daily. Results Rats with reflux esophagitis presented with several erosions, ulcers, and mucosal thickening with basal hyperplasia and marked inflammatory infiltration. The reflux esophagitis group showed a 34.0% increase in wake (232.2±11.4 min and 173.3±7.4 min in the reflux esophagitis and control groups, respectively; p<0.01) accompanied by a reduction in NREM sleep during light period, an increase in sleep fragmentation, and more frequent stage transitions. The use of omeprazole significantly improved sleep disturbances caused by reflux esophagitis, and this effect was not observed when the PPI was withdrawn. Conclusions Acid reflux directly causes sleep disturbances in rats with chronic esophagitis. PMID:25215524

  10. The mode of action alginic acid compound in the reduction of gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Malmud, L S; Charkes, N D; Littlefield, J; Reilley, J; Stern, H; Rosenberg, R; Fisher, R S

    1979-10-01

    This study was designed to evaluate quantitatively the mode of action of alginic acid compound (AAC) in the treatment of patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy using an orall administered Tc-99m sulfur colloid solution was used to demonstrate that AAC decreased significantly the gastroesophageal reflux index from (9.9 +/- 1.3) % to (6.5 +/- 0.8) % (p less than 0.05). No alteration of lower esophageal sphincter pressure was observed. After ACC was suitably labeled with Sr-87m, a dual-nuclide scintigraphic technique was used to show that most (greater than 75%) of the AAC was located in the upper half of the stomach in both normal subjects and patients with gastroesophageal reflux. In those subjects in whom reflux did occur after treatment with AAC, the Sr-87m-AAC refluxed into the esophagus preferentially compared with the liquid containing Tc-99m sulfur colloid. These findings suggest that AAC dimishes gastroesophageal reflux by means of its foaming, floating, and viscous properties. PMID:231639

  11. Helicobacter pylori eradication and reflux disease onset: did gastric acid get "crazy"?

    PubMed

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro; Bruzzese, Vincenzo

    2013-02-14

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is highly prevalent in the general population. In the last decade, a potential relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication and GORD onset has been claimed. The main putative mechanism is the gastric acid hypersecretion that develops after bacterial cure in those patients with corpus-predominant gastritis. We performed a critical reappraisal of the intricate pathogenesis and clinical data available in this field. Oesophagitis onset after H. pylori eradication in duodenal ulcer patients has been ascribed to a gastric acid hypersecretion, which could develop following body gastritis healing. However, the absence of an acid hypersecretive status in these patients is documented by both pathophysiology and clinical studies. Indeed, duodenal ulcer recurrence is virtually abolished following H. pylori eradication. In addition, intra-oesophageal pH recording studies failed to demonstrated increased acid reflux following bacterial eradication. Moreover, oesophageal manometric studies suggest that H. pylori eradication would reduce--rather than favor--acid reflux into the oesophagus. Finally, data of clinical studies would suggest that H. pylori eradication is not significantly associated with either reflux symptoms or erosive oesophagitis onset, some data suggesting also an advantage in curing the infection when oesophagitis is already present. Therefore, the legend of "crazy acid" remains--as all the others--a fascinating, but imaginary tale.

  12. Mucosal integrity and sensitivity to acid in the proximal esophagus in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Weijenborg, Pim W; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A; van den Wijngaard, René M J G J; Verheij, J; Smout, André J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-07-01

    Acid reflux episodes that extend to the proximal esophagus are more likely to be perceived. This suggests that the proximal esophagus is more sensitive to acid than the distal esophagus, which could be caused by impaired mucosal integrity in the proximal esophagus. Our aim was to explore sensitivity to acid and mucosal integrity in different segments of the esophagus. We used a prospective observational study, including 12 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). After stopping acid secretion-inhibiting medication, two procedures were performed: an acid perfusion test and an upper endoscopy with electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and esophageal biopsies. Proximal and distal sensitivity to acid and tissue impedance were measured in vivo, and mucosal permeability and epithelial intercellular spaces at different esophageal levels were measured in vitro. Mean lag time to heartburn perception was much shorter after proximal acid perfusion (0.8 min) than after distal acid perfusion (3.9 min) (P = 0.02). Median in vivo tissue impedance was significantly lower in the distal esophagus (4,563 Ω·m) compared with the proximal esophagus (8,170 Ω·m) (P = 0.002). Transepithelial permeability, as measured by the median fluorescein flux was significantly higher in the distal (2,051 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) than in the proximal segment (368 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) (P = 0.033). Intercellular space ratio and maximum heartburn intensity were not significantly different between the proximal and distal esophagus. In GERD patients off acid secretion-inhibiting medication, acid exposure in the proximal segment of the esophagus provokes symptoms earlier than acid exposure in the distal esophagus, whereas mucosal integrity is impaired more in the distal esophagus. These findings indicate that the enhanced sensitivity to proximal reflux episodes is not explained by increased mucosal permeability. PMID:27198192

  13. Acid Reflux

    MedlinePlus

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  14. Comparative evaluation of intragastric bile acids and hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the diagnosis of duodenogastric reflux

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Teng-Fei; Yadav, Praveen K; Wu, Rui-Jin; Yu, Wei-Hua; Liu, Chang-Qin; Lin, Hui; Liu, Zhan-Ju

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic value of a combination of intragastric bile acids and hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the detection of duodenogastric reflux (DGR). METHODS: The study contained 99 patients with DGR and 70 healthy volunteers who made up the control group. The diagnosis was based on the combination of several objective arguments: a long history of gastric symptoms (i.e., nausea, epigastric pain, and/or bilious vomiting) poorly responsive to medical treatment, gastroesophageal reflux symptoms unresponsive to proton-pump inhibitors, gastritis on upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and/or at histology, presence of a bilious gastric lake at > 1 upper GI endoscopy, pathologic 24-h intragastric bile monitoring with the Bilitec device. Gastric juice was aspirated in the GI endoscopy and total bile acid (TBA), total bilirubin (TBIL) and direct bilirubin (DBIL) were tested in the clinical laboratory. Continuous data of gastric juice were compared between each group using the independent-samples Mann-Whitney U-test and their relationship was analysed by Spearman’s rank correlation test and Fisher’s linear discriminant analysis. Histopathology of DGR patients and 23 patients with chronic atrophic gastritis was compared by clinical pathologists. Using the Independent-samples Mann-Whitney U-test, DGR index (DGRi) was calculated in 28 patients of DGR group and 19 persons of control group who were subjected to hepatobiliary scintigraphy. Receiver operating characteristic curve was made to determine the sensitivity and specificity of these two methods in the diagnosis of DGR. RESULTS: The group of patients with DGR showed a statistically higher prevalence of epigastric pain in comparison with control group. There was no significant difference between the histology of gastric mucosa with atrophic gastritis and duodenogastric reflux. The bile acid levels of DGR patients were significantly higher than the control values (Z: TBA: -8.916, DBIL: -3.914, TBIL: -6.197, all

  15. [Update on gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Serra Pueyo, Jordi

    2014-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a highly frequent disorder classically characterized by the presence of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation that improves with drug therapy that reduces acid content in the stomach. However, especially in patients with non-erosive disease, response to proton pump inhibitors is unsatisfactory in approximately 1 out of 3 patients, and consequently, in these patients, it is important to establish a definitive diagnosis and an alternative therapeutic strategy. In the last few years, advances have been made in knowledge of the physiopathology of reflux, such as identification of the role of the acid pocket in producing reflux, technological advances that allow differentiation among acid reflux, non-acid reflux and slightly acid reflux, and advances in the treatment of reflux with drugs that attempt to act on the barrier function of the esophagogastric junction.

  16. [Update on gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Serra Pueyo, Jordi

    2014-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a highly frequent disorder classically characterized by the presence of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation that improves with drug therapy that reduces acid content in the stomach. However, especially in patients with non-erosive disease, response to proton pump inhibitors is unsatisfactory in approximately 1 out of 3 patients, and consequently, in these patients, it is important to establish a definitive diagnosis and an alternative therapeutic strategy. In the last few years, advances have been made in knowledge of the physiopathology of reflux, such as identification of the role of the acid pocket in producing reflux, technological advances that allow differentiation among acid reflux, non-acid reflux and slightly acid reflux, and advances in the treatment of reflux with drugs that attempt to act on the barrier function of the esophagogastric junction. PMID:24355558

  17. Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux by Endoscopic Injection of Dextranomer/Hyaluronic Acid in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Timothy W; Lacy, John M; Preston, David M

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old man presented for evaluation after discovery of a left bladder-wall tumor. He underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) operation for treatment of low-grade, Ta urothelial cancer of the bladder. The patient developed recurrent disease and returned to the operating room for repeat TURBT, circumcision, and administration of intravesical mitomycin C. The patient developed balanitis xerotica obliterans 4 years post-circumcision, requiring self-dilation with a catheter. He subsequently developed 3 consecutive episodes of left-sided pyelonephritis. Further investigation with voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) revealed Grade 3, left-sided vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Due to existing comorbidities, the patient elected treatment with endoscopic dextranomer/hyaluronic acid injection. A post-operative VCUG demonstrated complete resolution of left-sided VUR. This patient has remained symptom free for 8 months post-injection, with no episodes of pyelonephritis. PMID:27162514

  18. Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux by Endoscopic Injection of Dextranomer/Hyaluronic Acid in Adults.

    PubMed

    Stark, Timothy W; Lacy, John M; Preston, David M

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old man presented for evaluation after discovery of a left bladder-wall tumor. He underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) operation for treatment of low-grade, Ta urothelial cancer of the bladder. The patient developed recurrent disease and returned to the operating room for repeat TURBT, circumcision, and administration of intravesical mitomycin C. The patient developed balanitis xerotica obliterans 4 years post-circumcision, requiring self-dilation with a catheter. He subsequently developed 3 consecutive episodes of left-sided pyelonephritis. Further investigation with voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) revealed Grade 3, left-sided vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Due to existing comorbidities, the patient elected treatment with endoscopic dextranomer/hyaluronic acid injection. A post-operative VCUG demonstrated complete resolution of left-sided VUR. This patient has remained symptom free for 8 months post-injection, with no episodes of pyelonephritis. PMID:27162514

  19. A novel once daily microparticulate dosage form comprising lansoprazole to prevent nocturnal acid breakthrough in the case of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: preparation, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Alai, Milind; Lin, Wen Jen

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to formulate and evaluate the lansoprazole (LPZ)-loaded microparticles to prevent nocturnal acid breakthrough in the case of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The microparticulate delivery system was prepared by solvent evaporation method using Eudragit RS100 as a matrix polymer followed by enteric coated with Eudragit S100 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate HP55 using spray drying method. The enteric coated microparticles were stable in gastric pH condition. In vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies in male Wistar rats demonstrated that enteric coated microparticles sustained release of LPZ and promoted ulcer healing activity. In other words, the microparticulate dosage form provided effective drug concentration for a longer period as compared to conventional extended release dosage form, and showed sufficient anti-acid secretion activity to treat acid related disorders including the enrichment of nocturnal acid breakthrough event based on a once daily administration.

  20. Knowledge and practice of Brazilian pediatricians on gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Ana Cristina Fontenele; de Freitas, Carla Lima; de Morais, Mauro Batista

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge and practice of pediatricians about infants with physiological reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease. METHODS: 140 pediatricians were interviewed during two scientific events in 2009 and 2010. The questions referred to two clinical cases of infants. One with symptoms of infant regurgitation (physiological reflux) and another with gastroesophageal reflux disease. RESULTS: Among 140 pediatricians, 11.4% (n=16) and 62.1% (n=87) would require investigation tests, respectively for infant regurgitation (physiological reflux) and gastroesophageal reflux disease. A series of upper gastrointestinal exams would be the first requested with a higher frequency. Medication would be prescribed by 18.6% (n=6) in the case of physiological reflux and 87.1% (n=122) in the case of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Prokinetic drugs would be prescribed more frequently than gastric acid secretion inhibitors. Sleeping position would be recommended by 94.2% (n=132) and 92.9% (n=130) of the respondents, respectively for the case of physiological reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease; however, about half of the respondents would recommend the prone position. Only 10 (7.1%) of the pediatricians would exclude the cow's milk protein from the infants' diet. CONCLUSIONS: Approaches different from the international guidelines are often considered appropriate, especially when recommending a different position other than the supine and prescription of medication. In turn, the interviews enable us to infer the right capacity of the pediatricians to distinguish physiologic reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease correctly. PMID:25662014

  1. Efficacy of acid suppression therapy in gastroesophageal reflux disease-related chronic laryngitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Wu, Haitao; Zhou, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: This research aims to assess the response to acid suppression therapy in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-related chronic laryngitis (CL). Methods: Data were extracted from Web of Knowledge, Embase, and PubMed for English language article published up to March 2016. Pooled overall response rate (ORR) rates were evaluated to determine acid suppression treatment efficacy. Random effects model was used with standard approaches to sensitivity analysis, quality assessment, heterogeneity, and exploration of publication bias. Results: Pooled data from 21 reports (N = 2864, antireflux medicine: 2741; antireflux surgery: 123, study duration 4–108 week) were analyzed. With the random-effect model, the ORR was 66% (95% confidence interval [CI] 54%–78%). The ORRs were 80% for antireflux surgery (95% CI 67%–93%, 3 studies, 123 patients), whereas 64% for antireflux medicine (95% CI 50%–77%, 18 studies, 2741 patients), and the ORR was 70% (95% CI 55%–85%, 15 reports, 2731 patients) for >8 weeks’ therapy duration, whereas 57% (95% CI 48%–65%, 6 reports, 133 patients) for ≤8 weeks’ duration of therapy. Conclusions: Acid suppression seems to be an effective therapy for GERD-related CL. There was an increase in effect among patients with surgery therapeutic method and longer therapy duration. PMID:27749540

  2. Reflux and cough.

    PubMed

    Merati, Albert L

    2010-02-01

    Reflux is a significant contributor to cough in otolaryngology practice; cough is just one marker of its many negative effects on the upper aerodigestive tract. Reflux causes cough both by direct irritation/inflammation and by increasing sensitivities to other noxious agents. Detailed and diligent clinical evaluation, including laryngoscopy, is useful in advancing the working diagnosis of reflux-associated cough. Supplemental testing, including impedance monitoring of esophageal refluxate, can be important to evaluate for both acidic and nonacidic reflux exposure. The mainstay of treatment continues to be dietary and other lifestyle interventions and drug therapy. Although proton-pump inhibitor therapy is effective in most patients, especially those with acid reflux disease, prokinetic therapy is probably very important with those with combined acid and nonacid disease and those with pure nonacid disease. It is likely that failure to improve can be due to behavioral and drug compliance issues. Antireflux surgery can yield long-lasting positive outcomes in carefully selected patients despite the lower efficacy of treatment for primary upper aerodigestive tract symptoms (cough, hoarseness, sore throat) compared with heartburn and regurgitation.

  3. Relation between oesophageal acid exposure and healing of oesophagitis with omeprazole in patients with severe reflux oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, R H; Dent, J; Narielvala, F; Mackinnon, A M

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS--Reducing oesophageal acid exposure by suppressing acid secretion with omeprazole is highly effective in healing reflux oesophagitis. Some patients with severe oesophagitis, fail to heal and whether this results from inadequate acid suppression or other factors is unclear. The aim of this study, was to investigate the relation between oesophageal acid exposure and healing in patients with severe reflux oesophagitis treated with omeprazole. METHODS--Sixty one patients with grade 3 or 4 ulcerative oesophagitis were treated for eight weeks with omeprazole 20 mg every morning. Those patients unhealed at eight weeks were treated with 40 mg every morning for a further eight weeks. Endoscopy and 24 hour oesophageal pH monitoring were performed before treatment and at the end of each treatment phase while receiving treatment. RESULTS--Thirty per cent of patients failed to heal with the 20 mg dose. Unhealed patients had greater total 24 hour oesophageal acid exposure before treatment, and while receiving treatment also had greater acid exposure and a smaller reduction in acid exposure than did patients who healed. Forty seven per cent of the unhealed patients also failed to heal with the 40 mg dose. These patients had similar levels of acid exposure before treatment to those who healed, but had greater acid exposure while receiving treatment, particularly at night when supine. CONCLUSIONS--Patients with severe ulcerative oesophagitis who are refractory to omeprazole have greater oesophageal acid exposure while receiving treatment than responding patients. This is due to a reduced responsiveness to acid suppression, and is likely to be an important factor underlying the failure of the oesophagitis to heal. PMID:8707107

  4. Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Acustimulation on Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate effects and possible mechanisms of transcutaneous electrical acustimulation (TEA) performed by a wearable watch-size stimulator for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (RGERD). Methods. Twenty patients diagnosed as RGERD were enrolled in the study and randomly divided into four groups: esomeprazole group (Group A), esomeprazole combined with TEA group (Group B), esomeprazole combined with sham-TEA group (Group C), and esomeprazole combined with domperidone group (Group D). HRM and 24 h pH-impedance monitoring and GerdQ score were used to measure related indexes before and after treatment. Results. (1) TEA significantly increased LESP, compared with PPI treatment only or PPI plus sham-TEA. After pairwise comparison, LESP of Group B was increased more than Group A (P = 0.008) or Group C (P = 0.021). (2) PPI plus TEA decreased not only the number of acid reflux episodes but also the number of weak acid reflux episodes (P = 0.005). (3) Heartburn and reflux symptoms were improved more with PPI + TEA than with PPI treatment only or PPI plus sham-TEA (GerdQ scores, P = 0.001). Conclusion. TEA can improve symptoms in RGERD patients by increasing LESP and decreasing events of weak acid reflux and acid reflux; addition of TEA to esomeprazole significantly enhances the effect of TEA.

  5. Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Acustimulation on Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate effects and possible mechanisms of transcutaneous electrical acustimulation (TEA) performed by a wearable watch-size stimulator for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (RGERD). Methods. Twenty patients diagnosed as RGERD were enrolled in the study and randomly divided into four groups: esomeprazole group (Group A), esomeprazole combined with TEA group (Group B), esomeprazole combined with sham-TEA group (Group C), and esomeprazole combined with domperidone group (Group D). HRM and 24 h pH-impedance monitoring and GerdQ score were used to measure related indexes before and after treatment. Results. (1) TEA significantly increased LESP, compared with PPI treatment only or PPI plus sham-TEA. After pairwise comparison, LESP of Group B was increased more than Group A (P = 0.008) or Group C (P = 0.021). (2) PPI plus TEA decreased not only the number of acid reflux episodes but also the number of weak acid reflux episodes (P = 0.005). (3) Heartburn and reflux symptoms were improved more with PPI + TEA than with PPI treatment only or PPI plus sham-TEA (GerdQ scores, P = 0.001). Conclusion. TEA can improve symptoms in RGERD patients by increasing LESP and decreasing events of weak acid reflux and acid reflux; addition of TEA to esomeprazole significantly enhances the effect of TEA. PMID:27648103

  6. Outcomes in patients with nonerosive reflux disease treated with a proton pump inhibitor and alginic acid ± glycyrrhetinic acid and anthocyanosides

    PubMed Central

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Gatti, Mario; Rapacioli, Giuliana; Ivaldi, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of alginic acid alone versus alginic acid combined with low doses of pure glycyrrhetinic acid and bilberry anthocyanosides as an addon to conventional proton pump inhibitor therapy in relieving symptoms associated with nonerosive reflux disease. Methods This prospective, randomized, 8-week, open-label trial was conducted at two centers. Sixty-three patients with persistent symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease and normal upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were eligible for the study. Patients in group A (n = 31) were treated with pantoprazole and a formula (Mirgeal®) containing alginic acid and low doses of pure glycyrrhetinic acid + standardized Vaccinium myrtillus extract for 4 weeks, then crossed over to the multi-ingredient formula for a further 4 weeks. Patients in group B (n = 32) were treated pantoprazole and alginic acid alone twice daily, then crossed over to alginic acid twice daily for a further 4 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by medical evaluation of a symptom relief score, estimated using a visual analog scale (0–10). Side effects, tolerability, and compliance were also assessed. Results Of the 63 patients enrolled in the study, 58 (29 in group A and 29 in group B) completed the 8-week trial. The baseline characteristics were comparable between the two groups. During the study, significant differences were recorded in symptom scores for both groups. In group A, symptoms of chest pain, heartburn, and abdominal swelling were less serious than in group B. Treatment A was better tolerated, did not induce hypertension, and had fewer side effects than treatment B. No significant differences in compliance were found between the two groups. Conclusion Use of low doses of pure glycyrrhetinic acid + bilberry anthocyanosides, together with alginic acid as addon therapy, substantially improves symptoms in patients with nonerosive reflux disease without increasing side effects or worsening

  7. Ingested acidic food and liquids may lead to misinterpretation of 24-hour ambulatory pH tests: focus on measurement of extra-esophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Koskenvuo, Juha W; Pärkkä, Jussi P; Hartiala, Jaakko J; Kinnunen, Ilpo; Peltola, Matti; Sala, Eeva

    2007-07-01

    Normal values of extra-esophageal reflux are difficult to determine owing to variation in the location of the proximal electrode, limited information on the ingestion of acidic food, different exclusion periods for meals, and poor reproducibility of measurement of extra-esophageal reflux. We studied whether ambulatory esophageal pH testing is disturbed by acidic food ingestion. Eighteen healthy subjects were enrolled in standard dual-channel esophageal pH tests (recorder 1). Ten subjects were equipped with another pH device (recorder 2), positioned to measure extra-esophageal reflux. The subjects were exposed to controlled ingestion of different acidic food or liquid for five 1-min periods. The present study showed that acidic food ingestion for 5 min has a significant effect on the outcome of standard dual-channel ambulatory pH testing. Reflux occurs equally on proximal channels during ingestion of acidic food, whether the proximal channel position is normal or 2 cm above the upper esophageal sphincter. We recommend avoiding acidic food intake during esophageal pH testing.

  8. Effect of gastroesophageal reflux on esophageal speech.

    PubMed

    Mathis, J G; Lehman, G A; Shanks, J C; Blom, E D; Brunelle, R L

    1983-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux has been incriminated as a factor-inhibiting acquisition of esophageal speech after laryngectomy. Fourteen proficient esophageal speakers and 10 nonproficient speakers underwent esophageal manometry, esophageal pH probe testing, and Bernstein acid perfusion testing. Additionally, 175 laryngectomized members of Lost Chord Clubs answered mailed questionnaires about the frequency of reflux symptoms. Nonproficient and proficient esophageal speakers had a similar frequency of gastroesophageal reflux by pH probe testing, esophageal mucosal acid sensitivity by Bernstein testing, lower esophageal sphincter pressures, and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Gastroesophageal reflux does not appear to be a major factor in preventing esophageal speech.

  9. Persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Daphne; How, Choon How; Ang, Tiing Leong

    2016-01-01

    About one-third of patients with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) do not respond symptomatically to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Many of these patients do not suffer from GERD, but may have underlying functional heartburn or atypical chest pain. Other causes of failure to respond to PPIs include inadequate acid suppression, non-acid reflux, oesophageal hypersensitivity, oesophageal dysmotility and psychological comorbidities. Functional oesophageal tests can exclude cardiac and structural causes, as well as help to confi rm or exclude GERD. The use of PPIs should only be continued in the presence of acid reflux or oesophageal hypersensitivity for acid reflux-related events that is proven on functional oesophageal tests. PMID:27779277

  10. Reflux of bile acids from the duodenum into the rumen of cows with a reduced intestinal passage.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Hausammann, K; Forrer, R

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out whether the concentration of bile acids in the rumen of healthy cows differs from that of cows with a reduced gastrointestinal passage. The investigations were performed on 277 heifers and cows of the Swiss Braunvieh, Simmental and Swiss Holstein breeds. Forty of these had traumatic reticuloperitonitis, 30 had right or left abomasal displacement, 14 had an ileus of the duodenum, 36 had an ileus of the jejunum and 54 had a caecal dilatation. The other 103 animals had disorders which did not affect the digestive system and were used as controls. The mean (+/- se) bile acid concentration in the rumen fluid of the control animals was 1.0 +/- 0.30 mumol/litre. The bile acid concentrations in the rumen fluid of the cows with a duodenal or jejunal ileus were significantly higher than those of the other groups, demonstrating that bile acids may reflux from the duodenum into the rumen of cows with an ileus in the small intestine.

  11. Size-controlled synthesis and formation mechanism of manganese oxide OMS-2 nanowires under reflux conditions with KMnO4 and inorganic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qin; Cheng, Xiaodi; Qiu, Guohong; Liu, Fan; Feng, Xionghan

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a simplified approach for size-controlled synthesis of manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2) nanowires using potassium permanganate (KMnO4) and different inorganic acids (HCl, HNO3, and H2SO4) under reflux conditions. The morphology and nanostructure of the synthesized products are characterized by X-ray diffraction, Ar adsorption, and electron microscopy analysis, in order to elucidate the controlling effects of acid concentration and type as well as the formation mechanism of OMS-2 nanowires. The concentration of inorganic acid is a crucial factor controlling the phase of the synthesized products. OMS-2 nanowires are obtained with HCl at the concentration ≥0.96 mol/L or with HNO3 and H2SO4 at the concentrations ≥0.72 mol/L. Differently, the type of inorganic acid effectively determines the particle size of OMS-2 nanowires. When the acid is changed from HCl to HNO3 and H2SO4 in the reflux system, the average length of OMS-2 declines significantly by 60-70% (1104-442 and 339 nm), with minor decreased in the average width (43-39 and 34 nm). The formation of OMS-2 nanowires under reflux conditions with KMnO4 and inorganic acids involves a two-step process, i.e., the initial formation of layered manganese oxides, and subsequent transformation to OMS-2 via a dissolution-recrystallization process under acidic conditions. The proposed reflux route provides an alternative approach for synthesizing OMS-2 nanowires as well as other porous nano-crystalline OMS materials.

  12. Size-controlled synthesis and formation mechanism of manganese oxide OMS-2 nanowires under reflux conditions with KMnO4 and inorganic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qin; Cheng, Xiaodi; Qiu, Guohong; Liu, Fan; Feng, Xionghan

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a simplified approach for size-controlled synthesis of manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2) nanowires using potassium permanganate (KMnO4) and different inorganic acids (HCl, HNO3, and H2SO4) under reflux conditions. The morphology and nanostructure of the synthesized products are characterized by X-ray diffraction, Ar adsorption, and electron microscopy analysis, in order to elucidate the controlling effects of acid concentration and type as well as the formation mechanism of OMS-2 nanowires. The concentration of inorganic acid is a crucial factor controlling the phase of the synthesized products. OMS-2 nanowires are obtained with HCl at the concentration ≥0.96 mol/L or with HNO3 and H2SO4 at the concentrations ≥0.72 mol/L. Differently, the type of inorganic acid effectively determines the particle size of OMS-2 nanowires. When the acid is changed from HCl to HNO3 and H2SO4 in the reflux system, the average length of OMS-2 declines significantly by 60-70% (1104-442 and 339 nm), with minor decreased in the average width (43-39 and 34 nm). The formation of OMS-2 nanowires under reflux conditions with KMnO4 and inorganic acids involves a two-step process, i.e., the initial formation of layered manganese oxides, and subsequent transformation to OMS-2 via a dissolution-recrystallization process under acidic conditions. The proposed reflux route provides an alternative approach for synthesizing OMS-2 nanowires as well as other porous nano-crystalline OMS materials.

  13. On the Opening of Thick Walled Elastic Tubes: A Fluid-Structure Model for Acid Reflux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sudip; Kahrilas, Peter

    2005-11-01

    A coupled fluid-structure mathematical model was developed to quantify rapid opening of thick-walled elastic tubes, a phenomenon underlying biological flows such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The wall was modeled using non-linear finite deformation theory to predict space-time radial distention of an axisymmetric tube with luminal fluid flow. Anisotropic azimuthal and longitudinal muscle-induced stresses were incorporated, and interstitial material properties were assumed isotropic and linearly elastic. Fluid flow was modeled using lubrication theory with inertial correction. Opening and flow were driven by a specified inflow pressure and zero pressure gradient was specified at outflow. No-slip and surface force balance were applied at the fluid-wall interface. Viscoelasticity was modeled with ad hoc damping and the evolution of the tube geometry was predicted at mid-layer. A potentially important discovery was made when applied to studies of initiation of opening with GERD: while material stiffness is of minor consequence, small changes in resting lumen distension (˜2 mm diameter) may be a sensitive distinguishing feature of the disease.

  14. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease in children].

    PubMed

    Privorotskiĭ, V F; Luppova, N E; Gerasimova, T A; Romaniuk, F P; Antonova, E A

    2011-01-01

    The last decade is characterized by increasing of the pathology of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in both adults and children. Among this diseases the first place according to frequency and variety of diseased organs and systems is at the acid developed diseases as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In this article provided comments to existing classifications of GERD in children, questions about diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of children with gastroesophageal reflux disease according to our large clinical experience.

  15. Characteristics of symptomatic reflux episodes in Japanese proton pump inhibitor-refractory non-erosive reflux disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Kenichiro; Koike, Tomoyuki; Iijima, Katsunori; Saito, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Hiroki; Hatta, Waku; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients. METHODS: Thirty-five NERD patients with persistent symptoms, despite taking rabeprazole 10 mg twice daily for at least 8 wk, were included in this study. All patients underwent 24 h combined impedance - pH on rabeprazole. The symptom index (SI) was considered to be positive if ≥ 50%, and proximal reflux episodes were determined when reflux reached 15 cm above the proximal margin of the lower esophageal sphincter. RESULTS: In 14 (40%) SI-positive patients, with liquid weakly acid reflux, the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms was significantly more frequent in proximal reflux episodes (46.7%) than in distal ones (5.7%) (P < 0.001). With liquid acid reflux, there were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms between proximal reflux episodes (38.5%) and distal ones (20.5%) (NS). With mixed liquid-gas weakly acid reflux, the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms in proximal reflux episodes was significantly more frequent (31.0%) than in distal reflux ones (3.3%) (P < 0.001). With mixed liquid-gas acid reflux, there were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms between proximal reflux episodes (29.4%) and distal ones (14.3%) (NS). CONCLUSION: The proximal extent of weakly acidic liquid and mixed liquid-gas reflux is a major factor associated with reflux perception in SI-positive patients on proton pump inhibitor therapy. PMID:26715820

  16. Cough in asthma triggered by reflux episodes.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Devendra; He, Zhaoping; Padman, Raj

    2014-05-01

    With combined pH and impedance monitoring, non-acid, as well as acid reflux episodes, are more commonly detected immediately prior to cough in asthma in children. Gastroesophageal reflux should be evaluated as a trigger for cough in difficult childhood asthma.

  17. A causal relationship between cough and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been established: a pro/con debate.

    PubMed

    Kahrilas, Peter J; Smith, Jaclyn A; Dicpinigaitis, Peter V

    2014-02-01

    Along with upper airway cough syndrome (formerly, postnasal drip syndrome) and eosinophilic airway inflammation (asthma, nonasthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is generally considered among the most common etiologies of chronic cough. Indeed, cough management guidelines published by numerous respiratory societies worldwide recommend evaluation and treatment of GERD as an integral component of the diagnostic/therapeutic algorithm for the management of chronic cough. However, a significant number of patients with chronic cough presumed due to GERD do not report improvement despite aggressive acid-suppressive therapy. Some of these refractory cases may be due to the recently appreciated entity of nonacid or weakly acidic reflux. Further contributing to the controversy are recent studies that demonstrate that patients with chronic cough do not have excessive reflux events relative to healthy volunteers. Although a temporal relationship between cough and reflux events has been suggested by studies utilizing impedance-pH monitoring of reflux events and objective cough recording, consensus is lacking in terms of whether this temporal relationship proves a causal link between reflux and cough. The fourth American Cough Conference (New York, June 2013) provided an ideal forum for the debate of this issue between two internationally recognized experts in the field of reflux and chronic cough.

  18. Laryngopharyngeal reflux and Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Taner; Bajin, Münir Demir; Günaydın, Rıza Önder; Ozer, Serdar; Sözen, Tevfik

    2014-07-21

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) occurs when gastric contents pass the upper esophageal sphincter, causing symptoms such as hoarseness, sore throat, coughing, excess throat mucus, and globus. The pattern of reflux is different in LPR and gastroesophageal reflux. LPR usually occurs during the daytime in the upright position whereas gastroesophageal reflux disease more often occurs in the supine position at night-time or during sleep. Ambulatory 24-h double pH-probe monitoring is the gold standard diagnostic tool for LPR. Acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor on a long-term basis is the mainstay of treatment. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is found in many sites including laryngeal mucosa and interarytenoid region. In this paper, we aim to present the relationship between LPR and H. pylori and review the current literature. PMID:25083069

  19. 2015 David Y. Graham Lecture: The First Two Decades Of Eosinophilic Esophagitis-From Acid Reflux To Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Ikuo

    2016-06-01

    Collaborative efforts by pediatric and adult gastroenterologists, allergists, dieticians, and pathologists have brought about marked progress in the recognition, understanding, and management of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) over the past two decades. Once an esoteric diagnosis, EoE is now increasingly identified as a major cause of morbidity, afflicting both children and adults. The detection of mucosal eosinophils has evolved from a diagnostic feature of acid reflux to a biomarker of food sensitization of the esophagus. Translational studies and murine models have elucidated Th-2 immune pathways in EoE, inspiring the development of targeted biologic therapeutics. At the same time, validation of patient-reported outcomes and endoscopic end points has facilitated the implementation of clinical trials of novel therapeutics. Ongoing investigations have elucidated the importance of "looking beneath the surface" of the epithelium, focusing greater attention on the impact of esophageal remodeling in the clinical consequences of EoE. Elimination diets continue to gain popularity as an intriguing, highly effective, and non-pharmacologic therapy that lends credence to the concept that EoE is a food-driven, immunologic disorder. PMID:27068720

  20. Pilot study of longitudinal ultrasonic sensor for dynamic volumetric assessment of gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuexin; Sadowski, Daniel C; Mintchev, Martin P

    2010-01-01

    In patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), esophageal symptoms are traditionally diagnosed by monitoring the contact time between the reflux content and the esophagus using multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH (MII-pH) catheters. However, esophageal catheter for quantifying the volume of reflux content is still lacking. The present work proposes an innovative method to develop a longitudinal ultrasonic catheter and an information extraction system for reflux event detection and reflux volume estimation. Gastroesophageal model that mimics reflux events was developed to test the proposed catheter. Ultrasonic sensing was evaluated by simulating different volumes of reflux. The obtained signals showed good consistency in detecting reflux events and measuring reflux volume. During an in vivo human testing, a MII-pH catheter was used simultaneously to compare the ultrasonic output. Both in vitro and in vivo human testing results demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing the proposed method for gastroesophageal reflux (GER) detection and reflux volume estimation. PMID:21097205

  1. Composition of gastro-oesophageal refluxate.

    PubMed Central

    Gotley, D C; Morgan, A P; Ball, D; Owen, R W; Cooper, M J

    1991-01-01

    Fifty two patients with abnormal acid gastro-oesophageal reflux were studied by simultaneous oesophageal pH monitoring and continuous aspiration for 16 hours. Aspirates (from discrete two hour periods) were analysed for volume, pH, bile acids (conjugated and unconjugated), trypsin, and pepsin. The results were compared with pH changes and degree of oesophagitis. Patients with oesophagitis had greater acid reflux than those without, but patients with stricture and Barrett's oesophagus had similar acid reflux to those with uncomplicated erosive oesophagitis. Pepsin concentrations were highest in patients with stricture and Barrett's oesophagus particularly during nocturnal periods. Conjugated bile acids were detected in 75% of patients, mainly during the night, but only 2% of aspirates contained concentrations likely to be cytotoxic. Unconjugated bile acids were not detected, and trypsin was seldom found. Reflux oesophagitis is caused by acid and pepsin. Bile acids and trypsin are probably unimportant. PMID:1955160

  2. Efficacy of dextranomer hyaluronic acid and polyacrylamide hydrogel in endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Anne-Sophie; Morin, Fannie; Cloutier, Jonathan; Moore, Katherine; Bolduc, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Various bulking agents are available for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) endoscopic treatment, but their inconsistent success rates and costs are concerns for urologists. Recently, polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAHG) has been shown to have a good overall success rate, which seems comparable to dextranomer hyaluronic acid (Dx/HA), currently the most popular bulking agent. Our objective was to compare the short-term success rate of PAHG and Dx/HA for VUR endoscopic treatment in children. Methods: We performed a prospective non-randomized study using PAHG and Dx/HA to treat VUR grades I to IV in pediatric patients. All patients underwent endoscopic sub-ureteric injection of PAHG or Dx/HA, using the double-HIT technique, followed by a 3-month postoperative renal ultrasound and voiding cystourethrogram. Treatment success was defined as the absence of de novo or worsening hydronephrosis and absence of VUR. Results: A total of 90 pediatric patients underwent an endoscopic injection: 45 patients (78 ureters) with PAHG and 45 patients (71 ureters) with Dx/HA. The mean injected volume of PAHG and Dx/HA was 1.1 mL and 1.0 mL, respectively. The overall success rate 3 months after a single treatment was 73.1% for PAHG and 77.5% for Dx/HA. Postoperatively, 1 patient in each group presented with acute pyelonephritis and 2 patients in the Dx/HA group developed symptomatic ureteral obstruction. Conclusion: Success rates of PAGH and Dx/HA in endoscopic injections for VUR treatment were comparable. The rate of resolution obtained with Dx/HA was equivalent to those previously published. The lower cost of PAHG makes it an interesting option. PMID:26225173

  3. The outcomes of two different bulking agents (dextranomer hyaluronic acid copolymer and polyacrylate-polyalcohol copolymer) in the treatment of primary vesico-ureteral reflux

    PubMed Central

    Taşkinlar, Hakan; Avlan, Dincer; Bahadir, Gokhan Berktug; Delibaş, Ali; Nayci, Ali

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose Subureteral injection of bulking agents in the endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux is widely accepted therapy with high success rates. Although the grade of vesicoureteric reflux and experience of surgeon is the mainstay of this success, the characteristics of augmenting substances may have an effect particularly in the long term. In this retrospective study, we aimed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of the endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) with two different bulking agents: Dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (Dx/HA) and Polyacrylate polyalcohol copolymer (PPC). Materials and Methods A total 80 patients (49 girls and 31 boys) aged 1-12 years (mean age 5.3 years) underwent endoscopic subureteral injection for correction of VUR last six years. The patients were assigned to two groups: subureteral injections of Dx/HA (45 patients and 57 ureters) and PPC (35 patients and 45 ureters). VUR was grade II in 27 ureters, grade III in 35, grade IV in 22 and grade V in 18 ureters. Results VUR was resolved in 38 (66.6%) of 57 ureters and this equates to VUR correction in 33 (73.3%) of the 45 patients in Dx/HA group. In PPC group, overall success rate was 88.8% (of 40 in 45 ureters). Thus, Thus, this equates to VUR correction in 31 (88.5%) of the 35 patients. Conclusions Our short term data show that two different bulking agent injections provide a high level of reflux resolution and this study revealed that success rate of PPC was significantly higher than Dx/HA with less material. PMID:27286115

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux and lung disease.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Keith C

    2015-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) can cause respiratory symptoms and may trigger, drive and/or worsen airway disorders, interstitial lung diseases and lung allograft dysfunction. Whether lifestyle changes and acid suppression alone can counter and prevent the adverse effects of GER on the respiratory tract remains unclear. Recent data suggest that antireflux surgery may be more effective in preventing lung disease progression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or lung transplant recipients who have evidence of allograft dysfunction associated with the presence of excessive GER. Additional research and clinical trials are needed to determine the role of GER in various lung disorders and identify which interventions are most efficacious in preventing the respiratory consequences of gastroesophageal reflux disease. In addition, measuring biomarkers that indicate that gastric refluxate has been aspirated into the lower respiratory tract (e.g., pepsin and bile acid concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) may prove helpful in both diagnosis and therapeutic decision making.

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux in children: evaluation of the water siphon test.

    PubMed

    Blumhagen, J D; Christie, D L

    1979-05-01

    Fifty-nine symptomatic children were radiologically evaluated for gastroesophageal reflux with the water siphon test and also with the acid reflux test and esophageal manometry. Of those with reflux on pH testing, 95% had positive water siphon tests, and 38% also had spontaneous barium reflux. Of those with negative acid reflux tests, 29% had positive water siphon tests. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure did not correlate with either test unless the pressure was less than 10 mm Hg. Barium esophagography with the water siphon test is the appropriate initial examination in symptomatic patients, but the false-positive rate is high.

  6. Characteristics and frequency of transient relaxations of the lower esophageal sphincter in patients with reflux esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, R K; McCallum, R W

    1988-09-01

    Electromyogram of the submental muscles, esophageal manometry, and pH studies were simultaneously performed in an unselected group of 12 patients with subjective and objective evidence of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease to determine the frequency of transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and mechanisms of GER. Findings from these patients were compared with data from 10 asymptomatic healthy volunteers. Recordings were obtained for 1 h in the fasting state and 3 h after a standard 850-kcal meal. Transient relaxation of the LES was the only mechanism of acid reflux in normal subjects and accounted for 73.0% of the episodes of acid reflux in patients with GER disease. In both normal subjects and patients with GER, a large number of transient relaxations were associated at their onset with an attenuated submental EMG complex, a small pharyngeal contraction, and an esophageal contraction. The incidences of these associated events were similar in the two study populations. The frequency of transient relaxation of the LES in patients with GER was identical to that of controls. The frequency did not differ even in 9 patients with GER disease who had endoscopic esophagitis. Thirty-six percent of transient relaxations in the normal subjects were accompanied by pH evidence of reflux, but in the GER patients with endoscopic esophagitis 65% of the transient LES relaxations resulted in a reflux event. Acid reflux at the moment of deep inspiration was the second most common mechanism of GER in our patients. Four patients who demonstrated this mechanism had hiatal hernias and more severe esophagitis than the rest of the group. Our findings confirm that transient relaxation of the LES is the major mechanism of GER in patients with reflux esophagitis. However, the similar frequency of this relaxation in GER patients and in healthy asymptomatic subjects suggests that factors other than transient LES relaxation play an important role in the pathogenesis of

  7. From Reflux Esophagitis to Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rhonda F

    2016-01-01

    Reflux esophagitis causes Barrett's metaplasia, an abnormal esophageal mucosa predisposed to adenocarcinoma. Medical therapy for reflux esophagitis focuses on decreasing gastric acid production with proton pump inhibitors. We have reported that reflux esophagitis in a rat model develops from a cytokine-mediated inflammatory injury, not from a caustic chemical (acid) injury. In this model, refluxed acid and bile stimulate the release of inflammatory cytokines from esophageal squamous cells, recruiting lymphocytes first to the submucosa and later to the luminal surface. Emerging studies on acute reflux esophagitis in humans support this new concept, suggesting that reflux-induced cytokine release may be a future target for medical therapies. Sometimes, reflux esophagitis heals with Barrett's metaplasia, a process facilitated by reflux-related nitric oxide (NO) production and Sonic Hedgehog (Hh) secretion by squamous cells. We have shown that NO reduces expression of genes that promote a squamous cell phenotype, while Hh signaling induces genes that mediate the development of the columnar cell phenotypes of Barrett's metaplasia. Agents targeting esophageal NO production or Hh signaling conceivably could prevent the development of Barrett's esophagus. Persistent reflux promotes cancer in Barrett's metaplasia. We have reported that acid and bile salts induce DNA damage in Barrett's cells. Bile salts also cause NF-x03BA;B activation in Barrett's cells, enabling them to resist apoptosis in the setting of DNA damage and likely contributing to carcinogenesis. Oral treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid prevents the esophageal DNA damage and NF-x03BA;B activation induced by toxic bile acids. Altering bile acid composition might be another approach to cancer prevention. PMID:27331918

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic esophagitis - discharge; Reflux esophagitis - discharge; GERD - discharge; Heartburn - chronic - discharge ... You have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a condition in which food or liquid travels backwards from the stomach to the ...

  9. Relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux and airway diseases: the airway reflux paradigm.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Galván, Adalberto; Hart, Simon P; Morice, Alyn H

    2011-04-01

    Our understanding of the relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux and respiratory disease has recently undergone important changes. The previous paradigm of airway reflux as synonymous with the classic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) causing heartburn has been overturned. Numerous epidemiological studies have shown a highly significant association of the acid, liquid, and gaseous reflux of GORD with conditions such as laryngeal diseases, chronic rhinosinusitis, treatment resistant asthma, COPD and even idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, it has become clear from studies on cough hypersensitivity syndrome that much reflux of importance in the airways has been missed, since it is either non- or weakly acid and gaseous in composition. The evidence for such a relationship relies on the clinical history pointing to symptom associations with known precipitants of reflux. The tools for the diagnosis of extra-oesophageal reflux, in contrast to the oesophageal reflux of GORD, lack sensitivity and reproducibility. Unfortunately, methodology for detecting such reflux is only just becoming available and much additional work is required to properly delineate its role. PMID:21459504

  10. Vesicoureteral Reflux

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  11. [Severe laryngitis associated to gastroesophageal reflux].

    PubMed

    Botto, Hugo; Antonioli, Cintia; Nieto, Mary; Cocciaglia, Alejandro; Cuestas, Giselle; Roques Revol, Magdalena; López Marti, Jessica; Rodríguez, Hugo

    2014-02-01

    There is a strong association between gastroesophageal reflux and pharyngolaryngeal reflux as factors leading to respiratory disease, manifested as dysphonia, wheezing, coughing, recurrent laryngitis, bronchial obstruction, laryngospasm and apparent life-threatening events (ALTEs). These manifestations can be mild or severe and may sometimes put the patient's life at risk. We present two cases of patients with severe laryngitis who required endotracheal intubation, one of which underwent tracheostomy. The diagnostic methods and their limitations and the patients outcomes are described.

  12. [Severe laryngitis associated to gastroesophageal reflux].

    PubMed

    Botto, Hugo; Antonioli, Cintia; Nieto, Mary; Cocciaglia, Alejandro; Cuestas, Giselle; Roques Revol, Magdalena; López Marti, Jessica; Rodríguez, Hugo

    2014-02-01

    There is a strong association between gastroesophageal reflux and pharyngolaryngeal reflux as factors leading to respiratory disease, manifested as dysphonia, wheezing, coughing, recurrent laryngitis, bronchial obstruction, laryngospasm and apparent life-threatening events (ALTEs). These manifestations can be mild or severe and may sometimes put the patient's life at risk. We present two cases of patients with severe laryngitis who required endotracheal intubation, one of which underwent tracheostomy. The diagnostic methods and their limitations and the patients outcomes are described. PMID:24566787

  13. Intravenous radionuclide cystography for the detection of vesicorenal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Pollet, J.E.; Sharp, P.F.; Smith, F.W.; Davidson, A.I.; Miller, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    Intravenous radionuclide cystography using a single intravenous injection of 99mtechnetium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, provides information on individual kidney function, coarse anatomy and vesicorenal reflux. This study investigates the effectiveness of intravenous radionuclide cystography in detecting reflux. In 58 children intravenous radionuclide cystography detected 53 ureters with reflux compared to 32 detected by voiding cystography. This difference was investigated further with patients in whom other test suggested reflux. While there was no statistically significant difference for patients having pyelonephritis or hydronephrosis, intravenous radionuclide cystography detected significantly more ureters with reflux in patients with abnormal ureteral orifices or infected urine and, therefore, predisposed to reflux. Intravenous radionuclide cystography is a more comprehensive and sensitive test for vesicorenal reflux than voiding cystography.

  14. Gastro-oesophageal reflux and gastric aspiration in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Edoardo; Carbone, Roberto; Marabotto, Elisa; Furnari, Manuele; Sconfienza, Luca; Ghio, Massimo; Zentilin, Patrizia; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to characterise gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). 40 consecutive IPF patients underwent pulmonary high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan and impedance-pH monitoring while off antisecretory therapy. The presence of pulmonary fibrosis was assessed using validated HRCT scores. Reflux features included distal oesophageal acid exposure, number of acid/weakly acidic reflux episodes and their proximal migration. 40 consecutive patients with interstitial lung disease other than IPF (non-IPF patients) and 50 healthy volunteers were also enrolled. IPF patients had significantly higher (p<0.01) oesophageal acid exposure (median (interquartile range (IQR)) 9.25 (4.7-15.4)% versus 3.3 (1.4-7.4)% versus 0.7 (0.2-4.2)%, number of acid (median (IQR) 45 (23-55) versus 32 (19-44) versus 18 (10-31)), weakly acidic (median (IQR) 34 (19-43) versus 21 (11-33) versus 18 (15-28)) and proximal reflux (median (IQR) 51 (26.5-65.5) versus 20 (9.5-34.5) versus 9 (5-20)) events compared to non-IPF patients and healthy volunteers, respectively. Pulmonary fibrosis HRCT scores correlated well with reflux episodes in both the distal (r(2)=0.567) and proximal (r(2)=0.6323) oesophagus. Patients with IPF had more bile acids and pepsin (p<0.03) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) (62% and 67%, respectively) and saliva (61% and 68%, respectively) than non-IPF patients (25% and 25% in BALF, and 33% and 36%, respectively, in saliva) and controls (0% and 0% in BALF and saliva, respectively). Acid GOR is common in IPF, but weakly acidic GOR may also occur. Patients with IPF had a risk of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. Outcome studies with intense antireflux therapy are needed.

  15. Does body posture affect the incidence and mechanism of gastro-oesophageal reflux?

    PubMed

    Freidin, N; Mittal, R K; McCallum, R W

    1991-02-01

    We studied eight patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease to compare the frequency and mechanism of reflux in the upright and supine positions. Simultaneous oesophageal manometry and pH studies were performed on two separate days in each subject in the fasting and postprandial periods. The frequency of reflux tended to be higher in the upright position. The most prevalent mechanism of reflux in either position was transient relaxation of the lower oesophageal sphincter. The frequency of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation was higher in the upright than in the supine position. There was no difference in the total reflux time, acid clearance time, and number of reflux episodes lasting longer than five minutes in the two positions. We suggest that daytime reflux (upright) may be as important as night time (supine) reflux in the pathogenesis of reflux oesophagitis and needs to be considered when treating patients with reflux disease.

  16. The Value of PIC Cystography in Detecting De Novo and Residual Vesicoureteral Reflux after Dextranomer/Hyaluronic Acid Copolymer Injection.

    PubMed

    Palmer, B W; Hemphill, M; Wettengel, K; Kropp, B P; Frimberger, D

    2011-01-01

    The endoscopic injection of Dx/HA in the management of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) has become an accepted alternative to open surgery. In the current study we evaluated the value of cystography to detect de novo contralateral VUR in unilateral cases of VUR at the time of Dx/HA injection and correlated the findings of immediate post-Dx/HA injection cystography during the same anesthesia to 2-month postoperative VCUG to evaluate its ability to predict successful surgical outcomes. The current study aimed to evaluate whether an intraoperatively performed cystogram could replace postoperative studies. But a negative intraoperative cystogram correlates with the postoperative study in only 80%. Considering the 75-80% success rate of Dx/HA implantation, the addition of intraoperative cystograms cannot replace postoperative studies. In patients treated with unilateral VUR, PIC cystography can detect occult VUR and prevent postoperative contralateral new onset of VUR.

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux and chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Everett, C F; Morice, A H

    2004-09-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GOR) disease is one of the 3 commonest causes of chronic cough. It can be difficult to diagnose as the traditionally recognised symptoms of GOR, such as heartburn and acid regurgitation, are often absent. More subtle indicators of a link between the cough and the oesophagus should therefore be sought. These include cough which occurs in relation to eating or phonation, cough which settles at night and does not tend to wake the patient from sleep and symptoms suggestive of laryngopharyngeal reflux. Investigations such as oesophageal manometry and 24 hour pH monitoring can be useful in characterising any underlying oesophageal abnormality, but may underestimate the problem since non-acid reflux can precipitate cough. Empirical trials of treatment are therefore often employed, but should be continued for at least 2 months, as symptoms can be slow to improve due to plasticity of the cough reflex. Pharmacologic treatment options include proton pump inhibitors, H2 receptor antagonists, pro-motility agents and liquid alginate preparations. Surgical fundoplication can also be effective when performed in appropriately selected individuals.

  18. Vesicoureteric reflux in children.

    PubMed

    Tullus, Kjell

    2015-01-24

    Vesicoureteric reflux is defined as the retrograde passage of urine from the bladder into one or both ureters and often up to the kidneys, and mainly affects babies and infants. In severe cases dilatation of the ureter, renal pelvis, and calyces might be seen. Traditionally it was thought that only a low percentage of children have vesicoureteric reflux, but studies have suggested as many as 25-40% are affected. Guidelines recommend that the number of investigations for vesicoureteric reflux in children who have had a febrile urinary tract infection be reduced, but this approach is controversial. The recommendations also suggest that prophylactic antibiotics and surgery should be avoided in children with non-severe vesicoureteric reflux. In this Seminar I present data on the management of children with vesicoureteric reflux and give suggestions on how to navigate this difficult area. PMID:25164069

  19. The influence of dust events on precipitation acidity in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dan; Wang, Shigong; Xia, Junrong; Meng, Xiaoyan; Shang, Kezheng; Xie, Yueyu; Wang, Ruibin

    2013-11-01

    Acid rain and dust events are both serious environmental problems striking China nowadays. This study investigates the distribution and change of precipitation pH and discusses the influence of dust events on precipitation acidity qualitatively and quantitatively in China. Acid rain exhibits remarkable regionality with strong acidic in South China and the acidity gradually decreases from the South to the North. This distribution is decided not only by the concentration of SO2 in atmosphere but also has relationship to the occurrence of dust events. Comparing the monthly changes of precipitation pH in the semiarid region (which is influenced by dust events) with those in the humid region (which is acid rain areas), it is found that the variation trends are just opposite in the two regions and there is an obvious peak value of pH in spring in semiarid region which coincides with the increase of dust event days. Chemical analysis results of precipitation in Lanzhou (a semiarid city intruded by dust events frequently, especially in spring) indicate that the ratio of Ca2+ plus Mg2+ concentrations (indicators of soil dust) to the total cation concentrations is the highest in spring, and the Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations are 1.8 and 1.9 times higher in spring than in summer respectively. The acidity of precipitation can be restrained by dust events qualitatively by increasing alkaline materials in the atmosphere and precipitation. The analysis of daily dust events and precipitation data at 6 stations in Northwest China indicates that the pH of precipitation influenced by dust events is greater than the precipitation not influenced by dust events. The increase degrees are different between different stations and have lagging effects. The direct increases are from 0.03 to 0.91 for the precipitation pH. Dust events can promote the precipitation pH to a certain extent quantitatively.

  20. Extraesophageal gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms are not more frequently associated with proximal esophageal reflux than typical GERD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J R; Aravapalli, A; Pohl, D; Freeman, J; Castell, D O

    2012-01-01

    Extraesophageal (EE) symptoms such as cough and throat clearing are common in patients referred for reflux testing, but are less commonly associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Patients with reflux associated EE symptoms often lack typical GERD symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation. Our aim was to compare the frequency of proximal esophageal reflux between esophageal (typical) symptoms and EE (atypical) symptoms. Combined multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (MII-pH) tracings were blinded by an investigator so that symptom markers were relabeled with a number without disclosure of symptom type. We selected 40 patients with at least five reflux-related symptom events for one of four symptoms (heartburn, regurgitation, cough, or throat clearing). A blinded investigator analyzed all 200 reflux episodes, reporting the proximal esophageal extent of the reflux for all symptoms. The percentage of symptom-related reflux extending proximally to 17 cm above the LES was similar among all four symptom types. At least 50% of all symptoms were associated with proximal esophageal reflux to 17 cm, with regurgitation having the highest frequency at 60%. Our data indicate that EE symptoms are not more frequently associated with proximal esophageal reflux than typical esophageal symptoms.

  1. Endoscopic Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Nabi, Zaheer; Reddy, D. Nageshwar

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is defined by the presence of troublesome symptoms resulting from the reflux of gastric contents. The prevalence of GERD is increasing globally. An incompetent lower esophageal sphincter underlies the pathogenesis of GERD. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) form the core of GERD management. However, a substantial number of patients do not respond well to PPIs. The next option is anti-reflux surgery, which is efficacious, but it has its own limitations, such as gas bloating, inability to belch or vomit, and dysphagia. Laparoscopic placement of magnetic augmentation device is emerging as a useful alternative to conventional anti-reflux surgery. However, invasiveness of a surgical procedure remains a concern for the patients. The proportion of PPI non-responders or partial responders who do not wish for anti-reflux surgery defines the ‘treatment gap’ and needs to be addressed. The last decade has witnessed the fall and rise of many endoscopic devices for GERD. Major endoscopic strategies include radiofrequency ablation and endoscopic fundoplication devices. Current endoscopic devices score high on subjective improvement, but have been unimpressive in objective improvement like esophageal acid exposure. In this review, we discuss the current endoscopic anti-reflux therapies and available evidence for their role in the management of GERD. PMID:27744659

  2. Guidelines on gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Niaz, Saad Khalid; Quraishy, Muhammed Saeed; Taj, Muhammad Ali; Abid, Shahab; Alam, Altaf; Nawaz, Arif Amir; Ali Shah, Syed Hasnain; Khan, Ijaz Muhammed; Memon, Abdul Rauf; Zuberi, Bader Fiaz; Tayyab, Ghayasun Nabi; Malik, Kashif; Mirza, Shakeel; Abbas, Zaigham

    2015-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common acid-related disorder encountered during clinical practice in Pakistan and is associated with significant impairment of health-related quality of life. A number of guidelines and recommendations for the diagnosis and management of GERD have been published in different countries, but a Pakistani accepted directive by the standards of evidence-based medicine is still lacking. Our aim was to create an understanding of the natural history and presentations of reflux disease; evaluating possible treatment options available for the patients with complex and uncomplicated reflux ailments with the development of current and up to date evidence based endorsement, relevant to the needs of Pakistani health care providers in order to treat oesophageal manifestations of GERD. In order to make such guidelines, a comprehensive literature search was conducted with pertinent evidence reviewed, and quality of relevant data assessed. The resultant conclusions were based on the best available evidence and expert opinion of the authors of technical review panel.

  3. Reflux and Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reflux and Lung Disease Proper Hydration Sodium Dangers Plant-Based Diets Why Breakfast Matters Patients & Visitors Giving For Professionals About Us Treatment & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make an Appointment Make a Donation ...

  4. Anti-reflux surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... come back up from your stomach into the esophagus. The esophagus is the tube from your mouth to the ... Reflux often occurs if the muscles where the esophagus meets the stomach do not close tightly enough. ...

  5. Profound duodenogastric reflux causes pancreatic growth in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gasslander, T; Mukaida, H; Herrington, M K; Hinder, R A; Adrian, T E

    1995-01-01

    Although duodenogastric reflux is a physiological event, excessive reflux may be a pathogenetic factor in several diseases of the foregut, including cancer. Long term profound duodenogastric reflux produces pancreatic and gastric tumours in rats. The trophic effect of surgically induced duodenogastric reflux on the pancreas was investigated and the mechanisms involved were examined. Rats with profound reflux from a split gastroenterostomy were compared with sham operated and unoperated controls after two and six weeks. In the six week experiment, one reflux and one sham group were given the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonist devazepide (25 nmol/kg/h). Duodenogastric reflux caused a significant increase in pancreatic weight, DNA, and plasma CCK and gastrin concentrations at both two and six weeks. Devazepide substantially reduced the pancreatic weight increase after six weeks but did not abolish it completely. CCK and gastrin were not affected by devazepide. These results suggest that CCK is largely responsible for the pancreatic growth induced by reflux but another factor may also be involved. The trophic effect of duodenogastric reflux may contribute to the increased incidence of pancreatic cancer reported after gastric surgery. PMID:7890218

  6. Mechanism of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Airway Obstruction or Obesity?

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Kelly; Orr, William

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: This is the first study to compare reflux events during wake and sleep in obese and non-obese individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obese individuals without OSA. The primary aim of the study was to investigate any additive effect of OSA on gastroesophageal reflux (GER) above that of obesity. Methods: Twenty obese individuals (body mass index, BMI > 30 kg/m2), 9 non-obese individuals (BMI < 30 kg/m2) with moderate-to-severe OSA, and 17 obese control subjects (BMI > 30 kg/m2) underwent high-resolution esophageal manometry, 24-h esophageal pH-impedance monitoring, and in-laboratory polysomnography. Results: Mean body mass index was 40 ± 6 and 27 ± 4 kg/m2 for the obese and non-obese OSA groups, respectively, and 34 ± 5 kg/m2 for the obese control group. Apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 50 ± 30 and 30 ± 25 per hour for the obese and non-obese OSA groups (p > 0.05), significantly higher than that of the obese control group (3 ± 3 per hour, p < 0.05). The two obese groups did not show any significant differences in the total number of acidic reflux events (41 ± 20 vs 28 ± 16); however, the obese OSA group had a greater number of acidic reflux events compared to the non-obese OSA group (22 ± 12 events, p < 0.05). In multivariate analysis, BMI significantly predicted number of acidic reflux events (r2 = 0.16, p = 0.01) during the 24-h period; however, AHI showed no significant association with any measure of GER severity. Conclusions: This study confirms an important role for obesity, rather than OSA per se in the relationship between OSA and GER. Citation: Shepherd K, Orr W. Mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux in obstructive sleep apnea: airway obstruction or obesity? J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(1):87–94. PMID:26446244

  7. Daytime gastro-oesophageal reflux is important in oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    de Caestecker, J S; Blackwell, J N; Pryde, A; Heading, R C

    1987-05-01

    Fifty two patients were studied to investigate the patterns of gastro-oesophageal reflux during ambulatory pH monitoring and the relationship of reflux to presence and severity of oesophagitis. Twenty nine had evidence of oesophagitis which was graded according to severity. Acid exposure (pH less than 4) was calculated in each case for the total study period, the recumbent and upright periods, and the three hour period after the evening meal. Exposure in the upright period correlated closet (r=0.92: p less than 0.001) with that during the total period. Recumbent exposure correlated with both upright and postprandial exposure (p less than 0.001). Acid exposure during all four periods correlated significantly with the severity of oesophagitis, but postprandial acid exposure correlated best and recumbent acid exposure least well. Although acid clearance in the total, recumbent and upright periods correlated with oesophagitis, postprandial clearance showed the closest relationship. Thus the magnitude of daytime reflux, especially postprandial reflux and acid clearance, is more closely related than nocturnal reflux to oesophagitis. The results do not support the contention that night time reflux is inherently more injurious than daytime reflux to the oesophageal mucosa.

  8. A simple method for the quantification of biliary reflux.

    PubMed

    Nicolai, J J; Silberbusch, J; van Roon, F; Schopman, W; vd Berg, J W

    1980-01-01

    99mTc-diethyl-IDA is completely excreted into the bile. When cholecystokinin is given after priming of the biliary tract with this tracer, gallbladder contraction leads to expulsion of bile into the duodenum. At the same time cholecystokinin causes contraction of the pylorus, which should normally prevent substantial reflux of tracer into the stomach. We have applied these physiological characteristics in a method to quantify biliary gastric reflux. Fourteen controls had a median reflux of 4.3% of the intravenous dose (93% of controls had values less than 9%). In 18 patients with Billroth II gastrectomies the median reflux was 46% (p less than 0.001). Patients with chronic gastritis (no. = 18) had also increased reflux (median 18.1%, p less than 0.001). The same was found in gastric ulcer (no. = 18, median 11.8%, p less than 0.003). In duodenal ulcer (no. = 7) increased reflux existed in only two patients with pyloric deformation. Patients with hiatal hernia did not show increased reflux (no. = 10, median 2.2%). Bilirubin measurements tended to underestimate reflux in pathological cases, whereas bile acid measurements and reflux percentages of tracer showed a close relationship (r = 0.87, p less than 0.001). PMID:7209386

  9. Refractory chronic cough due to gastroesophageal reflux: Definition, mechanism and management

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Han-Jing; Qiu, Zhong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Refractory chronic cough due to gastroesophageal reflux is a troublesome condition unresponsive to the standard medical anti-reflux therapy. Its underlying mechanisms may include incomplete acid suppression, non-acid reflux, transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations and esophageal hypersensitivity. The diagnosis of this disorder depends on both the findings of multi-channel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring and the subsequent intensified anti-reflux therapy. The strategies of pharmacological treatment for refractory chronic cough due to reflux include the optimization of proton pump inhibitors and add-on therapies with histamine H2 receptor antagonists, baclofen and gabapentin. However, the further study is needed to satisfy its management. PMID:26413488

  10. Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation for Gastroesophageal Reflux at 5 Years: Final Results of a Pilot Study Show Long-Term Acid Reduction and Symptom Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Saino, Greta; Bonavina, Luigi; Lipham, John C.; Dunn, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: As previously reported, the magnetic sphincter augmentation device (MSAD) preserves gastric anatomy and results in less severe side effects than traditional antireflux surgery. The final 5-year results of a pilot study are reported here. Patients and Methods: A prospective, multicenter study evaluated safety and efficacy of the MSAD for 5 years. Prior to MSAD placement, patients had abnormal esophageal acid and symptoms poorly controlled by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Patients served as their own control, which allowed comparison between baseline and postoperative measurements to determine individual treatment effect. At 5 years, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-Health Related Quality of Life (HRQL) questionnaire score, esophageal pH, PPI use, and complications were evaluated. Results: Between February 2007 and October 2008, 44 patients (26 males) had an MSAD implanted by laparoscopy, and 33 patients were followed up at 5 years. Mean total percentage of time with pH <4 was 11.9% at baseline and 4.6% at 5 years (P < .001), with 85% of patients achieving pH normalization or at least a 50% reduction. Mean total GERD-HRQL score improved significantly from 25.7 to 2.9 (P < .001) when comparing baseline and 5 years, and 93.9% of patients had at least a 50% reduction in total score compared with baseline. Complete discontinuation of PPIs was achieved by 87.8% of patients. No complications occurred in the long term, including no device erosions or migrations at any point. Conclusions: Based on long-term reduction in esophageal acid, symptom improvement, and no late complications, this study shows the relative safety and efficacy of magnetic sphincter augmentation for GERD. PMID:26437027

  11. Gastroesophageal reflux diagnosed by occlusal splint tintion.

    PubMed

    Cebrián-Carretero, José Luis; López-Arcas-Calleja, José María

    2006-01-01

    The gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease is a very frequent digestive disorder, mainly characterised by the reflux of the gastric acidic content to the esophage in abnormal quantities. There are different situations that favour this situation but almost in all of them rely an incompetence of the esophagic sphincter. The clinical consequences are many, including oral manifestations. Among all of them the most frequent is the esophagitis followed by symptoms at the pharynx or larynx and finally, the oral cavity. At this level fundamentally we will find enamel and oral mucosa erosions. We report the case of a patient who was indirectly diagnosed of her esophague disease by the observation of the alterations in the occlusal splint induced by the gastric reflux. We review the literature concerning the above topic and its possible association with the miofascial syndrome.

  12. The otolaryngologic manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): a clinical investigation of 225 patients using ambulatory 24-hour pH monitoring and an experimental investigation of the role of acid and pepsin in the development of laryngeal injury.

    PubMed

    Koufman, J A

    1991-04-01

    Occult (silent) gastroesophageal reflux disease (GER, GERD) is believed to be an important etiologic factor in the development of many inflammatory and neoplastic disorders of the upper aerodigestive tract. In order ot test this hypothesis, a human study and an animal study were performed. The human study consisted primarily of applying a new diagnostic technique (double-probe pH monitoring) to a population of otolaryngology patients with GERD to determine the incidence of overt and occult GERD. The animal study consisted of experiments to evaluate the potential damaging effects of intermittent GER on the larynx. Two hundred twenty-five consecutive patients with otolaryngologic disorders having suspected GERD evaluated from 1985 through 1988 are reported. Ambulatory 24-hour intraesophageal pH monitoring was performed in 197; of those, 81% underwent double-probe pH monitoring, with the second pH probe being placed in the hypopharynx at the laryngeal inlet. Seventy percent of the patients also underwent barium esophagography with videofluoroscopy. The patient population was divided into seven diagnostic subgroups: carcinoma of the larynx (n = 31), laryngeal and tracheal stenosis (n = 33), reflux laryngitis (n = 61), globus pharyngeus (n = 27), dysphagia (n = 25), chronic cough (n = 30), and a group with miscellaneous disorders (n = 18). The most common symptoms were hoarseness (71%), cough (51%), globus (47%), and throat clearing (42%). Only 43% of the patients had gastrointestinal symptoms (heartburn or acid regurgitation). Thus, by traditional symptomatology, GER was occult or silent in the majority of the study population. Twenty-eight patients (12%) refused or could not tolerate pH monitoring. Of the patients undergoing diagnostic pH monitoring, 62% had abnormal esophageal pH studies, and 30% demonstrated reflux into the pharynx. The results of diagnostic pH monitoring for each of the subgroups were as follows (percentage with abnormal studies): carcinoma (71

  13. Role of Mixed Reflux and Hypomotility with Delayed Reflux Clearance in Patients with Non-cardiac Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ribolsi, Mentore; Balestrieri, Paola; Biasutto, Dario; Emerenziani, Sara; Cicala, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common cause of non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). Currently available data reveal a weak relationship between NCCP and dysmotility. Moreover, it is unclear why some refluxes are perceived as heartburn and others as NCCP. We aimed to evaluate the role of the reflux pattern and the esophageal motility in patients with NCCP. Methods Forty-eight patients with NCCP (Group 1) and 50 only typical GERD symptoms (Group 2) were included and underwent high-resolution manometry (HRM) and multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring. Results Impaired peristalsis was found in 60% of patients with NCCP and in 24% of patients with typical symptoms (P < 0.05). In patients belonging to Group 1, the majority of reflux episodes associated with chest pain were acid and mixed. The proportion of mixed refluxes was higher than that in Group 2. In Group 1, the reflux clearing time at 5, 9, and 15 cm, measured in reflux episodes associated to NCCP was longer than in reflux episodes associated to typical symptoms (mean ± 95% CI: 27.2 ± 5.6, 23.3 ± 4.4, and 14.6 ± 2.3 seconds vs 18.3 ± 3.5, 13.3 ± 2.2, and 11.1 ± 1.8 seconds; P < 0.01). Conclusions The presence of gas in the refluxate seems to be associated with NCCP. The impaired motility observed in NCCP patients may play a relevant role in delaying reflux clearing, hence increasing the time of contact between refluxate and esophageal mucosa. PMID:27095707

  14. [Underlying Mechanisms and Management of Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in South Korea has increased over the past 10 years. Patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD) shows better response to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) than those with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). NERD is a heterogeneous condition, showing pathological gastroesophageal reflux or esophageal hypersensitivity to reflux contents. NERD patients with pathological gastroesophageal reflux or hypersensitivity to acid may respond to PPIs. However, many patients with esophageal hypersensitivity to nonacid or functional heartburn do not respond to PPIs. Therefore, careful history and investigations are required when managing patients with refractory GERD who show poor response to conventional dose PPIs. Combined pH-impedance studies and a PPI diagnostic trial are recommended to reveal underlying mechanisms of refractory symptoms. For those with ongoing reflux-related symptoms, split dose administration, change to long-acting PPIs or PPIs less influenced by CYP2C19 genotypes, increasing dose of PPIs, and the addition of alginate preparations, prokinetics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants can be considered. Pain modulators, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants are more likely to be effective for those with reflux-unrelated symptoms. Surgery or endoscopic per oral fundoplication may be effective in selected patients.

  15. Liquid in the gastroesophageal segment promotes reflux, but compliance does not: a mathematical modeling study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sudip K; Kahrilas, Peter J; Brasseur, James G

    2008-11-01

    The mechanical force relationships that distinguish normal from chronic reflux at sphincter opening are poorly understood and difficult to measure in vivo. Our aim was to apply physics-based computer simulations to determine mechanical pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux. A mathematical model of the gastroesophageal segment (GES) was developed, incorporating the primary anatomical and physiomechanical elements that drive GES opening and reflux. In vivo data were used to quantify muscle stiffness, sphincter tone, and gastric pressure. The liquid lining the mucosa was modeled as an "effective liquid film" between the mucosa and a manometric catheter. Newton's second law was solved mathematically, and the space-time details of opening and reflux were predicted for systematic variations in gastric pressure increase, film thickness, muscle stiffness, and tone. "Reflux" was defined as "2 ml of refluxate entering the esophagus within 1 s." GES opening and reflux were different events. Both were sensitive to changes in gastric pressure and sphincter tone. Reflux initiation was extremely sensitive to the liquid film thickness; the protective function of the sphincter was destroyed with only 0.4 mm of liquid in the GES. Compliance had no effect on reflux initiation, but affected reflux volume. The presence of abnormal levels of liquid within the collapsed GES can greatly increase the probability for reflux, suggesting a mechanical mechanism that may differentiate normal reflux from gastroesophageal reflux disease. Compliance does not affect the probability for reflux, but affects reflux volume once it occurs. Opening without reflux suggests the existence of "gastroesophageal pooling" in the distal esophagus, with clinical implications.

  16. [Gastroesophageal reflux, pulmonary and gastric function in patients with cystic fibrosis. Results of a randomized trial].

    PubMed

    Escobar Castro, H; Perdomo Giraldi, M; Gimeno Benítez, R; Máiz Carro, L; Suárez Cortina, L

    1996-01-01

    We studied ten patients with Cystic fibrosis. The purposes of this study were to investigate the presence of gastroesophageal reflux and establish the probable association between gastroesophageal reflux and pulmonary and gastric involvement. All 10 patients underwent 24-hour esophageal pH recording, spirometry and gastric function. Abnormal reflux index was found in all these patients. Lung function was pathologic in the 3 older children. There were no relationship between the severity of the gastroesophageal reflux and the degree of pulmonary damage. No patient has gastric acid hypersecretion. Eight of 10 patients had steatorrhea. Our findings confirm the high frequence of gastroesophageal reflux in cystic fibrosis. PMID:9180955

  17. Helicobacter pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Michele; Cadeddu, Federica; Villa, Massimo; Attinà, Grazia Maria; Muzi, Marco Gallinella; Nigro, Casimiro; Rulli, Francesco; Farinon, Attilio M

    2008-01-01

    Background The nature of the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and reflux oesophagitis is still not clear. To investigate the correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and GERD taking into account endoscopic, pH-metric and histopathological data. Methods Between January 2001 and January 2003 a prospective study was performed in 146 patients with GERD in order to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection at gastric mucosa; further the value of the De Meester score endoscopic, manometric and pH-metric parameters, i.e. reflux episodes, pathological reflux episodes and extent of oesophageal acid exposure, of the patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection were studied and statistically compared. Finally, univariate analysis of the above mentioned data were performed in order to evaluate the statistical correlation with reflux esophagitis. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups, HP infected and HP negative patients, regarding age, gender and type of symptoms. There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding severity of symptoms and manometric parameters. The value of the De Meester score and the ph-metric parameters were similar in both groups. On univariate analysis, we observed that hiatal hernia (p = 0,01), LES size (p = 0,05), oesophageal wave length (p = 0,01) and pathological reflux number (p = 0,05) were significantly related to the presence of reflux oesophagitis. Conclusion Based on these findings, it seems that there is no significant evidence for an important role for H. pylori infection in the development of GERD and erosive esophagitis. Nevertheless, current data do not provide sufficient evidence to define the relationship between HP and GERD. Further assessments in prospective large studies are warranted. PMID:18601740

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: clinical features.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Michael

    2005-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic disease affecting up to 40% of people in the Western world. Risk factors associated with GERD include age and lifestyle habits, although the clinically relevant contribution of many of these factors is unclear. In GERD, refluxed gastric acid damages the oesophageal mucosa, generally when the pH falls below 4. GERD patients present a variety of symptoms, most commonly heartburn and regurgitation. Oesophageal complications associated with GERD include erosions, ulcers, peptic strictures, and Barrett's oesophagus which is implicated in the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Diagnosis of GERD is problematic due to the range of symptoms which may be presented to the physician and symptom severity is frequently unrelated to disease severity. While endoscopic monitoring may be used to assess the presence and severity of GERD, a lack of visible damage does not necessarily indicate an absence of GERD. Techniques used to diagnose GERD include addition of an acid solution into the oesophagus in order to replicate symptoms (Bernstein test) or 24-hour intra-oesophageal pH monitoring. Proton pump inhibitors are effective in the treatment of GERD, acting to reduce the acidity of the gastric juice and hence reduce oesophageal damage and symptoms associated with GERD. Symptoms most indicative of GERD are those associated with erosive oesophagitis, including heartburn and acid regurgitation. Less common GERD-associated symptoms include chest pain, a range of ear, nose and throat conditions, and asthma. In contrast to perceptions of the disease as 'merely' heartburn, the impact on patients' quality of life can be profound. Increasing awareness of GERD by health care professionals has led to improved diagnosis and a greater appreciation of the need for maintenance therapy.

  19. A study of photocatalytic graphene–TiO{sub 2} synthesis via peroxo titanic acid refluxed sol

    SciTech Connect

    Low, Wasu; Boonamnuayvitaya, Virote

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} synthesized via PTA as a precursor demonstrates exclusively anatase phase. • The TEM image of GR–TiO{sub 2} (PTA) demonstrates that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are successfully loaded onto graphene sheet. • The specific surface area seems to increase with increasing weight ratio of graphene oxide. It was observed that GR–TiO{sub 2} showed higher adsorption compared to bare TiO{sub 2} (PTA). • The GR–TiO{sub 2} (PTA, 1:50) catalyst showed higher photocatalytic activity than any other catalyst. - Abstract: In the present work, graphene–TiO{sub 2} (GR–TiO{sub 2}) photocatalyst with various weight ratios of graphene was synthesized using peroxo titanic acid solution (PTA) as a precursor for TiO{sub 2}. Graphene oxide prepared by Hummer's method was converted to graphene under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in ethanol–water solvent for 48 h. The as-prepared GR–TiO{sub 2} composites were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV–vis spectrophotometry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The automated potentiostat was applied to measure the photocurrent generations of prepared catalysts. The photocatalytic activities of GR–TiO{sub 2} (PTA) catalysts were determined by measuring the percentage methylene blue (MB) degradation. The results showed that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were successfully loaded onto graphene sheet and the surface area of catalysts increased with increasing weight ratio of graphene. In addition, GR–TiO{sub 2} (PTA, 1:50) exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity among the catalysts under UV and visible light irradiation. The adsorption edge of GR–TiO{sub 2} was shifted to a longer wavelength of 400 nm in comparison with that of pure TiO{sub 2} (PTA). The increase in the photocatalytic performance of GR–TiO{sub 2} (PTA) catalyst may be attributed to the increase in surface area, the extension of light absorption in

  20. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Children with Interstitial Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Dziekiewicz, M A; Karolewska-Bochenek, K; Dembiński, Ł; Gawronska, A; Krenke, K; Lange, J; Banasiuk, M; Kuchar, E; Kulus, M; Albrecht, P; Banaszkiewicz, A

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is common in adult patients with interstitial lung disease. However, no data currently exist regarding the prevalence and characteristics of the disease in pediatric patients with interstitial lung disease. The aim of the present study was to prospectively assess the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and characterize its features in children with interstitial lung disease. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was established based on 24 h pH-impedance monitoring (MII-pH). Gastroesophageal reflux episodes (GERs) were classified according to widely recognized criteria as acid, weakly acid, weakly alkaline, or proximal. Eighteen consecutive patients (15 boys, aged 0.2-11.6 years) were enrolled in the study. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed in a half (9/18) of children. A thousand GERs were detected by MII-pH (median 53.5; IQR 39.0-75.5). Of these, 585 (58.5 %) episodes were acidic, 407 (40.7 %) were weakly acidic, and eight (0.8 %) were weakly alkaline. There were 637 (63.7 %) proximal GERs. The patients in whom gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed had a significantly higher number of proximal and total GERs. We conclude that the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with interstitial lung disease is high; thus, the disease should be considered regardless of presenting clinical symptoms. A high frequency of non-acid and proximal GERs makes the MII-pH method a preferable choice for the detection of reflux episodes in this patient population. PMID:27068927

  1. Liquid in the gastroesophageal segment promotes reflux, but compliance does not: a mathematical modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sudip K.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Brasseur, James G.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical force relationships that distinguish normal from chronic reflux at sphincter opening are poorly understood and difficult to measure in vivo. Our aim was to apply physics-based computer simulations to determine mechanical pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux. A mathematical model of the gastroesophageal segment (GES) was developed, incorporating the primary anatomical and physiomechanical elements that drive GES opening and reflux. In vivo data were used to quantify muscle stiffness, sphincter tone, and gastric pressure. The liquid lining the mucosa was modeled as an “effective liquid film” between the mucosa and a manometric catheter. Newton's second law was solved mathematically, and the space-time details of opening and reflux were predicted for systematic variations in gastric pressure increase, film thickness, muscle stiffness, and tone. “Reflux” was defined as “2 ml of refluxate entering the esophagus within 1 s.” GES opening and reflux were different events. Both were sensitive to changes in gastric pressure and sphincter tone. Reflux initiation was extremely sensitive to the liquid film thickness; the protective function of the sphincter was destroyed with only 0.4 mm of liquid in the GES. Compliance had no effect on reflux initiation, but affected reflux volume. The presence of abnormal levels of liquid within the collapsed GES can greatly increase the probability for reflux, suggesting a mechanical mechanism that may differentiate normal reflux from gastroesophageal reflux disease. Compliance does not affect the probability for reflux, but affects reflux volume once it occurs. Opening without reflux suggests the existence of “gastroesophageal pooling” in the distal esophagus, with clinical implications. PMID:18718998

  2. Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Charumathi Raghu; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents into the esophagus causes troublesome symptoms, esophageal injury, and/or complications. Use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) remains the standard therapy for GERD and is effective in most patients. Those whose symptoms are refractory to PPIs should be evaluated further and other treatment options should be considered, according to individual patient characteristics. Response to PPIs could be total (no symptoms), partial (residual breakthrough symptoms), or absent (no change in symptoms). Patients experiencing complete response do not usually need further management. Patients with partial response can be treated surgically or by using emerging endoscopic therapies. Patients who exhibit no response to PPI need further evaluation to rule out other causes. PMID:25274499

  3. Respiratory disease and the oesophagus: reflux, reflexes and microaspiration.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Lesley A; Lee, Augustine S; Badri, Huda; DeVault, Kenneth R; Smith, Jaclyn A

    2016-08-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux is associated with a wide range of respiratory disorders, including asthma, isolated chronic cough, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Reflux can be substantial and reach the proximal margins of the oesophagus in some individuals with specific pulmonary diseases, suggesting that this association is more than a coincidence. Proximal oesophageal reflux in particular has led to concern that microaspiration might have an important, possibly even causal, role in respiratory disease. Interestingly, reflux is not always accompanied by typical reflux symptoms, such as heartburn and/or regurgitation, leading many clinicians to empirically treat for possible gastro-oesophageal reflux. Indeed, costs associated with use of acid suppressants in pulmonary disease far outweigh those in typical GERD, despite little evidence of therapeutic benefit in clinical trials. This Review comprehensively examines the possible mechanisms that might link pulmonary disease and oesophageal reflux, highlighting the gaps in current knowledge and limitations of previous research, and helping to shed light on the frequent failure of antireflux treatments in pulmonary disease. PMID:27381074

  4. Current perspectives on reflux laryngitis.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Daisuke; Nagahara, Akihito; Matsumoto, Kenshi; Hojo, Mariko; Watanabe, Sumio

    2014-12-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is an extraesophageal manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). With the increase of GERD patients, the importance of LPR is acknowledged widely. However, the pathophysiology of LPR is not understood completely and the diagnostic criteria for LPR remain controversial. Unfortunately, a gold standard diagnostic test for reflux laryngitis is not available. Recently, an experimental animal model for reflux laryngitis was developed to investigate the pathophysiology of reflux laryngitis. An empirical trial of lifestyle modification and proton pump inhibitor therapy is a reasonable approach for LPR symptoms. Alternatives after failure with aggressive medical treatment are limited and multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring is currently the best alternative to detect nonacid reflux. Additional prospective and evidence-based research is anticipated.

  5. Effect of pantoprazole in patients with chronic laryngitis and pharyngitis related to gastroesophageal reflux disease: clinical, proximal, and distal pH monitoring results.

    PubMed

    Karoui, S; Bibani, N; Sahtout, S; Zouiten, L; Kallel, L; Matri, S; Serghini, M; Ben Mustapha, N; Boubaker, J; Besbes, G; Filali, A

    2010-05-01

    Few studies had evaluated the results of proton pump inhibitors on distal and proximal pH recording using a dual-channel probe. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and pH-metric effect of treatment with pantoprazole 80 mg for 8 weeks in patients with ear, nose, and throat (ENT) manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease associated with pathological proximal acid exposure. We conducted a prospective open study. Patients included had to have chronic pharyngitis or laryngitis, and a pathological gastroesophagopharyngeal reflux. All patients received treatment with pantoprazole 80 mg daily for 8 weeks. One week after the end treatment, patients had a second ENT examination and a 24-hour pH monitoring using dual-channel probe. We included 33 patients (11 men, 22 women). A pathological distal acid reflux was found in 30 patients (91%). After treatment, the improvement of ENT symptoms was found in 51.5% of patients. Normalization of 24-hour proximal esophageal pH monitoring was observed in 22 patients (66%). After treatment, the overall distal acid exposure, the number of distal reflux events, and the number of reflux during more than 5 minutes were significantly decreased (respectively: 19.4% vs 7.2% [P < 0.0001], 62.7 vs 28.4 [P < 0.0001], and 10.4 vs 3.9 [P < 0.0001] ). Similarly, in proximal level, the same parameters were significantly decreased after treatment (respectively: 6.8% vs 1.6% [P < 0.0001], 32.6 vs 8.1 [P < 0.0001], and 3.4 vs 0.6 [P= 0.005] ). Treatment with pantoprazole reduced the frequency and severity of gastroesophagopharyngeal acid reflux in patients with chronic pharyngitis and laryngitis.

  6. Gastroesophageal reflux: management guidance for the pediatrician.

    PubMed

    Lightdale, Jenifer R; Gremse, David A

    2013-05-01

    Recent comprehensive guidelines developed by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition define the common entities of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) as the physiologic passage of gastric contents into the esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) as reflux associated with troublesome symptoms or complications. The ability to distinguish between GER and GERD is increasingly important to implement best practices in the management of acid reflux in patients across all pediatric age groups, as children with GERD may benefit from further evaluation and treatment, whereas conservative recommendations are the only indicated therapy in those with uncomplicated physiologic reflux. This clinical report endorses the rigorously developed, well-referenced North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines and likewise emphasizes important concepts for the general pediatrician. A key issue is distinguishing between clinical manifestations of GER and GERD in term infants, children, and adolescents to identify patients who can be managed with conservative treatment by the pediatrician and to refer patients who require consultation with the gastroenterologist. Accordingly, the evidence basis presented by the guidelines for diagnostic approaches as well as treatments is discussed. Lifestyle changes are emphasized as first-line therapy in both GER and GERD, whereas medications are explicitly indicated only for patients with GERD. Surgical therapies are reserved for children with intractable symptoms or who are at risk for life-threatening complications of GERD. Recent black box warnings from the US Food and Drug Administration are discussed, and caution is underlined when using promoters of gastric emptying and motility. Finally, attention is paid to increasing evidence of inappropriate prescriptions for proton pump inhibitors in the pediatric population.

  7. Influence of reflux and central obesity on intercellular space diameter of esophageal squamous epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, Christopher H; Sharma, Anamay N; Johnson, Michele L; Geno, Deborah; Gupta, Milli; Bharucha, Adil E; Katzka, David A

    2015-01-01

    Background While central obesity increases gastroesophageal reflux (GER) by mechanically disrupting the anti-reflux barrier, limited data exist on pathways by which central obesity may potentiate esophageal injury by non-mechanical means. Obesity has been associated with an impaired epithelial intestinal barrier. Objective We aimed to assess the influence of central obesity and reflux on the squamous esophageal epithelial intercellular space diameter (ICSD). Methods The ICSD was measured using electron microscopy in esophageal biopsies from individuals who underwent ambulatory pH monitoring and endoscopy. Anthropometric measurements were obtained on all participants. Participants were classified into four groups: with and without central obesity and reflux. Results Sixteen individuals were studied with four in each study group. The mean ICSD was almost three-fold greater (p < 0.001) in the group with central obesity without reflux, compared to controls without central obesity and reflux. It was also comparable to the ICSD in groups with acid reflux only and those with both reflux and central obesity. Conclusions There is evidence of esophageal squamous ICSD increase in individuals with central obesity who do not have evidence of acid and nonacid reflux on ambulatory pH monitoring. This may reflect a mechanism by which central obesity potentiates reflux-induced esophageal injury and inflammation. PMID:27087944

  8. Nebulization reflux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, V. G.; Cofer, W. R., III

    1986-01-01

    A nebulization reflux concentrator for removing trace gas contaminants from a sample gas is described. Sample gas from a gas supply is drawn by a suction source into a vessel. The gas enters the vessel through an atomizing nozzle, thereby atomizing and entraining a scrubbing liquid solvent drawn through a siphon tube from a scrubbing liquid reservoir. The gas and entrained liquid rise through a concentrator and impinge upon a solvent phobic filter, whereby purified gas exits through the filter housing and contaminated liquid coalesces on the solvent phobic filter and falls into the reservoir.

  9. [Primary vesicoureteral reflux].

    PubMed

    Stein, R; Ziesel, C; Rubenwolf, P; Beetz, R

    2013-01-01

    The never ending discussion about the diagnostics and treatment of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) now includes arguments for diagnostic nihilism as well as invasive diagnostics and therapy, which is reminiscent of the debate on prostate cancer in adulthood. The common goal of all currently competing diagnostic strategies and approaches is the prevention of renal scars by the most effective and least burdensome approach. There is a difference between acquired pyelonephritic scars with VUR (acquired reflux nephropathy) and congenital reflux nephropathy (primary dysplasia) which cannot be influenced by any therapy.The VUR can be verified by conventional radiological voiding cystourethrography (VCUG), by urosonography, radionuclide cystography or even by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The guidelines of the European Association of Urology/European Society for Paediatric Urology (EAU/ESPU) recommend radiological screening for VUR after the first febrile urinary tract infection. Significant risk factors in patients with VUR are recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) and parenchymal scarring and the patients should undergo patient and risk-adapted therapy. Infants with dilating reflux have a higher risk of renal scarring than those without dilatation of the renal pelvis. Bladder dysfunction or dysfunctional elimination syndrome represents a well-known but previously neglected risk factor in combination with VUR and should be treated prior to any surgical intervention as far as is possible.Certainly not every patient with VUR needs therapy. The current treatment strategies take into account age and gender, the presence of dysplastic or pyelonephritic renal scars, the clinical symptoms, bladder dysfunction and frequency and severity of recurrent UTI as criteria for the therapy decision. The use of an antibacterial prophylaxis as well as the duration is controversially discussed. Endoscopic therapy can be a good alternative to antibacterial prophylaxis or a surveillance

  10. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of medical treatments in acid-related diseases. The Markov chain approach applied to a comparison between intermittent and maintenance treatment of reflux esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Stålhammar, N O

    1993-01-01

    Escalating medical costs have made it increasingly important to carry out economic evaluations of drug therapy. In the area of acid-related diseases, much of the current interest is focused on comparisons between omeprazole and H2 receptor antagonists. After having discussed the basic methodology used in these analyses, viz. the decision-tree analysis, this paper presents an extension of this methodology, the Markov chain approach, which is more appropriate for analyses of longer time periods. Thereafter, this methodology is used to analyze the cost-effectiveness of omeprazole in intermittent versus maintenance treatment of reflux esophagitis. The cost data are from Sweden and the time period studied is one year. It is found that maintenance treatment provides 63 more healthy days per year at an extra direct cost of SEK 40 per day. From a sensitivity analysis it is concluded that the cost-effectiveness of intermittent versus maintenance treatment is mainly determined by the probability of relapse when off treatment, the severity of the symptoms in the case of a relapse and the value to the patient of a healthy day, i.e. a day free from reflux esophagitis. PMID:8171303

  11. Multiple glass transitions and freezing events of aqueous citric acid.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Anatoli; Molina, Mario J; Tenhu, Heikki; Loerting, Thomas

    2015-05-14

    Calorimetric and optical cryo-microscope measurements of 10-64 wt % citric acid (CA) solutions subjected to moderate (3 K/min) and slow (0.5 and 0.1 K/min) cooling/warming rates and also to quenching/moderate warming between 320 and 133 K are presented. Depending on solution concentration and cooling rate, the obtained thermograms show one freezing event and from one to three liquid-glass transitions upon cooling and from one to six liquid-glass and reverse glass-liquid transitions, one or two freezing events, and one melting event upon warming of frozen/glassy CA/H2O. The multiple freezing events and glass transitions pertain to the mother CA/H2O solution itself and two freeze-concentrated solution regions, FCS1 and FCS2, of different concentrations. The FCS1 and FCS2 (or FCS22) are formed during the freezing of CA/H2O upon cooling and/or during the freezing upon warming of partly glassy or entirely glassy mother CA/H2O. The formation of two FCS1 and FCS22 regions during the freezing upon warming to our best knowledge has never been reported before. Using an optical cryo-microscope, we are able to observe the formation of a continuous ice framework (IF) and its morphology and reciprocal distribution of IF/(FCS1 + FCS2). Our results provide a new look at the freezing and glass transition behavior of aqueous solutions and can be used for the optimization of lyophilization and freezing of foods and biopharmaceutical formulations, among many other applications where freezing plays a crucial role.

  12. Gastroesophageal Reflux Affects Sleep Quality in Snoring Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Woodley, Frederick W; Skaggs, Beth; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Eneli, Ihuoma; Splaingard, Mark; Mousa, Hayat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the quality of sleep in snoring obese children without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); and to study the possible relationship between sleep interruption and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in snoring obese children. Methods Study subjects included 13 snoring obese children who were referred to our sleep lab for possible sleep-disordered breathing. Patients underwent multichannel intraluminal impedance and esophageal pH monitoring with simultaneous polysomnography. Exclusion criteria included history of fundoplication, cystic fibrosis, and infants under the age of 2 years. Significant association between arousals and awakenings with previous reflux were defined by symptom-association probability using 2-minute intervals. Results Sleep efficiency ranged from 67-97% (median 81%). A total of 111 reflux episodes (90% acidic) were detected during sleep, but there were more episodes per hour during awake periods after sleep onset than during sleep (median 2.3 vs. 0.6, p=0.04). There were 279 total awakenings during the sleep study; 56 (20.1%) of them in 9 patients (69.2%) were preceded by reflux episodes (55 acid, 1 non-acid). In 5 patients (38.5%), awakenings were significantly associated with reflux. Conclusion The data suggest that acid GER causes sleep interruptions in obese children who have symptoms of snoring or restless sleep and without evidence of OSA. PMID:27066445

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: Update on inflammation and symptom perception.

    PubMed

    Altomare, Annamaria; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Cocca, Silvia; Emerenziani, Sara; Cicala, Michele

    2013-10-21

    Although gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder in Western countries, with a significant impact on quality of life and healthcare costs, the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of symptoms remain to be fully elucidated. GERD symptoms and complications may result from a multifactorial mechanism, in which acid and acid-pepsin are the important noxious factors involved. Prolonged contact of the esophageal mucosa with the refluxed content, probably caused by a defective anti-reflux barrier and luminal clearance mechanisms, would appear to be responsible for macroscopically detectable injury to the esophageal squamous epithelium. Receptors on acid-sensitive nerve endings may play a role in nociception and esophageal sensitivity, as suggested in animal models of chronic acid exposure. Meanwhile, specific cytokine and chemokine profiles would appear to underlie the various esophageal phenotypes of GERD, explaining, in part, the genesis of esophagitis in a subset of patients. Despite these findings, which show a significant production of inflammatory mediators and neurotransmitters in the pathogenesis of GERD, the relationship between the hypersensitivity and esophageal inflammation is not clear. Moreover, the large majority of GERD patients (up to 70%) do not develop esophageal erosions, a variant of the condition called non-erosive reflux disease. This summary aims to explore the inflammatory pathway involved in GERD pathogenesis, to better understand the possible distinction between erosive and non-erosive reflux disease patients and to provide new therapeutic approaches.

  14. Duodenogastroesophageal reflux and its effect on extraesophageal tissues: a review.

    PubMed

    Blumin, Joel H; Merati, Albert L; Toohill, Robert J

    2008-04-01

    We conducted a literature review to identify elements of duodenogastroesophageal reflux (DGER)--namely pancreatic fluids, hydrochloric acid, pepsin, and bile--as to the effects each has when refluxed to the extraesophageal structures. Further, we wished to acquaint clinicians with the possibilities that, in addition to hydrochloric acid, the other components of DGER are likewise contributing to disease in the extraesophageal areas. Our review included studies that have indicated reflux of the above mentioned components of DGER to the pharynx, larynx, tracheobronchial tree, oral cavity, nasopharynx, nose and sinuses, eustachian tube, and middle ear. Findings demonstrate that injury to the upper aerodigestive tract can occur from a variety of substances secreted from the stomach and duodenum. Treatment for DGER is nonspecific. We conclude that patients with an incomplete response to acid suppression may have significant involvement of pepsin, bile, or both. Future studies are needed to clarify the importance of these elements and to suggest more precise treatments.

  15. Diagnosis and Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Infants and Children.

    PubMed

    Baird, Drew C; Harker, Dausen J; Karmes, Aaron S

    2015-10-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux is defined as the passage of stomach contents into the esophagus with or without accompanied regurgitation (spitting up) and vomiting. It is a normal physiologic process that occurs throughout the day in infants and less often in children and adolescents. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is reflux that causes troublesome symptoms or leads to medical complications. The diagnoses of gastroesophageal reflux and GERD are based on the history and physical examination. Diagnostic tests, such as endoscopy, barium study, multiple intraluminal impedance, and pH monitoring, are reserved for when there are atypical symptoms, warning signs, doubts about the diagnosis, or suspected complications or treatment failure. In infants, most regurgitation resolves by 12 months of age and does not require treatment. Reflux in infants may be treated with body position changes while awake, lower-volume feedings, thickening agents (i.e., rice cereal), antiregurgitant formula, extensively hydrolyzed or amino acid formulas, and, in breastfed infants, eliminating cow's milk and eggs from the mother's diet. Lifestyle changes to treat reflux in children and adolescents include sleeping position changes; weight loss; and avoiding smoking, alcohol, and late evening meals. Histamine H2 receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors are the principal medical therapies for GERD. They are effective in infants, based on low-quality evidence, and in children and adolescents, based on low- to moderate-quality evidence. Surgical treatment is available, but should be considered only when medical therapy is unsuccessful or is not tolerated. PMID:26554410

  16. An effective and physiological lifestyle change for management of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Mohammad A; Yar, Taley; Gillessen, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly used in the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Some disadvantages of these acid- suppressing drugs circulate and patients ask for alternatives. Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are important cause of reflux. Gastric distension in upper stomach are strongest stimulus for generation of TLESRs and is aggravated by intake of food in between meals. In the light of pathophysiological mechanisms it is suggested that increasing interval between meals and only soft drinks in between will reduce reflux episodes. The hypothesis was tested in 4 patients with endoscopically proven reflux oesophagitis and/or typical reflux symptoms. Three patients followed our advice to eat twice a day, with soft drinks in between. One patient had a light breakfast but increased the interval between lunch and dinner to 8 hours. All cases were relieved from repeated reflux episodes, in 1-2 weeks, without any medication. PMID:25098097

  17. Clinical manifestations and role of proton pump inhibitors in the management of laryngopharyngeal reflux.

    PubMed

    Patigaroo, Suhail Amin; Hashmi, S F; Hasan, Syed Abrar; Ajmal, M R; Mehfooz, Nazia

    2011-04-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) refers to the backflow of stomach contents into the throat that is into the hypopharynx. LPR is different from classical Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in many ways. Proton pump inhibitors have become the treatment of choice even though conflicting results exists in their response. Treatment requires acid suppression to be as complete as possible and treatment failure is not uncommon. In this article we present here our prospective study of 50 patients diagnosed as a case of LPR on the basis of reflux finding score and reflux symptom index. We tried to evaluate the role of PPI in LPR management by observing the effect of PPI on reflux finding score (RFS) and reflux symptom index (RFI) during the follow up period of 16 weeks.

  18. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dziekiewicz, Marcin A; Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Urzykowska, Agnieszka; Lisowska, Aleksandra; Rachel, Marta; Sands, Dorota; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Albrecht, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Previously published studies have indicated that gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease is common in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to get insight into the incidence of GER and to characterize the nature of reflux episodes in children with cystic fibrosis. This was a multicenter, prospective study of children with cystic fibrosis older than 18 months. Forty four consecutive patients (22 boys, mean age 10.4 ± 3.6, range 3.0-17.8 years) were enrolled into the study. All patients underwent 24 h pH-impedance monitoring. GER were classified according to the widely recognized criteria as an acid, weakly acid, weakly alkaline, or proximal. The pH-impedance trace was considered abnormal when acid exposure was >6 %. GER was diagnosed in 24/44 (54.5 %) children. A total of 1585 (median 35, range 7-128) reflux episodes were detected; 1199 (75.6 %) were acidic, 382 (24.1 %) weakly acidic, and 4 (0.3 %) weakly alkaline. Six hundred and ninety-one (43.6 %) reflux episodes reached the proximal esophagus. In 14/44 patients typical GER symptoms were present. We conclude that the incidence of GER in children with cystic fibrosis is very high. In the majority of patients typical GER symptoms are absent. Therefore, diagnostic procedures should be considered, regardless of lacking symptoms. Although acid reflux episodes predominate in children with cystic fibrosis, classical pH-metry may not constitute a sufficient diagnostic method in this population because of a relatively high number of proximal reflux episodes. Such episodes also indicate an increased risk for aspiration. The pH-impedance diagnostic measurement is advocated when suspecting GER in children with cystic fibrosis.

  19. [Morphology of the gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Daum, Ondřej; Kokošková, Bohuslava; Švajdler, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The present definition of gastroesophageal reflux disease is based on clinical criteria that are difficult to reproduce accurately. Pathologists are supposed to confirm the presence of morphological changes induced by gastroesophageal reflux. Traditional evaluation of injury, inflammatory and reactive changes of esophageal squamous epithelium lacks both sufficient sensitivity and specificity, and thus the modern diagnostic focuses on chronic metaplastic changes of esophageal mucosa defined as any mucosal type proximal to the upper border of oxyntic mucosa (also called fundic mucosa of the stomach). In the setting of gastroesophageal reflux the esophageal mucosa, under normal conditions lined with squamous epithelium, undergoes columnar metaplasia. According to morphology and immunophenotype of columnar cells, the columnar metaplasia may be further subdivided to oxyntocardiac mucosa, cardiac mucosa, intestinal metaplasia, and an intermediate type of cardiac mucosa expressing intestinal transcription factor CDX2, but devoid of goblet cells. The latter two mucosal types are currently thought to represent the most probable candidates for neoplastic transformation, whereas oxyntocardiac mucosa is believed to represent a stable compensatory change with no risk of further progression. An evaluation of dysplastic changes (intraepithelial neoplasia) in the setting of columnar lined esophagus necessitates correlation with the second opinion of a GI expert to prevent potentially harmful under- or over-treatment of the patient. Regarding invasive adenocarcinoma, the pathologist should avoid overdiagnosis of the infiltration of the space between the two layers of columnar lined esophagus - associated split muscularis mucosae as invasion of submucosa, as it is associated with different prognosis. Critical evaluation of the real impact of acid suppression on neoplastic transformation in the setting of gastroesophageal reflux disease may represent the greatest challenge for future

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: A long term relationship.

    PubMed

    Gnanapandithan, Karthik; Popkin, Joel H; Devadoss, Ramprakash; Martin, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a dreaded disease of uncertain etiology and no available cure. It is still unclear if a causal relationship exists between gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) and IPF, but studies have shown an increased prevalence of acid reflux in patients with IPF. We describe a patient with achalasia and GER who went on to develop IPF. She underwent a rapidly worsening course punctuated by acute exacerbations of IPF, despite best efforts to manage the acid GER. We also reviewed the literature on the role of GER in the etiology and progression of IPF and the impact of antireflux measures on its course. PMID:27222783

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease, tooth erosion, and prosthodontic rehabilitation: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Van Roekel, Ned B

    2003-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a relatively common gastrointestinal disorder in the United States. The reflux of acid adversely affects the mucosal lining of the esophagus and is responsible for dental erosion. This article briefly reviews the etiology, risk factors, and medical management of GERD. The patient presentation describes the rehabilitation of a young adult with GERD who needed multidisciplinary care.

  2. [Impact of reflux on the kidney].

    PubMed

    Mollard, P; Louis, D; Basset, T

    1984-03-01

    Description of the reflux nephropathy. Pyelonephritis lesions are undoubtedly linked to the vesico-ureteric reflux. The role of the intra-renal reflux ( Hodson ) and the Big Bang Theory ( Ransley ) are discussed as the data from animal experiments. The role of the sterile reflux and of the segmental hypoplasia is relatively less important. The actual management of vesico-ureteric reflux treatment is questioned.

  3. [Impact of reflux on the kidney].

    PubMed

    Mollard, P; Louis, D; Basset, T

    1984-03-01

    Description of the reflux nephropathy. Pyelonephritis lesions are undoubtedly linked to the vesico-ureteric reflux. The role of the intra-renal reflux ( Hodson ) and the Big Bang Theory ( Ransley ) are discussed as the data from animal experiments. The role of the sterile reflux and of the segmental hypoplasia is relatively less important. The actual management of vesico-ureteric reflux treatment is questioned. PMID:6736930

  4. Gastroesophageal and pharyngeal reflux detection using impedance and 24-hour pH monitoring in asymptomatic subjects: defining the normal environment.

    PubMed

    Oelschlager, Brant K; Quiroga, Elina; Isch, John A; Cuenca-Abente, Federico

    2006-01-01

    Airway symptoms are often caused by aspiration of refluxed materials into the larynx. In this study we sought to define the frequency, character, and proximal extent of refluxed contents - including nonacid reflux-in normal subjects using intraluminal impedance to improve our understanding of the relationship between reflux and aspiration. Ten subjects, who had no symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease or airway disease, underwent impedance/pH monitoring with a catheter that allowed simultaneous esophageal and pharyngeal monitoring. Impedance detected 496 gastroesophageal reflux episodes in the 10 subjects during 240 hours of study. The majority, 399 (81% of the total) were acid reflux episodes (pH < 4). Ninety-seven were nonacid (pH > 4). Most reflux episodes (348 of 496) reached the mid esophagus (9 cm above lower esophageal sphincter). There were 51 reflux episodes that reached the pharynx (PR). Only 13 (25%) of PR were acidic (pH < 4), while 38 were nonacid. Twenty-six PR episodes were liquid and 25 were mixed (liquid and gas). The median number of PR episodes measured with impedance was 5 (0-10). In asymptomatic subjects, most episodes of gastroesophageal reflux are acidic and reach the midesophagus. Reflux into the PR appears to be more common than previously believed, and most of these episodes are not acidic. Thus, traditional 24-hour pH monitoring may underestimate the presence of pharyngeal reflux. The combination of impedance with pH monitoring markedly enhances our ability to accurately detect potential microaspiration.

  5. [Vesico-ureteral reflux in patients with terminal renal failure. II. Causes of reflux (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Huland, H; Busch, R; Wahls, W

    1982-05-01

    The causes of the high incidence of vesicoureteral reflux in 161 patients with end stage renal disease was studied. In about half of these patients with pyelonephritis, reflux in combination with urinary tract infections is the cause of renal failure. Reflux is therefore found more often in this specific group. The incidence of reflux correlates with the duration of uremia. Reflux also is more common in patients with little or no diuresis. Theories of reflux into the "unused ureter" are discussed. PMID:7201702

  6. Current Pharmacological Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao-Kuang; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Wang, Sophie S. W.; Lu, Chien-Yu; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Su, Yu-Chung; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Wu, Deng-Chyang

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a common disorder with troublesome symptoms caused by reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus, has adverse impact on quality of life. A variety of medications have been used in GERD treatment, and acid suppression therapy is the mainstay of treatment for GERD. Although proton pump inhibitor is the most potent acid suppressant and provides good efficacy in esophagitis healing and symptom relief, about one-third of patients with GERD still have persistent symptoms with poor response to standard dose PPI. Antacids, alginate, histamine type-2 receptor antagonists, and prokinetic agents are usually used as add-on therapy to PPI in clinical practice. Development of novel therapeutic agents has focused on the underlying mechanisms of GERD, such as transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation, motility disorder, mucosal protection, and esophageal hypersensitivity. Newer formulations of PPI with faster and longer duration of action and potassium-competitive acid blocker, a newer acid suppressant, have also been investigated in clinical trials. In this review, we summarize the current and developing therapeutic agents for GERD treatment. PMID:23878534

  7. Gastric emptying of solid food in patients with gastroesophageal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, S.; Eggli, D.; Van Nostrand, D.; Johnson, L.

    1985-05-01

    While delayed solid gastric emptying (GE) has been reported in patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER), the relationship of GE to daytime and/or nighttime reflux patterns, and the severity of endoscopic esophagitis are unknown. The authors measured GE in a study population of symptomatic patients (n=33) with abnormal 24 hour pH monitoring (24 hr pH). The study population was divided into two groups by esophagoscopy; those with (E+=22); and 2) those without (E-=11) erosive esophagitis and/or Barrett's esophagus. GE was measured in all patients and in 15 normal volunteers (NL) by the in vivo labelling of chicken liver with Tc-99m-SC, which was in turn diced into 1 cm. cubes and given in 7 1/2 oz. of beef stew. Upright one minute anterior and posterior digital images were obtained every 15 min. for 2.5 hours. 24 hour pH was divided into daytime (upright) and nighttime (supine) segments, and acid exposure was defined as % time pH < 4 for that posture. There was no correlation between GE T 1/2 and acid exposure, daytime or nighttime, for the patient population as a whole. However, patients with the longest GE T1/2 tended to have severe daytime reflux. The authors rarely found delayed solid food gastric emptying in patients with reflux; moreover, they found no association between GE and either diurnal reflux patterns on 24 hr pH or the severity of endoscopic esophagitis.

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in children.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    Despite the frequency with which antireflux procedures are performed, decisions about gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment remain challenging. Several factors contribute to the difficulties in managing gastroesophageal reflux. First, the distinction between physiologic and pathologic gastroesophageal reflux (gastroesophageal reflux disease-GERD) is not always clear. Second, measures of the extent of gastroesophageal reflux often poorly correlate to symptoms or other complications attributed to reflux in infants and children. A third challenge is that the outcome of antireflux procedures, predominately fundoplications, are relatively poorly characterized. All of these factors contribute to difficulty in knowing when to recommend antireflux surgery. One of the manifestations of the uncertainties surrounding GERD is the high degree of variability in the utilization of pediatric antireflux procedures throughout the United States. Pediatric surgeons are frequently consulted for GERD and fundoplication, uncertainties notwithstanding. Although retrospective series and anecdotal observations support fundoplication in some patients, there are many important questions for which sufficient high-quality data to provide a clear answer is lacking. In spite of this, surgeons need to provide guidance to patients and families while awaiting the development of improved evidence to aid in these recommendations. The purpose of this article is to define what is known and what is uncertain, with an emphasis on the most recent evidence.

  9. Increased TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels are associated only with the esophageal reflux symptoms, but not with the extraesophageal reflux symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Joo; Kim, Nayoung; Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor and proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) have been implicated in the mechanism of acid-induced inflammation in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We aimed to evaluate TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels in the GERD patients and their relationship with endoscopic findings and reflux symptoms. Sixteen healthy controls, 45 patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD), and 14 nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) patients received endoscopy and completed questionnaires. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR) of TRPV1, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), PAR2, and interleukin (IL)-8 were performed in the distal esophagus specimen. The levels of TRPV1, GDNF, NGF, PAR2, and IL-8 mRNA expression were highest in the ERD group followed by NERD and control groups and the differences between control and ERD groups were statistically significant. Within the ERD group, patients with grade B in Los Angeles (LA) classification showed significantly higher levels of TRPV1, GDNF, and NGF mRNA expression than those with grade A. Presence of reflux symptoms was associated with significant higher levels of TRPV1, PAR2, and IL-8. Notably not extraesophageal but esophageal reflux symptoms were significantly associated with them. Upregulation of TRPV1 and PAR2 pathways might play a role in the development of distal esophageal inflammation and reflux symptoms. And extraesophageal reflux symptoms might not be associated with these processes. PMID:27512850

  10. Genetics of Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Ninoa, F.; Ilaria, M.; Noviello, C.; Santoro, L.; Rätsch, I.M.; Martino, A.; Cobellis, G.

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the retrograde passage of urine from the bladder to the upper urinary tract. It is the most common congenital urological anomaly affecting 1-2% of children and 30-40% of patients with urinary tract infections. VUR is a major risk factor for pyelonephritic scarring and chronic renal failure in children. It is the result of a shortened intravesical ureter with an enlarged or malpositioned ureteric orifice. An ectopic embryonal ureteric budding development is implicated in the pathogenesis of VUR, which is a complex genetic developmental disorder. Many genes are involved in the ureteric budding formation and subsequently in the urinary tract and kidney development. Previous studies demonstrate an heterogeneous genetic pattern of VUR. In fact no single major locus or gene for primary VUR has been identified. It is likely that different forms of VUR with different genetic determinantes are present. Moreover genetic studies of syndromes with associated VUR have revealed several possible candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis of VUR and related urinary tract malformations. Mutations in genes essential for urinary tract morphogenesis are linked to numerous congenital syndromes, and in most of those VUR is a feature. The Authors provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the VUR. The different genes and signaling pathways controlling the embryonal urinary tract development are analyzed. A better understanding of VUR genetic bases could improve the management of this condition in children. PMID:27013925

  11. Genetics of Vesicoureteral Reflux.

    PubMed

    Nino, F; Ilari, M; Noviello, C; Santoro, L; Rätsch, I M; Martino, A; Cobellis, G

    2016-02-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the retrograde passage of urine from the bladder to the upper urinary tract. It is the most common congenital urological anomaly affecting 1-2% of children and 30-40% of patients with urinary tract infections. VUR is a major risk factor for pyelonephritic scarring and chronic renal failure in children. It is the result of a shortened intravesical ureter with an enlarged or malpositioned ureteric orifice. An ectopic embryonal ureteric budding development is implicated in the pathogenesis of VUR, which is a complex genetic developmental disorder. Many genes are involved in the ureteric budding formation and subsequently in the urinary tract and kidney development. Previous studies demonstrate an heterogeneous genetic pattern of VUR. In fact no single major locus or gene for primary VUR has been identified. It is likely that different forms of VUR with different genetic determinantes are present. Moreover genetic studies of syndromes with associated VUR have revealed several possible candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis of VUR and related urinary tract malformations. Mutations in genes essential for urinary tract morphogenesis are linked to numerous congenital syndromes, and in most of those VUR is a feature. The Authors provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the VUR. The different genes and signaling pathways controlling the embryonal urinary tract development are analyzed. A better understanding of VUR genetic bases could improve the management of this condition in children. PMID:27013925

  12. Flux and reflux: metabolite reflux in plant suspension cells and its implications for isotope-assisted metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Nargund, Shilpa; Misra, Ashish; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Coleman, Gary D; Sriram, Ganesh

    2014-06-01

    Isotope-assisted metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is a powerful methodology to quantify intracellular fluxes via isotope labeling experiments (ILEs). In batch cultures, which are often convenient, inexpensive or inevitable especially for eukaryotic systems, MFA is complicated by the presence of the initially present biomass. This unlabeled biomass may either mix with the newly synthesized labeled biomass or reflux into the metabolic network, thus masking the true labeling patterns in the newly synthesized biomass. Here, we report a detailed investigation of such metabolite reflux in cell suspensions of the tree poplar. In ILEs supplying 28% or 98% U-(13)C glucose as the sole organic carbon source, biomass components exhibited lower (13)C enrichments than the supplied glucose as well as anomalous isotopomers not explainable by simple mixing of the initial and newly synthesized biomass. These anomalous labeling patterns were most prominent in a 98% U-(13)C glucose ILE. By comparing the performance of light- and dark-grown cells as well as by analyzing the isotope labeling patterns in aspartic and glutamic acids, we eliminated photosynthetic or anaplerotic fixation of extracellular (12)CO2 as explanations for the anomalous labeling patterns. We further investigated four different metabolic models for interpreting the labeling patterns and evaluating fluxes: (i) a carbon source (glucose) dilution model, (ii) an isotopomer correction model with uniform dilution for all amino acids, (iii) an isotopomer correction model with variable dilution for different amino acids, and (iv) a comprehensive metabolite reflux model. Of these, the metabolite reflux model provided a substantially better fit for the observed labeling patterns (sum of squared residues: 538) than the other three models whose sum of squared residues were (i) 4626, (ii) 4983, and (iii) 1748, respectively. We compared fluxes determined using the metabolite reflux model to those determined using an independent

  13. Acid Reflux (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease) in Adults (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... sphincter. The most common surgical treatment is the laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. This procedure involves wrapping the upper ... Ovaska JT. Comparison of long-term outcome of laparoscopic and conventional nissen fundoplication: a prospective randomized study ...

  14. Duodenogastric reflux in Chagas' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Troncon, L.E.; Rezende Filho, J.; Iazigi, N.

    1988-10-01

    Increased duodenogastric reflux has been recognized as a cause of gastric mucosa damage. The frequent finding of bile-stained gastric juice and a suggested higher frequency of lesions of the gastric mucosa in patients with Chagas' disease, which is characterized by a marked reduction of myenteric neurons, suggest that impairment of intrinsic innervation of the gut might be associated with increased duodenogastric reflux. Duodenogastric bile reflux was quantified after intravenous injection of 99mtechnetium-HIDA, in 18 patients with chronic Chagas' disease, 12 controls, and 7 patients with Billroth II gastrectomy. All but one of the chagasic patients were submitted to upper digestive tract endoscopy. High reflux values (greater than or equal to 10%) were detected both in chagasic patients and in the controls, but the values for both groups were significantly lower (P less than 0.01) than those obtained for Billroth II patients (median: 55.79%; range: 12.58-87.22%). Reflux values tended to be higher in the Chagas' disease group (median: 8.20%; range: 0.0-29.40%) than in the control group (median: 3.20%; range: 0.0-30.64%), with no statistical difference between the two groups (P greater than 0.10). Chronic gastritis was detected by endoscopy in 12 chagasic patients, benign gastric ulcer in 2 patients, and a pool of bile in the stomach in 11 patients. However, neither the occurrence of gastric lesions nor the finding of bile-stained gastric juice was associated with high reflux values after (99mTc)HIDA injection. This study suggests that lesions of the intramural nervous system of the gut in Chagas' disease do not appear to be associated with abnormally increased duodenogastric reflux.

  15. A Study on the Relationship between Reflux Esophagitis and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kyoichi; Mishiro, Tomoko; Tanaka, Shino; Yoshikawa, Hiroo; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Metabolic syndrome and dental erosion have been demonstrated to correlate with gastroesophageal acid reflux disease (GERD), while periodontitis has been reported to have a positive relationship with metabolic syndrome. However, no correlation between periodontitis and GERD has yet been reported. We therefore investigated the relationship between periodontitis and GERD. Methods The subjects consisted of 280 individuals who visited the Health Center for a detailed medical checkup examination. Each underwent upper endoscopy and periodontitis examinations, with the latter performed by measuring the concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase and hemoglobin in saliva. The subjects were divided into those with positive and negative periodontitis findings, and the prevalence rates of endoscopically proven reflux esophagitis, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia were compared. Results The number of subjects positive for periodontitis was 93, while 187 had negative findings. The prevalence of reflux esophagitis was not different between the positive and negative groups (8.6% vs. 8.0%). In addition, a multiple logistic regression analysis did not identify a positive relationship between the presence of periodontitis and reflux esophagitis. On the other hand, dyslipidemia and hypertension were more frequently observed in the subjects that were positive for periodontitis. Conclusion We did not find an association between periodontitis and reflux esophagitis in the present study. On the other hand, the presence of periodontitis was found to correlate with hypertension and dyslipidemia. PMID:27629943

  16. The evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux before and after medical therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.

    1981-07-01

    Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is a quantitative technique that can be employed to detect and quantitate gastroesophageal reflux before and after the application of therapeutic modalities, including change in body position, bethanechol, atropine, antacids, and antacid-alginate compounds. Five groups of 10-15 patients each were studied before and after using each therapeutic modality and before and after atropine. The results were compared to the patient's symptomatology and to the acid reflux test. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy was performed following oral administration of 300 microCi 99mTc-sulfur colloid in 300 ml acidified orange juice. Thirty-second gamma camera images were obtained as the gastroesophageal gradient was increased from approximately 10 to 35 mm Hg at 5 mm Hg increments using an inflatable abdominal binder. Data were processed using a digital computer. Reflux was reduced by change in position from recumbent to upright, and by the use of subcutaneous bethanechol, oral antacid, or oral antacidalginate compound. Atropine increased reflux. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is more sensitive than fluoroscopy, correlates well with clinical symptomatology, and is a reliable and convenient technique for the quantitative estimation of reflux before and after therapy.

  17. Role of altered esophageal intraluminal baseline impedance levels in patients with gatroesophageal reflux disease refractory to proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liuqin; Ye, Bixing; Lin, Lin; Wang, Ying; Wang, Meifeng

    2016-08-01

    Numerous studies have investigated utility of esophageal intraluminal baseline impedance levels (BILs) in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, effect of BILs in refractory GERD (RGERD) has not been well investigated. The aim of this study is to evaluate role of BILs in RGERD patients. Total 62 subjects with refractory gastroesophageal reflux symptoms underwent 24-hour impedance-pH monitoring and gastroendoscopy. Distal BILs in acid reflux type were significantly lower than those in nonacid reflux type and functional heartburn (FH) group. Distal BILs of reflux esophagitis (RE) patients were lower than those of nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) patients, while there were no statistical significance between 2 groups. Patients with severe esophagitis had lower distal BILs than those with mild esophagitis and NERD patients, and patients with severe esophagitis in acid reflux type had the lowest distal BILs. Distal BILs were significantly negatively correlated with DeMeester score, episodes of acid reflux, and acid exposure time, but no correlated with episodes of nonacid reflux. Characteristics of BILs in RGERD patients were similar with those in GERD patients, but might be more complicated. Evaluating BILs in RGERD patients could achieve a better understanding of pathophysiology in RGERD. PMID:27537561

  18. [Gastro-esophageal reflux and chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Dirou, S; Germaud, P; Bruley des Varannes, S; Magnan, A; Blanc, F-X

    2015-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) frequently occurs in association with chronic respiratory diseases although the casual link is not always clear. Several pathophysiological and experimental factors are considered to support a role for GERD in respiratory disease. Conversely, respiratory diseases and bronchodilator treatment can themselves exacerbate GERD. When cough or severe asthma is being investigated, GERD does not need to be systematically looked for and a therapeutic test with proton pump inhibitors is not always recommended. pH impedance monitoring is now the reference diagnostic tool to detect non acid reflux, a form of reflux for which proton pump inhibitor treatment is ineffective. Recent data have shown a potential role of GERD in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and bronchiolitis obliterans following lung transplantation, leading to discussions about the place of surgery in this context. However, studies using pH impedance monitoring are still needed to better understand and manage the association between GERD and chronic respiratory diseases.

  19. Enteryx for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David A

    2005-01-01

    The Enteryx procedure is an endoscopic injectable treatment for the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms. Enteryx was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in April 2003 for patients who respond to, and require daily pharmacologic therapy with proton-pump inhibitors. Although gastroesophageal reflux disease is rarely life threatening, symptoms are often chronic and disabling. Therefore, safe and cost-effective alternative treatments for chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease are sought by patients, physicians and payers. Multicenter clinical trials have demonstrated that the Enteryx procedure safely and effectively eliminates, or significantly reduces, proton-pump inhibitor use in approximately 84% of patients at 1 year, and 72% of patients at 2 years. PMID:16293024

  20. Laryngopharyngeal Reflux in Children with Chronic Otitis Media with Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Górecka-Tuteja, Anna; Jastrzębska, Izabela; Składzień, Jacek; Fyderek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the characteristic properties of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in children with otitis media with effusion (OME) using 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance combined with dual-probe (pharyngeal and esophageal) pH-metry. Methods Children aged 7–10 years of age with OME underwent 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance pH-metry. The upper pH sensor was situated 1 cm above the upper esophageal sphincter, and the lower pH sensor was placed 3–5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. Parents were asked to complete the gastroesophageal reflux assessment of symptoms in a pediatrics questionnaire. Results Twenty-eight children were enrolled; LPR was detected in 19 (67.9%) children. The criteria of the LPR diagnosis was the presence of at least one supraesophageal episode with a pH < 5.0 and a change in the pH value measured from the initial level at the upper sensor of > 0.2. In total, 64 episodes were observed. Assessment of all LPR episodes showed the presence of 246 episodes in the entire study. A considerable predominance of weakly acidic episodes (87.8%) was noted; there were 6.5% acidic episodes, and weakly alkaline episodes reached 5.7%. Pathological GER was noted in 10 (35.7%) subjects. Acid GER was detected in 8 children, 2 of whom demonstrated non-acidic reflux. In the LPR-negative patients, no pathological GER was confirmed with the exception of a single case of non-acidic reflux. Conclusions LPR was frequently noted in the group of children with OME, and it might be an important risk factor in this common disease. PMID:27193974

  1. Stillage reflux in food waste ethanol fermentation and its by-product accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongzhi; Yang, Jian; Jia, Yan; Wang, Qunhui; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    Raw materials and pollution control are key issues for the ethanol fermentation industry. To address these concerns, food waste was selected as fermentation substrate, and stillage reflux was carried out in this study. Reflux was used seven times during fermentation. Corresponding ethanol and reducing sugar were detected. Accumulation of by-products, such as organic acid, sodium chloride, and glycerol, was investigated. Lactic acid was observed to accumulate up to 120g/L, and sodium chloride reached 0.14mol/L. Other by-products did not accumulate. The first five cycles of reflux increased ethanol concentration, which prolonged fermentation time. Further increases in reflux time negatively influenced ethanol fermentation. Single-factor analysis with lactic acid and sodium chloride demonstrated that both factors affected ethanol fermentation, but lactic acid induced more effects.

  2. Stillage reflux in food waste ethanol fermentation and its by-product accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongzhi; Yang, Jian; Jia, Yan; Wang, Qunhui; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    Raw materials and pollution control are key issues for the ethanol fermentation industry. To address these concerns, food waste was selected as fermentation substrate, and stillage reflux was carried out in this study. Reflux was used seven times during fermentation. Corresponding ethanol and reducing sugar were detected. Accumulation of by-products, such as organic acid, sodium chloride, and glycerol, was investigated. Lactic acid was observed to accumulate up to 120g/L, and sodium chloride reached 0.14mol/L. Other by-products did not accumulate. The first five cycles of reflux increased ethanol concentration, which prolonged fermentation time. Further increases in reflux time negatively influenced ethanol fermentation. Single-factor analysis with lactic acid and sodium chloride demonstrated that both factors affected ethanol fermentation, but lactic acid induced more effects. PMID:26974357

  3. Personal view: to treat or not to treat? Helicobacter pylori and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease - an alternative hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Axon, A T R

    2004-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes acute on chronic gastritis and is responsible for most peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. However, recent papers have suggested that it may protect against gastro-oesophageal reflux, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal cancer. Furthermore, the rapid increase in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, Barrett's oesophagus and adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus in the developed world has been attributed by some to the falling prevalence of H. pylori. These considerations have led to the suggestion that H. pylori infection should not necessarily be treated, especially in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Conversely, data from prospective randomized studies have shown that H. pylori eradication does not cause gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in patients with duodenal ulcer or in the normal population, nor does it worsen the outcome of pre-existing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Therefore, although H. pylori is negatively associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, its eradication does not induce the disease. A hypothesis is presented suggesting that the increased prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a result of rising acid secretion in the general population, which, in turn, is a consequence of the increased linear height (a predictor of acid secretion). The greater acid secretion could also explain the decline in the prevalence of H. pylori and perhaps account for the inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. These considerations are explored in discussing whether H. pylori infection should be treated in infected patients presenting with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

  4. LINX(®) Reflux Management System in chronic gastroesophageal reflux: a novel effective technology for restoring the natural barrier to reflux.

    PubMed

    Bonavina, Luigi; Saino, Greta; Lipham, John C; Demeester, Tom R

    2013-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) results from incompetency of the lower esophageal sphincter that allows the contents of the stomach to reflux into the esophagus, the airways, and the mouth. The disease affects about 10% of the western population and has a profound negative impact on quality of life. The majority of patients are successfully treated with proton-pump inhibitors, but up to 40% have incomplete relief of symptoms even after dose adjustment. The laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication represents the surgical gold standard, but is largely underused because of the level of technical difficulty and the prevalence of side effects. These factors have contributed to the propensity of patients to continue with medical therapy despite inadequate symptom control and complications of the disease. As a consequence, a significant 'therapy gap' in the treatment of GERD remains evident in current clinical practice. The LINX(®) Reflux Management System (Torax Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA) is designed to provide a permanent solution to GERD by augmenting the sphincter barrier with a standardized, reproducible laparoscopic procedure that does not alter gastric anatomy and is easily reversible. Two single-group trials confirmed that a magnetic device designed to augment the lower esophageal sphincter can be safely and effectively implanted using a standard laparoscopic approach. The device decreased esophageal acid exposure, improved reflux symptoms and quality of life, and allowed cessation of proton-pump inhibitors in the majority of patients.

  5. Evaluation of Current Operations for the Prevention of Gastroesophageal Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Demeester, Tom R.; Johnson, Lawrence F.; Kent, Alfred H.

    1974-01-01

    A prospective randomized study was done on 45 patients to evaluate the effectiveness of the Hill, Nissen or Belsey anti-reflux procedure. All patients had symptoms of GE reflux unresponsive to medical therapy, a + standard acid reflux test (SART), and esophagitis (38/45) or + Burnstein test (7/45). Esophageal symptomatic, radiographic, manometric and pH (SART and 24-hr monitoring) evaluation was done pre- and 154 days (ave.) postsurgery. All procedures improved the symptoms of pyrosis. The best improvement was seen after the Nissen repair. All procedures increased the distal esophageal sphincter (DES) pressures over preoperative levels. The Nissen and Belsey increased it more than the Hill. Sphincter length and dynamics remained unchanged. The Nissen procedure placed more of the manometric sphincter below the respiratory inversion point in the positive pressure environment of the abdomen. The esophageal length was increased by the Nissen and Hill repairs. This was thought to account for the high incidence of temporary postsurgery dysphagia following the Nissen and Hill repairs and the lower incidence following the Belsey repair. Reflux was most effectively prevented by the Nissen repair, as shown by the SART and the 24-hr esophageal pH monitoring, a sensitive measurement of frequency and duration of reflux. The average length of hospital stay was 20 days for Belsey and 12 days for both Nissen and Hill procedure. Postsurgery complications were more common following the thoracic than the abdominal approach. Ability to vomit postrepair was greatest with the Hill and least with the Belsey and Nissen repair. All procedures temporarily increased amount of flatus. It is concluded that the Nissen repair best controls reflux and its symptoms by providing the greatest increase in DES pressure and placing more of the sphincter in the positive abdominal environment. This is accomplished with the lowest morbidity but at the expense of temporary postoperative dysphagia and a 50

  6. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: A review of surgical decision making

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Maureen; Afaneh, Cheguevara; Benhuri, Daniel; Antonacci, Caroline; Abelson, Jonathan; Zarnegar, Rasa

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a very common disorder with increasing prevalence. It is estimated that up to 20%-25% of Americans experience symptoms of GERD weekly. Excessive reflux of acidic often with alkaline bile salt gastric and duodenal contents results in a multitude of symptoms for the patient including heartburn, regurgitation, cough, and dysphagia. There are also associated complications of GERD including erosive esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus, stricture and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. While first line treatments for GERD involve mainly lifestyle and non-surgical therapies, surgical interventions have proven to be effective in appropriate circumstances. Anti-reflux operations are aimed at creating an effective barrier to reflux at the gastroesophageal junction and thus attempt to improve physiologic and mechanical issues that may be involved in the pathogenesis of GERD. The decision for surgical intervention in the treatment of GERD, moreover, requires an objective confirmation of the diagnosis. Confirmation is achieved using various preoperative evaluations including: ambulatory pH monitoring, esophageal manometry, upper endoscopy (esophagogastroduodenoscopy) and barium swallow. Upon confirmation of the diagnosis and with appropriate patient criteria met, an anti-reflux operation is a good alternative to prolonged medical therapy. Currently, minimally invasive gastro-esophageal fundoplication is the gold standard for surgical intervention of GERD. Our review outlines the many factors that are involved in surgical decision-making. We will review the prominent features that reflect appropriate anti-reflux surgery and present suggestions that are pertinent to surgical practices, based on evidence-based studies. PMID:26843915

  7. Associations between peripheral vertigo and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Viliušytė, Edita; Macaitytė, Raminta; Vaitkus, Antanas; Rastenytė, Daiva

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesize that peripheral vertigo is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Two mechanisms could be considered – gastric acids may directly irritate the respiratory mucosa and cause inflammation, or Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) could be present and cause local infection. Reflux material (Hydrochloric acid (HCl) and pepsin) could get into the middle ear via Eustachian tube and affect osseous structures directly. Disturbance of ossicles could cause tinnitus, which is more common for peripheral vertigo. H. pylori could also get in the esophagus and in the upper respiratory tract via gastroesophageal reflux, and could cause tympanosclerosis and fixation of ossicles. In our study group, 120 of 153 (78.4%) patients had gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Diagnostic tests of H. pylori (rapid urease test or blood antibody test) were performed for 96 of 120 (80%) patients with GERD and were found positive for 32 of 96 (33.3%) patients. Peripheral vertigo was present in 93 of 120 (77.6%) patients with GERD compared to 33 of 126 (26%) patients without GERD (χ(2)=9.016, p=0.003). H. pylori and peripheral vertigo coexisted in 26 of 126 patients (20.6%) (OR 1.36; 95% CI 0.49-3.74, p=0.55). Our study demonstrated statistically significant association between peripheral vertigo and GERD but not between peripheral vertigo and H. pylori. Further more extensive investigations are needed in order to explore our hypothesis.

  8. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... foods garlic and onions mint flavorings spicy foods tomato-based foods, like spaghetti sauce, chili, and pizza ... Regurgitation is when food and liquid containing stomach acid comes back up into the throat or mouth.) ...

  9. The Angelchik prosthesis for gastro-oesophageal reflux: symptomatic and objective assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, R. M.; Temple, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with intractable gastro-oesophageal reflux were treated by insertion of the Angelchik antireflux prosthesis. Good symptomatic relief was achieved in over 80% of patients reviewed up to 28 months after operation and there was marked resolution of oesophagitis as seen on endoscopy. Oesophageal manometry and pH studies performed preoperatively and at 3 and 12 months after operation, showed a significant increase in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure with decreased acid reflux. Some technical problems were encountered, but the prosthesis is potentially a simple and effective means of controlling gastro-oesophageal reflux. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4051424

  10. Extra-esophageal gastroesophageal reflux disease and asthma: understanding this interplay.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rishi D; Vaezi, Michael F

    2015-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition that develops when there is reflux of stomach contents, which typically manifests as heartburn and regurgitation. These esophageal symptoms are well recognized; however, there are extra-esophageal manifestations of GERD, which include asthma, chronic cough, laryngitis and sinusitis. With the rising incidence of asthma, there is increasing interest in identifying how GERD impacts asthma development and therapy. Due to the poor sensitivity of endoscopy and pH monitoring, empiric therapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is now considered the initial diagnostic step in patients suspected of having GERD-related symptoms. If unresponsive, diagnostic testing with pH monitoring off therapy and/or impedance/pH monitoring on therapy, may be reasonable in order to assess for baseline presence of reflux with the former and exclude continued acid or weakly acid reflux with the latter tests. PPI-unresponsive asthmatics, without overt regurgitation, usually have either no reflux or causes other than GERD. In this group, PPI therapy should be discontinued. In those with GERD as a contributing factor acid suppressive therapy should be continued as well as optimally treating other etiologies requiring concomitant treatment. Surgical fundoplication is rarely needed but in those with a large hiatal hernia, moderate-to-severe reflux by pH monitoring surgery might be helpful in eliminating the need for high-dose acid suppressive therapy.

  11. Sleeve gastrectomy with anti-reflux procedures

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Sergio; Lacombe, Arnaldo; de Aquino, Caio Gustavo Gaspar; Malzoni, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Sleeve gastrectomy is the fastest growing surgical procedure to treat obesity in the world but it may cause or worsen gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article originally aimed to describe the addition of anti-reflux procedures (removal of periesophageal fats pads, hiatoplasty, a small plication and fixation of the gastric remnant in position) to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and to report early and late results. Methods Eighty-eight obese patients that also presented symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease were submitted to sleeve gastrectomy with anti-reflux procedures. Fifty of them were also submitted to a transit bipartition. The weight loss of these patients was compared to consecutive 360 patients previously submitted to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and to 1,140 submitted to sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms were specifically inquired in all anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy patients and compared to the results of the same questionnaire applied to 50 sleeve gastrectomy patients and 60 sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition patients that also presented preoperative symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Results In terms of weight loss, excess of body mass index loss percentage after anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy is not inferior to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition is not inferior to sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition. Anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy did not add morbidity but significantly diminished gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and the use of proton pump inhibitors to treat this condition. Conclusion The addition of anti-reflux procedures, such as hiatoplasty and cardioplication, to the usual sleeve gastrectomy did not add morbidity neither worsened the weight loss but significantly reduced the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms as well as the use of proton pump inhibitors. PMID:25295447

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and patterns of reflux in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis using hypopharyngeal multichannel intraluminal impedance.

    PubMed

    Hoppo, T; Komatsu, Y; Jobe, B A

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a diffuse fibrotic lung disease of unknown etiology. The association between IPF and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been suggested. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of GERD and assess the proximity of reflux events in patients with histologically proven IPF using hypopharyngeal multichannel intraluminal impedance (HMII). This is a retrospective review of prospectively collected data from patients with histologically confirmed IPF (via lung biopsy) who underwent objective esophageal physiology testing including high-resolution manometry and HMII. Defective lower esophageal sphincter (LES) was defined as either LES pressure of <5.0 mmHg, total length of LES of <2.4 cm, or intra-abdominal length of LES of <0.9 cm. Abnormal esophageal motility was considered present when failed swallows ≥30% and/or mean wave amplitude <30 mmHg was present. HMII used a specialized impedance catheter to directly measure laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and full column reflux (reflux 2 cm distal to the upper esophageal sphincter). Based on the previous study of healthy subjects, abnormal proximal exposure was considered present when LPR ≥1/day and/or full column reflux ≥5/day were present. From October 2009 to June 2011, 46 patients were identified as having pulmonary fibrosis and sufficient HMII data. Of 46, 10 patients were excluded because of concomitant connective tissue diseases, and 8 patients were excluded because they had undergone lung transplantation, which may impact the patterns of reflux. The remaining 28 patients with histologically confirmed IPF (male 16, female 12) were included in this study. Mean age and BMI were 60.4 years (range, 41-78) and 28.4 (range, 21.1-38.1), respectively. All patients except one were symptomatic; 23 (82%) patients had concomitant typical GERD symptoms such as heartburn, whereas 4 (14%) patients had isolated pulmonary symptoms such as cough. Esophageal

  13. [Guidelines for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Haeng; Cho, Yu Kyung; Jeon, Seong Woo; Kim, Jie Hyun; Kim, Na Young; Lee, Joon Seong; Bak, Young Tae

    2011-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is defined as a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications. In the last decade, GERD has been increasing in Korea. Seventeen consensus statements for the treatment of GERD were developed using the modified Delphi approach. Acid suppression treatments, such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), histmine-2 receptor antagonists and antacids are effective in the control of GERD-related symptoms. Among them, PPIs are the most effective medication. Standard dose PPI is recommended as the initial treatment of erosive esophagitis (for 8 weeks) and non-erosive reflux disease (at least for 4 weeks). Long-term continuous PPI or on-demand therapy is required for the majority of GERD patients after the initial treatment. Anti-reflux surgery can be considered in well selected patients. Prokinetic agents and mucosal protective drugs have limited roles. Twice daily PPI therapy can be tried to control extra-esophageal symptoms of GERD. For symptomatic patients with Barrett's esophagus, long-term treatment with PPI is required. Further studies are strongly needed to develop better treatment strategies for Korean patients with GERD.

  14. Novel surgical options for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Jenny; Soffer, Edy

    2015-07-01

    There are limited options to patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who are not satisfied with acid suppression therapy. Fundoplication, the standard surgical procedure for GERD, is effective but is associated with adverse side effects and has thus been performed less frequently, creating a need for alternative surgical interventions that are effective, yet less invasive and reversible. Lately, two such interventions were developed: the magnetic sphincter augmentation and electrical stimulation of the lower esophageal sphincter. Human studies describing safety and efficacy over a follow-up period of a number of years have been published, documenting efficacy and safety of these interventions. Future studies should clarify the role of these procedures in the spectrum of GERD therapy. PMID:25947638

  15. Complications following endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteric reflux with Deflux® – two case studies

    PubMed Central

    Życzkowski, Marcin; Zajęcki, Wojciech; Paradysz, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The endoscopic injection of vesicoureteric orifices with synthetic or natural materials is a widely recognized method of treating vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). The aim of this study is to present two cases of clinically significant complications following the use of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer, which led to the progression of the reflux degree, permanent infection of the urinary tract, and the necessity to perform surgical treatment. PMID:24578970

  16. Complications following endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteric reflux with Deflux(®) - two case studies.

    PubMed

    Zyczkowski, Marcin; Prokopowicz, Grzegorz; Zajęcki, Wojciech; Paradysz, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The endoscopic injection of vesicoureteric orifices with synthetic or natural materials is a widely recognized method of treating vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). The aim of this study is to present two cases of clinically significant complications following the use of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer, which led to the progression of the reflux degree, permanent infection of the urinary tract, and the necessity to perform surgical treatment.

  17. A Fiber Optic System For The Detection Of Entero-Gastric Reflux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falciai, R.; Baldini, F.; Conforti, G.; Cosi, F.; Scheggi, A. M...; Bechi, P.

    1989-01-01

    The study and the development of an optical fiber sensor for entero-gastric and non-acid gastro-esophageal reflux is described. The working principle, based on the spectrophotometric properties of the bile, which constitutes the main part of the reflux, differs from the traditional measurement method, based on pH monitoring. The measuring apparatus is described as well as experimental "in vitro" and preliminary "in vivo" tests are reported.

  18. Effect of cimetidine on gastric secretion and duodenogastric reflux.

    PubMed Central

    Melville, R J; Suleiman, S I; Whitfield, P F; Parkin, J V; Nwabunike, T O; Hobsley, M

    1985-01-01

    In 19 subjects (four controls, one gastric ulcer and 14 duodenal ulcer) maximal gastric secretion was evoked with histamine 0.13 mumol/kg/h (0.04 mg/kg/h) for two to two and a half hours. A slow intravenous bolus dose of 200 mg cimetidine was given at the beginning of the last hour. Gastric secretion was measured before and after cimetidine administration and expressed both as mean acid output (mmol H+/h) and 'pyloric loss and duodenogastric reflux corrected' volume (Vg, ml/h). Mean reduction by acid output was 86%; mean reduction by corrected volume (Vg) was only 64%. The discrepancy, which is significant (p less than 0.01), is caused by a marked increase in duodenogastric reflux after cimetidine. PMID:4018640

  19. Increased TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels are associated only with the esophageal reflux symptoms, but not with the extraesophageal reflux symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Joo; Kim, Nayoung; Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-08-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor and proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) have been implicated in the mechanism of acid-induced inflammation in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We aimed to evaluate TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels in the GERD patients and their relationship with endoscopic findings and reflux symptoms.Sixteen healthy controls, 45 patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD), and 14 nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) patients received endoscopy and completed questionnaires. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR) of TRPV1, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), PAR2, and interleukin (IL)-8 were performed in the distal esophagus specimen.The levels of TRPV1, GDNF, NGF, PAR2, and IL-8 mRNA expression were highest in the ERD group followed by NERD and control groups and the differences between control and ERD groups were statistically significant. Within the ERD group, patients with grade B in Los Angeles (LA) classification showed significantly higher levels of TRPV1, GDNF, and NGF mRNA expression than those with grade A. Presence of reflux symptoms was associated with significant higher levels of TRPV1, PAR2, and IL-8. Notably not extraesophageal but esophageal reflux symptoms were significantly associated with them.Upregulation of TRPV1 and PAR2 pathways might play a role in the development of distal esophageal inflammation and reflux symptoms. And extraesophageal reflux symptoms might not be associated with these processes. PMID:27512850

  20. A new concept in the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed Central

    Samelson, S L; Weiser, H F; Bombeck, C T; Siewert, J R; Ludtke, F E; Hoelscher, A H; Abuabara, S F; Nyhus, L M

    1983-01-01

    Surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux has been thought to depend on the construction of a valve mechanism at the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). Recently, a silicone prosthesis that does not construct a valve has been introduced, and in preliminary studies in the human, shown to be effective in the treatment of reflux. A precise mode of action has not been demonstrated for the prosthesis. This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanics of the prosthesis and determine its effectiveness in an animal model. Six canine gastroesophageal specimens were excised and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) simulated by a rubber band placed around the GEJ at a tension calibrated to give 25 mmHg "sphincter" pressure. Circumferential silk ligatures of varying length were then placed on the stomach 3.0 cm distal to the GEJ. With no ligature, the LES opening pressure (LESOP) was 8.0 mmHg, varying to 17.0 mmHg with an 8.0 cm ligature. Further, 24 adult mongrel dogs were randomly divided into four equal groups: controls, circular myomectomy of the LES alone, myomectomy combined with fundoplication, and myomectomy combined with implantation of the silicone antireflux prosthesis. Evaluation included manometry, endoscopy, and histology. Although only the normal sphincter and fundoplication responded physiologically, the prosthesis was just as effective in preventing reflux, as evidenced by reducing acid exposure time of myomectomized dogs from 35.4% to 1.8%, and by preventing endoscopic esophagitis. It was concluded that the silicone antireflux prosthesis acts in the same fashion as the ligature in the model, by interrupting distraction of the LES by gastric wall tension. This concept is an effective method for raising LESOP, treating experimental gastroesophageal reflux, and eliminating the sequelae of reflux. Long-term evaluations of the prosthesis are required. PMID:6830333

  1. Diagnostic value of dilated intercellular space and histopathologic scores in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, R; Zhang, H; Zhou, L; Lu, J; Xue, Y; Wang, Y; Yan, X; Lin, L; Lin, S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the diagnostic value of histopathologic score and the dilated intercellular space (DIS) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and functional heartburn (FH). Participants with GERD symptoms including reflux esophagitis, non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), Barrett's esophagus (BE), functional heartburn (FH), along with a control group with atypical GERD-like symptom (Sym-C), and asymptomatic healthy volunteers (H-C) were administered GERD questionnaire, and subjected to endoscopy and biopsies, as well as 24-hour pH-impedance monitoring. Biopsies were evaluated using standards from the 2011 Esohisto Project after Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. DIS was measured quantitatively under light microscopy. Among the total of 565 participants with qualified biopsy specimens, the mean DIS of the reflux esophagitis (RE) group was significantly wider compared with the other five groups. DIS in patients with GERD-like symptoms was significantly wider compared with the H-C. No significant differences were observed between NERD and FH. Results from 24-hour pH-impedance monitoring indicated that only the DIS of patients with acid reflux or the amount of acid reflux episodes in patients with DIS was significantly wider compared with patients with nonacid reflux or patients without DIS (P < 0.001). With DIS = 0.9 μm as the cutoff value, the sensitivity and specificity were 62.6% and 54.1%, respectively. Using the total histopathologic score > 3 as the diagnostic criterion, the sensitivity and specificity were 71.7% and 47.4%. DIS is closely associated with GERD and acid reflux. The diagnostic value of histological scores in lower esophagus in GERD is very similar to that of the quantitative measurement of DIS.

  2. Glacial Acetic Acid Adverse Events: Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Doles, William; Wilkerson, Garrett; Morrison, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    Glacial acetic acid is a dangerous chemical that has been associated with several adverse drug events involving patients over recent years. When diluted to the proper concentration, acetic acid solutions have a variety of medicinal uses. Unfortunately, despite warnings, the improper dilution of concentrated glacial acetic acid has resulted in severe burns and other related morbidities. We report on 2 additional case reports of adverse drug events involving glacial acetic acid as well as a review of the literature. A summary of published case reports is provided, including the intended and actual concentration of glacial acetic acid involved, the indication for use, degree of exposure, and resultant outcome. Strategies that have been recommended to improve patient safety are summarized within the context of the key elements of the medication use process. PMID:26448660

  3. Evaluation of bile reflux in HIDA images based on fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Lo, Rong-Chin; Huang, Wen-Lin; Fan, Yu-Ming

    2015-05-01

    We propose a new method to help physicians assess, using a hepatobiliary iminodiacetic acid scan image, whether or not there is bile reflux into the stomach. The degree of bile reflux is an important index for clinical diagnosis of stomach diseases. The proposed method applies image-processing technology combined with a hydrodynamic model to determine the extent of bile reflux or whether the duodenum is also folded above the stomach. This condition in 2D dynamic images suggests that bile refluxes into the stomach, when endoscopy shows no bile reflux. In this study, we used optical flow to analyze images from Tc99m-diisopropyl iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy (Tc99m-DISIDA) to ascertain the direction and velocity of bile passing through the pylorus. In clinical diagnoses, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is the main clinical tool for evaluating functional images of hepatobiliary metabolism. Computed tomography (CT) shows anatomical images of the external contours of the stomach, liver, and biliary extent. By exploiting the functional fusion of the two kinds of medical image, physicians can obtain a more accurate diagnosis. We accordingly reconstructed 3D images from SPECT and CT to help physicians choose which cross sections to fuse with software and to help them more accurately diagnose the extent and quantity of bile reflux.

  4. Feeding and Reflux: A Parent & Professional Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, William J.; Martorana, Pamela; Vitello, Louise; Eicher, Peggy S.; LaCour, Tricia

    2008-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) as a cause of an infant or child's refusal to eat is becoming better recognized. However, the many more subtle influences that reflux can have on feeding are less often recognized. Although vomiting after meals is the classic presentation, infants and children may present with a variety of more subtle symptoms less…

  5. Review article: supra-oesophageal manifestations of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and the role of night-time gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Fass, R; Achem, S R; Harding, S; Mittal, R K; Quigley, E

    2004-12-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been associated with a variety of supra-oesophageal symptoms, including asthma, laryngitis, hoarseness, chronic cough, frequent throat clearing and globus pharyngeus. GERD may be overlooked as the underlying mechanism for these symptoms because typical GERD symptoms may be absent, despite abnormal oesophageal acid exposure. Two basic mechanisms linking GERD with laryngeal symptoms have been proposed: direct contact of gastric acid with the upper airway, in some cases due to micro-aspiration, and a vagovagal reflex triggered by acidification of the distal portion of the oesophagus. Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER) during sleep is believed to be an important mechanism for the development of supra-oesophageal complications of GERD, such as asthma and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Several physiological changes during sleep, including prolonged oesophageal acid contact time, decreased upper oesophageal sphincter pressure, increased gastric acid secretion, decreased salivation, decreased swallowing and a decrease in conscious perception of acid, render an individual more susceptible to reflux-induced injury. Supra-oesophageal symptoms often improve in response to aggressive acid-suppressive therapy. However, many unanswered questions remain regarding the appropriate approach to diagnosis and treatment of patients with GERD-related supra-oesophageal symptoms. In this article we review the relationship between supra-oesophageal symptoms and GERD and, where possible, highlight the evidence supporting the role of night-time reflux as a contributing factor to these symptoms. PMID:15527462

  6. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy to assess the severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease. [/sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid

    SciTech Connect

    Menin, R.A.; Malmud, L.S.; Petersen, R.P.; Maier, W.P.; Fisher, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-six (36) patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux were studied. Symptoms of heartburn, regurgitation, and dysphagia were scored as to their severity and compared to quantitative tests of gastroesophageal reflux. Patients were studied with the acid reflux test, fiberoptic endoscopy, exophageal mucosal biopsy with a pinch forceps, esophageal manometry, and radioisotopic gastroesophgeal scintigraphy. Symptoms were scored according to an arbitrary grading system as mild, moderate, or severe. There were significant correlations between symptoms scores and both the degree of endoscopic esophagitis and the gastroesophageal reflux indices as measured by the radioisotopic scintiscan, but not with the degree of histologic esophagitis or lower esophageal sphincter pressure. Review of the findings suggest the following profile for patients who might require antireflux surgery: severe symptoms; presence of endoscopic esophagitis; resting lower esophageal sphincter pressure below 10 mmHg; and gastroesophageal reflux index above 10%.

  7. The Role of Sleep in the Modulation of Gastroesophageal reflux and Symptoms in NICU Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Aslam; Malkar, Manish; Splaingard, Mark; Khuhro, Abdul; Jadcherla, Sudarshan

    2015-01-01

    Background Newborns sleep about 80% of the time. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease is prevalent in about 10% of NICU infants. Concurrent polysomnography and pH-impedance studies clarify relationship of GER with sleep. Aims To characterize spatio-temporal and chemical characteristics of impedance-positive GER and define symptom associations in sleep and wake states in symptomatic neonates. We hypothesized that frequency of impedance-positive GER events and their association with cardiorespiratory symptoms is greater during sleep. Methods Eighteen neonates underwent concurrent polysomnography with pH-impedance study. Impedance-positive GER events (weakly acidic or acidic) were categorized between sleep vs. wake states: Symptom Index = # of symptoms with GER/total symptoms*100, Symptom Sensitivity Index = # of GER with symptoms/Total GER*100 and Symptom Association Probability = [(1-Probability of observed association between reflux and symptoms)*100]). Results We analyzed 317 GER events during 116 hours of polysomnography. During wake vs. sleep respectively, the median (interquartile range) frequency of impedance-positive GER was 4.9(3.1–5.8) vs. 1.4(0.7–1.7)events/hour (P<0.001), proximal migration was 2.6(0.8–3.3) vs. 0.2(0.0–0.9)events/hour (P<0.001); Symptom Index for cardiorespiratory symptoms for impedance-positive events was 22.5 (0–55.3) vs. 6.1(0–13), P=0.04 while Symptom Sensitivity Index was 9.1(0–23.1) vs. 18.4 (0–50), P=0.04 though Symptom Association Probability was similar, (P=0.68). Conclusions Contrary to our hypothesis, frequency of GER in sleep is lesser; however, spatio-temporal and chemical characteristics of GER and symptom generation mechanisms are distinct. For cardiorespiratory symptoms during sleep, lower Symptom Index entails evaluation for etiologies other than GER disease, higher Symptom Sensitivity Index implies heightened esophageal sensitivity and similar Symptom Association Probability indicates other mechanistic

  8. The management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Keung, Charlotte; Hebbard, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY If there are no features of serious disease, suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease can be initially managed with a trial of a proton pump inhibitor for 4–8 weeks. This should be taken 30–60 minutes before food for optimal effect. Once symptoms are controlled, attempt to withdraw acid suppression therapy. If symptoms recur, use the minimum dose that controls symptoms. Patients who have severe erosive oesophagitis, scleroderma oesophagus or Barrett’s oesophagus require long-term treatment with a proton pump inhibitor. Lifestyle modification strategies can help gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Weight loss has the strongest evidence for efficacy. Further investigation and a specialist referral are required if there is no response to proton pump inhibitor therapy. Atypical symptoms or signs of serious disease also need investigation. PMID:27041798

  9. The management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Keung, Charlotte; Hebbard, Geoffrey

    2016-02-01

    If there are no features of serious disease, suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease can be initially managed with a trial of a proton pump inhibitor for 4-8 weeks. This should be taken 30-60 minutes before food for optimal effect. Once symptoms are controlled, attempt to withdraw acid suppression therapy. If symptoms recur, use the minimum dose that controls symptoms. Patients who have severe erosive oesophagitis, scleroderma oesophagus or Barrett's oesophagus require long-term treatment with a proton pump inhibitor. Lifestyle modification strategies can help gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Weight loss has the strongest evidence for efficacy. Further investigation and a specialist referral are required if there is no response to proton pump inhibitor therapy. Atypical symptoms or signs of serious disease also need investigation. PMID:27041798

  10. Editorial: Reflux While Running: Something to Belch About.

    PubMed

    Carlson, D A; Hirano, I

    2016-07-01

    Running is the most popular form of exercise in the United States. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is common during exercise and may affect performance. Previous studies have focused on increased intra-abdominal pressure as a major determinant of acid reflux during physical exertion. In this issue, Herregods et al. examined the mechanisms of GER in healthy volunteers using simultaneous high-resolution manometry and pH impedance testing performed while running. Novel observations afforded by the utilization of state-of-the-art technology include the importance of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation ("belch reflex") and transient formation of hiatal hernia during exercise. The findings are provocative and lend credence to commonsense strategies to minimize the consequences of belching in runners. PMID:27356820

  11. Editorial: Reflux, dyspepsia, and Rome III (or Rome IV?).

    PubMed

    Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Frisoni, Chiara

    2010-12-01

    The paper by Xiao et al. in this issue of American Journal of Gastroenterology reports that patients with functional dyspepsia (FD) complaining of epigastric burning have a higher probability to present abnormal gastroesophageal acid reflux, as well as response to proton pump inhibitor therapy than those complaining of epigastric pain, bothersome postprandial fullness, or early satiety. No differences in the above parameters were detected when comparing patients with epigastric pain syndrome and postprandial distress syndrome, as proposed by the Rome III classification of FD. If confirmed, these results contribute to clarify the relationship between FD and gastroesophageal reflux disease and, at the same time, highlight the importance of analyzing individual symptoms rather than clusters of symptoms, when managing patients complaining of upper gastrointestinal symptoms.

  12. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Bowrey, David J.; Peters, Jeffrey H.; DeMeester, Tom R.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To critique the English-language reports describing the effects of medical and surgical antireflux therapy on respiratory symptoms and function in patients with asthma. Methods The Medline computerized database (1959–1999) was searched, and all publications relating to both asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease were retrieved. Results Seven of nine trials of histamine-receptor antagonists showed a treatment-related improvement in asthma symptoms, with half of the patients benefiting. Only one study identified a beneficial effect on objective measures of pulmonary function. Three of six trials of proton pump inhibitors documented improvement in asthma symptoms with treatment; benefit was seen in 25% of patients. Half of the studies reported improvement in pulmonary function, but the effect occurred in fewer than 15% of patients. In the one study that used optimal antisecretory therapy, asthma symptoms were improved in 67% of patients and pulmonary function was improved in 20%. Combined data from 5 pediatric and 14 adult studies of antireflux surgery indicated that almost 90% of children and 70% of adults had improvement in respiratory symptoms, with approximately one third experiencing improvements in objective measures of pulmonary function. Conclusions Fundoplication has been consistently shown to ameliorate reflux-induced asthma; results are superior to the published results of antisecretory therapy. Optimal medical therapy may offer similar results, but large studies providing support for this assertion are lacking. PMID:10674606

  13. How Acid Reflux Disease Damages Teeth

    MedlinePlus

    ... an advanced stage of destruction." The potential of hydrogen, or pH, is a standard way to measure ... January 2012 Related Articles: Tooth Erosion Sports and Energy Drinks Responsible for Irreversible Damage to Teeth What ...

  14. Numerical analysis of seawater circulation in carbonate platforms: II. The dynamic interaction between geothermal and brine reflux circulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, G.D.; Whitaker, F.F.; Smart, P.L.; Sanford, W.E.

    2004-01-01

    Density-driven seawater circulation may occur in carbonate platforms due to geothermal heating and / or reflux of water of elevated salinity. In geothermal circulation lateral contrasts in temperature between seawater and platform groundwaters warmed by the geothermal heat flux result in upward convective flow, with colder seawater drawn into the platform at depth. With reflux circulation, platform-top waters concentrated by evaporation flow downward, displacing less dense underlying groundwaters. We have used a variable density groundwater flow model to examine the pattern, magnitude and interaction of these two different circulation mechanisms, for mesosaline platform-top waters (50???) and brines concentrated up to saturation with respect to gypsum (150???) and halite (246???). Geothermal circulation, most active around the platform margin, becomes restricted and eventually shut-off by reflux of brines from the platform interior towards the margin. The persistence of geothermal circulation is dependent on the rate of brine reflux, which is proportional to the concentration of platform-top brines and also critically dependent on the magnitude and distribution of permeability. Low permeability evaporites can severely restrict reflux whereas high permeability units in hydraulic continuity enhance brine transport. Reduction in permeability with depth and anisotropy of permeability (kv < < kh) focuses flow laterally in the shallow subsurface (<1 km), resulting in a horizontally elongated brine plume. Aquifer porosity and dispersivity are relatively minor controls on reflux. Platform brines can entrain surficial seawater when brine generating conditions cease but the platform-top remains submerged, a variant of reflux we term "latent reflux". Brines concentrated up to gypsum saturation have relatively long residence times of at least 100 times the duration of the reflux event. They thus represent a long-term control on post-reflux groundwater circulation, and

  15. The management of periprosthetic leakage in the presence of supra-oesophageal reflux after prosthetic voice rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Kai J; Grieser, L; Ehrhart, T; Maier, H

    2011-05-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the influence of anti-reflux medications on the management of periprosthetic leakage in laryngectomised patients with prosthetic voice rehabilitation. Sixty patients underwent laryngectomy and prosthetic voice rehabilitation. In a prospective non-randomised study, we examined the patients clinically and assessed the presence of reflux disease using 24-h dual-probe pH monitoring before and 6 months after oral anti-reflux treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The severity of reflux, the effectiveness of anti-reflux therapy, and the clinical success of treatment were evaluated. Reflux parameters before and after anti-reflux therapy as well as the severity and incidence of periprosthetic leakage before and after PPI therapy were the main outcome measures. The absolute number of reflux events was 162.2 (±144.3) before treatment and 63.1 (±87.9) after treatment with PPIs (p = 0.031). The reflex area index score decreased from 327.1 (±419.3) without PPIs to 123.8 (±249.7) with PPIs (p = 0.0228). The mean DeMeester score was 108.3 (±85.4) before treatment and 47.4 (±61.7) after 6 months of treatment (p = 0.0557). The relative risk of periprosthetic leakage decreased to 0.5 after anti-reflux treatment. In 19 patients, leakage problems were successfully managed by rigorous treatment with PPIs. No further surgical procedures were required in these cases. Rigorous anti-reflux treatment leads to an improvement in parameters that can be assessed objectively by 24-h dual-probe pH monitoring. In the majority of patients, the symptoms associated with periprosthetic leakage can be improved or cured.

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms not responding to proton pump inhibitor: GERD, NERD, NARD, esophageal hypersensitivity or dyspepsia?

    PubMed

    Bashashati, Mohammad; Hejazi, Reza A; Andrews, Christopher N; Storr, Martin A

    2014-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common gastrointestinal process that can generate symptoms of heartburn and chest pain. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the gold standard for the treatment of GER; however, a substantial group of GER patients fail to respond to PPIs. In the past, it was believed that acid reflux into the esophagus causes all, or at least the majority, of symptoms attributed to GER, with both erosive esophagitis and nonerosive outcomes. However, with modern testing techniques it has been shown that, in addition to acid reflux, the reflux of nonacid gastric and duodenal contents into the esophagus may also induce GER symptoms. It remains unknown how weakly acidic or alkaline refluxate with a pH similar to a normal diet induces GER symptoms. Esophageal hypersensitivity or functional dyspepsia with superimposed heartburn may be other mechanisms of symptom generation, often completely unrelated to GER. Detailed studies investigating the pathophysiology of esophageal hypersensitivity are not conclusive, and definitions of the various disease states may overlap and are often confusing. The authors aim to clarify the pathophysiology, definition, diagnostic techniques and medical treatment of patients with heartburn symptoms who fail PPI therapy.

  17. Feasibility of closed Fe(II)/Fe(III) system for product-reflux in Nitrox process

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, M.; Ishida, T.

    1981-03-10

    A concept of closed reflux system for stable isotope fractionation by chemical exchange method has been introduced. In a closed system a chemical agent used to convert one chemical species of an isotopic exchange reaction into the other at the product end is regenerated on site by means of an electrochemical or thermal process. It offers a convenience of eliminating the needs for transporting chemicals to and from the site and an advantage of allowing leniency in the degree of completeness of the reflux reaction. Feasibility of use of Fe(II) salt solutions in a closed reflux system for the Nitrox process for /sup 15/N fractionation has been studied. Two of such systems, FeSO/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and Fe(ClO/sub 4/)/sub 2/ in HClO/sub 4/, are adopted for packed column operation. For both systems, the rate of reduction of nitric acid increases with increasing acid concentration, the solubility of the salts decreases with the increasing acid concentration, and the reflux reaction can be made to go to completion. Evaluation of such a closed reflux system will have to include that of performance of regenerative process.

  18. Conservative surgical treatment of reflux esophagitis and esophageal stricture.

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, J L; Wright, R S; Edwards, W H; Sawyers, J L

    1975-01-01

    During a recent 3-year period, 17 consecutive patients were seen with advanced fibrotic esophageal strictures secondary to alkaline-acid-pepsin reflux. From detailed preoperative evaluations alone it was impossible to determine whether therapy should consist of excisional surgery, esophagogastroplasty or intra-operative dilatation with correction of reflux. Only at operation could the length, extent, degree and severity of the stricture be fully determined. Each of the 17 patients was treated by controlled dilatation, coupled with an antireflux procedure. This simplified approach proved successful on strictures thought preoperatively to be undilatable. It appears that this conservative approach is applicable to many advanced strictures and excisional and plastic procedures should be reserved for those cases that prove unyielding to intraoperative dilatation. The true appraisal of a reflux stricture and the choice of surgical procedure is best determined at the operating table. Images Fig. 5A. Fig. 5B. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. Fig. 16. Fig. 17. Fig. 18. Fig. 19. Fig. 20. Fig. 21. PMID:1130874

  19. Dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): is there any correlation?

    PubMed

    Simadibrata, Marcellus

    2009-10-01

    Dyspepsia is a syndrome characterized by symptoms and signs of upper gastrointestinal tract and the adjacent organs. It is estimated that 25% of the community have symptoms of dyspepsia syndrome. One-third of patients who visit general physician practices are patients with dyspepsia syndrome; and half of patients who visit gastroenterologists are also patients with dyspepsia syndrome. Dyspepsia syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are very prevalent in the community throughout the world.Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is more and more commonly found in daily medical practice. Until now,the natural history of disease on GERD and dyspepsia is hardly understood, even though many scientists studied both conditions and there are frequently overlapping. In an individual, GERD and dyspepsia may occur simultaneously and therefore they are hardly to be discriminated.The management of GERD is performed in keeping with Indonesia and Asia Pacific consensus, life-style modification and administering the acid suppression agents (Proton pump inhibitor (drug of choice), H2-receptor antagonist, etc),prokinetic agents (Cisapride, domperidone, etc). Life-style modification shall be performed as follows, i.e. sleep with 30-45 degree elevated head or upper chest, do not avoid sour beverages, chocolate, coffee or alcohol, avoid fat and various fried foods, sour food, less stress, stop smoking, small but frequent feeding, etc. There is a correlation between dyspepsia syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease(GERD), particularly between the functional dyspepsia and non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux (NERD). More appropriate definition is necessary to differentiate the dyspepsia syndrome and GERD. Further studies are needed to establish distinct definition and criteria between dyspepsia syndrome and GERD.

  20. An implantable, batteryless, and wireless capsule with integrated impedance and pH sensors for gastroesophageal reflux monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hung; Landge, Vaibhav; Tata, Uday; Seo, Young-Sik; Rao, Smitha; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Tibbals, H F; Spechler, Stuart; Chiao, J-C

    2012-11-01

    In this study, a device for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) monitoring has been prototyped. The system consists of an implantable, batteryless and wireless transponder with integrated impedance and pH sensors; and a wearable, external reader that wirelessly powers up the transponder and interprets the transponded radio-frequency signals. The transponder implant with the total size of 0.4 cm × 0.8 cm × 3.8 cm harvests radio frequency energy to operate dual-sensor and load-modulation circuitry. The external reader can store the data in a memory card and/or send it to a base station wirelessly, which is optional in the case of multiple-patient monitoring in a hospital or conducting large-scale freely behaving animal experiments. Tests were carried out to verify the signal transduction reliability in different situations for antenna locations and orientation. In vitro, experiments were conducted in a mannequin model by positioning the sensor capsule inside the wall of a tube mimicking the esophagus. Different liquids with known pH values were flushed through the tube creating reflux episodes and wireless signals were recorded. Live pigs under anesthesia were used for the animal models with the transponder implant attached on the esophageal wall. The reflux episodes were created while the sensor data were recorded wirelessly. The data were compared with those recorded independently by a clinically used wireless pH sensor capsule placed next to our implant transponder. The results showed that our transponder detected every episode in both acid and nonacid nature, while the commercial pH sensor missed events that had similar, repeated pH values, and failed to detect pH values higher than 10. Our batteryless transponder does not require a battery thus allowing longer diagnosis and prognosis periods to monitor drug efficacy, as well as providing accurate assessment of GERD symptoms. PMID:22922690

  1. An implantable, batteryless, and wireless capsule with integrated impedance and pH sensors for gastroesophageal reflux monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hung; Landge, Vaibhav; Tata, Uday; Seo, Young-Sik; Rao, Smitha; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Tibbals, H F; Spechler, Stuart; Chiao, J-C

    2012-11-01

    In this study, a device for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) monitoring has been prototyped. The system consists of an implantable, batteryless and wireless transponder with integrated impedance and pH sensors; and a wearable, external reader that wirelessly powers up the transponder and interprets the transponded radio-frequency signals. The transponder implant with the total size of 0.4 cm × 0.8 cm × 3.8 cm harvests radio frequency energy to operate dual-sensor and load-modulation circuitry. The external reader can store the data in a memory card and/or send it to a base station wirelessly, which is optional in the case of multiple-patient monitoring in a hospital or conducting large-scale freely behaving animal experiments. Tests were carried out to verify the signal transduction reliability in different situations for antenna locations and orientation. In vitro, experiments were conducted in a mannequin model by positioning the sensor capsule inside the wall of a tube mimicking the esophagus. Different liquids with known pH values were flushed through the tube creating reflux episodes and wireless signals were recorded. Live pigs under anesthesia were used for the animal models with the transponder implant attached on the esophageal wall. The reflux episodes were created while the sensor data were recorded wirelessly. The data were compared with those recorded independently by a clinically used wireless pH sensor capsule placed next to our implant transponder. The results showed that our transponder detected every episode in both acid and nonacid nature, while the commercial pH sensor missed events that had similar, repeated pH values, and failed to detect pH values higher than 10. Our batteryless transponder does not require a battery thus allowing longer diagnosis and prognosis periods to monitor drug efficacy, as well as providing accurate assessment of GERD symptoms.

  2. Utility scores for vesicoureteral reflux and anti-reflux surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Caleb; Routh, Jonathan C.; Logvinenko, Tanya; Rosoklija, Ilina; Kokorowski, Paul; Prosser, Lisa A.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Management of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) continues to be controversial. In conditions of uncertainty, decision analytic techniques such as cost-utility analysis (CUA) can help to structure the decision-making process. However, CUA analyses require a “utility,” a value between 0 (death) and 1 (perfect health) corresponding to the quality of life associated with a health state. Ideally, utility values are elicited directly from representative community samples, but utilities have not been rigorously measured for pediatric urology conditions. Objectives To elicit utility scores for VUR and open anti-reflux surgery (ARS) from a representative, well-characterized community sample of adults who have been parents. Methods Cross-sectional survey of nationally representative adults who had ever been parents. Each respondent saw one of four descriptions of VUR, with or without continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP) and occurrence of febrile urinary tract infection (UTI). A 6-week postoperative health state following ARS was also assessed. We used the time trade-off (TTO) method to elicit utility scores. Factors associated with utility score were assessed with a multivariate linear regression model. Results The survey was completed by 1200 individuals. Data were weighted to adjust for demographic differences between responders and non-responders. Mean age was 52 ± 15 years, 44% were male, and 68% were White. In terms of education, 29% had a college degree or higher. The mean utility score for VUR overall was 0.82 ± 0.28. VUR utility scores did not differ significantly based on inclusion of CAP or UTI in the health state description (p=0.21). The 6-week postoperative period garnered a utility of 0.71 ± 0.43. Discussion Our results showed that VUR has a mean utility score of 0.82, which indicates that the community perceives this condition to be a substantial burden. For comparison, conditions with similar utility scores include compensated hepatitis

  3. Laparoscopic Anti-Reflux (GERD) Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Opportunities Sponsorship Opportunities Login Laparoscopic Anti-Reflux (GERD) Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Print PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Surgery for “Heartburn” If you suffer from moderate to ...

  4. Oropharyngeal Reflux Monitoring and Atypical Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhyanesh A; Harb, Ali H; Vaezi, Michael F

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been increasing since the 1990 s, with up to 27.8 % of people in North America affected by this disorder. The healthcare burden of patients who primarily have extra-esophageal manifestations of GERD (atypical GERD) is estimated to be 5 times that of patients with primarily heartburn and regurgitation due to lack of a gold standard diagnostic test, poor responsiveness to PPI therapy, and delay in recognition. Empiric twice daily PPI therapy for 1-2 months is currently considered the best diagnostic test, but due to poor responsiveness to PPIs in patients with atypical GERD in multiple randomized controlled trials, newer modes of diagnostic procedures such as oropharyngeal pH monitoring have gained significantly more traction. The utility of oropharyngeal pH monitoring systems such as Restech Dx-pH is currently limited due to lack of consensus on normal and abnormal cutoff values. Recent studies suggest its utility as a prognostic tool and its ability to predict responsiveness to medical and surgical therapy. However, routine use of oropharyngeal pH monitoring is still not widespread due to the lack of well-controlled prospective studies. PMID:26908280

  5. Review article: impact of night-time reflux on lifestyle - unrecognized issues in reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Shaker, R; Brunton, S; Elfant, A; Golopol, L; Ruoff, G; Stanghellini, V

    2004-12-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), manifesting with symptoms including heartburn and regurgitation, affects people during both daytime and nocturnal hours. Night-time GERD has been reported to have a greater impact on a patient's life than daytime GERD due to prolonged oesophageal acid exposure time per reflux episode. To further understand this issue, it is important to implement quality of life (QOL) measures. QOL studies are becoming increasingly important to physicians in making clinical decisions, and generic and disease-specific health-related QOL (HRQL) tools have been developed to measure a wide variety of topics. There are currently no universally accepted guidelines on how to best measure HRQL in GERD patients. It is important to note that these surveys may not yield accurate results because many GERD sufferers may feel that their symptoms are not serious enough to seek treatment. Some surveys include the GERD-HRQL assessment, the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Gallup survey. When compared with daytime GERD patients, night-time GERD patients may suffer from sleep deprivation, which in turn leads to physical and emotional problems and a poor overall QOL. Studies indicate that the prevalence and impact of night-time heartburn have been underestimated and that adequate treatment of symptoms is often not achieved. In addition, GERD greatly affects work productivity and leads to a significant economic burden on society. Although limited studies are available on the impact of pharmacological treatment on GERD QOL, recent findings indicate that proton pump inhibitors are more effective than H(2)-receptor antagonists for the improvement of overall QOL.

  6. Gastroesophageal reflux in asymptomatic obese subjects: An esophageal impedance-pH study

    PubMed Central

    Akyüz, Filiz; Uyanıkoglu, Ahmet; Ermis, Fatih; Arıcı, Serpil; Akyüz, Ümit; Baran, Bülent; Pinarbasi, Binnur; Gul, Nurdan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between reflux and body mass index (BMI) in the asymptomatic obese population using the impedance-pH technique. METHODS: Gastroesophageal reflux is frequent in the obese population. However, the relationship between acid reflux and BMI in asymptomatic obese people is unclear. Forty-six obese (BMI > 25 kg/m2) people were enrolled in this prospective study. We evaluated the demographic findings and 24-h impedance pH values of the whole group. Gas, acid (pH < 4), weak acid (pH = 4-7) and weak alkaline (pH ≥ 7) reflux parameters were analyzed. RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 49.47 ± 12.24 years, and half of them were men. The mean BMI was 30.64 ± 3.95 kg/m2 (25.14-45.58 kg/m2). BMI of 23 was over 30 kg/m2. Seventeen patients had a comorbidity (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or ischemic heart disease). Endoscopic examination revealed esophagitis in 13 of the 28 subjects (10 Grade A, 3 Grade B). The subjects were divided into two groups according to BMI (< 30 and > 30 kg/m2). Demographic and endoscopic findings, and impedance results were similar in these two groups. However, there was a positive correlation between BMI and total and supine pH < 4 episodes (P = 0.002, r = 0.414; P = 0.000, r = 0.542), pH < 4 reflux time (P = 0.015, r = 0.319; P = 0.003, r = 0.403), and DeMeester score (P = 0.012, r = 0.333). CONCLUSION: Acid reflux is correlated with BMI in asymptomatic obese individuals. PMID:25780302

  7. Amino acids release in two red tide events in Chinese coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Chen, J.; Jin, H.

    2013-12-01

    During two red tide events and in situ experiments the East China Sea and the Pearl River Estuary, we analyzed DOC, POC, dissolved free amino acids (DFAA), dissolved combined amino acids (DCAA) and particulate hydrolysable amino acids (PHAA) and nutrients in samples from red tides areas as well as surrounding waters. The results show that POC and PHAA in red tide waters increased dramatically by about one order compared with those in surrounding waters. DCAA, DFAA and DOC also increased in red tide waters but only less than 2 folds increasing were observed. DFAA was only accounted for less than 5% of total amino acids (DFAA+DCAA+PHAA) and varied distinctly for all samples. Particulate organic carbon presented as amino acids (PHAA-C/POC) was accounted for about 35-60% of POC while dissolved organic carbon presented as amino acids (DCAA-C/DOC) was accounted for about 20-30% of DOC. Organic carbon pool shifted from DOC dominating at normal waters to POC dominating during red tides. During red tide most inorganic nitrogen nutrients (NO3+NO2) was seemly transformed into amino acids (here we called PHAA-N, DCAA-N, DFAA-N), in particular PHAA. Molecular composition of amino acids in organic matter suggested that POC mainly derived from phytoplankton in red tide waters, but the percentages of zooplanton and bacterial derived POC or DOC increased after one week of red tide. Our observations suggest that amino acids actually act as intergradation of nitrogen nutrients regeneration. We hypothesize that although zooplankton grazing and bacterial activities could lead to transformation of amino acids from phytoplankton into zooplankton and bacterial as well as from particulate organic matter into dissolved organic matter, nitrogen still present in its organic pool thus delay the regeneration of inorganic nitrogen.

  8. High incidence of vesicoureteric reflux in asymptomatic siblings of children with known reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Treves, S.T.; Van den Abbeele, A.D.; Davis, R.T.; Rosen, P.; Bauer, S.; Retik, A.; Colodny, A.

    1985-05-01

    A significant occurrence of vesicoureteric reflux in siblings of children with reflux has been previously suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of vesicoureteric reflux in asymptomatic siblings of children with vesicoureteric reflux using radionuclide voiding cystography (RNC). A random group of 52 siblings was studied. Their ages were from 2 mos. to 13 yrs. (mean 4 yrs.). Seventy-one percent were female and 29% male, RNC was performed with the patients supine, and Tc-99m pertechnetate (2mCi/1) was infused into the bladder by catheter. A computerized gamma camera recorded the filling and voiding phase of the study at 1 frame/5 sec. Reflux was detected in 40% of the patients. It was bilateral in 17% and unilateral in 23% of the patients. Reflux was identified to the renal pelves in half of the patients. In two of these patients Tc-99m DMSA scans were obtained which revealed significant renal scarring. This study demonstrates the high incidence of reflux of various degrees in these asymptomatic siblings on high risk of developing significant renal disease. Identification and proper treatment of asymptomatic children with vesicoureteric reflux may help prevent the development of renal damage.

  9. Bladder Dysfunction and Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Sillén, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the influence of functional bladder disturbances and of its treatment on the resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children is discussed. Historically both bladder dysfunction entities, the overactive bladder (OAB) and the dysfunctional voiding (DV), have been described in conjunction with VUR. Treatment of the dysfunction was also considered to influence spontaneous resolution in a positive way. During the last decades, however, papers have been published which could not support these results. Regarding the OAB, a prospective study with treatment of the bladder overactivity with anticholinergics, did not influence spontaneous resolution rate in children with a dysfunction including also the voiding phase, DV and DES (dysfunctional elimination syndrome), most studies indicate a negative influence on the resolution rate of VUR in children, both before and after the age for bladder control, both with and without treatment. However, a couple of uncontrolled studies indicate that there is a high short-term resolution rate after treatment with flow biofeedback. It should be emphasized that the voiding phase dysfunctions (DV and DES) are more severe than the genuine filling phase dysfunction (OAB), with an increased frequency of UTI and renal damage in the former groups. To be able to answer the question if treatment of bladder dysfunction influence the resolution rate of VUR in children, randomized controlled studies must be performed. PMID:19009037

  10. Mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux in recumbent asymptomatic human subjects.

    PubMed

    Dent, J; Dodds, W J; Friedman, R H; Sekiguchi, T; Hogan, W J; Arndorfer, R C; Petrie, D J

    1980-02-01

    We investigated the mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in 10 health volunteer subjects. Continuous recordings of intraluminal esophageal pH and pressure were obtained on two consecutive nights from 6:00 p.m. to 6:30 a.m. in each subject. During each study, the subject remained recumbent, except to eat a standardized meal after 1 h of basal recording. A manometric assembly with seven recording lumens monitored: (a) lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure via a sleeve device 6.5 cm in length, (b) esophageal-body motor activity, (c) swallowing activity in the pharynx, and (d) gastric pressure. An electrode 5 cm above the LES recorded esophageal pH. Sleep was monitored by electroencephalogram. All subjects showed wide variations of basal LES pressure. GER was not related to low steady-state basal LES pressure, but rather occurred during transient 5-30 s episodes of inappropriate complete LES relaxation. The inappropriate LES relaxations were usually either spontaneous or immediately followed appropriate sphincter relaxation induced by swallowing. The majority of GER episodes occurred within the first 3 h after eating. During the night LES relaxation and GER occurred only during transient arousals from sleep or when the subjects were fully awake, but not during stable sleep. After GER the esophagus was generally cleared of refluxed acid by primary peristalsis and less frequently by secondary peristalsis. Nonperistaltic contractions were less effective than peristalsis for clearing acid from the esophagus. We conclude that in asymptomatic recumbent subjects GER is related to transient inappropriate LES relaxations rather than to low steady-state basal LES pressure and also, that primary perstalsis is the major mechanism that clears the esophagus of refluxed material.

  11. Functional dyspepsia and nonerosive reflux disease: clinical interactions and their implications.

    PubMed

    Keohane, John; Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2007-08-08

    Functional dyspepsia or nonulcer dyspepsia, and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) or endoscopy-negative reflux disease, are common reasons for referral to a gastroenterologist. Although there is much confusion with regard to definition, recent research would suggest that these 2 conditions are linked and may represent components in the spectrum of the same disease entity, in terms of both symptoms and pathophysiology. Several theories have been proposed regarding the etiology of these disorders, including acid exposure, visceral hypersensitivity, impaired fundal accommodation, delayed gastric emptying, and Helicobacter pylori infection.

  12. Anatomy of reflux: a growing health problem affecting structures of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Lipan, Michael J; Reidenberg, Joy S; Laitman, Jeffrey T

    2006-11-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) are sibling diseases that are a modern-day plague. Millions of Americans suffer from their sequelae, ranging from subtle annoyances to life-threatening illnesses such as asthma, sleep apnea, and cancer. Indeed, the recognized prevalence of GERD alone has increased threefold throughout the 1990s. Knowledge of the precise etiologies for GERD and LPR is becoming essential for proper treatment. This review focuses on the anatomical, physiological, neurobiological, and cellular aspects of these diseases. By definition, gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus; when excessive and damaging to the esophageal mucosa, GERD results. Reflux that advances to the laryngopharynx and, subsequently, to other regions of the head and neck such as the larynx, oral cavity, nasopharynx, nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and even middle ear results in LPR. While GERD has long been identified as a source of esophageal disease, LPR has only recently been implicated in causing head and neck problems. Recent research has identified four anatomical/physiological "barriers" that serve as guardians to prevent the cranial incursion of reflux: the gastroesophageal junction, esophageal motor function and acid clearance, the upper esophageal sphincter, and pharyngeal and laryngeal mucosal resistance. Sequential failure of all four barriers is necessary to produce LPR. While it has become apparent that GER must precede both GERD and LPR, the head and neck distribution of the latter clearly separates these diseases as distinct entities warranting specialized focus and treatment.

  13. Pulsatile exposure to simulated reflux leads to changes in gene expression in a 3D model of oesophageal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Green, Nicola H; Nicholls, Zoe; Heath, Paul R; Cooper-Knock, Jonathan; Corfe, Bernard M; MacNeil, Sheila; Bury, Jonathan P

    2014-06-01

    Oesophageal exposure to duodenogastroesophageal refluxate is implicated in the development of Barrett's metaplasia (BM), with increased risk of progression to oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The literature proposes that reflux exposure activates NF-κB, driving the aberrant expression of intestine-specific caudal-related homeobox (CDX) genes. However, early events in the pathogenesis of BM from normal epithelium are poorly understood. To investigate this, our study subjected a 3D model of the normal human oesophageal mucosa to repeated, pulsatile exposure to specific bile components and examined changes in gene expression. Initial 2D experiments with a range of bile salts observed that taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDC) impacted upon NF-κB activation without causing cell death. Informed by this, the 3D oesophageal model was repeatedly exposed to TCDC in the presence and absence of acid, and the epithelial cells underwent gene expression profiling. We identified ~300 differentially expressed genes following each treatment, with a large and significant overlap between treatments. Enrichment analysis (Broad GSEA, DAVID and Metacore™; GeneGo Inc) identified multiple gene sets related to cell signalling, inflammation, proliferation, differentiation and cell adhesion. Specifically NF-κB activation, Wnt signalling, cell adhesion and targets for the transcription factors PTF1A and HNF4α were highlighted. Our data suggest that HNF4α isoform switching may be an early event in Barrett's pathogenesis. CDX1/2 targets were, however, not enriched, suggesting that although CDX1/2 activation reportedly plays a role in BM development, it may not be an initial event. Our findings highlight new areas for investigation in the earliest stages of BM pathogenesis of oesophageal diseases and new potential therapeutic targets.

  14. [Therapy of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)].

    PubMed

    Storr, Martin

    2011-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) comprises all symptoms and clinical consequences in the context of reflux of stomach contents into the esophagus. The symptoms reported by patients include heartburn, regurgitation and sour taste in the mouth. In some cases atypical reflux associated symptoms such as asthma, laryngitis or recurrent pneumonias are reported. Pathophysiologically an incompetence of the lower esophageal sphincter and a disturbed clearance of the esophagus are the underlying mechanisms. Current treatment recommendations include a change of lifestyle and a drug treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) being widely used. In patients with persistent symptoms other diagnoses like functional dyspepsia should be considered especially when additional symptoms like epigastric pain, postprandial fullness and nausea are present. This review summarizes the current understanding of the pathophysiology, the diagnosis and the treatment of GERD and gives an outlook on therapies currently developed for the treatment of reflux disease. A promising new drug, presently classified as being a reflux inhibitor, is lesogaberan. Lesogaberan is presently studied in phase II clinical trials.

  15. Endoscopic Options for Gastroesophageal Reflux: Where Are We Now and What Does the Future Hold?

    PubMed

    Triadafilopoulos, George

    2016-09-01

    Early in the twenty-first century, novel endoscopic techniques were introduced for the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease, providing minimally invasive ways to eliminate pharmacologic acid inhibition and avoid the need for anti-reflux surgery. These techniques do not significantly alter the anatomy of the gastroesophageal junction, minimizing short- and long-term adverse effects, such as dysphagia and bloating. After extensive clinical testing, many endoscopic therapies were abandoned due to either lack of durable efficacy or unfavorable safety profile. Today, only four such therapies remain clinically available, each with variable levels of clinical validation and market penetration. This review will provide an assessment of these endoscopic therapies, highlighting their respective strengths and weaknesses and their present and future applicability to patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:27424219

  16. Updated guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    DeVault, Kenneth R; Castell, Donald O

    2005-01-01

    Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were published in 1995 and updated in 1999. These and other guidelines undergo periodic review. Advances continue to be made in the area of GERD, leading us to review and revise previous guideline statements. GERD is defined as symptoms or mucosal damage produced by the abnormal reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus. These guidelines were developed under the auspices of the American College of Gastroenterology and its Practice Parameters Committee, and approved by the Board of Trustees. Diagnostic guidelines address empiric therapy and the use of endoscopy, ambulatory reflux monitoring, and esophageal manometry in GERD. Treatment guidelines address the role of lifestyle changes, patient directed (OTC) therapy, acid suppression, promotility therapy, maintenance therapy, antireflux surgery, and endoscopic therapy in GERD. Finally, there is a discussion of the rare patient with refractory GERD and a list of areas in need of additional study.

  17. Gastro-oesophageal reflux is common in oligosymptomatic patients with dental erosion: A pH-impedance and endoscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Materna, Andrea; Martig, Lukas; Lussi, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental erosion is a complication of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) according to the Montreal consensus statement. However, GORD has not been comprehensively characterized in patients with dental erosions and pH-impedance measures have not been reported. Objectives Characterize GORD in patients with dental erosions using 24-h multichannel intraluminal pH-impedance measurements (pH-MII) and endoscopy. Methods This single-centre study investigated reflux in successive patients presenting to dentists with dental erosion using pH-MII and endoscopy. Results Of the 374 patients, 298 (80%) reported GORD symptoms <2 per week, 72 (19%) had oesophagitis and 59 (16%) had a hiatal hernia. In the 349 with pH-MII the mean percentage time with a pH <4 (95% CI) was 11.0 (9.3–12.7), and 34.4% (31.9–36.9) for a pH <5.5, a critical threshold for dental tissue. The mean numbers of total, acidic and weakly acidic reflux episodes were 71 (63–79), 43 (38–49) and 31 (26–35), respectively. Of the reflux episodes, 19% (17–21) reached the proximal oesophagus. In 241 (69%) patients reflux was abnormal using published normal values for acid exposure time and reflux episodes. No significant associations between the severity of dental erosions and any reflux variables were found. The presence of GORD symptoms and of oesophagitis or a hiatal hernia was associated with greater reflux, but not with increased dental erosion scores. Conclusions Significant oligosymptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux occurs in the majority of patients with dental erosion. The degree of dental erosion did not correlate with any of the accepted quantitative reflux indicators. Definition of clinically relevant reflux parameters by pH-MII for dental erosion and of treatment guidelines are outstanding. Gastroenterologists and dentists need to be aware of the widely prevalent association between dental erosion and atypical GORD. PMID:25922678

  18. Current Diagnosis and Management of Suspected Reflux Symptoms Refractory to Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Suspected reflux symptoms that are refractory to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are rapidly becoming the most common presentation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients seen in gastroenterology clinics. These patients are a heterogeneous group, differing in symptom frequency and severity, PPI dosing regimens, and responses to therapy (from partial to absent). Before testing, the physician needs to question the patient carefully about PPI compliance and the timing of drug intake in relation to meals. Switching PPIs or doubling the dose is the next step, but only 20% to 25% of the group refractory to PPIs will respond. The first diagnostic test should be upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. In more than 90% of cases, the results will be normal, but persistent esophagitis may suggest pill esophagitis, eosinophilic esophagitis, or rarer diseases, such as lichen planus, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, or genotype variants of PPI metabolism. If the endoscopy results are normal, esophageal manometry and especially reflux testing should follow. Whether patients should be tested on or off PPI therapy is controversial. Most physicians prefer to test patients off PPIs to identify whether abnormal acid reflux is even present; if it is not, PPIs can be stopped and other diagnoses sought. Testing patients on PPI therapy allows nonacid reflux to be identified, but more than 50% of patients have a normal test result, leaving the clinician with a conundrum—whether to stop PPIs or continue them because the GERD is being treated adequately. Alternative diagnoses in patients with refractory GERD and normal reflux testing include achalasia, eosinophilic esophagitis, gastroparesis, rumination, and aerophagia. However, more than 50% will be given the diagnosis of functional heartburn, a visceral hypersensitivity syndrome. Treating patients with PPI-refractory GERD–like symptoms can be difficult and frustrating. Any of the following may help: a histamine-2 receptor antagonist

  19. Current Diagnosis and Management of Suspected Reflux Symptoms Refractory to Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2014-09-01

    Suspected reflux symptoms that are refractory to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are rapidly becoming the most common presentation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients seen in gastroenterology clinics. These patients are a heterogeneous group, differing in symptom frequency and severity, PPI dosing regimens, and responses to therapy (from partial to absent). Before testing, the physician needs to question the patient carefully about PPI compliance and the timing of drug intake in relation to meals. Switching PPIs or doubling the dose is the next step, but only 20% to 25% of the group refractory to PPIs will respond. The first diagnostic test should be upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. In more than 90% of cases, the results will be normal, but persistent esophagitis may suggest pill esophagitis, eosinophilic esophagitis, or rarer diseases, such as lichen planus, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, or genotype variants of PPI metabolism. If the endoscopy results are normal, esophageal manometry and especially reflux testing should follow. Whether patients should be tested on or off PPI therapy is controversial. Most physicians prefer to test patients off PPIs to identify whether abnormal acid reflux is even present; if it is not, PPIs can be stopped and other diagnoses sought. Testing patients on PPI therapy allows nonacid reflux to be identified, but more than 50% of patients have a normal test result, leaving the clinician with a conundrum-whether to stop PPIs or continue them because the GERD is being treated adequately. Alternative diagnoses in patients with refractory GERD and normal reflux testing include achalasia, eosinophilic esophagitis, gastroparesis, rumination, and aerophagia. However, more than 50% will be given the diagnosis of functional heartburn, a visceral hypersensitivity syndrome. Treating patients with PPI-refractory GERD-like symptoms can be difficult and frustrating. Any of the following may help: a histamine-2 receptor antagonist at

  20. [Reflux-like dyspepsia in obese patients].

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Michele; Marzocca, Giuseppe

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, with a specially prepared questionnaire, the prevalence of reflux-like dyspepsia in a population of 40 patients morbidly obese, Body Mass Index (BMI) 46.2+/- 1.7 kg/m2, comparing the results with those deriving from the analysis of 20 healthy volunteers (BMI 20.9+/-1.7 kg/m2). The prevalence of esophageal symptoms in all obese patients was 45%, versus 15% in controls. There was a significant direct correlation between obesity and reflux-like dyspepsia (p<0.05). Patients who are morbidly overweight should be encouraged to lose weight, as the very first step in fighting Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease. PMID:12587605

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Scott, R B; O'Loughlin, E V; Gall, D G

    1985-02-01

    Children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and their asymptomatic siblings were surveyed to determine the incidence of symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux. A subgroup of patients with CF with poor nutritional status were studied with esophageal manometry, 24-hour esophageal pH recording, and pulmonary function testing before and after initiation of supplemental continuous nighttime nasogastric feeds. Of 68 patients with CF greater than or equal to 5 years of age, 20.6% experienced regurgitation and 26.5% had heartburn. In the control group of 23 asymptomatic siblings greater than or equal to 5 years of age, none experienced regurgitation and 5.6% had heartburn. Among the patients there was no significant association between symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and bronchodilator therapy. Eight patients had normal lower esophageal sphincter pressure of 24.8 +/- 8.8 mm Hg and thoracoabdominal pressure gradient of 11.4 +/- 4.6 mm Hg; peristalsis and upper esophageal sphincter pressure were normal. There was a significant increase in reflux episodes, episodes greater than 5 minutes, duration of the longest episode, and percent time esophageal pH was less than 4 in patients, compared with published control data, for the entire 24-hour period and during sleep. During sleep, continuous nasogastric feeding significantly increased episodes of reflux, but did not result in an increase in percent time esophageal pH was less than 4, and was not associated with evidence of aspiration or deterioration in pulmonary function. Our findings indicate that symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux, heartburn, and regurgitation are more frequent in patients with CF than in asymptomatic siblings and that gastroesophageal reflux is significantly more common in patients with CF than in controls. Nighttime nasogastric feedings can safely be used as a means of nutritional rehabilitation in patients with CF.

  2. Proximal esophageal pH-metry in patients with 'reflux laryngitis'.

    PubMed

    Jacob, P; Kahrilas, P J; Herzon, G

    1991-02-01

    Fiberoptic laryngoscopic examinations were performed on 40 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, 25 of whom had persistent laryngeal symptoms (dysphonia, cough, globus sensation, frequent throat clearing, or sore throat) and 15 without laryngeal symptoms who served as disease controls. Ten patients with laryngeal symptoms but none of the controls had laryngoscopic findings consistent with reflux laryngitis. Dual-site ambulatory pH recordings were obtained with the pH electrodes spaced 15 cm apart and with the proximal sensor positioned just distal to the upper esophageal sphincter. Patients in the three groups (disease controls: group 1; patients with symptoms but without laryngoscopic findings: group 2; and patients with both laryngeal symptoms and findings: group 3) were comparable in terms of age, smoking habit, the presence of esophagitis, and distal esophageal acid exposure. Proximal esophageal acid exposure was, however, significantly increased in groups 2 and 3, and nocturnal proximal esophageal acidification occurred in over half of these patients but in none of the group 1 patients. We conclude that the subset of reflux patients who experience laryngeal symptoms show significantly more proximal esophageal acid exposure (especially nocturnally) and often have laryngoscopic findings of posterior laryngitis not observed in control reflux patients.

  3. Role for Ion Transport in Porcine Vocal Fold Epithelial Defense to Acid Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Erickson-Levendoski, Elizabeth; Sivasankar, M. Preeti

    2012-01-01

    Objective The vocal fold epithelium is routinely exposed to gastric contents, including acid and pepsin, during laryngopharyngeal reflux events. The epithelium may possess intrinsic defenses to reflux. The first objective of the current study was to examine whether vocal fold epithelial ion transport is one potential mechanism of defense to gastric contents. The second objective was to determine whether ion transport in response to gastric contents is associated with the secretion of bicarbonate. Study Design Prospective design in excised porcine larynges. Setting Laboratory. Subjects and Methods Porcine vocal folds (N = 56) were exposed on the luminal surface to acid, pepsin, or sham challenges. Ion transport at baseline and following challenge exposure was measured using electrophysiological techniques. To examine specific ion transport mechanisms, vocal folds were pretreated with either a sodium channel blocker or bicarbonate channel blocker. Results Within 60 seconds of acid but not pepsin exposure, there was a significant increase in ion transport. This rapid increase in ion transport was transient and related to bicarbonate secretion. Conclusion The current data suggest that porcine vocal folds immediately increase bicarbonate secretion following exposure to acid. Bicarbonate secretion may act to neutralize acid. These findings contribute to the identification of the mechanisms underlying vocal fold defense to reflux and offer implications for the development of treatments for reflux-induced vocal fold injury. PMID:22086905

  4. Physiology and pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Dean J; Murayama, Kenric M

    2015-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common problems treated by primary care physicians. Almost 20% of the population in the United States experiences occasional regurgitation, heartburn, or retrosternal pain because of GERD. Reflux disease is complex, and the physiology and pathogenesis are still incompletely understood. However, abnormalities of any one or a combination of the three physiologic processes, namely, esophageal motility, lower esophageal sphincter function, and gastric motility or emptying, can lead to GERD. There are many diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to GERD today, but more studies are needed to better understand this complex disease process.

  5. The association between reflux esophagitis and airway hyper-reactivity in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux

    PubMed Central

    Karbasi, Ashraf; Ardestani, Mohammad Emami; Ghanei, Mostafa; Harandi, Ali Amini

    2013-01-01

    Background: The association of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) with a wide variety of pulmonary disorders was recognized. We aimed to evaluate the effect of GER-induced esophagitis on airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) in patients and the response to treatment. Materials and Methods: In this cohort study, 30 patients attending the gastrointestinal clinic of a university hospital with acid reflux symptoms were included. All patients were evaluated endoscopically and divided into case group with esophagitis and control group without any evidence of esophagitis. Spirometry and methacholine test were done in all patients before and after treatment of GER with pantoprazole 40 mg daily for six months. Results: There was a significant difference in the rate of positive methacholine test between the cases (40%) and the controls (6.7%) prior to anti-acid therapy (P < 0.0001). After six months of treatment, the frequency of positive methacholine test diminished from 40 to 13.3% in the case group (P < 0.05) but did not change in the controls (P = 0.15). Conclusion: The presence of esophagitis due to GER would increase the AHR and treatment with pantoperazole would decrease AHR in patients with proved esophagitis and no previous history of asthma after six months. PMID:24250694

  6. Gastroesophageal reflux disease after bariatric procedures.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Maria S; Pryor, Aurora D

    2015-06-01

    GERD is a significant comorbidity in bariatric patients preoperatively and postoperatively. Surgeons should be aware of appropriate evaluation, procedures choices, and management options. Revision surgery for reflux symptoms is common and appropriate anatomy and outcomes should be considered when offering these interventions to our patients. Patient selection is important to ensure avoiding postoperative development or worsening of GERD.

  7. Laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Frazzoni, Marzio; Piccoli, Micaela; Conigliaro, Rita; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Melotti, Gianluigi

    2014-10-21

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition that develops when the reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus leads to troublesome symptoms and/or complications. Heartburn is the cardinal symptom, often associated with regurgitation. In patients with endoscopy-negative heartburn refractory to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and when the diagnosis of GERD is in question, direct reflux testing by impedance-pH monitoring is warranted. Laparoscopic fundoplication is the standard surgical treatment for GERD. It is highly effective in curing GERD with a 80% success rate at 20-year follow-up. The Nissen fundoplication, consisting of a total (360°) wrap, is the most commonly performed antireflux operation. To reduce postoperative dysphagia and gas bloating, partial fundoplications are also used, including the posterior (Toupet) fundoplication, and the anterior (Dor) fundoplication. Currently, there is consensus to advise laparoscopic fundoplication in PPI-responsive GERD only for those patients who develop untoward side-effects or complications from PPI therapy. PPI resistance is the real challenge in GERD. There is consensus that carefully selected GERD patients refractory to PPI therapy are eligible for laparoscopic fundoplication, provided that objective evidence of reflux as the cause of ongoing symptoms has been obtained. For this purpose, impedance-pH monitoring is regarded as the diagnostic gold standard.

  8. Refluxing supernumerary kidney: easy to overlook

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Supernumerary kidney is a rare anomaly and most of the times it is incidentally detected. On occasions it may present with symptoms due to stones, tumours and infections. Supernumerary unit if small and dysplastic may easily escape detection. In this case report, supernumerary kidney presented as vesicoureteric reflux in a 4-year-old male child. PMID:25287391

  9. The clinical characteristics of gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with laryngeal symptoms who are referred to gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    Oh, J-H; Choi, M-G; Park, J-M; Lim, C-H; Cho, Y-K; Lee, I-S; Kim, S-W; Chung, I-S

    2013-07-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has increased recently in Asia-Pacific countries. However, little is known about its prevalence and clinical characteristics in GERD patients with atypical symptoms in Asia. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics of GERD in patients who had laryngeal symptoms in Korea. Data were gathered retrospectively from patients who presented with atypical symptoms, such as throat discomfort, globus pharyngeus, hoarseness, and chronic cough. They underwent a 24-hour ambulatory intraesophageal pH monitoring and filled in a validated reflux questionnaire. Overall, 128 patients (36 men and 92 women) with laryngeal symptoms were included. Of these 128, 43 patients (34%) had erosive esophagitis or pathological reflux from 24-hour ambulatory pH monitoring, and 24 (19%) had a positive Bernstein test or positive symptom index from 24-hour pH monitoring. Sixty-one patients (48%) had no evidence of reflux esophagitis on upper endoscopy and pathological acid reflux on 24-hour pH monitoring. Fifty-six patients (44%) had weekly heartburn or regurgitation. Typical symptoms and dyspepsia were significantly more common in patients with GERD who had laryngeal symptoms than non-GERD. Fifty-two percent of patients had laryngeal symptoms that were associated with GERD. The presence of typical reflux symptoms and dyspepsia are risk factors for GERD in patients who present with laryngeal symptoms.

  10. Reflux Laryngitis: Correlation between the Symptoms Findings and Indirect Laryngoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Carlos Eduardo Dilen da; Niedermeier, Bruno Taccola; Portinho, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The indirect laryngoscopy has an important role in the characterization of reflux laryngitis. Although many findings are nonspecific, some strongly suggest that the inflammation is the cause of reflux. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between reflux symptoms and the findings of indirect laryngoscopy. Methods We evaluated 27 patients with symptoms of pharyngolaryngeal reflux disease. Results Laryngoscopy demonstrated in all patients the presence of hypertrophy of the posterior commissure and laryngeal edema. The most frequent symptoms were the presence of dry cough and foreign body sensation. Conclusion There was a correlation between the findings at laryngoscopy and symptoms of reflux. PMID:26157498

  11. Reflux Laryngitis: Correlation between the Symptoms Findings and Indirect Laryngoscopy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carlos Eduardo Dilen da; Niedermeier, Bruno Taccola; Portinho, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Introduction The indirect laryngoscopy has an important role in the characterization of reflux laryngitis. Although many findings are nonspecific, some strongly suggest that the inflammation is the cause of reflux. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between reflux symptoms and the findings of indirect laryngoscopy. Methods We evaluated 27 patients with symptoms of pharyngolaryngeal reflux disease. Results Laryngoscopy demonstrated in all patients the presence of hypertrophy of the posterior commissure and laryngeal edema. The most frequent symptoms were the presence of dry cough and foreign body sensation. Conclusion There was a correlation between the findings at laryngoscopy and symptoms of reflux.

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of patients with nonacid gastroesophageal reflux-induced chronic cough

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xianghuai; Yu, Li; Chen, Qiang; Lv, Hanjing; Qiu, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is one of the most common causes of chronic cough, and chronic cough due to GER represents a subtype of GER-related diseases. Gastroesophageal reflux-induced chronic cough (GERC) can be divided into two subgroups based on the pH of the GER. Nonacid GERC is less common than acid GERC, and its diagnosis and treatment strategy have not been standardized. However, nonacid GERC usually presents with its unique set of characteristics and features upon diagnosis and treatment in the clinic. Although the underlying molecular mechanism of nonacid GERC is not fully understood, it is considered to be associated with reflux theory, reflex theory and airway hypersensitivity. Multi-channel intraluminal impedance combined with pH monitoring is a promising new technique that can detect both acid and nonacid reflux, and our findings as well as those of others have shown its usefulness in diagnosing nonacid GERC. Development of new diagnostic techniques has led to an increased rate of nonacid GERC diagnosis. We summarize our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of nonacid GERC and provide a guide for future therapeutic approaches. PMID:26759577

  13. [Gastroesophageal reflux during pregnancy: 24-hour esophageal ph monitoring].

    PubMed

    Anton, C; Anton, E; Drug, V; Stanciu, C

    2001-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) occurs in 30-50% of all pregnancies. The progressive rise in plasma progesterone has been suggested as a possible mediator of GER during pregnancy. Recent advances in technology have made it possible to detect GER through monitoring of esophageal pH for prolonged periods, including sleep. 24-hour pH monitoring is the proper method for diagnosing GER in pregnant women. If 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring is to be a useful diagnostic tool, it must reliably discriminate GER patients despite daily variations in distal esophageal acid exposure. To address this issue, we studied 62 women (30 healthy non-pregnant women without GER symptoms and 32 pregnant women with GER symptoms-heartburn, acid regurgitation) with 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring. Intrasubject reproducibility of three pH parameters to discriminate the presence of abnormal acid reflux was determined (DeMeester score, Kaye score, circadian one hour diagram for pH < 4). Each patient was interviewed, using a reliable questionnaire detailing individual habits, life style characteristics and symptoms, at four time points during the first, second, third trimesters of pregnancy and post-partum period. Symptoms of GER are common in pregnancy and although GER rarely endangers maternal or fetal health, it can significantly affect patient comfort and quality of life. We conclude: 1. GER is almost constantly present during pregnancy, increasing with gestational age. 2. The most important pH--parameter is DeMcester score. 3. Heartburn disappear after delivery. 4. 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring is the gold standard for measuring acid exposure and is a reproducible test for the diagnosis of GER in pregnancy.

  14. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in the obese: Pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Nadaleto, Barbara F; Herbella, Fernando A M; Patti, Marco G

    2016-02-01

    Obesity is a condition that has increased all over the world in the last 3 decades. Overweight and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are related. GERD may have different causative factors in the obese compared with lean individuals. This review focuses on the proper treatment for GERD in the obese based on its pathophysiology. Increased abdominal pressure may play a more significant role in obese subjects with GERD than the defective esophagogastric barrier usually found in nonobese individuals. A fundoplication may be used to treat GERD in these individuals; however, outcomes may be not as good as in nonobese patients and it does not act on the pathophysiology of the disease. All bariatric techniques may ameliorate GERD symptoms owing to a decrease in abdominal pressure secondary to weight loss. However, some operations may lead to a disruption of natural anatomic antireflux mechanisms or even lead to slow gastric emptying and/or esophageal clearance and thus be a refluxogenic procedure. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass decreases both acid and bile reflux from the stomach into the esophagus. On the other hand, gastric banding is a refluxogenic operation, and sleeve gastrectomy may show different outcomes based on the anatomy of the gastric tube.

  15. Supraesophageal complications of reflux disease and hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Kahrilas, P J

    2001-12-01

    A unifying theme of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is increased acid exposure on vulnerable epithelia. In most cases, the vulnerable epithelium is the esophagus, but alternatively it may be that of the supraesophageal terrain, which includes the larynx, pharynx, and airways. In 50% to 94% of patients with GERD, hiatal hernia is a significant pathophysiologic factor. The esophagogastric junction (EGJ) is anatomically and physiologically complex, making it vulnerable to dysfunction by several mechanisms, including transient relaxations of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), hypotensive LES, and anatomic disruption. The importance of hiatal hernia is obscured by imprecise use of the term and by the misconception that it is an all-or-none, one-dimensional phenomenon. Rather, hiatal hernia can be viewed as a continuum of progressive disruption of the EGJ, with larger hernias being of greater significance and invoking several pathogenetic mechanisms. The dynamic anatomy of the EGJ highlights the difficulty of defining hiatal hernia and of elucidating the relation between hiatal hernia, the diaphragmatic hiatus, the LES, and GERD, including supraesophageal reflux.

  16. Fractionation of atmospheric acid and base components within storm events by precipitation scavenging processes.

    PubMed

    Liljestrand, H M

    1992-01-01

    Concentrations of ions in storm rainwater in Texas have been monitored for each 0.254 mm increment of precipitation. The changes in concentrations have been analyzed to investigate the role of differential rates of scavenging of particulate matter of differing particle size, and especially the major acid and base components. The empirical trend at the onset of rainfall is a chemical fractionation of acids and bases with correspondingly wide pH variations. These results are confirmed by model calculations, which show a significant preferential scavenging of calcium relative to sulfate in the first 10 mm of rainfall, resulting in fractionation of bases and acids from their atmospheric concentrations. Previous studies, using Target Transformation Factor Analysis of ion concentrations in storm precipitation and regional ambient aerosol data, statistically determined the average source for acidic secondary species and alkaline particulate matter. Two types of crustal sources were identified as western and eastern soil dust. In this study, an alternate physical explanation for these two soil dust factors is offered. As a storm progresses, the elements in the local soil dust are fractionated as a result of their differential rates of precipitation scavenging, enriching species predominantly in the fine particle size and depleting elements predominantly in the coarse particle size. This fractionation process results in a single source having different elemental ratios at the beginning and at the end of a rain event. For Austin, Dallas, and Tyler, Texas, the soil dust previously identified as being from eastern sources could, instead, be a fractionated form of the western soil source.

  17. Noncompliance is an impact factor in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Gerson; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado P

    2014-09-01

    The basis of pharmacological treatment of the gastroesophageal reflux disease is the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) which provide effective gastric acid secretion blockade. However, PPI therapy failure may occur in up to 42% of patients. The main causes for therapeutic failure are non-acid or weakly acid reflux, genotypic differences, presence of comorbidities, wrong diagnosis and lack of treatment compliance. Noncompliance is an important issue and should be carefully observed. Several studies addressed patient compliance and 20-50% of patients may present lack of compliance to the PPI prescribed. When symptoms persist depite adherence has been confirmed, it is recommended to substitute the prescribed PPI to another of the same class or alternatively, prescription of a double dose of the same drug. When even so the symptoms persist, other causes of failure should be assigned. In particular cases of PPI failure, fundoplication surgery may be indicated.

  18. Different risk factors between reflux symptoms and mucosal injury in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Chung-Hsien; Hsieh, Tsung-Cheng; Hsiao, Tsung-Hsien; Wang, Pin-Chao; Tseng, Tai-Chung; Lin, Hans Hsienhong; Wang, Chia-Chi

    2015-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is diagnosed based on typical symptoms in clinical practice. It can be divided into two groups using endoscopy: erosive and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD). This study aims to determine the risk factors of reflux symptoms and mucosal injury. This was a two-step case-control study derived from a cohort of 998 individuals having the data of reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ) and endoscopic findings. Those with minor reflux symptoms were excluded. The first step compared symptomatic GERD patients with healthy controls. The 2(nd) step compared patients with erosive esophagitis with healthy controls. In this study, the prevalence of symptomatic GERD and erosive esophagitis were 163 (16.3%) and 166 (16.6%), respectively. A total of 507 asymptomatic individuals without mucosal injury of the esophagus on endoscopy were selected as healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, multivariate analyses showed that symptomatic GERD patients had a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia [odds ratio (OR), 1.83; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-2.96] and obesity (OR, 1.85; 95% CI 1.08-3.02). By contrast, male sex (OR, 2.24; 95% CI 1.42-3.52), positive Campylo-like organism (CLO) test (OR, 0.56; 95% CI 0.37-0.84), and hiatus hernia (OR, 14.36; 95% CI 3.05-67.6) were associated with erosive esophagitis. In conclusion, obesity and hypertriglyceridemia were associated with reflux symptoms. By contrast, male sex, negative infection of Helicobacter pylori, and hiatus hernia were associated with mucosal injury. Our results suggested that risk factors of reflux symptoms or mucosal injury might be different in GERD patients. The underlying mechanism awaits further studies to clarify. PMID:26043412

  19. Different risk factors between reflux symptoms and mucosal injury in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Chung-Hsien; Hsieh, Tsung-Cheng; Hsiao, Tsung-Hsien; Wang, Pin-Chao; Tseng, Tai-Chung; Lin, Hans Hsienhong; Wang, Chia-Chi

    2015-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is diagnosed based on typical symptoms in clinical practice. It can be divided into two groups using endoscopy: erosive and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD). This study aims to determine the risk factors of reflux symptoms and mucosal injury. This was a two-step case-control study derived from a cohort of 998 individuals having the data of reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ) and endoscopic findings. Those with minor reflux symptoms were excluded. The first step compared symptomatic GERD patients with healthy controls. The 2(nd) step compared patients with erosive esophagitis with healthy controls. In this study, the prevalence of symptomatic GERD and erosive esophagitis were 163 (16.3%) and 166 (16.6%), respectively. A total of 507 asymptomatic individuals without mucosal injury of the esophagus on endoscopy were selected as healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, multivariate analyses showed that symptomatic GERD patients had a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia [odds ratio (OR), 1.83; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-2.96] and obesity (OR, 1.85; 95% CI 1.08-3.02). By contrast, male sex (OR, 2.24; 95% CI 1.42-3.52), positive Campylo-like organism (CLO) test (OR, 0.56; 95% CI 0.37-0.84), and hiatus hernia (OR, 14.36; 95% CI 3.05-67.6) were associated with erosive esophagitis. In conclusion, obesity and hypertriglyceridemia were associated with reflux symptoms. By contrast, male sex, negative infection of Helicobacter pylori, and hiatus hernia were associated with mucosal injury. Our results suggested that risk factors of reflux symptoms or mucosal injury might be different in GERD patients. The underlying mechanism awaits further studies to clarify.

  20. GPR84 and TREM-1 Signaling Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Reflux Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aziz, Heba; Schneider, Mathias; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kassem, Abdel Meguid; Khailah, Saleem; Müller, Jürgen; Eldeen, Hadeel Gamal; Khairy, Ahmed; Khayyal, Mohamed T; Shcherbakova, Anastasiia; Efferth, Thomas; Ulrich-Merzenich, Gudrun

    2015-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common disorders in gastroenterology. Patients present with or without increased acid exposure indicating a nonuniform etiology. Thus, the common treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) fails to control symptoms in up to 40% of patients. To further elucidate the pathophysiology of the condition and explore new treatment targets, transcriptomics, proteomics and histological methods were applied to a surgically induced subchronic reflux esophagitis model in Wistar rats after treatment with either omeprazole (PPI) or STW5, a herbal preparation shown to ameliorate esophagitis without affecting refluxate pH. The normal human esophageal squamous cell line HET-1A and human endoscopic biopsies were used to confirm our findings to the G-protein–coupled receptor (GPR) 84 in human tissue. Both treatments reduced reflux-induced macroscopic and microscopic lesions of the esophagi as well as known proinflammatory cytokines. Proteomic and transcriptomic analyses identified CINC1–3, MIP-1/3α, MIG, RANTES and interleukin (IL)-1β as prominent mediators in GERD. Most regulated cyto-/chemokines are linked to the TREM-1 signaling pathway. The fatty acid receptor GPR84 was upregulated in esophagitis but significantly decreased in treated groups, a finding supported by Western blot and immunohistochemistry in both rat tissue and HET-1A cells. GPR84 was also found to be significantly upregulated in patients with grade B reflux esophagitis. The expression of GPR84 in esophageal tissue and its potential involvement in GERD are reported for the first time. IL-8 (CINC1–3) and the TREM-1 signaling pathway are proposed, besides GPR84, to play an important role in the pathogenesis of GERD.org PMID:26650186

  1. Rumination, heartburn, and daytime gastroesophageal reflux. A case study with mechanisms defined and successfully treated with biofeedback therapy.

    PubMed

    Shay, S S; Johnson, L F; Wong, R K; Curtis, D J; Rosenthal, R; Lamott, J R; Owensby, L C

    1986-04-01

    A 31-year-old man with a 19-year history of rumination developed frequent episodes of heartburn and regurgitation associated with acid gastroesophageal reflux that occurred predominantly during the day. This reflux and its attendant symptoms resulted from abdominal muscle contractions at the time of gastroesophageal pressure equilibration (i.e., common cavity phenomena) consistent with the egress of air from the stomach to the esophagus. A voluntary pharyngeal maneuver unassociated with swallowing but simultaneous with the abdominal contraction resulted in a decrease in upper esophageal sphincter pressure. This lowered pressure facilitated acid esophagopharyngeal regurgitation at a velocity of 100 cm/s. Biofeedback therapy directed at relaxing the abdominal muscles during eating and avoiding the pharyngeal maneuver resulted in a decrease in reflux and marked improvement in symptoms.

  2. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and bulimia nervosa--a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Denholm, M; Jankowski, J

    2011-02-01

    Bulimia nervosa and other eating disorders have been on the increase for the past half century. Self-induced vomiting is often practiced as a method of weight control in these patients, potentially causing acidic damage to the esophagus of the kind observed in cases of gastroesophageal reflux disease. To ascertain whether patients suffering from bulimia nervosa had an increased rate of reflux-related symptoms, potentially placing them at risk of developing sequelae such as Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma, a literature review was performed via searches of databases including PubMed, Medline, OVID and PsycINFO and a recursive search of the literature. The search terms were: bulimia nervosa; reflux; esophageal adenocarcinoma; Barrett's esophagus; eating disorders; oral; dental; complications. Several case reports were identified detailing the occurrence of an esophageal tumor in patients with a history of bulimia. This was supported to some degree by studies detailing higher incidences of reflux symptoms in eating disordered patients compared to controls but there was large variability in study design, quality and results. From these results an association is suggested as possible but is far from being proved conclusively. Further investigation is required using larger patient groups, better study design controlling for confounding factors and symptom characterisation.

  3. Effect of ambulatory 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring on reflux-provoking activities.

    PubMed

    Fass, R; Hell, R; Sampliner, R E; Pulliam, G; Graver, E; Hartz, V; Johnson, C; Jaffe, P

    1999-11-01

    Ambulatory 24-hr esophageal pH monitoring is considered the gold standard for diagnosing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The current approach is to encourage patients to pursue their everyday activity in order to obtain near-physiological recordings. However, the effect of the test itself on reflux-provoking activities has never been evaluated. Thus, the aim of our study was to assess daily food consumption, habits, symptoms, sleep, and perceived experience of patients undergoing pH testing as compared to an off test (normal) day. Patients reported type and time spent in each activity pursued, food ingested and length of each meal, habits, frequency and severity of GERD and other related symptoms, sleep disturbances, side effects, and overall perceived experience during pH testing and four weeks later, during a normal day. Fifty-four patients enrolled. pH testing significantly reduced time spent being active, number of meals and cups of coffee consumed, and frequency of GERD symptoms. Almost half of the patients reported having dysphagia during the test. Most patients experienced side effects and stated that the test bothered them most of the time. In conclusion, pH testing has a significant effect on decreasing reflux-provoking activities-patients tend to assume a more sedentary lifestyle. This may influence the reliability of the test as a physiologic measure of acid reflux.

  4. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Melissas, John; Braghetto, Italo; Molina, Juan Carlos; Silecchia, Gianfranco; Iossa, Angelo; Iannelli, Antonio; Foletto, Mirto

    2015-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and/or hiatus hernia (HH) are one of the most common disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Despite the positive effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) regarding weight loss and improvement in obesity co-morbidities, there are concerns about the development of de novo gastroesophageal reflux disease or worsening the existing GERD after this bariatric operation. Furthermore, controversy exists on the consequences of SG in lower esophageal sphincter function and about the ideal procedure when a hiatus hernia is preoperatively diagnosed or discovered during the laparoscopic SG. This review systematically investigates the incidence, the pathophysiology of GERD and/or HH in morbidly obese individuals before and after SG, and the treatment options for concomitant HH repair during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. PMID:26428250

  5. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Melissas, John; Braghetto, Italo; Molina, Juan Carlos; Silecchia, Gianfranco; Iossa, Angelo; Iannelli, Antonio; Foletto, Mirto

    2015-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and/or hiatus hernia (HH) are one of the most common disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Despite the positive effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) regarding weight loss and improvement in obesity co-morbidities, there are concerns about the development of de novo gastroesophageal reflux disease or worsening the existing GERD after this bariatric operation. Furthermore, controversy exists on the consequences of SG in lower esophageal sphincter function and about the ideal procedure when a hiatus hernia is preoperatively diagnosed or discovered during the laparoscopic SG. This review systematically investigates the incidence, the pathophysiology of GERD and/or HH in morbidly obese individuals before and after SG, and the treatment options for concomitant HH repair during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

  6. Saliva transit in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Cassiani, R A; Mota, G A; Aprile, L R O; Dantas, R O

    2015-10-01

    Saliva is an important factor in the neutralization of the acidity of the refluxed material that comes from the stomach to the esophagus. The impairment of saliva transit from oral cavity to distal esophagus may be one of the causes of esophagitis and symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). With the scintigraphic method, the transit of 2 mL of artificial saliva was measured in 30 patients with GERD and 26 controls. The patients with GERD had symptoms of heartburn and acid regurgitation, a 24-hour pH monitoring with more than 4.2% of the time with pH below four, 26 with erosive esophagitis, and four with non-erosive reflux disease. Fourteen had mild dysphagia for solid foods. Twenty-one patients had normal esophageal manometry, and nine had ineffective esophageal motility. They were 15 men and 15 women, aged 21-61 years, mean 39 years. The control group had 14 men and 12 women, aged 19-61 years, mean 35 years. The subjects swallowed in the sitting and supine position 2 mL of artificial saliva labeled with 18 MBq of (99m) Technetium phytate. The time of saliva transit was measured from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, and the transit through proximal, middle, and distal esophageal body. There was no difference between patients and controls in the time for saliva to go from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, and from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, in the sitting and supine positions. In distal esophagus in the sitting position, the saliva transit duration was shorter in patients with GERD (3.0 ± 0.8 seconds) than in controls (7.6 ± 1.7 seconds, P = 0.03). In conclusion, the saliva transit from oral cavity to the esophageal-gastric transition in patients with GERD has the same duration than in controls. Saliva transit through the distal esophageal body is faster in patients with GERD than controls.

  7. [Current Status of Translational Research on Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    PubMed

    Jeong, In Du; Park, Moo In

    2016-09-25

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the incidence of some of its complications have risen strikingly over the last few decades. With the increase in our understanding of the pathophysiology of GERD along with the development of proton pump inhibitors, the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to GERD have changed dramatically over the past decade. However, GERD still poses a problem to many clinicians since the spectrum of the disease has evolved to encompass more challenging presentations such as refractory GERD and extra-esophageal manifestations. The aim of this article is to provide a review of available current translational research on GERD. This review includes acid pocket, ambulatory pH monitoring, impedance pH monitoring, mucosa impedance, and high resolution manometry. This article discusses current translational research on GERD. PMID:27646580

  8. Antimicrobial Prophylaxis for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Children with febrile urinary tract infection commonly have vesicoureteral reflux. Because trial results have been limited and inconsistent, the use of antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent recurrences in children with reflux remains controversial. METHODS In this 2-year, multisite, randomized, placebo-controlled trial involving 607 children with vesicoureteral reflux that was diagnosed after a first or second febrile or symptomatic urinary tract infection, we evaluated the efficacy of trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis in preventing recurrences (primary outcome). Secondary outcomes were renal scarring, treatment failure (a composite of recurrences and scarring), and antimicrobial resistance. RESULTS Recurrent urinary tract infection developed in 39 of 302 children who received prophylaxis as compared with 72 of 305 children who received placebo (relative risk, 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.78). Prophylaxis reduced the risk of recurrences by 50% (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.74) and was particularly effective in children whose index infection was febrile (hazard ratio, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.64) and in those with baseline bladder and bowel dysfunction (hazard ratio, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.58). The occurrence of renal scarring did not differ significantly between the prophylaxis and placebo groups (11.9% and 10.2%, respectively). Among 87 children with a first recurrence caused by Escherichia coli, the proportion of isolates that were resistant to trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole was 63% in the prophylaxis group and 19% in the placebo group. CONCLUSIONS Among children with vesicoureteral reflux after urinary tract infection, antimicrobial prophylaxis was associated with a substantially reduced risk of recurrence but not of renal scarring. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and others; RIVUR ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00405704.) PMID:24795142

  9. Genetic Variations in Vesicoureteral Reflux Sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Hains, David S.; Schwaderer, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are a common condition in children. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) represents a common associated condition with childhood UTI. UTI susceptibility appears to have a genetic component based on family and UTI cohort studies. Targeted analysis of innate immune system genetic variations indicate that these variations are important in UTI susceptibility. In this overview, we discuss how current cohorts and genetic strategies can be implemented to discover new susceptibility loci in patients with UTI. PMID:26848692

  10. [Pathology of non-reflux esophagitides].

    PubMed

    Daum, Ondřej; Dubová, Magdaléna; Švajdler, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The topic of non-reflux esophagitides is partially hidden in the shadow cast by the huge and modern entity of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Histological investigation alone is often insufficient to reach the correct diagnosis without a correlation of the microscopic picture with clinical presentation, endoscopic gross appearance, personal and pharmacological history of the patient, results of hematological, serological, immunological and microbiological examinations. Due to their low-prevalence, individual types of non-reflux esophagitides are not routinely encountered in routine biopsies. Furthermore, the plethora of etiological agents present with only a limited range of reaction patterns, and thus a single histological picture may be common for more agents. Conversely, one cause may be associated with more morphological patterns. Due to these circumstances the pathological diagnostic management should follow a settled algorithm to prevent an inadequate narrowing of the histopathologist´s view. Histologic findings forming the base of this algorithm include distribution and type of inflammatory infiltrate, appearance of epithelial changes, and (in some cases) even the presence of causative agent in histological slides. PMID:27108553

  11. Current Surgical Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Minki

    2013-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), a common congenital urinary tract anomaly, refers to retrograde flow of urine from the bladder into the upper urinary tract. The main goal in the treatment of pediatric VUR is to preserve renal function by preventing pyelonephritis. Many surgical management options are available for pediatric VUR. Open ureteral reimplantation has a high success rate but is invasive and is associated with postoperative pain and morbidity. Endoscopic therapy is minimally invasive but has the disadvantages of decreased short-term success and recurrence of reflux over the long term. Laparoscopic or robotic ureteral reimplantation has become increasingly popular owing to its effectiveness and minimal invasiveness, but long-term outcomes have yet to be documented. Urologists should make an effort to select the appropriate surgical strategy by taking into consideration the individual characteristics of the patient such as age, gender, grade of reflux at presentation, status of renal parenchyma, combined bladder and ureteral circumstances, functional status of the bladder and bowel, and preferences of the patients' family. PMID:24255753

  12. Comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the Practice of Otorhinolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Heloisa Sobreira; Pinto, José Antonio; Zavanela, Adma Roberta; Cavallini, André Freitas; Freitas, Gabriel Santos; Garcia, Fabiola Esteves

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  The Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease has a prevalence of ∼12% of the urban population in Brazil. Koufman proposed the term to designate Laryngeal Pharyngeal Reflux (LPR) symptoms, signs or tissue damage resulting from aggression of the gastrointestinal contents in the upper aerodigestive tract. Belafsky et al proposed a score that points to inflammatory laryngeal signs through videolaryngoscopic findings, the Reflux Finding Score (RFS). Moreover, in 2002, they published the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). Objective  The objective of this study is to provide a comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the practice of Otorhinolaryngology. Methods  Our study involved a total of 135 patients who visited the Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT) clinic Núcleo de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço de São Paulo between April 2014 and May 2015 with suspected LPR. We excluded nine patients and the study group was 126 patients. All patients were ranked by their RSI and RFS scores. Results  The study group consisted of 126 patients (88 women and 38 men). Their main complaints were cough (40.4%), globus (21.4%), dysphonia (19.8%), throat clearing (15.8%), postnasal drip (3.17%), snoring (1.5%), dysphagia (1.5%), cacosmia (0.7%), and regurgitation (1.5%). The RSI ranges from 13 to 42 with a mean of 20.7 (SD = 6.67). The RFS ranged from 3 to 19 with a mean of 9.53 (SD = 2.64). Conclusion  The RSI and RFS can easily be included in ENT routines as objective parameters, with low cost and high practicality. Based on the clinical index, the specialist can evaluate the need for further tests. PMID:27413402

  13. Renal Agenesis with Full Length Ipsilateral Refluxing Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Vipin; Banerjee, Manju

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral renal agenesis with vesicoureteral reflux in the ipsilateral full length ureter is a rare phenomenon. Herein we report a case of 10-year old boy who presented with recurrent urinary tract infections. No renal tissue was identified on left side in various imaging studies. Micturating cystourethrogram (MCUG) showed left sided refluxing and blind ending ureter. Left ureterectomy was done because of recurrent UTI in the refluxing system. PMID:27170916

  14. Complete duodenogastric reflux: A scintigraphic sign of significant duodenal pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Hanner, J.S. )

    1989-09-01

    Complete reflux of duodenal contents into the stomach with persistent retention on hepatobiliary scintigraphy or radionuclide gastrointestinal bleeding studies is a relatively rare occurrence. Two cases of complete duodenogastric reflux are reported: one case in a patient with a perforated duodenal diverticulum and the other in a patient with an inflamed, bleeding duodenal ulcer. The finding of complete duodenogastric reflux and persistent retention in the stomach should instigate a thorough evaluation for significant duodenal pathology.

  15. Bile reflux gastritis and Barrett's oesophagus: further evidence of a role for duodenogastro-oesophageal reflux?

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, M; Neville, P; Mapstone, N; Moayyedi, P; Axon, A

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—There is increasing evidence that reflux of bile plays a part in the pathogenesis of Barrett's oesophagus. Bile injury to the gastric mucosa results in a "chemical" gastritis in which oedema and intestinal metaplasia are prominent.
AIM—To determine if patients with Barrett's oesophagus have more bile related changes in antral mucosa than patients with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) or non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD).
PATIENTS AND METHODS—Patients were identified by a retrospective search of pathology records and those with a clinically confirmed diagnosis of either Barrett's oesophagus or reflux oesophagitis who had oesophageal and gastric biopsies taken at the same endoscopy and had no evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection entered the study. Control biopsies were taken from H pylori negative NUD patients. Antral biopsies were examined "blind" to clinical group and graded for a series of histological features from which the "reflux gastritis score" (RGS) and "bile reflux index" (BRI) could be calculated. The reproducibility of these histological scores was tested by a second pathologist.
RESULTS—There were 100 patients with Barrett's, 61 with GORD, and 50 with NUD. The RGSs did not differ between groups. BRI values in the Barrett's group were significantly higher than those in GORD subjects (p=0.014) which in turn were higher than those in NUD patients (p=0.037). Similarly, the frequency of high BRI values (>14) was significantly greater in the Barrett's group (29/100; 29%) than in the GORD (9/61; 14.8%) or NUD (4/50; 8%) group. However, agreement on BRI values was "poor", indicating limited applicability of this approach.
CONCLUSION—Patients with Barrett's oesophagus have more evidence of bile related gastritis than subjects with uncomplicated GORD or NUD. The presence of bile in the refluxate could be a factor in both the development of "specialised" intestinal metaplasia and malignancy in the oesophagus

  16. Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Lalonde, Stefan V; Planavsky, Noah J; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lyons, Timothy W; Mojzsis, Stephen J; Rouxel, Olivier J; Barley, Mark E; Rosìere, Carlos; Fralick, Phillip W; Kump, Lee R; Bekker, Andrey

    2011-10-20

    The enrichment of redox-sensitive trace metals in ancient marine sedimentary rocks has been used to determine the timing of the oxidation of the Earth's land surface. Chromium (Cr) is among the emerging proxies for tracking the effects of atmospheric oxygenation on continental weathering; this is because its supply to the oceans is dominated by terrestrial processes that can be recorded in the Cr isotope composition of Precambrian iron formations. However, the factors controlling past and present seawater Cr isotope composition are poorly understood. Here we provide an independent and complementary record of marine Cr supply, in the form of Cr concentrations and authigenic enrichment in iron-rich sedimentary rocks. Our data suggest that Cr was largely immobile on land until around 2.48 Gyr ago, but within the 160 Myr that followed--and synchronous with independent evidence for oxygenation associated with the Great Oxidation Event (see, for example, refs 4-6)--marked excursions in Cr content and Cr/Ti ratios indicate that Cr was solubilized at a scale unrivalled in history. As Cr isotope fractionations at that time were muted, Cr must have been mobilized predominantly in reduced, Cr(III), form. We demonstrate that only the oxidation of an abundant and previously stable crustal pyrite reservoir by aerobic-respiring, chemolithoautotrophic bacteria could have generated the degree of acidity required to solubilize Cr(III) from ultramafic source rocks and residual soils. This profound shift in weathering regimes beginning at 2.48 Gyr ago constitutes the earliest known geochemical evidence for acidophilic aerobes and the resulting acid rock drainage, and accounts for independent evidence of an increased supply of dissolved sulphate and sulphide-hosted trace elements to the oceans around that time. Our model adds to amassing evidence that the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary was marked by a substantial shift in terrestrial geochemistry and biology. PMID:22012395

  17. Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Lalonde, Stefan V; Planavsky, Noah J; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lyons, Timothy W; Mojzsis, Stephen J; Rouxel, Olivier J; Barley, Mark E; Rosìere, Carlos; Fralick, Phillip W; Kump, Lee R; Bekker, Andrey

    2011-10-19

    The enrichment of redox-sensitive trace metals in ancient marine sedimentary rocks has been used to determine the timing of the oxidation of the Earth's land surface. Chromium (Cr) is among the emerging proxies for tracking the effects of atmospheric oxygenation on continental weathering; this is because its supply to the oceans is dominated by terrestrial processes that can be recorded in the Cr isotope composition of Precambrian iron formations. However, the factors controlling past and present seawater Cr isotope composition are poorly understood. Here we provide an independent and complementary record of marine Cr supply, in the form of Cr concentrations and authigenic enrichment in iron-rich sedimentary rocks. Our data suggest that Cr was largely immobile on land until around 2.48 Gyr ago, but within the 160 Myr that followed--and synchronous with independent evidence for oxygenation associated with the Great Oxidation Event (see, for example, refs 4-6)--marked excursions in Cr content and Cr/Ti ratios indicate that Cr was solubilized at a scale unrivalled in history. As Cr isotope fractionations at that time were muted, Cr must have been mobilized predominantly in reduced, Cr(III), form. We demonstrate that only the oxidation of an abundant and previously stable crustal pyrite reservoir by aerobic-respiring, chemolithoautotrophic bacteria could have generated the degree of acidity required to solubilize Cr(III) from ultramafic source rocks and residual soils. This profound shift in weathering regimes beginning at 2.48 Gyr ago constitutes the earliest known geochemical evidence for acidophilic aerobes and the resulting acid rock drainage, and accounts for independent evidence of an increased supply of dissolved sulphate and sulphide-hosted trace elements to the oceans around that time. Our model adds to amassing evidence that the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary was marked by a substantial shift in terrestrial geochemistry and biology.

  18. Gastro-esophageal reflux time parameters and esophagitis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.; Maurage, C.; Casset, D.; Itti, R.

    1985-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the correlation between the reflux timing and the presence of esophagitis, an inconstant but serious complication of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). The hypothesis was that reflux occurring late after meal can be incriminated more than early reflux in esophagitis genesis. 32 children with GER (mean age = 10.5 months, 2 to 30 months) had esophagoscopy and scintigraphy in the same week. The children were classified in two groups according to esophagoscopy: group 1 (n = 18) no esophagitis, group 2 (n = 14) esophaqgitis. The scintigraphy involved the ingestion of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid milk mixture, followed by esophageal and gastric activity recording (one image per minute for 1 hour). The reflux was assessed from contrast enhanced images and esophageal time activity curves. Reflux intensity was quantitated by reflux index (Re). Mean reflux time was calculated as the mean esophageal activity peaks time (t-bar). Finally a composite parameter was calculated as the mean reflux time weighted by the relative intensity of each reflux peak (t-barw). Re was not found to be different between the two groups. t-bar was significantly higher in group 2: t-bar = 29.6 +- 3.0 mn (mean +- SD) than in group 1: t-bar = 24.5 +- 6.8 mn; rho <0.02. The difference between the two groups was enhanced by intensity weighting: group 1: t-barw = 16.6 +- 6.3 mn, group 2: t-barw = 33.5 +- 7.1 mn rho <0.001. t-barw value was not correlated to esophagitis grade. These results suggest that late reflux is more likely responsible of esophagitis.

  19. Role of Saliva in Esophageal Defense: Implications in Patients With Nonerosive Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yandrapu, Harathi; Marcinkiewicz, Marek; Poplawski, Cezary; Han, Kyung; Zbroch, Tomasz; Goldin, George; Sarosiek, Irene; Namiot, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background: It has been previously demonstrated that patients with reflux esophagitis exhibit a significant impairment in the secretion of salivary protective components versus controls. However, the secretion of salivary protective factors in patients with nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) is not explored. The authors therefore studied the secretion of salivary volume, pH, bicarbonate, nonbicarbonate glycoconjugate, protein, epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α) and prostaglandin E2 in patients with NERD and compared with the corresponding values in controls (CTRL). Methods: Salivary secretion was collected during basal condition, mastication and intraesophageal mechanical (tubing, balloon) and chemical (initial saline, acid, acid/pepsin, final saline) stimulations, respectively, mimicking the natural gastroesophageal reflux. Results: Salivary volume, protein and TGF-α outputs in patients with NERD were significantly higher than CTRL during intraesophageal mechanical (P < 0.05) and chemical stimulations (P < 0.05). Salivary bicarbonate was significantly higher in NERD than CTRL group during intraesophageal stimulation with both acid/pepsin (P < 0.05) and saline (P < 0.01). Salivary glycoconjugate secretion was significantly higher in the NERD group than the CTRL group during chewing (P < 0.05), mechanical (P < 0.05) and chemical stimulation (P < 0.01). Salivary EGF secretion was higher in patients with NERD during mechanical stimulation (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Patients with NERD demonstrated a significantly stronger salivary secretory response in terms of volume, bicarbonate, glycoconjugate, protein, EGF and TGF-α than asymptomatic controls. This enhanced salivary esophagoprotection is potentially mediating resistance to the development of endoscopic mucosal changes by gastroesophageal reflux. PMID:25789686

  20. [Current issues on gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Kim, Jie-Hyun; Kim, Beom Jin; Kim, Sang Wook; Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Yeon Soo; Sung, Hye Young; Oh, Tae-Hoon; Jeong, In Du; Park, Moo In

    2014-09-25

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common problems in gastrointestinal disorders. With the increase in our understanding on the pathophysiology of GERD along with the development of proton pump inhibitors, the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to GERD have changed dramatically over the past decade. However, GERD still poses a problem to many clinicians since the spectrum of the disease has evolved to encompass more challenging presentations such as refractory GERD and extraesophageal manifestations. This has led to significant confusion regarding the optimal approach to these patients. This article aims to discuss current issues on GERD.

  1. Efficacy of Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsin-Hsiao S.; Gbadegesin, Rasheed A.; Foreman, John W.; Nagaraj, Shashi K.; Wigfall, Delbert R.; Wiener, John S.; Routh, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Controversy exists regarding the use of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis vs observation in the management of children with vesicoureteral reflux. The reported effectiveness of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis in children with reflux varies widely. We determined whether the aggregated evidence supports use of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis in children with vesicoureteral reflux. Materials and Methods We searched the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, clinicaltrials.gov, MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, Google Scholar and recently presented meeting abstracts for reports in any language. Bibliographies of included studies were then hand searched for any missed articles. The study protocol was prospectively registered at PROSPERO (No. CRD42014009639). Reports were assessed and data abstracted in duplicate, with differences resolved by consensus. Risk of bias was assessed using standardized instruments. Results We identified 1,547 studies, of which 8 are included in the metaanalysis. Pooled results demonstrated that continuous antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduced the risk of recurrent febrile or symptomatic urinary tract infection (pooled OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42–0.96) but, if urinary tract infection occurred, increased the risk of antibiotic resistant organism (pooled OR 8.75, 95% CI 3.52–21.73). A decrease in new renal scarring was not associated with continuous antibiotic prophylaxis use. Adverse events were similar between the 2 groups. Significant heterogeneity existed between studies (I2 50%, p = 0.03), specifically between those trials with significant risk of bias (eg unclear protocol descriptions and/or lack of blinding). Conclusions Compared to no treatment, continuous antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduced the risk of febrile and symptomatic urinary tract infections in children with vesicoureteral reflux, although it increased the risk of infection due to antibiotic resistant bacteria. Continuous antibiotic prophylaxis did not significantly

  2. [The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in agricultural workers].

    PubMed

    Komleva, N E; Spirin, V F; Trubetskov, A D; Zaikina, I V

    2012-01-01

    Among agricultural workers is common gastroesophageal reflux disease. On a professional factors affecting agricultural labor (physical activity, weight lifting, carrying heavy loads, frequent and/or long slopes). These factors contribute to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease and severe course.

  3. Inguinal bladder hernia associated with vesico-ureteric reflux.

    PubMed

    Noble, J G; Christmas, T J; Chapple, C R; Rickards, D

    1992-04-01

    The urinary bladder is frequently found as a component of inguinal herniae. This report describes a case of 'bladder hernia' associated with vesico-ureteric reflux. The current methods of investigation and subsequent treatment for this condition are reviewed along with the possible underlying cause of vesico-ureteric reflux in this case.

  4. Gallic acid induced apoptotic events in HCT-15 colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Aruna Priyadharshni; Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Mandal, Mahitosh; Supriyanto, Eko; Muhamad, Ida Idayu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory action of diet-derived phenolic compound gallic acid (GA) against HCT-15 colon cancer cells. METHODS: The antiproliferative effect of GA against colon cancer cells was determined by performing thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The colony forming ability of GA treated colon cancer cells was evaluated using the colony forming assay. The cell cycle changes induced by GA in HCT-15 cells were analyzed by propidium iodide staining. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential of HCT-15 exposed to GA was assessed using 2’,7’-dichlorfluorescein-diacetate and rhodamine-123 respectively, with the help of flow cytometry. Morphological changes caused by GA treatment in the colon cancer cells were identified by scanning electron microscope and photomicrograph examination. Apoptosis was confirmed using flow cytometric analysis of GA treated HCT-15 cells after staining with Yo-Pro-1. RESULTS: MTT assay results illustrated that GA has an inhibitory effect on HCT-15 cells with IC50 value of 740 μmol/L. A time-dependent inhibition of colony formation was evident with GA treatment. Cell cycle arrest was evident from the accumulation of GA treated HCT-15 cells at sub-G1 phase (0.98 ± 1.03 vs 58.01 ± 2.05) with increasing exposure time. Flow cytometric analysis of GA treated HCT-15 cells depicted early events associated with apoptosis like lipid layer breakage and fall in mitochondrial membrane potential apart from an increase in the generation of ROS which were in a time dependent manner. SEM and photomicrograph images of the GA-treated cells displayed membrane blebbing and cell shrinking characteristics of apoptosis. Further apoptosis confirmation by Yo-Pro-1 staining also showed the time-dependent increase of apoptotic cells after treatment. CONCLUSION: These results show that GA induced ROS dependent apoptosis and inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells. PMID:27099438

  5. Endoscopic therapies of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Atif; Salinas, Vanessa; Filipi, Charles J

    2006-01-01

    The high prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Western societies has accelerated the need for new modalities of treatment. Currently, medical and surgical therapies are widely accepted among patients and physicians. New potent antisecretory drugs and the development of minimally invasive surgery for the management of GERD are at present the pivotal and largely accepted approaches to treatment. The minimally invasive treatment revolution, however, has stimulated several new endoscopic techniques for GERD. Up to now, the data is limited and further studies are necessary to compare the advantages and disadvantages of the various endoscopic techniques to medical and laparoscopic management of GERD. New journal articles and abstracts are continuously being published. The Food and Drug Administration has approved 3 modalities, thus gastroenterologists and surgeons are beginning to apply these techniques. Further trials and device refinements will assist clinicians. This article will present an overview of the various techniques that are currently on study. This review will report the efficacy and durability of various endoscopic therapies for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The potential for widespread use of these techniques will also be discussed. Articles and abstracts published in English on this topic were retrieved from Pubmed. Due to limited number of studies and remarkable differences between various trials, strict criteria were not used for the pooled data presented, however, an effort was made to avoid bias by including only studies that used off-PPI scoring as baseline and intent to treat. PMID:16718747

  6. [Classification of gastroesophageal reflux disease and gastritis].

    PubMed

    Vukobrat-Bijedic, Zora

    2002-01-01

    The gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is frequent and causes by retrograde flow of the gastric content through incompetent gastroesophageal junction. Epidemiological studies have proved that GORD is associated with hearburn in high prevalence. In western countries several studies reported that 20-40% of adult population experience heartburn symptoms at least once in the year, approximately 10% have symptoms weekly and 5% daily. Esophagitis was objectively defined as a mucosal damage and it was endoscopically verificated in 25% of patients. Indeed, GORD symptoms and esophagitis are in poor correlation and less than half of patients with heartburn symptoms had esophagitis on endoscopy. From 1989, Savary Monniér and Metaplasia-Ulcer-Stricture-Erosion (MUSE) endoscopically classification is in use. From 1994, LA (Los Angeles) classification of reflux disease is also in use by endoscopists. During its life cycle, gastric mucosa is exposed to different harmful agents and its response is restitution "ad integrum" on the beginning and at the end of process. First line defence is mucuse barrier which prevent contact between epithelial cell and possible irritant. Important role in mucuse layer plays prostaglandins. After several classification systems previously used, in 1991 Price introduced Sydney system gradation and gastritis classification. Pointing out importance of topographical differences in gastritis distribution, system has introduced 5 histological variations in its Morphological section: chronic inflammation, neutrophylic activity, glandular atrophy, intestinal metaplasy and H. pylori colonisation, with 4 points grading. PMID:12055715

  7. Analytical Investigation of a Reflux Boiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, William E.; Young, Fred M.; Chambers, Terrence L.

    1996-01-01

    A thermal model of a single Ultralight Fabric Reflux Tube (UFRT) was constructed and tested against data for an array of such tubes tested in the NASA-JSC facility. Modifications to the single fin model were necessary to accommodate the change in radiation shape factors due to adjacent tubes. There was good agreement between the test data and data generated for the same cases by the thermal model. The thermal model was also used to generate single and linear array data for the lunar environment (the primary difference between the test and lunar data was due to lunar gravity). The model was also used to optimize the linear spacing of the reflux tubes in an array. The optimal spacing of the tubes was recommended to be about 5 tube diameters based on maximizing the heat transfer per unit mass. The model also showed that the thermal conductivity of the Nextel fabric was the major limitation to the heat transfer. This led to a suggestion that the feasibility of jacketing the Nextel fiber bundles with copper strands be investigated. This jacketing arrangement was estimated to be able to double the thermal conductivity of the fabric at a volume concentration of about 12-14%. Doubling the thermal conductivity of the fabric would double the amount of heat transferred at the same steam saturation temperature.

  8. LINX(™) Reflux Management System: magnetic sphincter augmentation in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bonavina, Luigi; DeMeester, Tom R; Ganz, Robert A

    2012-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), commonly manifested by heartburn or regurgitation, is a chronic, progressive condition in which failed sphincter function allows the contents of the stomach to reflux into the esophagus, the airways and the mouth. Chronic GERD affects 10% of Western society. The majority of patients receive adequate relief from proton pump inhibitors, but up to 40% have incomplete relief of symptoms that cannot be addressed by increasing the dose of medications. The laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the surgical gold standard; however, the level of technical difficulty and its side effects have limited its use to less than 1% of the GERD population. These factors have contributed to the propensity of patients to persist with medical therapy, even when inadequate to control symptoms and complications of the disease. Consequently, a significant gap in the treatment continuum for GERD remains evident in current clinical practice. The LINX(™) Reflux Management System (Torax Medical) is designed to provide a permanent solution to GERD by augmenting the physiologic function of the sphincter barrier with a simple and reproducible laparoscopic procedure that does not alter gastric anatomy and can be easily reversed if necessary.

  9. Spontaneous enterogastric reflux gastritis and esophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gowen, G F

    1985-01-01

    Enterogastric reflux gastritis and esophagitis is best known after gastric resections and pyloroplasty but it also occurs spontaneously in the nonoperated patient. Forty-two patients are presented who meet the criteria for the diagnosis: constant burning epigastric pain, worse after meals, unrelieved by antacids and diet; endoscopic demonstration of a gastric bile pool; endoscopic biopsy proof of gastritis and esophagitis; and hypochlorhydria. Patients with mild and moderate stages of the disease can benefit from metoclopramide therapy which improves the gastric emptying mechanism. Of the surgical patients with intractable symptoms, 90% were women, 90% had marked hypochlorhydria, 83% had biliary disease, current or remote, and 50% had anemia. With vagotomy, antrectomy, and Roux-Y anastomosis 45-60 cm downstream, the clinical response has been most encouraging. PMID:3970596

  10. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Stenard, Fabien; Iannelli, Antonio

    2015-09-28

    Bariatric surgery is the only effective procedure that provides long-term sustained weight loss. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) has emerged over the last few years to be an ideal bariatric procedure because it has several advantages compared to more complex bariatric procedures, including avoiding an intestinal bypass. However, several published follow-up studies report an increased rate of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) after a SG. GERD is described as either de novo or as being caused by aggravation of preexisting symptoms. However, the literature on this topic is ambivalent despite the potentially increased rate of GERDs that may occur after this common bariatric procedure. This article reviews the mechanisms responsible for GERD in obese subjects as well as the results after a SG with respect to GERD. Future directions for clinical research are discussed along with the current surgical options for morbidly obese patients with GERD and undergoing bariatric surgery.

  11. Vesicoureteric reflux in the adult male.

    PubMed

    Chapple, C R; Christmas, T J; Turner-Warwick, R T

    1990-02-01

    The main prevalence of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) is in the adult female population. Although recognised as a clinical entity in adult males, little detailed information is available on this subject. A retrospective analysis was carried out on the results of 1519 consecutive videocystometrograms performed on male patients. VUR had an overall incidence of 8.6% within this population, with a range of 5.1% in patients with normal urodynamics to 15.6% in those with detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. The common denominator between VUR and urodynamic measurement appears to be the generation of high intravesical pressures. These findings suggest that VUR is not uncommon in the male population, is usually asymptomatic and should respond to the treatment of any underlying bladder abnormality.

  12. Perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early pathogenesis event of drug induced liver injury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Makoto; Miyake, Manami; Sato, Hiroko; Masutomi, Naoya; Tsutsui, Naohisa; Adam, Klaus-Peter; Alexander, Danny C.; Lawton, Kay A.; Milburn, Michael V.; Ryals, John A.; Wulff, Jacob E.; Guo, Lining

    2013-04-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant consideration for drug development. Current preclinical DILI assessment relying on histopathology and clinical chemistry has limitations in sensitivity and discordance with human. To gain insights on DILI pathogenesis and identify potential biomarkers for improved DILI detection, we performed untargeted metabolomic analyses on rats treated with thirteen known hepatotoxins causing various types of DILI: necrosis (acetaminophen, bendazac, cyclosporine A, carbon tetrachloride, ethionine), cholestasis (methapyrilene and naphthylisothiocyanate), steatosis (tetracycline and ticlopidine), and idiosyncratic (carbamazepine, chlorzoxasone, flutamide, and nimesulide) at two doses and two time points. Statistical analysis and pathway mapping of the nearly 1900 metabolites profiled in the plasma, urine, and liver revealed diverse time and dose dependent metabolic cascades leading to DILI by the hepatotoxins. The most consistent change induced by the hepatotoxins, detectable even at the early time point/low dose, was the significant elevations of a panel of bile acids in the plasma and urine, suggesting that DILI impaired hepatic bile acid uptake from the circulation. Furthermore, bile acid amidation in the hepatocytes was altered depending on the severity of the hepatotoxin-induced oxidative stress. The alteration of the bile acids was most evident by the necrosis and cholestasis hepatotoxins, with more subtle effects by the steatosis and idiosyncratic hepatotoxins. Taking together, our data suggest that the perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early event of DILI. Upon further validation, selected bile acids in the circulation could be potentially used as sensitive and early DILI preclinical biomarkers. - Highlights: ► We used metabolomics to gain insights on drug induced liver injury (DILI) in rats. ► We profiled rats treated with thirteen hepatotoxins at two doses and two time points. ► The toxins decreased the

  13. The RIVUR Trial: Profile and Baseline Clinical Associations of Children With Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Hoberman, Alejandro; Mattoo, Tej K.; Mathews, Ranjiv; Keren, Ron; Chesney, Russell W.; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Greenfield, Saul P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is diagnosed in ∼30% to 40% of children who have imaging studies after urinary tract infections (UTIs). Our goal is to characterize children enrolled in the Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR) trial and to compare our study cohort with those from previously published studies. METHODS: RIVUR investigators from 19 pediatric sites in the United States recruited 607 children with grade I through IV VUR. Children were enrolled after a first or second UTI. This cross-sectional report of baseline data includes extensive clinical, parental report, and imaging study results. RESULTS: RIVUR recruited 607 children (558 girls, 49 boys) with grade I (11%), II (42%), III (38%), or IV (8%) reflux. The median age was 12 months, and most children (91%) were enrolled after their first UTI. The UTI leading to enrollment was both febrile and symptomatic for 323 children, febrile only in 197 children, and symptomatic only in 86. Renal involvement at baseline as documented by a 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid scan was uncommon with cortical defects identified in 89 (15%) children. Bladder and bowel dysfunction was identified in 71 (56%) of 126 toilet-trained subjects assessed. CONCLUSIONS: RIVUR is the largest prospective, randomized trial for children with primary VUR to date, comparing prophylaxis with placebo. The study sample comprises patients from 19 pediatric clinical sites in the United States, whose demographic and clinical characteristics may differ from those of children enrolled in previous trials from other countries. PMID:23753091

  14. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in 9/11 survivors and workers: insights gained from tragic losses.

    PubMed

    Sayuk, Gregory S; Drossman, Douglas A

    2011-11-01

    Survivors of the 2001 World Trade Center (WTC) attacks and the individuals who volunteered for the rescue and recovery efforts remain substantially burdened by psychological trauma and respiratory illnesses related to the environmental exposures. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS) are also reported at higher rates than expected among this population. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and exposures to the caustic aerosolized debris of the WTC are explored in further detail as potential mechanisms underlying these GERS experiences in WTC Registry participants. Recent work by Li and colleagues suggests that the WTC experience is associated with increases in GER independent of asthma and PTSD diagnoses. However, this association may be more complex since over-representation of hypersensitive non-acid reflux subjects and failure to completely capture psychiatric comorbidity may also contribute to our understanding of these findings. Nonetheless, the WTC Registry offers a unique study population, and detailed psychologic profiling and physiologic testing of participants may promote greater insight into gastroesophageal reflux pathohysiology. PMID:22056575

  15. Neutronic analysis of the 1D and 1E banks reflux detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-12-21

    Two H Canyon neutron monitoring systems for early detection of postulated abnormal reflux conditions in the Second Uranium Cycle 1E and 1D Mixer-Settle Banks have been designed and built. Monte Carlo neutron transport simulations using the general purpose, general geometry, n-particle MCNP code have been performed to model expected response of the monitoring systems to varying conditions.The confirmatory studies documented herein conclude that the 1E and 1D neutron monitoring systems are able to achieve adequate neutron count rates for various neutron source and detector configurations, thereby eliminating excessive integration count time. Neutron count rate sensitivity studies are also performed. Conversely, the transport studies concluded that the neutron count rates are statistically insensitive to nitric acid content in the aqueous region and to the transition region length. These studies conclude that the 1E and 1D neutron monitoring systems are able to predict the postulated reflux conditions for all examined perturbations in the neutron source and detector configurations. In the cases examined, the relative change in the neutron count rates due to postulated transitions from normal {sup 235}U concentration levels to reflux levels remain satisfactory detectable.

  16. Frequency distribution of gastro esophageal reflux disease in inhalation injury: A historical cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Karbasi, Ashraf; Aliannejad, Rasoul; Ghanei, Mostafa; Sanamy, Mehran Noory; Alaeddini, Farshid; Harandi, Ali Amini

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is no data on the prevalence and the association of gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD) with toxic fume inhalation. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the frequency distribution of GERD symptoms among the individuals with mild respiratory disorder due to the past history of toxic fume exposure to sulfur mustard (SM). Materials and Methods: In a historical cohort study, subjects were randomly selected from 7000 patients in a database of all those who had a history of previous exposure to a single high dose of SM gas during war. The control group was randomly selected from adjacent neighbors of the patients, and two healthy male subjects were chosen per patient. In this study, we used the validated Persian translation of Mayo Gastroesophageal Reflux Questionnaire to assess the frequency distribution of reflux disease. Results: Relative frequency of GERD symptoms, was found to be significantly higher in the inhalation injury patients with an odds ratio of 8.30 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.73-14.55), and after adjustment for cigarette smoking, tea consumption, age, and body mass index, aspirin and chronic cough the odds ratio was found to be 4.41 (95% CI: 1.61-12.07). Conclusion: The most important finding of our study was the major GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation once or more per week) among the individuals with the past history of exposure to SM toxic gas is substantially higher (4.4-fold) than normal populations. PMID:26622251

  17. Persistent reflux symptoms cause anxiety, depression, and mental health and sleep disorders in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoshihide; Kamiya, Takeshi; Senoo, Kyouji; Tsuchida, Kenji; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Kojima, Hisayo; Yamashita, Hiroaki; Yamakawa, Yoshihiro; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Ozeki, Tomonori; Endo, Masatsugu; Nakanishi, Kazuhisa; Sando, Motoki; Inagaki, Yusuke; Shikano, Michiko; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Katsumi, Kohei; Joh, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Some patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease experience persistent reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy. These symptoms reduce their health-related quality of life. Our aims were to evaluate the relationship between proton pump inhibitor efficacy and health-related quality of life and to evaluate predictive factors affecting treatment response in Japanese patients. Using the gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire, 145 gastroesophageal reflux disease patients undergoing proton pump inhibitor therapy were evaluated and classified as responders or partial-responders. Their health-related quality of life was then evaluated using the 8-item Short Form Health Survey, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaires. Sixty-nine patients (47.6%) were partial responders. These patients had significantly lower scores than responders in 5/8 subscales and in the mental health component summary of the 8-item Short Form Health Survey. Partial responders had significantly higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, including anxiety and depression scores, than those of responders. Non-erosive reflux disease and double proton pump inhibitor doses were predictive factors of partial responders. Persistent reflux symptoms, despite proton pump inhibitor therapy, caused mental health disorders, sleep disorders, and psychological distress in Japanese gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

  18. Modulation of phorbol ester-elicited events in mouse epidermis by dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Belury, M A; Leyton, J; Patrick, K E; Cumberland, A G; Locniskar, M; Fischer, S M

    1991-09-01

    Because arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids are potent modulators of hyperproliferation and inflammation during skin tumor promotion with the phorbol ester, 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (17, 18), it was hypothesized that dietary modification of epidermal fatty acids might modulate TPA-induced biochemical events in mouse skin. Semipurified diets containing 10% total fat composed of corn oil (CO) or a combination of CO and menhaden oil (MO) or coconut oil (CT) were fed to SENCAR mice for 4 weeks. Fatty acid composition of epidermal phospholipids generally reflected fatty acid composition of dietary oils fed to the mice. Since fatty acid-derived eicosanoids are thought to be essential in tumorigenesis, we compared the effects of dietary fats on prostaglandin E (PGE) production in epidermis treated with a single dose of TPA. TPA-induced PGE production in mouse epidermis from mice fed the MO diet was significantly reduced compared to PGE production in epidermal homogenates from mice fed the CO or CT diets. Type of dietary fats did not appear to modulate TPA-induced vascular permeability, however hyperplasia was slightly elevated in skins of mice fed MO. The subcellular distribution of protein kinase C, the plasma membrane receptor for TPA predominantly located in the cytosol (80%), was altered in epidermis from mice fed the MO diet compared to preparations from mice fed CO or CT diets which exhibited normal protein kinase C distribution. Our results suggest that n-3 rich dietary lipids modulate TPA-elicited events in mouse skin to a greater extent than diets containing higher proportions of saturated or n-6 fatty acids.

  19. Associations between respiratory symptoms, lung function and gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms in a population-based birth cohort

    PubMed Central

    Hancox, Robert J; Poulton, Richie; Taylor, D Robin; Greene, Justina M; McLachlan, Christene R; Cowan, Jan O; Flannery, Erin M; Herbison, G Peter; Sears, Malcolm R; Talley, Nicholas J

    2006-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported an association between asthma and gastro-oesophageal reflux, but it is unclear which condition develops first. The role of obesity in mediating this association is also unclear. We explored the associations between respiratory symptoms, lung function, and gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms in a birth cohort of approximately 1000 individuals. Methods Information on respiratory symptoms, asthma, atopy, lung function and airway responsiveness was obtained at multiple assessments from childhood to adulthood in an unselected birth cohort of 1037 individuals followed to age 26. Symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux and irritable bowel syndrome were recorded at age 26. Results Heartburn and acid regurgitation symptoms that were at least "moderately bothersome" at age 26 were significantly associated with asthma (odds ratio = 3.2; 95% confidence interval = 1.6–6.4), wheeze (OR = 3.5; 95% CI = 1.7–7.2), and nocturnal cough (OR = 4.3; 95% CI = 2.1–8.7) independently of body mass index. In women reflux symptoms were also associated with airflow obstruction and a bronchodilator response to salbutamol. Persistent wheezing since childhood, persistence of asthma since teenage years, and airway hyperresponsiveness since age 11 were associated with a significantly increased risk of heartburn and acid regurgitation at age 26. There was no association between irritable bowel syndrome and respiratory symptoms. Conclusion Reflux symptoms are associated with respiratory symptoms in young adults independently of body mass index. The mechanism of these associations remains unclear. PMID:17147826

  20. Design and testing of ultralite fabric reflux tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Pauley, K.A.; Antoniak, Z.I.; King, L.L.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of Ultralite Fabric Reflux Tubes intended to provide thermal control for a Lunar Colony. The Ultralite Fabric Reflux Tubes, under this phase of development, are constructed of thin-walled copper liners overwrapped with aluminoborosilicate fabric. These devices were constructed and tested in air at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and subsequently taken to the NASA Johnson Space Center for thermal vacuum experimentation.

  1. An old dietary regimen as a new lifestyle change for Gastro esophageal reflux disease: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Mohammad Akram; Mahfouz, Salah Al-Din Mahmoud; Selim, Noor Ahmed; Yar, Taley; Gillessen, Anton

    2015-09-01

    Treatment of gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is becoming a challenge for medical profession. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly recommended but many disadvantages of these drugs are being reported, particularly when used for long term. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are important cause of acid reflux. Gastric distention in upper stomach is the strongest stimulus for generation of TLESRs and is aggravated by intake of food in between meals. In an earlier cases report, two meals a day with intake of only fluids in between was suggested as a remedy for GERD. Present pilot study was conducted on 20 patients with endoscopically proven reflux esophagitis (Los Angles Grade a, b or c), who followed our advice to take meal twice a day with consumption of only soft drinks (fruit juices, tea, coffee, water, etc) in between and no medication for two weeks. On 14th day 15 patients (75%) were free of reflux symptoms, 2 (10%) had partial improvement and 3 (15%) reported no difference. It is concluded that two meals a day with intake of only fluids in between, whenever the patient feels hungry or thirsty, is a useful dietary regimen for the management of GERD. Further investigations are needed to confirm the benefits of this physiological lifestyle change. PMID:26408867

  2. The Benefits of Combination Therapy with Esomeprazole and Rebamipide in Symptom Improvement in Reflux Esophagitis: An International Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Jin; Park, Soo-Heon; Moon, Jeong Seop; Shin, Woon Geon; Kim, Jae Gyu; Lee, Yong Chan; Lee, Dong Ho; Jang, Jae Young; Kim, Jae J.; Lee, Hang-Lak; Lee, Sang Woo; Hwangbo, Young; Xu, Jianming; Wang, Bangmao; Xue, Zhanxiong; Liu, Fei; Yuan, Yaozong; Leelakusolvong, Somchai; Dy, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To investigate the effects of esomeprazole and rebamipide combination therapy on symptomatic improvement in patients with reflux esophagitis. Methods A total of 501 patients with reflux esophagitis were randomized into one of the following two treatment regimens: 40 mg esomeprazole plus 300 mg rebamipide daily (combination therapy group) or 40 mg esomeprazole daily (monotherapy group). We used a symptom questionnaire that evaluated heartburn, acid regurgitation, and four upper gastrointestinal symptoms. The primary efficacy end point was the mean decrease in the total symptom score. Results The mean decreases in the total symptom score at 4 weeks were estimated to be −18.1±13.8 in the combination therapy group and −15.1±11.9 in the monotherapy group (p=0.011). Changes in reflux symptoms from baseline after 4 weeks of treatment were −8.4±6.6 in the combination therapy group and −6.8±5.9 in the monotherapy group (p=0.009). Conclusions Over a 4-week treatment course, esomeprazole and rebamipide combination therapy was more effective in decreasing the symptoms of reflux esophagitis than esomeprazole monotherapy. PMID:27282265

  3. Measurement of respiratory morbidity in general practice in the United Kingdom during the acid transport event of January 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, J.; Fleming, D.; Williams, M.; McInnes, G.

    1989-02-01

    The Weekly Returns System of the Royal College of General Practitioners was used to assess the effect on respiratory illness of the acid transport event that occurred during January 1985. The pollution event, as assessed by SO/sub 2/ and smoke levels measured at pollution monitoring stations within and without the affected area showed only modest rises in SO/sub 2/ levels, which were less than levels that occurred 4 years earlier. January is the peak time of year for reporting of acute respiratory episodes, and the minor increase in pollution was not reflected in any rise in respiratory morbidity, both for all ages and for different age bands. There was a rise in rates for children up to the age of 14, but this was seen each year and in both polluted and nonpolluted areas. This was probably due to children returning to school after the winter vacation and the subsequent spread of viral infections. The limitations of the two data sets in this analysis are discussed, including the relative insensitivity of weekly data in picking out a short-lived event, the distribution of the practices and pollution monitoring stations, and the effect of the extreme cold weather and the coal miners' strike on domestic coal burning during this event.

  4. Measurement of respiratory morbidity in general practice in the United Kingdom during the acid transport event of January 1985.

    PubMed

    Ayres, J; Fleming, D; Williams, M; McInnes, G

    1989-02-01

    The Weekly Returns System of the Royal College of General Practitioners was used to assess the effect on respiratory illness of the acid transport event that occurred during January 1985. The pollution event, as assessed by SO2 and smoke levels measured at pollution monitoring stations within and without the affected area showed only modest rises in SO2 levels, which were less than levels that occurred 4 years earlier. January is the peak time of year for reporting of acute respiratory episodes, and the minor increase in pollution was not reflected in any rise in respiratory morbidity, both for all ages and for different age bands. There was a rise in rates for children up to the age of 14, but this was seen each year and in both polluted and nonpolluted areas. This was probably due to children returning to school after the winter vacation and the subsequent spread of viral infections. The limitations of the two data sets in this analysis are discussed, including the relative insensitivity of weekly data in picking out a short-lived event, the distribution of the practices and pollution monitoring stations, and the effect of the extreme cold weather and the coal miners' strike on domestic coal burning during this event.

  5. DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Maria Aparecida Coelho de Arruda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is probably one of the most prevalent diseases in the world that also compromises the quality of life of the affected significantly. Its incidence in Brazil is 12%, corresponding to 20 million individuals. Objective To update the GERD management and the new trends on diagnosis and treatment, reviewing the international and Brazilian experience on it. Method The literature review was based on papers published on Medline/Pubmed, SciELO, Lilacs, Embase and Cochrane crossing the following headings: gastroesophageal reflux disease, diagnosis, clinical treatment, surgery, fundoplication. Results Various factors are involved on GERD physiopathology, the most important being the transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Clinical manifestations are heartburn, regurgitation (typical symptoms), cough, chest pain, asthma, hoarseness and throat clearing (atypical symptoms), which may be followed or not by typical symptoms. GERD patients may present complications such as peptic stenosis, hemorrhage, and Barrett's esophagus, which is the most important predisposing factor to adenocarcinoma. The GERD diagnosis must be based on the anamnesis and the symptoms must be evaluated in terms of duration, intensity, frequency, triggering and relief factors, pattern of evolution and impact on the patient's quality of life. The diagnosis requires confirmation with different exams. The goal of the clinical treatment is to relieve the symptoms and surgical treatment is indicated for patients who require continued drug use, with intolerance to prolonged clinical treatment and with GERD complications. Conclusion GERD is a major digestive health problem and affect 12% of Brazilian people. The anamnesis is fundamental for the diagnosis of GERD, with special analysis of the typical and atypical symptoms (duration, intensity, frequency, triggering and relief factors, evolution and impact on the life quality). High digestive endoscopy and

  6. [Clinical and pathogenetic significance of collagen metabolism disorder in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Butorina, N V; Zaprudnov, A M; Vakhrushev, Ia M; Sharaev, P N

    2013-01-01

    In 62 children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and 32 with gastroduodenitis (DG) aged 9-17 years, the peculiarities of metabolism of collagen were studied. High levels of fractions of sialic acids were set, that was associated with the protein fructose, fractions of hydroxyproline in children with GERD compared with the patients with DG, which testify to the process of degradation of collagen and may be one of the factors contributing to the local inflammation of the esophagus and gastroduodenal zone of the digestive tract. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori, as well as violations of diet, play an important role in maintaining the inflammatory process.

  7. Full-mouth rehabilitation of a patient with gastroesophageal reflux disease: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Guo, Juanli; Reside, Glenn; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2011-10-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic condition caused by stomach acid regurgitating into the esophagus or oral cavity, often causing heartburn. Tooth erosion and wear are common oral manifestations of GERD. This clinical report describes the full-mouth rehabilitation of a patient with over 30 years of GERD, causing wear of maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth, along with complications associated with past restorations. Full-mouth rehabilitation of natural teeth in conjunction with dental implants was selected as the treatment option. Ideal occlusal design and optimal esthetics, along with reinforcement of oral hygiene, ensure a favorable prognosis.

  8. Reflux condensation in a closed tube

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, C.L.

    1984-10-01

    Reflux condensation which may have an appreciable effect on the reflood process in the reactor core during the loss-of-coolant accident is investigated experimentally and analytically in the present work using the vertical two-phase closed thermosyphon. The condensation heat transfer coefficients of the countercurrent vapor-liquid flows are locally measured along the condenser wall. The results indicate that Nusselt's solution for film condensation cannot interpret satisfactorily the observed trend. Further improvements are made to consider the effects of interfacial shear, waviness and non-condensable gas on condensation. The vapor shear retards the condensate flow and thus increases the film thickness, which results in lower heat transfer coefficients than those calculated from Nusselt theory. Modified Fanning friction factors which account for the augmentation of interfacial shear through phase change are used to evaluate the reduction of heat transfer by vapor shear. On the other hand, the waves appearing on the interface can enhance heat transfer rates. Such enhancement is determined by solving numerically the nonlinear equation for the wavy interface. When non-condensable gases are present in the system, they will accumulate at the condenser end forming a gas barrier to the vapor and shut off that portion. A two-dimensional model is developed to include both axial and radial diffusion of gas mass. This two-dimensional analysis indicates the inadequacy of the common one-dimensional diffuse-front model in considering only axial diffusion of gas in most physical systems.

  9. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Medical or Surgical Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Liakakos, Theodore; Karamanolis, George; Patapis, Paul; Misiakos, Evangelos P.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common condition with increasing prevalence worldwide. The disease encompasses a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms and disorders from simple heartburn without esophagitis to erosive esophagitis with severe complications, such as esophageal strictures and intestinal metaplasia. Diagnosis is based mainly on ambulatory esophageal pH testing and endoscopy. There has been a long-standing debate about the best treatment approach for this troublesome disease. Methods and Results. Medical treatment with PPIs has an excellent efficacy in reversing the symptoms of GERD, but they should be taken for life, and long-term side effects do exist. However, patients who desire a permanent cure and have severe complications or cannot tolerate long-term treatment with PPIs are candidates for surgical treatment. Laparoscopic antireflux surgery achieves a significant symptom control, increased patient satisfaction, and complete withdrawal of antireflux medications, in the majority of patients. Conclusion. Surgical treatment should be reserved mainly for young patients seeking permanent results. However, the choice of the treatment schedule should be individualized for every patient. It is up to the patient, the physician and the surgeon to decide the best treatment option for individual cases. PMID:20069112

  10. Safety Events in Kidney Transplant Recipients: Results from the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplant (FAVORIT) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Matthew R.; Gravens-Muller, Lisa; Costa, Nadiesda; Ivanova, Anastasia; Manitpisitkul, Wana; Bostom, Andrew G.; Diamantidis, Clarissa J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Kidney transplant recipients are at increased risk for adverse safety events related to their reduced renal function and many medications. Methods We determined the incidence of adverse safety events based on previously defined Agency for Healthcare and Research Quality (AHRQ) ICD-9 code-derived patient safety indicators (PSI) in the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplant (FAVORIT) trial participants who had a hospitalization stratified by tertiles of estimated glomerular filtration rate. We also examined the frequency of Micromedex defined two precautionary drug-drug interactions, and two medications whose use may be contraindicated due to reduced GFR from the FAVORIT trial Medication Thesaurus at baseline, and annually among 4110 participants. Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between patient safety events and baseline demographic and clinical variables at a participant level. Event rates were estimated at participant and visit levels. Results Of the 2514 patients with a hospitalization, 978 (38.9%) experienced an AHRQ PSI. Factors which were associated with more common AHRQ PSI included: US location, history of cardiovascular disease or diabetes, and lower tertile of estimated GFR. At a participant level, 2524 of the 4110 participants (61.4%) were taking a CNI and a statin, 378 (9.2%) were taking azathioprine and an ACE inhibitor, 171 (12.9%) were taking a sulfonylurea ), 45 (3.4%) were taking metformin despite a baseline GFR below 40 ml/min/1.73m2. Conclusions We conclude that patient safety events are not uncommon in kidney transplant recipients. Careful monitoring is necessary to prevent adverse outcomes. PMID:25393158

  11. [Function of oesophagus and gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Höhne, S; Wachter, R; Merkel, N; Hesse, V; Finke, R

    2014-04-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER) has a special meaning for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Twelve voluntary patients with CF up to the age of 25 underwent an oesophageal manometry and a 24-hour impedance-pH monitoring. These patients were without symptoms of GER. The examination proved an acid GER in 42 %. In the total population the frequency is ≤ 10 %. In 11 of 12 patients a pathologically low pressure of the lower oesophageal sphincter (LES) was found. No significant correlations between the DeMeester score and the pressure of the LES, the reflux and respiratory symptomatology, the lung function as well as the quality of life could be proven. However, there was a significant correlation between the DeMeester score and the acid clearance time. 37 % of the registered cough pushes were related to a GER, of which 78 % were associated with an acid GER. Therefore, coughing in patients with CF must not necessarily be caused by the underlying disease. The timely detection of a pathological GER in patients with CF, but without symptoms of GER, and its prompt therapy could protect the lung function. PMID:24718938

  12. Sex and Gender Differences in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Gwang Ha

    2016-01-01

    It is important to understand sex and gender-related differences in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) because gender-related biologic factors might lead to better prevention and therapy. Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) affects more women than men. GERD symptoms are more frequent in patients with NERD than in those with reflux esophagitis. However, men suffer pathologic diseases such as reflux esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) more frequently than women. The prevalence of reflux esophagitis is significantly increased with age in women, especially after their 50s. The mean age of EAC incidence in women is higher than in men, suggesting a role of estrogen in delaying the onset of BE and EAC. In a chronic rat reflux esophagitis model, nitric oxide was found to be an aggravating factor of esophageal injury in a male-predominant way. In addition, the expression of esophageal occludin, a tight junction protein that plays an important role in the esophageal defense mechanism, was up-regulated in women. This explains the male predominance of reflux esophagitis and delayed incidence of BE or EAC in women. Moreover, the symptoms such as heartburn, regurgitation, and extra-esophageal symptoms have been more frequently reported by women than by men, suggesting that sex and gender play a role in symptom perception. Differential sensitivity with augmented symptoms in women might have diagnostic and therapeutic influence. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that hormone replacement therapy has a protective effect against esophageal cancer. However, an anti-inflammatory role of estrogen remains compelling, which means further study is necessary in this area. PMID:27703114

  13. Enterogastric reflux and gastric clearance of refluxate in normal subjects and in patients with and without bile vomiting following peptic ulcer surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, C.; Hulks, G.; Cuschieri, A.

    1986-11-01

    A noninvasive scintigraphic technique was used to estimate enterogastric reflux and subsequent gastric evacuation of refluxate in 35 normal, healthy subjects and 55 patients previously treated by vagotomy or partial gastrectomy. Reflux was provoked by a milk drink and quantitated by counting 99Tcm-EHIDA activity within the gastric area during gamma camera imaging. Seven normal subjects (20%) showed reflux of 5-18% of initial activity (mean: 10%), with peak values occurring at 5-30 minutes (mean: 14 minutes) following the milk. Gastric evacuation of activity in these subjects was monoexponential (r = 0.993, T1/2 = 24.1 minutes). Reflux occurred more frequently than normal in patients with truncal vagotomy and drainage (22/28 patients) and partial gastrectomy (20/21 patients). All of 16 patients with Billroth II anastomoses exhibited reflux, which was excessive compared with refluxing normal subjects (mean: 25%; p less than 0.01) and occurred later into the study (mean: 34 minutes; p less than 0.01). Ten of 11 asymptomatic patients showed reflux of similar amounts of activity (mean: 21%) compared with 16 patients who complained of bile vomiting (mean: 22%). However, asymptomatic patients exhibited gastric evacuation of refluxate at a rate similar to that of refluxing normal subjects, while bile vomiters showed significant gastric retention of refluxate at 25-30 minutes following peak gastric activity (p less than 0.05). This result confirms that post-operative bile vomiting is essentially a problem of gastric emptying.

  14. Safety analysis of first 1000 patients treated with magnetic sphincter augmentation for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lipham, J C; Taiganides, P A; Louie, B E; Ganz, R A; DeMeester, T R

    2015-01-01

    Antireflux surgery with a magnetic sphincter augmentation device (MSAD) restores the competency of the lower esophageal sphincter with a device rather than a tissue fundoplication. As a regulated device, safety information from the published clinical literature can be supplemented by tracking under the Safe Medical Devices Act. The aim of this study was to examine the safety profile of the MSAD in the first 1000 implanted patients. We compiled safety data from all available sources as of July 1, 2013. The analysis included intra/perioperative complications, hospital readmissions, procedure-related interventions, reoperations, and device malfunctions leading to injury or inability to complete the procedure. Over 1000 patients worldwide have been implanted with the MSAD at 82 institutions with median implant duration of 274 days. Event rates were 0.1% intra/perioperative complications, 1.3% hospital readmissions, 5.6% endoscopic dilations, and 3.4% reoperations. All reoperations were performed non-emergently for device removal, with no complications or conversion to laparotomy. The primary reason for device removal was dysphagia. No device migrations or malfunctions were reported. Erosion of the device occurred in one patient (0.1%). The safety analysis of the first 1000 patients treated with MSAD for gastroesophageal reflux disease confirms the safety of this device and the implantation technique. The overall event rates were low based on data from 82 institutions. The MSAD is a safe therapeutic option for patients with chronic, uncomplicated gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  15. Cisapride for gastro-oesophageal reflux and peptic oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Cucchiara, S; Staiano, A; Capozzi, C; Di Lorenzo, C; Boccieri, A; Auricchio, S

    1987-01-01

    Twenty children (age range 75 days-47 months) with reflux oesophagitis entered a random double blind trial in which they received either Cisapride (Janssen Pharmaceutical Ltd), a new prokinetic agent, or an identical placebo syrup. Diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux was made by measurement of intraluminal oesophageal pH combined with manometry. Oesophagitis was assessed in all patients by histological examination of mucosal specimens taken during oesophagogastroduodenoscopy. Manometry, pH test, and endoscopy with biopsy examination were repeated at the end of the treatment period. Seventeen patients completed the trial, eight of whom were taking the drug and nine the placebo. Mean total clinical score and post-prandial reflux time (% of reflux) significantly improved in patients in the group given Cisapride but not in the group given placebo. Furthermore, there was a significant improvement of the histological oesophagitis score only in the children in the group given Cisapride, whereas placebo was ineffective. It is concluded that Cisapride is a useful agent both for the relief of symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux and for the healing of peptic oesophagitis in infancy. PMID:3300570

  16. Characteristics of non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease refractory to proton pump inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Nishino, Masafumi; Kodaira, Chise; Yamade, Mihoko; Uotani, Takahiro; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Umemura, Kazuo; Furuta, Takahisa

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether potent acid inhibition is effective in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) refractory to standard rabeprazole (RPZ) treatment. METHODS: We treated 10 Japanese patients with NERD resistant to standard dosages of RPZ: 10 mg or 20 mg od, 20 mg bid, or 10 mg qid for 14 d. All patients completed a frequency scale for symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (FSSG); and underwent 24 h pH monitoring on day 14. RESULTS: With increased dosages and frequency of administration of RPZ, median intragastric pH significantly increased, and FSSG scores significantly decreased. With RPZ 10 mg qid, potent acid inhibition was attained throughout 24 h. However, five subjects were refractory to RPZ 10 mg qid, although the median intragastric pH in these subjects (6.6, range: 6.2-7.1) was similar to that in the remaining five responsive subjects (6.5, range: 5.3-7.3). With baseline RPZ 10 mg od, FSSG scores in responsive patients improved by > 30%, whereas there was no significant decrease in the resistant group. CONCLUSION: NERD patients whose FSSG score fails to decrease by > 30% after treatment with RPZ 10 mg od for 14 d are refractory to higher dosage. PMID:21528060

  17. [Voice disturbances in young children with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Viaz'menov, E O; Radtsig, E Iu; Bogomil'skiĭ, M R; Vodolazov, S Iu; Poliudov, S A; Myzin, A V

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study voice disturbances in young children with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Diagnostic algorithm included direct transnasal examination of the larynx using an Olympus fibroscope (Japan), fibrogastroduodenoscopy, 24-hour potentiometry, biopsy of oesophageal mucosa, and acoustic analysis of the voice. A total of 26 children at the age from 8 months to 3 years with voice disturbances were examined, including 12 children below one year, 5 between 1 and 2 years, and 9 between 2 and 3 years. The main signs of laryngoesophageal reflux were dysphonia, oedema, hyperemia, and altered light reflex of mucous membrane of arytenoid cartilages, interarytenoid space, and vocal cords. It is concluded that voice disturbances are the most common symptoms of laryngoesophageal reflux in young children which necessitates the earliest possible endoscopic study of the larynx in all cases of dysphonia. PMID:20517277

  18. Pay attention to reflux/feed entry design

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, B.; Martin, G.R.; Hartman, E.L.

    1996-01-01

    Trays generally are forgiving pieces of equipment and can conceal the effects of poorly designed feed and reflux entries. When one tries to push a tower to its hydraulic limit, however, poor entry design can penalize the performance of the trays and result in a lower final capacity. Normally, new towers are not as susceptible to entry design problems as ones being revamped. This is because new towers usually have some degree of capacity oversizing.Standard design practices used for new columns having spare capacity, though, may not be suitable for revamped towers. In this article, the authors detail the basic principles of reflux and feed entry design, good practices to follow, and poor practices to avoid. They also include a case study of a large-diameter light hydrocarbon splitter revamped with high capacity trays to illustrate the potential pitfalls associated with incorrectly designed reflux and feed entry arrangements.

  19. [A case of gastroesophageal reflux disease with marked eosinophilia].

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Rika; Yasunaga, Yuichi; Kizu, Takashi; Inoue, Takuya; Watanabe, Chie; Matsumoto, Yumi; Katata, Tatsuo; Inui, Yoshiaki; Kohro, Takashi; Nishikawa, Masahiro

    2007-04-01

    A 73-year-old woman without a history of allergic diseases visited our hospital complaining of sore throat and nocturnal cough. Blood tests showed marked eosinophilia (18000/mm(3);WBC 21900/mm(3), Eos 82.0%) with normal serum levels of C-reactive protein, non-specific and various allergen-specific IgE. Stool tests for protozoa or helminthic ova were negative. Chest X-ray films showed no pulmonary abnormalities. Endoscopic and histological examinations revealed reflux esophagitis (grade C according to the Los Angeles Classification System) with hiatal hernia with inflammatory infiltrates including eosinophils within the esophageal mucosa. A computed tomography showed the thickening of the esophageal wall. An administration of lansoprazole improved reflux esophagitis and also eosinophilia, and an alteration to famotidine caused heartburn with an increase in eosinophils. A re-alteration to omeprazole relieved the symptom and decreased eosinophils. It was shown that gastroesophageal reflux disease was one of the possible causes of eosinophilia.

  20. [Otorhinolaryngeal and phonation aspects of gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Horváth, E; Taller, A; Eló, J

    2001-11-25

    Experts dealing with patients of chronic upper and lower airway disorders have drawn a lot of interest in the last decades to gastrooesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Nowadays it is obvious that 'occult GORD' may be an aetiological factor in this group of patients. GORD may has a role in lot of organic laryngeal diseases and functional voice disorders. Symptoms are triggered by gastric content refluxed into the oesophagus, which cause irritation and inflammation. At laryngeal and phoniatric examinations gastrointestinal signs might remain hidden behind chronic cough, hoarseness and globus sensation. Authors summarise the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities of GORD and its typical laryngeal and phoniatric manifestations. Although the first step is medication of GORD, it might come to surgical intervention of the laryngeal alterations, sometimes followed by voice therapy as well. Authors draw attention to patients after laryngectomy, whose voice rehabilitation therapy is extremely hindered by medical therapy resistant GORD. These patients may benefit of anti-reflux surgery.

  1. [Vesicoureteric reflux in children: many questions still unanswered].

    PubMed

    Zieg, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) is the most common congenital anomaly of the uropoetic system. The gold standard for its diagnosis is the voiding cystourethrogram. Sonographic cystourethrography is an alternative method for reflux detection, but it is still not used routinely. Static scintigraphy enables us to diagnose renal scarring reflux nephropathy (RN). While congenital RN is a result of prenatal kidney injury, acquired RN results from pyelonephritis-induced renal damage.Risk factors for RN include VUR, recurrent APN, lower urinary tract dysfunction and delay in treatment of febrile urinary tract infection. Management of children after APN with VUR consists of antibiotic prophylaxy, surgery or surveillance only. The conclusions of performed studies are controversial, thus unified guidelines for the management of patients with VUR are not available. PMID:27256146

  2. Identification of okadaic acid-induced phosphorylation events by a mass spectrometry approach.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jennifer J; Callaghan, Deborah A; Ding, Wen; Kelly, John F; Chakravarthy, Balu R

    2006-04-14

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a widely used small-molecule phosphatase inhibitor that is thought to selectively inhibit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Multiple studies have demonstrated that PP2A activity is compromised in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Thus, we set out to determine changes in phosphorylation that occur upon OA treatment of neuronal cells. Utilizing isotope-coded affinity tags and mass spectrometry analysis, we determined the relative abundance of proteins in a phosphoprotein enriched fraction from control and OA-treated primary cortical neurons. We identified many proteins whose phosphorylation state is regulated by OA, including glycogen synthase kinase 3beta, collapsin-response mediator proteins (DRP-2, DPYSL-5, and CRMP-4), and the B subunit of PP2A itself. Most interestingly, we have found that complexin 2, an important regulator of neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity, is phosphorylated at serine 93 upon OA treatment of neurons. This is the first report of a phosphorylation site on complexin 2.

  3. Identification of okadaic acid-induced phosphorylation events by a mass spectrometry approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Jennifer J. . E-mail: Jennifer.Hill@nrc.gc.ca; Callaghan, Deborah A.; Ding Wen; Kelly, John F.; Chakravarthy, Balu R.

    2006-04-14

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a widely used small-molecule phosphatase inhibitor that is thought to selectively inhibit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Multiple studies have demonstrated that PP2A activity is compromised in Brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Thus, we set out to determine changes in phosphorylation that occur upon OA treatment of neuronal cells. Utilizing isotope-coded affinity tags and mass spectrometry analysis, we determined the relative abundance of proteins in a phosphoprotein enriched fraction from control and OA-treated primary cortical neurons. We identified many proteins whose phosphorylation state is regulated by OA, including glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta}, collapsin-response mediator proteins (DRP-2, DPYSL-5, and CRMP-4), and the B subunit of PP2A itself. Most interestingly, we have found that complexin 2, an important regulator of neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity, is phosphorylated at serine 93 upon OA treatment of neurons. This is First report of a phosphorylation site on complexin 2.

  4. [Dyspepsia, Ulcer Disease – Helicobacter pylori, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    PubMed

    Wirth, Hans-Peter

    2016-06-01

    Prevalence of H. pylori (HP) is declining, whereas reflux disease and the proportion of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAR) to HP-induced ulcers increase. Eradication heals HP-ulcer disease, interrupts cancerous progression and can improve dyspeptic symptoms. NSAR-ulcers heal under proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy but tend to recur after reexposition. Anticoagulants and antiplatlet agents increase the risk additionally. PPI reduces NSAR-ulcer recurrence. Reflux patients with severe inflammation and complications often need long-term therapy. Barrett’s esophagus patients are at risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  5. Autosomal dominant optic nerve colobomas, vesicoureteral reflux, and renal anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmenti, L.A.; Pierpont, M.E.; Carpenter, B.L.M.

    1995-11-06

    We describe a father and 3 sons with optic nerve colobomas, vesicoureteral reflux, and renal anomalies. The youngest son had congenital renal failure and ultimately underwent renal transplantation. The father and one son had high frequency hearing loss. There were no other affected relatives. We conclude that the association of optic nerve colobomas, renal anomalies, and vesicoureteral reflux comprises a unique autosomal dominant syndrome. Molecular investigations have determined this disorder to be associated with a single nucleotide deletion in the PAX2 gene. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Unmet Needs in the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Dickman, Ram; Maradey-Romero, Carla; Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Fass, Ronnie

    2015-07-30

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent gastrointestinal disorder. Proton pump inhibitors have profoundly revolutionized the treatment of GERD. However, several areas of unmet need persist despite marked improvements in the ther-apeutic management of GERD. These include the advanced grades of erosive esophagitis, nonerosive reflux disease, main-tenance treatment of erosive esophagitis, refractory GERD, postprandial heartburn, atypical and extraesophageal manifestations of GERD, Barrett's esophagus, chronic protein pump inhibitor treatment, and post-bariatric surgery GERD. Consequently, any fu-ture development of novel therapeutic modalities for GERD (medical, endoscopic, or surgical), would likely focus on the afore-mentioned areas of unmet need.

  7. [Dyspepsia, Ulcer Disease – Helicobacter pylori, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    PubMed

    Wirth, Hans-Peter

    2016-06-01

    Prevalence of H. pylori (HP) is declining, whereas reflux disease and the proportion of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAR) to HP-induced ulcers increase. Eradication heals HP-ulcer disease, interrupts cancerous progression and can improve dyspeptic symptoms. NSAR-ulcers heal under proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy but tend to recur after reexposition. Anticoagulants and antiplatlet agents increase the risk additionally. PPI reduces NSAR-ulcer recurrence. Reflux patients with severe inflammation and complications often need long-term therapy. Barrett’s esophagus patients are at risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27269775

  8. Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease: effects on risk factors, molecular pathways, and clinical events.

    PubMed

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Wu, Jason H Y

    2011-11-01

    We reviewed available evidence for cardiovascular effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) consumption, focusing on long chain (seafood) n-3 PUFA, including their principal dietary sources, effects on physiological risk factors, potential molecular pathways and bioactive metabolites, effects on specific clinical endpoints, and existing dietary guidelines. Major dietary sources include fatty fish and other seafood. n-3 PUFA consumption lowers plasma triglycerides, resting heart rate, and blood pressure and might also improve myocardial filling and efficiency, lower inflammation, and improve vascular function. Experimental studies demonstrate direct anti-arrhythmic effects, which have been challenging to document in humans. n-3 PUFA affect a myriad of molecular pathways, including alteration of physical and chemical properties of cellular membranes, direct interaction with and modulation of membrane channels and proteins, regulation of gene expression via nuclear receptors and transcription factors, changes in eicosanoid profiles, and conversion of n-3 PUFA to bioactive metabolites. In prospective observational studies and adequately powered randomized clinical trials, benefits of n-3 PUFA seem most consistent for coronary heart disease mortality and sudden cardiac death. Potential effects on other cardiovascular outcomes are less-well-established, including conflicting evidence from observational studies and/or randomized trials for effects on nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, atrial fibrillation, recurrent ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Research gaps include the relative importance of different physiological and molecular mechanisms, precise dose-responses of physiological and clinical effects, whether fish oil provides all the benefits of fish consumption, and clinical effects of plant-derived n-3 PUFA. Overall, current data provide strong concordant evidence that n-3 PUFA are bioactive compounds that reduce risk of cardiac

  9. Association Between Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease After Pneumatic Balloon Dilatation and Clinical Course in Patients With Achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yang Won; Lee, Jin Hee; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Kim, Jae J; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is known to be associated with lower post-treatment lower esophageal sphincter pressure in patients with achalasia. This study aimed to elucidate whether GERD after pneumatic balloon dilatation (PD) has a prognostic role and to investigate how the clinical course of GERD is. Methods A total of 79 consecutive patients who were first diagnosed with primary achalasia and underwent PD as an initial treatment were included in this retrospective study. Single PD was performed using a 3.0 cm balloon. The patients were divided into two groups: 1) who developed GERD after PD (GERD group) and 2) who did not develop GERD after PD (non-GERD group). GERD was defined as pathological acid exposure, reflux esophagitis or typical reflux symptoms. Results Twenty one patients (26.6%) developed GERD after PD during follow-up. There were no significant differences between the two groups in demographic or clinical factors including pre- and post-treatment manometric results. All patients in GERD group were well responsive to maintenance proton pump inhibitor therapy including on demand therapy or did not require maintenance. During a median follow-up of 17.8 months (interquartile range, 7.1–42.7 months), achalasia recurred in 15 patients (19.0%). However, the incidence of recurrence did not differ according to the occurrence of GERD after PD. Conclusions GERD often occurs after even a single PD for achalasia. However, GERD after PD is well responsive to PPI therapy. Our data suggest that GERD after PD during follow-up does not appear to have a prognostic role. PMID:24840373

  10. Esophageal Helicobacter pylori colonization aggravates esophageal injury caused by reflux

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yun-Xiang; Wang, Wei-Hong; Dai, Yun; Teng, Gui-Gen; Wang, Shu-Jun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate esophageal Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization on esophageal injury caused by reflux and the related mechanisms. METHODS: An esophagitis model, with acid and bile reflux, was surgically produced in male rats. The rats were randomly divided into either: (1) an esophagogastroduodenal anastomosis (EGDA) group; (2) an EGDA with H. pylori infection group; (3) a pseudo-operation with H. pylori infection group; or (4) a pseudo-operation group. All rats were kept for 36 wk. Based on the location of H. pylori colonization, the EGDA rats with H. pylori infection were subdivided into those with concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization or those with only gastric H. pylori colonization. The esophageal injuries were evaluated grossly and microscopically. The expressions of CDX2 and MUC2 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Ki-67 antigen expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA levels of cyclin D1, c-Myc, Bax and Bcl-2 were determined by RT-PCR. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using the TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling method. RESULTS: Esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) developed in rats that underwent EGDA. When comparing rats with EGDA and concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization to EGDA-only rats, the severity of injury (87.9 ± 5.2 vs 77.2 ± 8.6, macroscopically, 92.5 ± 8.0 vs 83.8 ± 5.5, microscopically, both P < 0.05) and the incidences of BE (80.0% vs 33.3%, P = 0.055) and EAC (60.0% vs 11.1%, P < 0.05) were increased. These increases were associated with upregulation of CDX2 and MUC2 mRNA (10.1 ± 5.4 vs 3.0 ± 2.9, 8.4 ± 4.6 vs 2.0 ± 3.2, respectively, Ps < 0.01) and protein (8.1 ± 2.3 vs 3.3 ± 3.1, 7.3 ± 4.0 vs 1.8 ± 2.7, respectively, all P < 0.05). The expression of Ki-67 (8.9 ± 0.7 vs 6.0 ± 1.7, P < 0.01) and the presence of apoptotic cells (8.3 ± 1.1 vs 5.3 ± 1.7, P < 0.01) were also increased

  11. A New Pathologic Assessment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: The Squamo-Oxyntic Gap.

    PubMed

    Chandrasoma, Parakrama; DeMeester, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is delayed by the lack of uniform histopathologic criteria for diagnosis. The only practical value of pathology is the assessment of columnar lined esophagus (CLO). As a result, GORD is treated with acid suppressive drug therapy until there is a failure to control symptoms and/or advanced adenocarcinoma develops. The reasons why there is a failure of pathologic diagnosis are two false dogmas that result in two widely believed fundamental errors. These are the belief that cardiac epithelium normally lines the proximal stomach (1) and that the gastroesophageal junction (GOJ) is defined by the proximal limit of rugal folds (2). When these false dogmas are eradicated by existing powerful evidence, the pathology of GERD falls into the following stages, all defined by histology: (a) The normal state where the esophageal squamous epithelium transitions at the GOJ to gastric oxyntic epithelium with no intervening cardiac epithelium; (b) cardiac metaplasia of the squamous epithelium due to exposure to gastric juice results in cephalad movement of the squamo-columnar junction (SCJ). This creates the squamo-oxyntic gap and the dilated distal esophagus, which is distal to the endoscopic GOJ. The length of the squamo-oxyntic gap in the dilated distal esophagus is concordant with the shortening of the abdominal segment of the lower esophageal sphincter (LOS); (c) in the early stages, the gap is <5 mm and the LOS retains its competence. Reflux is uncommon and patients are asymptomatic; (d) the squamo-oxyntic gap increases in length, concordant with the amount of shortening of the LOS, which becomes increasingly incompetent. At a gap length of 5-15 mm, reflux is sufficient to cause symptoms, but in most patients, symptoms are controllable and the patients are normal at endoscopy. The gap is entirely within the dilated distal esophagus, which is mistaken by present criteria for proximal stomach. (e) The last stage of GORD is when

  12. Managing complications I: leaks, strictures, emptying, reflux, chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Esophagectomy can be used to treat several esophageal diseases; it is most commonly used for treatment of esophageal cancer. Esophagectomy is a major procedure that may result in various complications. This article reviews only the important complications resulting from esophageal resection, which are anastomotic complications after esophageal reconstruction (leakage and stricture), delayed emptying or dumping syndrome, reflux, and chylothorax. PMID:24876942

  13. The association between gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity.

    PubMed

    Friedenberg, Frank K; Xanthopoulos, Melissa; Foster, Gary D; Richter, Joel E

    2008-08-01

    Nearly all epidemiologic studies have found an association between increasing body mass index (BMI) and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Changes in gastroesophageal anatomy and physiology caused by obesity may explain the association. These include an increased prevalence of esophageal motor disorders, diminished lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, the development of a hiatal hernia, and increased intragastric pressure. Central adiposity may be the most important risk for the development of reflux and related complications such as Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Weight loss, through caloric restriction and behavioral modification, has been studied infrequently as a means of improving reflux. Bariatric surgery and its effects on a number of obesity-related disorders have been studied more extensively. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has been consistently associated with improvement in the symptoms and findings of GERD. The mechanism of action through which this surgery is successful at improving GERD may be independent of weight loss and needs further examination. Current evidence suggests that laparoscopic adjusted gastric banding should be avoided in these patients as the impact on gastroesophageal reflux disease appears unfavorable.

  14. Helping Families Understand and Manage Pediatric Gastroesophageal Reflux

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulsifer-Anderson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a common medical problem affecting about 5% of otherwise healthy children. It is extremely common among children with special needs and affects more than half of children with cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, premature birth, and several other common conditions. The disease is becoming more widely recognized, but children…

  15. The human laryngeal microbiome: effects of cigarette smoke and reflux

    PubMed Central

    Jetté, Marie E.; Dill-McFarland, Kimberly A.; Hanshew, Alissa S.; Suen, Garret; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged diffuse laryngeal inflammation from smoking and/or reflux is commonly diagnosed as chronic laryngitis and treated empirically with expensive drugs that have not proven effective. Shifts in microbiota have been associated with many inflammatory diseases, though little is known about how resident microbes may contribute to chronic laryngitis. We sought to characterize the core microbiota of disease-free human laryngeal tissue and to investigate shifts in microbial community membership associated with exposure to cigarette smoke and reflux. Using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we compared bacterial communities of laryngeal tissue biopsies collected from 97 non-treatment-seeking volunteers based on reflux and smoking status. The core community was characterized by a highly abundant OTU within the family Comamonadaceae found in all laryngeal tissues. Smokers demonstrated less microbial diversity than nonsmokers, with differences in relative abundances of OTUs classified as Streptococcus, unclassified Comamonadaceae, Cloacibacterium, and Helicobacter. Reflux status did not affect microbial diversity nor community structure nor composition. Comparison of healthy laryngeal microbial communities to benign vocal fold disease samples revealed greater abundance of Streptococcus in benign vocal fold disease suggesting that mucosal dominance by Streptococcus may be a factor in disease etiology. PMID:27775059

  16. Gastric volvulus and associated gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, M; Burge, D M; Griffiths, D M

    1995-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1994, 10 neurologically normal children between 2 and 24 months were diagnosed as having gastric volvulus with associated gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR). The common features at presentation were episodic colicky abdominal pain, non-bilious vomiting, upper abdominal distension, haematemesis, and failure to thrive. Anterior gastropexy and conservative management of GOR was curative. Images Figure 2 PMID:8554369

  17. Vesicoureteral reflux in young children: a study of radiometric thermometry as detection modality using an ex vivo porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Svein; Klemetsen, Øystein; Birkelund, Yngve

    2012-09-01

    Microwave radiometry is evaluated for renal thermometry tailored to detect the pediatric condition of vesicoureteral urine reflux (VUR) from the bladder through the ureter into the kidney. Prior to a potential reflux event, the urine is heated within the bladder by an external body contacting a hyperthermia applicator to generate a fluidic contrast temperature relative to normal body temperature. A single band, miniaturized radiometer (operating at 3.5 GHz) is connected to an electromagnetic-interference-shielded and suction-coupled elliptical antenna to receive thermal radiation from an ex vivo porcine phantom model. Brightness (radiometric) and fiberoptic temperature data are recorded for varying urine phantom reflux volumes (20-40 mL) and contrast temperatures ranging from 2 to 10 °C within the kidney phantom. The kidney phantom itself is located at 40 mm depth (skin-to-kidney center distance) and surrounded by the porcine phantom. Radiometric step responses to injection of urine simulant by a syringe are shown to be highly correlated with in situ kidney temperatures measured by fiberoptic probes. Statistically, the performance of the VUR detecting scheme is evaluated by error probabilities of making a wrong decision. Laboratory testing of the radiometric system supports the feasibility of passive non-invasive kidney thermometry for the detection of VUR classified within the two highest grades

  18. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Refractory to Proton Pump Inhibitors and the Effects of Switching to 20 mg Esomeprazole on Reflux Symptoms and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Fuminao; Hashiguchi, Keiichi; Onitsuka, Yasunori; Tanigawa, Ken; Minami, Hitomi; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Shiozawa, Ken; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Taura, Naota; Ohnita, Ken; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Isomoto, Hajime; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-12-31

    BACKGROUND Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may deteriorate patient quality of life (QOL) despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS Nineteen Japanese institutions were surveyed to determine the clinical characteristics and QOL of patients with refractory GERD. Those patients treated with a conventional PPI were switched to 20 mg esomeprazole for 4 weeks. Symptoms and QOL were assessed using Global Overall Symptom and Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) questionnaires at baseline and at 2 and/or 4 weeks of esomeprazole treatment. RESULTS Of 120 patients who completed the survey, 58 (48.3%) had refractory GERD. Of these, 69.0% were aged ≥ 65 years, 79.3% were prescribed a PPI at a standard or high dose, and 22.4% were prescribed a PPI together with another drug. After switching to esomeprazole, patients reported significant improvements in heartburn, acid regurgitation, and excessive belching at 2 weeks using a symptom diary, as well as the total score, reflux, abdominal pain, and indigestion, which were assessed using the GSRS at 4 weeks. CONCLUSIONS About half of Japanese patients with GERD may be refractory to conventional PPIs. Their reflux-related symptoms are often severe and may impair QOL. Switching to esomeprazole could be used to improve their symptoms and QOL.

  19. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Refractory to Proton Pump Inhibitors and the Effects of Switching to 20 mg Esomeprazole on Reflux Symptoms and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, Fuminao; Hashiguchi, Keiichi; Onitsuka, Yasunori; Tanigawa, Ken; Minami, Hitomi; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Shiozawa, Ken; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Taura, Naota; Ohnita, Ken; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Isomoto, Hajime; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may deteriorate patient quality of life (QOL) despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Material/Methods Nineteen Japanese institutions were surveyed to determine the clinical characteristics and QOL of patients with refractory GERD. Those patients treated with a conventional PPI were switched to 20 mg esomeprazole for 4 weeks. Symptoms and QOL were assessed using Global Overall Symptom and Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) questionnaires at baseline and at 2 and/or 4 weeks of esomeprazole treatment. Results Of 120 patients who completed the survey, 58 (48.3%) had refractory GERD. Of these, 69.0% were aged ≥65 years, 79.3% were prescribed a PPI at a standard or high dose, and 22.4% were prescribed a PPI together with another drug. After switching to esomeprazole, patients reported significant improvements in heartburn, acid regurgitation, and excessive belching at 2 weeks using a symptom diary, as well as the total score, reflux, abdominal pain, and indigestion, which were assessed using the GSRS at 4 weeks. Conclusions About half of Japanese patients with GERD may be refractory to conventional PPIs. Their reflux-related symptoms are often severe and may impair QOL. Switching to esomeprazole could be used to improve their symptoms and QOL. PMID:26719012

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in the Greek general population: prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Spantideas, Nikolaos; Drosou, Eirini; Bougea, Anastasia; Assimakopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Population-based data regarding the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Greece are very poor. This study estimated the prevalence of GERD symptoms and their risk factors in the Greek adult population. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was answered by a randomly selected population of 340 subjects. The question regarding “heartburn, chest pain, indigestion, or stomach acid coming up” as included in the Reflux Symptom Index was used for prevalence assessment. Results The monthly prevalence of GERD symptoms was found to be 52.0% in the Greek general population, with no statistically significant difference between the two sexes (P>0.05). The age group of 65–79 years showed a higher prevalence rate of GERD. Symptom severity was found to be mild (59.3%) or moderate (27.1%). The number of cigarettes smoked daily (but not smoking duration) as well as the number of alcoholic drinks consumed daily (but not the duration of alcohol drinking) were found to be related to GERD symptoms. No reported concomitant disease or medication was found to be related with GERD symptoms. Conclusion The prevalence of GERD symptoms in the Greek general population was found to be 52.0%. Tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking but not concomitant disease or medications were found to be related with GERD symptoms. PMID:27382324

  1. Life events and daily hassles in patients with atypical chest pain.

    PubMed

    Lau, G K; Hui, W M; Lam, S K

    1996-10-01

    The impact of major life events and daily hassles on atypical chest pain is unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship of the occurrence and perception of major life events and daily hassles in atypical chest pain patients. Five groups of subjects were studied. They were healthy controls, atypical chest pain patients without motility/reflux changes, atypical chest pain patients with motility/reflux changes, dyspeptic patients, and patients with chronic obstructive airway disease/peptic ulcer/gallstone. A questionnaire concerning the occurrence and perception of major life events and daily hassles was administered to all five groups of subjects. Using analysis of variance, we found that atypical chest pain patients without underlying motility/reflux changes had significantly higher scores of negative life events and total life events than healthy controls, atypical chest pain patients with underlying motility/reflux changes, and patients with chronic obstructive airway disease/peptic ulcer/gallstone. There were no significant differences between atypical chest pain patients without underlying motility/reflux changes and patients with dyspepsia in terms of the number of negative life events, negative scores, number of positive life events, positive scores, and total life events. Discriminate analysis identified five of the 47 major life events (major changes in sleeping habits, change in work situation, major changes in financial status, retirement, and suffering from severe illness or injury) to be useful for discriminating atypical chest pain patients without underlying motility/reflux changes from the healthy controls and from atypical chest pain patients with underlying motility/reflux changes. The overall correct classification rate was 81.8%. In conclusion, psychological factors, such as perception of negative life events and occurrence and perception of daily hassles, may play a role in the pathogenesis of atypical chest pain.

  2. Sonographic Measurement of Abdominal Esophageal Length as a Diagnostic Tool in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Dehdashti, Hamid; Dehdashtian, Masoud; Rahim, Fakher; Payvasteh, Mehrdad

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim: This study was conducted to provide sonographic measurements of the abdominal esophagus length in neonates and infants with and without gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and to investigate its diagnostic value. GERD severity was also evaluated and correlated with esophageal length. It is a prospective case-control study. Materials and Methods: This prospective case-control study comprised 235 neonates and infants (120 without reflux and 115 with reflux). There were 40 children without reflux in each of three age categories: less than 1 month, 1–6 months, and 6–12 months. Of the children with reflux, 40 were less than 1 month old; 37, 1–6 months; and 38, 6–12 months. The abdominal esophagus was measured from its entrance into the diaphragm to the base of gastric folds in fed infants. GERD was sonographically diagnosed and confirmed by a barium meal. The number of refluxes during a 10-min period were recorded. Results: Neonates and infants with reflux had a significantly shorter abdominal esophagus than subjects without reflux: the mean difference in neonates, 4.65 mm; 1–6 months, 4.57 mm; 6–12 months, 3.61 mm. Conclusions: Children with severe reflux had a shorter esophagus compared with those with mild and moderate reflux only in the neonate group. Therefore, thinking of GERD and carefully looking for its symptoms is necessary to avoid unnecessary utilization of healthcare resources in children with severe reflux. PMID:21196654

  3. Molecular composition and size distribution of sugars, sugar-alcohols and carboxylic acids in airborne particles during a severe urban haze event caused by wheat straw burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gehui; Chen, Chunlei; Li, Jianjun; Zhou, Bianhong; Xie, Mingjie; Hu, Shuyuan; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Chen, Yan

    2011-05-01

    Molecular compositions and size distributions of water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC, i.e., sugars, sugar-alcohols and carboxylic acids) in particles from urban air of Nanjing, China during a severe haze event caused by field burning of wheat straw were characterized and compared with those in the summer and autumn non-haze periods. During the haze event levoglucosan (4030 ng m -3) was the most abundant compound among the measured WSOC, followed by succinic acid, malic acid, glycerol, arabitol and glucose, being different from those in the non-haze samples, in which sucrose or azelaic acid showed a second highest concentration, although levoglucosan was the highest. The measured WSOC in the haze event were 2-20 times more than those in the non-hazy days. Size distribution results showed that there was no significant change in the compound peaks in coarse mode (>2.1 μm) with respect to the haze and non-haze samples, but a large difference in the fine fraction (<2.1 μm) was found with a sharp increase during the hazy days mostly due to the increased emissions of wheat straw burning. Molecular compositions of organic compounds in the fresh smoke particles from wheat straw burning demonstrate that sharply increased concentrations of glycerol and succinic and malic acids in the fine particles during the haze event were mainly derived from the field burning of wheat straw, although the sources of glucose and related sugar-alcohols whose concentrations significantly increased in the fine haze samples are unclear. Compared to that in the fresh smoke particles of wheat straw burning an increase in relative abundance of succinic acid to levoglucosan during the haze event suggests a significant production of secondary organic aerosols during transport of the smoke plumes.

  4. Management of gastroesophageal reflux disease: medications, surgery, or endoscopic therapy? (Current status and trends).

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xu-ting; Kavic, Stephen M; Park, Adrian E

    2005-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common chronic disorder in the Western world. The basic cause of GERD has been well characterized--the fundamental defect is a loss of integrity of the gastroesophageal barrier. What is less clear is the most appropriate means of addressing this reflux. GERD has a variety of symptoms, ranging from typical presentations of heartburn and regurgitation (without esophagitis) to atypical presentations, such as severe erosive esophagitis and its associated complications. Because of its symptomatic diversity, physicians may select from a variety of therapeutic approaches. Medical therapy aims at decreasing acidity by suppressing proton secretion and has been well established. Available medications include antacids and alginates, H2-receptor antagonists, motility agents, and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Antireflux surgery, commonly performed laparoscopically, aims at reinforcing and repairing the defective barrier through plication of the gastric fundus. The earliest performed successful procedures were the Nissen and Toupet fundoplications, to which several modifications have since been made. It has been demonstrated in preliminary studies and long-term outcomes of such open surgery and preliminary studies of such laparoscopic surgery that antireflux surgery is an effective approach, with overall outcomes superior to those achieved with medications. The precise indications for the surgical treatment of patients with GERD, however, remain controversial. In recent years, endoscopic intraluminal antireflux approaches have attracted the attention of physicians, surgeons, and commercial companies, especially after the approval of two endoscopic intraluminal methods by the United States FDA in 2000. The common element is prevention of acid reflux by construction of a functional or controlled barrier in the lower esophageal sphincter zone. Three main methods are currently employed: endoscopic intraluminal valvuloplasty, endoscopic

  5. Duodenal ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux disease today: long-term therapy--a sideways glance.

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, K. D.

    1996-01-01

    Acid-peptic disease is widely considered conquered or controlled, future advances being refinements of existing treatments rather than radical new developments. Yet controversies remain and developments have yet to be made. DUODENAL ULCER: Daily maintenance treatment with the anti-secretory drugs, histamine H2 receptor antagonists and proton pump blockers, controls duodenal ulcer effectively, markedly reducing relapse rate at one year after treatment from about 75 percent to 15 to 20 percent (and to about 10 percent on proton pump blockers). In contrast, Helicobacter pylori eradication with a one to two week course of treatment yields prolonged remission or cure. The consequent reduction in drug costs in individual patients, however, has been exceeded by increasing community use on the more expensive proton pump blockers for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The marked decline in elective surgery since the introduction of histamine H2 receptor antagonists is commonly attributed to the power of these drugs. The fall, however, had started much earlier, indicating that the decline is due to changing natural history. In contrast, complication rates remain unaltered. An increasing proportion of newly diagnosed duodenal ulcer patients are elderly, and more of them now present for the first time with complications (in this center, about 40 percent), which consequently cannot be forestalled. Thus, duodenal ulcer disease is likely to remain a problem and in many will be a serious illness. GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE: The proton pump blockers have revolutionized the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. In clinical trials they have proven markedly superior to the histamine H2 receptor antagonists in healing (at eight weeks, 80 to 90 percent vs. 50 to 60 percent), symptom relief, prevention of relapse on maintenance therapy and cost-effectiveness. However, several issues remain. The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease seems to be rising

  6. Evaluation of the effectiveness of esomeprazole treatment strategies in the management of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mei, Jingtian; Yu, Yang; Ma, Jianxia; Yu, Xiaofeng

    2016-05-01

    Here we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of esomeprazole treatment strategies comparing with other proton pump inhibitors (PPI) in clinical practice for six months in the management of patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). An extensive search of the literature focusing on PPI therapeutic evaluation was performed up to December 2014. Risk ratio (RR) with its corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in each study was chosen as the effect size. Cochrane's Q statistic and I2 test were both conducted to evaluate heterogeneity across individual studies. Meta-regression was conducted to explore the source of heterogeneity and sensitive analysis was performed to assess the risk bias for the meta-analysis. Totally, eleven trials with high quality enrolled in the meta-analysis. Esomeprazole therapy (20 mg daily) had lower relapse rates than other drugs during six months maintenance treatment (RR = 0.67; 95% CI: 0.55-0.83). Heartburn (RR = 0.72; 95% CI: 0.57-0.92) and epigastric pain (RR = 0.82, 95% Cl: 0.70-0.96) were less likely to happen after esomeprazole treatment, and no significant advantage was found on acid regurgitation and dysphagia. Moreover, lower risk for serious adverse events was observed after esomeprazole therapy (RR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.04-1.88). Blind method or difference controlled drugs did not influence heterogeneity across studies. Moreover, the conclusion on acid regurgitation, abdominal pain and dysphagia might be unstable. In GERD patients, esomeprazole 20 mg daily is more effective than other PPIs regarding relapse rates, symptoms of epigastric pain and heartburn, and serious adverse events. PMID:27348974

  7. Myrtus communis L. Freeze-Dried Aqueous Extract Versus Omeprazol in Gastrointestinal Reflux Disease: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Zohalinezhad, Mohammad E; Hosseini-Asl, Mohammad Kazem; Akrami, Rahimeh; Nimrouzi, Majid; Salehi, Alireza; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2016-01-01

    The current work assessed a pharmaceutical dosage form of Myrtus communis L. (myrtle) in reflux disease compared with omeprazol via a 6-week double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial. Forty-five participants were assigned randomly to 3 groups as A (myrtle berries freeze-dried aqueous extract, 1000 mg/d), B (omeprazol capsules, 20 mg/d), and C (A and B). The assessment at the beginning and the end of the study was done by using a standardized questionnaire of frequency scale for the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (FSSG). In all groups, both reflux and dyspeptic scores significantly decreased in comparison with the respective baselines. Concerning each group, significant changes were found in FSSG, dysmotility-like symptoms and acid reflux related scores. No significant differences were observed between all groups in final FSSG total scores (FSSG2). Further studies with more precise design and larger sample size may lead to a better outcome to suggest the preparation as an alternative intervention. PMID:26045552

  8. [Differencial diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease -- eosinophilic esophagitis: case report].

    PubMed

    Franzius, M; Stolte, M; Porschen, R

    2005-04-01

    We report on a 22-year-old man with dysphagia and repeated bolus impaction in the esophagus for 10 years. Bolus impactions were frequently mobilised using an endoscope. At endoscopy, esophagitis IV degrees was described. After treatment with omeprazol there was no improvement. The patient was submitted to our hospital for fundoplication. pH-metry demonstrated an increased reflux. At endoscopy of the esophagus, we found red stripes which did not show the typical appearance of erosions. Manometry and X-ray films of the esophagus did not reveal any pathological findings. In combination with anamnesis, symptoms, and endoscopy, the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis was documented by histology. After administration of oral corticosteroids a rapid improvement of the clinical symptoms was observed. The diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis should be kept in mind in patients with chronic symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux persisting despite medical therapy, pathological pH-metry and repeated bolus impactions.

  9. Update on childhood urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Bell, Lorraine E; Mattoo, Tej K

    2009-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a leading cause of serious bacterial infection in young children. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), a common pediatric urologic disorder, is believed to predispose to UTI, and both are associated with renal scarring. The complex interaction of bacterial virulence factors and host defense mechanisms influence renal damage. However, some renal parenchymal abnormalities associated with VUR are noninfectious in origin. Long-term, renal parenchymal injury may be associated with hypertension, pregnancy complications, proteinuria, and renal insufficiency. Optimal management of VUR and UTI is controversial because of the paucity of appropriate randomized controlled trials; there is a need for well-designed studies. The recently launched Randomized Intervention for children with VesicoUreteral Reflux (RIVUR) study hopefully will provide insight into the role of antimicrobial prophylaxis of UTI in children with VUR.

  10. Hot electrons transverse refluxing in ultraintense laser-solid interactions.

    PubMed

    Buffechoux, S; Psikal, J; Nakatsutsumi, M; Romagnani, L; Andreev, A; Zeil, K; Amin, M; Antici, P; Burris-Mog, T; Compant-La-Fontaine, A; d'Humières, E; Fourmaux, S; Gaillard, S; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Kraft, S; Mancic, A; Plaisir, C; Sarri, G; Tarisien, M; Toncian, T; Schramm, U; Tampo, M; Audebert, P; Willi, O; Cowan, T E; Pépin, H; Tikhonchuk, V; Borghesi, M; Fuchs, J

    2010-07-01

    We have analyzed the coupling of ultraintense lasers (at ∼2×10{19}  W/cm{2}) with solid foils of limited transverse extent (∼10  s of μm) by monitoring the electrons and ions emitted from the target. We observe that reducing the target surface area allows electrons at the target surface to be reflected from the target edges during or shortly after the laser pulse. This transverse refluxing can maintain a hotter, denser and more homogeneous electron sheath around the target for a longer time. Consequently, when transverse refluxing takes places within the acceleration time of associated ions, we observe increased maximum proton energies (up to threefold), increased laser-to-ion conversion efficiency (up to a factor 30), and reduced divergence which bodes well for a number of applications. PMID:20867457

  11. [The endoscopic and morphological diagnostics of gastroesophageal reflux].

    PubMed

    Abakumov, M M; Pinchuk, T P; Galankina, I E; Pogodina, A N; Azarov, Ia B; Kislukhina, E V

    2004-01-01

    The experiences with endoscopic examinations of 140 patients with gastroesophageal reflux followed by the development of reflux-esophagitis (RE) of different degree are presented. The authors describe the complicated and uncomplicated forms of RE. The uncomplicated forms include RE with unimpaired integrity of the epithelium, erosive RE, erosive-ulcerous RE. The complicated forms include peptic ulcer of the esophagus, peptic stricture and Barrett esophagus. The degree of RE was found to depend on the character and degree of impairment of the obturating function of the cardia. The morphological examination of the esophagus mucosa was performed in 35 patients. Morphological heterogeneity of the so called "catarrhal RE" was shown that makes the expedience of using this term in clinical practice doubtful. Exact endoscopic and morphological criteria of the differential diagnostics of erosive and erosive-ulcerous RE, erosive-ulcerous RE and peptic ulcer of the esophagus are described.

  12. Surgical treatment of gastrooesophageal reflux in severely mentally retarded children.

    PubMed Central

    Spitz, L

    1982-01-01

    Twenty severely mentally retarded children with significant gastrooesophageal reflux were submitted to surgical treatment. In all patients vomiting was present to a distressing degree in 5 children, 3 of whom required extensive surgery to overcome the obstruction. All had failed to respond to conservative measures. Although the postoperative complication rate was high (50%), the final result in the majority of patients was highly satisfactory. Images Figure 1. PMID:7086804

  13. Nonobstructive hydrocolpos due to vesicovaginal reflux: expanding the differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Balani, Ankit; Alwala, Surendar; Kumar, D Anjani; Karnawat, Aruna; Marda, Sapna S; Zanke, Rajeshwari B

    2015-05-01

    We report the clinical details and imaging findings for a case of vesicovaginal reflux presenting as gross urocolpos in a 15-year-old female. Findings included a large fluid-filled vagina on full-bladder scan in the absence of any anatomical abnormality, which disappeared completely after micturition. It is important for radiologists to be aware of this entity as it is rarely encountered and leads to very confusing findings, which could result in an erroneous diagnosis. PMID:25724423

  14. Extra-Esophageal Pepsin from Stomach Refluxate Promoted Tonsil Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Jeong, Han-Sin; Kim, Kyung Mi; Lee, Ye Jin; Jung, Myeong Hee; Park, Jung Je; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux is associated with numerous pathologic conditions of the upper aerodigestive tract. Gastric pepsin within reflux contributes to immunologic reactions in the tonsil. In this study, we aimed to find the relationships between pepsin and tonsillar hypertrophy. Methods and finding We explored the notion whether tonsillar hypertrophy was due to pepsin-mediated gastric reflux in tonsil hypertrophy. Fifty-four children with tonsil hypertrophy and 30 adults with tonsillitis were recruited before surgical treatment. Blood and tonsil tissues from each patient were harvested for analysis of changes in lymphocyte and macrophage numbers coupled with histological and biochemical analysis. Pepsin was expressed at different levels in tonsil tissues from each tonsillar hypertrophy. Pepsin-positive cells were found in the crypt epithelium, surrounding the lymphoid follicle with developing fibrosis, and also surrounding the lymphoid follicle that faced the crypt. And also, pepsin staining was well correlated with damaged tonsillar squamous epithelium and TGF-β1 and iNOS expression in the tonsil section. In addition, pepsin and TGF-β1-positive cells were co-localized with CD68-positive cells in the crypt and surrounding germinal centers. In comparison of macrophage responsiveness to pepsin, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were noticeably larger in the presence of activated pepsin in the child group. Furthermore, CD11c and CD163-positive cells were significantly increased by activated pepsin. However, this was not seen for the culture of PBMNCs from the adult group. Conclusions The lymphocytes and monocytes are in a highly proliferative state in the tonsillar hypertrophy and associated with increased expression of pro-inflammatory factors as a result of exposure to stomach reflux pepsin. PMID:27058240

  15. Is alcohol consumption associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease?*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shao-hua; Wang, Jie-wei; Li, You-ming

    2010-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common disorders with an increasing incidence and prevalence. Alcohol consumption may be a risk factor for GERD; however, the relationship remains to be fully elucidated. The results of different studies are diverse and contradictory. Systematic investigations concerning this matter are inappropriate and further well-designed prospective studies are needed to clarify the effect of alcohol on GERD. PMID:20506572

  16. Design and minimum reflux calculations for multicomponent reactive distillation columns

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, D.; Doherty, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    A new set of transformed composition variables is introduced to simplify the design equations for single-feed, multicomponent reactive distillation columns. Based on these equations, a general method of calculating minimum reflux ratios for reactive distillation columns is presented. The new composition variables are also used to derive simple relationships between the dependent design variables, which are not evident when the design equations are written in terms of mole fractions.

  17. Late Carboniferous-early Permian events in the Trans-European Suture Zone: Tectonic and acid magmatic evidence from Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żelaźniewicz, A.; Oberc-Dziedzic, T.; Fanning, C. M.; Protas, A.; Muszyński, A.

    2016-04-01

    The Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) links the East and West European Platforms. It is concealed under Meso-Cenozoic cover. Available seismic data show that the lower crustal layer in the TESZ is an attenuated, 200 km wide, SW margin of Baltica. The attenuation occurred when Rodinia broke-up, which gave rise to evolution of the thinned, thus relatively unstable margin of Baltica. It accommodated accretions during Phanerozoic events. We focus on acid magmatism, specifically granitoid, observed close to the SW border of the TESZ in Poland. This border is defined by the Dolsk Fault Zone (DFZ) and the Kraków-Lubliniec Fault Zone (KLFZ) on which dextral wrenching developed as a result of the Variscan collision between Laurussia and Gondwana. The granitoids at the DFZ and KLFZ were dated at 300 Ma. In the Variscan foreland that overlaps the TESZ, orogenic thickening continued to 307-306 Ma, possibly contributed to melting of the thickened upper continental crust (εNd300 = - 6.0 to - 4.5) and triggered the tectonically controlled magmatism. The wrenching on the TESZ border faults caused tensional openings in the basement, which promoted magmatic centers with extrusions of rhyolites and extensive ignimbrites. The Chrzypsko-Paproć and Małopolska magmatic centers were developed at the DFZ and KLFZ, respectively. The magmatic edifices commenced at 302 Ma with relatively poorly evolved granites, which carried both suprasubduction and anorogenic signatures, then followed by more evolved volcanic rocks (up to 293 Ma). Their geochemistry and inherited zircons suggest that the felsic magmas were mainly derived from upper crustal rocks, with some mantle additions, which included Sveconorwegian and older Baltican components. The complex TESZ, with Baltica basement in the lower crust, was susceptible to transient effects of mantle upwelling that occurred by the end of the Variscan orogeny and resulted in an episode of the "flare-up" magmatism in the North German-Polish Basin.

  18. Late Carboniferous-early Permian events in the Trans-European Suture Zone: Tectonic and acid magmatic evidence from Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żelaźniewicz, A.; Oberc-Dziedzic, T.; Fanning, C. M.; Protas, A.; Muszyński, A.

    2016-04-01

    The Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) links the East and West European Platforms. It is concealed under Meso-Cenozoic cover. Available seismic data show that the lower crustal layer in the TESZ is an attenuated, ~ 200 km wide, SW margin of Baltica. The attenuation occurred when Rodinia broke-up, which gave rise to evolution of the thinned, thus relatively unstable margin of Baltica. It accommodated accretions during Phanerozoic events. We focus on acid magmatism, specifically granitoid, observed close to the SW border of the TESZ in Poland. This border is defined by the Dolsk Fault Zone (DFZ) and the Kraków-Lubliniec Fault Zone (KLFZ) on which dextral wrenching developed as a result of the Variscan collision between Laurussia and Gondwana. The granitoids at the DFZ and KLFZ were dated at ~ 300 Ma. In the Variscan foreland that overlaps the TESZ, orogenic thickening continued to ~ 307-306 Ma, possibly contributed to melting of the thickened upper continental crust (εNd300 = - 6.0 to - 4.5) and triggered the tectonically controlled magmatism. The wrenching on the TESZ border faults caused tensional openings in the basement, which promoted magmatic centers with extrusions of rhyolites and extensive ignimbrites. The Chrzypsko-Paproć and Małopolska magmatic centers were developed at the DFZ and KLFZ, respectively. The magmatic edifices commenced at ~ 302 Ma with relatively poorly evolved granites, which carried both suprasubduction and anorogenic signatures, then followed by more evolved volcanic rocks (up to 293 Ma). Their geochemistry and inherited zircons suggest that the felsic magmas were mainly derived from upper crustal rocks, with some mantle additions, which included Sveconorwegian and older Baltican components. The complex TESZ, with Baltica basement in the lower crust, was susceptible to transient effects of mantle upwelling that occurred by the end of the Variscan orogeny and resulted in an episode of the "flare-up" magmatism in the North German

  19. Childhood Vesicoureteral Reflux Studies: Registries and Repositories Sources and Nosology

    PubMed Central

    Chesney, Russell W.; Patters, Andrea B.

    2012-01-01

    Despite several recent studies, the advisability of antimicrobial prophylaxis and certain imaging studies for urinary tract infections (UTIs) remains controversial. The role of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) on the severity and re-infection rates for UTIs is also difficult to assess. Registries and repositories of data and biomaterials from clinical studies in children with VUR are valuable. Disease registries are collections of secondary data related to patients with a specific diagnosis, condition or procedure. Registries differ from indices in that they contain more extensive data. A research repository is an entity that receives, stores, processes and/or disseminates specimens (or other materials) as needed. It encompasses the physical location as well as the full range of activities associated with its operation. It may also be referred to as a biorepository. This report provides information about some current registries and repositories that include data and samples from children with VUR. It also describes the heterogeneous nature of the subjects, as some registries and repositories include only data or samples from patients with primary reflux while others also include those from patients with syndromic or secondary reflux. PMID:23044377

  20. Impact of obesity treatment on gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abraham; Kim, Aram; Sanossian, Cassandra; Francois, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a frequently encountered disorder. Obesity is an important risk factor for GERD, and there are several pathophysiologic mechanisms linking the two conditions. For obese patients with GERD, much of the treatment effort is focused on weight loss and its consistent benefit to symptoms, while there is a relative lack of evidence regarding outcomes after novel or even standard medical therapy is offered to this population. Physicians are hesitant to recommend operative anti-reflux therapy to obese patients due to the potentially higher risks and decreased efficacy, and these patients instead are often considered for bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgical approaches are broadening, and each technique has emerging evidence regarding its effect on both the risk and outcome of GERD. Furthermore, combined anti-reflux and bariatric options are now being offered to obese patients with GERD. However, currently Roux-en-Y gastric bypass remains the most effective surgical treatment option in this population, due to its consistent benefits in both weight loss and GERD itself. This article aims to review the impact of both conservative and aggressive approaches of obesity treatment on GERD. PMID:26819528

  1. Does surgery correct esophageal motor dysfunction in gastroesophageal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.O.; Pope, C.E.; Gannan, R.M.; Allen, F.D.; Velasco, N.; Hill, L.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high incidence of dysphagia in patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) but no evidence of peptic stricture suggests esophageal motor dysfunction. Conventional methods for detecting dysfunction (radiologic and manometric examinations) often fail to detect abnormality in these patients. Radionuclide transit (RT), a new method for detecting esophageal motor dysfunction, was used to prospectively assess function in 29 patients with symptomatic GER uncomplicated by stricture before and three months after antireflux surgery (HILL). The preoperative incidence of dysphagia and esophageal dysfunction was 73% and 52%, respectively. During operation (Hill repair), intraoperative measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure was performed and the LESP raised to levels between 45 and 55 mmHg. The preoperative lower esophageal sphincter pressure was raised from a mean of 8.6 mmHg, to mean of 18.5 mmHg after operation. No patient has free reflux after operation. Postoperative studies on 20 patients demonstrated persistence of all preoperative esophageal dysfunction despite loss of dysphagia. RT has demonstrated a disorder of esophageal motor function in 52% of patients with symptomatic GER that may be responsible for impaired esophageal clearance. This abnormality is not contraindication to surgery. The results indicate that construction of an effective barrier to reflex corrects symptoms of reflux, even in the presence of impaired esophageal transit. Radionuclide transit is a safe noninvasive test for assessment of esophageal function.

  2. Integrative Treatment of Reflux and Functional Dyspepsia in Children

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Ann Ming; Golianu, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and functional dyspepsia (FD) are common problems in the pediatric population, with up to 7% of school-age children and up to 8% of adolescents suffering from epigastric pain, heartburn, and regurgitation. Reflux is defined as the passage of stomach contents into the esophagus, while GERD refers to reflux symptoms that are associated with symptoms or complications—such as pain, asthma, aspiration pneumonia, or chronic cough. FD, as defined by the Rome III classification, is a persistent upper abdominal pain or discomfort, not related to bowel movements, and without any organic cause, that is present for at least two months prior to diagnosis. Endoscopic examination is typically negative in FD, whereas patients with GERD may have evidence of esophagitis or gastritis either grossly or microscopically. Up to 70% of children with dyspepsia exhibit delayed gastric emptying. Treatment of GERD and FD requires an integrative approach that may include pharmacologic therapy, treating concurrent constipation, botanicals, mind body techniques, improving sleep hygiene, increasing physical activity, and traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture. PMID:27417471

  3. Frequency of gastroesophageal reflux in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A M; al Karawi, M A; Shariq, S; Mohamed, A E

    1993-10-01

    Twenty-five adult patients with liver cirrhosis, and another 30 patients with no liver disease but referred with symptoms suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux disease were selected at random. Twenty-four hour ambulatory intra-esophageal pH measurement and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were carried out on all patients recruited. Applying the former test, 16 (64%) of the patients with liver cirrhosis have gastroesophageal reflux disease. This figure is comparable with the 70% (21/30) rate recorded in the group of dyspeptic patients clinically thought to have the disorder. A positive endoscopic diagnosis was much lower at 12% and 23%, respectively. No significant differences were observed among liver disease patients when they were subdivided in accordance with the etiology of liver cirrhosis and the grade of esophageal varices. We conclude that gastroesophageal reflux disease occurs at a high frequency (64%) in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension, irrespective of the etiology of cirrhosis and the grade of esophageal varices. It is therefore considered to be the main cause of esophagitis in these patients, and that it might play a role in initiating a variceal bleeding episode. The latter hypothesis needs further evaluation. PMID:8270239

  4. Double-blind crossover study of ranitidine and ebrotidine in gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Sito, E; Thor, P J; M[aczka, M; Lorens, K; Konturek, S J; Maj, A

    1993-09-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is multifactorial disorder in which acid exposure has a central role in the mucosal damage, and the mainstay of medical treatment is the suppression of gastric acid secretion justifying the use of H2 receptors antagonists. In our study we compared the effects of ranitidine and ebrotidine, a novel H2 antagonist with gastroprotective properties, on the motor, pH and endoscopic aspects of GERD in randomized cross-over trial in humans. Twenty patients with endoscopic evidence of erosive esophagitis were included in the study. Esophageal manometry and 24-hour pH-metry were done with the use Synectics (Sweden) systems. The same examinations were repeated after 20 days period of treatment with either ranitidine or ebrotidine, given in single dose 300 and 800 mg (nocte) respectively. The pressure within the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in the untreated and treated with ebrotidine or ranitidine patients remained lowered. Patients with GERD showed increase in duration and decrease in amplitude and propagation of peristaltic waves in the esophageal body which were not improved after treatment. Complete healing after 40 days of treatment was comparable with ebrotidine and ranitidine and averaged about 40%. The pH-metry showed improvement in treated patients in the reflux frequency and time pH below 4, ranitidine being more effective than ebrotidine. It can be concluded that GERD patients showed weaker primary peristalsis unrelated to LES pressure and treatment. Treatment with ebrotidine or ranitidine reduced significantly the endoscopic and self-assessment score, ebrotidine and ranitidine being equally effective in healing of esophageal mucosal lesions.

  5. Three-dimensional imaging of the lower esophageal sphincter in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, H J; DeMeester, T R; Naspetti, R; Jamieson, J; Perry, R E

    1991-01-01

    The resistance of the lower esophageal sphincter to reflux of gastric juice is determined by the integrated effects of radial pressures exerted over the entire length of the sphincter. This can be quantitated by three-dimensional computerized imaging of sphincter pressures obtained by a pullback of radially oriented pressure transducers and by calculating the volume of this image, in other words, the sphincter pressure vector volume. Validation studies showed that sphincter imaging based on a stepwise pullback of a catheter with four or eight radial side holes is superior to a rapid motorized pullback. Compared with 50 healthy volunteers, the total and abdominal sphincter pressure vector volume was lower in 150 patients with increased esophageal acid exposure (p less than 0.001) and decreased with increasing esophageal mucosal damage (p less than 0.01). Calculation of the sphincter pressure vector volume was superior to standard techniques in identifying a mechanically defective sphincter as the cause of increased esophageal acid exposure, particularly in patients without mucosal damage. The Nissen and Belsey fundoplication increased the total and intra-abdominal sphincter pressure vector volume (p less than 0.001) and normalized the three-dimensional sphincter image. Failure to do so was associated with recurrent or persistent reflux. These data indicate that three-dimensional imaging of the lower esophageal sphincter improves the identification of patients who would benefit from an antireflux procedure. Analysis of the three-dimensional sphincter pressure profile should become the standard for evaluation of the lower esophageal sphincter. PMID:1953093

  6. Effect of GutsyGum(tm), A Novel Gum, on Subjective Ratings of Gastro Esophageal Reflux Following A Refluxogenic Meal.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rachel; Sam, Cecilia H Y; Green, Tim; Wood, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Chewing gum alleviates symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) following a refluxogenic meal. GutsyGum(tm), a chewing gum developed to alleviate the symptoms of GER contains calcium carbonate, with a proprietary blend of licorice extract, papain, and apple cider vinegar (GiGs®). The efficacy of GutsyGum(tm) was determined in alleviating the symptoms of GER after a refluxogenic meal compared to placebo gum. This double-blind, placebo-controlled-crossover trial with a one-week washout between treatments had 24 participants with a history of GER consume a refluxogenic meal and then chew GutsyGum(tm) or placebo gum. Participants completed GER symptom questionnaires, consisting of symptom based 10 cm Visual Analogue Scales, immediately following the meal and then at regular intervals out to four hours postmeal. Adjusted mean ± SEM heartburn score (15-min postmeal to 240 min) was significantly lower in GutsyGum(tm) than in placebo gum treatment (0.81 ± 0.20 vs. 1.45 ± 0.20 cm; p = 0.034). Mean acid reflux score was significantly lower in GutsyGum(tm) than in placebo treatment (0.72 ± 0.19 vs. 1.46 ± 0.19 cm; p = 0.013). There were no significant differences for any of the secondary outcomes. However, pain approached significance with less pain reported in GutsyGum(tm) versus placebo treatment (0.4 ± 0.2 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 cm; p = 0.081). Although nausea (p = 0.114) and belching (p = 0.154) were lower following GutsyGum(tm), the difference was not statistically significant. GutsyGum(tm) is more effective than a placebo gum in alleviating primary symptoms of heartburn and acid reflux (Clinical Trial Registration: ACTRN12612000973819).

  7. Effects of carob-bean gum thickened formulas on infants’ reflux and tolerance indices

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, Miglena; Manios, Yannis; Rasheva, Niya; Pancheva, Ruzha; Dimitrova, Elena; Schaafsma, Anne

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of carob-bean gum (CBG) thickened-formulas on reflux and tolerance indices in infants with gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). METHODS: Fifty-six eligible infants (1-6 mo old) were randomly allocated to receive for two weeks a formula with either 0.33 g/100 mL (Formula A) or 0.45 g/100 mL (Formula B) of cold soluble CBG galactomannans respectively, or a formula with 0.45 g/100 mL of hot soluble CBG galactomannans (Formula C). No control group receiving standard formula was included in the study. Data on the following indices were obtained both at baseline and follow-up from all study participants: 24 h esophageal pH monitoring indices, anthropometrical indices (i.e., body weight and length) and tolerance indices (i.e., frequency of colics; type and frequency of defecations). From the eligible infants, forty seven were included in an intention-to-treat analysis to examine the effects of the two-week trial on esophageal 24 h pH monitoring, growth and tolerance indices. Repeated Measures ANOVA was used to examine the research hypothesis. RESULTS: Regarding changes in 24 h pH monitoring indices, significant decreases from baseline to follow-up were observed in the “Boix Ochoa Score” (i.e., an index of esophageal acid exposure), in the total number of visible refluxes and in all symptoms related indices due to acid reflux only for infants provided with Formula A, while no significant changes were observed for infants provided with Formulas B and C. In addition, the significant decreases observed in two symptoms related pH monitoring indices (i.e., “Symptom index for reflux” and “Percentage of all reflux”) for infants provided with Formula A were also found to differentiate significantly compared to the changes observed in the other two groups (P = 0.048 and P = 0.014 respectively). Concerning changes in anthropometric indices, body weight significantly increased among infants provided with Formulas A and C, but not for infants provided

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux in pregnancy: a systematic review on the benefit of raft forming agents.

    PubMed

    Quartarone, G

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms in pregnancy is very high, up to 80%, with a maximum peak during the third trimester. Together with lifestyle modifications, antacids and antisecretive agents, such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs), are commonly prescribed in non-pregnant, adult population. In certain Countries these drugs are not allowed in or are allowed only during the late stages of pregnancy. Alginate-based formulations have been used for the symptomatic treatment of heartburn for decades, as they usually contain sodium or potassium bicarbonate. In the presence of gastric acid, a foamy raft is created above the gastric contents. The alginate raft moves into the esophagus in place or ahead of acidic gastric contents during reflux episodes physically preventing reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus. Alginate-based formulations are allowed with no restrictions also in pregnancy: their safety profile make them a very valid option taking into account the risk/benefit ratio for both parturient and unborn baby. This systematic review paper aims to explore the use of medications for treating GERD in pregnancy, including alginate raft-forming-agents, highlighting the benefits for both the mother and the fetus. Electronic search in databases was conducted on databases such as Medline, PubMed, Ovid retrieving data concerning the reflux treatments in pregnancy, with a special focus on alginate raft forming antireflux agents. From the literature on alginate use in pregnancy, no particular risks have been shown to date for both parturient and unborn baby when alginate had been administered during all the pregnancy trimesters. The physical mode of action ensures the maximum esophageal protection by the neutral foam floating in the stomach, maintaining physiological pH values at stomach level, without interfering with the digestive processes. The symptoms' healing has been markedly improved

  9. Betulinic acid, a bioactive pentacyclic triterpenoid, inhibits skeletal-related events induced by breast cancer bone metastases and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Se Young; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Ki Rim; Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lee, Chang Ki; Park, Kwang-Kyun Chung, Won-Yoon

    2014-03-01

    Many breast cancer patients experience bone metastases and suffer skeletal complications. The present study provides evidence on the protective and therapeutic potential of betulinic acid on cancer-associated bone diseases. Betulinic acid is a naturally occurring triterpenoid with the beneficial activity to limit the progression and severity of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, and obesity. We first investigated its effect on breast cancer cells, osteoblastic cells, and osteoclasts in the vicious cycle of osteolytic bone metastasis. Betulinic acid reduced cell viability and the production of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), a major osteolytic factor, in MDA-MB-231 human metastatic breast cancer cells stimulated with or without tumor growth factor-β. Betulinic acid blocked an increase in the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin ratio by downregulating RANKL protein expression in PTHrP-treated human osteoblastic cells. In addition, betulinic acid inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in murine bone marrow macrophages and decreased the production of resorbed area in plates with a bone biomimetic synthetic surface by suppressing the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and cathepsin K in RANKL-induced osteoclasts. Furthermore, oral administration of betulinic acid inhibited bone loss in mice intra-tibially inoculated with breast cancer cells and in ovariectomized mice causing estrogen deprivation, as supported by the restored bone morphometric parameters and serum bone turnover markers. Taken together, these findings suggest that betulinic acid may have the potential to prevent bone loss in patients with bone metastases and cancer treatment-induced estrogen deficiency. - Highlights: • Betulinic acid reduced PTHrP production in human metastatic breast cancer cells. • Betulinic acid blocked RANKL/OPG ratio in PTHrP-stimulated human osteoblastic cells. • Betulinic

  10. Laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis at a single centre.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Ganesh; Morrow, Ellen; Collins, Bridget F; Ho, Lawrence A T; Hinojosa, Marcelo W; Hayes, Jennifer M; Spada, Carolyn A; Oelschlager, Brant; Li, Chenxiang; Yow, Eric; Anstrom, Kevin J; Mart, Dylan; Xiao, Keliang; Pellegrini, Carlos A

    2016-09-01

    We sought to assess whether laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery (LARS) is associated with decreased rates of disease progression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).The study was a retrospective single-centre study of IPF patients with worsening symptoms and pulmonary function despite antacid treatment for abnormal acid gastro-oesophageal reflux. The period of exposure to LARS was September 1998 to December 2012. The primary end-point was a longitudinal change in forced vital capacity (FVC) % predicted in the pre- versus post-surgery periods.27 patients with progressive IPF underwent LARS. At time of surgery, the mean age was 65 years and mean FVC was 71.7% pred. Using a regression model, the estimated benefit of surgery in FVC % pred over 1 year was 5.7% (95% CI -0.9-12.2%, p=0.088) with estimated benefit in FVC of 0.22 L (95% CI -0.06-0.49 L, p=0.12). Mean DeMeester scores decreased from 42 to 4 (p<0.01). There were no deaths in the 90 days following surgery and 81.5% of participants were alive 2 years after surgery.Patients with IPF tolerated the LARS well. There were no statistically significant differences in rates of FVC decline pre- and post-LARS over 1 year; a possible trend toward stabilisation in observed FVC warrants prospective studies. The ongoing prospective randomised controlled trial will hopefully provide further insights regarding the safety and potential efficacy of LARS in IPF. PMID:27492835

  11. Bile acids but not acidic acids induce Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongfeng; Wang, Xiao; Gai, Zhibo; Song, Xiaoming; Jia, Xinyong; Tian, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is associated with the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Bile acids (BAs) refluxing into the esophagus contribute to esophageal injury, which results in BE and subsequent EAC. We developed two animal models to test the role of BAs in the pathogenesis of BE. We surgically generated BA reflux, with or without gastric acid, in rats. In a second experiment, we fed animals separately with BAs and gastric acid. Pathologic changes were examined and the expression of Muc2 and Cdx2 in BE tissue was tested by immunostaining. Inflammatory factors in the plasma, as well as differentiation genes in BE were examined through highly sensitive ELISA and semi-quantitative RT-PCR techniques. We found that BAs are sufficient for the induction of esophagitis and Barrett's-like metaplasia in the esophagus. Overexpression of inflammatory cells, IL-6, and TNF-α was observed both in animals fed with BAs and surgically generated BA reflux. Furthermore, elevated levels of Cdx2, Muc2, Bmp4, Kit19, and Tff2 (differentiation genes in BE) were found in BA-treated rats. In conclusion, BAs, but not gastric acid, are a major causative factor for BE. We confirmed that BAs contribute to the development of BE by inducing the inflammatory response in the esophagus. Inhibiting BAs may be a promising therapy for BE.

  12. Vesicoureteral reflux and antibiotic prophylaxis: why cohorts and methodologies matter

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Saul P.; Cheng, Earl; DeFoor, William; Kropp, Bradley; Rushton, H. Gil; Skoog, Steve; Carpenter, Myra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Published cohorts of children with vesicoureteral reflux placed on antibiotic prophylaxis differ in baseline characteristics and methodology. These data have been combined in meta-analyses to derive treatment recommendations. We analyzed these cohorts in an attempt to understand the disparate outcomes reported. Materials and Methods Eighteen studies were identified from 1987 to 2013. These either retrospectively or prospectively evaluated children with VUR who were on long-term antibiotic prophylaxis. The presenting demographic data, criteria and methods of evaluation were tabulated. Outcomes were compared—specifically recurrent urinary infection and renal scarring. Results Significant differences in baseline characteristics and methodology were identified: gender, circumcision status, grade of reflux, evaluation of bowel and bladder dysfunction (BBD), methodology of urine collection, definition of urinary infection (UTI), measurement of compliance, means of identifying renal scarring. Cohorts with larger numbers of uncircumcised boys had more breakthrough UTI’s. Both infection and renal scarring rates were higher in series with higher grades of reflux. Bagged urine specimens were allowed in 6 series, rendering the data suspect. Children with BBD were excluded from 3 cohorts; only in 1 was BBD correlated with outcome. Compliance was monitored in only 6 studies. Conclusions Sub-populations as well as methodologies vary significantly in published series of children with VUR on anti-biotic prophylaxis. It is inappropriate to combine outcome data from these series in a meta-analysis, since this serves to blur distinctions between these sub-populations. Broad recommendations or guidelines based upon meta-analyses should be viewed with caution. PMID:22910235

  13. Gastric reflux is an independent risk factor for laryngopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Langevin, Scott M.; Michaud, Dominique S.; Marsit, Carmen J.; Nelson, Heather H.; Birnbaum, Ariel E.; Eliot, Melissa; Christensen, Brock C.; McClean, Michael D.; Kelsey, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Gastric reflux can reach into the upper airway, inducing cellular damage in the epithelial lining. This condition is believed to be a risk factor for development of laryngopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LPSCC), although the literature is conflicting. Methods To better clarify this relationship, we assessed the association of self-reported heartburn history and medication use among 631 LPSCC patients and 1234 control subjects (frequency-matched on age, gender and town of residence) enrolled as part of a population-based case-control study of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in the greater Boston area. Results After adjusting for age, gender, race, smoking, alcohol consumption, HPV16 seropositivity, education and body mass index, subjects reporting a history of frequent heartburn and who were neither a heavy smoker nor heavy drinker had a significantly elevated risk of LPSCC (OR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.00–3.16). Among those with a history of heartburn, there was an inverse association between antacid use and LPSCC relative to those never taking heartburn medication (OR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.38–0.93) that remained consistent when analyzed by smoking/drinking status, HPV16 status, or by primary tumor site. Conclusions Our data show that gastric reflux is an independent risk factor for squamous cancers of the pharynx and larynx. Further studies are needed to clarify the possible chemopreventive role of antacid use for patients with gastric reflux. Impact Elucidation of additional risk factors for head and neck cancer can allow for risk stratification and inform surveillance of high-risk patients. PMID:23703970

  14. [Burden of illness in Polish patients with reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Reguła, Jarosław; Kulich, Károly R; Stasiewicz, Jan; Jasiński, Bolesław; Carlsson, Jonas; Wiklund, Ingela

    2005-01-01

    The clinical and socioeconomic burden of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is considerable. The primary symptom of GERD is heartburn, but it may also be associated with extraesophageal manifestations, such as asthma, chest pain and otolaryngologic disorders. The objective of the study was to describe the impact of heartburn on patients' Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL) in Poland, using validated generic and disease-specific instruments to measure patient-reported outcomes. Patients with symptoms of heartburn completed the Polish versions of the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS), the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia questionnaire (QOLRAD), the Short Form-36 (SF-36) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale. Frequency and severity of heartburn during the previous 7 days were also recorded. 135 patients completed the assessments (mean age of 44 years, SD = 15; 61% female). 55% of patients had moderate symptoms and nearly two thirds (64%) had symptoms on 5 or more days in the previous week. Patients were most bothered by symptoms of reflux (mean GSRS score of 4.1, on a scale of 1 [not bothered] to 7 [very bothered]), indigestion (3.5) and abdominal pain (3.2). As a result of their symptoms, patients experienced impaired vitality (mean QOLRAD score of 3.8, on a scale of 1 to 7, where 1 represents the most severe impact on daily functioning), problems with food and drink (3.9), emotional distress (4.1) and sleep disturbance (4.7). Using HAD, 32% of heartburn patients were anxious and 10% were depressed. In conclusion it should be stated that there is consistent evidence that GERD substantially impairs all aspects of health-related quality of life.

  15. Antibiotic prophylaxis and reflux: critical review and assessment

    PubMed Central

    Baquerizo, Bernarda Viteri

    2014-01-01

    The use of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP) was critical in the evolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) from a condition in which surgery was the standard of treatment to its becoming a medically managed condition. The efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in the management of VUR has been challenged in recent years, and significant confusion exists as to its clinical value. This review summarizes the critical factors in the history, use, and investigation of antibiotic prophylaxis in VUR. This review provides suggestions for assessing the potential clinical utility of prophylaxis. PMID:25580258

  16. Urinary tract infection in the setting of vesicoureteral reflux

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Roig, Michael L.; Kirsch, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the most common underlying etiology responsible for febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs) or pyelonephritis in children. Along with the morbidity of pyelonephritis, long-term sequelae of recurrent renal infections include renal scarring, proteinuria, and hypertension. Treatment is directed toward the prevention of recurrent infection through use of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis during a period of observation for spontaneous resolution or by surgical correction. In children, bowel and bladder dysfunction (BBD) plays a significant role in the occurrence of UTI and the rate of VUR resolution. Effective treatment of BBD leads to higher rates of spontaneous resolution and decreased risk of UTI. PMID:27408706

  17. Advances in diagnostic testing for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Gawron, Andrew J; Hirano, Ikuo

    2010-08-14

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) contributes substantially to morbidity and to costs in the United States health care system. The burden of this disease has resulted in attempts at improving diagnosis and characterizing patients. Numerous research and technical advances have enhanced our understanding of both the utility and limitations of a variety of diagnostic modalities. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advances in GERD diagnostic testing and to discuss their implications for use in clinical practice. Topics addressed include esophageal pH monitoring, impedance testing, symptom association analyses, narrow-band imaging, and histopathology. PMID:20698036

  18. Urinary tract infection in the setting of vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Roig, Michael L; Kirsch, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the most common underlying etiology responsible for febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs) or pyelonephritis in children. Along with the morbidity of pyelonephritis, long-term sequelae of recurrent renal infections include renal scarring, proteinuria, and hypertension. Treatment is directed toward the prevention of recurrent infection through use of continuous antibiotic prophylaxis during a period of observation for spontaneous resolution or by surgical correction. In children, bowel and bladder dysfunction (BBD) plays a significant role in the occurrence of UTI and the rate of VUR resolution. Effective treatment of BBD leads to higher rates of spontaneous resolution and decreased risk of UTI. PMID:27408706

  19. Characterization of major ripening events during softening in grape: turgor, sugar accumulation, abscisic acid metabolism, colour development, and their relationship with growth

    PubMed Central

    Castellarin, Simone D.; Gambetta, Gregory A.; Wada, Hiroshi; Krasnow, Mark N.; Cramer, Grant R.; Peterlunger, Enrico; Shackel, Kenneth A.; Matthews, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Along with sugar accumulation and colour development, softening is an important physiological change during the onset of ripening in fruits. In this work, we investigated the relationships among major events during softening in grape (Vitis vinifera L.) by quantifying elasticity in individual berries. In addition, we delayed softening and inhibited sugar accumulation using a mechanical growth-preventing treatment in order to identify processes that are sugar and/or growth dependent. Ripening processes commenced on various days after anthesis, but always at similarly low elasticity and turgor. Much of the softening occurred in the absence of other changes in berry physiology investigated here. Several genes encoding key cell wall-modifying enzymes were not up-regulated until softening was largely completed, suggesting softening may result primarily from decreases in turgor. Similarly, there was no decrease in solute potential, increase in sugar concentration, or colour development until elasticity and turgor were near minimum values, and these processes were inhibited when berry growth was prevented. Increases in abscisic acid occurred early during softening and in the absence of significant expression of the V. vinifera 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenases. However, these increases were coincident with decreases in the abscisic acid catabolite diphasic acid, indicating that initial increases in abscisic acid may result from decreases in catabolism and/or exogenous import. These data suggest that softening, decreases in turgor, and increases in abscisic acid represent some of the earliest events during the onset of ripening. Later, physical growth, further increases in abscisic acid, and the accumulation of sugar are integral for colour development. PMID:26590311

  20. Characterization of major ripening events during softening in grape: turgor, sugar accumulation, abscisic acid metabolism, colour development, and their relationship with growth.

    PubMed

    Castellarin, Simone D; Gambetta, Gregory A; Wada, Hiroshi; Krasnow, Mark N; Cramer, Grant R; Peterlunger, Enrico; Shackel, Kenneth A; Matthews, Mark A

    2016-02-01

    Along with sugar accumulation and colour development, softening is an important physiological change during the onset of ripening in fruits. In this work, we investigated the relationships among major events during softening in grape (Vitis vinifera L.) by quantifying elasticity in individual berries. In addition, we delayed softening and inhibited sugar accumulation using a mechanical growth-preventing treatment in order to identify processes that are sugar and/or growth dependent. Ripening processes commenced on various days after anthesis, but always at similarly low elasticity and turgor. Much of the softening occurred in the absence of other changes in berry physiology investigated here. Several genes encoding key cell wall-modifying enzymes were not up-regulated until softening was largely completed, suggesting softening may result primarily from decreases in turgor. Similarly, there was no decrease in solute potential, increase in sugar concentration, or colour development until elasticity and turgor were near minimum values, and these processes were inhibited when berry growth was prevented. Increases in abscisic acid occurred early during softening and in the absence of significant expression of the V. vinifera 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenases. However, these increases were coincident with decreases in the abscisic acid catabolite diphasic acid, indicating that initial increases in abscisic acid may result from decreases in catabolism and/or exogenous import. These data suggest that softening, decreases in turgor, and increases in abscisic acid represent some of the earliest events during the onset of ripening. Later, physical growth, further increases in abscisic acid, and the accumulation of sugar are integral for colour development.

  1. Gavage-related reflux in rats: identification, pathogenesis, and toxicological implications (review).

    PubMed

    Damsch, Siegrid; Eichenbaum, Gary; Tonelli, Alfred; Lammens, Lieve; Van den Bulck, Kathleen; Feyen, Bianca; Vandenberghe, John; Megens, Anton; Knight, Elaine; Kelley, Michael

    2011-02-01

    After oral gavage dosing of rats, reflux may occur, resulting in serious respiratory effects and mortality. Published information on gavage-related reflux is limited, as it has not yet been a focus of research. Nevertheless, it represents a recurrent challenge in daily toxicology practice of oral gavage dosing. The absence of clear guidance and criteria for the identification and management of reflux-induced effects can limit the ability to properly interpret toxicity study results. The review presented herein includes an overview of experimental data from gavage studies in rats, in which reflux was observed, and provides a comprehensive analysis of the literature on reflux in general and the different potential pathways contributing to gavage-related reflux in rats. The article aims to increase the awareness and understanding of the pathogenesis of gavage-related reflux and provides guidance on identification of potential risk factors, as well as interpretation of histological changes and their toxicological relevance. Furthermore, differentiation of reflux-induced effects from direct compound-related toxicity and from gavage errors is addressed in particular, and the importance of nasal histology is discussed. PMID:21422261

  2. Comparison of central and intraesophageal factors between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients and those with GERD-related noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, M; Simantov, R; Yair, M; Leitman, M; Blatt, A; Scapa, E; Broide, E

    2012-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) causes a wide range of symptoms. Some patients present with typical symptoms such as heartburn and regurgitation and others with atypical symptoms such as chest pain. The mechanism responsible for the varying clinical presentation of GERD is still not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate differences in central and local intraesophageal factors between patients with typical GERD symptoms and those with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). Patients presenting with typical and atypical symptoms suspicious of GERD underwent upper endoscopy and 24-hour pH monitoring with four sensors, each positioned at a different esophageal level. All patients completed GERD symptom, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Symptom Stress Rating questionnaires. From January 2006 to December 2009, 50 patients were recruited, 29 with typical symptoms, and 21 with NCCP. Patients with proven GERD and NCCP had higher proximal extension of acid during reflux episodes than patients with typical symptoms. They were found to be older, had a shorter history of symptom onset, worse anxiety scores, and more endoscopic findings compatible with gastritis. Proximal extension of acid during the reflux episodes in patients with GERD presenting with NCCP may play a role in symptom generation.

  3. Triazolyl-donor-acceptor chromophore-decorated unnatural amino acids and peptides: FRET events in a β-turn conformation.

    PubMed

    Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Jana, Subhashis; Yashmeen, Afsana; Senthilkumar, K; Bag, Raghunath

    2014-01-14

    The β-turn conformation and FRET process were established in the designed tripeptide containing fluorescent triazolyl donor and acceptor-decorated unnatural amino acids separated by a natural alanine.

  4. Is There Hope for Renal Growth on Imaging Studies Following Ureteral Reimplant for Boys With Fetal Hydronephrosis and Urinary Reflux?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Reflux nephropathy is thought to be the etiology for renal maldevelopment. We present two boys with fetal hydronephrosis and sterile vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). There was lack of renal growth of the refluxing renal units on surveillance renal ultrasound. Parents elected to undergo open ureteral reimplants. Post-surgical ultrasounds demonstrated improved renal growth. PMID:26793522

  5. Pharmacological Therapy of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Monari, Caterina; Martini, Silvia; Aceti, Arianna; Faldella, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Although gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a very common phenomenon among preterm infants, its therapeutic management is still an issue of debate among neonatologists. A step-wise approach should be advisable, firstly promoting nonpharmacological interventions and limiting drugs to selected infants unresponsive to the conservative measures or who are suffering from severe GER with clinical complications. Despite of this, a concerning pharmacological overtreatment has been increasingly reported. Most of the antireflux drugs, however, have not been specifically assessed in preterm infants; moreover, serious adverse effects have been noticed in association to their administration. This review mainly aims to draw the state of the art regarding the pharmacological management of GER in preterm infants, analyzing the best piecies of evidence currently available on the most prescribed anti-reflux drugs. Although further trials are required, sodium alginate-based formulations might be considered promising; however, data regarding their safety are still limited. Few piecies of evidence on the efficacy of histamine-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors in preterm infants with GER are currently available. Nevertheless, a significantly increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and infections has been largely reported in association with their use, thereby leading to an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio. The efficacy of metoclopramide in GER's improvement still needs to be clarified. Other prokinetic agents, such as domperidone and erythromycin, have been reported to be ineffective, whereas cisapride has been withdrawn due to its remarkable cardiac adverse effects. PMID:23878533

  6. Effect of pancreatic biliary reflux as a cofactor in cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Amr, Abdel Raouf; Hamdy, Hussam Mohamed; Nasr, Magid Mahmoud; Hedaya, Mohammed Saied; Hassan, Ahmed Mohamed Abdelaziz

    2012-04-01

    This study assessed the effect of pancreatico-biliary reflux (PBR) as co-factor in the process of chronic cholecystitis by measurement of the levels of active pancreatic enzyme amylase in gallbladder bile and serum of patients undergoing cholecystectomy. Pancreatic Amylase levels in bile from the gallbladder and serum were measured during surgery in 68 patients with chronic calcular cholecystitis subjected to elective open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the National Hepatology and Tropical Medicine Research Institution and Theodore Bilharz Research Institute. Bile amylase was detected in 64 patients (94.1%) indicating pancreatico-biliary reflux. Biliary amylase level ranged from 20-50 IU/L in 42 patients (61.76%), below 20 IU/l in 14 patients (20.59%), over 50 IU/L in 8 patients (11.76%) and undetectable in two patients. According to gallbladder bile amylase, the incidence of Occult PBR in patients operated upon for chronic calcular cholecystitis was 94.1%. The reason should be clarified by further research and wider scale study. Routinely investigating biliary amylase in every patient having cholecystitis can be a method for early detection of precancerous lesions.

  7. Vesicoureteric reflux and urinary tract infection in children

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, I

    2006-01-01

    An association between vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and renal damage was found in 1960. In 1973, the term reflux nephropathy (RN) was first used to describe the renal damage caused by VUR. Follow up studies show that about 10%–20% of children with RN develop hypertension or end stage renal disease. It is now evident that there is a sex difference in the development of RN. In most males with RN, the kidneys are congenitally abnormal. In females it is an acquired condition, the most severe damage being sustained by recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). The purpose of current UTI guidelines is to identify VUR or any other abnormality of the urinary tract. Since the advent of routine antenatal ultrasonography, there is no longer a need to identify an abnormality of the urinary tract after the first reported UTI. Routine investigations are not required. Recurrent UTIs and a family history of VUR need further evaluation. There is also an urgent need to establish the long term value of prophylactic antibiotics in children with VUR. PMID:16397077

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux: natural evolution, diagnostic approach and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hegar, Badriul; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a normal physiologic process occurring several times per day in healthy infants. Regurgitation is defined as the passage of refluxed gastric contents into the pharynx or mouth, sometimes with expulsion out of the mouth. There are only a few studies that have been performed to determine the prevalence of regurgitation and its natural course in infants, and some of them were cross-sectional and retrospective. However, evaluation of the natural evolution of GER becomes difficult, since the emergence of widespread self-treatment and/or therapeutic interventions. It is important to determine which children have GER disease to offer optimal treatment and to avoid costly and potentially invasive diagnostic testing. Symptoms due to GER are troublesome when they have an adverse effect on the well-being of the pediatric patient. In regurgitating infants, decreasing the amount of regurgitation is often seen by the parents as the most welcomed intervention that physicians can provide. Many medications have been attempted to overcome GER in infants, each with their own advantages and limitations.

  9. From reflux esophagitis to Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Hua

    2015-05-01

    The occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease is common in the human population. Almost all cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma are derived from Barrett's esophagus, which is a complication of esophageal adenocarcinoma precancerous lesions. Chronic exposure of the esophagus to gastroduodenal intestinal fluid is an important determinant factor in the development of Barrett's esophagus. The replacement of normal squamous epithelium with specific columnar epithelium in the lower esophagus induced by the chronic exposure to gastroduodenal fluid could lead to intestinal metaplasia, which is closely associated with the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the exact mechanism of injury is not completely understood. Various animal models of the developmental mechanisms of disease, and theoretical and clinical effects of drug treatment have been widely used in research. Recently, animal models employed in studies on gastroesophageal reflux injury have allowed significant progress. The advantage of using animal models lies in the ability to accurately control the experimental conditions for better evaluation of results. In this article, various modeling methods are reviewed, with discussion of the major findings on the developmental mechanism of Barrett's esophagus, which should help to develop better prevention and treatment strategies for Barrett's esophagus.

  10. Efficacy and Safety of a Natural Remedy for the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux: A Double-Blinded Randomized-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Alecci, Umberto; Bonina, Francesco; Bonina, Andrea; Rizza, Luisa; Inferrera, Santi

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common, chronic, relapsing symptom. Often people self-diagnose and self-treat it even though health-related quality of life is significantly impaired. In the lack of a valid alternative approach, current treatments focus on suppression of gastric acid secretion by the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), but people with GER have a significantly lower response rate to therapy. We designed a randomized double-blinded controlled clinical study to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of a formulation based on sodium alginate/bicarbonate in combination with extracts obtained from Opuntia ficus-indica and Olea europaea associated with polyphenols (Mucosave®; verum), on GER-related symptoms. Male/female 118 (intention to treat) subjects with moderate GER and having at least 2 to 6 days of GER episodes/week were treated with verum (6 g/day) or placebo for two months. The questionnaires Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease-Health-Related Quality of Life (GERD-HRQoL) and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptom Assessment Scale (GSAS) were self-administered by participants before the treatment and at the end of the treatment. Verum produced statistically significant reduction of GERD-HRQoL and GSAS scores, −56.5% and −59.1%, respectively, in comparison to placebo. Heartburn and acid regurgitation episodes for week were significantly reduced by verum (p < 0.01). Results indicate that Mucosave formulation provides an effective and well-tolerated treatment for reducing the frequency and intensity of symptoms associated with gastroesophageal reflux.

  11. Exploring the physiologic role of human gastroesophageal reflux by analyzing time-series data from 24-h gastric and esophageal pH recordings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Luo; Mu, John C; Sloan, Sheldon; Miner, Philip B; Gardner, Jerry D

    2014-07-16

    Our previous finding of a fractal pattern for gastric pH and esophageal pH plus the statistical association of sequential pH values for up to 2 h led to our hypothesis that the fractal pattern encodes information regarding gastric acidity and that depending on the value of gastric acidity, the esophagus can signal the stomach to alter gastric acidity by influencing gastric secretion of acid or bicarbonate. Under our hypothesis values of gastric pH should provide information regarding values of esophageal pH and vice versa. We used vector autoregression, a theory-free set of inter-related linear regressions used to measure relationships that can change over time, to analyze data from 24-h recordings of gastric pH and esophageal pH. We found that in pH records from normal subjects, as well as from subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease alone and after treatment with a proton pump inhibitor, gastric pH values provided important information regarding subsequent values of esophageal pH and values of esophageal pH provided important information regarding subsequent values of gastric pH. The ability of gastric pH and esophageal pH to provide information regarding subsequent values of each other was reduced in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease compared to normal subjects. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that depending on the value of gastric acidity, the esophagus can signal the stomach to alter gastric acidity, and that this ability is impaired in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  12. Diagnosis and Anti-Reflux Therapy for GERD with Respiratory Symptoms: A Study Using Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance-pH Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Wu, Jimin; Hu, Zhiwei; Yan, Chao; Gao, Xiang; Liang, Weitao; Liu, Diangang; Li, Fei; Wang, Zhonggao

    2016-01-01

    Stretta procedure (0 vs. 19.4%, p = 0.006). Conclusions MII-pH monitoring effectively detected respiratory-related predictive parameters, including total/proximal reflux episodes and symptom correlations. We found that GERD patients with respiratory symptoms exhibited more proximal and total reflux episodes but not more acid-related episodes, as determined by MII-pH monitoring. Thus, such monitoring could be useful for diagnosing atypical GERD patients with respiratory symptoms. Furthermore, LTF exhibited a more significant effect on controlling typical symptoms in all GERD patients and reducing the recurrence rate than the Stretta procedure in patients with respiratory symptoms. PMID:27532103

  13. Electrical stimulation for gastroesophageal reflux disease: current state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sharon E; Soffer, Edy

    2016-01-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who are not satisfied with acid suppression therapy can benefit primarily from fundoplication, a surgical intervention. Fundoplication has been the standard surgical procedure for GERD. It is effective but is associated with adverse effects, resulting in a declining number of interventions, creating a need for alternative interventions that are effective, yet have a better adverse effect profile. One such alternative involves the application of electrical stimulation to the lower esophageal sphincter. A number of animal studies showed that such stimulation can increase resting lower esophageal sphincter pressure. An acute human study confirmed this effect, and was followed by two open-label studies, with a follow-up of up to 3 years. Results thus far show that the therapy is associated with a significant improvement in symptoms, a significant reduction in esophageal acid exposure, and a very good safety profile. This review will describe the evolution of electrical stimulation therapy for GERD, as well as the safety and efficacy of this intervention. PMID:26834494

  14. [Is folic acid effective for the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with advanced or terminal chronic kidney disease?].

    PubMed

    Peña, José; Claro, Juan Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease have an increased cardiovascular risk. Several non-traditional factors have been showed to be associated with this risk, including hyperhomocysteinemia. The effects of reducing homocysteine levels with folic acid supplementation have been studied in a number of randomized trials, with mixed results. In this article we critically appraise two systematic reviews providing disparate conclusions about this question and we summarize their main findings using the GRADE methodology. We conclude that there are methodological differences that may explain the mixed results in both systematic reviews. Folic acid supplementation does not reduce cardiovascular morbidity or mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease at any stage.

  15. [VESICOURETERAL REFLUX INTO SMALL KIDNEY DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC PARADIGM].

    PubMed

    Korol'kova, I A; Kolobova, L M; Dutov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The causes of renal size reductionin children by 20 percent or more from the age norm include abnormalities of urodynamics of upper (UUT) and lower (LUT) urinary tract, combined with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and infra-vesical obstruction (IVO). Several issues regarding diagnosis and choice of treatment in children with small kidneys depending on the severity of functional abnormalities and the presence of comorbidities still remain controversial. 101 children with small kidneys accounting for 3.1% of the entire number of urologic patients admitted to the clinic were followed for 25 years. 78 (77.2%) patients were simultaneously diagnosed as having ipsilateral vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) (2.4% of the total number of hospitalized children). Moreover, contralateral VUR was found in 63% of patients. In 5.1% of children, anomalies of the contralateral kidney were identified: lumbar dystopia (3.8%), duplication of the renal pelvis and ureter (1.3%). Combination with IVO was found in 25.5% of cases. 75 (96%) children with vesicoureteral reflux into the small kidney were operated on. Reconstructive plastic surgery was made in 72 (92%) those patients. Indications for conservative management were identified in patients with intermittent VUR of I-II degree into small kidney or both kidneys. In case of detection of IVO, initial surgery was carried out to eliminate the obstruction. Conservative therapy was aimed at getting rid of the inflammatory process, restoring the function of kidney and bladder, and at the treatment of concomitant vulvovaginitis. In the absence of positive results of 6-8 months of conservative treatment or in case of the negative clinical course, the operation was considered justified. Indications for antireflux surgery were the failure of conservative therapy for intermittent VUR into small kidney or both kidneys, the presence of VUR of III-V degree into one or both kidneys. In cases of bilateral VUR antireflux surgery was performed simultaneously

  16. Menthol suppresses laryngeal C-fiber hypersensitivity to cigarette smoke in a rat model of gastroesophageal reflux disease: the role of TRPM8.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bi-Yu; Lin, Yu-Jung; Lee, Hung-Fu; Ho, Ching-Yin; Ruan, Ting; Kou, Yu Ru

    2015-03-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) display enhanced laryngeal reflex reactivity to stimuli that may be due to sensitization of the laryngeal C-fibers by acid and pepsin. Menthol, a ligand of transient receptor potential melastatin-8 (TRPM8), relieves throat irritation. However, the possibility that GERD induces laryngeal C-fiber hypersensitivity to cigarette smoke (CS) and that menthol suppresses this event has not been investigated. We delivered CS into functionally isolated larynxes of 160 anesthetized rats. Laryngeal pH 5-pepsin treatment, but not pH 5-denatured pepsin, augmented the apneic response to CS, which was blocked by denervation or perineural capsaicin treatment (a procedure that blocks the conduction of C fibers) of the superior laryngeal nerves. This augmented apnea was partially attenuated by capsazepine [an transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist], SB-366791 (a TRPV1 antagonist), and HC030031 [a transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) antagonist] and was completely prevented by a combination of TRPV1 and TRPA1 antagonists. Local application of menthol significantly suppressed the augmented apnea and this effect was reversed by pretreatment with AMTB (a TRPM8 antagonist). Our electrophysiological studies consistently revealed that laryngeal pH 5-pepsin treatment increased the sensitivity of laryngeal C-fibers to CS. Likewise, menthol suppressed this laryngeal C-fiber hypersensitivity and its effect could be reversed by pretreatment with AMTB. Our results suggest that laryngeal pH 5-pepsin treatment increases sensitivity to CS of both TRPV1 and TRPA1, which are presumably located at the terminals of laryngeal C-fibers. This sensory sensitization leads to enhanced laryngeal reflex reactivity and augmentation of the laryngeal C-fiber responses to CS, which can be suppressed by menthol acting via TRPM8.

  17. Review article: quality-of-life issues in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Quigley, E M M; Hungin, A P S

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore issues relating to quality of life in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, examining the range of generic and disease-specific instruments available, their applicability and limitations and to overview the effect of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease on quality of life. Whereas instruments have been developed to assist researchers, there is a paucity of reliable instruments for pragmatic use in the clinical setting. The situation is complicated because there is not necessarily a direct correlation between endoscopic findings and symptom severity and non-erosive reflux disease is now recognized as an important manifestation of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. However, quality-of-life instruments are useful in evaluating the impact of therapies and interventions, although these are limited, particularly in surgical interventions. Impaired quality of life now forms part of a definition of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, the impact of which goes beyond the symptoms alone. While the symptoms themselves have a negative effect on sufferers' lives, there are secondary effects caused by impaired physical, emotional and social functioning on productivity. Non-gastrointestinal problems caused by gastro-oesophageal reflux disease also impair quality of life. There is an ongoing need to develop instruments which truly measure the impact of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and which are readily interpretable to the individual patient and clinician.

  18. Associations of Circulating Gut Hormone and Adipocytokine Levels with the Spectrum of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ping-Huei; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Liou, Jyh-Ming; Lee, Yi-Chia; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Lin, Jaw-Town; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective The pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is complex and poorly understood. We aim to investigate the association of various circulating peptide hormones with heterogenous manifestations of GERD. Methods One hundred and four patients that had experienced typical GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation) for at least 3 episodes per week in the past 3 months were enrolled. All patients received a baseline assessment of symptom severity and frequency with the Reflux Disease Questionnaire and an upper endoscopy to classify GERD into erosive esophagitis (EE, n = 67), non-erosive esophagitis (NE, n = 37), and Barrett’s esophagus (BE, n = 8). Fifty asymptomatic subjects with an endoscopically normal esophagus were recruited as the control group. Complete anthropometric measures and blood biochemistry were obtained and fasting serum levels of adipocytokines (adiponectin and leptin) and gut hormones (ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY)) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in all subjects. Results All circulating peptide hormone levels were not statistically different between the GERD and control groups. However, GERD patients appeared to have lower PYY levels [median (25th-75th percentile), 80.1 (49.8–108.3) vs. 99.4 (65.8–131.9) pg/ml, p = 0.057] compared with control subjects. Among the GERD patients, ghrelin levels were inversely associated with the frequency and severity of acid regurgitation. In male GERD patients, EE was associated with significantly higher PYY levels [107.0 (55.0–120.8) vs. 32.8 (28.7–84.5) pg/ml, p = 0.026] but lower adiponectin levels [6.7 (5.6–9.3) vs. 9.9 (9.6–10.6) μg/ml, p = 0.034] than NE. Patients with BE had significantly lower adiponectin levels [6.0 (5.1–9.2) vs. 9.2 (7.1–11.2) μg/ml, p = 0.026] than those without BE. Conclusions Humoral derangement of circulating peptide hormones might participate in inflammation and symptom perception in patients suffering from GERD

  19. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Rhei Rhizoma and Coptidis Rhizoma Mixture on Reflux Esophagitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kwon, O Jun; Kim, Min Yeong; Shin, Sung Ho; Lee, Ah Reum; Lee, Joo Young; Seo, Bu-Il; Shin, Mi-Rae; Choi, Hyun Gyu; Kim, Jeong Ah; Min, Byung Sun; Kim, Gyo-Nam; Noh, Jeong Sook; Rhee, Man Hee; Roh, Seong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of the combined extract of Rhei rhizoma and Coptidis rhizoma (RC-mix) in experimental model of acute reflux esophagitis. The antioxidant activity was assessed by in vitro 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) assays. RC-mix was given at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg body weight 2 h prior to induction of reflux esophagitis (RE). After 5 h, the effects of RC-mix treated rats were compared with those of normal and control rats. The representative flavonoid contents of RC-mix, such as sennoside A, epiberberine, coptisine, palmatine, and berberine, were detected using HPLC. The elevated esophageal mucosa damage was markedly ameliorated by RC-mix treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the administration of RC-mix reduced the increase of serum reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). The improvement of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) levels were marked in the group given RC-mix. Moreover, the elevation of inflammatory mediators and cytokines by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in control rats decreased by RC-mix pretreatment. These results indicate that RC-mix treatment reduces the pathological states of esophagitis via regulating NF-κB mediated inflammation related to oxidative stress. PMID:27239206

  20. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Rhei Rhizoma and Coptidis Rhizoma Mixture on Reflux Esophagitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, O Jun; Kim, Min Yeong; Shin, Sung Ho; Lee, Ah Reum; Lee, Joo Young; Seo, Bu-il; Shin, Mi-Rae; Choi, Hyun Gyu; Kim, Jeong Ah; Min, Byung Sun; Kim, Gyo-Nam; Noh, Jeong Sook; Rhee, Man Hee; Roh, Seong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of the combined extract of Rhei rhizoma and Coptidis rhizoma (RC-mix) in experimental model of acute reflux esophagitis. The antioxidant activity was assessed by in vitro 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) assays. RC-mix was given at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg body weight 2 h prior to induction of reflux esophagitis (RE). After 5 h, the effects of RC-mix treated rats were compared with those of normal and control rats. The representative flavonoid contents of RC-mix, such as sennoside A, epiberberine, coptisine, palmatine, and berberine, were detected using HPLC. The elevated esophageal mucosa damage was markedly ameliorated by RC-mix treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the administration of RC-mix reduced the increase of serum reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxynitrite (ONOO−). The improvement of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) levels were marked in the group given RC-mix. Moreover, the elevation of inflammatory mediators and cytokines by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in control rats decreased by RC-mix pretreatment. These results indicate that RC-mix treatment reduces the pathological states of esophagitis via regulating NF-κB mediated inflammation related to oxidative stress. PMID:27239206

  1. Correlation between reflux and multichannel intraluminal impedance pH monitoring in untreated volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Jetté, Marie E.; Gaumnitz, Eric A.; Birchall, Martin A.; Welham, Nathan V.; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective While probable causative agents have been identified (e.g., refluxate components, tobacco smoke), the definitive mechanism for inflammation-related laryngeal mucosal damage remains elusive. Multichannel intraluminal impedance combined with pH monitoring (MII/pH) has emerged as a sensitive tool for diagnosis and characterization of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with laryngopharyngeal manifestations. To determine the relationship between laryngeal signs and MII/pH, we examined correlations between Reflux Finding Score (RFS) ratings of videostroboscopic laryngeal examinations and findings from MII/pH. Study Design Correlational study. Methods Healthy, untreated volunteers (n =142) underwent reflux diagnosis using data acquired from MII/pH testing. Eight trained clinicians performed RFS ratings of corresponding laryngeal examinations. Averaged RFS ratings were compared to MII/pH data using Pearson correlation coefficients. The relationship between RFS and MII/pH findings and demographic/clinical information (age, sex, smoking status, reflux) was assessed using general linear modeling. Rater reliability was evaluated. Results Posterior commissure hypertrophy was negatively correlated with minutes of nonacid refluxate (R=-0.21, p=0.0115). General linear modeling revealed that 28-40% of the variance in ratings of ventricular obliteration, erythema/hyperemia, vocal fold edema, diffuse laryngeal edema, posterior commissure hypertrophy, and granulation/granuloma could be explained by main and interaction effects of age, sex, smoking status, and reflux. Intra- and inter-rater reliability for RFS were poor-fair. Conclusion These results support the theory that the RFS is not specific for reflux in healthy, untreated volunteers, suggesting there may be alternate explanations for inflammatory clinical signs commonly ascribed to reflux in this population. PMID:24782404

  2. [Holter monitoring data in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Apenchenko, Iu S; Shcherbakov, P L; Gnusaev, S F; Ivanova, I I; Rozov, D N

    2014-01-01

    The aim of research is to estimate the functional state of the cardiovascular system in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with the help of Holter monitoring. 117 children of school age were examined: 69 children with GERD and 48 children with chronic gastroduodenitis. All children passed esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 24-hour pH-monitoring, electrocardiography and Holter monitoring. According to Holter monitoring data it was revealed that children with GERD had increased low-frequency components of frequency domain analyses, increased number of nocturnal PVCs and increased time of enhanced dispertion periods. Holter monitoring in patients with GERD can be used to detect preclinical ectopic rhythm, to evaluate autonomic dysfunction by frequency domain analyses, to predict nocturnal symptoms.

  3. Flow instability and bifurcation in gas-loaded reflux thermosyphons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, P. F.; Tien, C. L.; Lee, K. W.; Elkouh, N.

    1991-02-01

    In vertical gas-loaded two-phase reflux thermosyphons, the temperature and concentration gradients between the active and shut-off regions can create double-diffusive mixed convection flows. When the noncondensable gas molecular weight is greater than that of the vapor, different steady and time-dependent gas recirculation patterns develop, similar to those observed during Rayleigh-Benard convection in vertical slots. Experimental results presented here show that bifurcations from axisymmetric to three-dimensional, then asymmetric, and finally multiple distinct gas-flow patterns occur as the Rayleigh number increases. Ultimately, a sudden transition to a large-amplitude oscillatory gas flow takes place. Detailed concentration maps and power-density spectra from point wet-bulb temperature measurements clearly chart these transitions. These results impact the design of many condensing systems where noncondensables are present.

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and non-digestive tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying

    2015-05-01

    Over the past decade, incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) showed an increasing trend resulting from factors, including lifestyle and dietary habits; however, both etiology and pathological mechanisms remain controversial. GERD occurs as a result of a variety of mechanisms and there is no single factor. Symptoms of GERD are often non-typical, with a likelihood of being overlooked by non-gastroenterology professionals. Therefore, improving GERD awareness in non-gastroenterology practitioners, along with early diagnosis and treatment, provide potential benefit to clinicians and patients alike. Increasing evidence suggests GERD has specific connections with a variety of non-digestive tract conditions, may contribute an aggravating compounding effect on other diseases, prolong hospitalization, and increase subsequent medical costs. This review considers and emphasizes the association between GERD and non-digestive tract conditions, including atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, primary pulmonary fibrosis and energy metabolism related to diet.

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in Asia: a condition in evolution.

    PubMed

    Ho, Khek Yu

    2008-05-01

    Widespread epidemiological changes, rising prevalence and gradual shifts in patterns of disease manifestations: this is the changing face of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Asia. Are we witnessing a disease in evolution or merely the result of increased and more accurate case reporting that comes with advancing diagnostic technology, better medical facilities and heightened awareness of the disease? Do the figures reported really reflect the actual scenario or is there more to it than meets the eye? In this article, we take you back in time to review relevant developments over the past decade or so. We will draw on findings from across Asia, take an in-depth look at prevailing trends and patterns and examine some of the most plausible explanations behind the dynamics of this epidemiological transition.

  6. Morphometric assessment of reflux oesophagitis in fibreoptic biopsy specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, L R; Dent, J; Whitehead, R

    1985-01-01

    The oesophageal epithelium of patients with reflux oesophagitis has been studied by means of computer aided morphometry. Measurements of histological features were made on biopsies from six cases before and after treatment. The size and elongation of the nuclei and their variation, the number of nuclei per unit length or per unit sectioned area, and the size and number of nucleoli per nucleus were measured for two zones of the epithelium, the base layer and the intermediate layer, which were independent of section orientation. The measurements were analysed using discriminant analysis. Significant discrimination was found between the two groups. The most important parameters were the number of intermediate layer nuclei per sectioned square millimetre, the mean intermediate layer nuclear area, and the number of nuclei per millimetre of base epithelium. These parameters are consistent with increased cell turnover of the non-ulcerated epithelium before treatment. Images PMID:3968208

  7. Massive reflux and aspiration after radiographically inserted gastrostomy tube placement.

    PubMed

    Chesoni, Sandra A; Bach, John R; Okamura, Erica Mia

    2015-01-01

    To the authors' knowledge, fatal postgastrostomy aspiration within 2 days of enteral nutrition has not been reported. The authors report consecutive cases of severe postgastrotomy aspiration with one being fatal for a 26-yr-old with Duchenne muscular dystrophy 2 days after initiation of gastrostomy feedings. Previous to these consecutive radiographically inserted gastrostomies, all gastrotomies at the institution were percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomies or open gastrostomies. Radiographically inserted gastrostomy tubes have an increased likelihood of being oriented toward the esophagus as opposed to the duodenum, which may increase the risk for reflux. Elimination of invasive airway tubes should be delayed until after gastrostomy feedings are documented to be well tolerated. Oximetry and repeated measurements of vital capacity can suggest changes in the status of airway clearance.

  8. Effectiveness of voice therapy in reflux-related voice disorders.

    PubMed

    Vashani, K; Murugesh, M; Hattiangadi, G; Gore, G; Keer, V; Ramesh, V S; Sandur, V; Bhatia, S J

    2010-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) with laryngopharyngeal reflux plays a significant role in voice disorders. A significant proportion of patients attending ear, nose, and throat clinics with voice disorders may have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). There is no controlled study of the effect of voice therapy on GERD. We assessed the effect of voice therapy in patients with dysphonia and GERD. Thirty-two patients with dysphonia and GERD underwent indirect laryngoscopy and voice analysis. Esophageal and laryngeal symptoms were assessed using the reflux symptom index (RSI). At endoscopy, esophagitis was graded according to Los Angeles classification. Patients were randomized to receive either voice therapy and omeprazole (20 mg bid) (n=16, mean [SD] age 36.1 [9.6] y; 5 men; Gp A) or omeprazole alone (n=16, age 31.8 [11.7] y; 9 men; Gp B). During voice analysis, jitter, shimmer, harmonic-to-noise ratio (HNR) and normalized noise energy (NNE) were assessed using the Dr. Speech software (version 4 1998; Tigers DRS, Inc). Hoarseness and breathiness of voice were assessed using a perceptual rating scale of 0-3. Parameters were reassessed after 6 weeks, and analyzed using parametric or nonparametric tests as applicable. In Group A, 9 patients had Grade A, 3 had Grade B, and 1 had Grade C esophagitis; 3 had normal study. In Group B, 8 patients had Grade A, 2 had Grade B esophagitis, and 6 had normal study. Baseline findings: median RSI scores were comparable (Group A 20.0 [range 14-27], Group B 19.0 [15-24]). Median rating was 2.0 for hoarseness and breathiness for both groups. Values in Groups A and B for jitter 0.5 (0.6) versus 0.5 (0.8), shimmer 3.1 (2.5) versus 2.8 (2.0), HNR 23.0 (5.6) versus 23.1 (4.2), and NNE -7.3 (3.2) versus -7.2 (3.4) were similar. Post-therapy values for Groups A and B: RSI scores were 9.0 (5-13; P<0.01 as compared with baseline) and 13.0 (10-17; P<0.01), respectively. Ratings for hoarseness and breathiness were 0.5 (P<0.01) and 1.0 (P<0

  9. [The experience with the application of non-medicamental methods for the treatment of the patients presenting with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Éfendieva, M T

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to estimate the effectiveness of structural resonance electromagnetic therapy, acupuncture, and DMW therapy applied for the treatment of the patients presenting with gastroesophageal reflux disease. It was shown that acupuncture produced beneficial effect on the functional state of oesophagus and neurohumoral regulation of the lower oesophageal sphincter; moreover, it suppressed the acid-producing activity of the stomach. Structural resonance electromagnetic therapy, acupuncture, and DMW therapy decreased the level of vasoactive intestinal peptide in blood sera of the patients with this condition. These findings give reason to recommend acupuncture using corporal points (in the form of monotherapy in combination with a diet) to the patients presenting with gastroesophageal reflux disease and grade 0 and 1 oesophagitis (Savary-Miller classification). Structural resonance electromagnetic therapy (both alone and in combination with iodine-bromine baths) may be used to treat patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and grade 0 oesophagitis. Such patients may be just as well managed using DMW therapy in combination with iodine-bromine baths. Patients presenting with grade 1 oesophagitisshoud be treated with the use of the above physical factors in combination with medicamental therapy.

  10. Anti-Gastroesophageal Reflux Surgery in Infants with Severe Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Erik A; Munson, David A; Zhang, Huayan; Blinman, Thane A; Kirpalani, Haresh

    2014-01-01

    Summary Gastroesophageal reflux may exacerbate lung disease in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Anti-reflux surgery may therefore reduce the severity of this disease in some infants. We report a retrospective series of 22 infants with severe BPD who underwent anti-reflux surgery. Our experience indicates that these procedures can be safely performed in this population and that early post-operative initiation of gastric feeds is well tolerated. Modest post-operative reductions in required oxygen and median respiratory rate were observed. PMID:24753497

  11. Systematic review: questionnaires for assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bolier, E A; Kessing, B F; Smout, A J; Bredenoord, A J

    2015-01-01

    Numerous questionnaires with a wide variety of characteristics have been developed for the assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Four well-defined dimensions are noticeable in these GERD questionnaires, which are symptoms, response to treatment, diagnosis, and burden on the quality of life of GERD patients. The aim of this review is to develop a complete overview of all available questionnaires, categorized per dimension of the assessment of GERD. A systematic search of the literature up to January 2013 using the Pubmed database and the Embase database, and search of references and conference abstract books were conducted. A total number of 65 questionnaires were extracted and evaluated. Thirty-nine questionnaires were found applicable for the assessment of GERD symptoms, three of which are generic gastrointestinal questionnaires. For the assessment of response to treatment, 14 questionnaires were considered applicable. Seven questionnaires with diagnostic purposes were found. In the assessment of quality of life in GERD patients, 18 questionnaires were found and evaluated. Twenty questionnaires were found to be used for more than one assessment dimension, and eight questionnaires were found for GERD assessment in infants and/or children. A wide variety of GERD questionnaires is available, of which the majority is used for assessment of GERD symptoms. Questionnaires differ in aspects such as design, validation and translations. Also, numerous multidimensional questionnaires are available, of which the Reflux Disease Questionnaire is widely applicable. We provided an overview of GERD questionnaires to aid investigators and clinicians in their search for the most appropriate questionnaire for their specific purposes.

  12. Reliability and clinical validity of the Italian Reflux Symptom Index.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Antonio; Mozzanica, Francesco; Ginocchio, Daniela; Peri, Andrea; Bottero, Alessandro; Ottaviani, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    Currently, there is no Italian version of the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). The aim of this study was to develop an Italian RSI and to evaluate its internal consistency, reliability, and clinical validity. The study design used was a cross-sectional survey study. Eighty patients with a Reflux Finding Score (RFS) >7, and 193 asymptomatic subjects were included in the study. For the RSI reliability analysis, the appositely developed Italian RSI was filled twice, with a week interval, by the 80 patients and 80 control subjects. The test-retest reliability was assessed through the Pearson correlation test, whereas the Cronbach's alpha coefficient was used for internal consistency analysis. For the clinical validity assessment, the scores obtained in the pathological group were compared with the data from the asymptomatic individuals through the Student's t test. Finally, the correlation between RSI and RFS in the 80 patients was assessed. All of the patients filled in the entire questionnaire autonomously. The test-retest reliability in the patients, as well as in the control group, was very high (r>0.90); the internal consistency also showed very high values (alpha=0.99). The mean RSI score in the patients was 21.1+/-6.6, whereas in the control group it was 6.3+/-5.6; the difference was statistically significant (P=0.0001). The mean RFS score in the 80 patients was 9.2+/-2.7 and the correlation between RFS score and RSI score was rather high (r=0.89). The Italian RSI is easily administered, highly reproducible, and exhibits excellent clinical validity.

  13. No Association of Coffee Consumption with Gastric Ulcer, Duodenal Ulcer, Reflux Esophagitis, and Non-Erosive Reflux Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study of 8,013 Healthy Subjects in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shimamoto, Takeshi; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Kodashima, Shinya; Takahashi, Yu; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Oka, Masashi; Mitsushima, Toru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Probably due to caffeine-induced gastric acid secretion, negative effects of coffee upon various upper-gastrointestinal diseases have been precariously accepted, despite the inadequate epidemiological evidence. Our aim is to evaluate the effect of coffee consumption on four major acid-related diseases: gastric ulcer (GU), duodenal ulcer (DU), reflux esophagitis (RE), and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) based on the large-scale multivariate analysis. Of the 9,517 healthy adults, GU, DU, and RE were diagnosed by endoscopy, and NERD was diagnosed by the symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation without esophageal erosion. Associations between coffee consumption and the four disorders were evaluated, together with age, gender, body mass index (BMI), Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection status, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, and alcohol. We further performed meta-analysis using the random effects model to redefine the relationship between coffee intake and peptic ulcer disease. The eligible 8,013 study subjects comprised of 5,451 coffee drinkers and 2,562 non-coffee drinkers. By univariate analysis, age, BMI, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, and alcohol showed significant associations with coffee consumption. By multiple logistic regression analysis, positively correlated factors with significance were HP infection, current smoking, BMI, and pepsinogen I/II ratio for GU; HP infection, pepsinogen I/II ratio, and current smoking for DU; HP non-infection, male, BMI, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, age, and alcohol for RE; younger age, smoking, and female for NERD. The meta-analyses could detect any association of coffee consumption with neither GU nor DU. In conclusion, there are no significant relationship between coffee consumption and the four major acid-related upper gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23776588

  14. Antacids and Acid Reducers: OTC Relief for Heartburn and Acid Reflux

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease, you shouldn’t use an antacid containing calcium carbonate or aluminum hydroxide and magnesium carbonate unless your doctor recommends it. Talk to your doctor before taking a proton pump inhibitor if: You are a ... reduce calcium absorption from foods and supplements and may increase ...

  15. Relief of Night-time Symptoms Associated With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Following 4 Weeks of Treatment With Pantoprazole Magnesium: The Mexican Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Orr, William; Vargas-Romero, José Antonio; Remes-Troche, José María; Morales-Arámbula, Miguel; Soto-Pérez, Julio César; Mateos-Pérez, Gualberto; Sobrino-Cossío, Sergio; Teramoto-Matsubara, Oscar; López-Colombo, Aurelio; Orozco-Gamiz, Antonio; Saez-Ríos, Adolfo; Arellano-Plancarte, Araceli; Chiu-Ugalde, Jazmin; Tholen, Anne; Horbach, Silke; Lundberg, Lars; Fass, Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of pantoprazole magnesium (pantoprazole-Mg) 40 mg in the relief of esophageal and extra-esophageal symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), particularly night-time symptoms. Methods Patients (aged 18-50 years) with 3-month history of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation plus at least one other symptom in the last week were enrolled in a nationwide, prospective and observational study in Mexico. Patients received pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg once daily during 4 weeks. Symptoms were assessed through a physician-administered structured interview and the patient-completed ReQuest in Practice™ questionnaire. Night-time GERD was defined as arousal from sleep during the night due to GERD-associated symptoms. Results Out of 4,343 patients included at basal visit, 3,665 were considered for the effectiveness per protocol analysis. At baseline, patients had a median of 8 GERD related symptoms. Patients with night-time GERD symptoms (42.7%) were more likely to have extra-esophageal symptoms (P < 0.001) than other GERD patients. Pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg once daily for 4 weeks improved a broad range of GERD-associated symptoms from baseline (80% reduction on physicians assessments; 68-77% reduction on ReQuest in Practice™ dimensions), including both day- and night-time GERD symptoms; improvements were the greatest for extra-esophageal symptoms in patients with night-time symptoms. Pantoprazole-Mg was well tolerated. Conclusions Pantoprazole-Mg 40 mg significantly improved a broad range of esophageal and extra-esophageal GERD related symptoms including sleep disturbances, as well as well-being, in patients with daytime or night-time GERD, making it a good option for patients with GERD, especially when extra-esophageal and night-time symptoms are present. PMID:24466446

  16. Acid-Catalyzed Isomerization of Carvone to Carvacrol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjonaas, Richard A.; Mattingly, Shawn P.

    2005-01-01

    The acid-catalyzed isomerization of carvone to carvacrol, first reported by Ritter and Ginsburg, is especially well suited with a permanent-magnet FT instrument. The acid-catalyzed isomerization of carvone to carvacrol produced a 61% yield after a three hour reflux with 30% aqueous sulfuric acid.

  17. Restoration of occlusal vertical dimension in dental erosion caused by gastroesophageal reflux: case report.

    PubMed

    Reston, Eduardo Galia; Closs, Luciane Quadrado; Busato, Adair Luiz Stefanello; Broliato, Gustavo André; Tessarollo, Fábio Rafael

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe a minimally invasive procedure for occlusal rehabilitation in a young patient presenting with mild mandibular prognathism and loss of occlusal vertical dimension caused by dental erosion from chronic gastroesophageal reflux.

  18. [Functional activity of alveolar macrophages in patients with bronchial asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Liamina, S V; Kalish, S V; Malysheva, E V; Iurenev, G L; Malyshev, I Iu

    2013-01-01

    Combination of bronchial asthma (BA) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a widespread clinical situation. The two pathologies are known to influence each other leading to disturbances in immune responsiveness. We studied phenotypes and phenotypic plasticity of immune cells (alveolar macrophages) in patients with BA and GERD. It was shown that BA and GERD are largely associated with AM of proinflammatory M2 and anti-inflammatory M1 phenotypes respectively. Population of AM with MI phenotype increases in patients having both BA and GERD compared with that in BA alone. In vitro experiments showed that acidic milieu promotes shifting the phenotype toward the predominance of M1, i.e. simulates the situation characteristic of GERD. Combination of BA and GERD narrows the interval within which AM can change MI phenotype (i.e. makes them more "rigid") but broadens the range in which they can change M2 phenotype. Also, GERD promotes the development of morphological rigidity of AM. Patients with BA given steroid therapy undergo inversion of phenotypic plasticity of AM. These data characterize the immunological component of BA and/or GERD pathogenesis. They help to better understand mechanisms of development of broncho-pulmonary pathology in GERD patients and can be used to work out new methods for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:24417067

  19. Overlap of dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux in the general population: one disease or distinct entities?

    PubMed Central

    Choung, Rok Seon; Locke, G. Richard; Schleck, Cathy D.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The overlap of dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is known to be frequent but whether the overlap group is a distinct entity or not remains unclear. Aims To evaluate whether the overlap of dyspepsia and GER (dyspepsia-GER overlap) occurs more than expected due to chance alone, and evaluate the risk factors for dyspepsia-GER overlap. Methods In 2008 and 2009, a validated Bowel Disease Questionnaire was mailed to a total of 8006 community sample from Olmsted County, MN. Overall, 3831 of the 8006 subjects returned surveys (response rate 48%). Dyspepsia was defined by symptom criteria of Rome III; GER was defined by weekly or more frequent heartburn and/or acid regurgitation. Results Dyspepsia and GER occurred together more commonly than expected by chance. The somatic symptom checklist score was significantly associated with dyspepsia-GER overlap vs. GER alone or dyspepsia alone (OR=1.9 [1.4, 2.5), and 1.6 [1.2, 2.1), respectively). Insomnia was also significantly associated with dyspepsia-GER overlap vs. GER alone or dyspepsia alone (OR=1.4 [1.1, 1.7], OR=1.3 [1.1, 1.6], respectively). Moreover, proton pump inhibitor use was significantly associated with dyspepsia-GER overlap vs. dyspepsia alone (OR=2.4 [1.5, 3.8]). Conclusions Dyspepsia-GER overlap is common in the population and is greater than expected by chance. PMID:22150874

  20. Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a Patient With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Five-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Moretto, G; Pupo, Y M; Bueno, A L N; Araujo, F O

    2016-01-01

    Tooth wear is a multifactorial process that is a growing concern in dentistry. This phenomenon can be caused by mechanical (attrition, abrasion, or abfraction) or chemical (erosion) processes. Etiologic factors in dental erosion can be due to changes in behavior, an unbalanced diet, or gastrointestinal disorders such as acid regurgitation, which may influence the salivary flow rate and buffering capacity of saliva. This case report describes an esthetic rehabilitation of a patient with gastroesophageal reflux and dental erosion, with a treatment rationale that includes the use of a diagnostic template and five-year follow-up. This technique, presented here in a clinical case with moderate enamel loss, integrates an additive wax-up and a direct intraoral bis-acryl resin mock-up. Lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) laminate veneers were fabricated with the heatpress technique. They were veneered with a layering ceramic (IPS e.max Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent) to improve the appearance of the incisal edge. The case demonstrated the success of veneers as an effective, conservative, and esthetic treatment for patients with this pathology. PMID:26449592

  1. Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a Patient With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Five-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Moretto, G; Pupo, Y M; Bueno, A L N; Araujo, F O

    2016-01-01

    Tooth wear is a multifactorial process that is a growing concern in dentistry. This phenomenon can be caused by mechanical (attrition, abrasion, or abfraction) or chemical (erosion) processes. Etiologic factors in dental erosion can be due to changes in behavior, an unbalanced diet, or gastrointestinal disorders such as acid regurgitation, which may influence the salivary flow rate and buffering capacity of saliva. This case report describes an esthetic rehabilitation of a patient with gastroesophageal reflux and dental erosion, with a treatment rationale that includes the use of a diagnostic template and five-year follow-up. This technique, presented here in a clinical case with moderate enamel loss, integrates an additive wax-up and a direct intraoral bis-acryl resin mock-up. Lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) laminate veneers were fabricated with the heatpress technique. They were veneered with a layering ceramic (IPS e.max Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent) to improve the appearance of the incisal edge. The case demonstrated the success of veneers as an effective, conservative, and esthetic treatment for patients with this pathology.

  2. Carotid-Cavernous Fistula Associated with an Intracranial Lesion Caused by Cortical Venous Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, S.; Sakuma, I.; Otani, T.; Yasuda, K.; Tomura, N.; Watarai, J.; Kinouchi, H.; Yanagisawa, T.; Mizoi, K.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in 20 patients with carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF; 3 direct CCFs and 17 indirect CCFs) were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate venous drainage patterns that may cause intracerebral haemorrhage or venous congestion of the brain parenchyma. We evaluated the relationship between cortical venous reflux and abnormal signal intensity of the brain parenchyma on MRI. Cortical venous reflux was identified on DSA in 12 of 20 patients (60.0%) into the superficial middle cerebral vein (SMCV; n=4), the uncal vein (n=2), the petrosal vein (n=2), the lateral mesencephalic vein (LMCV; n=1), the anterior pontomesencephalic vein (APMV; n=1), both the APMV and the petrosal vein (n=1) and both the uncal vein and the SMCV (n=1). Features of venous congestion, such as tortuous and engorged veins, focal staining and delayed appearance of the veins, were demonstrated along the region of cortical venous reflux in the venous phase of internal carotid or vertebral arteriography in six of 20 patients (30.0%). These findings were not observed in the eight CCF patients who did not demonstrate cortical venous reflux. MRI revealed abnormal signal intensity of the brain parenchyma along the region with cortical venous reflux in four of 20 indirect CCF patients (20%). Of these four patients, one presented with putaminal haemorrhage, while the other three presented with hyperintensity of the pons, the middle cerebellar peduncle or both on T2-weighted images, reflecting venous congestion. The venous drainage routes were obliterated except for cortical venous reflux in these four patients and the patients without abnormal signal intensity on MRI had other patent venous outlets in addition to cortical venous reflux. CCF is commonly associated with cortical venous reflux. The obliteration or stenosis of venous drainage routes causes a converging venous outflow that develops into cortical venous reflux and

  3. Endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux with a self-detachable balloon system.

    PubMed

    Atala, A; Peters, C A; Retik, A B; Mandell, J

    1992-08-01

    There is controversy about the use of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) paste in children for the endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux due to evidence of particle migration. However, there are definite advantages in treating patients endoscopically. It is evident that the ideal substance should be able to be delivered endoscopically, conserve its volume, and be nonmigratory and nonantigenic. Towards this goal we developed a catheter with an inflatable, detachable and self-sealing silicone balloon that would fit through a 19 gauge cystoscopic needle. Hydroxy-ethyl-methyl acrylate, a hydrophilic polymer that solidifies within 60 minutes after the addition of ferrous sulfate, was chosen as the filling material for the balloon. Conceptually, the sealed balloon would prevent the migration of hydroxy-ethyl-methyl acrylate and the solidified polymer would prevent volume loss. To test this system reflux was created in 6 Hanford mini-pigs by unroofing the ureters bilaterally. In 2 pigs a previously described method of open surgery was used and in the other 4 reflux was created endoscopically using the resectoscope and laparoscopic scissors. The presence of bilateral reflux was confirmed 4 weeks later with a cystogram and the balloon was implanted unilaterally through a cystoscope. The opposite ureter served as an internal control in all animals. A repeat cystogram was performed 2 to 4 weeks after implantation, demonstrating resolution of reflux in the treated side and persistence of reflux in the opposite untreated ureter. Serial cystograms, ultrasound and excretory urography showed no reflux on the implanted side nor any evidence of obstruction. Tissue sections from various organs showed no evidence of particle migration, granuloma formation or inflammatory reaction. Short-term results show that the balloon implants are able to correct reflux without evidence of obstruction.

  4. Modified pressure cooker technique: An easier way to control onyx reflux.

    PubMed

    Abud, Daniel Giansante; de Castro-Afonso, Luis Henrique; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Colli, Benedicto Oscar

    2016-06-01

    The use of onyx enabled the treatment of various intracranial vascular diseases more effectively than cyanoacrylate. The pressure cooker technique allowed definitive control of reflux and was made possible via detachable microcatheters. We present a variation of this technique called the modified pressure cooker to make reflux control easier and more reproducible and thus simplifying the procedure. We also extended the application of the technique to other diseases beyond arteriovenous malformations including dural arteriovenous fistulas and hypervascular tumors.

  5. Numerical modelling of geothermal and reflux circulation in Enewetak Atoll: Implications for dolomitization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, G.; Whitaker, F.; Smart, P.; Sanford, W.

    2000-01-01

    Two types of regional-scale seawater circulation have been proposed to explain the formation of Enewetak Atoll dolomites: geothermal and reflux circulation. We have used a finite element groundwater flow model to examine the pattern, magnitude and dynamic interaction of these two different circulation mechanisms in Enewetak Atoll. Geothermal circulation is concentrated around the atoll-margin whereas refluxing mesosaline brines flow from the atoll interior towards the margin to restrict and eventually shut off geothermal circulation. Refluxing brines of 36-80??? can account for the salinity signature recorded in dolomite fluid inclusions. Distributions of fluid flux and Mg mass-balance calculations suggest that both geothermal and reflux circulation mechanisms could account for the observed distribution of dolomite in Enewetak Atoll. Furthermore, the atoll interior may be extensively dolomitized as observed in other atolls. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.Two types of regional-scale seawater circulation have been proposed to explain the formation of Enewetak Atoll dolomites: geothermal and reflux circulation. We have used a finite element groundwater flow model to examine the pattern, magnitude and dynamic interaction of these two different circulation mechanisms in Enewetak Atoll. Geothermal circulation is concentrated around the atoll-margin whereas refluxing mesosaline brines flow from the atoll interior towards the margin to restrict and eventually shut off geothermal circulation. Refluxing brines of 36-80 per mil can account for the salinity signature recorded in dolomite fluid inclusions. Distributions of fluid flux and Mg mass-balance calculations suggest that both geothermal and reflux circulation mechanisms could account for the observed distribution of dolomite in Enewetak Atoll. Furthermore, the atoll interior may be extensively dolomitized as observed in other atolls.

  6. Association between Pattern of Gastritis and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients with Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nobakht, Hossein; Boghratian, Amirhossein; Sohrabi, Masoudreza; Panahian, Mohammad; Rakhshani, Naser; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Ajdarkosh, Hossein; Hemmasi, Gholamreza; Khonsari, Mahmoodreza; Gholami, Ali; Rabiei, Neda; Zamani, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Reflux disease is a common gastrointestinal problem. The association between reflux disease and gastritis pattern is controversial. AIM: To determine the association between reflux disease and gastritis pattern in patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. METHODS 470 patients with dyspepsia and reflux disease were enrolled in this study. The inclusion criteria were willing to participate in the study, age over 40 years, and having the criteria of ROME III for at least 3 months. Patients with history of H. pylori eradication therapy during the 3 months before the study, a history of gastric surgery, and gastric cancer were excluded. All of the participants underwent upper endoscopy and two biopsy samples were taken from antrum, body, and fundal areas. RESULTS H. pylori infection rate was 367 (78.1%) with mean age of 59.8 ± 11.4 years. Of them 131 patients (35.7%) were male. Reflux disease was detected in 273 (74.4%) patients. 216 (58.9%) and 102 (27.8%) patients had non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), respectively. Corpus predominant and antral predominant gastritis were seen in 72 (19.6%) and 129 (35.2%) patients, respectively. Antral gastritis was significantly associated with GERD (p<0.01). In regression analysis, antral predominant gastritis had a significant association with GERD (OR=1.92; 95%CI: 1.22- 3.12). The same result was observed in mild to moderate antral and greater curvature gastritis (OR= 1.26; 95%CI: 0.25-6.40 and OR= 3.0; 95%CI: 0.63-14.17, respectively). CONCLUSION According to these finding ,we could suggest that the pattern of gastritis could be associated with reflux disease and GERD.

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux activates the NF-κB pathway and impairs esophageal barrier function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yu; Chen, Hao; Hu, Yuhui; Djukic, Zorka; Tevebaugh, Whitney; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Orlando, Roy C.; Hu, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    The barrier function of the esophageal epithelium is a major defense against gastroesophageal reflux disease. Previous studies have shown that reflux damage is reflected in a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance associated with tight junction alterations in the esophageal epithelium. To develop novel therapies, it is critical to understand the molecular mechanisms whereby contact with a refluxate impairs esophageal barrier function. In this study, surgical models of duodenal and mixed reflux were developed in mice. Mouse esophageal epithelium was analyzed by gene microarray. Gene set enrichment analysis showed upregulation of inflammation-related gene sets and the NF-κB pathway due to reflux. Significance analysis of microarrays revealed upregulation of NF-κB target genes. Overexpression of NF-κB subunits (p50 and p65) and NF-κB target genes (matrix metalloproteinases-3 and -9, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8) confirmed activation of the NF-κB pathway in the esophageal epithelium. In addition, real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining also showed downregulation and mislocalization of claudins-1 and -4. In a second animal experiment, treatment with an NF-κB inhibitor, BAY 11-7085 (20 mg·kg−1·day−1 ip for 10 days), counteracted the effects of duodenal and mixed reflux on epithelial resistance and NF-κB-regulated cytokines. We conclude that gastroesophageal reflux activates the NF-κB pathway and impairs esophageal barrier function in mice and that targeting the NF-κB pathway may strengthen esophageal barrier function against reflux. PMID:23639809

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux activates the NF-κB pathway and impairs esophageal barrier function in mice.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu; Chen, Hao; Hu, Yuhui; Djukic, Zorka; Tevebaugh, Whitney; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Orlando, Roy C; Hu, Jianguo; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2013-07-01

    The barrier function of the esophageal epithelium is a major defense against gastroesophageal reflux disease. Previous studies have shown that reflux damage is reflected in a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance associated with tight junction alterations in the esophageal epithelium. To develop novel therapies, it is critical to understand the molecular mechanisms whereby contact with a refluxate impairs esophageal barrier function. In this study, surgical models of duodenal and mixed reflux were developed in mice. Mouse esophageal epithelium was analyzed by gene microarray. Gene set enrichment analysis showed upregulation of inflammation-related gene sets and the NF-κB pathway due to reflux. Significance analysis of microarrays revealed upregulation of NF-κB target genes. Overexpression of NF-κB subunits (p50 and p65) and NF-κB target genes (matrix metalloproteinases-3 and -9, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8) confirmed activation of the NF-κB pathway in the esophageal epithelium. In addition, real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining also showed downregulation and mislocalization of claudins-1 and -4. In a second animal experiment, treatment with an NF-κB inhibitor, BAY 11-7085 (20 mg·kg⁻¹·day⁻¹ ip for 10 days), counteracted the effects of duodenal and mixed reflux on epithelial resistance and NF-κB-regulated cytokines. We conclude that gastroesophageal reflux activates the NF-κB pathway and impairs esophageal barrier function in mice and that targeting the NF-κB pathway may strengthen esophageal barrier function against reflux. PMID:23639809

  9. Modified pressure cooker technique: An easier way to control onyx reflux.

    PubMed

    Abud, Daniel Giansante; de Castro-Afonso, Luis Henrique; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Colli, Benedicto Oscar

    2016-06-01

    The use of onyx enabled the treatment of various intracranial vascular diseases more effectively than cyanoacrylate. The pressure cooker technique allowed definitive control of reflux and was made possible via detachable microcatheters. We present a variation of this technique called the modified pressure cooker to make reflux control easier and more reproducible and thus simplifying the procedure. We also extended the application of the technique to other diseases beyond arteriovenous malformations including dural arteriovenous fistulas and hypervascular tumors. PMID:26944607

  10. Association between Pattern of Gastritis and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients with Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nobakht, Hossein; Boghratian, Amirhossein; Sohrabi, Masoudreza; Panahian, Mohammad; Rakhshani, Naser; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Ajdarkosh, Hossein; Hemmasi, Gholamreza; Khonsari, Mahmoodreza; Gholami, Ali; Rabiei, Neda; Zamani, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Reflux disease is a common gastrointestinal problem. The association between reflux disease and gastritis pattern is controversial. AIM: To determine the association between reflux disease and gastritis pattern in patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. METHODS 470 patients with dyspepsia and reflux disease were enrolled in this study. The inclusion criteria were willing to participate in the study, age over 40 years, and having the criteria of ROME III for at least 3 months. Patients with history of H. pylori eradication therapy during the 3 months before the study, a history of gastric surgery, and gastric cancer were excluded. All of the participants underwent upper endoscopy and two biopsy samples were taken from antrum, body, and fundal areas. RESULTS H. pylori infection rate was 367 (78.1%) with mean age of 59.8 ± 11.4 years. Of them 131 patients (35.7%) were male. Reflux disease was detected in 273 (74.4%) patients. 216 (58.9%) and 102 (27.8%) patients had non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), respectively. Corpus predominant and antral predominant gastritis were seen in 72 (19.6%) and 129 (35.2%) patients, respectively. Antral gastritis was significantly associated with GERD (p<0.01). In regression analysis, antral predominant gastritis had a significant association with GERD (OR=1.92; 95%CI: 1.22- 3.12). The same result was observed in mild to moderate antral and greater curvature gastritis (OR= 1.26; 95%CI: 0.25-6.40 and OR= 3.0; 95%CI: 0.63-14.17, respectively). CONCLUSION According to these finding ,we could suggest that the pattern of gastritis could be associated with reflux disease and GERD. PMID:27698970

  11. Posture and gastro-oesophageal reflux: a case for left lateral positioning

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, J.; McCloud, P.; Cameron, D.

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 4 November 1996
 AIM—Prone posture is often recommended for symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux in young infants, but prone positioning has been associated with sudden infant death. The aim of this study was thus to establish the optimal alternative posture for reducing reflux.
METHODS—24 infants (< 5 months) with symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux were studied prospectively with 48 h pH monitoring. They were randomly assigned to one of the 24 permutations of the four positions (supine, prone, right, left). During the first 24 hours the infant was held horizontally, and then the permutation was repeated at 30 degrees head elevation, giving a total of eight study segments for each infant. Data were edited to remove all time when the infants were not in the prescribed positions. Results were evaluated using analysis of covariance.
RESULTS—Gastro-oesophageal reflux expressed as reflux index (mean % (SEM)) was significantly less in the prone and left lateral positions (6.72 (1.06) and 7.69 (1.03) respectively) than in the supine and right lateral positions (15.33 (2.33) and 12.02 (1.38); p < 0.001). Head elevation did not affect any variables significantly.
CONCLUSIONS—Head elevation may not always be of clinical value. The left lateral position is a suitable alternative to prone for the postural management of infants with symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux.

 PMID:9135268

  12. Distribution of photoassimilates in the pea plant: chronology of events in non-fertilized ovaries and effects of gibberellic acid.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, S; Bier, D; Estruch, J J; Beltrán, J P

    1989-12-01

    The short-lived isotope(11)C (t1/2=20.4 min) has been used to study assimilate distribution in intact pea plants (Pisum sativum L.). Radiolabel was measured at the leaf fed with(11)CO2 (feed-leaf), at the ovary of the flower subtended by this leaf, and in shoot apex and roots of individual plants. Considerable(11)C-radiolabel was detected in the young ovaries during the first days after anthesis. Thereafter, when the ovaries stopped growing the uptake of(11)C rapidly decreased. At this developmental stage only apex and roots were competing for the photoassimilates. Fertilization, however, restored the strong sink activity of the ovaries. The same effect could be achieved by applying gibberellic acid to non-fertilized ovaries. About 2 h after treatment the residual(11)C-radiolabel entering the ovary started to increase and, at about the same time, the ovary resumed growth. Feed-leaf photosynthesis, as well as export of(11)C-radiolabel out of the leaf, was not changed by the treatment. The(11)C experiments show the dynamic behaviour of the sinks during developmental stages from the day of anthesis until 5 d later and demonstrate that phytohormones may play an important role in regulating carbon distribution. PMID:24201844

  13. Modeling the detectability of vesicoureteral reflux using microwave radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F.; De Luca, Valeria; Bardati, Fernando; Snow, Brent W.; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2010-09-01

    We present the modeling efforts on antenna design, frequency selection and receiver sensitivity estimation to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) using microwave (MW) radiometry as warm urine from the bladder maintained at fever range temperature using a MW hyperthermia device reflows into the kidneys. The radiometer center frequency (fc), frequency band (Δf) and aperture radius (ra) of the physical antenna for kidney temperature monitoring are determined using a simplified universal antenna model with a circular aperture. Anatomical information extracted from the computed tomography (CT) images of children aged 4-6 years is used to construct a layered 3D tissue model. Radiometric antenna efficiency is evaluated in terms of the ratio of the power collected from the target at depth to the total power received by the antenna (η). The power ratio of the theoretical antenna is used to design a microstrip log spiral antenna with directional radiation pattern over fc ± Δf/2. Power received by the log spiral from the deep target is enhanced using a thin low-loss dielectric matching layer. A cylindrical metal cup is proposed to shield the antenna from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Transient thermal simulations are carried out to determine the minimum detectable change in the antenna brightness temperature (δTB) for 15-25 mL urine refluxes at 40-42 °C located 35 mm from the skin surface. Theoretical antenna simulations indicate maximum η over 1.1-1.6 GHz for ra = 30-40 mm. Simulations of the 35 mm radius tapered log spiral yielded a higher power ratio over fc ± Δf/2 for the 35-40 mm deep targets in the presence of an optimal matching layer. Radiometric temperature calculations indicate δTB >= 0.1 K for the 15 mL urine at 40 °C and 35 mm depth. Higher η and δTB were observed for the antenna and matching layer inside the metal cup. Reflection measurements of the log spiral in a saline phantom are in agreement with the simulation data. The numerical study

  14. Modeling the Detectability of Vesicoureteral Reflux using Microwave Radiometry

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F.; De Luca, Valeria; Bardati, Fernando; Snow, Brent W.; Stauffer, Paul R

    2010-01-01

    We present the modeling efforts on antenna design, frequency selection and receiver sensitivity estimation to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) using microwave (MW) radiometry as the warm urine from the bladder maintained at fever range temperature using a MW hyperthermia device reflows into the kidneys. Radiometer center frequency (fc), frequency band (Δf), and aperture radius (ra) of the physical antenna for kidney temperature monitoring are determined using a simplified universal antenna model with circular aperture. Anatomical information extracted from computed tomography (CT) images of children age 4–6 years is used to construct a layered 3D tissue model. Radiometric antenna efficiency is evaluated in terms of the ratio between the power collected from the target at depth and the total power received by the antenna (η). Power ratio of the theoretical antenna is used to design a microstrip log spiral antenna with directional radiation pattern over fc ± Δf/2. Power received by the log spiral from the deep target is enhanced using a thin low-loss dielectric matching layer. A cylindrical metal cup is proposed to shield the antenna from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Transient thermal simulations are carried out to determine the minimum detectable change in antenna brightness temperature (δTB) for 15–25 mL urine refluxes at 40–42°C located 35 mm from the skin surface. Theoretical antenna simulations indicate maximum η over 1.1–1.6 GHz for ra = 30–40 mm. Simulations of the 35 mm radius tapered log spiral yielded higher power ratio over fc ± Δf/2 for the 35–40 mm deep targets in the presence of an optimal matching layer. Radiometric temperature calculations indicate δTB ≥ 0.1 K for the 15 mL urine at 40°C and 35 mm depth. Higher η and δTB were observed for the antenna and matching layer inside the metal cup. Reflection measurements of the log spiral in saline phantom are in agreement with the simulation data. Numerical study suggests

  15. Modeling the detectability of vesicoureteral reflux using microwave radiometry.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F; De Luca, Valeria; Bardati, Fernando; Snow, Brent W; Stauffer, Paul R

    2010-09-21

    We present the modeling efforts on antenna design, frequency selection and receiver sensitivity estimation to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) using microwave (MW) radiometry as warm urine from the bladder maintained at fever range temperature using a MW hyperthermia device reflows into the kidneys. The radiometer center frequency (f(c)), frequency band (Deltaf) and aperture radius (r(a)) of the physical antenna for kidney temperature monitoring are determined using a simplified universal antenna model with a circular aperture. Anatomical information extracted from the computed tomography (CT) images of children aged 4-6 years is used to construct a layered 3D tissue model. Radiometric antenna efficiency is evaluated in terms of the ratio of the power collected from the target at depth to the total power received by the antenna (eta). The power ratio of the theoretical antenna is used to design a microstrip log spiral antenna with directional radiation pattern over f(c) +/- Deltaf/2. Power received by the log spiral from the deep target is enhanced using a thin low-loss dielectric matching layer. A cylindrical metal cup is proposed to shield the antenna from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Transient thermal simulations are carried out to determine the minimum detectable change in the antenna brightness temperature (deltaT(B)) for 15-25 mL urine refluxes at 40-42 degrees C located 35 mm from the skin surface. Theoretical antenna simulations indicate maximum eta over 1.1-1.6 GHz for r(a) = 30-40 mm. Simulations of the 35 mm radius tapered log spiral yielded a higher power ratio over f(c) +/- Deltaf/2 for the 35-40 mm deep targets in the presence of an optimal matching layer. Radiometric temperature calculations indicate deltaT(B) 0.1 K for the 15 mL urine at 40 degrees C and 35 mm depth. Higher eta and deltaT(B) were observed for the antenna and matching layer inside the metal cup. Reflection measurements of the log spiral in a saline phantom are in agreement

  16. Theoretical foundations for quantitative paleogenetics. III - The molecular divergence of nucleic acids and proteins for the case of genetic events of unequal probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, R.; Pearl, D.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical equations are derived for molecular divergence with respect to gene and protein structure in the presence of genetic events with unequal probabilities: amino acid and base compositions, the frequencies of nucleotide replacements, the usage of degenerate codons, the distribution of fixed base replacements within codons and the distribution of fixed base replacements among codons. Results are presented in the form of tables relating the probabilities of given numbers of codon base changes with respect to the original codon for the alpha hemoglobin, beta hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochrome c and parvalbumin group gene families. Application of the calculations to the rabbit alpha and beta hemoglobin mRNAs and proteins indicates that the genes are separated by about 425 fixed based replacements distributed over 114 codon sites, which is a factor of two greater than previous estimates. The theoretical results also suggest that many more base replacements are required to effect a given gene or protein structural change than previously believed.

  17. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Application Improved Early Growth, Net Photosynthesis, and Associated Physio-Biochemical Events in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wu; Liu, Jianhua; Ashraf, Umair; Li, Gaoke; Li, Yuliang; Lu, Wenjia; Gao, Lei; Han, Fuguang; Hu, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an endogenous signaling molecule and involved in growth regulations and plant development, however, a little information is available on the consequences of exogenous GABA application on growth, development, and associated physio-biochemical processes in maize. The present study examined the GABA-induced regulations in early growth, net photosynthetic rate, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and enzymatic activities in three maize cultivars, i.e., Yuecainuo 6, Zhengtian 68, and Yuecainuo 2. Two levels of GABA, i.e., 0 mg L-1 and 50 mg L-1, in solution form, with total application volume of 100 ml per pot containing 15 maize seedlings were exogenously applied. Results revealed that exogenous GABA application improved seedling growth in terms of seedling length and biomass accumulation in all maize cultivars at both 3 and 7 days after treatment (DAT). It also promoted net photosynthesis and variably affected gas exchange attributes, i.e., stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (Tr), as well as leaves SPAD value. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation [in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA)] under GABA treated maize seedlings were also remained variable; however, osmolyte accumulation (protein and proline) and activities of anti-oxidants enzymes, i.e., super-oxide dismutase and peroxidase were also affected differently at both 3 and 7 DAT in all maize cultivars. Furthermore, enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase were improved. These results suggest the involvement of GABA in various physio-metablical mechanisms which might lead to improvement in morphological growth of maize. In future, research is still needed at molecular and genetic levels to unravel the involvement of GABA-mediated regulations in growth and its associated physio-biochemical mechanisms. PMID:27446149

  18. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Application Improved Early Growth, Net Photosynthesis, and Associated Physio-Biochemical Events in Maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Liu, Jianhua; Ashraf, Umair; Li, Gaoke; Li, Yuliang; Lu, Wenjia; Gao, Lei; Han, Fuguang; Hu, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an endogenous signaling molecule and involved in growth regulations and plant development, however, a little information is available on the consequences of exogenous GABA application on growth, development, and associated physio-biochemical processes in maize. The present study examined the GABA-induced regulations in early growth, net photosynthetic rate, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and enzymatic activities in three maize cultivars, i.e., Yuecainuo 6, Zhengtian 68, and Yuecainuo 2. Two levels of GABA, i.e., 0 mg L(-1) and 50 mg L(-1), in solution form, with total application volume of 100 ml per pot containing 15 maize seedlings were exogenously applied. Results revealed that exogenous GABA application improved seedling growth in terms of seedling length and biomass accumulation in all maize cultivars at both 3 and 7 days after treatment (DAT). It also promoted net photosynthesis and variably affected gas exchange attributes, i.e., stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (Tr), as well as leaves SPAD value. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation [in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA)] under GABA treated maize seedlings were also remained variable; however, osmolyte accumulation (protein and proline) and activities of anti-oxidants enzymes, i.e., super-oxide dismutase and peroxidase were also affected differently at both 3 and 7 DAT in all maize cultivars. Furthermore, enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase were improved. These results suggest the involvement of GABA in various physio-metablical mechanisms which might lead to improvement in morphological growth of maize. In future, research is still needed at molecular and genetic levels to unravel the involvement of GABA-mediated regulations in growth and its associated physio-biochemical mechanisms.

  19. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Application Improved Early Growth, Net Photosynthesis, and Associated Physio-Biochemical Events in Maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Liu, Jianhua; Ashraf, Umair; Li, Gaoke; Li, Yuliang; Lu, Wenjia; Gao, Lei; Han, Fuguang; Hu, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an endogenous signaling molecule and involved in growth regulations and plant development, however, a little information is available on the consequences of exogenous GABA application on growth, development, and associated physio-biochemical processes in maize. The present study examined the GABA-induced regulations in early growth, net photosynthetic rate, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and enzymatic activities in three maize cultivars, i.e., Yuecainuo 6, Zhengtian 68, and Yuecainuo 2. Two levels of GABA, i.e., 0 mg L(-1) and 50 mg L(-1), in solution form, with total application volume of 100 ml per pot containing 15 maize seedlings were exogenously applied. Results revealed that exogenous GABA application improved seedling growth in terms of seedling length and biomass accumulation in all maize cultivars at both 3 and 7 days after treatment (DAT). It also promoted net photosynthesis and variably affected gas exchange attributes, i.e., stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (Tr), as well as leaves SPAD value. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation [in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA)] under GABA treated maize seedlings were also remained variable; however, osmolyte accumulation (protein and proline) and activities of anti-oxidants enzymes, i.e., super-oxide dismutase and peroxidase were also affected differently at both 3 and 7 DAT in all maize cultivars. Furthermore, enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase were improved. These results suggest the involvement of GABA in various physio-metablical mechanisms which might lead to improvement in morphological growth of maize. In future, research is still needed at molecular and genetic levels to unravel the involvement of GABA-mediated regulations in growth and its associated physio-biochemical mechanisms. PMID:27446149

  20. Symptom index P-value and symptom sensitivity index P-value to determine symptom association between apnea and reflux in premature infants at term.

    PubMed

    Glen, D R; Murakami, P; Nunez, J S

    2013-08-01

    The current method to determine temporal association (TA) between reflux and symptoms is the symptom association probability (SAP), but this method has limitations due to the constraints of binning and the violation of statistical principles of the Fisher's exact test that lead to an invalid estimation of TA. The aim of this study is to develop improved methods of computing the TA between apneic and reflux events using simulation and permutation methods and to compare these to the SAP. TA was analyzed between polysomnographic obstructive apneas and multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) reflux events. Three new numerical methods were compared to the SAP in four former premature infants with persistent apneas at term. The experimentally found association was compared to the association observed in simulated or permuted data consistent with the lack of association beyond what is expected by chance alone. Temporal association was computed based on symptom and symptom sensitivity indices, SI and SSI, with varying window of association (WA) times from 15 to 300 s. The three new methods estimated P-values at varying WA that generally followed the same pattern of the SAP which had a more erratic pattern. The WA that gave the lowest P-value was approximately 120 s. Each of the novel methods produced P-value results consistent with each other and the SAP yet not subject to its limitations. The variation of WA gave a temporal profile of TA providing clues to its etiology. These new metrics are called Symptom Index (SIP) and Symptom Sensitivity Index (SSIP) P-values.

  1. Gastroesophageal Reflux in Critically Ill Children: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Solana García, Maria José; López-Herce Cid, Jesús; Sánchez Sánchez, César

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is very common in children due to immaturity of the antireflux barrier. In critically ill patients there is also a high incidence due to a partial or complete loss of pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter though other factors, such as the use of nasogastric tubes, treatment with adrenergic agonists, bronchodilators, or opiates and mechanical ventilation, can further increase the risk of GER. Vomiting and regurgitation are the most common manifestations in infants and are considered pathological when they have repercussions on the nutritional status. In critically ill children, damage to the esophageal mucosa predisposes to digestive tract hemorrhage and nosocomial pneumonia secondary to repeated microaspiration. GER is mainly alkaline in children, as is also the case in critically ill pediatric patients. pH-metry combined with multichannel intraluminal impedance is therefore the technique of choice for diagnosis. The proton pump inhibitors are the drugs of choice for the treatment of GER because they have a greater effect, longer duration of action, and a good safety profile. PMID:23431462

  2. Numerical modeling of dish-Stirling reflux solar receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Using reflux solar receivers to collect solar energy for dish-Stirling electric power generation systems is currently being investigated by several organizations, including Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. In support of this program, Sandia has developed two numerical models describing the energy transfer within and thermal performance of pool-boiler and heat-pipe receivers. Both models are applicable to axisymmetric geometries and they both consider the radiative and convective energy transfer within the receiver cavity, the conductive and convective energy transfer within the receiver cavity, the conductive and convective energy transfer from the receiver housing, and the energy transfer to the receiver working fluid. In these models, the radiative transfer within the receiver is analyzed using a two-band (solar and infrared) net-radiation formulation for enclosure radiation. Empirical convective correlations describe the convective heat transfer from the cavity to the surroundings. The primary difference between the models is the level of detail in modeling the heat conduction through the receiver walls. The more detailed model uses a two-dimensional finite control volume method, whereas the simpler model uses a one-dimensional thermal resistance approach. 20 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Detection of pulmonary aspiration in children with gastroesophageal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Orellana, P.; Olea, E.; Pino, C.; Rossel, M.; Ceresa, S.; Gonzalez, P.; Otarola, S.; Astudillo, S.

    1985-05-01

    The presence of pulmonary aspiration (PA) should be suspected in two groups of patients; those with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and pulmonary disease and patient's with pulmonary symptoms without signs of GER in whom other etiologies of pulmonary disease have been excluded. To determine if PA could be diagnosed in children using radionuclides 114 patients aged 3-12 months drank 500 ..mu..Ci of Tc-99m sulfur colloid mixed with infant formula and an additional 1.5 mCi was administered in the evening. All medicine was suspended 24 hours before. Images of the chest in supine position (ant, post views) were acquired on computer in 32 x 32 (byte mode) during 5 min each view at 2 and 18 hours. No outside pressure was applied. None of the patients with digestive symptomatology alone had positive exam. Of 88 patients with bronchopulmonary symptomatology 35 had abnormal examination 35% with moderate symptom were (Abn) and 55% with severe disease were abnormal. The radionuclide method appears to be the ideal study in patients where PA is suspected. The positivity of the method depends on the group of patients selected. The sensitivity is highest in patients with marked symptomatology.

  4. Common questions about the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, William D; Strayer, Scott M; Mull, Shane R

    2015-05-15

    Common questions that arise regarding treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) include which medications are most effective, when surgery may be indicated, which patients should be screened for Barrett esophagus and Helicobacter pylori infection, and which adverse effects occur with these medications. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the most effective medical therapy, and all PPIs provide similar relief of GERD symptoms. There is insufficient evidence to recommend testing for H. pylori in patients with GERD. In the absence of alarm symptoms, endoscopy is not necessary to make an initial diagnosis of GERD. Patients with alarm symptoms require endoscopy. Screening for Barrett esophagus is not routinely recommended, but may be considered in white men 50 years or older who have had GERD symptoms for at least five years. Symptom remission rates in patients with chronic GERD are similar in those who undergo surgery vs. medical management. PPI therapy has been associated with an increased risk of hip fracture, hypomagnesemia, community-acquired pneumonia, vitamin B12 deficiency, and Clostridium difficile infection.

  5. Review of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Punjabi, Paawan; Hira, Angela; Prasad, Shanti; Wang, Xiangbing; Chokhavatia, Sita

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews the known pathophysiological mechanisms of comorbid gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the diabetic patient, discusses therapeutic options in care, and provides an approach to its evaluation and management. We searched for review articles published in the past 10 years through a PubMed search using the filters diabetes mellitus, GERD, pathophysiology, and management. The search only yielded a handful of articles, so we independently included relevant studies from these review articles along with related citations as suggested by PubMed. We found diabetic patients are more prone to developing GERD and may present with atypical manifestations. A number of mechanisms have been proposed to elucidate the connection between these two diseases. Studies involving treatment options for comorbid disease suggest conflicting drug-drug interactions. Currently, there are no published guidelines specifically for the evaluation and management of GERD in the diabetic patient. Although there are several proposed mechanisms for the higher prevalence of GERD in the diabetic patient, this complex interrelationship requires further research. Understanding the pathophysiology will help direct diagnostic evaluation. In our review, we propose a management algorithm for GERD in the diabetic patient.

  6. Ultralight Fabric Reflux Tube (UFRT) Thermal/Vacuum Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurlbert, K. M.; Ewert, M. K.; Graf, J. P.; Keller, J. R.; Pauley, K. A.; Guenther, R. J.; Antoniak, Z. I.

    1996-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal control systems are essential to provide the necessary environment for the crew and equipment to function adequately on space missions. The Ultralight Fabric Reflux Tube (UFRT) was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as a lightweight radiator concept to be used on planetary-type missions (e.g., Moon, Mars). The UFRT consists of a thin-walled tube (acting as the fluid boundary), overwrapped with a low-mass ceramic fabric (acting as the primary pressure boundary). The tubes are placed in an array in the vertical position with the evaporators at the lower end. Heat is added to the evaporators, which vaporizes the working fluid. The vapor travels to the condenser end above and cools as heat is radiated to the environment. The fluid condensed on the tube wall is then returned to the evaporator by gravity. The primary objectives for the fiscal year 1994 program included the design and fabrication of prototype UFRTs and thermal/vacuum chamber testing of these test articles. Six UFRTS, with improved titanium liners, were successfully manufactured and provided to the Johnson Space Center in July 1994. Five were tested in a thermal/vacuum chamber in September 1994. Data obtained to characterize the performance of the UFRTs under simulated lunar conditions demonstrated the design concept successfully. In addition, a trade study showed that an optimized/improved UFRT could achieve as much as a 25% mass savings in the heat rejection subsystem of future planetary-type thermal control systems.

  7. Understanding, avoiding, and treating potential adverse events following the use of injectable poly-L-lactic acid for facial and nonfacial volumization.

    PubMed

    Vleggaar, Danny; Fitzgerald, Rebecca; Lorenc, Z Paul

    2014-04-01

    Injection-related adverse events (AEs) may occur with the use of any injectable substance, including all commercially available fillers. The most common of these AEs include discomfort, bruising, edema, and erythema, which are generally transient and resolve spontaneously. The majority of AEs widely felt to be associated with poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) are papules, nodules, and granulomas. Papules and nodules, which are histologically distinct from granulomas, tend to arise several weeks after injection, are generally palpable, asymptomatic, and nonvisible, and will typically resolve on their own, but can be camouflaged with the use of hyaluronic acid. They generally result from suboptimal product reconstitution or placement and, as such, their incidence can be minimized by improved injection methodology. In contrast, true inflammatory granulomas are very rare (incidence 0.01%-0.1%), seem to be systemic in nature, and represent an overabundance of host reaction to PLLA. Granulomas may become apparent months or years post-injection and may persist and grow over time. Their treatment is geared toward halting the increased secretion of interstitial substances and invasion of cells, and may include the administration of steroids and antimetabolites such as 5-fluorouracil. PMID:24719076

  8. (n-3) Fatty acid content of red blood cells does not predict risk of future cardiovascular events following an acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aarsetoey, Hildegunn; Pönitz, Volker; Grundt, Heidi; Staines, Harry; Harris, William S; Nilsen, Dennis W T

    2009-03-01

    A reduced risk of fatal coronary artery disease has been associated with a high intake of (n-3) fatty acids (FA) and a direct cardioprotective effect by their incorporation into myocardial cells has been suggested. Based on these observations, the omega-3 index (eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid in cell membranes of RBC expressed as percent of total FA) has been suggested as a new risk marker for cardiac death. In this study, our aim was to evaluate the omega-3 index as a prognostic risk marker following hospitalization with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The omega-3 index was measured at admission in 460 patients with an ACS as defined by Troponin-T (TnT) > or = 0.02 microg/L. During a 2-y follow-up, recurrent myocardial infarctions (MI) (defined as TnT > 0.05 microg/L with a typical MI presentation) and cardiac and all-cause mortality were registered. Cox regression analyses were used to relate the risk of new events to the quartiles of the omega-3 index at inclusion. After correction for age, sex, previous heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, brain natriuretic peptide, creatinine, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerol, homocysteine, BMI, and medication, there was no significant reduction in risk for all-cause mortality, cardiac death, or MI with increasing values of the index. In conclusion, we could not confirm the omega-3 index as a useful prognostic risk marker following an ACS. PMID:19158216

  9. The Lewis acid catalyzed synthesis of hyperbranched Oligo(glycerol-diacid)s in aprotic polar media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lewis-acid, titanium (IV) butoxide (15% (w/w; catalyst/reactants)), was used to catalyze the condensation of 0.05 mol glycerol with 0.10 mol of either succinic acid, glutaric acid, or azelaic acid to produce oligomers. The reactions were refluxed in dilute solutions of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) o...

  10. Helicobacter pylori may induce bile reflux: link between H pylori and bile induced injury to gastric epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Ladas, S D; Katsogridakis, J; Malamou, H; Giannopoulou, H; Kesse-Elia, M; Raptis, S A

    1996-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori and duodenogastric reflux are both recognised as playing aetiological roles in chronic gastritis. This study investigated whether H pylori colonisation of the antral mucosa and duodenogastric reflux are independent phenomena or have a causal relationship. Thirty eight patients (15 men, 23 women) aged (mean (SD)) 48 (17) years participated. Each patient underwent gastroscopy. Antral biopsy specimens were taken to investigate H pylori colonisation. In addition BrIDA-99mTc/111In-DTPA scintigraphy was used to quantify duodenogastric reflux. H pylori positive patients who were found to have duodenogastric reflux were treated with amoxycillin (1 g/d) and metronidazole (1.5 g/d) for seven days and four tablets of bismuth subcitrate daily for four weeks. Follow up antral biopsies and scintigraphy were repeated at six months. Duodenogastric reflux could not be found in 18 patients, including eight (44%) who were H pylori positive. Ten of the 11 patients who had duodenogastric reflux (reflux % 11.6 (9.2)), however, were H pylori positive (chi 2 = 6.26, p = 0.01). These 10 patients were given eradication treatment. At six months, in six patients who became H pylori negative, duodenogastric reflux was significantly reduced from a pretreatment value of 14.3% to 3.3% (two tail, paired t = 2.57, p = 0.016). These data suggest that H pylori may induced duodenogastric reflux which may be important in the pathogenesis of H pylori gastritis or carcinogenesis, or both. PMID:8566844

  11. A Review of New Surgical and Endoscopic Therapies for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the United States today is binary, with the majority of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease being treated with antisecre-tory medications and a minority of patients, typically those with volume regurgitation, undergoing Nissen fundoplication. However, there has been increasing dissatisfaction with proton pump inhibitor therapy among a significant number of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease owing to cost, side effects, and refractory symptoms, and there has been a general reluctance to undergo surgical fundoplication due to its attendant side-effect profile. As a result, a therapy gap exists for many patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Alternative techniques are available for these gap patients, including 2 endoscopic fundoplication techniques, an endoscopic radiofrequency energy delivery technique, and 2 minimally invasive surgical procedures. These alternative techniques have been extensively evaluated; however, there are limitations to published studies, including arbitrary definitions of success, variable efficacy measurements, deficient reporting tools, inconsistent study designs, inconsistent lengths of follow-up postintervention, and lack of comparison data across techniques. Although all of the techniques appear to be safe, the endoscopic techniques lack demonstrable reflux control and show variable symptom improvement and variable decreases in proton pump inhibitor use. The surgical techniques are more robust, with evidence for adequate reflux control, symptom improvement, and decreased proton pump inhibitor use; however, these techniques are more difficult to perform and are more intrusive. Additionally, these alternative techniques have only been studied in patients with relatively normal anatomy. The field of gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment is in need of consistent definitions of efficacy, standardized study design and outcome measurements, and improved reporting

  12. A novel approach in cinnamic acid synthesis: direct synthesis of cinnamic acids from aromatic aldehydes and aliphatic carboxylic acids in the presence of boron tribromide.

    PubMed

    Chiriac, Constantin I; Tanasa, Fulga; Onciu, Marioara

    2005-02-28

    Cinnamic acids have been prepared in moderate to high yields by a new direct synthesis using aromatic aldehydes and aliphatic carboxylic acids, in the presence of boron tribromide as reagent, 4-dimethylaminopyridine (4-DMAP) and pyridine (Py) as bases and N-methyl-2-pyrolidinone (NMP) as solvent, at reflux (180-190 degrees C) for 8-12 hours.

  13. Evaluation of a Self-Management Program for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenhong; Sun, Changxian; Lin, Lin; Wang, Meifeng; Zhang, Hongjie; Song, Yulei

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic disease with a high incidence worldwide. The various symptoms have substantial impact on the quality of life of affected individuals. A long-term self-management program can increase the ability of patients to make behavioral changes, and health outcomes can improve as a consequence. This study's aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-management program for gastroesophageal reflux disease. A total of 115 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease were allocated to the experimental group and the control group. The former received self-management intervention along with conventional drug therapy, whereas the latter received standard outpatient care and conventional drug therapy. After the clinical trial, the control group also received the same self-management intervention. The levels of self-management behaviors, self-efficacy, gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms, and psychological condition were compared. Those in the experimental group demonstrated significantly higher self-efficacy for managing their illness, showed positive changes in self-management behaviors, and had comparatively better remission of symptoms and improvement in psychological distress. The program helped patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease self-manage their illness as possible. PMID:27684637

  14. Evaluation of a Self-Management Program for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenhong; Sun, Changxian; Lin, Zheng; Lin, Lin; Wang, Meifeng; Zhang, Hongjie; Song, Yulei

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic disease with a high incidence worldwide. The various symptoms have substantial impact on the quality of life of affected individuals. A long-term self-management program can increase the ability of patients to make behavioral changes, and health outcomes can improve as a consequence. This study's aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-management program for gastroesophageal reflux disease. A total of 115 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease were allocated to the experimental group and the control group. The former received self-management intervention along with conventional drug therapy, whereas the latter received standard outpatient care and conventional drug therapy. After the clinical trial, the control group also received the same self-management intervention. The levels of self-management behaviors, self-efficacy, gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms, and psychological condition were compared. Those in the experimental group demonstrated significantly higher self-efficacy for managing their illness, showed positive changes in self-management behaviors, and had comparatively better remission of symptoms and improvement in psychological distress. The program helped patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease self-manage their illness as possible. PMID:27684637

  15. [Effect of elevated head position in bed in therapy of gastroesophageal reflux].

    PubMed

    Pollmann, H; Zillessen, E; Pohl, J; Rosemeyer, D; Abucar, A; Armbrecht, U; Bornhofen, B; Herz, R

    1996-06-01

    In a randomized multicentric trial the effect of sleeping with the bed-head raised was studied in inpatients with reflux symptoms. All patients underwent an endoscopic and pH-metric examination. As a result from the diagnostic procedures three groups were formed: group 1 - refluxlike dyspepsia (endoscopic and pH-metric examination normal), group 2 - reflux disease without esophagitis (endoscopy normal, pH-metric examination abnormal), group 3 - refluxesophagitis (endoscopy abnormal). All patients were randomly assigned to either sleeping with horizontal bed-head or having the bed-head raised (15 cm). Furthermore, the patients in group 3 were put on treatment with omeprazole (20 mg twice a day) those in group 2 were treated with a procinetic drug (cisapride 30 mg). The patients in group 1 had no drug therapy. However, antacids were allowed in all patients. For a two-week-period reflux symptoms and use of antacids were registered. No difference was seen in the symptom-score or use of antacids. Also sub-group analysis (sex, age, body-mass-index, severity of esophagitis and nocturnal reflux) did not reveal any impact of sleeping with the bed-head raised on reflux symptoms or use of antacids.

  16. Review article: gastro-oesophageal reflux disease--the health economic implications.

    PubMed

    Mason, J; Hungin, A P S

    2005-08-01

    For the vast majority of patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease appropriate care involves the management of symptoms with lifestyle advice and drugs. However, there is dissension about the appropriate use of endoscopy, whether drugs should be stepped up or down according to potency, how long drugs should be used for, the role of lifestyle advice, and, related to this, the role of patients' lifestyle choices. This exploration of the economics of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease reviews its cost burden to the UK, assesses published economic models for their strengths and weaknesses and examines current recommendations for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease management from a socioeconomic perspective. Drugs prescribed predominantly for dyspepsia cost the UK National Health Service a projected pound sterling 625 million in 2004, 7% of the primary care prescribing budget. When general practitioners consultations, endoscopies, over-the-counter sales and sickness absences are included the UK cost rises to pound sterling 1.5 billion: approximately half of this cost can be ascribed to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Emphasis upon regular review and stepping down treatment (while maintaining adequate symptom relief) is both clinically appropriate and resource efficient. Other cost-effectiveness issues largely lack objective answers because investment in treatment for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease depends upon how much more, at the margin, society wishes to invest for further but diminishing symptom relief.

  17. Dolomite from reflux of moderate salinity brine, Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.H.

    1996-12-31

    Dolomite from the Eocene of Enewetak Atoll provides a model for prediction of dolomite reservoirs. Others have noted dolomite below about 1200 meters at the base of permeable slope strata, and that dolomite postdates compaction, formed from fluids with {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr higher than the host strata, and that dolomite stable isotope values argue for precipitation from cool seawater or warm evaporated seawater. Dolomite contains cloudy cores, rich in primary fluid inclusions. Fluid inclusion ice melting ranges from -2.4 to -4.4{degrees}C (higher salinity than seawater; 44 to 85 ppt). Ratios of clear rim/cloudy core compared to new {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and stable isotope data yield no correlation indicative of differences between clear rims and cloudy cores. Dolomite {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr are 0.70750 to 0.70873, but fluid inclusion {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr are 0.70957 to 0.71198, indicating inclusions best preserve end-member compositions for the dolomitizing fluid. Thus, dolomite precipitated from a young fluid that, surprisingly, may have interacted with some unknown source of radiogenic Sr. For fluid inclusions, Na/K is similar to seawater indicating components were derived from seawater evaporation and not from dissolution of an evaporate, Na/Sr and Ca/Mg are similar to seawater modified by rock/water interaction, and Cl/SO{sub 4} suggests removal of SO{sub 4} from pore fluids. The only viable explanation for the Enewetak dolomite is that young fluids evaporated to salinities slightly above seawater in Enewetak lagoon. The density contrast allowed for reflux deep into the atoll, discharging through permeable slope strata. This model could predict distributions of dolomite in any platform with slight restriction and appropriate climate.

  18. Dolomite from reflux of moderate salinity brine, Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.H. )

    1996-01-01

    Dolomite from the Eocene of Enewetak Atoll provides a model for prediction of dolomite reservoirs. Others have noted dolomite below about 1200 meters at the base of permeable slope strata, and that dolomite postdates compaction, formed from fluids with [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr higher than the host strata, and that dolomite stable isotope values argue for precipitation from cool seawater or warm evaporated seawater. Dolomite contains cloudy cores, rich in primary fluid inclusions. Fluid inclusion ice melting ranges from -2.4 to -4.4[degrees]C (higher salinity than seawater; 44 to 85 ppt). Ratios of clear rim/cloudy core compared to new [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr and stable isotope data yield no correlation indicative of differences between clear rims and cloudy cores. Dolomite [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr are 0.70750 to 0.70873, but fluid inclusion [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr are 0.70957 to 0.71198, indicating inclusions best preserve end-member compositions for the dolomitizing fluid. Thus, dolomite precipitated from a young fluid that, surprisingly, may have interacted with some unknown source of radiogenic Sr. For fluid inclusions, Na/K is similar to seawater indicating components were derived from seawater evaporation and not from dissolution of an evaporate, Na/Sr and Ca/Mg are similar to seawater modified by rock/water interaction, and Cl/SO[sub 4] suggests removal of SO[sub 4] from pore fluids. The only viable explanation for the Enewetak dolomite is that young fluids evaporated to salinities slightly above seawater in Enewetak lagoon. The density contrast allowed for reflux deep into the atoll, discharging through permeable slope strata. This model could predict distributions of dolomite in any platform with slight restriction and appropriate climate.

  19. Risk factors of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Shiraz, southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saberi-Firoozi, Mehdi; Khademolhosseini, Farnaz; Yousefi, Maryam; Mehrabani, Davood; Zare, Najaf; Heydari, Seyed Taghi

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in a healthy general population in relation to demographic, lifestyle and health-seeking behaviors in Shiraz, southern Iran. METHODS: A total of 1978 subjects aged > 35 years who referred to Gastroenterohepatology Research Center and who completed a questionnaire consisting of 27 questions for GERD in relation to demographic, lifestyle and health-seeking behaviors were included in this study for a period of five months. The validity and reliability of the questionnaire were determined. RESULTS: The prevalence of GERD was 15.4%, which was higher in females (17.3%), in rural areas (19.8%), and in illiterate subjects (21.5%) and those with a mean age of 50.25 years. The prevalence was significantly lower in subjects having fried food (14.8%), and fruit and vegetables (14.6%). More symptoms were noticed in subjects consuming pickles (22.1%), taking aspirin (21%) and in subjects with psychological distresses (27.2%) and headaches (22%). The correlation was statistically significant between GERD and halitosis (18.3%), dyspepsia (30.6%), anxiety (19.5%), nightmares (23.9%) and restlessness (18.5%). Their health seeking behavior showed that there was a significant restriction of diet (20%), consumption of herbal medicine (19%), using over-the-counter drugs (29.9%) and consulting with physicians (24.8%). Presence of GERD symptoms was also significantly related to a previous family history of the disease (22.3%). CONCLUSION: GERD is more common in females, rural and illiterate subjects and correlated with consumption of pickles, occurrence of headache, psychological distress, dyspepsia, halitosis, anxiety, nightmare and restlessness, and a family history of GERD and aspirin intake, but the correlation was negative with consumption of fat and fiber intake. PMID:17907293

  20. Dietary habits and gastroesophageal reflux disease in preschool children

    PubMed Central

    Choi, You Jin; Ha, Eun Kyo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the relationship between dietary habits and childhood gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in preschool children. Methods We performed a questionnaire study to analyze the relationship between dietary habits and GERD in 85 preschool children with GERD and 117 healthy children of the same age. Results Irregular and picky eating were more p–revalent in the GERD group than in the control group (odds ratio [OR], 4.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37–12.54 and OR, 4.96; 95% CI, 1.88–13.14, respectively). The snack preferences and the late night eating habits were significantly more prevalent in the GERD group than in the control group (OR, 3.83; 95% CI, 1.23–11.87 and OR, 9.51; 95% CI, 2.55–35.49, respectively). A preference for liquid foods was significantly more prevalent in the GERD group (OR, 9.51; 95% CI, 2.548–35.485). The dinner-to-bedtime interval was significantly shorter in the GERD group than in the control group (157.06±48.47 vs. 174.62±55.10, P=0.020). In addition, the time between dinner and bedtime was shorter than 3 hours in 47 children (55.3%) of the GERD group and 44 (37.6%) of the control group. This difference was statistical significance (P=0.015). Conclusion Dietary habits such as picky and irregular eating, snack preference, a preference of liquid foods, late night eating, and a shorter dinner-to-bedtime interval had a significant correlation with GERD. Further large-scale studies are necessary to confirm our results. PMID:27588031

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in COPD: links and risks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Annemarie L; Goldstein, Roger S

    2015-01-01

    COPD is a long-term condition associated with considerable disability with a clinical course characterized by episodes of worsening respiratory signs and symptoms associated with exacerbations. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common gastrointestinal conditions in the general population and has emerged as a comorbidity of COPD. GERD may be diagnosed by both symptomatic approaches (including both typical and atypical symptoms) and objective measurements. Based on a mix of diagnostic approaches, the prevalence of GERD in COPD ranges from 17% to 78%. Although GERD is usually confined to the lower esophagus in some individuals, it may be associated with pulmonary microaspiration of gastric contents. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to GERD in COPD originate from gastroesophageal dysfunction, including altered pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (which normally protect against GERD) and changes in esophageal motility. Proposed respiratory contributions to the development of GERD include respiratory medications that may alter esophageal sphincter tone and changes in respiratory mechanics, with increased lung hyperinflation compromising the antireflux barrier. Although the specific cause and effect relationship between GERD and COPD has not been fully elucidated, GERD may influence lung disease severity and has been identified as a significant predictor of acute exacerbations of COPD. Further clinical effects could include a poorer health-related quality of life and an increased cost in health care, although these factors require further clarification. There are both medical and surgical options available for the treatment of GERD in COPD and while extensive studies in this population have not been undertaken, this comorbidity may be amenable to treatment.

  2. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in COPD: links and risks

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Annemarie L; Goldstein, Roger S

    2015-01-01

    COPD is a long-term condition associated with considerable disability with a clinical course characterized by episodes of worsening respiratory signs and symptoms associated with exacerbations. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common gastrointestinal conditions in the general population and has emerged as a comorbidity of COPD. GERD may be diagnosed by both symptomatic approaches (including both typical and atypical symptoms) and objective measurements. Based on a mix of diagnostic approaches, the prevalence of GERD in COPD ranges from 17% to 78%. Although GERD is usually confined to the lower esophagus in some individuals, it may be associated with pulmonary microaspiration of gastric contents. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to GERD in COPD originate from gastroesophageal dysfunction, including altered pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (which normally protect against GERD) and changes in esophageal motility. Proposed respiratory contributions to the development of GERD include respiratory medications that may alter esophageal sphincter tone and changes in respiratory mechanics, with increased lung hyperinflation compromising the antireflux barrier. Although the specific cause and effect relationship between GERD and COPD has not been fully elucidated, GERD may influence lung disease severity and has been identified as a significant predictor of acute exacerbations of COPD. Further clinical effects could include a poorer health-related quality of life and an increased cost in health care, although these factors require further clarification. There are both medical and surgical options available for the treatment of GERD in COPD and while extensive studies in this population have not been undertaken, this comorbidity may be amenable to treatment. PMID:26392769

  3. Gastroesophageal Reflux is Not Associated with Dental Erosion in Children

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Yvette K.; Heyman, Melvin B.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Dalal, Deepal H.; Wojcicki, Janet M.; Clark, Ann L.; Rechmann, Beate; Rechmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Dental erosion is a complication of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in adults; in children, it is not clear if GER has a role in dental pathologic conditions. Dietary intake, oral hygiene, high bacterial load, and decreased salivary flow might contribute independently to GER development or dental erosion, but their potential involvement in dental erosion from GER is not understood. We investigated the prevalence of dental erosion among children with and without GER symptoms, and whether salivary flow rate or bacterial load contribute to location-specific dental erosion. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 59 children (ages 9–17 y) with symptoms of GER and 20 asymptomatic children (controls); all completed a questionnaire on dietary exposure. Permanent teeth were examined for erosion into dentin, erosion locations, and affected surfaces. The dentist was not aware of GER status, nor was the gastroenterologist aware of dental status. Stimulated salivary flow was measured and salivary bacterial load was calculated for total bacteria, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Results Controlling for age, dietary intake, and oral hygiene, there was no association between GER symptoms and dental erosion, by tooth location or affected surface. Salivary flow did not correlate with GER symptoms or erosion. Erosion location and surface were independent of total bacteria and levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Conclusions Location-specific dental erosion is not associated with GER, salivary flow, or bacterial load. Prospective studies are required to determine the pathogenesis of GER-associated dental erosion and the relationship between dental caries to GER and dental erosion. PMID:21820389

  4. Acute Tc-99m DMSA scan for identifying dilating vesicoureteral reflux in children: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mantadakis, Elpis; Vouloumanou, Evridiki K; Georgantzi, Georgia G; Tsalkidis, Aggelos; Chatzimichael, Athanassios; Falagas, Matthew E

    2011-07-01

    Controversy exists regarding the type and/or sequence of imaging studies needed during the first febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) in young children. Several investigators have claimed that because acute-phase Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renal-scan results are abnormal in the presence of dilating vesicoureteral reflux, a normal DMSA-scan result makes voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) unnecessary in the primary examination of infants with UTI. To evaluate the accuracy of acute-phase DMSA scanning in identifying dilating (grades III through V) vesicoureteral reflux documented by VCUG in children with a first febrile UTI, we performed a meta-analysis of the accuracy of diagnostic tests as reported from relevant studies identified through the PubMed and Scopus databases. Patient-based and renal unit-based analyses were performed. Overall, 13 cohort studies were identified. Nine studies involved patients younger than 2 years, 3 involved children aged 16 years or younger, and 1 involved exclusively neonates. Girls constituted 22% to 85% of the involved children. Pooled (95% confidence intervals) sensitivity and specificity rates of DMSA scanning were 79% and 53%, respectively, for the patient-based analysis (8 studies) and 60% and 65% for the renal unit-based analysis (5 studies). The respective areas under the hierarchical summary receiver operating curves were 0.71 and 0.67. Marked statistical heterogeneity was observed in both analyses, as indicated by I(2) test values of 91% and 87%, respectively. Acute-phase DMSA renal scanning cannot be recommended as replacement for VCUG in the evaluation of young children with a first febrile UTI.

  5. Impaired Esophageal Mucosal Integrity May Play a Causative Role in Patients With Nongastroesophageal Reflux Disease-Related Noncardiac Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Min, Yang Won; Choi, Kyu; Pyo, Jeung Hui; Son, Hee Jung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-12-01

    Baseline impedance (BI) measurement can be used to evaluate the status of the esophageal mucosa integrity. We hypothesized that impaired esophageal mucosal integrity may play a causative role in patients with nongastroesophageal reflux disease (non-GERD)-related noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). This retrospective study analyzed 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH testing data from 77 patients with NCCP and 5 healthy volunteers. BI was calculated at 3 cm (distal esophagus) and 17 cm (proximal esophagus) above the lower esophageal sphincter. GERD was defined by the presence of pathologic acid exposure or reflux esophagitis. Among the 77 patients with NCCP, 16 (20.8%) were classified into the GERD-related NCCP group and 61 (79.2%) into the non-GERD-related NCCP group. BI (median, interquartile range) of the non-GERD-related NCCP group was lower than the control group at the proximal esophagus (2507 Ω, 2156-3217 vs 3855 Ω, 3238-4182, P = 0.001) but was similar at the distal esophagus. The GERD-related NCCP group showed lower BI than the control group at both the distal and proximal esophagus (2024 Ω, 1619-2308 vs 3203 Ω, 2366-3774, P = 0.007 and 2272 Ω, 1896-2908 vs 3855 Ω, 3238-4182, P = 0.003, respectively). At the distal esophagus, BI was lower in the GERD-related NCCP group than the non-GERD-related NCCP group (P = 0.002), whereas it did not differ between the 2 groups at the proximal esophagus. In conclusion, the mucosal integrity is impaired at the proximal esophagus in patients with non-GERD-related NCCP, which might be the pathogenic mechanism of NCCP. PMID:26705212

  6. The cytosolic half of helix III forms the substrate exit route during permeation events of the sodium/bile acid cotransporter ASBT.

    PubMed

    Hussainzada, Naissan; Claro Da Silva, Tatiana; Swaan, Peter W

    2009-09-15

    Site-directed alkylation of consecutively introduced cysteines was employed to probe the solvent-accessible profile of highly conserved transmembrane helix 3 (TM3), spanning residues V127-T149 of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT), a key membrane protein involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Sequence alignment of SLC10 family members has previously identified a signature motif (ALGMMPL) localized to TM3 of ASBT with as yet undetermined function. Cysteine mutagenesis of this motif resulted in severe decreases in uptake activity only for mutants M141C and P142C. Additional conservative and nonconservative replacement of P142 suggests its structural and functional importance during the ASBT transport cycle. Significant decreases in transport activity were also observed for three cysteine mutants clustered along the exofacial half of the helix (M129C, T130C, S133C) and five mutants consecutively lining the cytosolic half of TM3 (L145C-T149C). Measurable surface expression was detected for all TM3 mutants. Using physicochemically different alkylating reagents, sites predominantly lining the cytosolic half of the TM3 helix were found to be solvent accessible (i.e., S128C, L143C-T149C). Analysis of substrate kinetics for select TM3 mutants demonstrates significant loss of taurocholic acid affinity for mutants S128C and L145C-T149C. Overall, we conclude (i) the functional and structural importance of P142 during the transport cycle and (ii) the presence of a large hydrophilic cleft region lining the cytosolic half of TM3 that may form portions of the substrate exit route during permeation. Our studies provide unique insight into molecular mechanisms guiding the ASBT transport cycle with respect to substrate binding and translocation events.

  7. Effect of electrical stimulation of the lower esophageal sphincter in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients refractory to proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Soffer, Edy; Rodríguez, Leonardo; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gómez, Beatriz; Neto, Manoel G; Crowell, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of lower esophageal sphincter (LES)-electrical stimulation therapy (EST) in a subgroup of patients that reported only partial response to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) therapy, compared to a group of patient with complete response. METHODS: Bipolar stitch electrodes were laparoscopically placed in the LES and connected to an implantable pulse generator (EndoStim BV, the Hague, the Netherlands), placed subcutaneously in the anterior abdominal wall. Stimulation at 20 Hz, 215 μsec, 3-8 mAmp in 30 min sessions was delivered starting on day 1 post-implant. Patients were evaluated using gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-HRQL, symptom diaries; esophageal pH and esophageal manometry before and up to 24 mo after therapy and results were compared between partial and complete responders. RESULTS: Twenty-three patients with GERD on LES-EST were enrolled and received continuous per-protocol stimulation through 12 mo and 21 patients completed 24 mo of therapy. Of the 23 patients, 16 (8 male, mean age 52.1 ± 12 years) had incomplete response to PPIs prior to LES-EST, while 7 patients (5 male, mean age 52.7 ± 4.7) had complete response to PPIs. In the sub-group with incomplete response to PPIs, median (IQR) composite GERD-HRQL score improved significantly from 9.5 (9.0-10.0) at baseline on-PPI and 24.0 (20.8-26.3) at baseline off-PPI to 2.5 (0.0-4.0) at 12-mo and 0.0 (0.0-2.5) at 24-mo follow-up (P < 0.05 compared to on-and off-PPI at baseline). Median (IQR) % 24-h esophageal pH < 4.0 at baseline in this sub-group improved significantly from 9.8% (7.8-11.5) at baseline to 3.0% (1.9-6.3) at 12 mo (P < 0.001) and 4.6% (2.0-5.8) at 24 mo follow-up (P < 0.01). At their 24-mo follow-up, 9/11 patients in this sub-group were completely free of PPI use. These results were comparable to the sub-group that reported complete response to PPI therapy at baseline. No unanticipated implantation or stimulation-related adverse events, or any untoward sensation

  8. [Handling of the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) during pregnancy--a review].

    PubMed

    Fill, S; Malfertheiner, M; Costa, S-D; Mönkemüller, K

    2007-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is common during pregnancy. The pathogenesis is a decrease in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure caused by female sex hormones, especially progesterone. The most common symptom of GERD is heartburn. Nevertheless, serious reflux complications during pregnancy are rare. In contrast to non-pregnant patients, GERD during pregnancy should be managed with a step-up algorithm beginning with lifestyle modifications and dietary changes. Antacids or sucralfate are considered the first-line on-demand drug therapy. If symptoms persist, any of the histamine-2-receptor antagonists can be used. Proton pump inhibitors are reserved for women with intractable symptoms or complicated reflux disease. Usually, heartburn during pregnancy resolves soon after delivery but little is known about the late sequelae or, respectively, an influence on subsequent pregnancies. Accordingly a prospective study (longitudinal cohort analysis) is currently underway.

  9. Floral aroma improvement of Muscat spirits by packed column distillation with variable internal reflux.

    PubMed

    Matias-Guiu, Pau; Rodríguez-Bencomo, Juan José; Orriols, Ignacio; Pérez-Correa, José Ricardo; López, Francisco

    2016-12-15

    The organoleptic quality of wine distillates depends on raw materials and the distillation process. Previous work has shown that rectification columns in batch distillation with fixed reflux rate are useful to obtain distillates or distillate fractions with enhanced organoleptic characteristics. This study explores variable reflux rate operating strategies to increase the levels of terpenic compounds in specific distillate fractions to emphasize its floral aroma. Based on chemical and sensory analyses, two distillate heart sub-fractions obtained with the best operating strategy found, were compared with a distillate obtained in a traditional alembic. Results have shown that a drastic reduction of the reflux rate at an early stage of the heart cut produced a distillate heart sub-fraction with a higher concentration of terpenic compounds and lower levels of negative aroma compounds. Therefore, this sub-fraction presented a much more noticeable floral aroma than the distillate obtained with a traditional alembic.

  10. Floral aroma improvement of Muscat spirits by packed column distillation with variable internal reflux.

    PubMed

    Matias-Guiu, Pau; Rodríguez-Bencomo, Juan José; Orriols, Ignacio; Pérez-Correa, José Ricardo; López, Francisco

    2016-12-15

    The organoleptic quality of wine distillates depends on raw materials and the distillation process. Previous work has shown that rectification columns in batch distillation with fixed reflux rate are useful to obtain distillates or distillate fractions with enhanced organoleptic characteristics. This study explores variable reflux rate operating strategies to increase the levels of terpenic compounds in specific distillate fractions to emphasize its floral aroma. Based on chemical and sensory analyses, two distillate heart sub-fractions obtained with the best operating strategy found, were compared with a distillate obtained in a traditional alembic. Results have shown that a drastic reduction of the reflux rate at an early stage of the heart cut produced a distillate heart sub-fraction with a higher concentration of terpenic compounds and lower levels of negative aroma compounds. Therefore, this sub-fraction presented a much more noticeable floral aroma than the distillate obtained with a traditional alembic. PMID:27451153

  11. HIGH DEFINITION ENDOSCOPY AND "NARROW BAND IMAGING" IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    ASSIRATI, Frederico Salvador; HASHIMOTO, Cláudio Lyoiti; DIB, Ricardo Anuar; FONTES, Luiz Henrique Souza; NAVARRO-RODRIGUEZ, Tomás

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common condition in the western world but less than half of patients present endoscopic abnormalities, making a standard procedure unsuitable for diagnosis. High definition endoscopy coupled with narrow band imaging has shown potential for differentiation of lesions and possible biopsy, allowing early diagnosis and treatment. Methods This review describes the principles of biotic and their influence in obtaining images with better definition of the vessels in the mucosa, through the narrow band imaging. Selected papers using it in patients with reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus are analyzed in several ways, highlighting the findings and limitations. Conclusion The meaning of the narrow band imaging in the endoscopic diagnosis of reflux disease will be defined by large scale studies, with different categories of patients, including assessment of symptoms and response to treatment. PMID:24676302

  12. Unexpected nasal changes in rats related to reflux after gavage dosing.

    PubMed

    Damsch, Siegrid; Eichenbaum, Gary; Looszova, Adriana; Lammens, Lieve; Feyen, Bianca; Van den Bulck, Kathleen; Knight, Elaine; Kelley, Michael; Tonelli, Alfred

    2011-02-01

    In a three-week oral gavage toxicity study in rats, a high incidence of respiratory symptoms and high mortality was noted in compound-dosed rats only. Because of audible respiration, an effect in the upper respiratory tract was suspected and the nasal cavity was included for examination. Histology revealed extensive necrosis and purulent inflammation within the nasal passages, indicative of direct irritation. Since posterior nasal regions were most affected, with food material present within the inflammatory exudates, reflux and retrograde aspiration of irritant material (possibly stomach contents with test formulation) into the nasal cavity were suspected. Lowering the dose volume and fasting the rats prior to gavage dosing substantially reduced the respiratory effects and mortality. The current article focuses on the histological changes in the nasal cavity indicative of gavage-related reflux and provides guidance on differentiation between technical gavage error and gavage-related reflux. PMID:21422260

  13. Ultrafine metal particles immobilized on styrene/acrylic acid copolymer particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, Hisashi; Hamamoto, Shiro; Nishiyama, Fumitaka; Yasuda, Hajime

    1995-04-01

    Ultrafine metal particles immobilized on styrene/acrylic acid copolymer fine particles were produced by reducing the copolymer particles-metal ion complexes or refluxing an ethanol solution of metal ions in the presence of copolymer particles. The size of metal particles formed by reduction of the complex is smaller than that by reflux of the metal ion solution and depends on the amount of metal ions immobilized.

  14. Treating gastro-oesophageal reflux disease during pregnancy and lactation: what are the safest therapy options?

    PubMed

    Broussard, C N; Richter, J E

    1998-10-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux and heartburn are reported by 45 to 85% of women during pregnancy. Typically, the heartburn of pregnancy is new onset and is precipitated by the hormonal effects of estrogen and progesterone on lower oesophageal sphincter function. In mild cases, the patient should be reassured that reflux is commonly encountered during a normal pregnancy: lifestyle and dietary modifications may be all that are required. In a pregnant woman with moderate to severe reflux symptoms, the physician must discuss with the patient the benefits versus the risks of using drug therapy. Medications used for treating gastro-oesophageal reflux are not routinely or vigorously tested in randomised, controlled trials in women who are pregnant because of ethical and medico-legal concerns. Safety data are based on animal studies, human case reports and cohort studies as offered by physicians, pharmaceutical companies and regulatory authorities. If drug therapy is required, first-line therapy should consist of nonsystemically absorbed medications, including antacids or sucralfate, which offer little, if any, risk to the fetus. Systemic therapy with histamine H2 receptor antagonists (avoiding nizatidine) or prokinetic drugs (metoclopramide, cisapride) should be reserved for patients with more severe symptoms. Proton pump inhibitors are not recommended during pregnancy except for severe intractable cases of gastrooesophageal reflux or possibly prior to anaesthesia during labour and delivery. In these rare situations, animal teratogenicity studies suggests that lansoprazole may be the best choice. Use of the least possible amount of systemic drug needed to ameliorate the patient's symptoms is clearly the best for therapy. If reflux symptoms are intractable or atypical, endoscopy can safely be performed with conscious sedation and careful monitoring the mother and fetus.

  15. Regulation of maternal phospholipid composition and IP3-dependent embryonic membrane dynamics by a specific fatty acid metabolic event in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kniazeva, Marina; Shen, Huali; Euler, Tetyana; Wang, Chen; Han, Min

    2012-01-01

    Natural fatty acids (FAs) exhibit vast structural diversity, but the functional importance of FA variations and the mechanism by which they contribute to a healthy lipid composition in animals remain largely unexplored. A large family of acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs) regulates FA metabolism by esterifying FA to coenyzme A. However, little is known about how particular FA–ACS combinations affect lipid composition and specific cellular functions. We analyzed how the activity of ACS-1 on branched chain FA C17ISO impacts maternal lipid content, signal transduction, and development in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. We show that expression of ACS-1 in the somatic gonad guides the incorporation of C17ISO into certain phospholipids and thus regulates the phospholipid composition in the zygote. Disrupting this ACS-1 function causes striking defects in complex membrane dynamics, including exocytosis and cytokinesis, leading to early embryonic lethality. These defects are suppressed by hyperactive IP3 signaling, suggesting that C17ISO and ACS-1 functions are necessary for optimal IP3 signaling essential for early embryogenesis. This study shows a novel role of branched chain FAs whose functions in humans and animals are unknown and uncovers a novel intercellular regulatory pathway linking a specific FA–ACS interaction to specific developmental events. PMID:22426533

  16. Imaging diagnosis--duodenobiliary reflux of barium sulfate during esophagogastrography in a dog.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Layla; Sharma, Ajay; Secrest, Scott

    2015-01-01

    A 4-year-old Australian cattle dog presented for regurgitation, 2 months after duodenal resection and anastomosis for a perforated duodenal ulcer. Duodenobiliary reflux of barium sulfate suspension was detected during fluoroscopic esophagogastrography. Follow-up radiography 2 hours later demonstrated persistence of the barium in the gallbladder and biliary tree. Ultrasonography showed an open sphincter of Oddi but no other morphological abnormalities with the gallbladder or biliary system. No side effects or bloodwork abnormalities were noted. This is the first case report of duodenobiliary reflux of barium in a dog. The pathophysiology of this phenomenon and its incidence and significance in human medicine are discussed.

  17. Aqueous based reflux method for green synthesis of nanostructures: Application in CZTS synthesis.

    PubMed

    Aditha, Sai Kiran; Kurdekar, Aditya Dileep; Chunduri, L A Avinash; Patnaik, Sandeep; Kamisetti, Venkataramaniah

    2016-01-01

    The aqueous based reflux method useful for the green synthesis of nanostructures is described in detail. In this method, the parameters: the order of addition of precursors, the time of the reflux and the cooling rate should be optimized in order to obtain the desired phase and morphology of the nanostructures. The application of this method is discussed with reference to the synthesis of CZTS nanoparticles which have great potential as an absorber material in the photovoltaic devices. The highlights of this method are:•Simple.•Low cost.•Aqueous based.

  18. Prevesical Calcification and Hydronephrosis in a Girl Treated for Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Sarah; van der Horst, Eric H. J. R.; Verbeke, Jonathan I. M. L.; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2016-01-01

    The endoscopic STING procedure using Deflux is a common and minimal invasive treatment for vesicoureteral reflux. Herein we present the case of an 11-year-old girl with loin pain and de novo hydronephrosis and megaureter on the left. Ultrasound and plain abdominal X-ray demonstrated a calcification at the ureterovesical junction. She had been treated with Deflux injections 5 years before. The clinical quiz addresses the differential diagnosis, workup, and pathogenesis of calcifications at the ureterovesical junction following endoscopic reflux therapy. PMID:27408905

  19. [Pharyngolaryngeal reflux as one of the causes of chronic excretory otitis media].

    PubMed

    Petrova, L G; Chaĭkovskiĭ, V V; Rybak, P R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the relationship between chronic secretory otitis media (CSOM) and pharyngolaryngeal reflux (PLR). A total of 43 patients aged between 3 to 19 years presenting with CSOM were available for the examination. PLR was confirmed in 36 (83.7%) patients. A relapse of CSOM after a course of otorhinolaryngological and gastroenterological treatment developed in 6 (14.0%) patients. It is concluded that antireflux therapy should be a constituent component of CSOM therapy concomitant with gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:23528458

  20. Aqueous based reflux method for green synthesis of nanostructures: Application in CZTS synthesis.

    PubMed

    Aditha, Sai Kiran; Kurdekar, Aditya Dileep; Chunduri, L A Avinash; Patnaik, Sandeep; Kamisetti, Venkataramaniah

    2016-01-01

    The aqueous based reflux method useful for the green synthesis of nanostructures is described in detail. In this method, the parameters: the order of addition of precursors, the time of the reflux and the cooling rate should be optimized in order to obtain the desired phase and morphology of the nanostructures. The application of this method is discussed with reference to the synthesis of CZTS nanoparticles which have great potential as an absorber material in the photovoltaic devices. The highlights of this method are:•Simple.•Low cost.•Aqueous based. PMID:27408826

  1. Prevesical Calcification and Hydronephrosis in a Girl Treated for Vesicoureteral Reflux.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Sarah; van der Horst, Eric H J R; Verbeke, Jonathan I M L; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2016-01-01

    The endoscopic STING procedure using Deflux is a common and minimal invasive treatment for vesicoureteral reflux. Herein we present the case of an 11-year-old girl with loin pain and de novo hydronephrosis and megaureter on the left. Ultrasound and plain abdominal X-ray demonstrated a calcification at the ureterovesical junction. She had been treated with Deflux injections 5 years before. The clinical quiz addresses the differential diagnosis, workup, and pathogenesis of calcifications at the ureterovesical junction following endoscopic reflux therapy. PMID:27408905

  2. It is possible to classify non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients into endoscopically normal groups and minimal change groups by subjective symptoms and responsiveness to rabeprazole -- a report from a study with Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Motoyasu; Shirai, Naohito; Yamaguchi, Kanako; Hongo, Michio; Chiba, Tsutomu; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2008-12-01

    The hypothesis that non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients comprise various subgroups is gaining popularity. This study was conducted to investigate the possibility of categorizing NERD patients according to symptom types and response to acid-suppressive drug rabeprazole (RPZ) 10 mg/day. NERD patients were classified as grade N (endoscopically normal), M (minimal change), or erosive GERD, and answered a 51-item, yes-or-no questionnaire pre and post-treatment. Compared to erosive GERD, clear differences existed in pretreatment prevalence of symptoms and responsiveness to RPZ in grades N and M; the results suggested stomachaches (especially at night) were significant symptoms in grade N and dysmotility-like symptoms like bloated stomach were significant in grade M while gastroesophageal reflux symptoms were significant in erosive GERD. Clinical significance of classifying NERD was indicated from different symptoms and responsiveness to PPI. PMID:18465242

  3. Psychological modulation in patients surgically intervened for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lara, F J Pérez; Carranque, G; Oehling, H; Hernández, J M; Oliva, H

    2014-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been related with certain psychological dimensions. The influence of mood, emotional intelligence, and perceived quality of life on clinical symptoms and outcome of antireflux surgery was evaluated in GERD patients with and without hiatal hernia. The study included 61 patients who were diagnosed with GERD between 2003 and 2008: 16 of them without hiatal hernia (group A) and 45 of them with hiatal hernia (group B). All of these patients had undergone laparoscopic antireflux surgery. Patients were clinically examined and evaluated with the following instruments: Short Form (SF)-36 Health Survey, Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale, and Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS)-24. Proportions were compared by using the chi-squared test; averages were compared by using the Student's t-test (with Bonferroni's correction). In general, our patients intervened for GERD showed results lower than normal or close to the lower limit of normal in the administered tests. Patients in the group without hernia were younger (P < 0.001) and with lower American Society of Anaesthesiologists risk. They showed higher scores in the SF-36 dimensions: Physical Functioning, Physical Role and Emotional Role, and lower scores in the Social Role (P < 0.001). They showed lower scores in the Emotional dimension of Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (P = 0.0068) and worse results in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression subscales of Anxiety (P < 0.001) and Depression (not significant). Men in the group without hernia showed higher scores than men in the group with hernia in the TMMS subscales corresponding to Emotional Clarity and Emotional Repair (P < 0.001). Women in the group with hernia showed higher scores than women in the group without hernia regarding Emotional Clarity (P = 0.0012). GERD patients showed poor results in all the tests, and patients without hiatal hernia compared with patients with hernia showed

  4. Clinical and pH-metric characteristics of gastro-oesophageal reflux secondary to cows' milk protein allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Cavataio, F; Iacono, G; Montalto, G; Soresi, M; Tumminello, M; Carroccio, A

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: The primary aim was to assess whether there were differences in symptoms, laboratory data, and oesophageal pH-metry between infants with primary gastro-oesophageal reflux and those with reflux secondary to cows' milk protein allergy (CMPA). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 96 infants (mean(SD) age 7.8(2.0) months) with either primary gastro-oesophageal reflux, reflux with CMPA, CMPA only, or none of these (controls) were studied. Symptoms, immunochemical data, and oesophageal pH were compared between the four groups and the effect of a cows' milk protein-free diet on the severity of symptoms was also assessed. RESULTS: 14 out of 47(30%) infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux had CMPA. These infants had similar symptoms to those with primary gastro-oesophageal reflux but higher concentrations of total IgE and circulating eosinophils (p < 0.005) and IgG anti-beta lactoglobulin (p < 0.003). A progressive constant reduction in oesophageal pH at the end of a feed, which continued up to the next feed, was seen in 12 out of 14 patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux secondary to CMPA and in 24 of 25 infants with CMPA only. No infants with primary gastro-oesophageal reflux and none of the controls had this pattern. A cows' milk protein-free diet was associated with a significant improvement in symptoms only in infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux with CMPA. CONCLUSION: A characteristic oesophageal pH pattern is useful in distinguishing infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux associated with CMPA. PMID:8813871

  5. Upregulation of miRNA-143, -145, -192, and -194 in esophageal epithelial cells upon acidic bile salt stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bus, P; Siersema, P D; Verbeek, R E; van Baal, J W P M

    2014-08-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a metaplastic condition of the distal esophagus that occurs because of chronic gastroesophageal reflux. Previous studies have identified BE-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) in comparison with normal squamous epithelium (SQ). We hypothesized that BE-specific miRNAs could be induced in esophageal SQ cells by exposure to acid and/or bile salts. We aimed to determine whether BE-specific miRNAs are upregulated in an esophageal SQ cell line (Het-1A) in an environment with acid and/or bile salts and whether this is nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) dependent. Acid and/or bile salt incubations were performed in Het-1A cells. Experiments were performed with or without inhibiting the NF-κB pathway. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine expression of miRNA-143, -145, -192, -194, cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX2), mucin 2 (MUC2), and sex determining region Y-box 9. For validation, we determined levels of these miRNAs in biopsies from patients with reflux esophagitis and normal SQ. Significantly increased expression levels of miRNA-143 (2.7-fold), -145 (2.6-fold), -192 (2.0-fold), -194 (2.2-fold), COX2, MUC2, and sex determining region Y-box 9 were found upon acidic bile salt incubation, but not upon acid or bile salt alone. NF-κB pathway inhibition significantly decreased miRNA-143, -192, -194, COX2, and MUC2 expression. Additionally, miRNA-143, -145 and -194 expression was increased in reflux esophagitis biopsies compared with normal SQ, but no changes were found in miRNA-192 expression. Our findings suggest that upregulation of BE-specific miRNAs by acidic bile may be an early event in the transition of SQ to BE and that their expression is partly regulated by the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24006894

  6. Upregulation of miRNA-143, -145, -192, and -194 in esophageal epithelial cells upon acidic bile salt stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bus, P; Siersema, P D; Verbeek, R E; van Baal, J W P M

    2014-08-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a metaplastic condition of the distal esophagus that occurs because of chronic gastroesophageal reflux. Previous studies have identified BE-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) in comparison with normal squamous epithelium (SQ). We hypothesized that BE-specific miRNAs could be induced in esophageal SQ cells by exposure to acid and/or bile salts. We aimed to determine whether BE-specific miRNAs are upregulated in an esophageal SQ cell line (Het-1A) in an environment with acid and/or bile salts and whether this is nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) dependent. Acid and/or bile salt incubations were performed in Het-1A cells. Experiments were performed with or without inhibiting the NF-κB pathway. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine expression of miRNA-143, -145, -192, -194, cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX2), mucin 2 (MUC2), and sex determining region Y-box 9. For validation, we determined levels of these miRNAs in biopsies from patients with reflux esophagitis and normal SQ. Significantly increased expression levels of miRNA-143 (2.7-fold), -145 (2.6-fold), -192 (2.0-fold), -194 (2.2-fold), COX2, MUC2, and sex determining region Y-box 9 were found upon acidic bile salt incubation, but not upon acid or bile salt alone. NF-κB pathway inhibition significantly decreased miRNA-143, -192, -194, COX2, and MUC2 expression. Additionally, miRNA-143, -145 and -194 expression was increased in reflux esophagitis biopsies compared with normal SQ, but no changes were found in miRNA-192 expression. Our findings suggest that upregulation of BE-specific miRNAs by acidic bile may be an early event in the transition of SQ to BE and that their expression is partly regulated by the NF-κB pathway.

  7. Clinical Utility of Bronchoalveolar Lavage Pepsin in Diagnosis of Gastroesophageal Reflux among Wheezy Infants

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Ahmed Fathi; El-Desoky, Tarek; Fathi, Khalid; Elkashef, Wagdy Fawzi

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is no gold standard test for diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) associated infantile wheezing. Objectives. To evaluate the value of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) pepsin assay in diagnosis of GERD in wheezy infants. Methods. Fifty-two wheezy infants were evaluated for GERD using esophageal combined impedance-pH (MII-pH) monitoring, esophagogastroduodenoscopy with esophageal biopsies, and BAL pepsin. Tracheobronchial aspirates from 10 healthy infants planned for surgery without history of respiratory problems were examined for pepsin. Results. Wheezy infants with silent reflux and wheezy infants with typical GERD symptoms but normal MII-pH had significantly higher BAL pepsin compared to healthy control (45.3 ± 8.6 and 42.8 ± 8 versus 29 ± 2.6, P < 0.0001 and P = 0.011, resp.). BAL pepsin had sensitivity (61.7%, 72 %, and 70%) and specificity (55.5%, 52.9%, and 53%) to diagnose GERD associated infantile wheeze compared to abnormal MII-pH, reflux esophagitis, and lipid laden macrophage index, respectively. Conclusion. A stepwise approach for assessment of GERD in wheezy infants is advised. In those with silent reflux, a trial of antireflux therapy is warranted with no need for further pepsin assay. But when combined MII-pH is negative despite the presence of typical GERD symptoms, pepsin assay will be needed to rule out GERD related aspiration. PMID:27516725

  8. VERTICAL GASTRECTOMY AND GASTRIC BYPASS IN ROUX-EN-Y INDUCE POSTOPERATIVE GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE?

    PubMed Central

    NASSIF, Paulo Afonso Nunes; MALAFAIA, Osvaldo; RIBAS-FILHO, Jurandir Marcondes; CZECZKO, Nicolau Gregori; GARCIA, Rodrigo Ferreira; ARIEDE, Bruno Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Background The association between obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease has a high incidence and may be present in half of obese patients with surgical indication. Bariatric operations can also induce reflux alone - differently from BMI factors - and its mechanisms are dependent on the type of procedure performed. Objective To perform a literature review comparing the two procedures currently most used for surgical treatment of obesity and analyze their relationship with the advent of pre-existing reflux disease or its appearance only in postoperative period. Method The literature was reviewed in virtual database Medline/PubMed, SciELO, Lilacs, Embase and Cochrane crossing the following MeSH descriptors: gastric bypass AND / OR anastomosis, Roux-en-Y AND / OR gastroesophageal reflux AND / OR gastroenterostomy AND / OR gastrectomy AND / OR obesity AND / OR bariatric surgery AND / OR postoperative period. A total of 135 relevant references were considered but only 30 were used in this article. Also was added the experience of the authors of this article in handling these techniques on this field. Conclusion The structural changes caused by surgical technique in vertical gastrectomy shows greater commitment of antireflux mechanisms predisposing the induction of GERD postoperatively compared to the surgical technique performed in the gastrointestinal Bypass Roux-en-Y. PMID:25409970

  9. Effects of reflux laryngitis on non-nutritive swallowing in newborn lambs.

    PubMed

    Brisebois, Simon; Samson, Nathalie; Fortier, Pierre-Hugues; Doueik, Alexandre A; Carreau, Anne-Marie; Praud, Jean-Paul

    2014-08-15

    Reflux laryngitis in infants may be involved not only in laryngeal disorders, but also in disorders of cardiorespiratory control through its impact on laryngeal function. Our objective was to study the effect of reflux laryngitis on non-nutritive swallowing (NNS) and NNS-breathing coordination. Two groups of six newborn lambs, randomized into laryngitis and control groups, were surgically instrumented for recording states of alertness, swallowing and cardiorespiratory variables without sedation. A mild to moderate reflux laryngitis was induced in lambs from the experimental group. A significant decrease in the number of NNS bursts and apneas was observed in the laryngitis group in active sleep (p=0.03). In addition, lower heart and respiratory rates, as well as prolonged apnea duration (p<0.0001) were observed. No physiologically significant alterations in NNS-breathing coordination were observed in the laryngitis group. We conclude that a mild to moderate reflux laryngitis alters NNS burst frequency and autonomous control of cardiac activity and respiration in lambs.

  10. Voiding urosonography: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound cystography to diagnose vesico-ureteric reflux: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Ramesh; Gopinath, Vinu; Sai, Venkata

    2015-01-01

    We report two children with hydronephrosis, in whom we have utilized voiding urosonography (VUS) in the evaluation of vesico-ureteric reflux. With wider availability of ultrasound contrast agents and high-end ultrasound machines, VUS is likely to become a popular tool to diagnose or exclude VUR. PMID:25552831

  11. Diagnostic testing and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, J; Subbarao, G; Croffie, J

    2012-12-01

    The diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has evolved from reliance on history and fluoroscopy to continuous esophageal pH monitoring with catheter-based pH probes and wireless pH probes to continuous impedance/pH monitoring. This review describes the currently employed diagnostic tests and the actual management of GERD in children.

  12. Economic reflections on proton pump inhibitor therapy for non-erosive reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Moayyedi, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease is a good example of the evolution of economic analysis. Initial studies were simple models constructed on spreadsheets and described the most cost-effective therapy in terms of cost per cure of esophagitis. This tells a third-party payer what is the most efficient approach to healing esophagitis (technical efficiency) but does not give any indication of whether treating esophagitis is good value for money in the first place or whether health care dollars would be better spent in treating other diseases (allocative efficiency). As economic analyses became more sophisticated, more complex models were constructed. Outcomes were expressed in terms of cost per quality-adjusted life year gained or the question was framed in terms of the probability a strategy would be cost effective depending on willingness to pay for a month free from symptoms. These approaches answer the question of whether treating gastroesophageal reflux disease is good value for money. Models have traditionally evaluated treatment of esophagitis, but this does not address the most efficient therapy of non-erosive reflux disease. This article describes a simplified model (for illustrative purposes only) and suggests that PPI therapy is a cost-effective approach for the treatment of esophagitis whether generic or proprietary PPI costs are applied. PPI therapy is also likely to be a cost-effective strategy for non-erosive reflux disease at generic but not at proprietary prices.

  13. Validation and Diagnostic Usefulness of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire in a Primary Care Level in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Zavala-Gonzáles, Miguel Angel; Azamar-Jacome, Amyra Ali; Meixueiro-Daza, Arturo; de la Medina, Antonio Ramos; Reyes-Huerta J, Job; Roesch-Dietlen, Federico; Remes-Troche, José María

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Different non-invasive diagnostics strategies have been used to assess patients with gastroesophageal reflux. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) questionnaire (GerdQ) is a 6-item, easy to use questionnaire that was developed primarily as a diagnostic tool for GERD in primary care. Our aim was to validate and assess diagnostic utility of GerdQ questionnaire in Mexican patients in the primary care setting. Methods The study was performed in 3 phases: (1) a questionnaire translation and comprehension study (n = 20), (2) are a reproducibility and validation study (50 patients and 50 controls) and (3) a study to assess the clinical utility in 252 subjects with GERD symptoms. Diagnostic accuracy was calculated using endoscopy and/or pH-metry as the gold standard. Results Internal consistency measured by the Cronbach’s α coefficient was 0.81 for patients and 0.90 for healthy controls, with a mixed coefficient of 0.93. Reproducibility for GerdQ was very good and its discriminating validity was 88%. Most of the patients with erosive reflux and non-erosive reflux with abnormal pH-metry had scores > 8, meanwhile most of the patients with functional heartburn and hypersensitive esophagus had < 8. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of GerdQ com -pared to the gold standard were 72%, 72% and 87%, respectively. Conclusions In Mexico, the GerdQ questionnaire Spanish validated version is useful for GERD diagnosis in the primary care setting. PMID:25273118

  14. Preoperative endoscopy may reduce the need for revisional surgery for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Madhok, B M; Carr, W R J; McCormack, C; Boyle, M; Jennings, N; Schroeder, N; Balupuri, S; Small, P K

    2016-08-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a safe and effective bariatric operation, but postoperative reflux symptoms can sometimes necessitate revisional surgery. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the preferred operation in morbidly obese patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. In 2011, we introduced preoperative endoscopy to assess for hiatus hernia or evidence of oesophagitis in conjunction with an assessment of gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms for all patients undergoing bariatric surgery with a view to avoid sleeve gastrectomy for these patients. A prospectively maintained database was used to identify patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy before and after we changed the unit policy. The need for revisional surgery in patients with troublesome gastro-oesophageal reflux disease was examined. Prior to 2011, 130 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy, and 11 (8.5%) of them required conversion to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for symptomatic reflux disease. Following the policy change, 284 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy, and to date, only five (1.8%) have required revisional surgery (p = 0.001). Baseline demographics were comparable between the groups, and average follow-up period was 47 and 33 months, respectively, for each group. Preoperative endoscopy and a detailed clinical history regarding gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms may improve patient selection for sleeve gastrectomy. Avoiding sleeve gastrectomy in patients with reflux disease and/or hiatus hernia may reduce the incidence of revisional surgery. PMID:27400631

  15. Diagnosing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease or lactose intolerance in babies who cry a lot in the first few months overlooks feeding problems.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-04-01

    This paper explores two areas in which the translation of research into practice may be improved in the management of cry-fuss behaviours in the first few months of life. Firstly, babies who cry excessively are often prescribed proton pump inhibitors, despite evidence that gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is very rarely a cause. The inaccuracy of commonly used explanatory mechanisms, the side-effects of acid-suppressive medications, and the failure to identify treatable problems, including feeding difficulty when the diagnosis of 'reflux' is applied, are discussed. Secondly, crying breastfed babies are still prescribed lactase or lactose-free formula, despite evidence that the problem of functional lactose overload is one of breastfeeding management. The mechanisms and management of functional lactose overload are discussed. These two problems of research translation need to be addressed because failure to identify and manage other causes of cry-fuss problems, including feeding difficulty, may have adverse outcomes for a small but significant minority of families.

  16. Purification by reflux electrophoresis of whey proteins and of a recombinant protein expressed in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Corthals, G L; Collins, B M; Mabbutt, B C; Williams, K L; Gooley, A A

    1997-06-27

    Protein purification that combines the use of molecular mass exclusion membranes with electrophoresis is particularly powerful as it uses properties inherent to both techniques. The use of membranes allows efficient processing and is easily scaled up, while electrophoresis permits high resolution separation under mild conditions. The Gradiflow apparatus combines these two technologies as it uses polyacrylamide membranes to influence electrokinetic separations. The reflux electrophoresis process consists of a series of cycles incorporating a forward phase and a reverse phase. The forward phase involves collection of a target protein that passes through a separation membrane before trailing proteins in the same solution. The forward phase is repeated following clearance of the membrane in the reverse phase by reversing the current. We have devised a strategy to establish optimal reflux separation parameters, where membranes are chosen for a particular operating range and protein transfer is monitored at different pH values. In addition, forward and reverse phase times are determined during this process. Two examples of the reflux method are described. In the first case, we described the purification strategy for proteins from a complex mixture which contains proteins of higher electrophoretic mobility than the target protein. This is a two-step procedure, where first proteins of higher mobility than the target protein are removed from the solution by a series of reflux cycles, so that the target protein remains as the leading fraction. In the second step the target protein is collected, as it has become the leading fraction of the remaining proteins. In the second example we report the development of a reflux strategy which allowed a rapid one-step preparative purification of a recombinant protein, expressed in Dictyostelium discoideum. These strategies demonstrate that the Gradiflow is amenable to a wide range of applications, as the protein of interest is not

  17. Endoscopic injection therapy for treatment of vesicoureteric reflux: A 20-year perspective

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Michael P

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the application and outcome of endoscopic injection therapy for vesicoureteric reflux in regard to its evolution over the past two decades. DATA SOURCES: Review articles, original reports and abstracts pertaining to endoscopic injection therapy were obtained through a PubMed search of English, German and French publications from 1981 to 2001. DATA SELECTION: A total of 46 studies were selected. Four were selected to support basic concepts in the management of vesicoureteric reflux, and the remainder pertained specifically to endoscopic injection therapy for vesicoureteric reflux. DATA EXTRACTION: The reports were analyzed with focus on the physical properties of the biomaterial injected, results of treatment in regard to the cure of vesicoureteric reflux, duration of cure, and possible adverse effects and clinical benefits engendered by the use of injectable materials. DATA SYNTHESIS: Endoscopic injection therapy successfully cures vesicoureteric reflux in 60% to 80% of cases. Success rates are higher with particulate materials (Teflon and Macroplastique) than with bovine collagen or autologous chondrocytes. Long term data regarding cure are scant. Although concerns about particulate migration and autoimmune disease exist, these have not been borne out of clinical experience. Endoscopic injection may be accomplished on an outpatient basis, with less morbidity than with open ureteroneocystostomy. CONCLUSIONS: Endoscopic injection therapy should be offered as an alternative treatment in patients with indications to consider ureteroneocystotomy, but should not change the indications for surgical intervention. The ideal biomaterial for injection has yet to be developed, but the field of autologous tissue engineering holds promise for future development. PMID:20046467

  18. Protective effects of D-002 on experimentally induced gastroesophageal reflux in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zamora, Zullyt; Molina, Vivian; Mas, Rosa; Ravelo, Yazmin; Perez, Yohany; Oyarzabal, Ambar

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of beeswax alcohols (D-002) on the esophageal damage induced by gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in rats. METHODS: Sixty male rats were randomized into six groups (10 rats/group): a negative control and five groups with experimentally induced GER: a positive vehicle control, three treated with D-002 (25, 100 and 200 mg/kg, respectively), and one with omeprazole 10 mg/kg. All treatments were given by gastric gavage. One hour after dosing, GER was produced by simultaneous ligation of the pyloric end and the forestomach. Esophageal lesions index (ELI), gastric secretion volume and acidity, and esophageal malondialdehyde (MDA) and sulfhydryl (SH) group concentrations were measured. Statistical significance was considered at P < 0.05. RESULTS: As compared to the negative control, the positive control group exhibited increased ELI (5.2 ± 0.33 vs 0 ± 0, P = 0.0003), gastric secretion volume (2.69 ± 0.09 vs 0.1 ± 0.0, P = 0.0003) and acidity (238 ± 19.37 vs 120.0 ± 5.77, P = 0.001), and esophageal concentrations of MDA (2.56 ± 0.1 vs 1.76 ± 0.28, P = 0.001) and SH groups (1.02 ± 0.05 vs 0.56 ± 0.08, P = 0.0003). D-002 (25, 100 and 200 mg/kg) reduced ELI (3.36 ± 0.31, 2.90 ± 0.46 and 2.8 ± 0.23, respectively) vs the positive control (5.2 ± 0.33) (P = 0.004; P = 0.002; P = 0.001, respectively). There were no significant changes in acidity with D-002 treatment, and only the highest dose reduced the volume of the gastric secretion (1.92 ± 0.25) vs the positive control (2.69 ± 0.09, P = 0.013). D-002 (25, 100 and 200 mg/kg) lowered the esophageal MDA (2.05 ± 0.16, 1.98 ± 0.22 and 1.93 ± 0.22, respectively) (P = 0.01; P = 0.03; P = 0.03, respectively) and SH group concentration (0.87 ± 0.06, 0.79 ± 0.08 and 0.77 ± 0.06, respectively) (P = 0.04; P = 0.04; P = 0.02) vs the positive control (2.56 ± 0.10 and 1.02 ± 0.05, respectively). Omeprazole decreased ELI (2.54 ± 0.47), gastric secretion volume (1.97 ± 0.14) and acidity

  19. A stepwise protocol for the treatment of refractory gastroesophageal reflux-induced chronic cough

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xianghuai; Lv, Hanjing; Yu, Li; Chen, Qiang; Liang, Siwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Refractory gastroesophageal reflux-induced chronic cough (GERC) is difficult to manage. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of a novel stepwise protocol for treating this condition. Methods A total of 103 consecutive patients with suspected refractory reflux-induced chronic cough failing to a standard anti-reflux therapy were treated with a stepwise therapy. Treatment commences with high-dose omeprazole and, if necessary, is escalated to subsequent sequential treatment with ranitidine and finally baclofen. The primary end-point was overall cough resolution, and the secondary end-point was cough resolution after each treatment step. Results High-dose omeprazole eliminated or improved cough in 28.1% of patients (n=29). Further stepwise of treatment with the addition of ranitide yielded a favorable response in an additional 12.6% (n=13) of patients, and subsequent escalation to baclofen provoked response in another 36.9% (n=38) of patients. Overall, this stepwise protocol was successful in 77.6% (n=80) of patients. The diurnal cough symptom score fell from 3 [1] to 1 [0] (Z=6.316, P=0.000), and the nocturnal cough symptom score decreased from 1 [1] to 0 [1] (Z=–4.511, P=0.000), with a corresponding reduction in the Gastroesophageal Reflux Diagnostic Questionnaire score from 8.6±1.7 to 6.8±0.7 (t=3.612, P=0.000). Conversely, the cough threshold C2 to capsaicin was increased from 0.49 (0.49) µmol/L to 1.95 (2.92) µmol/L (Z=–5.892, P=0.000), and the cough threshold C5 was increased from 1.95 (2.92) µmol/L to 7.8 (5.85) µmol/L (Z=–5.171, P=0.000). Conclusions Sequential stepwise anti-reflux therapy is a useful therapeutic strategy for refractory reflux-induced chronic cough. PMID:26904227

  20. Effects of reflux ratio and feed conditions for the purification of bioethanol in a continuous distillation column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasan, Y. K.; Abdullah, M. A.; Bhat, A. H.

    2014-10-01

    Continuous distillation column was used for the purification of bioethanol from fermentation of molasses using Saccharomyces cerevisia. Bioethanol produced was at 8.32% (v/v) level. The efficiency of continuous distillation process was evaluated based on reflux ratio, and feed condition. The lab results were validated using COFE simulation Software. The analyses showed that both reflux ratio and feed condition had significant effects on the distillation process. Stages increased from 1.79 to 2.26 as the reflux ratio was decreased from 90% to 45% and the saturated feed produced lower mole fraction of desired product. We concluded that the lower reflux ratio with cold feed condition was suitable for higher mole fraction of top product.

  1. Long-lasting cytoprotection after pentadecapeptide BPC 157, ranitidine, sucralfate or cholestyramine application in reflux oesophagitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Jadrijevic, S; Seiwerth, S; Sosa, T; Deskovic, S; Perovic, D; Aralica, G; Grabarevic, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagic, V; Turkovic, B; Ziger, T; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Zoricic, I; Sebecic, B; Patrlj, L; Kocman, B; Sarlija, M; Mikus, D; Separovic, J; Hanzevacki, M; Gjurasin, M; Miklic, P

    1999-12-01

    Recently, the effectiveness of pentadecapeptide BPC 157 and other anti-ulcer agents, called 'direct cytoprotection', was evidenced in totally gastrectomized rats duodenum challenged with cysteamine 24 h after surgery, and sacrificed 24 h after ulcerogen application. The further focus was on the possibility that this effect could be seen over a more prolonged period (1, 2, 4 weeks), and in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract (i.e. oesophagus). After the removal of the stomach, the oesophagus and jejunum were joined by a termino-lateral anastomosis. The animals were euthanized 7, 14 or 28 d after surgery, when oesophagitis was blindly assessed both macroscopically (percentage of ulcerations areas) and microscopically (percentage of areas of ulcers, regeneration and hyperplasia; number of inflammatory cells - polymorphonuclear and mononuclear). Starting 24 h after surgery, the medication was continuously given in the drinking water, in a volume of 12.5 mL/rat daily, until euthanasia at the end of the observation period, i.e. 7, 14, 28 d following surgery. Based on previous experiments, the doses of agents were daily calculated per kg b.w. as follows: BPC 157 125 mg or 125 ng, cholestyramine 2.5 mg, ranitidine 125 mg, sucralfate 725 mg, whereas controls received 72.5 mL x kg(-1) water. In support of these initial findings, and considering gastrectomized acid-free rats as an ideal model for long-term cytoprotective studies as well, pentadecapeptide BPC 157 markedly attenuated termino-lateral oesophagojejunal anastomosis-reflux oesophagitis also over a quite prolonged period. This efficacy was only partly shared by other anti-ulcer agents. After 1-week-old oesophagitis (microscopical assessment), but not after 2 or 4 weeks, less damaged mucosa was noted in rats drinking ranitidine or sucralfate compared to controls. Similar effectiveness was noted for cholestyramine. The obtained results were supported also by inflammatory cell assessment. Compared with control

  2. Factors confusing the diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux: the role of allergic rhinitis and inter-rater variability of laryngeal findings.

    PubMed

    Eren, Erdem; Arslanoğlu, Seçil; Aktaş, Ayşe; Kopar, Aylin; Ciğer, Ejder; Önal, Kazım; Katılmiş, Hüseyin

    2014-04-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the inter-rater variability in assessment of laryngeal findings and whether diagnosing laryngopharyngeal reflux based on the laryngeal findings and history alone without considering allergic rhinitis leads to the overdiagnosis and overtreatment of laryngopharyngeal reflux. Patients with positive and negative skin prick tests were recruited from an allergy clinic in a tertiary teaching university hospital. All subjects completed the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI) and underwent laryngeal examinations by three physicians blinded to the skin prick test results and the Reflux Finding Score (RFS) was determined. RFS >7 or RSI >13 was considered reflux positive. Fleiss' kappa (κ) was used to measure inter-rater agreement. The inter-rater agreement was low for pseudosulcus vocalis (κ = 0.078), ventricular obliteration (κ = 0.206), diffuse laryngeal edema (κ = 0.204), and posterior laryngeal hypertrophy (κ = 0.27), intermediate for laryngeal erythema/hyperemia (κ = 0.42) and vocal fold edema (κ = 0.42), and high for thick endolaryngeal mucus (κ = 0.61). Although the frequency of allergy was high, there was no significant difference between allergy-positive and laryngopharyngeal reflux-positive patients. On logistic regression analysis, thick endolaryngeal mucus was a significant predictor of allergy (p = 0.012, odds ratio 0.264, 95 % confidence interval 0.093-0.74). The laryngeal examination for reflux is subject to marked inter-rater variability and allergic laryngitis was not misdiagnosed as laryngopharyngeal reflux. The presence of thick endolaryngeal mucus should alert physicians to the possibility of allergic rhinitis/laryngitis.

  3. Treatment Options for GERD or Acid Reflux Disease: A Review of the Research for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery might help you. How does surgery for GERD work? In a fundoplication, the top part of your ... how well endoscopic treatments (EndoCinch™, Stretta®, and EsophyX™) work to control the symptoms of GERD. What are the side effects of endoscopic treatments? ...

  4. Choosing a Proton Pump Inhibitor (PPI) to Treat Heartburn, Acid Reflux & GERD

    MedlinePlus

    ... scientific review by the Oregon Health and Science University-based Drug Effectiveness Review Project. This is a summary of a longer, more detailed report you can find at www.CRBestBuyDrugs.org . Generic Name & Dose Brand Name (or generic) 1 Cost Per Month 2 Dexlansoprazole 30 mg sustained-release ...

  5. The effect of refluxing on the alkoxide-based sodium potassium niobate sol-gel system: Thermal and spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Anirban; Bould, Jonathan; Londesborough, Michael G.S.; Milne, Steven J.

    2011-02-15

    A study on the effects of prolonged heating under reflux conditions of up to 70 h on alkoxides of sodium, potassium and niobium dissolved in 2-methoxyethanol for the synthesis of sols of composition Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3} (NKN) has been carried out using combined thermogravimetric-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses. Extended refluxing increases the homogeneity of the Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3} (NKN) system. Spectroscopic analyses on the non-refluxed and 70 h refluxed NKN gels reveal the existence of inorganic hydrated carbonates and bicarbonates, which we propose arise from the hydration and carbonation of the samples on standing in air. The X-ray diffraction patterns of these two types of gels show orthorhombic NKN phase evolutions at higher temperatures. -- Graphical abstract: Total organic evolution plots over time for NKN dried gels obtained under different refluxing times show different thermochemical behaviours and these were investigated by thermal and spectroscopic analysis tools to find a correlation between the extent of -M-O-M- chain link formation and the amount of solvent vapour (methoxyethanol) evolution. Display Omitted Research highlights: > Prolonged refluxing of sol-gel NKN precursor solutions improves final properties of an NKN system. > An NKN process thermo-chemistry with thermal and spectroscopic analysis tools was explored. > An FTIR of NKN gels reveals tendency of NKN systems for rehydration and recarbonation on standing.

  6. Color-Doppler sonographic tissue perfusion measurements reveal significantly diminished renal cortical perfusion in kidneys with vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Scholbach, T M; Sachse, C

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and its sequelae may lead to reduced renal perfusion and loss of renal function. Methods to describe and monitor tissue perfusion are needed. We investigated dynamic tissue perfusion measurement (DTPM) with the PixelFlux-software to measure microvascular changes in the renal cortex in 35 children with VUR and 28 healthy children. DTPM of defined horizontal slices of the renal cortex was carried out. A kidney was assigned to the "low grade reflux"-group if the reflux grade of the voiding cystourethrogram was 1 to 3 and to the "high grade reflux"-group if the reflux grade was 4 to 5. Kidneys with VUR showed a significantly reduced cortical perfusion. Compared to healthy kidneys, this decline reached in low and high grade refluxes within the proximal 50% of the cortex: 3% and 12 %, in the distal 50% of the cortex: 21% and 44 % and in the most distal 20 % of the cortex 41% and 44%. DTPM reveals a perfusion loss in kidneys depending on the degree of VUR, which is most pronounced in the peripheral cortex. Thus, DTPM offers the tool to evaluate microvascular perfusion, to help planning treatment decisions in children with VUR.

  7. Refluxed electrons direct laser acceleration in ultrahigh laser and relativistic critical density plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhu, B.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhou, W. M.; Gu, Y. Q.; Cao, L. H.

    2015-01-15

    Refluxed electrons direct laser acceleration is proposed so as to generate a high-charge energetic electron beam. When a laser pulse is incident on a relativistic critical density target, the rising edge of the pulse heats the target and the sheath fields on the both sides of the target reflux some electrons inside the expanding target. These electrons can be trapped and accelerated due to the self-transparency and the negative longitudinal electrostatic field in the expanding target. Some of the electrons can be accelerated to energies exceeding the ponderomotive limit 1/2a{sub 0}{sup 2}mc{sup 2}. Effective temperature significantly above the ponderomotive scaling is observed. Furthermore, due to the limited expanding length, the laser propagating instabilities are suppressed in the interaction. Thus, high collimated beams with tens of μC charge can be generated.

  8. Pulmonary Disease Secondary to Reflux Mimicking Interstitial Pneumonia in Systemic Sclerosis: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Ricardo Azêdo de Luca; Mazolli Veiga, Nathalia; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Mocarzel, Luis Otávio Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a complex disease due to the variety of clinical presentations, often superimposed on other conditions, related or not to the connective tissue. We report a 43-year-old Brazilian woman with limited systemic sclerosis and pulmonary symptoms secondary to gastroesophageal reflux disease, with a clinical presentation similar to a diffuse interstitial lung disease. Because of the frequency of interstitial lung injury due to systemic sclerosis, this was an important differential diagnosis, which could be excluded after optimized treatment of reflux disease, with clinical and radiological improvement. Clinical management of patients with collagen diseases requires clinician skills to identify the natural history and understand its nuances. This is a common situation in clinical practice, but with a few discussions in international literature. PMID:26885429

  9. Improvements in ion reflux: An electrodialytic eluent generation and suppression device for ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Kyle; Riviello, John; Small, Hamish

    2015-07-17

    This work describes a membrane based electrodialytic ion reflux device (IRD), which uses water as the pumped phase and integrates isocratic and gradient eluent generation and suppression. The current design incorporates several ion exchange membranes to create discrete chambers for suppression and eluent generation, while isolating the electrodes from the analytical stream. A small volume of recycled water can be used as the pumped phase while continuously refluxing the eluent ions. This current design permits electronically controlled eluent generation of at least 16.4μeq KOHmin(-1), while maintaining low suppressed background conductivity (<0.5μS/cm). The device was operated in gradient or isocratic mode continuously for up to 6 weeks. During this period, over 500 gradient and isocratic injections were performed, showing peak retention time precision below 1.5% RSD.

  10. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for intractable biliary reflux in an individual with incomplete tetraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Deborah; Tower, Donald; Goetz, Lance

    2015-01-01

    Context Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common complication in the spinal cord injury (SCI) population. Surgical treatment of GERD has a unique risk/benefit profile in this population. Findings This 68-year-old male with chronic incomplete tetraplegia, dyslipidemia, and well-controlled diabetes mellitus underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGBP) for intractable biliary reflux. Postoperatively, the patient had resolution of his symptoms but he also presented with significant weight loss and dumping syndrome. While he did have improvement in his dyslipidemia there was no change in his functional status. Conclusions RYGBP is an option for refractory GERD treatment in the SCI population but preoperative risk assessment and close monitoring postoperatively is essential. PMID:25243335

  11. Modeling of reflux condensation and countercurrent annular flow in a two-phase closed thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.G.; Tien, C.L.

    1985-12-01

    Reflux condensation in the steam generator tubes of a PWR is a potentially important heat removal mechanism during the cool-down phase following a small-break LOCA. This work studies reflux condensation using the two-phase closed thermosyphon as a model system. An analytical model based on control-volume formulations of mass, momentum, and energy balances for the liquid and vapor flows in each section of the device is developed. Numerical solutions to the system of governing equations are presented for both steady-state and transient operation of the device. While no data with which to compare the results of the transient analysis are currently available, the steady-state solutions compare well with available experimental data on flooding and film thickness. Thus, the analytical approach presented in this work is demonstrated to be a powerful technique for analyzing countercurrent, annular, two-phase flows. 17 refs., 17 figs.

  12. Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication for Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic, progressive, and costly medical condition affecting a substantial proportion of the world population, predominantly the Western population. The available treatment options for patients with refractory GERD symptoms are limited to either laparoscopic surgery with significant sequelae or potentially lifelong, high-dose proton pump inhibitor therapy. The restoration of the antireflux competence of the gastroesophageal junction at the anatomic and physiologic levels is critical for the effective long-term treatment of GERD. Transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) surgery is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective treatment that has yielded significant symptomatic improvement in patients with medically refractory GERD symptoms. In this review article, we have summarized case series and reports describing the role of TIF for patients with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. The reported indications, techniques, complications, and success rates are also discussed. PMID:26878326

  13. Neuro-regulation of lower esophageal sphincter function as treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Anupender Singh; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2008-02-21

    The junction between the esophagus and the stomach is a specialized region, composed of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and its adjacent anatomical structures, the gastric sling and crural diaphragm. Together these structures work in a coordinated manner to allow ingested food into the stomach while preventing reflux of gastric contents across the esophago-gastric junction (EGJ) into the esophagus. The same zone also permits retrograde passage of air and gastric contents into esophagus during belching and vomiting. The precise coordination required to execute such a complicated task is achieved by a finely-regulated high-pressure zone. This zone keeps the junction between esophagus and stomach continuously closed, but is still able to relax briefly via input from inhibitory neurons that are responsible for its innervation. Alterations of the structure and function of the EGJ and the LES may predispose to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

  14. De novo MEIS2 mutation causes syndromic developmental delay with persistent gastro-esophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Atsushi; Isidor, Bertrand; Piloquet, Hugues; Corre, Pierre; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-09-01

    MEIS2 aberrations are considered to be the cause of intellectual disability, cleft palate and cardiac septal defect, as MEIS2 copy number variation is often observed with these phenotypes. To our knowledge, only one nucleotide-level change-specifically, an in-frame MEIS2 deletion-has so far been reported. Here, we report a female patient with a de novo nonsense mutation (c.611C>G, p.Ser204*) in MEIS2. She showed severe intellectual disability, moderate motor/verbal developmental delay, cleft palate, cardiac septal defect, hypermetropia, severe feeding difficulties with gastro-esophageal reflux and constipation. By reviewing this patient and previous patients with MEIS2 point mutations, we found that feeding difficulty with gastro-esophageal reflux appears to be one of the core clinical features of MEIS2 haploinsufficiency, in addition to intellectual disability, cleft palate and cardiac septal defect.

  15. Defatting technique for two ground spices using simple reflux apparatus: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Dent, R G

    1982-09-01

    A solvent defatting technique was tested for 2 spices which require the same extraction process but different defatting agents. For turmeric, which uses isopropanol as the defatting agent, recoveries of rodent hair and insect fragments were not significantly different from those in the original collaborative study, and this technique is recommended as an alternative to AOAC method 44.122(a). However, for oregano, which uses chloroform as the defatting agent, recoveries of insect fragments were significantly lower by the reflux method. An alternative chloroform pretreatment for oregano, therefore, is not recommended for AOAC 44.122(b). It is suggested that reflux action defatting techniques be considered during the developmental stages of new methods. The technique has been adopted official first action for turmeric. PMID:7130080

  16. Alleviation of harmful effect in stillage reflux in food waste ethanol fermentation based on metabolic and side-product accumulation regulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongzhi; Yang, Jian; Jia, Yan; Wang, Qunhui; Ma, Xiaoyu; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    Stillage reflux fermentation in food waste ethanol fermentation could reduce sewage discharge but exert a harmful effect because of side-product accumulation. In this study, regulation methods based on metabolic regulation and side-product alleviation were conducted. Result demonstrated that controlling the proper oxidation-reduction potential value (-150mV to -250mV) could reduce the harmful effect, improve ethanol yield by 21%, and reduce fermentation time by 20%. The methods of adding calcium carbonate to adjust the accumulated lactic acid showed that ethanol yield increased by 17.3%, and fermentation time decreased by 20%. The accumulated glyceal also shows that these two methods can reduce the harmful effect. Fermentation time lasted for seven times without effect, and metabolic regulation had a better effect than side-product regulation.

  17. Alleviation of harmful effect in stillage reflux in food waste ethanol fermentation based on metabolic and side-product accumulation regulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongzhi; Yang, Jian; Jia, Yan; Wang, Qunhui; Ma, Xiaoyu; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    Stillage reflux fermentation in food waste ethanol fermentation could reduce sewage discharge but exert a harmful effect because of side-product accumulation. In this study, regulation methods based on metabolic regulation and side-product alleviation were conducted. Result demonstrated that controlling the proper oxidation-reduction potential value (-150mV to -250mV) could reduce the harmful effect, improve ethanol yield by 21%, and reduce fermentation time by 20%. The methods of adding calcium carbonate to adjust the accumulated lactic acid showed that ethanol yield increased by 17.3%, and fermentation time decreased by 20%. The accumulated glyceal also shows that these two methods can reduce the harmful effect. Fermentation time lasted for seven times without effect, and metabolic regulation had a better effect than side-product regulation. PMID:27394991

  18. [Prospects for improving the management tactics for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease complicated by Barrett's esophagus].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Trukhmanov, A S

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the new principles relative to adequate diagnosis, management tactics, and rational treatment regimens in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) complicated by the development of Barrett's esophagus. The paper contains up-to-date, mainly original information on the pathological physiology, clinical picture, and principles of diagnosis of this form of GERD. It outlines data on approaches to the early diagnosis and prevention of neoplastic progression in Barrett's esophagus, by taking into account recent advances in pharmacotherapy.

  19. Visceral artery embolization after endoscopic injection of Enteryx for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Helo, Naseem; Wu, Alex; Moon, Eunice; Wang, Weiping

    2014-09-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be difficult to manage medically and may require endoscopic or surgical interventions. The Enteryx procedure was designed to enhance the gastroesophageal barrier function by endoscopic injection of a copolymer into the lower esophageal sphincter. We present a rare case of a patient who was found to have migration of the copolymer into the celiac trunk and bilateral renal arteries during a work-up for persistent intermittent hematuria, which began shortly after Enteryx therapy for GERD. PMID:25426247

  20. [Postoperative reflux in treatment of complicated forms of duodenal ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Veligotskiĭ, N N; Komarchuk, V V; Trushin, A S; Gorbulich, A V; Komarchuk, E V

    2014-04-01

    There were examined 46 patients, in whom operative treatment of perforative duodenal ulcer was conducted. Organ-preserving operations were performed in conjunction with selective proxymal or truncal vagotomy. In far-remote terms after the operation in 12 patients gastrooesophageal reflux have occurred, DeMeester index have constituted 17.5-38.5. Impact of operative trauma on antireflux power of gastro-oesophageal junction was noted.

  1. Emphysematous pyelitis and cystitis associated with vesicoureteral reflux in a diabetic dog

    PubMed Central

    Fabbi, Martina; Manfredi, Sabrina; Bianchi, Ezio; Gnudi, Giacomo; Miduri, Francesca; Volta, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    A 12-year-old female dog with a 3-month history of poor response to diabetes treatment had an acute worsening of symptoms, including weakness and blindness. The dog had elevated blood glucose, alkaline phosphatase and urea concentration, hyposthenuria, glycosuria, hematuria, and pyuria. Escherichia coli was isolated from the urine. Radiographs and ultrasound examination showed that the dog had unilateral emphysematous pyelitis and concurrent cystitis associated with vesicoureteral reflux. PMID:27041755

  2. Esthetic and functional dental rehabilitation in a patient with gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Broliato, Gustavo André; Volcato, Danielle Biancini; Reston, Eduardo Galia; Kramer, Paulo Floriani; Marquezan, Marcela; Ruzzarin, Fabrício; Spiguel, Monica Hermann

    2008-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract in children and adults. The purpose of this report is to describe the case of a patient with GERD and the effects of the disease on the oral cavity, as well as to discuss functional and esthetic rehabilitation using composite resin. The authors also conducted a review of the literature on GERD etiopathogenesis, clinical signs and symptoms, diagnostic methods, and treatment.

  3. Pancreaticobiliary reflux as a high-risk factor for biliary malignancy: Clinical features and diagnostic advancements

    PubMed Central

    Sugita, Reiji

    2015-01-01

    Pancreaticobiliary junction is composed of complex structure with which biliary duct and pancreatic duct assemble and go out into the ampulla of Vater during duodenum wall surrounding the sphincter of Oddi. Although the sphincter of Oddi functionally prevents the reflux of pancreatic juice, pancreaticobiliary reflux (PBR) occurs when function of the sphincter of Oddi halt. The anatomically abnormal junction is termed pancreaticobiliary maljunction (PBM) and is characterized by pancreatic and bile ducts joining outside of the duodenal wall. PBM is an important anatomical finding because many studies have revealed that biliary malignancies are related due to the carcinogenetic effect of the pancreatic back flow on the biliary mucosa. On the other hand, several studies have been published on the reflux of pancreatic juice into the bile duct without morphological PBM, and the correlation of such cases with biliary diseases, especially biliary malignancies, is drawing considerable attention. Although it has long been possible to diagnose PBM by various imaging modalities, PBR without PBM has remained difficult to assess. Therefore, the pathological features of PBR without PBM have not been yet fully elucidated. Lately, a new method of diagnosing PBR without PBM has appeared, and the features of PBR without PBM should soon be better understood. PMID:26167246

  4. RARE VARIANTS IN TENASCIN GENES IN A COHORT OF CHILDREN WITH PRIMARY VESICOURETERIC REFLUX

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Shan; Homstad, Alison; Vaidya, Himani; Stout, Jennifer; Hall, Gentzon; Wu, Guanghong; Conlon, Peter; Routh, Jonathan C.; Wiener, John S.; Ross, Sherry S.; Nagaraj, Shashi; Wigfall, Delbert; Foreman, John; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Gupta, Indra R.; Brophy, Patrick D.; Rabinovich, C. Egla; Gbadegesin, Rasheed A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary vesicoureteral reflux (PVUR) is the most common malformation of the kidney and urinary tract and reflux nephropathy is a major cause of chronic kidney disease in children. Recently, we reported mutations in tenascin XB (TNXB) as a cause of PVUR with joint hypermobility. Methods To define the role of rare variants in tenascin genes in the etiology of PVUR, we screened a cohort of patients with familial PVUR (FPVUR) and non-familial PVUR (NFPVUR) for rare missense variants in TNXB and tenascin C (TNC) genes after excluding mutations in ROBO2 and SOX17. Results We identified 134 individuals from 112 families with PVUR, we excluded two families with mutations in ROBO2. We found rare missense variants in TNXB in the remaining 110 families comprising of 5/55 (9%) of families with FPVUR and 2/55 (4%) of NFPVUR. There were no differences in high-grade reflux, or renal parenchymal scarring between patients with and without TNXB variants. All patients with TNXB rare variants that were tested exhibited joint hypermobility. Overall we were able to identify causes of FPVUR in 7/57 (12%) families (9% in TNXB and 3% in ROBO2). Conclusions In conclusion, a rare missense variant in TNXB in combination with a positive family history of VUR and joint hypermobility may represent a non-invasive method to diagnose PVUR and warrants further evaluation in other cohorts. PMID:26408188

  5. Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Review of Medical and Surgical Management

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Sandhya

    2014-01-01

    Background. Gastroesophageal reflux disease currently accounts for the majority of esophageal pathologies. This study is an attempt to help us tackle the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of this disease. This study specifically focuses on patients in the urban Indian setup. Materials and Methods. This study was a prospective interventional study carried out at a teaching public hospital in Mumbai from May 2010 to September 2012. Fifty patients diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease (confirmed by endoscopy and esophageal manometry) were chosen for the study. Results. Fifty patients were included in the study. Twenty patients showed symptomatic improvement after three months and were thus managed conservatively, while 30 patients did not show any improvement in symptoms and were eventually operated. Conclusion. We suggest that all patients diagnosed to have gastroesophageal reflux disease should be subjected to 3 months of conservative management. In case of no relief of symptoms, patients need to be subjected to surgery. Laparoscopic Toupet's fundoplication is an effective and feasible surgical treatment option for such patients, associated with minimal side effects. However, the long-term effects of this form of treatment still need to be evaluated further with a larger sample size and a longer followup. PMID:24693423

  6. Alkaline oesophageal reflux--an artefact due to oxygen corrosion of antimony pH electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, F; Gustafsson, U; Tibbling, L

    1992-12-01

    Antimony electrodes are widely used for gastro-oesophageal pH monitoring. They are also sensitive to oxygen, however, especially at low PO2 levels, which are known to shift recorded values in the alkaline direction. This study, which compares antimony and glass electrodes for oesophageal pH monitoring in six adults, shows that values recorded by antimony electrodes are 2.1 +/- 0.8 pH units (mean +/- SD) higher than by glass electrodes (p < 0.001; n = 7642). A further 52 patients with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux were investigated by 24-h pH monitoring by means of antimony electrodes. In these patients the oesophageal pH was higher than 8.0 for 7% of the time (range, 0-60%). The alkaline periods recorded with antimony electrodes were all protracted in time, smoothly increasing from a neutral pH, and did not correspond to a sudden increase in pH, which would be expected if alkaline reflux had occurred. It is concluded that high pH values obtained by antimony electrodes are due to the oxygen sensitivity of the electrodes. The diagnosis of alkaline reflux seems to be valid only when pH monitoring is performed with glass electrodes or when values obtained with antimony electrodes are adjusted for the influence of the oxygen tension in the oesophagus. PMID:1475627

  7. The role of hot electron refluxing in laser-generated K-alpha sources

    SciTech Connect

    Neumayer, P.; Aurand, B.; Basko, M.; Ecker, B.; Gibbon, P.; Karmakar, A.; Hochhaus, D. C.; Kazakov, E.; Kuehl, T.; Labaune, C.; Rosmej, O.; Tauschwitz, An.

    2010-10-15

    A study of the contribution of refluxing electrons in the production of K-alpha radiation from high-intensity laser irradiated thin targets has been performed. Thin copper foils both freestanding, and backed by a thick substrate were irradiated with laser pulses of energies around 100 J at intensities ranging from below 10{sup 17} to above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. At high laser intensities we find a strong reduction in the K-alpha yield from targets backed by the substrate. The observed yield reduction is in good agreement with a simple model using hot electron spectra from particle-in-cell simulations or directly inferred from the measured bremsstrahlung emission and can therefore be interpreted as due to the suppression of hot electron refluxing. The study shows that refluxing electrons play a dominant role in high-intensity laser driven K- alpha generation and have to be taken into account in designing targets for laser driven high-flux K-alpha sources.

  8. A comprehensive review of anti-reflux procedures completed by computer-assisted tele-surgery.

    PubMed

    Aurora, A R; Talamini, M A

    2004-10-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common esophageal disorder. Although GERD is an illness primarily treated by medical management, patients refractory to, or those unwilling to endure long-term medical therapy often undergo anti-reflux surgery. Laparoscopic surgery made the surgeon's task technically more challenging. While laparoscopy provides a good field of vision, all depth perception is lost. Furthermore, the movements of the chopstick-like instruments are counter-intuitive with limited degrees of freedom, diminished tactile feedback, and disassociated movement. Now that advanced minimally invasive surgeons have acquired the necessary skills to overcome these hurdles, technology has developed a way to make laparoscopic surgery easier. The latest advance in laparoscopic surgery is computer-assisted telesurgery (CATS) which allows the surgeon to be seamlessly submerged into the surgical field while being seated at a distance from the patient. The technological advances afforded by CATS make minimally-invasive surgery easier by adding stereoscopic vision, which provides depth perception, and the endo-wrist, which provides wrist-like dexterity within the abdominal cavity. The advantages of CATS are: the ergonomic positioning of the surgeon thus decreasing fatigue; stereoscopic vision with possibility of 10x magnification; wrist-like manual dexterity with intuitive motion; motion-scaling and tremor elimination all of which enhance precision and accuracy. A small yet growing body of evidence has provided information which suggests that the use of CATS for anti-reflux surgery is equivalent to the current gold standard, unassisted laparoscopy.

  9. Clinical characteristics of elderly patients with proton pump inhibitor-refractory non-erosive reflux disease from the G-PRIDE study who responded to rikkunshito

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The incidence and severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Japan tends to increase in elderly women. Rikkunshito (RKT), a traditional Japanese medicine, acts as a prokinetic agent and improves gastric emptying and gastric accommodation. Our previous prospective randomized placebo-controlled study showed that RKT combined with a standard-dose of rabeprazole (RPZ) significantly improved the acid-related dysmotility symptoms (ARD) in elderly patients with proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-refractory non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). This study aimed to evaluate clinical characteristics of elderly PPI-refractory NERD patients with ARD symptoms who responded to RKT. Methods Two hundred forty-two patients with PPI-refractory NERD were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of either RPZ (10 mg/q.d.) + RKT (7.5 g/t.i.d.) (RKT group) or RPZ + placebo (PL group). Among them, 95 were elderly (≥65 years) with ARD (RKT group: n = 52; PL group: n = 43). We analyzed the changes using the 12 subscale score of frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (FSSG) and 15 items of the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale at 4 and 8 weeks and compared the therapeutic efficacy between the 2 groups. Results There were no marked differences in baseline demographic or clinical characteristics in the 2 groups except for rate of current smoking. The FSSG score (mean ± SD at 0, 4, and 8 weeks) in both the RKT (16.0 ± 7.0; 9.9 ± 8.4; 7.0 ± 6.4) and PL (15.1 ± 6.4; 10.9 ± 6.7, 11.1 ± 8.5) groups significantly decreased after treatment. However, the degree of improvement of total and ARD scores of FSSG after the 8-week treatment was significantly greater in the RKT group than in the PL group. Combination therapy with RKT for 8 weeks showed significant improvement in 3 subscale scores (abdominal bloating, heavy feeling in stomach and sick feeling after meals) of the ARD domain and 1 subscale score (heartburn after meals) of the reflux symptom domain

  10. 24-hour esophageal pH-monitoring in children suspected of gastroesophageal reflux disease: Analysis of intraesophageal pH monitoring values recorded in distal and proximal channel at diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Semeniuk, Janusz; Kaczmarski, Maciej

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess values of 24-h esophageal pH-monitoring parameters with dual-channel probe (distal and proximal channel) in children suspected of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). METHODS: 264 children suspected of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) were enrolled in a study (mean age χ = 20.78 ± 17.23 mo). The outcomes of this study, immunoallerrgological tests and positive result of oral food challenge test with a potentially noxious nutrient, enabled to qualify children into particular study groups. RESULTS: 32 (12.1%) infants (group 1) had physiological GER diagnosed. Pathological acid GER was confirmed in 138 (52.3%) children. Primary GER was diagnosed in 76 (28.8%) children (group 2) and GER secondary to allergy to cow milk protein and/or other food (CMA/FA) in 62 (23.5%) children (group 3). 32 (12.1%) of them had CMA/FA (group 4-reference group), and in remaining 62 (23.5%) children neither GER nor CMA/FA was confirmed (group 5). Mean values of pH monitoring parameters measured in distal and proximal channel were analyzed in individual groups. This analysis showed statistically significant differentiation of mean values in the case of: number of episodes of acid GER, episodes of acid GER lasting > 5 min, duration of the longest episode of acid GER in both channels, acid GER index total and supine in proximal channel. Statistically significant differences of mean values among examined groups, especially between group 2 and 3 in the case of total acid GER index (only distal channel) were confirmed. CONCLUSION: 24-h esophageal pH monitoring confirmed pathological acid GER in 52.3% of children with typical and atypical symptoms of GERD. The similar pH-monitoring values obtained in group 2 and 3 confirm the necessity of implementation of differential diagnosis for primary vs secondary cause of GER. PMID:17876877

  11. Novel approach to quantify duodenogastric reflux in healthy volunteers and in patients with type I gastric ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Lissner, S A; Fimmel, C J; Sonnenberg, A; Will, N; Müller-Duysing, W; Heinzel, F; Müller, R; Blum, A L

    1983-01-01

    A new method is described which allows simultaneous measurement of gastric emptying and duodenogastric reflux and avoids transpyloric intubation. After intragastric instillation of a liquid lipid meal in six healthy volunteers the fractional gastric emptying rate was 2.9 +/- 0.3 in the upright and 2.5 +/- 0.6 SEM X 10(-2)/min in the supine position, respectively (p greater than 0.5). The duodenogastric reflux rate (expressed as fraction of the intraduodenal amount of duodenal marker) was 0.30 (range 0.03-0.81) and 0.22 (0.01-0.55) X 10(-2)/min, respectively (p greater than 0.2). Atropine (40 micrograms/kg) decreased the supine gastric emptying rate to 1.1 +/- 0.2 (p less than 0.05) and increased the supine duodenogastric reflux rate to 2.74 (0.04-9.80) X 10(-2)/min (p less than 0.05). Fasting duodenogastric reflux rate was similar in the supine and upright position, 0.49 (0.04-0.89) and 0.42 (0.06-0.97) X 10(-2)/min, respectively (p greater than 0.5). Fractional gastric emptying rate was similar in 10 volunteers and 17 patients with type I gastric ulcer (2.1 +/- 0.4 vs 1.7 +/- 0.2 SEM X 10(-2)/min, p greater than 0.2). Their duodenogastric reflux rates were also similar, 0.65 (0.01-5.24) vs 1.10 (0.01-10.83) X 10(-2)/min (p greater than 0.5). We conclude therefore that (1) gastric emptying and both fasting and postprandial duodenogastric reflux are independent of the posture; (2) fasting and postprandial reflux are of similar magnitude; (3) atropine shows gastric emptying and increases duodenogastric reflux; and (4) patients with type I gastric ulcer have neither slowed gastric emptying nor increased duodenogastric reflux. PMID:6852631

  12. Exertional gastro-oesophageal reflux: a mechanism for symptoms in patients with angina pectoris and normal coronary angiograms.

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, P M; Bennett, D H; Whorwell, P J; Brooks, N H; Bray, C L; Ward, C; Jones, P E

    1987-01-01

    During 24 hour oesophageal pH monitoring 52 patients who had angina pectoris and normal coronary angiograms underwent exercise testing, as far as their symptoms allowed, on a treadmill to determine whether gastro-oesophageal reflux occurred during exertion. In 11 patients the 24 hour oesophageal pH score was abnormally high; 10 of these showed exertional gastro-oesophageal reflux, and in nine this was associated with their usual chest pain. A further 13 patients had a normal 24 hour pH score but had exertional reflux coincident with chest pain during exercise testing. The mean lower oesophageal sphincter pressure in both of these groups of patients was appreciably lower than that in 28 patients who had a normal 24 hour pH score and no exertional reflux. These findings suggest that exertional gastro-oesophageal reflux accounts for the symptoms of a large proportion of patients who have angina pectoris and normal coronary angiograms and that oesophageal pH monitoring during exercise testing on a treadmill enables this group of patients to be identified. PMID:3111585

  13. Transformational Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Hiles, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Transformational Events is a new pedagogic pattern that explains how innovations (and other transformations) happened. The pattern is three temporal stages: an interval of increasingly unsatisfactory ad hoc solutions to a persistent problem (the "mess"), an offer of an invention or of a new way of thinking, and a period of widespread adoption and…

  14. Maintenance Event

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-07-22

    Time:  08:00 am - 08:30 am EDT Event Impact:  Science Directorate websites will ... outage Thursday morning, 7/24, to perform upgrades to the web environment and are expected to be down for about 30 minutes. ...

  15. Effect of cisapride on delayed gastric emptying in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed Central

    Maddern, G J; Jamieson, G G; Myers, J C; Collins, P J

    1991-01-01

    Some patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease have delayed gastric emptying. This study investigates the effect of cisapride on gastric emptying in 34 patients with proved reflux and delayed gastric emptying of solids. They were enrolled in a double blind controlled crossover study. Placebo or cisapride (10 mg) tablets were given three times a day for three days followed by further assessment of gastric emptying. The protocol was repeated with the crossover tablet. Gastric emptying was assessed by a dual radionuclide technique. The percentage of a solid meal remaining in the stomach at 100 minutes (% R100 minutes) and the time taken for 50% of the liquid to empty (T50 minutes) were calculated and analysed by the Wilcoxon matched pairs signed ranks test and expressed as medians (ranges). For gastric emptying of solids the initial % R100 minutes (70 (60-100)%) was not significantly different from placebo (71 (35-100)%). After cisapride treatment a significant acceleration (p less than 0.001) in gastric emptying occurred (% R100 minutes, 50.5 (28-93)%). Similarly with gastric emptying of liquids, the initial T50 minute value was 26.5 (12-82) minutes, after placebo the value was 28 (11-81) minutes, but this was significantly accelerated with cisapride (p less than 0.03) to 22.5 (6-61) minutes. The acceleration in gastric emptying occurred in the proximal portion of the stomach for gastric emptying of both solids and liquids suggesting that this is the principal site of action of cisapride. We conclude that cisapride significantly accelerates gastric emptying of both solids and liquids in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and delayed gastric emptying. PMID:2040466

  16. Alternative vs. conventional treatment given on-demand for gastroesophageal reflux disease: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Farup, Per G; Heibert, Mathis; Høeg, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Background Alternative treatments are commonly used for various disorders and often taken on-demand. On-demand treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with pharmaceutical products is an established, cost-effective strategy. Comparisons between alternative medicine and pharmaceutical products are rare. The aim of this trial was to compare on-demand treatment with a pectin-based, raft-forming, natural, anti-reflux agent (PRA) with that of esomeprazole 20 mg (Eso20) in patients with mild/moderate GERD. Methods Patients with mild/moderate GERD were randomised to a six weeks' on-demand treatment with PRA or Eso20 in a pragmatic, open, multicentre trial. Overall satisfaction with treatment, satisfactory relief on a weekly basis, reflux symptoms, and treatment preferences were noted. Results Seventy-seven patients were included in the analyses. Eso20 was significantly superior to PRA for proportion of overall satisfied patients (92% and 58% respectively; p = 0.001), reduction of symptoms (mean symptom scores at the end 5.9 and 8.0 respectively; p = 0.019), proportion of weeks of satisfactory relief (89% and 62% respectively; p = 0.008) and proportion preferring continuation with the same treatment (85% and 42% respectively; p < 0.001). Older patients were more satisfied than younger, and patients preferring on-demand treatment had lower symptom scores at inclusion than those preferring regular treatment. Conclusion On-demand treatment with esomeprazole 20 mg was clearly superior to the pectin-based raft-forming agent. Most patients preferred on-demand treatment to regular treatment. Those preferring regular therapy had significantly more symptoms at inclusion. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00184522. PMID:19236727

  17. Halimeter ppb Levels as the Predictor of Erosive Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Gon; Kim, Yoon Jae; Yoo, Seung Hee; Lee, So Jung; Chung, Jun Won; Kim, Min Ho; Park, Dong Kyun

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims In a previous issue published in Gut and Liver, we found that erosive changes in the esophagogastroduodenal mucosa were strongly correlated with increased levels of volatile sulfur-containing compounds (VSC), suggesting that halitosis could be a symptom reflecting the erosive status of the upper gut mucosa. Together with other studies showing a possible association between halitosis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), under the premise that halitosis could be one of extraesophageal manifestations of erosive GERD (ERD), we investigated the significance of Halimeter ppb levels on ERD compared to non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD). Methods Subjects were assigned to the NERD group if there was no evidence of esophageal erosive changes on endoscopy, despite reflux symptoms, and to the ERD group if they had GERD A, B, C, or D (according to the Los Angeles classification). The VSC levels were measured in all patients with either a Halimeter (before endoscopy) or by gas chromatography of the gastric juices aspirated during endoscopy. Results The VSC level differed significantly between the NERD and ERD groups (p<0.0001), suggesting that this can be used to discriminate between NERD and ERD. However, the VSC level did not differ significantly with the severity of GERD. Even though hiatal hernia and a body mass index of >24 kg/m2 was significantly associated with ERD, there was no correlation with Halimeter ppb levels. Minimal-change lesions exhibited the highest VSC levels, signifying that minimal change lesions can be classified as ERD based on our finding that halimeter ppb levels were descrimitive of erosive change. Conclusions Erosive changes in the esophageal mucosa were strongly associated with VSC levels, supporting the hypothesis that halitosis can be a potential biomarker for the discrimination between ERD and NERD, reflecting the presence of erosive change in the lower esophagogastric junction. PMID:20981207

  18. Similar symptom patterns in gastroesophageal reflux patients with and without hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, S A; Koch, O O; Antoniou, G A; Asche, K U; Kaindlstorfer, A; Granderath, F A; Pointner, R

    2013-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common clinical entity in Western societies. Its association with hiatal hernia has been well documented; however, the comparative clinical profile of patients in the presence or absence of hiatal hernia remains mostly unknown. The aim of the present study was to delineate and compare symptom, impedance, and manometric patterns of patients with and without hiatal hernia. A cumulative number of 120 patients with reflux disease were enrolled in the study. Quality of life score, demographic, symptom, manometric, and impedance data were prospectively collected. Data comparison was undertaken between patients with and without hiatal hernia. A P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Patients with hiatal hernia tended to be older than patients without hernia (52.3 vs. 48.6 years, P < 0.05), whereas quality of life scores were slightly better for the former (97.0 vs. 88.2, P= 0.005). Regurgitation occurred more frequently in patients without hiatal hernia (78.3% vs. 93.9%, P < 0.05). Otherwise, no differences were found with regard to esophageal and extraesophageal symptoms. However, lower esophageal sphincter pressures (7.7 vs. 10.0 mmHg, P= 0.007) and more frequent reflux episodes (upright, 170 vs. 134, P= 0.01; supine, 41 vs. 24, P < 0.03) were documented for patients with hiatal hernia on manometric and impedance studies. Distinct functional characteristics in patients with and without hiatal hernia may suggest a tailored therapeutic management for these diverse patient groups.

  19. LATE EVALUATION OF PATIENTS OPERATED FOR GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE BY NISSEN FUNDOPLICATION

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO, Maxwel Capsy Boga; de ARAÚJO, Amanda Bueno; TERRA-JÚNIOR, Juverson Alves; CREMA, Eduardo; ANDREOLLO, Nelson Adami

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Surgical treatment of GERD by Nissen fundoplication is effective and safe, providing good results in the control of the disease. However, some authors have questioned the efficacy of this procedure and few studies on the long-term outcomes are available in the literature, especially in Brazil. Aim: To evaluate patients operated for gastro-esophageal reflux disease, for at least 10 years, by Nissen fundoplication. Methods: Thirty-two patients were interviewed and underwent upper digestive endoscopy, esophageal manometry, 24 h pH monitoring and barium esophagogram, before and after Nissen fundoplication. Results: Most patients were asymptomatic, satisfied with the result of surgery (87.5%) 10 years after operation, due to better symptom control compared with preoperative and, would do it again (84.38%). However, 62.5% were in use of some type of anti-reflux drugs. The manometry revealed lower esophageal sphincter with a mean pressure of 11.7 cm H2O and an average length of 2.85 cm. The average DeMeester index in pH monitoring was 11.47. The endoscopy revealed that most patients had a normal result (58.06%) or mild esophagitis (35.48%). Barium swallow revealed mild esophageal dilatation in 25,80% and hiatal hernia in 12.9% of cases. Conclusion: After at least a decade, most patients were satisfied with the operation, asymptomatic or had milder symptoms of GERD, being better and with easier control, compared to the preoperative period. Nevertheless, a considerable percentage still employed anti-reflux medications. PMID:27759771

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux leads to esophageal cancer in a surgical model with mice

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Esophago-gastroduodenal anastomosis with rats mimics the development of human Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma by introducing mixed reflux of gastric and duodenal contents into the esophagus. However, use of this rat model for mechanistic and chemopreventive studies is limited due to lack of genetically modified rat strains. Therefore, a mouse model of esophageal adenocarcinoma is needed. Methods We performed reflux surgery on wild-type, p53A135V transgenic, and INK4a/Arf+/- mice of A/J strain. Some mice were also treated with omeprazole (1,400 ppm in diet), iron (50 mg/kg/m, i.p.), or gastrectomy plus iron. Mouse esophagi were harvested at 20, 40 or 80 weeks after surgery for histopathological analysis. Results At week 20, we observed metaplasia in wild-type mice (5%, 1/20) and p53A135V mice (5.3%, 1/19). At week 40, metaplasia was found in wild-type mice (16.2%, 6/37), p53A135V mice (4.8%, 2/42), and wild-type mice also receiving gastrectomy and iron (6.7%, 1/15). Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma developed in INK4a/Arf+/- mice (7.1%, 1/14), and wild-type mice receiving gastrectomy and iron (21.4%, 3/14). Among 13 wild-type mice which were given iron from week 40 to 80, twelve (92.3%) developed squamous cell carcinoma at week 80. None of these mice developed esophageal adenocarcinoma. Conclusion Surgically induced gastroesophageal reflux produced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, but not esophageal adenocarcinoma, in mice. Dominant negative p53 mutation, heterozygous loss of INK4a/Arf, antacid treatment, iron supplementation, or gastrectomy failed to promote esophageal adenocarcinoma in these mice. Further studies are needed in order to develop a mouse model of esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:19627616

  1. Leg raise increases pressure in lower and upper esophageal sphincter among patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bitnar, P; Stovicek, J; Andel, R; Arlt, J; Arltova, M; Smejkal, M; Kolar, P; Kobesova, A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relation between posturally increased intra-abdominal pressure and lower/upper esophageal sphincter pressure changes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. We used high resolution manometry to measure pressure changes in lower and upper esophageal sphincter during bilateral leg rise. We also examined whether the rate of lower and upper esophageal sphincter pressure would increase during leg raise differentially in individuals with versus without normal resting pressure. Fifty eight patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease participated in the study. High resolution manometry was performed in relaxed supine position, then lower and upper esophageal sphincter pressure was measured. Finally, the subjects were instructed to keep their legs lifted while performing 90-degree flexion at the hips and knees and the pressure was measured again. Paired t-test and independent samples t-test were used. There was a significant increase in both lower (P < 0.001) and upper esophageal sphincter pressure (P = 0.034) during leg raise compared to the initial resting position. Individuals with initially higher pressure in lower esophageal sphincter (>10 mmHg) exhibited a greater pressure increase during leg raise than those with initially lower pressure (pressure ≤10 mmHg; P = 0.002). Similarly individuals with higher resting upper esophageal sphincter pressure (>44 mmHg) showed a greater pressure increase during leg raise than those with lower resting pressure (≤44 mmHg; P < 0.001). The results illustrate the influence of postural leg activities on intraesophageal pressure in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, indicating by means of high resolution manometry that diaphragmatic postural and sphincter function are likely interrelated in this population. PMID:27634073

  2. Leg raise increases pressure in lower and upper esophageal sphincter among patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bitnar, P; Stovicek, J; Andel, R; Arlt, J; Arltova, M; Smejkal, M; Kolar, P; Kobesova, A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relation between posturally increased intra-abdominal pressure and lower/upper esophageal sphincter pressure changes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. We used high resolution manometry to measure pressure changes in lower and upper esophageal sphincter during bilateral leg rise. We also examined whether the rate of lower and upper esophageal sphincter pressure would increase during leg raise differentially in individuals with versus without normal resting pressure. Fifty eight patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease participated in the study. High resolution manometry was performed in relaxed supine position, then lower and upper esophageal sphincter pressure was measured. Finally, the subjects were instructed to keep their legs lifted while performing 90-degree flexion at the hips and knees and the pressure was measured again. Paired t-test and independent samples t-test were used. There was a significant increase in both lower (P < 0.001) and upper esophageal sphincter pressure (P = 0.034) during leg raise compared to the initial resting position. Individuals with initially higher pressure in lower esophageal sphincter (>10 mmHg) exhibited a greater pressure increase during leg raise than those with initially lower pressure (pressure ≤10 mmHg; P = 0.002). Similarly individuals with higher resting upper esophageal sphincter pressure (>44 mmHg) showed a greater pressure increase during leg raise than those with lower resting pressure (≤44 mmHg; P < 0.001). The results illustrate the influence of postural leg activities on intraesophageal pressure in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, indicating by means of high resolution manometry that diaphragmatic postural and sphincter function are likely interrelated in this population.

  3. Adverse effects reported in the use of gastroesophageal reflux disease treatments in children: a 10 years literature review

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Shlomi; Bueno de Mesquita, Mirjam; Mimouni, Francis B

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is commonly observed in children, particularly during the first year of life. Pharmacological therapy is mostly reserved for symptomatic infants diagnosed with GER disease (GERD), usually as defined in a recent consensus statement. The purpose of the present article was to review the reported adverse effects of pharmacological agents used in the treatment of paediatric GERD. We conducted this review using the electronic journal database Pubmed and Cochrane database systematic reviews using the latest 10-year period (1 January 2003 to 31 December 2012). Our search strategy included the following keywords: omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole, rantidine, cimetidine, famotidine, nizatidine, domperidone, metoclopramide, betanechol, erythromycin, baclofen, alginate. We used Pubmed’s own filter of: ’child: birth–18 years’. All full articles were reviewed and we only included randomized controlled trials retrieved from our search. We addressed a summary of our search on a drug-by-drug basis with regard to its mechanism of action and clinical applications, and reviewed all of the adverse effects reported and the safety profile of each drug. Adverse effects have been reported in at least 23% of patients treated with histamine H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) and 34% of those treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), and mostly include headaches, diarrhoea, nausea (H2RAs and PPIs) and constipation (PPIs). Acid suppression may place immune-deficient infants and children, or those with indwelling catheters, at risk for the development of lower respiratory tract infections and nosocomial sepsis. Prokinetic agents have many adverse effects, without major benefits to support their routine use. PMID:25752807

  4. The suitability of the GERDyzer instrument in pH-test-proven laryngopharyngeal reflux patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Pin; Liang, Wen-Miin; Wang, Chen-Chi; Chang, Chi-Sen; Yeh, Hong-Zen; Hsu, Jeng-Yuan; Ko, Chung-Wang; Lee, Shou-Wu; Chang, Shu-Chuan; Sung, Fung-Chang; Lien, Han-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of validated patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments for the treatment outcome measure of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is crucial given the lack of objective markers. However, current symptom-based PRO instruments can only partially capture the impact of LPR. The GERD Analyzer (GERDyzer), an existing disease-specific PRO instrument, which measures multidimensional health-related quality of life (HRQL) affected by the illness rather than by any specific symptoms, has been validated in patients with erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Following the U.S. Food and Drug Administration PRO guidance, we cross-culturally adapted the GERDyzer instrument into Chinese, and examined the qualitative and quantitative psychometric properties of the Chinese version GERDyzer in pH-test-proven LPR patients. The GERDyzer comprises 10 dimensions of HRQL, including general well-being, pain/discomfort, physical health, diet, energy, activities, leisure activities, social life, mood, and sleep. To examine the content validity, we recruited 26 pH-test-proven LPR participants to conduct 4 focus group meetings for direct patient input on clinical manifestations and HRQL impacts. We also tested the quantitative psychometric properties, including reliability, validity, and responsiveness in 100 pH-test-proven LPR patients. Saturation of concept elicitation was achieved from the 4 focus groups, and a strong conceptual match was evident between the GERDyzer contents and responses from the focus group participants. Cognitive debriefing assessment showed that the Chinese version GERDyzer was adequate for use by patients as it demonstrated linguistic validation and cultural harmonization. Quantitative psychometric properties showed evidence of high internal consistency (Cronbach α: 0.96), good to excellent test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.84–0.98). Confirmatory factor analysis supported a 2-factor structure. Convergent validity was

  5. Detection of Reflux in Jugular and Vertebral Veins Through Directional Multigate Quality Doppler Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forzoni, Leonardo; Morovic, Sandra; Semplici, Paolo; Corsi, Massino; Ricci, Stefano; Tortoli, Piero

    Chronic Cerebro-Spinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI) is a medical condition where deoxygenated blood flows from the veins surrounding the brain and spine is slowed down or blocked in its return to the heart. The diagnosis and severity of CCSVI can be assessed by investigating the possible presence and the extent of such reflux and/or blockage in neck veins and intracranial veins, with the patient in both sitting and supine positions. During such examinations, B-Mode and Color Doppler ultrasound are not always capable of accurately detect the flow behavior in all subjects.

  6. The suitability of the GERDyzer instrument in pH-test-proven laryngopharyngeal reflux patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Pin; Liang, Wen-Miin; Wang, Chen-Chi; Chang, Chi-Sen; Yeh, Hong-Zen; Hsu, Jeng-Yuan; Ko, Chung-Wang; Lee, Shou-Wu; Chang, Shu-Chuan; Sung, Fung-Chang; Lien, Han-Chung

    2016-08-01

    The use of validated patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments for the treatment outcome measure of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is crucial given the lack of objective markers. However, current symptom-based PRO instruments can only partially capture the impact of LPR. The GERD Analyzer (GERDyzer), an existing disease-specific PRO instrument, which measures multidimensional health-related quality of life (HRQL) affected by the illness rather than by any specific symptoms, has been validated in patients with erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Following the U.S. Food and Drug Administration PRO guidance, we cross-culturally adapted the GERDyzer instrument into Chinese, and examined the qualitative and quantitative psychometric properties of the Chinese version GERDyzer in pH-test-proven LPR patients.The GERDyzer comprises 10 dimensions of HRQL, including general well-being, pain/discomfort, physical health, diet, energy, activities, leisure activities, social life, mood, and sleep. To examine the content validity, we recruited 26 pH-test-proven LPR participants to conduct 4 focus group meetings for direct patient input on clinical manifestations and HRQL impacts. We also tested the quantitative psychometric properties, including reliability, validity, and responsiveness in 100 pH-test-proven LPR patients.Saturation of concept elicitation was achieved from the 4 focus groups, and a strong conceptual match was evident between the GERDyzer contents and responses from the focus group participants. Cognitive debriefing assessment showed that the Chinese version GERDyzer was adequate for use by patients as it demonstrated linguistic validation and cultural harmonization. Quantitative psychometric properties showed evidence of high internal consistency (Cronbach α: 0.96), good to excellent test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.84-0.98). Confirmatory factor analysis supported a 2-factor structure. Convergent validity was confirmed by

  7. Dental Erosion in a Partially Edentulous Patient with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    PICOS, ALINA MONICA; PICOS, ANDREI; NICOARA, PETRA; CRAITOIU, MONICA M.

    2014-01-01

    Diseases such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), bulimia, anorexia, and extrinsic alimentary factors may cause dental erosion (DE). The minimally invasive therapeutic attitude preserves the remaining healthy tooth structure. In the earlier stages, the direct restoration of dental lesions is possible, using composite materials. In advanced stages of DE, prosthetic treatments are recommended for stable esthetic and functional results. We present a case of DE in a partially edentulous patient who benefited from a complex therapy. The prosthetic project of the case involves ceramic veneers associated with dental and implant supported fixed prosthesis for the restoration of esthetics, mastication, phonetics and their maintenance. PMID:26528037

  8. Perceptual and acoustic evaluation of individuals with laryngopharyngeal reflux pre- and post-treatment.

    PubMed

    Selby, Julia C; Gilbert, Harvey R; Lerman, J W

    2003-12-01

    Thirteen individuals with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) were studied pre- and post-treatment. The effect of treatment on perceptual ratings of voice quality and frequency and intensity measures was examined. Relationships between perceptual and acoustic parameters were assessed descriptively. Results showed a small, but significant improvement in the perception of voice quality post-treatment. No significant differences were found between pre- and post-treatment means for any of the acoustic measures except harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR). Descriptive analyses showed some association between perceptual ratings and acoustic measures. Discussion of results focuses on severity of LPR.

  9. Fast-electron refluxing effects on anisotropic hard-x-ray emission from intense laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    McKeever, K; Makita, M; Nersisyan, G; Dzelzainis, T; White, S; Kettle, B; Dromey, B; Zepf, M; Sarri, G; Doria, D; Ahmed, H; Lewis, C L S; Riley, D; Robinson, A P L

    2015-03-01

    Fast-electron generation and dynamics, including electron refluxing, is at the core of understanding high-intensity laser-plasma interactions. This field is itself of strong relevance to fast ignition fusion and the development of new short-pulse, intense, x-ray, γ-ray, and particle sources. In this paper, we describe experiments that explicitly link fast-electron refluxing and anisotropy in hard-x-ray emission. We find the anisotropy in x-ray emission to be strongly correlated to the suppression of refluxing. In contrast to some previous work, the peak of emission is directly along the rear normal to the target rather than along either the incident laser direction or the specular reflection direction. PMID:25871224

  10. Non-linear associations between laryngo-pharyngeal symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: clues from artificial intelligence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, E

    2006-01-01

    Summary The relationship between the different symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease remain markedly obscure due to the high underlying non-linearity and the lack of studies focusing on the problem. Aim of this study was to evaluate the hidden relationships between the triad of symptoms related to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease using advanced mathematical techniques, borrowed from the artificial intelligence field, in a cohort of patients with oesophagitis. A total of 388 patients (from 60 centres) with endoscopic evidence of oesophagitis were recruited. The severity of oesophagitis was scored by means of the Savary-Miller classification. PST algorithm was employed. This study shows that laryngo-pharyngeal symptoms related to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease are correlated even if in a non-linear way. PMID:17345935

  11. Voiding urosonography with second-generation ultrasound contrast versus micturating cystourethrography in the diagnosis of vesicoureteric reflux.

    PubMed

    Wong, L S; Tse, K S; Fan, T W; Kwok, K Y; Tsang, T K; Fung, H S; Chan, W; Lee, K W; Leung, M W Y; Chao, N S Y; Tang, K W; Chan, S C H

    2014-08-01

    Vesicoureteric reflux has been associated with paediatric urinary tract infection. Fluoroscopic micturating cystourethrography (MCU) has been the gold standard of diagnostic test for decades; however, it has been criticized owing to its lower detection rate and radiation dose to children. Therefore, new radiation-free reflux imaging modalities have been developed, in which ultrasound-based contrast-enhanced voiding urosonography (ceVUS) is a good example. However, ultrasonography has been considered as an operator-dependent examination. Therefore, our study aimed to examine the inter-observer agreement of this sonographic technique, which has not been evaluated before. Moreover, the second-generation ultrasound contrast SonoVue has been recently marketed, and the data on its efficacy on intravesical use in ceVUS is relatively scarce. Thus, we also aimed to investigate the diagnostic performance and safety profile of SonoVue-enhanced VUS in the diagnosis of vesicoureteric reflux. Our prospective comparative study compared the diagnostic performance of ceVUS with MCU in young children presenting with first episode of urinary tract infection. We performed sequential ceVUS and MCU examinations in 31 patients (62 pelvi-ureter units). Perfect inter-observer agreement (Cohen’s kappa statistics = 1.0, p < 0.001) was achieved in ceVUS, suggesting its good reliability in reflux detection and grading. Using MCU as reference, ceVUS had 100 % sensitivity and 84 % specificity and carried higher reflux detection rate than MCU (p < 0.001). There was no complication encountered. Conclusion: Voiding urosonography is a reliable, sensitive, safe and radiation-free modality in the investigation of vesicoureteric reflux in children. It should be incorporated in the diagnostic algorithm in paediatric urinary tract infection.

  12. Molecular events involved in up-regulating human Na+-independent neutral amino acid transporter LAT1 during T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Nii, T; Segawa, H; Taketani, Y; Tani, Y; Ohkido, M; Kishida, S; Ito, M; Endou, H; Kanai, Y; Takeda, E; Miyamoto Ki

    2001-09-15

    We investigated the regulation of system-L amino acid transporter (LAT1) during T-cell activation. In quiescent T-cells, L-leucine transport is mediated mainly by the system-L amino acid transport system and is increased significantly during T-cell activation by PMA and ionomycin. In quiescent T-cells, the LAT1 protein was heterocomplexed with 4F2 heavy chain (4F2hc) in the plasma membrane. During T-cell activation, the amounts of 4F2hc and LAT1 heterocomplex were significantly elevated compared with those in quiescent T-cells. In addition, by Northern-blot analysis, these increments were found to be due to elevated levels of LAT1 and 4F2hc mRNA. Transient expression of constructs comprising various LAT1 gene promoter fragments, which contained all three of the GC boxes, was sufficient for promoting luciferase expression in Jurkat T-cells, but the promoter of the LAT1 gene did not respond to PMA and ionomycin. Similar observations were observed in the human 4F2hc gene promoter. In nuclear run-on assay, the LAT1 and 4F2hc genes were actively transcribed even in quiescent T-cells, but the low levels of both transcripts were shown to be the result of a block to transcription elongation within the exon 1 intron 1 regions. These findings indicated that a removal of the block to mRNA elongation stimulates the induction of system-L amino acid transporter gene transcripts (LAT1 and 4F2hc) in activated T-cells. PMID:11535130

  13. Episodic cervical dystonia associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux. A case of adult-onset Sandifer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shahnawaz, M; van der Westhuizen, L R; Gledhill, R F

    2001-12-01

    Sandifer syndrome is a dystonic movement disorder described in children with severe gastro-oesophageal reflux. We now report a patient who had the features of Sandifer syndrome first developing in adult life. Onset of dystonic episodes followed closely the occurrence of a Bell's palsy, while symptoms of peptic oesophagitis had been present for several months beforehand. Successful symptomatic treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux was accompanied by cessation of the dystonic episodes. Possible pathophysiological mechanisms of the abnormal movements in Sandifer syndrome are discussed. PMID:11714563

  14. [Effects of rehabilitation on neurohumoral regulation of the lower esophageal sphincter in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Efendieva, M T; Razumov, A N; Poroĭkova, M V

    2002-01-01

    The effects of acupuncture or SHF electromagnetic field in combination with iodine-bromine baths on neurohumoral regulation of the lower esophageal sphincter were studied in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. DMW-therapy in combination with iodine-bromine baths lowered initially elevated level of the vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) while acupuncture reduced initially elevated levels of gastrin and VIP. These results show pathogenetic validity of using acupuncture or SHF electromagnetic field in combination with iodine-bromine baths in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease of the first or second degree.

  15. Vesicoureteral Reflux Detected with 99mTc-DTPA Renal Scintigraphy during Evaluation of Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Manevska, Nevena; Stojanoski, Sinisa; Majstorov, Venjamin; Pop-Gjorcheva, Daniela; Zdraveska, Nikolina; Kuzmanovska, Dafina

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radionuclide techniques, as direct radionuclide cystography and 99mTc-DMSA scintigraphy, have been used in evaluation of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and reflux nephropathy (RN) in children. Dynamic 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy is reserved for evaluation of differential renal function and obstruction in children, where hydronephrosis is detected by ultrasonography (US) pre- or postnatally. CASE REPORT: Six year old boy was prenatally diagnosed with bilateral hydronephrosis. Postnatal, severe bilateral VUR was detected by voiding urethrocytography. US and 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy performed in the first month of life showed small left kidney that participated with 2% in the global renal function. Bilateral cutaneous ureterostomy has been performed in order to obtain good renal drainage and promote optimal renal growth. Twelve months later, classic antireflux procedure was done. Control 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy, 5 ys after antireflux surgery, revealed persisting radioactivity during the diuretic phase, in the left kidney that indicated antireflux procedure failure with VUR reappearance. CONCLUSION: 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy is the first method of choice for long-term monitoring of individual kidney function in children with VUR and other congenital urinary tract anomalies. Additionally, it can be used as indirect radionuclide cystography when rising of radioactivity in the kidney region, during the diuretic phase can indicate presence of VUR. PMID:27275347

  16. National consensus on the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disorder, which gastric content repeatedly reflux into the esophagus causing disturbing symptoms and/or complications. Various epidemiological studies show that there is regional difference on the aspect of prevalence and clinical manifestation. Regional data also demonstrates increased incidence of complications such as the Barret's Esophagus and adenocarcinoma. In response to the situation, the Asia-Pacific GERD experts, including Indonesia, had published a consensus on the management of GERD in 2004, which was subsequently revised in 2008. Advances in medical technology, especially on gastrointestinal endoscopy technique and other diagnostic instruments such as 24-hour pH-metry and manometry, have improved the capacity of management of GERD. On the other hand, we feel that adequate knowledge and skills of doctors, both for general physicians and specialists of internal medicine in our country are not well-distributed. Moreover, the availability of instruments for diagnostic and therapeutical supports differs from one region to the others. The Organizing Committee of Indonesian Society of Gastroenterology or Pengurus Besar Perkumpulan Gastroenterologi Indonesia (PB PGI) considers that it is important to revise the National Consensus on the Management of GERD in Indonesia 2004, which is expected to be the guideline of GERD management.

  17. Lifestyle measures in the management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: clinical and pathophysiological considerations

    PubMed Central

    Kang, J.H.-E.

    2015-01-01

    Several lifestyle and dietary factors are commonly cited as risk factors for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and modification of these factors has been advocated as first-line measures for the management of GORD. We performed a systematic review of the literature from 2005 to the present relating to the effect of these factors and their modification on GORD symptoms, physiological parameters of reflux as well as endoscopic appearances. Conflicting results existed for the association between smoking, alcohol and various dietary factors in the development of GORD. These equivocal findings are partly due to methodology problems. There is recent good evidence that weight reduction and smoking cessation are beneficial in reducing GORD symptoms. Clinical and physiological studies also suggest that some physical measures as well as modification of meal size and timing can also be beneficial. However, there is limited evidence for the role of avoiding alcohol and certain dietary ingredients including carbonated drinks, caffeine, fat, spicy foods, chocolate and mint. PMID:25729556