Science.gov

Sample records for acid regulates ozone-induced

  1. Uric acid protects erythrocytes from ozone-induced changes

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.; Smith, R.C.

    1987-08-01

    Uric acid effectively reduced hemolysis and methemoglobin formation in bovine and swine erythrocytes bubbled with ozone in vitro. In bovine erythrocytes, formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive material was inhibited by uric acid, but there was little immediate protection for the swine cells. Antioxidant protection was due to preferential degradation of the uric acid by ozone. These results provide evidence to support the hypothesis that in plasma, uric acid can provide antioxidant protection for erythrocytes.

  2. Arabidopsis protein phosphatase 2C ABI1 interacts with type I ACC synthases and is involved in the regulation of ozone-induced ethylene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ludwików, Agnieszka; Cieśla, Agata; Kasprowicz-Maluśki, Anna; Mituła, Filip; Tajdel, Małgorzata; Gałgański, Łukasz; Ziółkowski, Piotr A; Kubiak, Piotr; Małecka, Arleta; Piechalak, Aneta; Szabat, Marta; Górska, Alicja; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Ibragimow, Izabela; Sadowski, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Ethylene plays a crucial role in various biological processes and therefore its biosynthesis is strictly regulated by multiple mechanisms. Posttranslational regulation, which is pivotal in controlling ethylene biosynthesis, impacts 1-aminocyclopropane 1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) protein stability via the complex interplay of specific factors. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana protein phosphatase type 2C, ABI1, a negative regulator of abscisic acid signaling, is involved in the regulation of ethylene biosynthesis under oxidative stress conditions. We found that ABI1 interacts with ACS6 and dephosphorylates its C-terminal fragment, a target of the stress-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinase, MPK6. In addition, ABI1 controls MPK6 activity directly and by this means also affects the ACS6 phosphorylation level. Consistently with this, ozone-induced ethylene production was significantly higher in an ABI1 knockout strain (abi1td) than in wild-type plants. Importantly, an increase in stress-induced ethylene production in the abi1td mutant was compensated by a higher ascorbate redox state and elevated antioxidant activities. Overall, the results of this study provide evidence that ABI1 restricts ethylene synthesis by affecting the activity of ACS6. The ABI1 contribution to stress phenotype underpins its role in the interplay between the abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene signaling pathways. PMID:24637173

  3. Rat lung phospholipid fatty acid composition in prepregnant, pregnant, and lactating rats: relationship to ozone-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gunnison, A F; Finkelstein, I

    1997-01-01

    Our laboratory has demonstrated recently that pulmonary inflammation induced by acute ozone exposure is much more severe in late stage pregnant and lactating rats than in postlactating rats or age-matched virgin females. It is currently widely believed that such pulmonary damage results, at least in part, from the reaction of ozone at sites of unsaturation in phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) molecules located in the epithelial fluid layer lining the lung surfaces and/or the plasma membranes of epithelial cells underlying this fluid layer. The objective of this study was to compare the PLFA composition of lung tissue and surfactant from ozone-sensitive late stage pregnant and lactating rats with comparable tissue from relatively ozone-insensitive age-matched prepregnant (virgin female) rats to explore the possibility that changes in lung PLFA composition during pregnancy and/or lactation contribute to the enhanced sensitivity of these physiologic states to ozone. In addition, the correlation of changes in plasma PLFA composition with those in lung was investigated. There were minor differences in the composition of lung tissue and surfactant PLFAs between prepregnant rats and pregnant rats at day 17 of gestation and only slightly greater differences between prepregnant and lactating rats. Changes from the prepregnant state in the PLFA composition of lung tissue, but not surfactant, correlated with changes in the plasma only in lactating rats and not in pregnant rats. Overall, the double bond index of PLFAs in surfactant and lung tissue was decreased in pregnant and lactating rats compared with prepregnant rats. Thus, the increased sensitivity of pregnant and lactating rats to ozone-induced lung injury cannot be attributed to an increased availability of unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the arachidonic acid composition of phospholipids did not appear to explain differences between prepregnant rats and pregnant or lactating rats in their inflammatory response to

  4. Src-Mediated EGF Receptor Activation Regulates Ozone-Induced Interleukin 8 Expression in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wages, Phillip A.; Devlin, Robert B.; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Peden, David B.; Samet, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human exposure to ozone (O3) results in pulmonary function decrements and airway inflammation. The mechanisms underlying these adverse effects remain unclear. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of lung inflammation. Objective We examined the role of EGFR activation in O3-induced expression of the chemokine interleukin 8 (IL-8) in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC). Methods We detected phosphorylated EGFR using immunoblotting. EGFR dimerization was examined through cross-linking reaction and immunoblotting, and levels of IL-8 protein were measured using ELISA. Results Exposure to O3 (0.25–1.0 ppm) induced rapid and marked increase in EGFR phosphorylation at the autophosphorylation site Y1068 and the transphosphorylation site Y845, implicating the involvement of Src kinase. Further investigation showed that O3 stimulation induced phosphorylation of Src at Y416, indicative of Src activation. Pharmacological inhibition of Src kinase activity abrogated O3-induced EGFR phosphorylation at tyrosines 1068 and 845. Moreover, pretreatment of BEAS-2B cells with inhibitor of either EGFR or Src kinase activities significantly blocked O3-induced IL-8 expression. Conclusion Conclusion: O3 exposure increased IL-8 expression through Src-mediated EGFR transactivation in HBEC. Citation> Wu W, Wages PA, Devlin RB, Diaz-Sanchez D, Peden DB, Samet JM. 2015. Src-mediated EGF receptor activation regulates ozone-induced interleukin 8 expression in human bronchial epithelial cells. Environ Health Perspect 123:231–236; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307379 PMID:25303742

  5. Ozone-induced alterations in arachidonic acid metabolism in cultured lung cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most sensitive cells to ozone (O/sub 3/) damage is the pulmonary endothelial cell which may mediate the response of the lung to injury by productions of the autacoid prostacyclin (PGl/sub 2/), a metabolite of arachidonic acid. Exposure of endothelial cell cultures to ozone produced a concentration dependent decreases in the synthesis of PGl/sub 2/. Release of /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid from endothelial cells was increased after two hours of 0.3 and 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ exposure while incubation of cells with 20 ..mu..M and arachidonate (4 min) after exposure resulted in a decreased PGl/sub 2/ synthesis. Cells exposed to 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ did not have a decreased PGl/sub 2/ production when incubated with 5 ..mu..M PGH/sub 2/ immediately after exposure. These results are consistent with an O/sub 3/-induced inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity. O/sub 3/ exposure (1.0 ppm) produced a rapid decrease in endothelial PGl/sub 2/ synthesis. The data suggest that cyclooxygenase was not inactivated by increased autooxidation due to metabolism of increased free arachidonate. PGl/sub 2/ synthesis returned to control amounts within 12 hours after ozone exposure similar to the recovery time of irreversibly inhibited cyclooxygenase suggesting that recovery was due to de novo synthesis of enzyme. Lipid peroxides and/or hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) may have caused the inhibition of cyclooxygenase. Incubation of cells with catalase (5 U/ml) protected against the O/sub 3/-induced depression in PGl/sub 2/ synthesis. Exogenously added H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ (greater than or equal to 75 ..mu..M) caused a stimulation of basal PGl/sub 2/ production but depressed arachidonate-stimulated synthesis. O/sub 3/ exposure (2 hr, 1.0 ppm) produced altered metabolism of arachidonate in other important lung cell types, e.g., a decreased PGl/sub 2/ synthesis in smooth muscle cultures. Exposure of lung macrophages to O/sub 3/ caused an increase in almost all arachidonate metabolites produced.

  6. α-Tocopherol/Gallic Acid Cooperation in the Protection of Galactolipids Against Ozone-Induced Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Rudolphi-Skórska, Elżbieta; Filek, Maria; Zembala, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The protective ability of α-tocopherol (TOH) and gallic acid (GA) acting simultaneously at the moment of oxidizer application was evaluated by determination of galactolipid layers' oxidation degree. Addition of GA resulted in a significant decrease of ozone-derived radicals shifting the threshold of lipid sensitivity by an amount approximately corresponding to the GA intake in bulk reaction with ozone. TOH presence in lipid layers results in a change of the role of GA which additionally may be involved in the reduction of tocopheroxyl radical formed during oxidation. This leads to a decrease in effectiveness of GA in diminishing the amount of ozone radicals. Such an effect was not observed for mixed layers containing galactolipid and pre-oxidized tocopherol where the ozone threshold level was associated with a stoichiometry of GA + O3 reaction. It was concluded that probably subsequent transformations of tocopheroxyl radical to less reactive forms prevent its reaction with GA the entire quantity of which is used for radicals scavenging. This result shows the role of time parameter in systems where substrates are engaged in various reactions taking place simultaneously. The inactivation of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical by studied antioxidants in homogeneous system confirmed observations made on the basis of lipid layer properties indicating their antagonistic action (at least at studied conditions). Formation of layers in post-oxidation situation did not depend whether tocopherol was oxidized during oxidation of lipid/tocopherol mixture or was introduced as pre-oxidized. This may be interpreted as indication that products of tocopherol oxidation may stabilize lipid layers. PMID:26498297

  7. α-Tocopherol/Gallic Acid Cooperation in the Protection of Galactolipids Against Ozone-Induced Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Rudolphi-Skórska, Elżbieta; Filek, Maria; Zembala, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The protective ability of α-tocopherol (TOH) and gallic acid (GA) acting simultaneously at the moment of oxidizer application was evaluated by determination of galactolipid layers' oxidation degree. Addition of GA resulted in a significant decrease of ozone-derived radicals shifting the threshold of lipid sensitivity by an amount approximately corresponding to the GA intake in bulk reaction with ozone. TOH presence in lipid layers results in a change of the role of GA which additionally may be involved in the reduction of tocopheroxyl radical formed during oxidation. This leads to a decrease in effectiveness of GA in diminishing the amount of ozone radicals. Such an effect was not observed for mixed layers containing galactolipid and pre-oxidized tocopherol where the ozone threshold level was associated with a stoichiometry of GA + O3 reaction. It was concluded that probably subsequent transformations of tocopheroxyl radical to less reactive forms prevent its reaction with GA the entire quantity of which is used for radicals scavenging. This result shows the role of time parameter in systems where substrates are engaged in various reactions taking place simultaneously. The inactivation of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical by studied antioxidants in homogeneous system confirmed observations made on the basis of lipid layer properties indicating their antagonistic action (at least at studied conditions). Formation of layers in post-oxidation situation did not depend whether tocopherol was oxidized during oxidation of lipid/tocopherol mixture or was introduced as pre-oxidized. This may be interpreted as indication that products of tocopherol oxidation may stabilize lipid layers.

  8. Regulation of ozone-induced lung inflammation and injury by the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-3

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Francis, Mary; Vayas, Kinal N.; Cervelli, Jessica A.; Choi, Hyejeong; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2015-04-15

    Macrophages play a dual role in ozone toxicity, contributing to both pro- and anti-inflammatory processes. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a lectin known to regulate macrophage activity. Herein, we analyzed the role of Gal-3 in the response of lung macrophages to ozone. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue were collected 24–72 h after exposure (3 h) of WT and Gal-3{sup -/-} mice to air or 0.8 ppm ozone. In WT mice, ozone inhalation resulted in increased numbers of proinflammatory (Gal-3{sup +}, iNOS{sup +}) and anti-inflammatory (MR-1{sup +}) macrophages in the lungs. While accumulation of iNOS{sup +} macrophages was attenuated in Gal-3{sup -/-} mice, increased numbers of enlarged MR-1{sup +} macrophages were noted. This correlated with increased numbers of macrophages in BAL. Flow cytometric analysis showed that these cells were CD11b{sup +} and consisted mainly (> 97%) of mature (F4/80{sup +}CD11c{sup +}) proinflammatory (Ly6GLy6C{sup hi}) and anti-inflammatory (Ly6GLy6C{sup lo}) macrophages. Increases in both macrophage subpopulations were observed following ozone inhalation. Loss of Gal-3 resulted in a decrease in Ly6C{sup hi} macrophages, with no effect on Ly6C{sup lo} macrophages. CD11b{sup +}Ly6G{sup +}Ly6C{sup +} granulocytic (G) and monocytic (M) myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were also identified in the lung after ozone. In Gal-3{sup -/-} mice, the response of G-MDSC to ozone was attenuated, while the response of M-MDSC was heightened. Changes in inflammatory cell populations in the lung of ozone treated Gal-3{sup -/-} mice were correlated with reduced tissue injury as measured by cytochrome b5 expression. These data demonstrate that Gal-3 plays a role in promoting proinflammatory macrophage accumulation and toxicity in the lung following ozone exposure. - Highlights: • Multiple monocytic-macrophage subpopulations accumulate in the lung after ozone inhalation. • Galectin-3 plays a proinflammatory role in ozone-induced lung injury. • In the

  9. A study of ozone-induced edema in the isolated rat lung in relation to arachidonic acid metabolism, mixed-function oxidases and angiotensin converting enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Dutta, S; Chatterjee, M; Teknos, T N; Carlson, R W

    1990-01-01

    In order to elucidate the role of arachidonic acid in the pathogenesis of ozone-induced pulmonary edema, isolated rat lungs were exposed to 14C-arachidonic acid in the presence or absence of ozone and the incorporation of radiolabelled arachidonate into pulmonary cell lipids was studied. The perfusates from these studies were also subjected to differential extraction and thin layer chromatography (t.l.c.) to determine synthesis of both cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase products. In the presence of an edemagenic concentration of ozone, isolated lungs incorporated significantly less exogenous arachidonic acid into phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine, whereas incorporation into phosphatidyl inositol or serine was not affected. The edemagenic concentration of ozone also increased production of a variety of arachidonic acid metabolites via cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways. In separate studies, a similar ozone exposure did not affect 14CO2 production, resulting from the metabolism of 14C-antipyrine by mixed function oxidases (MFO). Similarly, an edemagenic concentration of ozone did not affect pulmonary angiotensin converting enzyme activity (ACE) as determined by the rate of formation of 14C-hippuric acid from 14C-hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (14C-HHL). Thus, acute ozone exposure is specifically associated with a reduced incorporation of arachidonate into phospholipids and with an increased conversion of arachidonate into bio-active metabolites.

  10. ROCK insufficiency attenuates ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, David I; Mathews, Joel A; Park, Chan Y; Cho, Youngji; Hunt, Gabrielle; Wurmbrand, Allison P; Liao, James K; Shore, Stephanie A

    2015-10-01

    Ozone causes airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and pulmonary inflammation. Rho kinase (ROCK) is a key regulator of smooth muscle cell contraction and inflammatory cell migration. To determine the contribution of the two ROCK isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2 to ozone-induced AHR, we exposed wild-type, ROCK1(+/-), and ROCK2(+/-) mice to air or ozone (2 ppm for 3 h) and evaluated mice 24 h later. ROCK1 or ROCK2 haploinsufficiency did not affect airway responsiveness in air-exposed mice but significantly reduced ozone-induced AHR, with a greater reduction in ROCK2(+/-) mice despite increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammatory cells in ROCK2(+/-) mice. Compared with wild-type mice, ozone-induced increases in BAL hyaluronan, a matrix protein implicated in ozone-induced AHR, were lower in ROCK1(+/-) but not ROCK2(+/-) mice. Ozone-induced increases in other inflammatory moieties reported to contribute to ozone-induced AHR (IL-17A, osteopontin, TNFα) were not different in wild-type vs. ROCK1(+/-) or ROCK2(+/-) mice. We also observed a dose-dependent reduction in ozone-induced AHR after treatment with the ROCK1/ROCK2 inhibitor fasudil, even though fasudil was administered after induction of inflammation. Ozone increased pulmonary expression of ROCK2 but not ROCK1 or RhoA. A ROCK2 inhibitor, SR3677, reduced contractile forces in primary human airway smooth muscle cells, confirming a role for ROCK2 in airway smooth muscle contraction. Our results demonstrate that ozone-induced AHR requires ROCK. Whereas ROCK1-dependent changes in hyaluronan may contribute to ROCK1's role in O3-induced AHR, the role of ROCK2 is downstream of inflammation, likely at the level of airway smooth muscle contraction.

  11. Regulation of ozone-induced lung inflammation and injury by the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-3.

    PubMed

    Sunil, Vasanthi R; Francis, Mary; Vayas, Kinal N; Cervelli, Jessica A; Choi, Hyejeong; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2015-04-15

    Macrophages play a dual role in ozone toxicity, contributing to both pro- and anti-inflammatory processes. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a lectin known to regulate macrophage activity. Herein, we analyzed the role of Gal-3 in the response of lung macrophages to ozone. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue were collected 24-72h after exposure (3h) of WT and Gal-3(-/-) mice to air or 0.8ppm ozone. In WT mice, ozone inhalation resulted in increased numbers of proinflammatory (Gal-3(+), iNOS(+)) and anti-inflammatory (MR-1(+)) macrophages in the lungs. While accumulation of iNOS(+) macrophages was attenuated in Gal-3(-/-) mice, increased numbers of enlarged MR-1(+) macrophages were noted. This correlated with increased numbers of macrophages in BAL. Flow cytometric analysis showed that these cells were CD11b(+) and consisted mainly (>97%) of mature (F4/80(+)CD11c(+)) proinflammatory (Ly6GLy6C(hi)) and anti-inflammatory (Ly6GLy6C(lo)) macrophages. Increases in both macrophage subpopulations were observed following ozone inhalation. Loss of Gal-3 resulted in a decrease in Ly6C(hi) macrophages, with no effect on Ly6C(lo) macrophages. CD11b(+)Ly6G(+)Ly6C(+) granulocytic (G) and monocytic (M) myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were also identified in the lung after ozone. In Gal-3(-/-) mice, the response of G-MDSC to ozone was attenuated, while the response of M-MDSC was heightened. Changes in inflammatory cell populations in the lung of ozone treated Gal-3(-/-) mice were correlated with reduced tissue injury as measured by cytochrome b5 expression. These data demonstrate that Gal-3 plays a role in promoting proinflammatory macrophage accumulation and toxicity in the lung following ozone exposure.

  12. Ozone-Induced Rice Grain Yield Loss Is Triggered via a Change in Panicle Morphology That Is Controlled by ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tsukahara, Keita; Sawada, Hiroko; Kohno, Yoshihisa; Matsuura, Takakazu; Mori, Izumi C.; Terao, Tomio; Ioki, Motohide; Tamaoki, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Rice grain yield is predicted to decrease in the future because of an increase in tropospheric ozone concentration. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the responses to ozone of two rice (Oryza Sativa L.) cultivars, Sasanishiki and Habataki. Sasanishiki showed ozone-induced leaf injury, but no grain yield loss. By contrast, Habataki showed grain yield loss with minimal leaf injury. A QTL associated with grain yield loss caused by ozone was identified in Sasanishiki/Habataki chromosome segment substitution lines and included the ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1 (APO1) gene. The Habataki allele of the APO1 locus in a near-isogenic line also resulted in grain yield loss upon ozone exposure, suggesting APO1 involvement in ozone-induced yield loss. Only a few differences in the APO1 amino acid sequences were detected between the cultivars, but the APO1 transcript level was oppositely regulated by ozone exposure: i.e., it increased in Sasanishiki and decreased in Habataki. Interestingly, the levels of some phytohormones (jasmonic acid, jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine, and abscisic acid) known to be involved in attenuation of ozone-induced leaf injury tended to decrease in Sasanishiki but to increase in Habataki upon ozone exposure. These data indicate that ozone-induced grain yield loss in Habataki is caused by a reduction in the APO1 transcript level through an increase in the levels of phytohormones that reduce leaf damage. PMID:25923431

  13. Ozone-Induced Rice Grain Yield Loss Is Triggered via a Change in Panicle Morphology That Is Controlled by ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Keita; Sawada, Hiroko; Kohno, Yoshihisa; Matsuura, Takakazu; Mori, Izumi C; Terao, Tomio; Ioki, Motohide; Tamaoki, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Rice grain yield is predicted to decrease in the future because of an increase in tropospheric ozone concentration. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the responses to ozone of two rice (Oryza Sativa L.) cultivars, Sasanishiki and Habataki. Sasanishiki showed ozone-induced leaf injury, but no grain yield loss. By contrast, Habataki showed grain yield loss with minimal leaf injury. A QTL associated with grain yield loss caused by ozone was identified in Sasanishiki/Habataki chromosome segment substitution lines and included the ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1 (APO1) gene. The Habataki allele of the APO1 locus in a near-isogenic line also resulted in grain yield loss upon ozone exposure, suggesting APO1 involvement in ozone-induced yield loss. Only a few differences in the APO1 amino acid sequences were detected between the cultivars, but the APO1 transcript level was oppositely regulated by ozone exposure: i.e., it increased in Sasanishiki and decreased in Habataki. Interestingly, the levels of some phytohormones (jasmonic acid, jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine, and abscisic acid) known to be involved in attenuation of ozone-induced leaf injury tended to decrease in Sasanishiki but to increase in Habataki upon ozone exposure. These data indicate that ozone-induced grain yield loss in Habataki is caused by a reduction in the APO1 transcript level through an increase in the levels of phytohormones that reduce leaf damage. PMID:25923431

  14. Ozone-Induced Hypertussive Responses in Rabbits and Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Clay, Emlyn; Patacchini, Riccardo; Trevisani, Marcello; Preti, Delia; Branà, Maria Pia; Spina, Domenico; Page, Clive

    2016-04-01

    Cough remains a major unmet clinical need, and preclinical animal models are not predictive for new antitussive agents. We have investigated the mechanisms and pharmacological sensitivity of ozone-induced hypertussive responses in rabbits and guinea pigs. Ozone induced a significant increase in cough frequency and a decrease in time to first cough to inhaled citric acid in both conscious guinea pigs and rabbits. This response was inhibited by the established antitussive drugs codeine and levodropropizine. In contrast to the guinea pig, hypertussive responses in the rabbit were not inhibited by bronchodilator drugs (β2 agonists or muscarinic receptor antagonists), suggesting that the observed hypertussive state was not secondary to bronchoconstriction in this species. The ozone-induced hypertussive response in the rabbit was inhibited by chronic pretreatment with capsaicin, suggestive of a sensitization of airway sensory nerve fibers. However, we could find no evidence for a role of TRPA1 in this response, suggesting that ozone was not sensitizing airway sensory nerves via activation of this receptor. Whereas the ozone-induced hypertussive response was accompanied by a significant influx of neutrophils into the airway, the hypertussive response was not inhibited by the anti-inflammatory phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor roflumilast at a dose that clearly exhibited anti-inflammatory activity. In summary, our results suggest that ozone-induced hypertussive responses to citric acid may provide a useful model for the investigation of novel drugs for the treatment of cough, but some important differences were noted between the two species with respect to sensitivity to bronchodilator drugs.

  15. Ozone-Induced Hypertussive Responses in Rabbits and Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Emlyn; Patacchini, Riccardo; Trevisani, Marcello; Preti, Delia; Branà, Maria Pia; Spina, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Cough remains a major unmet clinical need, and preclinical animal models are not predictive for new antitussive agents. We have investigated the mechanisms and pharmacological sensitivity of ozone-induced hypertussive responses in rabbits and guinea pigs. Ozone induced a significant increase in cough frequency and a decrease in time to first cough to inhaled citric acid in both conscious guinea pigs and rabbits. This response was inhibited by the established antitussive drugs codeine and levodropropizine. In contrast to the guinea pig, hypertussive responses in the rabbit were not inhibited by bronchodilator drugs (β2 agonists or muscarinic receptor antagonists), suggesting that the observed hypertussive state was not secondary to bronchoconstriction in this species. The ozone-induced hypertussive response in the rabbit was inhibited by chronic pretreatment with capsaicin, suggestive of a sensitization of airway sensory nerve fibers. However, we could find no evidence for a role of TRPA1 in this response, suggesting that ozone was not sensitizing airway sensory nerves via activation of this receptor. Whereas the ozone-induced hypertussive response was accompanied by a significant influx of neutrophils into the airway, the hypertussive response was not inhibited by the anti-inflammatory phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor roflumilast at a dose that clearly exhibited anti-inflammatory activity. In summary, our results suggest that ozone-induced hypertussive responses to citric acid may provide a useful model for the investigation of novel drugs for the treatment of cough, but some important differences were noted between the two species with respect to sensitivity to bronchodilator drugs. PMID:26837703

  16. Ozone-Induced Hypertussive Responses in Rabbits and Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Clay, Emlyn; Patacchini, Riccardo; Trevisani, Marcello; Preti, Delia; Branà, Maria Pia; Spina, Domenico; Page, Clive

    2016-04-01

    Cough remains a major unmet clinical need, and preclinical animal models are not predictive for new antitussive agents. We have investigated the mechanisms and pharmacological sensitivity of ozone-induced hypertussive responses in rabbits and guinea pigs. Ozone induced a significant increase in cough frequency and a decrease in time to first cough to inhaled citric acid in both conscious guinea pigs and rabbits. This response was inhibited by the established antitussive drugs codeine and levodropropizine. In contrast to the guinea pig, hypertussive responses in the rabbit were not inhibited by bronchodilator drugs (β2 agonists or muscarinic receptor antagonists), suggesting that the observed hypertussive state was not secondary to bronchoconstriction in this species. The ozone-induced hypertussive response in the rabbit was inhibited by chronic pretreatment with capsaicin, suggestive of a sensitization of airway sensory nerve fibers. However, we could find no evidence for a role of TRPA1 in this response, suggesting that ozone was not sensitizing airway sensory nerves via activation of this receptor. Whereas the ozone-induced hypertussive response was accompanied by a significant influx of neutrophils into the airway, the hypertussive response was not inhibited by the anti-inflammatory phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor roflumilast at a dose that clearly exhibited anti-inflammatory activity. In summary, our results suggest that ozone-induced hypertussive responses to citric acid may provide a useful model for the investigation of novel drugs for the treatment of cough, but some important differences were noted between the two species with respect to sensitivity to bronchodilator drugs. PMID:26837703

  17. Ozone-induced ethylene release from leaf surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rodecap, K.D.; Tingey, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    Ozone-induced stress-ethylene emissions from the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces of four plant species (Glycine max (L) Merr. cv. Dare, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill cv. Roma VF, Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and Hedera helix L.) were studied to determine if the stress ethylene diffused through the stomata or cuticle. In plants not exposed to ozone, basal ethylene was detected above both the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces of all the plant species examined, indicating that some ethylene can diffuse across the leaf cuticle. Oxone-induced stress ethylene production in all species examined. These data indicate that ozone-induced stress ethylene primarily diffuses from the leaf via the stomata.

  18. Classical and alternative macrophage activation in the lung following ozone-induced oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Shen, Jianliang; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-09-01

    Ozone is a pulmonary irritant known to cause oxidative stress, inflammation and tissue injury. Evidence suggests that macrophages play a role in the pathogenic response; however, their contribution depends on the mediators they encounter in the lung which dictate their function. In these studies we analyzed the effects of ozone-induced oxidative stress on the phenotype of alveolar macrophages (AM). Exposure of rats to ozone (2 ppm, 3 h) resulted in increased expression of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in AM. Whereas 8-OHdG was maximum at 24 h, expression of HO-1 was biphasic increasing after 3 h and 48–72 h. Cleaved caspase-9 and beclin-1, markers of apoptosis and autophagy, were also induced in AM 24 h post-ozone. This was associated with increased bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, demonstrating alveolar epithelial injury. Ozone intoxication resulted in biphasic activation of the transcription factor, NFκB. This correlated with expression of monocyte chemotactic protein‐1, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase‐2, markers of proinflammatory macrophages. Increases in arginase-1, Ym1 and galectin-3 positive anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages were also observed in the lung after ozone inhalation, beginning at 24 h (arginase-1, Ym1), and persisting for 72 h (galectin-3). This was associated with increased expression of pro-surfactant protein-C, a marker of Type II cell proliferation and activation, important steps in wound repair. These data suggest that both proinflammatory/cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages are activated early in the response to ozone-induced oxidative stress and tissue injury. -- Highlights: ► Lung macrophages are highly sensitive to ozone induced oxidative stress. ► Ozone induces autophagy and apoptosis in lung macrophages. ► Proinflammatory and wound repair macrophages are activated

  19. Ozone-induced IL-17A and neutrophilic airway inflammation is orchestrated by the caspase-1-IL-1 cascade

    PubMed Central

    Che, Luanqing; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Lai, Tianwen; Zhou, Hongbin; Xia, Lixia; Tian, Baoping; Zhao, Yun; Liu, Juan; Wu, Yinfang; Wu, Yanping; Du, Jie; Li, Wen; Ying, Songmin; Chen, Zhihua; Shen, Huahao

    2016-01-01

    Ozone is a common environmental air pollutant leading to respiratory illness. The mechanisms regulating ozone-induced airway inflammation remain poorly understood. We hypothesize that ozone-triggered inflammasome activation and interleukin (IL)-1 production regulate neutrophilic airway inflammation through IL-17A. Pulmonary neutrophilic inflammation was induced by extended (72 h) low-dose (0.7 ppm) exposure to ozone. IL-1 receptor 1 (Il1r1)−/−, Il17a−/− mice and the caspase-1 inhibitor acetyl-YVAD-chloromethylketone (Ac-YVAD-cmk) were used for in vivo studies. Cellular inflammation and protein levels in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF), cytokines, and IL-17A-producing γδT-cells, as well as mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) release, and inflammasome activation in lung macrophages were analyzed. Ozone-induced neutrophilic airway inflammation, accompanied an increased production of IL-1β, IL-18, IL-17A, Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), Interferon-γ inducible protein 10 (IP-10) and BALF protein in the lung. Ozone-induced IL-17A production was predominantly in γδT-cells, and Il17a-knockout mice exhibited reduced airway inflammation. Lung macrophages from ozone-exposed mice exhibited higher levels of mitochondrial ROS, enhanced cytosolic mtDNA, increased caspase-1 activation, and higher production of IL-1β. Il1r1-knockout mice or treatment with Ac-YVAD-cmk decreased the IL-17A production and subsequent airway inflammation. Taken together, we demonstrate that ozone-induced IL-17A and neutrophilic airway inflammation is orchestrated by the caspase-1-IL-1 cascade. PMID:26739627

  20. Virucidal levels of ozone induce hemolysis and hemoglobin degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, S.J.; Wagner, K.F.; Friedman, L.I.; Benade, L.F. )

    1991-10-01

    The animal virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and the bacterial virus, phi 6, were inactivated by greater than 4 log10 in response to incubation with 13 to 14 mL of 1.4 mmol per L (65 micrograms/mL) to 1.6 mmol per L (75 micrograms/mL) of overlaid ozone in virus-spiked, dilute, red cell suspensions. Virus inactivation was greatly inhibited when ozone was overlaid in the presence of high-hematocrit red cells or, to a lesser degree, high levels of plasma. At hematocrits at which 5 to 6 log10 of VSV were inactivated, ozone caused 30-percent hemolysis, as measured by the loss of total cellular hemoglobin. Unexpectedly, this level of hemolysis could not be observed in supernatants because of the ozone-induced destruction (bleaching) of extracellular hemoglobin. These results suggest that ozone may have little biological specificity for damaging viruses over red cells.

  1. Lung transcriptional profiling: insights into the mechanisms of ozone-induced pulmonary injury in Wistar Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Ward, William O; Ledbetter, Allen D; Schladweiler, Mette C; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2015-01-01

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized in rats; however, mechanistic understanding of the pathways involved is limited. We hypothesized that acute exposure of healthy rats to ozone will cause transcriptional alterations, and comprehensive analysis of these changes will allow us to better understand the mechanism of pulmonary injury and inflammation. Male Wistar Kyoto rats (10-12 week) were exposed to air, or ozone (0.25, 0.5 or 1.0 ppm) for 4 h and pulmonary injury and inflammation were assessed at 0-h or 20-h (n = 8/group). Lung gene expression profiling was assessed at 0-h (air and 1.0 ppm ozone, n = 3-4/group). At 20-h bronchoalveolar lavage, fluid protein and neutrophils increased at 1 ppm ozone. Numerous genes involved in acute inflammatory response were up-regulated along with changes in genes involved in cell adhesion and migration, steroid metabolism, apoptosis, cell cycle control and cell growth. A number of NRF2 target genes were also induced after ozone exposure. Based on expression changes, Rela, SP1 and TP3-mediated signaling were identified to be mediating downstream changes. Remarkable changes in the processes of endocytosis provide the insight that ozone-induced lung injury and inflammation are likely initiated by changes in cell membrane components and receptors likely from oxidatively modified lung lining lipids and proteins. In conclusion, ozone-induced injury and inflammation are preceded by changes in gene targets for cell adhesion/migration, apoptosis, cell cycle control and growth regulated by Rela, SP1 and TP53, likely mediated by the process of endocytosis and altered steroid receptor signaling.

  2. The Kidney and Acid-Base Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koeppen, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    Since the topic of the role of the kidneys in the regulation of acid base balance was last reviewed from a teaching perspective (Koeppen BM. Renal regulation of acid-base balance. Adv Physiol Educ 20: 132-141, 1998), our understanding of the specific membrane transporters involved in H+, HCO , and NH transport, and especially how these…

  3. Trans fatty acid intake and emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Holt, Megan E; Lee, Jerry W; Morton, Kelly R; Tonstad, Serena

    2015-06-01

    We examined whether there is a relationship between trans fatty acid intakes and emotion regulation, mediated by positive or negative affect. Archival data on 1699 men and 3293 women were used to measure trans fatty acid intake at baseline, positive, and negative affects and emotion regulation at follow-up. Higher trans fatty acid intake related to subsequent difficulties with emotional awareness (p = 0.045), clarity (p = 0.012), and regulation strategies (p = 0.009). Affect mediated these relationships. Lower trans fatty acid intake associated with increased positive and decreased negative affects which, in turn, associated with improved emotion regulation. Trans fatty acid intakes may be associated with subsequent ability to regulate emotions.

  4. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN OZONE-INDUCED LUNG INJURY, ANTIOXIDANT COMPENSATION AND UNDERLYING CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE (CVD).

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased levels of oxidants and compromised compensatory response are associated with CVD susceptibility. We hypothesized that rat strains demonstrating genetic CVD will have lower levels of antioxidants and greater ozone-induced pulmonary injury relative to healthy strains. Mal...

  5. Role of neutrophilic inflammation in ozone-induced epithelial alterations in the nasal airways of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hye Youn

    Ozone is a principal oxidant air pollutant in photochemical smog. Epithelial cells lining the centriacinar region of lung and the proximal aspects of nasal passage are primary target sites for ozone-induced injury in laboratory animals. Acute exposure of rats to high ambient concentrations of ozone (e.g., 0.5 ppm) results in neutrophilic inflammation, epithelial hyperplasia and mucous cell metaplasia (MCM) in the nasal transitional epithelium (NTE) lining the proximal nasal airways. The principal purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of pre-metaplastic cellular responses, especially neutrophilic inflammation, in the pathogenesis of ozone-induced MCM in rat NTE. For this purpose, three specific hypotheses-based whole-animal inhalation studies were conducted. Male F344/N rats were exposed in whole-body inhalation chambers to 0 (filtered air) or 0.5 ppm ozone for 1-3 days (8 h/day). Histochemical, immunochemical, molecular and morphometric techniques were used to investigate the ozone-induced cellular and molecular events in the NTE. Two in vitro studies were also conducted to examine the effects of ozone-inducible cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-alpha; TNF- a, and interleukin-6; IL-6) on mucin gene (rMuc-5AC) expression. Ozone induced a rapid increase of rMuc-5AC mRNA in nasal tissues within hours after the start of exposure. It preceded the appearance of MCM, and persisted with MCM. Ozone-induced neutrophilic inflammation accompanied the mucin gene upregulation, but was resolved when MCM first appeared in the NTE. Antibody-mediated depletion of circulating neutrophils attenuated ozone-induced MCM, although it did not affect the ozone-induced epithelial hyperplasia and mucin mRNA upregulation. In another study, it was found that preexisting neutrophilic rhinitis induced by endotoxin augmented the ozone-induced MCM. However, pre-existing rhinitis did not alter the severity of ozone-induced epithelial hyperplasia and mucin gene upregulation

  6. Bile acids as metabolic regulators

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y. L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Small molecule ligands that target to TGR5 and FXR have shown promise in treating various metabolic and inflammation-related human diseases. New insights into the mechanisms underlying the bariatric surgery and bile acid sequestrant treatment suggest that targeting the enterohepatic circulation to modulate gut-liver bile acid signaling, incretin production and microbiota represents a new strategy to treat obesity and type-2 diabetes. PMID:25584736

  7. Executive Summary: variation in susceptibility to ozone-induced health effects in rodent models of cardiometabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Dye, Janice A; Costa, Daniel L; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2015-01-01

    Seven million premature deaths occur annually due to air pollution worldwide, of which ∼80% are attributed to exacerbation of cardiovascular disease (CVD), necessitating greater attention to understanding the causes of susceptibility to air pollution in this sector of population. We used rat models of CVD with or without obesity and compared them to healthy strains to examine the risk factors of ozone-induced lung injury and inflammation. We examined functional, biochemical and molecular changes in several organs to evaluate how physiological factors as well as compensatory antioxidant reserves modulate processes by which ozone injury is influenced by underlying disease. In this study, we highlight key findings of this series of reports. We show that underlying cardiopulmonary insufficiency in genetically predisposed rats appears to increase the effective ozone dose; thus dosimetry is one factor contributing to exacerbated ozone effects. We further show that antioxidant reserve in airway lining fluid modulates ozone-induced damage such that strains with the least antioxidant reserve incur the greatest injury. And finally, we show that the inflammatory response to ozone is governed by a cluster of genes involved in regulating cytokine release, trafficking of inflammatory cells and processes related to cellular apoptosis and growth. All such processes are influenced not only by ozone dosimetry and the lung antioxidant milieu but also by the strain-specific genetic factors. In using a comprehensive systems biology research approach, our data reveal key risk factors for--and strategies to reduce risk of--air pollution mortality among those with CVD.

  8. Ozone-induced modulation of airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Richard B; Cohen, Mitchell; Gordon, Terry; Nadziejko, Christine; Zelikoff, Judith T; Sisco, Maureen; Regal, Jean F; Ménache, Margaret G

    2002-06-01

    Although acute exposure to ozone (03*) has been shown to influence the severity and prevalence of airway hyperresponsiveness, information has been lacking on effects due to long-term exposure at relatively low exposure concentrations. The goals of this study were to determine whether long-term repeated ozone exposures could induce nonspecific hyperresponsiveness in normal, nonatopic (nonsensitized) animals, whether such exposure could exacerbate the preexisting hyperresponsive state in atopic (sensitized) animals, or both. The study was also designed to determine whether gender modulated airway responsiveness related to ozone exposure. Airway responsiveness was measured during and after exposure to 0.1 and 0.3 ppm ozone for 4 hours/day, 4 days/week for 24 weeks in normal, nonsensitized guinea pigs, in guinea pigs sensitized to an allergen (ovalbumin) prior to initiation of ozone exposures, and in animals sensitized concurrently with ozone exposures. Both male and female animals were studied. Ozone exposure did not produce airway hyperresponsiveness in nonsensitized animals. Ozone exposure did exacerbate airway hyperresponsiveness to specific and nonspecific bronchoprovocation in both groups of sensitized animals, and this effect persisted at least 4 weeks after the end of the exposures. Although the overall degree of airway responsiveness did differ between genders (males had more responsive airways than did females), the airway response to ozone exposure did not differ between the two groups. Ozone-induced effects upon airway responsiveness were not associated with the number of pulmonary eosinophils or with any chronic pulmonary inflammatory response. Levels of antigen-specific antibodies increased in sensitized animals, and a significant correlation was observed between airway responsiveness and antibody levels. The results of this study provide support for a role of ambient ozone exposure in exacerbation of airway dysfunction in persons with atopy.

  9. Fatty Acid Desaturases, Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Regulation, and Biotechnological Advances

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Je Min; Lee, Hyungjae; Kang, SeokBeom; Park, Woo Jung

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are considered to be critical nutrients to regulate human health and development, and numerous fatty acid desaturases play key roles in synthesizing PUFAs. Given the lack of delta-12 and -15 desaturases and the low levels of conversion to PUFAs, humans must consume some omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in their diet. Many studies on fatty acid desaturases as well as PUFAs have shown that fatty acid desaturase genes are closely related to different human physiological conditions. Since the first front-end desaturases from cyanobacteria were cloned, numerous desaturase genes have been identified and animals and plants have been genetically engineered to produce PUFAs such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. Recently, a biotechnological approach has been used to develop clinical treatments for human physiological conditions, including cancers and neurogenetic disorders. Thus, understanding the functions and regulation of PUFAs associated with human health and development by using biotechnology may facilitate the engineering of more advanced PUFA production and provide new insights into the complexity of fatty acid metabolism. PMID:26742061

  10. Inflammasome, IL-1 and inflammation in ozone-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Michaudel, Chloé; Couturier-Maillard, Aurélie; Chenuet, Pauline; Maillet, Isabelle; Mura, Catherine; Couillin, Isabelle; Gombault, Aurélie; Quesniaux, Valérie F; Huaux, François; Ryffel, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ambient ozone causes airway hyperreactivity and lung inflammation, which represent an important health concern in humans. Recent clinical and experimental studies contributed to the understanding of the mechanisms of epithelial injury, inflammation and airway hyperreactivity, which is reviewed here. The present data suggest that ozone induced oxidative stress causes inflammasome activation with the release of IL-1, other cytokines and proteases driving lung inflammation leading to the destruction of alveolar epithelia with emphysema and respiratory failure. Insights in the pathogenic pathway may allow to identify novel biomarkers of ozone-induced lung disease and therapeutic targets. PMID:27168953

  11. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness changes carbon and water balance of temperate deciduous forests.

    PubMed

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Katata, Genki; Deushi, Makoto; Watanabe, Makoto; Koike, Takayoshi; Paoletti, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations have increased by 60-100% in the Northern Hemisphere since the 19(th) century. The phytotoxic nature of ozone can impair forest productivity. In addition, ozone affects stomatal functions, by both favoring stomatal closure and impairing stomatal control. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness, i.e., a delay in stomatal responses to fluctuating stimuli, has the potential to change the carbon and water balance of forests. This effect has to be included in models for ozone risk assessment. Here we examine the effects of ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness on carbon assimilation and transpiration of temperate deciduous forests in the Northern Hemisphere in 2006-2009 by combining a detailed multi-layer land surface model and a global atmospheric chemistry model. An analysis of results by ozone FACE (Free-Air Controlled Exposure) experiments suggested that ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness can be incorporated into modelling based on a simple parameter (gmin, minimum stomatal conductance) which is used in the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal model. Our simulation showed that ozone can decrease water use efficiency, i.e., the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to transpiration, of temperate deciduous forests up to 20% when ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness is considered, and up to only 5% when the stomatal sluggishness is neglected. PMID:25943276

  12. Bioinforrnatics of Gene Expression Profiling Data Provide Mechanistic Understanding of Acute Ozone-Induced Lung injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized. A few studies have used gene expression profiling to determine the types of changes induced by ozone; however the mechanisms or the pathways involved are less well understood. We presumed that robust bi...

  13. OZONE-INDUCED RESPIRATORY SYMPTOMS: EXPOSURE-RESPONSE MODELS AND ASSOCIATION WITH LUNG FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone-induced respiratory symptoms are known to be functions of concentration, minute ventilation, and duration of exposure. The purposes of this study were to identify an exposure-response model for symptoms, to determine whether response was related to age, and to assess the re...

  14. A DYNAMIC NONLINEAR MODEL OF OZONE-INDUCED FEV1 RESPONSE UNDER CHANGING EXPOSURE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Dynamic Nonlinear Model of Ozone-induced FEV1 Response under Changing Exposure Conditions. 1WF McDonnell, 2PW Stewart, 3MV Smith. 1Human Studies Division, NHEERL, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC. 2University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. 3ASI, Durham, NC.

    Ozone exposure result...

  15. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces peripheral metabolic alterations in animals and humans. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for ozone-induced systemic metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wis...

  16. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats#

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces metabolic alterations in animals and humans. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for both ozone-induced metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats ...

  17. Stratospheric Ozone-induced Indirect Radiative Effects on Antarctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Xia, Y.; LIU, J.; Huang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that the Antarctic Ozone Hole has important influences on Antarctic sea ice. While all these have focused on stratospheric ozone-induced dynamic effects on sea ice, here we show results that ozone-induced indirect radiative effects have important influences on Antarctic sea ice. Our simulations demonstrate that the recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole causes equatorward shift of clouds over the Southern Ocean. The cloud-band shift leads to reduction of downward infrared radiation, which causes surface cooling. On the other hand, it also causes increasing solar radiation on the surface. However, the increase in solar radiation is offset by surface reflection due to increasing sea ice. As a result solar radiation absorbed by the surface is reduced, which also causes surface cooling. Therefore, the overall ozone-induced cloud radiative effect is to cool the surface and causes expansion of sea ice around the Antarctic. As shown in previous studies, the cloud-band shift is associated with the equatorward shift of the westerly jet stream around the Antarctic. Our simulations also demonstrate increasing snow rate near the sea ice edge, which also contributes to Antarctic sea-ice expansion. The ozone-induced cloud radiative effect would mitigate Antarctic sea-ice melting due to greenhouse warming in the 21st century.

  18. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness changes carbon and water balance of temperate deciduous forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Katata, Genki; Deushi, Makoto; Watanabe, Makoto; Koike, Takayoshi; Paoletti, Elena

    2015-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations have increased by 60-100% in the Northern Hemisphere since the 19th century. The phytotoxic nature of ozone can impair forest productivity. In addition, ozone affects stomatal functions, by both favoring stomatal closure and impairing stomatal control. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness, i.e., a delay in stomatal responses to fluctuating stimuli, has the potential to change the carbon and water balance of forests. This effect has to be included in models for ozone risk assessment. Here we examine the effects of ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness on carbon assimilation and transpiration of temperate deciduous forests in the Northern Hemisphere in 2006-2009 by combining a detailed multi-layer land surface model and a global atmospheric chemistry model. An analysis of results by ozone FACE (Free-Air Controlled Exposure) experiments suggested that ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness can be incorporated into modelling based on a simple parameter (gmin, minimum stomatal conductance) which is used in the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal model. Our simulation showed that ozone can decrease water use efficiency, i.e., the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to transpiration, of temperate deciduous forests up to 20% when ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness is considered, and up to only 5% when the stomatal sluggishness is neglected.

  19. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness changes carbon and water balance of temperate deciduous forests.

    PubMed

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Katata, Genki; Deushi, Makoto; Watanabe, Makoto; Koike, Takayoshi; Paoletti, Elena

    2015-05-06

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations have increased by 60-100% in the Northern Hemisphere since the 19(th) century. The phytotoxic nature of ozone can impair forest productivity. In addition, ozone affects stomatal functions, by both favoring stomatal closure and impairing stomatal control. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness, i.e., a delay in stomatal responses to fluctuating stimuli, has the potential to change the carbon and water balance of forests. This effect has to be included in models for ozone risk assessment. Here we examine the effects of ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness on carbon assimilation and transpiration of temperate deciduous forests in the Northern Hemisphere in 2006-2009 by combining a detailed multi-layer land surface model and a global atmospheric chemistry model. An analysis of results by ozone FACE (Free-Air Controlled Exposure) experiments suggested that ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness can be incorporated into modelling based on a simple parameter (gmin, minimum stomatal conductance) which is used in the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal model. Our simulation showed that ozone can decrease water use efficiency, i.e., the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to transpiration, of temperate deciduous forests up to 20% when ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness is considered, and up to only 5% when the stomatal sluggishness is neglected.

  20. Valve-regulated lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, D. A. J.; Holden, L. S.; May, G. J.; Newnham, R. H.; Peters, K.

    Given the growing importance of valve-regulated lead/acid technology in many existing and emerging market areas, an expert panel was assembled at the Sixth Asian Battery Conference to answer questions from delegates on various technical and operational aspects of such batteries. Key issues included: advantantages; performance and reliability; thermal runaway; and failure modes. The interaction between the audience and the panel was both vigorous and informative. Overwhelmingly, it was agreed that valve-regulated technology has come of age and offers a dynamic solution to many of the world's energy-storage requirements and opportunities.

  1. Lung transcriptional profiling: insights into the mechanisms of ozone-induced pulmonary injury in Wistar Kyoto rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized in rats; however, mechanistic understanding of the pathways involved is limited. We hypothesized that acute exposure of healthy rats to ozone will cause transcriptional alterations, and comprehensive ana...

  2. Ozone-induced changes in natural organic matter (NOM) structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westerhoff, P.; Debroux, J.; Aiken, G.; Amy, G.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrophobic organic acids (combined humic and fulvic acids), obtained from an Antarctic Lake with predominantly microbially derived organic carbon sources and two US fiver systems with terrestrial organic carbon sources, were ozonated. Several analyses, including 13C-NMR, UV absorbance, fluorescence, hydrophobic/transphilic classification, and potentiometric titrations, were performed before and after ozonation. Ozonation reduced aromatic carbon content, selectively reducing phenolic carbon content. Ozonation of the samples resulted in increased aliphatic, carboxyl, plus acetal and ketal anomeric carbon content and shifted towards less hydrophobic compounds.Hydrophobic organic acids (combined humic and fulvic acids), obtained from an Antarctic Lake with predominantly microbially derived organic carbon sources and two US river systems with terrestrial organic carbon sources, were ozonated. Several analyses, including 13C-NMR, UV absorbance, fluorescence, hydrophobic/transphilic classification, and potentiometric titrations, were performed before and after ozonation. Ozonation reduced aromatic carbon content, selectively reducing phenolic carbon content. Ozonation of the samples resulted in increased aliphatic, carboxyl, plus acetal and ketal anomeric carbon content and shifted towards less hydrophobic compounds.

  3. Gender differences in ozone-induced pulmonary and metabolic health effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    SOT 2015 abstractGender differences in ozone-induced pulmonary and metabolic health effectsU.P. Kodavanti1, V.L. Bass2, M.C. Schladweiler1, C.J. Gordon3, K.A. Jarema3, P. Phillips3, A.D. Ledbetter1, D.B. Miller4, S. Snow5, J.E. Richards1. 1 EPHD, NHEERL, USEPA, Research Triangle ...

  4. Involvement of superoxide in ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in anesthetized cats

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, T.; Miura, M.; Katsumata, U.; Ichinose, M.; Kimura, K.; Inoue, H.; Takishima, T.; Shirato, K. )

    1993-07-01

    To determine whether oxygen radical scavengers inhibit ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, we examined the protective effect of polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD) and PEG-catalase (PEG-CAT) on ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in cat airways. Twenty-five cats divided into five groups were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. There was no difference between the groups in baseline airway responsiveness to inhaled acetylcholine (ACh). In the control group, AChPC, the concentration required to produce a doubling increase in baseline pulmonary resistance, was significantly reduced by ozone exposure (2.0 ppm for 2 h); the ratios of AChPC before ozone exposure to after ozone exposure (AChPC ratio) were 14.8 +/- 5.7 (p < 0.001) and 4.80 +/- 1.6 (p < 0.01) 30 and 120 min after exposure, respectively. Local administration of PEG-SOD (2,000 U/kg) into airways partially but significantly prevented ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. The AChPC ratios were 6.2 +/- 1.4 and 1.5 +/- 0.2 30 and 120 min after exposure, respectively, which were significantly different from those of the control group (p < 0.05), whereas PEG-CAT pretreatment (6,000 U/kg) was without effect. Combined pretreatment with PEG-SOD and PEG-CAT had no additional protective effect compared with PEG-SOD alone. PEG-SOD had no direct effect on airway responsiveness to ACh. These results suggest that superoxide may be involved in ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness.

  5. Indomethacin does not inhibit the ozone-induced increase in bronchial responsiveness in human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, R.L.; Gross, K.B.; Terzo, T.S.; Eschenbacher, W.L. )

    1990-10-01

    Exposure of human subjects to sufficiently high levels of ozone can result in reversible changes in lung function (restrictive in nature) and increases in nonspecific airway responsiveness. Several studies have implicated products of cyclooxygenase metabolism in the mediation of these changes. The purpose of this study was to determine if indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor) would alter the changes in the ozone-induced increase in responsiveness to methacholine or the ozone-induced decrease in lung function. Thirteen male subjects underwent three randomly assigned 2-h exposure to 0.4 ppm ozone with alternating 15-min periods of rest and exercise on a cycle ergometer (30 L/min/m2, body surface area). For the 4 days before each of the exposures, the subjects received either indomethacin (150 mg/day) or placebo, or no modification. Of the 13 subjects, only seven had both detectable indomethacin serum levels on the indomethacin Study Day and a significant increase in bronchial responsiveness to methacholine on the No Medication Day. For this group of seven subjects, we found that indomethacin did not alter the ozone-induced increase in bronchial responsiveness to methacholine (decrease in PC100SRaw for the different study days: no medication, -78.4 +/- 5.3% (mean +/- SEM); placebo, -48.9 +/- 12.2%; indomethacin, -64.5 +/- 6.3%; p greater than 0.2), although indomethacin did attenuate the ozone-induced decrease in lung function. The decrease in the FEV1 for the different study days was as follows: no medication, -20.7 +/- 5.0% (mean +/- SEM); placebo, -19.2 +/- 6.3%; indomethacin, -4.8 +/- 3.7% (p less than 0.001).

  6. Valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, D.

    Valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries with gelled electrolyte appeared as a niche market during the 1950s. During the 1970s, when glass-fiber felts became available as a further method to immobilize the electrolyte, the market for VRLA batteries expanded rapidly. The immobilized electrolyte offers a number of obvious advantages including the internal oxygen cycle which accommodates the overcharging current without chemical change within the cell. It also suppresses acid stratification and thus opens new fields of application. VRLA batteries, however, cannot be made completely sealed, but require a valve for gas escape, since hydrogen evolution and grid corrosion are unavoidable secondary reactions. These reactions result in water loss, and also must be balanced in order to ensure proper charging of both electrodes. Both secondary reactions have significant activation energies, and can reduce the service life of VRLA batteries, operated at elevated temperature. This effect can be aggravated by the comparatively high heat generation caused by the internal oxygen cycle during overcharging. Temperature control of VRLA batteries, therefore, is important in many applications.

  7. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness develops progressively in Siebold's beech (Fagus crenata).

    PubMed

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Watanabe, Makoto; Inada, Naoki; Koike, Takayoshi

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the effects of ozone and leaf senescence on steady-state stomatal conductance and stomatal response to light variation. Measurements were carried out in a free-air ozone exposure experiment on a representative deciduous broadleaved tree species in Japan (Fagus crenata). Both steady-state and dynamic stomatal response to light variation varied intrinsically with season due to leaf senescence. Ozone induced the decrease in steady-state leaf gas exchange and the sluggish stomatal closure progressively. These findings suggest that ozone reduces the ability of plants to adapt to a fluctuating light environment under natural conditions, and therefore impairs plant growth and ability to control water loss.

  8. Effects of N-Acetylcysteine in Ozone-Induced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Seiffert, Joanna M.; Zhu, Jie; Clarke, Colin; Chang, Yan; Bhavsar, Pank; Adcock, Ian; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhou, Xin; Chung, Kian Fan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Chronic exposure to high levels of ozone induces emphysema and chronic inflammation in mice. We determined the recovery from ozone-induced injury and whether an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), could prevent or reverse the lung damage. Methods Mice were exposed to ozone (2.5 ppm, 3 hours/12 exposures, over 6 weeks) and studied 24 hours (24h) or 6 weeks (6W) later. Nac (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was administered either before each exposure (preventive) or after completion of exposure (therapeutic) for 6 weeks. Results After ozone exposure, there was an increase in functional residual capacity, total lung volume, and lung compliance, and a reduction in the ratio of forced expiratory volume at 25 and 50 milliseconds to forced vital capacity (FEV25/FVC, FEV50/FVC). Mean linear intercept (Lm) and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to acetylcholine increased, and remained unchanged at 6W after cessation of exposure. Preventive NAC reduced the number of BAL macrophages and airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. Therapeutic NAC reversed AHR, and reduced ASM mass and apoptotic cells. Conclusion Emphysema and lung function changes were irreversible up to 6W after cessation of ozone exposure, and were not reversed by NAC. The beneficial effects of therapeutic NAC may be restricted to the ASM. PMID:24260479

  9. Ozone-Induced Dissociation of Conjugated Lipids Reveals Significant Reaction Rate Enhancements and Characteristic Odd-Electron Product Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Huong T.; Maccarone, Alan T.; Campbell, J. Larry; Mitchell, Todd W.; Blanksby, Stephen J.

    2013-02-01

    Ozone-induced dissociation (OzID) is an alternative ion activation method that relies on the gas phase ion-molecule reaction between a mass-selected target ion and ozone in an ion trap mass spectrometer. Herein, we evaluated the performance of OzID for both the structural elucidation and selective detection of conjugated carbon-carbon double bond motifs within lipids. The relative reactivity trends for [M + X]+ ions (where X = Li, Na, K) formed via electrospray ionization (ESI) of conjugated versus nonconjugated fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) were examined using two different OzID-enabled linear ion-trap mass spectrometers. Compared with nonconjugated analogues, FAMEs derived from conjugated linoleic acids were found to react up to 200 times faster and to yield characteristic radical cations. The significantly enhanced reactivity of conjugated isomers means that OzID product ions can be observed without invoking a reaction delay in the experimental sequence (i.e., trapping of ions in the presence of ozone is not required). This possibility has been exploited to undertake neutral-loss scans on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer targeting characteristic OzID transitions. Such analyses reveal the presence of conjugated double bonds in lipids extracted from selected foodstuffs. Finally, by benchmarking of the absolute ozone concentration inside the ion trap, second order rate constants for the gas phase reactions between unsaturated organic ions and ozone were obtained. These results demonstrate a significant influence of the adducting metal on reaction rate constants in the fashion Li > Na > K.

  10. Ozone-induced dissociation of conjugated lipids reveals significant reaction rate enhancements and characteristic odd-electron product ions.

    PubMed

    Pham, Huong T; Maccarone, Alan T; Campbell, J Larry; Mitchell, Todd W; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2013-02-01

    Ozone-induced dissociation (OzID) is an alternative ion activation method that relies on the gas phase ion-molecule reaction between a mass-selected target ion and ozone in an ion trap mass spectrometer. Herein, we evaluated the performance of OzID for both the structural elucidation and selective detection of conjugated carbon-carbon double bond motifs within lipids. The relative reactivity trends for [M + X](+) ions (where X = Li, Na, K) formed via electrospray ionization (ESI) of conjugated versus nonconjugated fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) were examined using two different OzID-enabled linear ion-trap mass spectrometers. Compared with nonconjugated analogues, FAMEs derived from conjugated linoleic acids were found to react up to 200 times faster and to yield characteristic radical cations. The significantly enhanced reactivity of conjugated isomers means that OzID product ions can be observed without invoking a reaction delay in the experimental sequence (i.e., trapping of ions in the presence of ozone is not required). This possibility has been exploited to undertake neutral-loss scans on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer targeting characteristic OzID transitions. Such analyses reveal the presence of conjugated double bonds in lipids extracted from selected foodstuffs. Finally, by benchmarking of the absolute ozone concentration inside the ion trap, second order rate constants for the gas phase reactions between unsaturated organic ions and ozone were obtained. These results demonstrate a significant influence of the adducting metal on reaction rate constants in the fashion Li > Na > K.

  11. Acidic/IQ Motif Regulator of Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Putkey, John A.; Waxham, M. Neal; Gaertner, Tara R.; Brewer, Kari J.; Goldsmith, Michael; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Kleerekoper, Quinn K.

    2013-01-01

    The small IQ motif proteins PEP-19 (62 amino acids) and RC3 (78 amino acids) greatly accelerate the rates of Ca2+ binding to sites III and IV in the C-domain of calmodulin (CaM). We show here that PEP-19 decreases the degree of cooperativity of Ca2+ binding to sites III and IV, and we present a model showing that this could increase Ca2+ binding rate constants. Comparative sequence analysis showed that residues 28 to 58 from PEP-19 are conserved in other proteins. This region includes the IQ motif (amino acids 39–62), and an adjacent acidic cluster of amino acids (amino acids 28–40). A synthetic peptide spanning residues 28–62 faithfully mimics intact PEP-19 with respect to increasing the rates of Ca2+ association and dissociation, as well as binding preferentially to the C-domain of CaM. In contrast, a peptide encoding only the core IQ motif does not modulate Ca2+ binding, and binds to multiple sites on CaM. A peptide that includes only the acidic region does not bind to CaM. These results show that PEP-19 has a novel acidic/IQ CaM regulatory motif in which the IQ sequence provides a targeting function that allows binding of PEP-19 to CaM, whereas the acidic residues modify the nature of this interaction, and are essential for modulating Ca2+ binding to the C-domain of CaM. PMID:17991744

  12. Intercontinental trans-boundary contributions to ozone-induced crop yield losses in the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollaway, M. J.; Arnold, S. R.; Challinor, A. J.; Emberson, L. D.

    2011-08-01

    burning emissions may make important contributions to ozone-induced crop yield reductions. Our results demonstrate that local air quality and emission control strategies have the potential to partly alleviate ozone-induced crop yield loss in continents downstream, in addition to effectively mitigating local ozone-induced yield losses.

  13. Regulation of intestinal protein metabolism by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Julien; Goichon, Alexis; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2013-09-01

    Gut homeostasis plays a major role in health and may be regulated by quantitative and qualitative food intake. In the intestinal mucosa, an intense renewal of proteins occurs, at approximately 50% per day in humans. In some pathophysiological conditions, protein turnover is altered and may contribute to intestinal or systemic diseases. Amino acids are key effectors of gut protein turnover, both as constituents of proteins and as regulatory molecules limiting intestinal injury and maintaining intestinal functions. Many studies have focused on two amino acids: glutamine, known as the preferential substrate of rapidly dividing cells, and arginine, another conditionally essential amino acid. The effects of glutamine and arginine on protein synthesis appear to be model and condition dependent, as are the involved signaling pathways. The regulation of gut protein degradation by amino acids has been minimally documented until now. This review will examine recent data, helping to better understand how amino acids regulate intestinal protein metabolism, and will explore perspectives for future studies.

  14. Ozone-induced changes in the pulmonary clearance of (99m)Tc-DTPA in man

    SciTech Connect

    Kehrl, H.R.; Vincent, L.M.; Kowalsky, R.J.; Horstman, D.H.; O'Neil, J.J.

    1988-05-01

    Ozone is a respiratory irritant that has been shown in animals to increase the premeability of the respiratory epithelium. In the study the authors have recently reported that respiratory epithelial permeability was similarly affected in eight healthy non-smoking young men exposed to ozone (ARRD, 135 (1987) 1124-8). Permeability was evaluated by determining the pulmonary clearance of inhaled aerosolized 99mTc-DTPA with sequential posterior lung imaging by a computer-assisted gamma camera. In a randomized crossover design, 16 young men were exposed for 2 h to purified air and 0.4 ppm ozone while performing intermittent high intensity treadmill exercise; forced vital capacity (FVC) was measured before and at the end of exposures. The results demonstrate that ozone exposure increased respiratory epithelial permeability. Such an increase may be a manifestation of direct ozone-induced epithelial-cell injury, lung inflammation, or both.

  15. Evidence of widespread ozone-induced visible injury on plants in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhaozhong; Sun, Jingsong; Wan, Wuxing; Hu, Enzhu; Calatayud, Vicent

    2014-10-01

    Despite the high ozone levels measured in China, and in Beijing in particular, reports of ozone-induced visible injury in vegetation are very scarce. Visible injury was investigated on July and August 2013 in the main parks, forest and agricultural areas of Beijing. Ozone injury was widespread in the area, being observed in 28 different species. Symptoms were more frequent in rural areas and mountains from northern Beijing, downwind from the city, and less frequent in city gardens. Among crops, injury to different types of beans (genera Phaseolus, Canavalia and Vigna) was common, and it was also observed in watermelon, grape vine, and in gourds. Native species such as ailanthus, several pines and ash species were also symptomatic. The black locust, the rose of Sharon and the Japanese morning glory were among the injured ornamental plants. Target species for broader bio-monitoring surveys in temperate China have been identified.

  16. Intercontinental trans-boundary contributions to ozone-induced crop yield losses in the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollaway, M. J.; Arnold, S. R.; Challinor, A. J.; Emberson, L. D.

    2012-01-01

    Using a global atmospheric chemistry model, we have quantified for the first time, intercontinental transboundary contributions to crop ozone exposure and subsequent yield reductions in the Northern Hemisphere. We apply four metrics (AOT40, M7, M12, W126) to assess the impacts of 100% reductions in anthropogenic NOx emissions from North (N) America, South East (SE) Asia and Europe on global and regional exposure of 6 major agricultural crop types to surface ozone, and resultant crop production losses during the year 2000 growing season. Using these metrics, model calculations show that for wheat, rice, cotton and potato, 100 % reductions in SE Asian anthropogenic NOx emissions tend to produce the greatest global reduction in crop production losses (42.3-95.2%), and a 100 % reduction to N~American anthropogenic NOx emissions results in the greatest global impact on crop production losses for maize and soybean (59.2-85.9%). A 100% reduction in N~American anthropogenic NOx emissions produces the largest transboundary impact, resulting in European production loss reductions of between 14.2% and 63.2%. European NOx emissions tend to produce a smaller transboundary impact, due to inefficiency of transport from the European domain. The threshold nature of the AOT40 ozone-exposure metric results in strong dependence of non-local emissions impacts on the local ozone concentration distribution. Our calculations of absolute crop production change under emission reduction scenarios differ between the metrics used, however we find the relative importance of each region's transboundary impact remains robust between metrics. Our results demonstrate that local air quality and emission control strategies have the potential to partly alleviate ozone-induced crop yield loss in continents downstream, in addition to effectively mitigating local ozone-induced production losses.

  17. Inhibitory effect of hydrogen sulfide on ozone-induced airway inflammation, oxidative stress, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengyu; Li, Feng; Wiegman, Coen H; Zhang, Min; Hong, Yan; Gong, Jicheng; Chang, Yan; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Adcock, Ian; Chung, Kian Fan; Zhou, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ozone has been associated with airway inflammation, oxidative stress, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. The goal of this study was to examine whether these adverse effects of ozone could be prevented or reversed by hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as a reducing agent. The H2S donor sodium (NaHS) (2 mg/kg) or vehicle (PBS) was intraperitoneally injected into mice 1 hour before and after 3-hour ozone (2.5 ppm) or air exposure, and the mice were studied 24 hours later. Preventive and therapeutic treatment with NaHS reduced the ozone-induced increases in the total cells, including neutrophils and macrophages; this treatment also reduced levels of cytokines, including TNF-α, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1, IL-6, and IL-1β levels in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid; inhibited bronchial hyperresponsiveness; and attenuated ozone-induced increases in total malondialdehyde in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and decreases in the ratio of reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione in the lung. Ozone exposure led to decreases in the H2S production rate and in mRNA and protein levels of cystathionine-β-synthetase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in the lung. These effects were prevented and reversed by NaHS treatment. Furthermore, NaHS prevented and reversed the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and heat shock protein 27. H2S may have preventive and therapeutic value in the treatment of airway diseases that have an oxidative stress basis.

  18. Ozone-Induced Nasal Type 2 Immunity in Mice Is Dependent on Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Lewandowski, Ryan; Jackson-Humbles, Daven N; Li, Ning; Van Dyken, Steven J; Wagner, James G; Harkema, Jack R

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that elevated ambient concentrations of ozone are associated with activation of eosinophils in the nasal airways of atopic and nonatopic children. Mice repeatedly exposed to ozone develop eosinophilic rhinitis and type 2 immune responses. In this study, we determined the role of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in the pathogenesis of ozone-induced eosinophilic rhinitis by using lymphoid-sufficient C57BL/6 mice, Rag2(-/-) mice that are devoid of T cells and B cells, and Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice that are depleted of all lymphoid cells including ILCs. The animals were exposed to 0 or 0.8 ppm ozone for 9 consecutive weekdays (4 h/d). Mice were killed 24 hours after exposure, and nasal tissues were selected for histopathology and gene expression analysis. ILC-sufficient C57BL/6 and Rag2(-/-) mice exposed to ozone developed marked eosinophilic rhinitis and epithelial remodeling (e.g., epithelial hyperplasia and mucous cell metaplasia). Chitinase-like proteins and alarmins (IL-33, IL-25, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin) were also increased morphometrically in the nasal epithelium of ozone-exposed C57BL/6 and Rag2(-/-) mice. Ozone exposure elicited increased expression of Il4, Il5, Il13, St2, eotaxin, MCP-2, Gob5, Arg1, Fizz1, and Ym2 mRNA in C57BL/6 and Rag2(-/-) mice. In contrast, ozone-exposed ILC-deficient Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice had no nasal lesions or overexpression of Th2- or ILC2-related transcripts. These results indicate that ozone-induced eosinophilic rhinitis, nasal epithelial remodeling, and type 2 immune activation are dependent on ILCs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that ILCs play an important role in the nasal pathology induced by repeated ozone exposure.

  19. Ca(2+)/calmodulin regulates salicylic-acid-mediated plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Du, Liqun; Ali, Gul S; Simons, Kayla A; Hou, Jingguo; Yang, Tianbao; Reddy, A S N; Poovaiah, B W

    2009-02-26

    Intracellular calcium transients during plant-pathogen interactions are necessary early events leading to local and systemic acquired resistance. Salicylic acid, a critical messenger, is also required for both of these responses, but whether and how salicylic acid level is regulated by Ca(2+) signalling during plant-pathogen interaction is unclear. Here we report a mechanism connecting Ca(2+) signal to salicylic-acid-mediated immune response through calmodulin, AtSR1 (also known as CAMTA3), a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-binding transcription factor, and EDS1, an established regulator of salicylic acid level. Constitutive disease resistance and elevated levels of salicylic acid in loss-of-function alleles of Arabidopsis AtSR1 suggest that AtSR1 is a negative regulator of plant immunity. This was confirmed by epistasis analysis with mutants of compromised salicylic acid accumulation and disease resistance. We show that AtSR1 interacts with the promoter of EDS1 and represses its expression. Furthermore, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-binding to AtSR1 is required for suppression of plant defence, indicating a direct role for Ca(2+)/calmodulin in regulating the function of AtSR1. These results reveal a previously unknown regulatory mechanism linking Ca(2+) signalling to salicylic acid level.

  20. Regulation of amino acid metabolic enzymes and transporters in plants.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Réjane; Pilot, Guillaume

    2014-10-01

    Amino acids play several critical roles in plants, from providing the building blocks of proteins to being essential metabolites interacting with many branches of metabolism. They are also important molecules that shuttle organic nitrogen through the plant. Because of this central role in nitrogen metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, degradation, and transport are tightly regulated to meet demand in response to nitrogen and carbon availability. While much is known about the feedback regulation of the branched biosynthesis pathways by the amino acids themselves, the regulation mechanisms at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and protein levels remain to be identified. This review focuses mainly on the current state of our understanding of the regulation of the enzymes and transporters at the transcript level. Current results describing the effect of transcription factors and protein modifications lead to a fragmental picture that hints at multiple, complex levels of regulation that control and coordinate transport and enzyme activities. It also appears that amino acid metabolism, amino acid transport, and stress signal integration can influence each other in a so-far unpredictable fashion.

  1. Regulation of collagen synthesis by ascorbic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Murad, S; Grove, D; Lindberg, K A; Reynolds, G; Sivarajah, A; Pinnell, S R

    1981-01-01

    After prolonged exposure to ascorbate, collagen synthesis in cultured human skin fibroblasts increased approximately 8-fold with no significant change in synthesis of noncollagen protein. This effect of ascorbate appears to be unrelated to its cofactor function in collagen hydroxylation. The collagenous protein secreted in the absence of added ascorbate was normal in hydroxylysine but was mildly deficient in hydroxyproline. In parallel experiments, lysine hydroxylase (peptidyllysine, 2-oxoglutarate:oxygen 5-oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.11.4) activity increased 3-fold in response to ascorbate administration whereas proline hydroxylase (prolyl-glycyl-peptide, 2-oxoglutarate:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.11.2) activity decreased considerably. These results suggest that collage polypeptide synthesis, posttranslational hydroxylations, and activities of the two hydroxylases are independently regulated by ascorbate. PMID:6265920

  2. Acid and neutral sphingomyelinases: roles and mechanisms of regulation.

    PubMed

    Marchesini, Norma; Hannun, Yusuf A

    2004-02-01

    Ceramide, an emerging bioactive lipid and second messenger, is mainly generated by hydrolysis of sphingomyelin through the action of sphingomyelinases. At least two sphingomyelinases, neutral and acid sphingomyelinases, are activated in response to many extracellular stimuli. Despite extensive studies, the precise cellular function of each of these sphingomyelinases in sphingomyelin turnover and in the regulation of ceramide-mediated responses is not well understood. Therefore, it is essential to elucidate the factors and mechanisms that control the activation of acid and neutral sphingomyelinases to understand their the roles in cell regulation. This review will focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate these enzymes in vivo and in vitro, especially the roles of oxidants (glutathione, peroxide, nitric oxide), proteins (saposin, caveolin 1, caspases), and lipids (diacylglycerol, arachidonic acid, and ceramide).

  3. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, V.; Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C.; Cascio, W.E.; Phillips, P.M.; Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C.; Andrews, D.; Miller, D.; Doerfler, D.L.; Kodavanti, U.P.

    2013-12-15

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased α{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone

  4. ACUTE OZONE-INDUCED INFLAMMATORY GENE EXPRESSION IN THE RAT LUNG IS NOT RELATED TO LEVELS OF ANTIOXIDANTS IN THE LAVAGE FLUID

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Ozone causes oxidative stress and lung inflammation. We hypothesized that rat strains with or without genetic susceptibility to cardiovascular disease will have different antioxidant levels in alveolar lining, and that ozone induced inflammatory gene expression wil...

  5. Carbonic anhydrase and acid-base regulation in fish.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, K M; Perry, S F

    2009-06-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is the zinc metalloenzyme that catalyses the reversible reactions of CO(2) with water. CA plays a crucial role in systemic acid-base regulation in fish by providing acid-base equivalents for exchange with the environment. Unlike air-breathing vertebrates, which frequently utilize alterations of breathing (respiratory compensation) to regulate acid-base status, acid-base balance in fish relies almost entirely upon the direct exchange of acid-base equivalents with the environment (metabolic compensation). The gill is the critical site of metabolic compensation, with the kidney playing a supporting role. At the gill, cytosolic CA catalyses the hydration of CO(2) to H(+) and HCO(3)(-) for export to the water. In the kidney, cytosolic and membrane-bound CA isoforms have been implicated in HCO(3)(-) reabsorption and urine acidification. In this review, the CA isoforms that have been identified to date in fish will be discussed together with their tissue localizations and roles in systemic acid-base regulation.

  6. Impact of diet on ozone-induced pulmonary and systemic effects in female Brown Norway (BN) rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impact of diet on ozone-induced pulmonary and systemic effects in female Brown Norway (BN) ratsV.L. Bass1, M.C. Schladweiler2, S. Snow5, C.J. Gordon4, K.A. Jarema4, P. Phillips4, A.D. Ledbetter2, D.B. Miller3, J.E. Richards2, U.P. Kodavanti2. 1. SPH, UNC, Chapel Hill2. EPHD, NHE...

  7. Stabilized epoxygenated fatty acids regulate inflammation, pain, angiogenesis and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guodong; Kodani, Sean; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Epoxygenated fatty acids (EpFAs), which are lipid mediators produced by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases from polyunsaturated fatty acids, are important signaling molecules known to regulate various biological processes including inflammation, pain and angiogenesis. The EpFAs are further metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to form fatty acid diols which are usually less-active. Pharmacological inhibitors of sEH that stabilize endogenous EpFAs are being considered for human clinical uses. Here we review the biology of ω-3 and ω-6 EpFAs on inflammation, pain, angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. PMID:24345640

  8. The effect of platelet activating factor antagonist on ozone-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, W.C.; Bethel, R.A. )

    1992-10-01

    We investigated the role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in ozone-induced airway responses by examining the effects of L659,989, a potent PAF antagonist, on bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation. Twenty-four male guinea pigs were studied in four equal groups. Total lung resistance (RL) in intubated and spontaneously breathing animals was measured in a constant-volume body plethysmograph. Dose-response curves to methacholine were determined in all animals at the start of the experiment. These were repeated on a separate day after the following types of treatments: air exposure in Group 1, intraperitoneally administered alcohol and air exposure in Group 2; intraperitoneally administered alcohol and ozone exposure in Group 3, and intraperitoneally administered L659,989 (a specific PAF antagonist), 5 mg/kg dissolved in alcohol, and ozone exposure in Group 4. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed after the second methacholine challenge, and the bronchial mucosa was also examined for inflammatory cells. Exposure to 3 ppm ozone for 2 h resulted in a three-doubling concentration increase in bronchial responsiveness, which was not significantly inhibited by prior treatment with L659,989. Ozone induced a 1.8-fold increase in BAL total cell count, increased eosinophilic influx into the airways, and increased eosinophilic infiltration in the bronchial mucosa, which were all not inhibited by L659,989 pretreatment. The results suggest that PAF may not have an essential role in ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and nonallergic airway inflammation.

  9. Effects of buthionine sulfoximine on the development of ozone-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.D.; Pickrell, J.A.; Harkema, J.R.; McLaughlin, S.I.; Hahn, F.F.; Henderson, R.F.

    1988-10-01

    The capacity of reduced glutathione (GSH) to protect lung tissue against ozone-induced pulmonary fibrosis was investigated. Male B6C3F1 mice were exposed to 0, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 ppm ozone for 23 hr/day for 14 days. During exposures and/or for a period of 90 days after exposures, subgroups of mice at each exposure level were given drinking water containing 30 mM L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO) to lower in vivo levels of GSH. These BSO treatments reduced blood glutamylcysteine synthetase (GCS) activity (regulatory enzyme for GSH biosynthesis) and lung nonprotein sulfhydryl (NPSH) levels in nonexposed animals by approximately half. In contrast, ozone exposures increased blood GCS activity and lung NPSH levels in a concentration-dependent manner, with smaller increases in the BSO-treated mice. Immediately after exposures, an ozone-related inflammatory response was seen in lungs, but no histopathological signs of developing fibrosis were evident. Ninety days later, mice exposed to 1 ppm ozone and not treated with BSO had modest evidence of pulmonary fibrosis. Mice exposed to 1 ppm ozone and treated with BSO during this post-exposure period (regardless of BSO treatment during exposures) showed histopathological evidence of exacerbated pulmonary fibrosis, compared to similarly exposed mice not treated with BSO postexposure. These results indicated that interference with the body's normal defense mechanisms against oxidant damage, including suppression of GSH biosynthesis, exacerbates the subsequent development of pulmonary fibrosis.

  10. Dose-response relationship of ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in unanesthetized guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, M.; Suzuki, S.; Ikeda, H.; Fukuda, T.; Suzuki, J.; Okubo, T. )

    1990-06-01

    The effect of ozone dose (the product of ozone concentration and exposure time) on airway responsiveness was examined in unanesthetized, spontaneously breathing guinea pigs. Airway responsiveness was assessed by measuring specific airway resistance (sRaw) as a function of increasing concentration of inhaled methacholine (Mch) aerosol (the concentration of Mch required in order to double the baseline sRaw: PC200Mch). The airway responsiveness was measured before and at 5 min, 5 h, and 24 h after exposure. A 30-min exposure to 1 ppm ozone (dose 30 ppm.min) did not change PC200Mch at any time after exposure. Both a 90-min exposure to 1 ppm ozone and a 30-min exposure to 3 ppm ozone, which are identical in terms of ozone dose (90 ppm.min), decreased PC200Mch to a similar degree. A 120-min exposure to 3 ppm ozone (360 ppm.min) produced a much greater decrease of PC200Mch at 5 min and 5 h after exposure, compared with low-dose exposure. There was a significant correlation between ozone dose and the change in airway responsiveness. In all groups, the baseline sRaw was increased by approximately 50% at 5 min after exposure, but there was no correlation between the changes in PC200Mch and the baseline sRaw. This study suggests that ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs is closely related to ozone dose.

  11. Dietary antioxidants and ozone-induced bronchial hyperresponsiveness in adults with asthma.

    PubMed

    Trenga, C A; Koenig, J Q; Williams, P V

    2001-01-01

    Ozone exposure aggravates asthma, as has been demonstrated in both controlled exposures and epidemiologic studies. In the current double-blind crossover study, the authors evaluated the effects of dietary antioxidants (i.e., 400 IU vitamin E/500 mg vitamin C) on ozone-induced bronchial hyperresponsiveness in adult subjects with asthma. Seventeen subjects were exposed to 0.12 ppm of ozone or to air for 45 min during intermittent moderate exercise. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness was assessed with 10-min sulfur dioxide (i.e., 0.10 ppm and 0.25 ppm) inhalation challenges. Subjects who were given dietary antioxidants responded less severely to sulfur dioxide challenge than subjects given a placebo (i.e., forced expiratory volume in the 1st sec: -1.2% vs. 4.4%, respectively; peak flow: +2.2% vs. -3.0%, respectively; and mid-forced expiratory flow: +2.0% vs. -4.3%, respectively). Effects were more pronounced when subjects were grouped by response to sulfur dioxide at the screening visit. The results suggest that dietary supplementation with vitamins E and C benefits asthmatic adults who are exposed to air pollutants. PMID:11480500

  12. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid regulation of gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S D; Jump, D B

    1994-01-01

    We have known for nearly 30 years that dietary polyenoic (n-6) and (n-3) fatty acids potentially inhibit hepatic fatty acid biosynthesis. The teleological explanation for this unique action of PUFAs resides in their ability to suppress the synthesis of (n-9) fatty acids. By inhibiting fatty acid biosynthesis, dietary PUFAs reduce the availability of substrate for delta 9 desaturase (7, 22, 34, 36) and in turn reduce the availability of (n-9) fatty acids for incorporation into plasma membranes. In this way, essential biological processes dependent on essential fatty acids (e.g. reproduction and trans-dermal water loss) continue to operate normally. Therefore, if essential fatty acid intake did not regulate (n-9) fatty acid synthesis, the survival of the organism would be threatened. During the past 20 years, we have gradually elucidated the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which dietary PUFAs modulate fatty acid biosynthesis and (n-9) fatty acid availability. Central to this mechanism has been our ability to determine that dietary PUFAs regulate the transcription of genes coding for lipogenic enzymes (12, 40). The potential mechanisms by which PUFAs govern gene transcription are numerous, and it is unlikely that any one mechanism can fully elucidate the nuclear actions of PUFA. The difficulty in providing a unifying hypothesis at this time stems from: (a) the many metabolic routes taken by PUFAs upon entering the hepatocyte (Figure 1); and (b) the lack of identity of a specific PUFA-regulated trans-acting factor. However, the studies described above indicate that macronutrients, like PUFA, are not only utilized as fuel and structural components of cells, but also serve as important mediators of gene expression (12, 14, 40). As regulators of gene expression, PUFAs (or metabolites) are thought to affect the activity of transcription factors, which in turn target key cis-linked elements associated with specific genes. Whether this targeting involves DNA

  13. Ozone-induced bronchial hyperreactivity in guinea pigs is abolished by BW 755C or FPL 55712 but not by indomethacin

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.K.; Murlas, C.

    1985-11-01

    The authors investigated the effects of BW 755C, an inhibitor of both the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism; FPL 55712, a selective antagonist of slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis; and indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, on bronchial reactivity after ozone exposure. Guinea pigs in groups of 5 were treated with BW 755C, FPL 55712, or indomethacin and studied before and 30 min after a 15-min exposure to 3.0 ppm ozone. These animals were compared with a similarly exposed group that was untreated. Reactivity was determined by measuring specific airway resistance (SRaw) upon intravenous acetylcholine infusion in unanesthetized, spontaneously breathing animals. Prior to ozone exposure, they found that drug treatment did not affect either SRaw or muscarinic reactivity. After exposure to 3.0 ppm, all untreated guinea pigs showed substantial muscarinic hyperreactivity. Indomethacin treatment did not inhibit this effect. Furthermore, in the indomethacin-treated animals, marked elevations in SRaw after ozone occurred. In contrast, no change in SRaw or muscarinic reactivity occurred after ozone in any animal treated with either BW 755C or FPL 55712. The authors conclude that ozone-induced bronchial hyperreactivity in the guinea pig rapidly develops after a brief, high-level exposure. This effect may be mediated in part by lipoxygenase products derived from lung arachidonic acid metabolism post-ozone period.

  14. Differential regulation of placental amino acid transport by saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Lager, Susanne; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2014-10-15

    Fatty acids are critical for normal fetal development but may also influence placental function. We have previously reported that oleic acid (OA) stimulates amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts (PHTs). In other tissues, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids have distinct effects on cellular signaling, for instance, palmitic acid (PA) but not OA reduces IκBα expression. We hypothesized that saturated and unsaturated fatty acids differentially affect trophoblast amino acid transport and cellular signaling. To test this hypothesis, PHTs were cultured in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 50 μM), OA (100 μM), or PA (100 μM). DHA and OA were also combined to test whether DHA could counteract the OA stimulatory effect on amino acid transport. The effects of fatty acids were compared against a vehicle control. Amino acid transport was measured by isotope-labeled tracers. Activation of inflammatory-related signaling pathways and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway were determined by Western blot analysis. Exposure of PHTs to DHA for 24 h reduced amino acid transport and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, STAT3, mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1, and ribosomal protein (rp)S6. In contrast, OA increased amino acid transport and phosphorylation of ERK, mTOR, S6 kinase 1, and rpS6. The combination of DHA with OA increased amino acid transport and rpS6 phosphorylation. PA did not affect amino acid transport but reduced IκBα expression. In conclusion, these fatty acids differentially regulated placental amino acid transport and cellular signaling. Taken together, these findings suggest that dietary fatty acids could alter the intrauterine environment by modifying placental function, thereby having long-lasting effects on the developing fetus.

  15. A model study of the regulation of gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Van Duijn, B; Ypey, D L; de Goede, J; Verveen, A A; Hekkens, W

    1989-07-01

    A computer simulation model is presented of the gastric phase regulation of gastric acid secretion in humans. The model is based on experimental data from the literature and includes terms representing gastric pH and gastric volume-dependent gastrin secretion, gastrin-dependent acid secretion, food storage in the stomach, and gastric emptying. We have explored the predictive value of the model in assessing the relative importance of gastric pH-dependent and gastric volume-dependent acid secretion mechanisms under various conditions. Similarly we have studied the role of gastric acid deregulation in achlorhydria, the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and duodenal ulcer, and the influence of the antacid drugs cimetidine and ranitidine under duodenal ulcer conditions. Model analysis of normal gastric acid regulation suggests that gastric volume-controlled acid secretion is of major importance during eating and predicts that pH-dependent gastrin secretion is of major importance in preventing excessively low pH levels between meals and during the night.

  16. Cholestenoic acids regulate motor neuron survival via liver X receptors

    PubMed Central

    Theofilopoulos, Spyridon; Griffiths, William J.; Crick, Peter J.; Yang, Shanzheng; Meljon, Anna; Ogundare, Michael; Kitambi, Satish Srinivas; Lockhart, Andrew; Tuschl, Karin; Clayton, Peter T.; Morris, Andrew A.; Martinez, Adelaida; Reddy, M. Ashwin; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Bassi, Maria T.; Honda, Akira; Mizuochi, Tatsuki; Kimura, Akihiko; Nittono, Hiroshi; De Michele, Giuseppe; Carbone, Rosa; Criscuolo, Chiara; Yau, Joyce L.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Schüle, Rebecca; Schöls, Ludger; Sailer, Andreas W.; Kuhle, Jens; Fraidakis, Matthew J.; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Steffensen, Knut R.; Björkhem, Ingemar; Ernfors, Patrik; Sjövall, Jan; Arenas, Ernest; Wang, Yuqin

    2014-01-01

    Cholestenoic acids are formed as intermediates in metabolism of cholesterol to bile acids, and the biosynthetic enzymes that generate cholestenoic acids are expressed in the mammalian CNS. Here, we evaluated the cholestenoic acid profile of mammalian cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and determined that specific cholestenoic acids activate the liver X receptors (LXRs), enhance islet-1 expression in zebrafish, and increase the number of oculomotor neurons in the developing mouse in vitro and in vivo. While 3β,7α-dihydroxycholest-5-en-26-oic acid (3β,7α-diHCA) promoted motor neuron survival in an LXR-dependent manner, 3β-hydroxy-7-oxocholest-5-en-26-oic acid (3βH,7O-CA) promoted maturation of precursors into islet-1+ cells. Unlike 3β,7α-diHCA and 3βH,7O-CA, 3β-hydroxycholest-5-en-26-oic acid (3β-HCA) caused motor neuron cell loss in mice. Mutations in CYP7B1 or CYP27A1, which encode enzymes involved in cholestenoic acid metabolism, result in different neurological diseases, hereditary spastic paresis type 5 (SPG5) and cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX), respectively. SPG5 is characterized by spastic paresis, and similar symptoms may occur in CTX. Analysis of CSF and plasma from patients with SPG5 revealed an excess of the toxic LXR ligand, 3β-HCA, while patients with CTX and SPG5 exhibited low levels of the survival-promoting LXR ligand 3β,7α-diHCA. Moreover, 3β,7α-diHCA prevented the loss of motor neurons induced by 3β-HCA in the developing mouse midbrain in vivo.Our results indicate that specific cholestenoic acids selectively work on motor neurons, via LXR, to regulate the balance between survival and death. PMID:25271621

  17. Regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, K; Jackowski, S; Rock, C O; Cronan, J E

    1993-01-01

    Our understanding of fatty acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli has increased greatly in recent years. Since the discovery that the intermediates of fatty acid biosynthesis are bound to the heat-stable protein cofactor termed acyl carrier protein, the fatty acid synthesis pathway of E. coli has been studied in some detail. Interestingly, many advances in the field have aided in the discovery of analogous systems in other organisms. In fact, E. coli has provided a paradigm of predictive value for the synthesis of fatty acids in bacteria and plants and the synthesis of bacterial polyketide antibiotics. In this review, we concentrate on four major areas of research. First, the reactions in fatty acid biosynthesis and the proteins catalyzing these reactions are discussed in detail. The genes encoding many of these proteins have been cloned, and characterization of these genes has led to a better understanding of the pathway. Second, the function and role of the two essential cofactors in fatty acid synthesis, coenzyme A and acyl carrier protein, are addressed. Finally, the steps governing the spectrum of products produced in synthesis and alternative destinations, other than membrane phospholipids, for fatty acids in E. coli are described. Throughout the review, the contribution of each portion of the pathway to the global regulation of synthesis is examined. In no other organism is the bulk of knowledge regarding fatty acid metabolism so great; however, questions still remain to be answered. Pursuing such questions should reveal additional regulatory mechanisms of fatty acid synthesis and, hopefully, the role of fatty acid synthesis and other cellular processes in the global control of cellular growth. PMID:8246839

  18. Acute ozone-induced lung injury in rats: Structural-functional relationships of developing alveolar edema

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.F.; Hammond, M.D.; Montgomery, M.R.; Sharp, J.T.; Farrier, S.E.; Balis, J.U. )

    1992-11-01

    As part of a study on the effects of acute ozone stress on the lung surfactant system, we correlated morphometric, biochemical, and functional indices of lung injury using male rats exposed to 3 ppm ozone for 1, 2, 4, and 8 hr. Evaluation of lung mechanics, using the Pulmonary Evaluation and Diagnostic Laboratory System, revealed a significant decrease in dynamic lung compliance (ml/cmH[sub 2]O/kg) from a control value of 0.84 [plus minus] 0.02 (SEM) to 0.72 [plus minus] 0.04 and 0.57 [plus minus] 0.06 at 4 and 8 hr, respectively. At 2 hr there was a transient increase in PaO[sub 2] to 116 torr (control = 92 torr) followed by a decrease at 4 hr (65 torr) and 8 hr (55 torr). Morphometry of lung tissue, fixed by perfusion of fixative via the pulmonary artery at 12 cm H[sub 2]O airway distending pressure, demonstrated an increase in the area of the intravascular compartment at 8 hr, in association with a 65 and 39% replacement of the alveolar area by fluid in ventral and dorsal lung regions, respectively. There was a positive correlation (r = 0.966) between alveolar edema and transudated proteins in lavage fluid. A stepwise multiple regression model, with edema as the dependent variable, suggested that pulmonary vasodilatation, hypoxemia, and depletion of surfactant tubular myelin in lavage fluid were indices for predicting alveolar edema. In a second model, with lavage protein concentration as the dependent variable, decreasing dynamic compliance and hypoxemia were predictors of progressive, intraalveolar transudation of plasma proteins. The above structural-functional relationships support the concept that ozone-induced high-protein alveolar edema is pathogenetically linked to pulmonary hyperemia, deficiency of surfactant tubular myelin, and associated lung dysfunctions.

  19. Regulation of intestinal mucosal growth by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Amino acids, especially glutamine (GLN) have been known for many years to stimulate the growth of small intestinal mucosa. Polyamines are also required for optimal mucosal growth, and the inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis, blocks growth. Certain amino acids, primarily asparagine (ASN) and GLN stimulate ODC activity in a solution of physiological salts. More importantly, their presence is also required before growth factors and hormones such as epidermal growth factor and insulin are able to increase ODC activity. ODC activity is inhibited by antizyme-1 (AZ) whose synthesis is stimulated by polyamines, thus, providing a negative feedback regulation of the enzyme. In the absence of amino acids mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is inhibited, whereas, mTORC2 is stimulated leading to the inhibition of global protein synthesis but increasing the synthesis of AZ via a cap-independent mechanism. These data, therefore, explain why ASN or GLN is essential for the activation of ODC. Interestingly, in a number of papers, AZ has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation, stimulate apoptosis, or increase autophagy. Each of these activities results in decreased cellular growth. AZ binds to and accelerates the degradation of ODC and other proteins shown to regulate proliferation and cell death, such as Aurora-A, Cyclin D1, and Smad1. The correlation between the stimulation of ODC activity and the absence of AZ as influenced by amino acids is high. Not only do amino acids such as ASN and GLN stimulate ODC while inhibiting AZ synthesis, but also amino acids such as lysine, valine, and ornithine, which inhibit ODC activity, increase the synthesis of AZ. The question remaining to be answered is whether AZ inhibits growth directly or whether it acts by decreasing the availability of polyamines to the dividing cells. In either case, evidence strongly suggests that the regulation of AZ synthesis is the

  20. Regulation of intestinal mucosal growth by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Amino acids, especially glutamine (GLN) have been known for many years to stimulate the growth of small intestinal mucosa. Polyamines are also required for optimal mucosal growth, and the inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis, blocks growth. Certain amino acids, primarily asparagine (ASN) and GLN stimulate ODC activity in a solution of physiological salts. More importantly, their presence is also required before growth factors and hormones such as epidermal growth factor and insulin are able to increase ODC activity. ODC activity is inhibited by antizyme-1 (AZ) whose synthesis is stimulated by polyamines, thus, providing a negative feedback regulation of the enzyme. In the absence of amino acids mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is inhibited, whereas, mTORC2 is stimulated leading to the inhibition of global protein synthesis but increasing the synthesis of AZ via a cap-independent mechanism. These data, therefore, explain why ASN or GLN is essential for the activation of ODC. Interestingly, in a number of papers, AZ has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation, stimulate apoptosis, or increase autophagy. Each of these activities results in decreased cellular growth. AZ binds to and accelerates the degradation of ODC and other proteins shown to regulate proliferation and cell death, such as Aurora-A, Cyclin D1, and Smad1. The correlation between the stimulation of ODC activity and the absence of AZ as influenced by amino acids is high. Not only do amino acids such as ASN and GLN stimulate ODC while inhibiting AZ synthesis, but also amino acids such as lysine, valine, and ornithine, which inhibit ODC activity, increase the synthesis of AZ. The question remaining to be answered is whether AZ inhibits growth directly or whether it acts by decreasing the availability of polyamines to the dividing cells. In either case, evidence strongly suggests that the regulation of AZ synthesis is the

  1. Variability in ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation in healthy and cardiovascular-compromised rat models.

    PubMed

    Kodavanti, Urmila P; Ledbetter, Allen D; Thomas, Ronald F; Richards, Judy E; Ward, William O; Schladweiler, Mette C; Costa, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    The molecular bases for variability in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury due to underlying cardiovascular (CVD) and/or metabolic diseases are unknown. We hypothesized that healthy and genetic CVD-prone rat models will exhibit exacerbated response to acute ozone exposure dependent on the type and severity of disease. Healthy male 12-14-week-old Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Wistar (WS) and Sprague Dawley (SD); and CVD-compromised spontaneously hypertensive (SH), Fawn-Hooded hypertensive (FHH), stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive (SHSP), obese spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) and obese JCR (JCR) rats were exposed to 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, or 1.0 ppm ozone for 4 h; pulmonary injury and inflammation were analyzed immediately following (0-h) or 20-h later. Baseline bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein was higher in CVD strains except for FHH when compared to healthy. Ozone-induced increases in protein and inflammation were concentration-dependent within each strain but the degree of response varied from strain to strain and with time. Among healthy rats, SD were least affected. Among CVD strains, lean rats were more susceptible to protein leakage from ozone than obese rats. Ozone caused least neutrophilic inflammation in SH and SHHF while SHSP and FHH were most affected. BALF neutrophils and protein were poorly correlated when considering the entire dataset (r = 0.55). The baseline and ozone-induced increases in cytokine mRNA varied markedly between strains and did not correlate with inflammation. These data illustrate that the degree of ozone-induced lung injury/inflammation response is likely influenced by both genetic and physiological factors that govern the nature of cardiovascular compromise in CVD models.

  2. Effect of Obesity on Acute Ozone-Induced Changes in Airway Function, Reactivity, and Inflammation in Adult Females

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, William D.; Ivins, Sally; Alexis, Neil E.; Wu, Jihong; Bromberg, Philip A.; Brar, Sukhdev S.; Travlos, Gregory; London, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    We previously observed greater ozone-induced lung function decrements in obese than non-obese women. Animal models suggest that obesity enhances ozone-induced airway reactivity and inflammation. In a controlled exposure study, we compared the acute effect of randomized 0.4ppm ozone and air exposures (2 h with intermittent light exercise) in obese (N = 20) (30ozone-induced increases in sputum neutrophils. Plasma IL-6 was increased by exercise (4 hr post air exposure vs. pre) only in the obese but returned to pre-air exposure levels at 20hr post-exposure. Plasma IL-6 was significantly increased at 4hr post ozone exposure in both groups and returned to pre-exposure levels by 20h post-exposure. These results confirm our previous findings of greater post-ozone spirometric decrements in obese young women. However, acute ozone-induced airway reactivity to methacholine and airway inflammation did not differ by obesity at the exposure and exercise levels used. PMID:27513854

  3. Effect of Obesity on Acute Ozone-Induced Changes in Airway Function, Reactivity, and Inflammation in Adult Females.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William D; Ivins, Sally; Alexis, Neil E; Wu, Jihong; Bromberg, Philip A; Brar, Sukhdev S; Travlos, Gregory; London, Stephanie J

    2016-01-01

    We previously observed greater ozone-induced lung function decrements in obese than non-obese women. Animal models suggest that obesity enhances ozone-induced airway reactivity and inflammation. In a controlled exposure study, we compared the acute effect of randomized 0.4ppm ozone and air exposures (2 h with intermittent light exercise) in obese (N = 20) (30ozone-induced increases in sputum neutrophils. Plasma IL-6 was increased by exercise (4 hr post air exposure vs. pre) only in the obese but returned to pre-air exposure levels at 20hr post-exposure. Plasma IL-6 was significantly increased at 4hr post ozone exposure in both groups and returned to pre-exposure levels by 20h post-exposure. These results confirm our previous findings of greater post-ozone spirometric decrements in obese young women. However, acute ozone-induced airway reactivity to methacholine and airway inflammation did not differ by obesity at the exposure and exercise levels used. PMID:27513854

  4. Cyclic phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid induce hyaluronic acid synthesis via CREB transcription factor regulation in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Maeda-Sano, Katsura; Gotoh, Mari; Morohoshi, Toshiro; Someya, Takao; Murofushi, Hiromu; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko

    2014-09-01

    Cyclic phosphatidic acid (cPA) is a naturally occurring phospholipid mediator and an analog of the growth factor-like phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). cPA has a unique cyclic phosphate ring at the sn-2 and sn-3 positions of its glycerol backbone. We showed before that a metabolically stabilized cPA derivative, 2-carba-cPA, relieved osteoarthritis pathogenesis in vivo and induced hyaluronic acid synthesis in human osteoarthritis synoviocytes in vitro. This study focused on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts, which retain moisture and maintain health in the dermis. We investigated the effects of cPA and LPA on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts (NB1RGB cells). Using particle exclusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, we found that both cPA and LPA dose-dependently induced hyaluronic acid synthesis. We revealed that the expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 messenger RNA and protein is up-regulated by cPA and LPA treatment time dependently. We then characterized the signaling pathways up-regulating hyaluronic acid synthesis mediated by cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. Pharmacological inhibition and reporter gene assays revealed that the activation of the LPA receptor LPAR1, Gi/o protein, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) but not nuclear factor κB induced hyaluronic acid synthesis by the treatment with cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. These results demonstrate for the first time that cPA and LPA induce hyaluronic acid synthesis in human skin fibroblasts mainly through the activation of LPAR1-Gi/o followed by the PI3K, ERK, and CREB signaling pathway.

  5. The bile acid sensor FXR regulates insulin transcription and secretion.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Mencarelli, Andrea; Vavassori, Piero; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2010-03-01

    Farnesoid X Receptor plays an important role in maintaining bile acid, cholesterol homeostasis and glucose metabolism. Here we investigated whether FXR is expressed by pancreatic beta-cells and regulates insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cell line and human islets. We found that FXR activation induces positive regulatory effects on glucose-induced insulin transcription and secretion by genomic and non-genomic activities. Genomic effects of FXR activation relay on the induction of the glucose regulated transcription factor KLF11. Indeed, results from silencing experiments of KLF11 demonstrate that this transcription factor is essential for FXR activity on glucose-induced insulin gene transcription. In addition FXR regulates insulin secretion by non-genomic effects. Thus, activation of FXR in betaTC6 cells increases Akt phosphorylation and translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT2 at plasma membrane, increasing the glucose uptake by these cells. In vivo experiments on Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mice demonstrated that FXR activation delays development of signs of diabetes, hyperglycemia and glycosuria, by enhancing insulin secretion and by stimulating glucose uptake by the liver. These data established that an FXR-KLF11 regulated pathway has an essential role in the regulation of insulin transcription and secretion induced by glucose.

  6. Amino acid recognition and gene regulation by riboswitches

    PubMed Central

    Serganov, Alexander; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2012-01-01

    Riboswitches specifically control expression of genes predominantly involved in biosynthesis, catabolism and transport of various cellular metabolites in organisms from all three kingdoms of life. Amongst many classes of identified riboswitches, two riboswitches respond to amino acids lysine and glycine to date. Though these riboswitches recognize small compounds, they both belong to the largest riboswitches and have unique structural and functional characteristics. In this review, we attempt to characterize molecular recognition principles employed by amino acid-responsive riboswitches to selectively bind their cognate ligands and to effectively perform a gene regulation function. We summarize up-to-date biochemical and genetic data available for the lysine and glycine riboswitches and correlate these results with recent high-resolution structural information obtained for the lysine riboswitch. We also discuss the contribution of lysine riboswitches to antibiotic resistance and outline potential applications of riboswitches in biotechnology and medicine. PMID:19619684

  7. Regulation of human class I alcohol dehydrogenases by bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Langhi, Cédric; Pedraz-Cuesta, Elena; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F.; Rodríguez, Joan C.

    2013-01-01

    Class I alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH1s) are the rate-limiting enzymes for ethanol and vitamin A (retinol) metabolism in the liver. Because previous studies have shown that human ADH1 enzymes may participate in bile acid metabolism, we investigated whether the bile acid-activated nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates ADH1 genes. In human hepatocytes, both the endogenous FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid and synthetic FXR-specific agonist GW4064 increased ADH1 mRNA, protein, and activity. Moreover, overexpression of a constitutively active form of FXR induced ADH1A and ADH1B expression, whereas silencing of FXR abolished the effects of FXR agonists on ADH1 expression and activity. Transient transfection studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed functional FXR response elements in the ADH1A and ADH1B proximal promoters, thus indicating that both genes are direct targets of FXR. These findings provide the first evidence for direct connection of bile acid signaling and alcohol metabolism. PMID:23772048

  8. Transcriptional regulation of muscle fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Carey, J O; Neufer, P D; Farrar, R P; Veerkamp, J H; Dohm, G L

    1994-01-01

    Heart fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) is present in a wide variety of tissues but is found in the highest concentration in cardiac and red skeletal muscle. It has been proposed that the expression of H-FABP correlates directly with the fatty acid-oxidative capacity of the tissue. In the present study, the expression of H-FABP was measured in red and white skeletal muscle under two conditions in which fatty acid utilization is known to be increased: streptozotocin-induced diabetes and fasting. Protein concentration, mRNA concentration and transcription rate were measured under both conditions. The level of both protein and mRNA increased approximately 2-fold under each condition. The transcription rate was higher in red skeletal muscle than in white muscle, was increased 2-fold during fasting, but was unchanged by streptozotocin-induced diabetes. In addition to supporting the hypothesis that H-FABP is induced during conditions of increased fatty acid utilization, these findings demonstrate that the regulation of H-FABP expression may or may not be at the level of transcription depending on the stimulus. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8141774

  9. Regulation of human class I alcohol dehydrogenases by bile acids.

    PubMed

    Langhi, Cédric; Pedraz-Cuesta, Elena; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F; Rodríguez, Joan C

    2013-09-01

    Class I alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH1s) are the rate-limiting enzymes for ethanol and vitamin A (retinol) metabolism in the liver. Because previous studies have shown that human ADH1 enzymes may participate in bile acid metabolism, we investigated whether the bile acid-activated nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates ADH1 genes. In human hepatocytes, both the endogenous FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid and synthetic FXR-specific agonist GW4064 increased ADH1 mRNA, protein, and activity. Moreover, overexpression of a constitutively active form of FXR induced ADH1A and ADH1B expression, whereas silencing of FXR abolished the effects of FXR agonists on ADH1 expression and activity. Transient transfection studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed functional FXR response elements in the ADH1A and ADH1B proximal promoters, thus indicating that both genes are direct targets of FXR. These findings provide the first evidence for direct connection of bile acid signaling and alcohol metabolism.

  10. Arabidopsis YAK1 regulates abscisic acid response and drought resistance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongjin; Ntui, Valentine Otang; Xiong, Liming

    2016-07-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that controls several plant processes such as seed germination, seedling growth, and abiotic stress response. Here, we report that AtYak1 plays an important role in ABA signaling and postgermination growth in Arabidopsis. AtYak1 knockout mutant plants were hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of seed germination, cotyledon greening, seedling growth, and stomatal movement. atyak1-1 mutant plants display reduced drought stress resistance, as evidenced by water loss rate and survival rate. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that AtYak1 deficiency led to elevated expression of stomatal-related gene, MYB60, and down-regulation of several stress-responsive genes. Altogether, these results indicate that AtYak1 plays a role as a positive regulator in ABA-mediated drought response in Arabidopsis. PMID:27264339

  11. Fatty acid metabolism in the regulation of T cell function.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Matthias; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2015-02-01

    The specific regulation of cellular metabolic processes is of major importance for directing immune cell differentiation and function. We review recent evidence indicating that changes in basic cellular lipid metabolism have critical effects on T cell proliferation and cell fate decisions. While induction of de novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis is essential for activation-induced proliferation and differentiation of effector T cells, FA catabolism via β-oxidation is important for the development of CD8(+) T cell memory as well as for the differentiation of CD4(+) regulatory T cells. We consider the influence of lipid metabolism and metabolic intermediates on the regulation of signaling and transcriptional pathways via post-translational modifications, and discuss how an improved understanding of FA metabolism may reveal strategies for manipulating immune responses towards therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25592731

  12. Phenylacetic acid catabolism and its transcriptional regulation in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Kohl, Thomas A; Rückert, Christian; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Li, Ling-Hao; Ding, Jiu-Yuan; Kalinowski, Jörn; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2012-08-01

    The industrially important organism Corynebacterium glutamicum has been characterized in recent years for its robust ability to assimilate aromatic compounds. In this study, C. glutamicum strain AS 1.542 was investigated for its ability to catabolize phenylacetic acid (PAA). The paa genes were identified; they are organized as a continuous paa gene cluster. The type strain of C. glutamicum, ATCC 13032, is not able to catabolize PAA, but the recombinant strain ATCC 13032/pEC-K18mob2::paa gained the ability to grow on PAA. The paaR gene, encoding a TetR family transcription regulator, was studied in detail. Disruption of paaR in strain AS 1.542 resulted in transcriptional increases of all paa genes. Transcription start sites and putative promoter regions were determined. An imperfect palindromic motif (5'-ACTNACCGNNCGNNCGGTNAGT-3'; 22 bp) was identified in the upstream regions of paa genes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) demonstrated specific binding of PaaR to this motif, and phenylacetyl coenzyme A (PA-CoA) blocked binding. It was concluded that PaaR is the negative regulator of PAA degradation and that PA-CoA is the PaaR effector. In addition, GlxR binding sites were found, and binding to GlxR was confirmed. Therefore, PAA catabolism in C. glutamicum is regulated by the pathway-specific repressor PaaR, and also likely by the global transcription regulator GlxR. By comparative genomic analysis, we reconstructed orthologous PaaR regulons in 57 species, including species of Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Flavobacteria, that carry PAA utilization genes and operate by conserved binding motifs, suggesting that PaaR-like regulation might commonly exist in these bacteria.

  13. Regulation of hepatic bile acid transporters Ntcp and Bsep expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xingguo; Buckley, David; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2009-01-01

    Sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp) and bile salt export pump (Bsep) are two key transporters for hepatic bile acid uptake and excretion. Alterations in Ntcp and Bsep expression have been reported in pathophysiological conditions. In the present study, the effects of age, gender, and various chemicals on the regulation of these two transporters were characterized in mice. Ntcp and Bsep mRNA levels in mouse liver were low in the fetus, but increased to its highest expression at parturition. After birth, mouse Ntcp and Bsep mRNA decreased by more than 50%, and then gradually increased to adult levels by day 30. Expression of mouse Ntcp mRNA and protein exhibit higher levels in female than male livers, which is consistent with the trend of human NTCP mRNA expression between men and women. No gender difference exists in BSEP/Bsep expression in human and mouse livers. Hormone replacements conducted in gonadectomized, hypophysectomized, and lit/lit mice indicate that female-predominant Ntcp expression in mouse liver is due to the inhibitory effect of male-pattern GH secretion, but not sex hormones. Ntcp and Bsep expression are in general resistant to induction by a large battery of microsomal enzyme inducers. Administration of cholestyramine increased Ntcp, whereas chenodeoxycholic acid increased Bsep mRNA expression. In silico analysis indicates that female-predominant mouse and human Ntcp/NTCP expression may be due to GH. In conclusion, mouse Ntcp and Bsep are regulated by age, gender, cholestyramine, and bile acid, but resistant to induction by most microsomal enzyme inducers. PMID:17897632

  14. Metabolic regulation of amino acid uptake in marine waters

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchman, D.L.; Hodson, R.E.

    1986-03-01

    To determine the relationships among the processes of uptake, intracellular pool formation, and incorporation of amino acids into protein, the authors measured the uptake of dipeptides and free amino acids by bacterial assemblages in estuarine and coastal waters of the southeast US. The dipeptide phenylalanyl-phenylalanine (phe-phe) lowered V/sub max/ of phenylalanine uptake when the turnover rate of phenylalanine was relatively high. When the turnover rate was relatively low, phe-phe either had no effect or increased V/sub max/ of phenylalanine uptake. An analytical model was developed and tested to measure the turnover time of the intracellular pool of phenylalanine. The results suggested that the size of the intracellular pool is regulated, which precludes high assimilation rates of both phenylalanine and phe-phe. In waters with relatively low phenylalanine turnover rates, bacterial assemblages appear to have a greater capacity to assimilate phenylalanine and phe-phe simultaneously. Marine bacterial assemblages do not substantially increase the apparent respiration of amino acids when concentrations increase. The authors conclude that sustained increases in uptake rates and mineralization by marine bacterial assemblages in response to an increase in the concentrations of dissolved organic nitrogen is determined by the rate of protein synthesis.

  15. Ozone-Induced Responses in Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae): Metabolic Cross-Talk between Volatile Organic Compounds and Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso-Gustavson, Poliana; Bolsoni, Vanessa Palermo; de Oliveira, Debora Pinheiro; Guaratini, Maria Tereza Gromboni; Aidar, Marcos Pereira Marinho; Marabesi, Mauro Alexandre; Alves, Edenise Segala; de Souza, Silvia Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Here, we proposed that volatile organic compounds (VOC), specifically methyl salicylate (MeSA), mediate the formation of calcium oxalate crystals (COC) in the defence against ozone (O3) oxidative damage. We performed experiments using Croton floribundus, a pioneer tree species that is tolerant to O3 and widely distributed in the Brazilian forest. This species constitutively produces COC. We exposed plants to a controlled fumigation experiment and assessed biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters. O3 induced a significant increase in the concentrations of constitutive oxygenated compounds, MeSA and terpenoids as well as in COC number. Our analysis supported the hypothesis that ozone-induced VOC (mainly MeSA) regulate ROS formation in a way that promotes the opening of calcium channels and the subsequent formation of COC in a fast and stable manner to stop the consequences of the reactive oxygen species in the tissue, indeed immobilising the excess calcium (caused by acute exposition to O3) that can be dangerous to the plant. To test this hypothesis, we performed an independent experiment spraying MeSA over C. floribundus plants and observed an increase in the number of COC, indicating that this compound has a potential to directly induce their formation. Thus, the tolerance of C. floribundus to O3 oxidative stress could be a consequence of a higher capacity for the production of VOC and COC rather than the modulation of antioxidant balance. We also present some insights into constitutive morphological features that may be related to the tolerance that this species exhibits to O3. PMID:25165889

  16. Ozone-induced responses in Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae): metabolic cross-talk between volatile organic compounds and calcium oxalate crystal formation.

    PubMed

    Cardoso-Gustavson, Poliana; Bolsoni, Vanessa Palermo; de Oliveira, Debora Pinheiro; Guaratini, Maria Tereza Gromboni; Aidar, Marcos Pereira Marinho; Marabesi, Mauro Alexandre; Alves, Edenise Segala; de Souza, Silvia Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Here, we proposed that volatile organic compounds (VOC), specifically methyl salicylate (MeSA), mediate the formation of calcium oxalate crystals (COC) in the defence against ozone (O3) oxidative damage. We performed experiments using Croton floribundus, a pioneer tree species that is tolerant to O3 and widely distributed in the Brazilian forest. This species constitutively produces COC. We exposed plants to a controlled fumigation experiment and assessed biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters. O3 induced a significant increase in the concentrations of constitutive oxygenated compounds, MeSA and terpenoids as well as in COC number. Our analysis supported the hypothesis that ozone-induced VOC (mainly MeSA) regulate ROS formation in a way that promotes the opening of calcium channels and the subsequent formation of COC in a fast and stable manner to stop the consequences of the reactive oxygen species in the tissue, indeed immobilising the excess calcium (caused by acute exposition to O3) that can be dangerous to the plant. To test this hypothesis, we performed an independent experiment spraying MeSA over C. floribundus plants and observed an increase in the number of COC, indicating that this compound has a potential to directly induce their formation. Thus, the tolerance of C. floribundus to O3 oxidative stress could be a consequence of a higher capacity for the production of VOC and COC rather than the modulation of antioxidant balance. We also present some insights into constitutive morphological features that may be related to the tolerance that this species exhibits to O3.

  17. Ozone uptake (flux) as it relates to ozone-induced foliar symptoms of Prunus serotina and Populus maximowiziixtrichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Orendovici-Best, T; Skelly, J M; Davis, D D; Ferdinand, J A; Savage, J E; Stevenson, R E

    2008-01-01

    Field studies were conducted during 2003 and 2004 from early June to the end of August, at 20 sites of lower or higher elevation within north-central Pennsylvania, using seedlings of black cherry (Prunus serotina, Ehrh.) and ramets of hybrid poplar (Populus maximowiziixtrichocarpa). A linear model was developed to estimate the influence of local environmental conditions on stomatal conductance. The most significant factors explaining stomatal variance were tree species, air temperature, leaf vapor pressure deficit, elevation, and time of day. Overall, environmental factors explained less than 35% of the variation in stomatal conductance. Ozone did not affect gas exchange rates in either poplar or cherry. Ozone-induced foliar injury was positively correlated with cumulative ozone exposures, expressed as SUM40. Overall, the amount of foliar injury was better correlated to a flux-based approach rather than to an exposure-based approach. More severe foliar injuries were observed on plants growing at higher elevations. PMID:17524537

  18. Identification of genes regulated by UV/salicylic acid.

    SciTech Connect

    Paunesku, T.; Chang-Liu, C.-M.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Watson, C.; Milton, J.; Oryhon, J.; Salbego, D.; Milosavljevic, A.; Woloschak, G. E.; CuraGen Corp.

    2000-02-01

    Purpose : Previous work from the authors' group and others has demonstrated that some of the effects of UV irradiation on gene expression are modulated in response to the addition of salicylic acid to irradiated cells. The presumed effector molecule responsible for this modulation is NF-kappaB. In the experiments described here, differential-display RT-PCR was used to identify those cDNAs that are differentially modulated by UV radiation with and without the addition of salicylic acid. Materials and methods : Differential-display RT-PCR was used to identify differentially expressed genes. Results : Eight such cDNAs are presented: lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-beta), nuclear encoded mitochondrial NADH ubiquinone reductase 24kDa (NDUFV2), elongation initiation factor 4B (eIF4B), nuclear dots protein SP100, nuclear encoded mitochondrial ATPase inhibitor (IF1), a cDNA similar to a subunit of yeast CCAAT transcription factor HAP5, and two expressed sequence tags (AA187906 and AA513156). Conclusions : Sequences of four of these genes contained NF-kappaB DNA binding sites of the type that may attract transrepressor p55/p55 NF-kappaB homodimers. Down-regulation of these genes upon UV irradiation may contribute to increased cell survival via suppression of p53 independent apoptosis.

  19. Regulation of the electric charge in phosphatidic acid domains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Anderson, Nathaniel A; Travesset, Alex; Vaknin, David

    2012-06-21

    Although a minor component of the lipidome, phosphatidic acid (PA) plays a crucial role in nearly all signaling pathways involving cell membranes, in part because of its variable electrical charge in response to environmental conditions. To investigate how charge is regulated in domains of PA, we applied surface-sensitive X-ray reflectivity and fluorescence near-total-reflection techniques to determine the binding of divalent ions (Ca(2+) at various pH values) to 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (DMPA) and to the simpler lipid dihexadecyl phosphate (DHDP) spread as monolayers at the air/water interface. We found that the protonation state of PA is controlled not only by the pK(a) and local pH but also by the strong affinity to PA driven by electrostatic correlations from divalent ions and the cooperative effect of the two dissociable protons, which dramatically enhance the surface charge. A precise theoretical model is presented providing a general framework to predict the protonation state of PA. Implications for recent experiments on charge regulation by hydrogen bonding and the role of pH in PA signaling are discussed in detail.

  20. Salicylic acid 3-hydroxylase regulates Arabidopsis leaf longevity by mediating salicylic acid catabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kewei; Halitschke, Rayko; Yin, Changxi; Liu, Chang-Jun; Gan, Su-Sheng

    2013-09-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) plays critical roles in plant defense, stress responses, and senescence. Although SA biosynthesis is well understood, the pathways by which SA is catabolized remain elusive. Here we report the identification and characterization of an SA 3-hydroxylase (S3H) involved in SA catabolism during leaf senescence. S3H is associated with senescence and is inducible by SA and is thus a key part of a negative feedback regulation system of SA levels during senescence. The enzyme converts SA (with a Km of 58.29 µM) to both 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) and 2,5-DHBA in vitro but only 2,3-DHBA in vivo. The s3h knockout mutants fail to produce 2,3-DHBA sugar conjugates, accumulate very high levels of SA and its sugar conjugates, and exhibit a precocious senescence phenotype. Conversely, the gain-of-function lines contain high levels of 2,3-DHBA sugar conjugates and extremely low levels of SA and its sugar conjugates and display a significantly extended leaf longevity. This research reveals an elegant SA catabolic mechanism by which plants regulate SA levels by converting it to 2,3-DHBA to prevent SA overaccumulation. The research also provides strong molecular genetic evidence for an important role of SA in regulating the onset and rate of leaf senescence.

  1. Comparative Genomics of Regulation of Fatty Acid and Branched-chain Amino Acid Utilization in Proteobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, Alexey E.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Arkin, Adam Paul; Dubchak, Inna; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Alm, Eric

    2008-10-31

    Bacteria can use branched-chain amino acids (ILV, i.e. isoleucine, leucine, valine) and fatty acids (FA) as sole carbon and energy sources convering ILV into acetyl-CoA, propanoyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA, respectively. In this work, we used the comparative genomic approach to identify candidate transcriptional factors and DNA motifs that control ILV and FA utilization pathways in proteobacteria. The metabolic regulons were characterized based on the identification and comparison of candidate transcription factor binding sites in groups of phylogenetically related genomes. The reconstructed ILV/FA regulatory network demonstrates considerable variability and involves six transcriptional factors from the MerR, TetR and GntR families binding to eleven distinct DNA motifs. The ILV degradation genes in gamma- and beta-proteobacteria are mainly regulated by anovel regulator from the MerR family (e.g., LiuR in Pseudomonas aeruginosa) (40 species), in addition, the TetR-type regulator LiuQ was identified in some beta-proteobacteria (8 species). Besides the core set of ILV utilization genes, the LiuR regulon in some lineages is expanded to include genes from other metabolic pathways, such as the glyoxylate shunt and glutamate synthase in the Shewanella species. The FA degradation genes are controlled by four regulators including FadR in gamma-proteobacteria (34 species), PsrA in gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (45 species), FadP in beta-proteobacteria (14 species), and LiuR orthologs in alpha-proteobacteria (22 species). The remarkable variability of the regulatory systems associated with the FA degradation pathway is discussed from the functional and evolutionary points of view.

  2. Inhalation of ozone induces DNA strand breaks and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Bornholdt, Jette; Dybdahl, Marianne; Vogel, Ulla; Hansen, Max; Loft, Steffen; Wallin, Håkan

    2002-09-26

    Ozone (O3) is a well-known oxidant pollutant present in photochemical smog. Although ozone is suspected to be a respiratory carcinogen it is not regulated as a carcinogen in most countries. The genotoxic and inflammatory effects of ozone were investigated in female mice exposed to ozone for 90 min. The tail moment in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells from BALB/c mice was determined by the comet assay as a measure of DNA strand breaks. Within the first 200 min after exposure, the BAL cells from the mice exposed to 1 or 2 ppm ozone had 1.6- and 2.6-fold greater tail moments than unexposed mice. After 200 min there was no effect. It could be ruled out that the effect during the first 200 min was due to major infiltration of lymphocytes or neutrophils. Unexpectedly, ozone had no effect on the content of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in nuclear DNA or on oxidised amino acids in the lung tissue. The mRNA level of the repair enzyme ERCC1 was not increased in the lung tissue. Inflammation was measured by the cytokine mRNA level in lung homogenates. An up to 150-fold induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA was detected in the animals exposed to 2 ppm ozone compared to the air-exposed control mice. Also at 1 ppm ozone, the IL-6 mRNA was induced. The large induction of IL-6 mRNA in the lung took place after DNA strand breaks were induced in BAL. This does not support the notion that inflammatory reactions are the cause of DNA damage. To determine whether these exposures were mutagenic, Muta Mice were exposed to 2 ppm ozone, 90 min per day for 5 days. No treatment-related mutations could be detected in the cII transgene. These results indicate that a short episode of ozone exposure at five times the threshold limit value (TLV) in US induces lung inflammatory mediators and DNA damage in the cells in the lumen of the lung. This was not reflected by an induction of mutations in the lung of Muta Mice. PMID:12297145

  3. Inhalation of ozone induces DNA strand breaks and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Bornholdt, Jette; Dybdahl, Marianne; Vogel, Ulla; Hansen, Max; Loft, Steffen; Wallin, Håkan

    2002-09-26

    Ozone (O3) is a well-known oxidant pollutant present in photochemical smog. Although ozone is suspected to be a respiratory carcinogen it is not regulated as a carcinogen in most countries. The genotoxic and inflammatory effects of ozone were investigated in female mice exposed to ozone for 90 min. The tail moment in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells from BALB/c mice was determined by the comet assay as a measure of DNA strand breaks. Within the first 200 min after exposure, the BAL cells from the mice exposed to 1 or 2 ppm ozone had 1.6- and 2.6-fold greater tail moments than unexposed mice. After 200 min there was no effect. It could be ruled out that the effect during the first 200 min was due to major infiltration of lymphocytes or neutrophils. Unexpectedly, ozone had no effect on the content of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in nuclear DNA or on oxidised amino acids in the lung tissue. The mRNA level of the repair enzyme ERCC1 was not increased in the lung tissue. Inflammation was measured by the cytokine mRNA level in lung homogenates. An up to 150-fold induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA was detected in the animals exposed to 2 ppm ozone compared to the air-exposed control mice. Also at 1 ppm ozone, the IL-6 mRNA was induced. The large induction of IL-6 mRNA in the lung took place after DNA strand breaks were induced in BAL. This does not support the notion that inflammatory reactions are the cause of DNA damage. To determine whether these exposures were mutagenic, Muta Mice were exposed to 2 ppm ozone, 90 min per day for 5 days. No treatment-related mutations could be detected in the cII transgene. These results indicate that a short episode of ozone exposure at five times the threshold limit value (TLV) in US induces lung inflammatory mediators and DNA damage in the cells in the lumen of the lung. This was not reflected by an induction of mutations in the lung of Muta Mice.

  4. The role of abscisic acid in regulating cucumber fruit development and ripening and its transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanping; Wang, Ya; Ji, Kai; Dai, Shengjie; Hu, Ying; Sun, Liang; Li, Qian; Chen, Pei; Sun, Yufei; Duan, Chaorui; Wu, Yan; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Dian; Guo, Yangdong; Leng, Ping

    2013-03-01

    Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), a kind of fruit usually harvested at the immature green stage, belongs to non-climacteric fruit. To investigate the contribution of abscisic acid (ABA) to cucumber fruit development and ripening, variation in ABA level was investigated and a peak in ABA level was found in pulp before fruit get fully ripe. To clarify this point further, exogenous ABA was applied to cucumber fruits at two different development stages. Results showed that ABA application at the turning stage promotes cucumber fruit ripening, while application at the immature green stage had inconspicuous effects. In addition, with the purpose of understanding the transcriptional regulation of ABA, two partial cDNAs of CsNCED1 and CsNCED2 encoding 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED), a key enzyme in ABA biosynthetic pathway; one partial cDNA of CsCYP707A1 for 8'-hydroxylase, a key enzyme in the oxidative catabolism of ABA and two partial cDNAs of CsBG1 and CsBG2 for β-glucosidase (BG) that hydrolyzes ABA glucose ester (ABA-GE) to release active ABA were cloned from cucumber. The DNA and deduced amino acid sequences of these obtained genes respectively showed high similarities to their homologous genes in other plants. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that ABA content may be regulated by its biosynthesis (CsNCEDs), catabolism (CsCYP707A1) and reactivation genes (CsBGs) at the transcriptional level during cucumber fruit development and ripening, in response to ABA application, dehydration and pollination, among which CsNCED1, CsCYP707A1 and CsBG1 were highly expressed in pulp and may play more important roles in regulating ABA metabolism.

  5. Calcineurin mediates homeostatic synaptic plasticity by regulating retinoic acid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Kristin L.; Zhang, Zhenjie; Ganesan, Subhashree; Hintze, Maik; Shin, Maggie M.; Tang, Yitai; Cho, Ahryon; Graef, Isabella A.; Chen, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity is a form of non-Hebbian plasticity that maintains stability of the network and fidelity for information processing in response to prolonged perturbation of network and synaptic activity. Prolonged blockade of synaptic activity decreases resting Ca2+ levels in neurons, thereby inducing retinoic acid (RA) synthesis and RA-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity; however, the signal transduction pathway that links reduced Ca2+-levels to RA synthesis remains unknown. Here we identify the Ca2+-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) as a key regulator for RA synthesis and homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Prolonged inhibition of CaN activity promotes RA synthesis in neurons, and leads to increased excitatory and decreased inhibitory synaptic transmission. These effects of CaN inhibitors on synaptic transmission are blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of RA synthesis or acute genetic deletion of the RA receptor RARα. Thus, CaN, acting upstream of RA, plays a critical role in gating RA signaling pathway in response to synaptic activity. Moreover, activity blockade-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity is absent in CaN knockout neurons, demonstrating the essential role of CaN in RA-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Interestingly, in GluA1 S831A and S845A knockin mice, CaN inhibitor- and RA-induced regulation of synaptic transmission is intact, suggesting that phosphorylation of GluA1 C-terminal serine residues S831 and S845 is not required for CaN inhibitor- or RA-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Thus, our study uncovers an unforeseen role of CaN in postsynaptic signaling, and defines CaN as the Ca2+-sensing signaling molecule that mediates RA-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity. PMID:26443861

  6. Metabolic regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry D. Cohen

    2009-11-01

    The phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, auxin) is important for many aspects of plant growth, development and responses to the environment yet the routes to is biosynthesis and mechanisms for regulation of IAA levels remain important research questions. A critical issue concerning the biosynthesis if IAA in plants is that redundant pathways for IAA biosynthesis exist in plants. We showed that these redundant pathways and their relative contribution to net IAA production are under both developmental and environmental control. We worked on three fundamental problems related to how plants get their IAA: 1) An in vitro biochemical approach was used to define the tryptophan dependent pathway to IAA using maize endosperm, where relatively large amounts of IAA are produced over a short developmental period. Both a stable isotope dilution and a protein MS approach were used to identify intermediates and enzymes in the reactions. 2) We developed an in vitro system for analysis of tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthesis in maize seedlings and we used a metabolite profiling approach to isolate intermediates in this reaction. 3) Arabidopsis contains a small family of genes that encode potential indolepyruvate decarboxylase enzymes. We cloned these genes and studied plants that are mutant in these genes and that over-express each member in the family in terms of the level and route of IAA biosynthesis. Together, these allowed further development of a comprehensive picture of the pathways and regulatory components that are involved in IAA homeostasis in higher plants.

  7. Hepatic oleate regulates adipose tissue lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Burhans, Maggie S; Flowers, Matthew T; Harrington, Kristin R; Bond, Laura M; Guo, Chang-An; Anderson, Rozalyn M; Ntambi, James M

    2015-02-01

    Hepatic steatosis is associated with detrimental metabolic phenotypes including enhanced risk for diabetes. Stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCDs) catalyze the synthesis of MUFAs. In mice, genetic ablation of SCDs reduces hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and protects against diet-induced hepatic steatosis and adiposity. To understand the mechanism by which hepatic MUFA production influences adipose tissue stores, we created two liver-specific transgenic mouse models in the SCD1 knockout that express either human SCD5 or mouse SCD3, that synthesize oleate and palmitoleate, respectively. We demonstrate that hepatic de novo synthesized oleate, but not palmitoleate, stimulate hepatic lipid accumulation and adiposity, reversing the protective effect of the global SCD1 knockout under lipogenic conditions. Unexpectedly, the accumulation of hepatic lipid occurred without induction of the hepatic DNL program. Changes in hepatic lipid composition were reflected in plasma and in adipose tissue. Importantly, endogenously synthesized hepatic oleate was associated with suppressed DNL and fatty acid oxidation in white adipose tissue. Regression analysis revealed a strong correlation between adipose tissue lipid fuel utilization and hepatic and adipose tissue lipid storage. These data suggest an extrahepatic mechanism where endogenous hepatic oleate regulates lipid homeostasis in adipose tissues.

  8. Abscisic acid (ABA) regulation of Arabidopsis SR protein gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Tiago M D; Carvalho, Raquel F; Richardson, Dale N; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are major modulators of alternative splicing, a key generator of proteomic diversity and flexible means of regulating gene expression likely to be crucial in plant environmental responses. Indeed, mounting evidence implicates splicing factors in signal transduction of the abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone, which plays pivotal roles in the response to various abiotic stresses. Using real-time RT-qPCR, we analyzed total steady-state transcript levels of the 18 SR and two SR-like genes from Arabidopsis thaliana in seedlings treated with ABA and in genetic backgrounds with altered expression of the ABA-biosynthesis ABA2 and the ABA-signaling ABI1 and ABI4 genes. We also searched for ABA-responsive cis elements in the upstream regions of the 20 genes. We found that members of the plant-specific SC35-Like (SCL) Arabidopsis SR protein subfamily are distinctively responsive to exogenous ABA, while the expression of seven SR and SR-related genes is affected by alterations in key components of the ABA pathway. Finally, despite pervasiveness of established ABA-responsive promoter elements in Arabidopsis SR and SR-like genes, their expression is likely governed by additional, yet unidentified cis-acting elements. Overall, this study pinpoints SR34, SR34b, SCL30a, SCL28, SCL33, RS40, SR45 and SR45a as promising candidates for involvement in ABA-mediated stress responses. PMID:25268622

  9. A monoclonal antibody against the plant growth regulator, abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Banowetz, G M; Hess, J R; Carman, J G

    1994-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against the plant growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA) conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin through C-4. One of these antibodies was characterized for use in a competition fluorescence enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (F-ELISA). The antibody detected femtomole quantities of ABA when used in the F-ELISA and showed minimal cross-reactivity with ABA metabolites and structural analogs. Dilution analysis suggested that the F-ELISA could be used to determine the ABA content of methanolic extracts of crude samples of wheat seeds without further purification. The F-ELISA was used to determine the effect of seed priming on ABA levels in wheat seeds. The antibody also was used in a modified noncompetitive indirect ELISA to measure ABA content of wheat caryopses. The noncompetitive ELISA was more sensitive than the F-ELISA, although the F-ELISA had a broader measuring range. When our anti-ABA antibody and a commercially available anti-ABA antibody were compared by indirect ELISA, there were no significant differences between the ABA estimates.

  10. Pharmacological activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptors regulates erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Ho, Ya-Hsuan; Chiang, Jui-Chung; Li, Meng-Wei; Lin, Shi-Hung; Chen, Wei-Min; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Yu-Nung; Yang, Ya-Jan; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lu, Jenher; Huang, Chang-Jen; Tigyi, Gabor; Yao, Chao-Ling; Lee, Hsinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a growth factor-like phospholipid, regulates numerous physiological functions, including cell proliferation and differentiation. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that LPA activates erythropoiesis by activating the LPA 3 receptor subtype (LPA3) under erythropoietin (EPO) induction. In the present study, we applied a pharmacological approach to further elucidate the functions of LPA receptors during red blood cell (RBC) differentiation. In K562 human erythroleukemia cells, knockdown of LPA2 enhanced erythropoiesis, whereas knockdown of LPA3 inhibited RBC differentiation. In CD34+ human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) and K526 cells, the LPA3 agonist 1-oleoyl-2-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothionate (2S-OMPT) promoted erythropoiesis, whereas the LPA2 agonist dodecyl monophosphate (DMP) and the nonlipid specific agonist GRI977143 (GRI) suppressed this process. In zebrafish embryos, hemoglobin expression was significantly increased by 2S-OMPT treatment but was inhibited by GRI. Furthermore, GRI treatment decreased, whereas 2S-OMPT treatment increased RBC counts and amount of hemoglobin level in adult BALB/c mice. These results indicate that LPA2 and LPA3 play opposing roles during RBC differentiation. The pharmacological activation of LPA receptor subtypes represent a novel strategies for augmenting or inhibiting erythropoiesis. PMID:27244685

  11. Basic amino-acid side chains regulate transmembrane integrin signalling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chungho; Schmidt, Thomas; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Ye, Feng; Ulmer, Tobias S; Ginsberg, Mark H

    2011-12-18

    Side chains of Lys/Arg near transmembrane domain (TMD) membrane-water interfaces can 'snorkel', placing their positive charge near negatively charged phospholipid head groups; however, snorkelling's functional effects are obscure. Integrin β TMDs have such conserved basic amino acids. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to show that integrin β(3)(Lys 716) helps determine β(3) TMD topography. The α(ΙΙb)β(3) TMD structure indicates that precise β(3) TMD crossing angles enable the assembly of outer and inner membrane 'clasps' that hold the αβ TMD together to limit transmembrane signalling. Mutation of β(3)(Lys 716) caused dissociation of α(ΙΙb)β(3) TMDs and integrin activation. To confirm that altered topography of β(3)(Lys 716) mutants activated α(ΙΙb)β(3), we used directed evolution of β(3)(K716A) to identify substitutions restoring default state. Introduction of Pro(711) at the midpoint of β(3) TMD (A711P) increased α(ΙΙb)β(3) TMD association and inactivated integrin α(ΙΙb)β(3)(A711P,K716A). β(3)(Pro 711) introduced a TMD kink of 30 ± 1° precisely at the border of the outer and inner membrane clasps, thereby decoupling the tilt between these segments. Thus, widely occurring snorkelling residues in TMDs can help maintain TMD topography and membrane-embedding, thereby regulating transmembrane signalling.

  12. Abscisic Acid (ABA) Regulation of Arabidopsis SR Protein Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Tiago M. D.; Carvalho, Raquel F.; Richardson, Dale N.; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are major modulators of alternative splicing, a key generator of proteomic diversity and flexible means of regulating gene expression likely to be crucial in plant environmental responses. Indeed, mounting evidence implicates splicing factors in signal transduction of the abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone, which plays pivotal roles in the response to various abiotic stresses. Using real-time RT-qPCR, we analyzed total steady-state transcript levels of the 18 SR and two SR-like genes from Arabidopsis thaliana in seedlings treated with ABA and in genetic backgrounds with altered expression of the ABA-biosynthesis ABA2 and the ABA-signaling ABI1 and ABI4 genes. We also searched for ABA-responsive cis elements in the upstream regions of the 20 genes. We found that members of the plant-specific SC35-Like (SCL) Arabidopsis SR protein subfamily are distinctively responsive to exogenous ABA, while the expression of seven SR and SR-related genes is affected by alterations in key components of the ABA pathway. Finally, despite pervasiveness of established ABA-responsive promoter elements in Arabidopsis SR and SR-like genes, their expression is likely governed by additional, yet unidentified cis-acting elements. Overall, this study pinpoints SR34, SR34b, SCL30a, SCL28, SCL33, RS40, SR45 and SR45a as promising candidates for involvement in ABA-mediated stress responses. PMID:25268622

  13. Arabidopsis INCURVATA2 Regulates Salicylic Acid and Abscisic Acid Signaling, and Oxidative Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Micol-Ponce, Rosa; Sánchez-García, Ana Belén; Xu, Qian; Barrero, José María; Micol, José Luis; Ponce, María Rosa

    2015-11-01

    Epigenetic regulatory states can persist through mitosis and meiosis, but the connection between chromatin structure and DNA replication remains unclear. Arabidopsis INCURVATA2 (ICU2) encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase α, and null alleles of ICU2 have an embryo-lethal phenotype. Analysis of icu2-1, a hypomorphic allele of ICU2, demonstrated that ICU2 functions in chromatin-mediated cellular memory; icu2-1 strongly impairs ICU2 function in the maintenance of repressive epigenetic marks but does not seem to affect ICU2 polymerase activity. To better understand the global function of ICU2 in epigenetic regulation, here we performed a microarray analysis of icu2-1 mutant plants. We found that the genes up-regulated in the icu2-1 mutant included genes encoding transcription factors and targets of the Polycomb Repressive Complexes. The down-regulated genes included many known players in salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and accumulation, ABA signaling and ABA-mediated responses. In addition, we found that icu2-1 plants had reduced SA levels in normal conditions; infection by Fusarium oxysporum induced SA accumulation in the En-2 wild type but not in the icu2-1 mutant. The icu2-1 plants were also hypersensitive to salt stress and exogenous ABA in seedling establishment, post-germination growth and stomatal closure, and accumulated more ABA than the wild type in response to salt stress. The icu2-1 mutant also showed high tolerance to the oxidative stress produced by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT). Our results uncover a role for ICU2 in the regulation of genes involved in ABA signaling as well as in SA biosynthesis and accumulation.

  14. Retinoic acid response element in the human alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH3: implications for regulation of retinoic acid synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Duester, G; Shean, M L; McBride, M S; Stewart, M J

    1991-01-01

    Retinoic acid regulation of one member of the human class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family was demonstrated, suggesting that the retinol dehydrogenase function of ADH may play a regulatory role in the biosynthetic pathway for retinoic acid. Promoter activity of human ADH3, but not ADH1 or ADH2, was shown to be activated by retinoic acid in transient transfection assays of Hep3B human hepatoma cells. Deletion mapping experiments identified a region in the ADH3 promoter located between -328 and -272 bp which confers retinoic acid activation. This region was also demonstrated to confer retinoic acid responsiveness on the ADH1 and ADH2 genes in heterologous promoter fusions. Within a 34-bp stretch, the ADH3 retinoic acid response element (RARE) contains two TGACC motifs and one TGAAC motif, both of which exist in RAREs controlling other genes. A block mutation of the TGACC sequence located at -289 to -285 bp eliminated the retinoic acid response. As assayed by gel shift DNA binding studies, the RARE region (-328 to -272 bp) of ADH3 bound the human retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR beta) and was competed for by DNA containing a RARE present in the gene encoding RAR beta. Since ADH catalyzes the conversion of retinol to retinal, which can be further converted to retinoic acid by aldehyde dehydrogenase, these results suggest that retinoic acid activation of ADH3 constitutes a positive feedback loop regulating retinoic acid synthesis. Images PMID:1996113

  15. SRC-mediated EGF Receptor Activation Regulates Ozone-induced Interleukin 8 Expression in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Human exposure to ozone (03) results in pulmonary function decrements and airway inflammation. The mechanisms underlying these adverse effects remain unclear. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of lung inflammation. ...

  16. Ozone-induced kiwifruit ripening delay is mediated by ethylene biosynthesis inhibition and cell wall dismantling regulation.

    PubMed

    Minas, Ioannis S; Vicente, Ariel R; Dhanapal, Arun Prabhu; Manganaris, George A; Goulas, Vlasios; Vasilakakis, Miltiadis; Crisosto, Carlos H; Molassiotis, Athanassios

    2014-12-01

    Ozone treatments are used to preserve quality during cold storage of commercially important fruits due to its ethylene oxidizing capacity and its antimicrobial attributes. To address whether or not ozone also modulates ripening by directly affecting fruit physiology, kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa cv. 'Hayward') were stored in very low ethylene atmosphere at 0°C (95% RH) in air (control) or in the presence of ozone (0.3μLL(-1)) for 2 or 4 months and subsequently ripened at 20°C (90% RH) for up to 8d. Ozone-treated kiwifruit showed a significant delay of ripening during maintenance at 20°C, accompanied by a marked decrease in ethylene biosynthesis due to inhibited AdACS1 and AdACO1 expression and reduced ACC synthase (ACS) and ACC oxidase (ACO) enzyme activity. Furthermore, ozone-treated fruit exhibited a marked reduction in flesh softening and cell wall disassembly. This effect was associated with reduced cell wall swelling and pectin and neutral sugar solubilization and was correlated with the inhibition of cell wall degrading enzymes activity, such as polygalacturonase (PG) and endo-1,4-β-glucanase/1,4-β-glucosidase (EGase/glu). Conclusively, the present study indicated that ozone may exert major residual effects in fruit ripening physiology and suggested that ethylene biosynthesis and cell walls turnover are specifically targeted by ozone.

  17. Xenobiotic, bile acid, and cholesterol transporters: function and regulation.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Curtis D; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2010-03-01

    Transporters influence the disposition of chemicals within the body by participating in absorption, distribution, and elimination. Transporters of the solute carrier family (SLC) comprise a variety of proteins, including organic cation transporters (OCT) 1 to 3, organic cation/carnitine transporters (OCTN) 1 to 3, organic anion transporters (OAT) 1 to 7, various organic anion transporting polypeptide isoforms, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, peptide transporters (PEPT) 1 and 2, concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNT) 1 to 3, equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1 to 3, and multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters (MATE) 1 and 2, which mediate the uptake (except MATEs) of organic anions and cations as well as peptides and nucleosides. Efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, such as ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), multidrug resistance proteins (MDR) 1 and 2, bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 1 to 9, breast cancer resistance protein, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G members 5 and 8, are responsible for the unidirectional export of endogenous and exogenous substances. Other efflux transporters [ATPase copper-transporting beta polypeptide (ATP7B) and ATPase class I type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1) as well as organic solute transporters (OST) alpha and beta] also play major roles in the transport of some endogenous chemicals across biological membranes. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of these transporters (both rodent and human) with regard to tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and substrate preferences. Because uptake and efflux transporters are expressed in multiple cell types, the roles of transporters in a variety of tissues, including the liver, kidneys, intestine, brain, heart, placenta, mammary glands, immune cells, and testes are discussed. Attention is also placed upon a variety of

  18. Xenobiotic, Bile Acid, and Cholesterol Transporters: Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    Transporters influence the disposition of chemicals within the body by participating in absorption, distribution, and elimination. Transporters of the solute carrier family (SLC) comprise a variety of proteins, including organic cation transporters (OCT) 1 to 3, organic cation/carnitine transporters (OCTN) 1 to 3, organic anion transporters (OAT) 1 to 7, various organic anion transporting polypeptide isoforms, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, peptide transporters (PEPT) 1 and 2, concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNT) 1 to 3, equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1 to 3, and multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters (MATE) 1 and 2, which mediate the uptake (except MATEs) of organic anions and cations as well as peptides and nucleosides. Efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, such as ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), multidrug resistance proteins (MDR) 1 and 2, bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 1 to 9, breast cancer resistance protein, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G members 5 and 8, are responsible for the unidirectional export of endogenous and exogenous substances. Other efflux transporters [ATPase copper-transporting β polypeptide (ATP7B) and ATPase class I type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1) as well as organic solute transporters (OST) α and β] also play major roles in the transport of some endogenous chemicals across biological membranes. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of these transporters (both rodent and human) with regard to tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and substrate preferences. Because uptake and efflux transporters are expressed in multiple cell types, the roles of transporters in a variety of tissues, including the liver, kidneys, intestine, brain, heart, placenta, mammary glands, immune cells, and testes are discussed. Attention is also placed upon a variety of regulatory

  19. Retinoic acid regulation by CYP26 in vertebrate lens regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alvin G; Henry, Jonathan J

    2014-01-01

    Xenopus laevis is among the few species that are capable of fully regenerating a lost lens de novo. This occurs upon removal of the lens, when secreted factors from the retina are permitted to reach the cornea epithelium and trigger it to form a new lens. Although many studies have investigated the retinal factors that initiate lens regeneration, relatively little is known about what factors support this process and make the cornea competent to form a lens. We presently investigate the role of Retinoic acid (RA) signaling in lens regeneration in Xenopus. RA is a highly important morphogen during vertebrate development, including the development of various eye tissues, and has been previously implicated in several regenerative processes as well. For instance, Wolffian lens regeneration in the newt requires active RA signaling. In contrast, we provide evidence here that lens regeneration in Xenopus actually depends on the attenuation of RA signaling, which is regulated by the RA-degrading enzyme CYP26. Using RTPCR we examined the expression of RA synthesis and metabolism related genes within ocular tissues. We found expression of aldh1a1, aldh1a2, and aldh1a3, as well as cyp26a1 and cyp26b1 in both normal and regenerating corneal tissue. On the other hand, cyp26c1 does not appear to be expressed in either control or regenerating corneas, but it is expressed in the lens. Additionally in the lens, we found expression of aldh1a1 and aldh1a2, but not aldh1a3. Using an inhibitor of CYP26, and separately using exogenous retinoids, as well as RA signaling inhibitors, we demonstrate that CYP26 activity is necessary for lens regeneration to occur. We also find using phosphorylated Histone H3 labeling that CYP26 antagonism reduces cell proliferation in the cornea, and using qPCR we find that exogenous retinoids alter the expression of putative corneal stem cell markers. Furthermore, the Xenopus cornea is composed of an outer layer and inner basal epithelium, as well as a

  20. What is the Ultimate Goal in Acid-Base Regulation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balakrishnan, Selvakumar; Gopalakrishnan, Maya; Alagesan, Murali; Prakash, E. Sankaranarayanan

    2007-01-01

    It is common to see chapters on acid-base physiology state that the goal of acid-base regulatory mechanisms is to maintain the pH of arterial plasma and not arterial PCO [subscript 2] (Pa[subscript CO[subscript 2

  1. Saturated fatty acids regulate retinoic acid signalling and suppress tumorigenesis by targeting fatty acid-binding protein 5.

    PubMed

    Levi, Liraz; Wang, Zeneng; Doud, Mary Kathryn; Hazen, Stanley L; Noy, Noa

    2015-01-01

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) serve as energy sources, components of cell membranes and precursors for signalling molecules. Here we show that these biological compounds also regulate gene expression and that they do so by controlling the transcriptional activities of the retinoic acid (RA)-activated nuclear receptors RAR and PPARβ/δ. The data indicate that these activities of LCFA are mediated by FABP5, which delivers ligands from the cytosol to nuclear PPARβ/δ. Both saturated and unsaturated LCFA (SLCFA, ULCFA) bind to FABP5, thereby displacing RA and diverting it to RAR. However, while SLCFA inhibit, ULCFA activate the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway. We show further that, by concomitantly promoting the activation of RAR and inhibiting the activation of PPARβ/δ, SLCFA suppress the oncogenic properties of FABP5-expressing carcinoma cells in cultured cells and in vivo. The observations suggest that compounds that inhibit FABP5 may constitute a new class of drugs for therapy of certain types of cancer. PMID:26592976

  2. Ozone-induced changes in host-plant suitability: interactions of Keiferia lycopersicella and Lycopersicon esculentum

    SciTech Connect

    Trumble, J.T.; Hare, J.D.; Musselman, R.C.; McCool, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    Tomato pinworms, Keiferia lycopersicella (Walsingham), survived better and developed faster on tomato plants, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., damaged by ozone than on plants not subjected to ozone fumigation. Other measures of fitness, including survival during pupation, sex ratio of adults, female longevity, and fecundity, were not affected. Analyses of ozonated foliage at zero, two and seven days following fumigation demonstrated a transient but significant increase (18-24%) in soluble protein concentration. Although the concentration of the total free amino acids in ozonated foliage did not increase significantly, significant changes were observed in at least 10 specific amino acids, some of which are critical for either insect development or the production of plant defensive chemicals. A reduction in total nitrogen in ozonated foliage at seven days postfumigation indicated that nitrogen was being translocated to other portions of the plant. The implications of increases in assimilable forms of nitrogen in ozonated foliage, which lead to improved host-plant suitability for insect herbivores, are discussed both in relation to some current ecological theories and in regard to pest-management strategies. 59 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  3. The LysR-type regulator LeuO regulates the acid tolerance response in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Ante, Vanessa M; Bina, X Renee; Bina, James E

    2015-12-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a neutrophilic enteric pathogen that is extremely sensitive to acid. As V. cholerae passages through the host gastrointestinal tract it is exposed to a variety of environmental stresses including low pH and volatile fatty acids. Exposure to acidic environments induces expression of the V. cholerae acid tolerance response. A key component of the acid tolerance response is the cad system, which is encoded by cadC and the cadBA operon. CadB is a lysine/cadaverine antiporter and CadA is a lysine decarboxylase and these function together to counter low intracellular and extracellular pH. CadC is a membrane-associated transcription factor that activates cadBA expression in response to acidic conditions. Herein we investigated the role of the LysR-type transcriptional regulator LeuO in the V. cholerae acid tolerance response. Transcriptional reporter assays revealed that leuO expression repressed cadC transcription, indicating that LeuO was a cadC repressor. Consistent with this, leuO expression was inversely linked to lysine decarboxylase production and leuO overexpression resulted in increased sensitivity to organic acids. Overexpression of leuO in a cadA mutant potentiated killing by organic acids, suggesting that the function of leuO in the acid tolerance response extended beyond its regulation of the cad system. Collectively, these studies have identified a new physiological role for LeuO in V. cholerae acid tolerance.

  4. Transcription factor networks regulating hepatic fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Panagiota; Talianidis, Iannis

    2015-01-01

    Tight regulation of lipid levels is critical for cellular and organismal homeostasis, not only in terms of energy utilization and storage, but also to prevent potential toxicity. The liver utilizes a set of hepatic transcription factors to regulate the expression of genes implicated in all aspects of lipid metabolism including catabolism, transport, and synthesis. In this article, we will review the main transcriptional mechanisms regulating the expression of genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism. The principal regulatory pathways are composed of simple modules of transcription factor crosstalks, which correspond to building blocks of more complex regulatory networks. These transcriptional networks contribute to the regulation of proper lipid homeostasis in parallel to posttranslational mechanisms and end product-mediated modulation of lipid metabolizing enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics.

  5. Indomethacin pretreatment reduces ozone-induced pulmonary function decrements in human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Schelegle, E.S.; Adams, W.C.; Siefkin, A.D.

    1987-12-01

    We studied whether O/sub 3/-induced pulmonary function decrements could be inhibited by the prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor, indomethacin, in healthy human subjects. Fourteen college-age males completed six 1-h exposure protocols consisting of no drug, placebo, and indomethacin (Indocin SR 75 mg every 12 h for 5 days) pretreatments, with filtered air and O/sub 3/ (0.35 ppm) exposures within each pretreatment. Pretreatments were delivered weekly in random order in a double-blind fashion. Ozone and filtered air exposures, separated by 72 h, were delivered in random order in a single-blind fashion. Exposures consisted of 1-h exercise on a bicycle ergometer with work loads set to elicit a mean minute ventilation of 60 L/min. Statistical analysis revealed significant (p less than 0.05) across pretreatment effects for FVC and FEV1, with no drug versus indomethacin and placebo versus indomethacin comparisons being significant. These findings suggest that cyclooxygenase products of arachidonic acid, which are sensitive to indomethacin inhibition, play a prominent role in the development of pulmonary function decrements consequent to acute O/sub 3/ exposure.

  6. Ozone-induced formation of O,O'-dityrosine cross-linked in proteins.

    PubMed

    Verweij, H; Christianse, K; Van Steveninck, J

    1982-02-18

    Treatment of spectrin, insulin, glucagon and ribonuclease with ozone results in covalent cross-linking of these proteins. This cross-linking is not reversed by treatment with dithiothreitol and thus can not be ascribed to -S-S- bond formation. A concomitant O,O'-dityrosine formation is observed by spectrofluorometric analysis of the protein and by amino acid analysis and thin-layer chromatography of hydrolyzed protein samples. It is highly probable that the observed protein cross-linking should be attributed to interpeptide O,O'-dityrosine bonds. Several authors have shown before that oxidation of proteins with horseradish peroxidase and H2O2 also leads to O,O'-dityrosine formation. Peroxidase-induced O,O'-dityrosine formation in galactose oxidase (d-galactose:oxygen 6-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.3.9) causes a strong increase of enzyme activity. In accordance with these observations ozone treatment of galactose oxidase also leads to O,O'-dityrosine formation with a concomitant 8-fold increase of enzyme activity.

  7. Increased Anion Channel Activity Is an Unavoidable Event in Ozone-Induced Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Errakhi, Rafik; Hiramatsu, Takuya; Meimoun, Patrice; Briand, Joël; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari; Kawano, Tomonori; Bouteau, François

    2010-01-01

    Background Ozone is a major secondary air pollutant often reaching high concentrations in urban areas under strong daylight, high temperature and stagnant high-pressure systems. Ozone in the troposphere is a pollutant that is harmful to the plant. Principal Findings By exposing cells to a strong pulse of ozonized air, an acute cell death was observed in suspension cells of Arabidopsis thaliana used as a model. We demonstrated that O3 treatment induced the activation of a plasma membrane anion channel that is an early prerequisite of O3-induced cell death in A. thaliana. Our data further suggest interplay of anion channel activation with well known plant responses to O3, Ca2+ influx and NADPH-oxidase generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating the oxidative cell death. This interplay might be fuelled by several mechanisms in addition to the direct ROS generation by O3; namely, H2O2 generation by salicylic and abscisic acids. Anion channel activation was also shown to promote the accumulation of transcripts encoding vacuolar processing enzymes, a family of proteases previously reported to contribute to the disruption of vacuole integrity observed during programmed cell death. Significance Collectively, our data indicate that anion efflux is an early key component of morphological and biochemical events leading to O3-induced programmed cell death. Because ion channels and more specifically anion channels assume a crucial position in cells, an understanding about the underlying role(s) for ion channels in the signalling pathway leading to programmed cell death is a subject that warrants future investigation. PMID:20967217

  8. Regulation of bile acid synthesis in rat hepatocyte monolayer cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kubaska, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    Primary hepatocyte monolayer cultures (PHC) were prepared and incubated in serum free media. Cells from a cholestyramine fed rat converted exogenous (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol into (/sup 14/C)-bile acids at a 3-fold greater rate than rats fed a normal diet. PHC synthesize bile acids (BA) at a rate of approximately 0.06 ..mu..g/mg protein/h. The major bile acid composition, as determined by GLC, was ..beta..-muricholic acid (BMC) and cholic acid (CA) in a 3:1 ratio, respectively. PHC rapidly converted free BA and BA intermediates into taurine conjugated trihydroxy-BA up to 87h after plating. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A-reductase activity assayed in microsomes prepared from PHC, decreased during the initial 48h, then remained constant. Cholesterol 7..cap alpha..-hydroxylase activity decreased during the initial 48h, then increased during the next 48h. This occurred while whole cells produced BA at a linear rate. The effect of individual BA on bile acid synthesis (BAS) was also studied. Relative rates of BAS were measured as the conversion of (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol into (/sup 14/C)-BA. BA combinations were tested in order to simulate the composition of the enterohepatic circulation. The addition of TCA (525 ..mu..M) plus TCDCA (80..mu..M), in concentrations which greatly exceed the concentration of BA (60..mu..M) in rate portal blood, failed to inhibit BAS. BA plus phospholipid and/or cholesterol also did not inhibit BAS. Surprisingly, crude rat bile with a final concentration comparable to those in the synthetic mix inhibited (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol conversion into (/sup 14/C)-BA.

  9. Cysteine Sulfinic Acid Decarboxylase Regulation: A Role for FXR and SHP in Murine Hepatic Taurine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Thomas A.; Matsumoto, Yuri; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Xie, Yan; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.; Stipanuk, Martha H.; Anakk, Sayeepriyadarshini; Moore, David D.; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Kennedy, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Background Bile acid synthesis is regulated by nuclear receptors including farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and small heterodimer partner (SHP), and by fibroblast growth factor15/19 (FGF15/19). Because bile acid synthesis involves amino acid conjugation, we hypothesized that hepatic cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSAD) (a key enzyme in taurine synthesis) is regulated by bile acids. Aims To investigate CSAD regulation by bile acids and CSAD regulatory mechanisms. Methods Mice were fed a control diet or a diet supplemented with either 0.5% cholate or 2% cholestyramine. To gain mechanistic insight into CSAD regulation, we utilized GW4064 (FXR agonist), FGF19, or T-0901317 (LXR agonist) and Shp−/− mice. Tissue mRNA expression was determined by qRT-PCR. Amino acids were measured by HPLC. Results Mice supplemented with dietary cholate exhibited reduced hepatic CSAD mRNA expression while those receiving cholestyramine exhibited increased hepatic CSAD mRNA expression. Activation of FXR suppressed CSAD mRNA expression whereas hepatic CSAD mRNA expression was increased in Shp−/− mice. Hepatic hypotaurine concentration (the product of CSAD) was higher in Shp−/− mice with a corresponding increase in serum (but not hepatic) taurine-conjugated bile acids. FGF19 administration suppressed hepatic CYP7A1 mRNA but did not change CSAD mRNA expression. LXR activation induced CYP7A1 mRNA yet failed to induce CSAD mRNA expression. Conclusion CSAD mRNA expression is physiologically regulated by bile acids in a feedback fashion via mechanisms involving SHP and FXR but not FGF15/19 or LXR. These novel findings implicate bile acids as regulators of CSAD mRNA via mechanisms shared in part with CYP7A1. PMID:24033844

  10. Biogas Production on Demand Regulated by Butyric Acid Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, K.; Schiffels, J.; Krafft, S.; Kuperjans, I.; Elbers, G.; Selmer, T.

    2016-03-01

    Investigating effects of volatile fatty acids on the biogas process it was observed that butyric acid can be used for transient stimulation of the methane production in biogas plants operating with low energy substrates like cattle manure. Upon addition of butyrate the methane output of the reactors doubled within 24 h and reached almost 3-times higher methane yields within 3-4 days. Butyrate was quantitatively eliminated and the reactors returned to the original productivity state within 3 days when application of butyrate was stopped. The opportunity to use butyrate feeding for increased biogas production on demand is discussed.

  11. Regulation of Arabidopsis thaliana seed dormancy and germination by 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Anuja; Vaistij, Fabián E.; Gilday, Alison D.; Penfield, Steven D.; Graham, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the oxylipin 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) acts along with abscisic acid to regulate seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana, but the mechanistic details of this synergistic interaction remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that OPDA acts through the germination inhibition effects of abscisic acid, the abscisic acid-sensing ABI5 protein, and the gibberellin-sensing RGL2 DELLA protein. We further demonstrate that OPDA also acts through another dormancy-promoting factor, MOTHER-OF-FT-AND-TFL1 (MFT). Both abscisic acid and MFT positively feed back into the OPDA pathway by promoting its accumulation. These results confirm the central role of OPDA in regulating seed dormancy and germination in A. thaliana and underline the complexity of interactions between OPDA and other dormancy-promoting factors such as abscisic acid, RGL2, and MFT. PMID:26873978

  12. Regulation of Arabidopsis thaliana seed dormancy and germination by 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid.

    PubMed

    Dave, Anuja; Vaistij, Fabián E; Gilday, Alison D; Penfield, Steven D; Graham, Ian A

    2016-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that the oxylipin 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) acts along with abscisic acid to regulate seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana, but the mechanistic details of this synergistic interaction remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that OPDA acts through the germination inhibition effects of abscisic acid, the abscisic acid-sensing ABI5 protein, and the gibberellin-sensing RGL2 DELLA protein. We further demonstrate that OPDA also acts through another dormancy-promoting factor, MOTHER-OF-FT-AND-TFL1 (MFT). Both abscisic acid and MFT positively feed back into the OPDA pathway by promoting its accumulation. These results confirm the central role of OPDA in regulating seed dormancy and germination in A. thaliana and underline the complexity of interactions between OPDA and other dormancy-promoting factors such as abscisic acid, RGL2, and MFT.

  13. Fatty acids from diet and microbiota regulate energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Alcock, Joe; Lin, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    A high-fat diet and elevated levels of free fatty acids are known risk factors for metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and visceral obesity. Although these disease associations are well established, it is unclear how different dietary fats change the risk of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Here, we review emerging evidence that insulin resistance and fat storage are linked to changes in the gut microbiota. The gut microbiota and intestinal barrier function, in turn, are highly influenced by the composition of fat in the diet. We review findings that certain fats (for example, long-chain saturated fatty acids) are associated with dysbiosis, impairment of intestinal barrier function, and metabolic endotoxemia. In contrast, other fatty acids, including short-chain and certain unsaturated fatty acids, protect against dysbiosis and impairment of barrier function caused by other dietary fats. These fats may promote insulin sensitivity by inhibiting metabolic endotoxemia and dysbiosis-driven inflammation. During dysbiosis, the modulation of metabolism by diet and microbiota may represent an adaptive process that compensates for the increased fuel demands of an activated immune system. PMID:27006755

  14. Potency of individual bile acids to regulate bile acid synthesis and transport genes in primary human hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Hong; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Lei, Xiaohong; Cui, Julia Yue; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Stephen C; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate their own homeostasis, but the potency of individual bile acids is not known. This study examined the effects of cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on expression of BA synthesis and transport genes in human primary hepatocyte cultures. Hepatocytes were treated with the individual BAs at 10, 30, and 100μM for 48 h, and RNA was extracted for real-time PCR analysis. For the classic pathway of BA synthesis, BAs except for UDCA markedly suppressed CYP7A1 (70-95%), the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid synthesis, but only moderately (35%) down-regulated CYP8B1 at a high concentration of 100μM. BAs had minimal effects on mRNA of two enzymes of the alternative pathway of BA synthesis, namely CYP27A1 and CYP7B1. BAs increased the two major target genes of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), namely the small heterodimer partner (SHP) by fourfold, and markedly induced fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) over 100-fold. The BA uptake transporter Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide was unaffected, whereas the efflux transporter bile salt export pump was increased 15-fold and OSTα/β were increased 10-100-fold by BAs. The expression of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3; sixfold), ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G5 (ABCG5; sixfold), multidrug associated protein-2 (MRP2; twofold), and MRP3 (threefold) were also increased, albeit to lesser degrees. In general, CDCA was the most potent and effective BA in regulating these genes important for BA homeostasis, whereas DCA and CA were intermediate, LCA the least, and UDCA ineffective.

  15. Regulatory impact analysis of the proposed acid-rain implementation regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-16

    This regulatory impact analysis (RIA) was developed in response to Executive Order (EO) 12291, which requires Federal Agencies to assess the costs, benefits, and impacts of all 'major' regulations. In compliance with EO 12291, this RIA assesses costs, benefits and impacts for the important provisions of Title IV. EPA divided its analysis of the Acid Rain Program into two parts. First, EPA analyzed the effects of the statute in the absence of any implementation regulations. In the second part of the analysis, EPA examined a 'regulatory' case that included both the SO2 reductions and the implementation regulations. By comparing costs under the regulatory case to those under the absent regulations case, EPA was able to isolate the incremental savings provided by the regulations. At the same time, by combining the two parts of the analysis, EPA was able to show the total costs imposed by the Acid Rain Program (the statute and the regulations) as a whole.

  16. New insights into the regulation of plant immunity by amino acid metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Zeier, Jürgen

    2013-12-01

    Besides defence pathways regulated by classical stress hormones, distinct amino acid metabolic pathways constitute integral parts of the plant immune system. Mutations in several genes involved in Asp-derived amino acid biosynthetic pathways can have profound impact on plant resistance to specific pathogen types. For instance, amino acid imbalances associated with homoserine or threonine accumulation elevate plant immunity to oomycete pathogens but not to pathogenic fungi or bacteria. The catabolism of Lys produces the immune signal pipecolic acid (Pip), a cyclic, non-protein amino acid. Pip amplifies plant defence responses and acts as a critical regulator of plant systemic acquired resistance, defence priming and local resistance to bacterial pathogens. Asp-derived pyridine nucleotides influence both pre- and post-invasion immunity, and the catabolism of branched chain amino acids appears to affect plant resistance to distinct pathogen classes by modulating crosstalk of salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-regulated defence pathways. It also emerges that, besides polyamine oxidation and NADPH oxidase, Pro metabolism is involved in the oxidative burst and the hypersensitive response associated with avirulent pathogen recognition. Moreover, the acylation of amino acids can control plant resistance to pathogens and pests by the formation of protective plant metabolites or by the modulation of plant hormone activity.

  17. γδ T Cells Are Required for M2 Macrophage Polarization and Resolution of Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Joel A; Kasahara, David I; Ribeiro, Luiza; Wurmbrand, Allison P; Ninin, Fernanda M C; Shore, Stephanie A

    2015-01-01

    We examined the role of γδ T cells in the induction of alternatively activated M2 macrophages and the resolution of inflammation after ozone exposure. Wildtype (WT) mice and mice deficient in γδ T cells (TCRδ-/- mice) were exposed to air or to ozone (0.3 ppm for up to 72h) and euthanized immediately or 1, 3, or 5 days after cessation of exposure. In WT mice, M2 macrophages accumulated in the lungs over the course of ozone exposure. Pulmonary mRNA abundance of the M2 genes, Arg1, Retnla, and Clec10a, also increased after ozone. In contrast, no evidence of M2 polarization was observed in TCRδ-/- mice. WT but not TCRδ-/- mice expressed the M2c polarizing cytokine, IL-17A, after ozone exposure and WT mice treated with an IL-17A neutralizing antibody exhibited attenuated ozone-induced M2 gene expression. In WT mice, ozone-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophils and macrophages resolved quickly after cessation of ozone exposure returning to air exposed levels within 3 days. However, lack of M2 macrophages in TCRδ-/- mice was associated with delayed clearance of inflammatory cells after cessation of ozone and increased accumulation of apoptotic macrophages in the lungs. Delayed restoration of normal lung architecture was also observed in TCRδ-/- mice. In summary, our data indicate that γδ T cells are required for the resolution of ozone-induced inflammation, likely because γδ T cells, through their secretion of IL-17A, contribute to changes in macrophage polarization that promote clearance of apoptotic cells.

  18. Regulation of various proteolytic pathways by insulin and amino acids in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Inmaculada; Aguado, Carmen; Sánchez, Maribel; Knecht, Erwin

    2007-07-24

    Intracellular protein degradation is a regulated process with several proteolytic pathways. Although regulation of macroautophagy has been investigated in some detail in hepatocytes and in few other cells, less is known on this regulation in other cells and proteolytic pathways. We show that in human fibroblasts insulin and amino acids reduce protein degradation by different signalling pathways and that this inhibition proceeds in part via the mammalian target of rapamycin, especially with amino acids, which probably increase lysosomal pH. Moreover, the regulatory amino acids (Phe, Arg, Met, Tyr, Trp and Cys) are partially different from other cells. Finally, and in addition to macroautophagy, insulin and amino acids modify, to different extents and sometimes in opposite directions, the activities of other proteolytic pathways.

  19. Nutrigenomic regulation of adipose tissue development - role of retinoic acid: A review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Yang, Qiyuan; Harris, Corrine L; Nelson, Mark L; Busboom, Jan R; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Du, Min

    2016-10-01

    To improve the efficiency of animal production, livestock have been extensively selected or managed to reduce fat accumulation and increase lean growth, which reduces intramuscular or marbling fat content. To enhance marbling, a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating adipogenesis is needed. Vitamin A has recently been shown to have a profound impact on all stages of adipogenesis. Retinoic acid, an active metabolite of vitamin A, activates both retinoic acid receptors (RAR) and retinoid X receptors (RXR), inducing epigenetic changes in key regulatory genes governing adipogenesis. Additionally, Vitamin D and folates interact with the retinoic acid receptors to regulate adipogenesis. In this review, we discuss nutritional regulation of adipogenesis, focusing on retinoic acid and its impact on epigenetic modifications of key adipogenic genes.

  20. Nutrigenomic regulation of adipose tissue development - role of retinoic acid: A review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Yang, Qiyuan; Harris, Corrine L; Nelson, Mark L; Busboom, Jan R; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Du, Min

    2016-10-01

    To improve the efficiency of animal production, livestock have been extensively selected or managed to reduce fat accumulation and increase lean growth, which reduces intramuscular or marbling fat content. To enhance marbling, a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating adipogenesis is needed. Vitamin A has recently been shown to have a profound impact on all stages of adipogenesis. Retinoic acid, an active metabolite of vitamin A, activates both retinoic acid receptors (RAR) and retinoid X receptors (RXR), inducing epigenetic changes in key regulatory genes governing adipogenesis. Additionally, Vitamin D and folates interact with the retinoic acid receptors to regulate adipogenesis. In this review, we discuss nutritional regulation of adipogenesis, focusing on retinoic acid and its impact on epigenetic modifications of key adipogenic genes. PMID:27086067

  1. Separation and identification of phosphatidylcholine regioisomers by combining liquid chromatography with a fusion of collision-and ozone-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Todd; Blanksby, Stephen; Kozlowskia, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The differentiation of closely related lipid isomers is increasingly important to our evolving understanding of lipid biochemistry but it is equally challenging to contemporary chromatographic and mass spectral analyses. Recently, we described a novel ion-activation approach based on combining collision- with ozone-induced dissociation (CID/OzID) for the identification of the relative acyl chain substitution positions in glycerophospholipids. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that CID/OzID can be effectively combined with reversed-phase chromatography to enable the separation and unambiguous identification of regioisomeric pairs of phosphatidylcholines that differ only in the arrangement of acyl chains on the glycerol backbone. PMID:26307699

  2. Regulating fatty acids in infant formula: critical assessment of U.S. policies and practices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fatty acids in breast-milk such as docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid, commonly known as DHA and ARA, contribute to the healthy development of children in various ways. However, the manufactured versions that are added to infant formula might not have the same health benefits as those in breast-milk. There is evidence that the manufactured additives might cause harm to infants’ health, and they might lead to unwarranted increases in the cost of infant formula. The addition of such fatty acids to infant formula needs to be regulated. In the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration has primary responsibility for regulating the composition of infant formula. The central purpose of this study is to assess the FDA’s efforts with regard to the regulation of fatty acids in infant formula. Methods This study is based on critical analysis of policies and practices described in publicly available documents of the FDA, the manufacturers of fatty acids, and other relevant organizations. The broad framework for this work was set out by the author in his book on Regulating Infant Formula, published in 2011. Results The FDA does not assess the safety or the health impacts of fatty acid additives to infant formula before they are marketed, and there is no systematic assessment after marketing is underway. Rather than making its own independent assessments, the FDA accepts the manufacturers’ claims regarding their products’ safety and effectiveness. Conclusions The FDA is not adequately regulating the use of fatty acid additives to infant formula. This results in exposure of infants to potential risks. Adverse reactions are already on record. Also, the additives have led to increasing costs of infant formula despite the lack of proven benefits to normal, full term infants. There is a need for more effective regulation of DHA and ARA additives to infant formula. PMID:24433303

  3. Mechanism of bile acid-regulated glucose and lipid metabolism in duodenal-jejunal bypass

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jie; Zou, Lei; Li, Xirui; Han, Dali; Wang, Shan; Hu, Sanyuan; Guan, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Bile acid plays an important role in regulating blood glucose, lipid and energy metabolism. The present study was implemented to determine the effect of duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) on FXR, TGR-5expression in terminal ileum and its bile acid-related mechanism on glucose and lipid metabolism. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect relative gene or protein expression in liver and intestine. Firstly, we found that expression of FXR in liver and terminal ileum of DJB group was significantly higher than that in S-DJB group (P<0.05). In addition, DJB dramatically increased the activation of TGR-5 in the liver of rats. Furthermore, PEPCK, G6Pase, FBPase 1 and GLP-1 were up-regulated by DJB. In conclusion, these results showed that bile acid ameliorated glucose and lipid metabolism through bile acid-FXR and bile acid- TGR-5 signaling pathway. PMID:26884847

  4. New mechanisms that regulate Saccharomyces cerevisiae short peptide transporter achieve balanced intracellular amino acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Melnykov, Artem V

    2016-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to take up large quantities of amino acids in the form of di- and tripeptides via a short peptide transporter, Ptr2p. It is known that PTR2 can be induced by certain peptides and amino acids, and the mechanisms governing this upregulation are understood at the molecular level. We describe two new opposing mechanisms of regulation that emphasize potential toxicity of amino acids: the first is upregulation of PTR2 in a population of cells, caused by amino acid secretion that accompanies peptide uptake; the second is loss of Ptr2p activity, due to transporter internalization following peptide uptake. Our findings emphasize the importance of proper amino acid balance in the cell and extend understanding of peptide import regulation in yeast.

  5. Role of the AMP-activated protein kinase in regulating fatty acid metabolism during exercise.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Gregory R

    2009-06-01

    During moderate-intensity exercise, fatty acids are the predominant substrate for working skeletal muscle. The release of fatty acids from adipose tissue stores, combined with the ability of skeletal muscle to actively fine tune the gradient between fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism, depending on substrate availability and energetic demands, requires a coordinated system of metabolic control. Over the past decade, since the discovery that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was increased in accordance with exercise intensity, there has been significant interest in the proposed role of this ancient stress-sensing kinase as a critical integrative switch controlling metabolic responses during exercise. In this review, studies examining the role of AMPK as a regulator of fatty acid metabolism in both adipose tissue and skeletal muscle during exercise will be discussed. Exercise induces activation of AMPK in adipocytes and regulates triglyceride hydrolysis and esterfication through phosphorylation of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and glycerol-3-phosphate acyl-transferase, respectively. In skeletal muscle, exercise-induced activation of AMPK is associated with increases in fatty acid uptake, phosphorylation of HSL, and increased fatty acid oxidation, which is thought to occur via the acetyl-CoA carboxylase-malony-CoA-CPT-1 signalling axis. Despite the importance of AMPK in regulating fatty acid metabolism under resting conditions, recent evidence from transgenic models of AMPK deficiency suggest that alternative signalling pathways may also be important for the control of fatty acid metabolism during exercise.

  6. The Campylobacter jejuni Ferric Uptake Regulator Promotes Acid Survival and Cross-Protection against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Askoura, Momen; Sarvan, Sabina; Couture, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. The mechanisms by which C. jejuni survives stomach acidity remain undefined. In the present study, we demonstrated that the C. jejuni ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays an important role in C. jejuni acid survival and acid-induced cross-protection against oxidative stress. A C. jejuni Δfur mutant was more sensitive to acid than the wild-type strain. Profiling of the acid stimulon of the C. jejuni Δfur mutant allowed us to uncover Fur-regulated genes under acidic conditions. In particular, Fur was found to upregulate genes involved in flagellar and cell envelope biogenesis upon acid stress, and mutants with deletions of these genes were found to be defective in surviving acid stress. Interestingly, prior acid exposure of C. jejuni cross-protected against oxidative stress in a catalase (KatA)- and Fur-dependent manner. Western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR revealed increased expression of KatA upon acid stress. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated that the binding affinity between Fur and the katA promoter is reduced in vitro under conditions of low pH, rationalizing the higher levels of expression of katA under acidic conditions. Strikingly, the Δfur mutant exhibited reduced virulence in both human epithelial cells and the Galleria mellonella infection model. Altogether, this is the first study showing that, in addition to its role in iron metabolism, Fur is an important regulator of C. jejuni acid responses and this function cross-protects against oxidative stress. Moreover, our results clearly demonstrate Fur's important role in C. jejuni pathogenesis. PMID:26883589

  7. Regulation of indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis by branched-chain amino acids in Enterobacter cloacae UW5.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Cassandra V; Harris, Danielle M M; Patten, Cheryl L

    2015-09-01

    The soil bacterium Enterobacter cloacae UW5 produces the rhizosphere signaling molecule indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) via the indolepyruvate pathway. Expression of indolepyruvate decarboxylase, a key pathway enzyme encoded by ipdC, is upregulated by the transcription factor TyrR in response to aromatic amino acids. Some members of the TyrR regulon may also be controlled by branched-chain amino acids and here we show that expression from the ipdC promoter and production of IAA are downregulated by valine, leucine and isoleucine. Regulation of the IAA synthesis pathway by both aromatic and branched-chain amino acids suggests a broader role for this pathway in bacterial physiology, beyond plant interactions.

  8. Peatlands and green frogs: A relationship regulated by acidity?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazerolle, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of site acidification on amphibian populations have been thoroughly addressed in the last decades. However, amphibians in naturally acidic environments, such as peatlands facing pressure from the peat mining industry, have received little attention. Through two field studies and an experiment, I assessed the use of bog habitats by the green frog (Rana clamitans melanota), a species sensitive to various forestry and peat mining disturbances. First, I compared the occurrence and breeding patterns of frogs in bog and upland ponds. I then evaluated frog movements between forest and bog habitats to determine whether they corresponded to breeding or postbreeding movements. Finally, I investigated, through a field experiment, the value of bogs as rehydrating areas for amphibians by offering living Sphagnum moss and two media associated with uplands (i.e., water with pH ca 6.5 and water-saturated soil) to acutely dehydrated frogs. Green frog reproduction at bog ponds was a rare event, and no net movements occurred between forest and bog habitats. However, acutely dehydrated frogs did not avoid Sphagnum. Results show that although green frogs rarely breed in bogs and do not move en masse between forest and bog habitats, they do not avoid bog substrates for rehydrating, despite their acidity. Thus, bogs offer viable summering habitat to amphibians, which highlights the value of these threatened environments in terrestrial amphibian ecology.

  9. Effect of plant growth regulators on fatty acids composition in Jatropha curcas L. callus culture.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Ludwi Rodríguez; Mendiola, Martha A Rodríguez; Castro, Carlos Arias; Gutiérrez-Miceli, Federico A

    2015-01-01

    The influence of Naphtaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP) on callus formation, its morphology and fatty acids profile were examined from Jatropha curcas L. Embryo from seeds of J. curcas L. were sown in Murashige and skoog (MS) medium with NAA and BAP. All treatments induced callus formation, however callus morphology was different in most of the treatments. Higher callus biomass was presented with 1.0 NAA + 0.5 BAP mg/L. Plant growth regulators modifies the fatty acids profile in callus of J. curcas L. BAP was induced linoleic and linolenic acids.

  10. Effect of plant growth regulators on fatty acids composition in Jatropha curcas L. callus culture.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Ludwi Rodríguez; Mendiola, Martha A Rodríguez; Castro, Carlos Arias; Gutiérrez-Miceli, Federico A

    2015-01-01

    The influence of Naphtaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP) on callus formation, its morphology and fatty acids profile were examined from Jatropha curcas L. Embryo from seeds of J. curcas L. were sown in Murashige and skoog (MS) medium with NAA and BAP. All treatments induced callus formation, however callus morphology was different in most of the treatments. Higher callus biomass was presented with 1.0 NAA + 0.5 BAP mg/L. Plant growth regulators modifies the fatty acids profile in callus of J. curcas L. BAP was induced linoleic and linolenic acids. PMID:25757437

  11. Cadmium Induces Retinoic Acid Signaling by Regulating Retinoic Acid Metabolic Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, β,β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1–6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1–6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 μm cadmium in Hepa 1–6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  12. Retinoic acid from the meninges regulates cortical neuron generation.

    PubMed

    Siegenthaler, Julie A; Ashique, Amir M; Zarbalis, Konstantinos; Patterson, Katelin P; Hecht, Jonathan H; Kane, Maureen A; Folias, Alexandra E; Choe, Youngshik; May, Scott R; Kume, Tsutomu; Napoli, Joseph L; Peterson, Andrew S; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2009-10-30

    Extrinsic signals controlling generation of neocortical neurons during embryonic life have been difficult to identify. In this study we demonstrate that the dorsal forebrain meninges communicate with the adjacent radial glial endfeet and influence cortical development. We took advantage of Foxc1 mutant mice with defects in forebrain meningeal formation. Foxc1 dosage and loss of meninges correlated with a dramatic reduction in both neuron and intermediate progenitor production and elongation of the neuroepithelium. Several types of experiments demonstrate that retinoic acid (RA) is the key component of this secreted activity. In addition, Rdh10- and Raldh2-expressing cells in the dorsal meninges were either reduced or absent in the Foxc1 mutants, and Rdh10 mutants had a cortical phenotype similar to the Foxc1 null mutants. Lastly, in utero RA treatment rescued the cortical phenotype in Foxc1 mutants. These results establish RA as a potent, meningeal-derived cue required for successful corticogenesis.

  13. Farnesylation mediates brassinosteroid biosynthesis to regulate abscisic acid responses.

    PubMed

    Northey, Julian G B; Liang, Siyu; Jamshed, Muhammad; Deb, Srijani; Foo, Eloise; Reid, James B; McCourt, Peter; Samuel, Marcus A

    2016-01-01

    Protein farnesylation is a post-translational modification involving the addition of a 15-carbon farnesyl isoprenoid to the carboxy terminus of select proteins(1-3). Although the roles of this lipid modification are clear in both fungal and animal signalling, many of the mechanistic functions of farnesylation in plant signalling are still unknown. Here, we show that CYP85A2, the cytochrome P450 enzyme that performs the last step in brassinosteroid biosynthesis (conversion of castasterone to brassinolide)(4), must be farnesylated to function in Arabidopsis. Loss of either CYP85A2 or CYP85A2 farnesylation results in reduced brassinolide accumulation and increased plant responsiveness to the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and overall drought tolerance, explaining previous observations(5). This result not only directly links farnesylation to brassinosteroid biosynthesis but also suggests new strategies to maintain crop yield under challenging climatic conditions. PMID:27455172

  14. [The influence of simulated acid rain on acidity and K+ leaching regulation of different soil layers].

    PubMed

    Wang, Daizhang; Jiang, Xin; Bian, Yongrong; Sun, Lei; Li, Rui; He, Jizheng

    2003-03-01

    The influence of simulated acid rain on acidity and K+ release of different soil layers of red soil from Jiangxi was investigated in the lab when surface soil was mixed with KCl. The results indicated that pH of leaching solution first decreased, then increased in the different soil layers, but pH at the beginning moment of leaching existed prominent differences and pH of leachate of pH 2.5 acid rain in A and AB layers again decreased during subsequent stage. There was a peak value of EC of leachate appearing at the beginning stage, it showed that nutrient ions in soil rapidly moved downwards into lower depth of profile. K+ concentration of effluent solution was related to acidity of acid rain and the pH2.5 value of acid rain accelerated K+ transportation downwards along profile. K+ release of A soil layer was divided into two moments which one was the rapid rate of K+ release process at the moment of beginning and then into the middle rate of release process. As to pH 4.5 value of acid rain, it also existed rapid and slow rate processes.

  15. Regulation of legume nodulation by acidic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Brett J; Lin, Meng-Han; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2013-03-01

    Legumes represent some of the most important crop species worldwide. They are able to form novel root organs known as nodules, within which biological nitrogen fixation is facilitated through a symbiotic interaction with soil-dwelling bacteria called rhizobia. This provides legumes with a distinct advantage over other plant species, as nitrogen is a key factor for growth and development. Nodule formation is tightly regulated by the plant and can be inhibited by a number of external factors, such as soil pH. This is of significant agricultural and economic importance as much of global legume crops are grown on low pH soils. Despite this, the precise mechanism by which low pH conditions inhibits nodule development remains poorly characterized.

  16. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent responses via EDS1 and PAD4.

    PubMed

    Brodersen, Peter; Petersen, Morten; Bjørn Nielsen, Henrik; Zhu, Shijiang; Newman, Mari-Anne; Shokat, Kevan M; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane; Mundy, John

    2006-08-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 has been implicated in plant defense regulation because mpk4 knockout plants exhibit constitutive activation of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, but fail to induce jasmonic acid (JA) defense marker genes in response to JA. We show here that mpk4 mutants are also defective in defense gene induction in response to ethylene (ET), and that they are more susceptible than wild-type (WT) to Alternaria brassicicola that induces the ET/JA defense pathway(s). Both SA-repressing and ET/JA-(co)activating functions depend on MPK4 kinase activity and involve the defense regulators EDS1 and PAD4, as mutations in these genes suppress de-repression of the SA pathway and suppress the block of the ET/JA pathway in mpk4. EDS1/PAD4 thus affect SA-ET/JA signal antagonism as activators of SA but as repressors of ET/JA defenses, and MPK4 negatively regulates both of these functions. We also show that the MPK4-EDS1/PAD4 branch of ET defense signaling is independent of the ERF1 transcription factor, and use comparative microarray analysis of ctr1, ctr1/mpk4, mpk4 and WT to show that MPK4 is required for induction of a small subset of ET-regulated genes. The regulation of some, but not all, of these genes involves EDS1 and PAD4.

  17. Fatty acids regulate CREBh via transcriptional mechanisms that are dependent on proteasome activity and insulin

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, CL; Wang, D; Pfaffenbach, KT; Cox, R; Wei, Y; Pagliassotti, MJ

    2011-01-01

    Excess fatty acids are closely associated with metabolic dysfunction. The deleterious effects of fatty acids relate, in part, to their ability to up-regulate proinflammatory cytokines and propagate a state of systemic inflammation. CREBh is a recently identified transcription factor that appears to be required for hepatic synthesis of C-reactive protein (CRP). Recent data suggest that fatty acids can up-regulate CREBh, thus establishing a potential molecular link between fatty acids and inflammation. The aim of the current study was to examine the nature and mechanisms of fatty acid-mediated regulation of CREBh. H4IIE liver cells were incubated in the absence or presence of varying concentrations (50–500 μM) of albumin-bound, long-chain saturated (palmitate, stearate) or unsaturated (oleate, linoleate) fatty acids (1–16 hours). All fatty acids significantly increased CREBh gene expression via transcriptional mechanisms, at concentrations as low as 50 μM. Palmitate- or oleate-mediated upregulation of CREBh was not inhibited by triacsin C, an inhibitor of long-chain fatty acyl CoA synthetase, or by the PPARα antagonist, MK886. Inhibition of proteasome activity with MG132 or lactacystin, or inclusion of insulin reduced palmitate- and oleate-mediated increases in CREBh mRNA. Finally, we examined fatty acid regulation of CREBh in vivo. Male Wistar rats were exposed to a 4-hour pancreatic clamp combined with infusion of saline or a mixed lipid emulsion. CREBh mRNA and protein were significantly increased in rats exposed to the lipid infusion compared to the saline group. Collectively, these results may have important implications for metabolic diseases characterized by excess fatty acids, insulin resistance and inflammation. PMID:20607591

  18. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Ozone-Induced Injury in the Nasal Airways of Monkeys Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Morphometric Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, Stephen A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Trease, Lynn L.; Wagner, James G.; Garcia, Guilherme M.; Ballinger, Carol A.; Kimbell, Julia; Plopper, Charles G.; Corley, Rick A.; Postlewait, Ed; Harkema, Jack R.

    2007-03-01

    ABSTRACT Age-related changes in gross and microscopic structure of the nasal cavity can alter local tissue susceptibility as well as the dose of inhaled toxicant delivered to susceptible sites. This article describes a novel method for the use of magnetic resonance imaging, 3-dimensional airway modeling, and morphometric techniques to characterize the distribution and magnitude of ozone-induced nasal injury in infant monkeys. Using this method, we are able to generate age-specific, 3-dimensional, epithelial maps of the nasal airways of infant Rhesus macaques. The principal nasal lesions observed in this primate model of ozone-induced nasal toxicology were neutrophilic rhinitis, along with necrosis and exfoliation of the epithelium lining the anterior maxilloturbinate. These lesions, induced by acute or cyclic (episodic) exposures, were examined by light microscopy, quantified by morphometric techniques, and mapped on 3-dimensional models of the nasal airways. Here, we describe the histopathologic, imaging, and computational biology methods developed to efficiently characterize, localize, quantify, and map these nasal lesions. By combining these techniques, the location and severity of the nasal epithelial injury were correlated with epithelial type, nasal airway geometry, and local biochemical and molecular changes on an individual animal basis. These correlations are critical for accurate predictive modeling of exposure-dose-response relationships in the nasal airways, and subsequent extrapolation of nasal findings in animals to humans for developing risk assessment.

  19. Essential amino acids: master regulators of nutrition and environmental footprint?

    PubMed Central

    Tessari, Paolo; Lante, Anna; Mosca, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    The environmental footprint of animal food production is considered several-fold greater than that of crops cultivation. Therefore, the choice between animal and vegetarian diets may have a relevant environmental impact. In such comparisons however, an often neglected issue is the nutritional value of foods. Previous estimates of nutrients’ environmental footprint had predominantly been based on either food raw weight or caloric content, not in respect to human requirements. Essential amino acids (EAAs) are key parameters in food quality assessment. We re-evaluated here the environmental footprint (expressed both as land use for production and as Green House Gas Emission (GHGE), of some animal and vegetal foods, titrated to provide EAAs amounts in respect to human requirements. Production of high-quality animal proteins, in amounts sufficient to match the Recommended Daily Allowances of all the EAAs, would require a land use and a GHGE approximately equal, greater o smaller (by only ±1-fold), than that necessary to produce vegetal proteins, except for soybeans, that exhibited the smallest footprint. This new analysis downsizes the common concept of a large advantage, in respect to environmental footprint, of crops vs. animal foods production, when human requirements of EAAs are used for reference. PMID:27221394

  20. Essential amino acids: master regulators of nutrition and environmental footprint?

    PubMed

    Tessari, Paolo; Lante, Anna; Mosca, Giuliano

    2016-05-25

    The environmental footprint of animal food production is considered several-fold greater than that of crops cultivation. Therefore, the choice between animal and vegetarian diets may have a relevant environmental impact. In such comparisons however, an often neglected issue is the nutritional value of foods. Previous estimates of nutrients' environmental footprint had predominantly been based on either food raw weight or caloric content, not in respect to human requirements. Essential amino acids (EAAs) are key parameters in food quality assessment. We re-evaluated here the environmental footprint (expressed both as land use for production and as Green House Gas Emission (GHGE), of some animal and vegetal foods, titrated to provide EAAs amounts in respect to human requirements. Production of high-quality animal proteins, in amounts sufficient to match the Recommended Daily Allowances of all the EAAs, would require a land use and a GHGE approximately equal, greater o smaller (by only ±1-fold), than that necessary to produce vegetal proteins, except for soybeans, that exhibited the smallest footprint. This new analysis downsizes the common concept of a large advantage, in respect to environmental footprint, of crops vs. animal foods production, when human requirements of EAAs are used for reference.

  1. Essential amino acids: master regulators of nutrition and environmental footprint?

    PubMed

    Tessari, Paolo; Lante, Anna; Mosca, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    The environmental footprint of animal food production is considered several-fold greater than that of crops cultivation. Therefore, the choice between animal and vegetarian diets may have a relevant environmental impact. In such comparisons however, an often neglected issue is the nutritional value of foods. Previous estimates of nutrients' environmental footprint had predominantly been based on either food raw weight or caloric content, not in respect to human requirements. Essential amino acids (EAAs) are key parameters in food quality assessment. We re-evaluated here the environmental footprint (expressed both as land use for production and as Green House Gas Emission (GHGE), of some animal and vegetal foods, titrated to provide EAAs amounts in respect to human requirements. Production of high-quality animal proteins, in amounts sufficient to match the Recommended Daily Allowances of all the EAAs, would require a land use and a GHGE approximately equal, greater o smaller (by only ±1-fold), than that necessary to produce vegetal proteins, except for soybeans, that exhibited the smallest footprint. This new analysis downsizes the common concept of a large advantage, in respect to environmental footprint, of crops vs. animal foods production, when human requirements of EAAs are used for reference. PMID:27221394

  2. Stimulation of polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation in myocytes by regulating its cellular uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-aleem, S.; Frangakis, C. ); Badr, M. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to investigate the regulation of polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation in the heart, the effect of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor enoximone on the oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C) arachidonic acid, and (1-{sup 14}C) arachidonyl-CoA, were studied in adult rat myocytes, and isolated rat heart mitochondria. Enoximone stimulated arachidonate oxidation by 94%, at a concentration of 0.25 mM. The apparent Vmax value of archidonate oxidation in the presence of enoximone was approximately 75% higher than the value observed with the control in isolated myocytes. Also, enoximone stimulated arachidonate uptake by 27% at a concentration of 0.25 mM. On the other hand, enoximone had no effect on the oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C) arachidonyl-CoA in isolated rat heart mitochondria. These results suggest that the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids in myocytes is regulated by the rate of uptake of these acids across sarcolemmal membranes.

  3. The global regulator LaeA controls production of citric acid and endoglucanases in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    PubMed

    Linde, Tore; Zoglowek, Marta; Lübeck, Mette; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Lübeck, Peter Stephensen

    2016-08-01

    The global regulatory protein LaeA is known for regulating the production of many kinds of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus species, as well as sexual and asexual reproduction, and morphology. In Aspergillus carbonarius, it has been shown that LaeA regulates production of ochratoxin. We have investigated the regulatory effect of LaeA on production of citric acid and cellulolytic enzymes in A. carbonarius. Two types of A. carbonarius strains, having laeA knocked out or overexpressed, were constructed and tested in fermentation. The knockout of laeA significantly decreased the production of citric acid and endoglucanases, but did not reduce the production of beta-glucosidases or xylanases. The citric acid accumulation was reduced with 74-96 % compared to the wild type. The endoglucanase activity was reduced with 51-78 %. Overexpression of LaeA seemed not to have an effect on citric acid production or on cellulose or xylanase activity. PMID:27169528

  4. The global regulator LaeA controls production of citric acid and endoglucanases in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    PubMed

    Linde, Tore; Zoglowek, Marta; Lübeck, Mette; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Lübeck, Peter Stephensen

    2016-08-01

    The global regulatory protein LaeA is known for regulating the production of many kinds of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus species, as well as sexual and asexual reproduction, and morphology. In Aspergillus carbonarius, it has been shown that LaeA regulates production of ochratoxin. We have investigated the regulatory effect of LaeA on production of citric acid and cellulolytic enzymes in A. carbonarius. Two types of A. carbonarius strains, having laeA knocked out or overexpressed, were constructed and tested in fermentation. The knockout of laeA significantly decreased the production of citric acid and endoglucanases, but did not reduce the production of beta-glucosidases or xylanases. The citric acid accumulation was reduced with 74-96 % compared to the wild type. The endoglucanase activity was reduced with 51-78 %. Overexpression of LaeA seemed not to have an effect on citric acid production or on cellulose or xylanase activity.

  5. Regulation of protein synthesis by amino acids in muscle of neonates.

    PubMed

    Suryawan, Agus; Davis, Teresa A

    2011-01-01

    The marked increase in skeletal muscle mass during the neonatal period is largely due to a high rate of postprandial protein synthesis that is modulated by an enhanced sensitivity to insulin and amino acids. The amino acid signaling pathway leading to the stimulation of protein synthesis has not been fully elucidated. Among the amino acids, leucine is considered to be a principal anabolic agent that regulates protein synthesis. mTORC1, which controls protein synthesis, has been implicated as a target for leucine. Until recently, there have been few studies exploring the role of amino acids in enhancing muscle protein synthesis in vivo. In this review, we discuss amino acid-induced protein synthesis in muscle in the neonate, focusing on current knowledge of the role of amino acids in the activation of mTORC1 leading to mRNA translation. The role of the amino acid transporters, SNAT2, LAT1, and PAT, in the modulation of mTORC1 activation and the role of amino acids in the activation of putative regulators of mTORC1, i.e., raptor, Rheb, MAP4K3, Vps34, and Rag GTPases, are discussed.

  6. Amino acid limitation induces down-regulation of WNT5a at transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zuguang; Chen Hong

    2009-01-23

    An aberrant WNT signaling contributes to the development and progression of multiple cancers. WNT5a is one of the WNT signaling molecules. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that amino acid deprivation induces changes in the WNT signaling pathway in colon cancer cells. Results showed that targets of the amino acid response pathway, ATF3 and p21, were induced in the human colon cancer cell line SW480 during amino acid limitation. There was a significant decrease in the WNT5a mRNA level following amino acid deprivation. The down-regulation of WNT5a mRNA by amino acid deprivation is not due to mRNA destabilization. There is a reduction of nuclear {beta}-catenin protein level by amino acid limitation. Under amino acid limitation, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was increased and the blockage of ERK1/2 by the inhibitor U0126 partially restored WNT5a mRNA level. In conclusion, amino acid limitation in colon cancer cells induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which then down-regulates WNT5a expression.

  7. Regulation of L-ascorbic acid content in strawberry fruits

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Rus, Eduardo; Amaya, Iraida; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F.; Botella, Miguel A.; Valpuesta, Victoriano

    2011-01-01

    Plants have several L-ascorbic acid (AsA) biosynthetic pathways, but the contribution of each one to the synthesis of AsA varyies between different species, organs, and developmental stages. Strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) fruits are rich in AsA. The pathway that uses D-galacturonate as the initial substrate is functional in ripe fruits, but the contribution of other pathways to AsA biosynthesis has not been studied. The transcription of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes such as D-galacturonate reductase (FaGalUR) and myo-inositol oxygenase (FaMIOX), and the AsA recycling enzyme monodehydroascorbate reductase (FaMDHAR) were positively correlated with the increase in AsA during fruit ripening. Fruit storage for 72 h in a cold room reduced the AsA content by 30%. Under an ozone atmosphere, this reduction was 15%. Ozone treatment increased the expression of the FaGalUR, FaMIOX, and L-galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase (FaGIPP) genes, and transcription of the L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (FaGLDH) and FAMDHAR genes was higher in the ozone-stored than in the air-stored fruits. Analysis of AsA content in a segregating population from two strawberry cultivars showed high variability, which did not correlate with the transcription of any of the genes studied. Study of GalUR protein in diverse cultivars of strawberry and different Fragaria species showed that a correlation between GalUR and AsA content was apparent in most cases, but it was not general. Three alleles were identified in strawberry, but any sequence effect on the AsA variability was eliminated by analysis of the allele-specific expression. Taken together, these results indicate that FaGalUR shares the control of AsA levels with other enzymes and regulatory elements in strawberry fruit. PMID:21561953

  8. The NHR-8 nuclear receptor regulates cholesterol and bile acid homeostasis in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Magner, Daniel B; Wollam, Joshua; Shen, Yidong; Hoppe, Caroline; Li, Dongling; Latza, Christian; Rottiers, Veerle; Hutter, Harald; Antebi, Adam

    2013-08-01

    Hormone-gated nuclear receptors (NRs) are conserved transcriptional regulators of metabolism, reproduction, and homeostasis. Here we show that C. elegans NHR-8 NR, a homolog of vertebrate liver X and vitamin D receptors, regulates nematode cholesterol balance, fatty acid desaturation, apolipoprotein production, and bile acid metabolism. Loss of nhr-8 results in a deficiency in bile acid-like steroids, called the dafachronic acids, which regulate the related DAF-12/NR, thus controlling entry into the long-lived dauer stage through cholesterol availability. Cholesterol supplementation rescues various nhr-8 phenotypes, including developmental arrest, unsaturated fatty acid deficiency, reduced fertility, and shortened life span. Notably, nhr-8 also interacts with daf-16/FOXO to regulate steady-state cholesterol levels and is synthetically lethal in combination with insulin signaling mutants that promote unregulated growth. Our studies provide important insights into nuclear receptor control of cholesterol balance and metabolism and their impact on development, reproduction, and aging in the context of larger endocrine networks.

  9. 1-Acetylpyrene-salicylic acid: photoresponsive fluorescent organic nanoparticles for the regulated release of a natural antimicrobial compound, salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Barman, Shrabani; Mukhopadhyay, Sourav K; Behara, Krishna Kalyani; Dey, Satyahari; Singh, N D Pradeep

    2014-05-28

    Photoresponsive 1-acetylpyrene-salicylic acid (AcPy-SA) nanoparticles (NPs) were developed for the regulated release of a natural antimicrobial compound, salicylic acid. The strong fluorescent properties of AcPy-SA NPs have been extensively used for potential in vitro cell imaging. The phototrigger capability of our newly prepared AcPy-SA NPs was utilized for the efficient release of an antimicrobial compound, salicylic acid. The photoregulated drug release of AcPy-SA NPs has been shown by the subsequent switching off and on of a visible-light source. In vitro biological studies reveal that AcPy-SA NPs of ∼68 nm size deliver the antimicrobial drug salicylic acid into the bacteria cells (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and efficiently kill the cells upon exposure to visible light (≥410 nm). Such photoresponsive fluorescent organic NPs will be highly beneficial for targeted and regulated antimicrobial drug release because of their biocompatible nature, efficient cellular uptake, and light-induced drug release ability.

  10. Core Amino Acid Residues in the Morphology-Regulating Protein, Mms6, for Intracellular Magnetite Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Narumiya, Kaori; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms produce finely tuned biomineral architectures with the aid of biomineral-associated proteins. The functional amino acid residues in these proteins have been previously identified using in vitro and in silico experimentation in different biomineralization systems. However, the investigation in living organisms is limited owing to the difficulty in establishing appropriate genetic techniques. Mms6 protein, isolated from the surface of magnetite crystals synthesized in magnetotactic bacteria, was shown to play a key role in the regulation of crystal morphology. In this study, we have demonstrated a defect in the specific region or substituted acidic amino acid residues in the Mms6 protein for observing their effect on magnetite biomineralization in vivo. Analysis of the gene deletion mutants and transformants of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 expressing partially truncated Mms6 protein revealed that deletions in the N-terminal or C-terminal regions disrupted proper protein localization to the magnetite surface, resulting in a change in the crystal morphology. Moreover, single amino acid substitutions at Asp123, Glu124, or Glu125 in the C-terminal region of Mms6 clearly indicated that these amino acid residues had a direct impact on magnetite crystal morphology. Thus, these consecutive acidic amino acid residues were found to be core residues regulating magnetite crystal morphology. PMID:27759096

  11. FABP4 reversed the regulation of leptin on mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in mice adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lu; Liu, Zhenjiang; Cao, Weina; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Sun, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), plays key role in fatty acid transportation and oxidation, and increases with leptin synergistically during adipose inflammation process. However, the regulation mechanism between FABP4 and leptin on mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation remains unclear. In this study, we found that FABP4 reduced the expression of leptin, CPT-1 and AOX1 in mice adipocytes. Conversely, FABP4 was down-regulated in a time-dependent manner by leptin treatment. Additionally, forced expression of FABP4 attenuated the expression of PGC1-α, UCP2, CPT-1, AOX1 and COX2 compared with leptin incubation. Moreover, mitochondrial membrane potential, fatty acid oxidation enzyme medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD), long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) and Cyt C levels were reduced in response to the overexpression of FABP4. These reductions correspond well with the reduced release of free fatty acid and the inactivation of mitochondrial complexes I and III by FABP4 overexpression. Furthermore, addition of the Akt/mTOR pathway-specific inhibitor (MK2206) blocked the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and respiration factors, whereas interference of FABP4 overcame these effects. Taken together, FABP4 could reverse the activation of the leptin-induced mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, and the inhibition of Akt/mTOR signal pathway played a key role in this process. PMID:26310911

  12. Distinct amino acid-sensing mTOR pathways regulate skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Chen, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to amino acid availability controls many cellular and developmental processes. mTOR is a master regulator of myogenic differentiation, but the pathways mediating amino acid signals in this process are not known. Here we examine the Rag GTPases and the class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, two mediators of amino acid signals upstream of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in cell growth regulation, for their potential involvement in myogenesis. We find that, although both Rag and Vps34 mediate amino acid activation of mTORC1 in C2C12 myoblasts, they have opposing functions in myogenic differentiation. Knockdown of RagA/B enhances, whereas overexpression of active RagB/C mutants impairs, differentiation, and this inhibitory function of Rag is mediated by mTORC1 suppression of the IRS1-PI3K-Akt pathway. On the other hand, Vps34 is required for myogenic differentiation. Amino acids activate a Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1) pathway that controls the production of insulin-like growth factor II, an autocrine inducer of differentiation, through the Igf2 muscle enhancer. The product of PLD, phosphatidic acid, activates the enhancer in a rapamycin-sensitive but mTOR kinase-independent manner. Our results uncover amino acid-sensing mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of myogenesis and underline the versatility and context dependence of mTOR signaling.

  13. [Regulation effects of grafting on cinnamic acid and vanillin in eggplant root exudates].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-li; Zhou, Bao-li; Wang, Ru-hua; Fu, Ya-wen

    2008-11-01

    Cinnamic acid and vanillin are the allelochemicals commonly existed in eggplant root exudates. With pot culture experiment, the regulation effects of grafting on the cinnamic acid and vanillin in eggplant root exudates were studied, and the results showed that grafting decreased the amount of the two substances, especially of vanillin, in eggplants root system. The maximum reduction amount of cinnamic acid reached 68.96%, and that of vanillin reached 100%. Under the stress of exotic cinnamic acid and vanillin, especially of exotic cinnamic acid, grafting relieved the autotoxicity of the two substances on eggplants. Compared with own-rooted eggplant, grafted eggplant had a higher plant height and a larger stem diameter, its leaf chlorophyll content increased by 5.26%-13.12%, root electric conductivity and MDA content decreased, and root SOD activity enhanced.

  14. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Regulation of Adipocyte FADS1 and FADS2 Expression and Function

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Jessica C.; Matravadia, Sarthak; Gaudio, Nicholas; Holloway, Graham P.; Mutch, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) regulate fatty acid desaturase (FADS1, FADS2) expression in the liver; however, it is unknown whether PUFAs regulate FADS in adipocytes. This is important to study considering reports that link altered desaturase activity with adipose tissue PUFA profiles, body weight, and whole-body glucose homeostasis. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the direct effects of PUFAs on FADS expression in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Methods Differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with either α-linolenic (ALA), linoleic (LA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), or arachidonic acid (AA). Gene expression, protein abundance, and cellular PUFA content were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR, Western blotting, and gas chromatography, respectively. Results Fads1 and Fads2 gene expression was reduced by EPA and AA, but not ALA or LA. Reductions in gene expression were reflected in FADS2 protein levels, but not FADS1. Treating cells with ALA and LA led to significant increases in the cellular content of downstream PUFAs. Neither ALA nor EPA changed docosahexaenoic acid content. Conclusions Differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes have a functional FADS pathway that can be regulated by PUFA. Therefore, this common adipocyte model is suitable to study dietary regulation of the FADS pathway. PMID:25755223

  15. Eicosapentaenoic acid regulates brown adipose tissue gene expression and metabolism in high fat fed mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a thermogenic tissue, a key regulator of energy balance and a potential therapeutic target for obesity. We previously reported that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) reduced high fat (HF) diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice, independent of energy intake. We hy...

  16. Synthesis and regulation of chlorogenic acid in potato: Rerouting phenylpropanoid flux in HQT silenced lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is the major phenolic sink in potato tubers and can constitute over 90% of total phenylpropanoids. The regulation of CGA biosynthesis in potato and the role of the CGA biosynthetic gene hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) was characterized. A sucros...

  17. Acid rain compliance and coordination of state and federal utility regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nordhaus, R.R.

    1993-07-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) impose new controls on emissions by electric utilities of the two major precursors of acid rain: sulfur dioxide and oxides of nitrogen. Utilities, and the utility holding company systems and power pools of which they are members, will be subject to extensive and costly compliance obligations under the new stature. Most of these utilities, utility systems, and power pools are regulated by more than one utility regulatory authority. Utility regulators will need to coordinate their policies for ratemaking and for review of acid rain compliance strategies if least-cost solutions are to be implemented without imposing on rate payers and utility shareholders the costs and risks of inconsistent regulatory determinations. This article outlines the scope of the coordination problem and spells out possible approaches that utility regulators may take in dealing with it. Topics covered include the following: the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments; acid rain (SO2); acid rain (NOx); costs of compliance; implications for utility regulation - federal and state utility regulatory framework; potential jurisdictional conflicts under existing state/federal utility regulatory scheme - single utility, holding companies, power pools; Utility regulatory issues under the 1990 amendments - planning conflicts, operational conflicts; methods for dealing with potential jurisdictional conflicts; coordination mechanisms - informal consultation, rulemaking,coordination of adjudicatory proceedings, FERC rate filings.

  18. The Regulation of Acid-Base Balance--A Microprocessor Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasch, Robert W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a computer program designed to simulate the regulation of acid-base balance, emphasizing regulatory compensations involved in the total process. Includes discussion of equations involved, a sample run of the program, and program listing (MicroSoft Basic). (JN)

  19. Regulation of water-soluble phenolic acid biosynthesis in Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pengda; Liu, Jingling; Zhang, Chenlu; Liang, Zongsuo

    2013-07-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Lamiaceae) root, generally called Danshen, is an important herb in Chinese medicine widely used for treatment of various diseases. Phenolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza, as important effective compounds, have become a new research focus in plant secondary metabolism in recent years. This review summarizes the recent advances in the regulation of water-soluble phenolic acid biosynthesis in S. miltiorrhiza via regulators at molecular level, such as the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene (PAL), cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase gene (C4H), 4-coumarate-CoA ligase gene (4CL), tyrosine aminotransferase gene (TAT), 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate reductase gene (HPPR), 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvated dioxygenase gene (HPPD), hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:hydroxyphenyllactate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase-like gene (RAS-like), and v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog 4 gene (MYB4), and production of anthocyanin pigmentation 1 gene (AtPAP1), and via regulators at cell level, such as methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, abscisic acid, polyamines, metal ions, hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), ultraviolet-B radiation, and yeast elicitor.

  20. Phytoagents for Cancer Management: Regulation of Nucleic Acid Oxidation, ROS, and Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidized nucleic acids causes genomic instability leading to senescence, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Phytoagents are known to reduce the risk of cancer development; whether such effects are through regulating the extent of nucleic acid oxidation remains unclear. Here, we outlined the role of reactive oxygen species in nucleic acid oxidation as a driving force in cancer progression. The consequential relationship between genome instability and cancer progression highlights the importance of modulation of cellular redox level in cancer management. Current epidemiological and experimental evidence demonstrate the effects and modes of action of phytoagents in nucleic acid oxidation and provide rationales for the use of phytoagents as chemopreventive or therapeutic agents. Vitamins and various phytoagents antagonize carcinogen-triggered oxidative stress by scavenging free radicals and/or activating endogenous defence systems such as Nrf2-regulated antioxidant genes or pathways. Moreover, metal ion chelation by phytoagents helps to attenuate oxidative DNA damage caused by transition metal ions. Besides, the prooxidant effects of some phytoagents pose selective cytotoxicity on cancer cells and shed light on a new strategy of cancer therapy. The “double-edged sword” role of phytoagents as redox regulators in nucleic acid oxidation and their possible roles in cancer prevention or therapy are discussed in this review. PMID:24454991

  1. Recent advances in understanding trans-epithelial acid-base regulation and excretion mechanisms in cephalopods

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Marian Y; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Tseng, Yung-Che

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods have evolved complex sensory systems and an active lifestyle to compete with fish for similar resources in the marine environment. Their highly active lifestyle and their extensive protein metabolism has led to substantial acid-base regulatory abilities enabling these organisms to cope with CO2 induced acid-base disturbances. In convergence to teleost, cephalopods possess an ontogeny-dependent shift in ion-regulatory epithelia with epidermal ionocytes being the major site of embryonic acid-base regulation and ammonia excretion, while gill epithelia take these functions in adults. Although the basic morphology and excretory function of gill epithelia in cephalopods were outlined almost half a century ago, modern immunohistological and molecular techniques are bringing new insights to the mechanistic basis of acid-base regulation and excretion of nitrogenous waste products (e.g. NH3/NH4+) across ion regulatory epithelia of cephalopods. Using cephalopods as an invertebrate model, recent findings reveal partly conserved mechanisms but also novel aspects of acid-base regulation and nitrogen excretion in these exclusively marine animals. Comparative studies using a range of marine invertebrates will create a novel and exciting research direction addressing the evolution of pH regulatory and excretory systems. PMID:26716070

  2. Retinoic acid regulates the development of a gut homing precursor for intestinal dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ruizhu; Oderup, Cecilia; Yuan, Robert; Lee, Mike; Habtezion, Aida; Hadeiba, Husein; Butcher, Eugene C

    2012-01-01

    The vitamin A metabolite retinoic acid (RA) regulates intestinal immune responses through immunomodulatory actions on intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) and lymphocytes. Here, we show that retinoic acid also controls the generation of gut-tropic migratory DC precursors, referred to as pre-mucosal DCs (pre-μDCs). Pre-μDCs express the gut trafficking receptor α4β7 and home preferentially to the intestines. They develop in the bone marrow, can differentiate into CCR9+ plasmacytoid DCs as well as conventional DCs (cDCs), but preferentially give rise to CD103+ intestinal cDCs. Generation of pre-μDCs in vivo in the bone marrow or in vitro is regulated by RA and retinoic acid receptor α signaling. The frequency of pre-μDCs is reduced in vitamin A-deficient animals and in animals treated with retinoic acid receptor inhibitors. The results define a novel vitamin A-dependent, retinoic-acid-regulated developmental sequence for dendritic cells and identify a targeted precursor for CD103+ cDCs in the gut. PMID:23235743

  3. Recent advances in understanding trans-epithelial acid-base regulation and excretion mechanisms in cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Hu, Marian Y; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Tseng, Yung-Che

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods have evolved complex sensory systems and an active lifestyle to compete with fish for similar resources in the marine environment. Their highly active lifestyle and their extensive protein metabolism has led to substantial acid-base regulatory abilities enabling these organisms to cope with CO2 induced acid-base disturbances. In convergence to teleost, cephalopods possess an ontogeny-dependent shift in ion-regulatory epithelia with epidermal ionocytes being the major site of embryonic acid-base regulation and ammonia excretion, while gill epithelia take these functions in adults. Although the basic morphology and excretory function of gill epithelia in cephalopods were outlined almost half a century ago, modern immunohistological and molecular techniques are bringing new insights to the mechanistic basis of acid-base regulation and excretion of nitrogenous waste products (e.g. NH3/NH4 (+)) across ion regulatory epithelia of cephalopods. Using cephalopods as an invertebrate model, recent findings reveal partly conserved mechanisms but also novel aspects of acid-base regulation and nitrogen excretion in these exclusively marine animals. Comparative studies using a range of marine invertebrates will create a novel and exciting research direction addressing the evolution of pH regulatory and excretory systems.

  4. Regulation of collagenase gene expression by okadaic acid, an inhibitor of protein phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S J; Lafyatis, R; Kim, K Y; Angel, P; Fujiki, H; Karin, M; Sporn, M B; Roberts, A B

    1990-01-01

    Human collagenase gene expression is regulated transcriptionally and is inducible by various mitogens in many cell types. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of this response, we examined the effects on collagenase gene expression of okadaic acid, a non-12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-type tumor promoter, which induces apparent "activation" of protein kinases by inhibition of protein phosphatases. Steady state levels of collagenase mRNA were markedly increased by okadaic acid treatment. We show that the AP-1 consensus sequence in the collagenase promoter is required for the induction of collagenase gene expression by okadaic acid, even though sequences upstream of the AP-1 consensus site have an additive effect. We also examined the regulation by okadaic acid of expression of the components of the AP-1 complex, c-fos and c-jun. c-fos expression is dramatically stimulated by okadaic acid, whereas c-jun expression is stimulated to a lesser extent. Induction of c-fos gene mRNA occurs through a region known to contain multiple regulatory elements. These results suggest that phosphorylation regulates collagenase gene expression mediated by an AP-1 binding site. Images PMID:1966042

  5. Gut microbiota, cirrhosis and alcohol regulate bile acid metabolism in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Ridlon, Jason M.; Kang, Dae-Joong; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the complex role of the bile acid-gut microbiome axis in health and disease processes is evolving rapidly. Our focus revolves around the interaction of the gut microbiota with liver diseases, especially cirrhosis. The bile acid pool size has recently been shown to be a function of microbial metabolism of bile acid and regulation of the microbiota by bile acids is important in the development and progression of several liver diseases. Humans produce a large, conjugated hydrophilic bile acid pool, maintained through positive-feedback antagonism of FXR in intestine and liver. Microbes use bile acids, and via FXR signaling this results in a smaller, unconjugated hydrophobic bile acid pool. This equilibrium is critical to maintain health. The challenge is to examine the manifold functions of gut bile acids as modulators of antibiotic, probiotic and disease progression in cirrhosis, metabolic syndrome and alcohol use. Recent studies have shown potential mechanisms explaining how perturbations in the microbiome affect bile acid pool size and composition. With advancing liver disease and cirrhosis, there is dysbiosis in the fecal, ileal and colonic mucosa, in addition to a decrease in bile acid concentration in the intestine due to the liver problems. This results in a dramatic shift toward the Firmicutes, particularly Clostridium cluster XIVa and increasing production of deoxycholic acid (DCA). Alcohol intake speeds up these processes in the subjects with and without cirrhosis without significant FXR feedback. Taken together, these pathways can impact intestinal and systemic inflammation while worsening dysbiosis. The interaction between bile acids, alcohol, cirrhosis and dysbiosis is an important relationship that influences intestinal and systemic inflammation, which in turn determines progression of the overall disease process. These interactions and the impact of commonly used therapies for liver disease can provide insight into the pathogenesis

  6. Structure-dependent effects of pyridine derivatives on mechanisms of intestinal fatty acid uptake: regulation of nicotinic acid receptor and fatty acid transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Annett; Lang, Roman; Rohm, Barbara; Rubach, Malte; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-07-01

    Pyridines are widely distributed in foods. Nicotinic acid (NA), a carboxylated pyridine derivative, inhibits lipolysis in adipocytes by activation of the orphan NA receptor (HM74A) and is applied to treat hyperlipidemia. However, knowledge on the impact of pyridine derivatives on intestinal lipid metabolism is scarce. This study was performed to identify the structural determinants of pyridines for their effects on fatty acid uptake in enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and to elucidate the mechanisms of action. The impact of 17 pyridine derivatives on fatty acid uptake was tested. Multiple regression analysis revealed the presence of a methyl group to be the structural determinant at 0.1 mM, whereas at 1 mM, the presence of a carboxylic group and the N-methylation presented further structural characteristics to affect the fatty acid uptake. NA, showing a stimulating effect on FA uptake, and N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP), inhibiting FA uptake, were selected for mechanistic studies. Gene expression of the fatty acid transporters CD36, FATP2 and FATP4, and the lipid metabolism regulating transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and PPARγ was up-regulated upon NA treatment. Caco-2 cells were demonstrated to express the low-affinity NA receptor HM74 of which the gene expression was up-regulated upon NA treatment. We hypothesize that the NA-induced fatty acid uptake might result from NA receptor activation and related intracellular signaling cascades. In contrast, MPP increased transepithelial electrical resistance. We therefore conclude that NA and MPP, both sharing the pyridine motif core, exhibit their contrary effects on intestinal FA uptake by activation of different mechanisms.

  7. Structure-dependent effects of pyridine derivatives on mechanisms of intestinal fatty acid uptake: regulation of nicotinic acid receptor and fatty acid transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Annett; Lang, Roman; Rohm, Barbara; Rubach, Malte; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-07-01

    Pyridines are widely distributed in foods. Nicotinic acid (NA), a carboxylated pyridine derivative, inhibits lipolysis in adipocytes by activation of the orphan NA receptor (HM74A) and is applied to treat hyperlipidemia. However, knowledge on the impact of pyridine derivatives on intestinal lipid metabolism is scarce. This study was performed to identify the structural determinants of pyridines for their effects on fatty acid uptake in enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and to elucidate the mechanisms of action. The impact of 17 pyridine derivatives on fatty acid uptake was tested. Multiple regression analysis revealed the presence of a methyl group to be the structural determinant at 0.1 mM, whereas at 1 mM, the presence of a carboxylic group and the N-methylation presented further structural characteristics to affect the fatty acid uptake. NA, showing a stimulating effect on FA uptake, and N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP), inhibiting FA uptake, were selected for mechanistic studies. Gene expression of the fatty acid transporters CD36, FATP2 and FATP4, and the lipid metabolism regulating transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and PPARγ was up-regulated upon NA treatment. Caco-2 cells were demonstrated to express the low-affinity NA receptor HM74 of which the gene expression was up-regulated upon NA treatment. We hypothesize that the NA-induced fatty acid uptake might result from NA receptor activation and related intracellular signaling cascades. In contrast, MPP increased transepithelial electrical resistance. We therefore conclude that NA and MPP, both sharing the pyridine motif core, exhibit their contrary effects on intestinal FA uptake by activation of different mechanisms. PMID:24767308

  8. Regulation of polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis by seaweed fucoxanthin and its metabolite in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Aki, Tsunehiro; Yamamoto, Masaya; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Tomita, Kohki; Toyoura, Rieko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Kawamoto, Seiji; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo; Ono, Kazuhisa

    2014-02-01

    The effects of a seaweed carotenoid, fucoxanthin, and its physiological metabolite, fucoxanthinol, on the biosynthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were investigated using cultured rat hepatoma BRL-3A. The metabolism of α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) was suppressed by the addition of these carotenoids, resulting in a decrease in the content of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3), which suggested a down-regulation of metabolic enzymes such as fatty acid desaturase and elongase. An increase in the content of docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3), as observed in previous studies in vivo, might be a buffering action to maintain the membrane fluidity. The suppressive effect of fucoxanthinol on ∆6 fatty acid desaturase was not at the level of gene expression but due to specific modifications of the protein via a ubiquitin-proteasome system. A proteomic analysis revealed several factors such as phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein that might be involved in the observed action of fucoxanthin. These findings will contribute to studies on the elucidation of the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of PUFA biosynthesis by fucoxanthin. PMID:24174374

  9. The chromatin remodeler DDM1 promotes hybrid vigor by regulating salicylic acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingzhu; Li, Yanqiang; Xu, Tao; Srivastava, Ashish Kumar; Wang, Dong; Zeng, Liang; Yang, Lan; He, Li; Zhang, Heng; Zheng, Zhimin; Yang, Dong-Lei; Zhao, Cheng; Dong, Juan; Gong, Zhizhong; Liu, Renyi; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    In plants, hybrid vigor is influenced by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms; however, the molecular pathways are poorly understood. We investigated the potential contributions of epigenetic regulators to heterosis in Arabidposis and found that the chromatin remodeler DECREASED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DDM1) affects early seedling growth heterosis in Col/C24 hybrids. ddm1 mutants showed impaired heterosis and increased expression of non-additively expressed genes related to salicylic acid metabolism. Interestingly, our data suggest that salicylic acid is a hormetic regulator of seedling growth heterosis, and that hybrid vigor arises from crosses that produce optimal salicylic acid levels. Although DNA methylation failed to correlate with differential non-additively expressed gene expression, we uncovered DDM1 as an epigenetic link between salicylic acid metabolism and heterosis, and propose that the endogenous salicylic acid levels of parental plants can be used to predict the heterotic outcome. Salicylic acid protects plants from pathogens and abiotic stress. Thus, our findings suggest that stress-induced hormesis, which has been associated with increased longevity in other organisms, may underlie specific hybrid vigor traits. PMID:27551435

  10. MNL1 regulates weak acid-induced stress responses of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ramsdale, Mark; Selway, Laura; Stead, David; Walker, Jan; Yin, Zhikang; Nicholls, Susan M; Crowe, Jonathan; Sheils, Emma M; Brown, Alistair J P

    2008-10-01

    MNL1, the Candida albicans homologue of an orphan Msn2-like gene (YER130c in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) has no known function. Here we report that MNL1 regulates weak acid stress responses. Deletion of MNL1 prevents the long-term adaptation of C. albicans cells to weak acid stresses and compromises their global transcriptional response under these conditions. The promoters of Mnl1-dependent genes contain a novel STRE-like element (SLE) that imposes Mnl1-dependent, weak acid stress-induced transcription upon a lacZ reporter in C. albicans. The SLE (HHYYCCCCTTYTY) is related to the Nrg1 response element (NRE) element recognized by the transcriptional repressor Nrg1. Deletion of NRG1 partially restores the ability of C. albicans mnl1 cells to adapt to weak acid stress, indicating that Mnl1 and Nrg1 act antagonistically to regulate this response. Molecular, microarray, and proteomic analyses revealed that Mnl1-dependent adaptation does not occur in cells exposed to proapoptotic or pronecrotic doses of weak acid, suggesting that Ras-pathway activation might suppress the Mnl1-dependent weak acid response in dying cells. Our work defines a role for this YER130c orthologue in stress adaptation and cell death. PMID:18653474

  11. The chromatin remodeler DDM1 promotes hybrid vigor by regulating salicylic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingzhu; Li, Yanqiang; Xu, Tao; Srivastava, Ashish Kumar; Wang, Dong; Zeng, Liang; Yang, Lan; He, Li; Zhang, Heng; Zheng, Zhimin; Yang, Dong-Lei; Zhao, Cheng; Dong, Juan; Gong, Zhizhong; Liu, Renyi; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    In plants, hybrid vigor is influenced by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms; however, the molecular pathways are poorly understood. We investigated the potential contributions of epigenetic regulators to heterosis in Arabidposis and found that the chromatin remodeler DECREASED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DDM1) affects early seedling growth heterosis in Col/C24 hybrids. ddm1 mutants showed impaired heterosis and increased expression of non-additively expressed genes related to salicylic acid metabolism. Interestingly, our data suggest that salicylic acid is a hormetic regulator of seedling growth heterosis, and that hybrid vigor arises from crosses that produce optimal salicylic acid levels. Although DNA methylation failed to correlate with differential non-additively expressed gene expression, we uncovered DDM1 as an epigenetic link between salicylic acid metabolism and heterosis, and propose that the endogenous salicylic acid levels of parental plants can be used to predict the heterotic outcome. Salicylic acid protects plants from pathogens and abiotic stress. Thus, our findings suggest that stress-induced hormesis, which has been associated with increased longevity in other organisms, may underlie specific hybrid vigor traits. PMID:27551435

  12. Fatty acid esters produced by Lasiodiplodia theobromae function as growth regulators in tobacco seedlings.

    PubMed

    Uranga, Carla C; Beld, Joris; Mrse, Anthony; Córdova-Guerrero, Iván; Burkart, Michael D; Hernández-Martínez, Rufina

    2016-04-01

    The Botryosphaeriaceae are a family of trunk disease fungi that cause dieback and death of various plant hosts. This work sought to characterize fatty acid derivatives in a highly virulent member of this family, Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of an isolated compound revealed (Z, Z)-9,12-ethyl octadecadienoate, (trivial name ethyl linoleate), as one of the most abundant fatty acid esters produced by L. theobromae. A variety of naturally produced esters of fatty acids were identified in Botryosphaeriaceae. In comparison, the production of fatty acid esters in the soil-borne tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, and the non-phytopathogenic fungus Trichoderma asperellum was found to be limited. Ethyl linoleate, ethyl hexadecanoate (trivial name ethyl palmitate), and ethyl octadecanoate, (trivial name ethyl stearate), significantly inhibited tobacco seed germination and altered seedling leaf growth patterns and morphology at the highest concentration (0.2 mg/mL) tested, while ethyl linoleate and ethyl stearate significantly enhanced growth at low concentrations, with both still inducing growth at 98 ng/mL. This work provides new insights into the role of naturally esterified fatty acids from L. theobromae as plant growth regulators with similar activity to the well-known plant growth regulator gibberellic acid.

  13. The chromatin remodeler DDM1 promotes hybrid vigor by regulating salicylic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingzhu; Li, Yanqiang; Xu, Tao; Srivastava, Ashish Kumar; Wang, Dong; Zeng, Liang; Yang, Lan; He, Li; Zhang, Heng; Zheng, Zhimin; Yang, Dong-Lei; Zhao, Cheng; Dong, Juan; Gong, Zhizhong; Liu, Renyi; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    In plants, hybrid vigor is influenced by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms; however, the molecular pathways are poorly understood. We investigated the potential contributions of epigenetic regulators to heterosis in Arabidposis and found that the chromatin remodeler DECREASED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DDM1) affects early seedling growth heterosis in Col/C24 hybrids. ddm1 mutants showed impaired heterosis and increased expression of non-additively expressed genes related to salicylic acid metabolism. Interestingly, our data suggest that salicylic acid is a hormetic regulator of seedling growth heterosis, and that hybrid vigor arises from crosses that produce optimal salicylic acid levels. Although DNA methylation failed to correlate with differential non-additively expressed gene expression, we uncovered DDM1 as an epigenetic link between salicylic acid metabolism and heterosis, and propose that the endogenous salicylic acid levels of parental plants can be used to predict the heterotic outcome. Salicylic acid protects plants from pathogens and abiotic stress. Thus, our findings suggest that stress-induced hormesis, which has been associated with increased longevity in other organisms, may underlie specific hybrid vigor traits.

  14. Regulation of polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis by seaweed fucoxanthin and its metabolite in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Aki, Tsunehiro; Yamamoto, Masaya; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Tomita, Kohki; Toyoura, Rieko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Kawamoto, Seiji; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo; Ono, Kazuhisa

    2014-02-01

    The effects of a seaweed carotenoid, fucoxanthin, and its physiological metabolite, fucoxanthinol, on the biosynthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were investigated using cultured rat hepatoma BRL-3A. The metabolism of α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) was suppressed by the addition of these carotenoids, resulting in a decrease in the content of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3), which suggested a down-regulation of metabolic enzymes such as fatty acid desaturase and elongase. An increase in the content of docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3), as observed in previous studies in vivo, might be a buffering action to maintain the membrane fluidity. The suppressive effect of fucoxanthinol on ∆6 fatty acid desaturase was not at the level of gene expression but due to specific modifications of the protein via a ubiquitin-proteasome system. A proteomic analysis revealed several factors such as phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein that might be involved in the observed action of fucoxanthin. These findings will contribute to studies on the elucidation of the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of PUFA biosynthesis by fucoxanthin.

  15. The role of Zic transcription factors in regulating hindbrain retinoic acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The reiterated architecture of cranial motor neurons aligns with the segmented structure of the embryonic vertebrate hindbrain. Anterior-posterior identity of cranial motor neurons depends, in part, on retinoic acid signaling levels. The early vertebrate embryo maintains a balance between retinoic acid synthetic and degradative zones on the basis of reciprocal expression domains of the retinoic acid synthesis gene aldhehyde dehydrogenase 1a2 (aldh1a2) posteriorly and the oxidative gene cytochrome p450 type 26a1 (cyp26a1) in the forebrain, midbrain, and anterior hindbrain. Results This manuscript investigates the role of zinc finger of the cerebellum (zic) transcription factors in regulating levels of retinoic acid and differentiation of cranial motor neurons. Depletion of zebrafish Zic2a and Zic2b results in a strong downregulation of aldh1a2 expression and a concomitant reduction in activity of a retinoid-dependent transgene. The vagal motor neuron phenotype caused by loss of Zic2a/2b mimics a depletion of Aldh1a2 and is rescued by exogenously supplied retinoic acid. Conclusion Zic transcription factors function in patterning hindbrain motor neurons through their regulation of embryonic retinoic acid signaling. PMID:23937294

  16. Fatty acid esters produced by Lasiodiplodia theobromae function as growth regulators in tobacco seedlings.

    PubMed

    Uranga, Carla C; Beld, Joris; Mrse, Anthony; Córdova-Guerrero, Iván; Burkart, Michael D; Hernández-Martínez, Rufina

    2016-04-01

    The Botryosphaeriaceae are a family of trunk disease fungi that cause dieback and death of various plant hosts. This work sought to characterize fatty acid derivatives in a highly virulent member of this family, Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of an isolated compound revealed (Z, Z)-9,12-ethyl octadecadienoate, (trivial name ethyl linoleate), as one of the most abundant fatty acid esters produced by L. theobromae. A variety of naturally produced esters of fatty acids were identified in Botryosphaeriaceae. In comparison, the production of fatty acid esters in the soil-borne tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, and the non-phytopathogenic fungus Trichoderma asperellum was found to be limited. Ethyl linoleate, ethyl hexadecanoate (trivial name ethyl palmitate), and ethyl octadecanoate, (trivial name ethyl stearate), significantly inhibited tobacco seed germination and altered seedling leaf growth patterns and morphology at the highest concentration (0.2 mg/mL) tested, while ethyl linoleate and ethyl stearate significantly enhanced growth at low concentrations, with both still inducing growth at 98 ng/mL. This work provides new insights into the role of naturally esterified fatty acids from L. theobromae as plant growth regulators with similar activity to the well-known plant growth regulator gibberellic acid. PMID:26926564

  17. Fatty acid regulates gene expression and growth of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Chen, Y.; Tjandrawinata, R. R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been proposed that the omega-6 fatty acids increase the rate of tumor growth. Here we test that hypothesis in the PC-3 human prostate tumor. We found that the essential fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA), and the AA metabolite PGE(2) stimulate tumor growth while oleic acid (OA) and the omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) inhibited growth. In examining the role of AA in growth response, we extended our studies to analyze changes in early gene expression induced by AA. We demonstrate that c-fos expression is increased within minutes of addition in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the immediate early gene cox-2 is also increased in the presence of AA in a dose-dependent manner, while the constitutive cox-1 message was not increased. Three hours after exposure to AA, the synthesis of PGE(2) via COX-2 was also increased. Previous studies have demonstrated that AA was primarily delivered by low density lipoprotein (LDL) via its receptor (LDLr). Since it is known that hepatomas, acute myelogenous leukemia and colorectal tumors lack normal cholesterol feedback, we examined the role of the LDLr in growth regulation of the PC-3 prostate cancer cells. Analysis of ldlr mRNA expression and LDLr function demonstrated that human PC-3 prostate cancer cells lack normal feedback regulation. While exogenous LDL caused a significant stimulation of cell growth and PGE(2) synthesis, no change was seen in regulation of the LDLr by LDL. Taken together, these data show that normal cholesterol feedback of ldlr message and protein is lost in prostate cancer. These data suggest that unregulated over-expression of LDLr in tumor cells would permit increased availability of AA, which induces immediate early genes c-fos and cox-2 within minutes of uptake.

  18. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J.; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal. PMID:27128682

  19. The effects of trans-fatty acids on TAG regulation in mice depend on dietary unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Saín, Juliana; González, Marcela Aída; Lavandera, Jimena Verónica; Scalerandi, María Victoria; Bernal, Claudio Adrián

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of trans-fatty acids (TFA) on liver and serum TAG regulation in mice fed diets containing different proportions of n-3, n-6 and n-9 unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) from olive (O), maize (C) or rapeseed (R) oils partially substituted or not with TFA (Ot, Ct and Rt, respectively). Male CF1 mice were fed (30 d) one of these diets. The effects of the partial substitution (1 %, w/w) of different UFA with TFA on the activity and expression of hepatic enzymes involved in lipogenesis and fatty acids oxidation were evaluated, as well as their transcription factor expressions. Some of the mechanisms involved in the serum TAG regulation, hepatic VLDL rich in TAG (VLDL-TAG) secretion rate and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity were assessed. In liver, TFA induced an increase in TAG content in the Ot and Rt groups, and this effect was associated with an imbalance between lipogenesis and β-oxidation. In the Ot group, exacerbated lipogenesis may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the liver steatosis induced by TFA, whereas in Rt it has been related to a decreased β-oxidation, compared with their respective controls. The enhanced hepatic VLDL-TAG secretion in the Ot and Rt groups was compensated with a differential removal of TAG by LPL enzyme in extrahepatic tissues, leading to unchanged serum TAG levels. In brief, the effects of low levels of TFA on liver and serum TAG regulation in mice depend on the dietary proportions of n-3, n-6 and n-9 UFA. PMID:27464460

  20. Modulation of organic acids and sugar content in tomato fruits by an abscisic acid-regulated transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Bastías, Adriana; López-Climent, María; Valcárcel, Mercedes; Rosello, Salvador; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Casaretto, José A

    2011-03-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a role in fruit development. ABA signaling components of developmental programs and responses to stress conditions include the group of basic leucine zipper transcriptional activators known as ABA-response element binding factors (AREBs/ABFs). AREB transcription factors mediate ABA-regulated gene expression involved in desiccation tolerance and are expressed mainly in seeds and in vegetative tissues under stress; however, they are also expressed in some fruits such as tomato. In order to get an insight into the role of ABA signaling in fruit development, the expression of two AREB-like factors were investigated during different developmental stages. In addition, tomato transgenic lines that overexpress and downregulate one AREB-like transcription factor, SlAREB1, were used to determine its effect on the levels of some metabolites determining fruit quality. Higher levels of citric acid, malic acid, glutamic acid, glucose and fructose were observed in SlAREB1-overexpressing lines compared with those in antisense suppression lines in red mature fruit pericarp. The higher hexose concentration correlated with increased expression of genes encoding a vacuolar invertase (EC 3.2.1.26) and a sucrose synthase (EC 2.4.1.13). No significant changes were found in ethylene content which agrees with the normal ripening phenotype observed in transgenic fruits. These results suggest that an AREB-mediated ABA signal affects the metabolism of these compounds during the fruit developmental program.

  1. Observations of ozone-induced foliar injury on black cherry (Prunus serotina, var. capuli) within the Desierto de Los Leones National Park, Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Skelly, J M; Savage, J E; de Bauer, M de L; Alvarado, D

    1997-01-01

    A survey for ozone-induced foliar injury of black cherry was conducted in mid-June 1995 within the Desierto de Los Leones National Park located southwest of Mexico City. Evaluations of the upper and lower tree crowns of 18 trees revealed evidence of significant upper surface stipple, leaf reddening and premature senescence on 72% of the trees. A general survey of an additional 169 trees disclosed that 41% exhibited similar symptoms. A gradient of increasing symptoms with increasing elevation was also evident. For the most part, asymptomatic trees were observed to be situated within well-shaded coves at the lower elevations with very few symptomatic trees present in these areas. PMID:15093455

  2. Ozone pollution and ozone biomonitoring in European cities Part II. Ozone-induced plant injury and its relationship with descriptors of ozone pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, Andreas; Ansel, Wolfgang; Klumpp, Gabriele; Vergne, Phillippe; Sifakis, Nicolas; Sanz, María José; Rasmussen, Stine; Ro-Poulsen, Helge; Ribas, Àngela; Peñuelas, Josep; Kambezidis, Harry; He, Shang; Garrec, Jean Pierre; Calatayud, Vicent

    Within the scope of a biomonitoring study conducted in twelve urban agglomerations in eight European countries, the ozone-sensitive bioindicator plant Nicotiana tabacum cv. Bel-W3 was employed in order to assess the occurrence of phytotoxic ozone effects at urban, suburban, rural and traffic-exposed sites. The tobacco plants were exposed to ambient air for biweekly periods at up to 100 biomonitoring sites from 2000 to 2002. Special emphasis was placed upon methodological standardisation of plant cultivation, field exposure and injury assessment. Ozone-induced leaf injury showed a clearly increasing gradient from northern and northwestern Europe to central and southern European locations. The strongest ozone impact occurred at the exposure sites in Lyon and Barcelona, while in Edinburgh, Sheffield, Copenhagen and Düsseldorf only weak to moderate ozone effects were registered. Between-site differences within local networks were relatively small, but seasonal and inter-annual differences were strong due to the variability of meteorological conditions and related ozone concentrations. The 2001 data revealed a significant relationship between foliar injury degree and various descriptors of ozone pollution such as mean value, AOT20 and AOT40. Examining individual sites of the local monitoring networks separately, however, yielded noticeable differences. Some sites showed no association between ozone pollution and ozone-induced effects, whereas others featured almost linear relationships. This is because the actual ozone flux into the leaf, which is modified by various environmental factors, rather than ambient ozone concentration determines the effects on plants. The advantage of sensitive bioindicators like tobacco Bel-W3 is that the impact of the effectively absorbed ozone dose can directly be measured.

  3. The Helicobacter pylori homologue of the ferric uptake regulator is involved in acid resistance.

    PubMed

    Bijlsma, Jetta J E; Waidner, Barbara; Vliet, Arnoud H M van; Hughes, Nicky J; Häg, Stephanie; Bereswill, Stefan; Kelly, David J; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Kist, Manfred; Kusters, Johannes G

    2002-02-01

    The only known niche of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori is the gastric mucosa, where large fluctuations of pH occur, indicating that the bacterial response and resistance to acid are important for successful colonization. One of the few regulatory proteins in the H. pylori genome is a homologue of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur). In most bacteria, the main function of Fur is the regulation of iron homeostasis. However, in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Fur also plays an important role in acid resistance. In this study, we determined the role of the H. pylori Fur homologue in acid resistance. Isogenic fur mutants were generated in three H. pylori strains (1061, 26695, and NCTC 11638). At pH 7 there was no difference between the growth rates of mutants and the parent strains. Under acidic conditions, growth of the fur mutants was severely impaired. No differences were observed between the survival of the fur mutant and parent strain 1061 after acid shock. Addition of extra iron or removal of iron from the growth medium did not improve the growth of the fur mutant at acidic pH. This indicates that the phenotype of the fur mutant at low pH was not due to increased iron sensitivity. Transcription of fur was repressed in response to low pH. From this we conclude that Fur is involved in the growth at acidic pH of H. pylori; as such, it is the first regulatory protein implicated in the acid resistance of this important human pathogen. PMID:11796589

  4. Regulation of epinasty induced by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in pea and Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Pazmiño, D M; Rodríguez-Serrano, M; Sanz, M; Romero-Puertas, M C; Sandalio, L M

    2014-07-01

    The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) causes uncontrolled cell division and malformed growth in plants, giving rise to leaf epinasty and stem curvature. In this study, mechanisms involved in the regulation of leaf epinasty induced by 2,4-D were studied using different chemicals involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation (diphenyleniodonium, butylated hydroxyanisole, EDTA, allopurinol), calcium channels (LaCl3), protein phosphorylation (cantharidin, wortmannin) and ethylene emission/perception (aminoethoxyvinyl glycine, AgNO3). The effect of these compounds on the epinasty induced by 2,4-D was analysed in shoots and leaf strips from pea plants. For further insight into the effect of 2,4-D, studies were also made in Arabidopsis mutants deficient in ROS production (rbohD, rbohF, xdh), ethylene (ein 3-1, ctr 1-1, etr 1-1), abscisic acid (aba 3.1), and jasmonic acid (coi 1.1, jar 1.1, opr 3) pathways. The results suggest that ROS production, mainly ·OH, is essential in the development of epinasty triggered by 2,4-D. Epinasty was also found to be regulated by Ca2+, protein phosphorylation and ethylene, although all these factors act downstream of ROS production. The use of Arabidopsis mutants appears to indicate that abscisic and jasmonic acid are not involved in regulating epinasty, although they could be involved in other symptoms induced by 2,4-D.

  5. Inducible gene expression and environmentally regulated genes in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kok, J

    1996-10-01

    Relatively recently, a number of genes and operons have been identified in lactic acid bacteria that are inducible and respond to environmental factors. Some of these genes/operons had been isolated and analysed because of their importance in the fermentation industry and, consequently, their transcription was studied and found to be regulatable. Examples are the lactose operon, the operon for nisin production, and genes in the proteolytic pathway of Lactococcus lactis, as well as xylose metabolism in Lactobacillus pentosus. Some other operons were specifically targetted with the aim to compare their mode of regulation with known regulatory mechanisms in other well-studied bacteria. These studies, dealing with the biosynthesis of histidine, tryptophan, and of the branched chain amino acids in L. lactis, have given new insights in gene regulation and in the occurrence of auxotrophy in these bacteria. Also, nucleotide sequence analyses of a number of lactococcal bacteriophages was recently initiated to, among other things, specifically learn more about regulation of the phage life cycle. Yet another approach in the analysis of regulated genes is the 'random' selection of genetic elements that respond to environmental stimuli and the first of such sequences from lactic acid bacteria have been identified and characterized. The potential of these regulatory elements in fundamental research and practical (industrial) applications will be discussed.

  6. Regulation of de novo fatty acid synthesis in maturing oilseeds of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Baud, Sébastien; Lepiniec, Loïc

    2009-06-01

    As a Brassicaceae, Arabidopsis thaliana constitutes an excellent model system to investigate oil biosynthesis in seeds. Extensive tools for the genetic and molecular dissection of this model species are now available. Together with analytical procedures adapted to its tiny seeds, these tools have allowed major advances in isolating and characterising the factors that participate in the metabolic and developmental control of seed filling. Once the biochemical pathways producing storage lipids, namely triacylglycerols, were elucidated, the question of the regulation of this metabolic network has arisen. The coordinated up regulation of genes encoding enzymes of the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway observed at the onset of seed maturation suggests that the pathway may be subjected to a system of global transcriptional regulation. This has been further established by the study of master regulators of the maturation program like LEAFY COTYLEDON2 and the characterisation of the WRINKLED1 transcription factor. These factors have been shown to participate in a regulatory cascade controlling the induction of the genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis at the onset of the maturation phase. Although much remains to be elucidated, the framework of the regulatory system controlling fatty acid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis seeds is coming into focus.

  7. Retinoic Acid and Histone Deacetylases Regulate Epigenetic Changes in Embryonic Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Urvalek, Alison M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2014-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (RA) is a vitamin A metabolite that plays major roles in regulating stem cell differentiation and development. RA is the ligand of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) family of transcription factors, which interact with retinoic acid response elements (RAREs) within target gene proximal promoters and enhancers. Although RA-mediated gene activation is well understood, less is known about the mechanisms for repression at RA-regulated genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that in embryonic stem cells in the absence of RA, histone deacetylases (HDACs) differentially bind to various RAREs in proximal promoters or enhancer regions of RA-regulated genes; HDAC1, HDAC2, and HDAC3 bind at RAREs in the Hoxa1 and Cyp26a1 gene regulatory regions, whereas only HDAC1 binds at the RARβ2 RARE. shRNA knockdown of HDAC1, HDAC2, or HDAC3 differentially increases the deposition of the histone 3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27ac) epigenetic mark associated with increases in these three transcripts. Importantly, RA treatment differentially mediates the removal of HDACs from the Hoxa1, Cyp26a1, and RARβ2 genes and promotes the deposition of the H3K27ac mark at these genes. Overall, we show that HDACs differentially bind to RA-regulated genes to control key epigenetic marks involved in stem cell differentiation. PMID:24821725

  8. Regulation of the Pseudomonas sp. Strain ADP Cyanuric Acid Degradation Operon

    PubMed Central

    García-González, Vicente; Govantes, Fernando; Porrúa, Odil; Santero, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP is the model strain for studying bacterial degradation of the s-triazine herbicide atrazine. In this work, we focused on the expression of the atzDEF operon, involved in mineralization of the central intermediate of the pathway, cyanuric acid. Expression analysis of atzD-lacZ fusions in Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP and Pseudomonas putida showed that atzDEF is subjected to dual regulation in response to nitrogen limitation and cyanuric acid. The gene adjacent to atzD, orf99 (renamed here atzR), encoding a LysR-like regulator, was found to be required for both responses. Expression of atzR-lacZ was induced by nitrogen limitation and repressed by AtzR. Nitrogen regulation of atzD-lacZ and atzR-lacZ expression was dependent on the alternative σ factor σN and NtrC, suggesting that the cyanuric acid degradation operon may be subject to general nitrogen control. However, while atzR is transcribed from a σN-dependent promoter, atzDEF transcription appears to be driven from a σ70-type promoter. Expression of atzR from a heterologous promoter revealed that although NtrC regulation of atzD-lacZ requires the AtzR protein, it is not the indirect result of NtrC-activated AtzR synthesis. We propose that expression of the cyanuric acid degradation operon atzDEF is controlled by means of a complex regulatory circuit in which AtzR is the main activator. AtzR activity is in turn modulated by the presence of cyanuric acid and by a nitrogen limitation signal transduced by the Ntr system. PMID:15601699

  9. Marine- and plant-derived ω-3 fatty acids differentially regulate prostate cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    ESER, PINAR O.; VANDEN HEUVEL, JOHN P.; ARAUJO, JOHN; THOMPSON, JERRY T.

    2013-01-01

    Fish oil contains the marine ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) docosahexaenoic (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). The consumption of diets rich in these fatty acids is associated with a decreased incidence of prostate cancer. However, there is limited knowledge regarding the non-marine ω-3 PUFA α-linolenic acid (ALA). To study which ω-3 PUFAs are more effective in prostate cancer prevention, and whether the mechanisms of action are conserved between them, we investigated the effect of DHA, EPA and ALA on the human prostate cancer cell lines PC-3 and LNCaP. Different trends of inhibition of PC-3 cell proliferation were observed for the three ω-3 PUFA, with DHA having the most pronounced effects on cell proliferation, while ALA had the minimum effects of the three ω-3 PUFAs. All the ω-3 PUFAs decreased fatty acid synthase (FASN) mRNA. Concerning genes involved in inflammation, cell cycle and apoptosis, DHA regulated the most genes in all categories, followed by EPA and then ALA. In addition, DHA and EPA increased the gene expression of the pro-apoptotic protein activating transcription factor 3 mRNA. Moreover, these two fatty acids significantly induced apoptosis. In conclusion, while some mechanisms of cancer cell inhibition are conserved among ω-3 PUFA, the extent, magnitude, and duration of transcriptional changes vary for each individual fatty acid. PMID:24649190

  10. Structural evolution of differential amino acid effector regulation in plant chorismate mutases.

    PubMed

    Westfall, Corey S; Xu, Ang; Jez, Joseph M

    2014-10-10

    Chorismate mutase converts chorismate into prephenate for aromatic amino acid biosynthesis. To understand the molecular basis of allosteric regulation in the plant chorismate mutases, we analyzed the three Arabidopsis thaliana chorismate mutase isoforms (AtCM1-3) and determined the x-ray crystal structures of AtCM1 in complex with phenylalanine and tyrosine. Functional analyses show a wider range of effector control in the Arabidopsis chorismate mutases than previously reported. AtCM1 is activated by tryptophan with phenylalanine and tyrosine acting as negative effectors; however, tryptophan, cysteine, and histidine activate AtCM3. AtCM2 is a nonallosteric form. The crystal structure of AtCM1 in complex with tyrosine and phenylalanine identifies differences in the effector sites of the allosterically regulated yeast enzyme and the other two Arabidopsis isoforms. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues in the effector site reveals key features leading to differential effector regulation in these enzymes. In AtCM1, mutations of Gly-213 abolish allosteric regulation, as observed in AtCM2. A second effector site position, Gly-149 in AtCM1 and Asp-132 in AtCM3, controls amino acid effector specificity in AtCM1 and AtCM3. Comparisons of chorismate mutases from multiple plants suggest that subtle differences in the effector site are conserved in different lineages and may lead to specialized regulation of this branch point enzyme.

  11. Regulation of vitamin D receptor expression by retinoic acid receptor alpha in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Marchwicka, Aleksandra; Cebrat, Małgorzata; Łaszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Śnieżewski, Łukasz; Brown, Geoffrey; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2016-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by an accumulation of malignant immature myeloid precursors. A very promising way to treat AML is differentiation therapy using either all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D), or the use of both these differentiation-inducing agents. However, the effect of combination treatment varies in different AML cell lines, and this is due to ATRA either down- or up-regulating transcription of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in the cells examined. The mechanism of transcriptional regulation of VDR in response to ATRA has not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) is responsible for regulating VDR transcription in AML cells. We have shown that a VDR transcriptional variant, originating in exon 1a, is regulated by RARα agonists in AML cells. Moreover, in cells with a high basal level of RARα protein, the VDR gene is transcriptionally repressed as long as RARα agonist is absent. In these cells down-regulation of the level of RARα leads to increased expression of VDR. We consider that our findings provide a mechanistic background to explain the different outcomes from treating AML cell lines with a combination of ATRA and 1,25D. PMID:26969398

  12. Distinct amino acid-sensing mTOR pathways regulate skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Chen, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to amino acid availability controls many cellular and developmental processes. mTOR is a master regulator of myogenic differentiation, but the pathways mediating amino acid signals in this process are not known. Here we examine the Rag GTPases and the class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, two mediators of amino acid signals upstream of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in cell growth regulation, for their potential involvement in myogenesis. We find that, although both Rag and Vps34 mediate amino acid activation of mTORC1 in C2C12 myoblasts, they have opposing functions in myogenic differentiation. Knockdown of RagA/B enhances, whereas overexpression of active RagB/C mutants impairs, differentiation, and this inhibitory function of Rag is mediated by mTORC1 suppression of the IRS1-PI3K-Akt pathway. On the other hand, Vps34 is required for myogenic differentiation. Amino acids activate a Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1) pathway that controls the production of insulin-like growth factor II, an autocrine inducer of differentiation, through the Igf2 muscle enhancer. The product of PLD, phosphatidic acid, activates the enhancer in a rapamycin-sensitive but mTOR kinase-independent manner. Our results uncover amino acid-sensing mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of myogenesis and underline the versatility and context dependence of mTOR signaling. PMID:24068326

  13. Retinoic acid regulates anterior-posterior patterning within the lateral plate mesoderm of Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Deimling, Steven J; Drysdale, Thomas A

    2009-10-01

    The lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) lines the body cavities, gives rise to the heart and circulatory system and is responsible for patterning the underlying endoderm. We describe gene expression domains within the lateral plate mesoderm of the neurula stage Xenopus embryo that demonstrate a marked anterior posterior pattern in that tissue. FoxF1 and Nkx-2.5 are expressed in the anterior LPM, Hand1 in the middle and Xsal-1 in the posterior LPM. Since retinoic acid is known to pattern many tissues during development, and RALDH2, the enzyme primarily responsible for retinoic acid synthesis, is expressed in the anterior and dorsal LPM, we hypothesized that retinoic acid is necessary for correct patterning of the LPM. Exposure to exogenous retinoic acid during neurulation led to an expansion of the anterior and middle expression domains and a reduction of the posterior domain whereas exposure to a retinoic acid antagonist resulted in smaller anterior and middle expression domains. Furthermore, inhibition of RALDH2, which should decrease endogenous RA levels, caused a reduction of anterior domains indicating that endogenous RA is necessary for regulating their size. After altering retinoic acid signaling in a temporally restricted window, the displaced anterior-posterior pattern is maintained until gut looping, as demonstrated by permanently altered Hand1, FoxF1, xHoxC-10, and Pitx2 expression domains. We conclude that the broad expression domains of key transcription factors demonstrate a novel anterior-posterior pattern within the LPM and that retinoic acid can regulate the size of these domains in a coordinated manner.

  14. Vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together regulate lipid metabolism in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Khaire, Amrita; Rathod, Richa; Kale, Anvita; Joshi, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Our recent study indicates that maternal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status influence plasma and erythrocyte fatty acid profile in dams. The present study examines the effects of prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status on lipid metabolism in the offspring. Pregnant dams were divided into five groups: Control; Vitamin B12 deficient (BD); Vitamin B12 supplemented (BS); Vitamin B12 deficient group supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids (BDO); Vitamin B12 supplemented group with omega-3 fatty acids (BSO). The offspring were continued on the same diets till 3 month of age. Vitamin B12 deficiency increased cholesterol levels (p<0.01) but reduced docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (p<0.05), liver mRNA levels of acetyl CoA carboxylase-1 (ACC-1) (p<0.05) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) (p<0.01) in the offspring. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation to this group normalized cholesterol but not mRNA levels of ACC-1 and CPT-1. Vitamin B12 supplementation normalized the levels cholesterol to that of control but increased plasma triglyceride (p<0.01) and reduced liver mRNA levels of adiponectin, ACC-1, and CPT-1 (p<0.01 for all). Supplementation of both vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid normalized triglyceride and mRNA levels of all the above genes. Prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together play a crucial role in regulating the genes involved in lipid metabolism in adult offspring.

  15. Metabolic regulation of fatty acid esterification and effects of conjugated linoleic acid on glucose homeostasis in pig hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Conde-Aguilera, J A; Lachica, M; Nieto, R; Fernández-Fígares, I

    2012-02-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) are geometric and positional isomers of linoleic acid (LA) that promote growth, alter glucose metabolism and decrease body fat in growing animals, although the mechanisms are poorly understood. A study was conducted to elucidate the effects of CLA on glucose metabolism, triglyceride (TG) synthesis and IGF-1 synthesis in primary culture of porcine hepatocytes. In addition, hormonal regulation of TG and IGF-1 synthesis was addressed. Hepatocytes were isolated from piglets (n = 5, 16.0 ± 1.98 kg average body weight) by collagenase perfusion and seeded into collagen-coated T-25 flasks. Hepatocytes were cultured in William's E containing dexamethasone (10-8 and 10-7 M), insulin (10 and 100 ng/ml), glucagon (0 and 100 ng/ml) and CLA (1 : 1 mixture of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA, 0.05 and 0.10 mM) or LA (0.05 and 0.10 mM). Addition of CLA decreased gluconeogenesis (P < 0.05), whereas glycogen synthesis and degradation, TG synthesis and IGF-1 synthesis were not affected compared with LA. Increased concentration of fatty acids in the media decreased IGF-1 production (P < 0.001) and glycogen synthesis (P < 0.01), and increased gluconeogenesis (P < 0.001) and TG synthesis (P < 0.001). IGF-1 synthesis increased (P < 0.001) and TG synthesis decreased (P < 0.001) as dexamethasone concentration in the media rose. High insulin/glucagon increased TG synthesis. These results indicate that TG synthesis in porcine hepatocytes is hormonally regulated so that dexamethasone decreases and insulin/glucagon increases it. In addition, CLA decreases hepatic glucose production through decreased gluconeogenesis.

  16. Antiepileptic potential of matrine via regulation the levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid in the brain.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jun; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-12-05

    Our present study aimed to determine the antiepileptic activity of matrine, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. To evaluate the antiepileptic activity of matrine, seizures in mice induced by PTZ and MES were established, then the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests in mice were also carried out. For the molecular mechanism investigations, contents of aspartic acid (Asp), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid (Glu), glycine (Gly) in seizures mice were determined; then, the chronic seizures rats induced by PTZ were prepared, and western blotting was used to determine the expressions of GAD 65, GABAA and GABAB in the brains. In the results, matrine showed significant antiepileptic effects on seizures mice induced by MES and PTZ. Moreover, the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests were also demonstrated that matrine had obvious antiepileptic effects. Additionally, our results revealed that after treatment with matrine, contents of GABA can be elevated, and the contents of Glu were obviously decreased. Furthermore, western blotting revealed that the mechanism regarding the antiepileptic effect of may be related to the up-regulations of GAD 65 and GABAA in the brain. Collectively, we suggested that matrine can be developed as an effective antiseptic drug.

  17. Antiepileptic Potential of Matrine via Regulation the Levels of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamic Acid in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jun; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-01-01

    Our present study aimed to determine the antiepileptic activity of matrine, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. To evaluate the antiepileptic activity of matrine, seizures in mice induced by PTZ and MES were established, then the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests in mice were also carried out. For the molecular mechanism investigations, contents of aspartic acid (Asp), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid (Glu), glycine (Gly) in seizures mice were determined; then, the chronic seizures rats induced by PTZ were prepared, and western blotting was used to determine the expressions of GAD 65, GABAA and GABAB in the brains. In the results, matrine showed significant antiepileptic effects on seizures mice induced by MES and PTZ. Moreover, the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests were also demonstrated that matrine had obvious antiepileptic effects. Additionally, our results revealed that after treatment with matrine, contents of GABA can be elevated, and the contents of Glu were obviously decreased. Furthermore, western blotting revealed that the mechanism regarding the antiepileptic effect of may be related to the up-regulations of GAD 65 and GABAA in the brain. Collectively, we suggested that matrine can be developed as an effective antiseptic drug. PMID:24317434

  18. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses by dietary palmitic acid and its metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kunisawa, Jun; Hashimoto, Eri; Inoue, Asuka; Nagasawa, Risa; Suzuki, Yuji; Ishikawa, Izumi; Shikata, Shiori; Arita, Makoto; Aoki, Junken; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-08-15

    Enhancement of intestinal IgA responses is a primary strategy in the development of oral vaccine. Dietary fatty acids are known to regulate host immune responses. In this study, we show that dietary palmitic acid (PA) and its metabolites enhance intestinal IgA responses. Intestinal IgA production was increased in mice maintained on a PA-enriched diet. These mice also showed increased intestinal IgA responses against orally immunized Ag, without any effect on serum Ab responses. We found that PA directly stimulates plasma cells to produce Ab. In addition, mice receiving a PA-enriched diet had increased numbers of IgA-producing plasma cells in the large intestine; this effect was abolished when serine palmitoyltransferase was inhibited. These findings suggest that dietary PA regulates intestinal IgA responses and has the potential to be a diet-derived mucosal adjuvant. PMID:25031459

  19. The Secreted Enzyme PM20D1 Regulates Lipidated Amino Acid Uncouplers of Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Long, Jonathan Z; Svensson, Katrin J; Bateman, Leslie A; Lin, Hua; Kamenecka, Theodore; Lokurkar, Isha A; Lou, Jesse; Rao, Rajesh R; Chang, Mi Ra; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Paulo, Joao A; Gygi, Steven P; Griffin, Patrick R; Nomura, Daniel K; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2016-07-14

    Brown and beige adipocytes are specialized cells that express uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and dissipate chemical energy as heat. These cells likely possess alternative UCP1-independent thermogenic mechanisms. Here, we identify a secreted enzyme, peptidase M20 domain containing 1 (PM20D1), that is enriched in UCP1(+) versus UCP1(-) adipocytes. We demonstrate that PM20D1 is a bidirectional enzyme in vitro, catalyzing both the condensation of fatty acids and amino acids to generate N-acyl amino acids and also the reverse hydrolytic reaction. N-acyl amino acids directly bind mitochondria and function as endogenous uncouplers of UCP1-independent respiration. Mice with increased circulating PM20D1 have augmented respiration and increased N-acyl amino acids in blood. Lastly, administration of N-acyl amino acids to mice improves glucose homeostasis and increases energy expenditure. These data identify an enzymatic node and a family of metabolites that regulate energy homeostasis. This pathway might be useful for treating obesity and associated disorders. PMID:27374330

  20. Prohibitin/annexin 2 interaction regulates fatty acid transport in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, Ahmad; Daquinag, Alexes C.; Staquicini, Daniela I.; An, Zhiqiang; Pasqualini, Renata; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously identified prohibitin (PHB) and annexin A2 (ANX2) as proteins interacting on the surface of vascular endothelial cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) of humans and mice. Here, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB also interact in adipocytes. Mice lacking ANX2 have normal WAT vascularization, adipogenesis, and glucose metabolism but display WAT hypotrophy due to reduced fatty acid uptake by WAT endothelium and adipocytes. By using cell culture systems in which ANX2/PHB binding is disrupted either genetically or through treatment with a blocking peptide, we show that fatty acid transport efficiency relies on this protein complex. We also provide evidence that the interaction between ANX2 and PHB mediates fatty acid transport from the endothelium into adipocytes. Moreover, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB form a complex with the fatty acid transporter CD36. Finally, we show that the colocalization of PHB and CD36 on adipocyte surface is induced by extracellular fatty acids. Together, our results suggest that an unrecognized biochemical interaction between ANX2 and PHB regulates CD36-mediated fatty acid transport in WAT, thus revealing a new potential pathway for intervention in metabolic diseases. PMID:27468426

  1. Amino acids regulate expression of antizyme-1 to modulate ornithine decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ramesh M; Viar, Mary Jane; Johnson, Leonard R

    2012-02-01

    In a glucose-salt solution (Earle's balanced salt solution), asparagine (Asn) stimulates ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity in a dose-dependent manner, and the addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF) potentiates the effect of Asn. However, EGF alone fails to activate ODC. Thus, the mechanism by which Asn activates ODC is important for understanding the regulation of ODC activity. Asn reduced antizyme-1 (AZ1) mRNA and protein. Among the amino acids tested, Asn and glutamine (Gln) effectively inhibited AZ1 expression, suggesting a differential role for amino acids in the regulation of ODC activity. Asn decreased the putrescine-induced AZ1 translation. The absence of amino acids increased the binding of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP1) to 5'-mRNA cap and thereby inhibited global protein synthesis. Asn failed to prevent the binding of 4EBP1 to mRNA, and the bound 4EBP1 was unphosphorylated, suggesting the involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the regulation of AZ1 synthesis. Rapamycin treatment (4 h) failed to alter the expression of AZ1. However, extending the treatment (24 h) allowed expression in the presence of amino acids, indicating that AZ1 is expressed when TORC1 signaling is decreased. This suggests the involvement of cap-independent translation. However, transient inhibition of mTORC2 by PP242 completely abolished the phosphorylation of 4EBP1 and decreased basal as well as putrescine-induced AZ1 expression. Asn decreased the phosphorylation of mTOR-Ser(2448) and AKT-Ser(473), suggesting the inhibition of mTORC2. In the absence of amino acids, mTORC1 is inhibited, whereas mTORC2 is activated, leading to the inhibition of global protein synthesis and increased AZ1 synthesis via a cap-independent mechanism. PMID:22157018

  2. Hypertonic stress regulates amino acid transport and cell cycle proteins in chick embryo hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bruscalupi, Giovannella; Massimi, Mara; Spagnuolo, Silvana; Fiore, Anna Maria; Leoni, Silvia

    2012-02-01

    Hyperosmotic stress affects cell growth, decreasing cell volume and increasing the uptake of organic osmolytes. However, the sensitivity of embryonic cells to osmotic treatment remains to be established. We have analysed some aspects of cell-cycle control and amino-acid transport in hypertonic conditions during prenatal life. The effects of hyperosmotic stress on amino-acid uptake mediated by system A, (3)H-thymidine incorporation, and regulation of cell-cycle proteins were analysed in chick embryo hepatocytes. Hypertonic stress increased system A activity and caused cell-cycle delay. Effects on amino-acid transport involved p38 kinase activation and new carrier synthesis. Cyclin D1, cdk4 (cyclin-dependent kinase 4) and PCNA (proliferating-cell nuclear antigen) levels decreased, whereas cyclin E, p21 and p53 levels were unchanged. Incorporation of (3)H-leucine indicated decreased synthesis of cyclin D1. In contrast, analysis of mRNA by qRT-PCR (quantitative real-time PCR) showed a net increase of cyclin D1 transcripts, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation. The data show that chick embryo hepatocytes respond to hyperosmotic conditions by arresting cell growth to prevent DNA damage and increasing osmolyte uptake to regulate cell volume, indicating that the adaptive response to environmental stress exists during prenatal life.

  3. Low-maintenance, valve-regulated, lead/acid batteries in utility applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, G. M.; Spindler, W. C.

    Electric power utility companies have various needs for lead/acid batteries, and also are beginning to promote customer-side-of-the meter applications for mutual benefits. Increasing use of lead/acid batteries in the future will depend heavily on improving performance and reliability of sealed, recombination designs, and on their versatility for many applications. Classifying various utility uses could be by cycling requirements, depth-of-discharge, power or energy (ratio of watts to hours), or by site (utility or customer). Deep-cycling examples are energy storage, peak-shaving and electric vehicles. Shallow-cycling examples are frequency regulation and reactive power control. Infrequent discharge examples are stationary service and spinning reserve. (Float service for telecommunications and uninterruptible power sources (UPS) applications are not addressed.) Some present and planned installations of valve-regulated lead/acid batteries are surveyed. Performance characteristics will be discussed, including recent results of testing both gel and absorptive glass mat (AGM) types of deep-cycling batteries. Recommendations for future research and development of valve-regulated cell technology are outlined, based on a recent conference organized by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).

  4. Ca2+/H+ exchange by acidic organelles regulates cell migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Melchionda, Manuela; Pittman, Jon K.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence implicates Ca2+ in the control of cell migration. However, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Acidic Ca2+ stores are fast emerging as signaling centers. But how Ca2+ is taken up by these organelles in metazoans and the physiological relevance for migration is unclear. Here, we identify a vertebrate Ca2+/H+ exchanger (CAX) as part of a widespread family of homologues in animals. CAX is expressed in neural crest cells and required for their migration in vivo. It localizes to acidic organelles, tempers evoked Ca2+ signals, and regulates cell-matrix adhesion during migration. Our data provide new molecular insight into how Ca2+ is handled by acidic organelles and link this to migration, thereby underscoring the role of noncanonical Ca2+ stores in the control of Ca2+-dependent function. PMID:27002171

  5. Salicylic acid is involved in the regulation of starvation stress-induced flowering in Lemna paucicostata.

    PubMed

    Shimakawa, Aya; Shiraya, Takeshi; Ishizuka, Yuta; Wada, Kaede C; Mitsui, Toshiaki; Takeno, Kiyotoshi

    2012-07-01

    The short-day plant, Lemna paucicostata (synonym Lemna aequinoctialis), was induced to flower when cultured in tap water without any additional nutrition under non-inductive long-day conditions. Flowering occurred in all three of the tested strains, and strain 6746 was the most sensitive to the starvation stress conditions. For each strain, the stress-induced flowering response was weaker than that induced by short-day treatment, and the stress-induced flowering of strain 6746 was completely inhibited by aminooxyacetic acid and l-2-aminooxy-3-phenylpropionic acid, which are inhibitors of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase. Significantly higher amounts of endogenous salicylic acid (SA) were detected in the fronds that flowered under the poor-nutrition conditions than in the vegetative fronds cultured under nutrition conditions, and exogenously applied SA promoted the flowering response. The results indicate that endogenous SA plays a role in the regulation of stress-induced flowering.

  6. Ca2+/H+ exchange by acidic organelles regulates cell migration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Melchionda, Manuela; Pittman, Jon K; Mayor, Roberto; Patel, Sandip

    2016-03-28

    Increasing evidence implicates Ca(2+) in the control of cell migration. However, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Acidic Ca(2+) stores are fast emerging as signaling centers. But how Ca(2+) is taken up by these organelles in metazoans and the physiological relevance for migration is unclear. Here, we identify a vertebrate Ca(2+)/H(+)exchanger (CAX) as part of a widespread family of homologues in animals. CAX is expressed in neural crest cells and required for their migration in vivo. It localizes to acidic organelles, tempers evoked Ca(2+) signals, and regulates cell-matrix adhesion during migration. Our data provide new molecular insight into how Ca(2+) is handled by acidic organelles and link this to migration, thereby underscoring the role of noncanonical Ca(2+) stores in the control of Ca(2+)-dependent function. PMID:27002171

  7. Dietary regulation of intestinal brush-border sugar and amino acid transport in carnivores.

    PubMed

    Buddington, R K; Chen, J W; Diamond, J M

    1991-10-01

    The ability of omnivores and herbivores to regulate reversibly their intestinal brush-border nutrient transporters is functionally related to the unpredictably variable composition of their natural diets. To determine whether carnivores are able similarly to regulate the activities of their intestinal nutrient transporters, we fed to three species of vertebrates that are carnivorous as adults (cats, mink, and leopard frogs) diets with either at least 50% digestible carbohydrate or with negligible carbohydrate levels. Rates of transport for the sugars glucose and fructose and the amino acids (AAs) aspartate, leucine, lysine, and proline were measured throughout the intestine (only proline and glucose in the frogs) by an in vitro everted-sleeve method. Although all three species consume much carbohydrate during early development, only the mink was able to regulate sugar transporter activity in response to changes in levels of dietary carbohydrate. In contrast, the sugar transporters of the cat were unresponsive to varying carbohydrate levels, and long-term feeding of a high-carbohydrate diet caused down-regulation of sugar transport in frogs. Of the three species, only the mink is a member of a family that includes omnivorous species, whereas all members of the families to which the cat and frog belong are carnivorous as adults. All three species were able to regulate rates of AA transport, though the patterns and magnitude of the responses differed between species as well as between AAs, suggesting independent regulation of some AA transporters.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. The secretion of organic acids is also regulated by factors other than aluminum.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haiyan; Wen, Danni; Fu, Zhengwei; Qian, Haifeng

    2014-02-01

    As a result of natural processes and human activities, aluminum (Al) toxicity is recognized as a major limiting factor for plant productivity, and the secretion of organic acids facilitated by channel proteins is one of the most important Al resistance mechanisms in plants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of several types of stress, including herbicide (imazethapyr (IM) and diclofop-methyl (DM)), heavy metal (Al and Cu), salt stress (NaCl), and proton stress (HCl), on the release of organic acids in rice. The results showed that 0.05 mg/L IM, 0.1 mg/L DM, 4680 mg/L NaCl, 0.5 mg/L CuSO4, and 18 mg/L AlCl3 significantly inhibited rice root elongation and the root fresh weight. In contrast, no significant inhibitory effects on rice growth were found with HCl (pH = 4.5). Similar to the effect of AlCl3 on organic acid induction, treatment with IM, DM, NaCl, and CuSO4 also induced the synthesis of endogenous citric acid and oxalic acid but decreased endogenous malic acid synthesis in the seedlings, though only citric acid was released into the environment after these treatments. We also analyzed the transcripts of three citrate channel proteins and found they were up-regulated by NaCl, CuSO4, and AlCl3 but not by IM or DM. This study clarified that organic acid secretion in plants might be a common phenomenon when plants are exposed to environmental stress other than Al toxicity.

  9. Isp7 is a novel regulator of amino acid uptake in the TOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Laor, Dana; Cohen, Adiel; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Oron-Karni, Varda; Kupiec, Martin; Weisman, Ronit

    2014-03-01

    TOR proteins reside in two distinct complexes, TOR complexes 1 and 2 (TORC1 and TORC2), that are central for the regulation of cellular growth, proliferation, and survival. TOR is also the target for the immunosuppressive and anticancer drug rapamycin. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, disruption of the TSC complex, mutations in which can lead to the tuberous sclerosis syndrome in humans, results in a rapamycin-sensitive phenotype under poor nitrogen conditions. We show here that the sensitivity to rapamycin is mediated via inhibition of TORC1 and suppressed by overexpression of isp7(+), a member of the family of 2-oxoglutarate-Fe(II)-dependent oxygenase genes. The transcript level of isp7(+) is negatively regulated by TORC1 but positively regulated by TORC2. Yet we find extensive similarity between the transcriptome of cells disrupted for isp7(+) and cells mutated in the catalytic subunit of TORC1. Moreover, Isp7 regulates amino acid permease expression in a fashion similar to that of TORC1 and opposite that of TORC2. Overexpression of isp7(+) induces TORC1-dependent phosphorylation of ribosomal protein Rps6 while inhibiting TORC2-dependent phosphorylation and activation of the AGC-like kinase Gad8. Taken together, our findings suggest a central role for Isp7 in amino acid homeostasis and the presence of isp7(+)-dependent regulatory loops that affect both TORC1 and TORC2.

  10. Arginine methylation of HSP70 regulates retinoid acid-mediated RARβ2 gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei-wei; Xiao, Rong-quan; Peng, Bing-ling; Xu, Huan-teng; Shen, Hai-feng; Huang, Ming-feng; Shi, Tao-tao; Yi, Jia; Zhang, Wen-juan; Wu, Xiao-nan; Gao, Xiang; Lin, Xiang-zhi; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.; Liu, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Although “histone” methyltransferases and demethylases are well established to regulate transcriptional programs and to use nonhistone proteins as substrates, their possible roles in regulation of heat-shock proteins in the nucleus have not been investigated. Here, we report that a highly conserved arginine residue, R469, in HSP70 (heat-shock protein of 70 kDa) proteins, an evolutionarily conserved protein family of ATP-dependent molecular chaperone, was monomethylated (me1), at least partially, by coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1/protein arginine methyltransferase 4 (CARM1/PRMT4) and demethylated by jumonji-domain–containing 6 (JMJD6), both in vitro and in cultured cells. Functional studies revealed that HSP70 could directly regulate retinoid acid (RA)-induced retinoid acid receptor β2 (RARβ2) gene transcription through its binding to chromatin, with R469me1 being essential in this process. HSP70’s function in gene transcriptional regulation appears to be distinct from its protein chaperon activity. R469me1 was shown to mediate the interaction between HSP70 and TFIIH, which involves in RNA polymerase II phosphorylation and thus transcriptional initiation. Our findings expand the repertoire of nonhistone substrates targeted by PRMT4 and JMJD6, and reveal a new function of HSP70 proteins in gene transcription at the chromatin level aside from its classic role in protein folding and quality control. PMID:26080448

  11. Dietary Gut Microbial Metabolites, Short-chain Fatty Acids, and Host Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kasubuchi, Mayu; Hasegawa, Sae; Hiramatsu, Takero; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Kimura, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    During feeding, the gut microbiota contributes to the host energy acquisition and metabolic regulation thereby influencing the development of metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) such as acetate, butyrate, and propionate, which are produced by gut microbial fermentation of dietary fiber, are recognized as essential host energy sources and act as signal transduction molecules via G-protein coupled receptors (FFAR2, FFAR3, OLFR78, GPR109A) and as epigenetic regulators of gene expression by the inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC). Recent evidence suggests that dietary fiber and the gut microbial-derived SCFAs exert multiple beneficial effects on the host energy metabolism not only by improving the intestinal environment, but also by directly affecting various host peripheral tissues. In this review, we summarize the roles of gut microbial SCFAs in the host energy regulation and present an overview of the current understanding of its physiological functions. PMID:25875123

  12. Bile acids in regulation of inflammation and immunity: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ci; Fuchs, Claudia D; Halilbasic, Emina; Trauner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Apart from their pivotal role in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homeostasis, bile acids (BAs) are increasingly recognised as important signalling molecules in the regulation of systemic endocrine functions. As such BAs are natural ligands for several nuclear hormone receptors and G-protein-coupled receptors. Through activating various signalling pathways, BAs not only regulate their own synthesis, enterohepatic recirculation and metabolism, but also immune homeostasis. This makes BAs attractive therapeutic agents for managing metabolic and inflammatory liver disorders. Recent experimental and clinical evidence indicates that BAs exert beneficial effects in cholestatic and metabolically driven inflammatory diseases. This review elucidates how different BAs function as pathogenetic factors and potential therapeutic agents for inflammation-driven liver diseases, focusing on their role in regulation of inflammation and immunity. PMID:27586800

  13. Nutritional and Hormonal Regulation of Citrate and Carnitine/Acylcarnitine Transporters: Two Mitochondrial Carriers Involved in Fatty Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Giudetti, Anna M.; Stanca, Eleonora; Siculella, Luisa; Gnoni, Gabriele V.; Damiano, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The transport of solutes across the inner mitochondrial membrane is catalyzed by a family of nuclear-encoded membrane-embedded proteins called mitochondrial carriers (MCs). The citrate carrier (CiC) and the carnitine/acylcarnitine transporter (CACT) are two members of the MCs family involved in fatty acid metabolism. By conveying acetyl-coenzyme A, in the form of citrate, from the mitochondria to the cytosol, CiC contributes to fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis; CACT allows fatty acid oxidation, transporting cytosolic fatty acids, in the form of acylcarnitines, into the mitochondrial matrix. Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are inversely regulated so that when fatty acid synthesis is activated, the catabolism of fatty acids is turned-off. Malonyl-CoA, produced by acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, a key enzyme of cytosolic fatty acid synthesis, represents a regulator of both metabolic pathways. CiC and CACT activity and expression are regulated by different nutritional and hormonal conditions. Defects in the corresponding genes have been directly linked to various human diseases. This review will assess the current understanding of CiC and CACT regulation; underlining their roles in physio-pathological conditions. Emphasis will be placed on the molecular basis of the regulation of CiC and CACT associated with fatty acid metabolism. PMID:27231907

  14. Protein Analysis of Sapienic Acid-Treated Porphyromonas gingivalis Suggests Differential Regulation of Multiple Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Deborah V.; Blanchette, Derek R.; Drake, David R.; Wertz, Philip W.; Brogden, Kim A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipids endogenous to skin and mucosal surfaces exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Our previous work demonstrated the antimicrobial activity of the fatty acid sapienic acid (C16:1Δ6) against P. gingivalis and found that sapienic acid treatment alters both protein and lipid composition from those in controls. In this study, we further examined whole-cell protein differences between sapienic acid-treated bacteria and untreated controls, and we utilized open-source functional association and annotation programs to explore potential mechanisms for the antimicrobial activity of sapienic acid. Our analyses indicated that sapienic acid treatment induces a unique stress response in P. gingivalis resulting in differential expression of proteins involved in a variety of metabolic pathways. This network of differentially regulated proteins was enriched in protein-protein interactions (P = 2.98 × 10−8), including six KEGG pathways (P value ranges, 2.30 × 10−5 to 0.05) and four Gene Ontology (GO) molecular functions (P value ranges, 0.02 to 0.04), with multiple suggestive enriched relationships in KEGG pathways and GO molecular functions. Upregulated metabolic pathways suggest increases in energy production, lipid metabolism, iron acquisition and processing, and respiration. Combined with a suggested preferential metabolism of serine, which is necessary for fatty acid biosynthesis, these data support our previous findings that the site of sapienic acid antimicrobial activity is likely at the bacterial membrane. IMPORTANCE P. gingivalis is an important opportunistic pathogen implicated in periodontitis. Affecting nearly 50% of the population, periodontitis is treatable, but the resulting damage is irreversible and eventually progresses to tooth loss. There is a great need for natural products that can be used to treat and/or prevent the overgrowth of

  15. Intracellular pH regulation by acid-base transporters in mammalian neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ruffin, Vernon A.; Salameh, Ahlam I.; Boron, Walter F.; Parker, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation in the brain is important in both physiological and physiopathological conditions because changes in pHi generally result in altered neuronal excitability. In this review, we will cover 4 major areas: (1) The effect of pHi on cellular processes in the brain, including channel activity and neuronal excitability. (2) pHi homeostasis and how it is determined by the balance between rates of acid loading (JL) and extrusion (JE). The balance between JE and JL determine steady-state pHi, as well as the ability of the cell to defend pHi in the face of extracellular acid-base disturbances (e.g., metabolic acidosis). (3) The properties and importance of members of the SLC4 and SLC9 families of acid-base transporters expressed in the brain that contribute to JL (namely the Cl-HCO3 exchanger AE3) and JE (the Na-H exchangers NHE1, NHE3, and NHE5 as well as the Na+- coupled HCO3− transporters NBCe1, NBCn1, NDCBE, and NBCn2). (4) The effect of acid-base disturbances on neuronal function and the roles of acid-base transporters in defending neuronal pHi under physiopathologic conditions. PMID:24592239

  16. Regulation of the subcellular trafficking of CD36, a major determinant of cardiac fatty acid utilization.

    PubMed

    Glatz, Jan F C; Nabben, Miranda; Heather, Lisa C; Bonen, Arend; Luiken, Joost J F P

    2016-10-01

    Myocardial uptake of long-chain fatty acids largely occurs by facilitated diffusion, involving primarily the membrane-associated protein CD36. Other putative fatty acid transporters, such as FABPpm, FATP1 and FATP4, also play a role, but their quantitative contribution is much smaller or their involvement is rather permissive. Besides its sarcolemmal localization, CD36 is also present in intracellular compartments (endosomes). CD36 cycles between both pools via vesicle-mediated trafficking, and the relative distribution between endosomes versus sarcolemma determines the rate of cardiac fatty acid uptake. A net translocation of CD36 to the sarcolemma is induced by various stimuli, in particular hormones like insulin and myocyte contractions, so as to allow a proper coordination of the rate of fatty acid uptake with rapid fluctuations in myocardial energy needs. Furthermore, changes in cardiac fatty acid utilization that occur in both acute and chronic cardiac disease appear to be accompanied by concomitant changes in the sarcolemmal presence of CD36. Studies in various animal and cell models suggest that interventions aimed at modulating the sarcolemmal presence or functioning of CD36 hold promise as therapy to rectify aberrant rates of fatty acid uptake in order to fight cardiac metabolic remodeling and restore proper contractile function. In this review we discuss our current knowledge about the role of CD36 in cardiac fatty acid uptake and metabolism in health and disease with focus on the regulation of the subcellular trafficking of CD36 and its selective modulation as therapeutic approach for cardiac disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:27090938

  17. Aphid amino acid transporter regulates glutamine supply to intracellular bacterial symbionts.

    PubMed

    Price, Daniel R G; Feng, Honglin; Baker, James D; Bavan, Selvan; Luetje, Charles W; Wilson, Alex C C

    2014-01-01

    Endosymbiotic associations have played a major role in evolution. However, the molecular basis for the biochemical interdependence of these associations remains poorly understood. The aphid-Buchnera endosymbiosis provides a powerful system to elucidate how these symbioses are regulated. In aphids, the supply of essential amino acids depends on an ancient nutritional symbiotic association with the gamma-proteobacterium Buchnera aphidicola. Buchnera cells are densely packed in specialized aphid bacteriocyte cells. Here we confirm that five putative amino acid transporters are highly expressed and/or highly enriched in Acyrthosiphon pisum bacteriocyte tissues. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, two bacteriocyte amino acid transporters displayed significant levels of glutamine uptake, with transporter ACYPI001018, LOC100159667 (named here as Acyrthosiphon pisum glutamine transporter 1, ApGLNT1) functioning as the most active glutamine transporter. Transporter ApGLNT1 has narrow substrate selectivity, with high glutamine and low arginine transport capacity. Notably, ApGLNT1 has high binding affinity for arginine, and arginine acts as a competitive inhibitor for glutamine transport. Using immunocytochemistry, we show that ApGLNT1 is localized predominantly to the bacteriocyte plasma membrane, a location consistent with the transport of glutamine from A. pisum hemolymph to the bacteriocyte cytoplasm. On the basis of functional transport data and localization, we propose a substrate feedback inhibition model in which the accumulation of the essential amino acid arginine in A. pisum hemolymph reduces the transport of the precursor glutamine into bacteriocytes, thereby regulating amino acid biosynthesis in the bacteriocyte. Structural similarities in the arrangement of hosts and symbionts across endosymbiotic systems suggest that substrate feedback inhibition may be mechanistically important in other endosymbioses.

  18. New therapeutic strategy for amino acid medicine: notable functions of branched chain amino acids as biological regulators.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Fumiaki

    2012-01-01

    The branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) leucine, isoleucine, and valine are the most abundant of the essential amino acids. BCAAs have recently been recognized as having functions other than simple nutrition. The importance of BCAAs as nutrient regulators in protein synthesis was recognized over 20 years ago. Leucine is the most potent of the BCAAs in stimulating muscle protein synthesis, while isoleucine and valine are much less effective. The signaling action of leucine in protein synthesis has been well studied, and the mechanisms are currently under investigation. However, the pharmacological effects of isoleucine and valine have not been clarified. It has recently been reported that, among the BCAAs, leucine and isoleucine act as signals in glucose metabolism. We revealed that isoleucine stimulates both glucose uptake in the muscle and whole body glucose oxidation, in addition to depressing gluconeogenesis in the liver, thereby leading to a hypoglycemic effect in rats. Based on these results, we speculate that isoleucine signaling accelerates catabolism of incorporated glucose for energy production and consumption.

  19. The Arabidopsis LYST INTERACTING PROTEIN 5 Acts in Regulating Abscisic Acid Signaling and Drought Response.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zongliang; Huo, Yongjin; Wei, Yangyang; Chen, Qiansi; Xu, Ziwei; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) are unique endosomes containing vesicles in the lumens and play essential roles in many eukaryotic cellular processes. The Arabidopsis LYST INTERACTING PROTEIN 5 (LIP5), a positive regulator of MVB biogenesis, has critical roles in biotic and abiotic stress responses. However, whether the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling is involved in LIP5-mediated stress response is largely unknown. Here, we report that LIP5 functions in regulating ABA signaling and drought response in Arabidopsis. Analyses of a LIP5 promoter-β-glucuronidase (GUS) construct revealed substantial GUS activity in whole seedlings. The expression of LIP5 was induced by ABA and drought, and overexpression of LIP5 led to ABA hypersensitivity, enhanced stomatal closure, reduced water loss, and, therefore, increased drought tolerance. On the contrary, LIP5 knockdown mutants showed ABA-insensitive phenotypes and reduced drought tolerance; suggesting that LIP5 acts in regulating ABA response. Further analysis using a fluorescent dye revealed that ABA and water stress induced cell endocytosis or vesicle trafficking in a largely LIP5-dependent manner. Furthermore, expression of several drought- or ABA-inducible marker genes was significantly down-regulated in the lip5 mutant seedlings. Collectively, our data suggest that LIP5 positively regulates drought tolerance through ABA-mediated cell signaling. PMID:27313589

  20. The Arabidopsis LYST INTERACTING PROTEIN 5 Acts in Regulating Abscisic Acid Signaling and Drought Response

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zongliang; Huo, Yongjin; Wei, Yangyang; Chen, Qiansi; Xu, Ziwei; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) are unique endosomes containing vesicles in the lumens and play essential roles in many eukaryotic cellular processes. The Arabidopsis LYST INTERACTING PROTEIN 5 (LIP5), a positive regulator of MVB biogenesis, has critical roles in biotic and abiotic stress responses. However, whether the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling is involved in LIP5-mediated stress response is largely unknown. Here, we report that LIP5 functions in regulating ABA signaling and drought response in Arabidopsis. Analyses of a LIP5 promoter-β-glucuronidase (GUS) construct revealed substantial GUS activity in whole seedlings. The expression of LIP5 was induced by ABA and drought, and overexpression of LIP5 led to ABA hypersensitivity, enhanced stomatal closure, reduced water loss, and, therefore, increased drought tolerance. On the contrary, LIP5 knockdown mutants showed ABA-insensitive phenotypes and reduced drought tolerance; suggesting that LIP5 acts in regulating ABA response. Further analysis using a fluorescent dye revealed that ABA and water stress induced cell endocytosis or vesicle trafficking in a largely LIP5-dependent manner. Furthermore, expression of several drought- or ABA-inducible marker genes was significantly down-regulated in the lip5 mutant seedlings. Collectively, our data suggest that LIP5 positively regulates drought tolerance through ABA-mediated cell signaling. PMID:27313589

  1. Regulation of Abscisic Acid Signaling by the Ethylene Response Pathway in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemian, Majid; Nambara, Eiji; Cutler, Sean; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Yuji; McCourt, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Although abscisic acid (ABA) is involved in a variety of plant growth and developmental processes, few genes that actually regulate the transduction of the ABA signal into a cellular response have been identified. In an attempt to determine negative regulators of ABA signaling, we identified mutants, designated enhanced response to ABA3 (era3), that increased the sensitivity of the seed to ABA. Biochemical and molecular analyses demonstrated that era3 mutants overaccumulate ABA, suggesting that era3 is a negative regulator of ABA synthesis. Subsequent genetic analysis of era3 alleles, however, showed that these are new alleles at the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 locus. Other mutants defective in their response to ethylene also showed altered ABA sensitivity; from these results, we conclude that ethylene appears to be a negative regulator of ABA action during germination. In contrast, the ethylene response pathway positively regulates some aspects of ABA action that involve root growth in the absence of ethylene. We discuss the response of plants to ethylene and ABA in the context of how these two hormones could influence the same growth responses. PMID:10899978

  2. Expression and retinoic acid regulation of the zebrafish nr2f orphan nuclear receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Love, Crystal E.; Prince, Victoria E.

    2012-01-01

    Background The vertebrate nuclear receptor subfamily 2, group f (nr2f) genes encode orphan receptors that have the capacity to act as negative regulators of retinoic acid (RA) signaling. Results We describe embryonic and larval expression of four of the six zebrafish nr2f genes, nr2f1a, nr2f1b, nr2f2 and nr2f5. These genes show highly regulated patterns of expression within the CNS, including in the developing hindbrain, as well as in the mesoderm and endoderm. We also investigated the role of RA and Fgf signaling in regulating early nr2f gene expression. RA is not required for nr2f expression in the hindbrain; however, exogenous RA can repress this expression. Conversely, we find that RA positively regulates nr2f1a expression in trunk endoderm and mesoderm. Fgf signaling is not required for nr2f expression onset in the hindbrain; however, it may play a role in maintaining rhombomere-specific expression. Conclusions We report detailed expression analysis of four nr2f genes in all three germ layers. The onset of nr2f expression in the hindbrain does not require RA or Fgf signals. Our finding that RA positively regulates nr2f1a expression in the trunk supports the possibility that Nr2fs function in a negative feedback loop to modulate RA signaling in this region. PMID:22836912

  3. Abscisic acid and sucrose regulate tomato and strawberry fruit ripening through the abscisic acid-stress-ripening transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haifeng; Jiu, Songtao; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Chen; Tariq, Pervaiz; Liu, Zhongjie; Wang, Baoju; Cui, Liwen; Fang, Jinggui

    2016-10-01

    Although great progress has been made towards understanding the role of abscisic acid (ABA) and sucrose in fruit ripening, the mechanisms underlying the ABA and sucrose signalling pathways remain elusive. In this study, transcription factor ABA-stress-ripening (ASR), which is involved in the transduction of ABA and sucrose signalling pathways, was isolated and analysed in the nonclimacteric fruit, strawberry and the climacteric fruit, tomato. We have identified four ASR isoforms in tomato and one in strawberry. All ASR sequences contained the ABA stress- and ripening-induced proteins and water-deficit stress-induced proteins (ABA/WDS) domain and all ASR transcripts showed increased expression during fruit development. The expression of the ASR gene was influenced not only by sucrose and ABA, but also by jasmonic acid (JA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and these four factors were correlated with each other during fruit development. ASR bound the hexose transporter (HT) promoter, which contained a sugar box that activated downstream gene expression. Overexpression of the ASR gene promoted fruit softening and ripening, whereas RNA interference delayed fruit ripening, as well as affected fruit physiological changes. Change in ASR gene expression influenced the expression of several ripening-related genes such as CHS, CHI, F3H, DFR, ANS, UFGT, PG, PL, EXP1/2, XET16, Cel1/2 and PME. Taken together, this study may provide new evidence on the important role of ASR in cross-signalling between ABA and sucrose to regulate tomato and strawberry fruit ripening. The findings of this study also provide new insights into the regulatory mechanism underlying fruit development. PMID:27005823

  4. Abscisic acid and sucrose regulate tomato and strawberry fruit ripening through the abscisic acid-stress-ripening transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haifeng; Jiu, Songtao; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Chen; Tariq, Pervaiz; Liu, Zhongjie; Wang, Baoju; Cui, Liwen; Fang, Jinggui

    2016-10-01

    Although great progress has been made towards understanding the role of abscisic acid (ABA) and sucrose in fruit ripening, the mechanisms underlying the ABA and sucrose signalling pathways remain elusive. In this study, transcription factor ABA-stress-ripening (ASR), which is involved in the transduction of ABA and sucrose signalling pathways, was isolated and analysed in the nonclimacteric fruit, strawberry and the climacteric fruit, tomato. We have identified four ASR isoforms in tomato and one in strawberry. All ASR sequences contained the ABA stress- and ripening-induced proteins and water-deficit stress-induced proteins (ABA/WDS) domain and all ASR transcripts showed increased expression during fruit development. The expression of the ASR gene was influenced not only by sucrose and ABA, but also by jasmonic acid (JA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and these four factors were correlated with each other during fruit development. ASR bound the hexose transporter (HT) promoter, which contained a sugar box that activated downstream gene expression. Overexpression of the ASR gene promoted fruit softening and ripening, whereas RNA interference delayed fruit ripening, as well as affected fruit physiological changes. Change in ASR gene expression influenced the expression of several ripening-related genes such as CHS, CHI, F3H, DFR, ANS, UFGT, PG, PL, EXP1/2, XET16, Cel1/2 and PME. Taken together, this study may provide new evidence on the important role of ASR in cross-signalling between ABA and sucrose to regulate tomato and strawberry fruit ripening. The findings of this study also provide new insights into the regulatory mechanism underlying fruit development.

  5. CD44 Binding to Hyaluronic Acid Is Redox Regulated by a Labile Disulfide Bond in the Hyaluronic Acid Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Kellett-Clarke, Helena; Stegmann, Monika; Barclay, A. Neil; Metcalfe, Clive

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is the primary leukocyte cell surface receptor for hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix. Enzymatic post translational cleavage of labile disulfide bonds is a mechanism by which proteins are structurally regulated by imparting an allosteric change and altering activity. We have identified one such disulfide bond in CD44 formed by Cys77 and Cys97 that stabilises the HA binding groove. This bond is labile on the surface of leukocytes treated with chemical and enzymatic reducing agents. Analysis of CD44 crystal structures reveal the disulfide bond to be solvent accessible and in the–LH hook configuration characteristic of labile disulfide bonds. Kinetic trapping and binding experiments on CD44-Fc chimeric proteins show the bond is preferentially reduced over the other disulfide bonds in CD44 and reduction inhibits the CD44-HA interaction. Furthermore cells transfected with CD44 no longer adhere to HA coated surfaces after pre-treatment with reducing agents. The implications of CD44 redox regulation are discussed in the context of immune function, disease and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26379032

  6. Action of Plant Growth Regulators. IV. Adsorption of Unsubstituted and 2,6-Dichloro-aromatic Acids to Oat Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Brian, R. C.

    1967-01-01

    The adsorption of chloro-aromatic acids to monomolecular layers of oat squashes is reported in earlier papers but it was not possible by the technique used, to measure unambiguously the adsorption of unsubstituted and 2,6-dichloro-aromatic acids. This has now been achieved by a modification of the earlier method and involves assessments of competitive adsorption between the unknown acid and a standard acid, using measurements of surface potential. Benzoic and phenoxyacetic acids were not adsorbed but phenylacetic acid was weakly adsorbed. The second ring in naphthalene and naphthoxyacetic acids greatly increased adsorption. Substitution of the 2 and 6 positions in the phenyl and phenoxyacetic acids resulted in low adsorption but 2,6-disubstituted phenoxybutyric and benzoic acids were more highly adsorbed. The adsorption values from earlier work are combined and discussed in relation to the growth-regulating activity of the acids. It is conciuded that there is no direct relation embracing all acids between adsorption and activity, notable exceptions being those substituted by chlorine in the 3-position of the aromatic ring. However, for a number of acids it is suggested that activity is limited not only by their ability to interact at enzyme sites but also by the amount of acid immobilised by adsorption when moving to these sites. It is also concluded that the hydrophilic/lipophilic balance of a growth regulator sometimes used as a guide to its activity, is an unreliable indication of interfacial behaviour. PMID:16656642

  7. Recent Advances in Understanding Amino Acid Sensing Mechanisms that Regulate mTORC1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Liufeng; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Yuanfei; Li, Fengna; Wei, Hongkui; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is the central regulator of mammalian cell growth, and is essential for the formation of two structurally and functionally distinct complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 can sense multiple cues such as nutrients, energy status, growth factors and hormones to control cell growth and proliferation, angiogenesis, autophagy, and metabolism. As one of the key environmental stimuli, amino acids (AAs), especially leucine, glutamine and arginine, play a crucial role in mTORC1 activation, but where and how AAs are sensed and signal to mTORC1 are not fully understood. Classically, AAs activate mTORC1 by Rag GTPases which recruit mTORC1 to lysosomes, where AA signaling initiates. Plasma membrane transceptor L amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1)-4F2hc has dual transporter-receptor function that can sense extracellular AA availability upstream of mTORC1. The lysosomal AA sensors (PAT1 and SLC38A9) and cytoplasmic AA sensors (LRS, Sestrin2 and CASTOR1) also participate in regulating mTORC1 activation. Importantly, AAs can be sensed by plasma membrane receptors, like G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) T1R1/T1R3, and regulate mTORC1 without being transported into the cells. Furthermore, AA-dependent mTORC1 activation also initiates within Golgi, which is regulated by Golgi-localized AA transporter PAT4. This review provides an overview of the research progress of the AA sensing mechanisms that regulate mTORC1 activity. PMID:27690010

  8. Regulating acidity, porosity, and morphology of hierarchical SAPO-11 zeolite by aging treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuxiang; Xu, Lu; Lv, Yuchao; Liu, Xinmei

    2016-10-01

    A facile method to modify pore structure, acidic character, and morphology of SAPO-11 molecular sieve was proposed. Aging treatment (e.g., microwave irradiation or lyophilization) is introduced in the preparation of dry gel. It regulates the kinetics of zeolitic nucleation and growth. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, N2-adsorption, temperature programmed desorption, laser particle analyzer, and (29)Si MAS NMR were employed to investigate the effects of aging treatments on SAPO-11 products. The experimental results indicate that depolymerization reaction of silicon species is enhanced aged by microwave irradiation with a higher temperature (90°C). Ratio of SM 3 to SM 2 substituting mode increases producing more strong Brønsted acid sites. Lyophilization technology, as another aging method, was employed to control the morphology of SAPO-11. Nano-sized hierarchical SAPO-11 molecular sieve (200nm in length) is obtained with an oriented growth. Activity of hydroisomerization catalysts is regulated by aging treatment. Cracking reaction attributes to a high conversion nearly 87wt% for M90. The hydroisomerization reaction is enhanced for M40 due to a large proportion of moderate acid sites. PMID:27362909

  9. Wnt-Lrp5 Signaling Regulates Fatty Acid Metabolism in the Osteoblast

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Julie L.; Li, Zhu; Ellis, Jessica M.; Zhang, Qian; Farber, Charles R.; Aja, Susan; Wolfgang, Michael J.; Clemens, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt coreceptors Lrp5 and Lrp6 are essential for normal postnatal bone accrual and osteoblast function. In this study, we identify a previously unrecognized skeletal function unique to Lrp5 that enables osteoblasts to oxidize fatty acids. Mice lacking the Lrp5 coreceptor specifically in osteoblasts and osteocytes exhibit the expected reductions in postnatal bone mass but also exhibit an increase in body fat with corresponding reductions in energy expenditure. Conversely, mice expressing a high bone mass mutant Lrp5 allele are leaner with reduced plasma triglyceride and free fatty acid levels. In this context, Wnt-initiated signals downstream of Lrp5, but not the closely related Lrp6 coreceptor, regulate the activation of β-catenin and thereby induce the expression of key enzymes required for fatty acid β-oxidation. These results suggest that Wnt-Lrp5 signaling regulates basic cellular activities beyond those associated with fate specification and differentiation in bone and that the skeleton influences global energy homeostasis via mechanisms independent of osteocalcin and glucose metabolism. PMID:25802278

  10. Bidirectional CLOCK/BMAL1-dependent circadian gene regulation by retinoic acid in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Hidenori; Oishi, Katsutaka; Ishida, Norio . E-mail: n.ishida@aist.go.jp

    2006-12-15

    A central circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the mammalian hypothalamus entrains peripheral clocks through both neural and humoral factors. Although candidates for entrainment factors have been described, their details remain obscure. Here, we screened ligands for nuclear receptors that affect CLOCK/BMAL1-dependent transactivation of the mouse Period1 (mPer1) gene in NIH3T3 cells. We found that retinoic acids (RAs) significantly up-regulate mPer1 expression in an E-box-dependent manner. We also found that RAs up-regulate the expression of other E-box-dependent circadian genes such as mPer2, arginine vasopressin (mAVP), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (mPPAR{alpha}). Surprisingly, the effect of RAs on CLOCK/BMAL1 (E-box)-dependent mRNA expression was bidirectional and depended on the presence of exogenous retinoic acid receptor {alpha} (RAR{alpha}). These results suggest that RAs regulate the CLOCK/BMAL1-dependent transcription of circadian genes in a complex manner.

  11. Glucocorticoid regulation of amino acid transport in anucleate rat hepatoma (HTC) cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The transport of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) by rat hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) cells is rapidly and reversibly inhibited by dexamethasone and other glucocorticoids. To investigate the role of the nucleus in the regulation of transport and to determine whether steroid hormones or steroid-receptor complexes may have direct effects on cytoplasmic or membrane functions, we have examined the regulation of transport by dexamethasone in anucleate HTC cells. Cytoplasts prepared from suspension cultures of HTC cells fully retain active transport of AIB with the same kinetic properties as intact cells. However, the uptake of AIB is not inhibited by dexamethasone or other corticosteroids. Neither is the inhibited rate of transport, manifested by cytoplasts prepared from dexamethasone-treated cells, restored to normal upon removal of the hormone. Anucleate cells exhibit specific, saturable binding of [3H]dexamethasone; however, the binding is reduced compared with that of intact cells. The nucleus is thus required for the glucocorticoid regulation of amino acid transport in HTC cells. PMID:7217203

  12. A C-terminal acidic domain regulates degradation of the transcriptional coactivator Bob1.

    PubMed

    Lindner, John M; Wong, Christina S F; Möller, Andreas; Nielsen, Peter J

    2013-12-01

    Bob1 (Obf-1 or OCA-B) is a 34-kDa transcriptional coactivator encoded by the Pou2af1 gene that is essential for normal B-cell development and immune responses in mice. During lymphocyte activation, Bob1 protein levels dramatically increase independently of mRNA levels, suggesting that the stability of Bob1 is regulated. We used a fluorescent protein-based reporter system to analyze protein stability in response to genetic and physiological perturbations and show that, while Bob1 degradation is proteasome mediated, it does not require ubiquitination of Bob1. Furthermore, degradation of Bob1 in B cells appears to be largely independent of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Siah. We propose a novel mechanism of Bob1 turnover in B cells, whereby an acidic region in the C terminus of Bob1 regulates the activity of degron signals elsewhere in the protein. Changes that make the C terminus more acidic, including tyrosine phosphorylation-mimetic mutations, stabilize the instable murine Bob1 protein, indicating that B cells may regulate Bob1 stability and activity via signaling pathways. Finally, we show that expressing a stable Bob1 mutant in B cells suppresses cell proliferation and induces changes in surface marker expression commonly seen during B-cell differentiation.

  13. GABA production by glutamic acid decarboxylase is regulated by a dynamic catalytic loop.

    PubMed

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Law, Ruby H P; Buckle, Ashley M; Langendorf, Christopher; Tuck, Kellie; Rosado, Carlos J; Faux, Noel G; Mahmood, Khalid; Hampe, Christiane S; Banga, J Paul; Wilce, Matthew; Schmidberger, Jason; Rossjohn, Jamie; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Pike, Robert N; Smith, A Ian; Mackay, Ian R; Rowley, Merrill J; Whisstock, James C

    2007-04-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is synthesized by two isoforms of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65 and GAD67). GAD67 is constitutively active and is responsible for basal GABA production. In contrast, GAD65, an autoantigen in type I diabetes, is transiently activated in response to the demand for extra GABA in neurotransmission, and cycles between an active holo form and an inactive apo form. We have determined the crystal structures of N-terminal truncations of both GAD isoforms. The structure of GAD67 shows a tethered loop covering the active site, providing a catalytic environment that sustains GABA production. In contrast, the same catalytic loop is inherently mobile in GAD65. Kinetic studies suggest that mobility in the catalytic loop promotes a side reaction that results in cofactor release and GAD65 autoinactivation. These data reveal the molecular basis for regulation of GABA homeostasis.

  14. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.

    1993-12-31

    The project deals with understanding the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that physiologically control and regulate carbon and electron flow in anaerobic chemosynthetic bacteria that couple metabolism of single carbon compounds and hydrogen to the production of organic acids (formic, acetic, butyric, and succinic) or methane. The authors compare the regulation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism by fermentation, enzyme, and electron carrier analysis using Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, Anaeroblospirillum succiniciproducens, Methanosarcina barkeri, and a newly isolated tri-culture composed of a syntrophic butyrate degrader strain IB, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanobacterium formicicum as model systems. To understand the regulation of hydrogen metabolism during butyrate production or acetate degradation, hydrogenase activity in B. methylotrophicum or M. barkeri is measured in relation to growth substrate and pH; hydrogenase is purified and characterized to investigate number of hydrogenases; their localization and functions; and, their sequences are determined. To understand the mechanism for catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation to succinate the PEP carboxykinase enzyme and gene of A. succiniciproducens are purified and characterized. Genetically engineered strains of Escherichia coli containing the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase gene are examined for their ability to produce succinate in high yield. To understand the mechanism of fatty acid degradation by syntrophic acetogens during mixed culture methanogenesis formate and hydrogen production are characterized by radio tracer studies. It is intended that these studies provide strategies to improve anaerobic fermentations used for the production of organic acids or methane and, new basic understanding on catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation mechanisms and on the function of hydrogenase in anaerobic bacteria.

  15. Enhanced pinocembrin production in Escherichia coli by regulating cinnamic acid metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Weijia; Ma, Weichao; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Bowen; Cao, Xun; Chen, Kequan; Li, Yan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2016-09-01

    Microbial biosynthesis of pinocembrin is of great interest in the area of drug research and human healthcare. Here we found that the accumulation of the pathway intermediate cinnamic acid adversely affected pinocembrin production. Hence, a stepwise metabolic engineering strategy was carried out aimed at eliminating this pathway bottleneck and increasing pinocembrin production. The screening of gene source and the optimization of gene expression was first employed to regulate the synthetic pathway of cinnamic acid, which showed a 3.53-fold increase in pinocembrin production (7.76 mg/L) occurred with the alleviation of cinnamic acid accumulation in the engineered E. coli. Then, the downstream pathway that consuming cinnamic acid was optimized by the site-directed mutagenesis of chalcone synthase and cofactor engineering. S165M mutant of chalcone synthase could efficiently improve the pinocembrin production, and allowed the product titer of pinocembrin increased to 40.05 mg/L coupled with the malonyl-CoA engineering. With a two-phase pH fermentation strategy, the cultivation of the optimized strain resulted in a final pinocembrin titer of 67.81 mg/L. The results and engineering strategies demonstrated here would hold promise for the titer improvement of other flavonoids.

  16. Glutamic Acid Residues in HIV-1 p6 Regulate Virus Budding and Membrane Association of Gag

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Melanie; Setz, Christian; Hahn, Friedrich; Matthaei, Alina; Fraedrich, Kirsten; Rauch, Pia; Henklein, Petra; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 Gag p6 protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of its two late (l-) domains, which recruit Tsg101 and ALIX, components of the ESCRT system. Even though p6 consists of only 52 amino acids, it is encoded by one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and undergoes various posttranslational modifications including sumoylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. In addition, it mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into budding virions. Despite its small size, p6 exhibits an unusually high charge density. In this study, we show that mutation of the conserved glutamic acids within p6 increases the membrane association of Pr55 Gag followed by enhanced polyubiquitination and MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag-derived epitopes, possibly due to prolonged exposure to membrane bound E3 ligases. The replication capacity of the total glutamic acid mutant E0A was almost completely impaired, which was accompanied by defective virus release that could not be rescued by ALIX overexpression. Altogether, our data indicate that the glutamic acids within p6 contribute to the late steps of viral replication and may contribute to the interaction of Gag with the plasma membrane. PMID:27120610

  17. Regulation of laminin and entactin mRNA levels by retinoic acid and dibutyryl cyclic AMP

    SciTech Connect

    Durkin, M.E.; Phillips, S.L.; Carlin, B.E.; Merlie, J.P.; Chung, A.E.

    1986-05-01

    Retinoic acid and dibutyryl cAMP induced F9 embryonal carcinoma cells to differentiate to parietal endoderm; the morphological changes were accompanied by the increased synthesis of the basement membrane glycoproteins laminin and entactin. cDNA clones have been isolated for the A (400 kD), B1 (220 kD), and B2 (205 kD) chains of laminin. Northern blot analysis indicated that the A, B1, and B2 chains were encoded by RNA species of 9.8, 6.0, and 8.0 kb, respectively. The kinetics of induction of the laminin mRNAs were studied by dot-blotting dilutions of RNA extracted from F9 cells cultured in retinoic acid and dibutyryl cAMP for increasing amounts of time and hybridizing to /sup 32/P-labeled recombinant plasmids. Very low levels of the A and B chain RNAs were found in uninduced cells, and a large increase occurred between 48 and 72 hr of growth in retinoic acid and dibutyryl cAMP. A cDNA clone was also obtained for entactin, a 150 kD glycoprotein that forms a complex with laminin. Retinoic acid and dibutyryl cAMP treatment also increased the amount of entactin RNA in F9 cells. These results suggested that a common mechanism may exist for the coordinate regulation of the 4 basement membrane protein genes during differentiation.

  18. Conserved regulators of Rag GTPases orchestrate amino acid-dependent TORC1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Powis, Katie; De Virgilio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The highly conserved target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is the central component of a signaling network that couples a vast range of internal and external stimuli to cell growth, proliferation and metabolism. TORC1 deregulation is associated with a number of human pathologies, including many cancers and metabolic disorders, underscoring its importance in cellular and organismal growth control. The activity of TORC1 is modulated by multiple inputs; however, the presence of amino acids is a stimulus that is essential for its activation. Amino acid sufficiency is communicated to TORC1 via the highly conserved family of Rag GTPases, which assemble as heterodimeric complexes on lysosomal/vacuolar membranes and are regulated by their guanine nucleotide loading status. Studies in yeast, fly and mammalian model systems have revealed a multitude of conserved Rag GTPase modulators, which have greatly expanded our understanding of amino acid sensing by TORC1. Here we review the major known modulators of the Rag GTPases, focusing on recent mechanistic insights that highlight the evolutionary conservation and divergence of amino acid signaling to TORC1. PMID:27462445

  19. Enhanced pinocembrin production in Escherichia coli by regulating cinnamic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weijia; Ma, Weichao; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Bowen; Cao, Xun; Chen, Kequan; Li, Yan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2016-09-02

    Microbial biosynthesis of pinocembrin is of great interest in the area of drug research and human healthcare. Here we found that the accumulation of the pathway intermediate cinnamic acid adversely affected pinocembrin production. Hence, a stepwise metabolic engineering strategy was carried out aimed at eliminating this pathway bottleneck and increasing pinocembrin production. The screening of gene source and the optimization of gene expression was first employed to regulate the synthetic pathway of cinnamic acid, which showed a 3.53-fold increase in pinocembrin production (7.76 mg/L) occurred with the alleviation of cinnamic acid accumulation in the engineered E. coli. Then, the downstream pathway that consuming cinnamic acid was optimized by the site-directed mutagenesis of chalcone synthase and cofactor engineering. S165M mutant of chalcone synthase could efficiently improve the pinocembrin production, and allowed the product titer of pinocembrin increased to 40.05 mg/L coupled with the malonyl-CoA engineering. With a two-phase pH fermentation strategy, the cultivation of the optimized strain resulted in a final pinocembrin titer of 67.81 mg/L. The results and engineering strategies demonstrated here would hold promise for the titer improvement of other flavonoids.

  20. Acid sphingomyelinase activity is regulated by membrane lipids and facilitates cholesterol transfer by NPC2[S

    PubMed Central

    Oninla, Vincent O.; Breiden, Bernadette; Babalola, Jonathan O.; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    During endocytosis, membrane components move to intraluminal vesicles of the endolysosomal compartment for digestion. At the late endosomes, cholesterol is sorted out mainly by two sterol-binding proteins, Niemann-Pick protein type C (NPC)1 and NPC2. To study the NPC2-mediated intervesicular cholesterol transfer, we developed a liposomal assay system. (Abdul-Hammed, M., B. Breiden, M. A. Adebayo, J. O. Babalola, G. Schwarzmann, and K. Sandhoff. 2010. Role of endosomal membrane lipids and NPC2 in cholesterol transfer and membrane fusion. J. Lipid Res. 51: 1747–1760.) Anionic lipids stimulate cholesterol transfer between liposomes while SM inhibits it, even in the presence of anionic bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP). Preincubation of vesicles containing SM with acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) (SM phosphodiesterase, EC 3.1.4.12) results in hydrolysis of SM to ceramide (Cer), which enhances cholesterol transfer. Besides SM, ASM also cleaves liposomal phosphatidylcholine. Anionic phospholipids derived from the plasma membrane (phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acid) stimulate SM and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by ASM more effectively than BMP, which is generated during endocytosis. ASM-mediated hydrolysis of liposomal SM was also stimulated by incorporation of diacylglycerol (DAG), Cer, and free fatty acids into the liposomal membranes. Conversely, phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis was inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol, Cer, DAG, monoacylglycerol, and fatty acids. Our data suggest that SM degradation by ASM is required for physiological secretion of cholesterol from the late endosomal compartment, and is a key regulator of endolysosomal lipid digestion. PMID:25339683

  1. Acid sphingomyelinase activity is regulated by membrane lipids and facilitates cholesterol transfer by NPC2.

    PubMed

    Oninla, Vincent O; Breiden, Bernadette; Babalola, Jonathan O; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2014-12-01

    During endocytosis, membrane components move to intraluminal vesicles of the endolysosomal compartment for digestion. At the late endosomes, cholesterol is sorted out mainly by two sterol-binding proteins, Niemann-Pick protein type C (NPC)1 and NPC2. To study the NPC2-mediated intervesicular cholesterol transfer, we developed a liposomal assay system. (Abdul-Hammed, M., B. Breiden, M. A. Adebayo, J. O. Babalola, G. Schwarzmann, and K. Sandhoff. 2010. Role of endosomal membrane lipids and NPC2 in cholesterol transfer and membrane fusion. J. Lipid Res. 51: 1747-1760.) Anionic lipids stimulate cholesterol transfer between liposomes while SM inhibits it, even in the presence of anionic bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP). Preincubation of vesicles containing SM with acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) (SM phosphodiesterase, EC 3.1.4.12) results in hydrolysis of SM to ceramide (Cer), which enhances cholesterol transfer. Besides SM, ASM also cleaves liposomal phosphatidylcholine. Anionic phospholipids derived from the plasma membrane (phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acid) stimulate SM and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by ASM more effectively than BMP, which is generated during endocytosis. ASM-mediated hydrolysis of liposomal SM was also stimulated by incorporation of diacylglycerol (DAG), Cer, and free fatty acids into the liposomal membranes. Conversely, phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis was inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol, Cer, DAG, monoacylglycerol, and fatty acids. Our data suggest that SM degradation by ASM is required for physiological secretion of cholesterol from the late endosomal compartment, and is a key regulator of endolysosomal lipid digestion.

  2. Enhanced pinocembrin production in Escherichia coli by regulating cinnamic acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weijia; Ma, Weichao; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Bowen; Cao, Xun; Chen, Kequan; Li, Yan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biosynthesis of pinocembrin is of great interest in the area of drug research and human healthcare. Here we found that the accumulation of the pathway intermediate cinnamic acid adversely affected pinocembrin production. Hence, a stepwise metabolic engineering strategy was carried out aimed at eliminating this pathway bottleneck and increasing pinocembrin production. The screening of gene source and the optimization of gene expression was first employed to regulate the synthetic pathway of cinnamic acid, which showed a 3.53-fold increase in pinocembrin production (7.76 mg/L) occurred with the alleviation of cinnamic acid accumulation in the engineered E. coli. Then, the downstream pathway that consuming cinnamic acid was optimized by the site-directed mutagenesis of chalcone synthase and cofactor engineering. S165M mutant of chalcone synthase could efficiently improve the pinocembrin production, and allowed the product titer of pinocembrin increased to 40.05 mg/L coupled with the malonyl-CoA engineering. With a two-phase pH fermentation strategy, the cultivation of the optimized strain resulted in a final pinocembrin titer of 67.81 mg/L. The results and engineering strategies demonstrated here would hold promise for the titer improvement of other flavonoids. PMID:27586788

  3. α-Ketoglutarate regulates acid-base balance through an intrarenal paracrine mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Tokonami, Natsuko; Morla, Luciana; Centeno, Gabriel; Mordasini, David; Ramakrishnan, Suresh Krishna; Nikolaeva, Svetlana; Wagner, Carsten A.; Bonny, Olivier; Houillier, Pascal; Doucet, Alain; Firsov, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    Paracrine communication between different parts of the renal tubule is increasingly recognized as an important determinant of renal function. Previous studies have shown that changes in dietary acid-base load can reverse the direction of apical α-ketoglutarate (αKG) transport in the proximal tubule and Henle’s loop from reabsorption (acid load) to secretion (base load). Here we show that the resulting changes in the luminal concentrations of αKG are sensed by the αKG receptor OXGR1 expressed in the type B and non-A–non-B intercalated cells of the connecting tubule (CNT) and the cortical collecting duct (CCD). The addition of 1 mM αKG to the tubular lumen strongly stimulated Cl–-dependent HCO3– secretion and electroneutral transepithelial NaCl reabsorption in microperfused CCDs of wild-type mice but not Oxgr1–/– mice. Analysis of alkali-loaded mice revealed a significantly reduced ability of Oxgr1–/– mice to maintain acid-base balance. Collectively, these results demonstrate that OXGR1 is involved in the adaptive regulation of HCO3– secretion and NaCl reabsorption in the CNT/CCD under acid-base stress and establish αKG as a paracrine mediator involved in the functional coordination of the proximal and the distal parts of the renal tubule. PMID:23934124

  4. Acid sphingomyelinase activity is regulated by membrane lipids and facilitates cholesterol transfer by NPC2.

    PubMed

    Oninla, Vincent O; Breiden, Bernadette; Babalola, Jonathan O; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2014-12-01

    During endocytosis, membrane components move to intraluminal vesicles of the endolysosomal compartment for digestion. At the late endosomes, cholesterol is sorted out mainly by two sterol-binding proteins, Niemann-Pick protein type C (NPC)1 and NPC2. To study the NPC2-mediated intervesicular cholesterol transfer, we developed a liposomal assay system. (Abdul-Hammed, M., B. Breiden, M. A. Adebayo, J. O. Babalola, G. Schwarzmann, and K. Sandhoff. 2010. Role of endosomal membrane lipids and NPC2 in cholesterol transfer and membrane fusion. J. Lipid Res. 51: 1747-1760.) Anionic lipids stimulate cholesterol transfer between liposomes while SM inhibits it, even in the presence of anionic bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP). Preincubation of vesicles containing SM with acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) (SM phosphodiesterase, EC 3.1.4.12) results in hydrolysis of SM to ceramide (Cer), which enhances cholesterol transfer. Besides SM, ASM also cleaves liposomal phosphatidylcholine. Anionic phospholipids derived from the plasma membrane (phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acid) stimulate SM and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by ASM more effectively than BMP, which is generated during endocytosis. ASM-mediated hydrolysis of liposomal SM was also stimulated by incorporation of diacylglycerol (DAG), Cer, and free fatty acids into the liposomal membranes. Conversely, phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis was inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol, Cer, DAG, monoacylglycerol, and fatty acids. Our data suggest that SM degradation by ASM is required for physiological secretion of cholesterol from the late endosomal compartment, and is a key regulator of endolysosomal lipid digestion. PMID:25339683

  5. Enhanced pinocembrin production in Escherichia coli by regulating cinnamic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weijia; Ma, Weichao; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Bowen; Cao, Xun; Chen, Kequan; Li, Yan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biosynthesis of pinocembrin is of great interest in the area of drug research and human healthcare. Here we found that the accumulation of the pathway intermediate cinnamic acid adversely affected pinocembrin production. Hence, a stepwise metabolic engineering strategy was carried out aimed at eliminating this pathway bottleneck and increasing pinocembrin production. The screening of gene source and the optimization of gene expression was first employed to regulate the synthetic pathway of cinnamic acid, which showed a 3.53-fold increase in pinocembrin production (7.76 mg/L) occurred with the alleviation of cinnamic acid accumulation in the engineered E. coli. Then, the downstream pathway that consuming cinnamic acid was optimized by the site-directed mutagenesis of chalcone synthase and cofactor engineering. S165M mutant of chalcone synthase could efficiently improve the pinocembrin production, and allowed the product titer of pinocembrin increased to 40.05 mg/L coupled with the malonyl-CoA engineering. With a two-phase pH fermentation strategy, the cultivation of the optimized strain resulted in a final pinocembrin titer of 67.81 mg/L. The results and engineering strategies demonstrated here would hold promise for the titer improvement of other flavonoids. PMID:27586788

  6. Basic Aspects of Tumor Cell Fatty Acid-Regulated Signaling and Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Comba, Andrea; Lin, Yi-Hui; Eynard, Aldo Renato; Valentich, Mirta Ana; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin Ernesto; Pasqualini, Marìa Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge and experimental research about the mechanisms by which fatty acids and their derivatives control specific gene expression involved during carcinogenesis. Changes in dietary fatty acids, specifically the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of the ω-3 and ω-6 families and some derived eicosanoids from lipoxygenases (LOXs), cyclooxygenases (COXs), and cytochrome P-450 (CYP-450), seem to control the activity of transcription factor families involved in cancer cell proliferation or cell death. Their regulation may be carried out either through direct binding to DNA as peroxisome proliferator–activated receptors (PPARs) or via modulation in an indirect manner of signaling pathway molecules (e.g., protein kinase C [PKC]) and other transcription factors (nuclear factor kappa B [NFκB] and sterol regulatory element binding protein [SREBP]). Knowledge of the mechanisms by which fatty acids control specific gene expression may identify important risk factors for cancer, and provide insight into the development of new therapeutic strategies for a better management of whole-body lipid metabolism. PMID:22048864

  7. Cytokine regulation of human lung fibroblast hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid) production. Evidence for cytokine-regulated hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid) degradation and human lung fibroblast-derived hyaluronidase.

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, P M; Rochester, C L; Freundlich, B; Elias, J A

    1992-01-01

    We characterized the mechanisms by which recombinant (r) tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IFN-gamma, and IL-1, alone and in combination, regulate human lung fibroblast hyaluronic acid (HA) production. Each cytokine stimulated fibroblast HA production. The combination of rTNF and rIFN-gamma resulted in a synergistic increase in the production of high molecular weight HA. This was due to a synergistic increase in hyaluronate synthetase activity and a simultaneous decrease in HA degradation. In contrast, when rTNF and rIL-1 were combined, an additive increase in low molecular weight HA was noted. This was due to a synergistic increase in hyaluronate synthetase activity and a simultaneous increase in HA degradation. Human lung fibroblasts contained a hyaluronidase that, at pH 3.7, depolymerized high molecular weight HA to 10-40 kD end products of digestion. However, hyaluronidase activity did not correlate with fibroblast HA degradation. Instead, HA degradation correlated with fibroblast-HA binding, which was increased by rIL-1 plus rTNF and decreased by rIFN-gamma plus rTNF. Recombinant IL-1 and rTNF weakly stimulated and rIL-1 and rTNF in combination further augmented the levels of CD44 mRNA in lung fibroblasts. In contrast, rIFN-gamma did not significantly alter the levels of CD44 mRNA in unstimulated or rTNF stimulated cells. These studies demonstrate that rIL-1, rTNF, and rIFN-gamma have complex effects on biosynthesis and degradation which alter the quantity and molecular weight of the HA produced by lung fibroblasts. They also show that fibroblast HA degradation is mediated by a previously unrecognized lysosomal-type hyaluronidase whose function may be regulated by altering fibroblast-HA binding. Lastly, they suggest that the CD44 HA receptor may be involved in this process. Images PMID:1401082

  8. Characterization and Regulation of the Amino Acid Transporter SNAT2 in the Small Intestine of Piglets.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangran; Li, Jianjun; Tan, Bie; Wang, Jing; Kong, Xiangfeng; Guan, Guiping; Li, Fengna; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    The sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), which has dual transport/receptor functions, is well documented in eukaryotes and some mammalian systems, but has not yet been verified in piglets. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics and regulation of SNAT2 in the small intestine of piglets. The 1,521-bp porcine full cDNA sequence of SNAT2 (KC769999) from the small intestine of piglets was cloned. The open reading frame of cDNA encodes 506 deduced amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 56.08 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 7.16. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that SNAT2 is highly evolutionarily conserved in mammals. SNAT2 mRNA can be detected in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum by real-time quantitative PCR. During the suckling period from days 1 to 21, the duodenum had the highest abundance of SNAT2 mRNA among the three segments of the small intestine. There was a significant decrease in the expression of SNAT2 mRNA in the duodenal and jejunal mucosa and in the expression of SNAT2 protein in the jejunal and ileal mucosa on day 1 after weaning (P < 0.05). Studies with enterocytes in vitro showed that amino acid starvation and supplementation with glutamate, arginine or leucine enhanced, while supplementation with glutamine reduced, SNAT2 mRNA expression (P < 0.05). These results regarding the characteristics and regulation of SNAT2 should help to provide some information to further clarify its roles in the absorption of amino acids and signal transduction in the porcine small intestine.

  9. Drosophila Fatty Acid Transport Protein Regulates Rhodopsin-1 Metabolism and Is Required for Photoreceptor Neuron Survival

    PubMed Central

    Dourlen, Pierre; Bertin, Benjamin; Chatelain, Gilles; Robin, Marion; Napoletano, Francesco; Roux, Michel J.; Mollereau, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Tight regulation of the visual response is essential for photoreceptor function and survival. Visual response dysregulation often leads to photoreceptor cell degeneration, but the causes of such cell death are not well understood. In this study, we investigated a fatty acid transport protein (fatp) null mutation that caused adult-onset and progressive photoreceptor cell death. Consistent with fatp having a role in the retina, we showed that fatp is expressed in adult photoreceptors and accessory cells and that its re-expression in photoreceptors rescued photoreceptor viability in fatp mutants. The visual response in young fatp-mutant flies was abnormal with elevated electroretinogram amplitudes associated with high levels of Rhodopsin-1 (Rh1). Reducing Rh1 levels in rh1 mutants or depriving flies of vitamin A rescued photoreceptor cell death in fatp mutant flies. Our results indicate that fatp promotes photoreceptor survival by regulating Rh1 abundance. PMID:22844251

  10. New roles for Smad signaling and phosphatidic acid in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Craig A; Hornberger, Troy A

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is essential for normal bodily function and the loss of skeletal muscle (i.e. muscle atrophy/wasting) can have a major impact on mobility, whole-body metabolism, disease resistance, and quality of life. Thus, there is a clear need for the development of therapies that can prevent the loss, or increase, of skeletal muscle mass. However, in order to develop such therapies, we will first have to develop a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate muscle mass. Fortunately, our knowledge is rapidly advancing, and in this review, we will summarize recent studies that have expanded our understanding of the roles that Smad signaling and the synthesis of phosphatidic acid play in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass. PMID:24765525

  11. New roles for Smad signaling and phosphatidic acid in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Craig A; Hornberger, Troy A

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is essential for normal bodily function and the loss of skeletal muscle (i.e. muscle atrophy/wasting) can have a major impact on mobility, whole-body metabolism, disease resistance, and quality of life. Thus, there is a clear need for the development of therapies that can prevent the loss, or increase, of skeletal muscle mass. However, in order to develop such therapies, we will first have to develop a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate muscle mass. Fortunately, our knowledge is rapidly advancing, and in this review, we will summarize recent studies that have expanded our understanding of the roles that Smad signaling and the synthesis of phosphatidic acid play in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass.

  12. Microbiota regulate intestinal absorption and metabolism of fatty acids in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Semova, Ivana; Carten, Juliana D; Stombaugh, Jesse; Mackey, Lantz C; Knight, Rob; Farber, Steven A; Rawls, John F

    2012-09-13

    Regulation of intestinal dietary fat absorption is critical to maintaining energy balance. While intestinal microbiota clearly impact the host's energy balance, their role in intestinal absorption and extraintestinal metabolism of dietary fat is less clear. Using in vivo imaging of fluorescent fatty acid (FA) analogs delivered to gnotobiotic zebrafish hosts, we reveal that microbiota stimulate FA uptake and lipid droplet (LD) formation in the intestinal epithelium and liver. Microbiota increase epithelial LD number in a diet-dependent manner. The presence of food led to the intestinal enrichment of bacteria from the phylum Firmicutes. Diet-enriched Firmicutes and their products were sufficient to increase epithelial LD number, whereas LD size was increased by other bacterial types. Thus, different members of the intestinal microbiota promote FA absorption via distinct mechanisms. Diet-induced alterations in microbiota composition might influence fat absorption, providing mechanistic insight into how microbiota-diet interactions regulate host energy balance.

  13. Lysophosphatidic acid acts as a nutrient-derived developmental cue to regulate early hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haisen; Yue, Rui; Wei, Bin; Gao, Ge; Du, Jiulin; Pei, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Primitive hematopoiesis occurs in the yolk sac blood islands during vertebrate embryogenesis, where abundant phosphatidylcholines (PC) are available as important nutrients for the developing embryo. However, whether these phospholipids also generate developmental cues to promote hematopoiesis is largely unknown. Here, we show that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a signaling molecule derived from PC, regulated hemangioblast formation and primitive hematopoiesis. Pharmacological and genetic blockage of LPA receptor 1 (LPAR1) or autotoxin (ATX), a secretory lysophospholipase that catalyzes LPA production, inhibited hematopoietic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells and impaired the formation of hemangioblasts. Mechanistic experiments revealed that the regulatory effect of ATX-LPA signaling was mediated by PI3K/Akt-Smad pathway. Furthermore, during in vivo embryogenesis in zebrafish, LPA functioned as a developmental cue for hemangioblast formation and primitive hematopoiesis. Taken together, we identified LPA as an important nutrient-derived developmental cue for primitive hematopoiesis as well as a novel mechanism of hemangioblast regulation. PMID:24829209

  14. Regulating Underwater Oil Adhesion on Superoleophobic Copper Films through Assembling n-Alkanoic Acids.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhongjun; Liu, Hongwei; Lai, Hua; Du, Ying; Fu, Kewei; Li, Chong; Yu, Jianxin; Zhang, Naiqing; Sun, Kening

    2015-09-16

    Controlling liquid adhesion on special wetting surface is significant in many practical applications. In this paper, an easy self-assembled monolayer technique was advanced to modify nanostructured copper substrates, and tunable adhesive underwater superoleophobic surfaces were prepared. The surface adhesion can be regulated by simply varying the chain length of the n-alkanoic acids, and the tunable adhesive properties can be ascribed to the combined action of surfaces nanostructures and related variation in surface chemistry. Meanwhile, the tunable ability is universal, and the oil-adhesion controllability is suitable to various oils including silicon oil, n-hexane, and chloroform. Finally, on the basis of the special tunable adhesive properties, some applications of our surfaces including droplet storage, transfer, mixing, and so on are also discussed. The paper offers a novel and simple method to prepare underwater superoleophobic surfaces with regulated adhesion, which can potentially be applied in numerous fields, for instance, biodetection, microreactors, and microfluidic devices.

  15. Thyroid hormone and retinoic acid interact to regulate zebrafish craniofacial neural crest development.

    PubMed

    Bohnsack, Brenda L; Kahana, Alon

    2013-01-15

    Craniofacial and ocular morphogenesis require proper regulation of cranial neural crest migration, proliferation, survival and differentiation. Although alterations in maternal thyroid hormone (TH) are associated with congenital craniofacial anomalies, the role of TH on the neural crest has not been previously described. Using zebrafish, we demonstrate that pharmacologic and genetic alterations in TH signaling disrupt cranial neural crest migration, proliferation, and survival, leading to craniofacial, extraocular muscle, and ocular developmental abnormalities. In the rostral cranial neural crest that gives rise to the periocular mesenchyme and the frontonasal process, retinoic acid (RA) rescued migratory defects induced by decreased TH signaling. In the caudal cranial neural crest, TH and RA had reciprocal effects on anterior and posterior pharyngeal arch development. The interactions between TH and RA signaling were partially mediated by the retinoid X receptor. We conclude that TH regulates both rostral and caudal cranial neural crest. Further, coordinated interactions of TH and RA are required for proper craniofacial and ocular development.

  16. Thyroid Hormone and Retinoic Acid Interact to Regulate Zebrafish Craniofacial Neural Crest Development

    PubMed Central

    Bohnsack, Brenda L.; Kahana, Alon

    2012-01-01

    Craniofacial and ocular morphogenesis requires proper regulation of cranial neural crest migration, proliferation, survival and differentiation. Although alterations in maternal thyroid hormone (TH) are associated with congenital craniofacial anomalies, the role of TH on the neural crest has not been previously described. Using zebrafish, we demonstrate that pharmacologic and genetic alterations in TH signaling disrupt cranial neural crest migration, proliferation, and survival, leading to craniofacial, extraocular muscle, and ocular developmental abnormalities. In the rostral cranial neural crest that gives rise to the periocular mesenchyme and the frontonasal process, retinoic acid (RA) rescued migratory defects induced by decreased TH signaling. In the caudal cranial neural crest, TH and RA had reciprocal effects on anterior and posterior pharyngeal arch development. The interactions between TH and RA signaling were partially mediated by the retinoid X receptor. We conclude that TH regulates both rostral and caudal cranial neural crest. Further, coordinated interactions of TH and RA are required for proper craniofacial and ocular development. PMID:23165295

  17. Osmotic regulation of bile acid transport, apoptosis and proliferation in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Häussinger, Dieter; Reinehr, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Changes in mammalian cell volume as induced by either anisoosmolarity, hormones, nutrients or oxidative stress critically contribute to the regulation of metabolism, membrane transport, gene expression and the susceptibility to cellular stress. Osmosensing, i.e. the registration of cell volume changes, triggers signal transduction pathways towards effector pathways (osmosignaling) which link alterations of cell volume to changes in cell function. This review summarizes our own work on the understanding of how osmosensing and osmosignaling integrate into the overall context of bile acid transport, growth factor signaling and the execution of apoptotic programs. PMID:22178998

  18. Myxostiolide, myxostiol, and clavatoic acid, plant growth regulators from the fungus Myxotrichum stipitatum.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasuo; Shimada, Atsumi; Kusano, Miyako; Yoshii, Katsunobu; Morita, Akiko; Nishibe, Masahiko; Fujioka, Shozo; Kawano, Tsuyoshi

    2002-04-01

    New plant growth regulators, named myxostiolide (1), myxostiol (2), and clavatoic acid (3), have been isolated from Myxotrichum stipitatum, and their structures have been established by spectroscopic methods including 2D NMR. The biological activities of 1, 2, and 3 have been examined using tea pollen and lettuce seedling bioassay methods. With tea pollen, compound 1 inhibited the pollen tube growth to 14% of control at a concentration of 100 mg/L. With lettuce seedlings, compound 2 accelerated the root growth from 1 mg/L to 100 mg/L and compound 3 inhibited the root growth, to 52% of control, at a concentration of 100 mg/L.

  19. Valve-regulated lead/acid batteries for SLI use in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isoi, T.; Furukawa, H.

    Valve-regulated lead/acid batteries for automotive applications have been on the market in Japan for more than ten years. Initially, the batteries were used only for a small-size motorcycle. Today, however, they are widely employed in all sizes of motorcycles. In the meantime, VRLA batteries have also been used for agricultural machines, and even for some types of passenger cars. This paper provides an overview of the progress in the development and application of VRLA batteries for SLI (starting, lighting and ignition) use in Japan and discusses future expected trends.

  20. Advanced separator construction for long life valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. R.

    The performance of absorptive glass mat separators in valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries is strongly influenced by the diameter of the fibres from which they are made. Coarser diameter fibres are beneficial for the compressive properties of separators while finer fibres maintain the uniform distribution of the electrolyte. Studies of cell compression and electrolyte stratification are reported using separators manufactured with segregated layers of fine and coarse fibres incorporated into a single sheet. This construction locates the different classes of fibre at their location of maximum effectiveness. Improvements in battery life in both cyclic and float charge applications are recorded, and compared with single layer separators.

  1. Reliability of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries for stationary applications.

    SciTech Connect

    De Anda, Mindi Farber; Butler, Paul Charles; Miller, Jennifer L; Moseley, Patrick T.

    2004-03-01

    A survey has been carried out to quantify the performance and life of over 700,000 valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) cells, which have been or are being used in stationary applications across the United States. The findings derived from this study have not identified any fundamental flaws of VRLA battery technology. There is evidence that some cell designs are more successful in float duty than others. A significant number of the VRLA cells covered by the survey were found to have provided satisfactory performance.

  2. Role of bile acids in the regulation of the metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taoka, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Yoko; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Kitamura, Naho; Tanigaki, Tatsuya; Takashina, Yoko; Tsubota, Kazuo; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that bile acids (BAs) are not only facilitators of dietary lipid absorption but also important signaling molecules exerting multiple physiological functions. Some major signaling pathways involving the nuclear BAs receptor farnesoid X receptor and the G protein-coupled BAs receptor TGR5/M-BAR have been identified to be the targets of BAs. BAs regulate their own homeostasis via signaling pathways. BAs also affect diverse metabolic pathways including glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and energy expenditure. This paper suggests the mechanism of controlling metabolism via BA signaling and demonstrates that BA signaling is an attractive therapeutic target of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27433295

  3. Development of 36-V valve-regulated lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmae, T.; Hayashi, T.; Inoue, N.

    A 36-V valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) battery used in a 42-V power system has been developed for the Toyota Hybrid System-Mild (THS-M) vehicle to meet the large electrical power requirements of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and the increasing power demands on modern automobile electrical systems. The battery has a longer cycle-life in HEV use through the application of ultra high-density active-material and an anti-corrosive grid alloy for the positive plates, special additives for the negative plates, and absorbent glass mat with less contraction for the separators.

  4. Caffeic acid attenuates rat liver reperfusion injury through sirtuin 3-dependent regulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Mu, Hong-Na; Li, Quan; Pan, Chun-Shui; Liu, Yu-Ying; Yan, Li; Hu, Bai-He; Sun, Kai; Chang, Xin; Zhao, Xin-Rong; Fan, Jing-Yu; Han, Jing-Yan

    2015-08-01

    Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3) plays critical roles in regulating mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. However, whether Sirt3 is involved in liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury remains elusive. Caffeic acid (CA) is a natural antioxidant derived from Salvia miltiorrhiza. Whether CA protects against liver I/R injury through regulating Sirt3 and the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) is unclear. This study investigated the effect of CA on liver I/R injury, microcirculatory disturbance, and potential mechanisms, particularly focusing on Sirt3-dependent MRC. Liver I/R of male Sprague-Dawley rats was established by occlusion of portal area vessels for 30 min followed by 120 min of reperfusion. CA (15 mg/kg/h) was continuously infused via the femoral vein starting 30 min before ischemia. After I/R, Sirt3 expression, and MRC activity decreased, acetylation of NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] 1 alpha subcomplex subunit 9 and succinate dehydrogenase complex, subunit A, flavoprotein variant provoked, and the liver microcirculatory disturbance and injury were observed. Treatment with CA attenuated liver injury, inhibited Sirt3 down-expression, and up-regulated MRC activity. CA attenuated rat liver microcirculatory disturbance and oxidative injury through regulation of Sirt3 and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. PMID:25960048

  5. Retinoic acid negatively regulates dact3b expression in the hindbrain of zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Amrita; Waxman, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays important roles in normal development as well as pathophysiological conditions. The Dapper antagonist of β-catenin (Dact) proteins are modulators of both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling via direct interactions with Dishevelled (Dvl) and Van Gogh like-2 (Vangl2). Here, we report the dynamic expression patterns of two zebrafish dact3 paralogs during early embryonic development. Our whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) analysis indicates that specific dact3a expression starts by the tailbud stage in adaxial cells. Later, it is expressed in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm, somites, migrating cranial neural crest, and hindbrain neurons. By comparison, dact3b expression initiates on the dorsal side at the dome stage and soon after is expressed in the dorsal forerunner cells (DFCs) during gastrulation. At later stages, dact3b expression becomes restricted to the branchial neurons of the hindbrain and to the 2nd pharyngeal arch. To investigate how zebrafish dact3 gene expression is regulated, we manipulated retinoic acid (RA) signaling during development and found it negatively regulates dact3b in the hindbrain. Our study is the first to document the expression of the paralogous zebrafish dact3 genes during early development and demonstrate dact3b can be regulated by RA signaling. Therefore, our study opens up new avenues to study Dact3 function in the development of multiple tissues and suggests a previously unappreciated cross regulation of Wnt signaling by RA signaling in the developing vertebrate hindbrain. PMID:25266145

  6. All-trans retinoic acid negatively regulates cytotoxic activities of nature killer cell line 92

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ang . E-mail: liang3829@sina.com.cn; He Meilan; Wang Hui; Qiao Bin; Chen Ping; Gu Hua; Zhang Mengjie; He Shengxiang

    2007-01-05

    NK cells are key components of innate immune systems and their activities are regulated by cytokines and hormones. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), as a metabolite of vitamin A and an immunomodulatory hormone, plays an important role in regulating immune responses. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ATRA on human NK cell line NK92. We found that ATRA dose-dependently suppressed cytotoxic activities of NK92 cells without affecting their proliferation. To explore the mechanisms underlying the ATRA influence on NK92 cells, we examined the production of cytokines (TNF-{alpha}, IFN-{gamma}), gene expression of cytotoxic-associated molecules (perforin, granzyme B, nature killer receptors (NCRs), and NKG2D), and the activation of NF-{kappa}B pathways related with immune response. Our results demonstrated that ATRA suppressed NF-{kappa}B activity and prevented I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation in a dose-dependent way, inhibited IFN-{gamma} production and gene expression of granzyme B and NKp46. Our findings suggest that ATRA is a negative regulator of NK92 cell activation and may act as a potential regulator of anti-inflammatory functions in vivo.

  7. Nuclear receptors for retinoic acid and thyroid hormone regulate transcription of keratin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Tomic, M; Jiang, C K; Epstein, H S; Freedberg, I M; Samuels, H H; Blumenberg, M

    1990-01-01

    In the epidermis, retinoids regulate the expression of keratins, the intermediate filament proteins of epithelial cells. We have cloned the 5' regulatory regions of four human epidermal keratin genes, K#5, K#6, K#10, and K#14, and engineered constructs in which these regions drive the expression of the CAT reporter gene. By co-transfecting the constructs into epithelial cells along with the vectors expressing nuclear receptors for retinoic acid (RA) and thyroid hormone, we have demonstrated that the receptors can suppress the promoters of keratin genes. The suppression is ligand dependent; it is evident both in established cell lines and in primary cultures of epithelial cells. The three RA receptors have similar effects on keratin gene transcription. Our data indicate that the nuclear receptors for RA and thyroid hormone regulate keratin synthesis by binding to negative recognition elements in the upstream DNA sequences of the keratin genes. RA thus has a twofold effect on epidermal keratin expression: qualitatively, it regulates the regulators that effect the switch from basal cell-specific keratins to differentiation-specific ones; and quantitatively, it determines the level of keratin synthesis within the cell by direct interaction of its receptors with the keratin gene promoters. Images PMID:1712634

  8. Translational regulation of mammalian and Drosophila citric acid cycle enzymes via iron-responsive elements.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, N K; Pantopoulos, K; Dandekar, T; Ackrell, B A; Hentze, M W

    1996-01-01

    The posttranscriptional control of iron uptake, storage, and utilization by iron-responsive elements (IREs) and iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) provides a molecular framework for the regulation of iron homeostasis in many animals. We have identified and characterized IREs in the mRNAs for two different mitochondrial citric acid cycle enzymes. Drosophila melanogaster IRP binds to an IRE in the 5' untranslated region of the mRNA encoding the iron-sulfur protein (Ip) subunit of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH). This interaction is developmentally regulated during Drosophila embryogenesis. In a cell-free translation system, recombinant IRP-1 imposes highly specific translational repression on a reporter mRNA bearing the SDH IRE, and the translation of SDH-Ip mRNA is iron regulated in D. melanogaster Schneider cells. In mammals, an IRE was identified in the 5' untranslated regions of mitochondrial aconitase mRNAs from two species. Recombinant IRP-1 represses aconitase synthesis with similar efficiency as ferritin IRE-controlled translation. The interaction between mammalian IRPs and the aconitase IRE is regulated by iron, nitric oxide, and oxidative stress (H2O2), indicating that these three signals can control the expression of mitochondrial aconitase mRNA. Our results identify a regulatory link between energy and iron metabolism in vertebrates and invertebrates, and suggest biological functions for the IRE/IRP regulatory system in addition to the maintenance of iron homeostasis. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8643505

  9. A Nuclear Factor Regulates Abscisic Acid Responses in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Shin, Ryoung; Schachtman, Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone that regulates plant growth as well as stress responses. In this study, we identified and characterized a new Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protein, Nuclear Protein X1 (NPX1), which was up-regulated by stress and treatment with exogenous ABA. Stomatal closure, seed germination, and primary root growth are well-known ABA responses that were less sensitive to ABA in NPX1-overexpressing plants. NPX1-overexpressing plants were more drought sensitive, and the changes in response to drought were due to the altered guard cell sensitivity to ABA in transgenic plants and not to a lack of ABA production. The nuclear localization of NPX1 correlated with changes in the expression of genes involved in ABA biosynthesis and ABA signal transduction. To understand the function of NPX1, we searched for interacting proteins and found that an ABA-inducible NAC transcription factor, TIP, interacted with NPX1. Based on the whole plant phenotypes, we hypothesized that NPX1 acts as a transcriptional repressor, and this was demonstrated in yeast, where we showed that TIP was repressed by NPX1. Our results indicate that the previously unknown protein NPX1 acts as a negative regulator in plant response to changes in environmental conditions through the control of ABA-regulated gene expression. The characterization of this factor enhances our understanding of guard cell function and the mechanisms that plants use to modulate water loss from leaves under drought conditions. PMID:19759343

  10. Intracrine prostaglandin E(2) signalling regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression through retinoic acid receptor-β.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Jiménez, María I Arenas; Manzano, Victoria Moreno; Lucio-Cazaña, Francisco J

    2012-12-01

    We have previously found in human renal proximal tubular HK-2 cells that hypoxia- and all-trans retinoic acid-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation is accompanied by retinoic acid receptor-β up-regulation. Here we first investigated whether hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression is dependent on retinoic acid receptor-β and our results confirmed it since (i) hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-inducing agents hypoxia, hypoxia-mimetic agent desferrioxamine, all-trans retinoic acid and interleukin-1β increased retinoic acid receptor-β expression, (ii) hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation was prevented by retinoic acid receptor-β antagonist LE-135 or siRNA retinoic acid receptor-β and (iii) there was direct binding of retinoic acid receptor-β to the retinoic acid response element in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α promoter upon treatment with all-trans retinoic acid and 16,16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E(2). Since intracellular prostaglandin E(2) mediates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation in normoxia in HK-2 cells, we next investigated and confirmed, its role in the up-regulation of retinoic acid receptor-β in normoxia by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-inducing agents all-trans retinoic acid, interleukin-1β and 16,16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E(2) by inhibiting cyclooxygenases, prostaglandin influx transporter or EP receptors. Interestingly, the hypoxia-induced increase in retinoic acid receptor-β expression and accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α was also blocked by the inhibitors tested. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that retinoic acid receptor-β signalling is involved in the control of the expression of transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in both normoxia and hypoxia and that retinoic acid receptor-β expression is found to be strictly regulated by intracellular prostaglandin E(2). Given the relevance of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in the kidney in terms of tumorigenesis, progressive renal failure, production

  11. Ozone influence on native vegetation in the Jizerske hory Mts. of the Czech Republic: results based on ozone exposure and ozone-induced visible symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hůnová, Iva; Matoušková, Leona; Srněnský, Radek; Koželková, Klára

    2011-12-01

    Ozone levels in the Jizerske hory Mts. measured at 13 sites by diffusive samplers during the 2006 and 2007 vegetation seasons are presented. A significant ozone gradient (5.4 ppb in 2006 and 4.0 ppb in 2007) per 100 m difference in altitude between 370 and 1,100 m a.s.l. was recorded. High-resolution maps of phytotoxic potential were developed. The AOT40 threshold (5 ppm h) was exceeded over the entire area with the highest levels exceeding this threshold by 12 times in the upper portions of the mountains. Ozone visible injury was evaluated at four of the monitoring sites on seven native plant and tree species. Four species showed ozone-like symptoms, two of which (Rubus idaeus and Fagus sylvatica) were confirmed as ozone-induced. Our results indicate that ambient ozone is likely to have a much lower impact on the Jizerske hory Mts. vegetation than expected, considering the measured ambient ozone exposures and favourable environmental conditions for ozone uptake.

  12. Biodegradable DNA-Brush Block Copolymer Spherical Nucleic Acids Enable Transfection Agent-Free Intracellular Gene Regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan; Hao, Liangliang; Calabrese, Colin M; Zhou, Yu; Choi, Chung Hang J; Xing, Hang; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-10-28

    By grafting multiple DNA strands onto one terminus of a polyester chain, a DNA-brush block copolymer that can assemble into micelle structure is constructed. These micelle spherical nucleic acids have a density of nucleic acids that is substantively higher than linear DNA block copolymer structures, which makes them effective cellular transfection and intracellular gene regulation agents.

  13. Teaching the Role of Secretin in the Regulation of Gastric Acid Secretion Using a Classic Paper by Johnson and Grossman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Kristen L. W.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of gastric acid secretion has been the subject of investigation for over a century. Inhibition of gastrin-induced acid secretion by the intestine-derived hormone secretin provides a classic physiological example of negative feedback in the gastrointestinal tract. A classic paper by Leonard R. Johnson and Morton I. Grossman clearly…

  14. Regulation of hepatic branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex in rats fed a high-fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC) regulates branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism at the level of branched chain alpha-ketoacid (BCKA) catabolism. It has been demonstrated that the activity of hepatic BCKDC is markedly decreased in type 2 diabetic animal...

  15. Phosphorylation of KasB Regulates Virulence and Acid-Fastness in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Vilchèze, Catherine; Molle, Virginie; Carrère-Kremer, Séverine; Leiba, Jade; Mourey, Lionel; Shenai, Shubhada; Baronian, Grégory; Tufariello, Joann; Hartman, Travis; Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Trivelli, Xavier; Tiwari, Sangeeta; Weinrick, Brian; Alland, David; Guérardel, Yann; Jacobs, William R.; Kremer, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    -dependent KasB phosphorylation in regulating the later stages of mycolic acid elongation, with important consequences in terms of acid-fast staining and pathogenicity. PMID:24809459

  16. Organism-adapted specificity of the allosteric regulation of pyruvate kinase in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Veith, Nadine; Feldman-Salit, Anna; Cojocaru, Vlad; Henrich, Stefan; Kummer, Ursula; Wade, Rebecca C

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PYK) is a critical allosterically regulated enzyme that links glycolysis, the primary energy metabolism, to cellular metabolism. Lactic acid bacteria rely almost exclusively on glycolysis for their energy production under anaerobic conditions, which reinforces the key role of PYK in their metabolism. These organisms are closely related, but have adapted to a huge variety of native environments. They include food-fermenting organisms, important symbionts in the human gut, and antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In contrast to the rather conserved inhibition of PYK by inorganic phosphate, the activation of PYK shows high variability in the type of activating compound between different lactic acid bacteria. System-wide comparative studies of the metabolism of lactic acid bacteria are required to understand the reasons for the diversity of these closely related microorganisms. These require knowledge of the identities of the enzyme modifiers. Here, we predict potential allosteric activators of PYKs from three lactic acid bacteria which are adapted to different native environments. We used protein structure-based molecular modeling and enzyme kinetic modeling to predict and validate potential activators of PYK. Specifically, we compared the electrostatic potential and the binding of phosphate moieties at the allosteric binding sites, and predicted potential allosteric activators by docking. We then made a kinetic model of Lactococcus lactis PYK to relate the activator predictions to the intracellular sugar-phosphate conditions in lactic acid bacteria. This strategy enabled us to predict fructose 1,6-bisphosphate as the sole activator of the Enterococcus faecalis PYK, and to predict that the PYKs from Streptococcus pyogenes and Lactobacillus plantarum show weaker specificity for their allosteric activators, while still having fructose 1,6-bisphosphate play the main activator role in vivo. These differences in the specificity of allosteric activation may

  17. Free Fatty Acids Regulate Two Galactosyltransferases in Chloroplast Envelope Membranes Isolated from Spinach Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Sakaki, Takeshi; Kondo, Noriaki; Yamada, Mitsuhiro

    1990-01-01

    Effects of MgCl2 and free fatty acids (FFA) on galactolipid:galactolipid galactosyltransferase (GGGT) and UDP-galactose: 1,2-diacylglycerol galactosyltransferase (UDGT) in chloroplast envelope membranes isolated from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves were examined. GGGT activity was sigmoidally stimulated by MgCl2 with a saturated concentration of more than 5 millimolar. Free α-linolenic acid (18:3) caused a drastic increase in GGGT activity under limiting concentrations of MgCl2, without affecting its maximum activity at higher MgCl2 concentrations. Free 18:3 alone did not affect the GGGT activity. The effective species of FFA for the stimulation of GGGT activity in the presence of MgCl2 were unsaturated 16- and 18-carbon fatty acids. GGGT activity was also stimulated by 18:3 in the presence of MnCl2, CaCl2 and a high concentration of KCl in place of MgCl2. UDGT activity was hyperbolically enhanced by MgCl2 with a saturated concentration of 1 to 2 millimolar. In contrast to GGGT, UDGT was severely inhibited by 18:3, and MgCl2-induced stimulation was completely abolished by 18:3. Unsaturated 16- and 18-carbon fatty acids were more inhibitory to UDGT than the saturated acids. The dependence of GGGT activity on monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and MgCl2 concentrations was identical in the envelope membranes isolated from non- and ozone (0.5 microliter/liter)-fumigated spinach leaves, indicating that GGGT remained active in the leaves during ozone fumigation. The results are discussed in relation to the regulation of galactolipid biosynthesis by the endogenous FFA in the envelopes and to the involvement of GGGT in the triacylglycerol synthesis from MGDG in ozone-fumigated leaves. PMID:16667779

  18. Chemical genetics reveals negative regulation of abscisic acid signaling by a plant immune response pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Hauser, Felix; Ha, Tracy; Xue, Shaowu; Böhmer, Maik; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Munemasa, Shintaro; Hubbard, Katharine; Peine, Nora; Lee, Byeong-Ha; Lee, Stephen; Robert, Nadia; Parker, Jane E; Schroeder, Julian I

    2011-06-01

    Coordinated regulation of protection mechanisms against environmental abiotic stress and pathogen attack is essential for plant adaptation and survival. Initial abiotic stress can interfere with disease-resistance signaling [1-6]. Conversely, initial plant immune signaling may interrupt subsequent abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction [7, 8]. However, the processes involved in this crosstalk between these signaling networks have not been determined. By screening a 9600-compound chemical library, we identified a small molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that rapidly downregulates ABA-dependent gene expression and also inhibits ABA-induced stomatal closure. Transcriptome analyses show that DFPM also stimulates expression of plant defense-related genes. Major early regulators of pathogen-resistance responses, including EDS1, PAD4, RAR1, and SGT1b, are required for DFPM-and notably also for Pseudomonas-interference with ABA signal transduction, whereas salicylic acid, EDS16, and NPR1 are not necessary. Although DFPM does not interfere with early ABA perception by PYR/RCAR receptors or ABA activation of SnRK2 kinases, it disrupts cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling and downstream anion channel activation in a PAD4-dependent manner. Our findings provide evidence that activation of EDS1/PAD4-dependent plant immune responses rapidly disrupts ABA signal transduction and that this occurs at the level of Ca(2+) signaling, illuminating how the initial biotic stress pathway interferes with ABA signaling.

  19. Effects of glucose, ethanol and acetic acid on regulation of ADH2 gene from Lachancea fermentati.

    PubMed

    Yaacob, Norhayati; Mohamad Ali, Mohd Shukuri; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Abdul Rahman, Nor Aini

    2016-01-01

    Background. Not all yeast alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) are repressed by glucose, as reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia stipitis ADH2 is regulated by oxygen instead of glucose, whereas Kluyveromyces marxianus ADH2 is regulated by neither glucose nor ethanol. For this reason, ADH2 regulation of yeasts may be species dependent, leading to a different type of expression and fermentation efficiency. Lachancea fermentati is a highly efficient ethanol producer, fast-growing cells and adapted to fermentation-related stresses such as ethanol and organic acid, but the metabolic information regarding the regulation of glucose and ethanol production is still lacking. Methods. Our investigation started with the stimulation of ADH2 activity from S. cerevisiae and L. fermentati by glucose and ethanol induction in a glucose-repressed medium. The study also embarked on the retrospective analysis of ADH2 genomic and protein level through direct sequencing and sites identification. Based on the sequence generated, we demonstrated ADH2 gene expression highlighting the conserved NAD(P)-binding domain in the context of glucose fermentation and ethanol production. Results. An increase of ADH2 activity was observed in starved L. fermentati (LfeADH2) and S. cerevisiae (SceADH2) in response to 2% (w/v) glucose induction. These suggest that in the presence of glucose, ADH2 activity was activated instead of being repressed. An induction of 0.5% (v/v) ethanol also increased LfeADH2 activity, promoting ethanol resistance, whereas accumulating acetic acid at a later stage of fermentation stimulated ADH2 activity and enhanced glucose consumption rates. The lack in upper stream activating sequence (UAS) and TATA elements hindered the possibility of Adr1 binding to LfeADH2. Transcription factors such as SP1 and RAP1 observed in LfeADH2 sequence have been implicated in the regulation of many genes including ADH2. In glucose fermentation, L. fermentati exhibited a bell-shaped ADH2

  20. Effects of glucose, ethanol and acetic acid on regulation of ADH2 gene from Lachancea fermentati

    PubMed Central

    Yaacob, Norhayati; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Abdul Rahman, Nor Aini

    2016-01-01

    Background. Not all yeast alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) are repressed by glucose, as reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia stipitis ADH2 is regulated by oxygen instead of glucose, whereas Kluyveromyces marxianus ADH2 is regulated by neither glucose nor ethanol. For this reason, ADH2 regulation of yeasts may be species dependent, leading to a different type of expression and fermentation efficiency. Lachancea fermentati is a highly efficient ethanol producer, fast-growing cells and adapted to fermentation-related stresses such as ethanol and organic acid, but the metabolic information regarding the regulation of glucose and ethanol production is still lacking. Methods. Our investigation started with the stimulation of ADH2 activity from S. cerevisiae and L. fermentati by glucose and ethanol induction in a glucose-repressed medium. The study also embarked on the retrospective analysis of ADH2 genomic and protein level through direct sequencing and sites identification. Based on the sequence generated, we demonstrated ADH2 gene expression highlighting the conserved NAD(P)-binding domain in the context of glucose fermentation and ethanol production. Results. An increase of ADH2 activity was observed in starved L. fermentati (LfeADH2) and S. cerevisiae (SceADH2) in response to 2% (w/v) glucose induction. These suggest that in the presence of glucose, ADH2 activity was activated instead of being repressed. An induction of 0.5% (v/v) ethanol also increased LfeADH2 activity, promoting ethanol resistance, whereas accumulating acetic acid at a later stage of fermentation stimulated ADH2 activity and enhanced glucose consumption rates. The lack in upper stream activating sequence (UAS) and TATA elements hindered the possibility of Adr1 binding to LfeADH2. Transcription factors such as SP1 and RAP1 observed in LfeADH2 sequence have been implicated in the regulation of many genes including ADH2. In glucose fermentation, L. fermentati exhibited a bell-shaped ADH2

  1. Regulating inflammation using acid-responsive electrospun fibrous scaffolds for skin scarless healing.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ziming; Zhao, Jingwen; Chen, Yigang; Yang, Zhili; Cui, Wenguo; Zheng, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Skin injury in adult mammals brings about a series of events and inflammation in the wounded area is initiated first and provides lots of inflammatory factors, which is critical for the final scar formation. While the postinjured skin of fetus and nude mice heals scarlessly owing to the absence of inflammation or immunodeficient, we designed a feasible acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) fibrous scaffolds via doping sodium bicarbonate to prevent excessive inflammation and achieve scarless healing finally. The morphological results of in vivo experiments revealed that animals treated with acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded PLLA fibrous scaffolds exhibited alleviative inflammation, accelerated healing process, and regulated collagen deposition via interference in the collagen distribution, the α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) expression. The lower ratios of collagen I/collagen III and TGF-β1/TGF-β3 and higher ratio of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded PLLA fibrous scaffolds group were confirmed by real-time qPCR as well. These results suggest that inhibiting the excessive inflammation will result in regular collagen distribution and appropriate ratio between the factors, which promote or suppress the scar formation, then decrease the scar area, and finally achieve the scarless healing. PMID:24795507

  2. Regulation of inflammatory and lipid metabolism genes by eicosapentaenoic acid-rich oil[S

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Peter J.; Bhatia, Sujata K.; Belcher, Leigh A; Hannon, Daniel B.; Thompson, Jerry T.; Vanden Heuvel, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Omega-3-PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are associated with prevention of various aspects of metabolic syndrome. In the present studies, the effects of oil rich in EPA on gene expression and activation of nuclear receptors was examined and compared with other ω3-PUFAs. The EPA-rich oil (EO) altered the expression of FA metabolism genes in THP-1 cells, including stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) and FA desaturase-1 and -2 (FASDS1 and -2). Other ω3-PUFAs resulted in a similar gene expression response for a subset of genes involved in lipid metabolism and inflammation. In reporter assays, EO activated human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and PPARβ/γ with minimal effects on PPARγ, liver X receptor, retinoid X receptor, farnesoid X receptor, and retinoid acid receptor γ (RARγ); these effects were similar to that observed for purified EPA. When serum from a 6 week clinical intervention with dietary supplements containing olive oil (control), DHA, or two levels of EPA were applied to THP-1 cells, the expression of SCD and FADS2 decreased in the cells treated with serum from the ω3-PUFA-supplemented individuals. Taken together, these studies indicate regulation of gene expression by EO that is consistent with treating aspects of dyslipidemia and inflammation. PMID:22556214

  3. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) homeostasis regulates pollen germination and polarized growth in Picea wilsonii.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yu; Chen, Tong; Jing, Yanping; Fan, Lusheng; Wan, Yinglang; Lin, Jinxing

    2013-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a four-carbon non-protein amino acid found in a wide range of organisms. Recently, GABA accumulation has been shown to play a role in the stress response and cell growth in angiosperms. However, the effect of GABA deficiency on pollen tube development remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that specific concentrations of exogenous GABA stimulated pollen tube growth in Picea wilsonii, while an overdose suppressed pollen tube elongation. The germination percentage of pollen grains and morphological variations in pollen tubes responded in a dose-dependent manner to treatment with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MP), a glutamate decarboxylase inhibitor, while the inhibitory effects could be recovered in calcium-containing medium supplemented with GABA. Using immunofluorescence labeling, we found that the actin cables were disorganized in 3-MP treated cells, followed by the transition of endo/exocytosis activating sites from the apex to the whole tube shank. In addition, variations in the deposition of cell wall components were detected upon labeling with JIM5, JIM7, and aniline blue. Our results demonstrated that calcium-dependent GABA signaling regulates pollen germination and polarized tube growth in P. wilsonii by affecting actin filament patterns, vesicle trafficking, and the configuration and distribution of cell wall components.

  4. Regulating inflammation using acid-responsive electrospun fibrous scaffolds for skin scarless healing.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ziming; Zhao, Jingwen; Chen, Yigang; Yang, Zhili; Cui, Wenguo; Zheng, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Skin injury in adult mammals brings about a series of events and inflammation in the wounded area is initiated first and provides lots of inflammatory factors, which is critical for the final scar formation. While the postinjured skin of fetus and nude mice heals scarlessly owing to the absence of inflammation or immunodeficient, we designed a feasible acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) fibrous scaffolds via doping sodium bicarbonate to prevent excessive inflammation and achieve scarless healing finally. The morphological results of in vivo experiments revealed that animals treated with acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded PLLA fibrous scaffolds exhibited alleviative inflammation, accelerated healing process, and regulated collagen deposition via interference in the collagen distribution, the α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) expression. The lower ratios of collagen I/collagen III and TGF-β1/TGF-β3 and higher ratio of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded PLLA fibrous scaffolds group were confirmed by real-time qPCR as well. These results suggest that inhibiting the excessive inflammation will result in regular collagen distribution and appropriate ratio between the factors, which promote or suppress the scar formation, then decrease the scar area, and finally achieve the scarless healing.

  5. Regulating Inflammation Using Acid-Responsive Electrospun Fibrous Scaffolds for Skin Scarless Healing

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ziming; Zhao, Jingwen; Chen, Yigang; Yang, Zhili; Zheng, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Skin injury in adult mammals brings about a series of events and inflammation in the wounded area is initiated first and provides lots of inflammatory factors, which is critical for the final scar formation. While the postinjured skin of fetus and nude mice heals scarlessly owing to the absence of inflammation or immunodeficient, we designed a feasible acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) fibrous scaffolds via doping sodium bicarbonate to prevent excessive inflammation and achieve scarless healing finally. The morphological results of in vivo experiments revealed that animals treated with acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded PLLA fibrous scaffolds exhibited alleviative inflammation, accelerated healing process, and regulated collagen deposition via interference in the collagen distribution, the α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) expression. The lower ratios of collagen I/collagen III and TGF-β1/TGF-β3 and higher ratio of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded PLLA fibrous scaffolds group were confirmed by real-time qPCR as well. These results suggest that inhibiting the excessive inflammation will result in regular collagen distribution and appropriate ratio between the factors, which promote or suppress the scar formation, then decrease the scar area, and finally achieve the scarless healing. PMID:24795507

  6. Branched-chain amino acid metabolism in rat muscle: abnormal regulation in acidosis

    SciTech Connect

    May, R.C.; Hara, Y.; Kelly, R.A.; Block, K.P.; Buse, M.G.; Mitch, W.E.

    1987-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism is frequently abnormal in pathological conditions accompanied by chronic metabolic acidosis. To study how metabolic acidosis affects BCAA metabolism in muscle, rats were gavage fed a 14% protein diet with or without 4 mmol NH/sub 4/Cl x 100 g body wt/sup -1/ x day/sup -1/. Epitrochlearis muscles were incubated with L-(1-/sup 14/C)-valine and L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine, and rates of decarboxylation, net transamination, and incorporation into muscle protein were measured. Plasma and muscle BCAA levels were lower in acidotic rats. Rates of valine and leucine decarboxylation and net transamination were higher in muscles from acidotic rats; these differences were associated with a 79% increase in the total activity of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase and a 146% increase in the activated form of the enzyme. They conclude that acidosis affects the regulation of BCAA metabolism by enhancing flux through the transaminase and by directly stimulating oxidative catabolism through activation of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase.

  7. Plastidial fatty acid levels regulate resistance gene-dependent defense signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chandra-Shekara, A C; Venugopal, Srivathsa C; Barman, Subhankar Roy; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2007-04-24

    In Arabidopsis, resistance to Turnip Crinkle Virus (TCV) depends on the resistance (R) gene, HRT, and the recessive locus rrt. Resistance also depends on salicylic acid (SA), EDS1, and PAD4. Exogenous application of SA confers resistance in RRT-containing plants by increasing HRT transcript levels in a PAD4-dependent manner. Here we report that reduction of oleic acid (18:1) can also induce HRT gene expression and confer resistance to TCV. However, the 18:1-regulated pathway is independent of SA, rrt, EDS1, and PAD4. Reducing the levels of 18:1, via a mutation in the SSI2-encoded stearoyl-acyl carrier protein-desaturase, or by exogenous application of glycerol, increased transcript levels of HRT as well as several other R genes. Second-site mutations in the ACT1-encoded glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase or GLY1-encoded glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase restored 18:1 levels in HRT ssi2 plants and reestablished a dependence on rrt. Resistance to TCV and HRT gene expression in HRT act1 plants was inducible by SA but not by glycerol, whereas that in HRT pad4 plants was inducible by glycerol but not by SA. The low 18:1-mediated induction of R gene expression was also dependent on ACT1 but independent of EDS1, PAD4, and RAR1. Intriguingly, TCV inoculation did not activate this 18:1-regulated pathway in HRT plants, but instead resulted in the induction of several genes that encode 18:1-synthesizing isozymes. These results suggest that the 18:1-regulated pathway may be specifically targeted during pathogen infection and that altering 18:1 levels may serve as a unique strategy for promoting disease resistance.

  8. Vesicles from pH-regulated reversible gemini amino-acid surfactants as nanocapsules for delivery.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Qiao, Weihong; Li, Zongshi

    2016-10-01

    Reversible transition from micelles to vesicles by regulating pH were realized by gemini amino-acid surfactants N,N'-dialkyl-N,N'-diacetate ethylenediamine. Measurement results of ζ-potential at different pH and DLS at varying solvents revealed that the protonation between H(+) and double NCH2COO(-) groups (generating NH(+)CH2COO(-)), expressed as pKa1 and pKa2, is the key driving force to control the aggregation behaviors of gemini surfactant molecule. Effect of pH on the bilayer structure was studied in detail by using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy of hydrophobic pyrene and Coumarin 153 (C153) respectively and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from C153 to Rhodamine 6G (R6G). Various pH-regulated and pH-reversible self-assemblies were obtained in one surfactant system. Vitamin D3 was encapsulated in vesicle bilayers to form nano-VD3-capsules as VD3 supplement agent for health care products. By using the electrostatic attraction between Ca(2+) and double -COO(-) groups, nano-VD3-capsules with Ca(2+) coated outermost layers were prepared as a formulation for VD3 and calcium co-supplement agent. DLS and TEM were performed to check stability and morphology of the nano-capsules. It is concluded that the pH-regulated gemini amino-acid surfactants can be used to construct colloidal systems for delivering hydrophobic drugs or nutritions without lipids at human physiological pH level. PMID:27419647

  9. Vesicles from pH-regulated reversible gemini amino-acid surfactants as nanocapsules for delivery.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Qiao, Weihong; Li, Zongshi

    2016-10-01

    Reversible transition from micelles to vesicles by regulating pH were realized by gemini amino-acid surfactants N,N'-dialkyl-N,N'-diacetate ethylenediamine. Measurement results of ζ-potential at different pH and DLS at varying solvents revealed that the protonation between H(+) and double NCH2COO(-) groups (generating NH(+)CH2COO(-)), expressed as pKa1 and pKa2, is the key driving force to control the aggregation behaviors of gemini surfactant molecule. Effect of pH on the bilayer structure was studied in detail by using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy of hydrophobic pyrene and Coumarin 153 (C153) respectively and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from C153 to Rhodamine 6G (R6G). Various pH-regulated and pH-reversible self-assemblies were obtained in one surfactant system. Vitamin D3 was encapsulated in vesicle bilayers to form nano-VD3-capsules as VD3 supplement agent for health care products. By using the electrostatic attraction between Ca(2+) and double -COO(-) groups, nano-VD3-capsules with Ca(2+) coated outermost layers were prepared as a formulation for VD3 and calcium co-supplement agent. DLS and TEM were performed to check stability and morphology of the nano-capsules. It is concluded that the pH-regulated gemini amino-acid surfactants can be used to construct colloidal systems for delivering hydrophobic drugs or nutritions without lipids at human physiological pH level.

  10. ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE 4 negatively regulates flowering through directly promoting Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C transcription

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Kai; Chen, Qian; Wu, Yaorong; Liu, Ruijun; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Shengfu; Tang, Sanyuan; Yang, Wenyu; Xie, Qi

    2016-01-01

    During the life cycle of a plant, one of the major biological processes is the transition from the vegetative to the reproductive stage. In Arabidopsis, flowering time is precisely controlled by extensive environmental and internal cues. Gibberellins (GAs) promote flowering, while abscisic acid (ABA) is considered as a flowering suppressor. However, the detailed mechanism through which ABA inhibits the floral transition is poorly understood. Here, we report that ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE 4 (ABI4), a key component in the ABA signalling pathway, negatively regulates floral transition by directly promoting FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) transcription. The abi4 mutant showed the early flowering phenotype whereas ABI4-overexpressing (OE-ABI4) plants had delayed floral transition. Consistently, quantitative reverse transcription–PCR (qRT–PCR) assay revealed that the FLC transcription level was down-regulated in abi4, but up-regulated in OE-ABI4. The change in FT level was consistent with the pattern of FLC expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-qPCR (ChIP-qPCR), electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), and tobacco transient expression analysis showed that ABI4 promotes FLC expression by directly binding to its promoter. Genetic analysis demonstrated that OE-ABI4::flc-3 could not alter the flc-3 phenotype. OE-FLC::abi4 showed a markedly delayed flowering phenotype, which mimicked OE-FLC::WT, and suggested that ABI4 acts upstream of FLC in the same genetic pathway. Taken together, these findings suggest that ABA inhibits the floral transition by activating FLC transcription through ABI4. PMID:26507894

  11. Phosphatidic acid regulation of PIPKI is critical for actin cytoskeletal reorganization.

    PubMed

    Roach, Akua N; Wang, Ziqing; Wu, Ping; Zhang, Feng; Chan, Robin B; Yonekubo, Yoshiya; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Gorfe, Alemayehu A; Du, Guangwei

    2012-12-01

    Type I phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIPKI) is the main enzyme generating the lipid second messenger phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2], which has critical functions in many cellular processes, such as cytoskeletal reorganization, membrane trafficking, and signal transduction. All three members of the PIPKI family are activated by phosphatidic acid (PA). However, how PA regulates the activity and functions of PIPKI have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we identify a PA-binding site on PIPKIγ. Mutation of this site inhibited the PA-stimulated activity and membrane localization of PIPKIγ as well as the formation of actin comets and foci induced by PIPKIγ. We also demonstrate that phospholipase D (PLD) generates a pool of PA involved in PIPKIγ regulation by showing that PLD inhibitors blocked the membrane localization of PIPKIγ and its ability to induce actin cytoskeletal reorganization. Targeting the PIPKIγ PA-binding-deficient mutant to membranes by a membrane localization sequence failed to restore the actin reorganization activity of PIPKIγ, suggesting that PA binding is not only involved in recruiting PIPKIγ to membranes but also may induce a conformational change. Taken together, these results reveal a new molecular mechanism through which PA regulates PIPKI and provides direct evidence that PA is important for the localization and functions of PIPKI in intact cells. PMID:22991193

  12. Cytochrome P450s in the Regulation of Cellular Retinoic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ross, A. Catharine; Zolfaghari, Reza

    2013-01-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin A, retinoic acid (RA), is a powerful regulator of gene transcription. RA is also a therapeutic drug. The oxidative metabolism of RA by certain members of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily helps to maintain tissue RA concentrations within appropriate bounds. The CYP26 family—CYP26A1, CYP26B1, and CYP26C1—is distinguished by being both regulated by and active toward all-trans-RA (at-RA) while being expressed in different tissue-specific patterns. The CYP26A1 gene is regulated by multiple RA response elements. CYP26A1 is essential for embryonic development, whereas CYP26B1 is essential for postnatal survival as well as germ cell development. Enzyme kinetic studies have demonstrated that several CYP proteins are capable of metabolizing at-RA; however, it is likely that CYP26A1 plays a major role in RA clearance. Thus, pharmacological approaches to limiting the activity of CYP26 enzymes may extend the half-life of RA and could be useful clinically in the future. PMID:21529158

  13. Functional analysis of a Lemna gibba rbcS promoter regulated by abscisic acid and sugar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youru

    2013-04-01

    Photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes (PhANGs) are able to respond to multiple environmental and developmental signals, including light, sugar and abscisic acid (ABA). PhANGs have been extensively studied at the level of transcriptional regulation, and several cis-acting elements important for light responsiveness have been identified in their promoter sequences. However, the regulatory elements involved in sugar and ABA regulation of PhANGs have not been completely characterized. A ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit gene (rbcS) promoter (SSU5C promoter) was isolated from duckweed (Lemna gibba). A series of SSU5C promoter 5' deletion fragments were fused to an intron-gus gene, and transgenic tobacco suspension cell lines were generated. Assay of tobacco suspension cell line harbouring the complete promoter in the fusion construct indicated that SSU5C promoter was negatively regulated by sugar and ABA under the condition of regular photoperiod. 5' deletion analysis of SSU5C promoter in transgenic tobacco suspension cell lines confirmed that a region between positions -310 and -152 included the ABA-response region, and that sugar-response cis-acting elements might be located in the region between -152 and -117. Taken together, our results confirmed that the cis-regulatory region responsible for repression by ABA and sugar in the SSU5C promoter was located between -310 and -117. PMID:23640406

  14. Regulation of PDK mRNA by high fatty acid and glucose in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianxiang; Han, Junying; Epstein, Paul N; Liu, Ye Q

    2006-06-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) converts pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, links glycolysis to the Krebs cycle, and plays an important role in glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells. In beta cells from obese and Type 2 diabetic animals, PDH activity is significantly reduced. PDH is negatively regulated by multiple pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) isotypes (PDK subtypes 1-4). However, we do not know whether fatty acids or high glucose modulate PDKs in islets. To test this we determined PDH and PDK activities and PDK gene and protein expression in C57BL/6 mouse islets. Both high palmitate and high glucose reduced active PDH activity and increased PDK activity. The gene and protein for PDK3 were not expressed in islets. Palmitate up-regulated mRNA expression of PDK1 (2.9-fold), PDK2 (1.9-fold), and PDK4 (3.1-fold). High glucose increased PDK1 (1.8-fold) and PDK2 (2.7-fold) mRNA expression but reduced PDK4 mRNA expression by 40 percent in cultured islets. Changed PDK expression was confirmed by Western blotting. These results demonstrate that in islet cells both fat and glucose regulate PDK gene and protein expression and indicate that hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia contribute to the decline in diabetic islet PDH activity by increasing mRNA and protein expression of PDK. PMID:16631612

  15. Retinoic acid alleviates Con A-induced hepatitis and differentially regulates effector production in NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoo-A; Song, You Chan; Kim, Ga-Young; Choi, Gyeyoung; Lee, Yoon-Sook; Lee, Jung-Mi; Kang, Chang-Yuil

    2012-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a diverse regulator of immune responses. Although RA promotes natural killer T (NKT) cell activation in vitro by increasing CD1d expression on antigen-presenting cells (APCs), the direct effects of RA on NKT-cell responses in vivo are not known. In the present study, we demonstrated the effect of RA on the severity of Con A-induced hepatitis and molecular changes of NKT cells. First, we demonstrated that Con A-induced liver damage was ameliorated by RA. In correlation with cytokine levels in serum, RA regulated the production of IFN-γ and IL-4 but not TNF-α by NKT cells without influencing the NKT-cell activation status. However, RA did not alleviate α-GalCer-induced liver injury, even though it reduced IFN-γ and IL-4 but not TNF-α levels in serum. This regulation was also detected when liver mononuclear cells (MNCs) or NKT hybridoma cells were treated with RA in vitro. The regulatory effect of RA on NKT cells was mediated by RAR-α, and RA reduced the phosphorylation of MAPK. These results suggest that RA differentially modulates the production of effector cytokines by NKT cells in hepatitis, and the suppressive effect of RA on hepatitis varies with the pathogenic mechanism of liver injury.

  16. Retinoic acid differentially regulates the migration of innate lymphoid cell subsets to the gut

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung H.; Taparowsky, Elizabeth J.; Kim, Chang H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Distinct groups of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) such as ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3 populate the intestine, but how these ILCs develop tissue tropism for this organ is unclear. We report that prior to migration to the intestine ILCs first undergo a `switch' in their expression of homing receptors from lymphoid to gut homing receptors. This process is regulated by mucosal dendritic cells and the gut-specific tissue factor retinoic acid (RA). This change in homing receptors is required for long-term population and effector function of ILCs in the intestine. Only ILC1 and ILC3, but not ILC2, undergo the RA-dependent homing receptor switch in gut-associated lymphoid tissues. In contrast, ILC2 acquire gut homing receptors in a largely RA-independent manner during their development in the bone marrow and can migrate directly to the intestine. Thus, distinct programs regulate the migration of ILC subsets to the intestine for regulation of innate immunity. PMID:26141583

  17. Bile acid regulates c-Jun expression through the orphan nuclear receptor SHP induction in gastric cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Won Il; Park, Min Jung; An, Jin Kwang; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Hye Young; Cheong, JaeHun Yang, Ung Suk

    2008-05-02

    Bile reflux is considered to be one of the most important causative factors in gastric carcinogenesis, due to the attendant inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. In this study, we have assessed the molecular mechanisms inherent to the contribution of bile acid to the transcriptional regulation of inflammatory-related genes. In this study, we demonstrated that bile acid induced the expression of the SHP orphan nuclear receptor at the transcriptional level via c-Jun activation. Bile acid also enhanced the protein interaction of NF-{kappa}B and SHP, thereby resulting in an increase in c-Jun expression and the production of the inflammatory cytokine, TNF{alpha}. These results indicate that bile acid performs a critical function in the regulation of the induction of inflammatory-related genes in gastric cells, and that bile acid-mediated gene expression provides a pre-clue for the development of gastric cellular malformation.

  18. Bile acids are "homeotrophic" sensors of the functional hepatic capacity and regulate adaptive growth during liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Geier, Andreas; Trautwein, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Liver mass depends on one or more unidentified humoral signals that drive regeneration when liver functional capacity is diminished. Bile acids are important liver products, and their levels are tightly regulated. Here, we identify a role for nuclear receptor-dependent bile acid signaling in normal liver regeneration. Elevated bile acid levels accelerate regeneration, and decreased levels inhibit liver regrowth, as does the absence of the primary nuclear bile acid receptor FXR. We propose that FXR activation by increased bile acid flux is a signal of decreased functional capacity of the liver. FXR, and possibly other nuclear receptors, may promote homeostasis not only by regulating expression of appropriate metabolic target genes but also by driving homeotrophic liver growth.

  19. Folic acid protects against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Xiao-Bo; Luo, Hai-Yan; Chen, Yang; Li, Hui-hua; Ma, Xu; Lu, Cai-Ling

    2015-11-05

    As a nutritional factor, folic acid can prevent cardiac and neural defects during embryo development. Our previous study showed that arsenic impairs embryo development by down-regulating Dvr1/GDF1 expression in zebrafish. Here, we investigated whether folic acid could protect against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity. We found that folic acid supplementation increases hatching and survival rates, decreases malformation rate and ameliorates abnormal cardiac and neural development of zebrafish embryos exposed to arsenite. Both real-time PCR analysis and whole in-mount hybridization showed that folic acid significantly rescued the decrease in Dvr1 expression caused by arsenite. Subsequently, our data demonstrated that arsenite significantly decreased cell viability and GDF1 mRNA and protein levels in HEK293ET cells, while folic acid reversed these effects. Folic acid attenuated the increase in subcellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and oxidative adaptor p66Shc protein expression in parallel with the changes in GDF1 expression and cell viability. P66Shc knockdown significantly inhibited the production of ROS and the down-regulation of GDF1 induced by arsenite. Our data demonstrated that folic acid supplementation protected against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1/GDF1, and folic acid enhanced the expression of GDF1 by decreasing p66Shc expression and subcellular ROS levels.

  20. Folic acid protects against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Xiao-Bo; Luo, Hai-Yan; Chen, Yang; Li, Hui-hua; Ma, Xu; Lu, Cai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    As a nutritional factor, folic acid can prevent cardiac and neural defects during embryo development. Our previous study showed that arsenic impairs embryo development by down-regulating Dvr1/GDF1 expression in zebrafish. Here, we investigated whether folic acid could protect against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity. We found that folic acid supplementation increases hatching and survival rates, decreases malformation rate and ameliorates abnormal cardiac and neural development of zebrafish embryos exposed to arsenite. Both real-time PCR analysis and whole in-mount hybridization showed that folic acid significantly rescued the decrease in Dvr1 expression caused by arsenite. Subsequently, our data demonstrated that arsenite significantly decreased cell viability and GDF1 mRNA and protein levels in HEK293ET cells, while folic acid reversed these effects. Folic acid attenuated the increase in subcellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and oxidative adaptor p66Shc protein expression in parallel with the changes in GDF1 expression and cell viability. P66Shc knockdown significantly inhibited the production of ROS and the down-regulation of GDF1 induced by arsenite. Our data demonstrated that folic acid supplementation protected against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1/GDF1, and folic acid enhanced the expression of GDF1 by decreasing p66Shc expression and subcellular ROS levels. PMID:26537450

  1. Metabolic pathways regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributing to heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. The objectives of this study were to examine whether increased GABA could improve heat tolerance in cool-season creeping bentgrass through physiological analysis, and to determine major metabolic pathways regulated by GABA through metabolic profiling. Plants were pretreated with 0.5 mM GABA or water before exposed to non-stressed condition (21/19 °C) or heat stress (35/30 °C) in controlled growth chambers for 35 d. The growth and physiological analysis demonstrated that exogenous GABA application significantly improved heat tolerance of creeping bentgrass. Metabolic profiling found that exogenous application of GABA led to increases in accumulations of amino acids (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, threonine, serine, and valine), organic acids (aconitic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, and threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, galactose, and maltose), and sugar alcohols (mannitol and myo-inositol). These findings suggest that GABA-induced heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass could involve the enhancement of photosynthesis and ascorbate-glutathione cycle, the maintenance of osmotic adjustment, and the increase in GABA shunt. The increased GABA shunt could be the supply of intermediates to feed the tricarboxylic acid cycle of respiration metabolism during a long-term heat stress, thereby maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27455877

  2. Metabolic pathways regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributing to heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2016-07-26

    γ-Aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. The objectives of this study were to examine whether increased GABA could improve heat tolerance in cool-season creeping bentgrass through physiological analysis, and to determine major metabolic pathways regulated by GABA through metabolic profiling. Plants were pretreated with 0.5 mM GABA or water before exposed to non-stressed condition (21/19 °C) or heat stress (35/30 °C) in controlled growth chambers for 35 d. The growth and physiological analysis demonstrated that exogenous GABA application significantly improved heat tolerance of creeping bentgrass. Metabolic profiling found that exogenous application of GABA led to increases in accumulations of amino acids (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, threonine, serine, and valine), organic acids (aconitic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, and threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, galactose, and maltose), and sugar alcohols (mannitol and myo-inositol). These findings suggest that GABA-induced heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass could involve the enhancement of photosynthesis and ascorbate-glutathione cycle, the maintenance of osmotic adjustment, and the increase in GABA shunt. The increased GABA shunt could be the supply of intermediates to feed the tricarboxylic acid cycle of respiration metabolism during a long-term heat stress, thereby maintaining metabolic homeostasis.

  3. Metabolic pathways regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributing to heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. The objectives of this study were to examine whether increased GABA could improve heat tolerance in cool-season creeping bentgrass through physiological analysis, and to determine major metabolic pathways regulated by GABA through metabolic profiling. Plants were pretreated with 0.5 mM GABA or water before exposed to non-stressed condition (21/19 °C) or heat stress (35/30 °C) in controlled growth chambers for 35 d. The growth and physiological analysis demonstrated that exogenous GABA application significantly improved heat tolerance of creeping bentgrass. Metabolic profiling found that exogenous application of GABA led to increases in accumulations of amino acids (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, threonine, serine, and valine), organic acids (aconitic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, and threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, galactose, and maltose), and sugar alcohols (mannitol and myo-inositol). These findings suggest that GABA-induced heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass could involve the enhancement of photosynthesis and ascorbate-glutathione cycle, the maintenance of osmotic adjustment, and the increase in GABA shunt. The increased GABA shunt could be the supply of intermediates to feed the tricarboxylic acid cycle of respiration metabolism during a long-term heat stress, thereby maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27455877

  4. Efficient production of optically pure L-lactic acid from food waste at ambient temperature by regulating key enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Chen, Yinguang; Zhao, Shu; Chen, Hong; Zheng, Xiong; Luo, Jinyang; Liu, Yanan

    2015-03-01

    Bio-production of optically pure L-lactic acid from food waste has attracted much interest as it can treat organic wastes with simultaneous recovery of valuable by-products. However, the yield of L-lactic acid was very low and no optically pure L-lactic acid was produced in the literature due to (1) the lower activity of enzymes involved in hydrolysis and L-lactic acid generation, and (2) the participation of other enzymes related to D-lactic acid and acetic and propionic acids production. In this paper, a new strategy was reported for effective production of optically pure L-lactic acid from food waste at ambient temperature, i.e. via regulating key enzyme activity by sewage sludge supplement and intermittent alkaline fermentation. It was found that not only optically pure L-lactic acid was produced, but the yield was enhanced by 2.89-fold. The mechanism study showed that the activities of enzymes relevant to food waste hydrolysis and lactic acid production were enhanced, and the key enzymes related to volatile fatty acids and D-lactic acid generations were severally decreased or inhibited. Also, the microbes responsible for L-lactic acid production were selectively proliferated. Finally, the pilot-scale continuous experiment was conducted to testify the feasibility of this new technique.

  5. Ionic and Amino Acid Regulation in Hard Clam (Meretrix lusoria) in Response to Salinity Challenges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Yeh, Po-Ling; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Most marine mollusks are osmoconformers, in that, their body fluid osmolality changes in the direction of the change in environmental salinity. Marine mollusks exhibit a number of osmoregulatory mechanisms to cope with either hypo- or hyperosmotic stress. The effects of changes in salinity on the osmoregulatory mechanisms of the hard clam (Meretrix lusoria, an economically important species of marine bivalve for Taiwan) have not been determined. In this study, we examined the effect of exposure to hypo (10‰)- and hyper (35‰)-osmotic salinity on hard clams raised at their natural salinity (20‰). The osmolality, [Na(+)], and [Cl(-)] of the hard clam hemolymph were changed in the same direction as the surrounding salinity. Further, the contents of total free amino acids including taurine in the gills and mantles were significantly upregulated in hard clam with increasing salinity. The gill Na(+), K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity, the important enzyme regulating cellular inorganic ions, was not affected by the changed salinity. Mantle NKA activity, however, was stimulated in the 35‰ SW treatment. The taurine transporter (TAUT) is related to the regulation of intracellular contents of taurine, the dominant osmolyte. Herein, a TAUT gene of hard clam was cloned and a TAUT antibody was derived for the immunoblotting. The TAUT mRNA expression of the mantle in hard clam was significantly stimulated in 35‰ SW, but protein expression was not modulated by the changed salinity. In gills of the hard clam with 10‰ SW, both TAUT mRNA and protein expressions were significantly stimulated, and it may reflect a feedback regulation from the decreased gills taurine content under long-term hypoosmotic acclimation. These findings suggest that TAUT expression is regulated differently in gills and mantles following exposure to alterations in environmental salinity. Taken together, this study used the physiological, biochemical and molecular approaches to simultaneously explore the

  6. The Pepper CaOSR1 Protein Regulates the Osmotic Stress Response via Abscisic Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chanmi; Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms, and their growth and development is detrimentally affected by environmental stresses such as drought and high salinity. Defense mechanisms are tightly regulated and complex processes, which respond to changing environmental conditions; however, the precise mechanisms that function under adverse conditions remain unclear. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of the CaOSR1 gene, which functions in the adaptive response to abiotic stress. We found that CaOSR1 gene expression in pepper leaves was up-regulated after exposure to abscisic acid (ABA), drought, and high salinity. In addition, we demonstrated that the fusion protein of CaOSR1 with green fluorescent protein (GFP) is localized in the nucleus. We used CaOSR1-silenced pepper plants and CaOSR1-OX-overexpressing (OX) transgenic Arabidopsis plants to show that the CaOSR1 protein regulates the osmotic stress response. CaOSR1-silenced pepper plants showed increased drought susceptibility, and this was accompanied by a high transpiration rate. CaOSR1-OX plants displayed phenotypes that were hypersensitive to ABA and hyposensitive to osmotic stress, during the seed germination and seedling growth stages; furthermore, these plants exhibited enhanced drought tolerance at the adult stage, and this was characterized by higher leaf temperatures and smaller stomatal apertures because of ABA hypersensitivity. Taken together, our data indicate that CaOSR1 positively regulates osmotic stress tolerance via ABA-mediated cell signaling. These findings suggest an involvement of a novel protein in ABA and osmotic stress signalings in plants. PMID:27446121

  7. Vitamin D Regulates Fatty Acid Composition in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Through Elovl3.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lijuan; Gupta, Mihir; Feldman, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) are a major energy source in the body. White adipose tissue (WAT) is a primary site where FAs are stored as triacylglycerols. Brown adipose tissue also stores and recruits FAs as a carbon source for uncoupled β-oxidation during thermogenesis. The deletion of the vitamin D nuclear hormone receptor (VDR) gene in mice (VDRKO) results in a lean WAT phenotype with increased levels of expression of the brown adipose tissue marker Ucp1 in the WAT. However, the impact of vitamin D/VDR on FA composition in WAT has not been explored in detail. To address this question, we examined the FA composition of sc and visceral white adipose depots of VDRKO mice. We found that the levels of a subset of saturated and monounsaturated FAs of C18-C24 are specifically increased in the sc adipose depot in VDRKO mice. We revealed that a specific elongase enzyme (Elovl3), which has an important role in brown fat biology, is directly regulated by VDR and likely contributes to the altered FA composition in VDRKO mice. We also demonstrate that Elovl3 is regulated by vitamin D in vivo and tissue specifically in the sc WAT depot. We discovered that regulation of Elovl3 expression is mediated by ligand-dependent VDR occupancy of a negative-response element in the promoter proximal region of the Elovl3 gene. These data suggest that vitamin D/VDR tissue specifically modulates FA composition in sc WAT through direct regulation of Elovl3 expression. PMID:26488808

  8. The Pepper CaOSR1 Protein Regulates the Osmotic Stress Response via Abscisic Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Chanmi; Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms, and their growth and development is detrimentally affected by environmental stresses such as drought and high salinity. Defense mechanisms are tightly regulated and complex processes, which respond to changing environmental conditions; however, the precise mechanisms that function under adverse conditions remain unclear. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of the CaOSR1 gene, which functions in the adaptive response to abiotic stress. We found that CaOSR1 gene expression in pepper leaves was up-regulated after exposure to abscisic acid (ABA), drought, and high salinity. In addition, we demonstrated that the fusion protein of CaOSR1 with green fluorescent protein (GFP) is localized in the nucleus. We used CaOSR1-silenced pepper plants and CaOSR1-OX-overexpressing (OX) transgenic Arabidopsis plants to show that the CaOSR1 protein regulates the osmotic stress response. CaOSR1-silenced pepper plants showed increased drought susceptibility, and this was accompanied by a high transpiration rate. CaOSR1-OX plants displayed phenotypes that were hypersensitive to ABA and hyposensitive to osmotic stress, during the seed germination and seedling growth stages; furthermore, these plants exhibited enhanced drought tolerance at the adult stage, and this was characterized by higher leaf temperatures and smaller stomatal apertures because of ABA hypersensitivity. Taken together, our data indicate that CaOSR1 positively regulates osmotic stress tolerance via ABA-mediated cell signaling. These findings suggest an involvement of a novel protein in ABA and osmotic stress signalings in plants. PMID:27446121

  9. Thioredoxin, a master regulator of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Daloso, Danilo M; Müller, Karolin; Obata, Toshihiro; Florian, Alexandra; Tohge, Takayuki; Bottcher, Alexandra; Riondet, Christophe; Bariat, Laetitia; Carrari, Fernando; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Buchanan, Bob B; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2015-03-17

    Plant mitochondria have a fully operational tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle that plays a central role in generating ATP and providing carbon skeletons for a range of biosynthetic processes in both heterotrophic and photosynthetic tissues. The cycle enzyme-encoding genes have been well characterized in terms of transcriptional and effector-mediated regulation and have also been subjected to reverse genetic analysis. However, despite this wealth of attention, a central question remains unanswered: "What regulates flux through this pathway in vivo?" Previous proteomic experiments with Arabidopsis discussed below have revealed that a number of mitochondrial enzymes, including members of the TCA cycle and affiliated pathways, harbor thioredoxin (TRX)-binding sites and are potentially redox-regulated. We have followed up on this possibility and found TRX to be a redox-sensitive mediator of TCA cycle flux. In this investigation, we first characterized, at the enzyme and metabolite levels, mutants of the mitochondrial TRX pathway in Arabidopsis: the NADP-TRX reductase a and b double mutant (ntra ntrb) and the mitochondrially located thioredoxin o1 (trxo1) mutant. These studies were followed by a comparative evaluation of the redistribution of isotopes when (13)C-glucose, (13)C-malate, or (13)C-pyruvate was provided as a substrate to leaves of mutant or WT plants. In a complementary approach, we evaluated the in vitro activities of a range of TCA cycle and associated enzymes under varying redox states. The combined dataset suggests that TRX may deactivate both mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase and activate the cytosolic ATP-citrate lyase in vivo, acting as a direct regulator of carbon flow through the TCA cycle and providing a mechanism for the coordination of cellular function.

  10. Ionic and Amino Acid Regulation in Hard Clam (Meretrix lusoria) in Response to Salinity Challenges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Yeh, Po-Ling; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Most marine mollusks are osmoconformers, in that, their body fluid osmolality changes in the direction of the change in environmental salinity. Marine mollusks exhibit a number of osmoregulatory mechanisms to cope with either hypo- or hyperosmotic stress. The effects of changes in salinity on the osmoregulatory mechanisms of the hard clam (Meretrix lusoria, an economically important species of marine bivalve for Taiwan) have not been determined. In this study, we examined the effect of exposure to hypo (10‰)- and hyper (35‰)-osmotic salinity on hard clams raised at their natural salinity (20‰). The osmolality, [Na(+)], and [Cl(-)] of the hard clam hemolymph were changed in the same direction as the surrounding salinity. Further, the contents of total free amino acids including taurine in the gills and mantles were significantly upregulated in hard clam with increasing salinity. The gill Na(+), K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity, the important enzyme regulating cellular inorganic ions, was not affected by the changed salinity. Mantle NKA activity, however, was stimulated in the 35‰ SW treatment. The taurine transporter (TAUT) is related to the regulation of intracellular contents of taurine, the dominant osmolyte. Herein, a TAUT gene of hard clam was cloned and a TAUT antibody was derived for the immunoblotting. The TAUT mRNA expression of the mantle in hard clam was significantly stimulated in 35‰ SW, but protein expression was not modulated by the changed salinity. In gills of the hard clam with 10‰ SW, both TAUT mRNA and protein expressions were significantly stimulated, and it may reflect a feedback regulation from the decreased gills taurine content under long-term hypoosmotic acclimation. These findings suggest that TAUT expression is regulated differently in gills and mantles following exposure to alterations in environmental salinity. Taken together, this study used the physiological, biochemical and molecular approaches to simultaneously explore the

  11. Ionic and Amino Acid Regulation in Hard Clam (Meretrix lusoria) in Response to Salinity Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Yeh, Po-Ling; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Most marine mollusks are osmoconformers, in that, their body fluid osmolality changes in the direction of the change in environmental salinity. Marine mollusks exhibit a number of osmoregulatory mechanisms to cope with either hypo- or hyperosmotic stress. The effects of changes in salinity on the osmoregulatory mechanisms of the hard clam (Meretrix lusoria, an economically important species of marine bivalve for Taiwan) have not been determined. In this study, we examined the effect of exposure to hypo (10‰)- and hyper (35‰)-osmotic salinity on hard clams raised at their natural salinity (20‰). The osmolality, [Na+], and [Cl−] of the hard clam hemolymph were changed in the same direction as the surrounding salinity. Further, the contents of total free amino acids including taurine in the gills and mantles were significantly upregulated in hard clam with increasing salinity. The gill Na+, K+-ATPase (NKA) activity, the important enzyme regulating cellular inorganic ions, was not affected by the changed salinity. Mantle NKA activity, however, was stimulated in the 35‰ SW treatment. The taurine transporter (TAUT) is related to the regulation of intracellular contents of taurine, the dominant osmolyte. Herein, a TAUT gene of hard clam was cloned and a TAUT antibody was derived for the immunoblotting. The TAUT mRNA expression of the mantle in hard clam was significantly stimulated in 35‰ SW, but protein expression was not modulated by the changed salinity. In gills of the hard clam with 10‰ SW, both TAUT mRNA and protein expressions were significantly stimulated, and it may reflect a feedback regulation from the decreased gills taurine content under long-term hypoosmotic acclimation. These findings suggest that TAUT expression is regulated differently in gills and mantles following exposure to alterations in environmental salinity. Taken together, this study used the physiological, biochemical and molecular approaches to simultaneously explore the

  12. Tannic Acid Down-Regulates the Angiotensin Type 1 Receptor Through a MAPK-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yesudas, Rekha; Gumaste, Upendra; Snyder, Russell

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of tannic acid (TA), a hydrolysable polyphenol, on angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) expression in continuously passaged rat liver epithelial cells. Under normal conditions, exposure of cells to TA resulted in the down-regulation of AT1R-specific binding in concentrations ranging from 12.5–100 μg/ml (7.34–58.78 μm) over a time period of 2–24 h with no change in receptor affinity to angiotensin II (AngII). The inhibitory effect of TA on AT1R was specific and reversible. In TA-treated cells, we observed a significant reduction in AngII-mediated intracellular calcium signaling, a finding consistent with receptor down-regulation. Under similar conditions, TA down-regulated AT1R mRNA expression without changing the rate of mRNA degradation, suggesting that TA's effect is mediated through transcriptional inhibition. Cells expressing recombinant AT1R without the native promoter show no change in receptor expression, whereas a pCAT reporter construct possessing the rat AT1R promoter was significantly reduced in activity. Furthermore, TA induced the phosphorylation of MAPK p42/p44. Pretreatment of the cells with a MAPK kinase (MEK)-specific inhibitor PD98059 prevented TA-induced MAPK phosphorylation and down-regulation of the AT1R. Moreover, there was no reduction in AngII-mediated intracellular calcium release upon MEK inhibition, suggesting that TA's observed inhibitory effect is mediated through MEK/MAPK signaling. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that TA inhibits AT1R gene expression and cellular response, suggesting the observed protective effects of dietary polyphenols on cardiovascular conditions may be, in part, through inhibition of AT1R expression. PMID:22322600

  13. Ionic and Amino Acid Regulation in Hard Clam (Meretrix lusoria) in Response to Salinity Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Yeh, Po-Ling; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Most marine mollusks are osmoconformers, in that, their body fluid osmolality changes in the direction of the change in environmental salinity. Marine mollusks exhibit a number of osmoregulatory mechanisms to cope with either hypo- or hyperosmotic stress. The effects of changes in salinity on the osmoregulatory mechanisms of the hard clam (Meretrix lusoria, an economically important species of marine bivalve for Taiwan) have not been determined. In this study, we examined the effect of exposure to hypo (10‰)- and hyper (35‰)-osmotic salinity on hard clams raised at their natural salinity (20‰). The osmolality, [Na+], and [Cl−] of the hard clam hemolymph were changed in the same direction as the surrounding salinity. Further, the contents of total free amino acids including taurine in the gills and mantles were significantly upregulated in hard clam with increasing salinity. The gill Na+, K+-ATPase (NKA) activity, the important enzyme regulating cellular inorganic ions, was not affected by the changed salinity. Mantle NKA activity, however, was stimulated in the 35‰ SW treatment. The taurine transporter (TAUT) is related to the regulation of intracellular contents of taurine, the dominant osmolyte. Herein, a TAUT gene of hard clam was cloned and a TAUT antibody was derived for the immunoblotting. The TAUT mRNA expression of the mantle in hard clam was significantly stimulated in 35‰ SW, but protein expression was not modulated by the changed salinity. In gills of the hard clam with 10‰ SW, both TAUT mRNA and protein expressions were significantly stimulated, and it may reflect a feedback regulation from the decreased gills taurine content under long-term hypoosmotic acclimation. These findings suggest that TAUT expression is regulated differently in gills and mantles following exposure to alterations in environmental salinity. Taken together, this study used the physiological, biochemical and molecular approaches to simultaneously explore the

  14. Thioredoxin, a master regulator of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in plant mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Daloso, Danilo M.; Müller, Karolin; Obata, Toshihiro; Florian, Alexandra; Tohge, Takayuki; Bottcher, Alexandra; Riondet, Christophe; Bariat, Laetitia; Carrari, Fernando; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Buchanan, Bob B.; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Araújo, Wagner L.; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2015-01-01

    Plant mitochondria have a fully operational tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle that plays a central role in generating ATP and providing carbon skeletons for a range of biosynthetic processes in both heterotrophic and photosynthetic tissues. The cycle enzyme-encoding genes have been well characterized in terms of transcriptional and effector-mediated regulation and have also been subjected to reverse genetic analysis. However, despite this wealth of attention, a central question remains unanswered: “What regulates flux through this pathway in vivo?” Previous proteomic experiments with Arabidopsis discussed below have revealed that a number of mitochondrial enzymes, including members of the TCA cycle and affiliated pathways, harbor thioredoxin (TRX)-binding sites and are potentially redox-regulated. We have followed up on this possibility and found TRX to be a redox-sensitive mediator of TCA cycle flux. In this investigation, we first characterized, at the enzyme and metabolite levels, mutants of the mitochondrial TRX pathway in Arabidopsis: the NADP-TRX reductase a and b double mutant (ntra ntrb) and the mitochondrially located thioredoxin o1 (trxo1) mutant. These studies were followed by a comparative evaluation of the redistribution of isotopes when 13C-glucose, 13C-malate, or 13C-pyruvate was provided as a substrate to leaves of mutant or WT plants. In a complementary approach, we evaluated the in vitro activities of a range of TCA cycle and associated enzymes under varying redox states. The combined dataset suggests that TRX may deactivate both mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase and activate the cytosolic ATP-citrate lyase in vivo, acting as a direct regulator of carbon flow through the TCA cycle and providing a mechanism for the coordination of cellular function. PMID:25646482

  15. Why countries support international environmental agreements: The regulation of acid rain in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Sprinz, D.F.

    1992-01-01

    The protection of the environment has become a major challenge for international public policy in the 1980s. While international environmental agreements are seen as a way to limit environmental degradation, little is known why national governments support these agreements. This study focuses on the research question: Why do national governments spend scarce resources on the protection of the international environment The study presents a public choice foundation and empirically tests the impact of (i) pollution-generated incentives as well as (ii) domestic political-economic interests on national support for international environmental regulation. Theories of interdependence, the foreign environmental policy approach, and more recent syntheses of both approaches guide the explanation of the impact of asymmetrical, international pollution patterns on national support for international environmental regulation. Theories of postmaterialism, new social movements, and support for green or ecological parties are combined with theories of domestic political economy to explain national preferences for international regulation. These theories are integrated with public choice models, namely an amended externality model and an endogenous policy model. Hypotheses were tested for two contemporary environmental agreements which mandate substantial pollution reductions by signatory countries in the empirical analysis of the transboundary air pollution problem (acid rain) in Europe. These tests employed mass public attitude data, responses to expert interviews, and international pollution data. Both pollution-based theories and domestic political theories were supported in the various analyses. In a wider sense, the research findings offer guidance for the study of the regulation of global climate change, and contribute to the growing literature stressing the (i) domestic sources of international politics and (ii) links between domestic politics and international politics.

  16. The Sestrins interact with GATOR2 to negatively regulate the amino acid sensing pathway upstream of mTORC1

    PubMed Central

    Chantranupong, Lynne; Wolfson, Rachel L.; Orozco, Jose M.; Saxton, Robert A.; Scaria, Sonia M.; Bar-Peled, Liron; Spooner, Eric; Isasa, Marta; Gygi, Steven P.; Sabatini, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The mTORC1 kinase is a major regulator of cell growth that responds to numerous environmental cues. A key input is amino acids, which act through the heterodimeric Rag GTPases (RagA/B bound to RagC/D) to promote the translocation of mTORC1 to the lysosomal surface, its site of activation. GATOR2 is a complex of unknown function that positively regulates mTORC1 signaling by acting upstream of or in parallel to GATOR1, which is a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for RagA/B and an inhibitor of the amino acid sensing pathway. Here, we find that the Sestrins, a family of poorly understood growth regulators (Sestrin1-3), interact with GATOR2 in an amino acid-sensitive fashion. Sestrin2-mediated inhibition of mTORC1 signaling requires GATOR1 and the Rag GTPases, and the Sestrins regulate the localization of mTORC1 in response to amino acids. Thus, we identify the Sestrins as GATOR2-interacting proteins that regulate the amino acid sensing branch of the mTORC1 pathway. PMID:25263562

  17. Endotoxin treatment protects rats against ozone-induced lung edema: with evidence for the role of manganese superoxide dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, I.; Massaro, D. )

    1992-03-01

    Ozone is a strong oxidizing agent that can cause lung damage and edema. There is evidence that it does so by causing peroxidation of membrane lipids. However, the elevation in lung activity of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu, ZnSOD), and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) during exposure to ozone suggests that increased production of superoxide could contribute to lung edema caused by ozone. This latter observation, and preliminary evidence that treatment of rats with endotoxin elevates lung activity of MnSOD without elevation of the activity of Cu, ZnSOD, catalase (CAT), or glutathione peroxidase (GP), led to the present study. We treated rats with endotoxin, exposed them to different concentrations of ozone, measured lung wet weight to dry weight ratio, thiobarbituric acid-reactive material (TBAR), and assayed lung tissue for Cu, ZnSOD, MnSOD, CAT, and GP activity. Our major findings are, (1) a strongly edemogenic concentration of ozone-lowered MnSOD activity; (2) endotoxin treatment of air-breathing rats did not decrease lipid peroxidation as indicated by the lung concentration of TBAR; (3) induction of increased MnSOD activity in lung by treatment with endotoxin was associated with virtually complete protection against an otherwise edemogenic concentration of ozone, with less lipid peroxidation, and with less loss of weight; and (4) this protection occurred without elevated Cu, ZnSOD, CAT, or GP activity.

  18. Ozone-induced increases in substance P and 8-epi-prostaglandin F2 alpha in the airways of human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Hazbun, M.E.; Hamilton, R.; Holian, A.; Eschenbacher, W.L. )

    1993-11-01

    We are interested in the mechanisms of ozone-induced lung effects after short-term exposure and the relationship with subsequent pulmonary inflammation and disease. Our hypothesis is that ozone, as a powerful oxidant, will diminish the activity of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) in the airways of humans with resulting increased concentrations of neuropeptides such as substance P (SP). We have exposed seven (two women, five men) healthy, nonsmoking individuals (22 to 30 yr of age) to filtered air and ozone (0.25 ppm) for 1 h in an environmental chamber during heavy exercise. Bronchoscopy with airway lavage (AL) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed immediately after ozone exposure. The lavage samples were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay for SP and 8-epi-prostaglandin F2 alpha (8-epi-PGF2 alpha) (a marker for oxidative free radical reaction) and by radioimmunoassay for complement fragments. FEV1 had declined 12.4 +/- 1.9% (mean +/- SEM) as a result of ozone exposure. The AL concentration for SP and 8-epi-PGF2 alpha and BAL concentration of C3a after ozone exposure were significantly higher than after the filtered air exposure (P < 0.05). There was a significant correlation between SP and 8-epi-PGF2 alpha concentrations in the AL fluid (r2 = 0.89 and P < 0.05). There were no changes in C5a in either compartment or any of the mediators in the plasma samples. These results extend previous results from animal studies suggesting that ozone's mechanism of action is through an oxidative reaction resulting in a decreased activity of NEP in the airways with a subsequent increase in the concentration and activity of SP.

  19. Mutation affecting regulation of synthesis of acetohydroxy acid synthetase in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J H; Henderson, E K

    1975-01-01

    Altered regulation of synthesis of acetohydroxy acid synthetase (AHAS) was previously reported in a mutant of Escherichia coli strain K-12. The mutant strain, growing in minimal medium, exhibits a partial growth limiatation and derepression of AHAS, owing to deficient synthesis of isoleucine. The genetic lesion (ilvE503) causing the isoleucine limitation was shown to cause derepression of a valine-sensitive AHAS activity. The derepression effect of the ilvE503 mutation upon synthesis of AHAS was conclusively demonstrated by introducing both the ilvE503 allele and an altered AHAS (ilv-521) into the same cell. Evidence is presented that suggests the presence of multiple genetic regions for synthesis and control of the valine-sensitive AHAS activity. PMID:1089632

  20. Fatty acid remodeling by LPCAT3 enriches arachidonate in phospholipid membranes and regulates triglyceride transport

    PubMed Central

    Hashidate-Yoshida, Tomomi; Harayama, Takeshi; Hishikawa, Daisuke; Morimoto, Ryo; Hamano, Fumie; Tokuoka, Suzumi M; Eto, Miki; Tamura-Nakano, Miwa; Yanobu-Takanashi, Rieko; Mukumoto, Yoshiko; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Okamura, Tadashi; Kita, Yoshihiro; Shindou, Hideo; Shimizu, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in phospholipids affect the physical properties of membranes, but it is unclear which biological processes are influenced by their regulation. For example, the functions of membrane arachidonate that are independent of a precursor role for eicosanoid synthesis remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the lack of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (LPCAT3) leads to drastic reductions in membrane arachidonate levels, and that LPCAT3-deficient mice are neonatally lethal due to an extensive triacylglycerol (TG) accumulation and dysfunction in enterocytes. We found that high levels of PUFAs in membranes enable TGs to locally cluster in high density, and that this clustering promotes efficient TG transfer. We propose a model of local arachidonate enrichment by LPCAT3 to generate a distinct pool of TG in membranes, which is required for normal directionality of TG transfer and lipoprotein assembly in the liver and enterocytes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06328.001 PMID:25898003

  1. Accelerated life evaluation of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deluca, W. H.; Miller, J. F.

    Valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries are primarily used in standby and uninterruptable power source applications at present. Manufacturers expect these and/or similar VRLA batteries to provide a life of 1000 to 1500 cycles with deep discharging at operating temperatures of approximately 25 C. However, insufficient data are available to determine their suitability and life in such repetitive cycling applications. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed and initiated an accelerated life evaluation of VRLA batteries to acquire this data. The objectives of the ANL accelerated life evaluation are: (1) to use accelerated testing techniques to obtain supporting evidence within 6 months that VRLA batteries have an expected life of more than 500 cycles in deep-discharge applications, and (2) to determine VRLA battery life within a 2 to 3 year time period under conditions (temperature and depth-of-discharge) that simulate those encountered in a utility operating environment.

  2. Abscisic acid is a negative regulator of root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Han, Woong; Rong, Honglin; Zhang, Hanma; Wang, Myeong-Hyeon

    2009-01-23

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a role in root gravitropism and has led to an intense debate over whether ABA acts similar to auxin by translating the gravitational signal into directional root growth. While tremendous advances have been made in the past two decades in establishing the role of auxin in root gravitropism, little progress has been made in characterizing the role of ABA in this response. In fact, roots of plants that have undetectable levels of ABA and that display a normal gravitropic response have raised some serious doubts about whether ABA plays any role in root gravitropism. Here, we show strong evidence that ABA plays a role opposite to that of auxin and that it is a negative regulator of the gravitropic response of Arabidopsis roots.

  3. Nutrient Regulation: Conjugated Linoleic Acid's Inflammatory and Browning Properties in Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wan; McIntosh, Michael K

    2016-07-17

    Obesity is the most widespread nutritional disease in the United States. Developing effective and safe strategies to manage excess body weight is therefore of paramount importance. One potential strategy to reduce obesity is to consume conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplements containing isomers cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12, or trans-10, cis-12 alone. Proposed antiobesity mechanisms of CLA include regulation of (a) adipogenesis, (b) lipid metabolism, (c) inflammation, (d) adipocyte apoptosis, (e) browning or beiging of adipose tissue, and (f) energy metabolism. However, causality of CLA-mediated responses to body fat loss, particularly the linkage between inflammation, thermogenesis, and energy metabolism, is unclear. This review examines whether CLA's antiobesity properties are due to inflammatory signaling and considers CLA's linkage with lipogenesis, lipolysis, thermogenesis, and browning of white and brown adipose tissue. We propose a series of questions and studies to interrogate the role of the sympathetic nervous system in mediating CLA's antiobesity properties. PMID:27431366

  4. Mammalian target of rapamycin signalling modulates amino acid uptake by regulating transporter cell surface abundance in primary human trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Fredrick J; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Abnormal fetal growth increases the risk for perinatal complications and predisposes for the development of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease later in life. Emerging evidence suggests that changes in placental amino acid transport directly contribute to altered fetal growth. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating placental amino acid transport are largely unknown. Here we combined small interfering (si) RNA-mediated silencing approaches with protein expression/localization and functional studies in cultured primary human trophoblast cells to test the hypothesis that mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and 2 (mTORC2) regulate amino acid transporters by post-translational mechanisms. Silencing raptor (inhibits mTORC1) or rictor (inhibits mTORC2) markedly decreased basal System A and System L amino acid transport activity but had no effect on growth factor-stimulated amino acid uptake. Simultaneous inhibition of mTORC1 and 2 completely inhibited both basal and growth factor-stimulated amino acid transport activity. In contrast, mTOR inhibition had no effect on serotonin transport. mTORC1 or mTORC2 silencing markedly decreased the plasma membrane expression of specific System A (SNAT2, SLC38A2) and System L (LAT1, SLC7A5) transporter isoforms without affecting global protein expression. In conclusion, mTORC1 and mTORC2 regulate human trophoblast amino acid transporters by modulating the cell surface abundance of specific transporter isoforms. This is the first report showing regulation of amino acid transport by mTORC2. Because placental mTOR activity and amino acid transport are decreased in human intrauterine growth restriction our data are consistent with the possibility that dysregulation of placental mTOR plays an important role in the development of abnormal fetal growth.

  5. Consistent ozone-induced decreases in pasture forage quality across several grassland types and consequences for UK lamb production.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Felicity; Mills, Gina; Jones, Laurence; Abbott, John; Ashmore, Mike; Barnes, Jeremy; Neil Cape, J; Coyle, Mhairi; Peacock, Simon; Rintoul, Naomi; Toet, Sylvia; Wedlich, Kerstin; Wyness, Kirsten

    2016-02-01

    In this study we have demonstrated that rising background ozone has the potential to reduce grassland forage quality and explored the implications for livestock production. We analysed pasture samples from seven ozone exposure experiments comprising mesotrophic, calcareous, haymeadow and sanddune unimproved grasslands conducted in open-top chambers, solardomes and a field release system. Across all grassland types, there were significant increases in acid detergent fibre, crude fibre and lignin content with increasing ozone concentration, resulting in decreased pasture quality in terms of the metabolisable energy content of the vegetation. We derived a dose-response function for metabolisable energy of the grassland with ozone concentration, applicable to a range of grassland types, and used this to predict effects on pasture quality of UK vegetation at 1 km resolution using modelled ozone data for 2007 and for predicted higher average ozone concentrations in 2020. This showed a potential total reduction in lamb production in the UK of approximately 4% in 2020 compared to 2007. The largest impacts were in geographical areas of modest ozone increases between the two years, but where large numbers of lambs were present. For an individual farmer working to a very small cost margin this could represent a large reduction in profit, both in regions where the impacts per lamb and those where the impacts per km(2) of grazing land are largest. In the short term farmers could adapt their lamb management in response to changed forage quality by additional supplementary feed of high metabolisable energy content. Nationally this increase in annual additional feed in 2020 compared to 2007 would be 2,166 tonnes (an increase of 0.7%). Of added concern are the longer-term consequences of continual deterioration of pasture quality and the implications for changes in farming practices to compensate for potential reductions in livestock production capacity.

  6. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) 18:1 transcriptional regulation of primary human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cerutis, D Roselyn; Weston, Michael D; Ogunleye, Afolabi O; McVaney, Timothy P; Miyamoto, Takanari

    2014-12-01

    The pleiotropic, bioactive lipid lysophosphatidic acid [(LPA), 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate] exerts critical regulatory actions in physiology and pathophysiology in many systems. It is present in normal bodily fluids, and is elevated in pathology (1). In vivo, "LPA" exists as distinct molecular species, each having a single fatty acid of varying chain length and degree of unsaturation covalently attached to the glycerol backbone via an acyl, alkyl, or alkenyl link. These species differ in affinities for the individual LPA receptors [(LPARs), LPA1-6] and coupling to G proteins (2). However, LPA 18:1 has been and continues to be the most commonly utilized species in reported studies. The actions of "LPA" remain poorly defined in oral biology and pathophysiology. Our laboratory has addressed this knowledge gap by studying in vitro the actions of the major human salivary LPA species [18:1, 18:0, and 16:0 (3)] in human oral cells (4-7). This includes gingival fibroblasts (GF), which our flow cytometry data from multiple donors found that they express LPA1-5 (6). We have also reported that these species are ten-fold elevated to pharmacologic levels in the saliva and gingival crevicular fluid obtained from patients with moderate-severe periodontitis (8). As the potential of LPA to regulate transcriptional activity had not been examined in the oral system, this study used whole human genome microarray analysis to test the hypothesis that LPA 18:1-treated human GF would show significant changes in gene transcripts relevant to their biology, wound-healing, and inflammatory responses. LPA 18:1 was found to significantly regulate a large, complex set of genes critical to GF biology in these categories and to periodontal disease. The raw data has been deposited at NCBI's GEO database as record GSE57496. PMID:26484133

  7. Retinoic acid receptor agonists regulate expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ayaori, Makoto; Yakushiji, Emi; Ogura, Masatsune; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Hisada, Tetsuya; Uto-Kondo, Harumi; Takiguchi, Shunichi; Terao, Yoshio; Sasaki, Makoto; Komatsu, Tomohiro; Iizuka, Maki; Yogo, Makiko; Uehara, Yoshinari; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Ikewaki, Katsunori

    2012-04-01

    ABC transporter G1 (ABCG1) plays a pivotal role in HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux and atherogenesis. We investigated whether, and how, retinoic acid receptors (RARs) regulate ABCG1 expression in macrophages. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), an RAR ligand, increased ABCG1 protein levels and apoA-I/HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from the macrophages. Both ATRA and other RAR agonists, TTNPB and Am580, increased major transcripts driven by promoter B upstream of exon 5, though minor transcripts driven by promoter A upstream of exon 1 were only increased by ATRA. The stimulatory effects of ATRA on ABCG1 expression were completely abolished in the presence of RAR/RXR antagonists but were only partially canceled in the presence of an LXR antagonist. Adenovirus with overexpressed oxysterol sulfotransferase abolished the LXR pathway, as previously reported, and ATRA-responsiveness in ABCA1/ABCG1 expressions were respectively attenuated by 38 and 22% compared to the control virus. Promoter assays revealed that ABCG1 levels were regulated more by promoter B than promoter A, and ATRA activated promoter B in a liver X receptor-responsive element (LXRE)-dependent manner. Further, LXRE-B in intron 7, but not LXRE-A in intron 5, enhanced ATRA responsiveness under overexpression of all RAR isoforms-RARα/β/γ. In contrast, the activation of promoter B by TTNPB depended on LXRE-B and RARα, but not on RARβ/γ. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation and gel-shift assays revealed a specific and direct repeat 4-dependent binding of RARα to LXRE-B. In conclusion, RAR ligands increase ABCA1/G1 expression and apoA-I/HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages, and modulate ABCG1 promoter activity via LXRE-dependent mechanisms.

  8. A co-expression gene network associated with developmental regulation of apple fruit acidity.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Dougherty, Laura; Cheng, Lailiang; Xu, Kenong

    2015-08-01

    Apple fruit acidity, which affects the fruit's overall taste and flavor to a large extent, is primarily determined by the concentration of malic acid. Previous studies demonstrated that the major QTL malic acid (Ma) on chromosome 16 is largely responsible for fruit acidity variations in apple. Recent advances suggested that a natural mutation that gives rise to a premature stop codon in one of the two aluminum-activated malate transporter (ALMT)-like genes (called Ma1) is the genetic causal element underlying Ma. However, the natural mutation does not explain the developmental changes of fruit malate levels in a given genotype. Using RNA-seq data from the fruit of 'Golden Delicious' taken at 14 developmental stages from 1 week after full-bloom (WAF01) to harvest (WAF20), we characterized their transcriptomes in groups of high (12.2 ± 1.6 mg/g fw, WAF03-WAF08), mid (7.4 ± 0.5 mg/g fw, WAF01-WAF02 and WAF10-WAF14) and low (5.4 ± 0.4 mg/g fw, WAF16-WAF20) malate concentrations. Detailed analyses showed that a set of 3,066 genes (including Ma1) were expressed not only differentially (P FDR < 0.05) between the high and low malate groups (or between the early and late developmental stages) but also in significant (P < 0.05) correlation with malate concentrations. The 3,066 genes fell in 648 MapMan (sub-) bins or functional classes, and 19 of them were significantly (P FDR < 0.05) co-enriched or co-suppressed in a malate dependent manner. Network inferring using the 363 genes encompassed in the 19 (sub-) bins, identified a major co-expression network of 239 genes. Since the 239 genes were also differentially expressed between the early (WAF03-WAF08) and late (WAF16-WAF20) developmental stages, the major network was considered to be associated with developmental regulation of apple fruit acidity in 'Golden Delicious'.

  9. Ruminant Nutrition Symposium: Role of fermentation acid absorption in the regulation of ruminal pH.

    PubMed

    Aschenbach, J R; Penner, G B; Stumpff, F; Gäbel, G

    2011-04-01

    Highly fermentable diets are rapidly converted to organic acids [i.e., short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and lactic acid] within the rumen. The resulting release of protons can constitute a challenge to the ruminal ecosystem and animal health. Health disturbances, resulting from acidogenic diets, are classified as subacute and acute acidosis based on the degree of ruminal pH depression. Although increased acid production is a nutritionally desired effect of increased concentrate feeding, the accumulation of protons in the rumen is not. Consequently, mechanisms of proton removal and their quantitative importance are of major interest. Saliva buffers (i.e., bicarbonate, phosphate) have long been identified as important mechanisms for ruminal proton removal. An even larger proportion of protons appears to be removed from the rumen by SCFA absorption across the ruminal epithelium, making efficiency of SCFA absorption a key determinant for the individual susceptibility to subacute ruminal acidosis. Proceeding initially from a model of exclusively diffusional absorption of fermentation acids, several protein-dependent mechanisms have been discovered over the last 2 decades. Although the molecular identity of these proteins is mostly uncertain, apical acetate absorption is mediated, to a major degree, via acetate-bicarbonate exchange in addition to another nitrate-sensitive, bicarbonate-independent transport mechanism and lipophilic diffusion. Propionate and butyrate also show partially bicarbonate-dependent transport modes. Basolateral efflux of SCFA and their metabolites has to be mediated primarily by proteins and probably involves the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT1) and anion channels. Although the ruminal epithelium removes a large fraction of protons from the rumen, it also recycles protons to the rumen via apical sodium-proton exchanger, NHE. The latter is stimulated by ruminal SCFA absorption and salivary Na(+) secretion and protects epithelial integrity. Finally

  10. Proteomic analysis reveals dynamic regulation of fruit development and sugar and acid accumulation in apple.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjun; Li, Dongxia; Feng, Fengjuan; Zhang, Sheng; Ma, Fengwang; Cheng, Lailiang

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the fruit developmental process is critical for fruit quality improvement. Here, we report a comprehensive proteomic analysis of apple fruit development over five growth stages, from young fruit to maturity, coupled with metabolomic profiling. A tandem mass tag (TMT)-based comparative proteomics approach led to the identification and quantification of 7098 and 6247 proteins, respectively. This large-scale proteomic dataset presents a global view of the critical pathways involved in fruit development and metabolism. When linked with metabolomics data, these results provide new insights into the modulation of fruit development, the metabolism and storage of sugars and organic acids (mainly malate), and events within the energy-related pathways for respiration and glycolysis. We suggest that the key steps identified here (e.g. those involving the FK2, TST, EDR6, SPS, mtME and mtMDH switches), can be further targeted to confirm their roles in accumulation and balance of fructose, sucrose and malate. Moreover, our findings imply that the primary reason for decreases in amino acid concentrations during fruit development is related to a reduction in substrate flux via glycolysis, which is mainly regulated by fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and bisphosphoglycerate mutase.

  11. Circadian and Dopaminergic Regulation of Fatty Acid Oxidation Pathway Genes in Retina and Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vancura, Patrick; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Baba, Kenkichi; Tosini, Gianluca; Iuvone, P. Michael; Spessert, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The energy metabolism of the retina might comply with daily changes in energy demand and is impaired in diabetic retinopathy—one of the most common causes of blindness in Europe and the USA. The aim of this study was to investigate putative adaptation of energy metabolism in healthy and diabetic retina. Hence expression analysis of metabolic pathway genes was performed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, semi-quantitative western blot and immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional profiling of key enzymes of energy metabolism identified transcripts of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes, i.e. carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1α (Cpt-1α) and medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acadm) to display daily rhythms with peak values during daytime in preparations of the whole retina and microdissected photoreceptors. The cycling of both enzymes persisted in constant darkness, was dampened in mice deficient for dopamine D4 (D4) receptors and was altered in db/db mice—a model of diabetic retinopathy. The data of the present study are consistent with circadian clock-dependent and dopaminergic regulation of fatty acid oxidation in retina and its putative disturbance in diabetic retina. PMID:27727308

  12. Valve-regulated lead-acid batteries for stop-and-go applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, G. J.

    Increasing levels of demand for electrical power for vehicles have prompted a considerable level of research into higher voltage systems. This has resulted in the definition of preliminary standards for 36/42 V systems. The implementation costs for these systems are high and this has led to improvements in 12/14 V power architectures. In particular, alternator power outputs at 14 V have increased and the need for lower emission levels and fuel economy is stimulating a demand for stop-and-go systems. In this type of application, the engine is stopped each time the vehicle comes to a halt, and is restarted when the accelerator is pressed again. The duty cycle that this applies to the battery is quite onerous with many shallow discharge cycles. Flooded lead-acid batteries are unable to meet the requirements and valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries are essential to meet the demands applied. The background to stop-and-go battery applications is considered and test results on practical batteries are presented to show that under a simulated duty cycle, good performance can be achieved. There is also a need for a higher level of battery management for stop-and-go systems. A practical approach to battery condition monitoring to assess the state-of-charge and state-of-health of the battery is described.

  13. P300 acetyltransferase regulates fatty acid synthase expression, lipid metabolism and prostate cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Gang, Xiaokun; Yang, Yinhui; Zhong, Jian; Jiang, Kui; Pan, Yunqian; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Wanhai; Wang, Guixia; Huang, Haojie

    2016-03-22

    De novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis is required for prostate cancer (PCa) survival and progression. As a key enzyme for FA synthesis fatty acid synthase (FASN) is often overexpressed in human prostate cancers and its expression correlates with worse prognosis and poor survival. P300 is an acetyltransferase that acts as a transcription co-activator. Increasing evidence suggests that P300 is a major PCa promoter, although the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that P300 binds to and increases histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27Ac) in the FASN gene promoter. We provided evidence that P300 transcriptionally upregulates FASN expression and promotes lipid accumulation in human PCa cells in culture and Pten knockout prostate tumors in mice. Pharmacological inhibition of P300 decreased FASN expression and lipid droplet accumulation in PCa cells. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that expression of P300 protein positively correlates with FASN protein levels in a cohort of human PCa specimens. We further showed that FASN is a key mediator of P300-induced growth of PCa cells in culture and in mice. Together, our findings demonstrate P300 as a key factor that regulates FASN expression, lipid accumulation and cell growth in PCa. They also suggest that this regulatory pathway can serve as a new therapeutic target for PCa treatment. PMID:26934656

  14. Proteomic analysis reveals dynamic regulation of fruit development and sugar and acid accumulation in apple.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjun; Li, Dongxia; Feng, Fengjuan; Zhang, Sheng; Ma, Fengwang; Cheng, Lailiang

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the fruit developmental process is critical for fruit quality improvement. Here, we report a comprehensive proteomic analysis of apple fruit development over five growth stages, from young fruit to maturity, coupled with metabolomic profiling. A tandem mass tag (TMT)-based comparative proteomics approach led to the identification and quantification of 7098 and 6247 proteins, respectively. This large-scale proteomic dataset presents a global view of the critical pathways involved in fruit development and metabolism. When linked with metabolomics data, these results provide new insights into the modulation of fruit development, the metabolism and storage of sugars and organic acids (mainly malate), and events within the energy-related pathways for respiration and glycolysis. We suggest that the key steps identified here (e.g. those involving the FK2, TST, EDR6, SPS, mtME and mtMDH switches), can be further targeted to confirm their roles in accumulation and balance of fructose, sucrose and malate. Moreover, our findings imply that the primary reason for decreases in amino acid concentrations during fruit development is related to a reduction in substrate flux via glycolysis, which is mainly regulated by fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and bisphosphoglycerate mutase. PMID:27535992

  15. Acid-base regulation during heating and cooling in the lizard, Varanus exanthematicus.

    PubMed

    Wood, S C; Johansen, K; Glass, M L; Hoyt, R W

    1981-04-01

    Current concepts of acid-base balance in ectothermic animals require that arterial pH vary inversely with body temperature in order to maintain a constant OH-/H+ and constant net charge on proteins. The present study evaluates acid-base regulation in Varanus exanthematicus under various regimes of heating and cooling between 15 and 38 degrees C. Arterial blood was sampled during heating and cooling at various rates, using restrained and unrestrained animals with and without face masks. Arterial pH was found to have a small temperature dependence, i.e., pH = 7.66--0.005 (T). The slope (dpH/dT = -0.005), while significantly greater than zero (P less than 0.05), is much less than that required for a constant OH-/H+ or a constant imidazole alphastat (dpH/dT congruent to 0.018). The physiological mechanism that distinguishes this species from most other ectotherms is the presence of a ventilatory response to temperature-induced changes in CO2 production and O2 uptake, i.e., VE/VO2 is constant. This results in a constant O2 extraction and arterial saturation (approx. 90%), which is adaptive to the high aerobic requirements of this species.

  16. P300 acetyltransferase regulates fatty acid synthase expression, lipid metabolism and prostate cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Gang, Xiaokun; Yang, Yinhui; Zhong, Jian; Jiang, Kui; Pan, Yunqian; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Wanhai; Wang, Guixia; Huang, Haojie

    2016-03-22

    De novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis is required for prostate cancer (PCa) survival and progression. As a key enzyme for FA synthesis fatty acid synthase (FASN) is often overexpressed in human prostate cancers and its expression correlates with worse prognosis and poor survival. P300 is an acetyltransferase that acts as a transcription co-activator. Increasing evidence suggests that P300 is a major PCa promoter, although the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that P300 binds to and increases histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27Ac) in the FASN gene promoter. We provided evidence that P300 transcriptionally upregulates FASN expression and promotes lipid accumulation in human PCa cells in culture and Pten knockout prostate tumors in mice. Pharmacological inhibition of P300 decreased FASN expression and lipid droplet accumulation in PCa cells. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that expression of P300 protein positively correlates with FASN protein levels in a cohort of human PCa specimens. We further showed that FASN is a key mediator of P300-induced growth of PCa cells in culture and in mice. Together, our findings demonstrate P300 as a key factor that regulates FASN expression, lipid accumulation and cell growth in PCa. They also suggest that this regulatory pathway can serve as a new therapeutic target for PCa treatment.

  17. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 is coupled to hormonally regulated release of arachidonic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, L L; Lin, A Y; Knopf, J L

    1992-01-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) binds to natural membrane vesicles in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion, resulting in the selective release of arachidonic acid, thus implicating cPLA2 in the hormonally regulated production of eicosanoids. Here we report that the treatment of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells overexpressing cPLA2 with ATP or thrombin resulted in an increased release of arachidonic acid as compared with parental CHO cells, demonstrating the hormonal coupling of cPLA2. In contrast, CHO cells overexpressing a secreted form of mammalian PLA2 (sPLA2-II) failed to show any increased hormonal responsiveness. Interestingly, we have noted that the activation of cPLA2 with a wide variety of agents stimulates the phosphorylation of cPLA2 on serine residues. Pretreatment of cells with staurosporin blocked the ATP-mediated phosphorylation of cPLA2 and strongly inhibited the activation of the enzyme. Increased cPLA2 activity was also observed in lysates prepared from ATP-treated cells and was sensitive to phosphatase treatment. These results suggest that in addition to Ca2+, the phosphorylation of cPLA2 plays an important role in the agonist-induced activation of cPLA2. Images PMID:1631101

  18. Branched-chain amino acid catabolism is a conserved regulator of physiological ageing

    PubMed Central

    Mansfeld, Johannes; Urban, Nadine; Priebe, Steffen; Groth, Marco; Frahm, Christiane; Hartmann, Nils; Gebauer, Juliane; Ravichandran, Meenakshi; Dommaschk, Anne; Schmeisser, Sebastian; Kuhlow, Doreen; Monajembashi, Shamci; Bremer-Streck, Sibylle; Hemmerich, Peter; Kiehntopf, Michael; Zamboni, Nicola; Englert, Christoph; Guthke, Reinhard; Kaleta, Christoph; Platzer, Matthias; Sühnel, Jürgen; Witte, Otto W.; Zarse, Kim; Ristow, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ageing has been defined as a global decline in physiological function depending on both environmental and genetic factors. Here we identify gene transcripts that are similarly regulated during physiological ageing in nematodes, zebrafish and mice. We observe the strongest extension of lifespan when impairing expression of the branched-chain amino acid transferase-1 (bcat-1) gene in C. elegans, which leads to excessive levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). We further show that BCAAs reduce a LET-363/mTOR-dependent neuro-endocrine signal, which we identify as DAF-7/TGFβ, and that impacts lifespan depending on its related receptors, DAF-1 and DAF-4, as well as ultimately on DAF-16/FoxO and HSF-1 in a cell-non-autonomous manner. The transcription factor HLH-15 controls and epistatically synergizes with BCAT-1 to modulate physiological ageing. Lastly and consistent with previous findings in rodents, nutritional supplementation of BCAAs extends nematodal lifespan. Taken together, BCAAs act as periphery-derived metabokines that induce a central neuro-endocrine response, culminating in extended healthspan. PMID:26620638

  19. Bile acid-FXRα pathways regulate male sexual maturation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Aurélie; Sédes, Lauriane; Rouaisnel, Betty; de Haze, Angélique; Baron, Silvère; Schoonjans, Kristina; Caira, Françoise; Volle, David H.

    2016-01-01

    The bile acid receptor Farnesol-X-Receptor alpha (FRXα) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. FRXα is expressed in the interstitial compartment of the adult testes, which contain the Leydig cells. In adult, short term treatment (12 hours) with FRXα agonist inhibits the expression of steroidogenic genes via the induction of the Small heterodimer partner (SHP). However the consequences of FRXα activation on testicular pathophysiology have never been evaluated. We demonstrate here that mice fed a diet supplemented with bile acid during pubertal age show increased incidence of infertility. This is associated with altered differentiation and increase apoptosis of germ cells due to lower testosterone levels. At the molecular level, next to the repression of basal steroidogenesis via the induction expression of Shp and Dax-1, two repressors of steroidogenesis, the main action of the BA-FRXα signaling is through lowering the Leydig cell sensitivity to the hypothalamo-pituitary axis, the main regulator of testicular endocrine function. In conclusion, BA-FRXα signaling is a critical actor during sexual maturation. PMID:26848619

  20. Reciprocal regulation of amino acid import and epigenetic state through Lat1 and EZH2

    PubMed Central

    Dann, Stephen G; Ryskin, Michael; Barsotti, Anthony M; Golas, Jonathon; Shi, Celine; Miranda, Miriam; Hosselet, Christine; Lemon, Luanna; Lucas, Judy; Karnoub, Maha; Wang, Fang; Myers, Jeremy S; Garza, Scott J; Follettie, Maximillian T; Geles, Kenneth G; Klippel, Anke; Rollins, Robert A; Fantin, Valeria R

    2015-01-01

    Lat1 (SLC7A5) is an amino acid transporter often required for tumor cell import of essential amino acids (AA) including Methionine (Met). Met is the obligate precursor of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the methyl donor utilized by all methyltransferases including the polycomb repressor complex (PRC2)-specific EZH2. Cell populations sorted for surface Lat1 exhibit activated EZH2, enrichment for Met-cycle intermediates, and aggressive tumor growth in mice. In agreement, EZH2 and Lat1 expression are co-regulated in models of cancer cell differentiation and co-expression is observed at the invasive front of human lung tumors. EZH2 knockdown or small-molecule inhibition leads to de-repression of RXRα resulting in reduced Lat1 expression. Our results describe a Lat1-EZH2 positive feedback loop illustrated by AA depletion or Lat1 knockdown resulting in SAM reduction and concomitant reduction in EZH2 activity. shRNA-mediated knockdown of Lat1 results in tumor growth inhibition and points to Lat1 as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25979827

  1. Peptide and amino acid transporters are differentially regulated during seed development and germination in faba bean.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Manoela; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Tewes, Annegret; Dietrich, Daniela; Rentsch, Doris; Weber, Hans; Wobus, Ulrich

    2003-08-01

    Two peptide transporter (PTR) homologs have been isolated from developing seeds of faba bean (Vicia faba). VfPTR1 was shown to be a functional peptide transporter through complementation of a yeast mutant. Expression patterns of VfPTR1 and VfPTR2 as well as of the amino acid permease VfAAP1 (Miranda et al., 2001) were compared throughout seed development and germination. In developing seeds, the highest levels of VfPTR1 transcripts were reached during midcotyledon development, whereas VfAAP1 transcripts were most abundant during early cotyledon development, before the appearance of storage protein gene transcripts, and were detectable until late cotyledon development. During early germination, VfPTR1 mRNA appeared first in cotyledons and later, during seedling growth, also in axes and roots. Expression of VfPTR2 and VfAAP1 was delayed compared with VfPTR1, and was restricted to the nascent organs of the seedlings. Localization of VfPTR1 transcripts showed that this PTR is temporally and spatially regulated during cotyledon development. In germinating seeds, VfPTR1 mRNA was localized in root hairs and root epidermal cells, suggesting a role in nutrient uptake from the soil. In seedling roots, VfPTR1 was repressed by a dipeptide and by an amino acid, whereas nitrate was without influence.

  2. Bile acid-FXRα pathways regulate male sexual maturation in mice.

    PubMed

    Baptissart, Marine; Martinot, Emmanuelle; Vega, Aurélie; Sédes, Lauriane; Rouaisnel, Betty; de Haze, Angélique; Baron, Silvère; Schoonjans, Kristina; Caira, Françoise; Volle, David H

    2016-04-12

    The bile acid receptor Farnesol-X-Receptor alpha (FRXα) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. FRXα is expressed in the interstitial compartment of the adult testes, which contain the Leydig cells. In adult, short term treatment (12 hours) with FRXα agonist inhibits the expression of steroidogenic genes via the induction of the Small heterodimer partner (SHP). However the consequences of FRXα activation on testicular pathophysiology have never been evaluated. We demonstrate here that mice fed a diet supplemented with bile acid during pubertal age show increased incidence of infertility. This is associated with altered differentiation and increase apoptosis of germ cells due to lower testosterone levels. At the molecular level, next to the repression of basal steroidogenesis via the induction expression of Shp and Dax-1, two repressors of steroidogenesis, the main action of the BA-FRXα signaling is through lowering the Leydig cell sensitivity to the hypothalamo-pituitary axis, the main regulator of testicular endocrine function. In conclusion, BA-FRXα signaling is a critical actor during sexual maturation. PMID:26848619

  3. P300 acetyltransferase regulates fatty acid synthase expression, lipid metabolism and prostate cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jian; Jiang, Kui; Pan, Yunqian; Karnes, R. Jeffrey; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Wanhai; Wang, Guixia; Huang, Haojie

    2016-01-01

    De novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis is required for prostate cancer (PCa) survival and progression. As a key enzyme for FA synthesis fatty acid synthase (FASN) is often overexpressed in human prostate cancers and its expression correlates with worse prognosis and poor survival. P300 is an acetyltransferase that acts as a transcription co-activator. Increasing evidence suggests that P300 is a major PCa promoter, although the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that P300 binds to and increases histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27Ac) in the FASN gene promoter. We provided evidence that P300 transcriptionally upregulates FASN expression and promotes lipid accumulation in human PCa cells in culture and Pten knockout prostate tumors in mice. Pharmacological inhibition of P300 decreased FASN expression and lipid droplet accumulation in PCa cells. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that expression of P300 protein positively correlates with FASN protein levels in a cohort of human PCa specimens. We further showed that FASN is a key mediator of P300-induced growth of PCa cells in culture and in mice. Together, our findings demonstrate P300 as a key factor that regulates FASN expression, lipid accumulation and cell growth in PCa. They also suggest that this regulatory pathway can serve as a new therapeutic target for PCa treatment. PMID:26934656

  4. Synthesis and regulation of chlorogenic acid in potato: Rerouting phenylpropanoid flux in HQT-silenced lines.

    PubMed

    Payyavula, Raja S; Shakya, Roshani; Sengoda, Venkatesan G; Munyaneza, Joseph E; Swamy, Prashant; Navarre, Duroy A

    2015-05-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is the major phenolic sink in potato tubers and can constitute over 90% of total phenylpropanoids. The regulation of CGA biosynthesis in potato and the role of the CGA biosynthetic gene hydroxycinnamoyl CoA:quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) was characterized. A sucrose induced accumulation of CGA correlated with the increased expression of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) rather than HQT. Transient expression of the potato MYB transcription factor StAN1 (anthocyanin 1) in tobacco increased CGA. RNAi suppression of HQT resulted in over a 90% reduction in CGA and resulted in early flowering. The reduction in total phenolics and antioxidant capacity was less than the reduction in CGA, suggesting flux was rerouted into other phenylpropanoids. Network analysis showed distinct patterns in different organs, with anthocyanins and phenolic acids showing negative correlations in leaves and flowers and positive in tubers. Some flavonols increased in flowers, but not in leaves or tubers. Anthocyanins increased in flowers and showed a trend to increase in leaves, but not tubers. HQT suppression increased biosynthesis of caffeoyl polyamines, some of which are not previously reported in potato. Decreased PAL expression and enzyme activity was observed in HQT suppressed lines, suggesting the existence of a regulatory loop between CGA and PAL. Electrophysiology detected no effect of CGA suppression on potato psyllid feeding. Collectively, this research showed that CGA in potatoes is synthesized through HQT and HQT suppression altered phenotype and redirected phenylpropanoid flux. PMID:25421386

  5. Omega-3 fatty acids inhibit the up-regulation of endothelial chemokines in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Adriana M.; Booker, Cindy; Ellis, Charles D.; Siew, Edward D.; Graves, Amy J.; Shintani, Ayumi; Abumrad, Naji N.; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Ikizler, Talat Alp

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic systemic inflammation is common in patients with chronic kidney disease on dialysis (CKD5D) and has been considered a key mediator of the increased cardiovascular risk in this patient population. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that supplementation of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) will attenuate the systemic inflammatory process in CKD5D patients. Methods The design was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled pilot trial (NCT00655525). Thirty-eight patients were randomly assigned in a 1 : 1 fashion to receive 2.9 g of eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5, n-3) plus docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6, n-3) versus placebo for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was change in pro-inflammatory chemokines measured by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Secondary outcomes were changes in systemic inflammatory markers. Analysis of covariance was used to compare percent change from baseline to 12 weeks. Results Thirty-one patients completed 12 weeks and three patients completed 6 weeks of the study. Median age was 52 (interquartile range 45, 60) years, 74% were African-American and 79% were male. Supplementation of ω-3 PUFAs effectively decreased the LPS-induced PBMC expression of RANTES (Regulated upon Activation, Normal T cell Expressed and Secreted) and MCP-1 (Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1; unadjusted P = 0.04 and 0.06; adjusted for demographics P = 0.02 and 0.05, respectively). There was no significant effect of the intervention on serum inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and procalcitonin). Conclusions The results of this pilot study suggest that supplementation of ω-3 PUFAs is beneficial in decreasing the levels of endothelial chemokines, RANTES and MCP-1. Studies of larger sample size and longer duration are required to further evaluate effects of ω-3 PUFAs on systemic markers of inflammation, other metabolic parameters and clinical outcomes, particularly

  6. Sialic acid and N-acetylglucosamine Regulate type 1 Fimbriae Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Blomfield, Ian C

    2015-06-01

    Type 1 fimbriae of E. coli, a chaperon-usher bacterial adhesin, are synthesized by the majority of strains of the bacterium. Although frequently produced by commensal strains, the adhesin is nevertheless a virulence factor in Extraintestinal Pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). The role of the adhesin in pathogenesis is best understood in Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). Host attachment and invasion by type 1 fimbriate bacteria activates inflammatory pathways, with TLR4 signaling playing a predominant role. In a mouse model of cystitis, type 1 fimbriation not only enhances UPEC adherence to the surface of superficial umbrella cells of the bladder urothelium, but is both necessary and sufficient for their invasion. Moreover the adhesin plays a role in the formation of transient intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs) within the cytoplasm of urothelial cells as part of UPEC cycles of invasion. The expression of type 1 fimbriation is controlled by phase variation at the transcriptional level, a mode of gene regulation in which bacteria switch reversibly between fimbriate and afimbriate phases. Phase variation has been widely considered to be a mechanism enabling immune evasion. Notwithstanding the apparently random nature of phase variation, switching of type 1 fimbrial expression is nevertheless controlled by a range of environmental signals that include the amino sugars sialic acid and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). Sialic acid plays a pivotal role in innate immunity, including signaling by the toll-like receptors. Here how sialic acid and GlcNAc control type 1 fimbriation is described and the potential significance of this regulatory response is discussed.

  7. Role of CoA and acetyl-CoA in regulating cardiac fatty acid and glucose oxidation.

    PubMed

    Abo Alrob, Osama; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2014-08-01

    CoA (coenzyme A) and its derivatives have a critical role in regulating cardiac energy metabolism. This includes a key role as a substrate and product in the energy metabolic pathways, as well as serving as an allosteric regulator of cardiac energy metabolism. In addition, the CoA ester malonyl-CoA has an important role in regulating fatty acid oxidation, secondary to inhibiting CPT (carnitine palmitoyltransferase) 1, a key enzyme involved in mitochondrial fatty acid uptake. Alterations in malonyl-CoA synthesis by ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) and degradation by MCD (malonyl-CoA decarboxylase) are important contributors to the high cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates seen in ischaemic heart disease, heart failure, obesity and diabetes. Additional control of fatty acid oxidation may also occur at the level of acetyl-CoA involvement in acetylation of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidative enzymes. We find that acetylation of the fatty acid β-oxidative enzymes, LCAD (long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase) and β-HAD (β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) is associated with an increase in activity and fatty acid oxidation in heart from obese mice with heart failure. This is associated with decreased SIRT3 (sirtuin 3) activity, an important mitochondrial deacetylase. In support of this, cardiac SIRT3 deletion increases acetylation of LCAD and β-HAD, and increases cardiac fatty acid oxidation. Acetylation of MCD is also associated with increased activity, decreases malonyl-CoA levels and an increase in fatty acid oxidation. Combined, these data suggest that malonyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA have an important role in mediating the alterations in fatty acid oxidation seen in heart failure. PMID:25110000

  8. Clavulanic acid production by Streptomyces clavuligerus: biogenesis, regulation and strain improvement.

    PubMed

    Paradkar, Ashish

    2013-07-01

    Clavulanic acid (CA) is a potent β-lactamase inhibitor produced by Streptomyces clavuligerus and has been successfully used in combination with β-lactam antibiotics (for example, Augmentin) to treat infections caused by β-lactamase-producing pathogens. Since the discovery of CA in the late 1970s, significant information has accumulated on its biosynthesis, and regarding molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of its production. Notably, the genes directing CA biosynthesis are clustered along with the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of the β-lactam antibiotic, cephamycin C, and co-regulated, which makes this organism unique in that the production of an antibiotic and production of a small molecule to protect the antibiotic from its enzymatic degradation are controlled by shared mechanisms. Traditionally, the industrial strain improvement programs have relied significantly on random mutagenesis and selection approach. However, the recent availability of the genome sequence of S. clavuligerus along with the capability to build metabolic models, and ability to engineer the organism by directed approaches, has created exciting opportunities to improve strain productivity more efficiently. This review will include focus mainly on the gene organization of the CA biosynthetic genes, regulatory mechanisms that affect its production, and will include perspectives on improving strain productivity.

  9. The role of short chain fatty acids in appetite regulation and energy homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, C S; Chambers, E S; Morrison, D J; Frost, G

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 20 years there has been an increasing interest in the influence of the gastrointestinal tract on appetite regulation. Much of the focus has been on the neuronal and hormonal relationship between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain. There is now mounting evidence that the colonic microbiota and their metabolic activity have a significant role in energy homeostasis. The supply of substrate to the colonic microbiota has a major impact on the microbial population and the metabolites they produce, particularly short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). SCFAs are produced when non-digestible carbohydrates, namely dietary fibres and resistant starch, undergo fermentation by the colonic microbiota. Both the consumption of fermentable carbohydrates and the administration of SCFAs have been reported to result in a wide range of health benefits including improvements in body composition, glucose homeostasis, blood lipid profiles and reduced body weight and colon cancer risk. However, published studies tend to report the effects that fermentable carbohydrates and SCFAs have on specific tissues and metabolic processes, and fail to explain how these local effects translate into systemic effects and the mitigation of disease risk. Moreover, studies tend to investigate SCFAs collectively and neglect to report the effects associated with individual SCFAs. Here, we bring together the recent evidence and suggest an overarching model for the effects of SCFAs on one of their beneficial aspects: appetite regulation and energy homeostasis. PMID:25971927

  10. The role of short chain fatty acids in appetite regulation and energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Byrne, C S; Chambers, E S; Morrison, D J; Frost, G

    2015-09-01

    Over the last 20 years there has been an increasing interest in the influence of the gastrointestinal tract on appetite regulation. Much of the focus has been on the neuronal and hormonal relationship between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain. There is now mounting evidence that the colonic microbiota and their metabolic activity have a significant role in energy homeostasis. The supply of substrate to the colonic microbiota has a major impact on the microbial population and the metabolites they produce, particularly short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). SCFAs are produced when non-digestible carbohydrates, namely dietary fibres and resistant starch, undergo fermentation by the colonic microbiota. Both the consumption of fermentable carbohydrates and the administration of SCFAs have been reported to result in a wide range of health benefits including improvements in body composition, glucose homeostasis, blood lipid profiles and reduced body weight and colon cancer risk. However, published studies tend to report the effects that fermentable carbohydrates and SCFAs have on specific tissues and metabolic processes, and fail to explain how these local effects translate into systemic effects and the mitigation of disease risk. Moreover, studies tend to investigate SCFAs collectively and neglect to report the effects associated with individual SCFAs. Here, we bring together the recent evidence and suggest an overarching model for the effects of SCFAs on one of their beneficial aspects: appetite regulation and energy homeostasis. PMID:25971927

  11. Fatty acid binding protein 7 regulates phagocytosis and cytokine production in Kupffer cells during liver injury.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hirofumi; Sawada, Tomoo; Kiyohira, Miwa; Yu, Zhiqian; Nakamura, Keiji; Yasumoto, Yuki; Kagawa, Yoshiteru; Ebrahimi, Majid; Islam, Ariful; Sharifi, Kazem; Kawamura, Saki; Kodama, Takanori; Yamamoto, Yui; Adachi, Yasuhiro; Tokuda, Nobuko; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao; Ishikawa, Toshizo; Owada, Yuji

    2014-09-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) are involved in the progression of liver diseases such as hepatitis and liver cancer. Several members of the fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are expressed by tissue macrophages, and FABP7 is localized only in KCs. To clarify the role of FABP7 in the regulation of KC function, we evaluated pathological changes of Fabp7 knockout mice during carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury. During liver injury in Fabp7 knockout mice, serum liver enzymes were increased, cytokine expression (tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and transforming growth factor-β) was decreased in the liver, and the number of KCs in the liver necrotic area was significantly decreased. Interestingly, in the FABP7-deficient KCs, phagocytosis of apoptotic cells was impaired, and expression of the scavenger receptor CD36 was markedly decreased. In chronic liver injury, Fabp7 knockout mice showed less fibrogenic response to carbon tetrachloride compared with wild-type mice. Taken together, FABP7 is involved in the liver injury process through its regulation of KC phagocytic activity and cytokine production. Such modulation of KC function by FABP7 may provide a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of liver diseases.

  12. Regulation of ascorbic acid biosynthesis and recycling during root development in carrot (Daucus carota L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Long; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Wang, Feng; Li, Meng-Yao; Tan, Guo-Fei; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2015-09-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA), also known as vitamin C, is an essential nutrient in fruits and vegetables. The fleshy root of carrot (Daucus carota L.) is a good source of AsA for humans. However, the metabolic pathways and molecular mechanisms involved in the control of AsA content during root development in carrot have not been elucidated. To gain insights into the regulation of AsA accumulation and to identify the key genes involved in the AsA metabolism, we cloned and analyzed the expression of 21 related genes during carrot root development. The results indicate that AsA accumulation in the carrot root is regulated by intricate pathways, of which the l-galactose pathway may be the major pathway for AsA biosynthesis. Transcript levels of the genes encoding l-galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase and l-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase were strongly correlated with AsA levels during root development. Data from this research may be used to assist breeding for improved nutrition, quality, and stress tolerance in carrots.

  13. Regulation of Branched-Chain Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Salmonella typhimurium: Isolation of Regulatory Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, J. M.; Freundlich, M.; Umbarger, H. E.

    1969-01-01

    5′,5′,5′-Trifluoro-dl-leucine inhibited the activity of α-isopropylmalate synthetase (the initial enzyme unique to leucine biosynthesis) as well as the growth of Salmonella typhimurium. Mutants of S. typhimurium resistant to the analogue were isolated and characterized. In most cases, they overproduced and excreted leucine or leucine, valine, and isoleucine as a result of an alteration in the regulation of branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. Biochemical and genetic tests allowed the mutants to be grouped into three classes: I, a moderately large group (13%) which had high, constitutive leucine biosynthetic enzyme levels and mutant sites linked to the leucine operon (operator constitutive); II, a single mutant in which the mutant site was linked to the leucine operon and in which α-isopropylmalate synthetase was not inhibited by leucine (feedback negative); III, a majority type which had constitutive levels of leucine, valine, and isoleucine biosynthetic enzymes and mutant sites unlinked to the leucine operon. Mutants of class I provide important evidence for the concept of an operon organization of genes involved in leucine biosynthesis. The properties of class III mutants indicate that there is some element involved in regulation which is common to the three pathways. Images PMID:4887507

  14. Salicylic acid regulates Plasmodesmata closure during innate immune responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Sager, Ross; Cui, Weier; Zhang, Chong; Lu, Hua; Lee, Jung-Youn

    2013-06-01

    In plants, mounting an effective innate immune strategy against microbial pathogens involves triggering local cell death within infected cells as well as boosting the immunity of the uninfected neighboring and systemically located cells. Although not much is known about this, it is evident that well-coordinated cell-cell signaling is critical in this process to confine infection to local tissue while allowing for the spread of systemic immune signals throughout the whole plant. In support of this notion, direct cell-to-cell communication was recently found to play a crucial role in plant defense. Here, we provide experimental evidence that salicylic acid (SA) is a critical hormonal signal that regulates cell-to-cell permeability during innate immune responses elicited by virulent bacterial infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that direct exogenous application of SA or bacterial infection suppresses cell-cell coupling and that SA pathway mutants are impaired in this response. The SA- or infection-induced suppression of cell-cell coupling requires an enhanced desease resistance1- and nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes1-dependent SA pathway in conjunction with the regulator of plasmodesmal gating Plasmodesmata-located protein5. We discuss a model wherein the SA signaling pathway and plasmodesmata-mediated cell-to-cell communication converge under an intricate regulatory loop. PMID:23749844

  15. Regulation of water, salinity, and cold stress responses by salicylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Kenji; Tada, Yasuomi

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a naturally occurring phenolic compound. SA plays an important role in the regulation of plant growth, development, ripening, and defense responses. The role of SA in the plant–pathogen relationship has been extensively investigated. In addition to defense responses, SA plays an important role in the response to abiotic stresses, including drought, low temperature, and salinity stresses. It has been suggested that SA has great agronomic potential to improve the stress tolerance of agriculturally important crops. However, the utility of SA is dependent on the concentration of the applied SA, the mode of application, and the state of the plants (e.g., developmental stage and acclimation). Generally, low concentrations of applied SA alleviate the sensitivity to abiotic stresses, and high concentrations of applied induce high levels of oxidative stress, leading to a decreased tolerance to abiotic stresses. In this article, the effects of SA on the water stress responses and regulation of stomatal closure are reviewed. PMID:24478784

  16. G-Protein-Coupled Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptors and Their Regulation of AKT Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Anjum; Huang, Ying; Johansson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is their ability to recognize and respond to chemically diverse ligands. Lysophospholipids constitute a relatively recent addition to these ligands and carry out their biological functions by activating G-proteins coupled to a large family of cell-surface receptors. This review aims to highlight salient features of cell signaling by one class of these receptors, known as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors, in the context of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)–AKT pathway activation. LPA moieties efficiently activate AKT phosphorylation and activation in a multitude of cell types. The interplay between LPA, its receptors, the associated Gαi/o subunits, PI3K and AKT contributes to the regulation of cell survival, migration, proliferation and confers chemotherapy-resistance in certain cancers. However, detailed information on the regulation of PI3K–AKT signals induced by LPA receptors is missing from the literature. Here, some urgent issues for investigation are highlighted. PMID:26861299

  17. Abscisic acid regulation of DC8, a carrot embryonic gene. [Daucus carota

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzopoulos, P.; Fong, F.; Sung, Z.R. Texas A M Univ., College Station )

    1990-10-01

    DC8 encodes a hydrophylic 66 kilodalton protein located in the cytoplasm and cell walls of carrot (Daucus carota) embryo and endosperm. During somatic embryogenesis, the levels of DC8 mRNA and protein begin to increase 5 days after removal of auxin. To study the role of abscisic acid (ABA) in the regulation of DC8 gene, fluridone, 1-methyl-3-phenyl,-5(3-trifluoro-methyl-phenyl)-4(1H)-pyridinone, was used to inhibit the endogenous ABA content of the embryos. Fluridone, 50 micrograms per milliliter, effectively inhibits the accumulation of ABA in globular-tage embryos. Western and Northern analysis show that when fluridone is added to the culture medium DC8 protein and mRNA decrease to very low levels. ABA added to fluridone supplemented culture media restores the DC8 protein and mRNA to control levels. Globular-stage embryos contain 0.9 to 1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} molar ABA while 10{sup {minus}6} molar exogenously supplied ABA is the optimal concentration for restoration of DC8 protein accumulation in fluridone-treated embryos. The mRNA level is increased after 15 minutes of ABA addition and reaches maximal levels by 60 minutes. Evidence is presented that, unlike other ABA-regulated genes, DC8 is not induced in nonembryonic tissues via desiccation nor addition of ABA.

  18. Regulation of the abscisic acid-responsive gene rab28 in maize viviparous mutants.

    PubMed

    Pla, M; Gómez, J; Goday, A; Pagès, M

    1991-12-01

    We have isolated a new maize gene, rab28, that responds to abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. This gene has been characterized by determining the sequence of the cDNA and corresponding genomic copy, and by mapping the start site of its transcript. The rab 28 gene encodes a protein of predicted molecular weight 27713 Da which shows strong homology with the Lea D-34 protein identified in cotton. The proximal promoter region contains the conserved ABA-response element, CACGTGG, reported in other plant genes to be responsible for ABA induction. rab 28 mRNA has been identified as ABA-inducible in embryos and young leaves. It is also induced by water-stress in leaves of wild-type plants. Regulation of the rab 28 gene was studied in maize viviparous mutants. The results obtained with the ABA-insensitive vp1 mutant show that rab 28 transcripts do not accumulate to a significant level during embryogenesis. Surprisingly, induction of rab 28 mRNA can be achieved in young embryos by exogenous ABA treatment. Moreover, water-stressed or ABA-treated seedlings of vp1 contain significant levels of rab 28 mRNA which is not detectable in well-watered seedlings. Regulation of the rab 28 gene in excised young embryos of ABA-deficient vp2 mutants, in which influences of the maternal environment are absent, closely resembles that found in non-mutant excised young embryos. The significance of these results is discussed.

  19. Molecular regulation of lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 trafficking to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Wei, Jianxin; Bowser, Rachel K; Dong, Su; Xiao, Shuqi; Zhao, Yutong

    2014-11-01

    The lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPA1), a G-protein coupled receptor, regulates cell proliferation, migration, and cytokine release. Here, we investigate the molecular signature of LPA1 trafficking to the cell surface. The overexpressed LPA1 with a C-terminal V5 tag (LPA1-V5) is majorly expressed on the cell surface, while two deletion mutants (C320 and ∆84-87) failed to be trafficked to the cell surface. Further, site-directed mutagenesis analysis of the LPA1 revealed that Ile325, Tyr85, and Leu87 within these two fragments regulate LPA1 maturation and trafficking to the cell surface. Over-expression of Sar1, a component of coat protein complex II (COPII), enhances glycosylation of LPA1 wild type, but not these mutants. The mutants of LPA1 are majorly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and exhibit a higher binding affinity to heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), when compared to the LPA1 wild type. Further, we found that all these mutants failed to increase phosphorylation of Erk, and the cytokine release in response to LPA treatment. These results suggest that Ile325, Tyr85, and Leu87 within LPA1 are essential for LPA1 protein properly folding in the ER.

  20. G-Protein-Coupled Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptors and Their Regulation of AKT Signaling.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Anjum; Huang, Ying; Johansson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is their ability to recognize and respond to chemically diverse ligands. Lysophospholipids constitute a relatively recent addition to these ligands and carry out their biological functions by activating G-proteins coupled to a large family of cell-surface receptors. This review aims to highlight salient features of cell signaling by one class of these receptors, known as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors, in the context of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway activation. LPA moieties efficiently activate AKT phosphorylation and activation in a multitude of cell types. The interplay between LPA, its receptors, the associated Gαi/o subunits, PI3K and AKT contributes to the regulation of cell survival, migration, proliferation and confers chemotherapy-resistance in certain cancers. However, detailed information on the regulation of PI3K-AKT signals induced by LPA receptors is missing from the literature. Here, some urgent issues for investigation are highlighted. PMID:26861299

  1. Regulation of ascorbic acid metabolism by blue LED light irradiation in citrus juice sacs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lancui; Ma, Gang; Yamawaki, Kazuki; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Ohta, Satoshi; Kato, Masaya

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, the effects of red and blue LED lights on the accumulation of ascorbic acid (AsA) were investigated in the juice sacs of three citrus varieties, Satsuma mandarin, Valencia orange, and Lisbon lemon. The results showed that the blue LED light treatment effectively increased the AsA content in the juice sacs of the three citrus varieties, whereas the red LED light treatment did not. By increasing the blue LED light intensity, the juice sacs of the three citrus varieties accumulated more AsA. Moreover, continuous irradiation with blue LED light was more effective than pulsed irradiation for increasing the AsA content in the juice sacs of the three citrus varieties. Gene expression results showed that the modulation of AsA accumulation by blue LED light was highly regulated at the transcription level. The up-regulation of AsA biosynthetic genes (CitVTC1, CitVTC2, CitVTC4, and CitGLDH), AsA regeneration genes (CitMDAR1, CitMDAR2, and CitDHAR) and two GSH-producing genes (CitGR and CitchGR) contributed to these increases in the AsA content in the three citrus varieties.

  2. Changes in dynamics upon oligomerization regulate substrate binding and allostery in amino acid kinase family members.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Enrique; Crehuet, Ramon; Bahar, Ivet

    2011-09-01

    Oligomerization is a functional requirement for many proteins. The interfacial interactions and the overall packing geometry of the individual monomers are viewed as important determinants of the thermodynamic stability and allosteric regulation of oligomers. The present study focuses on the role of the interfacial interactions and overall contact topology in the dynamic features acquired in the oligomeric state. To this aim, the collective dynamics of enzymes belonging to the amino acid kinase family both in dimeric and hexameric forms are examined by means of an elastic network model, and the softest collective motions (i.e., lowest frequency or global modes of motions) favored by the overall architecture are analyzed. Notably, the lowest-frequency modes accessible to the individual subunits in the absence of multimerization are conserved to a large extent in the oligomer, suggesting that the oligomer takes advantage of the intrinsic dynamics of the individual monomers. At the same time, oligomerization stiffens the interfacial regions of the monomers and confers new cooperative modes that exploit the rigid-body translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the intact monomers. The present study sheds light on the mechanism of cooperative inhibition of hexameric N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase by arginine and on the allosteric regulation of UMP kinases. It also highlights the significance of the particular quaternary design in selectively determining the oligomer dynamics congruent with required ligand-binding and allosteric activities.

  3. Regulation of ascorbic acid biosynthesis and recycling during root development in carrot (Daucus carota L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Long; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Wang, Feng; Li, Meng-Yao; Tan, Guo-Fei; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2015-09-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA), also known as vitamin C, is an essential nutrient in fruits and vegetables. The fleshy root of carrot (Daucus carota L.) is a good source of AsA for humans. However, the metabolic pathways and molecular mechanisms involved in the control of AsA content during root development in carrot have not been elucidated. To gain insights into the regulation of AsA accumulation and to identify the key genes involved in the AsA metabolism, we cloned and analyzed the expression of 21 related genes during carrot root development. The results indicate that AsA accumulation in the carrot root is regulated by intricate pathways, of which the l-galactose pathway may be the major pathway for AsA biosynthesis. Transcript levels of the genes encoding l-galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase and l-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase were strongly correlated with AsA levels during root development. Data from this research may be used to assist breeding for improved nutrition, quality, and stress tolerance in carrots. PMID:25956452

  4. Principal transcriptional regulation and genome-wide system interactions of the Asp-family and aromatic amino acid networks of amino acid metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Less, Hadar; Angelovici, Ruthie; Tzin, Vered; Galili, Gad

    2010-10-01

    Amino acid metabolism is among the most important and best recognized networks within biological systems. In plants, amino acids serve multiple functions associated with growth. Besides their function in protein synthesis, the amino acids are also catabolized into energy-associated metabolites as well we into numerous secondary metabolites, which are essential for plant growth and response to various stresses. Despite the central importance of amino acids in plants growth, elucidation of the regulation of amino acid metabolism within the context of the entire system, particularly transcriptional regulation, is still in its infancy. The different amino acids are synthesized by a number of distinct metabolic networks, which are expected to possess regulatory cross interactions between them for proper coordination of their interactive functions, such as incorporation into proteins. Yet, individual amino acid metabolic networks are also expected to differentially cross interact with various genome-wide gene expression programs and metabolic networks, in respect to their functions as precursors for various metabolites with distinct functions. In the present review, we discuss our recent genomics, metabolic and bioinformatics studies, which were aimed at addressing these questions, focusing mainly on the Asp-family metabolic network as the main example and also comparing it to the aromatic amino acids metabolic network as a second example (Angelovici et al. in Plant Physiol 151:2058-2072, 2009; Less and Galili in BMC Syst Biol 3:14, 2009; Tzin et al. in Plant J 60:156-167, 2009). Our focus on these two networks is because of the followings: (i) both networks are central to plant metabolism and growth and are also precursors for a wide range of primary and secondary metabolites that are indispensable to plant growth; (ii) the amino acids produced by these two networks are also essential to the nutrition and health of human and farm animals; and (iii) both networks contain

  5. Human cell toxicogenomic analysis of bromoacetic acid: a regulated drinking water disinfection by-product.

    PubMed

    Muellner, Mark G; Attene-Ramos, Matias S; Hudson, Matthew E; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2010-04-01

    The disinfection of drinking water is a major achievement in protecting the public health. However, current disinfection methods also generate disinfection by-products (DBPs). Many DBPs are cytotoxic, genotoxic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic and represent an important class of environmentally hazardous chemicals that may carry long-term human health implications. The objective of this research was to integrate in vitro toxicology with focused toxicogenomic analysis of the regulated DBP, bromoacetic acid (BAA) and to evaluate modulation of gene expression involved in DNA damage/repair and toxic responses, with nontransformed human cells. We generated transcriptome profiles for 168 genes with 30 min and 4 hr exposure times that did not induce acute cytotoxicity. Using qRT-PCR gene arrays, the levels of 25 transcripts were modulated to a statistically significant degree in response to a 30 min treatment with BAA (16 transcripts upregulated and nine downregulated). The largest changes were observed for RAD9A and BRCA1. The majority of the altered transcript profiles are genes involved in DNA repair, especially the repair of double strand DNA breaks, and in cell cycle regulation. With 4 hr of treatment the expression of 28 genes was modulated (12 upregulated and 16 downregulated); the largest fold changes were in HMOX1 and FMO1. This work represents the first nontransformed human cell toxicogenomic study with a regulated drinking water disinfection by-product. These data implicate double strand DNA breaks as a feature of BAA exposure. Future toxicogenomic studies of DBPs will further strengthen our limited knowledge in this growing area of drinking water research.

  6. Mitochondrial regulators of fatty acid metabolism reflect metabolic dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sameer S; Salehzadeh, Firoozeh; Fritz, Tomas; Zierath, Juleen R; Krook, Anna; Osler, Megan E

    2012-02-01

    The delicate homeostatic balance between glucose and fatty acid metabolism in relation to whole-body energy regulation is influenced by mitochondrial function. We determined expression and regulation of mitochondrial enzymes including pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) 4, PDK2, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b, and malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase in skeletal muscle from people with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained from NGT (n = 79) or T2DM (n = 33) men and women matched for age and body mass index. A subset of participants participated in a 4-month lifestyle intervention program consisting of an unsupervised walking exercise. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for expression and DNA methylation status. Primary myotubes were derived from biopsies obtained from NGT individuals for metabolic studies. Cultured skeletal muscle was exposed to agents mimicking exercise activation for messenger RNA (mRNA) expression analysis. The mRNA expression of PDK4, PDK2, and malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase was increased in skeletal muscle from T2DM patients. Methylation of the PDK4 promoter was reduced in T2DM and inversely correlated with PDK4 expression. Moreover, PDK4 expression was positively correlated with body mass index, blood glucose, insulin, C peptide, and hemoglobin A(1c). A lifestyle intervention program resulted in increased PDK4 mRNA expression in NGT individuals, but not in those with T2DM. Exposure to caffeine or palmitate increased PDK4 mRNA in a cultured skeletal muscle system. Our findings reveal that skeletal muscle expression of PDK4 and related genes regulating mitochondrial function reflects alterations in substrate utilization and clinical features associated with T2DM. Furthermore, hypomethylation of the PDK4 promoter in T2DM coincided with an impaired response of PDK4 mRNA after exercise. PMID:21816445

  7. Regulation of the hemA gene during 5-aminolevulinic acid formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Hungerer, C; Troup, B; Römling, U; Jahn, D

    1995-01-01

    The general tetrapyrrole precursor 5-aminolevulinic acid is formed in bacteria via two different biosynthetic pathways. Members of the alpha group of the proteobacteria use 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase for the condensation of succinyl-coenzyme A and glycine, while other bacteria utilize a two-step pathway from aminoacylated tRNA(Glu). The tRNA-dependent pathway, involving the enzymes glutamyl-tRNA reductase (encoded by hemA) and glutamate-1-semialdehyde-2,1-aminomutase (encoded by hemL), was demonstrated to be used by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Comamonas testosteroni, Azotobacter vinelandii, and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. To study the regulation of the pathway, the glutamyl-tRNA reductase gene (hemA) from P. aeruginosa was cloned by complementation of an Escherichia coli hemA mutant. The hemA gene was mapped to the SpeI A fragment and the DpnIL fragment of the P. aeruginosa chromosome corresponding to min 24.1 to 26.8. The cloned hemA gene, coding for a protein of 423 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 46,234 Da, forms an operon with the gene for protein release factor 1 (prf1). This translational factor mediates the termination of the protein chain at the ribosome at amber and ochre codons. Since the cloned hemA gene did not possess one of the appropriate stop codons, an autoregulatory mechanism such as that postulated for the enterobacterial system was ruled out. Three open reading frames of unknown function transcribed in the opposite direction to the hemA gene were found. hemM/orf1 and orf2 were found to be homologous to open reading frames located in the 5' region of enterobacterial hemA genes. Utilization of both transcription start sites was changed in a P. aeruginosa mutant missing the oxygen regulator Anr (Fnr analog), indicating the involvement of the transcription factor in hemA expression. DNA sequences homologous to one half of an Anr binding site were detected at one of the determined

  8. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter protein levels are down-regulated through ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation induced by bile acids.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Hayashi, Kenjiro; Kuribayashi, Hideaki; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2013-08-15

    The ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT or SLC10A2) has a crucial role in intestinal bile acid absorption. We previously reported that enterobacteria-mediated bile acid conversion was involved in the alteration of ileal ASBT expression levels. In the present study, to investigate the hypothesis that ileal ASBT protein levels are post-translationally regulated by enterobacteria-associated bile acids, alteration of ileal ASBT protein levels was analysed in mice 12 h and 24 h after anti-bacterial drug ampicillin (ABPC) treatment (100 mg/kg, single shot) that altered bile acid composition in the intestinal lumen. In ABPC-treated mice, enterobacteria-biotransformed bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) and cholic acid (CA) levels were decreased, whereas taurocholic acid (TCA) and tauro-β-muricholic acid levels were increased in the intestinal lumen. Ileal ASBT protein levels in brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMVs), but not ileal Asbt mRNA levels, were significantly increased in the ABPC-treated mice, and the extent of ubiquitination of the ileal ASBT protein was reduced in the ABPC-treated mice. Treatment of ABPC-pretreated mice with CA or TDCA, but not TCA, significantly decreased ileal ASBT protein levels and increased the extent of ubiquitination of ileal ASBT protein. Treatment of mice with the lysosome inhibitor, chloroquine, or the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, increased ileal ASBT protein levels in BBMVs. CA-mediated reduction of ASBT protein levels in the ABPC-pretreated mice was attenuated by co-treatment with chloroquine or MG132. These results suggest that ileal ASBT protein is degraded by a ubiquitin-dependent pathway in response to enterobacteria-associated bile acids. PMID:23872411

  9. Uncovering co-expression gene network regulating fruit acidity in diverse apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acidity is a major contributor to fruit quality. Several organic acids are present in apple fruit, but malic acid is predominant and determines fruit acidity. The trait is largely controlled by the Malic acid (Ma) locus, underpinning which Ma1 that encodes an Aluminum-activated Malate Transporter1 (...

  10. Isomer-specific regulation of differentiating pig preadipocytes by conjugated linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Brandebourg, T D; Hu, C Y

    2005-09-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids are a group of geometric and positional isomers of linoleic acid that decrease body fat in growing animals by a poorly understood mechanism. The objective of this study was to investigate the isomer-specific effect of CLA on the proliferation and differentiation of pig preadipocytes in primary culture. The effect of CLA on preadipocyte proliferation was determined using cleavage of the tetrazolium salt, WST-1, as a marker for proliferation. Preadipocyte number was decreased in a dose-dependent fashion by trans-12,cis-10 CLA (P < 0.05). No other fatty acid affected preadipocyte number. Differentiation was monitored on d 10 after induction morphologically, enzymatically, and by measuring the mRNA abundance of key adipogenic transcription factors. Both a crude CLA preparation containing a mixture of CLA isomers (CLA-mix) and the pure trans-10,cis-12 CLA isomer inhibited glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity in a dose-dependent fashion, with trans-10,cis-12 CLA being more potent (P < 0.01) than the CLA-mix. Cis-9,trans-11 CLA failed to decrease GPDH activity; however, increasing concentrations of cis-9,trans-11 CLA tended to blunt the inhibitory effect of trans-10,cis-12 CLA on GPDH activity (P < 0.09), suggesting that cis-9,trans-11 CLA may antagonize the action of trans-10,cis-12 CLA in porcine adipocytes. Finally, the isomer-specific effect of CLA on adipogenic transcription factor gene expression was investigated. Trans-10,cis-12 CLA decreased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma; P < 0.01) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c; P < 0.05) mRNA, while failing to alter the expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPalpha) mRNA. Interestingly, both the CLA-mix and the trans-10,cis-12 CLA isomer increased the mRNA abundance of chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor 1 (COUP-TF; P < 0.002). No other fatty acid affected COUP-TF mRNA levels

  11. Acid Stability of the Hemagglutinin Protein Regulates H5N1 Influenza Virus Pathogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, Rebecca M.; Zaraket, Hassan; Reddivari, Muralidhar; Heath, Richard J.; White, Stephen W.; Russell, Charles J.

    2012-12-10

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype continue to threaten agriculture and human health. Here, we use biochemistry and x-ray crystallography to reveal how amino-acid variations in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein contribute to the pathogenicity of H5N1 influenza virus in chickens. HA proteins from highly pathogenic (HP) A/chicken/Hong Kong/YU562/2001 and moderately pathogenic (MP) A/goose/Hong Kong/437-10/1999 isolates of H5N1 were found to be expressed and cleaved in similar amounts, and both proteins had similar receptor-binding properties. However, amino-acid variations at positions 104 and 115 in the vestigial esterase sub-domain of the HA1 receptor-binding domain (RBD) were found to modulate the pH of HA activation such that the HP and MP HA proteins are activated for membrane fusion at pH 5.7 and 5.3, respectively. In general, an increase in H5N1 pathogenicity in chickens was found to correlate with an increase in the pH of HA activation for mutant and chimeric HA proteins in the observed range of pH 5.2 to 6.0. We determined a crystal structure of the MP HA protein at 2.50 {angstrom} resolution and two structures of HP HA at 2.95 and 3.10 {angstrom} resolution. Residues 104 and 115 that modulate the acid stability of the HA protein are situated at the N- and C-termini of the 110-helix in the vestigial esterase sub-domain, which interacts with the B loop of the HA2 stalk domain. Interactions between the 110-helix and the stalk domain appear to be important in regulating HA protein acid stability, which in turn modulates influenza virus replication and pathogenesis. Overall, an optimal activation pH of the HA protein is found to be necessary for high pathogenicity by H5N1 influenza virus in avian species.

  12. Ribonucleic Acid Regulation in Permeabilized Cells of Escherichia coli Capable of Ribonucleic Acid and Protein Synthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Alan G.

    1974-01-01

    A cell permeabilization procedure is described that reduces viability less than 10% and does not significantly reduce the rates of ribonucleic acid and protein synthesis when appropriately supplemented. Permeabilization abolishes the normal stringent coupling of protein and ribonucleic acid synthesis. PMID:4364330

  13. The general amino acid control pathway regulates mTOR and autophagy during serum/glutamine starvation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Zou, Yilong; Mao, Dongxue; Sun, Daxiao; Gao, Guanguang; Shi, Jingwen; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Chen; Yang, Mingyu; Ye, Wanlu; Hao, Qianqian; Li, Ruiqiang; Yu, Li

    2014-07-21

    Organisms have evolved elaborate mechanisms to adjust intracellular nutrient levels in response to fluctuating availability of exogenous nutrients. During starvation, cells can enhance amino acid uptake and synthesis through the general amino acid control (GAAC) pathway, whereas nonessential cellular contents are recycled by autophagy. How these two pathways are coordinated in response to starvation is currently unknown. Here we show that the GAAC pathway couples exogenous amino acid availability with autophagy. Starvation caused deactivation of mTOR, which then activated autophagy. In parallel, serum/glutamine starvation activated the GAAC pathway, which up-regulated amino acid transporters, leading to increased amino acid uptake. This elevated the intracellular amino acid level, which in turn reactivated mTOR and suppressed autophagy. Knockdown of activating transcription factor 4, the major transcription factor in the GAAC pathway, or of SLC7A5, a leucine transporter, caused impaired mTOR reactivation and much higher levels of autophagy. Thus, the GAAC pathway modulates autophagy by regulating amino acid uptake and mTOR reactivation during serum/glutamine starvation.

  14. The importance of glutamate, glycine, and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transport and regulation in manganese, mercury and lead neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Fitsanakis, Vanessa A.; Aschner, Michael . E-mail: michael.aschner@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-05-01

    Historically, amino acids were studied in the context of their importance in protein synthesis. In the 1950s, the focus of research shifted as amino acids were recognized as putative neurotransmitters. Today, many amino acids are considered important neurochemicals. Although many amino acids play a role in neurotransmission, glutamate (Glu), glycine (Gly), and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are among the more prevalent and better understood. Glu, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, and Gly and GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitters, in the central nervous system, are known to be tightly regulated. Prolonged exposure to environmental toxicants, such as manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), or lead (Pb), however, can lead to dysregulation of these neurochemicals and subsequent neurotoxicity. While the ability of these metals to disrupt the regulation of Glu, Gly and GABA have been studied, few articles have examined the collective role of these amino acids in the respective metal's mechanism of toxicity. For each of the neurotransmitters above, we will provide a brief synopsis of their regulatory function, including the importance of transport and re-uptake in maintaining their optimal function. Additionally, the review will address the hypothesis that aberrant homeostasis of any of these amino acids, or a combination of the three, plays a role in the neurotoxicity of Mn, Hg, or Pb.

  15. Regulation of amino acid transporters in pluripotent cell populations in the embryo and in culture; novel roles for sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Tan, Boon Siang Nicholas; Rathjen, Peter D; Harvey, Alexandra J; Gardner, David K; Rathjen, Joy

    2016-08-01

    The developmental outcomes of preimplantation mammalian embryos are regulated directly by the surrounding microenvironment, and inappropriate concentrations of amino acids, or the loss of amino acid-sensing mechanisms, can be detrimental and impact further development. A specific role for l-proline in the differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells, a cell population derived from the blastocyst, has been shown in culture. l-proline acts as a signalling molecule, exerting its effects through cell uptake and subsequent metabolism. Uptake in ES cells occurs predominantly through the sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2, Slc38a2 (SNAT2). Dynamic expression of amino acid transporters has been shown in the early mammalian embryo, reflecting functional roles for amino acids in embryogenesis. The expression of SNAT2 and family member Slc38a1 (SNAT1) was determined in mouse embryos from the 2-cell stage through to the early post-implantation pre-gastrulation embryo. Key changes in expression were validated in cell culture models of development. Both transporters showed temporal dynamic expression patterns and changes in intracellular localisation as differentiation progressed. Changes in transporter expression likely reflect different amino acid requirements during development. Findings include the differential expression of SNAT1 in the inner and outer cells of the compacted morula and nuclear localisation of SNAT2 in the trophectoderm and placental lineages. Furthermore, SNAT2 expression was up-regulated in the epiblast prior to primitive ectoderm formation, an expression pattern consistent with a role for the transporter in later developmental decisions within the pluripotent lineage. We propose that the differential expression of SNAT2 in the epiblast provides evidence for an l-proline-mediated mechanism contributing to the regulation of embryonic development. PMID:27373508

  16. Differential regulation of protein synthesis by amino acids and insulin in peripheral and visceral tissues of neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Suryawan, Agus; O'Connor, Pamela M J; Bush, Jill A; Nguyen, Hanh V; Davis, Teresa A

    2009-05-01

    The high efficiency of protein deposition during the neonatal period is driven by high rates of protein synthesis, which are maximally stimulated after feeding. In the current study, we examined the individual roles of amino acids and insulin in the regulation of protein synthesis in peripheral and visceral tissues of the neonate by performing pancreatic glucose-amino acid clamps in overnight-fasted 7-day-old pigs. We infused pigs (n = 8-12/group) with insulin at 0, 10, 22, and 110 ng kg(-0.66) min(-1) to achieve approximately 0, 2, 6 and 30 muU ml(-1) insulin so as to simulate below fasting, fasting, intermediate, and fed insulin levels, respectively. At each insulin dose, amino acids were maintained at the fasting or fed level. In conjunction with the highest insulin dose, amino acids were also allowed to fall below the fasting level. Tissue protein synthesis was measured using a flooding dose of L: -[4-(3)H] phenylalanine. Both insulin and amino acids increased fractional rates of protein synthesis in longissimus dorsi, gastrocnemius, masseter, and diaphragm muscles. Insulin, but not amino acids, increased protein synthesis in the skin. Amino acids, but not insulin, increased protein synthesis in the liver, pancreas, spleen, and lung and tended to increase protein synthesis in the jejunum and kidney. Neither insulin nor amino acids altered protein synthesis in the stomach. The results suggest that the stimulation of protein synthesis by feeding in most tissues of the neonate is regulated by the post-prandial rise in amino acids. However, the feeding-induced stimulation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscles is independently mediated by insulin as well as amino acids.

  17. New developments in separators for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhnstedt, W.

    In valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries the electrolyte solution has to be immobilized to ensure tiny channels left open for the transfer of oxygen from the positive to the negative electrode. So far microfibre glassmats have predominantly been used, which based on their high porosity and good wettability of the glass fibres are able to retain durably large electrolyte volumes. The tensile strength of such microfibre glassmats remains unsatisfactory. Developments to produce absorbing mats from organic fibres have recently succeeded due to advanced developments in polymers and in fibre production processes as well as in achieving permanent hydrophilisation. Such polypropylene-microfibremats have excellent tensile and puncture strength and—as pockets—can be well integrated into highly automated assembly processes. Test data for polypropylene-microfibremats are presented and compared to microfibre glassmats. Another approach to hamper the electrolyte in its free mobility is to gel it: batteries with gelled electrolyte have been shown to require conventional microporous separators—both for secure fixing of plate spacing as well as for preventing electronic shorts. Despite their complex filling process gel batteries are well accepted for cycling applications, when simultaneously freedom from maintenance is required. Due to the high power requirements for EV batteries there is a trend towards thinner plates and thinner separation; also substantial pressure on the positive electrode and thus also on the separator is desirable to improve the cycling life decisively. A new separator development is presented, which in spite of high porosity (>80%), suffers only little deformation even under very high pressure. It effectively prevents acid stratification, forms no filling profile and permits oxygen transfer.

  18. PI3K/AKT and ERK regulate retinoic acid-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Jingbo; Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora; Qiao, Lan; Josifi, Erlena; Tiao, Joshua R.; Chung, Dai H.

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Retinoic acid (RA) induces neuroblastoma cells differentiation, which is accompanied by G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA resulted in neuroblastoma cell survival and inhibition of DNA fragmentation; this is regulated by PI3K pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA activates PI3K and ERK1/2 pathway; PI3K pathway mediates RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of p21 is necessary for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. -- Abstract: Neuroblastoma, the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in infants and children, is characterized by a high rate of spontaneous remissions in infancy. Retinoic acid (RA) has been known to induce neuroblastoma differentiation; however, the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways that are responsible for RA-mediated neuroblastoma cell differentiation remain unclear. Here, we sought to determine the cell signaling processes involved in RA-induced cellular differentiation. Upon RA administration, human neuroblastoma cell lines, SK-N-SH and BE(2)-C, demonstrated neurite extensions, which is an indicator of neuronal cell differentiation. Moreover, cell cycle arrest occurred in G1/G0 phase. The protein levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21 and p27{sup Kip}, which inhibit cell proliferation by blocking cell cycle progression at G1/S phase, increased after RA treatment. Interestingly, RA promoted cell survival during the differentiation process, hence suggesting a potential mechanism for neuroblastoma resistance to RA therapy. Importantly, we found that the PI3K/AKT pathway is required for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Our results elucidated the molecular mechanism of RA-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation, which may be important for developing novel therapeutic strategy against poorly differentiated neuroblastoma.

  19. Gallic acid regulates body weight and glucose homeostasis through AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Doan, Khanh V; Ko, Chang Mann; Kinyua, Ann W; Yang, Dong Joo; Choi, Yun-Hee; Oh, In Young; Nguyen, Nguyen Minh; Ko, Ara; Choi, Jae Won; Jeong, Yangsik; Jung, Min Ho; Cho, Won Gil; Xu, Shanhua; Park, Kyu Sang; Park, Woo Jin; Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Hyoung Shik; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ki Woo

    2015-01-01

    Gallic acid [3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid (GA)], a natural phytochemical, is known to have a variety of cellular functions including beneficial effects on metabolic syndromes. However, the molecular mechanism by which GA exerts its beneficial effects is not known. Here we report that GA plays its role through the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and by regulating mitochondrial function via the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator1α (PGC1α). Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) knockdown significantly blunted GA's effect on PGC1α activation and downstream genes, suggesting a critical role of the AMPK/Sirt1/PGC1α pathway in GA's action. Moreover, diet-induced obese mice treated with GA showed significantly improved glucose and insulin homeostasis. In addition, the administration of GA protected diet-induced body weight gain without a change in food intake. Biochemical analyses revealed a marked activation of AMPK in the liver, muscle, and interscapular brown adipose tissue of the GA-treated mice. Moreover, uncoupling protein 1 together with other genes related to energy expenditure was significantly elevated in the interscapular brown adipose tissue. Taken together, these results indicate that GA plays its beneficial metabolic roles by activating the AMPK/Sirt1/PGC1α pathway and by changing the interscapular brown adipose tissue genes related to thermogenesis. Our study points out that targeting the activation of the AMPK/Sirt1/PGC1α pathway by GA or its derivatives might be a potential therapeutic intervention for insulin resistance in metabolic diseases.

  20. Role of Acinus in Regulating Retinoic Acid-Responsive Gene Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Soprano, Kenneth J.; Soprano, Dianne Robert

    2014-01-01

    Acinus-S’ is a co-repressor for retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-dependent gene transcription and has been suggested to be involved in RNA processing. In this study the role of Acinus isoforms in regulating pre-mRNA splicing was explored using in vivo splicing assays. Both Acinus-L and Acinus-S’, with the activity of Acinus-L higher than that of Acinus-S’, increase the splicing of a retinoic acid (RA)-responsive minigene containing a weak 5′ splice site but not a RA-responsive minigene containing a strong 5′ splice site. RA treatment further enhances the splicing of the weak 5′ splice site by Acinus in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting a RA-dependent activity in addition to a RA-independent activity of Acinus. The RA-independent effect of Acinus occurs to varying degrees using minigene constructs containing several different promoters while the RA-dependent splicing activity of Acinus is specific for transcripts derived from the minigene driven by a RA response element (RARE)-containing promoter. This suggests that the ligand-dependent splicing activity of Acinus is related to the RA-activated RAR bound to the RARE. The RRM domain is necessary for the RA-dependent splicing activity of Acinus and the RA-independent splicing activity of Acinus is repressed by RNPS1. Importantly, measurement of the splicing of endogenous human RARβ and Bcl-x in vivo demonstrates that Acinus stimulates the use of the weaker alternative 5′ splice site of these two genes in a RA-dependent manner for RARβ and a RA-independent manner for Bcl-x. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that Acinus functions in both RAR-dependent splicing and RAR-dependent transcription. PMID:25205379

  1. Abscisic Acid Induction of Vacuolar H+-ATPase Activity in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum Is Developmentally Regulated1

    PubMed Central

    Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Maldonado-Gama, Minerva; Pantoja, Omar

    1999-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) has been implicated as a key component in water-deficit-induced responses, including those triggered by drought, NaCl, and low- temperature stress. In this study a role for ABA in mediating the NaCl-stress-induced increases in tonoplast H+-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase) and Na+/H+ antiport activity in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, leading to vacuolar Na+ sequestration, were investigated. NaCl or ABA treatment of adult M. crystallinum plants induced V-ATPase H+ transport activity, and when applied in combination, an additive effect on V-ATPase stimulation was observed. In contrast, treatment of juvenile plants with ABA did not induce V-ATPase activity, whereas NaCl treatment resulted in a similar response to that observed in adult plants. Na+/H+ antiport activity was induced in both juvenile and adult plants by NaCl, but ABA had no effect at either developmental stage. Results indicate that ABA-induced changes in V-ATPase activity are dependent on the plant reaching its adult phase, whereas NaCl-induced increases in V-ATPase and Na+/H+ antiport activity are independent of plant age. This suggests that ABA-induced V-ATPase activity may be linked to the stress-induced, developmentally programmed switch from C3 metabolism to Crassulacean acid metabolism in adult plants, whereas, vacuolar Na+ sequestration, mediated by the V-ATPase and Na+/H+ antiport, is regulated through ABA-independent pathways. PMID:10398716

  2. Abscisic Acid Is a General Negative Regulator of Arabidopsis Axillary Bud Growth1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chi; Finlayson, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Branching is an important process controlled by intrinsic programs and by environmental signals transduced by a variety of plant hormones. Abscisic acid (ABA) was previously shown to mediate Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) branching responses to the ratio of red light (R) to far-red light (FR; an indicator of competition) by suppressing bud outgrowth from lower rosette positions under low R:FR. However, the role of ABA in regulating branching more generally was not investigated. This study shows that ABA restricts lower bud outgrowth and promotes correlative inhibition under both high and low R:FR. ABA was elevated in buds exhibiting delayed outgrowth resulting from bud position and low R:FR and decreased in elongating buds. ABA was reduced in lower buds of hyperbranching mutants deficient in auxin signaling (AUXIN RESISTANT1), MORE AXILLARY BRANCHING (MAX) signaling (MAX2), and BRANCHED1 (BRC1) function, and partial suppression of branch elongation in these mutants by exogenous ABA suggested that ABA may act downstream of these components. Bud BRC1 expression was not altered by exogenous ABA, consistent with a downstream function for ABA. However, the expression of genes encoding the indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis enzyme TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS1, the auxin transporter PIN-FORMED1, and the cell cycle genes CYCLIN A2;1 and PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN1 in buds was suppressed by ABA, suggesting that it may inhibit bud growth in part by suppressing elements of the cell cycle machinery and bud-autonomous IAA biosynthesis and transport. ABA was found to suppress bud IAA accumulation, thus confirming this aspect of its action. PMID:26149576

  3. Evolution of Mycolic Acid Biosynthesis Genes and Their Regulation during Starvation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jamet, Stevie; Quentin, Yves; Coudray, Coralie; Texier, Pauline; Laval, Françoise; Daffé, Mamadou

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis, is a Gram-positive bacterium with a unique cell envelope composed of an essential outer membrane. Mycolic acids, which are very-long-chain (up to C100) fatty acids, are the major components of this mycomembrane. The enzymatic pathways involved in the biosynthesis and transport of mycolates are fairly well documented and are the targets of the major antituberculous drugs. In contrast, only fragmented information is available on the expression and regulation of the biosynthesis genes. In this study, we report that the hadA, hadB, and hadC genes, which code for the mycolate biosynthesis dehydratase enzymes, are coexpressed with three genes that encode proteins of the translational apparatus. Consistent with the well-established control of the translation potential by nutrient availability, starvation leads to downregulation of the hadABC genes along with most of the genes required for the synthesis, modification, and transport of mycolates. The downregulation of a subset of the biosynthesis genes is partially dependent on RelMtb, the key enzyme of the stringent response. We also report the phylogenetic evolution scenario that has shaped the current genetic organization, characterized by the coregulation of the hadABC operon with genes of the translational apparatus and with genes required for the modification of the mycolates. IMPORTANCE Mycobacterium tuberculosis infects one-third of the human population worldwide, and despite the available therapeutic arsenal, it continues to kill millions of people each year. There is therefore an urgent need to identify new targets and develop a better understanding of how the bacterium is adapting itself to host defenses during infection. A prerequisite of this understanding is knowledge of how this adaptive skill has been implanted by evolution. Nutrient scarcity is an environmental condition the bacterium has to cope with during infection. In many

  4. Role and regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis in the response of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 to different temperatures and pressures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Xiao, Xiang; Ou, Hong-Yu; Gai, Yingbao; Wang, Fengping

    2009-04-01

    Members of the genus Shewanella inhabit various environments; they are capable of synthesizing various types of low-melting-point fatty acids, including monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and branched-chain fatty acids (BCFA) with and without eicosapentanoic acid (EPA). The genes involved in fatty acid synthesis in 15 whole-genome-sequenced Shewanella strains were identified and compared. A typical type II fatty acid synthesis pathway in Shewanella was constructed. A complete EPA synthesis gene cluster was found in all of the Shewanella genomes, although only a few of them were found to produce EPA. The roles and regulation of fatty acids synthesis in Shewanella were further elucidated in the Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 response to different temperatures and pressures. The EPA and BCFA contents of WP3 significantly increased when it was grown at low temperature and/or under high pressure. EPA, but not MUFA, was determined to be crucial for its growth at low temperature and high pressure. A gene cluster for a branched-chain amino acid ABC transporter (LIV-I) was found to be upregulated at low temperature. Combined approaches, including mutagenesis and an isotopic-tracer method, revealed that the LIV-I transporter played an important role in the regulation of BCFA synthesis in WP3. The LIV-I transporter was identified only in the cold-adapted Shewanella species and was assumed to supply an important strategy for Shewanella cold adaptation. This is the first time the molecular mechanism of BCFA regulation in bacteria has been elucidated. PMID:19201790

  5. Spatial and temporal regulation of biosynthesis of the plant immune signal salicylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao-yu; Zhou, Mian; Yoo, Heejin; Pruneda-Paz, Jose L.; Spivey, Natalie Weaver; Kay, Steve A.; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) is essential for local defense and systemic acquired resistance (SAR). When plants, such as Arabidopsis, are challenged by different pathogens, an increase in SA biosynthesis generally occurs through transcriptional induction of the key synthetic enzyme isochorismate synthase 1 (ICS1). However, the regulatory mechanism for this induction is poorly understood. Using a yeast one-hybrid screen, we identified two transcription factors (TFs), NTM1-LIKE 9 (NTL9) and CCA1 HIKING EXPEDITION (CHE), as activators of ICS1 during specific immune responses. NTL9 is essential for inducing ICS1 and two other SA synthesis-related genes, PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT 4 (PAD4) and ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 (EDS1), in guard cells that form stomata. Stomata can quickly close upon challenge to block pathogen entry. This stomatal immunity requires ICS1 and the SA signaling pathway. In the ntl9 mutant, this response is defective and can be rescued by exogenous application of SA, indicating that NTL9-mediated SA synthesis is essential for stomatal immunity. CHE, the second identified TF, is a central circadian clock oscillator and is required not only for the daily oscillation in SA levels but also for the pathogen-induced SA synthesis in systemic tissues during SAR. CHE may also regulate ICS1 through the known transcription activators CALMODULIN BINDING PROTEIN 60g (CBP60g) and SYSTEMIC ACQUIRED RESISTANCE DEFICIENT 1 (SARD1) because induction of these TF genes is compromised in the che-2 mutant. Our study shows that SA biosynthesis is regulated by multiple TFs in a spatial and temporal manner and therefore fills a gap in the signal transduction pathway between pathogen recognition and SA production. PMID:26139525

  6. Resistance to freshwater exposure in White Sea Littorina spp. II: Acid-base regulation.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, I M; Bock, C; Pörtner, H O

    2000-03-01

    Parameters of acid-base and energy status were studied by in vivo 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in three White Sea Littorina spp. (L. littorea, L. saxatilis and L. obtusata) during prolonged anaerobiosis in freshwater. Intracellular pH decreased significantly, especially during the early period of anaerobiosis, but later the decrease in intracellular pH slowed down considerably, suggesting a capacity for intracellular pH regulation in all three species. There was a trend for intracellular pH to fall most rapidly in the least freshwater-resistant species, L. obtusata, as compared to the most resistant, L. littorea. Non-bicarbonate, non-phosphate buffer values estimated by the homogenate technique were similar in the three studied species (28-37 mmol pH(-1) kg(-1) wet weight) and did not change during freshwater exposure. The CaCO3 buffer value of the foot tissues was considerably higher (171-218 mmol pH(-1) kg(-1) wet weight) and decreased significantly during freshwater exposure. The contribution of the multiple tissue buffering systems to intracellular pH regulation in Littorina spp. shifts between different stages of freshwater exposure. Initially, the non-bicarbonate, non-phosphate tissue buffering system seems to be of major importance for metabolic proton buffering at intracellular pH between 7.5 and 7.0. During later stages of anaerobiosis and at lower intracellular pH, the CaCO3 buffer is involved in proton buffering. Decrease in the CaCO3 buffer value during freshwater exposure was in quantitative agreement with the amount of metabolic protons buffered, thus suggesting that CaCO3 tissue stores may serve as a major buffering system during prolonged anaerobiosis in Littorina spp. PMID:10791570

  7. Glutathione plays a role in regulating the formation of toxic reactive intermediates from diphenylarsinic acid.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Kenji; Ochi, Takafumi; Suzuki, Toshihide; Kita, Kayoko; Kaise, Toshikazu

    2006-08-15

    The role of glutathione (GSH) in the cytotoxicity of diphenylarsinic acid [DPAA(V)], which was detected in drinking well water after a poisoning incident in Kamisu, Japan, was investigated in cultured human HepG2 cells. DPA-GS(III), which is the GSH adduct of DPAA, was synthesized and analyzed by HPLC/ESI-MS. DPA-GS(III) was highly toxic to cells and the potency was about 1000 times that of DPAA(V). DPAA(V) was stable in culture medium, while DPA-GS(III) was unstable and changed to protein-bound As (protein-As). By contrast, DPA-GS(III) remained stable with the addition of exogenous GSH, thereby reducing transformation to protein-As. In addition, DPA-GS(III) was transformed to bis(diphenylarsine)oxide [BDPAO(III)], which was observed under serum-free conditions. BDPAO(III) was very unstable and disappeared conversely with an increase in protein-As. In contrast, the presence of GSH suppressed the transformation of BDPAO(III) to protein-As while it enhanced the transformation of BDPAO(III) to DPA-GS(III). Depletion of cell GSH enhanced the cytotoxic effects of DPA-GS(III) and BDPAO(III). Moreover, exogenously-added GSH suppressed the cytotoxic effects of DPA-GS(III) and BDPAO(III). The dynamic behavior of arsenicals in the culture medium and the resultant cytotoxic effects suggested that GSH played a role in regulating the formation of toxic intermediates, such as DPA-GS(III) and BDPAO(III). Moreover, the results suggested that the formation of protein-As in culture medium was compatible with the cytotoxic effects and that GSH was a factor capable of regulating the formation of protein-As from either DPA-GS(III) or BDPAO(III). PMID:16793189

  8. RNA-binding protein QKI regulates Glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Radomska, Katarzyna J; Halvardson, Jonatan; Reinius, Björn; Lindholm Carlström, Eva; Emilsson, Lina; Feuk, Lars; Jazin, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Linkage, association and expression studies previously pointed to the human QKI, KH domain containing, RNA-binding (QKI) as a candidate gene for schizophrenia. Functional studies of the mouse orthologue Qk focused mainly on its role in oligodendrocyte development and myelination, while its function in astroglia remained unexplored. Here, we show that QKI is highly expressed in human primary astrocytes and that its splice forms encode proteins targeting different subcellular localizations. Uncovering the role of QKI in astrocytes is of interest in light of growing evidence implicating astrocyte dysfunction in the pathogenesis of several disorders of the central nervous system. We selectively silenced QKI splice variants in human primary astrocytes and used RNA sequencing to identify differential expression and splice variant composition at the genome-wide level. We found that an mRNA expression of Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), encoding a major component of astrocyte intermediate filaments, was down-regulated after QKI7 splice variant silencing. Moreover, we identified a potential QKI-binding site within the 3' untranslated region of human GFAP. This sequence was not conserved between mice and humans, raising the possibility that GFAP is a target for QKI in humans but not rodents. Haloperidol treatment of primary astrocytes resulted in coordinated increases in QKI7 and GFAP expression. Taken together, our results provide the first link between QKI and GFAP, two genes with alterations previously observed independently in schizophrenic patients. Our findings for QKI, together with its well-known role in myelination, suggest that QKI is a hub regulator of glia function in humans.

  9. Spatial and temporal regulation of biosynthesis of the plant immune signal salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-Yu; Zhou, Mian; Yoo, Heejin; Pruneda-Paz, Jose L; Spivey, Natalie Weaver; Kay, Steve A; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-07-28

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) is essential for local defense and systemic acquired resistance (SAR). When plants, such as Arabidopsis, are challenged by different pathogens, an increase in SA biosynthesis generally occurs through transcriptional induction of the key synthetic enzyme isochorismate synthase 1 (ICS1). However, the regulatory mechanism for this induction is poorly understood. Using a yeast one-hybrid screen, we identified two transcription factors (TFs), NTM1-like 9 (NTL9) and CCA1 hiking expedition (CHE), as activators of ICS1 during specific immune responses. NTL9 is essential for inducing ICS1 and two other SA synthesis-related genes, phytoalexin-deficient 4 (PAD4) and enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), in guard cells that form stomata. Stomata can quickly close upon challenge to block pathogen entry. This stomatal immunity requires ICS1 and the SA signaling pathway. In the ntl9 mutant, this response is defective and can be rescued by exogenous application of SA, indicating that NTL9-mediated SA synthesis is essential for stomatal immunity. CHE, the second identified TF, is a central circadian clock oscillator and is required not only for the daily oscillation in SA levels but also for the pathogen-induced SA synthesis in systemic tissues during SAR. CHE may also regulate ICS1 through the known transcription activators calmodulin binding protein 60g (CBP60g) and systemic acquired resistance deficient 1 (SARD1) because induction of these TF genes is compromised in the che-2 mutant. Our study shows that SA biosynthesis is regulated by multiple TFs in a spatial and temporal manner and therefore fills a gap in the signal transduction pathway between pathogen recognition and SA production.

  10. Regulation of host weight gain and lipid metabolism by bacterial bile acid modification in the gut.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Susan A; MacSharry, John; Casey, Patrick G; Kinsella, Michael; Murphy, Eileen F; Shanahan, Fergus; Hill, Colin; Gahan, Cormac G M

    2014-05-20

    Alterations in the gastrointestinal microbiota have been implicated in obesity in mice and humans, but the key microbial functions influencing host energy metabolism and adiposity remain to be determined. Despite an increased understanding of the genetic content of the gastrointestinal microbiome, functional analyses of common microbial gene sets are required. We established a controlled expression system for the parallel functional analysis of microbial alleles in the murine gut. Using this approach we show that bacterial bile salt hydrolase (BSH) mediates a microbe-host dialogue that functionally regulates host lipid metabolism and plays a profound role in cholesterol metabolism and weight gain in the host. Expression of cloned BSH enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract of gnotobiotic or conventionally raised mice significantly altered plasma bile acid signatures and regulated transcription of key genes involved in lipid metabolism (Pparγ, Angptl4), cholesterol metabolism (Abcg5/8), gastrointestinal homeostasis (RegIIIγ), and circadian rhythm (Dbp, Per1/2) in the liver or small intestine. High-level expression of BSH in conventionally raised mice resulted in a significant reduction in host weight gain, plasma cholesterol, and liver triglycerides, demonstrating the overall impact of elevated BSH activity on host physiology. In addition, BSH activity in vivo varied according to BSH allele group, indicating that subtle differences in activity can have significant effects on the host. In summary, we demonstrate that bacterial BSH activity significantly impacts the systemic metabolic processes and adiposity in the host and represents a key mechanistic target for the control of obesity and hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24799697

  11. TXNIP regulates myocardial fatty acid oxidation via miR-33a signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junqin; Young, Martin E; Chatham, John C; Crossman, David K; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Shalev, Anath

    2016-07-01

    Myocardial fatty acid β-oxidation is critical for the maintenance of energy homeostasis and contractile function in the heart, but its regulation is still not fully understood. While thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) has recently been implicated in cardiac metabolism and mitochondrial function, its effects on β-oxidation have remained unexplored. Using a new cardiomyocyte-specific TXNIP knockout mouse and working heart perfusion studies, as well as loss- and gain-of-function experiments in rat H9C2 and human AC16 cardiomyocytes, we discovered that TXNIP deficiency promotes myocardial β-oxidation via signaling through a specific microRNA, miR-33a. TXNIP deficiency leads to increased binding of nuclear factor Y (NFYA) to the sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP2) promoter, resulting in transcriptional inhibition of SREBP2 and its intronic miR-33a. This allows for increased translation of the miR-33a target genes and β-oxidation-promoting enzymes, carnitine octanoyl transferase (CROT), carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1), hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase/3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase/enoyl-CoA hydratase-β (HADHB), and AMPKα and is associated with an increase in phospho-AMPKα and phosphorylation/inactivation of acetyl-CoA-carboxylase. Thus, we have identified a novel TXNIP-NFYA-SREBP2/miR-33a-AMPKα/CROT/CPT1/HADHB pathway that is conserved in mouse, rat, and human cardiomyocytes and regulates myocardial β-oxidation.

  12. The orphan GPCR, Gpr161, regulates the retinoic acid and canonical Wnt pathways during neurulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo I; Matteson, Paul G; Ababon, Myka F; Nato, Alejandro Q; Lin, Yong; Nanda, Vikas; Matise, Tara C; Millonig, James H

    2015-06-01

    The vacuolated lens (vl) mouse mutation arose on the C3H/HeSnJ background and results in lethality, neural tube defects (NTDs) and cataracts. The vl phenotypes are due to a deletion/frameshift mutation in the orphan GPCR, Gpr161. A recent study using a null allele demonstrated that Gpr161 functions in primary cilia and represses the Shh pathway. We show the hypomorphic Gpr161(vl) allele does not severely affect the Shh pathway. To identify additional pathways regulated by Gpr161 during neurulation, we took advantage of naturally occurring genetic variation in the mouse. Previously Gpr161(vl-C3H) was crossed to different inbred backgrounds including MOLF/EiJ and the Gpr161(vl) mutant phenotypes were rescued. Five modifiers were mapped (Modvl: Modifier of vl) including Modvl5(MOLF). In this study we demonstrate the Modvl5(MOLF) congenic rescues the Gpr161(vl)-associated lethality and NTDs but not cataracts. Bioinformatics determined the transcription factor, Cdx1, is the only annotated gene within the Modvl5 95% CI co-expressed with Gpr161 during neurulation and not expressed in the eye. Using Cdx1 as an entry point, we identified the retinoid acid (RA) and canonical Wnt pathways as downstream targets of Gpr161. QRT-PCR, ISH and IHC determined that expression of RA and Wnt genes are down-regulated in Gpr161(vl/vl) but rescued by the Modvl5(MOLF) congenic during neurulation. Intraperitoneal RA injection restores expression of canonical Wnt markers and rescues Gpr161(vl/vl) NTDs. These results establish the RA and canonical Wnt as pathways downstream of Gpr161 during neurulation, and suggest that Modvl5(MOLF) bypasses the Gpr161(vl) mutation by restoring the activity of these pathways. PMID:25753732

  13. Regulation of the activity of lactate dehydrogenases from four lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Feldman-Salit, Anna; Hering, Silvio; Messiha, Hanan L; Veith, Nadine; Cojocaru, Vlad; Sieg, Antje; Westerhoff, Hans V; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Wade, Rebecca C; Fiedler, Tomas

    2013-07-19

    Despite high similarity in sequence and catalytic properties, the l-lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) display differences in their regulation that may arise from their adaptation to different habitats. We combined experimental and computational approaches to investigate the effects of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), phosphate (Pi), and ionic strength (NaCl concentration) on six LDHs from four LABs studied at pH 6 and pH 7. We found that 1) the extent of activation by FBP (Kact) differs. Lactobacillus plantarum LDH is not regulated by FBP, but the other LDHs are activated with increasing sensitivity in the following order: Enterococcus faecalis LDH2 ≤ Lactococcus lactis LDH2 < E. faecalis LDH1 < L. lactis LDH1 ≤ Streptococcus pyogenes LDH. This trend reflects the electrostatic properties in the allosteric binding site of the LDH enzymes. 2) For L. plantarum, S. pyogenes, and E. faecalis, the effects of Pi are distinguishable from the effect of changing ionic strength by adding NaCl. 3) Addition of Pi inhibits E. faecalis LDH2, whereas in the absence of FBP, Pi is an activator of S. pyogenes LDH, E. faecalis LDH1, and L. lactis LDH1 and LDH2 at pH 6. These effects can be interpreted by considering the computed binding affinities of Pi to the catalytic and allosteric binding sites of the enzymes modeled in protonation states corresponding to pH 6 and pH 7. Overall, the results show a subtle interplay among the effects of Pi, FBP, and pH that results in different regulatory effects on the LDHs of different LABs.

  14. Environmentally Realistic Mixtures of the Five Regulated Haloacetic Acids Exhibit Concentration-Dependent Departures from Dose Additivity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of water decreases waterborne disease. Disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are formed by the reaction of oxidizing disinfectants with inorganic and organic materials in the source water. The U.S. EPA regulates five haloacetic acid (HAA) DBPs as a mixture. The objective ...

  15. Regulation of mTORC1 by growth factors, energy status, amino acids and mechanical stimuli at a glance.

    PubMed

    Bond, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of skeletal muscle protein synthesis. Activation of the complex leads to phosphorylation of two important sets of substrates, namely eIF4E binding proteins and ribosomal S6 kinases. Phosphorylation of these substrates then leads to an increase in protein synthesis, mainly by enhancing translation initiation. mTORC1 activity is regulated by several inputs, such as growth factors, energy status, amino acids and mechanical stimuli. Research in this field is rapidly evolving and unraveling how these inputs regulate the complex. Therefore this review attempts to provide a brief and up-to-date narrative on the regulation of this marvelous protein complex. Additionally, some sports supplements which have been shown to regulate mTORC1 activity are discussed. PMID:26937223

  16. Ascorbic acid inhibition of Candida albicans Hsp90-mediated morphogenesis occurs via the transcriptional regulator Upc2.

    PubMed

    Van Hauwenhuyse, Frédérique; Fiori, Alessandro; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    Morphogenetic transitions of the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans are influenced by temperature changes, with induction of filamentation upon a shift from 30 to 37°C. Hsp90 was identified as a major repressor of an elongated cell morphology at low temperatures, as treatment with specific inhibitors of Hsp90 results in elongated growth forms at 30°C. Elongated growth resulting from a compromised Hsp90 is considered neither hyphal nor pseudohyphal growth. It has been reported that ascorbic acid (vitamin C) interferes with the yeast-to-hypha transition in C. albicans. In the present study, we show that ascorbic acid also antagonizes the morphogenetic change caused by hampered Hsp90 function. Further analysis revealed that Upc2, a transcriptional regulator of genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis, and Erg11, the target of azole antifungals, whose expression is in turn regulated by Upc2, are required for this antagonism. Ergosterol levels correlate with elongated growth and are reduced in cells treated with the Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GdA) and restored by cotreatment with ascorbic acid. In addition, we show that Upc2 appears to be required for ascorbic acid-mediated inhibition of the antifungal activity of fluconazole. These results identify Upc2 as a major regulator of ascorbic acid-induced effects in C. albicans and suggest an association between ergosterol content and elongated growth upon Hsp90 compromise. PMID:25084864

  17. Metabolic Regulation of Trisporic Acid on Blakeslea trispora Revealed by a GC-MS-Based Metabolomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie; Li, Hao; Yuan, Qipeng

    2012-01-01

    The zygomycete Blakeslea trispora is used commercially as natural source of â-carotene. Trisporic acid (TA) is secreted from the mycelium of B. trispora during mating between heterothallic strains and is considered as a mediator of the regulation of mating processes and an enhancer of carotene biosynthesis. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate analysis were employed to investigate TA-associated intracellular biochemical changes in B. trispora. By principal component analysis, the differential metabolites discriminating the control groups from the TA-treated groups were found, which were also confirmed by the subsequent hierarchical cluster analysis. The results indicate that TA is a global regulator and its main effects at the metabolic level are reflected on the content changes in several fatty acids, carbohydrates, and amino acids. The carbon metabolism and fatty acids synthesis are sensitive to TA addition. Glycerol, glutamine, and ã-aminobutyrate might play important roles in the regulation of TA. Complemented by two-dimensional electrophoresis, the results indicate that the actions of TA at the metabolic level involve multiple metabolic processes, such as glycolysis and the bypass of the classical tricarboxylic acid cycle. These results reveal that the metabolomics strategy is a powerful tool to gain insight into the mechanism of a microorganism’s cellular response to signal inducers at the metabolic level. PMID:23049952

  18. Retinoic acid receptors inhibit AP1 activation by regulating extracellular signal-regulated kinase and CBP recruitment to an AP1-responsive promoter.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, Madjid; Brand, Céline; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2002-07-01

    Retinoids exhibit antineoplastic activities that may be linked to retinoid receptor-mediated transrepression of activating protein 1 (AP1), a heterodimeric transcription factor composed of fos- and jun-related proteins. Here we show that transcriptional activation of an AP1-regulated gene through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway (MAPK(ERK)) is characterized, in intact cells, by a switch from a fra2-junD dimer to a junD-fosB dimer loading on its promoter and by simultaneous recruitment of ERKs, CREB-binding protein (CBP), and RNA polymerase II. All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) receptor (RAR) was tethered constitutively to the AP1 promoter. AP1 transrepression by retinoic acid was concomitant to glycogen synthase kinase 3 activation, negative regulation of junD hyperphosphorylation, and to decreased RNA polymerase II recruitment. Under these conditions, fra1 loading to the AP1 response element was strongly increased. Importantly, CBP and ERKs were excluded from the promoter in the presence of atRA. AP1 transrepression by retinoids was RAR and ligand dependent, but none of the functions required for RAR-mediated transactivation was necessary for AP1 transrepression. These results indicate that transrepressive effects of retinoids are mediated through a mechanism unrelated to transcriptional activation, involving the RAR-dependent control of transcription factors and cofactor assembly on AP1-regulated promoters.

  19. Rosmarinic acid down-regulates endothelial protein C receptor shedding in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sae-Kwang; Yang, Eun-Ju; Song, Kyung-Sik; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2013-09-01

    The endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) plays pivotal roles in coagulation and inflammation, however, its activity is markedly changed by ectodomain cleavage and release as the soluble protein (sEPCR). According to previous studies, there are approximately 100ng/ml sEPCR in human plasma and the levels increase in inflammatory diseases. EPCR can be shed from the cell surface, and this is mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE). We recently reported on the anti-inflammatory and barrier protective activities of rosmarinic acid (RA), an important component of the leaves of Perilla frutescens. However, little is known about the effects of RA on EPCR shedding. Here, we investigated this issue by monitoring the effects of RA on phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-1β, and on cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-mediated EPCR shedding and underlying mechanisms. Data showed that treatment with RA resulted in potent inhibition of PMA, TNF-α, IL-induced EPCR shedding by suppression of TACE expression. In addition, RA reduced PMA-stimulated phosphorylation of p38, extracellular regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). These results suggest the potential for use of RA as an anti-sEPCR shedding reagent against PMA, TNF-α, IL-1β and CLP-mediated EPCR shedding.

  20. Putting the brakes on: abscisic acid as a central environmental regulator of stomatal development.

    PubMed

    Chater, Caspar C C; Oliver, James; Casson, Stuart; Gray, Julie E

    2014-04-01

    Stomata are produced by a controlled series of epidermal cell divisions. The molecular underpinnings of this process are becoming well understood, but mechanisms that determine plasticity of stomatal patterning to many exogenous and environmental cues remain less clear. Light quantity and quality, vapour pressure deficit, soil water content, and CO2 concentration are detected by the plant, and new leaves adapt their stomatal densities accordingly. Mature leaves detect these environmental signals and relay messages to immature leaves to tell them how to adapt and grow. Stomata on mature leaves may act as stress signal-sensing and transduction centres, locally by aperture adjustment, and at long distance by optimizing stomatal density to maximize future carbon gain while minimizing water loss. Although mechanisms of stomatal aperture responses are well characterized, the pathways by which mature stomata integrate environmental signals to control immature epidermal cell fate, and ultimately stomatal density, are not. Here we evaluate current understanding of the latter through the influence of the former. We argue that mature stomata, as key portals by which plants coordinate their carbon and water relations, are controlled by abscisic acid (ABA), both metabolically and hydraulically, and that ABA is also a core regulator of environmentally determined stomatal development.

  1. Abscisic Acid Regulates Root Elongation Through the Activities of Auxin and Ethylene in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Thole, Julie M.; Beisner, Erin R.; Liu, James; Venkova, Savina V.; Strader, Lucia C.

    2014-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates many aspects of plant growth and development, including inhibition of root elongation and seed germination. We performed an ABA resistance screen to identify factors required for ABA response in root elongation inhibition. We identified two classes of Arabidopsis thaliana AR mutants that displayed ABA-resistant root elongation: those that displayed resistance to ABA in both root elongation and seed germination and those that displayed resistance to ABA in root elongation but not in seed germination. We used PCR-based genotyping to identify a mutation in ABA INSENSITIVE2 (ABI2), positional information to identify mutations in AUXIN RESISTANT1 (AUX1) and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2), and whole genome sequencing to identify mutations in AUX1, AUXIN RESISTANT4 (AXR4), and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE ROOT1/PIN-FORMED2 (EIR1/PIN2). Identification of auxin and ethylene response mutants among our isolates suggested that auxin and ethylene responsiveness were required for ABA inhibition of root elongation. To further our understanding of auxin/ethylene/ABA crosstalk, we examined ABA responsiveness of double mutants of ethylene overproducer1 (eto1) or ein2 combined with auxin-resistant mutants and found that auxin and ethylene likely operate in a linear pathway to affect ABA-responsive inhibition of root elongation, whereas these two hormones likely act independently to affect ABA-responsive inhibition of seed germination. PMID:24836325

  2. Nicotinic acid is a common regulator of heat-sensing TRPV1-4 ion channels.

    PubMed

    Ma, Linlin; Lee, Bo Hyun; Clifton, Heather; Schaefer, Saul; Zheng, Jie

    2015-03-10

    Nicotinic acid (NA, a.k.a. vitamin B3 or niacin) can reduce blood cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins whereas increase high-density lipoproteins. However, when NA is used to treat dyslipidemias, it causes a strong side effect of cutaneous vasodilation, commonly called flushing. A recent study showed that NA may cause flushing by lowering activation threshold temperature of the heat-sensitive capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel, leading to its activation at body temperature. The finding calls into question whether NA might also interact with the homologous heat-sensitive TRPV2-4 channels, particularly given that TRPV3 and TRPV4 are abundantly expressed in keratinocytes of the skin where much of the flushing response occurs. We found that NA indeed potentiated TRPV3 while inhibited TRPV2 and TRPV4. Consistent with these gating effects, NA lowered the heat-activation threshold of TRPV3 but elevated that of TRPV4. We further found that activity of TRPV1 was substantially prolonged by extracellular NA, which may further enhance the direct activation effect. Consistent with the broad gating effect on TRPV1-4 channels, evidence from the present study hints that NA may share the same activation pathway as 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), a common agonist for these TRPV channels. These findings shed new light on the molecular mechanism underlying NA regulation of TRPV channels.

  3. The Pokeweed Leaf mRNA Transcriptome and Its Regulation by Jasmonic Acid.

    PubMed

    Neller, Kira C M; Klenov, Alexander; Hudak, Katalin A

    2016-01-01

    The American pokeweed plant, Phytolacca americana, is recognized for synthesizing pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) that inhibits the replication of several plant and animal viruses. The plant is also a heavy metal accumulator with applications in soil remediation. However, little is known about pokeweed stress responses, as large-scale sequencing projects have not been performed for this species. Here, we sequenced the mRNA transcriptome of pokeweed in the presence and absence of jasmonic acid (JA), a hormone mediating plant defense. Trinity-based de novo assembly of mRNA from leaf tissue and BLASTx homology searches against public sequence databases resulted in the annotation of 59 096 transcripts. Differential expression analysis identified JA-responsive genes that may be involved in defense against pathogen infection and herbivory. We confirmed the existence of several PAP isoforms and cloned a potentially novel isoform of PAP. Expression analysis indicated that PAP isoforms are differentially responsive to JA, perhaps indicating specialized roles within the plant. Finally, we identified 52 305 natural antisense transcript pairs, four of which comprised PAP isoforms, suggesting a novel form of RIP gene regulation. This transcriptome-wide study of a Phytolaccaceae family member provides a source of new genes that may be involved in stress tolerance in this plant. The sequences generated in our study have been deposited in the SRA database under project # SRP069141.

  4. The Pokeweed Leaf mRNA Transcriptome and Its Regulation by Jasmonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Neller, Kira C. M.; Klenov, Alexander; Hudak, Katalin A.

    2016-01-01

    The American pokeweed plant, Phytolacca americana, is recognized for synthesizing pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) that inhibits the replication of several plant and animal viruses. The plant is also a heavy metal accumulator with applications in soil remediation. However, little is known about pokeweed stress responses, as large-scale sequencing projects have not been performed for this species. Here, we sequenced the mRNA transcriptome of pokeweed in the presence and absence of jasmonic acid (JA), a hormone mediating plant defense. Trinity-based de novo assembly of mRNA from leaf tissue and BLASTx homology searches against public sequence databases resulted in the annotation of 59 096 transcripts. Differential expression analysis identified JA-responsive genes that may be involved in defense against pathogen infection and herbivory. We confirmed the existence of several PAP isoforms and cloned a potentially novel isoform of PAP. Expression analysis indicated that PAP isoforms are differentially responsive to JA, perhaps indicating specialized roles within the plant. Finally, we identified 52 305 natural antisense transcript pairs, four of which comprised PAP isoforms, suggesting a novel form of RIP gene regulation. This transcriptome-wide study of a Phytolaccaceae family member provides a source of new genes that may be involved in stress tolerance in this plant. The sequences generated in our study have been deposited in the SRA database under project # SRP069141. PMID:27014307

  5. CitI, a Transcription Factor Involved in Regulation of Citrate Metabolism in Lactic Acid Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Mauricio G.; Magni, Christian; de Mendoza, Diego; López, Paloma

    2005-01-01

    A large variety of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can utilize citrate under fermentative conditions. Although much information concerning the metabolic pathways leading to citrate utilization by LAB has been gathered, the mechanisms regulating these pathways are obscure. In Weissella paramesenteroides (formerly called Leuconostoc paramesenteroides), transcription of the citMDEFCGRP citrate operon and the upstream divergent gene citI is induced by the presence of citrate in the medium. Although genetic experiments have suggested that CitI is a transcriptional activator whose activity can be modulated in response to citrate availability, specific details of the interaction between CitI and DNA remained unknown. In this study, we show that CitI recognizes two A+T-rich operator sites located between citI and citM and that the DNA-binding affinity of CitI is increased by citrate. Subsequently, this citrate signal propagation leads to the activation of the cit operon through an enhanced recruitment of RNA polymerase to its promoters. Our results indicate that the control of CitI by the cellular pools of citrate provides a mechanism for sensing the availability of citrate and adjusting the expression of the cit operon accordingly. In addition, this is the first reported example of a transcription factor directly functioning as a citrate-activated switch allowing the cell to optimize the generation of metabolic energy. PMID:16030208

  6. Arachidonic Acid Randomizes Endothelial Cell Motion and Regulates Adhesion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Rossen, Ninna Struck; Hansen, Anker Jon; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine; Oddershede, Lene Broeng

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are essential for the evolution, organization, and repair of living organisms. An example of a combination of these processes is the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis), which is mediated by a directed migration and adhesion of endothelial cells (ECs). Angiogenesis is an essential part of wound healing and a prerequisite of cancerous tumor growth. We investigated the effect of the amphiphilic compound arachidonic acid (AA) on EC adhesion and migration by combining live cell imaging with biophysical analysis methods. AA significantly influenced both EC adhesion and migration, in either a stimulating or inhibiting fashion depending on AA concentration. The temporal evolution of cell adhesion area was well described by a two-phase model. In the first phase, the spreading dynamics were independent of AA concentration. In the latter phase, the spreading dynamics increased at low AA concentrations and decreased at high AA concentrations. AA also affected EC migration; though the instantaneous speed of individual cells remained independent of AA concentration, the individual cells lost their sense of direction upon addition of AA, thus giving rise to an overall decrease in the collective motion of a confluent EC monolayer into vacant space. Addition of AA also caused ECs to become more elongated, this possibly being related to incorporation of AA in the EC membrane thus mediating a change in the viscosity of the membrane. Hence, AA is a promising non-receptor specific regulator of wound healing and angiogenesis. PMID:21966453

  7. Fibroblastic reticular cell-derived lysophosphatidic acid regulates confined intranodal T-cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Akira; Kobayashi, Daichi; Aoi, Keita; Sasaki, Naoko; Sugiura, Yuki; Igarashi, Hidemitsu; Tohya, Kazuo; Inoue, Asuka; Hata, Erina; Akahoshi, Noriyuki; Hayasaka, Haruko; Kikuta, Junichi; Scandella, Elke; Ludewig, Burkhard; Ishii, Satoshi; Aoki, Junken; Suematsu, Makoto; Ishii, Masaru; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Umemoto, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Lymph nodes (LNs) are highly confined environments with a cell-dense three-dimensional meshwork, in which lymphocyte migration is regulated by intracellular contractile proteins. However, the molecular cues directing intranodal cell migration remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) produced by LN fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) acts locally to LPA2 to induce T-cell motility. In vivo, either specific ablation of LPA-producing ectoenzyme autotaxin in FRCs or LPA2 deficiency in T cells markedly decreased intranodal T cell motility, and FRC-derived LPA critically affected the LPA2-dependent T-cell motility. In vitro, LPA activated the small GTPase RhoA in T cells and limited T-cell adhesion to the underlying substrate via LPA2. The LPA-LPA2 axis also enhanced T-cell migration through narrow pores in a three-dimensional environment, in a ROCK-myosin II-dependent manner. These results strongly suggest that FRC-derived LPA serves as a cell-extrinsic factor that optimizes T-cell movement through the densely packed LN reticular network. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10561.001 PMID:26830463

  8. Retinoic acid regulation of the Mesp-Ripply feedback loop during vertebrate segmental patterning.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Tanya A; Jappelli, Roberto; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Kintner, Chris

    2008-03-15

    The Mesp bHLH genes play a conserved role during segmental patterning of the mesoderm in the vertebrate embryo by specifying segmental boundaries and anteroposterior (A-P) segmental polarity. Here we use a xenotransgenic approach to compare the transcriptional enhancers that drive expression of the Mesp genes within segments of the presomitic mesoderm (PSM) of different vertebrate species. We find that the genomic sequences upstream of the mespb gene in the pufferfish Takifugu rubripes (Tr-mespb) are able to drive segmental expression in transgenic Xenopus embryos while those from the Xenopus laevis mespb (Xl-mespb) gene drive segmental expression in transgenic zebrafish. In both cases, the anterior segmental boundary of transgene expression closely matches the expression of the endogenous Mesp genes, indicating that many inputs into segmental gene expression are highly conserved. By contrast, we find that direct retinoic acid (RA) regulation of endogenous Mesp gene expression is variable among vertebrate species. Both Tr-mespb and Xl-mespb are directly upregulated by RA, through a complex, distal element. By contrast, RA represses the zebrafish Mesp genes. We show that this repression is mediated, in part, by RA-mediated activation of the Ripply genes, which together with Mesp genes form an RA-responsive negative feedback loop. These observations suggest that variations in a direct response to RA input may allow for changes in A-P patterning of the segments in different vertebrate species.

  9. PLZF is a negative regulator of retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Perrine J; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2003-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors controlling cellular proliferation and differentiation. Receptor-interacting proteins such as corepressors and coactivators play a crucial role in specifying the overall transcriptional activity of the receptor in response to ligand treatment. Little is known however on how receptor activity is controlled by intermediary factors which interact with RARs in a ligand-independent manner. RESULTS: We have identified the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF), a transcriptional corepressor, to be a RAR-interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid assay. We confirmed this interaction by GST-pull down assays and show that the PLZF N-terminal zinc finger domain is necessary and sufficient for PLZF to bind RAR. The RAR ligand binding domain displayed the highest affinity for PLZF, but corepressor and coactivator binding interfaces did not contribute to PLZF recruitment. The interaction was ligand-independent and correlated to a decreased transcriptional activity of the RXR-RAR heterodimer upon overexpression of PLZF. A similar transcriptional interference could be observed with the estrogen receptor alpha and the glucocorticoid receptor. We further show that PLZF is likely to act by preventing RXR-RAR heterodimerization, both in-vitro and in intact cells. CONCLUSION: Thus RAR and PLZF interact physically and functionally. Intriguingly, these two transcription factors play a determining role in hematopoiesis and regionalization of the hindbrain and may, upon chromosomal translocation, form fusion proteins. Our observations therefore define a novel mechanism by which RARs activity may be controlled.

  10. Novel Regulation of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2)-mediated Cell Growth by Polysialic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Sayaka; Hane, Masaya; Kitajima, Ken; Sato, Chihiro

    2012-01-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia) is a unique polysaccharide that modifies neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) spatiotemporally. Recently, we demonstrated that polySia functions as a reservoir for several neurotrophic factors and neurotransmitters. Here, we showed the direct interaction between polySia and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) by native-PAGE, gel filtration, and surface plasmon resonance. The minimum chain length of polySia required for the interaction with FGF2 was 17. Compared with heparan sulfate, a well known glycosaminoglycan capable of forming a complex with FGF2, polySia formed a larger complex with distinct properties in facilitating oligomerization of FGF2, as well as in binding to FGF receptors. In polySia-NCAM-expressing NIH-3T3 cells, which were established by transfecting cells with either of the plasmids for the expression of the polysialyltransferases ST8SiaII/STX and ST8SiaIV/PST that can polysialylate NCAM, FGF2-stimulated cell growth, but not cell survival, was inhibited. Taken together, these results suggest that polySia-NCAM might be involved in the regulation of FGF2-FGF receptor signaling through the direct binding of FGF2 in a manner distinct from heparan sulfate. PMID:22158871

  11. Gallic acid regulates skin photoaging in UVB-exposed fibroblast and hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eunson; Park, Sang-Yong; Lee, Hyun Ji; Lee, Tae Youp; Sun, Zheng-Wang; Yi, Tae Hoo

    2014-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the primary factor in skin photoaging, which is characterized by wrinkle formation, dryness, and thickening. The mechanisms underlying skin photoaging are closely associated with degradation of collagen via upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, which is induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Gallic acid (GA), a phenolic compound, possesses a variety of biological activities including antioxidant and antiinflammatory activities. We investigated the protective effects of GA against photoaging caused by UVB irradiation using normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) in vitro and hairless mice in vivo. The production levels of ROS, interlukin-6, and MMP-1 were significantly suppressed, and type I procollagen expression was stimulated in UVB-irradiated and GA-treated NHDFs. GA treatment inhibited the activity of transcription factor activation protein 1. The effects of GA following topical application and dietary administration were examined by measuring wrinkle formation, histological modification, protein expression, and physiological changes such as stratum corneum hydration, transepidermal water loss, and erythema index. We found that GA decreased dryness, skin thickness, and wrinkle formation via negative modulation of MMP-1 secretion and positive regulation of elastin, type I procollagen, and transforming growth factor-β1. Our data indicate that GA is a potential candidate for the prevention of UVB-induced premature skin aging.

  12. Regulation of Glucose Metabolism and Cell Wall Synthesis in Avena Stem Segments by Gibberellic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Michael J.; Ikuma, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    Gibberellic acid (GA) stimulated both the elongation of Avena sativa stem segments and increased synthesis of cell wall material. The effects of GA on glucose metabolism, as related to cell wall synthesis, have been investigated in order to find specific events regulated by GA. GA caused a decline in the levels of glucose, glucose 6-phosphate, and fructose 6-phosphate if exogenous sugar was not supplied to the segments, whereas the hormone caused no change in the levels of glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, UDP-glucose, or the adenylate energy charge if the segments were incubated in 0.1 m glucose. No GA-induced change could be demonstrated in the activities of hexokinase, phosphoglucomutase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, or polysaccharide synthetases using UDP-glucose, UDP-galactose, UDP-xylose, and UDP-arabinose as substrates. GA stimulated the activity of GDP-glucose-dependent β-glucan synthetase by 2- to 4-fold over the control. When glucan synthetase was assayed using UDP-glucose as substrate, only β-1,3-linked glucan was synthesized in vitro, whereas with GDP-glucose, only β-1,4-linked glucan was synthesized. These results suggest that one part of the mechanism by which GA stimulates cell wall synthesis concurrently with elongation in Avena stem segments may be through a stimulation of cell wall polysaccharide synthetase activity. PMID:16660524

  13. Reactive oxygen species, abscisic acid and ethylene interact to regulate sunflower seed germination.

    PubMed

    El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Sajjad, Yasar; Bazin, Jérémie; Langlade, Nicolas; Cristescu, Simona M; Balzergue, Sandrine; Baudouin, Emmanuel; Bailly, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seed dormancy is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and can be alleviated by incubating dormant embryos in the presence of methylviologen (MV), a ROS-generating compound. Ethylene alleviates sunflower seed dormancy whereas abscisic acid (ABA) represses germination. The purposes of this study were to identify the molecular basis of ROS effect on seed germination and to investigate their possible relationship with hormone signalling pathways. Ethylene treatment provoked ROS generation in embryonic axis whereas ABA had no effect on their production. The beneficial effect of ethylene on germination was lowered in the presence of antioxidant compounds, and MV suppressed the inhibitory effect of ABA. MV treatment did not alter significantly ethylene nor ABA production during seed imbibition. Microarray analysis showed that MV treatment triggered differential expression of 120 probe sets (59 more abundant and 61 less abundant genes), and most of the identified transcripts were related to cell signalling components. Many transcripts less represented in MV-treated seeds were involved in ABA signalling, thus suggesting an interaction between ROS and ABA signalling pathways at the transcriptional level. Altogether, these results shed new light on the crosstalk between ROS and plant hormones in seed germination.

  14. Abscisic acid regulates root elongation through the activities of auxin and ethylene in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Thole, Julie M; Beisner, Erin R; Liu, James; Venkova, Savina V; Strader, Lucia C

    2014-05-15

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates many aspects of plant growth and development, including inhibition of root elongation and seed germination. We performed an ABA resistance screen to identify factors required for ABA response in root elongation inhibition. We identified two classes of Arabidopsis thaliana AR mutants that displayed ABA-resistant root elongation: those that displayed resistance to ABA in both root elongation and seed germination and those that displayed resistance to ABA in root elongation but not in seed germination. We used PCR-based genotyping to identify a mutation in ABA INSENSITIVE2 (ABI2), positional information to identify mutations in AUXIN RESISTANT1 (AUX1) and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2), and whole genome sequencing to identify mutations in AUX1, AUXIN RESISTANT4 (AXR4), and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE ROOT1/PIN-FORMED2 (EIR1/PIN2). Identification of auxin and ethylene response mutants among our isolates suggested that auxin and ethylene responsiveness were required for ABA inhibition of root elongation. To further our understanding of auxin/ethylene/ABA crosstalk, we examined ABA responsiveness of double mutants of ethylene overproducer1 (eto1) or ein2 combined with auxin-resistant mutants and found that auxin and ethylene likely operate in a linear pathway to affect ABA-responsive inhibition of root elongation, whereas these two hormones likely act independently to affect ABA-responsive inhibition of seed germination.

  15. The Role of Circulating Amino Acids in the Hypothalamic Regulation of Liver Glucose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Arrieta-Cruz, Isabel; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Roger

    2016-07-01

    A pandemic of diabetes and obesity has been developing worldwide in close association with excessive nutrient intake and a sedentary lifestyle. Variations in the protein content of the diet have a direct impact on glucose homeostasis because amino acids (AAs) are powerful modulators of insulin action. In this work we review our recent findings on how elevations in the concentration of the circulating AAs leucine and proline activate a metabolic mechanism located in the mediobasal hypothalamus of the brain that sends a signal to the liver via the vagus nerve, which curtails glucose output. This neurogenic signal is strictly dependent on the metabolism of leucine and proline to acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and the subsequent production of malonyl-CoA; the signal also requires functional neuronal ATP-sensitive potassium channels. The liver then responds by lowering the rate of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, ultimately leading to a net decrease in glucose production and in concentrations of circulating glucose. Furthermore, we review here how our work with proline suggests a new role of astrocytes in the central regulation of glycemia. Last, we outline how factors such as the consumption of fat-rich diets can interfere with glucoregulatory mechanisms and, in the long term, may contribute to the development of hyperglycemia, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27422516

  16. Gibberelic acid and cGMP-dependent transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, René; Dawe, Adam; Meier, Stuart; Ludidi, Ndiko; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2010-01-01

    An ever increasing amount of transcriptomic data and analysis tools provide novel insight into complex responses of biological systems. Given these resources we have undertaken to review aspects of transcriptional regulation in response to the plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA) and its second messenger guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) in Arabidopsis thaliana, both wild type and selected mutants. Evidence suggests enrichment of GA-responsive (GARE ) elements in promoters of genes that are transcriptionally upregulated in response to cGMP but downregulated in a GA insensitive mutant (ga1-3). In contrast, in the genes upregulated in the mutant, no enrichment in the GARE is observed suggesting that GARE motifs are diagnostic for GA-induced and cGMP-dependent transcriptional upregulation. Further, we review how expression studies of GA-dependent transcription factors and transcriptional networks based on common promoter signatures derived from ab initio analyses can contribute to our understanding of plant responses at the systems level. PMID:20118660

  17. Avian prostatic acid phosphatase: estrogen regulation in the oviduct and epithelial cell-derived ovarian carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hyocheol; Lim, Whasun; Bae, Seung-Min; Bazer, Fuller W; Choi, Youngsok; Song, Gwonhwa

    2014-07-01

    Prostatic acid phosphatase (ACPP) is a glycoprotein that is mainly synthesized and secreted by glandular epithelial cells (GE) of the prostate, and it is well known as a biomarker for prostate cancer. Although ACPP was used as prognostic/diagnostic indicator and studied to elucidate regulatory mechanism(s) during several decades in humans, its role is not clearly understood. Gene profiling data using a chicken DNA microarray revealed that ACPP increased significantly during remodeling and recrudescence of the oviduct in response to estrogen. Thus, in this study, we investigated the expression and hormonal regulation of ACPP gene in the reproductive tracts of chickens. ACPP was specifically detected in the luminal cells (LE) and GE of chicken oviduct, and diethylstilbestrol (a synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen) stimulated its expression during development of the oviduct. In addition, ACPP mRNA and protein were localized to LE and GE during the regeneration phase of the oviduct of laying hens during induced molting. Furthermore, ACPP mRNA and protein were abundant in GE of ovarian carcinoma, but not in normal ovaries. Moreover, strong expression of ACPP protein was detected in epithelial cells of cancerous ovaries from women. Collectively, results of the present study are the first to show that ACPP is a novel estrogen-stimulated gene in the oviductal epithelial cells of the chicken and that its expression increases significantly in epithelial cells of ovarian carcinoma, which indicates that it may be a candidate biomarker for diagnosis of epithelia-derived ovarian cancer in women. PMID:24829029

  18. Regulation of Leaf Starch Degradation by Abscisic Acid Is Important for Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Thalmann, Matthias; Pazmino, Diana; Seung, David; Horrer, Daniel; Nigro, Arianna; Meier, Tiago; Kölling, Katharina; Pfeifhofer, Hartwig W; Zeeman, Samuel C; Santelia, Diana

    2016-08-01

    Starch serves functions that range over a timescale of minutes to years, according to the cell type from which it is derived. In guard cells, starch is rapidly mobilized by the synergistic action of β-AMYLASE1 (BAM1) and α-AMYLASE3 (AMY3) to promote stomatal opening. In the leaves, starch typically accumulates gradually during the day and is degraded at night by BAM3 to support heterotrophic metabolism. During osmotic stress, starch is degraded in the light by stress-activated BAM1 to release sugar and sugar-derived osmolytes. Here, we report that AMY3 is also involved in stress-induced starch degradation. Recently isolated Arabidopsis thaliana amy3 bam1 double mutants are hypersensitive to osmotic stress, showing impaired root growth. amy3 bam1 plants close their stomata under osmotic stress at similar rates as the wild type but fail to mobilize starch in the leaves. (14)C labeling showed that amy3 bam1 plants have reduced carbon export to the root, affecting osmolyte accumulation and root growth during stress. Using genetic approaches, we further demonstrate that abscisic acid controls the activity of BAM1 and AMY3 in leaves under osmotic stress through the AREB/ABF-SnRK2 kinase-signaling pathway. We propose that differential regulation and isoform subfunctionalization define starch-adaptive plasticity, ensuring an optimal carbon supply for continued growth under an ever-changing environment. PMID:27436713

  19. Search for an optimized cyclic charging algorithm for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. F.; Sexton, E. D.; Olson, J. B.; Keyser, M.; Pesaran, A.

    Valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries are characterized by relatively poor performance in cyclic applications of the order of two hundred to three hundred 100% depth-of-discharge (DoD) cycles. Failure is due to sulfation of the negative plate and softening of the positive active-material. It is felt that this failure mode arises from abnormally high levels of oxygen recombination that arise due to decreases in separator saturation levels as VRLA batteries age. Charging algorithms have been developed to address this changing condition throughout life. The key step is the finish of charge where, traditionally, low currents and low overcharge limits have been employed with poor results. It has been found that using high finishing currents in an alternating charge-rest algorithm results in proper recharge of the negative plate without creating unacceptable temperature increases. This has resulted in deep-discharge lifetimes of 800 to 1000 cycles, particularly when using a charging algorithm employing only partial recharges (97-100% return) interspersed with full conditioning recharges every 10th cycle. With such minimal average overcharge levels, deep-cycle lifetimes approaching 1000 cycles have been achieved without experiencing failure due to massive grid corrosion.

  20. Nolz1 promotes striatal neurogenesis through the regulation of retinoic acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nolz1 is a zinc finger transcription factor whose expression is enriched in the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE), although its function is still unknown. Results Here we analyze the role of Nolz1 during LGE development. We show that Nolz1 expression is high in proliferating neural progenitor cells (NPCs) of the LGE subventricular zone. In addition, low levels of Nolz1 are detected in the mantle zone, as well as in the adult striatum. Similarly, Nolz1 is highly expressed in proliferating LGE-derived NPC cultures, but its levels rapidly decrease upon cell differentiation, pointing to a role of Nolz1 in the control of NPC proliferation and/or differentiation. In agreement with this hypothesis, we find that Nolz1 over-expression promotes cell cycle exit of NPCs in neurosphere cultures and negatively regulates proliferation in telencephalic organotypic cultures. Within LGE primary cultures, Nolz1 over-expression promotes the acquisition of a neuronal phenotype, since it increases the number of β-III tubulin (Tuj1)- and microtubule-associated protein (MAP)2-positive neurons, and inhibits astrocyte generation and/or differentiation. Retinoic acid (RA) is one of the most important morphogens involved in striatal neurogenesis, and regulates Nolz1 expression in different systems. Here we show that Nolz1 also responds to this morphogen in E12.5 LGE-derived cell cultures. However, Nolz1 expression is not regulated by RA in E14.5 LGE-derived cell cultures, nor is it affected during LGE development in mouse models that present decreased RA levels. Interestingly, we find that Gsx2, which is necessary for normal RA signaling during LGE development, is also required for Nolz1 expression, which is lost in Gsx2 knockout mice. These findings suggest that Nolz1 might act downstream of Gsx2 to regulate RA-induced neurogenesis. Keeping with this hypothesis, we show that Nolz1 induces the selective expression of the RA receptor (RAR)β without altering RARα or RARγ. In

  1. Down-regulation of crambe fatty acid desaturase and elongase in Arabidopsis and crambe resulted in significantly increased oleic acid content in seed oil.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueyuan; Mei, Desheng; Liu, Qing; Fan, Jing; Singh, Surinder; Green, Allan; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Zhu, Li-Hua

    2016-01-01

    High oleic oil is an important industrial feedstock that has been one of the main targets for oil improvement in a number of oil crops. Crambe (Crambe abyssinica) is a dedicated oilseed crop, suitable for industrial oil production. In this study, we down-regulated the crambe fatty acid desaturase (FAD) and fatty acid elongase (FAE) genes for creating high oleic seed oil. We first cloned the crambe CaFAD2, CaFAD3 and CaFAE1 genes. Multiple copies of each of these genes were isolated, and the highly homologous sequences were used to make RNAi constructs. These constructs were first tested in Arabidopsis, which led to the elevated oleic or linoleic levels depending on the genes targeted, indicating that the RNAi constructs were effective in regulating the expression of the target genes in nonidentical but closely related species. Furthermore, down-regulation of CaFAD2 and CaFAE1 in crambe with the FAD2-FAE1 RNAi vector resulted in even more significant increase in oleic acid level in the seed oil with up to 80% compared to 13% for wild type. The high oleic trait has been stable in subsequent five generations and the GM line grew normally in greenhouse. This work has demonstrated the great potential of producing high oleic oil in crambe, thus contributing to its development into an oil crop platform for industrial oil production.

  2. Down-regulation of malignant potential by alpha linolenic acid in human and mouse colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, John P; Moon, Hyun-Seuk

    2015-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (also called ω-3 fatty acis or n-3 fatty acid) are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with a double bond (C=C) at the third carbon atom from the end of the carbon chain. Numerous test tube and animal studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids may prevent or inhibit the growth of cancers, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids are important in cancer physiology. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is one of an essential omega-3 fatty acid and organic compound found in seeds (chia and flaxseed), nuts (notably walnuts), and many common vegetable oils. ALA has also been shown to down-regulate cell proliferation of prostate, breast, and bladder cancer cells. However, direct evidence that ALA suppresses to the development of colon cancer has not been studied. Also, no previous studies have evaluated whether ALA may regulate malignant potential (adhesion, invasion and colony formation) in colon cancer cells. In order to address the questions above, we conducted in vitro studies and evaluated whether ALA may down-regulate malignant potential in human (HT29 and HCT116) and mouse (MCA38) colon cancer cell lines. We observed that treatment with 1-5 mM of ALA inhibits cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion in both human and mouse colon cancer cell lines. Interestingly, we observed that ALA did not decrease total colony numbers when compared to control. By contrast, we found that size of colony was significantly changed by ALA treatment when compared to control in all colon cancer cell lines. We suggest that our data enhance our current knowledge of ALA's mechanism and provide crucial information to further the development of new therapies for the management or chemoprevention of colon cancer.

  3. The antagonistic regulation of abscisic acid-inhibited root growth by brassinosteroids is partially mediated via direct suppression of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 5 expression by BRASSINAZOLE RESISTANT 1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaorui; Bai, Yang; Shang, Jianxiu; Xin, Ruijiao; Tang, Wenqiang

    2016-09-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) and abscisic acid (ABA) are plant hormones that antagonistically regulate many aspects of plant growth and development; however, the mechanisms that regulate the crosstalk of these two hormones are still not well understood. BRs regulate plant growth and development by activating BRASSINAZOLE RESISTANT 1 (BZR1) family transcription factors. Here we show that the crosstalk between BRs and ABA signalling is partially mediated by BZR1 regulated gene expression. bzr1-1D is a dominant mutant with enhanced BR signalling; our results showed that bzr1-1D mutant is less sensitive to ABA-inhibited primary root growth. By RNA sequencing, a subset of BZR1 regulated ABA-responsive root genes were identified. Of these genes, the expression of a major ABA signalling component ABA INSENSITIVE 5 (ABI5) was found to be suppressed by BR and by BZR1. Additional evidences showed that BZR1 could bind strongly with several G-box cis-elements in the promoter of ABI5, suppress the expression of ABI5 and make plants less sensitive to ABA. Our study demonstrated that ABI5 is a direct target gene of BZR1, and modulating the expression of ABI5 by BZR1 plays important roles in regulating the crosstalk between the BR and ABA signalling pathways.

  4. Ozone-induced changes in the expression of the genes encoding regulatory enzymes for polyamine, ethylene and phenylpropanoid metabolisms in ozone tolerant and sensitive birch (Betula pendula Roth) clones

    SciTech Connect

    Talvinen, J.; Pellinen, R.; Eloranta, T.; Kangasjaervi, J. ); Julkunen-Tiitto, R. ); Karjalainen, R. )

    1993-05-01

    Increase in the atmospheric ozone concentration has been shown to affect plant growth in several ways; from decreased photosynthetic activity to visible dames and in some extreme situations even to tissue death. Plants protect themselves from the damaging effect of ozone by inducing several physiological reactions. For example, increases in ethylene production, polyamine and phenylpropanoid synthesis have been observed in stress reaction induced by increased atmospheric ozone. similar changes, which are often called general stress reactions, are induced by several other biotic and which are often called general stress reactions, are induced by several other biontic and abiotic factors, e.g., plant pathogens. It has been shown previously that the production of stress ethylene can partly be responsible for the ozone damage formation in plants. Induction of stress-polyamine synthesis can prevent ethylene formation and is higher in some ozone-tolerant plants. We have exposed ozone sensitive and resistant birch clones to ozone (150 ppb. 8 hours) to analyze ozone-induced changes in the phenylpropanoid and polyamine metabolisms and gene expression. The polyamine and phenylpropanoid contents of the experimental material are currently being analyzed and the results will be presented. We have also cloned by PCR gene probes for birch ACC-synthase, arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and phenylalanine ammoniumlyase (PAL) genes. Results will be presented where the probes have been used to analyze ozone-induced expression of the genes in the birch clones.

  5. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Mohedano, Maria L; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation. PMID:27610104

  6. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Mohedano, Maria L.; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M.; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation. PMID:27610104

  7. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Mohedano, Maria L.; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M.; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation.

  8. Sucrose Loading in Isolated Veins of Pisum sativum: Regulation by Abscisic Acid, Gibberellic Acid, and Cell Turgor.

    PubMed

    Estruch, J J; Peretó, J G; Vercher, Y; Beltrán, J P

    1989-09-01

    Enzymatically isolated vein networks from mature pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) leaves were employed to investigate the properties of sucrose loading and the effect of phytohormones and cell turgor on this process. The sucrose uptake showed two components: a saturable and a first-order kinetics system. The high affinity system (K(m), 3.3 millimolar) was located at the plasmalemma (p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and orthovanadate sensitivity). Further characterization of this system, including pH dependence and effects of energy metabolism inhibitors, supported the H(+)-sugar symport concept for sucrose loading. Within a physiological range (0.1-100 micromolar) and after 90 min, abscisic acid (ABA) inhibited and gibberellic acid (GA(3)) promoted 1 millimolar sucrose uptake. These responses were partially (ABA) or totally (GA(3)) turgor-dependent. In experiments of combined hormonal treatments, ABA counteracted the GA(3) positive effects on sucrose uptake. The abolishment of these responses by p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and experiments on proton flux suggest that both factors (cell turgor and hormones) are modulating the H(+) ATPase plasmalemma activity. The results are discussed in terms of their physiological relevance. PMID:16667007

  9. Regulation of adipose branched chain amino acid catabolism enzyme expression and cross-adipose amino acid flux in human obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated blood branched chain amino acids (BCAA) are often associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. One possibility is that under these conditions there is a reduced cellular utilization and/or lower complete oxidation of BCAAs. White adipose tissue (WAT) has become appreciated as a...

  10. Progesterone regulates chicken embryonic germ cell meiotic initiation independent of retinoic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Mi, Yuling; He, Bin; Li, Jian; Zhang, Caiqiao

    2014-07-15

    The signaling molecule retinoic acid (RA) is known to trigger germ cells to enter meiosis. However, RA may not be the only secreted inducer of meiosis. Our previous data indicate that luteinizing hormone also promotes germ cell meiotic initiation by upregulating 3βHSDII transcription. Here, using chicken embryos, we investigate the role of progesterone (P4) in regulating germ cell meiotic initiation. Progesterone treatment at embryonic Day 9.5 accelerated germ cell meiosis entry in the female chicken embryos. However, P4 treatment in vivo did no influence on testicular germ cells but triggered their meiotic initiation in the cultured testes. As treatment with an RA receptor (RAR) inhibitor did not block the stimulatory effect of P4 on germ cell meiotic initiation, this P4 stimulatory effect seems to be independent of RAR-mediated signaling. The abundance of RA metabolism-related enzymes and RAR (RARβ) mRNAs did not differ significantly between P4-treated and control individuals. The RA concentration in the ovaries remained unchanged by P4 treatment in vivo. Because no inhibition by the P4 receptor (PR) nuclear receptor antagonist mifepristone on P4 effect was observed in either in vitro or in vivo experiments, the effect of P4 on germ cell meiotic initiation is probably mediated by membrane PRs (mPR). The mPRα, mPRβ, and mPRγ mRNAs were all expressed in the embryonic ovaries. The expression of mPRα and mPRβ was higher than that of mPRγ. Immunohistochemical results showed that mPRα-positive cells were mainly scattered in the ovarian cortex area where most germ cells were distributed. The mPRβ-positive cells were widely distributed in the ovaries, and positive cells were clustered with a similar morphology to that of germ cell clusters. In conclusion, P4 may regulate embryonic germ cell meiotic initiation independent of RA signaling through the membrane PRs. This study provides a new insight into the mechanisms of germ cell meiotic initiation in the chicken

  11. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  12. Differential 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine-mediated regulation of uncoupling protein 3 transcription: role of Fatty acids.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Pieter; Feola, Anna; Ragni, Maurizio; Senese, Rosalba; Moreno, Maria; Lombardi, Assunta; Silvestri, Elena; Amat, Ramon; Villarroya, Francesc; Goglia, Fernando; Lanni, Antonia

    2007-08-01

    T(3) regulates energy metabolism by stimulating metabolic rate and decreasing metabolic efficiency. The discovery of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3), its homology to UCP1, and regulation by T(3) rendered it a possible molecular determinant of the action of T(3) on energy metabolism, but data are controversial. This controversy may in part be attributable to discrepancies observed between the regulation by T(3) of UCP3 expression in rats, humans, and mice. To clarify this issue, we studied 1) the induction kinetics of the UCP3 gene by T(3) in rat skeletal muscle, 2) the influence of fatty acids, and 3) the structure and regulation of the various UCP3 promoters by T(3). Within 8 h of single-dose T(3) administration, hypothyroid rats showed a rise in serum fatty acid levels concomitant with a rapid increase in UCP3 expression in gastrocnemius muscle, followed by inductions of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (PPARdelta) (within 24 h) and PPAR target gene expression (after 24 h). This T(3)-induced early UCP3 expression depended on fatty acid-PPAR signaling because depleting serum fatty acid levels abolished its expression, restorable by administration of the PPARdelta agonist L165,041 (4-[3-(4-acetyl-3-hydroxy-2-propylphenoxy)propoxy]phenoxy]acetic acid). In transfected rat L6 myoblasts, only the rat UCP3 promoter positively responded to T(3) and L165,041 together in the presence of MyoD, thyroid hormone receptor beta1 (TRbeta1), PPARdelta, or PPARdelta plus the TR dimerization partner retinoid X receptor alpha. All promoters share a response element common to TR and PPAR (TRE 1), but the observed species differences may be attributable to different localizations of the MyoD response element, which in the rat maps to exon 1.

  13. Capric Acid Up-Regulates UCP3 Expression without PDK4 Induction in Mouse C2C12 Myotubes.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tomoki; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Kohno, Shohei; Tomida, Chisato; Haruna, Marie; Uchida, Takayuki; Ohno, Ayako; Oarada, Motoko; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada; Okumura, Yuushi; Choi, Inho; Aoyama, Toshiaki; Terao, Junji; Nikawa, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) in skeletal muscle are key regulators of the glucose and lipid metabolic processes that are involved in insulin resistance. Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) have anti-obesogenic effects in rodents and humans, while long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) cause increases in body weight and insulin resistance. To clarify the beneficial effects of MCFAs, we examined UCP3 and PDK4 expression in skeletal muscles of mice fed a MCFA- or LCFA-enriched high-fat diet (HFD). Five-week feeding of the LCFA-enriched HFD caused high body weight gain and induced glucose intolerance in mice, compared with those in mice fed the MCFA-enriched HFD. However, the amounts of UCP3 and PDK4 transcripts in the skeletal muscle of mice fed the MCFA- or LCFA-enriched HFD were similar. To further elucidate the specific effects of MCFAs, such as capric acid (C10:0), on lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles, we examined the effects of various FAs on expression of UCP3 and PDK4, in mouse C2C12 myocytes. Although palmitic acid (C16:0) and lauric acid (C12:0) significantly induced expression of both UCP3 and PDK4, capric acid (C10:0) upregulated only UCP3 expression via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ. Furthermore, palmitic acid (C16:0) disturbed the insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt, while MCFAs, including lauric (C12:0), capric (C10:0), and caprylic acid (C12:0), did not. These results suggest that capric acid (C10:0) increases the capacity for fatty acid oxidation without inhibiting glycolysis in skeletal muscle. PMID:27117849

  14. Differential Regulation of ABCA1 and Macrophage Cholesterol Efflux By Elaidic and Oleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Fei; Ford, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Trans fatty acid consumption is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. This increased risk has been attributed to decreased levels of HDL cholesterol and increased levels of LDL cholesterol. However, the mechanism by which trans fatty acid modulates cholesterol transit remains poorly defined. ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1)-mediated macrophage cholesterol efflux is the rate-limiting step initiating apolipoprotein A-I lipidation. In this study, elaidic acid, the most abundant trans fatty acid in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil, was shown to stabilize macrophage ABCA1 protein levels in comparison to that of its cis fatty acid isomer, oleic acid. The mechanism responsible for the disparate effects of oleic and elaidic acid on ABCA1 levels was through accelerated ABCA1 protein degradation in cells treated with oleic acid. In contrast, no apparent differences were observed in ABCA1 mRNA levels, and only minor changes were observed in Liver X receptor/Retinoic X receptor promoter activity in cells treated with elaidic and oleic acid. Efflux of both tracers and cholesterol mass revealed that elaidic acid slightly increased ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux, while oleic acid led to decreased ABCA1-mediated efflux. In conclusion, these studies sho that cis and trans structural differences in eighteen carbon n-9 monoenoic fatty acids variably impact cholesterol efflux through disparate effects on ABCA1 protein degradation. PMID:23800855

  15. Regulation of Chlamydia psittaci (strain guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis) growth in McCoy cells by amino acid antagonism.

    PubMed

    Coles, A M; Pearce, J H

    1987-03-01

    Chlamydiae have amino acid requirements for growth in tissue culture as defined by those amino acids whose individual omission from the growth medium prevents chlamydial multiplication. We have tested the hypothesis that this inhibition of growth arises as a result of antagonism between particular amino acids such that inhibition occurs when the concentration of one amino acid is reduced in the presence of the antagonist amino acid at high concentration. Using the Chlamydia psittaci strain guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC), in the presence of cycloheximide, the requirement for valine was abrogated by the simultaneous omission of isoleucine, that for phenylalanine by simultaneous omission of tryptophan and that for leucine by simultaneous omission of isoleucine plus valine. The antagonism shown between leucine and isoleucine plus valine appears to be unique among bacteria. In the absence of cycloheximide, GPIC had an additional need for tryptophan, tyrosine and isoleucine; these amino acid requirements were shown for both infected McCoy, HeLa and BHK cells. The results are consistent with a mechanism for regulation of parasite growth which depends on the balance of amino acid concentrations in the extracellular environment.

  16. Rosmarinic acid is a homoserine lactone mimic produced by plants that activates a bacterial quorum-sensing regulator.

    PubMed

    Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Ortega, Alvaro; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-05

    Quorum sensing is a bacterial communication mechanism that controls genes, enabling bacteria to live as communities, such as biofilms. Homoserine lactone (HSL) molecules function as quorum-sensing signals for Gram-negative bacteria. Plants also produce previously unidentified compounds that affect quorum sensing. We identified rosmarinic acid as a plant-derived compound that functioned as an HSL mimic. In vitro assays showed that rosmarinic acid bound to the quorum-sensing regulator RhlR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and competed with the bacterial ligand N-butanoyl-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL). Furthermore, rosmarinic acid stimulated a greater increase in RhlR-mediated transcription in vitro than that of C4-HSL. In P. aeruginosa, rosmarinic acid induced quorum sensing-dependent gene expression and increased biofilm formation and the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and elastase. Because P. aeruginosa PAO1 infection induces rosmarinic acid secretion from plant roots, our results indicate that rosmarinic acid secretion is a plant defense mechanism to stimulate a premature quorum-sensing response. P. aeruginosa is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects plants and animals; therefore, identification of rosmarinic acid as an inducer of premature quorum-sensing responses may be useful in agriculture and inform human therapeutic strategies.

  17. In vivo regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in Rhizopus oryzae to improve L-lactic acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Thitiprasert, Sitanan; Sooksai, Sarintip; Thongchul, Nuttha

    2011-08-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is becoming more important due to its ability to produce an optically pure L: -lactic acid. However, fermentation by Rhizopus usually suffers from low yield because of production of ethanol as a byproduct. Limiting ethanol production in living immobilized R. oryzae by inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was observed in shake flask fermentation. The effects of ADH inhibitors added into the medium on the regulation of ADH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as the production of cell biomass, lactic acid, and ethanol were elucidated. 1,2-diazole and 2,2,2-trifluroethanol were found to be the effective inhibitors used in this study. The highest lactic acid yield of 0.47 g/g glucose was obtained when 0.01 mM 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol was present during the production phase of the pregrown R. oryzae. This represents about 38% increase in yield as compared with that from the simple glucose fermentation. Fungal metabolism was suppressed when iodoacetic acid, N-ethylmaleimide, 4,4'-dithiodipyridine, or 4-hydroxymercury benzoic acid were present. Dramatic increase in ADH and LDH activities but slight change in product yields might be explained by the inhibitors controlling enzyme activities at the pyruvate branch point. This showed that in living R. oryzae, the inhibitors regulated the flux through the related pathways. PMID:21416338

  18. In vivo regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in Rhizopus oryzae to improve L-lactic acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Thitiprasert, Sitanan; Sooksai, Sarintip; Thongchul, Nuttha

    2011-08-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is becoming more important due to its ability to produce an optically pure L: -lactic acid. However, fermentation by Rhizopus usually suffers from low yield because of production of ethanol as a byproduct. Limiting ethanol production in living immobilized R. oryzae by inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was observed in shake flask fermentation. The effects of ADH inhibitors added into the medium on the regulation of ADH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as the production of cell biomass, lactic acid, and ethanol were elucidated. 1,2-diazole and 2,2,2-trifluroethanol were found to be the effective inhibitors used in this study. The highest lactic acid yield of 0.47 g/g glucose was obtained when 0.01 mM 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol was present during the production phase of the pregrown R. oryzae. This represents about 38% increase in yield as compared with that from the simple glucose fermentation. Fungal metabolism was suppressed when iodoacetic acid, N-ethylmaleimide, 4,4'-dithiodipyridine, or 4-hydroxymercury benzoic acid were present. Dramatic increase in ADH and LDH activities but slight change in product yields might be explained by the inhibitors controlling enzyme activities at the pyruvate branch point. This showed that in living R. oryzae, the inhibitors regulated the flux through the related pathways.

  19. Ursolic acid regulates aging process through enhancing of metabolic sensor proteins level.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Soroush Alaghehband; Bakhtiari, Nuredin

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that Ursolic Acid (UA) ameliorates skeletal muscle performance through satellite cells proliferation and cellular energy status. In studying the potential role of the hypothalamus in aging, we developed a strategy to pursue UA effects on the hypothalamus anti-aging proteins such as; SIRT1, SIRT6, PGC-1β and α-Klotho. In this study, we used a model of aging animals (C57BL/6). UA dissolved in Corn oil (20mg/ml) and then administrated (200mg/Kg i.p injection) to mice, twice daily for 7days. After treatment times, the mice perfused and the hypothalamus isolated for preparing of tissue to Immunofluorescence microscopy. The data illustrated that UA significantly increased SIRT1 (∼3.5±0.3 folds) and SIRT-6 (∼1.5±0.2 folds) proteins overexpression (P<0.001). In addition, our results showed that UA enhanced α-Klotho (∼3.3±0.3) and PGC-1β (∼2.6±0.2 folds) proteins levels (P<0. 01). In this study, data were analyzed using SPSS 16 (ANOVA test). To the best of our knowledge, it seems that UA through enhancing of anti-aging biomarkers (SIRT1 and SIRT6) and PGC-1β in hypothalamus regulates aging-process and attenuates mitochondrial-related diseases. In regard to the key role of α-Klotho in aging, our data indicate that UA may be on the horizon to forestall diseases of aging. PMID:27470332

  20. PLZF is a negative regulator of retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Perrine J; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Background Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors controlling cellular proliferation and differentiation. Receptor-interacting proteins such as corepressors and coactivators play a crucial role in specifying the overall transcriptional activity of the receptor in response to ligand treatment. Little is known however on how receptor activity is controlled by intermediary factors which interact with RARs in a ligand-independent manner. Results We have identified the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF), a transcriptional corepressor, to be a RAR-interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid assay. We confirmed this interaction by GST-pull down assays and show that the PLZF N-terminal zinc finger domain is necessary and sufficient for PLZF to bind RAR. The RAR ligand binding domain displayed the highest affinity for PLZF, but corepressor and coactivator binding interfaces did not contribute to PLZF recruitment. The interaction was ligand-independent and correlated to a decreased transcriptional activity of the RXR-RAR heterodimer upon overexpression of PLZF. A similar transcriptional interference could be observed with the estrogen receptor alpha and the glucocorticoid receptor. We further show that PLZF is likely to act by preventing RXR-RAR heterodimerization, both in-vitro and in intact cells. Conclusion Thus RAR and PLZF interact physically and functionally. Intriguingly, these two transcription factors play a determining role in hematopoiesis and regionalization of the hindbrain and may, upon chromosomal translocation, form fusion proteins. Our observations therefore define a novel mechanism by which RARs activity may be controlled. PMID:14521715

  1. Identification of RALDH2 as a Visually Regulated Retinoic Acid Synthesizing Enzyme in the Chick Choroid

    PubMed Central

    Hollaway, Lindsey R.; Lam, Wengtse; Li, Nan; Napoli, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) has been implicated in the local regulation of scleral proteoglycan synthesis in vivo. The purpose of the present study was to identify the enzymes involved in the synthesis of atRA during visually guided ocular growth, the cells involved in modulation of atRA biosynthesis in the choroid, and the effect of choroid-derived atRA on scleral proteoglycan synthesis. Methods. Myopia was induced in White leghorn chicks by form deprivation for 10 days, followed by up to 15 days of unrestricted vision (recovery). Expression of atRA synthesizing enzymes was evaluated by semiquantitative qRT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. atRA synthesis was measured in organ cultures of isolated choroids using LC-tandem MS quantification. Scleral proteoglycan synthesis was measured in vitro by the incorporation of 35SO4 in CPC-precipitable glycosaminoglycans. Results. RALDH2 was the predominant RALDH transcript in the choroid (>100-fold that of RALDH3). RALDH2 mRNA was elevated after 12 and 24 hours of recovery (60% and 188%, respectively; P < 0.01). The atRA concentration was significantly higher in cultures of choroids from 24-hour to 15-day recovering eyes than in paired controls (∼195%; P < 0.01). Choroid conditioned medium from recovering choroids inhibited proteoglycan synthesis to 43% of controls (P < 0.02, paired t-test; n = 16) and produced a relative inhibition corresponding to a RA concentration of 7.20 × 10−8 M. Conclusions. The results of this study suggest that RALDH2 is the major retinal dehydrogenase in the chick choroid and is responsible for increased atRA synthesis in response to myopic defocus. PMID:22323456

  2. The Role of Sirt1 in Bile Acid Regulation during Calorie Restriction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Cui, Julia Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) is an NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that is proposed to mediate many health-promoting effects of calorie restriction (CR). We recently reported that short-term CR increased the bile acid (BA) pool size in mice, likely due to increased BA synthesis in liver. Given the important role of Sirt1 in the regulation of glucose, lipid, as well as BA metabolism, we hypothesized that the CR-induced increase in BAs is Sirt1-dependent. To address this, the present study utilized genetically-modified mice that were Sirt1 loss of function (liver knockout, LKO) or Sirt1 gain of function (whole body-transgenic, TG). Three genotypes of mice (Sirt1-LKO, wild-type, and Sirt1-TG) were each randomly divided into ad libitum or 40% CR feeding for one month. BAs were extracted from various compartments of the enterohepatic circulation, followed by BA profiling by UPLC-MS/MS. CR increased the BA pool size and total BAs in serum, gallbladder, and small intestine. The CR-induced increase in BA pool size correlated with the tendency of increase in the expression of the rate-limiting BA-synthetic enzyme Cyp7a1. However, in contrast to the hypothesis, the CR-induced increase in BA pool size and Cyp7a1 expression was still observed with ablated expression of Sirt1 in liver, and completely suppressed with whole-body overexpression of Sirt1. Furthermore, in terms of BA composition, CR increased the ratio of 12α-hydroxylated BAs regardless of Sirt1 genotypes. In conclusion, the CR-induced alterations in BA pool size, BA profiles, and expression of BA-related genes do not appear to be dependent on Sirt1.

  3. The Role of Sirt1 in Bile Acid Regulation during Calorie Restriction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Cui, Julia Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) is an NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that is proposed to mediate many health-promoting effects of calorie restriction (CR). We recently reported that short-term CR increased the bile acid (BA) pool size in mice, likely due to increased BA synthesis in liver. Given the important role of Sirt1 in the regulation of glucose, lipid, as well as BA metabolism, we hypothesized that the CR-induced increase in BAs is Sirt1-dependent. To address this, the present study utilized genetically-modified mice that were Sirt1 loss of function (liver knockout, LKO) or Sirt1 gain of function (whole body-transgenic, TG). Three genotypes of mice (Sirt1-LKO, wild-type, and Sirt1-TG) were each randomly divided into ad libitum or 40% CR feeding for one month. BAs were extracted from various compartments of the enterohepatic circulation, followed by BA profiling by UPLC-MS/MS. CR increased the BA pool size and total BAs in serum, gallbladder, and small intestine. The CR-induced increase in BA pool size correlated with the tendency of increase in the expression of the rate-limiting BA-synthetic enzyme Cyp7a1. However, in contrast to the hypothesis, the CR-induced increase in BA pool size and Cyp7a1 expression was still observed with ablated expression of Sirt1 in liver, and completely suppressed with whole-body overexpression of Sirt1. Furthermore, in terms of BA composition, CR increased the ratio of 12α-hydroxylated BAs regardless of Sirt1 genotypes. In conclusion, the CR-induced alterations in BA pool size, BA profiles, and expression of BA-related genes do not appear to be dependent on Sirt1. PMID:26372644

  4. Ursolic acid regulates aging process through enhancing of metabolic sensor proteins level.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Soroush Alaghehband; Bakhtiari, Nuredin

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that Ursolic Acid (UA) ameliorates skeletal muscle performance through satellite cells proliferation and cellular energy status. In studying the potential role of the hypothalamus in aging, we developed a strategy to pursue UA effects on the hypothalamus anti-aging proteins such as; SIRT1, SIRT6, PGC-1β and α-Klotho. In this study, we used a model of aging animals (C57BL/6). UA dissolved in Corn oil (20mg/ml) and then administrated (200mg/Kg i.p injection) to mice, twice daily for 7days. After treatment times, the mice perfused and the hypothalamus isolated for preparing of tissue to Immunofluorescence microscopy. The data illustrated that UA significantly increased SIRT1 (∼3.5±0.3 folds) and SIRT-6 (∼1.5±0.2 folds) proteins overexpression (P<0.001). In addition, our results showed that UA enhanced α-Klotho (∼3.3±0.3) and PGC-1β (∼2.6±0.2 folds) proteins levels (P<0. 01). In this study, data were analyzed using SPSS 16 (ANOVA test). To the best of our knowledge, it seems that UA through enhancing of anti-aging biomarkers (SIRT1 and SIRT6) and PGC-1β in hypothalamus regulates aging-process and attenuates mitochondrial-related diseases. In regard to the key role of α-Klotho in aging, our data indicate that UA may be on the horizon to forestall diseases of aging.

  5. HBx regulates fatty acid oxidation to promote hepatocellular carcinoma survival during metabolic stress

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shuai; Zhang, Hui-Lu; Qin, Chen-Jie; Zhao, Ling-Hao; Fu, Gong-Bo; Zhou, Xu; Wang, Xian-Ming; Tang, Liang; Wen, Wen; Yang, Wen; Tang, Shan-Hua; Cao, Dan; Guo, Lin-Na; Zeng, Min; Wu, Meng-Chao; Yan, He-Xin; Wang, Hong-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Due to a high rate of nutrient consumption and inadequate vascularization, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells constantly undergo metabolic stress during tumor development. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of HBV-induced HCC. In this study, we investigated the functional roles of HBx in HCC adaptation to metabolic stress. Up-regulation of HBx increased the intracellular ATP and NADPH generation, and induced the resistance to glucose deprivation, whereas depletion of HBx via siRNA abolished these effects and conferred HCC cells sensitive to glucose restriction. Though HBx did not affect the glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation capacity of HCC cells under normal culture conditions, it facilitated fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in the absence of glucose, which maintained NADPH and ATP levels. Further investigation showed that HBx expression, under glucose deprivation, stimulated phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) via a calcium/CaMKK-dependent pathway, which was required for the activation of FAO. Conversely, inhibition of FAO by etomoxir (ETO) restored the sensitivity of HBx-expressing cells to glucose deficiency in vitro and retarded xenograft tumor formation in vivo. Finally, HBx-induced activation of the AMPK and FAO pathways were also observed in xenograft tumors and HBV-associated HCC specimens. Our data suggest that HBx plays a key role in the maintenance of redox and energy homeostasis by activating FAO, which is critical for HCC cell survival under conditions of metabolic stress and might be exploited for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26744319

  6. Neurotransmitters regulating acid secretion in the proventriculus of the Houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata): a morphological viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Mensah-Brown, E P; Lawrence, P A

    2001-05-01

    Endocrine cells containing somatostatin (Som), gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and nerve fibers containing choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), galanin (Gal), substance P (SP), and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) were immunolocalized in the proventriculus of the Houbara bustard, Chlamydotis undulata. While GRP-immunoreactive (GRP-IR) cells occur in the inner zone, somatostatin (Som-IR) and polyclonal nNOS (nNOS-IR) immunoreactive cells were localized mainly in the peripheral zone of submucosal glands. GRP-IR, Som-IR, and nNOS-IR cells were occasionally observed in the walls of the gastric glands. Endocrine cells are of the closed variety and usually possess apical processes extending along the basal surfaces of adjacent nonreactive cells. Ultrastructural features of these cells are typical. ChAT, Gal, SP, VIP, and TH were immunolocalized in nerve fibers and terminals in the walls of arterioles and capillaries at the periphery of submucosal glands. Immunoreactivity to monoclonal nNOS occurred mainly in neuronal cell bodies in ganglia located around the submucosal glands. ChAT and TH immunoreactive cell bodies were also occasionally seen around the submucosal glands in the peripheral region. Immunoreactivity to Gal, SP, and VIP, but not ChAT or TH, was discernible around the walls of gastric glands. It was concluded that the distribution of neurotransmitters in neuronal structures is similar, but that of the endocrine cells varies from that of some avian species. The roles of these neurotransmitters in the regulation of acid secretion are discussed.

  7. TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling is an essential positive regulator of the general amino acid control response and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Graef, Martin; Nunnari, Jodi; Powers, Ted

    2014-07-22

    The highly conserved Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a central regulator of cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrient availability. TOR functions in two structurally and functionally distinct complexes, TOR Complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR Complex 2 (TORC2). Through TORC1, TOR negatively regulates autophagy, a conserved process that functions in quality control and cellular homeostasis and, in this capacity, is part of an adaptive nutrient deprivation response. Here we demonstrate that during amino acid starvation TOR also operates independently as a positive regulator of autophagy through the conserved TORC2 and its downstream target protein kinase, Ypk1. Under these conditions, TORC2-Ypk1 signaling negatively regulates the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, to enable the activation of the amino acid-sensing eIF2α kinase, Gcn2, and to promote autophagy. Our work reveals that the TORC2 pathway regulates autophagy in an opposing manner to TORC1 to provide a tunable response to cellular metabolic status.

  8. The plastidial retrograde signal methyl erythritol cyclopyrophosphate is a regulator of salicylic acid and jasmonic acid crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Mark; Xiao, Yanmei; Bjornson, Marta; Wang, Jin-zheng; Hicks, Derrick; de Souza, Amancio; Wang, Chang-Quan; Yang, Panyu; Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2016-01-01

    The exquisite harmony between hormones and their corresponding signaling pathways is central to prioritizing plant responses to simultaneous and/or successive environmental trepidations. The crosstalk between jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) is an established effective mechanism that optimizes and tailors plant adaptive responses. However, the underlying regulatory modules of this crosstalk are largely unknown. Global transcriptomic analyses of mutant plants (ceh1) with elevated levels of the stress-induced plastidial retrograde signaling metabolite 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol cyclopyrophosphate (MEcPP) revealed robustly induced JA marker genes, expected to be suppressed by the presence of constitutively high SA levels in the mutant background. Analyses of a range of genotypes with varying SA and MEcPP levels established the selective role of MEcPP-mediated signal(s) in induction of JA-responsive genes in the presence of elevated SA. Metabolic profiling revealed the presence of high levels of the JA precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), but near wild type levels of JA in the ceh1 mutant plants. Analyses of coronatine-insensitive 1 (coi1)/ceh1 double mutant plants confirmed that the MEcPP-mediated induction is JA receptor COI1 dependent, potentially through elevated OPDA. These findings identify MEcPP as a previously unrecognized central regulatory module that induces JA-responsive genes in the presence of high SA, thereby staging a multifaceted plant response within the environmental context. PMID:26733689

  9. Transcriptomic analysis of Streptomyces clavuligerus ΔccaR::tsr: effects of the cephamycin C-clavulanic acid cluster regulator CcaR on global regulation.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Álvarez, R; Rodríguez-García, A; Santamarta, I; Pérez-Redondo, R; Prieto-Domínguez, A; Martínez-Burgo, Y; Liras, P

    2014-05-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064 and S. clavuligerus ΔccaR::tsr cultures were grown in asparagine-starch medium, and samples were taken in the exponential and stationary growth phases. Transcriptomic analysis showed that the expression of 186 genes was altered in the ccaR-deleted mutant. These genes belong to the cephamycin C gene cluster, clavulanic acid gene cluster, clavams, holomycin, differentiation, carbon, nitrogen, amino acids or phosphate metabolism and energy production. All the clavulanic acid biosynthesis genes showed Mc values in the order of -4.23. The blip gene-encoding a β-lactamase inhibitory protein was also controlled by the cephamycin C-clavulanic acid cluster regulator (Mc -2.54). The expression of the cephamycin C biosynthesis genes was greatly reduced in the mutant (Mc values up to -7.1), while the genes involved in putative β-lactam resistance were less affected (Mc averag