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Sample records for acid representation based

  1. Relationship of students' conceptual representations and problem-solving abilities in acid-base chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Angela R.

    2000-10-01

    This study explored the relationship between secondary chemistry students' conceptual representations of acid-base chemistry, as shown in student-constructed concept maps, and their ability to solve acid-base problems, represented by their score on an 18-item paper and pencil test, the Acid-Base Concept Assessment (ABCA). The ABCA, consisting of both multiple-choice and short-answer items, was originally designed using a question-type by subtopic matrix, validated by a panel of experts, and refined through pilot studies and factor analysis to create the final instrument. The concept map task included a short introduction to concept mapping, a prototype concept map, a practice concept-mapping activity, and the instructions for the acid-base concept map task. The instruments were administered to chemistry students at two high schools; 108 subjects completed both instruments for this study. Factor analysis of ABCA results indicated that the test was unifactorial for these students, despite the intention to create an instrument with multiple "question-type" scales. Concept maps were scored both holistically and by counting valid concepts. The two approaches were highly correlated (r = 0.75). The correlation between ABCA score and concept-map score was 0.29 for holistically-scored concept maps and 0.33 for counted-concept maps. Although both correlations were significant, they accounted for only 8.8 and 10.2% of variance in ABCA scores, respectively. However, when the reliability of the instruments used is considered, more than 20% of the variance in ABCA scores may be explained by concept map scores. MANOVAs for ABCA and concept map scores by instructor, student gender, and year in school showed significant differences for both holistic and counted concept-map scores. Discriminant analysis revealed that the source of these differences was the instruction variable. Significant differences between classes receiving different instruction were found in the frequency of

  2. XML-BASED REPRESENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. KELSEY

    2001-02-01

    For focused applications with limited user and use application communities, XML can be the right choice for representation. It is easy to use, maintain, and extend and enjoys wide support in commercial and research sectors. When the knowledge and information to be represented is object-based and use of that knowledge and information is a high priority, then XML-based representation should be considered. This paper discusses some of the issues involved in using XML-based representation and presents an example application that successfully uses an XML-based representation.

  3. DNA binding protein identification by combining pseudo amino acid composition and profile-based protein representation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Shanyi; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins play an important role in most cellular processes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient predictor for identifying DNA-binding proteins only based on the sequence information of proteins. The bottleneck for constructing a useful predictor is to find suitable features capturing the characteristics of DNA binding proteins. We applied PseAAC to DNA binding protein identification, and PseAAC was further improved by incorporating the evolutionary information by using profile-based protein representation. Finally, Combined with Support Vector Machines (SVMs), a predictor called iDNAPro-PseAAC was proposed. Experimental results on an updated benchmark dataset showed that iDNAPro-PseAAC outperformed some state-of-the-art approaches, and it can achieve stable performance on an independent dataset. By using an ensemble learning approach to incorporate more negative samples (non-DNA binding proteins) in the training process, the performance of iDNAPro-PseAAC was further improved. The web server of iDNAPro-PseAAC is available at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/iDNAPro-PseAAC/. PMID:26482832

  4. DNA binding protein identification by combining pseudo amino acid composition and profile-based protein representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Shanyi; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-10-01

    DNA-binding proteins play an important role in most cellular processes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient predictor for identifying DNA-binding proteins only based on the sequence information of proteins. The bottleneck for constructing a useful predictor is to find suitable features capturing the characteristics of DNA binding proteins. We applied PseAAC to DNA binding protein identification, and PseAAC was further improved by incorporating the evolutionary information by using profile-based protein representation. Finally, Combined with Support Vector Machines (SVMs), a predictor called iDNAPro-PseAAC was proposed. Experimental results on an updated benchmark dataset showed that iDNAPro-PseAAC outperformed some state-of-the-art approaches, and it can achieve stable performance on an independent dataset. By using an ensemble learning approach to incorporate more negative samples (non-DNA binding proteins) in the training process, the performance of iDNAPro-PseAAC was further improved. The web server of iDNAPro-PseAAC is available at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/iDNAPro-PseAAC/.

  5. On volume-source representations based on the representation theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, Mie; Kusakabe, Tetsuya; Kame, Nobuki; Kumagai, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    We discuss different ways to characterize a moment tensor associated with an actual volume change of ΔV C , which has been represented in terms of either the stress glut or the corresponding stress-free volume change ΔV T . Eshelby's virtual operation provides a conceptual model relating ΔV C to ΔV T and the stress glut, where non-elastic processes such as phase transitions allow ΔV T to be introduced and subsequent elastic deformation of - ΔV T is assumed to produce the stress glut. While it is true that ΔV T correctly represents the moment tensor of an actual volume source with volume change ΔV C , an explanation as to why such an operation relating ΔV C to ΔV T exists has not previously been given. This study presents a comprehensive explanation of the relationship between ΔV C and ΔV T based on the representation theorem. The displacement field is represented using Green's function, which consists of two integrals over the source surface: one for displacement and the other for traction. Both integrals are necessary for representing volumetric sources, whereas the representation of seismic faults includes only the first term, as the second integral over the two adjacent fault surfaces, across which the traction balances, always vanishes. Therefore, in a seismological framework, the contribution from the second term should be included as an additional surface displacement. We show that the seismic moment tensor of a volume source is directly obtained from the actual state of the displacement and stress at the source without considering any virtual non-elastic operations. A purely mathematical procedure based on the representation theorem enables us to specify the additional imaginary displacement necessary for representing a volume source only by the displacement term, which links ΔV C to ΔV T . It also specifies the additional imaginary stress necessary for representing a moment tensor solely by the traction term, which gives the "stress glut." The

  6. Unique graphical representation of protein sequences based on nucleotide triplet codons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Zupan, Jure; Balaban, Alexandru T.

    2004-10-01

    We consider a graphical representation of proteins as an alternative to the usual representation of proteins as a sequence listing the natural amino acids. The approach is based on a graphical representation of triplets of DNA in which the interior of a square or the interior of a tetrahedron is used to accommodate 64 sites for the 64 codons. By associating a zigzag curve and various matrices with a protein, just as was the case with graphical representation of DNA, one can construct selected invariants to serve as protein descriptors. The approach is illustrated on the A-chain of human insulin.

  7. Property-based sequence representations do not adequately encode local protein folding information.

    PubMed

    Solis, A D; Rackovsky, S

    2007-06-01

    We examine the informatic characteristics of amino acid representations based on physical properties. We demonstrate that sequences rewritten using contracted alphabets based on physical properties do not encode local folding information well. The best four-character alphabet can only encode approximately 57% of the maximum possible amount of structural information. This result suggests that property-based representations that operate on a local length scale are not likely to be useful in homology searches and fold-recognition exercises. PMID:17387739

  8. Facial expression recognition with facial parts based sparse representation classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Ruicong; Ruan, Qiuqi

    2009-10-01

    Facial expressions play important role in human communication. The understanding of facial expression is a basic requirement in the development of next generation human computer interaction systems. Researches show that the intrinsic facial features always hide in low dimensional facial subspaces. This paper presents facial parts based facial expression recognition system with sparse representation classifier. Sparse representation classifier exploits sparse representation to select face features and classify facial expressions. The sparse solution is obtained by solving l1 -norm minimization problem with constraint of linear combination equation. Experimental results show that sparse representation is efficient for facial expression recognition and sparse representation classifier obtain much higher recognition accuracies than other compared methods.

  9. Image inpainting based on sparse representations with a perceptual metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Takahiro; Haseyama, Miki

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents an image inpainting method based on sparse representations optimized with respect to a perceptual metric. In the proposed method, the structural similarity (SSIM) index is utilized as a criterion to optimize the representation performance of image data. Specifically, the proposed method enables the formulation of two important procedures in the sparse representation problem, 'estimation of sparse representation coefficients' and 'update of the dictionary', based on the SSIM index. Then, using the generated dictionary, approximation of target patches including missing areas via the SSIM-based sparse representation becomes feasible. Consequently, image inpainting for which procedures are totally derived from the SSIM index is realized. Experimental results show that the proposed method enables successful inpainting of missing areas.

  10. Improved Separability Criteria Based on Bloch Representation of Density Matrices.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shu-Qian; Yu, Juan; Li, Ming; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The correlation matrices or tensors in the Bloch representation of density matrices are encoded with entanglement properties. In this paper, based on the Bloch representation of density matrices, we give some new separability criteria for bipartite and multipartite quantum states. Theoretical analysis and some examples show that the proposed criteria can be more efficient than the previous related criteria. PMID:27350031

  11. Conditional Covariance-based Representation of Multidimensional Test Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolt, Daniel M.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a new nonparametric method for constructing a spatial representation of multidimensional test structure, the Conditional Covariance-based SCALing (CCSCAL) method. Describes an index to measure the accuracy of the representation. Uses simulation and real-life data analyses to show that the method provides a suitable approximation to…

  12. Improved Separability Criteria Based on Bloch Representation of Density Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shu-Qian; Yu, Juan; Li, Ming; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The correlation matrices or tensors in the Bloch representation of density matrices are encoded with entanglement properties. In this paper, based on the Bloch representation of density matrices, we give some new separability criteria for bipartite and multipartite quantum states. Theoretical analysis and some examples show that the proposed criteria can be more efficient than the previous related criteria. PMID:27350031

  13. Brain extraction based on locally linear representation-based classification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meiyan; Yang, Wei; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Yao; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Wufan; Feng, Qianjin

    2014-05-15

    Brain extraction is an important procedure in brain image analysis. Although numerous brain extraction methods have been presented, enhancing brain extraction methods remains challenging because brain MRI images exhibit complex characteristics, such as anatomical variability and intensity differences across different sequences and scanners. To address this problem, we present a Locally Linear Representation-based Classification (LLRC) method for brain extraction. A novel classification framework is derived by introducing the locally linear representation to the classical classification model. Under this classification framework, a common label fusion approach can be considered as a special case and thoroughly interpreted. Locality is important to calculate fusion weights for LLRC; this factor is also considered to determine that Local Anchor Embedding is more applicable in solving locally linear coefficients compared with other linear representation approaches. Moreover, LLRC supplies a way to learn the optimal classification scores of the training samples in the dictionary to obtain accurate classification. The International Consortium for Brain Mapping and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative databases were used to build a training dataset containing 70 scans. To evaluate the proposed method, we used four publicly available datasets (IBSR1, IBSR2, LPBA40, and ADNI3T, with a total of 241 scans). Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the four common brain extraction methods (BET, BSE, GCUT, and ROBEX), and is comparable to the performance of BEaST, while being more accurate on some datasets compared with BEaST. PMID:24525169

  14. Recognition mechanisms for schema-based knowledge representations

    SciTech Connect

    Havens, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    The author considers generalizing formal recognition methods from parsing theory to schemata knowledge representations. Within artificial intelligence, recognition tasks include aspects of natural language understanding, computer vision, episode understanding, speech recognition, and others. The notion of schemata as a suitable knowledge representation for these tasks is discussed. A number of problems with current schemata-based recognition systems are presented. To gain insight into alternative approaches, the formal context-free parsing method of earley is examined. It is shown to suggest a useful control structure model for integrating top-down and bottom-up search in schemata representations. 46 references.

  15. Acid-Base Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nakhoul, Nazih; Hering-Smith, Kathleen S.

    2015-01-01

    Acid-base homeostasis and pH regulation are critical for both normal physiology and cell metabolism and function. The importance of this regulation is evidenced by a variety of physiologic derangements that occur when plasma pH is either high or low. The kidneys have the predominant role in regulating the systemic bicarbonate concentration and hence, the metabolic component of acid-base balance. This function of the kidneys has two components: reabsorption of virtually all of the filtered HCO3− and production of new bicarbonate to replace that consumed by normal or pathologic acids. This production or generation of new HCO3− is done by net acid excretion. Under normal conditions, approximately one-third to one-half of net acid excretion by the kidneys is in the form of titratable acid. The other one-half to two-thirds is the excretion of ammonium. The capacity to excrete ammonium under conditions of acid loads is quantitatively much greater than the capacity to increase titratable acid. Multiple, often redundant pathways and processes exist to regulate these renal functions. Derangements in acid-base homeostasis, however, are common in clinical medicine and can often be related to the systems involved in acid-base transport in the kidneys. PMID:26597304

  16. Cervigram image segmentation based on reconstructive sparse representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaoting; Huang, Junzhou; Wang, Wei; Huang, Xiaolei; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2010-03-01

    We proposed an approach based on reconstructive sparse representations to segment tissues in optical images of the uterine cervix. Because of large variations in image appearance caused by the changing of the illumination and specular reflection, the color and texture features in optical images often overlap with each other and are not linearly separable. By leveraging sparse representations the data can be transformed to higher dimensions with sparse constraints and become more separated. K-SVD algorithm is employed to find sparse representations and corresponding dictionaries. The data can be reconstructed from its sparse representations and positive and/or negative dictionaries. Classification can be achieved based on comparing the reconstructive errors. In the experiments we applied our method to automatically segment the biomarker AcetoWhite (AW) regions in an archive of 60,000 images of the uterine cervix. Compared with other general methods, our approach showed lower space and time complexity and higher sensitivity.

  17. An object-based methodology for knowledge representation in SGML

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, R.L.; Hartley, R.T.; Webster, R.B.

    1997-11-01

    An object-based methodology for knowledge representation and its Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) implementation is presented. The methodology includes class, perspective domain, and event constructs for representing knowledge within an object paradigm. The perspective construct allows for representation of knowledge from multiple and varying viewpoints. The event construct allows actual use of knowledge to be represented. The SGML implementation of the methodology facilitates usability, structured, yet flexible knowledge design, and sharing and reuse of knowledge class libraries.

  18. Supervised Filter Learning for Representation Based Face Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Chao; Zhang, Lei; Qi, Miao; Zheng, Caixia; Yi, Yugen; Wang, Jianzhong; Zhang, Baoxue

    2016-01-01

    Representation based classification methods, such as Sparse Representation Classification (SRC) and Linear Regression Classification (LRC) have been developed for face recognition problem successfully. However, most of these methods use the original face images without any preprocessing for recognition. Thus, their performances may be affected by some problematic factors (such as illumination and expression variances) in the face images. In order to overcome this limitation, a novel supervised filter learning algorithm is proposed for representation based face recognition in this paper. The underlying idea of our algorithm is to learn a filter so that the within-class representation residuals of the faces' Local Binary Pattern (LBP) features are minimized and the between-class representation residuals of the faces' LBP features are maximized. Therefore, the LBP features of filtered face images are more discriminative for representation based classifiers. Furthermore, we also extend our algorithm for heterogeneous face recognition problem. Extensive experiments are carried out on five databases and the experimental results verify the efficacy of the proposed algorithm. PMID:27416030

  19. Supervised Filter Learning for Representation Based Face Recognition.

    PubMed

    Bi, Chao; Zhang, Lei; Qi, Miao; Zheng, Caixia; Yi, Yugen; Wang, Jianzhong; Zhang, Baoxue

    2016-01-01

    Representation based classification methods, such as Sparse Representation Classification (SRC) and Linear Regression Classification (LRC) have been developed for face recognition problem successfully. However, most of these methods use the original face images without any preprocessing for recognition. Thus, their performances may be affected by some problematic factors (such as illumination and expression variances) in the face images. In order to overcome this limitation, a novel supervised filter learning algorithm is proposed for representation based face recognition in this paper. The underlying idea of our algorithm is to learn a filter so that the within-class representation residuals of the faces' Local Binary Pattern (LBP) features are minimized and the between-class representation residuals of the faces' LBP features are maximized. Therefore, the LBP features of filtered face images are more discriminative for representation based classifiers. Furthermore, we also extend our algorithm for heterogeneous face recognition problem. Extensive experiments are carried out on five databases and the experimental results verify the efficacy of the proposed algorithm. PMID:27416030

  20. The representation of knowledge within model-based control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Weygand, D.P.; Koul, R.

    1987-01-01

    Representation of knowledge in artificially intelligent systems is discussed. Types of knowledge that might need to be represented in AI systems are listed, and include knowledge about objects, events, knowledge about how to do things, and knowledge about what human beings know (meta-knowledge). The use of knowledge in AI systems is discussed in terms of acquiring and retrieving knowledge and reasoning about known facts. Different kinds of reasonings or representations are ghen described with some examples given. These include formal reasoning or logical representation, which is related to mathematical logic, production systems, which are based on the idea of condition-action pairs (production), procedural reasoning, which uses pre-formed plans to solve problems, frames, which provide a structure for representing knowledge in an organized manner, direct analogical representations, which represent knowledge in such a manner that permits some observation without deduction. (LEW)

  1. The DTW-based representation space for seismic pattern classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco-Alzate, Mauricio; Castro-Cabrera, Paola Alexandra; Bicego, Manuele; Londoño-Bonilla, John Makario

    2015-12-01

    Distinguishing among the different seismic volcanic patterns is still one of the most important and labor-intensive tasks for volcano monitoring. This task could be lightened and made free from subjective bias by using automatic classification techniques. In this context, a core but often overlooked issue is the choice of an appropriate representation of the data to be classified. Recently, it has been suggested that using a relative representation (i.e. proximities, namely dissimilarities on pairs of objects) instead of an absolute one (i.e. features, namely measurements on single objects) is advantageous to exploit the relational information contained in the dissimilarities to derive highly discriminant vector spaces, where any classifier can be used. According to that motivation, this paper investigates the suitability of a dynamic time warping (DTW) dissimilarity-based vector representation for the classification of seismic patterns. Results show the usefulness of such a representation in the seismic pattern classification scenario, including analyses of potential benefits from recent advances in the dissimilarity-based paradigm such as the proper selection of representation sets and the combination of different dissimilarity representations that might be available for the same data.

  2. Acid-base chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, C.W.; Blewit, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    The book is not a research compendium and there are no references to the literature. It is a teaching text covering the entire range of undergraduate subject matter dealing with acid-base chemistry (some of it remotely) as taught in inorganic, analytical, and organic chemistry courses. The excellent chapters VII through IX deal in detail with the quantitative aspects of aqueous acid-base equilibria (salt hydrolysis and buffer, titrations, polyprotic and amphoteric substances).

  3. Group-based sparse representation for image restoration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Debin; Gao, Wen

    2014-08-01

    Traditional patch-based sparse representation modeling of natural images usually suffer from two problems. First, it has to solve a large-scale optimization problem with high computational complexity in dictionary learning. Second, each patch is considered independently in dictionary learning and sparse coding, which ignores the relationship among patches, resulting in inaccurate sparse coding coefficients. In this paper, instead of using patch as the basic unit of sparse representation, we exploit the concept of group as the basic unit of sparse representation, which is composed of nonlocal patches with similar structures, and establish a novel sparse representation modeling of natural images, called group-based sparse representation (GSR). The proposed GSR is able to sparsely represent natural images in the domain of group, which enforces the intrinsic local sparsity and nonlocal self-similarity of images simultaneously in a unified framework. In addition, an effective self-adaptive dictionary learning method for each group with low complexity is designed, rather than dictionary learning from natural images. To make GSR tractable and robust, a split Bregman-based technique is developed to solve the proposed GSR-driven ℓ0 minimization problem for image restoration efficiently. Extensive experiments on image inpainting, image deblurring and image compressive sensing recovery manifest that the proposed GSR modeling outperforms many current state-of-the-art schemes in both peak signal-to-noise ratio and visual perception. PMID:24835225

  4. Incorporating Feature-Based Annotations into Automatically Generated Knowledge Representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, L. I.; Lederman, J. I.; Aldridge, K. D.

    2006-12-01

    Earth Science Markup Language (ESML) is efficient and effective in representing scientific data in an XML- based formalism. However, features of the data being represented are not accounted for in ESML. Such features might derive from events (e.g., a gap in data collection due to instrument servicing), identifications (e.g., a scientifically interesting area/volume in an image), or some other source. In order to account for features in an ESML context, we consider them from the perspective of annotation, i.e., the addition of information to existing documents without changing the originals. Although it is possible to extend ESML to incorporate feature-based annotations internally (e.g., by extending the XML schema for ESML), there are a number of complicating factors that we identify. Rather than pursuing the ESML-extension approach, we focus on an external representation for feature-based annotations via XML Pointer Language (XPointer). In previous work (Lumb &Aldridge, HPCS 2006, IEEE, doi:10.1109/HPCS.2006.26), we have shown that it is possible to extract relationships from ESML-based representations, and capture the results in the Resource Description Format (RDF). Thus we explore and report on this same requirement for XPointer-based annotations of ESML representations. As in our past efforts, the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) allows us to illustrate with a real-world example this approach for introducing annotations into automatically generated knowledge representations.

  5. Visual Tracking Based on Extreme Learning Machine and Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoxian; Tang, Linbo; Yang, Jinglin; Zhao, Baojun; Wang, Shuigen

    2015-01-01

    The existing sparse representation-based visual trackers mostly suffer from both being time consuming and having poor robustness problems. To address these issues, a novel tracking method is presented via combining sparse representation and an emerging learning technique, namely extreme learning machine (ELM). Specifically, visual tracking can be divided into two consecutive processes. Firstly, ELM is utilized to find the optimal separate hyperplane between the target observations and background ones. Thus, the trained ELM classification function is able to remove most of the candidate samples related to background contents efficiently, thereby reducing the total computational cost of the following sparse representation. Secondly, to further combine ELM and sparse representation, the resultant confidence values (i.e., probabilities to be a target) of samples on the ELM classification function are used to construct a new manifold learning constraint term of the sparse representation framework, which tends to achieve robuster results. Moreover, the accelerated proximal gradient method is used for deriving the optimal solution (in matrix form) of the constrained sparse tracking model. Additionally, the matrix form solution allows the candidate samples to be calculated in parallel, thereby leading to a higher efficiency. Experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed tracker. PMID:26506359

  6. Visual tracking based on extreme learning machine and sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoxian; Tang, Linbo; Yang, Jinglin; Zhao, Baojun; Wang, Shuigen

    2015-01-01

    The existing sparse representation-based visual trackers mostly suffer from both being time consuming and having poor robustness problems. To address these issues, a novel tracking method is presented via combining sparse representation and an emerging learning technique, namely extreme learning machine (ELM). Specifically, visual tracking can be divided into two consecutive processes. Firstly, ELM is utilized to find the optimal separate hyperplane between the target observations and background ones. Thus, the trained ELM classification function is able to remove most of the candidate samples related to background contents efficiently, thereby reducing the total computational cost of the following sparse representation. Secondly, to further combine ELM and sparse representation, the resultant confidence values (i.e., probabilities to be a target) of samples on the ELM classification function are used to construct a new manifold learning constraint term of the sparse representation framework, which tends to achieve robuster results. Moreover, the accelerated proximal gradient method is used for deriving the optimal solution (in matrix form) of the constrained sparse tracking model. Additionally, the matrix form solution allows the candidate samples to be calculated in parallel, thereby leading to a higher efficiency. Experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed tracker. PMID:26506359

  7. Argumentation-Based Collaborative Inquiry in Science Through Representational Work: Impact on Primary Students' Representational Fluency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Kim; Gillies, Robyn; Hedberg, John

    2016-06-01

    This study explored the impact of argumentation-promoting collaborative inquiry and representational work in science on primary students' representational fluency. Two hundred sixty-six year 6 students received instruction on natural disasters with a focus on collaborative inquiry. Students in the Comparison condition received only this instruction. Students in the Explanation condition were also instructed with a focus on explanations using representations. Students in the Argumentation condition received similar instruction to the Comparison and Explanation conditions but were also instructed with a focus on argumentation using representations. Conceptual understanding and representational competencies (interpreting, explaining and constructing representations) were measured prior to and immediately following the instruction. A small group collaborative representational task was video recorded at the end of the instruction and coded for modes of knowledge-building discourse; knowledge-sharing and knowledge-construction. Higher measures of conceptual understanding, representational competencies and knowledge-construction discourse were taken together as representational fluency. Students in all conditions showed significant improvement in conceptual understanding, interpreting representations and explaining representations. Students in the Comparison and Argumentation conditions also showed significantly improved scores in constructing representations. When compared to the other conditions, the Explanation group had the highest scores in conceptual understanding and also interpreting and explaining representations. While the Argumentation group had the highest scores for constructing representations, their scores for conceptual understanding as well as interpreting and explaining representations were also high. There was no difference between the groups in knowledge-sharing discourse; however, the Argumentation group displayed the highest incidence of knowledge

  8. Ensemble polarimetric SAR image classification based on contextual sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lamei; Wang, Xiao; Zou, Bin; Qiao, Zhijun

    2016-05-01

    Polarimetric SAR image interpretation has become one of the most interesting topics, in which the construction of the reasonable and effective technique of image classification is of key importance. Sparse representation represents the data using the most succinct sparse atoms of the over-complete dictionary and the advantages of sparse representation also have been confirmed in the field of PolSAR classification. However, it is not perfect, like the ordinary classifier, at different aspects. So ensemble learning is introduced to improve the issue, which makes a plurality of different learners training and obtained the integrated results by combining the individual learner to get more accurate and ideal learning results. Therefore, this paper presents a polarimetric SAR image classification method based on the ensemble learning of sparse representation to achieve the optimal classification.

  9. Latent subspace sparse representation-based unsupervised domain adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, Liu; Sun, Hao; Zhao, Fumin; Zhou, Shilin

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce and study a novel unsupervised domain adaptation (DA) algorithm, called latent subspace sparse representation based domain adaptation, based on the fact that source and target data that lie in different but related low-dimension subspaces. The key idea is that each point in a union of subspaces can be constructed by a combination of other points in the dataset. In this method, we propose to project the source and target data onto a common latent generalized subspace which is a union of subspaces of source and target domains and learn the sparse representation in the latent generalized subspace. By employing the minimum reconstruction error and maximum mean discrepancy (MMD) constraints, the structure of source and target domain are preserved and the discrepancy is reduced between the source and target domains and thus reflected in the sparse representation. We then utilize the sparse representation to build a weighted graph which reflect the relationship of points from the different domains (source-source, source- target, and target-target) to predict the labels of the target domain. We also proposed an efficient optimization method for the algorithm. Our method does not need to combine with any classifiers and therefore does not need train the test procedures. Various experiments show that the proposed method perform better than the competitive state of art subspace-based domain adaptation.

  10. Implementation of a frame-based representation in CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assal, Hisham; Myers, Leonard

    1990-01-01

    Knowledge representation is one of the major concerns in expert systems. The representation of domain-specific knowledge should agree with the nature of the domain entities and their use in the real world. For example, architectural applications deal with objects and entities such as spaces, walls, and windows. A natural way of representing these architectural entities is provided by frames. This research explores the potential of using the expert system shell CLIPS, developed by NASA, to implement a frame-based representation that can accommodate architectural knowledge. These frames are similar but quite different from the 'template' construct in version 4.3 of CLIPS. Templates support only the grouping of related information and the assignment of default values to template fields. In addition to these features frames provide other capabilities including definition of classes, inheritance between classes and subclasses, relation of objects of different classes with 'has-a', association of methods (demons) of different types (standard and user-defined) to fields (slots), and creation of new fields at run-time. This frame-based representation is implemented completely in CLIPS. No change to the source code is necessary.

  11. Improving representation-based classification for robust face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongzhi; Zhang, Zheng; Li, Zhengming; Chen, Yan; Shi, Jian

    2014-06-01

    The sparse representation classification (SRC) method proposed by Wright et al. is considered as the breakthrough of face recognition because of its good performance. Nevertheless it still cannot perfectly address the face recognition problem. The main reason for this is that variation of poses, facial expressions, and illuminations of the facial image can be rather severe and the number of available facial images are fewer than the dimensions of the facial image, so a certain linear combination of all the training samples is not able to fully represent the test sample. In this study, we proposed a novel framework to improve the representation-based classification (RBC). The framework first ran the sparse representation algorithm and determined the unavoidable deviation between the test sample and optimal linear combination of all the training samples in order to represent it. It then exploited the deviation and all the training samples to resolve the linear combination coefficients. Finally, the classification rule, the training samples, and the renewed linear combination coefficients were used to classify the test sample. Generally, the proposed framework can work for most RBC methods. From the viewpoint of regression analysis, the proposed framework has a solid theoretical soundness. Because it can, to an extent, identify the bias effect of the RBC method, it enables RBC to obtain more robust face recognition results. The experimental results on a variety of face databases demonstrated that the proposed framework can improve the collaborative representation classification, SRC, and improve the nearest neighbor classifier.

  12. Low-resolution facial image restoration based on sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuelong; Bian, Junjie; Feng, Jufu

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, a strategy of reconstructing high resolution facial image based on that of low resolution is put forward. Rather than only relying on low resolution input image, we construct a face representation dictionary based on training high resolution facial images to compensate for the information difference between low and high resolution images. This restoration is realized through enrolling a low resolution facial image dictionary which is acquired through directly downsampling the learned high resolution dictionary. After the representation coefficient vector of a low resolution input image on low resolution dictionary is obtained through l1-optimization algorithm, this coefficient can be transplanted into high resolution dictionary directly to restore the high resolution image corresponding to input face. This approach was validated on the Extended Yale database.

  13. Prediction of protein-protein interactions with clustered amino acids and weighted sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiaoying; You, Zhuhong; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Yong

    2015-01-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project, bioscience has entered into the era of the genome and proteome. Therefore, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) research is becoming more and more important. Life activities and the protein-protein interactions are inseparable, such as DNA synthesis, gene transcription activation, protein translation, etc. Though many methods based on biological experiments and machine learning have been proposed, they all spent a long time to learn and obtained an imprecise accuracy. How to efficiently and accurately predict PPIs is still a big challenge. To take up such a challenge, we developed a new predictor by incorporating the reduced amino acid alphabet (RAAA) information into the general form of pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and with the weighted sparse representation-based classification (WSRC). The remarkable advantages of introducing the reduced amino acid alphabet is being able to avoid the notorious dimensionality disaster or overfitting problem in statistical prediction. Additionally, experiments have proven that our method achieved good performance in both a low- and high-dimensional feature space. Among all of the experiments performed on the PPIs data of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the best one achieved 90.91% accuracy, 94.17% sensitivity, 87.22% precision and a 83.43% Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) value. In order to evaluate the prediction ability of our method, extensive experiments are performed to compare with the state-of-the-art technique, support vector machine (SVM). The achieved results show that the proposed approach is very promising for predicting PPIs, and it can be a helpful supplement for PPIs prediction. PMID:25984606

  14. Prediction of Protein–Protein Interactions with Clustered Amino Acids and Weighted Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiaoying; You, Zhuhong; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Yong

    2015-01-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project, bioscience has entered into the era of the genome and proteome. Therefore, protein–protein interactions (PPIs) research is becoming more and more important. Life activities and the protein–protein interactions are inseparable, such as DNA synthesis, gene transcription activation, protein translation, etc. Though many methods based on biological experiments and machine learning have been proposed, they all spent a long time to learn and obtained an imprecise accuracy. How to efficiently and accurately predict PPIs is still a big challenge. To take up such a challenge, we developed a new predictor by incorporating the reduced amino acid alphabet (RAAA) information into the general form of pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and with the weighted sparse representation-based classification (WSRC). The remarkable advantages of introducing the reduced amino acid alphabet is being able to avoid the notorious dimensionality disaster or overfitting problem in statistical prediction. Additionally, experiments have proven that our method achieved good performance in both a low- and high-dimensional feature space. Among all of the experiments performed on the PPIs data of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the best one achieved 90.91% accuracy, 94.17% sensitivity, 87.22% precision and a 83.43% Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) value. In order to evaluate the prediction ability of our method, extensive experiments are performed to compare with the state-of-the-art technique, support vector machine (SVM). The achieved results show that the proposed approach is very promising for predicting PPIs, and it can be a helpful supplement for PPIs prediction. PMID:25984606

  15. Phylogenetic tree construction based on 2D graphical representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Shan, Xinzhou; Zhu, Wen; Li, Renfa

    2006-04-01

    A new approach based on the two-dimensional (2D) graphical representation of the whole genome sequence [Bo Liao, Chem. Phys. Lett., 401(2005) 196.] is proposed to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of genomes. The evolutionary distances are obtained through measuring the differences among the 2D curves. The fuzzy theory is used to construct phylogenetic tree. The phylogenetic relationships of H5N1 avian influenza virus illustrate the utility of our approach.

  16. Teaching object concepts for XML-based representations.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    Students learned about object-oriented design concepts and knowledge representation through the use of a set of toy blocks. The blocks represented a limited and focused domain of knowledge and one that was physical and tangible. The blocks helped the students to better visualize, communicate, and understand the domain of knowledge as well as how to perform object decomposition. The blocks were further abstracted to an engineering design kit for water park design. This helped the students to work on techniques for abstraction and conceptualization. It also led the project from tangible exercises into software and programming exercises. Students employed XML to create object-based knowledge representations and Java to use the represented knowledge. The students developed and implemented software allowing a lay user to design and create their own water slide and then to take a simulated ride on their slide.

  17. Argumentation-Based Collaborative Inquiry in Science through Representational Work: Impact on Primary Students' Representational Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Kim; Gillies, Robyn; Hedberg, John

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the impact of argumentation-promoting collaborative inquiry and representational work in science on primary students' representational fluency. Two hundred sixty-six year 6 students received instruction on natural disasters with a focus on collaborative inquiry. Students in the Comparison condition received only this…

  18. 3D ear identification based on sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Ding, Zhixuan; Li, Hongyu; Shen, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Biometrics based personal authentication is an effective way for automatically recognizing, with a high confidence, a person's identity. Recently, 3D ear shape has attracted tremendous interests in research field due to its richness of feature and ease of acquisition. However, the existing ICP (Iterative Closet Point)-based 3D ear matching methods prevalent in the literature are not quite efficient to cope with the one-to-many identification case. In this paper, we aim to fill this gap by proposing a novel effective fully automatic 3D ear identification system. We at first propose an accurate and efficient template-based ear detection method. By utilizing such a method, the extracted ear regions are represented in a common canonical coordinate system determined by the ear contour template, which facilitates much the following stages of feature extraction and classification. For each extracted 3D ear, a feature vector is generated as its representation by making use of a PCA-based local feature descriptor. At the stage of classification, we resort to the sparse representation based classification approach, which actually solves an l1-minimization problem. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work introducing the sparse representation framework into the field of 3D ear identification. Extensive experiments conducted on a benchmark dataset corroborate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach. The associated Matlab source code and the evaluation results have been made publicly online available at http://sse.tongji.edu.cn/linzhang/ear/srcear/srcear.htm. PMID:24740247

  19. Converting biomolecular modelling data based on an XML representation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yudong; McKeever, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Biomolecular modelling has provided computational simulation based methods for investigating biological processes from quantum chemical to cellular levels. Modelling such microscopic processes requires atomic description of a biological system and conducts in fine timesteps. Consequently the simulations are extremely computationally demanding. To tackle this limitation, different biomolecular models have to be integrated in order to achieve high-performance simulations. The integration of diverse biomolecular models needs to convert molecular data between different data representations of different models. This data conversion is often non-trivial, requires extensive human input and is inevitably error prone. In this paper we present an automated data conversion method for biomolecular simulations between molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics models. Our approach is developed around an XML data representation called BioSimML (Biomolecular Simulation Markup Language). BioSimML provides a domain specific data representation for biomolecular modelling which can effciently support data interoperability between different biomolecular simulation models and data formats. PMID:20134068

  20. Voxel selection in FMRI data analysis based on sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanqing; Namburi, Praneeth; Yu, Zhuliang; Guan, Cuntai; Feng, Jianfeng; Gu, Zhenghui

    2009-10-01

    Multivariate pattern analysis approaches toward detection of brain regions from fMRI data have been gaining attention recently. In this study, we introduce an iterative sparse-representation-based algorithm for detection of voxels in functional MRI (fMRI) data with task relevant information. In each iteration of the algorithm, a linear programming problem is solved and a sparse weight vector is subsequently obtained. The final weight vector is the mean of those obtained in all iterations. The characteristics of our algorithm are as follows: 1) the weight vector (output) is sparse; 2) the magnitude of each entry of the weight vector represents the significance of its corresponding variable or feature in a classification or regression problem; and 3) due to the convergence of this algorithm, a stable weight vector is obtained. To demonstrate the validity of our algorithm and illustrate its application, we apply the algorithm to the Pittsburgh Brain Activity Interpretation Competition 2007 functional fMRI dataset for selecting the voxels, which are the most relevant to the tasks of the subjects. Based on this dataset, the aforementioned characteristics of our algorithm are analyzed, and a comparison between our method with the univariate general-linear-model-based statistical parametric mapping is performed. Using our method, a combination of voxels are selected based on the principle of effective/sparse representation of a task. Data analysis results in this paper show that this combination of voxels is suitable for decoding tasks and demonstrate the effectiveness of our method. PMID:19567340

  1. Using Morphlet-Based Image Representation for Object Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatsevich, V. S.; Vizilter, Yu. V.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose an original method for objects detection based on a special tree-structured image representation - the trees of morphlets. The method provides robust detection of various types of objects in an image without employing a machine learning procedure. Along with a bounding box creation on a detection step, the method makes pre-segmentation, which can be further used for recognition purposes. Another important feature of the proposed approach is that there are no needs to use a running window as well as a features pyramid in order to detect the objects of different sizes.

  2. An object-based methodology for knowledge representation

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, R.L.; Hartley, R.T.; Webster, R.B.

    1997-11-01

    An object based methodology for knowledge representation is presented. The constructs and notation to the methodology are described and illustrated with examples. The ``blocks world,`` a classic artificial intelligence problem, is used to illustrate some of the features of the methodology including perspectives and events. Representing knowledge with perspectives can enrich the detail of the knowledge and facilitate potential lines of reasoning. Events allow example uses of the knowledge to be represented along with the contained knowledge. Other features include the extensibility and maintainability of knowledge represented in the methodology.

  3. Multiple kernel learning for sparse representation-based classification.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Ashish; Patel, Vishal M; Chellappa, Rama

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a multiple kernel learning (MKL) algorithm that is based on the sparse representation-based classification (SRC) method. Taking advantage of the nonlinear kernel SRC in efficiently representing the nonlinearities in the high-dimensional feature space, we propose an MKL method based on the kernel alignment criteria. Our method uses a two step training method to learn the kernel weights and sparse codes. At each iteration, the sparse codes are updated first while fixing the kernel mixing coefficients, and then the kernel mixing coefficients are updated while fixing the sparse codes. These two steps are repeated until a stopping criteria is met. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated using several publicly available image classification databases and it is shown that this method can perform significantly better than many competitive image classification algorithms. PMID:24835226

  4. Robust Pedestrian Classification Based on Hierarchical Kernel Sparse Representation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui; Zhang, Guanghai; Yan, Xiaoxing; Gao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Vision-based pedestrian detection has become an active topic in computer vision and autonomous vehicles. It aims at detecting pedestrians appearing ahead of the vehicle using a camera so that autonomous vehicles can assess the danger and take action. Due to varied illumination and appearance, complex background and occlusion pedestrian detection in outdoor environments is a difficult problem. In this paper, we propose a novel hierarchical feature extraction and weighted kernel sparse representation model for pedestrian classification. Initially, hierarchical feature extraction based on a CENTRIST descriptor is used to capture discriminative structures. A max pooling operation is used to enhance the invariance of varying appearance. Then, a kernel sparse representation model is proposed to fully exploit the discrimination information embedded in the hierarchical local features, and a Gaussian weight function as the measure to effectively handle the occlusion in pedestrian images. Extensive experiments are conducted on benchmark databases, including INRIA, Daimler, an artificially generated dataset and a real occluded dataset, demonstrating the more robust performance of the proposed method compared to state-of-the-art pedestrian classification methods. PMID:27537888

  5. Hippocampal shape analysis: surface-based representation and classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Li; Ford, James; Makedon, Fillia; Saykin, Andrew

    2003-05-01

    Surface-based representation and classification techniques are studied for hippocampal shape analysis. The goal is twofold: (1) develop a new framework of salient feature extraction and accurate classification for 3D shape data; (2) detect hippocampal abnormalities in schizophrenia using this technique. A fine-scale spherical harmonic expansion is employed to describe a closed 3D surface object. The expansion can then easily be transformed to extract only shape information (i.e., excluding translation, rotation, and scaling) and create a shape descriptor comparable across different individuals. This representation captures shape features and is flexible enough to do shape modeling, identify statistical group differences, and generate similar synthetic shapes. Principal component analysis is used to extract a small number of independent features from high dimensional shape descriptors, and Fisher's linear discriminant is applied for pattern classification. This framework is shown to be able to perform well in distinguishing clear group differences as well as small and noisy group differences using simulated shape data. In addition, the application of this technique to real data indicates that group shape differences exist in hippocampi between healthy controls and schizophrenic patients.

  6. Magnetic resonance brain tissue segmentation based on sparse representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Segmentation or delineation of specific organs and structures in medical images is an important task in the clinical diagnosis and treatment, since it allows to characterize pathologies through imaging measures (biomarkers). In brain imaging, segmentation of main tissues or specific structures is challenging, due to the anatomic variability and complexity, and the presence of image artifacts (noise, intensity inhomogeneities, partial volume effect). In this paper, an automatic segmentation strategy is proposed, based on sparse representations and coupled dictionaries. Image intensity patterns are singly related to tissue labels at the level of small patches, gathering this information in coupled intensity/segmentation dictionaries. This dictionaries are used within a sparse representation framework to find the projection of a new intensity image onto the intensity dictionary, and the same projection can be used with the segmentation dictionary to estimate the corresponding segmentation. Preliminary results obtained with two publicly available datasets suggest that the proposal is capable of estimating adequate segmentations for gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) tissues, with an average overlapping of 0:79 for GM and 0:71 for WM (with respect to original segmentations).

  7. Supporting Students' Learning with Multiple Representations in a Dynamic Simulation-Based Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Meij, Jan; de Jong, Ton

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the effects of different types of support for learning from multiple representations in a simulation-based learning environment were examined. The study extends known research by examining the use of dynamic representations instead of static representations and it examines the role of the complexity of the domain and the learning…

  8. Effects of Computer-Based Visual Representation on Mathematics Learning and Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yung, Hsin I.; Paas, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Visual representation has been recognized as a powerful learning tool in many learning domains. Based on the assumption that visual representations can support deeper understanding, we examined the effects of visual representations on learning performance and cognitive load in the domain of mathematics. An experimental condition with visual…

  9. Sparse representation based face recognition using weighted regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgazyev, Emil; Yeniaras, E.; Uyanik, I.; Unan, Mahmut; Leiss, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    Face recognition is a challenging research topic, especially when the training (gallery) and recognition (probe) images are acquired using different cameras under varying conditions. Even a small noise or occlusion in the images can compromise the accuracy of recognition. Lately, sparse encoding based classification algorithms gave promising results for such uncontrollable scenarios. In this paper, we introduce a novel methodology by modeling the sparse encoding with weighted patches to increase the robustness of face recognition even further. In the training phase, we define a mask (i.e., weight matrix) using a sparse representation selecting the facial regions, and in the recognition phase, we perform comparison on selected facial regions. The algorithm was evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively using two comprehensive surveillance facial image databases, i.e., SCfaceandMFPV, with the results clearly superior to common state-of-the-art methodologies in different scenarios.

  10. Crowd behavior representation: an attribute-based approach.

    PubMed

    Rabiee, Hamidreza; Haddadnia, Javad; Mousavi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    In crowd behavior studies, a model of crowd behavior needs to be trained using the information extracted from video sequences. Most of the previous methods are based on low-level visual features because there are only crowd behavior labels available as ground-truth information in crowd datasets. However, there is a huge semantic gap between low-level motion/appearance features and high-level concept of crowd behaviors. In this paper, we tackle the problem by introducing an attribute-based scheme. While similar strategies have been employed for action and object recognition, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time it is shown that the crowd emotions can be used as attributes for crowd behavior understanding. We explore the idea of training a set of emotion-based classifiers, which can subsequently be used to indicate the crowd motion. In this scheme, we collect a large dataset of video clips and provide them with both annotations of "crowd behaviors" and "crowd emotions". We test the proposed emotion based crowd representation methods on our dataset. The obtained promising results demonstrate that the crowd emotions enable the construction of more descriptive models for crowd behaviors. We aim at publishing the dataset with the article, to be used as a benchmark for the communities. PMID:27512638

  11. Sorting of Single Biomolecules based on Fourier Polar Representation of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leray, Aymeric; Brulé, Thibault; Buret, Mickael; Colas Des Francs, Gérard; Bouhelier, Alexandre; Dereux, Alain; Finot, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy becomes increasingly used in biosensors for its capacity to detect and identify single molecules. In practice, a large number of SERS spectra are acquired and reliable ranking methods are thus essential for analysing all these data. Supervised classification strategies, which are the most effective methods, are usually applied but they require pre-determined models or classes. In this work, we propose to sort SERS spectra in unknown groups with an alternative strategy called Fourier polar representation. This non-fitting method based on simple Fourier sine and cosine transforms produces a fast and graphical representation for sorting SERS spectra with quantitative information. The reliability of this method was first investigated theoretically and numerically. Then, its performances were tested on two concrete biological examples: first with single amino-acid molecule (cysteine) and then with a mixture of three distinct odorous molecules. The benefits of this Fourier polar representation were highlighted and compared to the well-established statistical principal component analysis method.

  12. Sorting of Single Biomolecules based on Fourier Polar Representation of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Leray, Aymeric; Brulé, Thibault; Buret, Mickael; Colas des Francs, Gérard; Bouhelier, Alexandre; Dereux, Alain; Finot, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy becomes increasingly used in biosensors for its capacity to detect and identify single molecules. In practice, a large number of SERS spectra are acquired and reliable ranking methods are thus essential for analysing all these data. Supervised classification strategies, which are the most effective methods, are usually applied but they require pre-determined models or classes. In this work, we propose to sort SERS spectra in unknown groups with an alternative strategy called Fourier polar representation. This non-fitting method based on simple Fourier sine and cosine transforms produces a fast and graphical representation for sorting SERS spectra with quantitative information. The reliability of this method was first investigated theoretically and numerically. Then, its performances were tested on two concrete biological examples: first with single amino-acid molecule (cysteine) and then with a mixture of three distinct odorous molecules. The benefits of this Fourier polar representation were highlighted and compared to the well-established statistical principal component analysis method. PMID:26833130

  13. Interrupting Infants' Persisting Object Representations: An Object-Based Limit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheries, Erik W.; Wynn, Karen; Scholl, Brian J.

    2006-01-01

    Making sense of the visual world requires keeping track of objects as the same persisting individuals over time and occlusion. Here we implement a new paradigm using 10-month-old infants to explore the processes and representations that support this ability in two ways. First, we demonstrate that persisting object representations can be maintained…

  14. Design of Activities on Numerical Representations Based on Cognitive Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalifatidou, Eleftheria R.

    2008-01-01

    The results of the cognitive research on numbers' representations can provide a sound theoretical framework to develop educational activities on representing numbers. A program of such activities for a nursery school was designed in order to enable the children to externalize and strengthen their internal representations about numerosity and link…

  15. Pavement crack characteristic detection based on sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoming; Huang, Jianping; Liu, Wanyu; Xu, Mantao

    2012-12-01

    Pavement crack detection plays an important role in pavement maintaining and management. The three-dimensional (3D) pavement crack detection technique based on laser is a recent trend due to its ability of discriminating dark areas, which are not caused by pavement distress such as tire marks, oil spills and shadows. In the field of 3D pavement crack detection, the most important thing is the accurate extraction of cracks in individual pavement profile without destroying pavement profile. So after analyzing the pavement profile signal characteristics and the changeability of pavement crack characteristics, a new method based on the sparse representation is developed to decompose pavement profile signal into a summation of the mainly pavement profile and cracks. Based on the characteristics of the pavement profile signal and crack, the mixed dictionary is constructed with an over-complete exponential function and an over-complete trapezoidal membership function, and the signal is separated by learning in this mixed dictionary with a matching pursuit algorithm. Some experiments were conducted and promising results were obtained, showing that we can detect the pavement crack efficiently and achieve a good separation of crack from pavement profile without destroying pavement profile.

  16. Visual recognition based on discriminative and collaborative representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Fengtao; Wang, Zhengzhi; Liu, Hongfu

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a low computation complexity, yet very efficient representation of image for visual recognition tasks is presented. The collaborative representation and discriminative ingredient are combined in a unified framework. The coefficients of collaborative representation of test samples are sparse and robust to occlusion or other disguises. It is known that in the recognition or classification tasks, the discriminative model is also very important. The proposed model has two-fold advantages. It can represent the test sample well using redundant representation with sparsity and robust to disguises. On the other hand, the representation coefficients are generated with more discriminative information. It is very helpful for visual recognition issues. The point is that the l 2 norm can achieve comparable performance to the l 1 norm with simple implementation. Experimental evaluations on some benchmarks indicate that the proposed method could achieve impressive performances in terms of accuracy and efficiency with other existing works.

  17. Quantum morphology operations based on quantum representation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Suzhen; Mao, Xia; Li, Tian; Xue, Yuli; Chen, Lijiang; Xiong, Qingxu

    2015-05-01

    Quantum morphology operations are proposed based on the novel enhanced quantum representation model. Two kinds of quantum morphology operations are included: quantum binary and grayscale morphology operations. Dilation and erosion operations are fundamental to morphological operations. Consequently, we focus on quantum binary and flat grayscale dilation and erosion operations and their corresponding circuits. As the basis of designing of binary morphology operations, three basic quantum logic operations AND, OR, and NOT involving two binary images are presented. Thus, quantum binary dilation and erosion operations can be realized based on these logic operations supplemented by quantum measurement operations. As to the design of flat grayscale dilation and erosion operations, the searching for maxima or minima in a certain space is involved; here, we use Grover's search algorithm to get these maxima and minima. With respect that the grayscale is represented by quantum bit string, the quantum bit string comparator is used as an oracle in Grover's search algorithm. In these quantum morphology operations, quantum parallelism is well utilized. The time complexity analysis shows that quantum morphology operations' time complexity is much lower or equal to the classical morphology operations.

  18. Pedestrian detection from thermal images: A sparse representation based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Bin; John, Vijay; Liu, Zheng; Mita, Seiichi

    2016-05-01

    Pedestrian detection, a key technology in computer vision, plays a paramount role in the applications of advanced driver assistant systems (ADASs) and autonomous vehicles. The objective of pedestrian detection is to identify and locate people in a dynamic environment so that accidents can be avoided. With significant variations introduced by illumination, occlusion, articulated pose, and complex background, pedestrian detection is a challenging task for visual perception. Different from visible images, thermal images are captured and presented with intensity maps based objects' emissivity, and thus have an enhanced spectral range to make human beings perceptible from the cool background. In this study, a sparse representation based approach is proposed for pedestrian detection from thermal images. We first adopted the histogram of sparse code to represent image features and then detect pedestrian with the extracted features in an unimodal and a multimodal framework respectively. In the unimodal framework, two types of dictionaries, i.e. joint dictionary and individual dictionary, are built by learning from prepared training samples. In the multimodal framework, a weighted fusion scheme is proposed to further highlight the contributions from features with higher separability. To validate the proposed approach, experiments were conducted to compare with three widely used features: Haar wavelets (HWs), histogram of oriented gradients (HOG), and histogram of phase congruency (HPC) as well as two classification methods, i.e. AdaBoost and support vector machine (SVM). Experimental results on a publicly available data set demonstrate the superiority of the proposed approach.

  19. A CAD system based on spherical dual representations

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, J.W.; Paripati, P.K.; Wright, J.S.

    1987-08-01

    Computer-aided design (CAD) systems typically have many different functions: drafting, two-dimensional modeling, three-dimensional modeling, finite element analysis, and fit and tolerancing of parts. The authors report on the construction of a CAD system based on shape representation ideas used in the vision community to determine the shape of an object from its image. In the long term, they propose to construct a combined CAD and sensing system based on the same underlying object models. Considerable advantages follow from building a model-driven sensor fusion system that uses a common geometric model. In a manufacturing environment, for example, a library of objects can be built up and its models used in a vision and touch sensing system integrated into an automated assembly line to discriminate between objects and determine orientation and distance. If such a system could be made robust and highly reliable, then some of the most difficult problems that plague attempts to create a fully flexible automated environment would be solved.

  20. Uncertainty Representation and Interpretation in Model-Based Prognostics Algorithms Based on Kalman Filter Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan, Jose Ramon; Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai Frank

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses several aspects of uncertainty representation and management for model-based prognostics methodologies based on our experience with Kalman Filters when applied to prognostics for electronics components. In particular, it explores the implications of modeling remaining useful life prediction as a stochastic process, and how it relates to uncertainty representation, management and the role of prognostics in decision-making. A distinction between the interpretations of estimated remaining useful life probability density function is explained and a cautionary argument is provided against mixing interpretations for two while considering prognostics in making critical decisions.

  1. Perceptual hashing of sheet music based on graphical representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremser, Gert; Schmucker, Martin

    2006-02-01

    For the protection of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR), different passive protection methods have been developed. These watermarking and fingerprinting technologies protect content beyond access control and thus tracing illegal distributions as well as the identification of people who are responsible for a illegal distribution is possible. The public's attention was attracted especially to the second application by the illegal distribution of the so called 'Hollywood screeners'. The focus of current research is on audio and video content and images. These are the common content types we are faced with every day, and which mostly have a huge commercial value. Especially the illegal distribution of content that has not been officially published shows the potential commercial impact of illegal distributions. Content types, however, are not limited to audio, video and images. There is a range of other content types, which also deserve the development of passive protection technologies. For sheet music for instance, different watermarking technologies have been developed, which up to this point only function within certain limitations. This is the reason why we wanted to find out how to develop a fingerprinting or perceptual hashing method for sheet music. In this article, we describe the development of our algorithm for sheet music, which is based on simple graphical features. We describe the selection of these features and the subsequent processing steps. The resulting compact representation is analyzed and the first performance results are reported.

  2. Feature Selection and Pedestrian Detection Based on Sparse Representation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shihong; Wang, Tao; Shen, Weiming; Pan, Shaoming; Chong, Yanwen; Ding, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Pedestrian detection have been currently devoted to the extraction of effective pedestrian features, which has become one of the obstacles in pedestrian detection application according to the variety of pedestrian features and their large dimension. Based on the theoretical analysis of six frequently-used features, SIFT, SURF, Haar, HOG, LBP and LSS, and their comparison with experimental results, this paper screens out the sparse feature subsets via sparse representation to investigate whether the sparse subsets have the same description abilities and the most stable features. When any two of the six features are fused, the fusion feature is sparsely represented to obtain its important components. Sparse subsets of the fusion features can be rapidly generated by avoiding calculation of the corresponding index of dimension numbers of these feature descriptors; thus, the calculation speed of the feature dimension reduction is improved and the pedestrian detection time is reduced. Experimental results show that sparse feature subsets are capable of keeping the important components of these six feature descriptors. The sparse features of HOG and LSS possess the same description ability and consume less time compared with their full features. The ratios of the sparse feature subsets of HOG and LSS to their full sets are the highest among the six, and thus these two features can be used to best describe the characteristics of the pedestrian and the sparse feature subsets of the combination of HOG-LSS show better distinguishing ability and parsimony. PMID:26295480

  3. Reconstruction and visualization of model-based volume representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ziyi; Mueller, Klaus

    2010-02-01

    In modern medical CT, the primary source of data is a set of X-ray projections acquired around the object, which are then used to reconstruct a discrete regular grid of sample points. Conventional volume rendering methods use this reconstructed regular grid to estimate unknown off-grid values via interpolation. However, these interpolated values may not match the values that would have been generated had they been reconstructed directly with CT. The consequence can be simple blurring, but also the omission of fine object detail which usually contains precious information. To avoid these problems, in the method we propose, instead of reconstructing a lattice of volume sample points, we derive a highfidelity object model directly from the reconstruction process, fitting a localized object model to the acquired raw data within tight tolerances. This model can then be easily evaluated both for slice-based viewing as well as in GPU 3D volume rendering, offering excellent detail preservation in zooming operations. Furthermore, the model-driven representation also supports high-precision analytical ray casting.

  4. Feature Selection and Pedestrian Detection Based on Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Shihong; Wang, Tao; Shen, Weiming; Pan, Shaoming; Chong, Yanwen; Ding, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Pedestrian detection have been currently devoted to the extraction of effective pedestrian features, which has become one of the obstacles in pedestrian detection application according to the variety of pedestrian features and their large dimension. Based on the theoretical analysis of six frequently-used features, SIFT, SURF, Haar, HOG, LBP and LSS, and their comparison with experimental results, this paper screens out the sparse feature subsets via sparse representation to investigate whether the sparse subsets have the same description abilities and the most stable features. When any two of the six features are fused, the fusion feature is sparsely represented to obtain its important components. Sparse subsets of the fusion features can be rapidly generated by avoiding calculation of the corresponding index of dimension numbers of these feature descriptors; thus, the calculation speed of the feature dimension reduction is improved and the pedestrian detection time is reduced. Experimental results show that sparse feature subsets are capable of keeping the important components of these six feature descriptors. The sparse features of HOG and LSS possess the same description ability and consume less time compared with their full features. The ratios of the sparse feature subsets of HOG and LSS to their full sets are the highest among the six, and thus these two features can be used to best describe the characteristics of the pedestrian and the sparse feature subsets of the combination of HOG-LSS show better distinguishing ability and parsimony. PMID:26295480

  5. A Knowledge-Based Representation Scheme for Environmental Science Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Dungan, Jennifer L.; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    One of the primary methods available for studying environmental phenomena is the construction and analysis of computational models. We have been studying how artificial intelligence techniques can be applied to assist in the development and use of environmental science models within the context of NASA-sponsored activities. We have identified several high-utility areas as potential targets for research and development: model development; data visualization, analysis, and interpretation; model publishing and reuse, training and education; and framing, posing, and answering questions. Central to progress on any of the above areas is a representation for environmental models that contains a great deal more information than is present in a traditional software implementation. In particular, a traditional software implementation is devoid of any semantic information that connects the code with the environmental context that forms the background for the modeling activity. Before we can build AI systems to assist in model development and usage, we must develop a representation for environmental models that adequately describes a model's semantics and explicitly represents the relationship between the code and the modeling task at hand. We have developed one such representation in conjunction with our work on the SIGMA (Scientists' Intelligent Graphical Modeling Assistant) environment. The key feature of the representation is that it provides a semantic grounding for the symbols in a set of modeling equations by linking those symbols to an explicit representation of the underlying environmental scenario.

  6. Nucleic acid based molecular devices.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Yamuna; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2011-03-28

    In biology, nucleic acids are carriers of molecular information: DNA's base sequence stores and imparts genetic instructions, while RNA's sequence plays the role of a messenger and a regulator of gene expression. As biopolymers, nucleic acids also have exciting physicochemical properties, which can be rationally influenced by the base sequence in myriad ways. Consequently, in recent years nucleic acids have also become important building blocks for bottom-up nanotechnology: as molecules for the self-assembly of molecular nanostructures and also as a material for building machinelike nanodevices. In this Review we will cover the most important developments in this growing field of nucleic acid nanodevices. We also provide an overview of the biochemical and biophysical background of this field and the major "historical" influences that shaped its development. Particular emphasis is laid on DNA molecular motors, molecular robotics, molecular information processing, and applications of nucleic acid nanodevices in biology. PMID:21432950

  7. Protein Sub-Nuclear Localization Based on Effective Fusion Representations and Dimension Reduction Algorithm LDA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shunfang; Liu, Shuhui

    2015-01-01

    An effective representation of a protein sequence plays a crucial role in protein sub-nuclear localization. The existing representations, such as dipeptide composition (DipC), pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and position specific scoring matrix (PSSM), are insufficient to represent protein sequence due to their single perspectives. Thus, this paper proposes two fusion feature representations of DipPSSM and PseAAPSSM to integrate PSSM with DipC and PseAAC, respectively. When constructing each fusion representation, we introduce the balance factors to value the importance of its components. The optimal values of the balance factors are sought by genetic algorithm. Due to the high dimensionality of the proposed representations, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is used to find its important low dimensional structure, which is essential for classification and location prediction. The numerical experiments on two public datasets with KNN classifier and cross-validation tests showed that in terms of the common indexes of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and MCC, the proposed fusing representations outperform the traditional representations in protein sub-nuclear localization, and the representation treated by LDA outperforms the untreated one. PMID:26703574

  8. Similarity/Dissimilarity Analysis of Protein Sequences Based on a New Spectrum-Like Graphical Representation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuhua; Yan, Shoujiang; Xu, Huimin; Han, Jianning; Nan, Xuying; He, Ping-an; Dai, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Sequence comparison is one of the foundations in bioinformatics, which can be used to study evolutionary relations among the sequences. In this study, a 2D spectrum-like graphical representation of protein sequences is presented based on the hydrophobicity scale of amino acids. The frequencies of amplitudes of 4-subsequences are adopted to characterize a spectrum-like graph, and a 17D vector is used as the descriptor of protein sequence. The χ2 value of compatibility test is performed. New similarity analysis approach is illustrated on the all protein sequences, which are encoded by the mitochondrion genome of 20 different species. Finally, comparison with the ClustalW method shows the utility of our method. PMID:25002811

  9. Molten fatty acid based microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Noirjean, Cecile; Testard, Fabienne; Dejugnat, Christophe; Jestin, Jacques; Carriere, David

    2016-06-21

    We show that ternary mixtures of water (polar phase), myristic acid (MA, apolar phase) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB, cationic surfactant) studied above the melting point of myristic acid allow the preparation of microemulsions without adding a salt or a co-surfactant. The combination of SANS, SAXS/WAXS, DSC, and phase diagram determination allows a complete characterization of the structures and interactions between components in the molten fatty acid based microemulsions. For the different structures characterized (microemulsion, lamellar or hexagonal phases), a similar thermal behaviour is observed for all ternary MA/CTAB/water monophasic samples and for binary MA/CTAB mixtures without water: crystalline myristic acid melts at 52 °C, and a thermal transition at 70 °C is assigned to the breaking of hydrogen bounds inside the mixed myristic acid/CTAB complex (being the surfactant film in the ternary system). Water determines the film curvature, hence the structures observed at high temperature, but does not influence the thermal behaviour of the ternary system. Myristic acid is partitioned in two "species" that behave independently: pure myristic acid and myristic acid associated with CTAB to form an equimolar complex that plays the role of the surfactant film. We therefore show that myristic acid plays the role of a solvent (oil) and a co-surfactant allowing the fine tuning of the structure of oil and water mixtures. This solvosurfactant behaviour of long chain fatty acid opens the way for new formulations with a complex structure without the addition of any extra compound. PMID:27241163

  10. SAR target classification based on multiscale sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Huaiyu; Zhang, Rong; Li, Jingge; Zhan, Yibing

    2016-03-01

    We propose a novel multiscale sparse representation approach for SAR target classification. It firstly extracts the dense SIFT descriptors on multiple scales, then trains a global multiscale dictionary by sparse coding algorithm. After obtaining the sparse representation, the method applies spatial pyramid matching (SPM) and max pooling to summarize the features for each image. The proposed method can provide more information and descriptive ability than single-scale ones. Moreover, it costs less extra computation than existing multiscale methods which compute a dictionary for each scale. The MSTAR database and ship database collected from TerraSAR-X images are used in classification setup. Results show that the best overall classification rate of the proposed approach can achieve 98.83% on the MSTAR database and 92.67% on the TerraSAR-X ship database.

  11. Redundancy in perceptual and linguistic experience: comparing feature-based and distributional models of semantic representation.

    PubMed

    Riordan, Brian; Jones, Michael N

    2011-04-01

    Since their inception, distributional models of semantics have been criticized as inadequate cognitive theories of human semantic learning and representation. A principal challenge is that the representations derived by distributional models are purely symbolic and are not grounded in perception and action; this challenge has led many to favor feature-based models of semantic representation. We argue that the amount of perceptual and other semantic information that can be learned from purely distributional statistics has been underappreciated. We compare the representations of three feature-based and nine distributional models using a semantic clustering task. Several distributional models demonstrated semantic clustering comparable with clustering-based on feature-based representations. Furthermore, when trained on child-directed speech, the same distributional models perform as well as sensorimotor-based feature representations of children's lexical semantic knowledge. These results suggest that, to a large extent, information relevant for extracting semantic categories is redundantly coded in perceptual and linguistic experience. Detailed analyses of the semantic clusters of the feature-based and distributional models also reveal that the models make use of complementary cues to semantic organization from the two data streams. Rather than conceptualizing feature-based and distributional models as competing theories, we argue that future focus should be on understanding the cognitive mechanisms humans use to integrate the two sources. PMID:25164298

  12. An Accurate Projector Calibration Method Based on Polynomial Distortion Representation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Sun, Changku; Huang, Shujun; Zhang, Zonghua

    2015-01-01

    In structure light measurement systems or 3D printing systems, the errors caused by optical distortion of a digital projector always affect the precision performance and cannot be ignored. Existing methods to calibrate the projection distortion rely on calibration plate and photogrammetry, so the calibration performance is largely affected by the quality of the plate and the imaging system. This paper proposes a new projector calibration approach that makes use of photodiodes to directly detect the light emitted from a digital projector. By analyzing the output sequence of the photoelectric module, the pixel coordinates can be accurately obtained by the curve fitting method. A polynomial distortion representation is employed to reduce the residuals of the traditional distortion representation model. Experimental results and performance evaluation show that the proposed calibration method is able to avoid most of the disadvantages in traditional methods and achieves a higher accuracy. This proposed method is also practically applicable to evaluate the geometric optical performance of other optical projection system. PMID:26492247

  13. Maximum-Margin Based Representation Learning from Multiple Atlases for Alzheimer’s Disease Classification

    PubMed Central

    Min, Rui; Cheng, Jian; Price, True; Wu, Guorong; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    In order to establish the correspondences between different brains for comparison, spatial normalization based morphometric measurements have been widely used in the analysis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In the literature, different subjects are often compared in one atlas space, which may be insufficient in revealing complex brain changes. In this paper, instead of deploying one atlas for feature extraction and classification, we propose a maximum-margin based representation learning (MMRL) method to learn the optimal representation from multiple atlases. Unlike traditional methods that perform the representation learning separately from the classification, we propose to learn the new representation jointly with the classification model, which is more powerful in discriminating AD patients from normal controls (NC). We evaluated the proposed method on the ADNI database, and achieved 90.69% for AD/NC classification and 73.69% for p-MCI/s-MCI classification. PMID:25485381

  14. Improving the Representational Strategies of Children in a Music-Listening and Playing Task: An Intervention-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gil, Vicent; Reybrouck, Mark; Tejada, Jesús; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2015-01-01

    This intervention-based study focuses on the relation between music and its graphic representation from a meta-representational point of view. It aims to determine whether middle school students show an increase in meta-representational competence (MRC) after an educational intervention. Three classes of 11 to 14-year-old students participated in…

  15. Refining the Construct of Classroom-Based Writing-from-Readings Assessment: The Role of Task Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfersberger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that task representation should be considered as part of the construct of classroom-based academic writing. Task representation is a process that writers move through when creating a unique mental model of the requirements for each new writing task they encounter. Writers' task representations evolve throughout the composing…

  16. Use of an Acid-Base Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Grover; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Identifies several ways in which an acid-base table can provide students with information about chemical reactions. Cites examples of the chart's use and includes a table which indicates the strengths of some common acids and bases. (ML)

  17. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  18. The Use of Multiple Representations in a Web-Based and Situated Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Ying-Shao; Hwang, Fu-Kwun

    This article presents the development and evaluation of a Web-based lesson with multiple representations that is developed to cultivate situated learning. The quasi-experimental method along with semi-structured interviews was used to investigate the effects of a Web-based lesson on science learning at the senior high school level. Three classes…

  19. Multi-layer sparse representation for weighted LBP-patches based facial expression recognition.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qi; Gao, Xinkai; Guo, He; Luo, Zhongxuan; Wang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel facial expression recognition method based on sparse representation is proposed. Most contemporary facial expression recognition systems suffer from limited ability to handle image nuisances such as low resolution and noise. Especially for low intensity expression, most of the existing training methods have quite low recognition rates. Motivated by sparse representation, the problem can be solved by finding sparse coefficients of the test image by the whole training set. Deriving an effective facial representation from original face images is a vital step for successful facial expression recognition. We evaluate facial representation based on weighted local binary patterns, and Fisher separation criterion is used to calculate the weighs of patches. A multi-layer sparse representation framework is proposed for multi-intensity facial expression recognition, especially for low-intensity expressions and noisy expressions in reality, which is a critical problem but seldom addressed in the existing works. To this end, several experiments based on low-resolution and multi-intensity expressions are carried out. Promising results on publicly available databases demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach. PMID:25808772

  20. Robust Face Recognition via Minimum Error Entropy-Based Atomic Representation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulong; Tang, Yuan Yan; Li, Luoqing

    2015-12-01

    Representation-based classifiers (RCs) have attracted considerable attention in face recognition in recent years. However, most existing RCs use the mean square error (MSE) criterion as the cost function, which relies on the Gaussianity assumption of the error distribution and is sensitive to non-Gaussian noise. This may severely degrade the performance of MSE-based RCs in recognizing facial images with random occlusion and corruption. In this paper, we present a minimum error entropy-based atomic representation (MEEAR) framework for face recognition. Unlike existing MSE-based RCs, our framework is based on the minimum error entropy criterion, which is not dependent on the error distribution and shown to be more robust to noise. In particular, MEEAR can produce discriminative representation vector by minimizing the atomic norm regularized Renyi's entropy of the reconstruction error. The optimality conditions are provided for general atomic representation model. As a general framework, MEEAR can also be used as a platform to develop new classifiers. Two effective MEE-based RCs are proposed by defining appropriate atomic sets. The experimental results on popular face databases show that MEEAR can improve both the recognition accuracy and the reconstructed results compared with the state-of-the-art MSE-based RCs. PMID:26513784

  1. Graph representation of hepatic vessel based on centerline extraction and junction detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing; Tian, Jie; Deng, Kexin; Li, Xiuli; Yang, Fei

    2012-02-01

    In the area of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), segmentation and analysis of hepatic vessel is a prerequisite for hepatic diseases diagnosis and surgery planning. For liver surgery planning, it is crucial to provide the surgeon with a patient-individual three-dimensional representation of the liver along with its vasculature and lesions. The representation allows an exploration of the vascular anatomy and the measurement of vessel diameters, following by intra-patient registration, as well as the analysis of the shape and volume of vascular territories. In this paper, we present an approach for generation of hepatic vessel graph based on centerline extraction and junction detection. The proposed approach involves the following concepts and methods: 1) Flux driven automatic centerline extraction; 2) Junction detection on the centerline using hollow sphere filtering; 3) Graph representation of hepatic vessel based on the centerline and junction. The approach is evaluated on contrast-enhanced liver CT datasets to demonstrate its availability and effectiveness.

  2. Low-Rank and Eigenface Based Sparse Representation for Face Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yi-Fu; Sun, Zhan-Li; Chong, Yan-Wen; Zheng, Chun-Hou

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, based on low-rank representation and eigenface extraction, we present an improvement to the well known Sparse Representation based Classification (SRC). Firstly, the low-rank images of the face images of each individual in training subset are extracted by the Robust Principal Component Analysis (Robust PCA) to alleviate the influence of noises (e.g., illumination difference and occlusions). Secondly, Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is applied to extract the eigenfaces from these low-rank and approximate images. Finally, we utilize these eigenfaces to construct a compact and discriminative dictionary for sparse representation. We evaluate our method on five popular databases. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our method. PMID:25334027

  3. Grid-based representation and dynamic visualization of ionospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, L. M.; Yang, Y.; Su, C.; Yu, J. Q.; Yang, F.; Wu, L. X.

    2013-10-01

    The ionosphere is a dynamic system with complex structures. With the development of abundant global navigation satellite systems, the ionospheric electron density in different altitudes and its time variations can be obtained by ionospheric tomography technique using GNSS observations collected by the continuously operating GNSS tracking stations distributed over globe. However, it is difficult to represent and analyze global and local ionospheric electron density variations in three-dimensional (3D) space due to its complex structures. In this paper, we introduce a grid-based system to overcome this constraint. First, we give the principles, algorithms and procedures of GNSS-based ionospheric tomography technique. Then, the earth system spatial grid (ESSG) based on the spheroid degenerated octree grid (SDOG) is introduced in detail. Finally, more than 400 continuously operating GNSS receivers from the International GNSS Service are utilized to realize global ionospheric tomography, and then the ESSG is used to organize and express the tomography results in 4D, including 3 spatial dimensions and time.

  4. Image-based scene representation using wavelet-based interval morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Paul; Xu, Dan

    1999-07-01

    Scene appearance for a continuous range of viewpoint can be represented by a discrete set of images via image morphing. In this paper, we present a new robust image morphing scheme based on 2D wavelet transform and interval field interpolation. Traditional mesh-base and field-based morphing algorithms, usually designed in the spatial image space, suffer from very high time complexity and therefore make themselves impractical in real-time virtual environment applications. Compared with traditional morphing methods, the proposed wavelet-based interval morphing scheme performs interval interpolation in both the frequency and spatial spaces. First, the images of the scene can be significantly compressed in the frequency domain with little degradation in visual quality and therefore the complexity of the scene can be significantly reduced. Second, since a feature point in the image may correspond to a neighborhood in a subband image in the wavelet domain, we define feature interval for the wavelet-transformed images for an accurate feature matching between the morphing images. Based on the feature intervals, we employ the interval field interpolation to morph the images progressively in a coarse-to-fine process. Finally, we use a post-warping procedure to transform the interpolated views to its desired position. A nice future of using wavelet transformation is its multiresolution representation mode, which enables the progressive morphing of scene.

  5. Sparse coding based dense feature representation model for hyperspectral image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguslu, Ender; Zhou, Guoqing; Zheng, Zezhong; Iftekharuddin, Khan; Li, Jiang

    2015-11-01

    We present a sparse coding based dense feature representation model (a preliminary version of the paper was presented at the SPIE Remote Sensing Conference, Dresden, Germany, 2013) for hyperspectral image (HSI) classification. The proposed method learns a new representation for each pixel in HSI through the following four steps: sub-band construction, dictionary learning, encoding, and feature selection. The new representation usually has a very high dimensionality requiring a large amount of computational resources. We applied the l1/lq regularized multiclass logistic regression technique to reduce the size of the new representation. We integrated the method with a linear support vector machine (SVM) and a composite kernels SVM (CKSVM) to discriminate different types of land cover. We evaluated the proposed algorithm on three well-known HSI datasets and compared our method to four recently developed classification methods: SVM, CKSVM, simultaneous orthogonal matching pursuit, and image fusion and recursive filtering. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve better overall and average classification accuracies with a much more compact representation leading to more efficient sparse models for HSI classification.

  6. Ontology and modeling patterns for state-based behavior representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castet, Jean-Francois; Rozek, Matthew L.; Ingham, Michel D.; Rouquette, Nicolas F.; Chung, Seung H.; Kerzhner, Aleksandr A.; Donahue, Kenneth M.; Jenkins, J. Steven; Wagner, David A.; Dvorak, Daniel L.; Karban, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an approach to capture state-based behavior of elements, that is, the specification of their state evolution in time, and the interactions amongst them. Elements can be components (e.g., sensors, actuators) or environments, and are characterized by state variables that vary with time. The behaviors of these elements, as well as interactions among them are represented through constraints on state variables. This paper discusses the concepts and relationships introduced in this behavior ontology, and the modeling patterns associated with it. Two example cases are provided to illustrate their usage, as well as to demonstrate the flexibility and scalability of the behavior ontology: a simple flashlight electrical model and a more complex spacecraft model involving instruments, power and data behaviors. Finally, an implementation in a SysML profile is provided.

  7. Growth Points in Linking Representations of Function: A Research-Based Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronda, Erlina

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes five growth points in linking representations of function developed from a study of secondary school learners. Framed within the cognitivist perspective and process-object conception of function, the growth points were identified and described based on linear and quadratic function tasks learners can do and their strategies…

  8. An Individualized e-Reading System Developed Based on Multi-Representations Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, Chien-Chuan; Chiang, Chun-Han; Lin, Yun-Lung; Chen, Ming-Chung

    2011-01-01

    Students with disabilities encounter many difficulties in learning activities, especially in reading. To help them participate in reading activities more effectively, this study proposed an integrated reading support system based on the principle of multiple representations. An integrated e-reading support system provides physical, sensory, and…

  9. Supporting Representational Competence in High School Biology with Computer-Based Biomolecular Visualizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, Anna; Brinkerhoff, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of computer-based biomolecular visualization activities on the development of high school biology students' representational competence as a means of understanding and visualizing protein structure/function relationships. Also assessed were students' attitudes toward these activities. Sixty-nine students…

  10. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: New bases of representation for the unitary parasupersymmetry algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, H.

    2003-01-01

    Representation bases of unitary parasupersymmetry algebra of arbitrary order p is constructed by some one-dimensional models which are shape invariant with respect to the main quantum number n. Consequently, the isospectral Hamiltonians and their exact solutions are obtained as labelled by the main quantum number n.

  11. The Effect of Project-Based Learning on Students' Statistical Literacy Levels for Data Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koparan, Timur; Güven, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    The point of this study is to define the effect of project-based learning approach on 8th Grade secondary-school students' statistical literacy levels for data representation. To achieve this goal, a test which consists of 12 open-ended questions in accordance with the views of experts was developed. Seventy 8th grade secondary-school students, 35…

  12. Two-stage sparse representation-based face recognition with reconstructed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guangtao; Song, Zhanjie; Lei, Yang; Han, Xiuning

    2014-09-01

    In order to address the challenges that both the training and testing images are contaminated by random pixels corruption, occlusion, and disguise, a robust face recognition algorithm based on two-stage sparse representation is proposed. Specifically, noises in the training images are first eliminated by low-rank matrix recovery. Then, by exploiting the first-stage sparse representation computed by solving a new extended ℓ1-minimization problem, noises in the testing image can be successfully removed. After the elimination, feature extraction techniques that are more discriminative but are sensitive to noise can be effectively performed on the reconstructed clean images, and the final classification is accomplished by utilizing the second-stage sparse representation obtained by solving the reduced ℓ1-minimization problem in a low-dimensional feature space. Extensive experiments are conducted on publicly available databases to verify the superiority and robustness of our algorithm.

  13. Acoustic emission source localization based on distance domain signal representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, M.; Grabowski, K.; Russek, P.; Staszewski, W. J.; Uhl, T.; Packo, P.

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission is a vital non-destructive testing technique and is widely used in industry for damage detection, localisation and characterization. The latter two aspects are particularly challenging, as AE data are typically noisy. What is more, elastic waves generated by an AE event, propagate through a structural path and are significantly distorted. This effect is particularly prominent for thin elastic plates. In these media the dispersion phenomenon results in severe localisation and characterization issues. Traditional Time Difference of Arrival methods for localisation techniques typically fail when signals are highly dispersive. Hence, algorithms capable of dispersion compensation are sought. This paper presents a method based on the Time - Distance Domain Transform for an accurate AE event localisation. The source localisation is found through a minimization problem. The proposed technique focuses on transforming the time signal to the distance domain response, which would be recorded at the source. Only, basic elastic material properties and plate thickness are used in the approach, avoiding arbitrary parameters tuning.

  14. An object-based compression system for a class of dynamic image-based representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing; Ng, King-To; Chan, Shing-Chow; Shum, Heung-Yeung

    2005-07-01

    This paper proposes a new object-based compression system for a class of dynamic image-based representations called plenoptic videos (PVs). PVs are simplified dynamic light fields, where the videos are taken at regularly spaced locations along line segments instead of a 2-D plane. The proposed system employs an object-based approach, where objects at different depth values are segmented to improve the rendering quality as in the pop-up light fields. Furthermore, by coding the plenoptic video at the object level, desirable functionalities such as scalability of contents, error resilience, and interactivity with individual IBR objects can be achieved. Besides supporting the coding of the texture and binary shape maps for IBR objects with arbitrary shapes, the proposed system also supports the coding of gray-scale alpha maps as well as geometry information in the form of depth maps to respectively facilitate the matting and rendering of the IBR objects. To improve the coding performance, the proposed compression system exploits both the temporal redundancy and spatial redundancy among the video object streams in the PV by employing disparity-compensated prediction or spatial prediction in its texture, shape and depth coding processes. To demonstrate the principle and effectiveness of the proposed system, a multiple video camera system was built and experimental results show that considerable improvements in coding performance are obtained for both synthetic scene and real scene, while supporting the stated object-based functionalities.

  15. Locality Constrained Joint Dynamic Sparse Representation for Local Matching Based Face Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianzhong; Yi, Yugen; Zhou, Wei; Shi, Yanjiao; Qi, Miao; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Baoxue; Kong, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Sparse Representation-based Classification (SRC) has attracted a lot of attention for its applications to various tasks, especially in biometric techniques such as face recognition. However, factors such as lighting, expression, pose and disguise variations in face images will decrease the performances of SRC and most other face recognition techniques. In order to overcome these limitations, we propose a robust face recognition method named Locality Constrained Joint Dynamic Sparse Representation-based Classification (LCJDSRC) in this paper. In our method, a face image is first partitioned into several smaller sub-images. Then, these sub-images are sparsely represented using the proposed locality constrained joint dynamic sparse representation algorithm. Finally, the representation results for all sub-images are aggregated to obtain the final recognition result. Compared with other algorithms which process each sub-image of a face image independently, the proposed algorithm regards the local matching-based face recognition as a multi-task learning problem. Thus, the latent relationships among the sub-images from the same face image are taken into account. Meanwhile, the locality information of the data is also considered in our algorithm. We evaluate our algorithm by comparing it with other state-of-the-art approaches. Extensive experiments on four benchmark face databases (ORL, Extended YaleB, AR and LFW) demonstrate the effectiveness of LCJDSRC. PMID:25419662

  16. Shape representation for efficient landmark-based segmentation in 3-d.

    PubMed

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach to landmark-based shape representation that is based on transportation theory, where landmarks are considered as sources and destinations, all possible landmark connections as roads, and established landmark connections as goods transported via these roads. Landmark connections, which are selectively established, are identified through their statistical properties describing the shape of the object of interest, and indicate the least costly roads for transporting goods from sources to destinations. From such a perspective, we introduce three novel shape representations that are combined with an existing landmark detection algorithm based on game theory. To reduce computational complexity, which results from the extension from 2-D to 3-D segmentation, landmark detection is augmented by a concept known in game theory as strategy dominance. The novel shape representations, game-theoretic landmark detection and strategy dominance are combined into a segmentation framework that was evaluated on 3-D computed tomography images of lumbar vertebrae and femoral heads. The best shape representation yielded symmetric surface distance of 0.75 mm and 1.11 mm, and Dice coefficient of 93.6% and 96.2% for lumbar vertebrae and femoral heads, respectively. By applying strategy dominance, the computational costs were further reduced for up to three times. PMID:24710155

  17. Improving the learning of clinical reasoning through computer-based cognitive representation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bian; Wang, Minhong; Johnson, Janice M.; Grotzer, Tina A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Clinical reasoning is usually taught using a problem-solving approach, which is widely adopted in medical education. However, learning through problem solving is difficult as a result of the contextualization and dynamic aspects of actual problems. Moreover, knowledge acquired from problem-solving practice tends to be inert and fragmented. This study proposed a computer-based cognitive representation approach that externalizes and facilitates the complex processes in learning clinical reasoning. The approach is operationalized in a computer-based cognitive representation tool that involves argument mapping to externalize the problem-solving process and concept mapping to reveal the knowledge constructed from the problems. Methods Twenty-nine Year 3 or higher students from a medical school in east China participated in the study. Participants used the proposed approach implemented in an e-learning system to complete four learning cases in 4 weeks on an individual basis. For each case, students interacted with the problem to capture critical data, generate and justify hypotheses, make a diagnosis, recall relevant knowledge, and update their conceptual understanding of the problem domain. Meanwhile, students used the computer-based cognitive representation tool to articulate and represent the key elements and their interactions in the learning process. Results A significant improvement was found in students’ learning products from the beginning to the end of the study, consistent with students’ report of close-to-moderate progress in developing problem-solving and knowledge-construction abilities. No significant differences were found between the pretest and posttest scores with the 4-week period. The cognitive representation approach was found to provide more formative assessment. Conclusions The computer-based cognitive representation approach improved the learning of clinical reasoning in both problem solving and knowledge construction. PMID:25518871

  18. Secure base representations for both fathers and mothers predict children's secure base behavior in a sample of Portuguese families.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Ligia; Verissimo, Manuela; Vaughn, Brian E; Santos, Antonio J; Bost, Kelly K

    2008-06-01

    Relations between fathers' and mothers' representations of attachment (independently assessed using an attachment script representation task) and children's secure base behavior (assessed using the Attachment Q-sort; AQS) were studied in 56 Portuguese families (mean age of child = 31.9 months). Each parent's secure base script representation score predicted AQS security scores for the child with that parent at approximately equivalent degrees of association. However, both parental secure base script scores and AQS security scores were positively correlated across parents. A hierarchical regression predicting AQS security with father from both parent's scriptedness scores and from the AQS score with mother showed a unique, significant influence of father's scriptedness score and the AQS score with mother, but mother's scriptedness score did not uniquely add to the prediction. Difficult temperament was ruled out as a mediator of the cross-parent association for AQS security scores. PMID:18773318

  19. Integration of object-oriented knowledge representation with the CLIPS rule based system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logie, David S.; Kamil, Hasan

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes a portion of the work aimed at developing an integrated, knowledge based environment for the development of engineering-oriented applications. An Object Representation Language (ORL) was implemented in C++ which is used to build and modify an object-oriented knowledge base. The ORL was designed in such a way so as to be easily integrated with other representation schemes that could effectively reason with the object base. Specifically, the integration of the ORL with the rule based system C Language Production Systems (CLIPS), developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center, will be discussed. The object-oriented knowledge representation provides a natural means of representing problem data as a collection of related objects. Objects are comprised of descriptive properties and interrelationships. The object-oriented model promotes efficient handling of the problem data by allowing knowledge to be encapsulated in objects. Data is inherited through an object network via the relationship links. Together, the two schemes complement each other in that the object-oriented approach efficiently handles problem data while the rule based knowledge is used to simulate the reasoning process. Alone, the object based knowledge is little more than an object-oriented data storage scheme; however, the CLIPS inference engine adds the mechanism to directly and automatically reason with that knowledge. In this hybrid scheme, the expert system dynamically queries for data and can modify the object base with complete access to all the functionality of the ORL from rules.

  20. Virtual images inspired consolidate collaborative representation-based classification method for face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shigang; Zhang, Xinxin; Peng, Yali; Cao, Han

    2016-07-01

    The collaborative representation-based classification method performs well in the field of classification of high-dimensional images such as face recognition. It utilizes training samples from all classes to represent a test sample and assigns a class label to the test sample using the representation residuals. However, this method still suffers from the problem that limited number of training sample influences the classification accuracy when applied to image classification. In this paper, we propose a modified collaborative representation-based classification method (MCRC), which exploits novel virtual images and can obtain high classification accuracy. The procedure to produce virtual images is very simple but the use of them can bring surprising performance improvement. The virtual images can sufficiently denote the features of original face images in some case. Extensive experimental results doubtlessly demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively improve the classification accuracy. This is mainly attributed to the integration of the collaborative representation and the proposed feature-information dominated virtual images.

  1. Temporal logic and operation relations based knowledge representation for land cover change web services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Wu, Hao; Li, Songnian; Liao, Anping; He, Chaoying; Peng, Shu

    2013-09-01

    Providing land cover spatio-temporal information and geo-computing through web service is a new challenge for supporting global change research, earth system simulation and many other societal benefit areas. This requires an integrated knowledge representation and web implementation of static land cover and change information, as well as the related operations for geo-computing. The temporal logic relations among land cover snapshots and increments were examined with a matrix-based three-step analysis. Twelve temporal logic relations were identified and five basic spatial operations were formalized with set operators, which were all used to develop algorithms for deriving implicit change information. A knowledge representation for land cover change information was then developed based on these temporal logic and operation relations. A prototype web-service system was further implemented based on OWL-DL. Both online access and conversion of land cover spatio-temporal information can be facilitated with such a web service system.

  2. A Frame-based Representation for a Bedside Ventilator Weaning Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Sorenson, D; Grissom, CK; Carpenter, L; Austin, A; Sward, K; Napoli, L; Warner, HR; Morris, AH

    2016-01-01

    We describe the use of a frame-based knowledge representation to construct an adequately-explicit bedside clinical decision support application for ventilator weaning. The application consists of a data entry form, a knowledge base, an inference engine, and a patient database. The knowledge base contains database queries, a data dictionary, and decision frames. A frame consists of a title, a list of findings necessary to make a decision or carry out an action, and a logic or mathematical statement to determine its output. Frames for knowledge representation are advantageous because they can be created, visualized, and conceptualized as self-contained entities that correspond to accepted medical constructs. They facilitate knowledge engineering and provide understandable explanations of protocol outputs for clinicians. Our frames are elements of a hierarchical decision process. In addition to running diagnostic and therapeutic logic, frames can run database queries, make changes to the user interface, and modify computer variables. PMID:18358789

  3. Reexamining the language account of cross-national differences in base-10 number representations.

    PubMed

    Vasilyeva, Marina; Laski, Elida V; Ermakova, Anna; Lai, Weng-Feng; Jeong, Yoonkyung; Hachigian, Amy

    2015-01-01

    East Asian students consistently outperform students from other nations in mathematics. One explanation for this advantage is a language account; East Asian languages, unlike most Western languages, provide cues about the base-10 structure of multi-digit numbers, facilitating the development of base-10 number representations. To test this view, the current study examined how kindergartners represented two-digit numbers using single unit-blocks and ten-blocks. The participants (N=272) were from four language groups (Korean, Mandarin, English, and Russian) that vary in the extent of "transparency" of the base-10 structure. In contrast to previous findings with older children, kindergartners showed no cross-language variability in the frequency of producing base-10 representations. Furthermore, they showed a pattern of within-language variability that was not consistent with the language account and was likely attributable to experiential factors. These findings suggest that language might not play as critical a role in the development of base-10 representations as suggested in earlier research. PMID:25240152

  4. A Computational Shape-based Model of Anger and Sadness Justifies a Configural Representation of Faces

    PubMed Central

    Neth, Donald; Martinez, Aleix M.

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that configural cues (second-order relations) play a major role in the representation and classification of face images; making faces a “special” class of objects, since object recognition seems to use different encoding mechanisms. It is less clear, however, how this representation emerges and whether this representation is also used in the recognition of facial expressions of emotion. In this paper, we show how configural cues emerge naturally from a classical analysis of shape in the recognition of anger and sadness. In particular our results suggest that at least two of the dimensions of the computational (cognitive) space of facial expressions of emotion correspond to pure configural changes. The first of these dimensions measures the distance between the eyebrows and the mouth, while the second is concerned with the height-width ratio of the face. Under this proposed model, becoming a face “expert” would mean to move from the generic shape representation to that based on configural cues. These results suggest that the recognition of facial expressions of emotion shares this expertise property with the other processes of face processing. PMID:20510267

  5. User-based representation of time-resolved multimodal public transportation networks.

    PubMed

    Alessandretti, Laura; Karsai, Márton; Gauvin, Laetitia

    2016-07-01

    Multimodal transportation systems, with several coexisting services like bus, tram and metro, can be represented as time-resolved multilayer networks where the different transportation modes connecting the same set of nodes are associated with distinct network layers. Their quantitative description became possible recently due to openly accessible datasets describing the geo-localized transportation dynamics of large urban areas. Advancements call for novel analytics, which combines earlier established methods and exploits the inherent complexity of the data. Here, we provide a novel user-based representation of public transportation systems, which combines representations, accounting for the presence of multiple lines and reducing the effect of spatial embeddedness, while considering the total travel time, its variability across the schedule, and taking into account the number of transfers necessary. After the adjustment of earlier techniques to the novel representation framework, we analyse the public transportation systems of several French municipal areas and identify hidden patterns of privileged connections. Furthermore, we study their efficiency as compared to the commuting flow. The proposed representation could help to enhance resilience of local transportation systems to provide better design policies for future developments. PMID:27493773

  6. User-based representation of time-resolved multimodal public transportation networks

    PubMed Central

    Alessandretti, Laura; Gauvin, Laetitia

    2016-01-01

    Multimodal transportation systems, with several coexisting services like bus, tram and metro, can be represented as time-resolved multilayer networks where the different transportation modes connecting the same set of nodes are associated with distinct network layers. Their quantitative description became possible recently due to openly accessible datasets describing the geo-localized transportation dynamics of large urban areas. Advancements call for novel analytics, which combines earlier established methods and exploits the inherent complexity of the data. Here, we provide a novel user-based representation of public transportation systems, which combines representations, accounting for the presence of multiple lines and reducing the effect of spatial embeddedness, while considering the total travel time, its variability across the schedule, and taking into account the number of transfers necessary. After the adjustment of earlier techniques to the novel representation framework, we analyse the public transportation systems of several French municipal areas and identify hidden patterns of privileged connections. Furthermore, we study their efficiency as compared to the commuting flow. The proposed representation could help to enhance resilience of local transportation systems to provide better design policies for future developments. PMID:27493773

  7. Multi-Atlas Based Representations for Alzheimer’s Disease Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Min, Rui; Wu, Guorong; Cheng, Jian; Wang, Qian; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Brain morphometry based classification from magnetic resonance (MR) acquisitions has been widely investigated in the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and its prodromal stage, i.e., mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In the literature, a morphometric representation of brain structures is obtained by spatial normalization of each image into a common space (i.e., a pre-defined atlas) via non-linear registration, thus the corresponding regions in different brains can be compared. However, representations generated from one single atlas may not be sufficient to reveal the underlying anatomical differences between the groups of disease-affected patients and normal controls (NC). In this article, we propose a different methodology, namely the multi-atlas based morphometry, which measures morphometric representations of the same image in different spaces of multiple atlases. Representations generated from different atlases can thus provide the complementary information to discriminate different groups, and also reduce the negative impacts from registration errors. Specifically, each studied subject is registered to multiple atlases, where adaptive regional features are extracted. Then, all features from different atlases are jointly selected by a correlation and relevance based scheme, followed by final classification with the support vector machine (SVM). We have evaluated the proposed method on 459 subjects (97 AD, 117 progressive-MCI (p-MCI), 117 stable-MCI (s-MCI), and 128 NC) from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database, and achieved 91.64% for AD/NC classification and 72.41% for p-MCI/s-MCI classification. Our results clearly demonstrate that the proposed multi-atlas based method can significantly outperform the previous single-atlas based methods. PMID:24753060

  8. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  9. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  10. Sparse Representation-Based Image Quality Index With Adaptive Sub-Dictionaries.

    PubMed

    Li, Leida; Cai, Hao; Zhang, Yabin; Lin, Weisi; Kot, Alex C; Sun, Xingming

    2016-08-01

    Distortions cause structural changes in digital images, leading to degraded visual quality. Dictionary-based sparse representation has been widely studied recently due to its ability to extract inherent image structures. Meantime, it can extract image features with slightly higher level semantics. Intuitively, sparse representation can be used for image quality assessment, because visible distortions can cause significant changes to the sparse features. In this paper, a new sparse representation-based image quality assessment model is proposed based on the construction of adaptive sub-dictionaries. An overcomplete dictionary trained from natural images is employed to capture the structure changes between the reference and distorted images by sparse feature extraction via adaptive sub-dictionary selection. Based on the observation that image sparse features are invariant to weak degradations and the perceived image quality is generally influenced by diverse issues, three auxiliary quality features are added, including gradient, color, and luminance information. The proposed method is not sensitive to training images, so a universal dictionary can be adopted for quality evaluation. Extensive experiments on five public image quality databases demonstrate that the proposed method produces the state-of-the-art results, and it delivers consistently well performances when tested in different image quality databases. PMID:27295675

  11. Multisensory Part-based Representations of Objects in Human Lateral Occipital Cortex.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Goker; Chen, Quanjing; Garcea, Frank E; Mahon, Bradford Z; Jacobs, Robert A

    2016-06-01

    The format of high-level object representations in temporal-occipital cortex is a fundamental and as yet unresolved issue. Here we use fMRI to show that human lateral occipital cortex (LOC) encodes novel 3-D objects in a multisensory and part-based format. We show that visual and haptic exploration of objects leads to similar patterns of neural activity in human LOC and that the shared variance between visually and haptically induced patterns of BOLD contrast in LOC reflects the part structure of the objects. We also show that linear classifiers trained on neural data from LOC on a subset of the objects successfully predict a novel object based on its component part structure. These data demonstrate a multisensory code for object representations in LOC that specifies the part structure of objects. PMID:26918587

  12. Top-down attention based on object representation and incremental memory for knowledge building and inference.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bumhwi; Ban, Sang-Woo; Lee, Minho

    2013-10-01

    Humans can efficiently perceive arbitrary visual objects based on an incremental learning mechanism with selective attention. This paper proposes a new task specific top-down attention model to locate a target object based on its form and color representation along with a bottom-up saliency based on relativity of primitive visual features and some memory modules. In the proposed model top-down bias signals corresponding to the target form and color features are generated, which draw the preferential attention to the desired object by the proposed selective attention model in concomitance with the bottom-up saliency process. The object form and color representation and memory modules have an incremental learning mechanism together with a proper object feature representation scheme. The proposed model includes a Growing Fuzzy Topology Adaptive Resonance Theory (GFTART) network which plays two important roles in object color and form biased attention; one is to incrementally learn and memorize color and form features of various objects, and the other is to generate a top-down bias signal to localize a target object by focusing on the candidate local areas. Moreover, the GFTART network can be utilized for knowledge inference which enables the perception of new unknown objects on the basis of the object form and color features stored in the memory during training. Experimental results show that the proposed model is successful in focusing on the specified target objects, in addition to the incremental representation and memorization of various objects in natural scenes. In addition, the proposed model properly infers new unknown objects based on the form and color features of previously trained objects. PMID:23624577

  13. The Kidney and Acid-Base Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koeppen, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    Since the topic of the role of the kidneys in the regulation of acid base balance was last reviewed from a teaching perspective (Koeppen BM. Renal regulation of acid-base balance. Adv Physiol Educ 20: 132-141, 1998), our understanding of the specific membrane transporters involved in H+, HCO , and NH transport, and especially how these…

  14. Students' Alternate Conceptions on Acids and Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Hanqing; Henriques, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Knowing what students bring to the classroom can and should influence how we teach them. This study is a review of the literature associated with secondary and postsecondary students' ideas about acids and bases. It was found that there are six types of alternate ideas about acids and bases that students hold. These are: macroscopic properties of…

  15. The Conjugate Acid-Base Chart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treptow, Richard S.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the difficulties that beginning chemistry students have in understanding acid-base chemistry. Describes the use of conjugate acid-base charts in helping students visualize the conjugate relationship. Addresses chart construction, metal ions, buffers and pH titrations, and the organic functional groups and nonaqueous solvents. (TW)

  16. Internal representations for face detection: an application of noise-based image classification to BOLD responses.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Adrian; Vettel, Jean M; Tarr, Michael J

    2013-11-01

    What basic visual structures underlie human face detection and how can we extract such structures directly from the amplitude of neural responses elicited by face processing? Here, we address these issues by investigating an extension of noise-based image classification to BOLD responses recorded in high-level visual areas. First, we assess the applicability of this classification method to such data and, second, we explore its results in connection with the neural processing of faces. To this end, we construct luminance templates from white noise fields based on the response of face-selective areas in the human ventral cortex. Using behaviorally and neurally-derived classification images, our results reveal a family of simple but robust image structures subserving face representation and detection. Thus, we confirm the role played by classical face selective regions in face detection and we help clarify the representational basis of this perceptual function. From a theory standpoint, our findings support the idea of simple but highly diagnostic neurally-coded features for face detection. At the same time, from a methodological perspective, our work demonstrates the ability of noise-based image classification in conjunction with fMRI to help uncover the structure of high-level perceptual representations. PMID:22711230

  17. Model based matching using simulated annealing and a minimum representation size criterion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravichandran, B.; Sanderson, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    We define the model based matching problem in terms of the correspondence and transformation that relate the model and scene, and the search and evaluation measures needed to find the best correspondence and transformation. Simulated annealing is proposed as a method for search and optimization, and the minimum representation size criterion is used as the evaluation measure in an algorithm that finds the best correspondence. An algorithm based on simulated annealing is presented and evaluated. This algorithm is viewed as a part of an adaptive, hierarchical approach which provides robust results for a variety of model based matching problems.

  18. Spacetime texture representation and recognition based on a spatiotemporal orientation analysis.

    PubMed

    Derpanis, Konstantinos G; Wildes, Richard P

    2012-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the representation and recognition of the observed dynamics (i.e., excluding purely spatial appearance cues) of spacetime texture based on a spatiotemporal orientation analysis. The term "spacetime texture" is taken to refer to patterns in visual spacetime, (x,y,t), that primarily are characterized by the aggregate dynamic properties of elements or local measurements accumulated over a region of spatiotemporal support, rather than in terms of the dynamics of individual constituents. Examples include image sequences of natural processes that exhibit stochastic dynamics (e.g., fire, water, and windblown vegetation) as well as images of simpler dynamics when analyzed in terms of aggregate region properties (e.g., uniform motion of elements in imagery, such as pedestrians and vehicular traffic). Spacetime texture representation and recognition is important as it provides an early means of capturing the structure of an ensuing image stream in a meaningful fashion. Toward such ends, a novel approach to spacetime texture representation and an associated recognition method are described based on distributions (histograms) of spacetime orientation structure. Empirical evaluation on both standard and original image data sets shows the promise of the approach, including significant improvement over alternative state-of-the-art approaches in recognizing the same pattern from different viewpoints. PMID:22064801

  19. Representation-based user interfaces for the audiovisual library of the year 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigrain, Philippe; Joly, Philippe; Lepain, Philippe; Longueville, Veronique

    1995-03-01

    The audiovisual library of the future will be based on computerized access to digitized documents. In this communication, we address the user interface issues which will arise from this new situation. One cannot simply transfer a user interface designed for the piece by piece production of some audiovisual presentation and make it a tool for accessing full-length movies in an electronic library. One cannot take a digital sound editing tool and propose it as a means to listen to a musical recording. In our opinion, when computers are used as mediations to existing contents, document representation-based user interfaces are needed. With such user interfaces, a structured visual representation of the document contents is presented to the user, who can then manipulate it to control perception and analysis of these contents. In order to build such manipulable visual representations of audiovisual documents, one needs to automatically extract structural information from the documents contents. In this communication, we describe possible visual interfaces for various temporal media, and we propose methods for the economically feasible large scale processing of documents. The work presented is sponsored by the Bibliotheque Nationale de France: it is part of the program aiming at developing for image and sound documents an experimental counterpart to the digitized text reading workstation of this library.

  20. Quantum representation and watermark strategy for color images based on the controlled rotation of qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Panchi; Xiao, Hong; Li, Binxu

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a novel quantum representation and watermarking scheme based on the controlled rotation of qubits are proposed. Firstly, a flexible representation for quantum color image (FRQCI) is proposed to facilitate the image processing tasks. Some basic image processing operations based on FRQCI representation are introduced. Then, a novel watermarking scheme for quantum images is presented. In our scheme, the carrier image is stored in the phase θ of a qubit; at the same time, the watermark image is embedded into the phase φ of a qubit, which will not affect the carrier image's visual effect. Before being embedded into the carrier image, the watermark image is scrambled to be seemingly meaningless using quantum circuits, which further ensures the security of the watermark image. All the operations mentioned above are implemented by the controlled rotation of qubits. The experimental results on the classical computer show that the proposed watermarking scheme has better visual quality under a higher embedding capacity and outperforms the existing schemes in the literature.

  1. Ontology-based time information representation of vaccine adverse events in VAERS for temporal analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The U.S. FDA/CDC Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) provides a valuable data source for post-vaccination adverse event analyses. The structured data in the system has been widely used, but the information in the write-up narratives is rarely included in these kinds of analyses. In fact, the unstructured nature of the narratives makes the data embedded in them difficult to be used for any further studies. Results We developed an ontology-based approach to represent the data in the narratives in a “machine-understandable” way, so that it can be easily queried and further analyzed. Our focus is the time aspect in the data for time trending analysis. The Time Event Ontology (TEO), Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE), and Vaccine Ontology (VO) are leveraged for the semantic representation of this purpose. A VAERS case report is presented as a use case for the ontological representations. The advantages of using our ontology-based Semantic web representation and data analysis are emphasized. Conclusions We believe that representing both the structured data and the data from write-up narratives in an integrated, unified, and “machine-understandable” way can improve research for vaccine safety analyses, causality assessments, and retrospective studies. PMID:23256916

  2. The Neural Representation of Unexpected Uncertainty During Value-Based Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Payzan-LeNestour, Elise; Dunne, Simon; Bossaerts, Peter; O'Doherty, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Uncertainty is an inherent property of the environment and a central feature of models of decision-making and learning. Theoretical propositions suggest that one form, unexpected uncertainty, may be used to rapidly adapt to changes in the environment, while being influenced by two other forms: risk and estimation uncertainty. While previous studies have reported neural representations of estimation uncertainty and risk, relatively little is known about unexpected uncertainty. Here, participants performed a decision-making task while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which, in combination with a Bayesian model-based analysis, enabled each form of uncertainty to be separately measured. We found representations of unexpected uncertainty in multiple cortical areas, as well as the noradrenergic brainstem nucleus locus coeruleus. Other unique cortical regions were found to encode risk, estimation uncertainty and learning rate. Collectively, these findings support theoretical models in which several formally separable uncertainty computations determine the speed of learning. PMID:23849203

  3. A geometric modeler based on a dual-geometry representation polyhedra and rational b-splines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klosterman, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    For speed and data base reasons, solid geometric modeling of large complex practical systems is usually approximated by a polyhedra representation. Precise parametric surface and implicit algebraic modelers are available but it is not yet practical to model the same level of system complexity with these precise modelers. In response to this contrast the GEOMOD geometric modeling system was built so that a polyhedra abstraction of the geometry would be available for interactive modeling without losing the precise definition of the geometry. Part of the reason that polyhedra modelers are effective is that all bounded surfaces can be represented in a single canonical format (i.e., sets of planar polygons). This permits a very simple and compact data structure. Nonuniform rational B-splines are currently the best representation to describe a very large class of geometry precisely with one canonical format. The specific capabilities of the modeler are described.

  4. Fluorescent sensors based on boronic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christopher R.; James, Tony D.

    1999-05-01

    Sensor systems have long been needed for detecting the presence in solution of certain chemically or biologically important species. Sensors are used in a wide range of applications from simple litmus paper that shows a single color change in acidic or basic environments to complex biological assays that use enzymes, antibodies and antigens to display binding events. With this work the use of boronic acids in the design and synthesis of sensors for saccharides (diols) will be presented. The fluorescent sensory systems rely on photoinduced electron transfer (PET) to modulate the observed fluorescence. When saccharides form cyclic boronate esters with boronic acids, the Lewis acidity of the boronic acid is enhanced and therefore the Lewis acid-base interaction between the boronic acid and a neighboring amine is strengthened. The strength of this acid-base interaction modulates the PET from the amine (acting as a quencher) to anthracene (acting as a fluorophore). These compounds show increased fluorescence at neutral pH through suppression of the PET from nitrogen to anthracene on saccharide binding. The general strategy for the development of saccharide selective systems will be discussed. The potential of the boronic acid based systems will be illustrated using the development of glucose and glucosamine selective fluorescent sensors as examples.

  5. [Recognition of water-injected meat based on visible/near-infrared spectrum and sparse representation].

    PubMed

    Hao, Dong-mei; Zhou, Ya-nan; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Song; Yang, Yi-min; Lin, Ling; Li, Gang; Wang, Xiu-li

    2015-01-01

    The present paper proposed a new nondestructive method based on visible/near infrared spectrum (Vis/NIRS) and sparse representation to rapidly and accurately discriminate between raw meat and water-injected meat. Water-injected meat model was built by injecting water into non-destructed meat samples comprising pigskin, fat layer and muscle layer. Vis/NIRS data were collected from raw meat and six scales of water-injected meat with spectrometers. To reduce the redundant information in the spectrum and improve the difference between the samples,. some preprocessing steps were performed for the spectral data, including light modulation and normalization. Effective spectral bands were extracted from the preprocessed spectral data. The meat samples were classified as raw meat and water-injected meat, and further, water-injected meat with different water injection rates. All the training samples were used to compose an atom dictionary, and test samples were represented by the sparsest linear combinations of these atoms via l1-minimization. Projection errors of test samples with respect to each category were calculated. A test sample was classified to the category with the minimum projection error, and leave-one-out cross-validation was conducted. The recognition performance from sparse representation was compared with that from support vector machine (SVM).. Experimental results showed that the overall recognition accuracy of sparse representation for raw meat and water-injected meat was more than 90%, which was higher than that of SVM. For water-injected meat samples with different water injection rates, the recognition accuracy presented a positive correlation with the water injection rate difference. Spare representation-based classifier eliminates the need for the training and feature extraction steps required by conventional pattern recognition models, and is suitable for processing data of high dimensionality and small sample size. Furthermore, it has a low

  6. Secure base representations in middle childhood across two Western cultures: Associations with parental attachment representations and maternal reports of behavior problems.

    PubMed

    Waters, Theodore E A; Bosmans, Guy; Vandevivere, Eva; Dujardin, Adinda; Waters, Harriet S

    2015-08-01

    Recent work examining the content and organization of attachment representations suggests that 1 way in which we represent the attachment relationship is in the form of a cognitive script. This work has largely focused on early childhood or adolescence/adulthood, leaving a large gap in our understanding of script-like attachment representations in the middle childhood period. We present 2 studies and provide 3 critical pieces of evidence regarding the presence of a script-like representation of the attachment relationship in middle childhood. We present evidence that a middle childhood attachment script assessment tapped a stable underlying script using samples drawn from 2 western cultures, the United States (Study 1) and Belgium (Study 2). We also found evidence suggestive of the intergenerational transmission of secure base script knowledge (Study 1) and relations between secure base script knowledge and symptoms of psychopathology in middle childhood (Study 2). The results from this investigation represent an important downward extension of the secure base script construct. PMID:26147774

  7. Secure Base Representations in Middle Childhood Across Two Western Cultures: Associations with Parental Attachment Representations and Maternal Reports of Behavior Problems

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Theodore E. A.; Bosmans, Guy; Vandevivere, Eva; Dujardin, Adinda; Waters, Harriet S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent work examining the content and organization of attachment representations suggests that one way in which we represent the attachment relationship is in the form of a cognitive script. That said, this work has largely focused on early childhood or adolescence/adulthood, leaving a large gap in our understanding of script-like attachment representations in the middle childhood period. We present two studies and provide three critical pieces of evidence regarding the presence of a script-like representation of the attachment relationship in middle childhood. We present evidence that a middle childhood attachment script assessment tapped a stable underlying script using samples drawn from two western cultures, the United States (Study 1) and Belgium (Study 2). We also found evidence suggestive of the intergenerational transmission of secure base script knowledge (Study 1) and relations between secure base script knowledge and symptoms of psychopathology in middle childhood (Study 2). The results from this investigation represent an important downward extension of the secure base script construct. PMID:26147774

  8. Base-acid hybrid water electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Fei; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-02-21

    A base-acid hybrid electrolytic system with a low onset voltage of 0.78 V for water electrolysis was developed by using a ceramic Li-ion exchange membrane to separate the oxygen-evolving reaction (OER) in a basic electrolyte solution containing the Li-ion and hydrogen-evolving reaction (HER) in an acidic electrolyte solution. PMID:26804323

  9. Multi-Parametric Representation of Voxel-Based Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Engström, Maria; Warntjes, Jan B. M.; Tisell, Anders; Landtblom, Anne-Marie; Lundberg, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the possibilities of multi-parametric representations of voxel-wise quantitative MRI data to objectively discriminate pathological cerebral tissue in patients with brain disorders. For this purpose, we recruited 19 patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) as benchmark samples and 19 age and gender matched healthy subjects as a reference group. The subjects were examined using quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measuring the tissue structure parameters: relaxation rates, R and R, and proton density. The resulting parameter images were normalized to a standard template. Tissue structure in MS patients was assessed by voxel-wise comparisons with the reference group and with correlation to a clinical measure, the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). The results were visualized by conventional geometric representations and also by multi-parametric representations. Data showed that MS patients had lower R and R, and higher proton density in periventricular white matter and in wide-spread areas encompassing central and sub-cortical white matter structures. MS-related tissue abnormality was highlighted in posterior white matter whereas EDSS correlation appeared especially in the frontal cortex. The multi-parameter representation highlighted disease-specific features. In conclusion, the proposed method has the potential to visualize both high-probability focal anomalies and diffuse tissue changes. Results from voxel-based statistical analysis, as exemplified in the present work, may guide radiologists where in the image to inspect for signs of disease. Future clinical studies must validate the usability of the method in clinical practice. PMID:25393722

  10. Inherent Structure-Based Multiview Learning With Multitemplate Feature Representation for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxia; Zhang, Daoqiang; Adeli, Ehsan; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-07-01

    Multitemplate-based brain morphometric pattern analysis using magnetic resonance imaging has been recently proposed for automatic diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its prodromal stage (i.e., mild cognitive impairment or MCI). In such methods, multiview morphological patterns generated from multiple templates are used as feature representation for brain images. However, existing multitemplate-based methods often simply assume that each class is represented by a specific type of data distribution (i.e., a single cluster), while in reality, the underlying data distribution is actually not preknown. In this paper, we propose an inherent structure-based multiview leaning method using multiple templates for AD/MCI classification. Specifically, we first extract multiview feature representations for subjects using multiple selected templates and then cluster subjects within a specific class into several subclasses (i.e., clusters) in each view space. Then, we encode those subclasses with unique codes by considering both their original class information and their own distribution information, followed by a multitask feature selection model. Finally, we learn an ensemble of view-specific support vector machine classifiers based on their, respectively, selected features in each view and fuse their results to draw the final decision. Experimental results on the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database demonstrate that our method achieves promising results for AD/MCI classification, compared to the state-of-the-art multitemplate-based methods. PMID:26540666

  11. Exploring the potential of the theory of social representations in community-based health research--and vice versa?

    PubMed

    Howarth, Caroline; Foster, Juliet; Dorrer, Nike

    2004-03-01

    This article seeks to demonstrate the importance of developing a dialogue between social representations theory and community approaches to researching issues of health. We show how we have used the theory within our own research to ground our findings at the level of community. The article is divided into three sections: the recognition of competing systems of knowledge; the role of representations in maintaining stigmatizing practices; and the impact of representations on identities. Each section is illustrated with material drawn from Foster's research on mental illness and Dorrer's research on women's representations of healthy eating. We conclude by arguing that, while social representations theory is a valuable tool for community-based health research, the theory would benefit from developing a more participatory methodology. PMID:15018725

  12. A framework for knowledge acquisition, representation and problem-solving in knowledge-based planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Bermudez, Iliana

    This research addresses the problem of developing planning knowledge-based applications. In particular, it is concerned with the problems of knowledge acquisition and representation---the issues that remain an impediment to the development of large-scale, knowledge-based planning applications. This work aims to develop a model of planning problem solving that facilitates expert knowledge elicitation and also supports effective problem solving. Achieving this goal requires determining the types of knowledge used by planning experts, the structure of this knowledge, and the problem-solving process that results in the plan. While answering these questions it became clear that the knowledge structure, as well as the process of problem solving, largely depends on the knowledge available to the expert. This dissertation proposes classification of planning problems based on their use of expert knowledge. Such classification can help in the selection of the appropriate planning method when dealing with a specific planning problem. The research concentrates on one of the identified classes of planning problems that can be characterized by well-defined and well-structured problem-solving knowledge. To achieve a more complete knowledge representation architecture for such problems, this work employs the task-specific approach to problem solving. The result of this endeavor is a task-specific methodology that allows the representation and use of planning knowledge in a structural, consistent manner specific to the domain of the application. The shell for building a knowledge-based planning application was created as a proof of concept for the methodology described in this dissertation. This shell enabled the development of a system for manufacturing planning---COMPLAN. COMPLAN encompasses knowledge related to four generic techniques used in composite material manufacturing and, given the description of the composite part, creates a family of plans capable of producing it.

  13. Rubber airplane: Constraint-based component-modeling for knowledge representation in computer-aided conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Rubber Airplane: Constraint-based Component-Modeling for Knowledge Representation in Computer Aided Conceptual Design are presented. Topics covered include: computer aided design; object oriented programming; airfoil design; surveillance aircraft; commercial aircraft; aircraft design; and launch vehicles.

  14. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  15. A Modified Rife Algorithm for Off-Grid DOA Estimation Based on Sparse Representations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Wu, Huanxin; Guo, Limin; Liu, Lutao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of off-grid direction of arrival (DOA) estimation based on sparse representations in the situation of multiple measurement vectors (MMV). A novel sparse DOA estimation method which changes MMV problem to SMV is proposed. This method uses sparse representations based on weighted eigenvectors (SRBWEV) to deal with the MMV problem. MMV problem can be changed to single measurement vector (SMV) problem by using the linear combination of eigenvectors of array covariance matrix in signal subspace as a new SMV for sparse solution calculation. So the complexity of this proposed algorithm is smaller than other DOA estimation algorithms of MMV. Meanwhile, it can overcome the limitation of the conventional sparsity-based DOA estimation approaches that the unknown directions belong to a predefined discrete angular grid, so it can further improve the DOA estimation accuracy. The modified Rife algorithm for DOA estimation (MRife-DOA) is simulated based on SRBWEV algorithm. In this proposed algorithm, the largest and sub-largest inner products between the measurement vector or its residual and the atoms in the dictionary are utilized to further modify DOA estimation according to the principle of Rife algorithm and the basic idea of coarse-to-fine estimation. Finally, simulation experiments show that the proposed algorithm is effective and can reduce the DOA estimation error caused by grid effect with lower complexity. PMID:26610521

  16. A Modified Rife Algorithm for Off-Grid DOA Estimation Based on Sparse Representations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Wu, Huanxin; Guo, Limin; Liu, Lutao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of off-grid direction of arrival (DOA) estimation based on sparse representations in the situation of multiple measurement vectors (MMV). A novel sparse DOA estimation method which changes MMV problem to SMV is proposed. This method uses sparse representations based on weighted eigenvectors (SRBWEV) to deal with the MMV problem. MMV problem can be changed to single measurement vector (SMV) problem by using the linear combination of eigenvectors of array covariance matrix in signal subspace as a new SMV for sparse solution calculation. So the complexity of this proposed algorithm is smaller than other DOA estimation algorithms of MMV. Meanwhile, it can overcome the limitation of the conventional sparsity-based DOA estimation approaches that the unknown directions belong to a predefined discrete angular grid, so it can further improve the DOA estimation accuracy. The modified Rife algorithm for DOA estimation (MRife-DOA) is simulated based on SRBWEV algorithm. In this proposed algorithm, the largest and sub-largest inner products between the measurement vector or its residual and the atoms in the dictionary are utilized to further modify DOA estimation according to the principle of Rife algorithm and the basic idea of coarse-to-fine estimation. Finally, simulation experiments show that the proposed algorithm is effective and can reduce the DOA estimation error caused by grid effect with lower complexity. PMID:26610521

  17. The Role of Familiarity for Representations in Norm-Based Face Space

    PubMed Central

    Faerber, Stella J.; Kaufmann, Jürgen M.; Leder, Helmut; Martin, Eva Maria; Schweinberger, Stefan R.

    2016-01-01

    According to the norm-based version of the multidimensional face space model (nMDFS, Valentine, 1991), any given face and its corresponding anti-face (which deviates from the norm in exactly opposite direction as the original face) should be equidistant to a hypothetical prototype face (norm), such that by definition face and anti-face should bear the same level of perceived typicality. However, it has been argued that familiarity affects perceived typicality and that representations of familiar faces are qualitatively different (e.g., more robust and image-independent) from those for unfamiliar faces. Here we investigated the role of face familiarity for rated typicality, using two frequently used operationalisations of typicality (deviation-based: DEV), and distinctiveness (face in the crowd: FITC) for faces of celebrities and their corresponding anti-faces. We further assessed attractiveness, likeability and trustworthiness ratings of the stimuli, which are potentially related to typicality. For unfamiliar faces and their corresponding anti-faces, in line with the predictions of the nMDFS, our results demonstrate comparable levels of perceived typicality (DEV). In contrast, familiar faces were perceived much less typical than their anti-faces. Furthermore, familiar faces were rated higher than their anti-faces in distinctiveness, attractiveness, likability and trustworthiness. These findings suggest that familiarity strongly affects the distribution of facial representations in norm-based face space. Overall, our study suggests (1) that familiarity needs to be considered in studies of mental representations of faces, and (2) that familiarity, general distance-to-norm and more specific vector directions in face space make different and interactive contributions to different types of facial evaluations. PMID:27168323

  18. The Role of Familiarity for Representations in Norm-Based Face Space.

    PubMed

    Faerber, Stella J; Kaufmann, Jürgen M; Leder, Helmut; Martin, Eva Maria; Schweinberger, Stefan R

    2016-01-01

    According to the norm-based version of the multidimensional face space model (nMDFS, Valentine, 1991), any given face and its corresponding anti-face (which deviates from the norm in exactly opposite direction as the original face) should be equidistant to a hypothetical prototype face (norm), such that by definition face and anti-face should bear the same level of perceived typicality. However, it has been argued that familiarity affects perceived typicality and that representations of familiar faces are qualitatively different (e.g., more robust and image-independent) from those for unfamiliar faces. Here we investigated the role of face familiarity for rated typicality, using two frequently used operationalisations of typicality (deviation-based: DEV), and distinctiveness (face in the crowd: FITC) for faces of celebrities and their corresponding anti-faces. We further assessed attractiveness, likeability and trustworthiness ratings of the stimuli, which are potentially related to typicality. For unfamiliar faces and their corresponding anti-faces, in line with the predictions of the nMDFS, our results demonstrate comparable levels of perceived typicality (DEV). In contrast, familiar faces were perceived much less typical than their anti-faces. Furthermore, familiar faces were rated higher than their anti-faces in distinctiveness, attractiveness, likability and trustworthiness. These findings suggest that familiarity strongly affects the distribution of facial representations in norm-based face space. Overall, our study suggests (1) that familiarity needs to be considered in studies of mental representations of faces, and (2) that familiarity, general distance-to-norm and more specific vector directions in face space make different and interactive contributions to different types of facial evaluations. PMID:27168323

  19. Weighted joint sparse representation-based classification method for robust alignment-free face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Xu, Feng; Zhou, Guoyan; He, Jun; Ge, Fengxiang

    2015-01-01

    This work proposes a weighted joint sparse representation (WJSR)-based classification method for robust alignment-free face recognition, in which an image is represented by a set of scale-invariant feature transform descriptors. The proposed method considers the correlation and the reliability of the query descriptors. The reliability is measured by the similarity information between the query descriptors and the atoms in the dictionary, which is incorporated into the l0∖l2-norm minimization to seek the optimal WJSR. Compared with the related state-of-art methods, the performance is advanced, as verified by the experiments on the benchmark face databases.

  20. Gyrator transform based double random phase encoding with sparse representation for information authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-xin; Zhu, Zhi-liang; Fu, Chong; Yu, Hai; Zhang, Li-bo

    2015-07-01

    Optical information security systems have drawn long-term concerns. In this paper, an optical information authentication approach using gyrator transform based double random phase encoding with sparse representation is proposed. Different from traditional optical encryption schemes, only sparse version of the ciphertext is preserved, and hence the decrypted result is completely unrecognizable and shows no similarity to the plaintext. However, we demonstrate that the noise-like decipher result can be effectively authenticated by means of optical correlation approach. Simulations prove that the proposed method is feasible and effective, and can provide additional protection for optical security systems.

  1. Distinct pathways for rule-based retrieval and spatial mapping of memory representations in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Navawongse, Rapeechai; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal neurons encode events within the context in which they occurred, a fundamental feature of episodic memory. Here we explored the sources of event and context information represented by hippocampal neurons during the retrieval of object associations in rats. Temporary inactivation of the medial prefrontal cortex differentially reduced the selectivity of rule-based object associations represented by hippocampal neuronal firing patterns but did not affect spatial firing patterns. By contrast, inactivation of the medial entorhinal cortex resulted in a pervasive reorganization of hippocampal mappings of spatial context and events. These results suggest distinct and cooperative prefrontal and medial temporal mechanisms in memory representation. PMID:23325238

  2. Voxel Based Representation of Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanner Data for Forestry Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelling, N.; Richter, K.

    2016-06-01

    The advantages of using airborne full-waveform laser scanner data in forest applications, e.g. for the description of the vertical vegetation structure or accurate biomass estimation, have been emphasized in many publications. To exploit the full potential offered by airborne full-waveform laser scanning data, the development of voxel based methods for data analysis is essential. In contrast to existing approaches based on the extraction of discrete 3D points by a Gaussian decomposition, it is very promising to derive the voxel attributes from the digitised waveform directly. For this purpose, the waveform data have to be transferred into a 3D voxel representation. This requires a series of radiometric and geometric transformations of the raw full-waveform laser scanner data. Thus, the paper deals with the geometric aspects and describes a processing chain from the raw waveform data to an attenuationcorrected volumetric forest stand reconstruction. The integration of attenuation-corrected waveform data into the voxel space is realised with an efficient parametric voxel traversal method operating on an octree data structure. The voxel attributes are derived from the amplitudes of the attenuation-corrected waveforms. Additionally, a new 3D filtering approach is presented to eliminate non-object voxel. Applying these methods to real full-waveform laser scanning data, a voxel based representation of a spruce was generated combining three flight strips from different viewing directions.

  3. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  4. [Identification of transmission fluid based on NIR spectroscopy by combining sparse representation method with manifold learning].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lu-Lu; Luo, Mei-Fu; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Xin-Jie; Kong, Wen-Wen; Liu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    An identification method based on sparse representation (SR) combined with autoencoder network (AN) manifold learning was proposed for discriminating the varieties of transmission fluid by using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy technology. NIR transmittance spectra from 600 to 1 800 nm were collected from 300 transmission fluid samples of five varieties (each variety consists of 60 samples). For each variety, 30 samples were randomly selected as training set (totally 150 samples), and the rest 30 ones as testing set (totally 150 samples). Autoencoder network manifold learning was applied to obtain the characteristic information in the 600-1800 nm spectra and the number of characteristics was reduced to 10. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to extract several relevant variables to represent the useful information of spectral variables. All of the training samples made up a data dictionary of the sparse representation (SR). Then the transmission fluid variety identification problem was reduced to the problem as how to represent the testing samples from the data dictionary (training samples data). The identification result thus could be achieved by solving the L-1 norm-based optimization problem. We compared the effectiveness of the proposed method with that of linear discriminant analysis (LDA), least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) and sparse representation (SR) using the relevant variables selected by principal component analysis (PCA) and AN. Experimental results demonstrated that the overall identification accuracy of the proposed method for the five transmission fluid varieties was 97.33% by AN-SR, which was significantly higher than that of LDA or LS-SVM. Therefore, the proposed method can provide a new effective method for identification of transmission fluid variety. PMID:24783534

  5. Representation is representation of similarities.

    PubMed

    Edelman, S

    1998-08-01

    Advanced perceptual systems are faced with the problem of securing a principled (ideally, veridical) relationship between the world and its internal representation. I propose a unified approach to visual representation, addressing the need for superordinate and basic-level categorization and for the identification of specific instances of familiar categories. According to the proposed theory, a shape is represented internally by the responses of a small number of tuned modules, each broadly selective for some reference shape, whose similarity to the stimulus it measures. This amounts to embedding the stimulus in a low-dimensional proximal shape space spanned by the outputs of the active modules. This shape space supports representations of distal shape similarities that are veridical as Shepard's (1968) second-order isomorphisms (i.e., correspondence between distal and proximal similarities among shapes, rather than between distal shapes and their proximal representations). Representation in terms of similarities to reference shapes supports processing (e.g., discrimination) of shapes that are radically different from the reference ones, without the need for the computationally problematic decomposition into parts required by other theories. Furthermore, a general expression for similarity between two stimuli, based on comparisons to reference shapes, can be used to derive models of perceived similarity ranging from continuous, symmetric, and hierarchical ones, as in multidimensional scaling (Shepard 1980), to discrete and nonhierarchical ones, as in the general contrast models (Shepard & Arabie 1979; Tversky 1977). PMID:10097019

  6. A sampling-based computational strategy for the representation of epistemic uncertainty in model predictions with evidence theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J. D.; Oberkampf, William Louis; Helton, Jon Craig (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ); Storlie, Curtis B. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC)

    2006-10-01

    Evidence theory provides an alternative to probability theory for the representation of epistemic uncertainty in model predictions that derives from epistemic uncertainty in model inputs, where the descriptor epistemic is used to indicate uncertainty that derives from a lack of knowledge with respect to the appropriate values to use for various inputs to the model. The potential benefit, and hence appeal, of evidence theory is that it allows a less restrictive specification of uncertainty than is possible within the axiomatic structure on which probability theory is based. Unfortunately, the propagation of an evidence theory representation for uncertainty through a model is more computationally demanding than the propagation of a probabilistic representation for uncertainty, with this difficulty constituting a serious obstacle to the use of evidence theory in the representation of uncertainty in predictions obtained from computationally intensive models. This presentation describes and illustrates a sampling-based computational strategy for the representation of epistemic uncertainty in model predictions with evidence theory. Preliminary trials indicate that the presented strategy can be used to propagate uncertainty representations based on evidence theory in analysis situations where naive sampling-based (i.e., unsophisticated Monte Carlo) procedures are impracticable due to computational cost.

  7. A new graph-based molecular descriptor using the canonical representation of the molecule.

    PubMed

    Hentabli, Hamza; Saeed, Faisal; Abdo, Ammar; Salim, Naomie

    2014-01-01

    Molecular similarity is a pervasive concept in drug design. The basic idea underlying molecular similarity is the similar property principle, which states that structurally similar molecules will exhibit similar physicochemical and biological properties. In this paper, a new graph-based molecular descriptor (GBMD) is introduced. The GBMD is a new method of obtaining a rough description of 2D molecular structure in textual form based on the canonical representations of the molecule outline shape and it allows rigorous structure specification using small and natural grammars. Simulated virtual screening experiments with the MDDR database show clearly the superiority of the graph-based descriptor compared to many standard descriptors (ALOGP, MACCS, EPFP4, CDKFP, PCFP, and SMILE) using the Tanimoto coefficient (TAN) and the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) when searches were carried. PMID:25140330

  8. Reserve networks based on richness hotspots and representation vary with scale.

    PubMed

    Shriner, Susan A; Wilson, Kenneth R; Flather, Curtis H

    2006-10-01

    While the importance of spatial scale in ecology is well established, few studies have investigated the impact of data grain on conservation planning outcomes. In this study, we compared species richness hotspot and representation networks developed at five grain sizes. We used species distribution maps for mammals and birds developed by the Arizona and New Mexico Gap Analysis Programs (GAP) to produce 1-km2, 100-kmn2, 625-km2, 2500-km2, and 10,000-km2 grid cell resolution distribution maps. We used these distribution maps to generate species richness and hotspot (95th quantile) maps for each taxon in each state. Species composition information at each grain size was used to develop two types of representation networks using the reserve selection software MARXAN. Reserve selection analyses were restricted to Arizona birds due to considerable computation requirements. We used MARXAN to create best reserve networks based on the minimum area required to represent each species at least once and equal area networks based on irreplaceability values. We also measured the median area of each species' distribution included in hotspot (mammals and birds of Arizona and New Mexico) and irreplaceability (Arizona birds) networks across all species. Mean area overlap between richness hotspot reserves identified at the five grain sizes was 29% (grand mean for four within-taxon/state comparisons), mean overlap for irreplaceability reserve networks was 32%, and mean overlap for best reserve networks was 53%. Hotspots for mammals and birds showed low overlap with a mean of 30%. Comparison of hotspots and irreplaceability networks showed very low overlap with a mean of 13%. For hotspots, median species distribution area protected within reserves declined monotonically from a high of 11% for 1-km2 networks down to 6% for 10,000-km2 networks. Irreplaceability networks showed a similar, but more variable, pattern of decline. This work clearly shows that map resolution has a profound

  9. Weighted sparse representation for human ear recognition based on local descriptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawloud, Guermoui; Djamel, Melaab

    2016-01-01

    A two-stage ear recognition framework is presented where two local descriptors and a sparse representation algorithm are combined. In a first stage, the algorithm proceeds by deducing a subset of the closest training neighbors to the test ear sample. The selection is based on the K-nearest neighbors classifier in the pattern of oriented edge magnitude feature space. In a second phase, the co-occurrence of adjacent local binary pattern features are extracted from the preselected subset and combined to form a dictionary. Afterward, sparse representation classifier is employed on the developed dictionary in order to infer the closest element to the test sample. Thus, by splitting up the ear image into a number of segments and applying the described recognition routine on each of them, the algorithm finalizes by attributing a final class label based on majority voting over the individual labels pointed out by each segment. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness as well as the robustness of the proposed scheme over leading state-of-the-art methods. Especially when the ear image is occluded, the proposed algorithm exhibits a great robustness and reaches the recognition performances outlined in the state of the art.

  10. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images. PMID:26980176

  11. Dictionary learning method for joint sparse representation-based image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiheng; Fu, Yuli; Li, Haifeng; Zou, Jian

    2013-05-01

    Recently, sparse representation (SR) and joint sparse representation (JSR) have attracted a lot of interest in image fusion. The SR models signals by sparse linear combinations of prototype signal atoms that make a dictionary. The JSR indicates that different signals from the various sensors of the same scene form an ensemble. These signals have a common sparse component and each individual signal owns an innovation sparse component. The JSR offers lower computational complexity compared with SR. First, for JSR-based image fusion, we give a new fusion rule. Then, motivated by the method of optimal directions (MOD), for JSR, we propose a novel dictionary learning method (MODJSR) whose dictionary updating procedure is derived by employing the JSR structure one time with singular value decomposition (SVD). MODJSR has lower complexity than the K-SVD algorithm which is often used in previous JSR-based fusion algorithms. To capture the image details more efficiently, we proposed the generalized JSR in which the signals ensemble depends on two dictionaries. MODJSR is extended to MODGJSR in this case. MODJSR/MODGJSR can simultaneously carry out dictionary learning, denoising, and fusion of noisy source images. Some experiments are given to demonstrate the validity of the MODJSR/MODGJSR for image fusion.

  12. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images.

  13. The effect of project-based learning on students' statistical literacy levels for data representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koparan, Timur; Güven, Bülent

    2015-07-01

    The point of this study is to define the effect of project-based learning approach on 8th Grade secondary-school students' statistical literacy levels for data representation. To achieve this goal, a test which consists of 12 open-ended questions in accordance with the views of experts was developed. Seventy 8th grade secondary-school students, 35 in the experimental group and 35 in the control group, took this test twice, one before the application and one after the application. All the raw scores were turned into linear points by using the Winsteps 3.72 modelling program that makes the Rasch analysis and t-tests, and an ANCOVA analysis was carried out with the linear points. Depending on the findings, it was concluded that the project-based learning approach increases students' level of statistical literacy for data representation. Students' levels of statistical literacy before and after the application were shown through the obtained person-item maps.

  14. Force Concept Inventory-Based Multiple-Choice Test for Investigating Students' Representational Consistency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieminen, Pasi; Savinainen, Antti; Viiri, Jouni

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates students' ability to interpret multiple representations consistently (i.e., representational consistency) in the context of the force concept. For this purpose we developed the Representational Variant of the Force Concept Inventory (R-FCI), which makes use of nine items from the 1995 version of the Force Concept Inventory…

  15. Automated bone segmentation from dental CBCT images using patch-based sparse representation and convex optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Feng; Liao, Shu; Li, Gang; Chen, Ken Chung; Shen, Steve G. F.; Yan, Jin; Lee, Philip K. M.; Chow, Ben; Liu, Nancy X.; Xia, James J.; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an increasingly utilized imaging modality for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with craniomaxillofacial (CMF) deformities. Accurate segmentation of CBCT image is an essential step to generate three-dimensional (3D) models for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with CMF deformities. However, due to the poor image quality, including very low signal-to-noise ratio and the widespread image artifacts such as noise, beam hardening, and inhomogeneity, it is challenging to segment the CBCT images. In this paper, the authors present a new automatic segmentation method to address these problems. Methods: To segment CBCT images, the authors propose a new method for fully automated CBCT segmentation by using patch-based sparse representation to (1) segment bony structures from the soft tissues and (2) further separate the mandible from the maxilla. Specifically, a region-specific registration strategy is first proposed to warp all the atlases to the current testing subject and then a sparse-based label propagation strategy is employed to estimate a patient-specific atlas from all aligned atlases. Finally, the patient-specific atlas is integrated into amaximum a posteriori probability-based convex segmentation framework for accurate segmentation. Results: The proposed method has been evaluated on a dataset with 15 CBCT images. The effectiveness of the proposed region-specific registration strategy and patient-specific atlas has been validated by comparing with the traditional registration strategy and population-based atlas. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieves the best segmentation accuracy by comparison with other state-of-the-art segmentation methods. Conclusions: The authors have proposed a new CBCT segmentation method by using patch-based sparse representation and convex optimization, which can achieve considerably accurate segmentation results in CBCT

  16. Automated bone segmentation from dental CBCT images using patch-based sparse representation and convex optimization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Chen, Ken Chung; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Feng; Liao, Shu; Li, Gang; Shen, Steve G. F.; Yan, Jin; Lee, Philip K. M.; Chow, Ben; Liu, Nancy X.; Xia, James J.; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an increasingly utilized imaging modality for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with craniomaxillofacial (CMF) deformities. Accurate segmentation of CBCT image is an essential step to generate three-dimensional (3D) models for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with CMF deformities. However, due to the poor image quality, including very low signal-to-noise ratio and the widespread image artifacts such as noise, beam hardening, and inhomogeneity, it is challenging to segment the CBCT images. In this paper, the authors present a new automatic segmentation method to address these problems. Methods: To segment CBCT images, the authors propose a new method for fully automated CBCT segmentation by using patch-based sparse representation to (1) segment bony structures from the soft tissues and (2) further separate the mandible from the maxilla. Specifically, a region-specific registration strategy is first proposed to warp all the atlases to the current testing subject and then a sparse-based label propagation strategy is employed to estimate a patient-specific atlas from all aligned atlases. Finally, the patient-specific atlas is integrated into a maximum a posteriori probability-based convex segmentation framework for accurate segmentation. Results: The proposed method has been evaluated on a dataset with 15 CBCT images. The effectiveness of the proposed region-specific registration strategy and patient-specific atlas has been validated by comparing with the traditional registration strategy and population-based atlas. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieves the best segmentation accuracy by comparison with other state-of-the-art segmentation methods. Conclusions: The authors have proposed a new CBCT segmentation method by using patch-based sparse representation and convex optimization, which can achieve considerably accurate segmentation results in CBCT

  17. [Kidney, Fluid, and Acid-Base Balance].

    PubMed

    Shioji, Naohiro; Hayashi, Masao; Morimatsu, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Kidneys play an important role to maintain human homeostasis. They contribute to maintain body fluid, electrolytes, and acid-base balance. Especially in fluid control, we, physicians can intervene body fluid balance using fluid resuscitation and diuretics. In recent years, one type of fluid resuscitation, hydroxyl ethyl starch has been extensively studied in the field of intensive care. Although their effects on fluid resuscitation are reasonable, serious complications such as kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy occur frequently. Now we have to pay more attention to this important complication. Another topic of fluid management is tolvaptan, a selective vasopressin-2 receptor antagonist Recent randomized trial suggested that tolvaptan has a similar supportive effect for fluid control and more cost effective compared to carperitide. In recent years, Stewart approach is recognized as one important tool to assess acid-base balance in critically ill patients. This approach has great value, especially to understand metabolic components in acid-base balance. Even for assessing the effects of kidneys on acid-base balance, this approach gives us interesting insight. We should appropriately use this new approach to treat acid-base abnormality in critically ill patients. PMID:27319095

  18. The extraction of spot signal in Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor based on sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Xu, Wentao; Chen, Suting; Ge, Junxiang; Wan, Fayu

    2016-07-01

    Several techniques have been used with Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors to determine the local wave-front gradient across each lenslet. While the centroid error of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is relatively large since the skylight background and the detector noise. In this paper, we introduce a new method based on sparse representation to extract the target signal from the background and the noise. First, an over complete dictionary of the spot signal is constructed based on two-dimensional Gaussian model. Then the Shack-Hartmann image is divided into sub blocks. The corresponding coefficients of each block is computed in the over complete dictionary. Since the coefficients of the noise and the target are large different, then extract the target by setting a threshold to the coefficients. Experimental results show that the target can be well extracted and the deviation, RMS and PV of the centroid are all smaller than the method of subtracting threshold.

  19. Tensor-based cortical surface morphometry via weighted spherical harmonic representation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moo K; Dalton, Kim M; Davidson, Richard J

    2008-08-01

    We present a new tensor-based morphometric framework that quantifies cortical shape variations using a local area element. The local area element is computed from the Riemannian metric tensors, which are obtained from the smooth functional parametrization of a cortical mesh. For the smooth parametrization, we have developed a novel weighted spherical harmonic (SPHARM) representation, which generalizes the traditional SPHARM as a special case. For a specific choice of weights, the weighted-SPHARM is shown to be the least squares approximation to the solution of an isotropic heat diffusion on a unit sphere. The main aims of this paper are to present the weighted-SPHARM and to show how it can be used in the tensor-based morphometry. As an illustration, the methodology has been applied in the problem of detecting abnormal cortical regions in the group of high functioning autistic subjects. PMID:18672431

  20. An analysis and an operating method of switched reluctance motors based on a simple inductance representation

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Akira; Fukao, Tadashi

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, a mathematical analysis based on a simple model is carried out. The operating characteristics of switched reluctance motors fed by square waveform voltage are analyzed. Inductance variations with respect to the rotor rotational position is approximated with only a sinusoidal function and a constant. Square waveform voltage is approximated by a fundamental component only. Based on this simple representation, it is possible to analyze operating characteristics mathematically in normalized planes and to derive a general control method. It is found that there exists a particular voltage phase angle which realizes the maximum output per current. It was also found that the maximum output per voltage can be achieved at the another particular voltage phase angle. These characteristics are found to be very similar to those of synchronous reluctance motors. As a result of the analysis, an efficient operating method is proposed. These results are confirmed by a 6,000 r/min., 2kW prototype machine.

  1. Blind image deblurring based on trained dictionary and curvelet using sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liang; Huang, Qian; Xu, Tingfa; Li, Shao

    2015-04-01

    Motion blur is one of the most significant and common artifacts causing poor image quality in digital photography, in which many factors resulted. In imaging process, if the objects are moving quickly in the scene or the camera moves in the exposure interval, the image of the scene would blur along the direction of relative motion between the camera and the scene, e.g. camera shake, atmospheric turbulence. Recently, sparse representation model has been widely used in signal and image processing, which is an effective method to describe the natural images. In this article, a new deblurring approach based on sparse representation is proposed. An overcomplete dictionary learned from the trained image samples via the KSVD algorithm is designed to represent the latent image. The motion-blur kernel can be treated as a piece-wise smooth function in image domain, whose support is approximately a thin smooth curve, so we employed curvelet to represent the blur kernel. Both of overcomplete dictionary and curvelet system have high sparsity, which improves the robustness to the noise and more satisfies the observer's visual demand. With the two priors, we constructed restoration model of blurred images and succeeded to solve the optimization problem with the help of alternating minimization technique. The experiment results prove the method can preserve the texture of original images and suppress the ring artifacts effectively.

  2. A reconstruction algorithm based on sparse representation for Raman signal processing under high background noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, X.; Wang, X.; Wang, X.; Xu, Y.; Que, J.; He, H.; Wang, X.; Tang, M.

    2016-02-01

    Background noise is one of the main interference sources of the Raman spectroscopy measurement and imaging technique. In this paper, a sparse representation based algorithm is presented to process the Raman signals under high background noise. In contrast with the existing de-noising methods, the proposed method reconstructs the pure Raman signals by estimating the Raman peak information. The advantage of the proposed algorithm is its high anti-noise capacity and low pure Raman signal reduction contributed by its reconstruction principle. Meanwhile, the Batch-OMP algorithm is applied to accelerate the training of the sparse representation. Therefore, it is very suitable to be adopted in the Raman measurement or imaging instruments to observe fast dynamic processes where the scanning time has to be shortened and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the raw tested signal is reduced. In the simulation and experiment, the de-noising result obtained by the proposed algorithm was better than the traditional Savitzky-Golay (S-G) filter and the fixed-threshold wavelet de-noising algorithm.

  3. Improving low-dose cardiac CT images using 3D sparse representation based processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Luyao; Chen, Yang; Luo, Limin

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) has been widely used in diagnoses of coronary artery diseases due to the continuously improving temporal and spatial resolution. When helical CT with a lower pitch scanning mode is used, the effective radiation dose can be significant when compared to other radiological exams. Many methods have been developed to reduce radiation dose in coronary CT exams including high pitch scans using dual source CT scanners and step-and-shot scanning mode for both single source and dual source CT scanners. Additionally, software methods have also been proposed to reduce noise in the reconstructed CT images and thus offering the opportunity to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the desired diagnostic performance of a certain imaging task. In this paper, we propose that low-dose scans should be considered in order to avoid the harm from accumulating unnecessary X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. Accordingly, in this paper, a 3D dictionary representation based image processing method is proposed to reduce CT image noise. Information on both spatial and temporal structure continuity is utilized in sparse representation to improve the performance of the image processing method. Clinical cases were used to validate the proposed method.

  4. Classification of mammographic lesion based in Completed Local Binary Pattern and using multiresolution representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Y. A. S.; Nascimento, M. Z.; Oliveira, D. L. L.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a comparison of two methods for features extraction of mammograms based in completed local binary pattern (CLBP) and wavelet transform. In first part, CLBP was applied in digitized mammograms. In second part, we applied CLBP in the sub-bands obtained from the wavelet multi-resolution representation of the mammographies. In this study, we evaluated the CLBP in the image in the spatial domain and in the sub-bands obtained with wavelet transform. Then, the statistical technique of variance analysis (ANOVA) was used to reduce the number of features. Finally, the classifier Support Vector Machine (SVM) was applied in the samples. The proposed methods were tested on 720 mammographies which 240 was diagnosed as normal samples, 240 as benign lesion and 240 as malign lesion. The images were obtained randomly of the Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). The system effectiveness was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The experiments demonstrate that the textural feature extraction of the multi-resolution representation was more relevant with value of AUC=1.0. In our experiments, CLBP in the spatial domain resulted in value of AUC=0.89. The proposed method demonstrated promising results in the classification of different classes of mammographic lesions.

  5. Aspect-Aided Dynamic Non-Negative Sparse Representation-Based Microwave Image Classification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinzheng; Yang, Qiuyue; Liu, Miaomiao; Jia, Yunjian; Liu, Shujun; Li, Guojun

    2016-01-01

    Classification of target microwave images is an important application in much areas such as security, surveillance, etc. With respect to the task of microwave image classification, a recognition algorithm based on aspect-aided dynamic non-negative least square (ADNNLS) sparse representation is proposed. Firstly, an aspect sector is determined, the center of which is the estimated aspect angle of the testing sample. The training samples in the aspect sector are divided into active atoms and inactive atoms by smooth self-representative learning. Secondly, for each testing sample, the corresponding active atoms are selected dynamically, thereby establishing dynamic dictionary. Thirdly, the testing sample is represented with ℓ 1 -regularized non-negative sparse representation under the corresponding dynamic dictionary. Finally, the class label of the testing sample is identified by use of the minimum reconstruction error. Verification of the proposed algorithm was conducted using the Moving and Stationary Target Acquisition and Recognition (MSTAR) database which was acquired by synthetic aperture radar. Experiment results validated that the proposed approach was able to capture the local aspect characteristics of microwave images effectively, thereby improving the classification performance. PMID:27598172

  6. Sparse representation based on local time-frequency template matching for bearing transient fault feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingbo; Ding, Xiaoxi

    2016-05-01

    The transients caused by the localized fault are important measurement information for bearing fault diagnosis. Thus it is crucial to extract the transients from the bearing vibration or acoustic signals that are always corrupted by a large amount of background noise. In this paper, an iterative transient feature extraction approach is proposed based on time-frequency (TF) domain sparse representation. The approach is realized by presenting a new method, called local TF template matching. In this method, the TF atoms are constructed based on the TF distribution (TFD) of the Morlet wavelet bases and local TF templates are formulated from the TF atoms for the matching process. The instantaneous frequency (IF) ridge calculated from the TFD of an analyzed signal provides the frequency parameter values for the TF atoms as well as an effective template matching path on the TF plane. In each iteration, local TF templates are employed to do correlation with the TFD of the analyzed signal along the IF ridge tube for identifying the optimum parameters of transient wavelet model. With this iterative procedure, transients can be extracted in the TF domain from measured signals one by one. The final signal can be synthesized by combining the extracted TF atoms and the phase of the raw signal. The local TF template matching builds an effective TF matching-based sparse representation approach with the merit of satisfying the native pulse waveform structure of transients. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by practical defective bearing signals. Comparison results also show that the proposed method is superior to traditional methods in transient feature extraction.

  7. Subject and Citation Indexing. Part I: The Clustering Structure of Composite Representations in the Cystic Fibrosis Document Collection. Part II: The Optimal, Cluster-Based Retrieval Performance of Composite Representations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, W. M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Two articles discuss the clustering of composite representations in the Cystic Fibrosis Document Collection from the National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE file. Clustering is evaluated as a function of the exhaustivity of composite representations based on Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and citation indexes, and evaluation of retrieval…

  8. The Effects of Directive Self-Explanation Prompts to Support Active Processing of Multiple Representations in a Simulation-Based Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Meij, J.; de Jong, T.

    2011-01-01

    Processing of multiple representations in multimedia learning environments is considered to help learners obtain a more complete overview of the domain and gain deeper knowledge. This is based on the idea that relating and translating different representations leads to reflection beyond the boundaries and details of the separate representations.…

  9. A critical review of the allocentric spatial representation and its neural underpinnings: toward a network-based perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ekstrom, Arne D.; Arnold, Aiden E. G. F.; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    While the widely studied allocentric spatial representation holds a special status in neuroscience research, its exact nature and neural underpinnings continue to be the topic of debate, particularly in humans. Here, based on a review of human behavioral research, we argue that allocentric representations do not provide the kind of map-like, metric representation one might expect based on past theoretical work. Instead, we suggest that almost all tasks used in past studies involve a combination of egocentric and allocentric representation, complicating both the investigation of the cognitive basis of an allocentric representation and the task of identifying a brain region specifically dedicated to it. Indeed, as we discuss in detail, past studies suggest numerous brain regions important to allocentric spatial memory in addition to the hippocampus, including parahippocampal, retrosplenial, and prefrontal cortices. We thus argue that although allocentric computations will often require the hippocampus, particularly those involving extracting details across temporally specific routes, the hippocampus is not necessary for all allocentric computations. We instead suggest that a non-aggregate network process involving multiple interacting brain areas, including hippocampus and extra-hippocampal areas such as parahippocampal, retrosplenial, prefrontal, and parietal cortices, better characterizes the neural basis of spatial representation during navigation. According to this model, an allocentric representation does not emerge from the computations of a single brain region (i.e., hippocampus) nor is it readily decomposable into additive computations performed by separate brain regions. Instead, an allocentric representation emerges from computations partially shared across numerous interacting brain regions. We discuss our non-aggregate network model in light of existing data and provide several key predictions for future experiments. PMID:25346679

  10. Face recognition via edge-based Gabor feature representation for plastic surgery-altered images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chude-Olisah, Chollette C.; Sulong, Ghazali; Chude-Okonkwo, Uche A. K.; Hashim, Siti Z. M.

    2014-12-01

    Plastic surgery procedures on the face introduce skin texture variations between images of the same person (intra-subject), thereby making the task of face recognition more difficult than in normal scenario. Usually, in contemporary face recognition systems, the original gray-level face image is used as input to the Gabor descriptor, which translates to encoding some texture properties of the face image. The texture-encoding process significantly degrades the performance of such systems in the case of plastic surgery due to the presence of surgically induced intra-subject variations. Based on the proposition that the shape of significant facial components such as eyes, nose, eyebrow, and mouth remains unchanged after plastic surgery, this paper employs an edge-based Gabor feature representation approach for the recognition of surgically altered face images. We use the edge information, which is dependent on the shapes of the significant facial components, to address the plastic surgery-induced texture variation problems. To ensure that the significant facial components represent useful edge information with little or no false edges, a simple illumination normalization technique is proposed for preprocessing. Gabor wavelet is applied to the edge image to accentuate on the uniqueness of the significant facial components for discriminating among different subjects. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated on the Georgia Tech (GT) and the Labeled Faces in the Wild (LFW) databases with illumination and expression problems, and the plastic surgery database with texture changes. Results show that the proposed edge-based Gabor feature representation approach is robust against plastic surgery-induced face variations amidst expression and illumination problems and outperforms the existing plastic surgery face recognition methods reported in the literature.

  11. Schematic representation of residue-based protein context-dependent data: an application to transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Campagne, F; Weinstein, H

    1999-01-01

    An algorithmic method for drawing residue-based schematic diagrams of proteins on a 2D page is presented and illustrated. The method allows the creation of rendering engines dedicated to a given family of sequences, or fold. The initial implementation provides an engine that can produce a 2D diagram representing secondary structure for any transmembrane protein sequence. We present the details of the strategy for automating the drawing of these diagrams. The most important part of this strategy is the development of an algorithm for laying out residues of a loop that connects to arbitrary points of a 2D plane. As implemented, this algorithm is suitable for real-time modification of the loop layout. This work is of interest for the representation and analysis of data from (1) protein databases, (2) mutagenesis results, or (3) various kinds of protein context-dependent annotations or data. PMID:10736778

  12. A Sparse Representation-Based Deployment Method for Optimizing the Observation Quality of Camera Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chang; Qi, Fei; Shi, Guangming; Wang, Xiaotian

    2013-01-01

    Deployment is a critical issue affecting the quality of service of camera networks. The deployment aims at adopting the least number of cameras to cover the whole scene, which may have obstacles to occlude the line of sight, with expected observation quality. This is generally formulated as a non-convex optimization problem, which is hard to solve in polynomial time. In this paper, we propose an efficient convex solution for deployment optimizing the observation quality based on a novel anisotropic sensing model of cameras, which provides a reliable measurement of the observation quality. The deployment is formulated as the selection of a subset of nodes from a redundant initial deployment with numerous cameras, which is an ℓ0 minimization problem. Then, we relax this non-convex optimization to a convex ℓ1 minimization employing the sparse representation. Therefore, the high quality deployment is efficiently obtained via convex optimization. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed camera deployment algorithms. PMID:23989826

  13. Deep Learning-Based Feature Representation for AD/MCI Classification

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Heung-Il; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great interest in computer-aided diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and its prodromal stage, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Unlike the previous methods that consider simple low-level features such as gray matter tissue volumes from MRI, mean signal intensities from PET, in this paper, we propose a deep learning-based feature representation with a stacked auto-encoder. We believe that there exist latent complicated patterns, e.g., non-linear relations, inherent in the low-level features. Combining latent information with the original low-level features helps build a robust model for AD/MCI classification with high diagnostic accuracy. Using the ADNI dataset, we conducted experiments showing that the proposed method is 95.9%, 85.0%, and 75.8% accurate for AD, MCI, and MCI-converter diagnosis, respectively. PMID:24579188

  14. VLSI Floorplanning with Boundary Constraints Based on Single-Sequence Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kang; Yu, Juebang; Li, Jian

    In modern VLSI physical design, huge integration scale necessitates hierarchical design and IP reuse to cope with design complexity. Besides, interconnect delay becomes dominant to overall circuit performance. These critical factors require some modules to be placed along designated boundaries to effectively facilitate hierarchical design and interconnection optimization related problems. In this paper, boundary constraints of general floorplan are solved smoothly based on the novel representation Single-Sequence (SS). Necessary and sufficient conditions of rooms along specified boundaries of a floorplan are proposed and proved. By assigning constrained modules to proper boundary rooms, our proposed algorithm always guarantees a feasible SS code with appropriate boundary constraints in each perturbation. Time complexity of the proposed algorithm is O(n). Experimental results on MCNC benchmarks show effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  15. Knowledge acquisition and knowledge representation in a rule-based expert system.

    PubMed

    Chang, B L; Hirsch, M

    1991-01-01

    It is important to understand and describe how nurses make diagnostic decisions. This article describes the process by which knowledge is acquired and represented in a rule-based expert system for nursing diagnosis. Knowledge acquisition was obtained by tapping the expertise of clinical nurse specialists who were able to articulate the elements present in their diagnostic decisions. Knowledge representation was achieved using a commercially-available software package. VP Expert (Berkeley, CA). The clinical nurse specialists contributed many of the heuristics in the determination of self-care deficit as a nursing diagnosis. Three models of rules for the determination of self-care deficit, bathing are provided. These models represent a method for discriminating between levels of patient dependence. A description of rules that define specific causes, such as immobility are also included. They will be tested in the clinical setting. PMID:1933658

  16. Spatiotemporal Context Awareness for Urban Traffic Modeling and Prediction: Sparse Representation Based Variable Selection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Su; Shi, Shixiong; Hu, Xiaobing; Wang, Minjie

    2015-01-01

    Spatial-temporal correlations among the data play an important role in traffic flow prediction. Correspondingly, traffic modeling and prediction based on big data analytics emerges due to the city-scale interactions among traffic flows. A new methodology based on sparse representation is proposed to reveal the spatial-temporal dependencies among traffic flows so as to simplify the correlations among traffic data for the prediction task at a given sensor. Three important findings are observed in the experiments: (1) Only traffic flows immediately prior to the present time affect the formation of current traffic flows, which implies the possibility to reduce the traditional high-order predictors into an 1-order model. (2) The spatial context relevant to a given prediction task is more complex than what is assumed to exist locally and can spread out to the whole city. (3) The spatial context varies with the target sensor undergoing prediction and enlarges with the increment of time lag for prediction. Because the scope of human mobility is subject to travel time, identifying the varying spatial context against time lag is crucial for prediction. Since sparse representation can capture the varying spatial context to adapt to the prediction task, it outperforms the traditional methods the inputs of which are confined as the data from a fixed number of nearby sensors. As the spatial-temporal context for any prediction task is fully detected from the traffic data in an automated manner, where no additional information regarding network topology is needed, it has good scalability to be applicable to large-scale networks. PMID:26496370

  17. Efficient Online Aggregates in Dense-Region-Based Data Cube Representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadin, Kais; Lauer, Tobias

    In-memory OLAP systems require a space-efficient representation of sparse data cubes in order to accommodate large data sets. On the other hand, most efficient online aggregation techniques, such as prefix sums, are built on dense array-based representations. These are often not applicable to real-world data due to the size of the arrays which usually cannot be compressed well, as most sparsity is removed during pre-processing. A possible solution is to identify dense regions in a sparse cube and only represent those using arrays, while storing sparse data separately, e.g. in a spatial index structure. Previous dense-region-based approaches have concentrated mainly on the effectiveness of the dense-region detection (i.e. on the space-efficiency of the result). However, especially in higher-dimensional cubes, data is usually more cluttered, resulting in a potentially large number of small dense regions, which negatively affects query performance on such a structure. In this paper, our focus is not only on space-efficiency but also on time-efficiency, both for the initial dense-region extraction and for queries carried out in the resulting hybrid data structure. We describe two methods to trade available memory for increased aggregate query performance. In addition, optimizations in our approach significantly reduce the time to build the initial data structure compared to former systems. Also, we present a straightforward adaptation of our approach to support multi-core or multi-processor architectures, which can further enhance query performance. Experiments with different real-world data sets show how various parameter settings can be used to adjust the efficiency and effectiveness of our algorithms.

  18. Spatiotemporal Context Awareness for Urban Traffic Modeling and Prediction: Sparse Representation Based Variable Selection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Su; Shi, Shixiong; Hu, Xiaobing; Wang, Minjie

    2015-01-01

    Spatial-temporal correlations among the data play an important role in traffic flow prediction. Correspondingly, traffic modeling and prediction based on big data analytics emerges due to the city-scale interactions among traffic flows. A new methodology based on sparse representation is proposed to reveal the spatial-temporal dependencies among traffic flows so as to simplify the correlations among traffic data for the prediction task at a given sensor. Three important findings are observed in the experiments: (1) Only traffic flows immediately prior to the present time affect the formation of current traffic flows, which implies the possibility to reduce the traditional high-order predictors into an 1-order model. (2) The spatial context relevant to a given prediction task is more complex than what is assumed to exist locally and can spread out to the whole city. (3) The spatial context varies with the target sensor undergoing prediction and enlarges with the increment of time lag for prediction. Because the scope of human mobility is subject to travel time, identifying the varying spatial context against time lag is crucial for prediction. Since sparse representation can capture the varying spatial context to adapt to the prediction task, it outperforms the traditional methods the inputs of which are confined as the data from a fixed number of nearby sensors. As the spatial-temporal context for any prediction task is fully detected from the traffic data in an automated manner, where no additional information regarding network topology is needed, it has good scalability to be applicable to large-scale networks. PMID:26496370

  19. Student Concept Changes in Acids and Bases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ye, Renmin; Wells, Raymond R.

    This study focuses on student concept changes in acids and bases. Variables include field dependent level, personal independence level, interest in science or chemistry, teaching strategy, and student gender. This study of Grade 10 students (N=81) provides information relevant to secondary school chemistry learning, teaching, and concept change.…

  20. Jigsaw Cooperative Learning: Acid-Base Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarhan, Leman; Sesen, Burcin Acar

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on investigating the effectiveness of jigsaw cooperative learning instruction on first-year undergraduates' understanding of acid-base theories. Undergraduates' opinions about jigsaw cooperative learning instruction were also investigated. The participants of this study were 38 first-year undergraduates in chemistry education…

  1. Epileptic Seizure Detection with Log-Euclidean Gaussian Kernel-Based Sparse Representation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shasha; Zhou, Weidong; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Yanli

    2016-05-01

    Epileptic seizure detection plays an important role in the diagnosis of epilepsy and reducing the massive workload of reviewing electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. In this work, a novel algorithm is developed to detect seizures employing log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based sparse representation (SR) in long-term EEG recordings. Unlike the traditional SR for vector data in Euclidean space, the log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based SR framework is proposed for seizure detection in the space of the symmetric positive definite (SPD) matrices, which form a Riemannian manifold. Since the Riemannian manifold is nonlinear, the log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel function is applied to embed it into a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) for performing SR. The EEG signals of all channels are divided into epochs and the SPD matrices representing EEG epochs are generated by covariance descriptors. Then, the testing samples are sparsely coded over the dictionary composed by training samples utilizing log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based SR. The classification of testing samples is achieved by computing the minimal reconstructed residuals. The proposed method is evaluated on the Freiburg EEG dataset of 21 patients and shows its notable performance on both epoch-based and event-based assessments. Moreover, this method handles multiple channels of EEG recordings synchronously which is more speedy and efficient than traditional seizure detection methods. PMID:26906674

  2. Automatic registration of multisensor images with affine deformation based on triangle area representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Wang, Wei; Ye, Hao

    2013-01-01

    A new automatic feature-based registration algorithm of multisensor images with affine deformation is presented. Although the feature-based registration methods have an advantage in reducing computational load over the area-based ones, certain typical issues such as complex deformation and grayscale discrepancy existing in a multisensor image pair will make the design of a robust feature descriptor challenging. To deal with these issues, in contrast with most existing feature-based methods that describe feature points directly, we introduce an additional procedure of feature quadrilateral construction in the proposed algorithm. Then the descriptors for the constructed feature quadrilaterals are designed based on the affine-invariance property of triangle area representation. By doing these, the proposed algorithm's robustness to both affine deformation and grayscale discrepancy can be guaranteed. Besides, since the calculation of feature descriptors only involves simple algebraic operations, the proposed method has low computational load. Experimental results using real multisensor image pairs are presented to show the merits of the proposed method.

  3. Hologram representation of design data in an expert system knowledge base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiva, S. G.; Klon, Peter F.

    1988-01-01

    A novel representational scheme for design object descriptions is presented. An abstract notion of modules and signals is developed as a conceptual foundation for the scheme. This abstraction relates the objects to the meaning of system descriptions. Anchored on this abstraction, a representational model which incorporates dynamic semantics for these objects is presented. This representational model is called a hologram scheme since it represents dual level information, namely, structural and semantic. The benefits of this scheme are presented.

  4. "Lesson Rainbow": The Use of Multiple Representations in an Internet-Based, Discipline-Integrated Science Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Ying-Shao

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the development and evaluation of a web-based lesson--Lesson Rainbow. This lesson features multiple representations (MRs), which purposefully deliver concepts in relation to distinctive disciplinary subject areas through story-based animations that are closely related to learners' life experiences. The researchers selected 58…

  5. A Sparse Representation Based Method to Classify Pulmonary Patterns of Diffuse Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Tachibana, Rie; Kido, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    We applied and optimized the sparse representation (SR) approaches in the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) to classify normal tissues and five kinds of diffuse lung disease (DLD) patterns: consolidation, ground-glass opacity, honeycombing, emphysema, and nodule. By using the K-SVD which is based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) and orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP), it can achieve a satisfied recognition rate, but too much time was spent in the experiment. To reduce the runtime of the method, the K-Means algorithm was substituted for the K-SVD, and the OMP was simplified by searching the desired atoms at one time (OMP1). We proposed three SR based methods for evaluation: SR1 (K-SVD+OMP), SR2 (K-Means+OMP), and SR3 (K-Means+OMP1). 1161 volumes of interest (VOIs) were used to optimize the parameters and train each method, and 1049 VOIs were adopted to evaluate the performances of the methods. The SR based methods were powerful to recognize the DLD patterns (SR1: 96.1%, SR2: 95.6%, SR3: 96.4%) and significantly better than the baseline methods. Furthermore, when the K-Means and OMP1 were applied, the runtime of the SR based methods can be reduced by 98.2% and 55.2%, respectively. Therefore, we thought that the method using the K-Means and OMP1 (SR3) was efficient for the CAD of the DLDs. PMID:25821509

  6. A sparse representation based method to classify pulmonary patterns of diffuse lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Xu, Rui; Hirano, Yasushi; Tachibana, Rie; Kido, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    We applied and optimized the sparse representation (SR) approaches in the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) to classify normal tissues and five kinds of diffuse lung disease (DLD) patterns: consolidation, ground-glass opacity, honeycombing, emphysema, and nodule. By using the K-SVD which is based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) and orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP), it can achieve a satisfied recognition rate, but too much time was spent in the experiment. To reduce the runtime of the method, the K-Means algorithm was substituted for the K-SVD, and the OMP was simplified by searching the desired atoms at one time (OMP1). We proposed three SR based methods for evaluation: SR1 (K-SVD+OMP), SR2 (K-Means+OMP), and SR3 (K-Means+OMP1). 1161 volumes of interest (VOIs) were used to optimize the parameters and train each method, and 1049 VOIs were adopted to evaluate the performances of the methods. The SR based methods were powerful to recognize the DLD patterns (SR1: 96.1%, SR2: 95.6%, SR3: 96.4%) and significantly better than the baseline methods. Furthermore, when the K-Means and OMP1 were applied, the runtime of the SR based methods can be reduced by 98.2% and 55.2%, respectively. Therefore, we thought that the method using the K-Means and OMP1 (SR3) was efficient for the CAD of the DLDs. PMID:25821509

  7. A nonparametric feature for neonatal EEG seizure detection based on a representation of pseudo-periodicity.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, N J; O'Toole, J M; Rankine, L J; Boylan, G B; Boashash, B

    2012-05-01

    Automated methods of neonatal EEG seizure detection attempt to highlight the evolving, stereotypical, pseudo-periodic, nature of EEG seizure while rejecting the nonstationary, modulated, coloured stochastic background in the presence of various EEG artefacts. An important aspect of neonatal seizure detection is, therefore, the accurate representation and detection of pseudo-periodicity in the neonatal EEG. This paper describes a method of detecting pseudo-periodic components associated with neonatal EEG seizure based on a novel signal representation; the nonstationary frequency marginal (NFM). The NFM can be considered as an alternative time-frequency distribution (TFD) frequency marginal. This method integrates the TFD along data-dependent, time-frequency paths that are automatically extracted from the TFD using an edge linking procedure and has the advantage of reducing the dimension of a TFD. The reduction in dimension simplifies the process of estimating a decision statistic designed for the detection of the pseudo-periodicity associated with neonatal EEG seizure. The use of the NFM resulted in a significant detection improvement compared to existing stationary and nonstationary methods. The decision statistic estimated using the NFM was then combined with a measurement of EEG amplitude and nominal pre- and post-processing stages to form a seizure detection algorithm. This algorithm was tested on a neonatal EEG database of 18 neonates, 826 h in length with 1389 seizures, and achieved comparable performance to existing second generation algorithms (a median receiver operating characteristic area of 0.902; IQR 0.835-0.943 across 18 neonates). PMID:21925920

  8. Progressive sparse representation-based classification using local discrete cosine transform evaluation for image recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaoning; Feng, Zhen-Hua; Hu, Guosheng; Yang, Xibei; Yang, Jingyu; Qi, Yunsong

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a progressive sparse representation-based classification algorithm using local discrete cosine transform (DCT) evaluation to perform face recognition. Specifically, the sum of the contributions of all training samples of each subject is first taken as the contribution of this subject, then the redundant subject with the smallest contribution to the test sample is iteratively eliminated. Second, the progressive method aims at representing the test sample as a linear combination of all the remaining training samples, by which the representation capability of each training sample is exploited to determine the optimal "nearest neighbors" for the test sample. Third, the transformed DCT evaluation is constructed to measure the similarity between the test sample and each local training sample using cosine distance metrics in the DCT domain. The final goal of the proposed method is to determine an optimal weighted sum of nearest neighbors that are obtained under the local correlative degree evaluation, which is approximately equal to the test sample, and we can use this weighted linear combination to perform robust classification. Experimental results conducted on the ORL database of faces (created by the Olivetti Research Laboratory in Cambridge), the FERET face database (managed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the National Institute of Standards and Technology), AR face database (created by Aleix Martinez and Robert Benavente in the Computer Vision Center at U.A.B), and USPS handwritten digit database (gathered at the Center of Excellence in Document Analysis and Recognition at SUNY Buffalo) demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Multi-class remote sensing object recognition based on discriminative sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Shen, Siqiu; Ning, Chen; Huang, Fengchen; Gao, Hongmin

    2016-02-20

    The automatic recognition of multi-class objects with various backgrounds is a big challenge in the field of remote sensing (RS) image analysis. In this paper, we propose a novel recognition framework for multi-class RS objects based on the discriminative sparse representation. In this framework, the recognition problem is implemented in two stages. In the first, or discriminative dictionary learning stage, considering the characterization of remote sensing objects, the scale-invariant feature transform descriptor is first combined with an improved bag-of-words model for multi-class objects feature extraction and representation. Then, information about each class of training samples is fused into the dictionary learning process; by using the K-singular value decomposition algorithm, a discriminative dictionary can be learned for sparse coding. In the second, or recognition, stage, to improve the computational efficiency, the phase spectrum of a quaternion Fourier transform model is applied to the test image to predict a small set of object candidate locations. Then, a multi-scale sliding window mechanism is utilized to scan the image over those candidate locations to obtain the object candidates (or objects of interest). Subsequently, the sparse coding coefficients of these candidates under the discriminative dictionary are mapped to the discriminative vectors that have a good ability to distinguish different classes of objects. Finally, multi-class object recognition can be accomplished by analyzing these vectors. The experimental results show that the proposed work outperforms a number of state-of-the-art methods for multi-class remote sensing object recognition. PMID:26906591

  10. Cationic Lipid-Based Nucleic Acid Vectors.

    PubMed

    Jubeli, Emile; Goldring, William P D; Pungente, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    The delivery of nucleic acids into cells remains an important laboratory cell culture technique and potential clinical therapy, based upon the initial cellular uptake, then translation into protein (in the case of DNA), or gene deletion by RNA interference (RNAi). Although viral delivery vectors are more efficient, the high production costs, limited cargo capacity, and the potential for clinical adverse events make nonviral strategies attractive. Cationic lipids are the most widely applied and studied nonviral vectors; however, much remains to be solved to overcome limitations of these systems. Advances in the field of cationic lipid-based nucleic acid (lipoplex) delivery rely upon the development of robust and reproducible lipoplex formulations, together with the use of cell culture assays. This chapter provides detailed protocols towards the formulation, delivery, and assessment of in vitro cationic lipid-based delivery of DNA. PMID:27436310

  11. Research-Based Worksheets on Using Multiple Representations in Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Matthew; Sharma, Manjula

    2015-01-01

    The ability to represent the world like a scientist is difficult to teach; it is more than simply knowing the representations (e.g., graphs, words, equations and diagrams). For meaningful science learning to take place, consideration needs to be given to explicitly integrating representations into instructional methods, linked to the content, and…

  12. Interleaved Practice with Multiple Representations: Analyses with Knowledge Tracing Based Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rau, Martina A.; Pardos, Zachary A.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to use Knowledge Tracing to augment the results obtained from an experiment that investigated the effects of practice schedules using an intelligent tutoring system for fractions. Specifically, this experiment compared different practice schedules of multiple representations of fractions: representations were presented to…

  13. Gender Difference in the Use of Thought Representation--A Corpus-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riissanen, Anne; Watson, Greg

    2014-01-01

    This study (Note 1) investigates potential differences in language use between genders, by applying a modified model of thought representation. Our hypothesis is that women use more direct forms of thought representation than men in modern spoken British English. Women are said to favour "private speech" that creates intimacy and…

  14. An application to pulmonary emphysema classification based on model of texton learning by sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Zhou, Xiangrong; Goshima, Satoshi; Chen, Huayue; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hara, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Ryojiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    We aim at using a new texton based texture classification method in the classification of pulmonary emphysema in computed tomography (CT) images of the lungs. Different from conventional computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) pulmonary emphysema classification methods, in this paper, firstly, the dictionary of texton is learned via applying sparse representation(SR) to image patches in the training dataset. Then the SR coefficients of the test images over the dictionary are used to construct the histograms for texture presentations. Finally, classification is performed by using a nearest neighbor classifier with a histogram dissimilarity measure as distance. The proposed approach is tested on 3840 annotated regions of interest consisting of normal tissue and mild, moderate and severe pulmonary emphysema of three subtypes. The performance of the proposed system, with an accuracy of about 88%, is comparably higher than state of the art method based on the basic rotation invariant local binary pattern histograms and the texture classification method based on texton learning by k-means, which performs almost the best among other approaches in the literature.

  15. Clustering-weighted SIFT-based classification method via sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Xu, Feng; He, Jun

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, sparse representation-based classification (SRC) has received significant attention due to its high recognition rate. However, the original SRC method requires a rigid alignment, which is crucial for its application. Therefore, features such as SIFT descriptors are introduced into the SRC method, resulting in an alignment-free method. However, a feature-based dictionary always contains considerable useful information for recognition. We explore the relationship of the similarity of the SIFT descriptors to multitask recognition and propose a clustering-weighted SIFT-based SRC method (CWS-SRC). The proposed approach is considerably more suitable for multitask recognition with sufficient samples. Using two public face databases (AR and Yale face) and a self-built car-model database, the performance of the proposed method is evaluated and compared to that of the SRC, SIFT matching, and MKD-SRC methods. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method exhibits better performance in the alignment-free scenario with sufficient samples.

  16. Fast pseudo-semantic segmentation for joint region-based hierarchical and multiresolution representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekkal, Rafiq; Strauss, Clement; Pasteau, François; Babel, Marie; Deforges, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new scalable segmentation algorithm called JHMS (Joint Hierarchical and Multiresolution Segmentation) that is characterized by region-based hierarchy and resolution scalability. Most of the proposed algorithms either apply a multiresolution segmentation or a hierarchical segmentation. The proposed approach combines both multiresolution and hierarchical segmentation processes. Indeed, the image is considered as a set of images at different levels of resolution, where at each level a hierarchical segmentation is performed. Multiresolution implies that a segmentation of a given level is reused in further segmentation processes operated at next levels so that to insure contour consistency between different resolutions. Each level of resolution provides a Region Adjacency Graph (RAG) that describes the neighborhood relationships between regions within a given level of the multiresolution representation. Region label consistency is preserved thanks to a dedicated projection algorithm based on inter-level relationships. Moreover, a preprocess based on a quadtree partitioning reduces the amount of input data thus leading to a lower overall complexity of the segmentation framework. Experiments show that we obtain effective results when compared to the state of the art together with a lower complexity.

  17. Cell-based representation and analysis of social-economic data in grid-city construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangnan; Huang, Fang; Wang, Ping

    2007-06-01

    Grid-city management currently attracts a wider audience globally. Socio-economic data is an essential part of grid-city management system. Social-economic data of an urban is characterized by discrete, time-varying, statistical, distributed and complicated. Most of data are with no exactly spatial location or from various statistical units. There is obvious gap while matching social-economic data with existing grid map of natural geographical elements emerges. It may cause many difficulties in data input, organization, processing and analysis while the grid system constructing and executing. The issue of how to allocate and integrate the huge social-economic data into each grid effectively is crucial for grid-city construction. In this paper, we discussed the characteristics of social-economic data in a grid-city systematically, thereafter a cell-based model for social-economic data representing and analyzing is presented in this paper. The kernel issues of the cell-based model establishment include cell size determining, cell capabilities developing for multi-dimension representation and evaluation, and cell dynamic simulation functions designing. The cell-based model supplements the methods system of spatial data mining, and is also promising in application to the spatialization of statistical data obtained from other researches including environmental monitoring, hydrological and meteorological observation.

  18. Feature-based representations of emotional facial expressions in the human amygdala.

    PubMed

    Ahs, Fredrik; Davis, Caroline F; Gorka, Adam X; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2014-09-01

    The amygdala plays a central role in processing facial affect, responding to diverse expressions and features shared between expressions. Although speculation exists regarding the nature of relationships between expression- and feature-specific amygdala reactivity, this matter has not been fully explored. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and principal component analysis (PCA) in a sample of 300 young adults, to investigate patterns related to expression- and feature-specific amygdala reactivity to faces displaying neutral, fearful, angry or surprised expressions. The PCA revealed a two-dimensional correlation structure that distinguished emotional categories. The first principal component separated neutral and surprised from fearful and angry expressions, whereas the second principal component separated neutral and angry from fearful and surprised expressions. This two-dimensional correlation structure of amygdala reactivity may represent specific feature-based cues conserved across discrete expressions. To delineate which feature-based cues characterized this pattern, face stimuli were averaged and then subtracted according to their principal component loadings. The first principal component corresponded to displacement of the eyebrows, whereas the second principal component corresponded to increased exposure of eye whites together with movement of the brow. Our results suggest a convergent representation of facial affect in the amygdala reflecting feature-based processing of discrete expressions. PMID:23887817

  19. Sensorimotor representation and knowledge-based reasoning for spatial exploration and localisation.

    PubMed

    Zetzsche, C; Wolter, J; Schill, K

    2008-12-01

    We investigate a hybrid system for autonomous exploration and navigation, and implement it in a virtual mobile agent, which operates in virtual spatial environments. The system is based on several distinguishing properties. The representation is not map-like, but based on sensorimotor features, i.e. on combinations of sensory features and motor actions. The system has a hybrid architecture, which integrates a bottom-up processing of sensorimotor features with a top-down, knowledge-based reasoning strategy. This strategy selects the optimal motor action in each step according to the principle of maximum information gain. Two sensorimotor levels with different behavioural granularity are implemented, a macro-level, which controls the movements of the agent in space, and a micro-level, which controls its eye movements. At each level, the same type of hybrid architecture and the same principle of information gain are used for sensorimotor control. The localisation performance of the system is tested with large sets of virtual rooms containing different mixtures of unique and non-unique objects. The results demonstrate that the system efficiently performs those exploratory motor actions that yield a maximum amount of information about the current environment. Localisation is typically achieved within a few steps. Furthermore, the computational complexity of the underlying computations is limited, and the system is robust with respect to minor variations in the spatial environments. PMID:18461375

  20. The first proton sponge-based amino acids: synthesis, acid-base properties and some reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ozeryanskii, Valery A; Gorbacheva, Anastasia Yu; Pozharskii, Alexander F; Vlasenko, Marina P; Tereznikov, Alexander Yu; Chernov'yants, Margarita S

    2015-08-21

    The first hybrid base constructed from 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (proton sponge or DMAN) and glycine, N-methyl-N-(8-dimethylamino-1-naphthyl)aminoacetic acid, was synthesised in high yield and its hydrobromide was structurally characterised and used to determine the acid-base properties via potentiometric titration. It was found that the basic strength of the DMAN-glycine base (pKa = 11.57, H2O) is on the level of amidine amino acids like arginine and creatine and its structure, zwitterionic vs. neutral, based on the spectroscopic (IR, NMR, mass) and theoretical (DFT) approaches has a strong preference to the zwitterionic form. Unlike glycine, the DMAN-glycine zwitterion is N-chiral and is hydrolytically cleaved with the loss of glycolic acid on heating in DMSO. This reaction together with the mild decarboxylative conversion of proton sponge-based amino acids into 2,3-dihydroperimidinium salts under air-oxygen was monitored with the help of the DMAN-alanine amino acid. The newly devised amino acids are unique as they combine fluorescence, strongly basic and redox-active properties. PMID:26159785

  1. Computer-Based Learning: Interleaving Whole and Sectional Representation of Neuroanatomy

    PubMed Central

    Pani, John R.; Chariker, Julia H.; Naaz, Farah

    2015-01-01

    The large volume of material to be learned in biomedical disciplines requires optimizing the efficiency of instruction. In prior work with computer-based instruction of neuroanatomy, it was relatively efficient for learners to master whole anatomy and then transfer to learning sectional anatomy. It may, however, be more efficient to continuously integrate learning of whole and sectional anatomy. A study of computer-based learning of neuroanatomy was conducted to compare a basic transfer paradigm for learning whole and sectional neuroanatomy with a method in which the two forms of representation were interleaved (alternated). For all experimental groups, interactive computer programs supported an approach to instruction called adaptive exploration. Each learning trial consisted of time-limited exploration of neuroanatomy, self-timed testing, and graphical feedback. The primary result of this study was that interleaved learning of whole and sectional neuroanatomy was more efficient than the basic transfer method, without cost to long-term retention or generalization of knowledge to recognizing new images (Visible Human and MRI). PMID:22761001

  2. Depth-based representations: Which coding format for 3D video broadcast applications?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbiriou, Paul; Boisson, Guillaume; Sidibé, Korian; Huynh-Thu, Quan

    2011-03-01

    3D Video (3DV) delivery standardization is currently ongoing in MPEG. Now time is to choose 3DV data representation format. What is at stake is the final quality for end-users, i.e. synthesized views' visual quality. We focus on two major rival depth-based formats, namely Multiview Video plus Depth (MVD) and Layered Depth Video (LDV). MVD can be considered as the basic depth-based 3DV format, generated by disparity estimation from multiview sequences. LDV is more sophisticated, with the compaction of multiview data into color- and depth-occlusions layers. We compare final views quality using MVD2 and LDV (both containing two color channels plus two depth components) coded with MVC at various compression ratios. Depending on the format, the appropriate synthesis process is performed to generate final stereoscopic pairs. Comparisons are provided in terms of SSIM and PSNR with respect to original views and to synthesized references (obtained without compression). Eventually, LDV outperforms significantly MVD when using state-of-the-art reference synthesis algorithms. Occlusions management before encoding is advantageous in comparison with handling redundant signals at decoder side. Besides, we observe that depth quantization does not induce much loss on the final view quality until a significant degradation level. Improvements in disparity estimation and view synthesis algorithms are therefore still expected during the remaining standardization steps.

  3. proBAMsuite, a Bioinformatics Framework for Genome-Based Representation and Analysis of Proteomics Data*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojing; Slebos, Robbert J. C.; Chambers, Matthew C.; Tabb, David L.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    To facilitate genome-based representation and analysis of proteomics data, we developed a new bioinformatics framework, proBAMsuite, in which a central component is the protein BAM (proBAM) file format for organizing peptide spectrum matches (PSMs)1 within the context of the genome. proBAMsuite also includes two R packages, proBAMr and proBAMtools, for generating and analyzing proBAM files, respectively. Applying proBAMsuite to three recently published proteomics datasets, we demonstrated its utility in facilitating efficient genome-based sharing, interpretation, and integration of proteomics data. First, the interpretation of proteomics data is significantly enhanced with the rich genomic annotation information. Second, PSMs can be easily reannotated using user-specified gene annotation schemes and assembled into both protein and gene identifications. Third, using the genome as a common reference, proBAMsuite facilitates seamless proteomics and proteogenomics data integration. Finally, proBAM files can be readily visualized in genome browsers and thus bring proteomics data analysis to a general audience beyond the proteomics community. Results from this study establish proBAMsuite as a useful bioinformatics framework for proteomics and proteogenomics research. PMID:26657539

  4. A modular non-negative matrix factorization for parts-based object recognition using subspace representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajla, Ivan; Soukup, Daniel

    2008-02-01

    Non-negative matrix factorization of an input data matrix into a matrix of basis vectors and a matrix of encoding coefficients is a subspace representation method that has attracted attention of researches in pattern recognition in the recent period. We have explored crucial aspects of NMF on massive recognition experiments with the ORL database of faces which include intuitively clear parts constituting the whole. Using a principal changing of the learning stage structure and by formulating NMF problems for each of a priori given parts separately, we developed a novel modular NMF algorithm. Although this algorithm provides uniquely separated basis vectors which code individual face parts in accordance with the parts-based principle of the NMF methodology applied to object recognition problems, any significant improvement of recognition rates for occluded parts, predicted in several papers, was not reached. We claim that using the parts-based concept in NMF as a basis for solving recognition problems with occluded objects has not been justified.

  5. Gaussian Process Regression-Based Video Anomaly Detection and Localization With Hierarchical Feature Representation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kai-Wen; Chen, Yie-Tarng; Fang, Wen-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a hierarchical framework for detecting local and global anomalies via hierarchical feature representation and Gaussian process regression (GPR) which is fully non-parametric and robust to the noisy training data, and supports sparse features. While most research on anomaly detection has focused more on detecting local anomalies, we are more interested in global anomalies that involve multiple normal events interacting in an unusual manner, such as car accidents. To simultaneously detect local and global anomalies, we cast the extraction of normal interactions from the training videos as a problem of finding the frequent geometric relations of the nearby sparse spatio-temporal interest points (STIPs). A codebook of interaction templates is then constructed and modeled using the GPR, based on which a novel inference method for computing the likelihood of an observed interaction is also developed. Thereafter, these local likelihood scores are integrated into globally consistent anomaly masks, from which anomalies can be succinctly identified. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time GPR is employed to model the relationship of the nearby STIPs for anomaly detection. Simulations based on four widespread datasets show that the new method outperforms the main state-of-the-art methods with lower computational burden. PMID:26394423

  6. Network-based representation of energy transfer in unsteady separated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Aditya; Taira, Kunihiko

    2015-11-01

    We construct a network-based representation of energy pathways in unsteady separated flows using a POD-Galerkin projection model. In this formulation, we regard the POD modes as the network nodes and the energy transfer between the modes as the network edges. Based on the energy transfer analysis performed by Noack et al. (2008), edge weights are characterized on the interaction graph. As an example, we examine the energy transfer within the two-dimensional incompressible flow over a circular cylinder. In particular, we analyze the energy pathways involved in flow transition from the unstable symmetric steady state to periodic shedding cycle. The growth of perturbation energy over the network is examined to highlight key features of flow physics and to determine how the energy transfer can be influenced. Furthermore, we implement closed-loop flow control on the POD-Galerkin model to alter the energy interaction path and modify the global behavior of the wake dynamics. The insights gained will be used to perform further network analysis on fluid flows with added complexity. Work supported by US Army Research Office (W911NF-14-1-0386) and US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (YIP: FA9550-13-1-0183).

  7. Remote Sensing Image Fusion Method Based on Nonsubsampled Shearlet Transform and Sparse Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moonon, Altan-Ulzii; Hu, Jianwen; Li, Shutao

    2015-12-01

    The remote sensing image fusion is an important preprocessing technique in remote sensing image processing. In this paper, a remote sensing image fusion method based on the nonsubsampled shearlet transform (NSST) with sparse representation (SR) is proposed. Firstly, the low resolution multispectral (MS) image is upsampled and color space is transformed from Red-Green-Blue (RGB) to Intensity-Hue-Saturation (IHS). Then, the high resolution panchromatic (PAN) image and intensity component of MS image are decomposed by NSST to high and low frequency coefficients. The low frequency coefficients of PAN and the intensity component are fused by the SR with the learned dictionary. The high frequency coefficients of intensity component and PAN image are fused by local energy based fusion rule. Finally, the fused result is obtained by performing inverse NSST and inverse IHS transform. The experimental results on IKONOS and QuickBird satellites demonstrate that the proposed method provides better spectral quality and superior spatial information in the fused image than other remote sensing image fusion methods both in visual effect and object evaluation.

  8. Direct isosurface visualization of hex-based high-order geometry and attribute representations.

    PubMed

    Martin, Tobias; Cohen, Elaine; Kirby, Robert M

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel isosurface visualization technique that guarantees the accurate visualization of isosurfaces with complex attribute data defined on (un)structured (curvi)linear hexahedral grids. Isosurfaces of high-order hexahedral-based finite element solutions on both uniform grids (including MRI and CT scans) and more complex geometry representing a domain of interest that can be rendered using our algorithm. Additionally, our technique can be used to directly visualize solutions and attributes in isogeometric analysis, an area based on trivariate high-order NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-splines) geometry and attribute representations for the analysis. Furthermore, our technique can be used to visualize isosurfaces of algebraic functions. Our approach combines subdivision and numerical root finding to form a robust and efficient isosurface visualization algorithm that does not miss surface features, while finding all intersections between a view frustum and desired isosurfaces. This allows the use of view-independent transparency in the rendering process. We demonstrate our technique through a straightforward CPU implementation on both complex-structured and complex-unstructured geometries with high-order simulation solutions, isosurfaces of medical data sets, and isosurfaces of algebraic functions. PMID:22442127

  9. Neural Network Based Representation of UH-60A Pilot and Hub Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi

    2000-01-01

    Neural network relationships between the full-scale, experimental hub accelerations and the corresponding pilot floor vertical vibration are studied. The present physics-based, quantitative effort represents an initial systematic study on the UH-60A Black Hawk hub accelerations. The NASA/Army UH-60A Airloads Program flight test database was used. A 'maneuver-effect-factor (MEF)', derived using the roll-angle and the pitch-rate, was used. Three neural network based representation-cases were considered. The pilot floor vertical vibration was considered in the first case and the hub accelerations were separately considered in the second case. The third case considered both the hub accelerations and the pilot floor vertical vibration. Neither the advance ratio nor the gross weight alone could be used to predict the pilot floor vertical vibration. However, the advance ratio and the gross weight together could be used to predict the pilot floor vertical vibration over the entire flight envelope. The hub accelerations data were modeled and found to be of very acceptable quality. The hub accelerations alone could not be used to predict the pilot floor vertical vibration. Thus, the hub accelerations alone do not drive the pilot floor vertical vibration. However, the hub accelerations, along with either the advance ratio or the gross weight or both, could be used to satisfactorily predict the pilot floor vertical vibration. The hub accelerations are clearly a factor in determining the pilot floor vertical vibration.

  10. Force Concept Inventory-based multiple-choice test for investigating students' representational consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, Pasi; Savinainen, Antti; Viiri, Jouni

    2010-07-01

    This study investigates students’ ability to interpret multiple representations consistently (i.e., representational consistency) in the context of the force concept. For this purpose we developed the Representational Variant of the Force Concept Inventory (R-FCI), which makes use of nine items from the 1995 version of the Force Concept Inventory (FCI). These original FCI items were redesigned using various representations (such as motion map, vectorial and graphical), yielding 27 multiple-choice items concerning four central concepts underpinning the force concept: Newton’s first, second, and third laws, and gravitation. We provide some evidence for the validity and reliability of the R-FCI; this analysis is limited to the student population of one Finnish high school. The students took the R-FCI at the beginning and at the end of their first high school physics course. We found that students’ (n=168) representational consistency (whether scientifically correct or not) varied considerably depending on the concept. On average, representational consistency and scientifically correct understanding increased during the instruction, although in the post-test only a few students performed consistently both in terms of representations and scientifically correct understanding. We also compared students’ (n=87) results of the R-FCI and the FCI, and found that they correlated quite well.

  11. Attachment and God Representations among Lay Catholics, Priests, and Religious: A Matched Comparison Study Based on the Adult Attachment Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassibba, Rosalinda; Granqvist, Pehr; Costantini, Alessandro; Gatto, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Based on the idea that believers' perceived relationships with God develop from their attachment-related experiences with primary caregivers, the authors explored the quality of such experiences and their representations among individuals who differed in likelihood of experiencing a principal attachment to God. Using the Adult Attachment Interview…

  12. Integrating Argument-Based Science Inquiry with Modal Representations: Impact on Science Achievement, Argumentation, and Writing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demirbag, Mehmet; Gunel, Murat

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of integrating the Argument-Based Science Inquiry (ABSI) approach with multi-modal representations on students' achievement, and their argumentation and writing skills. The study was conducted with 62 female and 57 male college students at the Central Anatolian Turkish University. All participants…

  13. Object tracking for a class of dynamic image-based representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Zhi-Feng; Chan, Shing-Chow; Ng, King-To; Shum, Heung-Yeung

    2005-07-01

    Image-based rendering (IBR) is an emerging technology for photo-realistic rendering of scenes from a collection of densely sampled images and videos. Recently, an object-based approach for rendering and the compression of a class of dynamic image-based representations called plenoptic videos was proposed. The plenoptic video is a simplified dynamic light field, which is obtained by capturing videos at regularly locations along a series of line segments. In the object-based approach, objects at large depth differences are segmented into layers for rendering and compression. The rendering quality in large environment can be significantly improved, as demonstrated by the pop-up lightfields. In addition, by coding the plenoptic video at the object level, desirable functionalities such as scalability of contents, error resilience, and interactivity with individual IBR objects, can be achieved. An important step in the object-based approach is to segment the objects in the video streams into layers or image-based objects, which is largely done by semi-automatic technique. To reduce the segmentation time for segmenting plenoptic videos, efficient tracking techniques are highly desirable. This paper proposes a new automatic object tracking method based on the level-set method. Our method, which utilizes both local and global features of the image sequences instead of global features exploited in previous approach, can achieve better tracking results for objects, especially with non-uniform energy distribution. Due to possible segmentation errors around object boundaries, natural matting with Bayesian approach is also incorporated into our system. Using the alpha map and texture so estimated, it is very convenient to composite the image-based objects onto the background of the original or other plenoptic videos. Furthermore, a MPEG-4 like object-based algorithm is developed for compressing the plenoptic videos, which consist of the alpha maps, depth maps and textures of the

  14. Chem I Supplement: Emphasis on Acids and Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education Staff

    1977-01-01

    Provides supplementary notes on acids and bases suitable for secondary school chemistry instruction, including acidity in solid and natural waters, acidity balance in body chemistry, acid and basic foods, pH values of common fluids, examples of drugs, and commercial preparation of nitric acid. (SL)

  15. Applying representational state transfer (REST) architecture to archetype-based electronic health record systems

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The openEHR project and the closely related ISO 13606 standard have defined structures supporting the content of Electronic Health Records (EHRs). However, there is not yet any finalized openEHR specification of a service interface to aid application developers in creating, accessing, and storing the EHR content. The aim of this paper is to explore how the Representational State Transfer (REST) architectural style can be used as a basis for a platform-independent, HTTP-based openEHR service interface. Associated benefits and tradeoffs of such a design are also explored. Results The main contribution is the formalization of the openEHR storage, retrieval, and version-handling semantics and related services into an implementable HTTP-based service interface. The modular design makes it possible to prototype, test, replicate, distribute, cache, and load-balance the system using ordinary web technology. Other contributions are approaches to query and retrieval of the EHR content that takes caching, logging, and distribution into account. Triggering on EHR change events is also explored. A final contribution is an open source openEHR implementation using the above-mentioned approaches to create LiU EEE, an educational EHR environment intended to help newcomers and developers experiment with and learn about the archetype-based EHR approach and enable rapid prototyping. Conclusions Using REST addressed many architectural concerns in a successful way, but an additional messaging component was needed to address some architectural aspects. Many of our approaches are likely of value to other archetype-based EHR implementations and may contribute to associated service model specifications. PMID:23656624

  16. Secure Base Representations in Middle Childhood across Two Western Cultures: Associations with Parental Attachment Representations and Maternal Reports of Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theodore E. A.; Bosmans, Guy; Vandevivere, Eva; Dujardin, Adinda; Waters, Harriet S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent work examining the content and organization of attachment representations suggests that 1 way in which we represent the attachment relationship is in the form of a cognitive script. This work has largely focused on early childhood or adolescence/adulthood, leaving a large gap in our understanding of script-like attachment representations in…

  17. A Mathematical Representation of the Genetic Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Vanessa J.; Rowlands, Peter

    Algebraic and geometric representations of the genetic code are used to show their functions in coding for amino acids. The algebra is a 64-part vector quaternion combination, and the geometry is based on the structure of the regular icosidodecahedron. An almost perfect pattern suggests that this is a biologically significant way of representing the genetic code.

  18. Efficient representation of shape variability using surface-based free-vibration modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Kaus, Michael R.; Pekar, Vladimir; Weese, Juergen

    2001-07-01

    The efficient representation of shape and shape variability is a key issue in computerized 3D image processing. One of the common goals is the ability to express as much shape variability as necessary with as few parameters as possible. In this paper we focus on the capture of shape variability on the basis of free surface vibration modes. We do not model the interior of an elastic object, but rather its triangulated surface. As in the case of 3D statistical point-distribution models (PDM) we assume that the shape of an anatomical object can efficiently be approximated by a weighted sum of a mean shape and a number of variation modes. The variation modes are in our case Eigenvectors of a stiffness-matrix. Based on a given surface triangulation we define a physical model by placing mass points at the vertices and coil- and leaf-spring elements at the edge positions of the triangulation. Ordered by wavelength, the resulting free vibration modes can be used to efficiently approximate shape variability in a coarse to fine manner, similar to a Fourier decomposition. As real-object examples from the medical image-processing domain, we applied the method to triangulated surfaces of segmented lumbar vertebra and femor-head from CT data sets. A comparison to corresponding statistical shape models shows, that natural variability of anatomical shape can efficiently be approximated by free surface vibration modes.

  19. Pulmonary emphysema classification based on an improved texton learning model by sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Zhou, Xiangrong; Goshima, Satoshi; Chen, Huayue; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hara, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we present a texture classification method based on texton learned via sparse representation (SR) with new feature histogram maps in the classification of emphysema. First, an overcomplete dictionary of textons is learned via KSVD learning on every class image patches in the training dataset. In this stage, high-pass filter is introduced to exclude patches in smooth area to speed up the dictionary learning process. Second, 3D joint-SR coefficients and intensity histograms of the test images are used for characterizing regions of interest (ROIs) instead of conventional feature histograms constructed from SR coefficients of the test images over the dictionary. Classification is then performed using a classifier with distance as a histogram dissimilarity measure. Four hundreds and seventy annotated ROIs extracted from 14 test subjects, including 6 paraseptal emphysema (PSE) subjects, 5 centrilobular emphysema (CLE) subjects and 3 panlobular emphysema (PLE) subjects, are used to evaluate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method. The proposed method is tested on 167 PSE, 240 CLE and 63 PLE ROIs consisting of mild, moderate and severe pulmonary emphysema. The accuracy of the proposed system is around 74%, 88% and 89% for PSE, CLE and PLE, respectively.

  20. Robust classification for occluded ear via Gabor scale feature-based non-negative sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baoqing; Mu, Zhichun; Li, Chen; Zeng, Hui

    2014-06-01

    The Gabor wavelets have been experimentally verified to be a good approximation to the response of cortical neurons. A new feature extraction approach is investigated for ear recognition by using scale information of Gabor wavelets. The proposed Gabor scale feature conforms to human visual perception of objects from far to near. It can not only avoid too much redundancy in Gabor features but also tends to extract more precise structural information that is robust to image variations. Then, Gabor scale feature-based non-negative sparse representation classification (G-NSRC) is proposed for ear recognition under occlusion. Compared with SRC in which the sparse coding coefficients can be negative, the non-negativity of G-NSRC conforms to the intuitive notion of combing parts to form a whole and therefore is more consistent with the biological modeling of visual data. Additionally, the use of Gabor scale features increases the discriminative power of G-NSRC. Finally, the proposed classification paradigm is applied to occluded ear recognition. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. Especially when the ear is occluded, the proposed algorithm exhibits great robustness and achieves state-of-the-art recognition performance.

  1. 3D Face Recognition Based on Multiple Keypoint Descriptors and Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Ding, Zhixuan; Li, Hongyu; Shen, Ying; Lu, Jianwei

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in developing methods for 3D face recognition. However, 3D scans often suffer from the problems of missing parts, large facial expressions, and occlusions. To be useful in real-world applications, a 3D face recognition approach should be able to handle these challenges. In this paper, we propose a novel general approach to deal with the 3D face recognition problem by making use of multiple keypoint descriptors (MKD) and the sparse representation-based classification (SRC). We call the proposed method 3DMKDSRC for short. Specifically, with 3DMKDSRC, each 3D face scan is represented as a set of descriptor vectors extracted from keypoints by meshSIFT. Descriptor vectors of gallery samples form the gallery dictionary. Given a probe 3D face scan, its descriptors are extracted at first and then its identity can be determined by using a multitask SRC. The proposed 3DMKDSRC approach does not require the pre-alignment between two face scans and is quite robust to the problems of missing data, occlusions and expressions. Its superiority over the other leading 3D face recognition schemes has been corroborated by extensive experiments conducted on three benchmark databases, Bosphorus, GavabDB, and FRGC2.0. The Matlab source code for 3DMKDSRC and the related evaluation results are publicly available at http://sse.tongji.edu.cn/linzhang/3dmkdsrcface/3dmkdsrc.htm. PMID:24940876

  2. Video reframing relying on panoramic estimation based on a 3D representation of the scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Simon, Agnes; Figue, Jean; Nicolas, Henri

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes a new method for creating mosaic images from an original video and for computing a new sequence modifying some camera parameters like image size, scale factor, view angle... A mosaic image is a representation of the full scene observed by a moving camera during its displacement. It provides a wide angle of view of the scene from a sequence of images shot with a narrow angle of view camera. This paper proposes a method to create a virtual sequence from a calibrated original video and a rough 3D model of the scene. A 3D relationship between original and virtual images gives pixel correspondent in different images for a same 3D point in model scene. To texture the model with natural textures obtained in the original sequence, a criterion based on constraints related to the temporal variations of the background and 3D geometric considerations is used. Finally, in the presented method, the textured 3D model is used to recompute a new sequence of image with possibly different point of view and camera aperture angle. The algorithm is being proven with virtual sequences and, obtained results are encouraging up to now.

  3. Space-based radar representation in the advanced warfighting simulation (AWARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phend, Andrew E.; Buckley, Kathryn; Elliott, Steven R.; Stanley, Page B.; Shea, Peter M.; Rutland, Jimmie A.

    2004-09-01

    Space and orbiting systems impact multiple battlefield operating systems (BOS). Space support to current operations is a perfect example of how the United States fights. Satellite-aided munitions, communications, navigation and weather systems combine to achieve military objectives in a relatively short amount of time. Through representation of space capabilities within models and simulations, the military will have the ability to train and educate officers and soldiers to fight from the high ground of space or to conduct analysis and determine the requirements or utility of transformed forces empowered with advanced space-based capabilities. The Army Vice Chief of Staff acknowledged deficiencies in space modeling and simulation during the September 2001 Space Force Management Analsyis Review (FORMAL) and directed that a multi-disciplinary team be established to recommend a service-wide roadmap to address shortcomings. A Focus Area Collaborative Team (FACT), led by the U.S. Army Space & Missile Defense Command with participation across the Army, confirmed the weaknesses in scope, consistency, correctness, completeness, availability, and usability of space model and simulation (M&S) for Army applications. The FACT addressed the need to develop a roadmap to remedy Space M&S deficiencies using a highly parallelized process and schedule designed to support a recommendation during the Sep 02 meeting of the Army Model and Simulation Executive Council (AMSEC).

  4. Dim moving target tracking algorithm based on particle discriminative sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengzhou; Li, Jianing; Ge, Fengzeng; Shao, Wanxing; Liu, Bing; Jin, Gang

    2016-03-01

    The small dim moving target usually submerged in strong noise, and its motion observability is debased by numerous false alarms for low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A target tracking algorithm based on particle filter and discriminative sparse representation is proposed in this paper to cope with the uncertainty of dim moving target tracking. The weight of every particle is the crucial factor to ensuring the accuracy of dim target tracking for particle filter (PF) that can achieve excellent performance even under the situation of non-linear and non-Gaussian motion. In discriminative over-complete dictionary constructed according to image sequence, the target dictionary describes target signal and the background dictionary embeds background clutter. The difference between target particle and background particle is enhanced to a great extent, and the weight of every particle is then measured by means of the residual after reconstruction using the prescribed number of target atoms and their corresponding coefficients. The movement state of dim moving target is then estimated and finally tracked by these weighted particles. Meanwhile, the subspace of over-complete dictionary is updated online by the stochastic estimation algorithm. Some experiments are induced and the experimental results show the proposed algorithm could improve the performance of moving target tracking by enhancing the consistency between the posteriori probability distribution and the moving target state.

  5. Accelerometer-Based Gait Recognition by Sparse Representation of Signature Points With Clusters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuting; Pan, Gang; Jia, Kui; Lu, Minlong; Wang, Yueming; Wu, Zhaohui

    2015-09-01

    Gait, as a promising biometric for recognizing human identities, can be nonintrusively captured as a series of acceleration signals using wearable or portable smart devices. It can be used for access control. Most existing methods on accelerometer-based gait recognition require explicit step-cycle detection, suffering from cycle detection failures and intercycle phase misalignment. We propose a novel algorithm that avoids both the above two problems. It makes use of a type of salient points termed signature points (SPs), and has three components: 1) a multiscale SP extraction method, including the localization and SP descriptors; 2) a sparse representation scheme for encoding newly emerged SPs with known ones in terms of their descriptors, where the phase propinquity of the SPs in a cluster is leveraged to ensure the physical meaningfulness of the codes; and 3) a classifier for the sparse-code collections associated with the SPs of a series. Experimental results on our publicly available dataset of 175 subjects showed that our algorithm outperformed existing methods, even if the step cycles were perfectly detected for them. When the accelerometers at five different body locations were used together, it achieved the rank-1 accuracy of 95.8% for identification, and the equal error rate of 2.2% for verification. PMID:25423662

  6. Signal representation on the angular Poincaré sphere, based on second-order moments.

    PubMed

    Bastiaans, Martin J; Alieva, Tatiana

    2010-04-01

    Based on the analysis of second-order moments, a generalized canonical representation of a two-dimensional optical signal is proposed, which is associated with the angular Poincaré sphere. Vortex-free (or zero-twist) optical beams arise on the equator of this sphere, while beams with a maximum vorticity (or maximum twist) are located at the poles. An easy way is shown how the latitude on the sphere, which is a measure for the degree of vorticity, can be derived from the second-order moments. The latitude is invariant when the beam propagates through a first-order optical system between conjugate planes. To change the vorticity of a beam, a system that does not operate between conjugate planes is needed, with the gyrator as the prime representative of such a system. A direct way is derived to find an optical system (consisting of a lens, a magnifier, a rotator, and a gyrator) that transforms a beam with an arbitrary moment matrix into its canonical form. PMID:20360834

  7. 3D face recognition based on multiple keypoint descriptors and sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Ding, Zhixuan; Li, Hongyu; Shen, Ying; Lu, Jianwei

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in developing methods for 3D face recognition. However, 3D scans often suffer from the problems of missing parts, large facial expressions, and occlusions. To be useful in real-world applications, a 3D face recognition approach should be able to handle these challenges. In this paper, we propose a novel general approach to deal with the 3D face recognition problem by making use of multiple keypoint descriptors (MKD) and the sparse representation-based classification (SRC). We call the proposed method 3DMKDSRC for short. Specifically, with 3DMKDSRC, each 3D face scan is represented as a set of descriptor vectors extracted from keypoints by meshSIFT. Descriptor vectors of gallery samples form the gallery dictionary. Given a probe 3D face scan, its descriptors are extracted at first and then its identity can be determined by using a multitask SRC. The proposed 3DMKDSRC approach does not require the pre-alignment between two face scans and is quite robust to the problems of missing data, occlusions and expressions. Its superiority over the other leading 3D face recognition schemes has been corroborated by extensive experiments conducted on three benchmark databases, Bosphorus, GavabDB, and FRGC2.0. The Matlab source code for 3DMKDSRC and the related evaluation results are publicly available at http://sse.tongji.edu.cn/linzhang/3dmkdsrcface/3dmkdsrc.htm. PMID:24940876

  8. Topography-Based Registration of Developing Cortical Surfaces in Infants Using Multidirectional Varifold Representation

    PubMed Central

    Rekik, Islem; Li, Gang; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Cortical surface registration or matching facilitates atlasing, cortical morphology-function comparison and statistical analysis. Methods that geodesically shoot surfaces into one another, as currents or varifolds, provide an elegant mathematical framework for generic surface matching and dynamic local features estimation, such as deformation momenta. However, conventional current and varifold matching methods only use the normals of the surface to measure its geometry and guide the warping process, which overlooks the importance of the direction in the convoluted cortical sulcal and gyral folds. To cope with the stated limitation, we decompose each cortical surface into its normal and tangent varifold representations, by integrating principal curvature direction field into the varifold matching framework, thus providing rich information for the direction of cortical folding and better characterization of the cortical geometry. To include more informative cortical geometric features in the matching process, we adaptively place control points based on the surface topography, hence the deformation is controlled by points lying on gyral crests (or “hills”) and sulcal fundi (or “valleys”) of the cortical surface, which are the most reliable and important topographic and anatomical landmarks on the cortex. We applied our method for registering the developing cortical surfaces in 12 infants from 0 to 6 months of age. Both of these variants significantly improved the matching accuracy in terms of closeness to the target surface and the precision of alignment with regional anatomical boundaries, when compared with several state-of-the-art methods: (1) diffeomorphic spectral matching, (2) current-based surface matching and (3) original varifold-based surface matching. PMID:27169137

  9. Why Representations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, James E.; Waters, Michael S.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses representations in the context of solving a system of linear equations. Views representations (concrete, tables, graphs, algebraic, matrices) from perspectives of understanding, technology, generalization, exact versus approximate solution, and learning style. (KHR)

  10. A ranklet-based image representation for mass classification in digital mammograms

    SciTech Connect

    Masotti, Matteo

    2006-10-15

    Regions of interest (ROIs) found on breast radiographic images are classified as either tumoral mass or normal tissue by means of a support vector machine classifier. Classification features are the coefficients resulting from the specific image representation used to encode each ROI. Pixel and wavelet image representations have already been discussed in one of our previous works. To investigate the possibility of improving classification performances, a novel nonparametric, orientation-selective, and multiresolution image representation is developed and evaluated, namely a ranklet image representation. A dataset consisting of 1000 ROIs representing biopsy-proven tumoral masses (either benign or malignant) and 5000 ROIs representing normal breast tissue is used. ROIs are extracted from the digital database for screening mammography collected by the University of South Florida. Classification performances are evaluated using the area A{sub z} under the receiver operating characteristic curve. By achieving A{sub z} values of 0.978{+-}0.003 and 90% sensitivity with a false positive fraction value of 4.5%, experiments demonstrate classification results higher than those reached by the previous image representations. In particular, the improvement on the A{sub z} value over that achieved by the wavelet image representation is statistically relevant with the two-tailed p value <0.0001. Besides, owing to the tolerance that the ranklet image representation reveals to variations in the ROIs' gray-level intensity histogram, this approach discloses to be robust also when tested on radiographic images having gray-level intensity histogram remarkably different from that used for training.

  11. The Bronsted-Lowery Acid-Base Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, George B.

    1988-01-01

    Gives the background history of the simultaneous discovery of acid-base relationships by Johannes Bronsted and Thomas Lowry. Provides a brief biographical sketch of each. Discusses their concept of acids and bases in some detail. (CW)

  12. An Introductory Laboratory Exercise for Acids and Bases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Richard; Silberman, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Discusses an acid-base neutralization exercise requiring groups of students to determine: (1) combinations of solutions giving neutralization; (2) grouping solutions as acids or bases; and (3) ranking groups in order of concentration. (JM)

  13. Mathematical modeling of acid-base physiology

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Rossana; Boron, Walter F.

    2015-01-01

    pH is one of the most important parameters in life, influencing virtually every biological process at the cellular, tissue, and whole-body level. Thus, for cells, it is critical to regulate intracellular pH (pHi) and, for multicellular organisms, to regulate extracellular pH (pHo). pHi regulation depends on the opposing actions of plasma-membrane transporters that tend to increase pHi, and others that tend to decrease pHi. In addition, passive fluxes of uncharged species (e.g., CO2, NH3) and charged species (e.g., HCO3− , NH4+) perturb pHi. These movements not only influence one another, but also perturb the equilibria of a multitude of intracellular and extracellular buffers. Thus, even at the level of a single cell, perturbations in acid-base reactions, diffusion, and transport are so complex that it is impossible to understand them without a quantitative model. Here we summarize some mathematical models developed to shed light onto the complex interconnected events triggered by acids-base movements. We then describe a mathematical model of a spherical cell–which to our knowledge is the first one capable of handling a multitude of buffer reaction–that our team has recently developed to simulate changes in pHi and pHo caused by movements of acid-base equivalents across the plasma membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Finally, we extend our work to a consideration of the effects of simultaneous CO2 and HCO3− influx into a cell, and envision how future models might extend to other cell types (e.g., erythrocytes) or tissues (e.g., renal proximal-tubule epithelium) important for whole-body pH homeostasis. PMID:25617697

  14. Photocurable bioadhesive based on lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Marques, D S; Santos, J M C; Ferreira, P; Correia, T R; Correia, I J; Gil, M H; Baptista, C M S G

    2016-01-01

    Novel photocurable and low molecular weight oligomers based on l-lactic acid with proven interest to be used as bioadhesive were successfully manufactured. Preparation of lactic acid oligomers with methacrylic end functionalizations was carried out in the absence of catalyst or solvents by self-esterification in two reaction steps: telechelic lactic acid oligomerization with OH end groups and further functionalization with methacrylic anhydride. The final adhesive composition was achieved by the addition of a reported biocompatible photoinitiator (Irgacure® 2959). Preliminary in vitro biodegradability was investigated by hydrolytic degradation in PBS (pH=7.4) at 37 °C. The adhesion performance was evaluated using glued aminated substrates (gelatine pieces) subjected to pull-to-break test. Surface energy measured by contact angles is lower than the reported values of the skin and blood. The absence of cytoxicity was evaluated using human fibroblasts. A notable antimicrobial behaviour was observed using two bacterial models (Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli). The cured material exhibited a strong thrombogenic character when placed in contact with blood, which can be predicted as a haemostatic effect for bleeding control. This novel material was subjected to an extensive characterization showing great potential for bioadhesive or other biomedical applications where biodegradable and biocompatible photocurable materials are required. PMID:26478350

  15. Bipolar Membranes for Acid Base Flow Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthamatten, Mitchell; Roddecha, Supacharee; Jorne, Jacob; Coughlan, Anna

    2011-03-01

    Rechargeable batteries can provide grid-scale electricity storage to match power generation with consumption and promote renewable energy sources. Flow batteries offer modular and flexible design, low cost per kWh and high efficiencies. A novel flow battery concept will be presented based on acid-base neutralization where protons (H+) and hydroxyl (OH-) ions react electrochemically to produce water. The large free energy of this highly reversible reaction can be stored chemically, and, upon discharge, can be harvested as usable electricity. The acid-base flow battery concept avoids the use of a sluggish oxygen electrode and utilizes the highly reversible hydrogen electrode, thus eliminating the need for expensive noble metal catalysts. The proposed flow battery is a hybrid of a battery and a fuel cell---hydrogen gas storing chemical energy is produced at one electrode and is immediately consumed at the other electrode. The two electrodes are exposed to low and high pH solutions, and these solutions are separated by a hybrid membrane containing a hybrid cation and anion exchange membrane (CEM/AEM). Membrane design will be discussed, along with ion-transport data for synthesized membranes.

  16. Teaching Acid/Base Physiology in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friis, Ulla G.; Plovsing, Ronni; Hansen, Klaus; Laursen, Bent G.; Wallstedt, Birgitta

    2010-01-01

    Acid/base homeostasis is one of the most difficult subdisciplines of physiology for medical students to master. A different approach, where theory and practice are linked, might help students develop a deeper understanding of acid/base homeostasis. We therefore set out to develop a laboratory exercise in acid/base physiology that would provide…

  17. Using Willie's Acid-Base Box for Blood Gas Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a method developed by Dr. William T. Lipscomb for teaching blood gas analysis of acid-base status and provides three examples using Willie's acid-base box. Willie's acid-base box is constructed using three of the parameters of standard arterial blood gas analysis: (1) pH; (2) bicarbonate; and (3) CO[subscript…

  18. EEG-based discrimination between imagination of left and right hand movements using Adaptive Gaussian Representation.

    PubMed

    Costa, E J; Cabral, E F

    2000-06-01

    This article uses the Adaptive Gaussian Representation (AGR) for human electroencephalogram (EEG) feature extraction aiming the discrimination among mental tasks to be used in a brain computer interface (BCI). It does not focus on the AGR time-frequency representation, but rather on their projection coefficients. Ten volunteers were asked to imagine either right or left hand movement, according to a proper visual stimulus. The features of the resulting EEG signals were characterised by extracting AGR coefficients. Classification was carried out using a Multilayer perceptron (MLP) trained with the classical backpropagation algorithm. Overall results show that AGR coefficients representation is able to reveal a significant EEG discrimination between imagination of right and left hand movement with a mean classification performance of 91%+/-5.8% achieved for female subjects and 87%+/-5.0% achieved for male subjects. PMID:11121767

  19. Block-diagonal representations for covariance-based anomalous change detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Matsekh, Anna M; Theiler, James P

    2010-01-01

    We use singular vectors of the whitened cross-covariance matrix of two hyper-spectral images and the Golub-Kahan permutations in order to obtain equivalent tridiagonal representations of the coefficient matrices for a family of covariance-based quadratic Anomalous Change Detection (ACD) algorithms. Due to the nature of the problem these tridiagonal matrices have block-diagonal structure, which we exploit to derive analytical expressions for the eigenvalues of the coefficient matrices in terms of the singular values of the whitened cross-covariance matrix. The block-diagonal structure of the matrices of the RX, Chronochrome, symmetrized Chronochrome, Whitened Total Least Squares, Hyperbolic and Subpixel Hyperbolic Anomalous Change Detectors are revealed by the white singular value decomposition and Golub-Kahan transformations. Similarities and differences in the properties of these change detectors are illuminated by their eigenvalue spectra. We presented a methodology that provides the eigenvalue spectrum for a wide range of quadratic anomalous change detectors. Table I summarizes these results, and Fig. I illustrates them. Although their eigenvalues differ, we find that RX, HACD, Subpixel HACD, symmetrized Chronochrome, and WTLSQ share the same eigenvectors. The eigen vectors for the two variants of Chronochrome defined in (18) are different, and are different from each other, even though they share many (but not all, unless d{sub x} = d{sub y}) eigenvalues. We demonstrated that it is sufficient to compute SVD of the whitened cross covariance matrix of the data in order to almost immediately obtain highly structured sparse matrices (and their eigenvalue spectra) of the coefficient matrices of these ACD algorithms in the white SVD-transformed coordinates. Converting to the original non-white coordinates, these eigenvalues will be modified in magnitude but not in sign. That is, the number of positive, zero-valued, and negative eigenvalues will be conserved.

  20. [Progress in biotransformation of bio-based lactic acid ].

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2013-10-01

    Fermentative production of lactic acid, an important bio-based chemicals, has made considerable progress. In addition to the food industry and production of polylactic acid, lactic acid also can be used as an important platform chemical for the production of acrylic acid, pyruvic acid, 1,2-propanediol, and lactic acid esters. This article summarizes the recent progress in biocatalytic production of lactic acid derivatives by dehydration, dehydrogenation, reduction, and esterification. Trends in the biotransformation of lactic acid are also discussed. PMID:24432656

  1. Identifying a base in a nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2005-02-08

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  2. Analysis and Benchmark of Hydrological Network Representation Models for Improved Access and Query in Web-based System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, I.; Szczepanek, R.

    2015-12-01

    Web based systems allow users to delineate watersheds on interactive map environments using server side processing and databases. With increasing resolution of hydrological networks, optimized methods for storage of network representation in databases, and efficient queries and actions on the river network structure become critical. This presentation provides a comprehensive study on analysis of network models in relational databases for hydrological networks, and benchmarking common queries and operations on the network structure using these methods. The analysis has been applied to the hydrological network of the State of Iowa based on 90m DEM consist of 600,000 network nodes. The application results indicate that certain representation methods provide massive improvements on query times and storage of network structure in the database. Suggested method allows watershed delineation tools running on the client-side with desktop-like performance. This will allow users to carry out large scale analysis and visualizations tasks on the web.

  3. A Discussion on Uncertainty Representation and Interpretation in Model-Based Prognostics Algorithms based on Kalman Filter Estimation Applied to Prognostics of Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celaya, Jose R.; Saxen, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses several aspects of uncertainty representation and management for model-based prognostics methodologies based on our experience with Kalman Filters when applied to prognostics for electronics components. In particular, it explores the implications of modeling remaining useful life prediction as a stochastic process and how it relates to uncertainty representation, management, and the role of prognostics in decision-making. A distinction between the interpretations of estimated remaining useful life probability density function and the true remaining useful life probability density function is explained and a cautionary argument is provided against mixing interpretations for the two while considering prognostics in making critical decisions.

  4. An Exploration of Secondary Students' Mental States When Learning About Acids and Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chia-Ju; Hou, I.-Lin; Chiu, Houn-Lin; Treagust, David F.

    2014-02-01

    This study explored factors of students' mental states, including emotion, intention, internal mental representation, and external mental representation, which can affect their learning performance. In evaluating students' mental states during the science learning process and the relationship between mental states and learning achievement, valid, reliable, and scalable measures of students' mental states and learning achievement are needed. This paper presents the development of the Mental State Conceptual Learning Inventory (MSCLI) to identify students' mental states before and after learning about acids and bases. This instrument is time efficient and convenient and can be administered to large student samples so that teachers and researchers can gain profound insights into their students' learning of acids and bases in science class. The results of this study indicate that students' mental states are highly correlated with their achievement. As a whole, low-achieving students tended to have negative emotions and low intentions, were not good at internal visualization, and were unable to interpret graphics and draw pictures. In contrast, high-achieving students had positive emotions and intentions when learning life-related topics about acids and bases, and were good at internal visualization and drawing and interpreting graphics.

  5. Eighth Grade Students' Representations of Linear Equations Based on a Cups and Tiles Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caglayan, Gunhan; Olive, John

    2010-01-01

    This study examines eighth grade students' use of a representational metaphor (cups and tiles) for writing and solving equations in one unknown. Within this study, we focused on the obstacles and difficulties that students experienced when using this metaphor, with particular emphasis on the operations that can be meaningfully represented through…

  6. Embodied Numerosity: Implicit Hand-Based Representations Influence Symbolic Number Processing across Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domahs, Frank; Moeller, Korbinian; Huber, Stefan; Willmes, Klaus; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, a strong functional relationship between finger counting and number processing has been suggested. Developmental studies have shown specific effects of the structure of the individual finger counting system on arithmetic abilities. Moreover, the orientation of the mental quantity representation ("number line") seems to be…

  7. Information Object Definition–based Unified Modeling Language Representation of DICOM Structured Reporting

    PubMed Central

    Tirado-Ramos, Alfredo; Hu, Jingkun; Lee, K.P.

    2002-01-01

    Supplement 23 to DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications for Medicine), Structured Reporting, is a specification that supports a semantically rich representation of image and waveform content, enabling experts to share image and related patient information. DICOM SR supports the representation of textual and coded data linked to images and waveforms. Nevertheless, the medical information technology community needs models that work as bridges between the DICOM relational model and open object-oriented technologies. The authors assert that representations of the DICOM Structured Reporting standard, using object-oriented modeling languages such as the Unified Modeling Language, can provide a high-level reference view of the semantically rich framework of DICOM and its complex structures. They have produced an object-oriented model to represent the DICOM SR standard and have derived XML-exchangeable representations of this model using World Wide Web Consortium specifications. They expect the model to benefit developers and system architects who are interested in developing applications that are compliant with the DICOM SR specification. PMID:11751804

  8. Mis/Representations in School-Based Digital Media Production: An Ethnographic Exploration with Muslim Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahya, Negin; Jenson, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss findings from a digital media production club with racialized girls in a low-income school in Toronto, Ontario. Specifically, the authors consider how student-produced media is impacted by ongoing postcolonial structures relating to power and representation in the school and in the media production work of…

  9. Heart rate variability analysis based on time-frequency representation and entropies in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients.

    PubMed

    Clariá, F; Vallverdú, M; Baranowski, R; Chojnowska, L; Caminal, P

    2008-03-01

    In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients there is an increased risk of premature death, which can occur with little or no warning. Furthermore, classification for sudden cardiac death on patients with HCM is very difficult. The aim of our study was to improve the prognostic value of heart rate variability (HRV) in HCM patients, giving insight into changes of the autonomic nervous system. In this way, the suitability of linear and nonlinear measures was studied to assess the HRV. These measures were based on time-frequency representation (TFR) and on Shannon and Rényi entropies, and compared with traditional HRV measures. Holter recordings of 64 patients with HCM and 55 healthy subjects were analyzed. The HCM patients consisted of two groups: 13 high risk patients, after aborted sudden cardiac death (SCD); 51 low risk patients, without SCD. Five-hour RR signals, corresponding to the sleep period of the subjects, were considered for the analysis as a comparable standard situation. These RR signals were filtered in the three frequency bands: very low frequency band (VLF, 0-0.04 Hz), low frequency band (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz) and high frequency band (HF, 0.15-0.45 Hz). TFR variables based on instantaneous frequency and energy functions were able to classify HCM patients and healthy subjects (control group). Results revealed that measures obtained from TFR analysis of the HRV better classified the groups of subjects than traditional HRV parameters. However, results showed that nonlinear measures improved group classification. It was observed that entropies calculated in the HF band showed the highest statistically significant levels comparing the HCM group and the control group, p-value < 0.0005. The values of entropy measures calculated in the HCM group presented lower values, indicating a decreasing of complexity, than those calculated from the control group. Moreover, similar behavior was observed comparing high and low risk of premature death, the values of the

  10. Graphical representations of the chemistry of garnets in a three-dimensional MATLAB based provenance plot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knierzinger, Wolfgang; Palzer, Markus; Wagreich, Michael; Meszar, Maria; Gier, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    A newly developed, MATLAB based garnet provenance plot allows a three-dimensional tetrahedral representation of the chemistry of garnets for the endmembers almandine, pyrope, spessartine and grossular. Based on a freely accessible database of Suggate & Hall (2013) and additional EPMA-data on the internet, the chemistry of more than 2500 garnets was evaluated and used to create various subfields that correspond to different facies conditions of metapelitic, metasomatic and metaigneous rocks as well as granitic rocks. These triangulated subfields act as reference structures within the tetrahedron, facilitating assignments of garnet chemistries to different lithologies. In comparison with conventional tenary garnet discrimination diagrams by Mange & Morton (2007), Wright/Preston et al. (1938/2002) and Aubrecht et al. (2009), this tetrahedral provenance plot enables a better assessment of the conditions of formation of garnets by reducing the overlapping of certain subfields. In particular, a clearer distinction between greenschist facies rocks, amphibolite facies rocks and granitic rocks can be achieved. First applications of the tetrahedral garnet plot provided new insights on sedimentary processes during the Lower Miocene in the pre-Alpine Molasse basin. Bibliography Aubrecht, R., Meres, S., Sykora, M., Mikus, T. (2009). Provenance of the detrital garnets and spinels from the Albian sediments of the Czorsztyn Unit (Pieniny Klippen Belt , Western Carpathians, Slovakia). In: Geologica Carpathica, Dec. 2009, 60, 6, pp. 463-483. Mange, M.A., Morton, A.C. (2007). Geochemistry of Heavy Minerals. In: Mange, M.A. & Wright, D.T.(2007).Heavy Minerals in Use, Amsterdam, pp. 345-391. Preston, J., Hartley, A., Mange-Rajetzky, M., Hole, M., May, G., Buck, S., Vaughan, L. (2002). The provenance of Triassic continental sandstones from the Beryl Field, northern North Sea: Mineralogical, geochemical and sedimentological constraints. In: Journal of Sedimentary Research, 72, pp. 18

  11. Students' integration of multiple representations in a titration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, Nicole M.

    A complete understanding of a chemical concept is dependent upon a student's ability to understand the microscopic or particulate nature of the phenomenon and integrate the microscopic, symbolic, and macroscopic representations of the phenomenon. Acid-base chemistry is a general chemistry topic requiring students to understand the topics of chemical reactions, solutions, and equilibrium presented earlier in the course. In this study, twenty-five student volunteers from a second semester general chemistry course completed two interviews. The first interview was completed prior to any classroom instruction on acids and bases. The second interview took place after classroom instruction, a prelab activity consisting of a titration calculation worksheet, a titration computer simulation, or a microscopic level animation of a titration, and two microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) titration experiments. During the interviews, participants were asked to define and describe acid-base concepts and in the second interview they also drew the microscopic representations of four stages in an acid-base titration. An analysis of the data showed that participants had integrated the three representations of an acid-base titration to varying degrees. While some participants showed complete understanding of acids, bases, titrations, and solution chemistry, other participants showed several alternative conceptions concerning strong acid and base dissociation, the formation of titration products, and the dissociation of soluble salts. Before instruction, participants' definitions of acid, base, and pH were brief and consisted of descriptive terms. After instruction, the definitions were more scientific and reflected the definitions presented during classroom instruction.

  12. Towards knowledge-based retrieval of medical images. The role of semantic indexing, image content representation and knowledge-based retrieval.

    PubMed

    Lowe, H J; Antipov, I; Hersh, W; Smith, C A

    1998-01-01

    Medicine is increasingly image-intensive. The central importance of imaging technologies such as computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in clinical decision making, combined with the trend to store many "traditional" clinical images such as conventional radiographs, microscopic pathology and dermatology images in digital format present both challenges and an opportunities for the designers of clinical information systems. The emergence of Multimedia Electronic Medical Record Systems (MEMRS), architectures that integrate medical images with text-based clinical data, will further hasten this trend. The development of these systems, storing a large and diverse set of medical images, suggests that in the future MEMRS will become important digital libraries supporting patient care, research and education. The representation and retrieval of clinical images within these systems is problematic as conventional database architectures and information retrieval models have, until recently, focused largely on text-based data. Medical imaging data differs in many ways from text-based medical data but perhaps the most important difference is that the information contained within imaging data is fundamentally knowledge-based. New representational and retrieval models for clinical images will be required to address this issue. Within the Image Engine multimedia medical record system project at the University of Pittsburgh we are evolving an approach to representation and retrieval of medical images which combines semantic indexing using the UMLS Metathesuarus, image content-based representation and knowledge-based image analysis. PMID:9929345

  13. Physiological roles of acid-base sensors.

    PubMed

    Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Acid-base homeostasis is essential for life. The macromolecules upon which living organisms depend are sensitive to pH changes, and physiological systems use the equilibrium between carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and protons to buffer their pH. Biological processes and environmental insults are constantly challenging an organism's pH; therefore, to maintain a consistent and proper pH, organisms need sensors that measure pH and that elicit appropriate responses. Mammals use multiple sensors for measuring both intracellular and extracellular pH, and although some mammalian pH sensors directly measure protons, it has recently become apparent that many pH-sensing systems measure pH via bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase. PMID:25340964

  14. Polymer gel dosimeter based on itaconic acid.

    PubMed

    Mattea, Facundo; Chacón, David; Vedelago, José; Valente, Mauro; Strumia, Miriam C

    2015-11-01

    A new polymeric dosimeter based on itaconic acid and N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide was studied. The preparation method, compositions of monomer and crosslinking agent and the presence of oxygen in the dosimetric system were analyzed. The resulting materials were irradiated with an X-ray tube at 158cGy/min, 226cGymin and 298cGy/min with doses up to 1000Gy. The dosimeters presented a linear response in the dose range 75-1000Gy, sensitivities of 0.037 1/Gyat 298cGy/min and an increase in the sensitivity with lower dose rates. One of the most relevant outcomes in this study was obtaining different monomer to crosslinker inclusion in the formed gel for the dosimeters where oxygen was purged during the preparation method. This effect has not been reported in other typical dosimeters and could be attributed to the large differences in the reactivity among these species. PMID:26275817

  15. OpenEHR-based representation of guideline compliance data through the example of stroke clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Anani, Nadim; Chen, Rong; Prazeres Moreira, Tiago; Koch, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    In light of the lack of integration between electronic health records and decision support, this research explores how semantic electronic health record technology, particularly openEHR, can be used to represent clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). We used the tool Visual Understanding Environment (VUE) to build a graphical representation of the European ischaemic stroke clinical management guidelines. We used openEHR archetypes to conceptually support this process and also to represent clinical concepts in stroke treatment compliance criteria. Our results show that, as an intermediate step in authoring computer-interpretable guidelines, an openEHR-based representation of CPGs and their compliance criteria supports the process of identifying the relevant knowledge and data elements in the care process to be modelled. It further eases the separation of the CPGs into data and logic components and is useful as a communication means for guideline verification by clinicians. Additionally, we retrieved existing and authored new openEHR archetypes for the acute stroke clinical management process. We conclude that openEHR-based guideline and compliance data representations may be a promising first step in building future decision support applications that are well connected to the electronic health record, can be useful in locating discrepancies between different sets of guidelines within the same care context and provide a helpful tool for driving the archetype authoring and review process. PMID:22874238

  16. Evaluation of a Computer-Based Training Program for Enhancing Arithmetic Skills and Spatial Number Representation in Primary School Children

    PubMed Central

    Rauscher, Larissa; Kohn, Juliane; Käser, Tanja; Mayer, Verena; Kucian, Karin; McCaskey, Ursina; Esser, Günter; von Aster, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Calcularis is a computer-based training program which focuses on basic numerical skills, spatial representation of numbers and arithmetic operations. The program includes a user model allowing flexible adaptation to the child's individual knowledge and learning profile. The study design to evaluate the training comprises three conditions (Calcularis group, waiting control group, spelling training group). One hundred and thirty-eight children from second to fifth grade participated in the study. Training duration comprised a minimum of 24 training sessions of 20 min within a time period of 6–8 weeks. Compared to the group without training (waiting control group) and the group with an alternative training (spelling training group), the children of the Calcularis group demonstrated a higher benefit in subtraction and number line estimation with medium to large effect sizes. Therefore, Calcularis can be used effectively to support children in arithmetic performance and spatial number representation. PMID:27445889

  17. Generic Representation of Y( s o(3)) Based on the Lie Algebraic Basis of s o(3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-Biao; Wang, Gang-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    We focus on constructing a generic representation of Y( s o(3)) based on the Lie algebraic basis of s o(3) basis, and further developing transition of Yangian operator hat Y. As an application of Y( s o(3)), we calculate all the matrix elements of unit vector operators hat n in angular momentum basis. It is also discovered that the Yangian operator hat Y may work in quantum vector space. In addition, some shift operators hat {O}^{(± )}_{μ } are naturally built on the basis of the representation of Y( s o(3)). As an another application of Y( s o(3)), we can derive the CG cofficients of two coupled angular momenta from the down-shift operator hat {O}^{(-)}_{-1} acting on a s o(3)-coupled tensor basis. This not only explores that Yangian algebras can work in quantum tensor space, but also provides a novel approach to solve CG coefficients for two coupled angular momenta.

  18. Wigner functions for noncommutative quantum mechanics: A group representation based construction

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, S. Hasibul Hassan; Ali, S. Twareque

    2015-12-15

    This paper is devoted to the construction and analysis of the Wigner functions for noncommutative quantum mechanics, their marginal distributions, and star-products, following a technique developed earlier, viz, using the unitary irreducible representations of the group G{sub NC}, which is the three fold central extension of the Abelian group of ℝ{sup 4}. These representations have been exhaustively studied in earlier papers. The group G{sub NC} is identified with the kinematical symmetry group of noncommutative quantum mechanics of a system with two degrees of freedom. The Wigner functions studied here reflect different levels of non-commutativity—both the operators of position and those of momentum not commuting, the position operators not commuting and finally, the case of standard quantum mechanics, obeying the canonical commutation relations only.

  19. Scene classification based on spatial pyramid representation by superpixel lattices and contextual visual features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Guanghua; Li, Fengcai; Zhao, Yao; Zhu, Zhenfeng

    2012-01-01

    Natural scene classification is a challenging open problem in computer vision. We present a novel spatial pyramid representation scheme for recognizing scene category. Initially, each image is partitioned into sub-blocks, applying the technology of superpixel lattices segmentation according to a boosted edge learning boundary map, which makes the objects in each sub-block have the integrity--that is, the features in each sub-block are relatively consistent. Then, we extract the dense scale-invariant feature transform features of the images and form the contextual visual feature description. Finally, the image representations are performed by following the methodology of spatial pyramid. The feature descriptions we present include both local structural information and global spatial structural information; therefore, they are more discriminative for scene classification. Experiments demonstrate that the classification rate can achieve about 87.13% on a set of 15 categories of complex scenes.

  20. Unitary irreducible representations of SL(2,C) in discrete and continuous SU(1,1) bases

    SciTech Connect

    Conrady, Florian; Hnybida, Jeff

    2011-01-15

    We derive the matrix elements of generators of unitary irreducible representations of SL(2,C) with respect to basis states arising from a decomposition into irreducible representations of SU(1,1). This is done with regard to a discrete basis diagonalized by J{sup 3} and a continuous basis diagonalized by K{sup 1}, and for both the discrete and continuous series of SU(1,1). For completeness, we also treat the more conventional SU(2) decomposition as a fifth case. The derivation proceeds in a functional/differential framework and exploits the fact that state functions and differential operators have a similar structure in all five cases. The states are defined explicitly and related to SU(1,1) and SU(2) matrix elements.

  1. Eye fixation during multiple object attention is based on a representation of discrete spatial foci.

    PubMed

    Fluharty, Meg; Jentzsch, Ines; Spitschan, Manuel; Vishwanath, Dhanraj

    2016-01-01

    We often look at and attend to several objects at once. How the brain determines where to point our eyes when we do this is poorly understood. Here we devised a novel paradigm to discriminate between different models of spatial selection guiding fixation. In contrast to standard static attentional tasks where the eye remains fixed at a predefined location, observers selected their own preferred fixation position while they tracked static targets that were arranged in specific geometric configurations and which changed identity over time. Fixations were best predicted by a representation of discrete spatial foci, not a polygonal grouping, simple 2-foci division of attention or a circular spotlight. Moreover, attentional performance was incompatible with serial selection. Together with previous studies, our findings are compatible with a view that attentional selection and fixation rely on shared spatial representations and suggest a more nuanced definition of overt vs. covert attention. PMID:27561413

  2. Eye fixation during multiple object attention is based on a representation of discrete spatial foci

    PubMed Central

    Fluharty, Meg; Jentzsch, Ines; Spitschan, Manuel; Vishwanath, Dhanraj

    2016-01-01

    We often look at and attend to several objects at once. How the brain determines where to point our eyes when we do this is poorly understood. Here we devised a novel paradigm to discriminate between different models of spatial selection guiding fixation. In contrast to standard static attentional tasks where the eye remains fixed at a predefined location, observers selected their own preferred fixation position while they tracked static targets that were arranged in specific geometric configurations and which changed identity over time. Fixations were best predicted by a representation of discrete spatial foci, not a polygonal grouping, simple 2-foci division of attention or a circular spotlight. Moreover, attentional performance was incompatible with serial selection. Together with previous studies, our findings are compatible with a view that attentional selection and fixation rely on shared spatial representations and suggest a more nuanced definition of overt vs. covert attention. PMID:27561413

  3. A 4-Dimensional Representation of Antennal Lobe Output Based on an Ensemble of Characterized Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Erich M.; Huetteroth, Wolf; Schachtner, Joachim; Daly, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    A central problem facing studies of neural encoding in sensory systems is how to accurately quantify the extent of spatial and temporal responses. In this study, we take advantage of the relatively simple and stereotypic neural architecture found in invertebrates. We combine standard electrophysiological techniques, recently developed population analysis techniques, and novel anatomical methods to form an innovative 4-dimensional view of odor output representations in the antennal lobe of the moth Manduca sexta. This novel approach allows quantification of olfactory responses of characterized neurons with spike time resolution. Additionally, arbitrary integration windows can be used for comparisons with other methods such as imaging. By assigning statistical significance to changes in neuronal firing, this method can visualize activity across the entire antennal lobe. The resulting 4-dimensional representation of antennal lobe output complements imaging and multi-unit experiments yet provides a more comprehensive and accurate view of glomerular activation patterns in spike time resolution. PMID:19464513

  4. Wavelet-Based Interpolation and Representation of Non-Uniformly Sampled Spacecraft Mission Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Tamal

    2000-01-01

    A well-documented problem in the analysis of data collected by spacecraft instruments is the need for an accurate, efficient representation of the data set. The data may suffer from several problems, including additive noise, data dropouts, an irregularly-spaced sampling grid, and time-delayed sampling. These data irregularities render most traditional signal processing techniques unusable, and thus the data must be interpolated onto an even grid before scientific analysis techniques can be applied. In addition, the extremely large volume of data collected by scientific instrumentation presents many challenging problems in the area of compression, visualization, and analysis. Therefore, a representation of the data is needed which provides a structure which is conducive to these applications. Wavelet representations of data have already been shown to possess excellent characteristics for compression, data analysis, and imaging. The main goal of this project is to develop a new adaptive filtering algorithm for image restoration and compression. The algorithm should have low computational complexity and a fast convergence rate. This will make the algorithm suitable for real-time applications. The algorithm should be able to remove additive noise and reconstruct lost data samples from images.

  5. Detection of dual-band infrared small target based on joint dynamic sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jinwei; Li, Jicheng; Shi, Zhiguang; Lu, Xiaowei; Ren, Dongwei

    2015-10-01

    Infrared small target detection is a crucial and yet still is a difficult issue in aeronautic and astronautic applications. Sparse representation is an important mathematic tool and has been used extensively in image processing in recent years. Joint sparse representation is applied in dual-band infrared dim target detection in this paper. Firstly, according to the characters of dim targets in dual-band infrared images, 2-dimension Gaussian intensity model was used to construct target dictionary, then the dictionary was classified into different sub-classes according to different positions of Gaussian function's center point in image block; The fact that dual-band small targets detection can use the same dictionary and the sparsity doesn't lie in atom-level but in sub-class level was utilized, hence the detection of targets in dual-band infrared images was converted to be a joint dynamic sparse representation problem. And the dynamic active sets were used to describe the sparse constraint of coefficients. Two modified sparsity concentration index (SCI) criteria was proposed to evaluate whether targets exist in the images. In experiments, it shows that the proposed algorithm can achieve better detecting performance and dual-band detection is much more robust to noise compared with single-band detection. Moreover, the proposed method can be expanded to multi-spectrum small target detection.

  6. Multiple domains of parental secure base support during childhood and adolescence contribute to adolescents' representations of attachment as a secure base script.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Brian E; Waters, Theodore E A; Steele, Ryan D; Roisman, Glenn I; Bost, Kelly K; Truitt, Warren; Waters, Harriet S; Booth-Laforce, Cathryn

    2016-08-01

    Although attachment theory claims that early attachment representations reflecting the quality of the child's "lived experiences" are maintained across developmental transitions, evidence that has emerged over the last decade suggests that the association between early relationship quality and adolescents' attachment representations is fairly modest in magnitude. We used aspects of parenting beyond sensitivity over childhood and adolescence and early security to predict adolescents' scripted attachment representations. At age 18 years, 673 participants from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development completed the Attachment Script Assessment from which we derived an assessment of secure base script knowledge. Measures of secure base support from childhood through age 15 years (e.g., parental monitoring of child activity, father presence in the home) were selected as predictors and accounted for an additional 8% of the variance in secure base script knowledge scores above and beyond direct observations of sensitivity and early attachment status alone, suggesting that adolescents' scripted attachment representations reflect multiple domains of parenting. Cognitive and demographic variables also significantly increased predicted variance in secure base script knowledge by 2% each. PMID:27032953

  7. Renal acid-base metabolism after ischemia.

    PubMed

    Holloway, J C; Phifer, T; Henderson, R; Welbourne, T C

    1986-05-01

    The response of the kidney to ischemia-induced cellular acidosis was followed over the immediate one hr post-ischemia reflow period. Clearance and extraction experiments as well as measurement of cortical intracellular pH (pHi) were performed on Inactin-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Arteriovenous concentration differences and para-aminohippurate extraction were obtained by cannulating the left renal vein. Base production was monitored as bicarbonate released into the renal vein and urine; net base production was related to the renal handling of glutamine and ammonia as well as to renal oxygen consumption and pHi. After a 15 min control period, the left renal artery was snared for one-half hr followed by release and four consecutive 15 min reflow periods. During the control period, cortical cell pHi measured by [14C]-5,5-Dimethyl-2,4-Oxazolidinedione distribution was 7.07 +/- 0.08, and Q-O2 was 14.1 +/- 2.2 micromoles/min; neither net glutamine utilization nor net bicarbonate generation occurred. After 30 min of ischemia, renal tissue pH fell to 6.6 +/- 0.15. However, within 45 min of reflow, cortical cell pH returned and exceeded the control value, 7.33 +/- 0.06 vs. 7.15 +/- 0.08. This increase in pHi was associated with a significant rise in cellular metabolic rate, Q-O2 increased to 20.3 +/- 6.4 micromoles/min. Corresponding with cellular alkalosis was a net production of bicarbonate and a net ammonia uptake and glutamine release; urinary acidification was abolished. These results are consistent with a nonexcretory renal metabolic base generating mechanism governing cellular acid base homeostasis following ischemia. PMID:3723929

  8. Base pairing and base mis-pairing in nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H. J.; Rich, A.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years we have learned that DNA is conformationally active. It can exist in a number of different stable conformations including both right-handed and left-handed forms. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis we are able to discover not only additional conformations of the nucleic acids but also different types of hydrogen bonded base-base interactions. Although Watson-Crick base pairings are the predominant type of interaction in double helical DNA, they are not the only types. Recently, we have been able to examine mismatching of guanine-thymine base pairs in left-handed Z-DNA at atomic resolution (1A). A minimum amount of distortion of the sugar phosphate backbone is found in the G x T pairing in which the bases are held together by two hydrogen bonds in the wobble pairing interaction. Because of the high resolution of the analysis we can visualize water molecules which fill in to accommodate the other hydrogen bonding positions in the bases which are not used in the base-base interactions. Studies on other DNA oligomers have revealed that other types of non-Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding interactions can occur. In the structure of a DNA octamer with the sequence d(GCGTACGC) complexed to an antibiotic triostin A, it was found that the two central AT base pairs are held together by Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick base pairs. Similarly, the G x C base pairs at the ends are also Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick pairing. Hoogsteen base pairs make a modified helix which is distinct from the Watson-Crick double helix.

  9. Scenarios, personas and user stories from design ethnography: Evidence-based design representations of communicable disease investigations

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Anne M; Reeder, Blaine; Ramey, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Despite years of effort and millions of dollars spent to create a unified electronic communicable disease reporting systems, the goal remains elusive. A major barrier has been a lack of understanding by system designers of communicable disease (CD) work and the public health workers who perform this work. This study reports on the application of User Center Design representations, traditionally used for improving interface design, to translate the complex CD work identified through ethnographic studies to guide designers and developers of CD systems. The purpose of this work is to: (1) better understand public health practitioners and their information workflow with respect to communicable disease (CD) monitoring and control at a local health department, and (2) to develop evidence-based design representations that model this CD work to inform the design of future disease surveillance systems. Methods We performed extensive onsite semi-structured interviews, targeted work shadowing and a focus group to characterize local health department communicable disease workflow. Informed by principles of design ethnography and user-centered design (UCD) we created persona, scenarios and user stories to accurately represent the user to system designers. Results We sought to convey to designers the key findings from ethnographic studies: 1) that public health CD work is mobile and episodic, in contrast to current CD reporting systems, which are stationary and fixed 2) health department efforts are focused on CD investigation and response rather than reporting and 3) current CD information systems must conform to PH workflow to ensure their usefulness. In an effort to illustrate our findings to designers, we developed three contemporary design-support representations: persona, scenario, and user story. Conclusions Through application of user centered design principles, we were able to create design representations that illustrate complex public health communicable

  10. Quantum cognition based on an ambiguous representation derived from a rough set approximation.

    PubMed

    Gunji, Yukio-Pegio; Sonoda, Kohei; Basios, Vasileios

    2016-03-01

    Over the last years, in a series papers by Arecchi and others, a model for the cognitive processes involved in decision making has been proposed and investigated. The key element of this model is the expression of apprehension and judgment, basic cognitive process of decision making, as an inverse Bayes inference classifying the information content of neuron spike trains. It has been shown that for successive plural stimuli this inference, equipped with basic non-algorithmic jumps, is affected by quantum-like characteristics. We show here that such a decision making process is related consistently with an ambiguous representation by an observer within a universe of discourse. In our work the ambiguous representation of an object or a stimuli is defined as a pair of maps from objects of a set to their representations, where these two maps are interrelated in a particular structure. The a priori and a posteriori hypotheses in Bayes inference are replaced by the upper and lower approximations, correspondingly, for the initial data sets that are derived with respect to each map. Upper and lower approximations herein are defined in the context of "rough set" analysis. The inverse Bayes inference is implemented by the lower approximations with respect to the one map and for the upper approximation with respect to the other map for a given data set. We show further that, due to the particular structural relation between the two maps, the logical structure of such combined approximations can only be expressed as an orthomodular lattice and therefore can be represented by a quantum rather than a Boolean logic. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation aiming to reveal the concrete logic structure of inverse Bayes inference in cognitive processes. PMID:26861118

  11. Applicability/evaluation of flux based representations for linear/higher order elements for heat transfer in structures - Generalized gamma(T)-family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namburu, R. R.; Tamma, K. K.

    1991-01-01

    The applicability and evaluation of a generalized gamma(T) family of flux-based representations are examined for two different thermal analysis formulations for structures and materials which exhibit no phase change effects. The so-called H-theta and theta forms are demonstrated for numerous test models and linear and higher-order elements. The results show that the theta form with flux-based representations is generally superior to traditional approaches.

  12. Feature-based face representations and image reconstruction from behavioral and neural data.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Adrian; Plaut, David C; Behrmann, Marlene

    2016-01-12

    The reconstruction of images from neural data can provide a unique window into the content of human perceptual representations. Although recent efforts have established the viability of this enterprise using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns, these efforts have relied on a variety of prespecified image features. Here, we take on the twofold task of deriving features directly from empirical data and of using these features for facial image reconstruction. First, we use a method akin to reverse correlation to derive visual features from functional MRI patterns elicited by a large set of homogeneous face exemplars. Then, we combine these features to reconstruct novel face images from the corresponding neural patterns. This approach allows us to estimate collections of features associated with different cortical areas as well as to successfully match image reconstructions to corresponding face exemplars. Furthermore, we establish the robustness and the utility of this approach by reconstructing images from patterns of behavioral data. From a theoretical perspective, the current results provide key insights into the nature of high-level visual representations, and from a practical perspective, these findings make possible a broad range of image-reconstruction applications via a straightforward methodological approach. PMID:26711997

  13. Non-Markovian reduced dynamics based upon a hierarchical effective-mode representation

    SciTech Connect

    Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco; Hughes, Keith H.

    2012-10-14

    A reduced dynamics representation is introduced which is tailored to a hierarchical, Mori-chain type representation of a bath of harmonic oscillators which are linearly coupled to a subsystem. We consider a spin-boson system where a single effective mode is constructed so as to absorb all system-environment interactions, while the residual bath modes are coupled bilinearly to the primary mode and among each other. Using a cumulant expansion of the memory kernel, correlation functions for the primary mode are obtained, which can be suitably approximated by truncated chains representing the primary-residual mode interactions. A series of reduced-dimensional bath correlation functions is thus obtained, which can be expressed as Fourier-Laplace transforms of spectral densities that are given in truncated continued-fraction form. For a master equation which is second order in the system-bath coupling, the memory kernel is re-expressed in terms of local-in-time equations involving auxiliary densities and auxiliary operators.

  14. Weakly Supervised Fine-Grained Categorization With Part-Based Image Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Wei, Xiu-Shen; Wu, Jianxin; Cai, Jianfei; Lu, Jiangbo; Nguyen, Viet-Anh; Do, Minh N.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we categorize fine-grained images without using any object / part annotation neither in the training nor in the testing stage, a step towards making it suitable for deployments. Fine-grained image categorization aims to classify objects with subtle distinctions. Most existing works heavily rely on object / part detectors to build the correspondence between object parts by using object or object part annotations inside training images. The need for expensive object annotations prevents the wide usage of these methods. Instead, we propose to select useful parts from multi-scale part proposals in objects, and use them to compute a global image representation for categorization. This is specially designed for the annotation-free fine-grained categorization task, because useful parts have shown to play an important role in existing annotation-dependent works but accurate part detectors can be hardly acquired. With the proposed image representation, we can further detect and visualize the key (most discriminative) parts in objects of different classes. In the experiment, the proposed annotation-free method achieves better accuracy than that of state-of-the-art annotation-free and most existing annotation-dependent methods on two challenging datasets, which shows that it is not always necessary to use accurate object / part annotations in fine-grained image categorization.

  15. Feature-based face representations and image reconstruction from behavioral and neural data

    PubMed Central

    Nestor, Adrian; Plaut, David C.; Behrmann, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    The reconstruction of images from neural data can provide a unique window into the content of human perceptual representations. Although recent efforts have established the viability of this enterprise using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns, these efforts have relied on a variety of prespecified image features. Here, we take on the twofold task of deriving features directly from empirical data and of using these features for facial image reconstruction. First, we use a method akin to reverse correlation to derive visual features from functional MRI patterns elicited by a large set of homogeneous face exemplars. Then, we combine these features to reconstruct novel face images from the corresponding neural patterns. This approach allows us to estimate collections of features associated with different cortical areas as well as to successfully match image reconstructions to corresponding face exemplars. Furthermore, we establish the robustness and the utility of this approach by reconstructing images from patterns of behavioral data. From a theoretical perspective, the current results provide key insights into the nature of high-level visual representations, and from a practical perspective, these findings make possible a broad range of image-reconstruction applications via a straightforward methodological approach. PMID:26711997

  16. Virtual terrain: a security-based representation of a computer network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holsopple, Jared; Yang, Shanchieh; Argauer, Brian

    2008-03-01

    Much research has been put forth towards detection, correlating, and prediction of cyber attacks in recent years. As this set of research progresses, there is an increasing need for contextual information of a computer network to provide an accurate situational assessment. Typical approaches adopt contextual information as needed; yet such ad hoc effort may lead to unnecessary or even conflicting features. The concept of virtual terrain is, therefore, developed and investigated in this work. Virtual terrain is a common representation of crucial information about network vulnerabilities, accessibilities, and criticalities. A virtual terrain model encompasses operating systems, firewall rules, running services, missions, user accounts, and network connectivity. It is defined as connected graphs with arc attributes defining dynamic relationships among vertices modeling network entities, such as services, users, and machines. The virtual terrain representation is designed to allow feasible development and maintenance of the model, as well as efficacy in terms of the use of the model. This paper will describe the considerations in developing the virtual terrain schema, exemplary virtual terrain models, and algorithms utilizing the virtual terrain model for situation and threat assessment.

  17. Change detection based on deep feature representation and mapping transformation for multi-spatial-resolution remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Puzhao; Gong, Maoguo; Su, Linzhi; Liu, Jia; Li, Zhizhou

    2016-06-01

    Multi-spatial-resolution change detection is a newly proposed issue and it is of great significance in remote sensing, environmental and land use monitoring, etc. Though multi-spatial-resolution image-pair are two kinds of representations of the same reality, they are often incommensurable superficially due to their different modalities and properties. In this paper, we present a novel multi-spatial-resolution change detection framework, which incorporates deep-architecture-based unsupervised feature learning and mapping-based feature change analysis. Firstly, we transform multi-resolution image-pair into the same pixel-resolution through co-registration, followed by details recovery, which is designed to remedy the spatial details lost in the registration. Secondly, the denoising autoencoder is stacked to learn local and high-level representation/feature from the local neighborhood of the given pixel, in an unsupervised fashion. Thirdly, motivated by the fact that multi-resolution image-pair share the same reality in the unchanged regions, we try to explore the inner relationships between them by building a mapping neural network. And it can be used to learn a mapping function based on the most-unlikely-changed feature-pairs, which are selected from all the feature-pairs via a coarse initial change map generated in advance. The learned mapping function can bridge the different representations and highlight changes. Finally, we can build a robust and contractive change map through feature similarity analysis, and the change detection result is obtained through the segmentation of the final change map. Experiments are carried out on four real datasets, and the results confirmed the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed method.

  18. History of medical understanding and misunderstanding of Acid base balance.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Christopher Geoffrey Alexander

    2013-09-01

    To establish how controversies in understanding acid base balance arose, the literature on acid base balance was reviewed from 1909, when Henderson described how the neutral reaction of blood is determined by carbonic and organic acids being in equilibrium with an excess of mineral bases over mineral acids. From 1914 to 1930, Van Slyke and others established our acid base principles. They recognised that carbonic acid converts into bicarbonate all non-volatile mineral bases not bound by mineral acids and determined therefore that bicarbonate represents the alkaline reserve of the body and should be a physiological constant. They showed that standard bicarbonate is a good measure of acidosis caused by increased production or decreased elimination of organic acids. However, they recognised that bicarbonate improved low plasma bicarbonate but not high urine acid excretion in diabetic ketoacidosis, and that increasing pCO2 caused chloride to shift into cells raising plasma titratable alkali. Both indicate that minerals influence pH. In 1945 Darrow showed that hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis in preterm infants fed milk with 5.7 mmol of chloride and 2.0 mmol of sodium per 100 kcal was caused by retention of chloride in excess of sodium. Similar findings were made but not recognised in later studies of metabolic acidosis in preterm infants. Shohl in 1921 and Kildeberg in 1978 presented the theory that carbonic and organic acids are neutralised by mineral base, where mineral base is the excess of mineral cations over anions and organic acid is the difference between mineral base, bicarbonate and protein anion. The degree of metabolic acidosis measured as base excess is determined by deviation in both mineral base and organic acid from normal. PMID:24179938

  19. Acid-Base Pairs in Lewis Acidic Zeolites Promote Direct Aldol Reactions by Soft Enolization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer D; Van de Vyver, Stijn; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-08-17

    Hf-, Sn-, and Zr-Beta zeolites catalyze the cross-aldol condensation of aromatic aldehydes with acetone under mild reaction conditions with near quantitative yields. NMR studies with isotopically labeled molecules confirm that acid-base pairs in the Si-O-M framework ensemble promote soft enolization through α-proton abstraction. The Lewis acidic zeolites maintain activity in the presence of water and, unlike traditional base catalysts, in acidic solutions. PMID:26138135

  20. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  1. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1996-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  2. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene disphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  3. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1994-01-25

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

  4. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1996-07-23

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  5. Perception of oyster-based products by French consumers. The effect of processing and role of social representations.

    PubMed

    Debucquet, Gervaise; Cornet, Josiane; Adam, Isabelle; Cardinal, Mireille

    2012-12-01

    The search for new markets in the seafood sector, associated with the question of the continuity of raw oyster consumption over generations can be an opportunity for processors to extend their ranges with oyster-based products. The twofold aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of processing and social representation on perception of oyster-based products by French consumers and to identify the best means of development in order to avoid possible failure in the market. Five products with different degrees of processing (cooked oysters in a half-shell, hot preparation for toast, potted oyster, oyster butter and oyster-based soup) were presented within focus groups and consumer tests, at home and in canteens with the staff of several companies in order to reach consumers with different ages and professional activities. The results showed that social representation had a strong impact and that behaviours were contrasted according to the initial profile of the consumer (traditional raw oyster consumers or non-consumers) and their age distribution (younger and older people). The degree of processing has to be adapted to each segment. It is suggested to develop early exposure to influence the food choices and preferences of the youngest consumers on a long-term basis. PMID:22940688

  6. Determination of the acidic sites of purified single-walled carbon nanotubes by acid base titration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Bhowmik, P.; Zhao, B.; Hamon, M. A.; Itkis, M. E.; Haddon, R. C.

    2001-09-01

    We report the measurement of the acidic sites in three different samples of commercially available full-length purified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) - as obtained from CarboLex (CLI), Carbon Solutions (CSI) and Tubes@Rice (TAR) - by simple acid-base titration methods. Titration of the purified SWNTs with NaOH and NaHCO 3 solutions was used to determine the total percentage of acidic sites and carboxylic acid groups, respectively. The total percentage of acidic sites in full length purified SWNTs from TAR, CLI and CSI are about 1-3%.

  7. Hamiltonian-based ray-tracing method with triangular-mesh representation for a large-scale cloaking device with an arbitrary shape.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tatsuo; Matoba, Osamu

    2016-05-01

    Hamiltonian-based ray-tracing technique with mesh representation is presented for designing large-scale cloaking devices with three-dimensional arbitrary shapes, which have inhomogeneity and anisotropy in their electric permittivity and magnetic permeability. In order to deal with arbitrary shapes, the surfaces of the cloaking devices are represented by triangular meshes. Comparison between the result of cloaking simulations with the mesh representation and those with the rigorous function representation is presented. The numerical results showed that fine-mesh resolution is required for accurate evaluation of cloaking performances. PMID:27140356

  8. An update on HL7's XML-based document representation standards.

    PubMed Central

    Dolin, R. H.; Alschuler, L.; Boyer, S.; Beebe, C.

    2000-01-01

    Many people know of HL7 as an organization that creates healthcare messaging standards. But HL7 is also developing standards for the representation of clinical documents (such as discharge summaries and consultation notes). These document standards comprise the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture (CDA). Last year we presented a high-level conceptual overview of the CDA. Since that time, CDA has entered HL7's formal ballot process (which when successful will make the CDA an ANSI-approved HL7 standard). This article delves into the technical details of the current CDA proposal. Note that due to space limitations, only a subset of CDA details can be described. Also, because the ballot process elicits considerable feedback, it is likely that the material presented here will undergo evolution prior to becoming a final standard. The most up-to-date information is available on HL7's web site (www.hl7.org). PMID:11079871

  9. An efficient classification method based on principal component and sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Lin; Fu, Shujun; Zhang, Caiming; Liu, Yunxian; Wang, Lu; Liu, Guohua; Yang, Mingqiang

    2016-01-01

    As an important application in optical imaging, palmprint recognition is interfered by many unfavorable factors. An effective fusion of blockwise bi-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis and grouping sparse classification is presented. The dimension reduction and normalizing are implemented by the blockwise bi-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis for palmprint images to extract feature matrixes, which are assembled into an overcomplete dictionary in sparse classification. A subspace orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm is designed to solve the grouping sparse representation. Finally, the classification result is gained by comparing the residual between testing and reconstructed images. Experiments are carried out on a palmprint database, and the results show that this method has better robustness against position and illumination changes of palmprint images, and can get higher rate of palmprint recognition. PMID:27386281

  10. Acid-base properties of titanium-antimony oxides catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zenkovets, G.A.; Paukshtis, E.A.; Tarasova, D.V.; Yurchenko, E.N.

    1982-06-01

    The acid-base properties of titanium-antimony oxide catalysts were studied by the methods of back titration and ir spectroscopy. The interrelationship between the acid-base and catalytic properties in the oxidative ammonolysis of propylene was discussed. 3 figures, 1 table.

  11. A Closer Look at Acid-Base Olfactory Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neppel, Kerry; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Queen, Connie; Reed, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Olfactory titrations using raw onions and eugenol as acid-base indicators are reported. An in-depth investigation on olfactory titrations is presented to include requirements for potential olfactory indicators and protocols for using garlic, onions, and vanillin as acid-base olfactory indicators are tested.

  12. What is the Ultimate Goal in Acid-Base Regulation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balakrishnan, Selvakumar; Gopalakrishnan, Maya; Alagesan, Murali; Prakash, E. Sankaranarayanan

    2007-01-01

    It is common to see chapters on acid-base physiology state that the goal of acid-base regulatory mechanisms is to maintain the pH of arterial plasma and not arterial PCO [subscript 2] (Pa[subscript CO[subscript 2

  13. The Roles of Acids and Bases in Enzyme Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2007-01-01

    Many organic reactions are catalyzed by strong acids or bases that protonate or deprotonate neutral reactants leading to reactive cations or anions that proceed to products. In enzyme reactions, only weak acids and bases are available to hydrogen bond to reactants and to transfer protons in response to developing charges. Understanding this…

  14. Connecting Acids and Bases with Encapsulation... and Chemistry with Nanotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criswell, Brett

    2007-01-01

    The features and the development of various new acids and bases activity sets that combines chemistry with nanotechnology are being described. These sets lead to the generation of many nanotechnology-based pharmaceuticals for the treatment of various diseases.

  15. When Simple Harmonic Motion is not That Simple: Managing Epistemological Complexity by Using Computer-based Representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnafes, Orit

    2010-12-01

    Many real-world phenomena, even "simple" physical phenomena such as natural harmonic motion, are complex in the sense that they require coordinating multiple subtle foci of attention to get the required information when experiencing them. Moreover, for students to develop sound understanding of a concept or a phenomenon, they need to learn to get the same type of information across different contexts and situations (diSessa and Sherin 1998; diSessa and Wagner 2005). Rather than simplifying complex situations, or creating a linear instructional sequence in which students move from one context to another, this paper demonstrates the use of computer-based representations to facilitate developing understanding of complex physical phenomena. The data is collected from 8 studies in which pairs of students are engaged in an exploratory activity, trying to understand the dynamic behavior of a simulation and, at the same time, to attribute meaning to it in terms of the physical phenomenon it represents. The analysis focuses on three episodes. The first two episodes demonstrate the epistemological complexity involved in attempting to make sense of natural harmonic oscillation. A third episode demonstrates the process by which students develop understanding in this complex perceptual and conceptual territory, through the mediation (Vygotsky 1978) of computer-based representations designed to facilitate understanding in this topic.

  16. Multiple local feature representations and their fusion based on an SVR model for iris recognition using optimized Gabor filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Fei; Liu, Yuanning; Zhu, Xiaodong; Huang, Chun; Han, Ye; Dong, Hongxing

    2014-12-01

    Gabor descriptors have been widely used in iris texture representations. However, fixed basic Gabor functions cannot match the changing nature of diverse iris datasets. Furthermore, a single form of iris feature cannot overcome difficulties in iris recognition, such as illumination variations, environmental conditions, and device variations. This paper provides multiple local feature representations and their fusion scheme based on a support vector regression (SVR) model for iris recognition using optimized Gabor filters. In our iris system, a particle swarm optimization (PSO)- and a Boolean particle swarm optimization (BPSO)-based algorithm is proposed to provide suitable Gabor filters for each involved test dataset without predefinition or manual modulation. Several comparative experiments on JLUBR-IRIS, CASIA-I, and CASIA-V4-Interval iris datasets are conducted, and the results show that our work can generate improved local Gabor features by using optimized Gabor filters for each dataset. In addition, our SVR fusion strategy may make full use of their discriminative ability to improve accuracy and reliability. Other comparative experiments show that our approach may outperform other popular iris systems.

  17. A Computer-Based Simulation of an Acid-Base Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boblick, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Reviews the advantages of computer simulated environments for experiments, referring in particular to acid-base titrations. Includes pre-lab instructions and a sample computer printout of a student's use of an acid-base simulation. Ten references. (PR)

  18. Nucleic acid duplexes incorporating a dissociable covalent base pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, K.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    We have used molecular modeling techniques to design a dissociable covalently bonded base pair that can replace a Watson-Crick base pair in a nucleic acid with minimal distortion of the structure of the double helix. We introduced this base pair into a potential precursor of a nucleic acid double helix by chemical synthesis and have demonstrated efficient nonenzymatic template-directed ligation of the free hydroxyl groups of the base pair with appropriate short oligonucleotides. The nonenzymatic ligation reactions, which are characteristic of base paired nucleic acid structures, are abolished when the covalent base pair is reduced and becomes noncoplanar. This suggests that the covalent base pair linking the two strands in the duplex is compatible with a minimally distorted nucleic acid double-helical structure.

  19. Nucleic acid duplexes incorporating a dissociable covalent base pair.

    PubMed

    Gao, K; Orgel, L E

    1999-12-21

    We have used molecular modeling techniques to design a dissociable covalently bonded base pair that can replace a Watson-Crick base pair in a nucleic acid with minimal distortion of the structure of the double helix. We introduced this base pair into a potential precursor of a nucleic acid double helix by chemical synthesis and have demonstrated efficient nonenzymatic template-directed ligation of the free hydroxyl groups of the base pair with appropriate short oligonucleotides. The nonenzymatic ligation reactions, which are characteristic of base paired nucleic acid structures, are abolished when the covalent base pair is reduced and becomes noncoplanar. This suggests that the covalent base pair linking the two strands in the duplex is compatible with a minimally distorted nucleic acid double-helical structure. PMID:10611299

  20. Analysis of amino acids network based on distance matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Tazid; Akhtar, Adil; Gohain, Nisha

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we have constructed a distance matrix of the amino acids. The distance is defined based on the relative evolutionary importance of the base position of the corresponding codons. From this distance matrix a network of the amino acids is obtained. We have argued that this network depicts the evolutionary pattern of the amino acids. To examine the relative importance of the amino acids with respect to this network we have discussed different measures of centrality. We have also investigated the correlation coefficients between different measures of centrality. Further we have explored clustering coefficient as well as degree of distribution.

  1. Acid-base properties of 2-phenethyldithiocarbamoylacetic acid, an antitumor agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novozhilova, N. E.; Kutina, N. N.; Petukhova, O. A.; Kharitonov, Yu. Ya.

    2013-07-01

    The acid-base properties of the 2-phenethyldithiocarbamoylacetic acid (PET) substance belonging to the class of isothiocyanates and capable of inhibiting the development of tumors on many experimental models were studied. The acidity and hydrolysis constants of the PET substance in ethanol, acetone, aqueous ethanol, and aqueous acetone solutions were determined from the data of potentiometric (pH-metric) titration of ethanol and acetone solutions of PET with aqueous solidum hydroxide at room temperature.

  2. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari; Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2015-10-01

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100-500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO3H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO3H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst.

  3. Representation of Stormflow and a More Responsive Water Table in a TOPMODEL-Based Hydrology Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Stieglitz, Marc; Engel, Victor; Koster, Randal; Stark, Colin; Houser, Paul R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This study presents two new modeling strategies. First, a methodology for representing the physical process of stormflow within a TOPMODEL framework is developed. In using this approach, discharge at quickflow time scales is simulated and a fuller depiction of hydrologic activity is brought about. Discharge of water from the vadose zone is permitted in a physically realistic manner without a priori assumption of the level within the soil column at which stormflow saturation can take place. Determination of the stormflow contribution to discharge is made using the equation for groundwater flow. No new parameters are needed. Instead, regions of near saturation that develop during storm events, producing vertical recharge, are allowed to contribute to soil column discharge. These stormflow contributions to river runoff, as for groundwater flow contributions, are a function of catchment topography and local hydraulic conductivity at the depth of these regions of near saturation. The second approach improves groundwater flow response through a reduction of porosity and field capacity with depth in the soil column. Large storm events are better captured and a more dynamic water table develops with application of this modified soil column profile (MSCP). The MSCP predominantly reflects soil depth differences in upland and lowland regions of a watershed. Combined, these two approaches - stormflow and the MSCP - provide a more accurate representation of the time scales at which soil column discharge responds and a more complete depiction of hydrologic activity. Storm events large and small are better simulated, and some of the biases previously evident in TOPMODEL simulations are reduced.

  4. Grid-based methods for diatomic quantum scattering problems: a finite-element, discrete variable representation in prolate spheroidal coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Liang; McCurdy, C.W.; Rescigno, T.N.

    2008-11-25

    We show how to combine finite elements and the discrete variable representation in prolate spheroidal coordinates to develop a grid-based approach for quantum mechanical studies involving diatomic molecular targets. Prolate spheroidal coordinates are a natural choice for diatomic systems and have been used previously in a variety of bound-state applications. The use of exterior complex scaling in the present implementation allows for a transparently simple way of enforcing Coulomb boundary conditions and therefore straightforward application to electronic continuum problems. Illustrative examples involving the bound and continuum states of H2+, as well as the calculation of photoionization cross sections, show that the speed and accuracy of the present approach offer distinct advantages over methods based on single-center expansions.

  5. Iris classification based on sparse representations using on-line dictionary learning for large-scale de-duplication applications.

    PubMed

    Nalla, Pattabhi Ramaiah; Chalavadi, Krishna Mohan

    2015-01-01

    De-duplication of biometrics is not scalable when the number of people to be enrolled into the biometric system runs into billions, while creating a unique identity for every person. In this paper, we propose an iris classification based on sparse representation of log-gabor wavelet features using on-line dictionary learning (ODL) for large-scale de-duplication applications. Three different iris classes based on iris fiber structures, namely, stream, flower, jewel and shaker, are used for faster retrieval of identities. Also, an iris adjudication process is illustrated by comparing the matched iris-pair images side-by-side to make the decision on the identification score using color coding. Iris classification and adjudication are included in iris de-duplication architecture to speed-up the identification process and to reduce the identification errors. The efficacy of the proposed classification approach is demonstrated on the standard iris database, UPOL. PMID:26069877

  6. A Vehicle Active Safety Model: Vehicle Speed Control Based on Driver Vigilance Detection Using Wearable EEG and Sparse Representation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zutao; Luo, Dianyuan; Rasim, Yagubov; Li, Yanjun; Meng, Guanjun; Xu, Jian; Wang, Chunbai

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a vehicle active safety model for vehicle speed control based on driver vigilance detection using low-cost, comfortable, wearable electroencephalographic (EEG) sensors and sparse representation. The proposed system consists of three main steps, namely wireless wearable EEG collection, driver vigilance detection, and vehicle speed control strategy. First of all, a homemade low-cost comfortable wearable brain-computer interface (BCI) system with eight channels is designed for collecting the driver's EEG signal. Second, wavelet de-noising and down-sample algorithms are utilized to enhance the quality of EEG data, and Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) is adopted to extract the EEG power spectrum density (PSD). In this step, sparse representation classification combined with k-singular value decomposition (KSVD) is firstly introduced in PSD to estimate the driver's vigilance level. Finally, a novel safety strategy of vehicle speed control, which controls the electronic throttle opening and automatic braking after driver fatigue detection using the above method, is presented to avoid serious collisions and traffic accidents. The simulation and practical testing results demonstrate the feasibility of the vehicle active safety model. PMID:26907278

  7. A Vehicle Active Safety Model: Vehicle Speed Control Based on Driver Vigilance Detection Using Wearable EEG and Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zutao; Luo, Dianyuan; Rasim, Yagubov; Li, Yanjun; Meng, Guanjun; Xu, Jian; Wang, Chunbai

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a vehicle active safety model for vehicle speed control based on driver vigilance detection using low-cost, comfortable, wearable electroencephalographic (EEG) sensors and sparse representation. The proposed system consists of three main steps, namely wireless wearable EEG collection, driver vigilance detection, and vehicle speed control strategy. First of all, a homemade low-cost comfortable wearable brain-computer interface (BCI) system with eight channels is designed for collecting the driver’s EEG signal. Second, wavelet de-noising and down-sample algorithms are utilized to enhance the quality of EEG data, and Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) is adopted to extract the EEG power spectrum density (PSD). In this step, sparse representation classification combined with k-singular value decomposition (KSVD) is firstly introduced in PSD to estimate the driver’s vigilance level . Finally, a novel safety strategy of vehicle speed control, which controls the electronic throttle opening and automatic braking after driver fatigue detection using the above method, is presented to avoid serious collisions and traffic accidents. The simulation and practical testing results demonstrate the feasibility of the vehicle active safety model. PMID:26907278

  8. Reactive Distillation for Esterification of Bio-based Organic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Nathan; Miller, Dennis J.; Asthana, Navinchandra S.; Kolah, Aspi K.; Vu, Dung; Lira, Carl T.

    2008-09-23

    The following is the final report of the three year research program to convert organic acids to their ethyl esters using reactive distillation. This report details the complete technical activities of research completed at Michigan State University for the period of October 1, 2003 to September 30, 2006, covering both reactive distillation research and development and the underlying thermodynamic and kinetic data required for successful and rigorous design of reactive distillation esterification processes. Specifically, this project has led to the development of economical, technically viable processes for ethyl lactate, triethyl citrate and diethyl succinate production, and on a larger scale has added to the overall body of knowledge on applying fermentation based organic acids as platform chemicals in the emerging biorefinery. Organic acid esters constitute an attractive class of biorenewable chemicals that are made from corn or other renewable biomass carbohydrate feedstocks and replace analogous petroleum-based compounds, thus lessening U.S. dependence on foreign petroleum and enhancing overall biorefinery viability through production of value-added chemicals in parallel with biofuels production. Further, many of these ester products are candidates for fuel (particularly biodiesel) components, and thus will serve dual roles as both industrial chemicals and fuel enhancers in the emerging bioeconomy. The technical report from MSU is organized around the ethyl esters of four important biorenewables-based acids: lactic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and propionic acid. Literature background on esterification and reactive distillation has been provided in Section One. Work on lactic acid is covered in Sections Two through Five, citric acid esterification in Sections Six and Seven, succinic acid in Section Eight, and propionic acid in Section Nine. Section Ten covers modeling of ester and organic acid vapor pressure properties using the SPEAD (Step Potential

  9. Polymerization of amino acids containing nucleotide bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben Cheikh, Azzouz; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleoamino acids 1-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)uracil (3) and 9-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)adenine (4) have been prepared as (L)-en-antiomers and as racemic mixtures. When 3 or 4 is suspended in water and treated with N,N'-carbon-yldiimidazole, peptides are formed in good yield. The products formed from the (L)-enantiomers are hydrolyzed to the monomeric amino acids by pronase. Attempts to improve the efficiency of these oligomerizations by including a polyuridylate template in the reaction mixture were not successful. Similarly, oligomers derived from the (L)-enantiomer of 3 did not act as templates to facilitate the oligomerization of 4.

  10. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari; Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2015-10-15

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100–500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO{sub 3}H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO{sub 3}H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst. - Highlights: • Carbon solid acid was successfully prepared by one-step hydrothermal carbonization. • The acrylic acid as monomer was effectively reduce the diameter size of particle. • The solid acid catalyst show good catalytic performance of starch hydrolysis. • The solid acid catalyst is not significantly deteriorated after repeated use.

  11. Nucleic Acid-Based Nanodevices in Biological Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kasturi; Veetil, Aneesh T; Jaffrey, Samie R; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2016-06-01

    The nanoscale engineering of nucleic acids has led to exciting molecular technologies for high-end biological imaging. The predictable base pairing, high programmability, and superior new chemical and biological methods used to access nucleic acids with diverse lengths and in high purity, coupled with computational tools for their design, have allowed the creation of a stunning diversity of nucleic acid-based nanodevices. Given their biological origin, such synthetic devices have a tremendous capacity to interface with the biological world, and this capacity lies at the heart of several nucleic acid-based technologies that are finding applications in biological systems. We discuss these diverse applications and emphasize the advantage, in terms of physicochemical properties, that the nucleic acid scaffold brings to these contexts. As our ability to engineer this versatile scaffold increases, its applications in structural, cellular, and organismal biology are clearly poised to massively expand. PMID:27294440

  12. Nucleic acid based fluorescent sensor for mercury detection

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Juewen

    2013-02-05

    A nucleic acid enzyme comprises an oligonucleotide containing thymine bases. The nucleic acid enzyme is dependent on both Hg.sup.2+and a second ion as cofactors, to produce a product from a substrate. The substrate comprises a ribonucleotide, a deoxyribonucleotide, or both.

  13. Design and Development of a Linked Open Data-Based Health Information Representation and Visualization System: Potentials and Preliminary Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kauppinen, Tomi; Keßler, Carsten; Fritz, Fleur

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare organizations around the world are challenged by pressures to reduce cost, improve coordination and outcome, and provide more with less. This requires effective planning and evidence-based practice by generating important information from available data. Thus, flexible and user-friendly ways to represent, query, and visualize health data becomes increasingly important. International organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO) regularly publish vital data on priority health topics that can be utilized for public health policy and health service development. However, the data in most portals is displayed in either Excel or PDF formats, which makes information discovery and reuse difficult. Linked Open Data (LOD)—a new Semantic Web set of best practice of standards to publish and link heterogeneous data—can be applied to the representation and management of public level health data to alleviate such challenges. However, the technologies behind building LOD systems and their effectiveness for health data are yet to be assessed. Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate whether Linked Data technologies are potential options for health information representation, visualization, and retrieval systems development and to identify the available tools and methodologies to build Linked Data-based health information systems. Methods We used the Resource Description Framework (RDF) for data representation, Fuseki triple store for data storage, and Sgvizler for information visualization. Additionally, we integrated SPARQL query interface for interacting with the data. We primarily use the WHO health observatory dataset to test the system. All the data were represented using RDF and interlinked with other related datasets on the Web of Data using Silk—a link discovery framework for Web of Data. A preliminary usability assessment was conducted following the System Usability Scale (SUS) method. Results We developed an LOD-based

  14. Representing Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Aaron M.

    2010-01-01

    What can be known and how to render what we know are perpetual quandaries met by qualitative research, complicated further by the understanding that the everyday discourses influencing our representations are often tacit, unspoken or heard so often that they seem to warrant little reflection. In this article, I offer analytic memos as a means for…

  15. A general approach based on constrained parameter-optimization for the implicit representation of information concerning welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrakos, S.G.; Milewski, J.O.

    1998-12-01

    An analysis of weld morphology which typically occurs in deep penetration welding processes using electron or laser beams is presented. The method of analysis is based on geometric constraints with formal mathematical foundation within the theory of constrained parameter optimization. The analysis presented in this report serves as an example of the application of the geometric-constraints method to the analysis of weld fusion boundary morphology where there can be fragmented and incomplete information concerning material properties and only approximate information concerning the character of energy deposition, thus making a direct first principals approach difficult. A significant aspect of the geometric-constraints method is that it permits the implicit representation of information concerning temperature dependence of material properties and of coupling between heat transfer and fluid convection occurring in the weld meltpool.

  16. Towards lactic acid bacteria-based biorefineries.

    PubMed

    Mazzoli, Roberto; Bosco, Francesca; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Bayer, Edward A; Pessione, Enrica

    2014-11-15

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have long been used in industrial applications mainly as starters for food fermentation or as biocontrol agents or as probiotics. However, LAB possess several characteristics that render them among the most promising candidates for use in future biorefineries in converting plant-derived biomass-either from dedicated crops or from municipal/industrial solid wastes-into biofuels and high value-added products. Lactic acid, their main fermentation product, is an attractive building block extensively used by the chemical industry, owing to the potential for production of polylactides as biodegradable and biocompatible plastic alternative to polymers derived from petrochemicals. LA is but one of many high-value compounds which can be produced by LAB fermentation, which also include biofuels such as ethanol and butanol, biodegradable plastic polymers, exopolysaccharides, antimicrobial agents, health-promoting substances and nutraceuticals. Furthermore, several LAB strains have ascertained probiotic properties, and their biomass can be considered a high-value product. The present contribution aims to provide an extensive overview of the main industrial applications of LAB and future perspectives concerning their utilization in biorefineries. Strategies will be described in detail for developing LAB strains with broader substrate metabolic capacity for fermentation of cheaper biomass. PMID:25087936

  17. Improving mass detection using combined feature representations from projection views and reconstructed volume of DBT and boosting based classification with feature selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Hoe; Kim, Seong Tae; Ro, Yong Man

    2015-11-01

    In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), image characteristics of projection views and reconstructed volume are different and both have the advantage of detecting breast masses, e.g. reconstructed volume mitigates a tissue overlap, while projection views have less reconstruction blur artifacts. In this paper, an improved mass detection is proposed by using combined feature representations from projection views and reconstructed volume in the DBT. To take advantage of complementary effects on different image characteristics of both data, combined feature representations are extracted from both projection views and reconstructed volume concurrently. An indirect region-of-interest segmentation in projection views, which projects volume-of-interest in reconstructed volume into the corresponding projection views, is proposed to extract combined feature representations. In addition, a boosting based classification with feature selection has been employed for selecting effective feature representations among a large number of combined feature representations, and for reducing false positives. Experiments have been conducted on a clinical data set that contains malignant masses. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed mass detection can achieve high sensitivity with a small number of false positives. In addition, the experimental results demonstrate that the selected feature representations for classifying masses complementarily come from both projection views and reconstructed volume.

  18. Improving mass detection using combined feature representations from projection views and reconstructed volume of DBT and boosting based classification with feature selection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hoe; Kim, Seong Tae; Ro, Yong Man

    2015-11-21

    In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), image characteristics of projection views and reconstructed volume are different and both have the advantage of detecting breast masses, e.g. reconstructed volume mitigates a tissue overlap, while projection views have less reconstruction blur artifacts. In this paper, an improved mass detection is proposed by using combined feature representations from projection views and reconstructed volume in the DBT. To take advantage of complementary effects on different image characteristics of both data, combined feature representations are extracted from both projection views and reconstructed volume concurrently. An indirect region-of-interest segmentation in projection views, which projects volume-of-interest in reconstructed volume into the corresponding projection views, is proposed to extract combined feature representations. In addition, a boosting based classification with feature selection has been employed for selecting effective feature representations among a large number of combined feature representations, and for reducing false positives. Experiments have been conducted on a clinical data set that contains malignant masses. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed mass detection can achieve high sensitivity with a small number of false positives. In addition, the experimental results demonstrate that the selected feature representations for classifying masses complementarily come from both projection views and reconstructed volume. PMID:26529080

  19. An Olfactory Indicator for Acid-Base Titrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flair, Mark N.; Setzer, William N.

    1990-01-01

    The use of an olfactory acid-base indicator in titrations for visually impaired students is discussed. Potential olfactory indicators include eugenol, thymol, vanillin, and thiophenol. Titrations performed with each indicator with eugenol proved to be successful. (KR)

  20. Synthesis and antimicrobial activities of new higher amino acid Schiff base derivatives of 6-aminopenicillanic acid and 7-aminocephalosporanic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir (nee Güngör), Özlem; Gürkan, Perihan; Özçelik, Berrin; Oyardı, Özlem

    2016-02-01

    Novel β-lactam derivatives (1c-3c) (1d-3d) were produced by using 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA), 7-aminocephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) and the higher amino acid Schiff bases. The synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H/13C NMR and UV-vis spectra. Antibacterial activities of all the higher amino acid Schiff bases (1a-3a) (1b-3b) and β-lactam derivatives were screened against three gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Acinetobacter baumannii RSKK 02026), three gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 07005, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633) and their drug-resistant isolates by using broth microdilution method. Two fungi (Candida albicans and Candida krusei) were used for antifungal activity.

  1. Acid-base homeostasis in the human system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Acid-base regulation is a cooperative phenomena in vivo with body fluids, extracellular and intracellular buffers, lungs, and kidneys all playing important roles. The present account is much too brief to be considered a review of present knowledge of these regulatory systems, and should be viewed, instead, as a guide to the elements necessary to construct a simple model of the mutual interactions of the acid-base regulatory systems of the body.

  2. TRANSFUSIONS—Hazardous Acid-Base Changes with Citrated Blood

    PubMed Central

    Pedro, Jovita M. San; Iwai, Seizo; Hattori, Mitsuo; Leigh, M. Digby

    1962-01-01

    In a study of the acid-base changes in the blood of rabbits during and following transfusions of citrated blood and of heparinized blood, it was observed that, with citrated blood, pH decreased and carbon dioxide tensions rose. With heparinized blood, the acid-base balance was maintained within normal limits following transfusions. The potential hazards of rapid massive citrated blood transfusions in the anesthetized patient during operation must be kept in mind. PMID:14496706

  3. Fostering Collaborative Knowledge Construction in a Video-Based Learning Setting: Effects of a Shared Workspace and a Content-Specific Graphical Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hron, Aemilian; Cress, Ulrike; Hammer, Karsten; Friedrich, Helmut-Felix

    2007-01-01

    This study examined means of fostering videoconference-based collaborative learning. An experiment was conducted with 15 learning dyads divided into three conditions of videoconference-based learning: without shared workspace, with shared workspace and with shared workspace plus a content-specific graphical representation. Compared with those with…

  4. Discovery Learning, Representation, and Explanation within a Computer-Based Simulation: Finding the Right Mix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieber, Lloyd P.; Tzeng, Shyh-Chii; Tribble, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore how adult users interact and learn during an interactive computer-based simulation supplemented with brief multimedia explanations of the content. A total of 52 college students interacted with a computer-based simulation of Newton's laws of motion in which they had control over the motion of a simple…

  5. Caregiving Antecedents of Secure Base Script Knowledge: A Comparative Analysis of Young Adult Attachment Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Ryan D.; Waters, Theodore E. A.; Bost, Kelly K.; Vaughn, Brian E.; Truitt, Warren; Waters, Harriet S.; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; Roisman, Glenn I.

    2014-01-01

    Based on a subsample (N = 673) of the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (SECCYD) cohort, this article reports data from a follow-up assessment at age 18 years on the antecedents of "secure base script knowledge", as reflected in the ability to generate narratives in which attachment-related difficulties are…

  6. Synthesis of polyacrylic-acid-based thermochromic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Jyoti; Alam, Sarfaraz; Mathur, G. N.

    2003-10-01

    Smart materials respond to environmental stimuli with particular changes in some variables (for example temperature, pressure and electric field etc), for that reason they are often called responsive materials. In the present work, we have synthesized thermochromic polymer based on poly acrylic acid cobalt chloride (CoCl2) and phosphoric acid (H3PO4) that visually and reversibly changes color in the temperature range (70 - 130°C). These thermochromic materials can be used as visual sensors of temperature. Thermochromic polymers are based on polyacrylic acid and CoCl2 complex.

  7. Comparison of two ways for representation of the forecast probability density function in ensemble-based sequential data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Shinya

    2013-04-01

    In the ensemble-based sequential data assimilation, the probability density function (PDF) at each time step is represented by ensemble members. These ensemble members are usually assumed to be Monte Carlo samples drawn from the PDF, and the probability density is associated with the concentration of the ensemble members. On the basis of the Monte Carlo approximation, the forecast ensemble, which is obtained by applying the dynamical model to each ensemble member, provides an approximation of the forecast PDF on the basis of the Chapman-Kolmogorov integral. In practical cases, however, the ensemble size is limited by available computational resources, and it is typically much less than the system dimension. In such situations, the Monte Carlo approximation would not well work. When the ensemble size is less than the system dimension, the ensemble would form a simplex in a subspace. The simplex can not represent the third or higher-order moments of the PDF, but it can represent only the Gaussian features of the PDF. As noted by Wang et al. (2004), the forecast ensemble, which is obtained by applying the dynamical model to each member of the simplex ensemble, provides an approximation of the mean and covariance of the forecast PDF where the Taylor expansion of the dynamical model up to the second-order is considered except that the uncertainties which can not represented by the ensemble members are ignored. Since the third and higher-order nonlinearity is discarded, the forecast ensemble would provide some bias to the forecast. Using a small nonlinear model, the Lorenz 63 model, we also performed the experiment of the state estimation with both the simplex representation and the Monte Carlo representation, which corresponds to the limited-sized ensemble case and the large-sized ensemble case, respectively. If we use the simplex representation, it is found that the estimates tend to have some bias which is likely to be caused by the nonlinearity of the system rather

  8. LEGO: a novel method for gene set over-representation analysis by incorporating network-based gene weights.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xinran; Hao, Yun; Wang, Xiao; Tian, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Pathway or gene set over-representation analysis (ORA) has become a routine task in functional genomics studies. However, currently widely used ORA tools employ statistical methods such as Fisher's exact test that reduce a pathway into a list of genes, ignoring the constitutive functional non-equivalent roles of genes and the complex gene-gene interactions. Here, we develop a novel method named LEGO (functional Link Enrichment of Gene Ontology or gene sets) that takes into consideration these two types of information by incorporating network-based gene weights in ORA analysis. In three benchmarks, LEGO achieves better performance than Fisher and three other network-based methods. To further evaluate LEGO's usefulness, we compare LEGO with five gene expression-based and three pathway topology-based methods using a benchmark of 34 disease gene expression datasets compiled by a recent publication, and show that LEGO is among the top-ranked methods in terms of both sensitivity and prioritization for detecting target KEGG pathways. In addition, we develop a cluster-and-filter approach to reduce the redundancy among the enriched gene sets, making the results more interpretable to biologists. Finally, we apply LEGO to two lists of autism genes, and identify relevant gene sets to autism that could not be found by Fisher. PMID:26750448

  9. LEGO: a novel method for gene set over-representation analysis by incorporating network-based gene weights

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xinran; Hao, Yun; Wang, Xiao; Tian, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Pathway or gene set over-representation analysis (ORA) has become a routine task in functional genomics studies. However, currently widely used ORA tools employ statistical methods such as Fisher’s exact test that reduce a pathway into a list of genes, ignoring the constitutive functional non-equivalent roles of genes and the complex gene-gene interactions. Here, we develop a novel method named LEGO (functional Link Enrichment of Gene Ontology or gene sets) that takes into consideration these two types of information by incorporating network-based gene weights in ORA analysis. In three benchmarks, LEGO achieves better performance than Fisher and three other network-based methods. To further evaluate LEGO’s usefulness, we compare LEGO with five gene expression-based and three pathway topology-based methods using a benchmark of 34 disease gene expression datasets compiled by a recent publication, and show that LEGO is among the top-ranked methods in terms of both sensitivity and prioritization for detecting target KEGG pathways. In addition, we develop a cluster-and-filter approach to reduce the redundancy among the enriched gene sets, making the results more interpretable to biologists. Finally, we apply LEGO to two lists of autism genes, and identify relevant gene sets to autism that could not be found by Fisher. PMID:26750448

  10. Characterizing and differentiating task-based and resting state fMRI signals via two-stage sparse representations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Li, Xiang; Lv, Jinglei; Jiang, Xi; Guo, Lei; Liu, Tianming

    2016-03-01

    A relatively underexplored question in fMRI is whether there are intrinsic differences in terms of signal composition patterns that can effectively characterize and differentiate task-based or resting state fMRI (tfMRI or rsfMRI) signals. In this paper, we propose a novel two-stage sparse representation framework to examine the fundamental difference between tfMRI and rsfMRI signals. Specifically, in the first stage, the whole-brain tfMRI or rsfMRI signals of each subject were composed into a big data matrix, which was then factorized into a subject-specific dictionary matrix and a weight coefficient matrix for sparse representation. In the second stage, all of the dictionary matrices from both tfMRI/rsfMRI data across multiple subjects were composed into another big data-matrix, which was further sparsely represented by a cross-subjects common dictionary and a weight matrix. This framework has been applied on the recently publicly released Human Connectome Project (HCP) fMRI data and experimental results revealed that there are distinctive and descriptive atoms in the cross-subjects common dictionary that can effectively characterize and differentiate tfMRI and rsfMRI signals, achieving 100% classification accuracy. Moreover, our methods and results can be meaningfully interpreted, e.g., the well-known default mode network (DMN) activities can be recovered from the very noisy and heterogeneous aggregated big-data of tfMRI and rsfMRI signals across all subjects in HCP Q1 release. PMID:25732072

  11. Quaternionic representation of the genetic code.

    PubMed

    Carlevaro, C Manuel; Irastorza, Ramiro M; Vericat, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    A heuristic diagram of the evolution of the standard genetic code is presented. It incorporates, in a way that resembles the energy levels of an atom, the physical notion of broken symmetry and it is consistent with original ideas by Crick on the origin and evolution of the code as well as with the chronological order of appearance of the amino acids along the evolution as inferred from work that mixtures known experimental results with theoretical speculations. Suggested by the diagram we propose a Hamilton quaternions based mathematical representation of the code as it stands now-a-days. The central object in the description is a codon function that assigns to each amino acid an integer quaternion in such a way that the observed code degeneration is preserved. We emphasize the advantages of a quaternionic representation of amino acids taking as an example the folding of proteins. With this aim we propose an algorithm to go from the quaternions sequence to the protein three dimensional structure which can be compared with the corresponding experimental one stored at the Protein Data Bank. In our criterion the mathematical representation of the genetic code in terms of quaternions merits to be taken into account because it describes not only most of the known properties of the genetic code but also opens new perspectives that are mainly derived from the close relationship between quaternions and rotations. PMID:26751396

  12. Subspacing Based on Connected Opening Spaces and for Different Locomotion Types Using Geometric and Graph Based Representation in Multilayered Space-Event Model (mlsem)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A. A.; Kolbe, T. H.

    2013-09-01

    Indoor navigation has to deal with more issues as compared to outdoor navigation. Those issues include but are not limited to; need more level of detail to process enclosing area around navigating subject or object, consideration of the context of navigation (about locomotion type and its operating environment), and dealing with unconstrained indoor space for accurate results. Because of these complex issues, most of the frameworks for indoor navigation support for only one single type of locomotion, i.e. either walking, driving, or flying. And this decision to select a specific type of locomotion results in restricting the use of representation of indoor space for other types of locomotion e.g. graph-based abstraction of indoor space for driving cannot be used for flying. In this work, we addressed the problem of supporting different types of locomotion in indoor space by determining 3D navigable subspace for the given locomotion type based on its physical constraints. While determining 3D subspace, we focused on some issues that include indoor space representation, precision of subspace computation, and "the consideration of the context of navigation" (about indoor space and the locomotion type). To achieve better representation of indoor space, the subspaces are determined based on the connected opening spaces. And for precise subspace computation according to the given locomotion type, we used the geometric methods i.e. configuration space from robotics field. Furthermore, a semantically enriched 3D indoor virtual model in CityGML format and different locomotion types (flying, driving, and walking) containing information (semantics, geometry, and topology) were considered to examine the context of navigation. Last but not least, the subspacing procedure was presented and implemented in a sound mathematical framework i.e. Multilayered Space-Event Model (MLSEM) as proposed by Becker, Nagel, and Kolbe in 2008 and 2009.

  13. Caregiving Antecedents of Secure Base Script Knowledge: A Comparative Analysis of Young Adult Attachment Representations

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Ryan D.; Waters, Theodore E. A.; Bost, Kelly K.; Vaughn, Brian E.; Truitt, Warren; Waters, Harriet S.; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; Roisman, Glenn I.

    2015-01-01

    Based on a sub-sample (N = 673) of the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (SECCYD) cohort, this paper reports data from a follow-up assessment at age 18 years on the antecedents of secure base script knowledge, as reflected in the ability to generate narratives in which attachment-related difficulties are recognized, competent help is provided, and the problem is resolved. Secure base script knowledge was (a) modestly to moderately correlated with more well established assessments of adult attachment, (b) associated with mother-child attachment in the first three years of life and with observations of maternal and paternal sensitivity from childhood to adolescence, and (c) partially accounted for associations previously documented in the SECCYD cohort between early caregiving experiences and Adult Attachment Interview states of mind (Booth-LaForce & Roisman, 2014) as well as self-reported attachment styles (Fraley, Roisman, Booth-LaForce, Owen, & Holland, 2013). PMID:25264703

  14. Virtual screening applications: a study of ligand-based methods and different structure representations in four different scenarios.

    PubMed

    Hristozov, Dimitar P; Oprea, Tudor I; Gasteiger, Johann

    2007-01-01

    Four different ligand-based virtual screening scenarios are studied: (1) prioritizing compounds for subsequent high-throughput screening (HTS); (2) selecting a predefined (small) number of potentially active compounds from a large chemical database; (3) assessing the probability that a given structure will exhibit a given activity; (4) selecting the most active structure(s) for a biological assay. Each of the four scenarios is exemplified by performing retrospective ligand-based virtual screening for eight different biological targets using two large databases--MDDR and WOMBAT. A comparison between the chemical spaces covered by these two databases is presented. The performance of two techniques for ligand--based virtual screening--similarity search with subsequent data fusion (SSDF) and novelty detection with Self-Organizing Maps (ndSOM) is investigated. Three different structure representations--2,048-dimensional Daylight fingerprints, topological autocorrelation weighted by atomic physicochemical properties (sigma electronegativity, polarizability, partial charge, and identity) and radial distribution functions weighted by the same atomic physicochemical properties--are compared. Both methods were found applicable in scenario one. The similarity search was found to perform slightly better in scenario two while the SOM novelty detection is preferred in scenario three. No method/descriptor combination achieved significant success in scenario four. PMID:18008169

  15. Memory-Based Decision-Making with Heuristics: Evidence for a Controlled Activation of Memory Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khader, Patrick H.; Pachur, Thorsten; Meier, Stefanie; Bien, Siegfried; Jost, Kerstin; Rosler, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Many of our daily decisions are memory based, that is, the attribute information about the decision alternatives has to be recalled. Behavioral studies suggest that for such decisions we often use simple strategies (heuristics) that rely on controlled and limited information search. It is assumed that these heuristics simplify decision-making by…

  16. The Development of Representation Skills in Transitive Reasoning Based on Relations of Equality and Inequality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mims, Michael; And Others

    1983-01-01

    On tasks involving assessement of the heights of colored sticks, kindergarten, third-grade, and adult subjects were successful on inferences involving only equalities or only inequalities across various conditions and procedures. A dramatic developmental increase in performance was found on inferences based on the combination of equality and…

  17. Effects of Knowledge Representation during Computer-Based Training of Console Operation Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farquhar, John D.; Regian, J. Wesley

    Console-operation skill is procedural knowledge of control panel actions. The console operator must select appropriate sequences of steps (e.g., setting dials, pressing buttons, etc.) as mandated by desired goals and subgoals. A computer-based training (CBT) environment can simulate an environment where knowledge acquisition is efficiently and…

  18. Computer-Based Learning: Interleaving Whole and Sectional Representation of Neuroanatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pani, John R.; Chariker, Julia H.; Naaz, Farah

    2013-01-01

    The large volume of material to be learned in biomedical disciplines requires optimizing the efficiency of instruction. In prior work with computer-based instruction of neuroanatomy, it was relatively efficient for learners to master whole anatomy and then transfer to learning sectional anatomy. It may, however, be more efficient to continuously…

  19. Tensor Based Representation and Analysis of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barmpoutis, Angelos

    2009-01-01

    Cartesian tensor bases have been widely used to model spherical functions. In medical imaging, tensors of various orders can approximate the diffusivity function at each voxel of a diffusion-weighted MRI data set. This approximation produces tensor-valued datasets that contain information about the underlying local structure of the scanned tissue.…

  20. Sparse representation of multi parametric DCE-MRI features using K-SVD for classifying gene expression based breast cancer recurrence risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrooghy, Majid; Ashraf, Ahmed B.; Daye, Dania; Mies, Carolyn; Rosen, Mark; Feldman, Michael; Kontos, Despina

    2014-03-01

    We evaluate the prognostic value of sparse representation-based features by applying the K-SVD algorithm on multiparametric kinetic, textural, and morphologic features in breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). K-SVD is an iterative dimensionality reduction method that optimally reduces the initial feature space by updating the dictionary columns jointly with the sparse representation coefficients. Therefore, by using K-SVD, we not only provide sparse representation of the features and condense the information in a few coefficients but also we reduce the dimensionality. The extracted K-SVD features are evaluated by a machine learning algorithm including a logistic regression classifier for the task of classifying high versus low breast cancer recurrence risk as determined by a validated gene expression assay. The features are evaluated using ROC curve analysis and leave one-out cross validation for different sparse representation and dimensionality reduction numbers. Optimal sparse representation is obtained when the number of dictionary elements is 4 (K=4) and maximum non-zero coefficients is 2 (L=2). We compare K-SVD with ANOVA based feature selection for the same prognostic features. The ROC results show that the AUC of the K-SVD based (K=4, L=2), the ANOVA based, and the original features (i.e., no dimensionality reduction) are 0.78, 0.71. and 0.68, respectively. From the results, it can be inferred that by using sparse representation of the originally extracted multi-parametric, high-dimensional data, we can condense the information on a few coefficients with the highest predictive value. In addition, the dimensionality reduction introduced by K-SVD can prevent models from over-fitting.

  1. Roles of urea production, ammonium excretion, and amino acid oxidation in acid-base balance.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, W

    1986-02-01

    Atkinson and colleagues recently proposed several concepts that contrast with traditional views: first, that acid-base balance is regulated chiefly by the reactions leading to urea production in the liver; second, that ammonium excretion by the kidney plays no role in acid-base homeostasis; and third, that ammonium does not stimulate ureagenesis (except indirectly). To examine these concepts, plasma ions other than bicarbonate are categorized as 1) fixed cations (Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, symbolized M+) and anions (Cl-), 2) buffer anions (A-), 3) other anions (X-), and 4) ammonium plus charged amino groups (N+). Since electroneutrality dictates that M+ + N+ = Cl- + HCO3- + A- + X-, it follows that delta HCO3- = delta(M+ - Cl-) - delta A- - delta X- + delta N+. Therefore acid-base disturbances (changes in HCO3-) can be categorized as to how they affect bodily content and hence plasma concentration of each of these four types of ions. The stoichiometry of ureagenesis, glutamine hydrolysis, ammonium and titratable acid excretion, oxidation of neutral, acidic, and basic amino acids, and oxidation of methionine, phosphoserine, and protein are examined to see how they alter these quantities. It is concluded that 1) although ureagenesis is pH dependent and also counteracts a tendency of amino acid oxidation to cause alkalosis, this tendency is inherently limited by the hyperammonemia (delta N+) that necessarily accompanies it, 2) ammonium excretion is equivalent to hydrogen excretion in its effects on acid-base balance if, and only if, it occurs in exchange for sodium or is accompanied by chloride excretion and only when the glutamate generated by glutamine hydrolysis is oxidized.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3511732

  2. Differences in knowledge networks about acids and bases of year-12, undergraduate and postgraduate chemistry students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Janice M.

    1998-12-01

    This study examines differences in conceptual knowledge representations among three groups of students with different levels of study of chemistry. Variation in the structural characteristics of participants’ concept maps on the topic of acid-base equilibrium were sought by indirect means. Year 12 secondary chemistry students, undergraduate chemistry majors and honours, masters and doctoral candidates participated in the study. Paired propositional links in the concept maps for the three groups were analysed by the scaling algorithms “Pathfinder” and multidimensional scaling. Results show differences among groups in the structural significance in the networks of abstract process-related nodes and matter-related nodes. Implications for theories of conceptual change are discussed.

  3. Truncated feature representation for automatic target detection using transformed data-based decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riasati, Vahid R.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the data covariance matrix is diagonalized to provide an orthogonal bases set using the eigen vectors of the data. The eigen-vector decomposition of the data is transformed and filtered in the transform domain to truncate the data for robust features related to a specified set of targets. These truncated eigen features are then combined and reconstructed to utilize in a composite filter and consequently utilized for the automatic target detection of the same class of targets. The results associated with the testing of the current technique are evaluated using the peak-correlation and peak-correlation energy metrics and are presented in this work. The inverse transformed eigen-bases of the current technique may be thought of as an injected sparsity to minimize data in representing the skeletal data structure information associated with the set of targets under consideration.

  4. A single-frame terahertz image super-resolution reconstruction method based on sparse representation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Zhao, Yuan-meng; Deng, Chao; Zhang, Cunlin

    2014-11-01

    Terrorist attacks make the public safety issue becoming the focus of national attention. Passive terahertz security instrument can help overcomesome shortcomings with current security instruments. Terahertz wave has a strong penetrating power which can pass through clothes without harming human bodies and detected objects. However, in the lab experiments, we found that original terahertz imagesobtained by passive terahertz technique were often too vague to detect the objects of interest. Prior studies suggest that learning-based image super-resolution reconstruction(SRR) method can solve this problem. To our knowledge, we applied the learning-based image SRR method for the first time in single-frame passive terahertz image processing. Experimental results showed that the processed passive terahertz images wereclearer and easier to identify suspicious objects than the original images. We also compare our method with three conventional methods and our method show greater advantage over the other methods.

  5. Poly (ricinoleic acid) based novel thermosetting elastomer.

    PubMed

    Ebata, Hiroki; Yasuda, Mayumi; Toshima, Kazunobu; Matsumura, Shuichi

    2008-01-01

    A novel bio-based thermosetting elastomer was prepared by the lipase-catalyzed polymerization of methyl ricinoleate with subsequent vulcanization. Some mechanical properties of the cured carbon black-filled polyricinoleate compounds were evaluated as a thermosetting elastomer. It was found that the carbon black-filled polyricinoleate compounds were readily cured by sulfur curatives to produce a thermosetting elastomer that formed a rubber-like sheet with a smooth and non-sticky surface. The curing behaviors and mechanical properties were dependent on both the molecular weight of the polyricinoleate and the amount of the sulfur curatives. Cured compounds consisting of polyricinoleate with a molecular weight of 100,800 showed good mechanical properties, such as a hardness of 48 A based on the durometer A measurements, a tensile strength at break of 6.91 MPa and an elongation at break of 350%. PMID:18469493

  6. A symmetry-based formal synthesis of zaragozic acid A.

    PubMed

    Freeman-Cook, K D; Halcomb, R L

    2000-09-22

    A symmetry-based strategy for the synthesis of the zaragozic acids is reported. Two enantioselective dihydroxylations were used to establish the absolute configuration of a C(2) symmetric intermediate. Noteworthy transformations include a group-selective lactonization, which accomplished an end-differentiation of a pseudo-C(2) symmetric intermediate. Late stage protecting group adjustments and oxidations accomplished a formal synthesis of zaragozic acid A. PMID:10987953

  7. Detecting protein-protein interactions with a novel matrix-based protein sequence representation and support vector machines.

    PubMed

    You, Zhu-Hong; Li, Jianqiang; Gao, Xin; He, Zhou; Zhu, Lin; Lei, Ying-Ke; Ji, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and their interactions lie at the heart of most underlying biological processes. Consequently, correct detection of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is of fundamental importance to understand the molecular mechanisms in biological systems. Although the convenience brought by high-throughput experiment in technological advances makes it possible to detect a large amount of PPIs, the data generated through these methods is unreliable and may not be completely inclusive of all possible PPIs. Targeting at this problem, this study develops a novel computational approach to effectively detect the protein interactions. This approach is proposed based on a novel matrix-based representation of protein sequence combined with the algorithm of support vector machine (SVM), which fully considers the sequence order and dipeptide information of the protein primary sequence. When performed on yeast PPIs datasets, the proposed method can reach 90.06% prediction accuracy with 94.37% specificity at the sensitivity of 85.74%, indicating that this predictor is a useful tool to predict PPIs. Achieved results also demonstrate that our approach can be a helpful supplement for the interactions that have been detected experimentally. PMID:26000305

  8. Soil Studies: Applying Acid-Base Chemistry to Environmental Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Donna M.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory activities for chemistry students focus attention on the use of acid-base chemistry to examine environmental conditions. After using standard laboratory procedures to analyze soil and rainwater samples, students use web-based resources to interpret their findings. Uses CBL probes and graphing calculators to gather and analyze data and…

  9. High School Students' Concepts of Acids and Bases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Bertram H. B.

    An investigation of Ontario high school students' understanding of acids and bases with quantitative and qualitative methods revealed misconceptions. A concept map, based on the objectives of the Chemistry Curriculum Guideline, generated multiple-choice items and interview questions. The multiple-choice test was administered to 34 grade 12…

  10. Coupled circuit based representation of piezoelectric structures modeled using the finite volume method.

    PubMed

    Bolborici, V; Dawson, F P

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the methodology of generating a corresponding electrical circuit for a simple piezoelectric plate modeled with the finite volume method. The corresponding circuit is implemented using a circuit simulation software and the simulation results are compared to the finite volume modeling results for validation. It is noticed that both, the finite volume model and its corresponding circuit, generate identical results. The results of a corresponding circuit based on the finite volume model are also compared to the results of a corresponding circuit based on a simplified analytical model for a long piezoelectric plate, and to finite element simulation results for the same plate. It is observed that, for one control volume, the finite volume model corresponding circuit and the simplified analytical model corresponding circuit generate close results. It is also noticed that the results of the two corresponding circuits are different from the best approximation results obtained with high resolution finite element simulations due to the approximations made in the simplified analytical model and the fact that only one finite volume was used in the finite volume model. The implementation of the circuit can be automated for higher order systems by a program that takes as an input the matrix of the system and the forcing function vector, and returns a net list for the circuit. PMID:26639999

  11. Spatiotemporal representation of 3D hand trajectory based on beta-elliptic models.

    PubMed

    Boubaker, Houcine; Rezzoug, Nasser; Kherallah, Monji; Gorce, Philippe; Alimi, Adel M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to model the hand trajectory during grasping by an extension in 3D of the 2D written language beta-elliptic model. The interest of this model is that it takes into account both geometric and velocity information. The method relies on the decomposition of the task space trajectories in elementary bricks. The latter is characterized by a velocity profile modelled with beta functions and a geometry modelled with elliptic shapes. A data base of grasping movements has been constructed and the errors of reconstruction were assessed (distance and curvature) considering two variations of the beta-elliptic model ('quarter ellipse' and 'two tangents points' method). The results showed that the method based on two tangent points outperforms the quarter ellipse method with average and maximum relative errors of 2.73% and 8.62%, respectively, and a maximum curvature error of 9.26% for the former. This modelling approach can find interesting application to characterize the improvement due to a rehabilitation or teaching process by a quantitative measurement of hand trajectory parameters. PMID:25199025

  12. a Topic Modeling Based Representation to Detect Tweet Locations. Example of the Event "je Suis Charlie"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morchid, M.; Josselin, D.; Portilla, Y.; Dufour, R.; Altman, E.; Linarès, G.

    2015-09-01

    Social Networks became a major actor in information propagation. Using the Twitter popular platform, mobile users post or relay messages from different locations. The tweet content, meaning and location, show how an event-such as the bursty one "JeSuisCharlie", happened in France in January 2015, is comprehended in different countries. This research aims at clustering the tweets according to the co-occurrence of their terms, including the country, and forecasting the probable country of a non-located tweet, knowing its content. First, we present the process of collecting a large quantity of data from the Twitter website. We finally have a set of 2,189 located tweets about "Charlie", from the 7th to the 14th of January. We describe an original method adapted from the Author-Topic (AT) model based on the Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) method. We define an homogeneous space containing both lexical content (words) and spatial information (country). During a training process on a part of the sample, we provide a set of clusters (topics) based on statistical relations between lexical and spatial terms. During a clustering task, we evaluate the method effectiveness on the rest of the sample that reaches up to 95% of good assignment. It shows that our model is pertinent to foresee tweet location after a learning process.

  13. Local-Based Semantic Navigation on a Networked Representation of Information

    PubMed Central

    Capitán, José A.; Borge-Holthoefer, Javier; Gómez, Sergio; Martinez-Romo, Juan; Araujo, Lourdes; Cuesta, José A.; Arenas, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The size and complexity of actual networked systems hinders the access to a global knowledge of their structure. This fact pushes the problem of navigation to suboptimal solutions, one of them being the extraction of a coherent map of the topology on which navigation takes place. In this paper, we present a Markov chain based algorithm to tag networked terms according only to their topological features. The resulting tagging is used to compute similarity between terms, providing a map of the networked information. This map supports local-based navigation techniques driven by similarity. We compare the efficiency of the resulting paths according to their length compared to that of the shortest path. Additionally we claim that the path steps towards the destination are semantically coherent. To illustrate the algorithm performance we provide some results from the Simple English Wikipedia, which amounts to several thousand of pages. The simplest greedy strategy yields over an 80% of average success rate. Furthermore, the resulting content-coherent paths most often have a cost between one- and threefold compared to shortest-path lengths. PMID:22937081

  14. A similarity-based community detection method with multiple prototype representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kuang; Martin, Arnaud; Pan, Quan

    2015-11-01

    Communities are of great importance for understanding graph structures in social networks. Some existing community detection algorithms use a single prototype to represent each group. In real applications, this may not adequately model the different types of communities and hence limits the clustering performance on social networks. To address this problem, a Similarity-based Multi-Prototype (SMP) community detection approach is proposed in this paper. In SMP, vertices in each community carry various weights to describe their degree of representativeness. This mechanism enables each community to be represented by more than one node. The centrality of nodes is used to calculate prototype weights, while similarity is utilized to guide us to partitioning the graph. Experimental results on computer generated and real-world networks clearly show that SMP performs well for detecting communities. Moreover, the method could provide richer information for the inner structure of the detected communities with the help of prototype weights compared with the existing community detection models.

  15. Knowledge-based probabilistic representations of branching ratios in chemical networks: The case of dissociative recombinations

    SciTech Connect

    Plessis, Sylvain; Carrasco, Nathalie; Pernot, Pascal

    2010-10-07

    Experimental data about branching ratios for the products of dissociative recombination of polyatomic ions are presently the unique information source available to modelers of natural or laboratory chemical plasmas. Yet, because of limitations in the measurement techniques, data for many ions are incomplete. In particular, the repartition of hydrogen atoms among the fragments of hydrocarbons ions is often not available. A consequence is that proper implementation of dissociative recombination processes in chemical models is difficult, and many models ignore invaluable data. We propose a novel probabilistic approach based on Dirichlet-type distributions, enabling modelers to fully account for the available information. As an application, we consider the production rate of radicals through dissociative recombination in an ionospheric chemistry model of Titan, the largest moon of Saturn. We show how the complete scheme of dissociative recombination products derived with our method dramatically affects these rates in comparison with the simplistic H-loss mechanism implemented by default in all recent models.

  16. Status of the phenomena representation, 3D modeling, and cloud-based software architecture development

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Curtis L.; Prescott, Steven; Kvarfordt, Kellie; Sampath, Ram; Larson, Katie

    2015-09-01

    Early in 2013, researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory outlined a technical framework to support the implementation of state-of-the-art probabilistic risk assessment to predict the safety performance of advanced small modular reactors. From that vision of the advanced framework for risk analysis, specific tasks have been underway in order to implement the framework. This report discusses the current development of a several tasks related to the framework implementation, including a discussion of a 3D physics engine that represents the motion of objects (including collision and debris modeling), cloud-based analysis tools such as a Bayesian-inference engine, and scenario simulations. These tasks were performed during 2015 as part of the technical work associated with the Advanced Reactor Technologies Program.

  17. Machinery vibration signal denoising based on learned dictionary and sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang; Gao, Hongli; Li, Jun; Huang, Haifeng; Zhang, Xiaochen

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical vibration signal denoising has been an import problem for machine damage assessment and health monitoring. Wavelet transfer and sparse reconstruction are the powerful and practical methods. However, those methods are based on the fixed basis functions or atoms. In this paper, a novel method is presented. The atoms used to represent signals are learned from the raw signal. And in order to satisfy the requirements of real-time signal processing, an online dictionary learning algorithm is adopted. Orthogonal matching pursuit is applied to extract the most pursuit column in the dictionary. At last, denoised signal is calculated with the sparse vector and learned dictionary. A simulation signal and real bearing fault signal are utilized to evaluate the improved performance of the proposed method through the comparison with kinds of denoising algorithms. Then Its computing efficiency is demonstrated by an illustrative runtime example. The results show that the proposed method outperforms current algorithms with efficiency calculation.

  18. Online learning and generalization of parts-based image representations by non-negative sparse autoencoders.

    PubMed

    Lemme, Andre; Reinhart, René Felix; Steil, Jochen Jakob

    2012-09-01

    We present an efficient online learning scheme for non-negative sparse coding in autoencoder neural networks. It comprises a novel synaptic decay rule that ensures non-negative weights in combination with an intrinsic self-adaptation rule that optimizes sparseness of the non-negative encoding. We show that non-negativity constrains the space of solutions such that overfitting is prevented and very similar encodings are found irrespective of the network initialization and size. We benchmark the novel method on real-world datasets of handwritten digits and faces. The autoencoder yields higher sparseness and lower reconstruction errors than related offline algorithms based on matrix factorization. It generalizes to new inputs both accurately and without costly computations, which is fundamentally different from the classical matrix factorization approaches. PMID:22706093

  19. Trait-Based Representation of Biological Nitrification: Model Development, Testing, and Predicted Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Bouskill, Nicholas J.; Tang, Jinyun; Riley, William J.; Brodie, Eoin L.

    2012-01-01

    Trait-based microbial models show clear promise as tools to represent the diversity and activity of microorganisms across ecosystem gradients. These models parameterize specific traits that determine the relative fitness of an “organism” in a given environment, and represent the complexity of biological systems across temporal and spatial scales. In this study we introduce a microbial community trait-based modeling framework (MicroTrait) focused on nitrification (MicroTrait-N) that represents the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) using traits related to enzyme kinetics and physiological properties. We used this model to predict nitrifier diversity, ammonia (NH3) oxidation rates, and nitrous oxide (N2O) production across pH, temperature, and substrate gradients. Predicted nitrifier diversity was predominantly determined by temperature and substrate availability, the latter was strongly influenced by pH. The model predicted that transient N2O production rates are maximized by a decoupling of the AOB and NOB communities, resulting in an accumulation and detoxification of nitrite to N2O by AOB. However, cumulative N2O production (over 6 month simulations) is maximized in a system where the relationship between AOB and NOB is maintained. When the reactions uncouple, the AOB become unstable and biomass declines rapidly, resulting in decreased NH3 oxidation and N2O production. We evaluated this model against site level chemical datasets from the interior of Alaska and accurately simulated NH3 oxidation rates and the relative ratio of AOA:AOB biomass. The predicted community structure and activity indicate (a) parameterization of a small number of traits may be sufficient to broadly characterize nitrifying community structure and (b) changing decadal trends in climate and edaphic conditions could impact nitrification rates in ways that are not captured by extant biogeochemical models. PMID

  20. Noise correlation-based adaptive polarimetric image representation for contrast enhancement of a polarized beacon in fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panigrahi, Swapnesh; Fade, Julien; Alouini, Mehdi

    2015-10-01

    We show the use of a simplified snapshot polarimetric camera along with an adaptive image processing for optimal detection of a polarized light beacon through fog. The adaptive representation is derived using theoretical noise analysis of the data at hand and is shown to be optimal in the Maximum likelihood sense. We report that the contrast enhancing optimal representation that depends on the background noise correlation differs in general from standard representations like polarimetric difference image or polarization filtered image. Lastly, we discuss a detection strategy to reduce the false positive counts.

  1. Manipulating Representations.

    PubMed

    Recchia-Luciani, Angelo N M

    2012-04-01

    The present paper proposes a definition for the complex polysemic concepts of consciousness and awareness (in humans as well as in other species), and puts forward the idea of a progressive ontological development of consciousness from a state of 'childhood' awareness, in order to explain that humans are not only able to manipulate objects, but also their mental representations. The paper builds on the idea of qualia intended as entities posing regular invariant requests to neural processes, trough the permanence of different properties. The concept of semantic differential introduces the properties of metaphorical qualia as an exclusively human ability. Furthermore this paper proposes a classification of qualia, according to the models-with different levels of abstraction-they are implied in, in a taxonomic perspective. This, in turn, becomes a source of categorization of divergent representations, sign systems, and forms of intentionality, relying always on biological criteria. New emerging image-of-the-world-devices are proposed, whose qualia are likely to be only accessible to humans: emotional qualia, where emotion accounts for the invariant and dominant property; and the qualic self where continuity, combined with the oneness of the self, accounts for the invariant and dominant property. The concept of congruence between different domains in a metaphor introduces the possibility of a general evaluation of truth and falsity of all kinds of metaphorical constructs, while the work of Matte Blanco enables us to classify conscious versus unconscious metaphors, both in individuals and in social organizations. PMID:22347988

  2. DNS of thermocapillary flows based on two-scalar temperature representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothe, Dieter; Ma, Chen

    2011-11-01

    The direct numerical simulation (DNS) of thermocapillary two-phase flow with free deformable interface requires the solution of the two-phase Navier-Stokes equations in 3D together with the energy balance. We employ the sharp interface model which is solved using an extended volume of fluid method, where the discretization is based on Finite Volumes. The energy equation is given in temperature form, where the temperature field is represented by two scalars, one for each phase. This way the averaging over grid cells is confined to the individual phases and, hence, a smearing of the temperature gradient jump is avoided. Interpolation of the temperature within interfacial cells, exploiting the energy transmission condition, yields accurate temperatures at the interface, which is of utmost importance for the calculation of thermocapillary forces. Here the position and orientation of the interface is approximated by piecewise linear interface construction (PLIC). This method is applied to investigate liquid films on locally heated planar, respectively heated structured substrates. The approach allows for the numerical simulation of evaporating flows coupled with thermal Marangoni effects.

  3. Medical image compression based on a morphological representation of wavelet coefficients.

    PubMed

    Phelan, N C; Ennis, J T

    1999-08-01

    Image compression is fundamental to the efficient and cost-effective use of digital medical imaging technology and applications. Wavelet transform techniques currently provide the most promising approach to high-quality image compression which is essential for diagnostic medical applications. A novel approach to image compression based on the wavelet decomposition has been developed which utilizes the shape or morphology of wavelet transform coefficients in the wavelet domain to isolate and retain significant coefficients corresponding to image structure and features. The remaining coefficients are further compressed using a combination of run-length and Huffman coding. The technique has been implemented and applied to full 16 bit medical image data for a range of compression ratios. Objective peak signal-to-noise ratio performance of the compression technique was analyzed. Results indicate that good reconstructed image quality can be achieved at compression ratios of up to 15:1 for the image types studied. This technique represents an effective approach to the compression of diagnostic medical images and is worthy of further, more thorough, evaluation of diagnostic quality and accuracy in a clinical setting. PMID:10501061

  4. A graph-based approach to developing adaptive representations of complex reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    He, Kaiyuan; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.

    2008-12-15

    An effective adaptive mechanism reduction approach based on flux graph clustering is proposed in this paper. The instantaneous element flux is quantified and considered as a proxy for describing the reactive propensities of the system. Our underlying hypothesis is that even though particular conditions may be characterized by a multitude of combinations of species mass fraction, T, and P, the essential chemistry, and hence the reaction propensity of the mixture that is active under this family of conditions, is the same. Therefore, we opt to use the instantaneous fluxes through the active reactions as an intrinsic property of the system. Flux graphs are first constructed for the chemical reaction system under numerous conditions aiming at capturing the attainable region. Similarity between flux graphs is quantified through the distances between corresponding vectors, using the cosine coefficient and a novel graph-distance metric taking into account the magnitude of each flux and the activity distribution of different fluxes. A hierarchical clustering algorithm is implemented to group similar instantaneous flux graphs into clusters, and consequently a reduced mechanism is generated for each cluster. A search algorithm is defined afterward to assign a new query point to a particular flux graph cluster, and subsequently the reduced mechanism associated with this cluster is used to describe the system at this time point. Finally, the methodology is demonstrated using n-pentane combustion in an adiabatic plug flow reactor model and a pairwise mixing stirred reactor model. (author)

  5. On Equivalence of FIS and ELM for Interpretable Rule-Based Knowledge Representation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shen Yuong; Yap, Keem Siah; Yap, Hwa Jen; Tan, Shing Chiang; Chang, Siow Wee

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a fuzzy extreme learning machine (F-ELM) that embeds fuzzy membership functions and rules into the hidden layer of extreme learning machine (ELM). Similar to the concept of ELM that employed the random initialization technique, three parameters of F-ELM are randomly assigned. They are the standard deviation of the membership functions, matrix-C (rule-combination matrix), and matrix-D [don't care (DC) matrix]. Fuzzy if-then rules are formulated by the rule-combination Matrix of F-ELM, and a DC approach is adopted to minimize the number of input attributes in the rules. Furthermore, F-ELM utilizes the output weights of the ELM to form the target class and confidence factor for each of the rules. This is to indicate that the corresponding consequent parameters are determined analytically. The operations of F-ELM are equivalent to a fuzzy inference system. Several benchmark data sets and a real world fault detection and diagnosis problem have been used to empirically evaluate the efficacy of the proposed F-ELM in handling pattern classification tasks. The results show that the accuracy rates of F-ELM are comparable (if not superior) to ELM with distinctive ability of providing explicit knowledge in the form of interpretable rule base. PMID:25134093

  6. Efficient Image-Vector-Generation Processor for Edge-Based Complementary Feature Representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Naoya; Shibata, Tadashi

    2012-02-01

    A digital processor dedicated to edge-based image vector generation has been developed aiming at real-time image recognition. The processor consists of an on-chip memory and 16 single instruction multiple data (SIMD) processing elements. The capacity of the on-chip memory as well as the overhead for starting the processing have been minimized by introducing a seamless data transferring scheme from memory to processing elements. The 16 SIMD processing elements work together either as accumulators or as shift registers, thus achieving a very efficient generation of two different kinds of feature vector: projected principal-edge distribution (PPED)[3,4] and averaged principal-edge distribution (APED).[5] Concurrent use of these two vectors is shown to be very important for robust image recognition.[5] The chip was fabricated using 0.18-µm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology and the generation of 64-dimension PPED and APED vectors at 84.7 and 83.9 fps, respectively, from video graphics array (VGA) size images was demonstrated at 62.5 MHz.

  7. Pyrolytic Behavior of Amino Acids and Nucleic Acid Bases: Implications for Their Survival during Extraterrestrial Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Navarro-González, Rafael

    1998-08-01

    The idea of extraterrestrial delivery of organic matter (by comets, asteroids, meteorites, and interplanetary dust particles) to the early Earth is very popular at present. A strong argument for its favor is the detection of a large variety of organic compounds, including amino acids and nucleic acid bases, in carbonaceous chondrites. Whether these compounds can be delivered by other space bodies is unclear and depends primarily on capability of the biomolecules to survive high temperature regimes during atmospheric deceleration and impacts to the terrestrial surface. Although some indirect estimates of simple biomolecules' survivability have been reported, there is an evident lack of experimental data. In the present study we demonstrate that some simple amino acids, purines, and pyrimidines do not completely decompose even under volatilization at 500°C in a nitrogen atmosphere at normal pressure, with the percentage of survival of the order of 1-10%. In the case of amino acids, several types of condensation products form (piperazine-2,5-diones, bicyclic amidines, hydantoins, etc.) with total yields in the same percentage range, preserving amino acid residues intact and being able to release free amino acids upon hydrolysis. Taking into account the property of amino acids as well as nucleic acid bases to sublime in vacuum under temperatures of about 200°C, one should expect that the biomolecules in the dust particles actually do not experience the temperatures as much as 400-500°C and rapidly sublime during the atmospheric passage, dissipating in the upper atmosphere. The biomolecules' survival during catastrophic airbursts of comets is also possible, but very unlikely for asteroidal impacts to the terrestrial surface (at least for those resulting in complete pulverization and evaporation of the projectiles).

  8. Structural damage detection in wind turbine blades based on time series representations of dynamic responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoell, Simon; Omenzetter, Piotr

    2015-03-01

    The development of large wind turbines that enable to harvest energy more efficiently is a consequence of the increasing demand for renewables in the world. To optimize the potential energy output, light and flexible wind turbine blades (WTBs) are designed. However, the higher flexibilities and lower buckling capacities adversely affect the long-term safety and reliability of WTBs, and thus the increased operation and maintenance costs reduce the expected revenue. Effective structural health monitoring techniques can help to counteract this by limiting inspection efforts and avoiding unplanned maintenance actions. Vibration-based methods deserve high attention due to the moderate instrumentation efforts and the applicability for in-service measurements. The present paper proposes the use of cross-correlations (CCs) of acceleration responses between sensors at different locations for structural damage detection in WTBs. CCs were in the past successfully applied for damage detection in numerical and experimental beam structures while utilizing only single lags between the signals. The present approach uses vectors of CC coefficients for multiple lags between measurements of two selected sensors taken from multiple possible combinations of sensors. To reduce the dimensionality of the damage sensitive feature (DSF) vectors, principal component analysis is performed. The optimal number of principal components (PCs) is chosen with respect to a statistical threshold. Finally, the detection phase uses the selected PCs of the healthy structure to calculate scores from a current DSF vector, where statistical hypothesis testing is performed for making a decision about the current structural state. The method is applied to laboratory experiments conducted on a small WTB with non-destructive damage scenarios.

  9. A review of selection-based tests of abiotic surrogates for species representation.

    PubMed

    Beier, Paul; Sutcliffe, Patricia; Hjort, Jan; Faith, Daniel P; Pressey, Robert L; Albuquerque, Fabio

    2015-06-01

    Because conservation planners typically lack data on where species occur, environmental surrogates--including geophysical settings and climate types--have been used to prioritize sites within a planning area. We reviewed 622 evaluations of the effectiveness of abiotic surrogates in representing species in 19 study areas. Sites selected using abiotic surrogates represented more species than an equal number of randomly selected sites in 43% of tests (55% for plants) and on average improved on random selection of sites by about 8% (21% for plants). Environmental diversity (ED) (42% median improvement on random selection) and biotically informed clusters showed promising results and merit additional testing. We suggest 4 ways to improve performance of abiotic surrogates. First, analysts should consider a broad spectrum of candidate variables to define surrogates, including rarely used variables related to geographic separation, distance from coast, hydrology, and within-site abiotic diversity. Second, abiotic surrogates should be defined at fine thematic resolution. Third, sites (the landscape units prioritized within a planning area) should be small enough to ensure that surrogates reflect species' environments and to produce prioritizations that match the spatial resolution of conservation decisions. Fourth, if species inventories are available for some planning units, planners should define surrogates based on the abiotic variables that most influence species turnover in the planning area. Although species inventories increase the cost of using abiotic surrogates, a modest number of inventories could provide the data needed to select variables and evaluate surrogates. Additional tests of nonclimate abiotic surrogates are needed to evaluate the utility of conserving nature's stage as a strategy for conservation planning in the face of climate change. PMID:25923191

  10. Strength of object representation: its key role in object-based attention for determining the competition result between Gestalt and top-down objects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjing; Wang, Yonghui; Liu, Donglai; Zhao, Liang; Liu, Peng

    2015-10-01

    It was found in previous studies that two types of objects (rectangles formed according to the Gestalt principle and Chinese words formed in a top-down fashion) can both induce an object-based effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate how the strength of an object representation affects the result of the competition between these two types of objects based on research carried out by Liu, Wang and Zhou [(2011) Acta Psychologica, 138(3), 397-404]. In Experiment 1, the rectangles were filled with two different colors to increase the strength of Gestalt object representation, and we found that the object effect changed significantly for the different stimulus types. Experiment 2 used Chinese words with various familiarities to manipulate the strength of the top-down object representation. As a result, the object-based effect induced by rectangles was observed only when the Chinese word familiarity was low. These results suggest that the strength of object representation determines the result of competition between different types of objects. PMID:26041271

  11. Experimental validation of a nonlinear derating technique based upon Gaussian-modal representation of focused ultrasound beams.

    PubMed

    Dibaji, Seyed Ahmad Reza; Banerjee, Rupak K; Liu, Yunbo; Soneson, Joshua E; Myers, Matthew R

    2016-05-01

    A technique useful for performing derating at acoustic powers where significant harmonic generation occurs is illustrated and validated with experimental measurements. The technique was previously presented using data from simulations. The method is based upon a Gaussian representation of the propagation modes, resulting in simple expressions for the modal quantities, but a Gaussian source is not required. The nonlinear interaction of modes within tissue is estimated from the nonlinear interaction in water, using appropriate amounts of source reduction and focal-point reduction derived from numerical simulations. An important feature of this nonlinear derating method is that focal temperatures can be estimated with little additional effort beyond that required to determine the focal pressure waveforms. Hydrophone measurements made in water were used to inform the derating algorithm, and the resulting pressure waveforms and increases in temperature were compared with values directly measured in tissue phantoms. For a 1.05 MHz focused transducer operated at 80 W and 128 W, the derated pressures (peak positive, peak negative) agreed with the directly measured values to within 11%. Focal temperature rises determined by the derating method agreed with values measured using a remote thermocouple technique with a difference of 17%. PMID:27250156

  12. Individual subject classification for Alzheimer's disease based on incremental learning using a spatial frequency representation of cortical thickness data.

    PubMed

    Cho, Youngsang; Seong, Joon-Kyung; Jeong, Yong; Shin, Sung Yong

    2012-02-01

    Patterns of brain atrophy measured by magnetic resonance structural imaging have been utilized as significant biomarkers for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, brain atrophy is variable across patients and is non-specific for AD in general. Thus, automatic methods for AD classification require a large number of structural data due to complex and variable patterns of brain atrophy. In this paper, we propose an incremental method for AD classification using cortical thickness data. We represent the cortical thickness data of a subject in terms of their spatial frequency components, employing the manifold harmonic transform. The basis functions for this transform are obtained from the eigenfunctions of the Laplace-Beltrami operator, which are dependent only on the geometry of a cortical surface but not on the cortical thickness defined on it. This facilitates individual subject classification based on incremental learning. In general, methods based on region-wise features poorly reflect the detailed spatial variation of cortical thickness, and those based on vertex-wise features are sensitive to noise. Adopting a vertex-wise cortical thickness representation, our method can still achieve robustness to noise by filtering out high frequency components of the cortical thickness data while reflecting their spatial variation. This compromise leads to high accuracy in AD classification. We utilized MR volumes provided by Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) to validate the performance of the method. Our method discriminated AD patients from Healthy Control (HC) subjects with 82% sensitivity and 93% specificity. It also discriminated Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients, who converted to AD within 18 months, from non-converted MCI subjects with 63% sensitivity and 76% specificity. Moreover, it showed that the entorhinal cortex was the most discriminative region for classification, which is consistent with previous pathological findings. In

  13. Nucleic acid-based nanoengineering: novel structures for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanying; LaBean, Thomas H.; Leong, Kam W.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoengineering exploits the interactions of materials at the nanometre scale to create functional nanostructures. It relies on the precise organization of nanomaterials to achieve unique functionality. There are no interactions more elegant than those governing nucleic acids via Watson–Crick base-pairing rules. The infinite combinations of DNA/RNA base pairs and their remarkable molecular recognition capability can give rise to interesting nanostructures that are only limited by our imagination. Over the past years, creative assembly of nucleic acids has fashioned a plethora of two-dimensional and three-dimensional nanostructures with precisely controlled size, shape and spatial functionalization. These nanostructures have been precisely patterned with molecules, proteins and gold nanoparticles for the observation of chemical reactions at the single molecule level, activation of enzymatic cascade and novel modality of photonic detection, respectively. Recently, they have also been engineered to encapsulate and release bioactive agents in a stimulus-responsive manner for therapeutic applications. The future of nucleic acid-based nanoengineering is bright and exciting. In this review, we will discuss the strategies to control the assembly of nucleic acids and highlight the recent efforts to build functional nucleic acid nanodevices for nanomedicine. PMID:23050076

  14. Crystal and molecular structure of eight organic acid-base adducts from 2-methylquinoline and different acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Jin, Shouwen; Tao, Lin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Daqi

    2014-08-01

    Eight supramolecular complexes with 2-methylquinoline and acidic components as 4-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, salicylic acid, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid, malic acid, sebacic acid, and 1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid were synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. All of the complexes are organic salts except compound 2. All supramolecular architectures of 1-8 involve extensive classical hydrogen bonds as well as other noncovalent interactions. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the classical hydrogen bonds (ionic or neutral) between acidic components and 2-methylquinoline are sufficient to bring about the formation of binary organic acid-base adducts. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. These weak interactions combined, the complexes 1-8 displayed 2D-3D framework structure.

  15. ACID PRECIPITATION IN NORTH AMERICA: 1984 ANNUAL DATA SUMMARY FROM ACID DEPOSITION SYSTEM DATA BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives a summary of 1984 wet deposition precipitation chemistry data collected in North America and available in the Acid Deposition System (ADS) data base. North American wet deposition monitoring networks with data in ADS are NADP/NTN, CANSAP, APN, UAPSP, MAP3S/PCN, W...

  16. ACID PRECIPITATION IN NORTH AMERICA: 1983 ANNUAL DATA SUMMARY FROM ACID DEPOSITION SYSTEM DATA BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives a summary of 1983 wet deposition precipitation chemistry data collected in North America and available in the Acid Deposition System (ADS) data base. North American wet deposition monitoring networks with data in ADS are NADP/NTN, CANSAP, APN, UAPSP, MAP3S/PCN, W...

  17. Parallel Representation of Value-Based and Finite State-Based Strategies in the Ventral and Dorsal Striatum.

    PubMed

    Ito, Makoto; Doya, Kenji

    2015-11-01

    Previous theoretical studies of animal and human behavioral learning have focused on the dichotomy of the value-based strategy using action value functions to predict rewards and the model-based strategy using internal models to predict environmental states. However, animals and humans often take simple procedural behaviors, such as the "win-stay, lose-switch" strategy without explicit prediction of rewards or states. Here we consider another strategy, the finite state-based strategy, in which a subject selects an action depending on its discrete internal state and updates the state depending on the action chosen and the reward outcome. By analyzing choice behavior of rats in a free-choice task, we found that the finite state-based strategy fitted their behavioral choices more accurately than value-based and model-based strategies did. When fitted models were run autonomously with the same task, only the finite state-based strategy could reproduce the key feature of choice sequences. Analyses of neural activity recorded from the dorsolateral striatum (DLS), the dorsomedial striatum (DMS), and the ventral striatum (VS) identified significant fractions of neurons in all three subareas for which activities were correlated with individual states of the finite state-based strategy. The signal of internal states at the time of choice was found in DMS, and for clusters of states was found in VS. In addition, action values and state values of the value-based strategy were encoded in DMS and VS, respectively. These results suggest that both the value-based strategy and the finite state-based strategy are implemented in the striatum. PMID:26529522

  18. The neural substrates of drawing: a voxel-based morphometry analysis of constructional, hierarchical, and spatial representation deficits.

    PubMed

    Chechlacz, Magdalena; Novick, Abigail; Rotshtein, Pia; Bickerton, Wai-Ling; Humphreys, Glyn W; Demeyere, Nele

    2014-12-01

    Deficits in the ability to draw objects, despite apparently intact perception and motor abilities, are defined as constructional apraxia. Constructional deficits, often diagnosed based on performance on copying complex figures, have been reported in a range of pathologies, perhaps reflecting the contribution of several underlying factors to poor figure drawing. The current study provides a comprehensive analysis of brain-behavior relationships in drawing disorders based on data from a large cohort of subacute stroke patients (n = 358) using whole-brain voxel-wise statistical analyses linked to behavioral measures from a complex figure copy task. We found that (i) overall poor performance on figure copying was associated with subcortical lesions (BG and thalamus), (ii) lateralized deficits with respect to the midline of the viewer were associated with lesions within the posterior parietal lobule, and (iii) spatial positioning errors across the entire figure were associated with lesions within visual processing areas (lingual gyrus and calcarine) and the insula. Furthermore, deficits in reproducing global aspects of form were associated with damage to the right middle temporal gyrus, whereas deficits in representing local features were linked to the left hemisphere lesions within calcarine cortex (extending into the cuneus and precuneus), the insula, and the TPJ. The current study provides strong evidence that impairments in separate cognitive mechanisms (e.g., spatial coding, attention, motor execution, and planning) linked to different brain lesions contribute to poor performance on complex figure copying tasks. The data support the argument that drawing depends on several cognitive processes operating via discrete neuronal networks and that constructional problems as well as hierarchical and spatial representation deficits contribute to poor figure copying. PMID:24893744

  19. Acid/base account and minesoils: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Hossner, L.R.; Brandt, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    Generation of acidity from the oxidation of iron sulfides (FeS{sub 2}) is a common feature of geological materials exposed to the atmosphere by mining activities. Acid/base accounting (ABA) has been the primary method to evaluate the acid- or alkaline-potential of geological materials and to predict if weathering of these materials will have an adverse effect on terrestrial and aquatic environments. The ABA procedure has also been used to evaluate minesoils at different stages of weathering and, in some cases, to estimate lime requirements. Conflicting assessments of the methodology have been reported in the literature. The ABA is the fastest and easiest way to evaluate the acid-forming characteristics of overburden materials; however, accurate evaluations sometimes require that ABA data be examined in conjunction with additional sample information and results from other analytical procedures. The end use of ABA data, whether it be for minesoil evaluation or water quality prediction, will dictate the method`s interpretive criteria. Reaction kinetics and stoichiometry may vary and are not clearly defined for all situations. There is an increasing awareness of the potential for interfering compounds, particularly siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), to be present in geological materials associated with coal mines. Hardrock mines, with possible mixed sulfide mineralogy, offer a challenge to the ABA, since acid generation may be caused by minerals other than pyrite. A combination of methods, static and kinetic, is appropriate to properly evaluate the presence of acid-forming materials.

  20. Acid-Base Disorders--A Computer Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maude, David L.

    1985-01-01

    Describes and lists a program for Apple Pascal Version 1.1 which investigates the behavior of the bicarbonate-carbon dioxide buffer system in acid-base disorders. Designed specifically for the preclinical medical student, the program has proven easy to use and enables students to use blood gas parameters to arrive at diagnoses. (DH)

  1. Using Spreadsheets to Produce Acid-Base Titration Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawley, Martin James; Parkinson, John

    1995-01-01

    Describes two spreadsheets for producing acid-base titration curves, one uses relatively simple cell formulae that can be written into the spreadsheet by inexperienced students and the second uses more complex formulae that are best written by the teacher. (JRH)

  2. Turkish Prospective Chemistry Teachers' Alternative Conceptions about Acids and Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boz, Yezdan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain prospective chemistry teachers' conceptions about acids and bases concepts. Thirty-eight prospective chemistry teachers were the participants. Data were collected by means of an open-ended questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. Analysis of data indicated that most prospective teachers did not have…

  3. Students' Understanding of Acids/Bases in Organic Chemistry Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartrette, David P.; Mayo, Provi M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding key foundational principles is vital to learning chemistry across different contexts. One such foundational principle is the acid/base behavior of molecules. In the general chemistry sequence, the Bronsted-Lowry theory is stressed, because it lends itself well to studying equilibrium and kinetics. However, the Lewis theory of…

  4. The Semantic Representation of Event Information Depends on the Cue Modality: An Instance of Meaning-Based Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Kristina; Sikström, Sverker; Willander, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The semantic content, or the meaning, is the essence of autobiographical memories. In comparison to previous research, which has mainly focused on the phenomenological experience and the age distribution of retrieved events, the present study provides a novel view on the retrieval of event information by quantifying the information as semantic representations. We investigated the semantic representation of sensory cued autobiographical events and studied the modality hierarchy within the multimodal retrieval cues. The experiment comprised a cued recall task, where the participants were presented with visual, auditory, olfactory or multimodal retrieval cues and asked to recall autobiographical events. The results indicated that the three different unimodal retrieval cues generate significantly different semantic representations. Further, the auditory and the visual modalities contributed the most to the semantic representation of the multimodally retrieved events. Finally, the semantic representation of the multimodal condition could be described as a combination of the three unimodal conditions. In conclusion, these results suggest that the meaning of the retrieved event information depends on the modality of the retrieval cues. PMID:24204561

  5. Primordial transport of sugars and amino acids via Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillwell, William; Rau, Aruna

    1981-09-01

    Experimental support is given for a model concerning the origin of a primordial transport system. The model is based on the facilitated diffusion of amino acids stimulated by aliphatic aldehyde carriers and sugars stimulated by aliphatic amine carriers. The lipid-soluble diffusing species is the Schiff base. The possible role of this simple transport system in the origin of an early protocell is discussed.

  6. Multidirectional and Topography-based Dynamic-scale Varifold Representations with Application to Matching Developing Cortical Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rekik, Islem; Li, Gang; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-07-15

    The human cerebral cortex is marked by great complexity as well as substantial dynamic changes during early postnatal development. To obtain a fairly comprehensive picture of its age-induced and/or disorder-related cortical changes, one needs to match cortical surfaces to one another, while maximizing their anatomical alignment. Methods that geodesically shoot surfaces into one another as currents (a distribution of oriented normals) and varifolds (a distribution of non-oriented normals) provide an elegant Riemannian framework for generic surface matching and reliable statistical analysis. However, both conventional current and varifold matching methods have two key limitations. First, they only use the normals of the surface to measure its geometry and guide the warping process, which overlooks the importance of the orientations of the inherently convoluted cortical sulcal and gyral folds. Second, the 'conversion' of a surface into a current or a varifold operates at a fixed scale under which geometric surface details will be neglected, which ignores the dynamic scales of cortical foldings. To overcome these limitations and improve varifold-based cortical surface registration, we propose two different strategies. The first strategy decomposes each cortical surface into its normal and tangent varifold representations, by integrating principal curvature direction field into the varifold matching framework, thus providing rich information of the orientation of cortical folding and better characterization of the complex cortical geometry. The second strategy explores the informative cortical geometric features to perform a dynamic-scale measurement of the cortical surface that depends on the local surface topography (e.g., principal curvature), thereby we introduce the concept of a topography-based dynamic-scale varifold. We tested the proposed varifold variants for registering 12 pairs of dynamically developing cortical surfaces from 0 to 6 months of age. Both

  7. Translation between representation languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbaalen, Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    A capability for translating between representation languages is critical for effective knowledge base reuse. A translation technology for knowledge representation languages based on the use of an interlingua for communicating knowledge is described. The interlingua-based translation process consists of three major steps: translation from the source language into a subset of the interlingua, translation between subsets of the interlingua, and translation from a subset of the interlingua into the target language. The first translation step into the interlingua can typically be specified in the form of a grammar that describes how each top-level form in the source language translates into the interlingua. In cases where the source language does not have a declarative semantics, such a grammar is also a specification of a declarative semantics for the language. A methodology for building translators that is currently under development is described. A 'translator shell' based on this methodology is also under development. The shell has been used to build translators for multiple representation languages and those translators have successfully translated nontrivial knowledge bases.

  8. ProSMoS server: a pattern-based search using interaction matrix representation of protein structures.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuoyong; Chitturi, Bhadrachalam; Grishin, Nick V

    2009-07-01

    Assessing structural similarity and defining common regions through comparison of protein spatial structures is an important task in functional and evolutionary studies of proteins. There are many servers that compare structures and define sub-structures in common between proteins through superposition and closeness of either coordinates or contacts. However, a natural way to analyze a structure for experts working on structure classification is to look for specific three-dimensional (3D) motifs and patterns instead of finding common features in two proteins. Such motifs can be described by the architecture and topology of major secondary structural elements (SSEs) without consideration of subtle differences in 3D coordinates. Despite the importance of motif-based structure searches, currently there is a shortage of servers to perform this task. Widely known TOPS does not fully address this problem, as it finds only topological match but does not take into account other important spatial properties, such as interactions and chirality. Here, we implemented our approach to protein structure pattern search (ProSMoS) as a web-server. ProSMoS converts 3D structure into an interaction matrix representation including the SSE types, handednesses of connections between SSEs, coordinates of SSE starts and ends, types of interactions between SSEs and beta-sheet definitions. For a user-defined structure pattern, ProSMoS lists all structures from a database that contain this pattern. ProSMoS server will be of interest to structural biologists who would like to analyze very general and distant structural similarities. The ProSMoS web server is available at: http://prodata.swmed.edu/ProSMoS/. PMID:19420061

  9. ProSMoS server: a pattern-based search using interaction matrix representation of protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shuoyong; Chitturi, Bhadrachalam; Grishin, Nick V.

    2009-01-01

    Assessing structural similarity and defining common regions through comparison of protein spatial structures is an important task in functional and evolutionary studies of proteins. There are many servers that compare structures and define sub-structures in common between proteins through superposition and closeness of either coordinates or contacts. However, a natural way to analyze a structure for experts working on structure classification is to look for specific three-dimensional (3D) motifs and patterns instead of finding common features in two proteins. Such motifs can be described by the architecture and topology of major secondary structural elements (SSEs) without consideration of subtle differences in 3D coordinates. Despite the importance of motif-based structure searches, currently there is a shortage of servers to perform this task. Widely known TOPS does not fully address this problem, as it finds only topological match but does not take into account other important spatial properties, such as interactions and chirality. Here, we implemented our approach to protein structure pattern search (ProSMoS) as a web-server. ProSMoS converts 3D structure into an interaction matrix representation including the SSE types, handednesses of connections between SSEs, coordinates of SSE starts and ends, types of interactions between SSEs and β-sheet definitions. For a user-defined structure pattern, ProSMoS lists all structures from a database that contain this pattern. ProSMoS server will be of interest to structural biologists who would like to analyze very general and distant structural similarities. The ProSMoS web server is available at: http://prodata.swmed.edu/ProSMoS/. PMID:19420061

  10. Counterion specificity of surfactants based on dicarboxylic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Romain; Tropsch, Jürgen; Holmberg, Krister

    2009-10-15

    The behavior in solution of a series of amino acid-based surfactants having two carboxyl groups separated by a spacer of one, two, or three carbon atoms has been investigated. All three surfactants precipitated on addition of acid, but the aspartate surfactant (with a two-carbon spacer) was considerably more resistant to precipitation than the aminomalonate surfactant (one-carbon spacer) and the glutamate surfactant (three-carbon spacer). The interactions with the monovalent counterions lithium, sodium, and potassium were investigated by conductivity. It was found that lithium ions bound the strongest and potassium ions the weakest to the surfactant micelles. These results were interpreted using the hard and soft acid-base theory. Comparing the three surfactants with respect to binding of one specific counterion, sodium, showed that the aminomalonate surfactant, which has the shortest spacer, bound sodium ions the strongest and the glutamate surfactant, which has the longest spacer, had the lowest affinity for the counterion. Also that could be explained by the hard and soft acid-base concept. The glutamate surfactant was found to be considerably more resistant to calcium ions than the two other surfactants. This was attributed to this surfactant forming an intermolecular complex with the calcium ion at the air-water interface while the aminomalonate and the aspartate surfactants, with shorter distance between the carboxylate groups could form six- and seven-membered intramolecular calcium complexes. PMID:19608191

  11. Acid-base transport in pancreas—new challenges

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Ivana; Haanes, Kristian A.; Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Along the gastrointestinal tract a number of epithelia contribute with acid or basic secretions in order to aid digestive processes. The stomach and pancreas are the most extreme examples of acid (H+) and base (HCO−3) transporters, respectively. Nevertheless, they share the same challenges of transporting acid and bases across epithelia and effectively regulating their intracellular pH. In this review, we will make use of comparative physiology to enlighten the cellular mechanisms of pancreatic HCO−3 and fluid secretion, which is still challenging physiologists. Some of the novel transporters to consider in pancreas are the proton pumps (H+-K+-ATPases), as well as the calcium-activated K+ and Cl− channels, such as KCa3.1 and TMEM16A/ANO1. Local regulators, such as purinergic signaling, fine-tune, and coordinate pancreatic secretion. Lastly, we speculate whether dys-regulation of acid-base transport contributes to pancreatic diseases including cystic fibrosis, pancreatitis, and cancer. PMID:24391597

  12. Acid-base Balance in Acute Gastrointestinal Bleeding*

    PubMed Central

    Northfield, T. C.; Kirby, B. J.; Tattersfield, Anne E.

    1971-01-01

    Acid-base balance has been studied in 21 patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A low plasma bicarbonate concentration was found in nine patients, accompanied in each case by a base deficit of more than 3 mEq/litre, indicating a metabolic acidosis. Three patients had a low blood pH. Hyperlactataemia appeared to be a major cause of the acidosis. This was not accompanied by a raised blood pyruvate concentration. The hyperlactataemia could not be accounted for on the basis of hyperventilation, intravenous infusion of dextrose, or arterial hypoxaemia. Before blood transfusion it was most pronounced in patients who were clinically shocked, suggesting that it may have resulted from poor tissue perfusion and anaerobic glycolysis. Blood transfusion resulted in a rise in lactate concentration in seven patients who were not clinically shocked, and failed to reverse a severe uncompensated acidosis in a patient who was clinically shocked. These effects of blood transfusion are probably due to the fact that red blood cells in stored bank blood, with added acid-citrate-dextrose solution, metabolize the dextrose anaerobically to lactic acid. Monitoring of acid-base balance is recommended in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding who are clinically shocked. A metabolic acidosis can then be corrected with intravenous sodium bicarbonate. PMID:5313902

  13. [Time perceptions and representations].

    PubMed

    Tordjman, S

    2015-09-01

    fundamentally lacking in their physiological development due to possibly altered circadian rhythms, including arhythmy and asynchrony. Time measurement, based on the repetition of discontinuity at regular intervals, involves also a spatial representation. It is our own trajectory through space-time, and thus our own motion, including the physiological process of aging, that affords us a representation of the passing of time, just as the countryside seems to be moving past us when we travel in a vehicle. Chinese and Indian societies actually have circular representations of time, and linear representations of time and its trajectory through space-time are currently a feature of Western societies. Circular time is collective time, and its metaphysical representations go beyond the life of a single individual, referring to the cyclical, or at least nonlinear, nature of time. Linear time is individual time, in that it refers to the scale of a person's lifetime, and it is physically represented by an arrow flying ineluctably from the past to the future. An intermediate concept can be proposed that acknowledges the existence of linear time involving various arrows of time corresponding to different lifespans (human, animal, plant, planet lifespans, etc.). In fact, the very notion of time would depend on the trajectory of each arrow of time, like shooting stars in the sky with different trajectory lengths which would define different time scales. The time scale of these various lifespans are very different (for example, a few decades for humans and a few days or hours for insects). It would not make sense to try to understand the passage of time experienced by an insect which may live only a few hours based on a human time scale. One hour in an insect's life cannot be compared to one experienced by a human. Yet again, it appears that there is a coexistence of different clocks based here on different lifespans. Finally, the evolution of our society focused on the present moment and

  14. Alternative Approach to Nuclear Data Representation

    SciTech Connect

    Pruet, J; Brown, D; Beck, B; McNabb, D P

    2005-07-27

    This paper considers an approach for representing nuclear data that is qualitatively different from the approach currently adopted by the nuclear science community. Specifically, they examine a representation in which complicated data is described through collections of distinct and self contained simple data structures. This structure-based representation is compared with the ENDF and ENDL formats, which can be roughly characterized as dictionary-based representations. A pilot data representation for replacing the format currently used at LLNL is presented. Examples are given as is a discussion of promises and shortcomings associated with moving from traditional dictionary-based formats to a structure-rich or class-like representation.

  15. Revealing children's implicit spelling representations.

    PubMed

    Critten, Sarah; Pine, Karen J; Messer, David J

    2013-06-01

    Conceptualizing the underlying representations and cognitive mechanisms of children's spelling development is a key challenge for literacy researchers. Using the Representational Redescription model (Karmiloff-Smith), Critten, Pine and Steffler (2007) demonstrated that the acquisition of phonological and morphological knowledge may be underpinned by increasingly explicit levels of spelling representation. However, their proposal that implicit representations may underlie early 'visually based' spelling remains unresolved. Children (N = 101, aged 4-6 years) were given a recognition task (Critten et al., 2007) and a novel production task, both involving verbal justifications of why spellings are correct/incorrect, strategy use and word pattern similarity. Results for both tasks supported an implicit level of spelling characterized by the ability to correctly recognize/produce words but the inability to explain operational strategies or generalize knowledge. Explicit levels and multiple representations were also in evidence across the two tasks. Implications for cognitive mechanisms underlying spelling development are discussed. PMID:23659891

  16. A generalized wavelet extrema representation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jian; Lades, M.

    1995-10-01

    The wavelet extrema representation originated by Stephane Mallat is a unique framework for low-level and intermediate-level (feature) processing. In this paper, we present a new form of wavelet extrema representation generalizing Mallat`s original work. The generalized wavelet extrema representation is a feature-based multiscale representation. For a particular choice of wavelet, our scheme can be interpreted as representing a signal or image by its edges, and peaks and valleys at multiple scales. Such a representation is shown to be stable -- the original signal or image can be reconstructed with very good quality. It is further shown that a signal or image can be modeled as piecewise monotonic, with all turning points between monotonic segments given by the wavelet extrema. A new projection operator is introduced to enforce piecewise inonotonicity of a signal in its reconstruction. This leads to an enhancement to previously developed algorithms in preventing artifacts in reconstructed signal.

  17. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of dibromoacetic acid in F344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Jessica L.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Easterling, Michael R.; Melnick, Ronald L.

    2010-04-15

    A novel physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model structure, which includes submodels for the common metabolites (glyoxylate (GXA) and oxalate (OXA)) that may be involved in the toxicity or carcinogenicity of dibromoacetic acid (DBA), has been developed. Particular attention is paid to the representation of hepatic metabolism, which is the primary elimination mechanism. DBA-induced suicide inhibition is modeled by irreversible covalent binding of the intermediate metabolite alpha-halocarboxymethylglutathione (alphaH1) to the glutathione-S-transferase zeta (GSTzeta) enzyme. We also present data illustrating the presence of a secondary non-GSTzeta metabolic pathway for DBA, but not dichloroacetic acid (DCA), that produces GXA. The model is calibrated with plasma and urine concentration data from DBA exposures in female F344 rats through intravenous (IV), oral gavage, and drinking water routes. Sensitivity analysis is performed to confirm identifiability of estimated parameters. Finally, model validation is performed with data sets not used during calibration. Given the structural similarity of dihaloacetates (DHAs), we hypothesize that the PBPK model presented here has the capacity to describe the kinetics of any member or mixture of members of this class in any species with the alteration of chemical-and species-specific parameters.

  18. Chemistry Problem Solving Instruction: A Comparison of Three Computer-Based Formats for Learning from Hierarchical Network Problem Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngu, Bing Hiong; Mit, Edwin; Shahbodin, Faaizah; Tuovinen, Juhani

    2009-01-01

    Within the cognitive load theory framework, we designed and compared three alternative instructional solution formats that can be derived from a common static hierarchical network representation depicting problem structure. The interactive-solution format permitted students to search in self-controlled manner for solution steps, static-solution…

  19. The Scholarship of Teaching and Web-Based Representations of Teaching in the United States: Definitions, Histories, and New Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between the scholarship of teaching and practitioner inquiry is characterized both by questions of definition (what "counts" as scholarship and who can produce it) and execution (how to facilitate the representation, interpretation and analysis of teaching). This article addresses both issues by beginning with an overview of the…

  20. Evidence-Based Practices: Applications of Concrete Representational Abstract Framework across Math Concepts for Students with Mathematics Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, Jugnu; Morin, Lisa L.

    2016-01-01

    Students with mathematics disabilities (MD) experience difficulties with both conceptual and procedural knowledge of different math concepts across grade levels. Research shows that concrete representational abstract framework of instruction helps to bridge this gap for students with MD. In this article, we provide an overview of this strategy…

  1. Bio-based production of organic acids with Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Wieschalka, Stefan; Blombach, Bastian; Bott, Michael; Eikmanns, Bernhard J

    2013-03-01

    The shortage of oil resources, the steadily rising oil prices and the impact of its use on the environment evokes an increasing political, industrial and technical interest for development of safe and efficient processes for the production of chemicals from renewable biomass. Thus, microbial fermentation of renewable feedstocks found its way in white biotechnology, complementing more and more traditional crude oil-based chemical processes. Rational strain design of appropriate microorganisms has become possible due to steadily increasing knowledge on metabolism and pathway regulation of industrially relevant organisms and, aside from process engineering and optimization, has an outstanding impact on improving the performance of such hosts. Corynebacterium glutamicum is well known as workhorse for the industrial production of numerous amino acids. However, recent studies also explored the usefulness of this organism for the production of several organic acids and great efforts have been made for improvement of the performance. This review summarizes the current knowledge and recent achievements on metabolic engineering approaches to tailor C. glutamicum for the bio-based production of organic acids. We focus here on the fermentative production of pyruvate, L- and D-lactate, 2-ketoisovalerate, 2-ketoglutarate, and succinate. These organic acids represent a class of compounds with manifold application ranges, e.g. in pharmaceutical and cosmetics industry, as food additives, and economically very interesting, as precursors for a variety of bulk chemicals and commercially important polymers. PMID:23199277

  2. A novel 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequences of low degeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Randic, Milan; Basak, Subhash C.

    2001-12-01

    Some 2-D and 3-D graphical representations of DNA sequences have been given by Nandy, Leong and Mogenthaler, and Randic et al., which give visual characterizations of DNA sequences. In this Letter, we introduce a novel graphical representation of DNA sequences by taking four special vectors in 2-D space to represent the four nucleic acid bases in DNA sequences, so that a DNA sequence is denoted on a plane by a successive vector sequence, which is also a directed walk on the plane. It is showed that the novel graphical representation of DNA sequences has lower degeneracy and less overlapping.

  3. Self-glazing ceramic tiles based on acidic igneous glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Merkin, A.P.; Nanazashvili, V.I.

    1988-07-01

    A technology was derived to produce self-glazing ceramic tiles based on single-component systems of acidic igneous (volcanic) glasses. A weakly alkaline solution of NaOH or KOH was used as the sealing water to activate the sintering process. Tests conducted on the self-glazing ceramic tiles showed that their water absorption amounts to 2.5-8%, linear shrinkage is 3.2-7%, and frost resistance amounts to 35-70 cycles. The application of acidic igneous glasses as the main raw material for the production of ceramic facing tiles made it possible to widen the raw material base and simplify the technology for fabricating ceramic facing tiles at lower cost. The use of waste products when processing perlite-bearing rocks, when carrying out mining and cutting of tuffs, slags, and tuff breccia for recovering cut materials was recommended.

  4. Nucleic acid-based approaches to STAT inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sen, Malabika; Grandis, Jennifer R

    2012-10-01

    Silencing of abnormally activated genes can be accomplished in a highly specific manner using nucleic acid based approaches. The focus of this review includes the different nucleic acid based inhibition strategies such as antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, small interfering RNA (siRNA), dominant-negative constructs, G-quartet oligonucleotides and decoy oligonucleotides, their mechanism of action and the effectiveness of these approaches to targeting the STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) proteins in cancer. Among the STAT proteins, especially STAT3, followed by STAT5, are the most frequently activated oncogenic STATs, which have emerged as plausible therapeutic cancer targets. Both STAT3 and STAT5 have been shown to regulate numerous oncogenic signaling pathways including proliferation, survival, angiogenesis and migration/invasion. PMID:24058785

  5. Analysis of the mineral acid-base components of acid-neutralizing capacity in Adirondack Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munson, R. K.; Gherini, S. A.

    1993-04-01

    Mineral acids and bases influence pH largely through their effects on acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). This influence becomes particularly significant as ANC approaches zero. Analysis of data collected by the Adirondack Lakes Survey Corporation (ALSC) from 1469 lakes throughout the Adirondack region indicates that variations in ANC in these lakes correlate well with base cation concentrations (CB), but not with the sum of mineral acid anion concentrations (CA). This is because (CA) is relatively constant across the Adirondacks, whereas CB varies widely. Processes that supply base cations to solution are ion-specific. Sodium and silica concentrations are well correlated, indicating a common source, mineral weathering. Calcium and magnesium also covary but do not correlate well with silica. This indicates that ion exchange is a significant source of these cations in the absence of carbonate minerals. Iron and manganese concentrations are elevated in the lower waters of some lakes due to reducing conditions. This leads to an ephemeral increase in CB and ANC. When the lakes mix and oxic conditions are restored, these ions largely precipitate from solution. Sulfate is the dominant mineral acid anion in ALSC lakes. Sulfate concentrations are lowest in seepage lakes, commonly about 40 μeq/L less than in drainage lakes. This is due in part to the longer hydraulic detention time in seepage lakes, which allows slow sulfate reduction reactions more time to decrease lake sulfate concentration. Nitrate typically influences ANC during events such as snowmelt. Chloride concentrations are generally low, except in lakes impacted by road salt.

  6. Acid-base actuation of [c2]daisy chains.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lei; Hmadeh, Mohamad; Wu, Jishan; Olson, Mark A; Spruell, Jason M; Trabolsi, Ali; Yang, Ying-Wei; Elhabiri, Mourad; Albrecht-Gary, Anne-Marie; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2009-05-27

    A versatile synthetic strategy, which was conceived and employed to prepare doubly threaded, bistable [c2]daisy chain compounds, is described. Propargyl and 1-pentenyl groups have been grafted onto the stoppers of [c2]daisy chain molecules obtained using a template-directed synthetic protocol. Such [c2]daisy chain molecules undergo reversible extension and contraction upon treatment with acid and base, respectively. The dialkyne-functionalized [c2]daisy chain (AA) was subjected to an [AA+BB] type polymerization with an appropriate diazide (BB) to afford a linear, mechanically interlocked, main-chain polymer. The macromolecular properties of this polymer were characterized by chronocoulometry, size exclusion chromatography, and static light-scattering analysis. The acid-base switching properties of both the monomers and the polymer have been studied in solution, using (1)H NMR spectroscopy, UV/vis absorption spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. The experimental results demonstrate that the functionalized [c2]daisy chains, along with their polymeric derivatives, undergo quantitative, efficient, and fully reversible switching processes in solution. Kinetics measurements demonstrate that the acid/base-promoted extension/contraction movements of the polymeric [c2]daisy chain are actually faster than those of its monomeric counterpart. These observations open the door to correlated molecular motions and to changes in material properties. PMID:19419175

  7. Synthesis of bio-based methacrylic acid by decarboxylation of itaconic acid and citric acid catalyzed by solid transition-metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Le Nôtre, Jérôme; Witte-van Dijk, Susan C M; van Haveren, Jacco; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2014-09-01

    Methacrylic acid, an important monomer for the plastics industry, was obtained in high selectivity (up to 84%) by the decarboxylation of itaconic acid using heterogeneous catalysts based on Pd, Pt and Ru. The reaction takes place in water at 200-250 °C without any external added pressure, conditions significantly milder than those described previously for the same conversion with better yield and selectivity. A comprehensive study of the reaction parameters has been performed, and the isolation of methacrylic acid was achieved in 50% yield. The decarboxylation procedure is also applicable to citric acid, a more widely available bio-based feedstock, and leads to the production of methacrylic acid in one pot in 41% selectivity. Aconitic acid, the intermediate compound in the pathway from citric acid to itaconic acid was also used successfully as a substrate. PMID:25045161

  8. 3D representations of amino acids—applications to protein sequence comparison and classification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Koehl, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of a protein is the key to understanding its structure and ultimately its function in the cell. This paper addresses the fundamental issue of encoding amino acids in ways that the representation of such a protein sequence facilitates the decoding of its information content. We show that a feature-based representation in a three-dimensional (3D) space derived from amino acid substitution matrices provides an adequate representation that can be used for direct comparison of protein sequences based on geometry. We measure the performance of such a representation in the context of the protein structural fold prediction problem. We compare the results of classifying different sets of proteins belonging to distinct structural folds against classifications of the same proteins obtained from sequence alone or directly from structural information. We find that sequence alone performs poorly as a structure classifier. We show in contrast that the use of the three dimensional representation of the sequences significantly improves the classification accuracy. We conclude with a discussion of the current limitations of such a representation and with a description of potential improvements. PMID:25379143

  9. Recent Developments in Peptide-Based Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Veldhoen, Sandra; Laufer, Sandra D.; Restle, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    Despite the fact that non-viral nucleic acid delivery systems are generally considered to be less efficient than viral vectors, they have gained much interest in recent years due to their superior safety profile compared to their viral counterpart. Among these synthetic vectors are cationic polymers, branched dendrimers, cationic liposomes and cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). The latter represent an assortment of fairly unrelated sequences essentially characterised by a high content of basic amino acids and a length of 10–30 residues. CPPs are capable of mediating the cellular uptake of hydrophilic macromolecules like peptides and nucleic acids (e.g. siRNAs, aptamers and antisense-oligonucleotides), which are internalised by cells at a very low rate when applied alone. Up to now, numerous sequences have been reported to show cell-penetrating properties and many of them have been used to successfully transport a variety of different cargos into mammalian cells. In recent years, it has become apparent that endocytosis is a major route of internalisation even though the mechanisms underlying the cellular translocation of CPPs are poorly understood and still subject to controversial discussions. In this review, we will summarise the latest developments in peptide-based cellular delivery of nucleic acid cargos. We will discuss different mechanisms of entry, the intracellular fate of the cargo, correlation studies of uptake versus biological activity of the cargo as well as technical problems and pitfalls. PMID:19325804

  10. Recent developments in peptide-based nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    Veldhoen, Sandra; Laufer, Sandra D; Restle, Tobias

    2008-06-01

    Despite the fact that non-viral nucleic acid delivery systems are generally considered to be less efficient than viral vectors, they have gained much interest in recent years due to their superior safety profile compared to their viral counterpart. Among these synthetic vectors are cationic polymers, branched dendrimers, cationic liposomes and cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). The latter represent an assortment of fairly unrelated sequences essentially characterised by a high content of basic amino acids and a length of 10-30 residues. CPPs are capable of mediating the cellular uptake of hydrophilic macromolecules like peptides and nucleic acids (e.g. siRNAs, aptamers and antisense-oligonucleotides), which are internalised by cells at a very low rate when applied alone. Up to now, numerous sequences have been reported to show cell-penetrating properties and many of them have been used to successfully transport a variety of different cargos into mammalian cells. In recent years, it has become apparent that endocytosis is a major route of internalisation even though the mechanisms underlying the cellular translocation of CPPs are poorly understood and still subject to controversial discussions. In this review, we will summarise the latest developments in peptide-based cellular delivery of nucleic acid cargos. We will discuss different mechanisms of entry, the intracellular fate of the cargo, correlation studies of uptake versus biological activity of the cargo as well as technical problems and pitfalls. PMID:19325804

  11. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts. PMID:26762189

  12. Gabor representation with oversampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibulski, Meir; Zeevi, Yehoshua Y.

    1992-11-01

    An approach for characterizing the properties of the basis functions of the Gabor representation in the context of oversampling is presented. The approach is based on the concept of frames and utilizes the Piecewise Zak Transform (PZT). The frame operator associated with the Gabor-type frame, the so-called Weyl-Heisenberg frame, is examined for a rational oversampling rate by representing the frame operator as a matrix-valued function in the PZT domain. Completeness and frame properties of the Gabor representation functions are examined in relation to the properties of the matrix-valued function. The frame bounds are calculated by means of the eigenvalues of the matrix-valued function, and the dual-frame, which is used in calculation of the expansion coefficients, is expressed by means of the inverse matrix.

  13. Vietnamese Document Representation and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Giang-Son; Gao, Xiaoying; Andreae, Peter

    Vietnamese is very different from English and little research has been done on Vietnamese document classification, or indeed, on any kind of Vietnamese language processing, and only a few small corpora are available for research. We created a large Vietnamese text corpus with about 18000 documents, and manually classified them based on different criteria such as topics and styles, giving several classification tasks of different difficulty levels. This paper introduces a new syllable-based document representation at the morphological level of the language for efficient classification. We tested the representation on our corpus with different classification tasks using six classification algorithms and two feature selection techniques. Our experiments show that the new representation is effective for Vietnamese categorization, and suggest that best performance can be achieved using syllable-pair document representation, an SVM with a polynomial kernel as the learning algorithm, and using Information gain and an external dictionary for feature selection.

  14. Students' Representational Fluency at University: A Cross-Sectional Measure of How Multiple Representations Are Used by Physics Students Using the Representational Fluency Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Matthew; Sharma, Manjula Devi

    2015-01-01

    To succeed within scientific disciplines, using representations, including those based on words, graphs, equations, and diagrams, is important. Research indicates that the use of discipline specific representations (sometimes referred to as expert generated representations), as well as multi-representational use, is critical for problem solving…

  15. Renal regulation of acid-base equilibrium during chronic administration of mineral acid.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, R C; Harrington, J T; Ricanati, E S; Shelkrot, J W; Schwartz, W B

    1974-02-01

    load is the inability of the distal exchange mechanism to conserve the Na+ increment fully by means of H+ exchange. Escape of Na+ and K+ into the urine and the resulting stimulus to Na(+)-H+ exchange remove this constraint and are responsible for establishment of a new steady-state of acid-base equilibrium at plasma [HCO3-] levels significantly higher than those seen with HCl. The feeding of HCl in the presence of a normal salt intake led to a degree of metabolic acidosis not significantly different from that seen in dogs ingesting a low-salt diet. We suggest that the presence of dietary sodium at distal exchange sites did not enhance acid excretion because it is only after a loss of body sodium stores that sodium avidity is increased sufficiently to allow full removal of the acid load. The present findings indicate that the fundamental factors controlling acid excretion and bicarbonate reabsorption in metabolic acidosis are closely similar to those operative in metabolic alkalosis. PMID:11344560

  16. Nucleic acid-based tissue biomarkers of urologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Dimo; Meller, Sebastian; Uhl, Barbara; Ralla, Bernhard; Stephan, Carsten; Jung, Klaus; Ellinger, Jörg; Kristiansen, Glen

    2014-08-01

    Molecular biomarkers play an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Biomarkers allow estimation of the risk of developing cancer; help to diagnose a tumor, ideally at an early stage when cure is still possible; and aid in monitoring disease progression. Furthermore, they hold the potential to predict the outcome of the disease (prognostic biomarkers) and the response to therapy (predictive biomarkers). Altogether, biomarkers will help to avoid tumor-related deaths and reduce overtreatment, and will contribute to increased survival and quality of life in cancer patients due to personalized treatments. It is well established that the process of carcinogenesis is a complex interplay between genomic predisposition, acquired somatic mutations, epigenetic changes and genomic aberrations. Within this complex interplay, nucleic acids, i.e. RNA and DNA, play a fundamental role and therefore represent ideal candidates for biomarkers. They are particularly promising candidates because sequence-specific hybridization and amplification technologies allow highly accurate and sensitive assessment of these biomarker levels over a broad dynamic range. This article provides an overview of nucleic acid-based biomarkers in tissues for the management of urologic malignancies, i.e. tumors of the prostate, testis, kidney, penis, urinary bladder, renal pelvis, ureter and other urinary organs. Special emphasis is put on genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic biomarkers (SNPs, mutations [genomic and mitochondrial], microsatellite instabilities, viral and bacterial DNA, DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation, mRNA expression, and non-coding RNAs [lncRNA, miRNA, siRNA, piRNA, snRNA, snoRNA]). Due to the multitude of published biomarker candidates, special focus is given to the general applicability of different molecular classes as biomarkers and some particularly promising nucleic acid biomarkers. Furthermore, specific challenges regarding the development and clinical

  17. Bio-based production of organic acids with Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Wieschalka, Stefan; Blombach, Bastian; Bott, Michael; Eikmanns, Bernhard J

    2013-01-01

    The shortage of oil resources, the steadily rising oil prices and the impact of its use on the environment evokes an increasing political, industrial and technical interest for development of safe and efficient processes for the production of chemicals from renewable biomass. Thus, microbial fermentation of renewable feedstocks found its way in white biotechnology, complementing more and more traditional crude oil-based chemical processes. Rational strain design of appropriate microorganisms has become possible due to steadily increasing knowledge on metabolism and pathway regulation of industrially relevant organisms and, aside from process engineering and optimization, has an outstanding impact on improving the performance of such hosts. Corynebacterium glutamicum is well known as workhorse for the industrial production of numerous amino acids. However, recent studies also explored the usefulness of this organism for the production of several organic acids and great efforts have been made for improvement of the performance. This review summarizes the current knowledge and recent achievements on metabolic engineering approaches to tailor C. glutamicum for the bio-based production of organic acids. We focus here on the fermentative production of pyruvate, l-and d-lactate, 2-ketoisovalerate, 2-ketoglutarate, and succinate. These organic acids represent a class of compounds with manifold application ranges, e.g. in pharmaceutical and cosmetics industry, as food additives, and economically very interesting, as precursors for a variety of bulk chemicals and commercially important polymers. Funding Information Work in the laboratories of the authors was supported by the Fachagentur Nachwachsende Rohstoffe (FNR) of the Bundesministerium für Ernährung, Landwirtschaft und Verbraucherschutz (BMELV; FNR Grants 220-095-08A and 220-095-08D; Bio-ProChemBB project, ERA-IB programme), by the Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt (DBU Grant AZ13040/05) and the Evonik Degussa AG. PMID

  18. Superabsorbent biphasic system based on poly(lactic acid) and poly(acrylic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartore, Luciana; Pandini, Stefano; Baldi, Francesco; Bignotti, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    In this research work, biocomposites based on crosslinked particles of poly(acrylic acid), commonly used as superabsorbent polymer (SAP), and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) were developed to elucidate the role of the filler (i.e., polymeric crosslinked particles) on the overall physico-mechanical behavior and to obtain superabsorbent thermoplastic products. Samples prepared by melt-blending of components in different ratios showed a biphasic system with a regular distribution of particles, with diameter ranging from 5 to 10 μm, within the PLLA polymeric matrix. The polymeric biphasic system, coded PLASA i.e. superabsorbent poly(lactic acid), showed excellent swelling properties, demonstrating that cross-linked particles retain their superabsorbent ability, as in their free counterparts, even if distributed in a thermoplastic polymeric matrix. The thermal characteristics of the biocomposites evidence enhanced thermal stability in comparison with neat PLLA and also mechanical properties are markedly modified by addition of crosslinked particles which induce regular stiffening effect. Furthermore, in aqueous environments the particles swell and are leached from PLLA matrix generating very high porosity. These new open-pore PLLA foams, produced in absence of organic solvents and chemical foaming agents, with good physico-mechanical properties appear very promising for several applications, for instance in tissue engineering for scaffold production.

  19. General Analytical Procedure for Determination of Acidity Parameters of Weak Acids and Bases

    PubMed Central

    Pilarski, Bogusław; Kaliszan, Roman; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Młodzianowski, Janusz; Balińska, Agata

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a new convenient, inexpensive, and reagent-saving general methodology for the determination of pKa values for components of the mixture of diverse chemical classes weak organic acids and bases in water solution, without the need to separate individual analytes. The data obtained from simple pH-metric microtitrations are numerically processed into reliable pKa values for each component of the mixture. Excellent agreement has been obtained between the determined pKa values and the reference literature data for compounds studied. PMID:25692072

  20. Spatial representation of soundscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubezari, Mohammed; Bento Coelho, Jos-Luis

    2001-05-01

    For the last 30 years the concept of soundscape has been largely adopted in many scientific disciplines and by the urban experts for the benefit of a better comprehension and management of the sound environment. However, the spatial representation of the soundscape as a simple tool for the description, management or composition of sound environment is always needed. In this article a method is presented for the spatial sound representation with differentiated sources. The first results are shown. This method gives an account of the soundscape as close as possible to the way it can be perceived by the listener in each location. This method generates qualitative sound maps in a reduced urban scale, based on in situ measurements and on the implication of the measuring subject perception. The maps are sufficient enough to isolate many sound sources of the overall sound field. In this manner, sound quality refers to the sound attribute of a perceived object. It is neither an aesthetic judgment nor traditional psychoacoustics criteria. Concrete examples of application to squares in the city of Lisbon will be shown and discussed. The limits and the prospects of such a qualitative representation will also be presented and discussed.

  1. Functional nucleic-acid-based sensors for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sett, Arghya; Das, Suradip; Bora, Utpal

    2014-10-01

    Efforts to replace conventional chromatographic methods for environmental monitoring with cheaper and easy to use biosensors for precise detection and estimation of hazardous environmental toxicants, water or air borne pathogens as well as various other chemicals and biologics are gaining momentum. Out of the various types of biosensors classified according to their bio-recognition principle, nucleic-acid-based sensors have shown high potential in terms of cost, sensitivity, and specificity. The discovery of catalytic activities of RNA (ribozymes) and DNA (DNAzymes) which could be triggered by divalent metallic ions paved the way for their extensive use in detection of heavy metal contaminants in environment. This was followed with the invention of small oligonucleotide sequences called aptamers which can fold into specific 3D conformation under suitable conditions after binding to target molecules. Due to their high affinity, specificity, reusability, stability, and non-immunogenicity to vast array of targets like small and macromolecules from organic, inorganic, and biological origin, they can often be exploited as sensors in industrial waste management, pollution control, and environmental toxicology. Further, rational combination of the catalytic activity of DNAzymes and RNAzymes along with the sequence-specific binding ability of aptamers have given rise to the most advanced form of functional nucleic-acid-based sensors called aptazymes. Functional nucleic-acid-based sensors (FNASs) can be conjugated with fluorescent molecules, metallic nanoparticles, or quantum dots to aid in rapid detection of a variety of target molecules by target-induced structure switch (TISS) mode. Although intensive research is being carried out for further improvements of FNAs as sensors, challenges remain in integrating such bio-recognition element with advanced transduction platform to enable its use as a networked analytical system for tailor made analysis of environmental

  2. Liquid crystal based biosensors for bile acid detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Sihui; Liang, Wenlang; Tanner, Colleen; Fang, Jiyu; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2013-03-01

    The concentration level of bile acids is a useful indicator for early diagnosis of liver diseases. The prevalent measurement method in detecting bile acids is the chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, which is precise yet expensive. Here we present a biosensor platform based on liquid crystal (LC) films for the detection of cholic acid (CA). This platform has the advantage of low cost, label-free, solution phase detection and simple analysis. In this platform, LC film of 4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) was hosted by a copper grid supported with a polyimide-coated glass substrate. By immersing into sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, the LC film was coated with SDS which induced a homeotropic anchoring of 5CB. Addition of CA introduced competitive adsorption between CA and SDS at the interface, triggering a transition from homeotropic to homogeneous anchoring. The detection limit can be tuned by changing the pH value of the solution from 12uM to 170uM.

  3. Ultrasensitive impedimetric lectin based biosensor for glycoproteins containing sialic acid

    PubMed Central

    Bertok, Tomas; Gemeiner, Pavol; Mikula, Milan; Gemeiner, Peter; Tkac, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We report on an ultrasensitive label-free lectin-based impedimetric biosensor for the determination of the sialylated glycoproteins fetuin and asialofetuin. A sialic acid binding agglutinin from Sambucus nigra I was covalently immobilised on a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) consisting of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid and 6-mercaptohexanol. Poly(vinyl alcohol) was used as a blocking agent. The sensor layer was characterised by atomic force microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The biosensor exhibits a linear range that spans 7 orders of magnitude for both glycoproteins, with a detection limit as low as 0.33 fM for fetuin and 0.54 fM for asialofetuin. We also show, by making control experiments with oxidised asialofetuin, that the biosensor is capable of quantitatively detecting changes in the fraction of sialic acid on glycoproteins. We conclude that this work lays a solid foundation for future applications of such a biosensor in terms of the diagnosis of diseases such as chronic inflammatory rheumatoid arthritis, genetic disorders and cancer, all of which are associated with aberrant glycosylation of protein biomarkers. PMID:27231402

  4. Texture Representations Using Subspace Embeddings

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaodong; Tian, YingLi

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a texture representation framework to map local texture patches into a low-dimensional texture subspace. In natural texture images, textons are entangled with multiple factors, such as rotation, scaling, viewpoint variation, illumination change, and non-rigid surface deformation. Mapping local texture patches into a low-dimensional subspace can alleviate or eliminate these undesired variation factors resulting from both geometric and photometric transformations. We observe that texture representations based on subspace embeddings have strong resistance to image deformations, meanwhile, are more distinctive and more compact than traditional representations. We investigate both linear and non-linear embedding methods including Principle Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), and Locality Preserving Projections (LPP) to compute the essential texture subspace. The experiments in the context of texture classification on benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed subspace embedding representations achieve the state-of-the-art results while with much fewer feature dimensions. PMID:23710105

  5. Texture Representations Using Subspace Embeddings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodong; Tian, Yingli

    2013-07-15

    In this paper, we propose a texture representation framework to map local texture patches into a low-dimensional texture subspace. In natural texture images, textons are entangled with multiple factors, such as rotation, scaling, viewpoint variation, illumination change, and non-rigid surface deformation. Mapping local texture patches into a low-dimensional subspace can alleviate or eliminate these undesired variation factors resulting from both geometric and photometric transformations. We observe that texture representations based on subspace embeddings have strong resistance to image deformations, meanwhile, are more distinctive and more compact than traditional representations. We investigate both linear and non-linear embedding methods including Principle Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), and Locality Preserving Projections (LPP) to compute the essential texture subspace. The experiments in the context of texture classification on benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed subspace embedding representations achieve the state-of-the-art results while with much fewer feature dimensions. PMID:23710105

  6. An empirically based electrosource horizon lead-acid battery model

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.; Eshani, M.

    1996-09-01

    An empirically based mathematical model of a lead-acid battery for use in the Texas A and M University`s Electrically Peaking Hybrid (ELPH) computer simulation is presented. The battery model is intended to overcome intuitive difficulties with currently available models by employing direct relationships between state-of-charge, voltage, and power demand. The model input is the power demand or load. Model outputs include voltage, an instantaneous battery efficiency coefficient and a state-of-charge indicator. A time and current depend voltage hysteresis is employed to ensure correct voltage tracking inherent with the highly transient nature of a hybrid electric drivetrain.

  7. Biofuncationalized microfiber Bragg grating for acid-based sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Yang; Huang, Yunyun; Shen, Xiang; Sun, Dandan; Wang, Xiuxin; Jin, Long; Li, Jie; Guan, Baiou

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate an acid-based sensor from the biofuncationalized microfiber Bragg grating. By electrostatic selfassembly layer-by-layer technique, the film consisting of sodium alginate which has hygroscopic response to the potential of hydrogen is coated on the fiber surface. Consequently, the refractive index variation of the sensing film caused by water absorption can be measured by mFBG's higher order mode peak which can be translated into pH value information. The sensitivity of the sensor is received as high as 265pm/pH.

  8. The comprehensive acid-base characterization of glutathione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzahosseini, Arash; Somlyay, Máté; Noszál, Béla

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione in its thiol (GSH) and disulfide (GSSG) forms, and 4 related compounds were studied by 1H NMR-pH titrations and a case-tailored evaluation method. The resulting acid-base properties are quantified in terms of 128 microscopic protonation constants; the first complete set of such parameters for this vitally important pair of compounds. The concomitant 12 interactivity parameters were also determined. Since biological redox systems are regularly compared to the GSH-GSSG pair, the eight microscopic thiolate basicities determined this way are exclusive means for assessing subtle redox parameters in a wide pH range.

  9. Acid-Base Homeostasis: Overview for Infusion Nurses.

    PubMed

    Masco, Natalie A

    2016-01-01

    Acid-base homeostasis is essential to normal function of the human body. Even slight alterations can significantly alter physiologic processes at the tissue and cellular levels. To optimally care for patients, nurses must be able to recognize signs and symptoms that indicate deviations from normal. Nurses who provide infusions to patients-whether in acute care, home care, or infusion center settings-have a responsibility to be able to recognize the laboratory value changes that occur with the imbalance and appreciate the treatment options, including intravenous infusions. PMID:27598068

  10. Decoherence under many-body system-environment interactions: A stroboscopic representation based on a fictitiously homogenized interaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Danieli, Ernesto P.; Levstein, Patricia R.; Pastawski, Horacio M.

    2007-06-01

    An environment interacting with portions of a system leads to multiexponential interaction rates. Within the Keldysh formalism, we fictitiously homogenize the system-environment interaction yielding a uniform decay rate facilitating the evaluation of the propagators. Through an injection procedure we neutralize the fictitious interactions. This technique justifies a stroboscopic representation of the system-environment interaction which is useful for numerical implementation and converges to the natural continuous process. We apply this procedure to a fermionic two-level system and use the Jordan-Wigner transformation to solve a two-spin swapping gate in the presence of a spin environment.

  11. [Practical approach to complex acid-base disorders using a slide rule].

    PubMed

    Rives, E; Grimaud, D

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosis of mixed acid-base disturbances is often difficult. Nowadays it depends on biochemical and statistical interpretation, coupled with clinical data. The acid-base slide-rule is a useful tool to carry out this five step procedure, which it simplifies, giving rapidly at the patient's bed-side an objective support for the diagnosis of acid-base disturbances. PMID:3777572

  12. 78 FR 36698 - Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Nucleic Acid-Based Systems for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... Nucleic Acid-Based Systems for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Respiratory Specimens AGENCY: Food...) is proposing to reclassify nucleic acid-based in vitro diagnostic devices for the detection of... Controls Guideline: Nucleic Acid-Based In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for the Detection of...

  13. Channel representation in physically based models coupling groundwater and surface water: pitfalls and how to avoid them.

    PubMed

    Käser, Daniel; Graf, Tobias; Cochand, Fabien; McLaren, Rob; Therrien, René; Brunner, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Recent models that couple three-dimensional subsurface flow with two-dimensional overland flow are valuable tools for quantifying complex groundwater/stream interactions and for evaluating their influence on watershed processes. For the modeler who is used to defining streams as a boundary condition, the representation of channels in integrated models raises a number of conceptual and technical issues. These models are far more sensitive to channel topography than conventional groundwater models. On all spatial scales, both the topography of a channel and its connection with the floodplain are important. For example, the geometry of river banks influences bank storage and overbank flooding; the slope of the river is a primary control on the behavior of a catchment; and at the finer scale bedform characteristics affect hyporheic exchange. Accurate data on streambed topography, however, are seldom available, and the spatial resolution of digital elevation models is typically too coarse in river environments, resulting in unrealistic or undulating streambeds. Modelers therefore perform some kind of manual yet often cumbersome correction to the available topography. In this context, the paper identifies some common pitfalls, and provides guidance to overcome these. Both aspects of topographic representation and mesh discretization are addressed. Additionally, two tutorials are provided to illustrate: (1) the interpolation of channel cross-sectional data and (2) the refinement of a mesh along a stream in areas of high topographic variability. PMID:24417289

  14. Exploiting Representation of the Aerosol-Radiation interactions in Climate Systems: Observation-based Analyses and Global Climate Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. C.; Li, J.; Lee, W. L.; Diner, D. J.; Garay, M. J.; Kalashnikova, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols affect the Earth's climate by perturbing the radiation budget through scattering and absorption of solar radiation and emitting thermal infrared radiation (defined and referred to as aerosol direct effect). At first order, it is essential for a model to realistically represent the distributions of clouds, convection, aerosol profiles and their associated radiative properties (cloud fraction and effective radius), which are critical for simulating Earth's surface energy and water budgets. The representation of aerosols and their radiative properties remains problematic both in retrieval and modeling. Up to now, the representation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in GCMs is still far from agreement with the observation. We evaluate the aerosol simulations from the 20th century CMIP5 simulations, and investigate the biases in aerosol loadings against observations. AOD and retrieved aerosol types (e.g., sea salt, organic matter, sulfate) from MISR, MODIS, and CALIPSO satellite observations are utilized to compare with model simulated aerosols. The impacts of the biases of modeled AOD and cloud fraction on aerosol direct effects in GCMs will be presented.

  15. Soluble adenylyl cyclase is an acid-base sensor in epithelial base-secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Roa, Jinae N; Tresguerres, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Blood acid-base regulation by specialized epithelia, such as gills and kidney, requires the ability to sense blood acid-base status. Here, we developed primary cultures of ray (Urolophus halleri) gill cells to study mechanisms for acid-base sensing without the interference of whole animal hormonal regulation. Ray gills have abundant base-secreting cells, identified by their noticeable expression of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (VHA), and also express the evolutionarily conserved acid-base sensor soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). Exposure of cultured cells to extracellular alkalosis (pH 8.0, 40 mM HCO3 (-)) triggered VHA translocation to the cell membrane, similar to previous reports in live animals experiencing blood alkalosis. VHA translocation was dependent on sAC, as it was blocked by the sAC-specific inhibitor KH7. Ray gill base-secreting cells also express transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); however, tmAC inhibition by 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine did not prevent alkalosis-dependent VHA translocation, and tmAC activation by forskolin reduced the abundance of VHA at the cell membrane. This study demonstrates that sAC is a necessary and sufficient sensor of extracellular alkalosis in ray gill base-secreting cells. In addition, this study indicates that different sources of cAMP differentially modulate cell biology. PMID:27335168

  16. The Effects of Borate Minerals on the Synthesis of Nucleic Acid Bases, Amino Acids and Biogenic Carboxylic Acids from Formamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saladino, Raffaele; Barontini, Maurizio; Cossetti, Cristina; di Mauro, Ernesto; Crestini, Claudia

    2011-08-01

    The thermal condensation of formamide in the presence of mineral borates is reported. The products afforded are precursors of nucleic acids, amino acids derivatives and carboxylic acids. The efficiency and the selectivity of the reaction was studied in relation to the elemental composition of the 18 minerals analyzed. The possibility of synthesizing at the same time building blocks of both genetic and metabolic apparatuses, along with the production of amino acids, highlights the interest of the formamide/borate system in prebiotic chemistry.

  17. Design of chitosan-based nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid.

    PubMed

    Lamarra, J; Rivero, S; Pinotti, A

    2016-10-01

    Active nanoparticles based on chitosan could be applied as a support for the modulation of gallic acid delivery. In this sense, these nanostructures could be employed in different fields such as food, packaging, and pharmaceutical areas. The design parameters of chitosan-based nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA) were optimized through RSM by means of the analysis of zeta potential (ZP) and percentage encapsulation efficiency (PEE). The nanoparticles were prepared by ionotropic gelation using tripolyphosphate (TPP), at different combinations of chitosan (CH) concentration, CH:TPP ratio and GA. Global desirability methodology allowed finding the optimum formulation that included CH 0.76% (w/w), CH:TPP ratio of 5 and 37mgGA/gCH leading to ZP of +50mV and 82% of PEE. Analysis through QuickScan and turbidity demonstrated that the most stable nanoparticle suspensions were achieved combining concentrations of chitosan ranging between 0.5 and 0.75% with CH:TPP ratios higher than 3. These suspensions had high stability confirmed by means ZP and transmittance values which were higher than +25mV and 0.21 on average, respectively, as well as nanoparticle diameters of about 140nm. FTIR revealed the occurrence of both hydrogen bond and ionic interactions of CH-TPP which allowed the encapsulation and the improvement of the stability of the active agent. PMID:27287172

  18. An ascorbic acid sensor based on cadmium sulphide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ganiga, Manjunatha; Cyriac, Jobin

    2016-05-01

    We present a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based fluorescence detection of vitamin C [ascorbic acid (AA)] using cadmium sulphide quantum dots (CdS QDs) and diphenylcarbazide (DPC). Initially, DPC was converted to diphenylcarbadiazone (DPCD) in the presence of CdS QDs to form QD-DPCD. This enabled excited-state energy transfer from the QDs to DPCD, which led to the fluorescence quenching of QDs. The QD-DPCD solution was used as the sensor solution. In the presence of AA, DPCD was converted back to DPC, resulting in the fluorescence recovery of CdS QDs. This fluorescence recovery can be used to detect and quantify AA. Dynamic range and detection limit of this sensing system were found to be 60-300 nM and 2 nM, respectively. We also performed fluorescence lifetime analyses to confirm existence of FRET. Finally, the sensor responded with equal accuracy to actual samples such as orange juice and vitamin C tablets. Graphical abstract Schematic showing the FRET based fluorescence detection of ascorbic acid. PMID:27023220

  19. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products. PMID:25300299

  20. Effect of temperature on the acid-base properties of the alumina surface: microcalorimetry and acid-base titration experiments.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jean-Pierre; Marmier, Nicolas; Hurel, Charlotte; Morel-Desrosiers, Nicole

    2006-06-15

    Sorption reactions on natural or synthetic materials that can attenuate the migration of pollutants in the geosphere could be affected by temperature variations. Nevertheless, most of the theoretical models describing sorption reactions are at 25 degrees C. To check these models at different temperatures, experimental data such as the enthalpies of sorption are thus required. Highly sensitive microcalorimeters can now be used to determine the heat effects accompanying the sorption of radionuclides on oxide-water interfaces, but enthalpies of sorption cannot be extracted from microcalorimetric data without a clear knowledge of the thermodynamics of protonation and deprotonation of the oxide surface. However, the values reported in the literature show large discrepancies and one must conclude that, amazingly, this fundamental problem of proton binding is not yet resolved. We have thus undertaken to measure by titration microcalorimetry the heat effects accompanying proton exchange at the alumina-water interface at 25 degrees C. Based on (i) the surface sites speciation provided by a surface complexation model (built from acid-base titrations at 25 degrees C) and (ii) results of the microcalorimetric experiments, calculations have been made to extract the enthalpic variations associated respectively to first and second deprotonation of the alumina surface. Values obtained are deltaH1 = 80+/-10 kJ mol(-1) and deltaH2 = 5+/-3 kJ mol(-1). In a second step, these enthalpy values were used to calculate the alumina surface acidity constants at 50 degrees C via the van't Hoff equation. Then a theoretical titration curve at 50 degrees C was calculated and compared to the experimental alumina surface titration curve. Good agreement between the predicted acid-base titration curve and the experimental one was observed. PMID:16504204

  1. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E.; Tan, Li Huey

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insights gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed. PMID:25205057

  2. Formulation of a Peptide Nucleic Acid Based Nucleic Acid Delivery Construct

    PubMed Central

    Millili, Peter G.; Yin, Daniel H.; Fan, Haihong; Naik, Ulhas P.; Sullivan, Millicent O.

    2010-01-01

    Gene delivery biomaterials need to be designed to efficiently achieve nuclear delivery of plasmid DNA. Polycations have been used to package DNA and other nucleic acids within sub-micron sized particles, offering protection from shear-induced or enzymatic degradation. However, cytotoxicity issues coupled with limited in vivo transfection efficiencies minimize the effectiveness of this approach. In an effort to improve upon existing technologies aimed at delivering nucleic acids, an alternative approach to DNA packaging was explored. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) were used to directly functionalize DNA with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains that provide a steric layer and inhibit multimolecular aggregation during complexation. DNA prePEGylation by this strategy was predicted to enable the formation of more homogeneous and efficiently packaged polyplexes. In this work, DNA-PNA-peptide-PEG (DP3) conjugates were synthesized and self-assembled with 25 kDa poly(ethylenimine) (PEI). Complexes with small standard deviations and average diameters ranging from 30 – 50 nm were created, with minimal dependence of complex size on N:P ratio (PEI amines to DNA phosphates). Furthermore, PEI-DNA interactions were altered by the derivitization strategy, resulting in tighter compaction of the PEI-DP3 complexes in comparison with PEI-DNA complexes. Transfection experiments in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells revealed comparable transfection efficiencies but reduced cytotoxicities of the PEI-DP3 complexes relative to PEI-DNA complexes. The enhanced cellular activities of the PEI-DP3 complexes were maintained following the removal of free PEI from the PEI-DP3 formulations, whereas the cellular activity of the conventional PEI-DNA formulations was reduced by free PEI removal. These findings suggest that DNA prePEGylation by the PNA-based strategy might provide a way to circumvent cytotoxicity and formulation issues related to the use of PEI for in vivo gene delivery. PMID:20131756

  3. A comprehensive classification of nucleic acid structural families based on strand direction and base pairing.

    PubMed Central

    Lavery, R; Zakrzewska, K; Sun, J S; Harvey, S C

    1992-01-01

    We propose a classification of DNA structures formed from 1 to 4 strands, based only on relative strand directions, base to strand orientation and base pairing geometries. This classification and its associated notation enable all nucleic acids to be grouped into structural families and bring to light possible structures which have not yet been observed experimentally. It also helps in understanding transitions between families and can assist in the design of multistrand structures. PMID:1383936

  4. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  5. Probe kit for identifying a base in a nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  6. Method of Identifying a Base in a Nucleic Acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    1999-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  7. Sparse representation with kernels.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shenghua; Tsang, Ivor Wai-Hung; Chia, Liang-Tien

    2013-02-01

    Recent research has shown the initial success of sparse coding (Sc) in solving many computer vision tasks. Motivated by the fact that kernel trick can capture the nonlinear similarity of features, which helps in finding a sparse representation of nonlinear features, we propose kernel sparse representation (KSR). Essentially, KSR is a sparse coding technique in a high dimensional feature space mapped by an implicit mapping function. We apply KSR to feature coding in image classification, face recognition, and kernel matrix approximation. More specifically, by incorporating KSR into spatial pyramid matching (SPM), we develop KSRSPM, which achieves a good performance for image classification. Moreover, KSR-based feature coding can be shown as a generalization of efficient match kernel and an extension of Sc-based SPM. We further show that our proposed KSR using a histogram intersection kernel (HIK) can be considered a soft assignment extension of HIK-based feature quantization in the feature coding process. Besides feature coding, comparing with sparse coding, KSR can learn more discriminative sparse codes and achieve higher accuracy for face recognition. Moreover, KSR can also be applied to kernel matrix approximation in large scale learning tasks, and it demonstrates its robustness to kernel matrix approximation, especially when a small fraction of the data is used. Extensive experimental results demonstrate promising results of KSR in image classification, face recognition, and kernel matrix approximation. All these applications prove the effectiveness of KSR in computer vision and machine learning tasks. PMID:23014744

  8. Internet-based hearing screening using speech-in-noise: validation and comparisons of self-reported hearing problems, quality of life and phonological representation

    PubMed Central

    Molander, Peter; Nordqvist, Peter; Öberg, Marie; Lunner, Thomas; Lyxell, Björn; Andersson, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Objectives For the last decade a host of different projects have been launched to allow persons who are concerned about their hearing status to quickly and at a low cost test their hearing ability. Most often, this is carried out without collecting complementary information that could be correlated with hearing impairment. In this two-part study we first, present the development and validation of a novel Internet-based hearing test, and second, report on the associations between this test and phonological representation, quality of life and self-reported hearing difficulties. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting An opportunity sample of participants was recruited at the Stockholm central station for the first study. All parts of the second study were conducted via the Internet, with testing and self-report forms adapted for online use. Participants The first part of the study was carried out in direct contact with the participants, and participants from the second study were recruited by means of advertisements in newspapers and on webpages. The only exclusion criterion was that participants had to be over 18 years old. Most participants were between 60 and 69 years old. There were almost an equal number of men and women (total n=316). Outcome measures 48 participants failed the Internet-based hearing screening test. The group failing the test reported more problems on the Amsterdam Inventory of Auditory Disability. In addition, they were found to have diminished phonological representational skills. However, no difference in quality of life was found. Conclusions Almost one in five participants was in need of contacting their local hearing clinic. This group had more complaints regarding tinnitus and hyperacusis, rated their own hearing as worse than those who passed, and had a poorer capability of generating accurate phonological representations. This study suggests that it is feasible to screen for hearing status online, and obtain valid data. PMID

  9. Model Representation of Multi-Cyclic Phenomena Using Role State Variables: Model Based Fast Idling Control of SI Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimbo, Tomohiko; Hayakawa, Yoshikazu

    The present paper describes a model representation of multi-cyclic phenomena for a multi-cylinder engine system. The model is simplified for implementation as a practical engine controller. The simplified model with physically meaningful variables can be used in design considering practical objectives and constraints more effectively. The proposed approach consists of two steps. First, an approximate analytical discrete crank angle model (i.e., a periodically time-varying state space model) is derived from the conservation laws. Second, the concept of role state variables is proposed to transform the periodically time-varying state space model into a time-invariant state space model. The stabilizability and optimality of the time-invariant state space model imply those of the periodically time-varying state space model. The time-invariant state space model is used to design cold start feedforward and feedback controllers.

  10. Guanine base stacking in G-quadruplex nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Lech, Christopher Jacques; Heddi, Brahim; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2013-02-01

    G-quadruplexes constitute a class of nucleic acid structures defined by stacked guanine tetrads (or G-tetrads) with guanine bases from neighboring tetrads stacking with one another within the G-tetrad core. Individual G-quadruplexes can also stack with one another at their G-tetrad interface leading to higher-order structures as observed in telomeric repeat-containing DNA and RNA. In this study, we investigate how guanine base stacking influences the stability of G-quadruplexes and their stacked higher-order structures. A structural survey of the Protein Data Bank is conducted to characterize experimentally observed guanine base stacking geometries within the core of G-quadruplexes and at the interface between stacked G-quadruplex structures. We couple this survey with a systematic computational examination of stacked G-tetrad energy landscapes using quantum mechanical computations. Energy calculations of stacked G-tetrads reveal large energy differences of up to 12 kcal/mol between experimentally observed geometries at the interface of stacked G-quadruplexes. Energy landscapes are also computed using an AMBER molecular mechanics description of stacking energy and are shown to agree quite well with quantum mechanical calculated landscapes. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a structural explanation for the experimentally observed preference of parallel G-quadruplexes to stack in a 5'-5' manner based on different accessible tetrad stacking modes at the stacking interfaces of 5'-5' and 3'-3' stacked G-quadruplexes. PMID:23268444

  11. Structure of six organic acid-base adducts from 6-bromobenzo[d]thiazol-2-amine and acidic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shouwen; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Daqi; Tao, Lin; Zhou, Mengjian; Shen, Yinyan; Chen, Quan; Lin, Zhanghui; Gao, Xingjun

    2014-05-01

    Six anhydrous organic acid-base adducts of 6-bromobenzo[d]thiazol-2-amine were prepared with organic acids as 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, salicylic acid, 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid, malonic acid and sebacic acid. The compounds 1-6 were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, and elemental analysis. The melting points of all the adducts were given. Of the six adducts, 1, 3, 4, and 5 are organic salts, while 2, and 6 are cocrystals. The supramolecular arrangement in the crystals 2-6 is based on the R22(8) synthon. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-6 suggests that there are strong NH⋯O, OH⋯N, and OH⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between acid and base components in the supramolecular assemblies. When the hydroxyl group is present in the ortho position of the carboxy, the intramolecular S6 synthon is present, as expected. Besides the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, other noncovalent interactions also play important roles in structure extension. Due to the synergetic effect of these weak interactions, compounds 1-6 display 1D-3D framework structure.

  12. Identifying Bilingual Semantic Neural Representations across Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchweitz, Augusto; Shinkareva, Svetlana V.; Mason, Robert A.; Mitchell, Tom M.; Just, Marcel Adam

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the study was to identify the neural representation of a noun's meaning in one language based on the neural representation of that same noun in another language. Machine learning methods were used to train classifiers to identify which individual noun bilingual participants were thinking about in one language based solely on their…

  13. Spherical Nucleic Acids as Intracellular Agents for Nucleic Acid Based Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liangliang

    Recent functional discoveries on the noncoding sequences of human genome and transcriptome could lead to revolutionary treatment modalities because the noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) can be applied as therapeutic agents to manipulate disease-causing genes. To date few nucleic acid-based therapeutics have been translated into the clinic due to challenges in the delivery of the oligonucleotide agents in an effective, cell specific, and non-toxic fashion. Unmodified oligonucleotide agents are destroyed rapidly in biological fluids by enzymatic degradation and have difficulty crossing the plasma membrane without the aid of transfection reagents, which often cause inflammatory, cytotoxic, or immunogenic side effects. Spherical nucleic acids (SNAs), nanoparticles consisting of densely organized and highly oriented oligonucleotides, pose one possible solution to circumventing these problems in both the antisense and RNA interference (RNAi) pathways. The unique three dimensional architecture of SNAs protects the bioactive oligonucleotides from unspecific degradation during delivery and supports their targeting of class A scavenger receptors and endocytosis via a lipid-raft-dependent, caveolae-mediated pathway. Owing to their unique structure, SNAs are able to cross cell membranes and regulate target genes expression as a single entity, without triggering the cellular innate immune response. Herein, my thesis has focused on understanding the interactions between SNAs and cellular components and developing SNA-based nanostructures to improve therapeutic capabilities. Specifically, I developed a novel SNA-based, nanoscale agent for delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides to manipulate microRNAs (miRNAs), the endogenous post-transcriptional gene regulators. I investigated the role of SNAs involving miRNAs in anti-cancer or anti-inflammation responses in cells and in in vivo murine disease models via systemic injection. Furthermore, I explored using different strategies to construct

  14. Representation in Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumelhart, David E.; Norman, Donald A.

    This paper reviews work on the representation of knowledge from within psychology and artificial intelligence. The work covers the nature of representation, the distinction between the represented world and the representing world, and significant issues concerned with propositional, analogical, and superpositional representations. Specific topics…

  15. Dynamical Approach to Multiequilibria Problems for Mixtures of Acids and Their Conjugated Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Rainer E.; Delarosa, Marco A.; Salau, Ahmed Olasunkanmi; Chicone, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical methods are described for the determination of steady-state concentrations of all species in multiequilibria systems consisting of several acids and their conjugated bases in aqueous solutions. The main example consists of a mixture of a diprotic acid H[subscript 2]A, a monoprotic acid HB, and their conjugate bases. The reaction…

  16. Adansonian Analysis and Deoxyribonucleic Acid Base Composition of Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, R. R.; Mandel, M.

    1965-01-01

    Colwell, R. R. (Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.), and M. Mandel. Adansonian analysis and deoxyribonucleic acid base composition of Serratia marcescens. J. Bacteriol. 89:454–461. 1965.—A total of 33 strains of Serratia marcescens were subjected to Adansonian analysis for which more than 200 coded features for each of the organisms were included. In addition, the base composition [expressed as moles per cent guanine + cytosine (G + C)] of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) prepared from each of the strains was determined. Except for four strains which were intermediate between Serratia and the Hafnia and Aerobacter group C of Edwards and Ewing, the S. marcescens species group proved to be extremely homogeneous, and the different strains showed high affinities for each other (mean similarity, ¯S = 77%). The G + C ratio of the DNA from the Serratia strains ranged from 56.2 to 58.4% G + C. Many species names have been listed for the genus, but only a single clustering of the strains was obtained at the species level, for which the species name S. marcescens was retained. S. kiliensis, S. indica, S. plymuthica, and S. marinorubra could not be distinguished from S. marcescens; it was concluded, therefore, that there is only a single species in the genus. The variety designation kiliensis does not appear to be valid, since no subspecies clustering of strains with negative Voges-Proskauer reactions could be detected. The characteristics of the species are listed, and a description of S. marcescens is presented. PMID:14255714

  17. Activity-Based Probe for N-Acylethanolamine Acid Amidase.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Elisa; Ponzano, Stefano; Armirotti, Andrea; Summa, Maria; Bertozzi, Fabio; Garau, Gianpiero; Bandiera, Tiziano; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-09-18

    N-Acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA) is a lysosomal cysteine hydrolase involved in the degradation of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs), a family of endogenous lipid signaling molecules that includes oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA). Among the reported NAAA inhibitors, α-amino-β-lactone (3-aminooxetan-2-one) derivatives have been shown to prevent FAE hydrolysis in innate-immune and neural cells and to reduce reactions to inflammatory stimuli. Recently, we disclosed two potent and selective NAAA inhibitors, the compounds ARN077 (5-phenylpentyl-N-[(2S,3R)-2-methyl-4-oxo-oxetan-3-yl]carbamate) and ARN726 (4-cyclohexylbutyl-N-[(S)-2-oxoazetidin-3-yl]carbamate). The former is active in vivo by topical administration in rodent models of hyperalgesia and allodynia, while the latter exerts systemic anti-inflammatory effects in mouse models of lung inflammation. In the present study, we designed and validated a derivative of ARN726 as the first activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probe for the in vivo detection of NAAA. The newly synthesized molecule 1 is an effective in vitro and in vivo click-chemistry activity based probe (ABP), which is able to capture the catalytically active form of NAAA in Human Embryonic Kidney 293 (HEK293) cells overexpressing human NAAA as well as in rat lung tissue. Competitive ABPP with 1 confirmed that ARN726 and ARN077 inhibit NAAA in vitro and in vivo. Compound 1 is a useful new tool to identify activated NAAA both in vitro and in vivo and to investigate the physiological and pathological roles of this enzyme. PMID:26102511

  18. Biotechnological routes based on lactic acid production from biomass.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid, the most important hydroxycarboxylic acid, is now commercially produced by the fermentation of sugars present in biomass. In addition to its use in the synthesis of biodegradable polymers, lactic acid can be regarded as a feedstock for the green chemistry of the future. Different potentially useful chemicals such as pyruvic acid, acrylic acid, 1,2-propanediol, and lactate ester can be produced from lactic acid via chemical and biotechnological routes. Here, we reviewed the current status of the production of potentially valuable chemicals from lactic acid via biotechnological routes. Although some of the reactions described in this review article are still not applicable at current stage, due to their "greener" properties, biotechnological processes for the production of lactic acid derivatives might replace the chemical routes in the future. PMID:21846500

  19. Nanoconstructions Based on Spatially Ordered Nucleic Acid Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevdokimov, Yu. M.

    Different strategies for the design of nanoconstructions whose building blocks are both linear molecules of double-stranded nucleic acids and nucleic acid molecules fixed in the spatial structure of particles of liquid-crystalline dispersions are described.

  20. Microgel Tethering For Microarray-Based Nucleic Acid Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiaoguang

    Molecular diagnostics (MDx) have radically changed the process of clinical microbial identification based on identifying genetic information, MDx approaches are both specific and fast. They can identify microbes to the species and strain level over a time scale that can be as short as one hour. With such information clinicians can administer the most effective and appropriate antimicrobial treatment at an early time point with substantial implications both for patient well-being and for easing the burden on the health-care system. Among the different MDx approaches, such as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, microarrays, next-generation sequencing, and mass spectrometry, point-of-care MDx platforms are drawing particular interest due to their low cost, robustness, and wide application. This dissertation develops a novel MDx technology platform capable of high target amplification and detection performance. For nucleic acid target detection, we fabricate an array of electron-beam-patterned microgels on a standard glass microscope slide. The microgels can be as small as a few hundred nanometers. The unique way of energy deposition during electron-beam lithography provides the microgels with a very diffuse water -gel interface that enables them to not only serve as substrates to immobilize DNA probes but do so while preserving them in a highly hydrated environment that optimizes their performance. Benefiting from the high spatial resolution provided by such techniques as position-sensitive microspotting and dip-pen nanolithography, multiple oligonucleotide probes known as molecular beacons (MBs) can be patterned on microgels. Furthermore, nucleic acid target amplification can be conducted in direct contact with the microgel-tethered detection array. Specifically, we use an isothermal RNA amplification reaction - nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA). ssRNA amplicons of from the NASBA reaction can directly hybridize with microgel-tethered MBs, and the

  1. [Determination of body fluid based on analysis of nucleic acids].

    PubMed

    Korabečná, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Recent methodological approaches of molecular genetics allow isolation of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) from negligible forensic samples. Analysis of these molecules may be used not only for individual identification based on DNA profiling but also for the detection of origin of the body fluid which (alone or in mixture with other body fluids) forms the examined biological trace. Such an examination can contribute to the evaluation of procedural, technical and tactical value of the trace. Molecular genetic approaches discussed in the review offer new possibilities in comparison with traditional spectrum of chemical, immunological and spectroscopic tests especially with regard to the interpretation of mixtures of biological fluids and to the confirmatory character of the tests. Approaches based on reverse transcription of tissue specific mRNA and their subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fragmentation analysis are applicable on samples containing minimal amounts of biological material. Methods for body fluid discrimination based on examination of microRNA in samples provided so far confusing results therefore further development in this field is needed. The examination of tissue specific methylation of nucleotides in selected gene sequences seems to represent a promising enrichment of the methodological spectrum. The detection of DNA sequences of tissue related bacteria has been established and it provides satisfactory results mainly in combination with above mentioned methodological approaches. PMID:26419517

  2. Acid-base transport by the renal proximal tubule

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Lara A.; Boron, Walter F.; Zhou, Yuehan

    2015-01-01

    Each day, the kidneys filter 180 L of blood plasma, equating to some 4,300 mmol of the major blood buffer, bicarbonate (HCO3−). The glomerular filtrate enters the lumen of the proximal tubule (PT), and the majority of filtered HCO3− is reclaimed along the early (S1) and convoluted (S2) portions of the PT in a manner coupled to the secretion of H+ into the lumen. The PT also uses the secreted H+ to titrate non-HCO3− buffers in the lumen, in the process creating “new HCO3−” for transport into the blood. Thus, the PT – along with more distal renal segments – is largely responsible for regulating plasma [HCO3−]. In this review we first focus on the milestone discoveries over the past 50+ years that define the mechanism and regulation of acid-base transport by the proximal tubule. Further on in the review, we will summarize research still in progress from our laboratory, work that addresses the problem of how the PT is able to finely adapt to acid–base disturbances by rapidly sensing changes in basolateral levels of HCO3− and CO2 (but not pH), and thereby to exert tight control over the acid–base composition of the blood plasma. PMID:21170887

  3. DNA Methylation Profiling at Single-Base Resolution Reveals Gestational Folic Acid Supplementation Influences the Epigenome of Mouse Offspring Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Subit; Kuizon, Salomon; Brown, W. Ted; Junaid, Mohammed A.

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly more evident that lifestyle, environmental factors, and maternal nutrition during gestation can influence the epigenome of the developing fetus and thus modulate the physiological outcome. Variations in the intake of maternal nutrients affecting one-carbon metabolism may influence brain development and exert long-term effects on the health of the progeny. In this study, we investigated whether supplementation with high maternal folic acid during gestation alters DNA methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of mouse offspring. We used reduced representation bisulfite sequencing to analyze the DNA methylation profile at the single-base resolution level. The genome-wide DNA methylation analysis revealed that supplementation with higher maternal folic acid resulted in distinct methylation patterns (P < 0.05) of CpG and non-CpG sites in the cerebellum of offspring. Such variations of methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of offspring were highly sex-specific, including several genes of the neuronal pathways. These findings demonstrate that alterations in the level of maternal folic acid during gestation can influence methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of offspring. Such changes in the offspring epigenome may alter neurodevelopment and influence the functional outcome of neurologic and psychiatric diseases. PMID:27199632

  4. Review of Sparse Representation-Based Classification Methods on EEG Signal Processing for Epilepsy Detection, Brain-Computer Interface and Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Dong; Jia, Peilei; Lian, Qiusheng; Zhou, Yanhong; Lu, Chengbiao

    2016-01-01

    At present, the sparse representation-based classification (SRC) has become an important approach in electroencephalograph (EEG) signal analysis, by which the data is sparsely represented on the basis of a fixed dictionary or learned dictionary and classified based on the reconstruction criteria. SRC methods have been used to analyze the EEG signals of epilepsy, cognitive impairment and brain computer interface (BCI), which made rapid progress including the improvement in computational accuracy, efficiency and robustness. However, these methods have deficiencies in real-time performance, generalization ability and the dependence of labeled sample in the analysis of the EEG signals. This mini review described the advantages and disadvantages of the SRC methods in the EEG signal analysis with the expectation that these methods can provide the better tools for analyzing EEG signals. PMID:27458376

  5. Graphical representations of DNA as 2-D map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan

    2004-03-01

    We describe a modification of the compact representation of DNA sequences which transforms the sequence into a 2-D diagram in which the 'spots' have integer coordinates. As a result the accompanying numerical characterization of DNA is quite simple and straightforward. This is an important advantage, particularly when considering DNA sequences having thousands of nucleic bases. The approach starts with the compact representation of DNA based on zigzag spiral template used for placing 'spots' associated with binary codes of the nucleic acids and subsequent suppression of the underlying zigzag curve. As a result, a 2-D map is formed in which all 'spots' have integer coordinates. By using only distances between spots having the same x or the same y coordinate one can construct a 'map profile' using integer arithmetic. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin.

  6. World representations for unmanned vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broten, Gregory S.; Monckton, Simon P.; Mackay, David; Collier, Jack

    2007-04-01

    Unmanned vehicles (UxV) operate in numerous environments, with air, ground and marine representing the majority of the implementations. All unmanned vehicles, when traversing unknown space, have similar requirements. They must sense their environment, create a world representation, and, then plan a path that safely avoids obstacles and hazards. Traditionally, each unmanned vehicle class used environment specific assumptions to create a unique world representation that was tailored to it operating environment. Thus, an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) used the simplest possible world representation, where all space above the ground plane was free of obstacles. Conversely, an unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) required a world representation that was suitable to its complex and unstructured environment. Such a clear cut differentiation between UAV and UGV environments is no longer valid as UAVs have migrated down to elevations where terrestrial structures are located. Thus, the operating environment for a low flying UAV contains similarities to the environments experienced by UGVs. As a result, the world representation techniques and algorithms developed for UGVs are now applicable to UAVs, since low flying UAVs must sense and represent its world in order to avoid obstacles. Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) conducts research and development in both the UGV and UAV fields. Researchers have developed a platform neutral world representation, based upon a uniform 21/ II-D elevation grid, that is applicable to many UxV classes, including aerial and ground vehicles. This paper describes DRDC's generic world representation, known as the Global Terrain map, and provides an example of unmanned ground vehicle implementation, along with details of it applicability to aerial vehicles.

  7. Building Hierarchical Representations for Oracle Character and Sketch Recognition.

    PubMed

    Jun Guo; Changhu Wang; Roman-Rangel, Edgar; Hongyang Chao; Yong Rui

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study oracle character recognition and general sketch recognition. First, a data set of oracle characters, which are the oldest hieroglyphs in China yet remain a part of modern Chinese characters, is collected for analysis. Second, typical visual representations in shape- and sketch-related works are evaluated. We analyze the problems suffered when addressing these representations and determine several representation design criteria. Based on the analysis, we propose a novel hierarchical representation that combines a Gabor-related low-level representation and a sparse-encoder-related mid-level representation. Extensive experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed representation in both oracle character recognition and general sketch recognition. The proposed representation is also complementary to convolutional neural network (CNN)-based models. We introduce a solution to combine the proposed representation with CNN-based models, and achieve better performances over both approaches. This solution has beaten humans at recognizing general sketches. PMID:26571529

  8. Acid-base properties of aqueous illite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.; Sun, Z.; Forsling, W.; Tang, H.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, the acid-base properties of illite/water suspensions are examined using the constant capacitance surface complexation model. On the basis of results of potentiometric titrations and solubility experiments, the authors conclude that the proton reactions in the supernatants of illite suspensions can be successfully represented by proton reactions of Al(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{sup 3+} and Si(OH){sub 4} in water solutions. For illustrating the acidic characteristics of aqueous illite surfaces, two surface protonation models are proposed: (1) one site-one pK{sub a} model, {triple_bond}SOH {r_reversible} {triple_bond}SO{sup {minus}} + H{sup +}, pK{sub a}{sup int} = 4.12-4.23; (2) two sites-two pK{sub a}s model, {triple_bond}S{sub 1}OH {r_reversible} {triple_bond}S{sup 1}O{sup {minus}} + H{sup +}, pK{sub a{sub I}} = 4.17-4.44, and {triple_bond}S{sub II}OH {r_reversible} {triple_bond}S{sub II}O{sup {minus}} + H{sup +}, pK{sub a{sub II}}{sup int} = 6.35-7.74. Evaluation of these two models indicates that both of them can give good descriptions of the experimental data of systems with different illite concentrations and ionic strengths and that the one site-one pK{sub a} model can be considered as a simplification of the two sites-two pK{sub a}s model. Since both models assume only deprotonation reactions at the illite surfaces, they suggest that the surface behavior of the illite is similar to that of amorphous SiO{sub 2}. Model assumptions, experimental procedures, and evaluative criteria are detailed in the paper.

  9. Solution influence on biomolecular equilibria - Nucleic acid base associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; Burt, S. K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    Various attempts to construct an understanding of the influence of solution environment on biomolecular equilibria at the molecular level using computer simulation are discussed. First, the application of the formal statistical thermodynamic program for investigating biomolecular equilibria in solution is presented, addressing modeling and conceptual simplications such as perturbative methods, long-range interaction approximations, surface thermodynamics, and hydration shell. Then, Monte Carlo calculations on the associations of nucleic acid bases in both polar and nonpolar solvents such as water and carbon tetrachloride are carried out. The solvent contribution to the enthalpy of base association is positive (destabilizing) in both polar and nonpolar solvents while negative enthalpies for stacked complexes are obtained only when the solute-solute in vacuo energy is added to the total energy. The release upon association of solvent molecules from the first hydration layer around a solute to the bulk is accompanied by an increase in solute-solvent energy and decrease in solvent-solvent energy. The techniques presented are expectd to displace less molecular and more heuristic modeling of biomolecular equilibria in solution.

  10. Extended loop representation of quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Di Bartolo, C. ); Gambini, R.; Griego, J. )

    1995-01-15

    A new representation of quantum gravity is developed. This formulation is based on an extension of the group of loops. The enlarged group that we call the extended loop group behaves locally as an infinite dimensional Lie group. Quantum gravity can be realized on the state space of extended loop-dependent wave functions. The extended representation generalizes the loop representation and contains this representation as a particular case. The resulting diffeomorphism and Hamiltonian constraints take a very simple form and allow us to apply functional methods and simplify the loop calculus. In particular we show that the constraints are linear in the momenta. The nondegenerate solutions known in the loop representation are also solutions of the constraints in the new representation. An approach to the regularization problems associated with the formal calculus is performed. We show that the solutions are generalized knot invariants, smooth in the extended variables, and any framing is unnecessary.

  11. Effect of model error representation in the Yellow and East China Sea modeling system based on the ensemble Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kyung Man; Choi, Byoung-Ju; Lee, Sang-Ho; Kim, Young Ho; Seo, Gwang-Ho; Cho, Yang-Ki

    2016-02-01

    To increase the accuracy of ocean predictions in the Yellow and East China Sea (YES), the satellite-borne sea surface temperature (SST) data have been assimilated to an operational ocean modeling system by applying an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). As the observed SST was assimilated continuously into the model with time, the ensemble spread decreased and the efficiency of data assimilation degenerated. To increase liability of the system and the ensemble spread, model uncertainties were represented stochastically by perturbing the model tendency parameters such as eddy viscosity, bottom drag coefficient, light attenuation depth, as well as atmospheric forcing. Data assimilation experiments were performed with forcing from a regional atmospheric model from September 2011 to February 2012. The assimilation results with and without the stochastically perturbed model parameters and atmospheric forcing were compared. The ensemble with the perturbations has larger spread and smaller root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) in temperature compared with the ensemble without the perturbations. The SST RMSD relative to anther supplementary SST dataset was reduced from 0.91 to 0.81 °C over the YES. The assimilation of the SST data improved the simulated SST compared with the observation at the ocean buoy stations, and also made the subsurface temperature profiles closer to the observed ones. The assimilation experiments showed that a stochastic representation of the model errors by the perturbations of the model parameters and atmospheric forcing increases the spread of the ensemble and improves the structure of background error covariance, which enhances the performance of the ensemble modeling system in the YES.

  12. Grobner Basis Representations of Sudoku

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taalman, Laura; Arnold, Elizabeth; Lucas, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses Grobner bases to explore the inherent structure of Sudoku puzzles and boards. In particular, we develop three different ways of representing the constraints of Sudoku puzzles with a system of polynomial equations. In one case, we explicitly show how a Grobner basis can be used to obtain a more meaningful representation of the…

  13. Using problem based learning and guided inquiry in a high school acid-base chemistry unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, Katie

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if incorporating problem based learning and guided inquiry would improve student achievement in an acid base unit for high school chemistry. The activities and labs in the unit were modified to be centered around the problem of a fish kill that students investigated. Students also participated in guided inquiry labs to increase the amount of critical thinking and problem solving being done in the classroom. The hypothesis was that the implementation of problem based learning and guided inquiry would foster student learning. Students took a pre-test and post-test on questions covering the objectives of the acid base unit. These assessments were compared to determine the effectiveness of the unit. The results indicate that the unit was effective in increasing student performance on the unit test. This study also analyzed the process of problem based learning. Problem based learning can be an effective method of engaging students in inquiry. However, designing an effective problem based learning unit requires careful design of the problem and enough structure to assure students learn the intended content.

  14. Characterizing Interaction with Visual Mathematical Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedig, Kamran; Sumner, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a characterization of computer-based interactions by which learners can explore and investigate visual mathematical representations (VMRs). VMRs (e.g., geometric structures, graphs, and diagrams) refer to graphical representations that visually encode properties and relationships of mathematical structures and concepts.…

  15. Elementary School Students' Mental Representation of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitta-Pantazi, Demetra; Gray, Eddie M.; Christou, Constantinos

    2004-01-01

    Based on psychological approaches that evoke mental representations through verbal and visual cues, this paper investigates the different kinds of mental representations projected by 8 to 11 year old children of identified arithmetical achievement when responding to verbal and visual stimuli associated with fractions. It examines how the visual…

  16. Developing a high-latitude soil carbon cycle model with a focus on trait-based representation of decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouskill, N.; Tang, J.; Riley, W. J.; Brodie, E. L.

    2012-12-01

    Global climate change is projected to have a significant impact on high-latitude ecosystems by altering the stability and distribution of annual permafrost and deepening the active layer. High-latitude permafrost soils store large quantities of organic matter, and climate change may lead to increases in organic matter decomposition and the production of carbon dioxide (CO2). The magnitude of CO2 flux depends largely on a complex suite of mechanisms primarily regulated by C-cycling microorganisms. In the present study we are developing a mechanistic ecological model by synthesizing multiple microbial traits to reconstruct a representation of the heterotrophic microbial community. The model develops a dynamic energy budget that is scaled against the availability and identity of electron donors and acceptors and represented by an ATP pool. This energy budget contributes to regulating macromolecular synthesis, including exoenzyme production, cell growth, and division. Traits encoded by a hypothetical 'genome' that are specific to individual guilds include growth rate, carbon use efficiency (CUE), and the possession of between 2 and 11 distinct monomer transporters linked to the presence of exoenzymes within the 'genome'. These traits determine the emergence of microbial communities under initial environmental conditions and also community dynamics as conditions change over time. The model prognoses decomposition rates, carbon pool transformations, and CO2 production. The system ecology was initially studied using a chemostat approach with one or multiple polymeric substrates. Emergence of the heterotrophic community was dependent on the presence of different polymers and trade-offs between physiological traits (e.g., possession of different exoenzymes or growth rate) and the cellular energy budget. Using this approach we examine the dynamics of the heterotrophic community and identify conditions under which copiotrophic and oligotrophic communities dominate

  17. Towards a Representation of Flexible Canopy N Stiochiometry for Land-surface Models Based on Optimality Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaehle, S.; Caldararu, S.

    2015-12-01

    Foliar nitrogen (N) is know to acclimate to environmental conditions. One particular pertinent response is the general decline in foliar N following exposure to elevated levels of atmospheric CO2 (eCO2). Associated with reduced foliar N is an increased plant nitrogen-use efficiency, which contributes to the plants' sustained growth response to eCO2 in the absence of any counteracting litter N feedbacks. Flexible leaf N thus has important consequences for the mid- to long-term response of terrestrial ecosystems to eCO2. The current generation of land-surface models including a prognostic N cycle generally employ heuristic, and simply mass-balancing parameterisations to estimate changes in stoichiometry given altered N and carbon (C) availability. This generation generally and substantially overestimates the decline of foliar N (and thus the increase in plant nitrogen use efficiency) observed in Free Air CO2 Enrichment Experiments (FACE; Zaehle et al. 2014). In this presentation, I develop a simple, prognostic and dynamic representation of flexible foliar N for use in land-surface models by maximising the marginal gain of net assimilation with respect to the energy investment to generate foliar area and foliar N. I elucidate the underlying assumptions required to simulate the commonly observed decline in foliar N with eCO2 under different scenarios of N availability (Feng et al. 2015). References: Zaehle, Sönke, Belinda E Medlyn, Martin G De Kauwe, Anthony P Walker, Michael C Dietze, Hickler Thomas, Yiqi Luo, et al. 2014. "Evaluation of 11 Terrestrial Carbon-Nitrogen Cycle Models Against Observations From Two Temperate Free-Air CO2 Enrichment Studies." New Phytologist 202 (3): 803-22. doi:10.1111/nph.12697. Feng, Zhaozhong, Tobias RUtting, Håkan Pleijel, GORAN WALLIN, Peter B Reich, Claudia I Kammann, Paul C D Newton, Kazuhiko Kobayashi, Yunjian Luo, and Johan Uddling. 2015. "Constraints to Nitrogen Acquisition of Terrestrial Plants Under Elevated CO 2." Global

  18. SHORT-TERM CHANGES IN THE BASE NEUTRALIZING CAPACITY OF AN ACID ADIRONDACK LAKE, NEW YORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern and controversy over the effects of acidic deposition on low ionic strength surface wa ters has led to much discussion on the nature and extent of proton transformations within acid sensitive ecosystems. The source of base neutralizing capacity(BNC) within acid surface wa...

  19. Intentionality, Representation, and Anticipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Preester, Helena

    2002-09-01

    Both Brentano and Merleau-Ponty have developed an account of intentionality, which nevertheless differ profoundly in the following respect. According to Brentano, intentionality mainly is a matter of mental presentations. This marks the beginning of phenomenology's difficult relation with the nature of the intentional reference. Merleau-Ponty, on the other hand, has situated intentionality on the level of the body, a turn which has important implications for the nature of intentionality. Intentionality no longer is primarily based on having (re)presentations, but is rooted in the dynamics of the living body. To contrast those approaches enables us to make clear in what way intentionality is studied nowadays. On the one hand, intentionality is conceived of as a matter of formal-syntactical causality in cognitive science, and in particular in classical-computational theory. On the other hand, a interactivist approach offers a more Merleau-Ponty-like point of view, in which autonomy, embodiment and interaction are stressed.

  20. A Comparison of Different Teaching Designs of "Acids and Bases" Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ültay, Neslihan; Çalik, Muammer

    2016-01-01

    Inability to link the acid-base concepts with daily life phenomena (as contexts) highlights the need for further research on the context-based acid-base chemistry. In this vein, the aim of this study is to investigate the effects of different teaching designs (REACT strategy, 5Es learning model and traditional (existing) instruction) relevant with…

  1. Hands-On Science: Is It an Acid or a Base? These Colorful Tests Tell All!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanCleave, Janice

    1998-01-01

    Two hands-on science activities for K-6 students teach them how to determine if something is an acid or a base. The activities require acid/base indicator juice, testing strips, and a base solution. A recipe for making them in the classroom using red cabbage and baking soda is provided. (SM)

  2. Hyaluronic Acid Based Hydrogels for Regenerative Medicine Applications

    PubMed Central

    Borzacchiello, Assunta; Russo, Luisa; Malle, Birgitte M.; Schwach-Abdellaoui, Khadija; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels, obtained by cross-linking HA molecules with divinyl sulfone (DVS) based on a simple, reproducible, and safe process that does not employ any organic solvents, were developed. Owing to an innovative preparation method the resulting homogeneous hydrogels do not contain any detectable residual cross-linking agent and are easier to inject through a fine needle. HA hydrogels were characterized in terms of degradation and biological properties, viscoelasticity, injectability, and network structural parameters. They exhibit a rheological behaviour typical of strong gels and show improved viscoelastic properties by increasing HA concentration and decreasing HA/DVS weight ratio. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that processes such as sterilization and extrusion through clinical needles do not imply significant alteration of viscoelastic properties. Both SANS and rheological tests indicated that the cross-links appear to compact the network, resulting in a reduction of the mesh size by increasing the cross-linker amount. In vitro degradation tests of the HA hydrogels demonstrated that these new hydrogels show a good stability against enzymatic degradation, which increases by increasing HA concentration and decreasing HA/DVS weight ratio. Finally, the hydrogels show a good biocompatibility confirmed by in vitro tests. PMID:26090451

  3. Hyaluronic Acid Based Hydrogels for Regenerative Medicine Applications.

    PubMed

    Borzacchiello, Assunta; Russo, Luisa; Malle, Birgitte M; Schwach-Abdellaoui, Khadija; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels, obtained by cross-linking HA molecules with divinyl sulfone (DVS) based on a simple, reproducible, and safe process that does not employ any organic solvents, were developed. Owing to an innovative preparation method the resulting homogeneous hydrogels do not contain any detectable residual cross-linking agent and are easier to inject through a fine needle. HA hydrogels were characterized in terms of degradation and biological properties, viscoelasticity, injectability, and network structural parameters. They exhibit a rheological behaviour typical of strong gels and show improved viscoelastic properties by increasing HA concentration and decreasing HA/DVS weight ratio. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that processes such as sterilization and extrusion through clinical needles do not imply significant alteration of viscoelastic properties. Both SANS and rheological tests indicated that the cross-links appear to compact the network, resulting in a reduction of the mesh size by increasing the cross-linker amount. In vitro degradation tests of the HA hydrogels demonstrated that these new hydrogels show a good stability against enzymatic degradation, which increases by increasing HA concentration and decreasing HA/DVS weight ratio. Finally, the hydrogels show a good biocompatibility confirmed by in vitro tests. PMID:26090451

  4. Citric acid-based hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds enhance calvarial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dawei; Chen, Yuhui; Tran, Richard T; Xu, Song; Xie, Denghui; Jia, Chunhong; Wang, Yuchen; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Zhongmin; Guo, Jinshan; Yang, Jian; Jin, Dadi; Bai, Xiaochun

    2014-01-01

    Citric acid-based polymer/hydroxyapatite composites (CABP-HAs) are a novel class of biomimetic composites that have recently attracted significant attention in tissue engineering. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of using two different CABP-HAs, poly (1,8-octanediol citrate)-click-HA (POC-Click-HA) and crosslinked urethane-doped polyester-HA (CUPE-HA) as an alternative to autologous tissue grafts in the repair of skeletal defects. CABP-HA disc-shaped scaffolds (65 wt.-% HA with 70% porosity) were used as bare implants without the addition of growth factors or cells to renovate 4 mm diameter rat calvarial defects (n = 72, n = 18 per group). Defects were either left empty (negative control group), or treated with CUPE-HA scaffolds, POC-Click-HA scaffolds, or autologous bone grafts (AB group). Radiological and histological data showed a significant enhancement of osteogenesis in defects treated with CUPE-HA scaffolds when compared to POC-Click-HA scaffolds. Both, POC-Click-HA and CUPE-HA scaffolds, resulted in enhanced bone mineral density, trabecular thickness, and angiogenesis when compared to the control groups at 1, 3, and 6 months post-trauma. These results show the potential of CABP-HA bare implants as biocompatible, osteogenic, and off-shelf-available options in the repair of orthopedic defects. PMID:25372769

  5. [Development of Nucleic Acid-Based Adjuvant for Cancer Immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Ishii, Ken J

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery of the human T cell-defined tumor antigen, the cancer immunotherapy field has rapidly progressed, with the research and development of cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, being conducted actively. However, the disadvantages of most cancer vaccines include relatively weak immunogenicity and immune escape or exhaustion. Adjuvants with innate immunostimulatory activities have been used to overcome these issues, and these agents have been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines and to act as mono-therapeutic anti-tumor agents. CpG ODN, an agonist for TLR9, is one of the promising nucleic acid-based adjuvants, and it is a potent inducer of innate immune effector functions. CpG ODN suppresses tumor growth in the absence of tumor antigens and peptide administration. Therefore, CpG ODN is expected to be useful as a cancer vaccine adjuvant as well as a cancer immunotherapy agent. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic applications and mechanisms of CpG ODN for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26469159

  6. The pharmacokinetics of glycyrrhizic acid evaluated by physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Ploeger, B; Mensinga, T; Sips, A; Seinen, W; Meulenbelt, J; DeJongh, J

    2001-05-01

    Glycyrrhizic acid is widely applied as a sweetener in food products and chewing tobacco. In addition, it is of clinical interest for possible treatment of chronic hepatitis C. In some highly exposed subjects, side effects such as hypertension and symptoms associated with electrolyte disturbances have been reported. To analyze the relationship between the pharmacokinetics of glycyrrhizic acid in its toxicity, the kinetics of glycyrrhizic acid and its biologically active metabolite glycyrrhetic acid were evaluated. Glycyrrhizic acid is mainly absorbed after presystemic hydrolysis as glycyrrhetic acid. Because glycyrrhetic acid is a 200-1000 times more potent inhibitor of 11-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase compared to glycyrrhizic acid, the kinetics of glycyrrhetic acid are relevant in a toxicological perspective. Once absorbed, glycyrrhetic acid is transported, mainly taken up into the liver by capacity-limited carriers, where it is metabolized into glucuronide and sulfate conjugates. These conjugates are transported efficiently into the bile. After outflow of the bile into the duodenum, the conjugates are hydrolyzed to glycyrrhetic acid by commensal bacteria; glycyrrhetic acid is subsequently reabsorbed, causing a pronounced delay in the terminal plasma clearance. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling indicated that, in humans, the transit rate of gastrointestinal contents through the small and large intestines predominantly determines to what extent glycyrrhetic acid conjugates will be reabsorbed. This parameter, which can be estimated noninvasively, may serve as a useful risk estimator for glycyrrhizic-acid-induced adverse effects, because in subjects with prolonged gastrointestinal transit times, glycyrrhetic acid might accumulate after repeated intake. PMID:11495500

  7. Polyol and Amino Acid-Based Biosurfactants, Builders, and Hydrogels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter reviews different detergent materials which have been synthesized from natural agricultural commodities. Background information, which gives reasons why the use of biobased materials may be advantageous, is presented. Detergent builders from L-aspartic acid, citric acid and D-sorbitol...

  8. Comparison of Support-Vector Machine and Sparse Representation Using a Modified Rule-Based Method for Automated Myocardial Ischemia Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yi-Li; Lin, Keng-Sheng; Jaw, Fu-Shan

    2016-01-01

    An automatic method is presented for detecting myocardial ischemia, which can be considered as the early symptom of acute coronary events. Myocardial ischemia commonly manifests as ST- and T-wave changes on ECG signals. The methods in this study are proposed to detect abnormal ECG beats using knowledge-based features and classification methods. A novel classification method, sparse representation-based classification (SRC), is involved to improve the performance of the existing algorithms. A comparison was made between two classification methods, SRC and support-vector machine (SVM), using rule-based vectors as input feature space. The two methods are proposed with quantitative evaluation to validate their performances. The results of SRC method encompassed with rule-based features demonstrate higher sensitivity than that of SVM. However, the specificity and precision are a trade-off. Moreover, SRC method is less dependent on the selection of rule-based features and can achieve high performance using fewer features. The overall performances of the two methods proposed in this study are better than the previous methods. PMID:26925158

  9. Comparison of Support-Vector Machine and Sparse Representation Using a Modified Rule-Based Method for Automated Myocardial Ischemia Detection.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yi-Li; Lin, Keng-Sheng; Jaw, Fu-Shan

    2016-01-01

    An automatic method is presented for detecting myocardial ischemia, which can be considered as the early symptom of acute coronary events. Myocardial ischemia commonly manifests as ST- and T-wave changes on ECG signals. The methods in this study are proposed to detect abnormal ECG beats using knowledge-based features and classification methods. A novel classification method, sparse representation-based classification (SRC), is involved to improve the performance of the existing algorithms. A comparison was made between two classification methods, SRC and support-vector machine (SVM), using rule-based vectors as input feature space. The two methods are proposed with quantitative evaluation to validate their performances. The results of SRC method encompassed with rule-based features demonstrate higher sensitivity than that of SVM. However, the specificity and precision are a trade-off. Moreover, SRC method is less dependent on the selection of rule-based features and can achieve high performance using fewer features. The overall performances of the two methods proposed in this study are better than the previous methods. PMID:26925158

  10. Wheat flour based propionic acid fermentation: an economic approach.

    PubMed

    Kagliwal, Lalit D; Survase, Shrikant A; Singhal, Rekha S; Granström, Tom

    2013-02-01

    A process for the fermentative production of propionic acid from whole wheat flour using starch and gluten as nutrients is presented. Hydrolysis of wheat flour starch using amylases was optimized. A batch fermentation of hydrolysate supplemented with various nitrogen sources using Propionibacterium acidipropionici NRRL B 3569 was performed. The maximum production of 48.61, 9.40, and 11.06 g of propionic acid, acetic acid and succinic acid, respectively, was found with wheat flour hydrolysate equivalent to 90 g/l glucose and supplemented with 15 g/l yeast extract. Further, replacement of yeast extract with wheat gluten hydrolysate showed utilization of gluten hydrolysate without compromising the yields and also improving the economics of the process. The process so developed could be useful for production of animal feed from whole wheat with in situ production of preservatives, and also suggest utilization of sprouted or germinated wheat for the production of organic acids. PMID:23357590

  11. New yeast-based approaches in production of palmitoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Kolouchová, Irena; Sigler, Karel; Schreiberová, Olga; Masák, Jan; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2015-09-01

    Palmitoleic acid is found in certain dairy products and has broad applications in medicine and cosmetics. We tried to find a suitable producer of this acid among traditional biotechnological yeast species (Kluyveromyces polysporus, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) characterized by high biomass yield and Candida krusei, Yarrowia lipolytica and Trichosporon cutaneum accumulating large amounts of lipids. The main factor affecting the content of palmitoleic acid was found to be the C/N ratio in the culture medium, with ammonium sulfate as an optimum nitrogen source leading to highest biomass yield with concomitantly increased lipid accumulation, and an increased content of ω6-linoleic acid, the precursor of prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and thromboxanes. We found that C. krusei can be conveniently used for the purpose, albeit only under certain cultivation conditions, whereas S. cerevisiae can produce high and stable amounts of palmitoleic acid in a broad range of cultivation conditions ranging from conventional to nutrient limitations. PMID:26101962

  12. The Effects of Scaffolded Simulation-Based Inquiry Learning on Fifth-Graders' Representations of the Greenhouse Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukkonen, Jari Ensio; Kärkkäinen, Sirpa; Dillon, Patrick; Keinonen, Tuula

    2014-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that simulation-based inquiry learning has significant advantages for learning outcomes when properly scaffolded. For successful learning in science with simulation-based inquiry, one needs to ascertain levels of background knowledge so as to support learners in making, evaluating and modifying hypotheses, conducting…

  13. Development of polylactic acid-based materials through reactive modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowlks, Alison Camille

    2009-12-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA)-based systems have shown to be of great potential for the development of materials requiring biobased content, biodegradation, and sufficient properties. The efforts in this study are directed toward addressing the current research need to overcome some of the inherent drawbacks of PLA. To meet this need, reactive extrusion was employed to develop new materials based on PLA by grafting, compounding, and polymer blending. In the first part of this work, maleic anhydride (MA) was grafted onto PLA by reactive extrusion. Two structurally different peroxides were used to initiate grafting and results were reported on the basis of grafting, molecular weight, and thermal behavior. An inverse relationship between degree of grafting and molecular weight was established. It was also found that, regardless of peroxide type, there is an optimum peroxid-to-MA ratio of 0.5:2 that promotes maximum grafting, beyond which degradation reactions become predominant. Overall, it was found that the maleated copolymer (MAPLA) could be used as an interfacial modifier in PLA-based composites. Therefore, MAPLA was incorporated into PLA-talc composites in varying concentrations. The influence of the MAPLA addition on the mechanical and thermal behavior was investigated. When added in an optimum concentration, MAPLA improved the tensile strength and crystallization of the composite. Furthermore, microscopic observation confirmed the compatibilization effect of MAPLA in PLA-talc composites. Vinyltrimethoxysilane was free-radically grafted onto the backbone of PLA and subsequently moisture crosslinked. The effects of monomer, initiator, and catalyst concentration on the degree of crosslinking and the mechanical and thermal properties were investigated. The presence of a small amount of catalyst showed to be a major contributor to the crosslinking formation in the time frame investigated, shown by an increase in gel content and decrease in crystallinity. Furthermore

  14. Hybride magnetic nanostructure based on amino acids functionalized polypyrrole

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Alexandrina Bunge, Alexander; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-23

    Conducting polypyrrole is especially promising for many commercial applications because of its unique optical, electric, thermal and mechanical properties. We report the synthesis and characterization of novel pyrrole functionalized monomers and core-shell hybrid nanostructures, consisting of a conjugated polymer layer (amino acids functionalized pyrrole copolymers) and a magnetic nanoparticle core. For functionalization of the pyrrole monomer we used several amino acids: tryptophan, leucine, phenylalanine, serine and tyrosine. These amino acids were linked via different types of hydrophobic linkers to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole monomer. The magnetic core-shell hybrid nanostructures are characterized by various methods such as FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements.

  15. Hybride magnetic nanostructure based on amino acids functionalized polypyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Alexandrina; Bunge, Alexander; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-01

    Conducting polypyrrole is especially promising for many commercial applications because of its unique optical, electric, thermal and mechanical properties. We report the synthesis and characterization of novel pyrrole functionalized monomers and core-shell hybrid nanostructures, consisting of a conjugated polymer layer (amino acids functionalized pyrrole copolymers) and a magnetic nanoparticle core. For functionalization of the pyrrole monomer we used several amino acids: tryptophan, leucine, phenylalanine, serine and tyrosine. These amino acids were linked via different types of hydrophobic linkers to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole monomer. The magnetic core-shell hybrid nanostructures are characterized by various methods such as FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements.

  16. Morphologies of precise polyethylene-based acid copolymers and ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago, C. Francisco

    Acid copolymers and ionomers are polymers that contain a small fraction of covalently bound acidic or ionic groups, respectively. For the specific case of polyethylene (PE), acid and ionic pendants enhance many of the physical properties such as toughness, adhesion and rheological properties. These improved properties result from microphase separated aggregates of the polar pendants in the non-polar PE matrix. Despite the widespread industrial use of these materials, rigorous chemical structure---morphology---property relationships remain elusive due to the inevitable structural heterogeneities in the historically-available acid copolymers and ionomers. Recently, precise acid copolymers and ionomers were successfully synthesized by acyclic diene metathesis (ADMET) polymerization. These precise materials are linear, high molecular weight PEs with pendant acid or ionic functional groups separated by a precisely controlled number of carbon atoms. The morphologies of nine precise acid copolymers and eleven precise ionomers were investigated by X-ray scattering, solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). For comparison, the morphologies of linear PEs with pseudo-random placement of the pendant groups were also studied. Previous studies of precise copolymers with acrylic acid (AA) found that the microstructural precision produces a new morphology in which PE crystals drive the acid aggregates into layers perpendicular to the chain axes and presumably at the interface between crystalline and amorphous phases. In this dissertation, a second new morphology for acid copolymers is identified in which the aggregates arrange on cubic lattices. The fist report of a cubic morphology was observed at room and elevated temperatures for a copolymer functionalized with two phosphonic acid (PA) groups on every 21st carbon atom. The cubic lattice has been identified as face-centered cubic (FCC). Overall, three morphology types have been

  17. Polyphosphate-containing fluid fertilizers based on wet-process acid and wet-process acid-sulfuric acid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    In the late 1960s and early 1970s, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) developed and patented a pipe-reactor process that used low-conversion superphosphoric acid to produce a 10-34-0 grade liquid fertilizer that contained about 60 to 70% of the total P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ as polyphosphate. The process was accepted rapidly by the fluid-fertilizer industry and there are now about 125 commercial plants in operation throughout the United States using this technology. In the latter part of 1970, studies were begun to develop a process to use less expensive merchant-grade acid in a pipe reactor. The process that resulted was designed so that it could be retrofitted into the existing 10-34-0 process with some equipment changes. The product was a 9-32-0 grade suspension fertilizer containing about 20% of the total P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ as polyphosphate. In 1981, TVA began operation in a demonstration-scale unit with a design capacity of 20 tons of 9-32-0 suspension per hour. In addition to using the relatively inexpensive anhydrous ammonia and merchant-grade wet-process acid as raw materials, the process was designed to be energy efficient in that all of the heat required to vaporize the ammonia and preheat the merchant-grade acid was obtained from the process.

  18. Chance-constrained overland flow modeling for improving conceptual distributed hydrologic simulations based on scaling representation of sub-daily rainfall variability.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing-Cheng; Huang, Guohe; Huang, Yuefei; Zhang, Hua; Li, Zhong; Chen, Qiuwen

    2015-08-15

    Lack of hydrologic process representation at the short time-scale would lead to inadequate simulations in distributed hydrological modeling. Especially for complex mountainous watersheds, surface runoff simulations are significantly affected by the overland flow generation, which is closely related to the rainfall characteristics at a sub-time step. In this paper, the sub-daily variability of rainfall intensity was considered using a probability distribution, and a chance-constrained overland flow modeling approach was proposed to capture the generation of overland flow within conceptual distributed hydrologic simulations. The integrated modeling procedures were further demonstrated through a watershed of China Three Gorges Reservoir area, leading to an improved SLURP-TGR hydrologic model based on SLURP. Combined with rainfall thresholds determined to distinguish various magnitudes of daily rainfall totals, three levels of significance were simultaneously employed to examine the hydrologic-response simulation. Results showed that SLURP-TGR could enhance the model performance, and the deviation of runoff simulations was effectively controlled. However, rainfall thresholds were so crucial for reflecting the scaling effect of rainfall intensity that optimal levels of significance and rainfall threshold were 0.05 and 10 mm, respectively. As for the Xiangxi River watershed, the main runoff contribution came from interflow of the fast store. Although slight differences of overland flow simulations between SLURP and SLURP-TGR were derived, SLURP-TGR was found to help improve the simulation of peak flows, and would improve the overall modeling efficiency through adjusting runoff component simulations. Consequently, the developed modeling approach favors efficient representation of hydrological processes and would be expected to have a potential for wide applications. PMID:25889540

  19. In Vitro Investigation of Self-Assembled Nanoparticles Based on Hyaluronic Acid-Deoxycholic Acid Conjugates for Controlled Release Doxorubicin: Effect of Degree of Substitution of Deoxycholic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen-Hao; Dong, Xue-Meng; Liu, Chen-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembled nanoparticles based on a hyaluronic acid-deoxycholic acid (HD) chemical conjugate with different degree of substitution (DS) of deoxycholic acid (DOCA) were prepared. The degree of substitution (DS) was determined by titration method. The nanoparticles were loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) as the model drug. The human cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line was utilized for in vitro studies and cell cytotoxicity of DOX incorporated in the HD nanoparticles was accessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. In addition, cellular uptake of fluorescently labeled nanoparticles was also investigated. An increase in the degree of deoxycholic acid substitution reduced the size of the nanoparticles and also enhanced their drug encapsulation efficiency (EE), which increased with the increase of DS. A higher degree of deoxycholic acid substitution also lead to a lower release rate and an initial burst release of doxorubicin from the nanoparticles. In summary, the degree of substitution allows the modulation of the particle size, drug encapsulation efficiency, drug release rate, and cell uptake efficiency of the nanoparticles. The herein developed hyaluronic acid-deoxycholic acid conjugates are a good candidate for drug delivery and could potentiate therapeutic formulations for doxorubicin–mediated cancer therapy. PMID:25837468

  20. Proton exchange in acid-base complexes induced by reaction coordinates with heavy atom motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Taghikhani, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    We extend previous work on nitric acid-ammonia and nitric acid-alkylamine complexes to illustrate that proton exchange reaction coordinates involve the rocking motion of the base moiety in many double hydrogen-bonded gas phase strong acid-strong base complexes. The complexes studied involve the biologically and atmospherically relevant glycine, formic, acetic, propionic, and sulfuric acids with ammonia/alkylamine bases. In these complexes, the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies associated with the proton exchange transition states are <400 cm-1. This contrasts with widely studied proton exchange reactions between symmetric carboxylic acid dimers or asymmetric DNA base pair and their analogs where the reaction coordinate is localized in proton motions and the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies for the transition states are >1100 cm-1. Calculations on complexes of these acids with water are performed for comparison. Variations of normal vibration modes along the reaction coordinate in the complexes are described.