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Sample records for acid residues forming

  1. Residual cadmium forms in acid-extracted anaerobically digested sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Feltz, R.E.; Logan, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of phosphorus and lime additions after acid extraction on residual Cd solubility and chemical forms in an anaerobically digested sewage sludge were investigated. High Cd content anaerobically digested sewage sludge was aerated and then acidified to pH 2 to solubilize Cd. After 18 h of acidification, the sludge was dewatered and the supernatant and solids separated. Seventy or more percent of the Cd was removed from the solids. Similar amounts of Ni, Mn and Zn were also removed, but Cu removal was only 26% and that of Pb was < 5%. Before liming the sludge was amended with rock phosphate (RP) or monocalcium phosphate (MCP). The RP was insoluble while MCP dissolved, providing a high level of phosphate ligand for Cd precipitation or coprecipitation. Estimated sludge solution solubility products for major Fe, Al and Ca phosphates showed that several of these minerals could have precipitated with P addition, especially with MCP, and Cd may have coprecipitated with these solid phases. Cadmium phosphate may also have been formed in the MCP sludge. Chemical fractionation indicated that 50% of the Cd in the aerated unextracted sludge existed as inorganic precipitates with another 40% Na/sub 4/P/sub 2/O/sub 7/ extractable. Acidification solubilized 98% of the inorganic Cd and 86% of the organically bound Cd. Seventy-nine percent of the Cd remaining in the dewatered acidified sludge was in the KNO/sub 3/ extractable (exchangeable) fraction. Liming redistributed the Cd with 13 to 19% as inorganic precipitates, 70 to 85% organically bound and < 3% in the exchangeable fraction. Phosphate addition had no significant effect on Cd fractionation.

  2. Process for forming sulfuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen-Tong P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved electrode is disclosed for the anode in a sulfur cycle hydrogen generation process where sulfur dioxie is oxidized to form sulfuric acid at the anode. The active compound in the electrode is palladium, palladium oxide, an alloy of palladium, or a mixture thereof. The active compound may be deposited on a porous, stable, conductive substrate.

  3. Improving the acidic stability of a methyl parathion hydrolase by changing basic residues to acidic residues.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Wang, Ping; Tian, Jian; Jiang, Huachen; Wu, Ningfeng; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin; Fan, Yunliu

    2012-06-01

    The acidic stability of a methyl parathion hydrolase (Ochr-MPH) was improved by selectively changing basic amino acids to acidic ones. Mutation sites were selected based on the position-specific amino acid replacement probabilities (more than or equal to 0.2) and the entropy of each site (more than or equal to 0.8). Three mutants (K208E, K277D, and K208E/K277D) were more stable than the wild-type (WT). Their half-lives at pH 5.0 were 64, 68, 65 min, respectively, whereas that of WT was 39 min. The acidic stability of proteins may therefore be improved by changing selected basic amino acid residues to acidic ones.

  4. XPS and STEM studies of Allende acid insoluble residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.; Clarke, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Data on Allende acid residues obtained both before and after etching with hot HNO3 are presented. X-ray photoelectron spectra show predominantly carbonaceous material plus Fe-deficient chromite in both cases. The HNO3 oxidizes the carbonaceous material to some extent. The small chromites in these residues have a wide range of compositions somewhat paralleling those observed in larger Allende chromites and in Murchison chromites, especially in the high Al contents; however, they are deficient in divalent cations, which makes them metastable and indicates that they must have formed at relatively low temperatures. It is suggested that they formed by precipitation of Cr(3+) and Fe(3+) from olivine at low temperature or during rapid cooling.

  5. NEUTRALIZATION OF THE ASPARTIC ACID RESIDUE D367, BUT NOT D454, INHIBITS BINDING OF NA+ TO THE GLUTAMATE-FREE FORM AND CYCLING OF THE GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTER EAAC1

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Zhen; Zhang, Zhou; Grewer, Christof

    2008-01-01

    Substrate transport by the plasma membrane glutamate transporter EAAC1 is coupled to cotransport of three sodium ions. One of these Na+ ions binds to the transporter already in the absence of glutamate. Here, we have investigated the possible involvement of two conserved aspartic acid residues in transmembrane segments 7 and 8 of EAAC1, D367 and D454, in Na+ cotransport. In order to test the effect of charge neutralization mutations in these positions on Na+ binding to the glutamate-free transporter, we recorded the Na+-induced anion leak current to determine the Km of EAAC1 for Na+. For EAAC1WT, this Km was determined as 120 mM. When the negative charge of D367 was neutralized by mutagenesis to asparagine, Na+ activated the anion leak current with a Km of about 2 M, indicating dramatically impaired Na+ binding to the mutant transporter. In contrast, the Na+ affinity of EAAC1D454N was virtually unchanged compared to the wild type transporter (Km = 90 mM). The reduced occupancy of the Na+ binding site of EAAC1D367N resulted in a dramatic reduction in glutamate affinity (Km = 3.6 mM, 140 mM [Na+]), which could be partially overcome by increasing extracellular [Na+]. In addition to impairing Na+ binding, the D367N mutation slowed glutamate transport, as shown by pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of transport currents, by strongly decreasing the rate of a reaction step associated with glutamate translocation. Our data are consistent with a model in which D367, but not D454 is involved in coordinating the bound Na+ in the glutamate-free transporter form. PMID:16478724

  6. 40 CFR 180.289 - Methanearsonic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... residues. 180.289 Section 180.289 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.289 Methanearsonic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established...

  7. 40 CFR 180.311 - Cacodylic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... residues. 180.311 Section 180.311 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.311 Cacodylic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established for...

  8. 40 CFR 180.289 - Methanearsonic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Methanearsonic acid; tolerances for...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.289 Methanearsonic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established...

  9. 40 CFR 180.289 - Methanearsonic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methanearsonic acid; tolerances for...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.289 Methanearsonic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established...

  10. 40 CFR 180.289 - Methanearsonic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methanearsonic acid; tolerances for...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.289 Methanearsonic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established...

  11. 40 CFR 180.289 - Methanearsonic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methanearsonic acid; tolerances for...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.289 Methanearsonic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established...

  12. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1989-12-05

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

  13. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1987-02-27

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and thence quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal. 1 fig.

  14. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1989-01-01

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

  15. 40 CFR 180.180 - Orthoarsenic acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Orthoarsenic acid; tolerance for residues. 180.180 Section 180.180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific...

  16. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  17. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl- N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints.

  18. 40 CFR 180.550 - Arsanilic acid [(4-aminophenyl) arsonic acid]; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for residues of the plant growth regulator arsanilic acid , in or on the following food commodities in...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific...

  19. 40 CFR 180.550 - Arsanilic acid [(4-aminophenyl) arsonic acid]; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for residues of the plant growth regulator arsanilic acid , in or on the following food commodities in...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific...

  20. 40 CFR 180.550 - Arsanilic acid [(4-aminophenyl) arsonic acid]; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for residues of the plant growth regulator arsanilic acid , in or on the following food commodities in...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific...

  1. Effect of the secondary structure of carbohydrate residues of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) on the local dynamics of Trp residues.

    PubMed

    Albani, Jihad René

    2004-01-01

    We studied in this work the relation between the secondary structure of the carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein and the local motions of Trp residues of the protein. We measured for this purpose the fluorescence emission intensity and anisotropy of the Trp residues between -46 and +30 degrees of the sialylated and asialylated protein. Our results indicate that, in both forms, the global profile of the emission intensity with temperature shows that Trp residues display static and collisional interaction with the neighboring amino acids. However, the profile of the asialylated form is more structured than that observed for the sialylated protein. The Y-plot analysis of the emission-anisotropy results indicated that the frictional resistance to rotation of the surface Trp residue is less important in the sialylated protein than in the asialylated form. This result is in good agreement with the fact that, in the asialylated conformation, the carbohydrate residues are closer to the protein surface than in the sialylated form, thereby increasing the contact of the surface Trp residue with the neighboring amino acids. Also, the interaction between the carbohydrate residues and the surface Trp residue contributes to the modification of the frictional resistance to rotation of the fluorophore.

  2. Microscopic residues of bone from dissolving human remains in acids.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Erwin; Zoon, Peter; van Wijk, Mayonne; Gerretsen, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Dissolving bodies is a current method of disposing of human remains and has been practiced throughout the years. During the last decade in the Netherlands, two cases have emerged in which human remains were treated with acid. In the first case, the remains of a cremated body were treated with hydrofluoric acid. In the second case, two complete bodies were dissolved in a mixture of hydrochloric and sulfuric acid. In both cases, a great variety of evidence was collected at the scene of crime, part of which was embedded in resin, polished, and investigated using SEM/EDX. Apart from macroscopic findings like residual bone and artificial teeth, in both cases, distinct microscopic residues of bone were found as follows: (partly) digested bone, thin-walled structures, and recrystallized calcium phosphate. Although some may believe it is possible to dissolve a body in acid completely, at least some of these microscopic residues will always be found.

  3. Acid transformation of bauxite residue: Conversion of its alkaline characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangfeng; Li, Meng; Xue, Shengguo; Hartley, William; Chen, Chengrong; Wu, Chuan; Li, Xiaofei; Li, Yiwei

    2017-02-15

    Bauxite residue (BR) is a highly alkaline solid hazardous waste produced from bauxite processing for alumina production. Alkaline transformation appears to reduce the environmental risk of bauxite residue disposal areas (BRDAs) whilst potentially providing opportunities for the sustainable reuse and on-going management of BR. Mineral acids, a novel citric acid and a hybrid combination of acid-gypsum treatments were investigated for their potential to reduce residue pH and total alkalinity and transform the alkaline mineral phase. XRD results revealed that with the exception of andradite, the primary alkaline solid phases of cancrinite, grossular and calcite were transformed into discriminative products based on the transformation used. Supernatants separated from BR and transformed bauxite residue (TBR) displayed distinct changes in soluble Na, Ca and Al, and a reduction in pH and total alkalinity. SEM images suggest that mineral acid transformations promote macro-aggregate formation, and the positive promotion of citric acid, confirming the removal or reduction in soluble and exchangeable Na. NEXAFS analysis of Na K-edge revealed that the chemical speciation of Na in TBRs was consistent with BR. Three acid treatments and gypsum combination had no effect on Na speciation, which affects the distribution of Na revealed by sodium STXM imaging.

  4. Electron microscopy of carbonaceous matter in Allende acid residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkin, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of characteristic diffuse ring diffraction patterns, much of the carbonaceous matter in a large suite of Allende acid residues has been identified as a variety of turbostratic carbon. Crystallites of this phase contain randomly stacked sp(2) hybridized carbon layers and diffraction patterns resemble those from carbon black and glassy carbon. Carbynes are probably absent, and are certainly restricted to less than 0.5% of these acid residues. The work of Ott et al. (1981) provides a basis for the possibility that turbostratic carbon is a carrier of noble gases, but an additional component - amorphous carbon - may be necessary to explain the high release temperatures of noble gases as well as the glassy character of many of the carbonaceous particles. Carbynes are considered to be questionable as important carriers of noble gases in the Allende acid residues.

  5. Polymorphisms at Amino Acid Residues 141 and 154 Influence Conformational Variation in Ovine PrP

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sujeong; Thackray, Alana M.; Hopkins, Lee; Monie, Tom P.; Burke, David F.; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphisms in ovine PrP at amino acid residues 141 and 154 are associated with susceptibility to ovine prion disease: Leu141Arg154 with classical scrapie and Phe141Arg154 and Leu141His154 with atypical scrapie. Classical scrapie is naturally transmissible between sheep, whereas this may not be the case with atypical scrapie. Critical amino acid residues will determine the range or stability of structural changes within the ovine prion protein or its functional interaction with potential cofactors, during conversion of PrPC to PrPSc in these different forms of scrapie disease. Here we computationally identified that regions of ovine PrP, including those near amino acid residues 141 and 154, displayed more conservation than expected based on local structural environment. Molecular dynamics simulations showed these conserved regions of ovine PrP displayed genotypic differences in conformational repertoire and amino acid side-chain interactions. Significantly, Leu141Arg154 PrP adopted an extended beta sheet arrangement in the N-terminal palindromic region more frequently than the Phe141Arg154 and Leu141His154 variants. We supported these computational observations experimentally using circular dichroism spectroscopy and immunobiochemical studies on ovine recombinant PrP. Collectively, our observations show amino acid residues 141 and 154 influence secondary structure and conformational change in ovine PrP that may correlate with different forms of scrapie. PMID:25126555

  6. Lactic Acid and Biosurfactants Production from Residual Cellulose Films.

    PubMed

    Portilla Rivera, Oscar Manuel; Arzate Martínez, Guillermo; Jarquín Enríquez, Lorenzo; Vázquez Landaverde, Pedro Alberto; Domínguez González, José Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The increasing amounts of residual cellulose films generated as wastes all over the world represent a big scale problem for the meat industry regarding to environmental and economic issues. The use of residual cellulose films as a feedstock of glucose-containing solutions by acid hydrolysis and further fermentation into lactic acid and biosurfactants was evaluated as a method to diminish and revalorize these wastes. Under a treatment consisting in sulfuric acid 6% (v/v); reaction time 2 h; solid liquid ratio 9 g of film/100 mL of acid solution, and temperature 130 °C, 35 g/L of glucose and 49% of solubilized film was obtained. From five lactic acid strains, Lactobacillus plantarum was the most suitable for metabolizing the glucose generated. The process was scaled up under optimized conditions in a 2-L bioreactor, producing 3.4 g/L of biomass, 18 g/L of lactic acid, and 15 units of surface tension reduction of a buffer phosphate solution. Around 50% of the cellulose was degraded by the treatment applied, and the liqueurs generated were useful for an efficient production of lactic acid and biosurfactants using L. plantarum. Lactobacillus bacteria can efficiently utilize glucose from cellulose films hydrolysis without the need of clarification of the liqueurs.

  7. Relation between the secondary structure of carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) and the fluorescence of the protein.

    PubMed

    Albani, Jihad R

    2003-05-01

    We studied in this work the relation that exists between the secondary structure of the glycans of alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein and the fluorescence of the Trp residues of the protein. We calculated for that the efficiency of quenching and the radiative and non-radiative constants. Our results indicate that the glycans display a spatial structure that is modified upon asialylation. The asialylated conformation is closer to the protein matrix than the sialylated form, inducing by that a decrease in the fluorescence parameters of the Trp residues. In fact, the mean quantum yield of Trp residues in sialylated and asialylated alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein are 0.0645 and 0.0385, respectively. Analysis of the fluorescence emission of alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein as the result of two contributions (surface and hydrophobic domains) indicates that quantum yields of both classes of Trp residues are lower when the protein is in the asialylated form. Also, the mean fluorescence lifetime of Trp residues decreases from 2.285 ns in the sialylated protein to 1.948 ns in the asialylated one. The radiative rate constant k(r) of the Trp residues in the sialylated alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein is higher than that in the asialylated protein. Thus, the carbohydrate residues are closer to the Trp residues in the absence of sialic acid. The modification of the spatial conformation of the glycans upon asialylation is confirmed by the decrease of the fluorescence lifetimes of Calcofluor, a fluorophore that binds to the carbohydrate residues. Finally, thermal intensity quenching of Calcofluor bound to alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein shows that the carbohydrate residues have slower residual motions in the absence of sialic acid residues.

  8. Intramolecular cyclization of aspartic acid residues assisted by three water molecules: a density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota

    2014-01-01

    Aspartic acid (Asp) residues in peptides and proteins (l-Asp) are known to undergo spontaneous nonenzymatic reactions to form l-β-Asp, d-Asp, and d-β-Asp residues. The formation of these abnormal Asp residues in proteins may affect their three-dimensional structures and hence their properties and functions. Indeed, the reactions have been thought to contribute to aging and pathologies. Most of the above reactions of the l-Asp residues proceed via a cyclic succinimide intermediate. In this paper, a novel three-water-assisted mechanism is proposed for cyclization of an Asp residue (forming a gem-diol precursor of the succinimide) by the B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) density functional theory calculations carried out for an Asp-containing model compound (Ace-Asp-Nme, where Ace = acetyl and Nme = NHCH3). The three water molecules act as catalysts by mediating ‘long-range’ proton transfers. In the proposed mechanism, the amide group on the C-terminal side of the Asp residue is first converted to the tautomeric iminol form (iminolization). Then, reorientation of a water molecule and a conformational change occur successively, followed by the nucleophilic attack of the iminol nitrogen on the carboxyl carbon of the Asp side chain to form the gem-diol species. A satisfactory agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental energetics.

  9. Methodology for detecting residual phosphoric acid in polybenzoxazole fibers.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Su; Sieber, John; Guttman, Charles; Rice, Kirk; Flynn, Kathleen; Watson, Stephanie; Holmes, Gale

    2009-12-01

    Because of the premature failure of in-service soft-body armor containing the ballistic fiber poly[(benzo-[1,2-d:5,4-d']-benzoxazole-2,6-diyl)-1,4-phenylene] (PBO), the Office of Law Enforcement Standards (OLES) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) initiated a research program to investigate the reasons for this failure and to develop testing methodologies and protocols to ensure that these types of failures do not reoccur. In a report that focused on the stability of the benzoxazole ring that is characteristic of PBO fibers, Holmes, G. A.; Rice, K.; Snyder, C. R. J. Mater. Sci. 2006, 41, 4105-4116, showed that the benzoxazole ring was susceptible to hydrolytic degradation under acid conditions. Because of the processing conditions for the fibers, it is suspected by many researchers that residual phosphoric acid may cause degradation of the benzoxazole ring resulting in a reduction of ballistic performance. Prior to this work, no definitive data have indicated the presence of phosphoric acid since the residual phosphorus is not easily extracted and the processed fibers are known to incorporate phosphorus containing processing aids. Methods to efficiently extract phosphorus from PBO are described in this article. Further, characterization determined that the majority of the extractable phosphorus in PBO was attributed to the octyldecyl phosphate processing aid with some phosphoric acid being detected. Analysis by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of model PBO oligomers indicates that the nonextractable phosphorus is attached to the PBO polymer chain as a monoaryl phosphate ester. The response of model aryl phosphates to NaOH exposure indicates that monoaryl phosphate ester is stable to NaOH washes used in the manufacturing process to neutralize the phosphoric acid reaction medium and to extract residual phosphorus impurities.

  10. Residues involved in the pore-forming activity of the Clostridium perfringens iota toxin.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Oliver; Maier, Elke; Waltenberger, Eva; Mazuet, Christelle; Benz, Roland; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota toxin is a binary toxin that is organized into enzyme (Ia) and binding (Ib) components. Ib forms channels in lipid bilayers and mediates the transport of Ia into the target cells. Here we show that Ib residues 334-359 contain a conserved pattern of alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues forming two amphipathic β-strands involved in membrane insertion and channel formation. This stretch of amino acids shows remarkable structural and functional analogies with the β-pore-forming domain of C. perfringens epsilon toxin. Several mutations within the two amphipathic β-strands affected pore formation, single-channel conductance and ion selectivity (S339E-S341E, Q345H N346E) confirming their involvement in channel formation. F454 of Ib corresponds to the Φ-clamp F427 of anthrax protective antigen and F428 of C2II binary toxins. The mutation F454A resulted in a loss of cytotoxicity and strong increase in single-channel conductance (500 pS as compared with 85 pS in 1 M KCl) with a slight decrease in cation selectivity, indicating that the Φ-clamp is highly conserved and crucial for binary toxin activity. In contrast, the mutants Q367D, N430D, L443E had no or only minor effects on Ib properties, while T360I, T360A and T360W caused a dramatic effect on ion selectivity and single-channel conductance, indicating gross disturbance of the oligomer structure. This suggests that, at least in the iota toxin family, T360 has a structural role in the pore organization. Moreover, introduction of charged residues within the channel (S339E-S341E) or in the vestibule (Q367D, N430D and L443E) had virtually no effect on chloroquine or Ia binding, whereas F454A, T360I, T360A and T360W strongly decreased the chloroquine and Ia affinity to Ib. These results support that distinct residues within the vestibule interact with chloroquine and Ia or are responsible for channel structure, while the channel lining amino acids play a less important role.

  11. Koetjapic acid chloro-form hemisolvate.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Z D; Aisha, A F A; Majid, A M S Abdul; Yeap, Chin Sing; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2010-05-08

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C(30)H(46)O(4)·0.5CHCl(3), consists of one koetjapic acid [systematic name: (3R,4aR,4bS,7S,8S,10bS,12aS)-7-(2-carboxy-ethyl)-3,4b,7,10b,12a-penta-methyl-8-(prop-1-en-2-yl)-1,2,3,4,4a,4b,5,6,7,8,9,10,10b,11,12,12a-hexa-deca-hydro-chrysene-3-carboxylic acid] mol-ecule and one half-mol-ecule of chloro-form solvent, which is disordered about a twofold rotation axis. The symmetry-independent component is further disordered over two sites, with occupancies of 0.30 and 0.20. The koetjapic acid contains a fused four-ring system, A/B/C/D. The A/B, B/C and C/D junctions adopt E/trans/cis configurations, respectively. The conformation of ring A is inter-mediate between envelope and half-chair and ring B adopts an envelope conformation whereas rings C and D adopt chair conformations. A weak intra-molecular C-H⋯O hydrogen bond is observed. The koetjapic acid mol-ecules are linked into dimers by two pairs of inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The dimers are stacked along the c axis.

  12. 77 FR 65834 - Residues of Fatty Acids, Tall-Oil, Ethoxylated Propoxylated; Tolerance Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Residues of Fatty Acids, Tall-Oil, Ethoxylated Propoxylated; Tolerance Exemption... an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of fatty acids, tall-oil, ethoxylated... residues of fatty ] acids, tall-oil, ethoxylated propoxylated on food or feed commodities. DATES:...

  13. New form of acid phosphatase during lysosome biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, G R; Aithal, H N; Toback, F G; Getz, G S

    1981-01-01

    Lysosome formation was induced in cells of the renal medulla by feeding rats on a K+-deficient diet. The role of the endoplasmic reticulum in the production of acid phosphatase, a typical lysosomal enzyme, was examined. Lysosomal and microsomal fractions were prepared for study by differential centrifugation of homogenates of renal papilla and inner stripe of red medulla. Acid phosphatase activity in the microsomal fraction was distinguished from the activity in the lysosomal fraction in normal tissue by differences in pH optima, tartrate inhibition, distribution of multiple forms after polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and detergent-sensitivity. During progressive K+ depletion, acid phosphatase activity in both microsomal and lysosomal fractions of the tissue increased 3-fold. In the lysosomes, K+ depletion was associated with the appearance of a new band of acid phosphatase. The neuraminidase-sensitivity of this band on polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis indicated that the enzyme protein had been modified by the addition of sialic acid residues. K+ depletion also altered the lysosomal enzyme so that thiol compounds were able to stimulate its activity. Images Fig. 4. PMID:7326004

  14. Chemical and isotopic compositions in acid residues from various meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kano, N.; Yamakoshi, K.; Matsuzaki, H.; Nogami, K.

    1993-01-01

    We are planning to carry out systematic isotopic investigations of Ru, Mg, etc., in primordial samples. The investigations will be pursued in the context of a study of the pre-history of the solar system. It is hoped that the study will yield direct evidence for processes of nucleosynthesis in the pre-solar stage and detection of extinct radioactive nuclides. In this paper, we present the results of chemical compositions of acid residues obtained from three types of meteorites: Canyon Diablo (IA), Allende (CV3), and Nuevo Mercuro (H5); and the preliminary results of Ru isotopic compositions.

  15. Natural populations of lactic acid bacteria isolated from vegetable residues and silage fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Cao, Y; Cai, Y; Terada, F

    2010-07-01

    Natural populations of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and silage fermentation of vegetable residues were studied. Fifty-two strains of LAB isolated from cabbage, Chinese cabbage, and lettuce residues were identified and characterized. The LAB strains were gram-positive and catalase-negative bacteria, which were divided into 6 groups (A to F) according to morphological and biochemical characteristics. The strains in group A were rods that did not produce gas from glucose and formed the d and l isomers of lactate. Groups B and C were homofermentative cocci that formed l-lactic acid. Groups D, E, and F were heterofermentative cocci that formed d-lactic acid. Based on 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis, group A to F strains were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactococcus piscium, Lactococcus lactis, Leuconostoc citreum, Weissella soli and Leuconostoc gelidum, respectively. The prevalent LAB, predominantly homofermentative lactobacilli, consisted of Lactobacillus plantarum (34.6%), Weissella soli (19.2%), Leuconostoc gelidum (15.4%), Leuconostoc citreum (13.5%), Lactococcus lactis (9.6%), and Lactococcus piscium (7.7%). Lactobacillus plantarum was the dominant member of the LAB population in 3 types of vegetable residues. These vegetable residues contained a high level of crude protein (20.2 to 28.4% of dry matter). These silages prepared by using a small-scale fermentation system were well preserved, with low pH and a relatively high content of lactate. This study suggests that the vegetable residues contain abundant LAB species and nutrients, and that they could be well preserved by making silage, which is a potentially good vegetable protein source for livestock diets.

  16. Identification of the amino acid residues responsible for stable nucleosome formation by histone H3.Y.

    PubMed

    Kujirai, Tomoya; Horikoshi, Naoki; Xie, Yan; Taguchi, Hiroyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2017-01-24

    Histone H3.Y is conserved among primates. We previously reported that exogenously produced H3.Y accumulates around transcription start sites, suggesting that it may play a role in transcription regulation. The H3.Y nucleosome forms a relaxed chromatin conformation with flexible DNA ends. The H3.Y-specific Lys42 residue is partly responsible for enhancing the flexibility of the nucleosomal DNA. To our surprise, we found that H3.Y stably associates with chromatin and nucleosomes in vivo and in vitro. However, the H3.Y residues responsible for its stable nucleosome incorporation have not been identified yet. In the present study, we performed comprehensive mutational analyses of H3.Y, and determined that the H3.Y C-terminal region including amino acid residues 124-135 is responsible for its stable association with DNA. Among the H3.Y C-terminal residues, the H3.Y Met124 residue significantly contributed to the stable DNA association with the H3.Y-H4 tetramer. The H3.Y M124I mutation substantially reduced the H3.Y-H4 association in the nucleosome. In contrast, the H3.Y K42R mutation affected the nucleosome stability less, although it contributes to the flexible DNA ends of the nucleosome. Therefore, these H3.Y-specific residues, Lys42 and Met124, play different and specific roles in nucleosomal DNA relaxation and stable nucleosome formation, respectively, in chromatin.

  17. Removal of coagulant aluminum from water treatment residuals by acid.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Tetsuji; Nishijima, Wataru; Sugimoto, Mayo; Saka, Naoyuki; Nakai, Satoshi; Tanabe, Kazuyasu; Ito, Junki; Takenaka, Kenji; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2014-09-01

    Sediment sludge during coagulation and sedimentation in drinking water treatment is called "water treatment residuals (WTR)". Polyaluminum chloride (PAC) is mainly used as a coagulant in Japan. The recycling of WTR has been desired; one method for its reuse is as plowed soil. However, WTR reuse in this way is inhibited by the aluminum from the added PAC, because of its high adsorption capacity for phosphate and other fertilizer components. The removal of such aluminum from WTR would therefore be advantageous for its reuse as plowed soil; this research clarified the effect of acid washing on aluminum removal from WTR and on plant growth in the treated soil. The percentage of aluminum removal from raw WTR by sulphuric acid solution was around 90% at pH 3, the percentage decreasing to 40% in the case of a sun-dried sample. The maximum phosphate adsorption capacity was decreased and the available phosphorus was increased by acid washing, with 90% of aluminum removal. The enhancement of Japanese mustard spinach growth and the increased in plant uptake of phosphates following acid washing were observed.

  18. Mutagenesis of conserved amino acids of Helicobacter pylori fur reveals residues important for function.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Beth M; Gancz, Hanan; Benoit, Stéphane L; Evans, Sarah; Olsen, Cara H; Michel, Sarah L J; Maier, Robert J; Merrell, D Scott

    2010-10-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) of the medically important pathogen Helicobacter pylori is unique in that it has been shown to function as a repressor both in the presence of an Fe2+ cofactor and in its apo (non-Fe2+-bound) form. However, virtually nothing is known concerning the amino acid residues that are important for Fur functioning. Therefore, mutations in six conserved amino acid residues of H. pylori Fur were constructed and analyzed for their impact on both iron-bound and apo repression. In addition, accumulation of the mutant proteins, protein secondary structure, DNA binding ability, iron binding capacity, and the ability to form higher-order structures were also examined for each mutant protein. While none of the mutated residues completely abrogated the function of Fur, we were able to identify residues that were critical for both iron-bound and apo-Fur repression. One mutation, V64A, did not alter regulation of any target genes. However, each of the five remaining mutations showed an effect on either iron-bound or apo regulation. Of these, H96A, E110A, and E117A mutations altered iron-bound Fur regulation and were all shown to influence iron binding to different extents. Additionally, the H96A mutation was shown to alter Fur oligomerization, and the E110A mutation was shown to impact oligomerization and DNA binding. Conversely, the H134A mutant exhibited changes in apo-Fur regulation that were the result of alterations in DNA binding. Although the E90A mutant exhibited alterations in apo-Fur regulation, this mutation did not affect any of the assessed protein functions. This study is the first for H. pylori to analyze the roles of specific amino acid residues of Fur in function and continues to highlight the complexity of Fur regulation in this organism.

  19. Conservation of cysteine residues in fungal histidine acid phytases.

    PubMed

    Mullaney, Edward J; Ullah, Abul H J

    2005-03-11

    Amino acid sequence analysis of fungal histidine acid phosphatases displaying phytase activity has revealed a conserved eight-cysteine motif. These conserved amino acids are not directly associated with catalytic function; rather they appear to be essential in the formation of disulfide bridges. Their role is seen as being similar to another eight-cysteine motif recently reported in the amino acid sequence of nearly 500 plant polypeptides. An additional disulfide bridge formed by two cysteines at the N-terminus of all the filamentous ascomycete phytases was also observed. Disulfide bridges are known to increase both stability and heat tolerance in proteins. It is therefore plausible that this extra disulfide bridge contributes to the higher stability found in phytase from some Aspergillus species. To engineer an enhanced phytase for the feed industry, it is imperative that the role of disulfide bridges be taken into cognizance and possibly be increased in number to further elevate stability in this enzyme.

  20. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp) residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe) as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA), which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition) to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds) occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism. PMID:25588215

  1. Role of lysine and acidic amino acid residues on the insecticidal activity of Jackbean urease.

    PubMed

    Real-Guerra, Rafael; Carlini, Célia Regina; Stanisçuaski, Fernanda

    2013-09-01

    Canavalia ensiformis has three isoforms of urease: Jackbean urease (JBU), Jackbean urease II and canatoxin. These isoforms present several biological activities, independent from the enzymatic property, such as entomotoxicity and antifungal properties. The entomotoxic activity is a property of the whole protein, as well as of a 10 kDa peptide released by insect digestive enzymes. Here we have used chemical modification to observe the influence of lysines and acidic residues on JBU enzymatic and insecticidal activities. Chemical modification of lysine residues was performed with dimethylamine-borane complex and formaldehyde, and acidic residues were modified by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and ethylenediamine. Derivatized ureases, called JBU-Lys (lysine-modified) and JBU-Ac (acidic residues-modified), were assayed for their biochemical and insecticidal properties. Neither modification altered significantly the kinetic parameters analyzed, indicating that no residue critical for the enzyme activity was affected and that the modifications did not incur in any significant structural alteration. On the other hand, both modifications reduced the toxic activity of the native protein fed to Dysdercus peruvianus. The changes observed in the entomotoxic property of the derivatized proteins reflect alterations in different steps of JBU's toxicity towards insects. JBU-Ac is not susceptible to hydrolysis by insect digestive enzymes, hence impairing the release of toxic peptide(s), while JBU-Lys is processed as the native protein. On the other hand, the antidiuretic effect of JBU on Rhodnius prolixus is altered in JBU-Lys, but not in JBU-Ac. Altogether, these data emphasize the role of lysine and acidic residues on the insecticidal properties of ureases.

  2. Standard test method for acidity of distillation residues or hydrocarbon liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This method covers the qualitative determination of the acidity of the distillation residue from a gasoline. The sample of distillation residue or hydrocarbon liquid is shaken with water and the aqueous layer tested for acidity to methyl orange. Some petroleum products are treated with mineral acid as part of the refining procedure. Obviously, any residual mineral acid in a petroleum product is undesirable. The absence of a positive indication in the test for acidity of the distillation residue or aqueous extract of a hydrocarbon liquid is an assurance of the care used in refining the fuel or solvent.

  3. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances... Tolerances § 180.202 p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance is established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite...

  4. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances... Tolerances § 180.202 p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance is established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite...

  5. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances... Tolerances § 180.202 p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance is established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite...

  6. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances... Tolerances § 180.202 p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance is established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite...

  7. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances... Tolerances § 180.202 p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance is established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite...

  8. 40 CFR 180.325 - 2-(m-Chlorophenoxy) propionic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 2-(m-Chlorophenoxy) propionic acid... Tolerances § 180.325 2-(m-Chlorophenoxy) propionic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance is established for negligible residues of the plant regulator 2-(m-chlorophenoxy) propionic acid from...

  9. Comparison of the Organic Composition of Cometary Samples with Residues Formed from the UV Irradiation of Astrophysical Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, S. N.; Nuevo, M.; Sandford, S. A.; Cody, G. D.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Stroud, R. M.; DeGregorio, B. T.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Stardust mission successfully collected material from Comet 81P/Wild 2 [1], including authentic cometary grains [2]. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy analysis of these samples indicates the presence of oxygen-rich and nitrogen-rich organic materials, which contain a broad variety of functional groups (carbonyls, C=C bonds, aliphatic chains, amines, arnides, etc.) [3]. One component of these organics appears to contain very little aromatic carbon and bears some similarity to the organic residues produced by the irradiation of ices of interstellar/cometary composition, Stardust samples were also recently shown to contain glycine, the smallest biological amino acid [4]. Organic residues produced froth the UV irradiation of astrophysical ice analogs are already known to contain a large suite of organic molecules including amino acids [5-7], amphiphilic compounds (fatty acids) [8], and other complex species. This work presents a comparison between XANES spectra measured from organic residues formed in the laboratory with similar data of cometary samples collected by the Stardust mission

  10. Identification of Key Amino Acid Residues Modulating Intracellular and In vitro Microcin E492 Amyloid Formation.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Paulina; Marcoleta, Andrés; Lobos-Ruiz, Pablo; Arranz, Rocío; Valpuesta, José M; Monasterio, Octavio; Lagos, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Microcin E492 (MccE492) is a pore-forming bacteriocin produced and exported by Klebsiella pneumoniae RYC492. Besides its antibacterial activity, excreted MccE492 can form amyloid fibrils in vivo as well as in vitro. It has been proposed that bacterial amyloids can be functional playing a biological role, and in the particular case of MccE492 it would control the antibacterial activity. MccE492 amyloid fibril's morphology and formation kinetics in vitro have been well-characterized, however, it is not known which amino acid residues determine its amyloidogenic propensity, nor if it forms intracellular amyloid inclusions as has been reported for other bacterial amyloids. In this work we found the conditions in which MccE492 forms intracellular amyloids in Escherichia coli cells, that were visualized as round-shaped inclusion bodies recognized by two amyloidophilic probes, 2-4'-methylaminophenyl benzothiazole and thioflavin-S. We used this property to perform a flow cytometry-based assay to evaluate the aggregation propensity of MccE492 mutants, that were designed using an in silico prediction of putative aggregation hotspots. We established that the predicted amino acid residues 54-63, effectively act as a pro-amyloidogenic stretch. As in the case of other amyloidogenic proteins, this region presented two gatekeeper residues (P57 and P59), which disfavor both intracellular and in vitro MccE492 amyloid formation, preventing an uncontrolled aggregation. Mutants in each of these gatekeeper residues showed faster in vitro aggregation and bactericidal inactivation kinetics, and the two mutants were accumulated as dense amyloid inclusions in more than 80% of E. coli cells expressing these variants. In contrast, the MccE492 mutant lacking residues 54-63 showed a significantly lower intracellular aggregation propensity and slower in vitro polymerization kinetics. Electron microscopy analysis of the amyloids formed in vitro by these mutants revealed that, although with

  11. Identification of Key Amino Acid Residues Modulating Intracellular and In vitro Microcin E492 Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Paulina; Marcoleta, Andrés; Lobos-Ruiz, Pablo; Arranz, Rocío; Valpuesta, José M.; Monasterio, Octavio; Lagos, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Microcin E492 (MccE492) is a pore-forming bacteriocin produced and exported by Klebsiella pneumoniae RYC492. Besides its antibacterial activity, excreted MccE492 can form amyloid fibrils in vivo as well as in vitro. It has been proposed that bacterial amyloids can be functional playing a biological role, and in the particular case of MccE492 it would control the antibacterial activity. MccE492 amyloid fibril’s morphology and formation kinetics in vitro have been well-characterized, however, it is not known which amino acid residues determine its amyloidogenic propensity, nor if it forms intracellular amyloid inclusions as has been reported for other bacterial amyloids. In this work we found the conditions in which MccE492 forms intracellular amyloids in Escherichia coli cells, that were visualized as round-shaped inclusion bodies recognized by two amyloidophilic probes, 2-4′-methylaminophenyl benzothiazole and thioflavin-S. We used this property to perform a flow cytometry-based assay to evaluate the aggregation propensity of MccE492 mutants, that were designed using an in silico prediction of putative aggregation hotspots. We established that the predicted amino acid residues 54–63, effectively act as a pro-amyloidogenic stretch. As in the case of other amyloidogenic proteins, this region presented two gatekeeper residues (P57 and P59), which disfavor both intracellular and in vitro MccE492 amyloid formation, preventing an uncontrolled aggregation. Mutants in each of these gatekeeper residues showed faster in vitro aggregation and bactericidal inactivation kinetics, and the two mutants were accumulated as dense amyloid inclusions in more than 80% of E. coli cells expressing these variants. In contrast, the MccE492 mutant lacking residues 54–63 showed a significantly lower intracellular aggregation propensity and slower in vitro polymerization kinetics. Electron microscopy analysis of the amyloids formed in vitro by these mutants revealed that, although

  12. The amino acid sequence around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues, and the buried cysteine residue in ficin.

    PubMed

    Husain, S S; Lowe, G

    1970-04-01

    Ficin that had been prepared from the latex of Ficus glabrata by salt fractionation and chromatography on carboxymethylcellulose was completely and irreversibly inhibited with 1,3-dibromo[2-(14)C]acetone and then treated with N-(4-dimethylamino-3,5-dinitrophenyl)maleimide in 6m-guanidinium chloride. After reduction and carboxymethylation of the labelled protein, it was digested with trypsin and alpha-chymotrypsin. Two radioactive peptides and two coloured peptides were isolated chromatographically and their sequences determined. The radioactive peptides revealed the amino acid sequences around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues and showed a high degree of homology with the omino acid sequence around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues in papain. The coloured peptides allowed the amino acid sequence around the buried cysteine residue in ficin to be determined.

  13. Residual Stress In Sheet Metal Parts Made By Incremental Forming Process

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Shigekazu; Nakamura, Tamotsu; Hayakawa, Kunio; Nakamura, Hideo; Motomura, Kazuo

    2007-05-17

    Incremental sheet metal forming, which uses a CNC forming stylus, is new flexible forming process not requiring the use of any expensive dies. We have applied the incremental forming process to dental prosthesis. This new process, however, posed difficult problems. After removing the outer portion of the incremental formed sheet metal part, the inner part is distorted. In this paper, the residual stress in the sheet metal part obtained by incremental forward stretch forming operations has been examined. Numerical simulations were conducted for solid elements. When small rigid ball slides on the metal sheet with a certain vertical feed, tension residual stress is produced in the upper layer of the sheet and compression stress in the lower. Then, the resultant moments throughout the sheet cause negative spring-back when the outer portion is removed. A systematic study of the behavior was conducted in this paper. Parameters considered included the tool radius and the vertical tool feed rate. The tip radius of forming stylus has a significant influence on the residual stress. The smaller radius of forming stylus, the larger bending force becomes. And new process with double forming styluses is examined to reduce the bending force.

  14. 40 CFR 180.297 - N-1-Naphthyl phthalamic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; tolerances for residues. 180.297 Section 180.297 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.297 N-1-Naphthyl phthalamic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances...

  15. 40 CFR 180.297 - N-1-Naphthyl phthalamic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; tolerances for residues. 180.297 Section 180.297 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.297 N-1-Naphthyl phthalamic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances...

  16. 40 CFR 180.297 - N-1-Naphthyl phthalamic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; tolerances for residues. 180.297 Section 180.297 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.297 N-1-Naphthyl phthalamic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances...

  17. 40 CFR 180.297 - N-1-Naphthyl phthalamic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; tolerances for residues. 180.297 Section 180.297 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.297 N-1-Naphthyl phthalamic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances...

  18. 40 CFR 180.297 - N-1-Naphthyl phthalamic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; tolerances for residues. 180.297 Section 180.297 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.297 N-1-Naphthyl phthalamic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances...

  19. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family*

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Miller, Darcie J.; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W.; Rock, Charles O.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins. PMID:26774272

  20. A resonance Raman spectroscopic study of the quadruplex form of polyriboinosinic acid.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, V; Jollès, B; Miskovsky, P; Chinsky, L

    1996-08-01

    The four stranded form of polyriboinosinic acid, or poly(rl), formed under conditions of high ionic strength, has been studied principally by resonance Raman spectroscopy excited in the ultraviolet absorbent band of the hypoxanthine residues. UV Absorption and circular dichroism studies were made, principally in order to verify the presence of the quadruplex form at the low concentrations of poly(rl) used, and a trial experiment with the structural probe Tb3+ was also performed. Experimental evidence is found for highly stacked metastable forms present at low concentrations of polynucleotide, which are destroyed by heating in favor of the two well known forms.

  1. Oxidation in Acidic Medium of Lignins from Agricultural Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labat, Gisele Aparecida Amaral; Gonçalves, Adilson Roberto

    Agricultural residues as sugarcane straw and bagasse are burned in boilers for generation of energy in sugar and alcohol industries. However, excess of those by-products could be used to obtain products with higher value. Pulping process generates cellulosic pulps and lignin. The lignin could be oxidized and applied in effluent treatments for heavy metal removal. Oxidized lignin presents very strong chelating properties. Lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse were obtained by ethanol-water pulping. Oxidation of lignins was carried out using acetic acid and Co/Mn/Br catalytical system at 50, 80, and 115 °C for 5 h. Kinetics of the reaction was accomplished by measuring the UV-visible region. Activation energy was calculated for lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse (34.2 and 23.4 kJ mol-1, respectively). The first value indicates higher cross-linked formation. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy data of samples collected during oxidation are very similar. Principal component analysis applied to spectra shows only slight structure modifications in lignins after oxidation reaction.

  2. Pyrolytic characteristics of biomass acid hydrolysis residue rich in lignin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanqin; Wei, Zhiguo; Yin, Xiuli; Wu, Chuangzhi

    2012-01-01

    Pyrolytic characteristics of acid hydrolysis residue (AHR) of corncob and pinewood (CAHR, WAHR) were investigated using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a self-designed pyrolysis apparatus. Gasification reactivity of CAHR char was then examined using TGA and X-ray diffractometer. Result of TGA showed that thermal degradation curves of AHR descended smoothly along with temperature increasing from 150 °C to 850 °C, while a "sharp mass loss stage" for original biomass feedstock (OBF) was observed. Char yield from AHR (42.64-30.35 wt.%) was found to be much greater than that from OBF (26.4-19.15 wt.%). In addition, gasification reactivity of CAHR char was lower than that of corncob char, and there was big difference in micro-crystallite structure. It was also found that CAHR char reactivity decreased with pyrolysis temperature, but increased with pyrolysis heating rate and gasification temperature at 850-950 °C. Furthermore, CAHR char reactivity performed better under steam atmosphere than under CO2 atmosphere.

  3. Mutation of aspartic acid residues in the fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975.

    PubMed Central

    Song, D D; Jacques, N A

    1999-01-01

    The site-directed mutated fructosyltransferases (Ftfs) of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, D312E, D312S, D312N and D312K were all active at 37 degrees C, indicating that Asp-312 present in the 'sucrose box' was not the nucleophilic Asp residue responsible for the formation of a covalent fructosyl-enzyme intermediate required for enzyme activity. Analysis of the kinetic constants of the purified mutated forms of the enzyme showed that Asp-312 was most likely an essential amino acid involved in determining acceptor recognition and/or stabilizing a beta-turn in the protein. In contrast, when the Asp-397 of the Ftf present in the conserved triplet RDP motif of all 60 bacterial and plant family-32 glycosylhydrolases was mutated to a Ser residue, both sucrose hydrolysis and polymerization ceased. Tryptophan emission spectra confirmed that this mutation did not alter protein structure. Comparison of published data from other site-directed mutated enzymes implicated the Asp residue in the RDP motif as the one that may form a transient covalent fructosyl intermediate during the catalysis of sucrose by the Ftf of S. salivarius. PMID:10548559

  4. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  5. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  6. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  7. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  8. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  9. Effects of the number of fatty acid residues on the phase behaviors of decaglycerol fatty acid esters.

    PubMed

    Ai, Sakiko; Ishitobi, Masahiko

    2006-04-15

    The effects of the number of fatty acid residues (n) in decaglycerol fatty acid esters, i.e., decaglycerol laurates (abbreviated to (C11)nG10), on the phase behaviors of three laurate esters, (C11)1.9G10, (C11)2.7G10, and (C11)3.4G10, were investigated. The unreacted decaglycerol remaining in each ester was removed by liquid extraction before use. (C11)1.9G10 formed hexagonal liquid crystals in aqueous solutions, while (C11)2.7G10 and (C11)3.4G10, which are more hydrophobic than (C11)1.9G10, formed lamellar liquid crystals. The cloud point in aqueous solution was measured for mixtures of these three esters. The cloud phenomenon was observed when the weight ratio of hydrophilic groups to the total surfactant (WH/WS) was around 0.6. The cloud point shifted to a markedly higher temperature, even with a slight increase in the WH/WS ratio. The solubilization abilities of (C11)nG10 for the oils m-xylene and (R)-(+)-limonene were also examined. When the WH/WS ratio was between 0.60 and 0.64, (C11)nG10 formed microemulsions and lyotropic liquid crystals in the presence of water and the oils. These self-organized structures were stable, even above 90 degrees C. It is concluded that the phase behavior of (C11)nG10 are insensitive to temperature, but strongly dependent on both the WH/WS ratio and the number of fatty acid residues (n).

  10. Properties of nanocellulose isolated from corncob residue using sulfuric acid, formic acid, oxidative and mechanical methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Li, Bin; Du, Haishun; Lv, Dong; Zhang, Yuedong; Yu, Guang; Mu, Xindong; Peng, Hui

    2016-10-20

    In this work, nanocellulose was extracted from bleached corncob residue (CCR), an underutilized lignocellulose waste from furfural industry, using four different methods (i.e. sulfuric acid hydrolysis, formic acid (FA) hydrolysis, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation, and pulp refining, respectively). The self-assembled structure, morphology, dimension, crystallinity, chemical structure and thermal stability of prepared nanocellulose were investigated. FA hydrolysis produced longer cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) than the one obtained by sulfuric acid hydrolysis, and resulted in high crystallinity and thermal stability due to its preferential degradation of amorphous cellulose and lignin. The cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) with fine and individualized structure could be isolated by TEMPO-mediated oxidation. In comparison with other nanocellulose products, the intensive pulp refining led to the CNFs with the longest length and the thickest diameter. This comparative study can help to provide an insight into the utilization of CCR as a potential source for nanocellulose production.

  11. Dihedral angle preferences of DNA and RNA binding amino acid residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Ponnuraj, Karthe; Saravanan, Konda Mani

    2017-04-01

    A protein can interact with DNA or RNA molecules to perform various cellular processes. Identifying or analyzing DNA/RNA binding site amino acid residues is important to understand molecular recognition process. It is quite possible to accurately model DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues in experimental protein-DNA/RNA complex by using the electron density map whereas, locating/modeling the binding site amino acid residues in the predicted three dimensional structures of DNA/RNA binding proteins is still a difficult task. Considering the above facts, in the present work, we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of dihedral angle preferences of DNA and RNA binding site amino acid residues by using a classical Ramachandran map. We have computed backbone dihedral angles of non-DNA/RNA binding residues and used as control dataset to make a comparative study. The dihedral angle preference of DNA and RNA binding site residues of twenty amino acid type is presented. Our analysis clearly revealed that the dihedral angles (φ, ψ) of DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues prefer to occupy (-89° to -60°, -59° to -30°) bins. The results presented in this paper will help to model/locate DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues with better accuracy.

  12. Glycolic acid-catalyzed deamidation of asparagine residues in degrading PLGA matrices: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Noriyoshi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2015-03-31

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is a strong candidate for being a drug carrier in drug delivery systems because of its biocompatibility and biodegradability. However, in degrading PLGA matrices, the encapsulated peptide and protein drugs can undergo various degradation reactions, including deamidation at asparagine (Asn) residues to give a succinimide species, which may affect their potency and/or safety. Here, we show computationally that glycolic acid (GA) in its undissociated form, which can exist in high concentration in degrading PLGA matrices, can catalyze the succinimide formation from Asn residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. A two-step mechanism was studied by quantum-chemical calculations using Ace-Asn-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHCH3) as a model compound. The first step is cyclization (intramolecular addition) to form a tetrahedral intermediate, and the second step is elimination of ammonia from the intermediate. Both steps involve an extensive bond reorganization mediated by a GA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The present findings are expected to be useful in the design of more effective and safe PLGA devices.

  13. Chlorine residuals and haloacetic acid reduction in rapid sand filtration.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yi-Hsueh; Wang, Gen-Shuch; Tung, Hsin-hsin

    2011-11-01

    It is quite rare to find biodegradation in rapid sand filtration for drinking water treatment. This might be due to frequent backwashes and low substrate levels. High chlorine concentrations may inhibit biofilm development, especially for plants with pre-chlorination. However, in tropical or subtropical regions, bioactivity on the sand surface may be quite significant due to high biofilm development--a result of year-round high temperature. The objective of this study is to explore the correlation between biodegradation and chlorine concentration in rapid sand filters, especially for the water treatment plants that practise pre-chlorination. In this study, haloacetic acid (HAA) biodegradation was found in conventional rapid sand filters practising pre-chlorination. Laboratory column studies and field investigations were conducted to explore the association between the biodegradation of HAAs and chlorine concentrations. The results showed that chlorine residual was an important factor that alters bioactivity development. A model based on filter influent and effluent chlorine was developed for determining threshold chlorine for biodegradation. From the model, a temperature independent chlorine concentration threshold (Cl(threshold)) for biodegradation was estimated at 0.46-0.5mgL(-1). The results imply that conventional filters with adequate control could be conducive to bioactivity, resulting in lower HAA concentrations. Optimizing biodegradable disinfection by-product removal in conventional rapid sand filter could be achieved with minor variation and a lower-than-Cl(threshold) influent chlorine concentration. Bacteria isolation was also carried out, successfully identifying several HAA degraders. These degraders are very commonly seen in drinking water systems and can be speculated as the main contributor of HAA loss.

  14. CS(2) blinds in Brassica crops: false positive results in the dithiocarbamate residue analysis by the acid digestion method.

    PubMed

    Perz, R C; van Lishaut, H; Schwack, W

    2000-03-01

    Various members of the Brassicaceae family (cauliflower, savoy cabbage, red cabbage, turnip-rooted cabbage) grown without any application of pesticides were analyzed according to the acid digestion method commonly used for the determination of dithiocarbamate fungicide residues. Depending on postharvest treatments, high non-anthropogenic CS(2) values up to 4 mg/kg were found in some cases, especially in frozen raw cabbage samples, exceeding maximum residue limits. To explore phytogenic CS(2) occurrences, two model substances (phenylisothiocyanate and methyl tryptaminedithiocarbamate) representing natural mustard oils and brassinines, respectively, were analyzed for their acid hydrolysis decomposition products. In both cases, COS was found generally, but CS(2) was readily formed during acid digestion, too, when sulfides were present. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that CS(2) values determined by using the acid digestion method of crops rich in secondary metabolism sulfur compounds have to be interpreted carefully.

  15. Phosphorous acid residues in apples after foliar fertilization: results of field trials.

    PubMed

    Malusà, E; Tosi, L

    2005-06-01

    The levels of phosphorous acid residues in apples after foliar fertilization with P fertilizers and after treatment with a phosphonate fungicide (Fosetyl-Al) were determined and compared. Two field trials and a glasshouse experiment, using different genotypes and plants of different age, were carried out and monitored over a three-year period. Phosphorous acid residues were found in apples after application of foliar P fertilizers. Concentrations of the residues ranged between 0.02 and 14 mg kg(-1) depending on the phosphorous acid content in the fertilizer used and the plant size and yield. The treatments induced an accumulation of the residue in the course of the experiments, which in some cases reached a level exceeding the maximum limit set by EU legislation. Residues were also detected in other plant organs, i.e., roots and buds. Plants treated with Fosetyl-Al contained phosphorous acid residues in their fruits and buds two years after the suspension of the treatment, suggesting a long-term persistence of the substance in plant storage organs. A second experiment, involving treatment of trees with seven foliar fertilizers of different composition, also induced accumulation of phosphorous acid residues in fruits. It is concluded that a wide array of foliar products containing phosphorous acid, even as a minor component, could mimic the residue effect of phosphonate fungicide treatments.

  16. Characterisation of the products from pyrolysis of residues after acid hydrolysis of Miscanthus.

    PubMed

    Melligan, F; Dussan, K; Auccaise, R; Novotny, E H; Leahy, J J; Hayes, M H B; Kwapinski, W

    2012-03-01

    Platform chemicals such as furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural are major products formed during the acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass in second generation biorefining processes. Solid hydrolysis residues (HR) can amount to 50 wt.% of the starting biomass materials. Pyrolysis of the HRs gives rise to biochar, bio-liquids, and gases. Time and temperature were variables during the pyrolysis of HRs in a fixed bed tubular reactor, and both parameters have major influences on the amounts and properties of the products. Biochar, with potential for carbon sequestration and soil conditioning, composed about half of the HR pyrolysis product. The amounts (11-20 wt.%) and compositions (up to 77% of phenols in organic fraction) of the bio-liquids formed suggest that these have little value as fuels, but could be sources of phenols, and the gas can have application as a fuel.

  17. 40 CFR 180.311 - Cacodylic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances... million Expiration/Revocation Date Cotton, undelinted seed 2.8 1/1/12 (b) Section 18 emergency...

  18. Conversion of Undaria pinnatifida residue to glycolic acid with recyclable methylamine in low temperature hydrothermal liquefaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongxing; Ren, Xiulian; Wei, Qifeng

    2017-03-01

    The conversion of Undaria pinnatifida residue to glycolic acid was carried out using methylamine as catalyst by hydrothermal method at relatively low temperature. GC-MS and HPLC were used to identify the composition of bio-oil and liquid products which provide the knowledge of the chemical reaction pathways of the hydrothermal liquefaction. The main liquid product was organic acid which contained glycolic acid, lactic acid, formic acid and acetic acid. And the major organic acid was glycolic acid with the highest yield of 46.52% or 33.98% of dry biomass. Methylamine promoted the dissolution of cellulose from Undaria pinnatifida residue, and significantly improved the yield of glycolic acid. The mechanism of HTL was investigated and the results show that the carbocation C3 was attacked by methylamine molecule which led to the high yield of glycolic acid. In addition, the recovery of methylamine was studied and the highest recovery rate reached 99.28%.

  19. Differentiating amino acid residues and side chain orientations in peptides using scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Claridge, Shelley A; Thomas, John C; Silverman, Miles A; Schwartz, Jeffrey J; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Weiss, Paul S

    2013-12-11

    Single-molecule measurements of complex biological structures such as proteins are an attractive route for determining structures of the large number of important biomolecules that have proved refractory to analysis through standard techniques such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance. We use a custom-built low-current scanning tunneling microscope to image peptide structures at the single-molecule scale in a model peptide that forms β sheets, a structural motif common in protein misfolding diseases. We successfully differentiate between histidine and alanine amino acid residues, and further differentiate side chain orientations in individual histidine residues, by correlating features in scanning tunneling microscope images with those in energy-optimized models. Beta sheets containing histidine residues are used as a model system due to the role histidine plays in transition metal binding associated with amyloid oligomerization in Alzheimer's and other diseases. Such measurements are a first step toward analyzing peptide and protein structures at the single-molecule level.

  20. Residual stress analysis in forming process of filament wound thick-walled CFRP pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Toshimi; Sekine, Hideki; Nakano, Kunio

    1995-11-01

    Residual stress analysis for the cracking phenomenon of filament would thick-walled CFRP pipes, which frequently occurs in the forming process of curing and thermal cycling through the course of the wet filament winding, was made from both the experimental and theoretical points of view. A simple analytical model to study the cracking in the CFRP pipes was proposed. The pipes are multilayered and reinforced in the axial and circumferential directions alternatively by carbon fibers. Taking account of the anisotropy of mechanical and thermal properties including the shrinkage strain, which depend considerably on the temperature, the residual stresses in the CFRP pipes were elucidated in the forming process, particularly, in cooling of the cure process.

  1. 40 CFR 180.331 - 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and conjugated, determined as the acid, in or on food commodities, as follows: Commodity Parts per... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid... Tolerances § 180.331 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General....

  2. 40 CFR 180.331 - 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and conjugated, determined as the acid, in or on food commodities, as follows: Commodity Parts per... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid... Tolerances § 180.331 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General....

  3. 40 CFR 180.331 - 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and conjugated, determined as the acid, in or on food commodities, as follows: Commodity Parts per... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid... Tolerances § 180.331 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General....

  4. 40 CFR 180.331 - 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and conjugated, determined as the acid, in or on food commodities, as follows: Commodity Parts per... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid... Tolerances § 180.331 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General....

  5. Ceramic waste form for residues from molten salt oxidation of mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Hopper, R.W.; Rard, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    A ceramic waste form based on Synroc-D is under development for the incorporation of the mineral residues from molten salt oxidation treatment of mixed low-level wastes. Samples containing as many as 32 chemical elements have been fabricated, characterized, and leach-tested. Universal Treatment Standards have been satisfied for all regulated elements except and two (lead and vanadium). Efforts are underway to further improve chemical durability.

  6. Quantitative solid state NMR analysis of residues from acid hydrolysis of loblolly pine wood.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Carsten; Marzialetti, Teresita; Hoskins, Travis J C; Valenzuela Olarte, Mariefel B; Agrawal, Pradeep K; Jones, Christopher W

    2009-10-01

    The composition of solid residues from hydrolysis reactions of loblolly pine wood with dilute mineral acids is analyzed by (13)C Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Using this method, the carbohydrate and lignin fractions are quantified in less than 3h as compared to over a day using wet chemical methods. In addition to the quantitative information, (13)C CP MAS NMR spectroscopy provides information on the formation of additional extractives and pseudo lignin from the carbohydrates. Being a non-destructive technique, NMR spectroscopy provides unambiguous evidence of the presence of side reactions and products, which is a clear advantage over the wet chemical analytical methods. Quantitative results from NMR spectroscopy and proximate analysis are compared for the residues from hydrolysis of loblolly pine wood under 13 different conditions; samples were treated either at 150 degrees C or 200 degrees C in the presence of various acids (HCl, H(2)SO(4), H(3)PO(4), HNO(3) and TFA) or water. The lignin content determined by both methods differed on averaged by 2.9 wt% resulting in a standard deviation of 3.5 wt%. It is shown that solid degradation products are formed from saccharide precursors under harsh reaction conditions. These degradation reactions limit the total possible yield of monosaccharides from any subsequent reaction.

  7. D-amino acid residue in a defensin-like peptide from platypus venom: effect on structure and chromatographic properties.

    PubMed

    Torres, Allan M; Tsampazi, Chryssanthi; Geraghty, Dominic P; Bansal, Paramjit S; Alewood, Paul F; Kuchel, Philip W

    2005-10-15

    The recent discovery that the natriuretic peptide OvCNPb (Ornithorhynchus venom C-type natriuretic peptide B) from platypus (Ornithorynchus anatinus) venom contains a D-amino acid residue suggested that other D-amino-acid-containing peptides might be present in the venom. In the present study, we show that DLP-2 (defensin-like peptide-2), a 42-amino-acid residue polypeptide in the platypus venom, also contains a D-amino acid residue, D-methionine, at position 2, while DLP-4, which has an identical amino acid sequence, has all amino acids in the L-form. These findings were supported further by the detection of isomerase activity in the platypus gland venom extract that converts DLP-4 into DLP-2. In the light of this new information, the tertiary structure of DLP-2 was recalculated using a new structural template with D-Met2. The structure of DLP-4 was also determined in order to evaluate the effect of a D-amino acid at position 2 on the structure and possibly to explain the large retention time difference observed for the two molecules in reverse-phase HPLC. The solution structures of the DLP-2 and DLP-4 are very similar to each other and to the earlier reported structure of DLP-2, which assumed that all amino acids were in the L-form. Our results suggest that the incorporation of the D-amino acid at position 2 has minimal effect on the overall fold in solution.

  8. Osmium isotope anomalies in chondrites: Results for acid residues and related leachates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Tetsuya; O'D. Alexander, Conel M.; Walker, Richard J.

    2010-03-01

    We have investigated Os isotope anomalies in acid residues enriched in insoluble organic matter (IOM) extracted from ten primitive chondrites, acid leachates and residues of these fractions, as well as acid leachates of bulk chondrites. Osmium isotopic compositions of bulk carbonaceous, ordinary and enstatite chondrites are also reported. Consistent with prior results, bulk chondrites have homogeneous Os isotope compositions for s-, r-, and p-process nuclides that are indistinguishable from terrestrial, at the current level of resolution. In contrast, nearly all the IOM-rich residues are enriched in s-process Os, evidently due to the preferential incorporation of s-process enriched presolar grains (most likely presolar SiC). Presolar silicate grains that formed in red giant branch (RGB) or asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are also likely hosts of additional s-process Os in chondrites. Consistent with one prior study, Os released by weak acid leaching of bulk chondrites is slightly to strongly enriched in r-process nuclides, of which the carrier may be fine-grained presolar silicates formed in supernovae or unidentified solar phases. Collectively, the different, chemically concentrated components in these meteorites are variably enriched in s-, r-, and possibly p-process Os, of which the individual carriers must have been produced in multiple stellar environments. The lack of evidence for Os isotopic heterogeneity among bulk chondrites contrasts with evidence for isotopic heterogeneities for various other elements at approximately the same levels of resolution (e.g., Cr, Mo, Ru, Ba, Sm, and Nd). One possible explanation for this is that the heterogeneities for some elements in bulk materials reflect selective removal of some types of presolar grains as a result of nebular processes, and that because of the strong chemical differences between Os and the other elements, the Os was not significantly affected. Another possible explanation is that late-stage injection

  9. Direct fermentation of potato starch and potato residues to lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus under non-sterile conditions

    PubMed Central

    Smerilli, Marina; Neureiter, Markus; Wurz, Stefan; Haas, Cornelia; Frühauf, Sabine; Fuchs, Werner

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lactic acid is an important biorefinery platform chemical. The use of thermophilic amylolytic microorganisms to produce lactic acid by fermentation constitutes an efficient strategy to reduce operating costs, including raw materials and sterilization costs. RESULTS A process for the thermophilic production of lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus directly from potato starch was characterized and optimized. Geobacillus stearothermophilus DSM 494 was selected out of 12 strains screened for amylolytic activity and the ability to form lactic acid as the major product of the anaerobic metabolism. In total more than 30 batches at 3–l scale were run at 60 °C under non-sterile conditions. The process developed produced 37 g L−1 optically pure (98%) L-lactic acid in 20 h from 50 g L−1 raw potato starch. As co-metabolites smaller amounts (<7% w/v) of acetate, formate and ethanol were formed. Yields of lactic acid increased from 66% to 81% when potato residues from food processing were used as a starchy substrate in place of raw potato starch. CONCLUSIONS Potato starch and residues were successfully converted to lactic acid by G. stearothermophilus. The process described in this study provides major benefits in industrial applications and for the valorization of starch-rich waste streams. © 2015 The Authors.Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:25937690

  10. Teichuronic acid reducing terminal N-acetylglucosamine residue linked by phosphodiester to peptidoglycan of Micrococcus luteus

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner, G.T.; Dickie, J.P.; Hamerski, D.A.; Magnuson, J.K.; Anderson, J.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Teichuronic acid-peptidoglycan complex isolated from Micrococcus luteus cells by lysozyme digestion in osmotically stabilized medium was treated with mild acid to cleave the linkage joining teichuronic acid to peptidoglycan. This labile linkage was shown to be the phosphodiester which joins N-acetylglucosamine, the residue located at the reducing end of the teichuronic acid, through its anomeric hydroxyl group to a 6-phosphomuramic acid, a residue of the glycan strand of peptidoglycan. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the lysozyme digest of cell walls demonstrated the presence of a phosphodiester which was converted to a phosphomonoester by the conditions which released teichuronic acid from cell walls. Reduction of acid-liberated reducing end groups by NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} followed by complete acid hydrolysis yielded ({sup 3}H) glucosaminitol from the true reducing end residue of teichuronic acid and ({sup 3}H)glucitol from the sites of fragmentation of teichuronic acid. The amount of N-acetylglucosamine detected was approximately stoichiometric with the amount of phosphate in the complex. Partial fragmentation of teichuronic acid provides an explanation of the previous erroneous identification of the reducing end residue.

  11. 40 CFR 180.155 - 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... established for the combined residues of the plant growth regulator 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and its... ammonium, sodium, or potassium salts, ethyl ester, and acetamide in or on food commodities as...

  12. Prediction of nucleic acid binding probability in proteins: a neighboring residue network based score.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2015-06-23

    We describe a general binding score for predicting the nucleic acid binding probability in proteins. The score is directly derived from physicochemical and evolutionary features and integrates a residue neighboring network approach. Our process achieves stable and high accuracies on both DNA- and RNA-binding proteins and illustrates how the main driving forces for nucleic acid binding are common. Because of the effective integration of the synergetic effects of the network of neighboring residues and the fact that the prediction yields a hierarchical scoring on the protein surface, energy funnels for nucleic acid binding appear on protein surfaces, pointing to the dynamic process occurring in the binding of nucleic acids to proteins.

  13. Effect of low molecular weight organic acids on phosphorus adsorption by ferric-alum water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Wang, Ziyuan; Lin, Lu; Tian, Binghui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2012-02-15

    Effects of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs; citric acid, oxalic acid and tartaric acid) on phosphorus (P) adsorption by ferric-alum water treatment residuals (FARs) were studied. Both batch and column experiments indicated that the effects of LMWOAs on P adsorption were closely related to adsorption time. Initially, all acids presented inhibitory function on P adsorption. The inhibition became weaker with time, eventually promoting P adsorption for citric acid and tartaric acid. In the column experiment with a 61-day duration, high P adsorption rates (>55%) were observed for the test groups containing citric acid and tartaric acid. Interestingly, higher pH likely enhanced P adsorption with the effects of LMWOAs and a distinct relationship between LMWOAs' effects on P adsorption and their concentrations was not observed. Moreover, fractionation of the adsorbed P from the FARs demonstrated that oxalic acid reduced P adsorption capacity, while citric acid and tartaric acid increased. Based on the forms of Fe and Al existing in the FARs and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses, LMWOAs can promote P adsorption through activating crystalline Fe/Al and preventing crystallization of amorphous Fe/Al to increase P adsorption sites, and can also inhibit P adsorption by competition with adsorption sites.

  14. A synthetic amino acid residue containing a new oligopeptide-based photosensitive fluorescent organogel.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Dibakar Kumar; Banerjee, Arindam

    2013-01-01

    A synthetic amino acid (with a stilbene residue in the main chain) containing a tripeptide-based organogelator has been discovered. This peptide-based synthetic molecule 1 self-assembles in various organic solvents to form an organogel. The gel has been thoroughly characterized by using various microscopic techniques including field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy, and rheology. Morphological investigations using FESEM and AFM show a nanofibrillar network structure. Interestingly, the organogel is photoresponsive and a gel-sol transition occurred by irradiating the gel with UV light of 365 nm for 2 h as shown by the UV and fluorescence study. This photoresponsive fluorescent gel holds promise for new peptide-based soft materials with interesting applications.

  15. Effect of temperature on iron leaching from bauxite residue by sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Rong; Zeng, Kai; Zhao, Wei; Li, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Bauxite residue, as solid waste from alumina production, contains mainly hematite [Fe2O3]. Kinetic study of iron leaching of bauxite residue by diluted sulfuric acid at atmospheric pressure has been investigated. The results have been obtained as following: (i) Temperature play an important role in iron leaching from bauxite residue. Higher temperature is favor of Fe(III) leaching from bauxite residue. (ii) The leaching process is applicable to the intra-particle diffusion model and the apparent activation energy of model of leaching is found to be 17.32 kJ/mol.

  16. Entropy reduction in unfolded peptides (and proteins) due to conformational preferences of amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Toal, Siobhan E

    2014-11-07

    As established by several groups over the last 20 years, amino acid residues in unfolded peptides and proteins do not exhibit the unspecific random distribution as assumed by the classical random coil model. Individual amino acid residues in small peptides were found to exhibit different conformational preferences. Here, we utilize recently obtained conformational distributions of guest amino acid residues in GxG peptides to estimate their conformational entropy, which we find to be significantly lower than the entropy of an assumed random coil like distribution. Only at high temperature do backbone entropies approach random coil like values. We utilized the obtained backbone entropies of the investigated amino acid residues to estimate the loss of conformational entropy caused by a coil → helix transition and identified two subsets of amino acid residues for which the thus calculated entropy losses correlate well with the respective Gibbs energy of helix formation obtained for alanine based host-guest systems. Calculated and experimentally derived entropic losses were found to be in good agreement. For most of the amino acid residues investigated entropic losses derived from our GxG distributions correlate very well with corresponding values recently obtained from MD simulations biased by conformational propensities derived from truncated coil libraries. Both, conformational entropy and the entropy of solvation exhibit a strong, residue specific temperature dependence, which can be expected to substantially affect the stability of unfolded states. Altogether, our results provide strong evidence for the notion that conformational preferences of amino acid residues matter with regard to the thermodynamics of peptide and protein folding.

  17. Core Amino Acid Residues in the Morphology-Regulating Protein, Mms6, for Intracellular Magnetite Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Narumiya, Kaori; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms produce finely tuned biomineral architectures with the aid of biomineral-associated proteins. The functional amino acid residues in these proteins have been previously identified using in vitro and in silico experimentation in different biomineralization systems. However, the investigation in living organisms is limited owing to the difficulty in establishing appropriate genetic techniques. Mms6 protein, isolated from the surface of magnetite crystals synthesized in magnetotactic bacteria, was shown to play a key role in the regulation of crystal morphology. In this study, we have demonstrated a defect in the specific region or substituted acidic amino acid residues in the Mms6 protein for observing their effect on magnetite biomineralization in vivo. Analysis of the gene deletion mutants and transformants of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 expressing partially truncated Mms6 protein revealed that deletions in the N-terminal or C-terminal regions disrupted proper protein localization to the magnetite surface, resulting in a change in the crystal morphology. Moreover, single amino acid substitutions at Asp123, Glu124, or Glu125 in the C-terminal region of Mms6 clearly indicated that these amino acid residues had a direct impact on magnetite crystal morphology. Thus, these consecutive acidic amino acid residues were found to be core residues regulating magnetite crystal morphology. PMID:27759096

  18. Effects of advanced oxidation pretreatment on residual aluminum control in high humic acid water purification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendong; Li, Hua; Ding, Zhenzhen; Wang, Xiaochang

    2011-01-01

    Due to the formation of disinfection by-products and high concentrations of Al residue in drinking water purification, humic substances are a major component of organic matter in natural waters and have therefore received a great deal of attention in recent years. We investigated the effects of advanced oxidation pretreatment methods usually applied for removing dissolved organic matters on residual Al control. Results showed that the presence of humic acid increased residual Al concentration notably. With 15 mg/L of humic acid in raw water, the concentrations of soluble aluminum and total aluminum in the treated water were close to the quantity of Al addition. After increasing coagulant dosage from 12 to 120 mg/L, the total-Al in the treated water was controlled to below 0.2 mg/L. Purification systems with ozonation, chlorination, or potassium permanganate oxidation pretreatment units had little effects on residual Al control; while UV radiation decreased Al concentration notably. Combined with ozonation, the effects of UV radiation were enhanced. Optimal dosages were 0.5 mg O3/mg C and 3 hr for raw water with 15 mg/L of humic acid. Under UV light radiation, the combined forces or bonds that existed among humic acid molecules were destroyed; adsorption sites increased positively with radiation time, which promoted adsorption of humic acid onto polymeric aluminum and Al(OH)3(s). This work provides a new solution for humic acid coagulation and residual Al control for raw water with humic acid purification.

  19. Solid-state forms of zoledronic acid: polymorphism in hydrates.

    PubMed

    Ruscica, Romina; Bianchi, Micaela; Quintero, Mariano; Martinez, Andrea; Vega, Daniel R

    2010-12-01

    Solid-state forms of zoledronic acid, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate used for treatment of bone diseases are studied using different experimental techniques (DSC, TG, and XRD). Two degrees of hydration have been obtained, containing one and three water molecules per zoledronic acid molecule. The crystal structure of the trihydrated form is reported. Two different anhydrated forms have been obtained when the hydrated ones were heated. Besides, during the dehydration process, an amount of metastable amorphous phase appears, as a function of the dehydration rate. The stability of the obtained crystalline forms is examined under high humidity and a different trihydrated form was obtained, setting clear that the same degree of hydration (trihydrated) can be obtained in two different crystalline forms, and then very different thermal behaviors have been observed.

  20. On the distribution of amino acid residues in transmembrane alpha-helix bundles.

    PubMed Central

    Samatey, F A; Xu, C; Popot, J L

    1995-01-01

    The periodic distribution of residues in the sequence of 469 putative transmembrane alpha-helices from eukaryotic plasma membrane polytopic proteins has been analyzed with correlation matrices. The method does not involve any a priori assumption about the secondary structure of the segments or about the physicochemical properties of individual amino acid residues. Maximal correlation is observed at 3.6 residues per period, characteristic of alpha-helices. A scale extracted from the data describes the propensity of the various residues to lie on the same or on opposite helix faces. The most polar face of transmembrane helices, presumably that buried in the protein core, shows a strong enrichment in aromatic residues, while residues likely to face the fatty acyl chains of lipids are largely aliphatic. PMID:7753846

  1. Stability of oral liquid dosage forms of ethacrynic Acid.

    PubMed

    Ling, J; Gupta, V D

    2001-01-01

    The stability of ethacrynic acid (2.5 mg/mL) in oral liquid dosage forms was investigated. Tablets in 0.05 M phosphate buffer (available commercially) in water were used to prepare the dosage forms. The effects of mannitol and sugar on the stability of ethacrynic acid were negligible. There was no change in the physical appearance of the oral liquid dosage forms or pH values during the study. There was, however, a new peak in the chromatogram from the products(s) of decomposition. An oral liquid dosage form of ethacrynic acid containing 0.05 M phosphate buffer and 10% mannitol was stable for 24 days when stored at 5 deg C and for only 3 days when stored at 25 deg C.

  2. Fusion and quasifission studies in reactions forming Rn via evaporation residue measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamlath, A.; Prasad, E.; Madhavan, N.; Laveen, P. V.; Gehlot, J.; Nasirov, A. K.; Giardina, G.; Mandaglio, G.; Nath, S.; Banerjee, Tathagata; Vinodkumar, A. M.; Shareef, M.; Jhingan, A.; Varughese, T.; Kumar, Dvgrks; Devi, P. Sandya; Khushboo, Jisha, P.; Kumar, Neeraj; Hosamani, M. M.; Kailas, S.

    2017-03-01

    Background: Formation of the compound nucleus (CN) is highly suppressed by quasifission in heavy-ion collisions involving massive nuclei. Though considerable progress has been made in the understanding of fusion-fission and quasifission, the exact dependence of fusion probability on various entrance channel variables is not completely clear, which is very important for the synthesis of new heavy and superheavy elements. Purpose: To study the interplay between fusion and quasifission in reactions forming CN in the boundary region where the fusion probability starts to deviate from unity. Methods: Fusion evaporation residue cross sections were measured for the Si,3028+180Hf reactions using the Hybrid Recoil Mass Analyser at IUAC, New Delhi. Experimental data were compared with data from other reactions forming the same CN or isotopes of the CN. Theoretical calculations were performed using the dinuclear system and statistical models. Results: Reduced evaporation residue cross sections were observed for the reactions studied compared with the asymmetric reaction forming the same CN, indicating fusion suppression in more symmetric systems. The observations are consistent with fission fragment measurements performed in the same or similar systems. Larger ER cross sections are observed with increase in mass in the isotopic chain of the CN. Conclusions: Fusion probability varies significantly with the entrance channels in reactions forming the same CN. While complete fusion occurs for the 16O+194Pt reaction, the fusion probability drops to approximately 60 -70 % for the 30Si+180Hf and less than 20 % for the 50Ti+160Gd reactions, respectively, forming the same CN at similar excitation energies.

  3. Solvent accessibility, residue charge and residue volume, the three ingredients of a robust amino acid substitution matrix.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Hani; Katanforoush, Ali; Torabi, Noorossadat; Najafabadi, Hamed Shateri

    2007-04-21

    Cost measure matrices or different amino acid indices have been widely used for studies in many fields of biology. One major criticism of these studies might be based on the unavailability of an unbiased and yet effective amino acid substitution matrix. Throughout this study we have devised a cost measure matrix based on the solvent accessibility, residue charge, and residue volume indices. Performed analyses on this novel substitution matrix (i.e. solvent accessibility charge volume (SCV) matrix) support the uncontaminated nature of this matrix regarding the genetic code. Although highly similar to a number of previously available cost measure matrices, the SCV matrix results in a more significant optimality in the error-buffering capacity of the genetic code when compared to many other amino acid substitution matrices. Besides, a method to compare an SCV-based scoring matrix with a number of widely used matrices has been devised, the results of which highlights the robustness of this matrix in protein family discrimination.

  4. Intra-molecular cross-linking of acidic residues for protein structure studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Kruppa, Gary Hermann; Young, Malin M.; Novak, Petr; Schoeniger, Joseph S.

    2005-03-01

    Intra-molecular cross-linking has been suggested as a method of obtaining distance constraints that would be useful in developing structural models of proteins. Recent work published on intra-molecular cross-linking for protein structural studies has employed commercially available primary amine selective reagents that can cross-link lysine residues to other lysine residues or the amino terminus. Previous work using these cross-linkers has shown that for several proteins of known structure, the number of cross-links that can be obtained experimentally may be small compared to what would be expected from the known structure, due to the relative reactivity, distribution, and solvent accessibility of the lysines in the protein sequence. To overcome these limitations we have investigated the use of cross-linking reagents that can react with other reactive sidechains in proteins. We used 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) to activate the carboxylic acid containing residues, aspartic acid (D), glutamic acid (E), and the carboxy terminus (O), for cross-linking reactions. Once activated, the DEO sidechains can react to form 'zero-length' cross-links with nearby primary amine containing resides, lysines (K) and the amino terminus (X), via the formation of a new amide bond. We also show that the EDC-activated DEO sidechains can be cross-linked to each other using dihydrazides, two hydrazide moieties connected by an alkyl cross-linker ann of variable length. Using these reagents, we have found three new 'zero-length' cross-links in ubiquitin consistent with its known structure (M1-E16, M1-E18, and K63-E64). Using the dihydrazide cross-linkers, we have identified 2 new cross-links (D21-D32 and E24-D32) unambiguously. Using a library of dihydrazide cross-linkers with varying arm length, we have shown that there is a minimum arm length required for the DEO-DEO cross-links of 5.8 angstroms. These results show that additional structural information

  5. Just three water molecules can trigger the undesired nonenzymatic reactions of aspartic acid residues: new insight from a quantum-chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, O.

    2014-03-01

    Aspartic acid (Asp) residues in peptides and proteins (L-Asp) can undergo spontaneous, nonenzymatic reactions under physiological conditions by which abnormal L-β-Asp, D-Asp, and/or D-β-Asp residues are formed. These altered Asp residues may affect the three-dimensional structures of the peptides and proteins and hence their properties and functions. In fact, the altered Asp residues are relevant to age-related diseases such as cataract and Alzheimer's disease. Most of the above reactions of the L-Asp residue proceed via a cyclic succinimide intermediate. In this paper, I propose a detailed mechanism of cyclization of an Asp residue (forming a precursor of the succinimide) by the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) density functional theory calculations carried out for a small Asp-containing model compound complexed with three water molecules which act as general acid-base catalysts in proton transfers. In the proposed mechanism, the amide group on the C-terminal side of the Asp residue is first converted to the tautomeric iminol form. Then, successive reorientation of a water molecule and conformational change occur followed by the nucleophilic attack of the iminol nitrogen atom on the carboxyl carbon atom of the Asp side chain to form a five-membered ring. A satisfactory agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental energetics.

  6. Optimization of acid hydrolysis from the hemicellulosic fraction of Eucalyptus grandis residue using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Canettieri, Eliana Vieira; de Moraes Rocha, George Jackson; de Carvalho, João Andrade; de Almeida e Silva, João Batista

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnological conversion of biomass into fuels and chemicals requires hydrolysis of the polysaccharide fraction into monomeric sugars. Hydrolysis can be performed enzymatically and with dilute or concentrate mineral acids. The present study used dilute sulfuric acid as a catalyst for hydrolysis of Eucalyptus grandis residue. The purpose of this paper was to optimize the hydrolysis process in a 1.4 l pilot-scale reactor and investigate the effects of the acid concentration, temperature and residue/acid solution ratio on the hemicellulose removal and consequently on the production of sugars (xylose, glucose and arabinose) as well as on the formation of by-products (furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and acetic acid). This study was based on a model composition corresponding to a 2(3) orthogonal factorial design and employed the response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize the hydrolysis conditions, aiming to attain maximum xylose extraction from hemicellulose of residue. The considered optimum conditions were: H(2)SO(4) concentration of 0.65%, temperature of 157 degrees C and residue/acid solution ratio of 1/8.6 with a reaction time of 20 min. Under these conditions, 79.6% of the total xylose was removed and the hydrolysate contained 1.65 g/l glucose, 13.65 g/l xylose, 1.55 g/l arabinose, 3.10 g/l acetic acid, 1.23 g/l furfural and 0.20 g/l 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

  7. Hydroxynonenal inactivates cathepsin B by forming Michael adducts with active site residues.

    PubMed

    Crabb, John W; O'Neil, June; Miyagi, Masaru; West, Karen; Hoff, Henry F

    2002-04-01

    Oxidation of plasma low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) generates the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2 nonenal (HNE) and also reduces proteolytic degradation of oxLDL and other proteins internalized by mouse peritoneal macrophages in culture. This leads to accumulation of undegraded material in lysosomes and formation of ceroid, a component of foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions. To explore the possibility that HNE contributes directly to the inactivation of proteases, structure-function studies of the lysosomal protease cathepsin B have been pursued. We found that treatment of mouse macrophages with HNE reduces degradation of internalized maleyl bovine serine albumin and cathepsin B activity. Purified bovine cathepsin B treated briefly with 15 microM HNE lost approximately 76% of its protease activity and also developed immunoreactivity with antibodies to HNE adducts in Western blot analysis. After stabilization of the potential Michael adducts by sodium borohydride reduction, modified amino acids were localized within the bovine cathepsin B protein structure by mass spectrometric analysis of tryptic peptides. Michael adducts were identified by tandem mass spectrometry at cathepsin B active site residues Cys 29 (mature A chain) and His 150 (mature B chain). Thus, covalent interaction between HNE and critical active site residues inactivates cathepsin B. These results support the hypothesis that the accumulation of undegraded macromolecules in lysosomes after oxidative damage are caused in part by direct protease inactivation by adduct formation with lipid peroxidation products such as HNE.

  8. Form II of adipic acid-nicotinohydrazide (1/2).

    PubMed

    Lemmerer, Andreas; Bernstein, Joel; Kahlenberg, Volker

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure of the title co-crystal, 2C(6)H(7)N(3)O·C(6)H(10)O(4), is a second polymorph, designated form II, of the co-crystal formed between the two mol-ecules [Lemmerer et al. (2011 ▶). CrystEngComm, 13, 55-59]. The asymmetric unit comprises one mol-ecule of nicotinic acid hydrazide, and one half-mol-ecule of adipic acid (the entire mol-ecule is completed by the application of a centre of inversion). In the crystal, mol-ecules assemble into a three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds, formed by three N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and one O-H⋯N hydrogen bond. The O-H⋯N hydrogen bond formed between the carboxyl group and the pyridine ring is supported by a C-H⋯O hydrogen bond.

  9. Intramolecular bridges formed by photoswitchable click amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hoppmann, Christian; Kühne, Ronald; Beyermann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Photoswitchable click amino acids (PSCaa) are amino acids bearing a side chain consisting of a photoswitchable unit elongated with a functional group that allows for a specific click reaction, such as an alkene that can react with the thiol group of a cysteine residue. An intramolecular click reaction results in the formation of a photoswitchable bridge, which can be used for controlling conformational domains in peptides and proteins. The ability to control conformations as well as the efficiency of the intramolecular bridging depends on the length of the PSCaa side chain and the distance to the cysteine residue to be clicked with. On comparing i,i+4 and i,i+7 spacings of PSCaa and cysteine in a model peptide without a preferred conformation, it was seen that the thiol-ene click reaction takes place efficiently in both cases. Upon induction of an α-helical structure by the addition of trifluoroethanol, the thiol click reaction occurs preferentially with the i,i+4 spacing. Even in the presence of glutathione as an additional thiol the click reaction of the PSCaa occurs intramolecularly with the cysteine rather than with the glutathione, indicating that the click reaction may be used even under reducing conditions occurring in living cells.

  10. Residual Gas Analysis of Samples Formed from the UV Irradiation of Astrophysical Ice Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materese, C. K.; Nuevo, M.; Sandford, S. A.

    2011-05-01

    The formation of complex organics, including nucleic acids, amino acids, sugars, and other molecules of prebiotic interest, in an interstellar environment is an important field of modern astrochemistry research. In a typical experiment, we perform a controlled deposition of a known mixture of gas onto a cold finger while irradiating the sample to simulate the conditions of cold interstellar grains (Bernstein et al., 1995, 2002; Muñoz Caro et al., 2002; Nuevo et al., 2008, 2009, 2010). After the deposition is complete, the sample is warmed and recovered for analysis. Our traditional analysis methods have made extensive use of HPLC with UV-visible detection, GC-MS, and IR spectroscopy when appropriate. While these techniques provide significant insight into the photo-processing of our ices, they invariably lead to the loss of some volatiles during the warm-up, which may be of interest. In order to learn more about the volatiles lost during the warm-up we have installed a residual gas analyzer (RGA) mass spec device on one of our vacuum systems. With this tool, we can perform controlled warm-ups of our samples and monitor the composition of outgassing volatiles as a function of temperature change. Knowledge of the composition of these volatiles could prove invaluable in two ways. First, we may observe important chemical species, which we are unable to detect with our other methods because they are either lost during the warm-up, or cannot be detected using our GC-MS protocol. Second, even compounds which are mundane in and of themselves, may provide important clues about the type of chemistry occurring within the rest of the ice. We are currently using the RGA to study the formation of pyrimidine-based nucleobases from in interstellar ice analogs. In the future we will expand our studies to purines-based nucleic acids, amino acids, and other prebiotic organics.

  11. Residual stresses and microstructure of H13 steel formed by combining two different direct fabrication methods

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Payzant, E.A.; Schlienger, M.E.; McHugh, K.M.

    1998-10-13

    Direct fabrication (DF) of tool and die steels by rapid solidification techniques can produce near-net-shape parts and components with unique properties, and without the distortions caused by conventional normalizing and tempering heat-treatments. When combined with sophisticated 3-dimensional computer control to build complex solid metallic shapes, one has the capability of using DF for rapid prototyping. Spray forming using a circular converging/diverging atomizer is a DF process being developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for rapid manufacturing of tool and die steels like H-13. Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS{trademark}) is a DF process being developed at Sandia National laboratory (SNL). LENS involves laser-processing fine powder metal sprays into complex, fully-dense 3-dimensional shapes with fine-detail control that would allow rapid prototyping of tools or dies. One logical combination of the two processes is to combine spray forming to replicate most of the die surface and backing, and then t o build other die-surface fine-features with LENS. Premium H-13 steel was used because it belongs to the widely used group of hot-work steels that have good resistance to heat, pressure and abrasion for metal-forging and aluminum die-casting applications. The microstructure and residual stresses that exist across the interface of a composite metal produced by these two DF methods are critical parameters in producing crack-free components with functional properties. The purpose of this work is to combine unique neutron-diffraction facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for measuring bulk residual stresses with these two different DF processes to characterize LENS deposits of H-13 steel made on a spray-formed base of that same steel.

  12. 75 FR 1773 - Notice of Receipt of a Pesticide Petition Filed for Residues of Polymeric Polyhydroxy Acid in or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... AGENCY Notice of Receipt of a Pesticide Petition Filed for Residues of Polymeric Polyhydroxy Acid in or... establishment of a regulation for residues of the plant growth regulator, polymeric polyhydroxy acid, in or on... polymeric polyhydroxy acid in or on all food commodities. EPA has determined that the pesticide...

  13. Functional analyses of carnivorous plant-specific amino acid residues in S-like ribonucleases.

    PubMed

    Arai, Naoki; Nishimura, Emi; Kikuchi, Yo; Ohyama, Takashi

    2015-09-11

    Unlike plants with no carnivory, carnivorous plants seem to use S-like ribonucleases (RNases) as an enzyme for carnivory. Carnivorous plant-specific conserved amino acid residues are present at four positions around the conserved active site (CAS). The roles of these conserved amino acid residues in the enzymatic function were explored in the current study by preparing five recombinant variants of DA-I, the S-like RNase of Drosera adelae. The kcat and kcat/Km values of the enzymes revealed that among the four variants with a single mutation, the serine to glycine mutation at position 111 most negatively influenced the enzymatic activity. The change in the bulkiness of the amino acid residue side-chain seemed to be the major cause of the above effect. Modeling of the three dimensional (3D) structures strongly suggested that the S to G mutation at 111 greatly altered the overall enzyme conformation. The conserved four amino acid residues are likely to function in keeping the two histidine residues, which are essential for the cleavage of RNA strands, and the CAS in the most functional enzymatic conformation.

  14. Isolation of lactic acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Jelena; Yüksel-Dadak, Aytül; Dröge, Stefan; König, Helmut

    2017-02-20

    Direct molecular approaches provide hints that lactic acid bacteria play an important role in the degradation process of organic material to methanogenetic substrates in biogas plants. However, their diversity in biogas fermenter samples has not been analyzed in detail yet. For that reason, five different biogas fermenters, which were fed mainly with maize silage and manure from cattle or pigs, were examined for the occurrence of lactic acid-forming bacteria. A total of 197 lactic acid-forming bacterial strains were isolated, which we assigned to 21 species, belonging to the genera Bacillus, Clostridium, Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Streptococcus and Pseudoramibacter-related. A qualitative multiplex system and a real-time quantitative PCR could be developed for most isolates, realized by the selection of specific primers. Their role in biogas plants was discussed on the basis of the quantitative results and on physiological data of the isolates.

  15. A microalgae residue based carbon solid acid catalyst for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaobo; Li, Dianhong; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Yuanming; Huang, Weiya; Zhu, Yi; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Chengwu

    2013-10-01

    Biodiesel production from microalgae is recognized as one of the best solutions to deal with the energy crisis issues. However, after the oil extraction from the microalgae, the microalgae residue was generally discarded or burned. Here a novel carbon-based solid acid catalyst derived from microalgae residue by in situ hydrothermal partially carbonization were synthesized. The obtained catalyst was characterized and subjected to both the esterification of oleic acid and transesterification of triglyceride to produce biodiesel. The catalyst showed high catalytic activity and can be regenerated while its activity can be well maintained after five cycles.

  16. Enzymatic Kolbe-Schmitt reaction to form salicylic acid from phenol: enzymatic characterization and gene identification of a novel enzyme, Trichosporon moniliiforme salicylic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kirimura, Kohtaro; Gunji, Hiroaki; Wakayama, Rumiko; Hattori, Takasumi; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2010-04-02

    Salicylic acid decarboxylase (Sdc) can produce salicylic acid from phenol; it was found in the yeast Trichosporon moniliiforme WU-0401 and was for the first time enzymatically characterized, with the sdc gene heterologously expressed. Sdc catalyzed both reactions: decarboxylation of salicylic acid to phenol and the carboxylation of phenol to form salicylic acid without any byproducts. Both reactions were detected without the addition of any cofactors and occurred even in the presence of oxygen, suggesting that this Sdc is reversible, nonoxidative, and oxygen insensitive. Therefore, it is readily applicable in the selective production of salicylic acid from phenol, the enzymatic Kolbe-Schmitt reaction. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene, sdc, encoding Sdc comprises 350 amino acid residues corresponding to a 40-kDa protein. The recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) expressing sdc converted phenol to salicylic acid with a 27% (mol/mol) yield at 30 degrees C for 9h.

  17. Experimental study of the antithrombogenic behavior of Dacron vascular grafts coated with hydrophilic acrylic copolymers bearing salicylic acid residues.

    PubMed

    San Román, J; Buján, J; Bellón, J M; Gallardo, A; Escudero, M C; Jorge, E; de Haro, J; Alvarez, L; Castillo-Olivares, J L

    1996-09-01

    The objective of the present work was study of the behavior of active coatings of hydrophilic acrylic polymers bearing salicylic acid residues linked covalently to the macromolecular chains, after their application to woven and knitted Dacron vascular grafts. In vitro tests were carried out under dynamic flow conditions using equipment especially designed to reproduce physiologic conditions, to determine the retention of the coating using a saline solution. Ex vivo tests were carried out in an extracorporeal circuit using the dog as an animal model. The study of the deposition of platelets was followed by labeling of autologous platelets with 111In-oxine, as well as by analysis of the surfaces of the prostheses by scanning electron microscopy. An application of thin coatings of hydrophilic acrylic copolymers improves the antithrombogenicity of the vascular grafts with respect to the uncoated prosthesis. The presence of relatively small amounts of units bearing salicylic acid residues in the copolymer chains (5-20 wt %) gives good results when they are applied to woven and knitten Dacron meshes which have been quantified by analysis of the percentage of radiotracer on the surface of the vascular grafts tested in ex vivo experiments. The salicylic acid residues are released slowly to the medium by hydrolysis of the reversible covalent bonds of this compound to the acrylic macromolecular chains, which provides an additional antiaggregating effect for platelets. The polymeric coating forms a thin active film which improves the antithrombogenic properties of the surface of woven or knitted Dacron vascular grafts in ex vivo experiments.

  18. Sequence of the canine herpesvirus thymidine kinase gene: taxon-preferred amino acid residues in the alphaherpesviral thymidine kinases.

    PubMed

    Rémond, M; Sheldrick, P; Lebreton, F; Foulon, T

    1995-12-01

    Multiple sequence alignments of evolutionarily related proteins are finding increasing use as indicators of critical amino acid residues necessary for structural stability or involved in functional domains responsible for catalytic activities. In the past, a number of alignments have provided such information for the herpesviral thymidine kinases, for which three-dimensional structures are not yet available. We have sequenced the thymidine kinase gene of a canine herpesvirus, and with a multiple alignment have identified amino acids preferentially conserved in either of two taxons, the genera Varicellovirus and Simplexvirus, of the subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae. Since some regions of the thymidine kinases show otherwise elevated levels of substitutional tolerance, these conserved amino acids are candidates for critical residues which have become fixed through selection during the evolutionary divergence of these enzymes. Several pairs with distinctive patterns of distribution among the various viruses occur in or near highly conserved sequence motifs previously proposed to form the catalytic site, and we speculate that they may represent interacting, co-ordinately variable residues.

  19. Simultaneous determination of rutin and ascorbic acid mixture in their pure forms and combined dosage form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, Tamer Z.

    2016-12-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive and selective high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with ultraviolet detection has been developed for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid and rutin in pure forms and pharmaceutical dosage form. HPLC separation was performed on Phenomenex C18 analytical column with 0.1% v/v acetic acid in water and acetonitrile (75:25, v/v), as mobile phase. The separation was done at ambient temperature with flow rate of 1 mL·min- 1 in isocratic mode. HPLC measurements were carried out using ultraviolet detection wavelength at 257 nm. The average retention times were 2.72 and 7.00 min for ascorbic acid and rutin, respectively. The calibration plots were constructed over the concentration range of 5.0-30.0 for ascorbic acid and 10.0-60.0 μg·mL- 1 for rutin. The limits of detection were 1.06 and 1.89 μg·mL- 1 and limits of quantification were 3.54 and 6.31 μg·mL- 1 for ascorbic acid and rutin, respectively. The proposed HPLC-UV method was successfully applied for determination of ascorbic acid in its tablets and for simultaneous determination of the studied drugs in their laboratory prepared mixtures and in pharmaceutical formulation. Statistical comparisons of the results with the reference method show an excellent agreement and indicate no significant difference in respect to accuracy and precision.

  20. Helix formation in preorganized beta/gamma-peptide foldamers: hydrogen-bond analogy to the alpha-helix without alpha-amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Almeida, Aaron M; Zhang, Weicheng; Reidenbach, Andrew G; Choi, Soo Hyuk; Guzei, Ilia A; Gellman, Samuel H

    2010-06-16

    We report the first high-resolution structural data for the beta/gamma-peptide 13-helix (i,i+3 C=O...H-N H-bonds), a secondary structure that is formed by oligomers with a 1:1 alternation of beta- and gamma-amino acid residues. Our characterization includes both crystallographic and 2D NMR data. Previous studies suggested that beta/gamma-peptides constructed from conformationally flexible residues adopt a different helical secondary structure in solution. Our design features preorganized beta- and gamma-residues, which strongly promote 13-helical folding by the 1:1 beta/gamma backbone.

  1. Evaluation of microwave-accelerated residue-specific acid cleavage for proteomic applications.

    PubMed

    Swatkoski, Stephen; Gutierrez, Peter; Wynne, Colin; Petrov, Alexey; Dinman, Jonathan D; Edwards, Nathan; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-02-01

    Microwave-accelerated proteolysis using acetic acid has been shown to occur specifically on either or both sides of aspartic acid residues. This chemical cleavage has been applied to ovalbumin and several model peptides to test the effect on some of the more common post-translational modifications. No oxidation of methionine or cysteine was observed; however, hydrolysis of phosphate groups proceeds at a detectable rate. Acid cleavage was also extended to the yeast ribosome model proteome, where it provided information on 74% of that proteome. Aspartic acid occurs across the proteome with approximately half the frequency of the combined occurrence of the trypsin residues lysine and arginine, and implications of this are considered.

  2. Modification of amino acid residues in carious dentin matrix.

    PubMed

    Kleter, G A; Damen, J J; Buijs, M J; Ten Cate, J M

    1998-03-01

    The Maillard reaction between sugar and protein has been postulated as the cause for the browning and arrestment of caries lesions. This reaction has been implicated as the cause for decreased degradability of collagen in vivo. The aim of the present study was to verify the occurrence of the reaction in vivo. Carious and sound dentin samples were taken from extracted human teeth and analyzed for the fluorescence characteristic of the Maillard reaction and oxidation and, by HPLC, for Maillard products. In addition, physiological cross-links were analyzed by HPLC. Oxidation- and Maillard reaction-related fluorescence increased in collagenase digests from carious dentin. Advanced Maillard products (carboxymethyllysine and pentosidine) increased, whereas furosine, a marker for the initial reaction, was not observed consistently. This implies no direct addition of sugars to protein, but rather the addi-tion of smaller metabolites and glycoxidation products. In addition, the physiological cross-links hydroxylysinonorleucine and dihydroxylysinonorleucine decreased in carious dentin. Also for hydroxylysylpyridinoline, a decrease was observed, but not consistently. In conclusion, the caries process modifies amino acids in dentin collagen, which can lead to increased resistance against proteolysis and ultimately to caries arrestment.

  3. Evolutionary diversification of aminopeptidase N in Lepidoptera by conserved clade-specific amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Austin L

    2014-07-01

    Members of the aminopepidase N (APN) gene family of the insect order Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) bind the naturally insecticidal Cry toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of seven lepidopteran APN classes provided strong support for the hypothesis that lepidopteran APN2 class arose by gene duplication prior to the most recent common ancestor of Lepidoptera and Diptera. The Cry toxin-binding region (BR) of lepidopteran and dipteran APNs was subject to stronger purifying selection within APN classes than was the remainder of the molecule, reflecting conservation of catalytic site and adjoining residues within the BR. Of lepidopteran APN classes, APN2, APN6, and APN8 showed the strongest evidence of functional specialization, both in expression patterns and in the occurrence of conserved derived amino acid residues. The latter three APN classes also shared a convergently evolved conserved residue close to the catalytic site. APN8 showed a particularly strong tendency towards class-specific conserved residues, including one of the catalytic site residues in the BR and ten others in close vicinity to the catalytic site residues. The occurrence of class-specific sequences along with the conservation of enzymatic function is consistent with the hypothesis that the presence of Cry toxins in the environment has been a factor shaping the evolution of this multi-gene family.

  4. Revised Backbone-Virtual-Bond-Angle Potentials to Treat the l- and d-Amino Acid Residues in the Coarse-Grained United Residue (UNRES) Force Field

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Continuing our effort to introduce d-amino-acid residues in the united residue (UNRES) force field developed in our laboratory, in this work the Cα ··· Cα ··· Cα backbone-virtual-bond-valence-angle (θ) potentials for systems containing d-amino-acid residues have been developed. The potentials were determined by integrating the combined energy surfaces of all possible triplets of terminally blocked glycine, alanine, and proline obtained with ab initio molecular quantum mechanics at the MP2/6-31G(d,p) level to calculate the corresponding potentials of mean force (PMFs). Subsequently, analytical expressions were fitted to the PMFs to give the virtual-bond-valence potentials to be used in UNRES. Alanine represented all types of amino-acid residues except glycine and proline. The blocking groups were either the N-acetyl and N′,N′-dimethyl or N-acetyl and pyrrolidyl group, depending on whether the residue next in sequence was an alanine-type or a proline residue. A total of 126 potentials (63 symmetry-unrelated potentials for each set of terminally blocking groups) were determined. Together with the torsional, double-torsional, and side-chain-rotamer potentials for polypeptide chains containing d-amino-acid residues determined in our earlier work (Sieradzan et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2012, 8, 4746), the new virtual-bond-angle (θ) potentials now constitute the complete set of physics-based potentials with which to run coarse-grained simulations of systems containing d-amino-acid residues. The ability of the extended UNRES force field to reproduce thermodynamics of polypeptide systems with d-amino-acid residues was tested by comparing the experimentally measured and the calculated free energies of helix formation of model KLALKLALxxLKLALKLA peptides, where x denotes any d- or l- amino-acid residue. The obtained results demonstrate that the UNRES force field with the new potentials reproduce the changes of free energies of helix formation upon d

  5. Cascade Dissociations of Peptide Cation-Radicals. Part 1. Scope and Effects of Amino Acid Residues in Penta-, Nona- and Decapeptides

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Thomas W.; Hui, Renjie; Ledvina, Aaron; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid residue-specific backbone and side-chain dissociations of peptide z ions in MS3 spectra were elucidated for over 40 pentapeptides with arginine C-terminated sequences of the AAXAR and AAHXR type, nonapeptides of the AAHAAXYAR and AAHAXAYAR type, and AAHAAXYAAR decapeptides. Peptide zn ions containing amino acid residues with readily transferrable benzylic or tertiary β-hydrogen atoms (Phe, Tyr, His, Trp, Val) underwent facile backbone cleavages to form dominant zn-2 or zn-3 ions. These backbone cleavages are thought to be triggered by a side-chain β-hydrogen atom transfer to the z ion Cα radical site followed by homolytic dissociation of the adjacent Cα—CO bond, forming zn-2 + HNCO cation-radicals that spontaneously dissociate by loss of HNCO. Amino acid residues that do not have readily transferrable β-hydrogen atoms (Gly, Ala) do not undergo the zn → zn-2 dissociations. The backbone cleavages compete with side-chain dissociations in z ions containing Asp and Asn residues. Side-chain dissociations are thought to be triggered by α-hydrogen atom transfers that activate the Cβ—Cγ or Cβ—heteroatom bonds for dissociations that dominate the MS3 spectra of z ions from peptides containing Leu, Cys, Lys, Met, Ser, Arg, Glu and Gln residues. The Lys, Arg, Gln, and Glu residues also participate in γ-hydrogen atom transfers that trigger other side-chain dissociations. PMID:22669761

  6. Identification of amino acid residues responsible for the enantioselectivity and amide formation capacity of the Arylacetonitrilase from Pseudomonas fluorescens EBC191.

    PubMed

    Kiziak, Christoph; Stolz, Andreas

    2009-09-01

    The nitrilase from Pseudomonas fluorescens EBC191 converted (R,S)-mandelonitrile with a low enantioselectivity to (R)-mandelic acid and (S)-mandeloamide in a ratio of about 4:1. In contrast, the same substrate was hydrolyzed by the homologous nitrilase from Alcaligenes faecalis ATCC 8750 almost exclusively to (R)-mandelic acid. A chimeric enzyme between both nitrilases was constructed, which represented in total 16 amino acid exchanges in the central part of the nitrilase from P. fluorescens EBC191. The chimeric enzyme clearly resembled the nitrilase from A. faecalis ATCC 8750 in its turnover characteristics for (R,S)-mandelonitrile and (R,S)-2-phenylpropionitrile (2-PPN) and demonstrated an even higher enantioselectivity for the formation of (R)-mandelic acid than the nitrilase from A. faecalis. An alanine residue (Ala165) in direct proximity to the catalytically active cysteine residue was replaced in the nitrilase from P. fluorescens by a tryptophan residue (as found in the nitrilase from A. faecalis ATCC 8750 and most other bacterial nitrilases) and several other amino acid residues. Those enzyme variants that possessed a larger substituent in position 165 (tryptophan, phenylalanine, tyrosine, or histidine) converted racemic mandelonitrile and 2-PPN to increased amounts of the R enantiomers of the corresponding acids. The enzyme variant Ala165His showed a significantly increased relative activity for mandelonitrile (compared to 2-PPN), and the opposite was found for the enzyme variants carrying aromatic residues in the relevant position. The mutant forms carrying an aromatic substituent in position 165 generally formed significantly reduced amounts of mandeloamide from mandelonitrile. The important effect of the corresponding amino acid residue on the reaction specificity and enantiospecificity of arylacetonitrilases was confirmed by the construction of a Trp164Ala variant of the nitrilase from A. faecalis ATCC 8750. This point mutation converted the highly R

  7. Isoelectric Point, Electric Charge, and Nomenclature of the Acid-Base Residues of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado, Andres A.; Ribeiro, Joao M.; Sillero, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The main object of this work is to present the pedagogical usefulness of the theoretical methods, developed in this laboratory, for the determination of the isoelectric point (pI) and the net electric charge of proteins together with some comments on the naming of the acid-base residues of proteins. (Contains 8 figures and 4 tables.)

  8. Progesterone binding to the tryptophan residues of human alpha1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R

    2006-11-06

    Binding studies between progesterone and alpha1-acid glycoprotein allowed us to demonstrate that the binding site of progesterone contains one hydrophobic tryptophan residue and that the structure of the protein is not altered upon binding. The data obtained at saturated concentrations of progesterone clearly reveal the type of interaction at physiological levels.

  9. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR). We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. Results We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. Conclusions The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine) residues (with some exceptions). Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the interfaces between the

  10. Phospho-N-Acetyl-Muramyl-Pentapeptide Translocase from Escherichia coli: Catalytic Role of Conserved Aspartic Acid Residues

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Adrian J.; Brandish, Philip E.; Gilbey, Andrea M.; Bugg, Timothy D. H.

    2004-01-01

    Phospho-N-acetyl-muramyl-pentapeptide translocase (translocase 1) catalyzes the first of a sequence of lipid-linked steps that ultimately assemble the peptidoglycan layer of the bacterial cell wall. This essential enzyme is the target of several natural product antibiotics and has recently been the focus of antimicrobial drug discovery programs. The catalytic mechanism of translocase 1 is believed to proceed via a covalent intermediate formed between phospho-N-acetyl-muramyl-pentapeptide and a nucleophilic amino acid residue. Amino acid sequence alignments of the translocase 1 family and members of the related transmembrane phosphosugar transferase superfamily revealed only three conserved residues that possess nucleophilic side chains: the aspartic acid residues D115, D116, and D267. Here we report the expression and partial purification of Escherichia coli translocase 1 as a C-terminal hexahistidine (C-His6) fusion protein. Three enzymes with the site-directed mutations D115N, D116N, and D267N were constructed, expressed, and purified as C-His6 fusions. Enzymatic analysis established that all three mutations eliminated translocase 1 activity, and this finding verified the essential role of these residues. By analogy with the structural environment of the double aspartate motif found in prenyl transferases, we propose a model whereby D115 and D116 chelate a magnesium ion that coordinates with the pyrophosphate bridge of the UDP-N-acetyl-muramyl-pentapeptide substrate and in which D267 therefore fulfills the role of the translocase 1 active-site nucleophile. PMID:14996806

  11. Kinetic and mutagenic evidence for the role of histidine residues in the Lycopersicon esculentum 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Tayeh, M A; Howe, D L; Salleh, H M; Sheflyan, G Y; Son, J K; Woodard, R W

    1999-01-01

    The ACCO gene from Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) has been cloned into the expression vector PT7-7. The highly expressed protein was recovered in the form of inclusion bodies. ACCO is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC) with a second-order rate constant of 170 M(-1) min(-1). The pH-inactivation rate data imply the involvement of an amino acid residue with a pK value of 6.05. The difference UV spectrum of the the DEPC-inactivated versus native ACCO showed a single peak at 242 nm indicating the modification of histidine residues. The inactivation was reversed by the addition of hydroxylamine to the DEPC-inactivated ACCO. Substrate/cofactor protection studies indicate that both iron and ACC bind near the active site, which contains histidine residues. Four histidines of ACCO were individually mutated to alanine and glycine. H39A is catalytically active, while H177A, H177G, H211A, H211G, H234A, and H234G are basically inactive. The results indicate that histidine residues 177, 211, and 234 may serve as ligands for the active-site iron of ACCO and/or may play some important structural or catalytic role.

  12. Residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential decreases unsaturated fatty acid level in sake yeast during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Kazutaka; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen, a key nutrient in alcoholic fermentation, is rapidly depleted during this process. Several pathways of oxygen utilization have been reported in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation, namely synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid, sterols and heme, and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. However, the interaction between these pathways has not been investigated. In this study, we showed that the major proportion of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids in sake fermentation mash is derived from the sake yeast rather than from rice or koji (rice fermented with Aspergillus). Additionally, during alcoholic fermentation, inhibition of the residual mitochondrial activity of sake yeast increases the levels of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids. These findings indicate that the residual activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain reduces molecular oxygen levels and decreases the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, thereby increasing the synthesis of estery flavors by sake yeast. This is the first report of a novel link between residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids by the brewery yeast during alcoholic fermentation.

  13. Hexameric RSF1010 helicase RepA: the structural and functional importance of single amino acid residues

    PubMed Central

    Ziegelin, Günter; Niedenzu, Timo; Lurz, Rudi; Saenger, Wolfram; Lanka, Erich

    2003-01-01

    In the known monoclinic crystals the 3-dimensional structure of the hexameric, replicative helicase RepA encoded by plasmid RSF1010 shows 6-fold rotational symmetry. In contrast, in the cubic crystal form at 2.55 Å resolution described here RepA has 3-fold symmetry and consists of a trimer of dimers. To study structure–function relationships, a series of repA deletion mutants and mutations yielding single amino acid exchanges were constructed and the respective gene products were analyzed in vivo and in vitro. Hexamerization of RepA occurs via the N-terminus and is required for NTP hydrolysis. The C-terminus is essential both for the interaction with the replication machinery and for the helicase activity. Functional analyses of RepA variants with single amino acid exchanges confirmed most of the predictions that were based on the published 3-dimensional structure. Of the five motifs conserved in family 4 helicases, all residues conserved in RepA and T7 gp4 helicases participate in DNA unwinding. Residues K42, E76, D77, D139 and H178, proposed to play key roles in catalyzing the hydrolysis of NTPs, are essential for RepA activity. Residue H178 of motif H3 couples nucleotide consumption to DNA strand separation. PMID:14530440

  14. A solid form of ambazone with lactic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodi, Gh.; Muresan-Pop, M.; Kacsó, I.; Bratu, I.

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, much research has been carried out on the preparation of pharmaceutical solid forms due to their improved physical-chemical parameters such as solubility, dissolution rate of the drug, chemical stability, melting point and hygroscopic parameter. The aim of this study was to obtain and to investigate the structural properties of the ambazone (AMB) with lactic acid (LA) solid form. The solid form was obtained starting from the mixture of ambazone with lactic acid (1:1), by grinding method at constant temperature. The obtained compound was investigated via X-ray powder diffraction (PXRD), thermal analysis (DSC, TG-DTA) and infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The difference between the patterns of AMB•LA and of the starting compounds evidenced a new compound. Using X-ray powder diffraction method, by indexing procedure the unit cell and the lattice parameters were determined. Thermal and FTIR measurements on the pure compounds and on the (1:1) ground mixture of AMB with LA confirm the new salt form formation.

  15. Structure-function studies of nerve growth factor: functional importance of highly conserved amino acid residues.

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, C F; Hallböök, F; Ebendal, T; Persson, H

    1990-01-01

    Selected amino acid residues in chicken nerve growth factor (NGF) were replaced by site-directed mutagenesis. Mutated NGF sequences were transiently expressed in COS cells and the yield of NGF protein in conditioned medium was quantified by Western blotting. Binding of each mutant to NGF receptors on PC12 cells was evaluated in a competition assay. The biological activity was determined by measuring stimulation of neurite outgrowth from chick sympathetic ganglia. The residues homologous to the proposed receptor binding site of insulin (Ser18, Met19, Val21, Asp23) were substituted by Ala. Replacement of Ser18, Met19 and Asp23 did not affect NGF activity. Modification of Val21 notably reduced both receptor binding and biological activity, suggesting that this residue is important to retain a fully active NGF. The highly conserved Tyr51 and Arg99 were converted into Phe and Lys respectively, without changing the biological properties of the molecule. However, binding and biological activity were greatly impaired after the simultaneous replacement of both Arg99 and Arg102 by Gly. The three conserved Trp residues at positions 20, 75 and 98 were substituted by Phe. The Trp mutated proteins retained 15-60% of receptor binding and 40-80% of biological activity, indicating that the Trp residues are not essential for NGF activity. However, replacement of Trp20 significantly reduced the amount of NGF in the medium, suggesting that this residue may be important for protein stability. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2328722

  16. Signal transduction in light-oxygen-voltage receptors lacking the adduct-forming cysteine residue.

    PubMed

    Yee, Estella F; Diensthuber, Ralph P; Vaidya, Anand T; Borbat, Peter P; Engelhard, Christopher; Freed, Jack H; Bittl, Robert; Möglich, Andreas; Crane, Brian R

    2015-12-09

    Light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) receptors sense blue light through the photochemical generation of a covalent adduct between a flavin-nucleotide chromophore and a strictly conserved cysteine residue. Here we show that, after cysteine removal, the circadian-clock LOV-protein Vivid still undergoes light-induced dimerization and signalling because of flavin photoreduction to the neutral semiquinone (NSQ). Similarly, photoreduction of the engineered LOV histidine kinase YF1 to the NSQ modulates activity and downstream effects on gene expression. Signal transduction in both proteins hence hinges on flavin protonation, which is common to both the cysteinyl adduct and the NSQ. This general mechanism is also conserved by natural cysteine-less, LOV-like regulators that respond to chemical or photoreduction of their flavin cofactors. As LOV proteins can react to light even when devoid of the adduct-forming cysteine, modern LOV photoreceptors may have arisen from ancestral redox-active flavoproteins. The ability to tune LOV reactivity through photoreduction may have important implications for LOV mechanism and optogenetic applications.

  17. Signal transduction in light–oxygen–voltage receptors lacking the adduct-forming cysteine residue

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Estella F.; Diensthuber, Ralph P.; Vaidya, Anand T.; Borbat, Peter P.; Engelhard, Christopher; Freed, Jack H.; Bittl, Robert; Möglich, Andreas; Crane, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Light–oxygen–voltage (LOV) receptors sense blue light through the photochemical generation of a covalent adduct between a flavin-nucleotide chromophore and a strictly conserved cysteine residue. Here we show that, after cysteine removal, the circadian-clock LOV-protein Vivid still undergoes light-induced dimerization and signalling because of flavin photoreduction to the neutral semiquinone (NSQ). Similarly, photoreduction of the engineered LOV histidine kinase YF1 to the NSQ modulates activity and downstream effects on gene expression. Signal transduction in both proteins hence hinges on flavin protonation, which is common to both the cysteinyl adduct and the NSQ. This general mechanism is also conserved by natural cysteine-less, LOV-like regulators that respond to chemical or photoreduction of their flavin cofactors. As LOV proteins can react to light even when devoid of the adduct-forming cysteine, modern LOV photoreceptors may have arisen from ancestral redox-active flavoproteins. The ability to tune LOV reactivity through photoreduction may have important implications for LOV mechanism and optogenetic applications. PMID:26648256

  18. The prediction of the degree of exposure to solvent of amino acid residues via genetic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Handley, S.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper I evolve programs that predict the degree of exposure to solvent (the buriedness) of amino acid residues given only the primary structure. I use genetic programming to evolve programs that take as input the primary structure and that output the buriedness of each residue. I trained these programs on a set of 82 proteins from the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank (PDB) and cross-validated them on a separate testing set of 40 proteins, also from the PDB. The best program evolved had a correlation of 0.434 between the predicted and observed buriednesses on the testing set.

  19. Thiostrepton Variants Containing a Contracted Quinaldic Acid Macrocycle Result from Mutagenesis of the Second Residue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feifei; Li, Chaoxuan

    2016-01-01

    The thiopeptides are a family of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptide metabolites, and the vast majority of thiopeptides characterized to date possess one highly modified macrocycle. A few members, including thiostrepton A, harbor a second macrocycle that incorporates a quinaldic acid moiety and the four N-terminal residues of the peptide. The antibacterial properties of thiostrepton A are well established, and its recently discovered ability to inhibit the proteasome has additional implications for the development of antimalarial and anticancer therapeutics. We have conducted the saturation mutagenesis of Ala2 in the precursor peptide, TsrA, to examine which variants can be transformed into a mature thiostrepton analogue. Although the thiostrepton biosynthetic system is somewhat restrictive towards substitutions at the second residue, eight thiostrepton Ala2 analogues were isolated. The TsrA Ala2Ile and Ala2Val variants were largely channeled through an alternate processing pathway wherein the first residue of the core peptide, Ile1, is removed and the resulting thiostrepton analogues bear quinaldic acid macrocycles abridged by one residue. This is the first report revealing that quinaldic acid loop size is amenable to alteration during the course of thiostrepton biosynthesis. Both the antibacterial and proteasome inhibitory properties of the thiostrepton Ala2 analogues were examined. While the identity of the residue at the second position of the core peptide influences thiostrepton biosynthesis, our report suggests it may not be crucial for antibacterial and proteasome inhibitory properties of the full-length variants. In contrast, the contracted quinaldic acid loop can, to differing degrees, affect both types of biological activity. PMID:26630475

  20. Characterization of Magnetite Scale Formed in Naphthenic Acid Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Peng; Robbins, Winston; Bota, Gheorghe; Nesic, Srdjan

    2017-02-01

    Naphthenic acid corrosion (NAC) is one of the major concerns for corrosion engineers in refineries. Traditionally, the iron sulfide (FeS) scale, formed when sulfur compounds in crudes corrode the metal, is expected to be protective and limit the NAC. Nevertheless, no relationship has been found between protectiveness and the characteristics of FeS scale. In this study, lab scale tests with model sulfur compounds and naphthenic acids replicated corrosive processes of refineries with real crude fractions behavior. The morphology and chemical composition of scales were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These high-resolution microscopy techniques revealed the presence of an iron oxide (Fe3O4 or magnetite) scale and discrete particulates on metal surfaces under FeS scales, especially on a low chrome steel. The presence of the iron oxide was correlated with the naphthenic acid activity during the experiments. It is postulated that the formation of the magnetite scale resulted from the decomposition of iron naphthenates at high temperatures. It is further postulated that a nano-particulate form of magnetite may be providing corrosion resistance.

  1. Characterization of Magnetite Scale Formed in Naphthenic Acid Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Peng; Robbins, Winston; Bota, Gheorghe; Nesic, Srdjan

    2016-10-01

    Naphthenic acid corrosion (NAC) is one of the major concerns for corrosion engineers in refineries. Traditionally, the iron sulfide (FeS) scale, formed when sulfur compounds in crudes corrode the metal, is expected to be protective and limit the NAC. Nevertheless, no relationship has been found between protectiveness and the characteristics of FeS scale. In this study, lab scale tests with model sulfur compounds and naphthenic acids replicated corrosive processes of refineries with real crude fractions behavior. The morphology and chemical composition of scales were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These high-resolution microscopy techniques revealed the presence of an iron oxide (Fe3O4 or magnetite) scale and discrete particulates on metal surfaces under FeS scales, especially on a low chrome steel. The presence of the iron oxide was correlated with the naphthenic acid activity during the experiments. It is postulated that the formation of the magnetite scale resulted from the decomposition of iron naphthenates at high temperatures. It is further postulated that a nano-particulate form of magnetite may be providing corrosion resistance.

  2. A novel sono-assisted acid pretreatment of chili post harvest residue for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, Raveendran; Binod, Parameswaran; Pandey, Ashok

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a sono-assisted acid pretreatment strategy for the effective removal of lignin and hemicelluloses and to improve the sugar yield from chili post harvest residue. Operational parameters that affect the pretreatment efficiency were studied and optimized. Inhibitor analysis of the hydrolyzate revealed that major fermentation inhibitors like furfural, hydroxymethyl furfural and organic acids like citric acid, succinic acid and propionic acid were absent. Changes in structural properties of the biomass were studied in relation to the pretreatment process using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis, and the changes in chemical composition was also monitored. The biomass pretreated with the optimized novel method yielded 0.465g/g of reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis. Fermentation of the non-detoxified hydrolysate yielded 2.14% of bioethanol with a fermentation efficiency of 71.03%.

  3. Conjugated fatty acid synthesis: residues 111 and 115 influence product partitioning of Momordica charantia conjugase.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Richa; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Sweet, Marie; Shanklin, John

    2012-05-11

    Conjugated linolenic acids (CLNs), 18:3 Δ(9,11,13), lack the methylene groups found between the double bonds of linolenic acid (18:3 Δ(9,12,15)). CLNs are produced by conjugase enzymes that are homologs of the oleate desaturases FAD2. The goal of this study was to map the domain(s) within the Momordica charantia conjugase (FADX) responsible for CLN formation. To achieve this, a series of Momordica FADX-Arabidopsis FAD2 chimeras were expressed in the Arabidopsis fad3fae1 mutant, and the transformed seeds were analyzed for the accumulation of CLN. These experiments identified helix 2 and the first histidine box as a determinant of conjugase product partitioning into punicic acid (18:3 Δ(9cis,11trans,13cis)) or α-eleostearic acid (18:3 Δ(9cis,11trans,13trans)). This was confirmed by analysis of a FADX mutant containing six substitutions in which the sequence of helix 2 and first histidine box was converted to that of FAD2. Each of the six FAD2 substitutions was individually converted back to the FADX equivalent identifying residues 111 and 115, adjacent to the first histidine box, as key determinants of conjugase product partitioning. Additionally, expression of FADX G111V and FADX G111V/D115E resulted in an approximate doubling of eleostearic acid accumulation to 20.4% and 21.2%, respectively, compared with 9.9% upon expression of the native Momordica FADX. Like the Momordica conjugase, FADX G111V and FADX D115E produced predominantly α-eleostearic acid and little punicic acid, but the FADX G111V/D115E double mutant produced approximately equal amounts of α-eleostearic acid and its isomer, punicic acid, implicating an interactive effect of residues 111 and 115 in punicic acid formation.

  4. The forms of alkalis in the biochar produced from crop residues at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jin-Hua; Xu, Ren-Kou; Zhang, Hong

    2011-02-01

    The forms of alkalis of the biochars produced from the straws of canola, corn, soybean and peanut at different temperatures (300, 500 and 700°C) were studied by means of oxygen-limited pyrolysis. The alkalinity and pH of the biochars increased with increased pyrolysis temperature. The X-ray diffraction spectra and the content of carbonates of the biochars suggested that carbonates were the major alkaline components in the biochars generated at the high temperature; they were also responsible for the strong buffer plateau-regions on the acid-base titration curves at 500 and 700°C. The data of FTIR-PAS and zeta potentials indicated that the functional groups such as -COO(-) (-COOH) and -O(-) (-OH) contained by the biochars contributed greatly to the alkalinity of the biochar samples tested, especially for those generated at the lower temperature. These functional groups were also responsible for the negative charges of the biochars.

  5. G4IPDB: A database for G-quadruplex structure forming nucleic acid interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Subodh Kumar; Tawani, Arpita; Mishra, Amit; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid G-quadruplex structure (G4) Interacting Proteins DataBase (G4IPDB) is an important database that contains detailed information about proteins interacting with nucleic acids that forms G-quadruplex structures. G4IPDB is the first database that provides comprehensive information about this interaction at a single platform. This database contains more than 200 entries with details of interaction such as interacting protein name and their synonyms, their UniProt-ID, source organism, target name and its sequences, ∆Tm, binding/dissociation constants, protein gene name, protein FASTA sequence, interacting residue in protein, related PDB entries, interaction ID, graphical view, PMID, author’s name and techniques that were used to detect their interactions. G4IPDB also provides an efficient web-based “G-quadruplex predictor tool” that searches putative G-quadruplex forming sequences simultaneously in both sense and anti-sense strands of the query nucleotide sequence and provides the predicted G score. Studying the interaction between proteins and nucleic acids forming G-quadruplex structures could be of therapeutic significance for various diseases including cancer and neurological disease, therefore, having detail information about their interactions on a single platform would be helpful for the discovery and development of novel therapeutics. G4IPDB can be routinely updated (twice in year) and freely available on http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/ipdb/index.php. PMID:27905517

  6. Oxidation and inactivation of SERCA by selective reaction of cysteine residues with amino acid peroxides.

    PubMed

    Dremina, Elena S; Sharov, Victor S; Davies, Michael J; Schöneich, Christian

    2007-10-01

    The oxidative modification of proteins plays an important role in a wide range of pathological processes and aging. Proteins are modified by numerous biologic oxidants including hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, singlet oxygen, and oxygen- and nitrogen-centered radicals. More recently, an additional class of physiologically important oxidants has been identified, peptide and protein peroxides. The latter react quite rapidly and selectively with protein cysteine residues. The sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) is reversibly regulated through NO-dependent S-glutathiolation of specific cysteine residues. The irreversible oxidation of these cysteine residues could, therefore, impair NO-dependent muscle relaxation. Here, we show that specific protein-derived (amino acid) peroxides react selectively with a subset of the 22 reduced cysteine residues of SERCA1, including a peptide-containing Cys674 and Cys675, where Cys674 (in SERCA2) represents one of the targets for NO-dependent S-glutathiolation. Out of 11 tested amino acid, peptide, and protein peroxides, those derived from free tryptophan and free tyrosine showed the highest reactivity towards SERCA, while no oxidation under similar experimental conditions was detected through hydrogen peroxide. Among the peroxides from tryptophan, those of free tryptophan showed a significantly higher reactivity as compared to those from N- and C-terminally blocked tryptophan. Quantitative HPLC-MS/MS analysis demonstrated that the highest reactivity of the tryptophan-derived peroxides was observed for Cys774 and Cys938, cysteine residues, which are embedded within the transmembrane domains of SERCA1. This unusual reactivity of transmembrane domains cannot be solely rationalized by the hydrophobicity of the oxidant, as the peroxide from dl-tryptophan shows considerable higher reactivity as compared to the one derived from N-acetyl-tryptophan methyl ester. Our data demonstrate a potential role of peptide- and protein

  7. Determination of free acidic and alkaline residues of protein via moving reaction boundary titration in microdevice electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hou-yu; Li, Si; Tang, Yun-yun; Dong, Jing-yu; Fan, Liu-yin; Cao, Cheng-xi

    2013-06-21

    As two important physico-chemical parameters, the acidic and alkaline residues of protein are of evident significance for the evaluation of protein properties and the design of relevant separation and analysis. However, there is still no electrophoretic method used for the direct detection of free acidic and alkaline residues of protein. Herein, we developed the concepts of moving reaction boundary (MRB) and MRB titration, relevant MRB titration theory, and the method of microdevice electrophoresis for the determination of free acidic and alkaline residues of protein. In the MRB titration, the boundary was created with acid or alkali and target protein immobilized via highly cross-linked polyacrylamide gel (PAG). It was theoretically revealed that the number of free acidic or alkaline residues of protein was as a function of MRB displacement in the electrophoretic titration system. As a proof of concept, seven model proteins were chosen for the determination of acidic or alkaline residues of protein via MRB titration. The results showed that the numbers of free acidic and alkaline residues of proteins detected were in good agreement with those obtained from the relevant amino sequences in the NCBI database, demonstrating the feasibility of the developed concept, theory and technique. The general methodology of MRB titration has potential application for inexpensive, facilitative and informative protein structure analysis of free acidic or alkaline residues of protein.

  8. Comparison between liquid and solid acids catalysts on reducing sugars conversion from furfural residues via pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Lin, Keying; Ma, Baojun; Sun, Yuan; Liu, Wanyi

    2014-09-01

    Liquid sulphuric acid is adopted and compared with carbon-based sulfonated solid acids (coal tar-based and active carbon-based) for furfural residues conversion into reducing sugars. The optimum hydrolysis conditions of liquid acid are at 4% of sulphuric acid, 25:1 of liquid and solid ratio, 175°C of reaction temperature and 120 min of reaction time. The reducing sugar yields are reached over 60% on liquid acid via NaOH/H2O2, NaOH/microwave and NaOH/ultrasonic pretreatments, whereas only over 30% on solid acids. The TOFs (turnover number frequency) via NaOH/H2O2 pretreatments are 0.093, 0.020 and 0.023 h(-1) for liquid sulphuric acid, coal tar-based and active carbon-based solid acids catalysts, respectively. Considering the efficiency, cost and environment factors, the liquid and solid acids have their own advantages of potential commercial application values.

  9. The reactivity of myeloperoxidase compound I formed with hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Furtmüller, P G; Burner, U; Jantschko, W; Regelsberger, G; Obinger, C

    2000-01-01

    The reaction of human myeloperoxidase (MPO) with hypochlorous acid (HOCl) was investigated by conventional stopped-flow spectroscopy at pH 5, 7, and 9. In the reaction of MPO with HOCl, compound I is formed. Its formation is strongly dependent on pH. HOCl (rather than OCl-) reacts with the unprotonated enzyme in its ferric state. Apparent second-order rate constants were determined to be 8.1 x 10(7) M(-1)s(-1) (pH 5), 2.0 x 10(8) M(-1)s(-1) (pH 7) and 2.0 x 10(6) M(-1)s(-1) (pH 9) at 15 degrees C. Furthermore, the kinetics and spectra of the reactions of halides and thiocyanate and of physiologically relevant one-electron donors (ascorbate, nitrite, tyrosine and hydrogen peroxide) with this compound I were investigated using the sequential-mixing technique. The results show conclusively that the redox intermediates formed upon addition of either hydrogen peroxide or hypochlorous acid to native MPO exhibit the same spectral features and reactivities and thus are identical. In stopped-flow investigations, the MPO/HOCl system has some advantage since: (i) in contrast to H2O2, HOCl cannot function as a one-electron donor of compound I; and (ii) MPO can easily be prevented from cycling by addition of methionine as HOCl scavenger. As a consequence, the observed absorbance changes are bigger and errors in data analysis are smaller.

  10. Important amino acid residues of hexachlorocyclohexane dehydrochlorinases (LinA) for enantioselective transformation of hexachlorocyclohexane isomers.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Nidhi; Macwan, Ankit S; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Kumar, Ashwani

    2017-03-01

    LinA-type1 and LinA-type2 are two well-characterized variants of the enzyme 'hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-dehydrochlorinase'. They differ from each other at ten amino acid positions and exhibit differing enantioselectivity for the transformation of the (-) and (+) enantiomers of α-HCH. Amino acids responsible for this enantioselectivity, however, are not known. An in silico docking analysis identified four amino acids (K20, L96, A131, and T133) in LinA-type1 that could be involved in selective binding of the substrates. Experimental studies with constructed mutant enzymes revealed that a combined presence of three amino acid changes in LinA-type1, i.e. K20Q, L96C, and A131G, caused a reversal in its preference from the (-) to the (+) enantiomer of α-HCH. This preference was enhanced by the additional amino acid change T133 M. Presence of these four changes also caused the reversal of enantioselectivity of LinA-type1 for δ-HCH, and β-, γ-, and δ-pentachlorocyclohexens. Thus, the residues K20, L96, A131, and T133 in LinA-type1 and the residues Q20, C96, G131, and M133 in LinA-type 2 appear to be important determinants for the enantioselectivity of LinA enzymes.

  11. Lactobacillus plantarum BL011 cultivation in industrial isolated soybean protein acid residue.

    PubMed

    Coghetto, Chaline Caren; Vasconcelos, Carolina Bettker; Brinques, Graziela Brusch; Ayub, Marco Antônio Záchia

    In this study, physiological aspects of Lactobacillus plantarum BL011 growing in a new, all-animal free medium in bioreactors were evaluated aiming at the production of this important lactic acid bacterium. Cultivations were performed in submerged batch bioreactors using the Plackett-Burman methodology to evaluate the influence of temperature, aeration rate and stirring speed as well as the concentrations of liquid acid protein residue of soybean, soy peptone, corn steep liquor, and raw yeast extract. The results showed that all variables, except for corn steep liquor, significantly influenced biomass production. The best condition was applied to bioreactor cultures, which produced a maximal biomass of 17.87gL(-1), whereas lactic acid, the most important lactic acid bacteria metabolite, peaked at 37.59gL(-1), corresponding to a productivity of 1.46gL(-1)h(-1). This is the first report on the use of liquid acid protein residue of soybean medium for L. plantarum growth. These results support the industrial use of this system as an alternative to produce probiotics without animal-derived ingredients to obtain high biomass concentrations in batch bioreactors.

  12. Critical amino acid residues of maurocalcine involved in pharmacology, lipid interaction and cell penetration.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, Kamel; Ram, Narendra; Boisseau, Sylvie; Strappazzon, Flavie; Rehaim, Amel; Sadoul, Rémy; Darbon, Hervé; Ronjat, Michel; De Waard, Michel

    2007-10-01

    Maurocalcine (MCa) is a 33-amino acid residue peptide that was initially identified in the Tunisian scorpion Scorpio maurus palmatus. This peptide triggers interest for three main reasons. First, it helps unravelling the mechanistic basis of Ca(2+) mobilization from the sarcoplasmic reticulum because of its sequence homology with a calcium channel domain involved in excitation-contraction coupling. Second, it shows potent pharmacological properties because of its ability to activate the ryanodine receptor. Finally, it is of technological value because of its ability to carry cell-impermeable compounds across the plasma membrane. Herein, we characterized the molecular determinants that underlie the pharmacological and cell-penetrating properties of maurocalcine. We identify several key amino acid residues of the peptide that will help the design of cell-penetrating analogues devoid of pharmacological activity and cell toxicity. Close examination of the determinants underlying cell penetration of maurocalcine reveals that basic amino acid residues are required for an interaction with negatively charged lipids of the plasma membrane. Maurocalcine analogues that penetrate better have also stronger interaction with negatively charged lipids. Conversely, less effective analogues present a diminished ability to interact with these lipids. These findings will also help the design of still more potent cell penetrating analogues of maurocalcine.

  13. Acid-base properties of humic and fulvic acids formed during composting.

    PubMed

    Plaza, César; Senesi, Nicola; Polo, Alfredo; Brunetti, Gennaro

    2005-09-15

    The soil acid-base buffering capacity and the biological availability, mobilization, and transport of macro- and micronutrients, toxic metal ions, and xenobiotic organic cations in soil are strongly influenced by the acid-base properties of humic substances, of which humic and fulvic acids are the major fractions. For these reasons, the proton binding behavior of the humic acid-like (HA) and fulvic acid-like (FA) fractions contained in a compost are believed to be instrumental in its successful performance in soil. In this work, the acid-base properties of the HAs and FAs isolated from a mixture of the sludge residue obtained from olive oil mill wastewater (OMW) evaporated in an open-air pond and tree cuttings (TC) at different stages of composting were investigated by a current potentiometric titration method and the nonideal competitive adsorption (NICA)-Donnan model. The NICA-Donnan model provided an excellent description of the acid-base titration data, and pointed out substantial differences in site density and proton-binding affinity between the HAs and FAs examined. With respect to FAs, HAs were characterized by a smaller content of carboxylic- and phenolic-type groups and their larger affinities for proton binding. Further, HAs featured a greater heterogeneity in carboxylic-type groups than FAs. The composting process increased the content and decreased the proton affinity of carboxylic- and phenolic-type groups of HAs and FAs, and increased the heterogeneity of phenolic-type groups of HAs. As a whole, these effects indicated that the composting process could produce HA and FA fractions with greater cation binding capacities. These results suggest that composting of organic materials improves their agronomic and environmental value by increasing their potential to retain and exchange macro- and micronutrients, and to reduce the bioavailability of organic and inorganic pollutants.

  14. Statistical analysis of protein structures suggests that buried ionizable residues in proteins are hydrogen bonded or form salt bridges.

    PubMed

    Bush, Jeffrey; Makhatadze, George I

    2011-07-01

    It is well known that nonpolar residues are largely buried in the interior of proteins, whereas polar and ionizable residues tend to be more localized on the protein surface where they are solvent exposed. Such a distribution of residues between surface and interior is well understood from a thermodynamic point: nonpolar side chains are excluded from the contact with the solvent water, whereas polar and ionizable groups have favorable interactions with the water and thus are preferred at the protein surface. However, there is an increasing amount of information suggesting that polar and ionizable residues do occur in the protein core, including at positions that have no known functional importance. This is inconsistent with the observations that dehydration of polar and in particular ionizable groups is very energetically unfavorable. To resolve this, we performed a detailed analysis of the distribution of fractional burial of polar and ionizable residues using a large set of ˜2600 nonhomologous protein structures. We show that when ionizable residues are fully buried, the vast majority of them form hydrogen bonds and/or salt bridges with other polar/ionizable groups. This observation resolves an apparent contradiction: the energetic penalty of dehydration of polar/ionizable groups is paid off by favorable energy of hydrogen bonding and/or salt bridge formation in the protein interior. Our conclusion agrees well with the previous findings based on the continuum models for electrostatic interactions in proteins.

  15. Camphorquinone-10-sulfonic acid and derivatives: convenient reagents for reversible modification of arginine residues

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, C.S.; Pelzig, M.; Glass, J.D.

    1980-02-01

    Camphorquinone-10-sulfonic acid hydrate was prepared by the action of selenous acid on camphor-10-sulfonic acid. Camphorquinone-10-sulfonylnorleucine was prepared either from the sulfonic acid via the sulfonyl chloride or by selenous acid oxidation of camphor-10-sulfonylnorleucine. These reagents are useful for specific, reversible modification of the guanidino groups of arginine residues. Camphorquinonsulfonic acid is a crystalline water-soluble reagent that is especially suitable for use with small arginine-containing molecules, because the sulfonic acid group of the reagent is a convenient handle for analytical and preparative separation of products. Camphorquinonesulfonylnorleucine is more useful for work with large polypeptides and proteins, because hydrolysates of modified proteins may be analyzed for norleucine to determine the extent of arginine modification. The adducts of the camphorquinone derivatives with the guanidino group are stable to 0.5 M hydroxylamine solutions at pH 7, the recommended conditions for cleavage of the corresponding cyclohexanedione adducts. At pH 8-9 the adducts of the camphorquinone derivatives with the guanidino group are cleaved by o-phenylenediamine. The modification and regeneration of arginine, of the dipeptide arginylaspartic acid, of ribonuclease S-peptide, and of soybean trypsin inhibitor are presented as demonstrations of the use of the reagents.The use of camphorquinonesulfonyl chloride to prepare polymers containing arginine-specific ligands is discussed.

  16. Diverse amino acid residues function within the type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal. Implications for the role of accessory residues upstream of the type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal.

    PubMed

    Mullen, R T; Lee, M S; Flynn, C R; Trelease, R N

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the plant type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1) utilizes amino acid residues that do not strictly adhere to the serine-lysine-leucine (SKL) motif (small-basic-hydrophobic residues). Selected residues were appended to the C terminus of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and were tested for their ability to target CAT fusion proteins to glyoxysomes in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cv Bright Yellow 2 suspension-cultured cells. CAT was redirected from the cytosol into glyoxysomes by a wide range of residues, i.e. A/C/G/S/T-H/K/ L/N/R-I/L/M/Y. Although L and N at the -2 position (-SLL, -ANL) do not conform to the SKL motif, both functioned, but in a temporally less-efficient manner. Other SKL divergent residues, however, did not target CAT to glyoxysomes, i.e. F or P at the -3 position (-FKL, -PKL), S or T at the -2 position (-SSI, STL), or D at the -1 position (-SKD). The targeting inefficiency of CAT-ANL could be ameliorated when K was included at the -4 position (-KANL). In summary, the plant PTS1 mostly conforms to the SKL motif. For those PTS1s that possess nonconforming residue(s), other residues upstream of the PTS1 appear to function as accessory sequences that enhance the temporal efficiency of peroxisomal targeting.

  17. Removal of copper from acid wastewater of bioleaching by adsorption onto ramie residue and uptake by Trichoderma viride.

    PubMed

    Wang, Buyun; Wang, Kai

    2013-05-01

    A continuous batch bioleaching was built to realize the bioleaching of sewage sludge in large scale. In the treatment, heavy metal in acid wastewater of bioleaching was removed by adsorption onto ramie residue. Then, acid wastewater was reused in next bioleaching batch. In this way, most time and water of bioleaching was saved and leaching efficiency of copper, lead and chromium kept at a high level in continuous batch bioleaching. It was found that residual heavy metal in sewage sludge is highly related to that in acid wastewater after bioleaching. To get a high leaching efficiency, concentration of heavy metal in acid wastewater should be low. Adsorption of copper from acid wastewater onto ramie residue can be described by pseudo first-order kinetics equation and Freundlich isotherm model. Trichoderma viride has the potential to be used for the concentration and recovery of heavy metal adsorbed onto ramie residue.

  18. AMINO ACID COMPOSITION AND C-TERMINAL RESIDUES OF ALGAL BILIPROTEINS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    R-phycoerythrin from Ceramium rubrum and C- phycocyanin from Nostoc nuscorum were obtained in purified form by fractional crystallization, followed by...as amino acids. Alanine was identified as the only C-terminal amino acid of R-phycoerythrin, each molecule of which contained about 12 terminal groups. Serine was identified as the only C-terminal group of C- phycocyanin . (Author)

  19. Extension of UNRES force field to treat polypeptide chains with D-amino-acid residues

    PubMed Central

    Sieradzan, Adam K.; Hansmann, Ulrich H.E.; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Coarse-grained force fields for protein simulations are usually designed and parameterized to treat proteins composed of natural L-amino-acid residues. However, D-amino-acid residues occur in bacterial, fungal (e.g., gramicidins), as well as human-designed proteins. For this reason, we have extended the UNRES coarse-grained force field developed in our laboratory to treat systems with D-amino-acid residues. We developed the respective virtual-bond-torsional and double-torsional potentials for rotation about the Cα · · · Cα virtual-bond axis and two consecutive Cα · · · Cα virtual-bond axes, respectively, as functions of virtual-bond-dihedral angles γ. In turn, these were calculated as potentials of mean force (PMFs) from the diabatic energy surfaces of terminally-blocked model compounds for glycine, alanine, and proline. The potential-energy surfaces were calculated by using the ab initio method of molecular quantum mechanics at the Møller-Plesset (MP2) level of theory and the 6-31G(d,p) basis set, with the rotation angles of the peptide groups about Ci-1α⋯Ciα(λ(1)) and Ciα⋯Ci+1α(λ(2)) used as variables, and the energy was minimized with respect to the remaining degrees of freedom. The PMFs were calculated by numerical integration for all pairs and triplets with all possible combinations of types (glycine, alanine, and proline) and chirality (D or L); however, symmetry relations reduce the number of non-equivalent torsional potentials to 13 and the number of double-torsional potentials to 63 for a given C-terminal blocking group. Subsequently, one- (for torsional) and two-dimensional (for double-torsional potentials) Fourier series were fitted to the PMFs to obtain analytical expressions. It was found that the torsional potentials of the x-Y and X-y types, where X and Y are Ala or Pro, respectively, and a lowercase letter denotes D-chirality, have global minima for small absolute values of γ, accounting for the double-helical structure of

  20. Study of Self Assembly Systems Formed by Malic Acid and Alkyloxy Benzoic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, Vellalapalayam Nallagounder; Madhu Mohan, Mathukumalli Lakshmi Narayana

    2010-12-01

    Self assembly systems formed by malic acid and alkyloxy benzoic acids are characterized. The ferroelectric ingredient malic acid formed double hydrogen bond with p-n-alkyloxy benzoic acids. Various hydrogen bonded complexes have been synthesized with malic acid and pentyl to dodecyloxy benzoic acid, respectively. Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) studies confirm the hydrogen bond formation. Polarizing optical microscopic (POM) studies revealed the textural information while the transition and enthalpy values are calculated from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies. A phase diagram has been constructed from the POMand DSC studies. A new smectic ordering, smectic X*, has been identified which exhibits a finger print type texture. This phase has been characterized by POM, DSC, helix, and tilt angle studies. The transition from traditional cholesteric to smectic X* phase is observed to be first order. The tilt angle data in this phase has been fitted to a power law and the temperature variation of the tilt angle follows mean field theory predictions. The results of FTIR, POM, DSC, tilt angle, and helicoidal studies are discussed.

  1. Mobilization of Cr(VI) from chromite ore processing residue through acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Tinjum, James M; Benson, Craig H; Edil, Tuncer B

    2008-02-25

    Batch leaching studies on chromite ore processing residue (COPR) were performed using acids to investigate leaching of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), with respect to particle size, reaction time, and type of acid (HNO(3) and H(2)SO(4)). Aqueous Cr(VI) is maximized at approximately 0.04 mol Cr(VI) per kg of dry COPR at pH 7.6-8.1. Cr(VI) mobilized more slowly for larger particles, and the pH increased with time and increased more rapidly for smaller particles, suggesting that rate limitations occur in the solid phase. With H(2)SO(4), the pH stabilized at a higher value (8.8 for H(2)SO(4) vs. 8.0 for HNO(3)) and more rapidly (16 h vs. 30 h), and the differences in pH for different particle sizes were smaller. The acid neutralization capacity (ANC) of COPR is very large (8 mol HNO(3) per kg of dry COPR for a stable eluate pH of 7.5). Changes to the elemental and mineralogical composition and distribution in COPR particles after mixing with acid indicate that Cr(VI)-bearing solids dissolved. However, concentrations of Cr(VI) >2800 mg kg(-1) (>50% of the pre-treatment concentration) were still found after mixing with acid, regardless of the particle size, reaction time, or type of acid used. The residual Cr(VI) appears to be partially associated with poorly-ordered Fe and Al oxyhydroxides that precipitated in the interstitial areas of COPR particles. Remediation strategies that use HNO(3) or H(2)SO(4) to neutralize COPR or to maximize Cr(VI) in solution are likely to require extensive amounts of acid, may not mobilize all of the Cr(VI), and may require extended contact time, even under well-mixed conditions.

  2. Spherical Nucleic Acids: A New Form of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Joshua Isaac

    Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs) are a new class of nucleic acid-based nanomaterials that exhibit unique properties currently being explored in the contexts of gene-based cancer therapies and in the design of programmable nanoparticle-based materials. The properties of SNAs differ from canonical, linear nucleic acids by virtue of their dense packing into an oriented 3-dimensional array. SNAs can be synthesized from a number of useful nanoparticle templates, such as plasmonic gold and silver, magnetic oxides, luminescent semi-conductor quantum dots, and silica. In addition, by crosslinking the oligonucleotides and dissolving the core, they can be made in a hollow form as well. This dissertation describes the evolution of SNAs from initial studies of inorganic nanoparticle-based materials densely functionalized with oligonucleotides to the proving of a hypothesis that their unique properties can be observed in a core-less structure if the nucleic acids are densely packed and highly oriented. Chapter two describes the synthesis of densely functionalized polyvalent oligonucleotide superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. These particles are shown to exhibit cooperative binding in a density- and salt concentration-dependent fashion, with nearly identical behaviors to those of SNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles. Importantly, these particles are the first non-gold particles shown to be capable of entering cells in high numbers via the SNA-mediated cellular uptake pathway, and provided the first evidence that SNA-mediated cellular uptake is core-independent. In the third chapter, a gold nanoparticle catalyzed alkyne cross-linking reaction is described that is capable of forming hollow organic nanoparticles using polymers with alkyne-functionalized backbones. With this method, the alkyne-modified polymers adsorb to the particle surfaces, cross-link on the surface, allowing the gold nanoparticle to be

  3. Isolation and characterization of two forms of an acidic bromelain stem proteinase.

    PubMed

    Harrach, T; Eckert, K; Maurer, H R; Machleidt, I; Machleidt, W; Nuck, R

    1998-05-01

    Two forms of an acidic bromelain proteinase isolated from crude bromelain, an extract from pineapple stem, were found by a two-step FPLC purification procedure. The basic main components were removed by cation exchange chromatography and the breakthrough fraction was further resolved by anion exchange chromatography into 15 protein fractions, only two of which, called SBA/a and SBA/b, were proteolytically active. These components were characterized by electrospray mass spectroscopy (ESMS), isoelectric focusing, N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis, monosaccharide analysis, and enzymatic parameters. The molecular masses of SBA/a and SBA/b were determined by ESMS to be 23,550 and 23,560, respectively. The isoelectric points (pI) of the two bands of SBA/a were 4.8 and 4.9; SBA/b focused as a single band at pI = 4.8. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequences (11 residues) were identical to SBA/a and SBA/b and identical with those of stem bromelain, the basic main proteinase of the pineapple stem, and fruit bromelain, the acidic main proteinase of the pineapple fruit. Both components are highly glycosylated; hydrolysis of SBA/a yielded about twofold more monosaccharide per protein than SBA/b. The comparison of the catalytic properties of SBA/a with those of SBA/b revealed no relevant differences in the hydrolysis of three peptidyl-NH-Mec substrates and in the inhibition profiles using chicken cystatin and E-64, indicating that these components can be considered as two forms of a single enzyme. Both forms are scarcely inhibited by chicken cystatin and slowly inactivated by E-64, hence are nontypical cysteine proteinases of the papain superfamily.

  4. Ideal amino acid exchange forms for approximating substitution matrices.

    PubMed

    Pokarowski, Piotr; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Nowakowski, Szymon; Pokarowska, Maria; Jernigan, Robert L; Kolinski, Andrzej

    2007-11-01

    We have analyzed 29 published substitution matrices (SMs) and five statistical protein contact potentials (CPs) for comparison. We find that popular, 'classical' SMs obtained mainly from sequence alignments of globular proteins are mostly correlated by at least a value of 0.9. The BLOSUM62 is the central element of this group. A second group includes SMs derived from alignments of remote homologs or transmembrane proteins. These matrices correlate better with classical SMs (0.8) than among themselves (0.7). A third group consists of intermediate links between SMs and CPs - matrices and potentials that exhibit mutual correlations of at least 0.8. Next, we show that SMs can be approximated with a correlation of 0.9 by expressions c(0) + x(i)x(j) + y(i)y(j) + z(i)z(j), 1acids, respectively. The present paper is the continuation of our work (Pokarowski et al., Proteins 2005;59:49-57), where similar approximation were used to derive ideal amino acid interaction forms from CPs. Both approximations allow us to understand general trends in amino acid similarity and can help improve multiple sequence alignments using the fast Fourier transform (MAFFT), fast threading or another methods based on alignments of physicochemical profiles of protein sequences. The use of this approximation in sequence alignments instead of a classical SM yields results that differ by less than 5%. Intermediate links between SMs and CPs, new formulas for approximating these matrices, and the highly significant dependence of classical SMs on coil preferences are new findings.

  5. Evidence that the amino acid residue Cys117 of chloroplastic monodehydroascorbate reductase is involved in its activity and structural stability.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Wu, Qing-Yun; Sun, Yan-Li; Ma, Na-Na; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2010-04-01

    Monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR; EC 1.6.5.4) is crucial for AsA regeneration and essential for maintaining the reduced pool of AsA. And the amino acid residue C117 of chloroplastic MDAR is the conserved cysteine residue in MDAR isoforms. A series mutation of conserved amino acid residue cysteine117 (C117) was constructed to investigate its role in MDAR structural stability and activity. Our study revealed that mutation in this conserved residue could cause pronounced loss of activity and conformational changes. Spectroscopic experiments indicated that these mutations influenced transition from the molten globule intermediate to the native state in folding process. These results suggested that amino acid residue C117 played a relatively important role in keeping MDAR structural stability and activity.

  6. Unexpectedly acidic nanoparticles formed in dimethylamine-ammonia-sulfuric-acid nucleation experiments at CLOUD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, Michael J.; Winkler, Paul M.; Kim, Jaeseok; Ahlm, Lars; Tröstl, Jasmin; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kürten, Andreas; Kirkby, Jasper; Bianchi, Federico; Duplissy, Jonathan; Hansel, Armin; Jokinen, Tuija; Keskinen, Helmi; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Petäjä, Tuukka; Rissanen, Matti; Rondo, Linda; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Riipinen, Ilona; Virtanen, Annele; Smith, James N.

    2016-11-01

    New particle formation driven by acid-base chemistry was initiated in the CLOUD chamber at CERN by introducing atmospherically relevant levels of gas-phase sulfuric acid and dimethylamine (DMA). Ammonia was also present in the chamber as a gas-phase contaminant from earlier experiments. The composition of particles with volume median diameters (VMDs) as small as 10 nm was measured by the Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS). Particulate ammonium-to-dimethylaminium ratios were higher than the gas-phase ammonia-to-DMA ratios, suggesting preferential uptake of ammonia over DMA for the collected 10-30 nm VMD particles. This behavior is not consistent with present nanoparticle physicochemical models, which predict a higher dimethylaminium fraction when NH3 and DMA are present at similar gas-phase concentrations. Despite the presence in the gas phase of at least 100 times higher base concentrations than sulfuric acid, the recently formed particles always had measured base : acid ratios lower than 1 : 1. The lowest base fractions were found in particles below 15 nm VMD, with a strong size-dependent composition gradient. The reasons for the very acidic composition remain uncertain, but a plausible explanation is that the particles did not reach thermodynamic equilibrium with respect to the bases due to rapid heterogeneous conversion of SO2 to sulfate. These results indicate that sulfuric acid does not require stabilization by ammonium or dimethylaminium as acid-base pairs in particles as small as 10 nm.

  7. Leaching of lead from zinc leach residue in acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le; Mu, Wen-ning; Shen, Hong-tao; Liu, Shao-ming; Zhai, Yu-chun

    2015-05-01

    A process with potentially reduced environmental impacts and occupational hazards of lead-bearing zinc plant residue was studied to achieve a higher recovery of lead via a cost-effective and environmentally friendly process. This paper describes an optimization study on the leaching of lead from zinc leach residue using acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution. Six main process conditions, i.e., the solution pH value, stirring rate, concentration of CaCl2 aqueous solution, liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, leaching temperature, and leaching time, were investigated. The microstructure and components of the residue and tailing were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). On the basis of experimental results, the optimum reaction conditions were determined to be a solution pH value of 1, a stirring rate of 500 r·min-1, a CaCl2 aqueous solution concentration of 400 g·L-1, a liquid-to-solid mass ratio of 7:1, a leaching temperature of 80°C, and a leaching time of 45 min. The leaching rate of lead under these conditions reached 93.79%, with an iron dissolution rate of 19.28%. Silica did not take part in the chemical reaction during the leaching process and was accumulated in the residue.

  8. Radionuclide Leaching from Residual Solids Remaining after Acid Dissolution of Composite K East Canister Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.; Soderquist, C.Z.; Fadeff, S.K.

    1999-04-02

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine mixed nitric/hydrofluoric acid leach treatments for decontaminating dissolver residual solids (KECDVSR24H-2) produced during a 20- to 24-hr dissolution of a composite K East (KE) Basin canister sludge in 95 C 6 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The scope of this testing has been described in Section 4.5 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basin Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the residual solids generated in the K Basin sludge treatment process can restrict disposal of this solid to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The starting dissolver residual solid for this testing, KECDVSR24H-2, contains radionuclides at concentrations which exceed the ERDF Waste Acceptance Criteria for TRU by about a factor of 70, for {sup 239}Pu by a factor of 200, and for {sup 241}Am by a factor of 50. The solids also exceed the ERDF criterion for {sup 137}Cs by a factor of 2 and uranium by a factor of 5. Therefore, the radionuclides of greatest interest in this leaching study are first {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am (both components of TRU) and then uranium and {sup 137}Cs.

  9. Functional role of polar amino acid residues in Na+/H+ exchangers.

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, C A; Dibattista, E R; Fliegel, L

    2001-01-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchangers are a family of ubiquitous membrane proteins. In higher eukaryotes they regulate cytosolic pH by removing an intracellular H(+) in exchange for an extracellular Na(+). In yeast and Escherichia coli, Na(+)/H(+) exchangers function in the opposite direction to remove intracellular Na(+) in exchange for extracellular H(+). Na(+)/H(+) exchangers display an internal pH-sensitivity that varies with the different antiporter types. Only recently have investigations examined the amino acids involved in pH-sensitivity and in cation binding and transport. Histidine residues are good candidates for H(+)-sensing amino acids, since they can ionize within the physiological pH range. Histidine residues have been shown to be important in the function of the E. coli Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NhaA and in the yeast Na(+)/H(+) exchanger sod2. In E. coli, His(225) of NhaA may function to interact with, or regulate, the pH-sensory region of NhaA. In sod2, His(367) is also critical to transport and may be a functional analogue of His(225) of NhaA. Histidine residues are not critical for the function of the mammalian Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, although an unusual histidine-rich sequence of the C-terminal tail has some influence on activity. Other amino acids involved in cation binding and transport by Na(+)/H(+) exchangers are only beginning to be studied. Amino acids with polar side chains such as aspartate and glutamate have been implicated in transport activity of NhaA and sod2, but have not been studied in the mammalian Na(+)/H(+) exchanger. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in pH-sensitivity and cation binding and transport by Na(+)/H(+) exchangers. PMID:11415429

  10. Prediction of functionally important residues in globular proteins from unusual central distances of amino acids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Well-performing automated protein function recognition approaches usually comprise several complementary techniques. Beside constructing better consensus, their predictive power can be improved by either adding or refining independent modules that explore orthogonal features of proteins. In this work, we demonstrated how the exploration of global atomic distributions can be used to indicate functionally important residues. Results Using a set of carefully selected globular proteins, we parametrized continuous probability density functions describing preferred central distances of individual protein atoms. Relative preferred burials were estimated using mixture models of radial density functions dependent on the amino acid composition of a protein under consideration. The unexpectedness of extraordinary locations of atoms was evaluated in the information-theoretic manner and used directly for the identification of key amino acids. In the validation study, we tested capabilities of a tool built upon our approach, called SurpResi, by searching for binding sites interacting with ligands. The tool indicated multiple candidate sites achieving success rates comparable to several geometric methods. We also showed that the unexpectedness is a property of regions involved in protein-protein interactions, and thus can be used for the ranking of protein docking predictions. The computational approach implemented in this work is freely available via a Web interface at http://www.bioinformatics.org/surpresi. Conclusions Probabilistic analysis of atomic central distances in globular proteins is capable of capturing distinct orientational preferences of amino acids as resulting from different sizes, charges and hydrophobic characters of their side chains. When idealized spatial preferences can be inferred from the sole amino acid composition of a protein, residues located in hydrophobically unfavorable environments can be easily detected. Such residues turn out to be

  11. Conformational characterization of the 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid residue in model peptides.

    PubMed

    Gatos, M; Formaggio, F; Crisma, M; Toniolo, C; Bonora, G M; Benedetti, Z; Di Blasio, B; Iacovino, R; Santini, A; Saviano, M; Kamphuis, J

    1997-01-01

    A series of N- and C-protected, monodispersed homo-oligopeptides (to the dodecamer level) from the small-ring alicyclic C alpha, alpha-dialkylated glycine 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (Ac4c) and two Ala/Ac4c tripeptides were synthesized by solution methods and fully characterized. The conformational preferences of all the model peptides were determined in deuterochloroform solution by FT-IR absorption and 1H-NMR. The molecular structures of the amino acid derivatives Z-Ac4c-OH and Z2-Ac4c-OH, the tripeptides Z-(Ac4c)3-OtBu, Z-Ac4c-(L-Ala)2-OMe and Z-L-Ala-Ac4c-L-Ala-OMe, and the tetrapeptide Z-(Ac4c)4-OtBu were determined in the crystal state by X-ray diffraction. The average geometry of the cyclobutyl moiety of the Ac4c residue was assessed and the tau(N-C alpha-C') bond angle was found to be significantly expanded from the regular tetrahedral value. The conformational data are strongly in favour of the conclusion that the Ac4c residue is an effective beta-turn and helix former. A comparison with the structural propensities of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, the prototype of C alpha, alpha-dialkylated glycines, and the other extensively investigated members of the family of 1-aminocycloalkane-1-carboxylic acids (Acnc, with n = 3, 5-8) is made and the implications for the use of the Ac4c residue in conformationally constrained peptide analogues are briefly examined.

  12. A Novel Treatment for Acid Mine Drainage Utilizing Reclaimed Limestone Residual

    SciTech Connect

    Horace K. Moo-Young; Charles E. Ochola

    2004-08-31

    The viability of utilizing Reclaimed Limestone Residual (RLR) to remediate Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) was investigated. Physical and chemical characterization of RLR showed that it is composed of various minerals that contain significant quantities of limestone or calcium bearing compounds that can be exploited for acid neutralization. Acid Neutralization Potential (ANP) test results showed that RLR has a neutralization potential of approximately 83% as calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}). Neutralization tests with most of the heavy metals associated with AMD showed removal efficiencies of over 99%. An unexpected benefit of utilizing RLR was the removal of hexavalent chromium Cr (VI) from the aqueous phase. Due to an elevation in pH by RLR most AMD heavy metals are removed from solution by precipitation as their metal hydroxides. Cr (VI) however is not removed by pH elevation and therefore subsequent ongoing tests to elucidate the mechanism responsible for this reaction were conducted.

  13. Acid hydrolysis of Curcuma longa residue for ethanol and lactic acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong Mai; Nguyen, Thanh Ngoc; Choi, Gyung Ja; Choi, Yong Ho; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Park, Youn-Je; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the acid hydrolysis of Curcuma longa waste, to obtain the hydrolysate containing lactic acid and ethanol fermentative sugars. A central composite design for describing regression equations of variables was used. The selected optimum condition was 4.91% sulphuric acid, 122.68°C and 50 min using the desirability function under the following conditions: the maximum reducing sugar (RS) yield is within the limited range of the 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and furfural concentrations. Under the condition, the obtained solution contained 144 g RS/L, 0.79 g furfural/L and 2.59 g HMF/L and was directly fermented without a detoxification step. The maximum product concentration, average productivity, RS conversion and product yield were 115.36 g/L, 2.88 g/L/h, 89.43% and 64% for L-lactic acid; 113.92 g/L, 2.59 g/L/h, 88.31% and 63.29% for D-lactic acid; and 55.03 g/L, 1.38 g/L/h, 42.66 and 30.57%, respectively, for ethanol using a 7-L jar fermenter.

  14. [Nitrate nitrogen leaching and residue of humic acid fertilizer in field soil].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang-chun; Xing, Shang-jun; Duan, Chun-hua; Du, Zhen-yu; Ma, Hai-lin; Ma, Bing-yao

    2010-07-01

    To elucidate the potential influence of humic acidfertilizer on groundwater and soil quality in clay soil (CS) and sandy soil (SS), nitrate nitrogen leaching and residue of different fertilizers in field soil were studied using a self-made leaching field device. Nitrate nitrogen concentration in leaching water of fertilizer treatments was 28.1%-222.2% higher than that of non-nitrogen treatment in different times, but humic acid fertilizer could prevent nitrate nitrogen leaching both in CS and SS, especially in CS. Nitrate nitrogen concentration of leaching water in CS was 41.2%-59.1% less than that in SS and the inhibiting effect in CS was greater than that in SS. Nitrate nitrogen could be accumulated in soil profile by fertilizer application. The residue of nitrate nitrogen retained in 0-40 cm soil layer of humic acid fertilizer treatment was 59.8% and 54.4% respectively, higher than that of urea and compound fertilizer treatments. Nitrate nitrogen amount of humic acid, urea and compound fertilizer treatments in SS was significantly less than that in CS, being 81.7%, 81.1% and 47.6% respectively. Compared with the conventional fertilizer, humic acid fertilizer treatment improved the contents of organic matter, available nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium of upper layer soil as well as cation exchange capacity. Besides, total amount of water-soluble salts in humic acid fertilizer treatment was decreased by 24.8% and 22.5% in comparison to urea and compound fertilizer treatments in CS, respectively. In summary, the application of humic acid fertilizer could improve physical and chemical properties of upper layer soil and reduce the risk of potential pollution to groundwater.

  15. Effects on general acid catalysis from mutations of the invariant tryptophan and arginine residues in the protein tyrosine phosphatase from Yersinia.

    PubMed

    Hoff, R H; Hengge, A C; Wu, L; Keng, Y F; Zhang, Z Y

    2000-01-11

    General acid catalysis in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) is accomplished by a conserved Asp residue, which is brought into position for catalysis by movement of a flexible loop that occurs upon binding of substrate. With the PTPase from Yersinia, we have examined the effect on general acid catalysis caused by mutations to two conserved residues that are integral to this conformation change. Residue Trp354 is at a hinge of the loop, and Arg409 forms hydrogen bonding and ionic interactions with the phosphoryl group of substrates. Trp354 was mutated to Phe and to Ala, and residue Arg409 was mutated to Lys and to Ala. The four mutant enzymes were studied using steady state kinetics and heavy-atom isotope effects with the substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate. The data indicate that mutation of the hinge residue Trp354 to Ala completely disables general acid catalysis. In the Phe mutant, general acid catalysis is partially effective, but the proton is only partially transferred in the transition state, in contrast to the native enzyme where proton transfer to the leaving group is virtually complete. Mutation of Arg409 to Lys has a minimal effect on the K(m), while this parameter is increased 30-fold in the Ala mutant. The k(cat) values for R409K and for R409A are about 4 orders of magnitude lower than that for the native enzyme. General acid catalysis is rendered inoperative by the Lys mutation, but partial proton transfer during catalysis still occurs in the Ala mutant. Structural explanations for the differential effects of these mutations on movement of the flexible loop that enables general acid catalysis are presented.

  16. "Silent" Amino Acid Residues at Key Subunit Interfaces Regulate the Geometry of Protein Nanocages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengli; Zang, Jiachen; Zhang, Xiaorong; Chen, Hai; Mikami, Bunzo; Zhao, Guanghua

    2016-11-22

    Rendering the geometry of protein-based assemblies controllable remains challenging. Protein shell-like nanocages represent particularly interesting targets for designed assembly. Here, we introduce an engineering strategy-key subunit interface redesign (KSIR)-that alters a natural subunit-subunit interface by selective deletion of a small number of "silent" amino acid residues (no participation in interfacial interactions) into one that triggers the generation of a non-native protein cage. We have applied KSIR to construct a non-native 48-mer nanocage from its native 24-mer recombinant human H-chain ferritin (rHuHF). This protein is a heteropolymer composed of equal numbers of two different subunits which are derived from one polypeptide. This strategy has allowed the study of conversion between protein nanocages with different geometries by re-engineering key subunit interfaces and the demonstration of the important role of the above-mentioned specific residues in providing geometric specificity for protein assembly.

  17. Chemical modification of amino acid residues in glycerinated Vorticella stalk and Ca(2+)-induced contractility.

    PubMed

    Kono, R; Ochiai, T; Asai, H

    1997-01-01

    The glycerinated stalk of the peritrich ciliate Vorticella, was treated with various reagents to chemically modify the amino acid residues. The influences of these modifcations on spasmoneme contractility were investigated. First, it was confirmed that the spasmoneme contraction is not inhibited by alteration of SH groups. It was also demonstrated that chemical modification of methionine and tryptophan residues abolishes spasmoneme contractility. The reagents used for chemical modification were N-bromosuccinimide (NBS), chloramine T, and 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl bromide (HNBB), which abolished spasmoneme contractility at concentrations of 40-50 microM, 200-300 microM, and 4 mM, respectively. These results suggest that, along with Ca2+ binding proteins, there are other as yet to be identified proteins involved in contractility.

  18. A conserved amino acid residue critical for product and substrate specificity in plant triterpene synthases

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Melissa; Thimmappa, Ramesha B.; Minto, Robert E.; Melton, Rachel E.; O’Maille, Paul E.; Hemmings, Andrew M.; Osbourn, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Triterpenes are structurally complex plant natural products with numerous medicinal applications. They are synthesized through an origami-like process that involves cyclization of the linear 30 carbon precursor 2,3-oxidosqualene into different triterpene scaffolds. Here, through a forward genetic screen in planta, we identify a conserved amino acid residue that determines product specificity in triterpene synthases from diverse plant species. Mutation of this residue results in a major change in triterpene cyclization, with production of tetracyclic rather than pentacyclic products. The mutated enzymes also use the more highly oxygenated substrate dioxidosqualene in preference to 2,3-oxidosqualene when expressed in yeast. Our discoveries provide new insights into triterpene cyclization, revealing hidden functional diversity within triterpene synthases. They further open up opportunities to engineer novel oxygenated triterpene scaffolds by manipulating the precursor supply. PMID:27412861

  19. Volatile fatty acids distribution during acidogenesis of algal residues with pH control.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Hua, Dongliang; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yuxiao; Xu, Haipeng; Liang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2013-06-01

    The anaerobic acidification of protein-rich algal residues with pH control (4, 6, 8, 10) was studied in batch reactors, which was operated at mesophilic(35 °C) condition. The distribution of major volatile fatty acids (VFAs) during acidogenesis was emphasized in this paper. The results showed that the acidification efficiency and VFAs distribution in the acid reactor strongly depended on the pH. The main product for all the runs involved acetic acid except that the proportion of butyric acid acidified at pH 6 was relatively higher. The other organic acids remained at lower levels. The VFAs yield reached the maximum value with about 0.6 g VFAs/g volatile solid (VS) added as pH was 8, and also the content of total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) reached the highest values of 9,629 mg/l. Low acidification degrees were obtained under the conditions at pH 4 and 10, which was not suitable for the metabolism of acidogens. Hydralic retention time (HRT) required for different conditions varied. As a consequence, it was indicated that pH was crucial to the acidification efficiency and products distribution. The investigation of acidogenesis process, which was producing the major substrates, short-chain fatty acids, would play the primary role in the efficient operation of methanogenesis.

  20. Influence of glutamic acid residues and pH on the properties of transmembrane helices.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Venkatesan; Greathouse, Denise V; Koeppe, Roger E

    2017-03-01

    Negatively charged side chains are important for the function of particular ion channels and certain other membrane proteins. To investigate the influence of single glutamic acid side chains on helices that span lipid-bilayer membranes, we have employed GWALP23 (acetyl-GGALW(5)LALALALALALALW(19)LAGA-amide) as a favorable host peptide framework. We substituted individual Leu residues with Glu residues (L12E or L14E or L16E) and incorporated specific (2)H-labeled alanine residues within the core helical region or near the ends of the sequence. Solid-state (2)H NMR spectra reveal little change for the core labels in GWALP23-E12, -E14 and -E16 over a pH range of 4 to 12.5, with the spectra being broader for samples in DOPC compared to DLPC bilayers. The spectra for samples with deuterium labels near the helix ends on alanines 3 and 21 show modest pH-dependent changes in the extent of unwinding of the helix terminals in DLPC and DOPC bilayers. The combined results indicate minor overall responses of these transmembrane helices to changes in pH, with the most buried residue E12 showing no pH dependence. While the Glu residues E14 and E16 may have high pKa values in the lipid bilayer environment, it is also possible that a paucity of helix response is masking the pKa values. Interestingly, when E16 is present, spectral changes at high pH report significant local unwinding of the core helix. Our results are consistent with the expectation that buried carboxyl groups aggressively hold their protons and/or waters of hydration.

  1. Cascade dissociations of peptide cation-radicals. Part 1. Scope and effects of amino acid residues in penta-, nona-, and decapeptides.

    PubMed

    Chung, Thomas W; Hui, Renjie; Ledvina, Aaron; Coon, Joshua J; Tureček, Frantisek

    2012-08-01

    Amino acid residue-specific backbone and side-chain dissociations of peptide z ions in MS(3) spectra were elucidated for over 40 pentapeptides with arginine C-terminated sequences of the AAXAR and AAHXR type, nonapeptides of the AAHAAXX"AR and AAHAXAX"AR type, and AAHAAXX"AAR decapeptides. Peptide z(n) ions containing amino acid residues with readily transferrable benzylic or tertiary β-hydrogen atoms (Phe, Tyr, His, Trp, Val) underwent facile backbone cleavages to form dominant z(n-2) or z(n-3) ions. These backbone cleavages are thought to be triggered by a side-chain β-hydrogen atom transfer to the z ion C(α) radical site followed by homolytic dissociation of the adjacent C(α)-CO bond, forming x(n-2) cation-radicals that spontaneously dissociate by loss of HNCO. Amino acid residues that do not have readily transferrable β-hydrogen atoms (Gly, Ala) do not undergo the z(n) → z(n-2) dissociations. The backbone cleavages compete with side-chain dissociations in z ions containing Asp and Asn residues. Side-chain dissociations are thought to be triggered by α-hydrogen atom transfers that activate the C(β)-C(γ) or C(β)-heteroatom bonds for dissociations that dominate the MS(3) spectra of z ions from peptides containing Leu, Cys, Lys, Met, Ser, Arg, Glu, and Gln residues. The Lys, Arg, Gln, and Glu residues also participate in γ-hydrogen atom transfers that trigger other side-chain dissociations.

  2. Statin induced myotoxicity: the lactone forms are more potent than the acid forms in human skeletal muscle cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Skottheim, Ine Blankenberg; Gedde-Dahl, Ane; Hejazifar, Solmaz; Hoel, Kjersti; Asberg, Anders

    2008-04-23

    Statins exist in both acid and lactone forms in vivo. High plasma levels of the lactone forms have been observed in patients with statin induced myopathy. In the present study, the hypothesis that lactone forms have a higher potency of inducing myotoxicity as compared to acid forms was investigated. Primary human skeletal muscle cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of lactone and acid forms of atorvastatin, fluvastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin. Following incubation, living myotubes were quantified by fluorescence staining. Atorvastatin lactone showed a 14-fold, fluvastatin lactone a 26-fold, pravastatin lactone a 23-fold, and simvastatin lactone a 37-fold higher potency to induce myotoxicity compared to their corresponding acid forms. Thus, for the four different statins the present study shows a significantly higher potency of the lactone forms, than the respective acid forms, to induce myotoxicity in human skeletal muscle cells in vitro. These results clearly indicate the need to differentiate between acid and lactone forms in future investigation of statin myotoxicity.

  3. Conformation of dehydropentapeptides containing four achiral amino acid residues – controlling the role of L-valine

    PubMed Central

    Krzciuk-Gula, Joanna; Makowski, Maciej; Latajka, Rafał; Kafarski, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Summary Structural studies of pentapeptides containing an achiral block, built from two dehydroamino acid residues (ΔZPhe and ΔAla) and two glycines, as well as one chiral L-Val residue were performed using NMR spectroscopy. The key role of the L-Val residue in the generation of the secondary structure of peptides is discussed. The obtained results suggest that the strongest influence on the conformation of peptides arises from a valine residue inserted at the C-terminal position. The most ordered conformation was found for peptide Boc-Gly-ΔAla-Gly-ΔZPhe-Val-OMe (3), which adopts a right-handed helical conformation. PMID:24778717

  4. Keys to Lipid Selection in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Catalysis: Structural Flexibility, Gating Residues and Multiple Binding Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Giulia; Bauer, Inga; Campomanes, Pablo; Cavalli, Andrea; Armirotti, Andrea; Girotto, Stefania; Rothlisberger, Ursula; De Vivo, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) regulates the endocannabinoid system cleaving primarily the lipid messenger anandamide. FAAH has been well characterized over the years and, importantly, it represents a promising drug target to treat several diseases, including inflammatory-related diseases and cancer. But its enzymatic mechanism for lipid selection to specifically hydrolyze anandamide, rather than similar bioactive lipids, remains elusive. Here, we clarify this mechanism in FAAH, examining the role of the dynamic paddle, which is formed by the gating residues Phe432 and Trp531 at the boundary between two cavities that form the FAAH catalytic site (the “membrane-access” and the “acyl chain-binding” pockets). We integrate microsecond-long MD simulations of wild type and double mutant model systems (Phe432Ala and Trp531Ala) of FAAH, embedded in a realistic membrane/water environment, with mutagenesis and kinetic experiments. We comparatively analyze three fatty acid substrates with different hydrolysis rates (anandamide > oleamide > palmitoylethanolamide). Our findings identify FAAH’s mechanism to selectively accommodate anandamide into a multi-pocket binding site, and to properly orient the substrate in pre-reactive conformations for efficient hydrolysis that is interceded by the dynamic paddle. Our findings therefore endorse a structural framework for a lipid selection mechanism mediated by structural flexibility and gating residues between multiple binding cavities, as found in FAAH. Based on the available structural data, this exquisite catalytic strategy for substrate specificity seems to be shared by other lipid-degrading enzymes with similar enzymatic architecture. The mechanistic insights for lipid selection might assist de-novo enzyme design or drug discovery efforts. PMID:26111155

  5. Identification of essential amino acid residues of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris white kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hiramoto, S; Wato, S; Nishimoto, T; Wada, Y; Nagai, K; Yamaguchi, H

    1999-11-01

    Kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitors, which are bivalent inhibitors with the subunit stoichiometry of (alphabeta)(2) complex, have been inferred to contain unique arginine, tryptophan, and tyrosine residues essential for the inhibitory activity. To test the validity of this inference, an attempt was made to identify the essential amino acid residues of a white kidney bean (P. vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor (PHA-I) by using the chemical modification technique combined with amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. Exhaustive modification of the arginine residues by phenylglyoxal did not lead to a marked loss of activity, suggesting that no arginine residue is directly associated with the inhibitory activity. N-Bromosuccinimide treatment of PHA-I in the presence or absence of a substrate alpha-amylase revealed the involvement of two tryptophan residues in alpha-amylase inhibition, and they were identified as Trp188 of the beta-subunit by amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry of lysylendopeptidase peptides. Further, two tyrosine residues were preferentially modified either by N-acetylimidazole or by tetranitromethane, resulting in a concomitant loss of most of the PHA-I activity. Amino acid sequencing of the lysylendopeptidase peptides from a tetranitromethane-modified PHA-I identified Tyr186 of the beta-subunit as an essential residue.

  6. XANES analysis of organic residues formed from the UV irradiation of astrophysical ice analogs and comparison with Stardust samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuevo, Michel; Milam, Stefanie; Sandford, Scott; Cody, George; Kilcoyne, David; de Gregorio, Bradley; Stroud, Rhonda

    The NASA Stardust mission successfully collected authentic cometary grains from Comet 81P/Wild 2.1,2 X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis of these samples in-dicates that a number of them contains O-rich and N-rich organic materials, consisting of a broad variety of functional groups: carbonyls, C=C bonds, aliphatic chains, amines, amides, etc.3 One component of these organics contains very little aromatic carbon and resembles the organic residues produced by the irradiation of interstellar/cometary ice analogs. Stardust sam-ples were also recently shown to contain the amino acid glycine.4 Organic residues produced from the UV irradiation of astrophysical ice analogs are already known to contain a large suite of prebiotic molecules including amino acids,5-7 and amphiphilic compounds (fatty acids).8 In this work, residues were produced in the laboratory from the UV irradiation of mixtures of ices containing H2 O, CH3 OH, CO, and NH3 in relative proportions 100:50:1:1 at 7 K. Additional residues were produced from mixtures with no NH3 , and mixtures containing alkanes and/or naphthalene (C10 H8 ). C-, N-, and O-XANES spectra of these residues were measured in order to assess their organic functional group chemistry and overall atomic composition, as well as their C/N/O ratios. The first results indicate the presence of a number of chemical bonds and functions, namely, carbonyls, C=C bonds, alcohols, amides, amines, and nitrile groups, whose relative proportions are compared with XANES measurements of Stardust samples.9 References: 1. Brownlee, D. E., et al., Science, 314, 1711 (2006). 2. Sandford, S. A., et al., Science, 314, 1720 (2006). 3. Cody, G. D., et al., Meteoritics & Planet. Sci., 43, 353 (2008). 4. Elsila, J. E., et al., Meteoritics & Planet. Sci., 44, 1323 (2009). 5. Bernstein, M. P., et al., Nature, 416, 401 (2002). 6. Muñoz Caro, G. M., et al., Nature, 416, 403 (2002). n 7. Nuevo, M., et al., Orig. Life Evol. Biosph., 38, 37 (2008). 8

  7. Optimization of thermal-dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment for enhancement of methane production from cassava residues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghua; Tang, Lei; Zhang, Jianhua; Mao, Zhonggui; Jiang, Li

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the pretreatment of cassava residues by thermal-dilute sulfuric acid (TDSA) hydrolysis was investigated by means of a statistically designed set of experiments. A three-factor central composite design (CCD) was employed to identify the optimum pretreatment condition of cassava residues for methane production. The individual and interactive effects of temperature, H(2)SO(4) concentration and reaction time on increase of methane yield (IMY) were evaluated by applying response surface methodology (RSM). After optimization, the resulting optimum pretreatment condition was 157.84°C, utilizing 2.99% (w/w TS) H(2)SO(4) for 20.15 min, where the maximum methane yield (248 mL/g VS) was 56.96% higher than the control (158 mL/g VS), which was very close to the predict value 56.53%. These results indicate the model obtained through RSM analysis is suit to predict the optimum pretreatment condition and there is great potential of using TDSA pretreatment of cassava residues to enhance methane yield.

  8. Identification of Structural and Catalytic Classes of Highly Conserved Amino Acid Residues in Lysine 2,3-Aminomutase †

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dawei; Frey, Perry A.; Lepore, Bryan W.; Ringe, Dagmar; Ruzicka, Frank J.

    2008-01-01

    Lysine 2,3-aminomutase (LAM) from Clostridium subterminale SB4 catalyzes the interconversion of (S)-lysine and (S)-β-lysine by a radical mechanism involving coenzymatic actions of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a [4Fe-4S] cluster, and pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP). The enzyme contains a number of conserved acidic residues and a cysteine and arginine-rich motif, that binds iron and sulfide in the [4Fe–4S] cluster. The results of activity and iron, sulfide, and PLP analysis of variants resulting from site-specific mutations of the conserved acidic residues and the arginine residues in the iron-sulfide binding motif indicate two classes of conserved residues of each type. Mutation of the conserved residues Arg134, Asp293, and Asp330 abolish all enzymatic activity. Based on the x-ray crystal structure, these residues bind the ε-aminium and α-carboxylate groups of (S)-lysine. However, among these residues only Asp293 appears to be important for stabilizing the [4Fe–4S] cluster. Members of a second group of conserved residues appear to stabilize the structure of LAM. Mutations of arginine residues 130, 135, and 136 and acidic residues Glu86, Asp165, Glu236, and Asp172 dramatically decrease iron and sulfide contents in the purified variants. Mutation of Asp96 significantly decreases iron and sulfide content. Variants in Arg130 or Asp172 display no detectable activity, whereas variants in the other positions display low to very low activities. Structural roles are assigned to this latter class of conserved amino acids. In particular, a network of hydrogen bonded interactions of Arg130, Glu86, Arg135 and the main chain carbonyl groups of Cys132 and Leu55 appears to stabilize the [4Fe–4S] cluster. PMID:17042481

  9. Differences in sialic acid residues among bone alkaline phosphatase isoforms: a physical, biochemical, and immunological characterization.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, P; Farley, J R

    2002-12-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separates three human bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP) isoforms in serum; two major BALP isoforms, B1 and B2, and a minor fraction, B/I, which is composed on average of 70% bone and 30% intestinal ALP. The current studies were intended to identify an in vitro source of the BALP isoforms for physical, biochemical, and immunological characterizations. The three BALP isoforms were identified in extracts of human osteosarcoma (SaOS-2) cells, by HPLC, after separation by anion-exchange chromatography. All three BALP isoforms were similar with respect to freeze-thaw stability, solubility, heat inactivation, and inhibition by L-phenylalanine, L-homoarginine, and levamisole. The isoforms were also kinetically similar (i.e., maximal velocity and KM at pH 8.8 and pH 10.0). The isoforms differed, however, with respect to sensitivity to precipitation with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), P < 0.001, but not Concanavalin A. At 3.0 mg/ml, WGA precipitated approximately 25% of B/I but more than 80% of B1 and B2. Molecular weights were estimated by native gradient gel electrophoresis: B/I, 126 kDa; B1, 136 kDa; and B2, 141 kDa. Desialylation with neuraminidase reduced the apparent sizes of B1 and B2 to 127 kDa (i.e., approximately to that of B/I). The total carbohydrate content was calculated to be 18 kDa, 28 kDa, and 33 kDa (i.e., 14%, 21%, and 23%) for the BALP isofonns, B/I, B1, and B2, respectively. The number of sialic acid residues was estimated to be 29 and 45, for each B1 and B2 homodimer, respectively. Apparent discrepancies between these estimates of molecular weight and estimates based on gel filtration chromatography were attributed to nonspecific interactions between carbohydrate residues and the gel filtration beads. All three BALP isoforms showed similar dose-dependent linearity in the commercial Alkphase-B and Tandem-MP Ostase immunoassays, r = 0.944 and r = 0.985, respectively (P < 0.001). In summary, our data indicate that

  10. Processes to remove acid forming gases from exhaust gases

    DOEpatents

    Chang, S.G.

    1994-09-20

    The present invention relates to a process for reducing the concentration of NO in a gas, which process comprises: (A) contacting a gas sample containing NO with a gaseous oxidizing agent to oxidize the NO to NO[sub 2]; (B) contacting the gas sample of step (A) comprising NO[sub 2] with an aqueous reagent of bisulfite/sulfite and a compound selected from urea, sulfamic acid, hydrazinium ion, hydrazoic acid, nitroaniline, sulfanilamide, sulfanilic acid, mercaptopropanoic acid, mercaptosuccinic acid, cysteine or combinations thereof at between about 0 and 100 C at a pH of between about 1 and 7 for between about 0.01 and 60 sec; and (C) optionally contacting the reaction product of step (A) with conventional chemical reagents to reduce the concentrations of the organic products of the reaction in step (B) to environmentally acceptable levels. Urea or sulfamic acid are preferred, especially sulfamic acid, and step (C) is not necessary or performed. 16 figs.

  11. Human small-intestinal β-galactosidases. Separation and characterization of three forms of an acid β-galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Asp, Nils-Georg

    1971-01-01

    1. An acid β-galactosidase, optimum pH4.0–4.5, in the human small-intestinal mucosa was separated and characterized. 2. Autolysis of mucosal homogenates at acid pH inactivated the lactase and hetero β-galactosidase; the total activity of the acid β-galactosidase was only slightly depleted, but a greater proportion of the enzyme was solubilized by this treatment. 3. Separation on a Sephadex G-200 column revealed that the acid β-galactosidase could occur in at least three different forms, probably representing monomer, dimer and octamer or polymer of the enzyme. 4. The properties of the different forms of the acid β-galactosidase were studied with regard to pH optimum, Km, rate of hydrolysis of different substrates, and sensitivity to p-chloromercuribenzoate and tris as inhibitors. All these properties were the same for the different forms of the enzyme. 5. The acid β-galactosidase hydrolyses lactose as well as hetero β-galactosides and contributes to the lactase activity of intestinal biopsies also when measured at pH 6. This enzyme may therefore be responsible for a considerable part of the residual lactase activity found in lactose-intolerant patients. PMID:5117032

  12. Role of enthalpy-entropy compensation interactions in determining the conformational propensities of amino acid residues in unfolded peptides.

    PubMed

    Toal, Siobhan E; Verbaro, Daniel J; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2014-02-06

    The driving forces governing the unique and restricted conformational preferences of amino acid residues in the unfolded state are still not well understood. In this study, we experimentally determine the individual thermodynamic components underlying intrinsic conformational propensities of these residues. Thermodynamic analysis of ultraviolet-circular dichroism (UV-CD) and (1)H NMR data for a series of glycine capped amino acid residues (i.e., G-x-G peptides) reveals the existence of a nearly exact enthalpy-entropy compensation for the polyproline II-β strand equilibrium for all investigated residues. The respective ΔHβ, ΔSβ values exhibit a nearly perfect linear relationship with an apparent compensation temperature of 295 ± 2 K. Moreover, we identified iso-equilibrium points for two subsets of residues at 297 and 305 K. Thus, our data suggest that within this temperature regime, which is only slightly below physiological temperatures, the conformational ensembles of amino acid residues in the unfolded state differ solely with respect to their capability to adopt turn-like conformations. Such iso-equilibria are rarely observed, and their existence herein indicates a common physical origin behind conformational preferences, which we are able to assign to side-chain dependent backbone solvation. Conformational effects such as differences between the number of sterically allowed side chain rotamers can contribute to enthalpy and entropy but not to the Gibbs energy associated with conformational preferences. Interestingly, we found that alanine, aspartic acid, and threonine are the only residues which do not share these iso-equilbiria. The enthalpy-entropy compensation discovered as well as the iso-equilbrium and thermodynamics obtained for each amino acid residue provide a new and informative way of identifying the determinants of amino acid propensities in unfolded and disordered states.

  13. Theoretical exploration of the cooperative effect in NMF-NMF-amino acid residue hydrogen bonding system.

    PubMed

    Li, Xichen; Liu, Wenlan; Sun, Kening; Wang, Yan; Tan, Hongwei; Chen, Guangju

    2008-09-28

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the cooperative effect in sixteen linearly-arranged trimer systems consisting of N-methylformamide dimer and an extra amino acid residue. These trimer systems, NMF-NMF-AAR, in short, have been systematically investigated by full optimization at B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level and subsequent electronic energy calculations at PBE1PBE/cc-pVTZ, HF/cc-pVTZ and MP2/cc-pVTZ, respectively. Obvious spatial transformation due to energetic factors has been found in almost all the trimers. Systematic analysis in weak interaction energy components has shown that: (1) in these trimer systems, the bonding structure and the cooperative effect combine to determine the stability of both HB1 and HB2. For HB2, the structure of the constituent amino acid residue also plays a crucial role by interfering with the neighboring moieties; (2) the large contribution of the cooperative effect to the overall hydrogen bonding energy has claimed the importance of cooperativity in our systems; (3) the non-hydrogen bonding weak interaction components are found to be non-negligible in these trimer systems; (4) moreover, the cooperative effect between these non-hydrogen bonding components is always found to be positive. The good performances of PBE1PBE and PM6 have been established by comparisons between these methods.

  14. Accurate determination of residual acrylic acid in superabsorbent polymer of hygiene products by headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Jiang, Ran

    2017-02-17

    This work reports on a method for the determination of residual acrylic acid (AA) in the superabsorbent polymers for hygiene products by headspace analysis. It was based on water extraction for the polymer sample at a room temperature for 50min. Then, the AA in the extractant reacted with bicarbonate solution in a closed headspace sample vial, from which the carbon dioxide generated from the reaction (within 20min at 70°C) was detected by gas chromatography (GC). It was found that there is adsorption partition equilibrium of AA between solid-liquid phases. Therefore, an equation for calculating the total AA content in the original polymers sample was derived based on the above phase equilibrium. The results show that the HS-GC method has good precision (RSD<2.51%) and good accuracy (recoveries from 93 to 105%); the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 373mg/kg. The present method is rapid, accurate, and suitable for determining total residual acrylic acid in a wide variety of applications from processing of superabsorbent polymer to commercial products quality control.

  15. The Dual NOD1/NOD2 Agonism of Muropeptides Containing a Meso-Diaminopimelic Acid Residue

    PubMed Central

    Dagil, Yulia A.; Arbatsky, Nikolai P.; Alkhazova, Biana I.; L’vov, Vyacheslav L.; Mazurov, Dmitriy V.; Pashenkov, Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    Muropeptides are fragments of peptidoglycan that trigger innate immune responses by activating nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) 1 and NOD2. Muropeptides from Gram-negative bacteria contain a meso-diaminopimelic acid (meso-DAP) residue in either a terminal or a non-terminal position. While the former ones are known to be recognized by NOD1, much less is known about recognition of muropeptides with non-terminal meso-DAP, which are most abundant moieties of Gram-negative peptidoglycans. Here, we developed a novel system to assess biological activity of muropeptides, based on CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout (KO) of NOD1 and NOD2 genes in modified HEK293T cells. Using NOD1/NOD2 knockout and overexpression systems, as well as human monocytes and macrophages, we refine the current view of muropeptide recognition. We show that NOD2 can recognize different natural muropeptides containing a meso-DAP residue (preferably in a non-terminal position), provided they are present at micromolar concentrations. NOD2 accepts muropeptides with long and branched peptide chains and requires an intact N-acetylmuramyl residue. Muropeptides with non-terminal meso-DAP can activate NOD1 as well, but, in this case, probably require peptidase pre-processing to expose the meso-DAP residue. Depending on NOD1/NOD2 ratio in specific cell types, meso-DAP-containing muropeptides can be recognized either primarily via NOD2 (in monocytes) or via NOD1 (in monocyte-derived macrophages and HEK293T-derived cells). The dual NOD1/NOD2 agonism of meso-DAP-containing muropeptides should be taken into account when assessing cellular responses to muropeptides and designing muropeptide immunostimulants and vaccine adjuvants. PMID:27513337

  16. The spatial distribution patterns of condensed phase post-blast explosive residues formed during detonation.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Karim, Nadia; Blackman, Christopher S; Gill, Philip P; Karu, Kersti

    2016-10-05

    The continued usage of explosive devices, as well as the ever growing threat of 'dirty' bombs necessitates a comprehensive understanding of particle dispersal during detonation events in order to develop effectual methods for targeting explosive and/or additive remediation efforts. Herein, the distribution of explosive analytes from controlled detonations of aluminised ammonium nitrate and an RDX-based explosive composition were established by systematically sampling sites positioned around each firing. This is the first experimental study to produce evidence that the post-blast residue mass can distribute according to an approximate inverse-square law model, while also demonstrating for the first time that distribution trends can vary depending on individual analytes. Furthermore, by incorporating blast-wave overpressure measurements, high-speed imaging for fireball volume recordings, and monitoring of environmental conditions, it was determined that the principle factor affecting all analyte dispersals was the wind direction, with other factors affecting specific analytes to varying degrees. The dispersal mechanism for explosive residue is primarily the smoke cloud, a finding which in itself has wider impacts on the environment and fundamental detonation theory.

  17. Newly identified essential amino acid residues affecting ^8-sphingolipid desaturase activity revealed by site-directed mutagenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to identify amino acid residues crucial for the enzymatic activity of ^8-sphingolipid desaturases, a sequence comparison was performed among ^8-sphingolipid desaturases and ^6-fatty acid desaturase from various plants. In addition to the known conserved cytb5 (cytochrome b5) HPGG motif and...

  18. Comparison of the effects of ozone on the modification of amino acid residues in glutamine synthetase and bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Berlett, B S; Levine, R L; Stadtman, E R

    1996-02-23

    During exposure to ozone, the methionine and aromatic amino acid residues of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (GS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) are oxidized rapidly in the order Met > Trp > Tyr approximately His > Phe. The loss of His is matched by a nearly equivalent formation of aspartate or of a derivative that is converted to aspartic acid upon acid hydrolysis. Conversion of His to aspartate was confirmed by showing that the oxidation of E. coli protein in which all His residues were uniformly labeled with 14C gave rise to 14C-labeled aspartic acid in 80% yield and also by the demonstration that His residues in the tripeptides Ala-His-Ala or Ala-Ala-His gave rise to nearly stoichiometric amounts of aspartic acid whereas oxidation of His-Ala-Ala yielded only 36% aspartate. The oxidation of BSA and GS led to formation, respectively, of 11 and 3.3 eq of carbonyl groups and 0.5 and 0.3 eq of quinoprotein per subunit. Although BSA and GS contain nearly identical amounts of each kind of aromatic amino acid residues, oxidation of these residues in BSA was about 1.5-2.0 times faster than in GS indicating that the susceptibility to oxidation is dependent on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure of the protein.

  19. Lead Isotope Compositions of Acid Residues from Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Tissint: Implications for Heterogeneous Shergottite Source Reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriwaki, R.; Usui, T.; Yokoyama, T.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical studies of shergottites suggest that their parental magmas reflect mixtures between at least two distinct geochemical source reservoirs, producing correlations between radiogenic isotope compositions and trace element abundances. These correlations have been interpreted as indicating the presence of a reduced, incompatible element- depleted reservoir and an oxidized, incompatible- element-enriched reservoir. The former is clearly a depleted mantle source, but there is ongoing debate regarding the origin of the enriched reservoir. Two contrasting models have been proposed regarding the location and mixing process of the two geochemical source reservoirs: (1) assimilation of oxidized crust by mantle derived, reduced magmas, or (2) mixing of two distinct mantle reservoirs during melting. The former requires the ancient Martian crust to be the enriched source (crustal assimilation), whereas the latter requires isolation of a long-lived enriched mantle domain that probably originated from residual melts formed during solidification of a magma ocean (heterogeneous mantle model). This study conducts Pb isotope and trace element concentration analyses of sequential acid-leaching fractions (leachates and the final residues) from the geochemically depleted olivine-phyric shergottite Tissint. The results suggest that the Tissint magma is not isotopically uniform and sampled at least two geochemical source reservoirs, implying that either crustal assimilation or magma mixing would have played a role in the Tissint petrogenesis.

  20. Kinetics of sulfuric acid leaching of cadmium from Cd-Ni zinc plant residues.

    PubMed

    Safarzadeh, Mohammad Sadegh; Moradkhani, Davood; Ojaghi-Ilkhchi, Mehdi

    2009-04-30

    Cd-Ni filtercakes are produced continuously at the third purification step in the electrolytic production of zinc in the National Iranian Lead and Zinc Company (NILZ) in northwestern Iran. In this research, the dissolution kinetics of cadmium from Cd-Ni residues produced in NILZ plant has been investigated. Hence, the effects of temperature, sulfuric acid concentration, particle size and stirring speed on the kinetics of cadmium dissolution in sulfuric acid were studied. The dissolution kinetics at 25-55 degrees C and tacid concentration, solid/liquid ratio and particle size were also achieved. The rate of reaction at first 5 min based on diffusion-controlled process can be expressed by a semi-empirical equation as:It was determined that the dissolution rate increased with increasing sulfuric acid concentration and decreasing particle size.

  1. Identification of acid-base catalytic residues of high-Mr thioredoxin reductase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Paul J; Arscott, L David; Ballou, David P; Becker, Katja; Williams, Charles H; Müller, Sylke

    2006-11-03

    High-M(r) thioredoxin reductase from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfTrxR) contains three redox active centers (FAD, Cys-88/Cys-93, and Cys-535/Cys-540) that are in redox communication. The catalytic mechanism of PfTrxR, which involves dithiol-disulfide interchanges requiring acid-base catalysis, was studied by steady-state kinetics, spectral analyses of anaerobic static titrations, and rapid kinetics analysis of wild-type enzyme and variants involving the His-509-Glu-514 dyad as the presumed acid-base catalyst. The dyad is conserved in all members of the enzyme family. Substitution of His-509 with glutamine and Glu-514 with alanine led to TrxR with only 0.5 and 7% of wild type activity, respectively, thus demonstrating the crucial roles of these residues for enzymatic activity. The H509Q variant had rate constants in both the reductive and oxidative half-reactions that were dramatically less than those of wild-type enzyme, and no thiolateflavin charge-transfer complex was observed. Glu-514 was shown to be involved in dithiol-disulfide interchange between the Cys-88/Cys-93 and Cys-535/Cys-540 pairs. In addition, Glu-514 appears to greatly enhance the role of His-509 in acid-base catalysis. It can be concluded that the His-509-Glu-514 dyad, in analogy to those in related oxidoreductases, acts as the acid-base catalyst in PfTrxR.

  2. Acid-catalyzed hydrothermal severity on the fractionation of agricultural residues for xylose-rich hydrolyzates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Ye; Ryu, Hyun Jin; Oh, Kyeong Keun

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility of acid-catalyzed hydrothermal fractionation for maximum solubilization of the hemicellulosic portion of three agricultural residues. The fractionation conditions converted into combined severity factor (CS) in the range of 1.2-2.9. The highest hemicellulose yield of 87.88% was achieved when barley straw was fractionated at a CS of 2.19. However, the maximum glucose release of 15.29% was achieved for the case of rice straw. The maximum productions of various by-products were observed with the fractionation of rape straw: 0.88 g/L of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), 2.16 g/L of furfural, 0.44 g/L of levulinic acid, 1.59 g/L of formic acid, and 3.06 g/L of acetic acid. The highest selectivities, a criterion for evaluating the fractionation of 21.55 for fractionated solid and 7.48 for liquid hydrolyzate were obtained from barley straw.

  3. A simplified method for estimation of jarosite and acid-forming sulfates in acid mine wastes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Smart, Roger St C; Schumann, Russell C; Gerson, Andrea R; Levay, George

    2007-02-01

    In acid base accounting (ABA) estimates of acid mine wastes, the acid potential (AP) estimate can be improved by using the net carbonate value (NCV) reactive sulfide S method rather than total S assay methods but this does not give recovery of potentially acid producing ferrous and ferric sulfates present in many wastes. For more accurate estimation of AP, an effective, site-specific method to quantify acid sulfate salts, such as jarosite and melanterite, in waste rocks has been developed and tested on synthetic and real wastes. The SPOCAS (acid sulfate soils) methods have been modified to an effective, rapid method to speciate sulfate forms in different synthetic waste samples. A three-step sequential extraction procedure has been established. These steps are: (1) argon-purged water extraction (3 min) to extract soluble Fe(II) salts (particularly melanterite), epsomite and gypsum (<10 wt.%), (2) roasting at 550 degrees C (1 h) to remove sulfur from pyrite and other reactive sulfides, (3) HCl extraction (4 M, 30 min) for determination of jarosites. Products (solid and aqueous) have been characterized at each step including the jarosite decomposition process in Step 2 where temperature control is critical to avoid S loss. The sequential extraction procedure was used to quantitatively determine melanterite, epsomite, gypsum, pyrite and jarosite concentrations in a synthetic waste sample containing these mineral phases at 5 wt.% in quartz, and also tested using a tailings waste sample to quantitatively determine epsomite, gypsum and jarosite contents. The method is applicable to most waste samples including those with non-pyrite sulfides but for samples containing significant amounts of sulfur (>1 wt.% S) as copper sulfides, the second step of roasting needs to be excluded from the procedure with an increased time of 4 M HCl extraction to 16 h for jarosite determination.

  4. Interaction between carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) and saturating concentrations of Calcofluor White. A fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R; Sillen, A; Plancke, Y D; Coddeville, B; Engelborghs, Y

    2000-07-24

    Calcofluor White is a fluorescent probe that interacts with polysaccharides and is commonly used in clinical studies. Interaction between Calcofluor White and carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) was previously followed by fluorescence titration of the Trp residues of the protein. A stoichiometry of one Calcofluor for one protein has been found [J.R. Albani and Y.D. Plancke, Carbohydr. Res., 318 (1999) 193-200]. Alpha1-acid glycoprotein contains 40% carbohydrate by weight and has up to 16 sialic acid residues. Since binding of Calcofluor to alpha1-acid glycoprotein occurs mainly on the carbohydrate residues, we studied in the present work the interaction between Calcofluor and the protein by following the fluorescence change of the fluorophore. In order to establish the role of the sialic acid residues in the interaction, the experiments were performed with the sialylated and asialylated protein. Interaction of Calcofluor with sialylated alpha1-acid glycoprotein induces a red shift of the emission maximum of the fluorophore from 438 to 450 nm at saturation (one Calcofluor for one sialic acid) and an increase in the fluorescence intensity. At saturation the fluorescence intensity increase levels off. Binding of Calcofluor to asialylated acid glycoprotein does not change the position of the emission maximum of the fluorophore and induces a decrease in its fluorescence intensity. Saturation occurs when 10 molecules of Calcofluor are bound to 1 mol of alpha1-acid glycoprotein. Since the protein contains five heteropolysaccharide groups, we have 2 mol of Calcofluor for each group. Addition of free sialic acid to Calcofluor induces a continuous decrease in the fluorescence intensity of the fluorophore but does not change the position of the emission maximum. Our results confirm the presence of a defined spatial conformation of the sialic acid residues, a conformation that disappears when they are free in solution. Dynamics studies on Calcofluor

  5. Cut-off net acid generation pH in predicting acid-forming potential in mine spoils.

    PubMed

    Liao, B; Huang, L N; Ye, Z H; Lan, C Y; Shu, W S

    2007-01-01

    Acidification of mine wastes can lead to a series of environmental problems, such as acid drainage, heavy metal mobilization, and ecosystem degradation. Prediction of acid-forming potential is one of the key steps in management of sulfide-bearing mine wastes. In this paper, the acid-forming potential of 180 mine waste samples collected from 17 mine sites in China were studied using a net acid generation (NAG) method. The samples contained different contents of total sulfur (ranging from 0.6 to 200 g kg(-1)), pyritic sulfur (ranging from 0 to 100 g kg(-1)), and acid neutralization capacity (ANC, ranging from -41 to 274 kg H2SO4 t(-1)). Samples with high acid-forming potential are generally due to their high sulfur content or low acid neutralization capacity. After the samples were oxidized by H2O2, the amounts of acid generation and the final NAG pH were measured. Results indicated that the final NAG pH gave a well-defined demarcation between acid-forming and non-acid-forming materials. Samples with final NAG pH >or= 5 could be classified as non-acid-forming materials, while those with NAG pH acid-forming materials. Materials with NAG pH > 2.5, but < 5, had low risk of being acid-forming. The confirmation of cut-off NAG pH will be used as a rapid and cost-effective operational monitoring tool for the in-pit prediction of acid-forming potential of mine wastes and classification of waste types.

  6. Stabilization of secondary structure elements by specific combinations of hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acid residues is more important for proteins encoded by GC-poor genes.

    PubMed

    Khrustalev, Vladislav Victorovich; Barkovsky, Eugene Victorovich

    2012-12-01

    Stabilization of secondary structure elements by specific combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids has been studied by the way of analysis of pentapeptide fragments from twelve partial bacterial proteomes. PDB files describing structures of proteins from species with extremely high and low genomic GC-content, as well as with average G + C were included in the study. Amino acid residues in 78,009 pentapeptides from alpha helices, beta strands and coil regions were classified into hydrophobic and hydrophilic ones. The common propensity scale for 32 possible combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acid residues in pentapeptide has been created: specific pentapeptides for helix, sheet and coil were described. The usage of pentapeptides preferably forming alpha helices is decreasing in alpha helices of partial bacterial proteomes with the increase of the average genomic GC-content in first and second codon positions. The usage of pentapeptides preferably forming beta strands is increasing in coil regions and in helices of partial bacterial proteomes with the growth of the average genomic GC-content in first and second codon positions. Due to these circumstances the probability of coil-sheet and helix-sheet transitions should be increased in proteins encoded by GC-rich genes making them prone to form amyloid in certain conditions. Possible causes of the described fact that importance of alpha helix and coil stabilization by specific combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids is growing with the decrease of genomic GC-content have been discussed.

  7. Delivery of a foreign epitope by sharing amino acid residues with the carrier matrix.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Wan-Shoo; Drummer, Heidi Edelgard; Netter, Hans-Jürgen

    2009-06-01

    A broad range of structural viral proteins has the ability to assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs). Under the condition that modified subunits are still competent to assemble into VLPs, they are epitope delivery platforms suitable for vaccination purposes. The insertion of foreign sequences can be detrimental for the formation of chimeric VLPs as a result of misfolded subunit proteins. Hence, a strategy was adopted to screen for locations allowing the use of shared residues between the wildtype subunit sequence and the foreign insert. The insertion of a cysteine-containing sequence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein 2 (E2) without adding an additional cysteine residue retained the ability of recombinant small hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg-S) to form secretion competent VLPs. A cysteine residue shared by the insert and the template protein avoided the formation of non-native disulfide bonds, and allowed the formation of VLPs. The chimeric HBsAg-S VLPs were similar to wildtype VLPs in density exposing the inserted foreign epitope and being immunogenic. Overall, the use of shared sequences between the insert and the subunit will facilitate the design of chimeric VLPs carrying multiple epitopes.

  8. Frequencies of amino acid strings in globular protein sequences indicate suppression of blocks of consecutive hydrophobic residues

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Russell; Istrail, Sorin; King, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Patterns of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues play a major role in protein folding and function. Long, predominantly hydrophobic strings of 20–22 amino acids each are associated with transmembrane helices and have been used to identify such sequences. Much less attention has been paid to hydrophobic sequences within globular proteins. In prior work on computer simulations of the competition between on-pathway folding and off-pathway aggregate formation, we found that long sequences of consecutive hydrophobic residues promoted aggregation within the model, even controlling for overall hydrophobic content. We report here on an analysis of the frequencies of different lengths of contiguous blocks of hydrophobic residues in a database of amino acid sequences of proteins of known structure. Sequences of three or more consecutive hydrophobic residues are found to be significantly less common in actual globular proteins than would be predicted if residues were selected independently. The result may reflect selection against long blocks of hydrophobic residues within globular proteins relative to what would be expected if residue hydrophobicities were independent of those of nearby residues in the sequence. PMID:11316883

  9. L-Altruronic acid formed by epimerization of D-galacturonic acid methyl esters during saponification of citrus pectin.

    PubMed

    Zhan, D; Qiu, F; Mort, A J

    2001-02-15

    While searching for oligosaccharides containing rhamnose residues in the endopolygalacturonase (EPG) digest of saponified citrus pectin, we found several oligomers containing, in addition to galacturonic acid, a sugar previously unreported in pectin. The 1- and 2-D 1H NMR spectra of the oligosaccharides were consistent with the sugar being a uronic acid with its 2- and 3-hydroxyls being axial and 4-hydroxyl being equatorial. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry indicated that the oligomers consisted solely of uronic acids. Reduction of the uronic acids in the oligosaccharides converted them to galactose and altrose. The altrose was found to be the L enantiomer by comparison of its trimethylsilyl (-)-2-butyl glycosides to those of authentic D-altrose and a racemic mixture. The sugar was not found in oligosaccharides prepared from EPG digestion of citrus pectin deesterified with pectin methylesterase rather than saponification. Thus, it appears that during saponification, a small proportion of the methylesterified galacturonic acid residues in pectins is epimerized at C-5 leading to formation of L-altruronic acid residues.

  10. Evidence for a Proton Transfer Network and a Required Persulfide-Bond-Forming Cysteine Residue in Ni-Containing Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Eun Jin Kim; Jian Feng; Matthew R. Bramlett; Paul A. Lindahl

    2004-05-18

    OAK-B135 Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Moorella thermoacetica catalyzes the reversible oxidation of CO to CO2 at a nickel-iron-sulfur active-site called the C-cluster. Mutants of a proposed proton transfer pathway and of a cysteine residue recently found to form a persulfide bond with the C-cluster were characterized. Four semi-conserved histidine residues were individually mutated to alanine. His116 and His122 were essential to catalysis, while His113 and His119 attenuated catalysis but were not essential. Significant activity was ''rescued'' by a double mutant where His116 was replaced by Ala and His was also introduced at position 115. Activity was also rescued in double mutants where His122 was replaced by Ala and His was simultaneously introduced at either position 121 or 123. Activity was also ''rescued'' by replacing His with Cys at position 116. Mutation of conserved Lys587 near the C-cluster attenuated activity but did not eliminate it. Activity was virtually abolished in a double mutant where Lys587 and His113 were both changed to Ala. Mutations of conserved Asn284 also attenuated activity. These effects suggest the presence of a network of amino acid residues responsible for proton transfer rather than a single linear pathway. The Ser mutant of the persulfide-forming Cys316 was essentially inactive and displayed no EPR signals originating from the C-cluster. Electronic absorption and metal analysis suggests that the C-cluster is absent in this mutant. The persulfide bond appears to be essential for either the assembly or stability of the C-cluster, and/or for eliciting the redox chemistry of the C-cluster required for catalytic activity.

  11. Single aromatic residue location alters nucleic acid binding and chaperone function of FIV nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Wei; Naiyer, Nada; Fichtenbaum, Eric; Qualley, Dominic F.; McCauley, Micah J.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Williams, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a retrovirus that infects domestic cats, and is an excellent animal model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis. The nucleocapsid (NC) protein is critical for replication in both retroviruses. FIV NC has several structural features that differ from HIV-1 NC. While both NC proteins have a single conserved aromatic residue in each of the two zinc fingers, the aromatic residue on the second finger of FIV NC is located on the opposite C-terminal side relative to its location in HIV-1 NC. In addition, whereas HIV-1 NC has a highly charged cationic N-terminal tail and a relatively short C-terminal extension, the opposite is true for FIV NC. To probe the impact of these differences on the nucleic acid (NA) binding and chaperone properties of FIV NC, we carried out ensemble and single-molecule assays with wild-type (WT) and mutant proteins. The ensemble studies show that FIV NC binding to DNA is strongly electrostatic, with a higher effective charge than that observed for HIV-1 NC. The C-terminal basic domain contributes significantly to the NA binding capability of FIV NC. In addition, the non-electrostatic component of DNA binding is much weaker for FIV NC than for HIV-1 NC. Mutation of both aromatic residues in the zinc fingers to Ala (F12A/W44A) further increases the effective charge of FIV NC and reduces its non-electrostatic binding affinity. Interestingly, switching the location of the C-terminal aromatic residue to mimic the HIV-1 NC sequence (N31W/W44A) reduces the effective charge of FIV NC and increases its non-electrostatic binding affinity to values similar to HIV-1 NC. Consistent with the results of these ensemble studies, single-molecule DNA stretching studies show that while WT FIV NC has reduced stacking capability relative to HIV-1 NC, the aromatic switch mutant recovers the ability to intercalate between the DNA bases. Our results demonstrate that altering the position of a single aromatic

  12. Processes to remove acid forming gases from exhaust gases

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Ger

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for reducing the concentration of NO in a gas, which process comprises: (A) contacting a gas sample containing NO with a gaseous oxidizing agent to oxidize the NO to NO.sub.2 ; (B) contacting the gas sample of step (A) comprising NO.sub.2 with an aqueous reagent of bisulfite/sulfite and a compound selected from urea, sulfamic acid, hydrazinium ion, hydrazoic acid, nitroaniline, sulfanilamide, sulfanilic acid, mercaptopropanoic acid, mercaptosuccinic acid, cysteine or combinations thereof at between about 0.degree. and 100.degree. C. at a pH of between about 1 and 7 for between about 0.01 and 60 sec; and (C) optionally contacting the reaction product of step (A) with conventional chemical reagents to reduce the concentrations of the organic products of the reaction in step (B) to environ-mentally acceptable levels. Urea or sulfamic acid are preferred, especially sulfamic acid, and step (C) is not necessary or performed.

  13. A photogrammetric method for monitoring changes in the residual alveolar ridge form.

    PubMed

    Adams, L P; Wilding, R J

    1985-09-01

    Resorption of the residual alveolar ridge calls for regular attention to the fitting surface of a denture. In the case of distal extension partial dentures, changes which occur in less than a year may require attention. These changes are apparent, though difficult to measure using radiographic techniques. Stereophotogrammetry is a means of recording and measuring contours of land masses. A short focus non-metric camera was used in this study to produce stereoscopic paired pictures of four casts of the same partial dentition. Additional casts were made 2 and 12 months after a partial denture had been made. A stereophotogrammetric plotting instrument was used to map the alveolar ridge area of each cast. A prescribed area for each map was traced out and the volume above a reference height was calculated. The percentage error between the four columns for the pre-treatment casts was +/- 2%. A 10% loss of ridge volume was observed after wearing a partial denture for 2 months. The same area observed 12 months later revealed an 18% volume reduction. Short range stereophotogrammetry may be applied to study changes in alveolar ridge morphology which may result from wearing a partial denture.

  14. Polyimide amic acid salts and polyimide membranes formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Ding, Yong; Bikson, Benjamin; Nelson, Joyce Katz; Macheras, James Timothy

    2004-04-06

    The invention relates to preparation and uses of novel polymeric materials, polyimide amic acid salts (PIAAS). The use of these materials for the fabrication of fluid separation membranes is further disclosed.

  15. Residue-based scattering factors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongliang

    2016-11-01

    A glob is defined as a group of atoms in the crystal which can be chosen in various ways. Globs themselves can be used as scattering elements in the theory of structure determination, just as atoms are used at present. In this paper, amino-acid residues are chosen to form globs and empirical formulas for residue-based scattering factors have been developed.

  16. Nitrate and Nitrite Determination in Gunshot Residue Samples by Capillary Electrophoresis in Acidic Run Buffer().

    PubMed

    Erol, Özge Ö; Erdoğan, Behice Y; Onar, Atiye N

    2017-03-01

    Simultaneous determination of nitrate and nitrite in gunshot residue has been conducted by capillary electrophoresis using an acidic run buffer (pH 3.5). In previously developed capillary electrophoretic methods, alkaline pH separation buffers were used where nitrite and nitrate possess similar electrophoretic mobility. In this study, the electroosmotic flow has been reversed by using low pH running buffer without any additives. As a result of reversing the electroosmotic flow, very fast analysis has been actualized, well-defined and separated ion peaks emerge in less than 4 min. Besides, the limit of detection was improved by employing large volume sample stacking. Limit of detection values were 6.7 and 4.3 μM for nitrate and nitrite, respectively. In traditional procedure, mechanical agitation is employed for extraction, while in this work the extraction efficiency of ultrasound mixing for 30 min was found sufficient. The proposed method was successfully applied to authentic gunshot residue samples.

  17. Allosteric Inhibition of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylases is Determined by a Single Amino Acid Residue in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Takeya, Masahiro; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Osanai, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is an important enzyme for CO2 fixation and primary metabolism in photosynthetic organisms including cyanobacteria. The kinetics and allosteric regulation of PEPCs have been studied in many organisms, but the biochemical properties of PEPC in the unicellular, non-nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 have not been clarified. In this study, biochemical analysis revealed that the optimum pH and temperature of Synechocystis 6803 PEPC proteins were 7.3 and 30 °C, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 PEPC was found to be tolerant to allosteric inhibition by several metabolic effectors such as malate, aspartate, and fumarate compared with other cyanobacterial PEPCs. Comparative sequence and biochemical analysis showed that substitution of the glutamate residue at position 954 with lysine altered the enzyme so that it was inhibited by malate, aspartate, and fumarate. PEPC of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was purified, and its activity was inhibited in the presence of malate. Substitution of the lysine at position 946 (equivalent to position 954 in Synechocystis 6803) with glutamate made Anabaena 7120 PEPC tolerant to malate. These results demonstrate that the allosteric regulation of PEPC in cyanobacteria is determined by a single amino acid residue, a characteristic that is conserved in different orders. PMID:28117365

  18. Site-Specific Pyrolysis Induced Cleavage at Aspartic Acid Residue in Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaofeng; Basile, Franco

    2011-01-01

    A simple and site-specific non-enzymatic method based on pyrolysis has been developed to cleave peptides and proteins. Pyrolytic cleavage was found to be specific and rapid as it induced a cleavage at the C-terminal side of aspartic acid in the temperature range of 220–250 °C in 10 seconds. Electrospray Ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem-MS (MS/MS) were used to characterize and identify pyrolysis cleavage products, confirming that sequence information is conserved after the pyrolysis process in both peptides and protein tested. This suggests that pyrolysis-induced cleavage at aspartyl residues can be used as a rapid protein digestion procedure for the generation of sequence specific protein biomarkers. PMID:17388620

  19. Residue Geometry Networks: A Rigidity-Based Approach to the Amino Acid Network and Evolutionary Rate Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fokas, Alexander S.; Cole, Daniel J.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Chin, Alex W.

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid networks (AANs) abstract the protein structure by recording the amino acid contacts and can provide insight into protein function. Herein, we describe a novel AAN construction technique that employs the rigidity analysis tool, FIRST, to build the AAN, which we refer to as the residue geometry network (RGN). We show that this new construction can be combined with network theory methods to include the effects of allowed conformal motions and local chemical environments. Importantly, this is done without costly molecular dynamics simulations required by other AAN-related methods, which allows us to analyse large proteins and/or data sets. We have calculated the centrality of the residues belonging to 795 proteins. The results display a strong, negative correlation between residue centrality and the evolutionary rate. Furthermore, among residues with high closeness, those with low degree were particularly strongly conserved. Random walk simulations using the RGN were also successful in identifying allosteric residues in proteins involved in GPCR signalling. The dynamic function of these residues largely remain hidden in the traditional distance-cutoff construction technique. Despite being constructed from only the crystal structure, the results in this paper suggests that the RGN can identify residues that fulfil a dynamical function. PMID:27623708

  20. Residue Geometry Networks: A Rigidity-Based Approach to the Amino Acid Network and Evolutionary Rate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokas, Alexander S.; Cole, Daniel J.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Chin, Alex W.

    2016-09-01

    Amino acid networks (AANs) abstract the protein structure by recording the amino acid contacts and can provide insight into protein function. Herein, we describe a novel AAN construction technique that employs the rigidity analysis tool, FIRST, to build the AAN, which we refer to as the residue geometry network (RGN). We show that this new construction can be combined with network theory methods to include the effects of allowed conformal motions and local chemical environments. Importantly, this is done without costly molecular dynamics simulations required by other AAN-related methods, which allows us to analyse large proteins and/or data sets. We have calculated the centrality of the residues belonging to 795 proteins. The results display a strong, negative correlation between residue centrality and the evolutionary rate. Furthermore, among residues with high closeness, those with low degree were particularly strongly conserved. Random walk simulations using the RGN were also successful in identifying allosteric residues in proteins involved in GPCR signalling. The dynamic function of these residues largely remain hidden in the traditional distance-cutoff construction technique. Despite being constructed from only the crystal structure, the results in this paper suggests that the RGN can identify residues that fulfil a dynamical function.

  1. Differential contribution of basic residues to HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein’s nucleic acid chaperone function and retroviral replication

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Mitra, Mithun; Naufer, M. Nabuan; McCauley, Micah J.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Williams, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid (NC) protein contains 15 basic residues located throughout its 55-amino acid sequence, as well as one aromatic residue in each of its two CCHC-type zinc finger motifs. NC facilitates nucleic acid (NA) rearrangements via its chaperone activity, but the structural basis for this activity and its consequences in vivo are not completely understood. Here, we investigate the role played by basic residues in the N-terminal domain, the N-terminal zinc finger and the linker region between the two zinc fingers. We use in vitro ensemble and single-molecule DNA stretching experiments to measure the characteristics of wild-type and mutant HIV-1 NC proteins, and correlate these results with cell-based HIV-1 replication assays. All of the cationic residue mutations lead to NA interaction defects, as well as reduced HIV-1 infectivity, and these effects are most pronounced on neutralizing all five N-terminal cationic residues. HIV-1 infectivity in cells is correlated most strongly with NC’s NA annealing capabilities as well as its ability to intercalate the DNA duplex. Although NC’s aromatic residues participate directly in DNA intercalation, our findings suggest that specific basic residues enhance these interactions, resulting in optimal NA chaperone activity. PMID:24293648

  2. Amino acid residues 201-205 in C-terminal acidic tail region plays a crucial role in antibacterial activity of HMGB1

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Antibacterial activity is a novel function of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). However, the functional site for this new effect is presently unknown. Methods and Results In this study, recombinant human HMGB1 A box and B box (rHMGB1 A box, rHMGB1 B box), recombinant human HMGB1 (rHMGB1) and the truncated C-terminal acidic tail mutant (tHMGB1) were prepared by the prokaryotic expression system. The C-terminal acidic tail (C peptide) was synthesized, which was composed of 30 amino acid residues. Antibacterial assays showed that both the full length rHMGB1 and the synthetic C peptide alone could efficiently inhibit bacteria proliferation, but rHMGB1 A box and B box, and tHMGB1 lacking the C-terminal acidic tail had no antibacterial function. These results suggest that C-terminal acidic tail is the key region for the antibacterial activity of HMGB1. Furthermore, we prepared eleven different deleted mutants lacking several amino acid residues in C-terminal acidic tail of HMGB1. Antibacterial assays of these mutants demonstrate that the amino acid residues 201-205 in C-terminal acidic tail region is the core functional site for the antibacterial activity of the molecule. Conclusion In sum, these results define the key region and the crucial site in HMGB1 for its antibacterial function, which is helpful to illustrating the antibacterial mechanisms of HMGB1. PMID:19751520

  3. 37 CFR 1.824 - Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form. 1.824 Section 1.824 Patents... And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.824 Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence... readable form may be created by any means, such as word processors, nucleotide/amino acid sequence...

  4. 37 CFR 1.824 - Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form. 1.824 Section 1.824 Patents... And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.824 Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence... readable form may be created by any means, such as word processors, nucleotide/amino acid sequence...

  5. 37 CFR 1.824 - Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form. 1.824 Section 1.824 Patents... And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.824 Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence... readable form may be created by any means, such as word processors, nucleotide/amino acid sequence...

  6. Critical amino acid residues involved in the electrogenic sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter kNBC1-mediated transport.

    PubMed

    Abuladze, Natalia; Azimov, Rustam; Newman, Debra; Sassani, Pakan; Liu, Weixin; Tatishchev, Sergei; Pushkin, Alexander; Kurtz, Ira

    2005-06-15

    We have previously reported a topological model of the electrogenic Na(+)-HCO(3)(-) cotransporter (NBC1) in which the cotransporter spans the plasma membrane 10 times with N- and C-termini localized intracellularly. An analysis of conserved amino acid residues among members of the SLC4 superfamily in both the transmembrane segments (TMs) and intracellular/extracellular loops (ILs/ELs) provided the basis for the mutagenesis approach taken in the present study to determine amino acids involved in NBC1-mediated ion transport. Using large-scale mutagenesis, acidic and basic amino acids putatively involved in ion transport mediated by the predominant variant of NBC1 expressed in the kidney (kNBC1) were mutated to neutral and/or oppositely charged amino acids. All mutant kNBC1 cotransporters were expressed in HEK-293T cells and the Na(+)-dependent base flux of the mutants was determined using intracellular pH measurements with 2',7'-bis-(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). Critical glutamate, aspartate, lysine, arginine and histidine residues in ILs/ELs and TMs were detected that were essential for kNBC1-mediated Na(+)-dependent base transport. In addition, critical phenylalanine, serine, tyrosine, threonine and alanine residues in TMs and ILs/ELs were detected. Furthermore, several amino acid residues in ILs/ELs and TMs were shown to be essential for membrane targeting. The data demonstrate asymmetry of distribution of kNBC1 charged amino acids involved in ion recognition in putative outward-facing and inward-facing conformations. A model summarizing key amino acid residues involved in kNBC1-mediated ion transport is presented.

  7. Critical amino acid residues involved in the electrogenic sodium–bicarbonate cotransporter kNBC1-mediated transport

    PubMed Central

    Abuladze, Natalia; Azimov, Rustam; Newman, Debra; Sassani, Pakan; Liu, Weixin; Tatishchev, Sergei; Pushkin, Alexander; Kurtz, Ira

    2005-01-01

    We have previously reported a topological model of the electrogenic Na+–HCO3− cotransporter (NBC1) in which the cotransporter spans the plasma membrane 10 times with N- and C-termini localized intracellularly. An analysis of conserved amino acid residues among members of the SLC4 superfamily in both the transmembrane segments (TMs) and intracellular/extracellular loops (ILs/ELs) provided the basis for the mutagenesis approach taken in the present study to determine amino acids involved in NBC1-mediated ion transport. Using large-scale mutagenesis, acidic and basic amino acids putatively involved in ion transport mediated by the predominant variant of NBC1 expressed in the kidney (kNBC1) were mutated to neutral and/or oppositely charged amino acids. All mutant kNBC1 cotransporters were expressed in HEK-293T cells and the Na+-dependent base flux of the mutants was determined using intracellular pH measurements with 2′,7′-bis-(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). Critical glutamate, aspartate, lysine, arginine and histidine residues in ILs/ELs and TMs were detected that were essential for kNBC1-mediated Na+-dependent base transport. In addition, critical phenylalanine, serine, tyrosine, threonine and alanine residues in TMs and ILs/ELs were detected. Furthermore, several amino acid residues in ILs/ELs and TMs were shown to be essential for membrane targeting. The data demonstrate asymmetry of distribution of kNBC1 charged amino acids involved in ion recognition in putative outward-facing and inward-facing conformations. A model summarizing key amino acid residues involved in kNBC1-mediated ion transport is presented. PMID:15817634

  8. Selective conversion of cellulose in corncob residue to levulinic acid in an aluminum trichloride-sodium chloride system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianmei; Jiang, Zhicheng; Hu, Libin; Hu, Changwei

    2014-09-01

    Increased energy consumption and environmental concerns have driven efforts to produce chemicals from renewable biomass with high selectivity. Here, the selective conversion of cellulose in corncob residue, a process waste from the production of xylose, to levulinic acid was carried out using AlCl3 as catalyst and NaCl as promoter by a hydrothermal method at relatively low temperature. A levulinic acid yield of 46.8 mol% was obtained, and the total selectivity to levulinic acid with formic acid was beyond 90%. NaCl selectively promoted the dissolution of cellulose from corncob residue, and significantly improved the yield and selectivity to levulinic acid by inhibiting lactic acid formation in the subsequent dehydration process. Owing to the salt effect of NaCl, the obtained levulinic acid could be efficiently extracted to tetrahydrofuran from aqueous solution. The aqueous solution with AlCl3 and NaCl could be recycled 4 times. Because of the limited conversion of lignin, this process allows for the production of levulinic acid with high selectivity directly from corncob residue in a simple separation process.

  9. Differential expression of the α2,3-sialic acid residues in breast cancer is associated with metastatic potential.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongxia; Lin, Yu; Yue, Liling; Zhao, Xuemei; Liu, Jicheng

    2011-05-01

    Aberrant sialylation is closely associated with the malignant phenotype of cancer cells and metastatic potential. However, the precise nature of the molecules in breast cancers has not been unveiled. In this study, we investigated the expression levels of α2,3-sialic acid residues of 50 primary tumor cases, 50 pair-matched lymph node metastasis tumor samples and in the MDA-MB-231, T-47D and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential. The expression of α2,3-sialic acid residues was analyzed by histochemistry, cytochemistry and flow cytometry with Maackia amurensis lectin (MAL). The invasion and migration abilities of cells were examined using cell adhesion and transwell in vitro assays. Pair-matched lymph node metastasis tumor samples exhibited higher levels of expression of α2,3-sialic acid residues compared to that of primary tumors (P=0.0432). Furthermore, of 38 tumors cases in T1/T2 stages, 31 (81.58%) had weak staining for MAL, which specifically binds to α2,3-sialic acid residues, whereas of 12 tumor cases in T3/T4 stages, only 1 (8.33%) had weak reactions for MAL. The highly metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 exhibited the strongest binding to MAL and the highest expression levels of α2,3-sialic acid residues among the selected cell lines, depending on mRNA expression levels of α2,3-sialyltransferase gene. The adhesion, invasion and migration activities confirmed that MDA-MB-231 exhibited the greater cell adhesion to, migration toward and invasion to Matrigel. Taken together, the high expression of α2,3-sialic acid residues in breast cancer was associated with metastatic potential. This property may be important for developing new therapeutic approaches for breast cancer.

  10. Site-specific PEGylation of therapeutic proteins via optimization of both accessible reactive amino acid residues and PEG derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun; Yang, Xiao-lan; Yuan, Yong-hua; Pu, Jun; Liao, Fei

    2012-08-01

    Modification of accessible amino acid residues with poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG] is a widely used technique for formulating therapeutic proteins. In practice, site-specific PEGylation of all selected/engineered accessible nonessential reactive residues of therapeutic proteins with common activated PEG derivatives is a promising strategy to concomitantly improve pharmacokinetics, allow retention of activity, alleviate immunogenicity, and avoid modification isomers. Specifically, through molecular engineering of a therapeutic protein, accessible essential residues reactive to an activated PEG derivative are substituted with unreactive residues provided that protein activity is retained, and a limited number of accessible nonessential reactive residues with optimized distributions are selected/introduced. Subsequently, all accessible nonessential reactive residues are completely PEGylated with the activated PEG derivative in great excess. Branched PEG derivatives containing new PEG chains with negligible metabolic toxicity are more desirable for site-specific PEGylation. Accordingly, for the successful formulation of therapeutic proteins, optimization of the number and distributions of accessible nonessential reactive residues via molecular engineering can be integrated with the design of large-sized PEG derivatives to achieve site-specific PEGylation of all selected/engineered accessible reactive residues.

  11. Tri-peptide reference structures for the calculation of relative solvent accessible surface area in protein amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Topham, Christopher M; Smith, Jeremy C

    2015-02-01

    Relative amino acid residue solvent accessibility values allow the quantitative comparison of atomic solvent-accessible surface areas in different residue types and physical environments in proteins and in protein structural alignments. Geometry-optimised tri-peptide structures in extended solvent-exposed reference conformations have been obtained for 43 amino acid residue types at a high level of quantum chemical theory. Significant increases in side-chain solvent accessibility, offset by reductions in main-chain atom solvent exposure, were observed for standard residue types in partially geometry-optimised structures when compared to non-minimised models built from identical sets of proper dihedral angles abstracted from the literature. Optimisation of proper dihedral angles led most notably to marked increases of up to 54% in proline main-chain atom solvent accessibility compared to literature values. Similar effects were observed for fully-optimised tri-peptides in implicit solvent. The relief of internal strain energy was associated with systematic variation in N, C(α) and C(β) atom solvent accessibility across all standard residue types. The results underline the importance of optimisation of 'hard' degrees of freedom (bond lengths and valence bond angles) and improper dihedral angle values from force field or other context-independent reference values, and impact on the use of standardised fixed internal co-ordinate geometry in sampling approaches to the determination of absolute values of protein amino acid residue solvent accessibility. Quantum chemical methods provide a useful and accurate alternative to molecular mechanics methods to perform energy minimisation of peptides containing non-standard (chemically modified) amino acid residues frequently present in experimental protein structure data sets, for which force field parameters may not be available. Reference tri-peptide atomic co-ordinate sets including hydrogen atoms are made freely available.

  12. Amino acid residues of bitter taste receptor TAS2R16 that determine sensitivity in primates to β-glycosides

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Hiroo; Suzuki-Hashido, Nami; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Sakurai, Takanobu; Yin, Lijie; Pan, Wenshi; Ishiguro, Masaji; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Abe, Keiko; Misaka, Takumi; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, bitter taste is mediated by TAS2Rs, which belong to the family of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors. Since TAS2Rs are directly involved in the interaction between mammals and their dietary sources, it is likely that these genes evolved to reflect species-specific diets during mammalian evolution. Here, we analyzed the amino acids responsible for the difference in sensitivities of TAS2R16s of various primates using a cultured cell expression system. We found that the sensitivity of TAS2R16 varied due to several amino acid residues. Mutation of amino acid residues at E86T, L247M, and V260F in human and langur TAS2R16 for mimicking the macaque TAS2R16 decreased the sensitivity of the receptor in an additive manner, which suggests its contribution to the potency of salicin, possibly via direct interaction. However, mutation of amino acid residues 125 and 133 in human TAS2R16, which are situated in helix 4, to the macaque sequence increased the sensitivity of the receptor. These results suggest the possibility that bitter taste sensitivities evolved independently by replacing specific amino acid residues of TAS2Rs in different primate species to adapt to species-specific food. PMID:27924271

  13. SeqX: a tool to detect, analyze and visualize residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid structures

    PubMed Central

    Biro, Jan C; Fördös, Gergely

    2005-01-01

    Background The interacting residues of protein and nucleic acid sequences are close to each other – they are co-located. Structure databases (like Protein Data Bank, PDB and Nucleic Acid Data Bank, NDB) contain all information about these co-locations; however it is not an easy task to penetrate this complex information. We developed a JAVA tool, called SeqX for this purpose. Results SeqX tool is useful to detect, analyze and visualize residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid structures. The user a. selects a structure from PDB; b. chooses an atom that is commonly present in every residues of the nucleic acid and/or protein structure(s) c. defines a distance from these atoms (3–15 Å). The SeqX tool detects every residue that is located within the defined distances from the defined "backbone" atom(s); provides a DotPlot-like visualization (Residues Contact Map), and calculates the frequency of every possible residue pairs (Residue Contact Table) in the observed structure. It is possible to exclude +/- 1 to 10 neighbor residues in the same polymeric chain from detection, which greatly improves the specificity of detections (up to 60% when tested on dsDNA). Results obtained on protein structures showed highly significant correlations with results obtained from literature (p < 0.0001, n = 210, four different subsets). The co-location frequency of physico-chemically compatible amino acids is significantly higher than is calculated and expected in random protein sequences (p < 0.0001, n = 80). Conclusion The tool is simple and easy to use and provides a quick and reliable visualization and analyses of residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid structures. Availability and requirements SeqX, Java J2SE Runtime Environment 5.0 (available from [see Additional file 1] ) and at least a 1 GHz processor and with a minimum 256 Mb RAM. Source codes are available from the authors. PMID:16011796

  14. Leaching and selective zinc recovery from acidic leachates of zinc metallurgical leach residues.

    PubMed

    Sethurajan, Manivannan; Huguenot, David; Jain, Rohan; Lens, Piet N L; Horn, Heinrich A; Figueiredo, Luiz H A; van Hullebusch, Eric D

    2017-02-15

    Zinc (Zn) leaching yields and kinetics from three different zinc plant leach residues (ZLR) generated in different periods (ZLR1>30 years, ZLR2 5-30 years and ZLR3<2 years) were investigated. The factors affecting the Zn leaching rate such as solid to liquid ratio, temperature, acid concentration and agitation were optimized. Under optimum conditions, 46.2 (±4.3), 23.3 (±2.7) and 17.6 (±1.2) mg of Zn can be extracted per gram of ZLR1, ZLR2 and ZLR3, respectively. The Zn leaching kinetics of ZLRs follow the shrinking core diffusion model. The activation energy required to leach Zn from ZLR1, ZLR2 and ZLR3 were estimated to be 2.24kcal/mol, 6.63kcal/mol and 11.7kcal/mol, respectively, by the Arrhenius equation. The order of the reaction with respect to the sulfuric acid concentration was also determined as 0.20, 0.56, and 0.87 for ZLR1, ZLR2 and ZLR3, respectively. Zn was selectively recovered from the leachates by adjusting the initial pH and by the addition of sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide. More than 90% of Zn was selectively recovered as sphalerite from the ZLR polymetallic leachates by chemical sulfide precipitation.

  15. Evidence for pentagalloyl glucose binding to human salivary alpha-amylase through aromatic amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Zajácz, Agnes; Bécsi, Bálint; Ragunath, Chandran; Ramasubbu, Narayanan; Erdodi, Ferenc; Batta, Gyula; Kandra, Lili

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate here that pentagalloyl glucose (PGG), a main component of gallotannins, was an effective inhibitor of HSA and it exerted similar inhibitory potency to Aleppo tannin used in this study. The inhibition of HSA by PGG was found to be non-competitive and inhibitory constants of K(EI)=2.6 microM and K(ESI)=3.9 microM were determined from Lineweaver-Burk secondary plots. PGG as a model compound for gallotannins was selected to study the inhibitory mechanism and to characterize the interaction of HSA with this type of molecules. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding experiments confirmed the direct interaction of HSA and PGG, and it also established similar binding of Aleppo tannin to HSA. Saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment by NMR clearly demonstrated the aromatic rings of PGG may be involved in the interaction suggesting a possible stacking with the aromatic side chains of HSA. The role of aromatic amino acids of HSA in PGG binding was reinforced by kinetic studies with the W58L and Y151M mutants of HSA: the replacement of the active site aromatic amino acids with aliphatic ones decreased the PGG inhibition dramatically, which justified the importance of these residues in the interaction.

  16. Quantitative assessment of the preferences for the amino acid residues flanking archaeal N-linked glycosylation sites.

    PubMed

    Igura, Mayumi; Kohda, Daisuke

    2011-05-01

    Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) catalyzes the transfer of an oligosaccharide to an asparagine residue in polypeptide chains. Using positional scanning peptide libraries, we assessed the effects of amino acid variations on the in vitro glycosylation efficiency within and adjacent to an N-glycosylation consensus, Asn-X-Ser/Thr, with an archaeal OST from Pyrococcus furiosus. The amino acid variations at the X(-2), X(-1) and X(+1) positions in the sequence X(-2)-X(-1)-Asn-X-Ser/Thr-X(+1) strongly influenced the glycosylation efficiency to a similar extent at position X. The rank orders of the amino acid preferences were unique at each site. We experimentally confirmed that the archaeal OST does not require an acidic residue at the -2 position, unlike the eubacterial OSTs. Pro was disfavored at the -1 and +1 positions, although the exclusion was not as strict as that at X, whereas Pro was the most favored amino acid residue among those studied at the -2 position. The overall amino acid preferences are correlated with a conformational propensity to extend around the sequon. The results of the library experiments revealed that the optimal acceptor sequence was PYNVTK, with a K(m) of 10 µM. The heat-stable, single-subunit OST of P. furiosus is a potential candidate enzyme for the production of recombinant glycoproteins in bacterial cells. Quantitative assessment of the amino acid preferences of the OST enzyme will facilitate the proper design of a production system.

  17. Key amino acid residues in the regulation of soluble methane monooxygenase catalysis by component B.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, Brian J; Lipscomb, John D

    2003-05-20

    The regulatory component MMOB of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) has been hypothesized to control access of substrates into the active site of the hydroxylase component (MMOH) through formation of a size specific channel or region of increased structural flexibility tuned to methane and O(2). Accordingly, a decrease in the size of four MMOB residues (N107G/S109A/S110A/T111A, the Quad mutant) was shown to accelerate the reaction of substrates larger than methane with the reactive MMOH intermediate Q [Wallar, B. J., and Lipscomb, J. D. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 2220-2233]. Here, this hypothesis is tested by construction of single and double mutations involving the residues of the Quad mutant. It is shown that mutations of residues that extend into the core structure of MMOB alter many aspects of the MMOH catalyzed reaction but do not mimic the effects of the Quad mutant. In contrast, the MMOB residues that are thought to form part of the interface in the MMOH-MMOB complex increase active site accessibility as observed for the Quad mutant. In particular, the mutant T111A mimics most of the effects of the Quad mutant; thus, Thr111 is proposed to most directly control access. Unexpectedly, mutation of Thr111 to the larger Tyr greatly increases the rate constant for the reaction of larger substrates such as ethane, furan, and nitrobenzene with Q while decreasing the rate constant for the reaction with methane. Other steps in the cycle are dramatically slowed, the regiospecificity for nitrobenzene oxidation is altered, and 10-fold more T111Y than wild-type MMOB is required to maximize the rate of turnover. Thus, T111Y appears to make a more extensive change in local interface structure that allows hydrocarbons at least as large as ethane to bind and react with Q similarly. As a result, the bond cleavage rates for methane, ethane, and their deuterated analogues are shown for the first time to correlate with bond strength in accord with a mechanism in which C-H bond

  18. Evidence of residual core material from the moon-forming impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helffrich, George; Wood, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    Earth was accreted from smaller bodies initially dispersed over a wide range of heliocentric distances (Albarède, 2009; Morbidelli et al. 2012). Models of their assembly include timing constraints from short-lived isotopic systems (W-Hf (Allègre et al. 2008), Ag-Pd (Schönbächler et al. 2010)), physical condition constraints from metal-silicate element partitioning (W, Mo, Ni, Co, Cr, V, Si; Wade et al. (2012)) and orbital parameter constraints from accretion histories (Morbidelli et al. 2012). Current models invoke continuous or multi-stage core formation with later epochs being more oxidized and volatile rich (Wood, 2008; Schönbächler et al. 2010; Rubie et al. 2011). Here we show, using models of core liquid wavespeeds, that a volatile-enriched outermost outer core leads to the observed layering in it, as well as satisfying the relative abundances of W and Mo in the mantle and the volume of material added in late-stage core accretion. Layering can be explained by incomplete mixing of late-added core material. Densities of progressively accreted metal vary, initially mixing the growing core but then stratifying upon it. The topmost outer core's structure is consistent with it being a physical remnant of the Moon-forming impact.

  19. 6-Iso-chlortetracycline or keto form of chlortetracycline? Need for clarification for relevant monitoring of chlortetracycline residues in food.

    PubMed

    Gaugain, Murielle; Gautier, Sophie; Bourcier, Sophie; Jacques, Anne-Marie; Laurentie, Michel; Abjean, Jean-Pierre; Hurtaud-Pessel, Dominique; Verdon, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Chlortetracycline (CTC) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic used in veterinary medicine for pulmonary or digestive infections and having a regulatory maximum residue limit (MRL) necessitating an official analytical control method. The purpose of this study was to clarify the identification of different forms of CTC observed in standard solution, in spiked muscle samples and in naturally incurred muscle samples of pigs analysed by LC-MS/MS and to demonstrate the in vivo formation of 6-iso-chlortetracycline and 4-epi-6-iso-CTC as a metabolite of CTC and 4-epi-CTC in muscle. The six following forms were identified, all being isobaric with a protonated molecule at m/z 479 (precursor ion): the keto-enol forms of CTC and the keto-enol forms of 4-epi-chlortetracycline (4-epi-CTC), 6-iso-chlortetracycline (6-iso-CTC) and 4-epi-6-iso-chlortetracycline (4-epi-6-iso-CTC). The 6-iso-CTC and 4-epi-6-iso-CTC were observed only in incurred pig samples so were identified for the first time as metabolites of CTC and 4-epi-CTC. Identification of the different forms was obtained by comparing incurred muscle samples with standard solutions and with spiked samples. Then the differences between the features of the chromatograms obtained by LC-TQ-MS and the fragmentation study of the different forms of CTC obtained by LC-Q-TOF-MS helped us to support this identification. The extraction steps and the LC-MS/MS conditions developed to analyse muscle tissue samples are described. This clarification concerning the rigorous identification of chromatographic peaks allowed us to evaluate the relevance of our monitoring method with regard to the regulations in place in the European Union and could be of help to laboratories involved in official control of antibiotic residues in food of animal origin. Additional results are also presented highlighting the transformation of the CTC when prepared in a mixture with other antibiotics.

  20. Importance of clustered 2'-O-(2-aminoethyl) residues for the gene targeting activity of triple helix-forming oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Puri, Nitin; Majumdar, Alokes; Cuenoud, Bernard; Miller, Paul S; Seidman, Michael M

    2004-02-10

    We are developing triple helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as gene targeting reagents in living mammalian cells. We have described psoralen-linked TFOs with 2'-O-methyl and 2'-O-(2-aminoethyl) (2'-AE) substitutions that are active in a gene knockout assay in cultured cells. The assay is based on mutagenesis by psoralen, a photoactive DNA cross-linker. Previous work showed that TFOs with three or four 2'-AE residues were disproportionately more active than those with one or two substitutions. Here we demonstrate that for optimal bioactivity the 2'-AE residues must be clustered rather than dispersed. We have further characterized bioactive and inactive TFOs in an effort to identify biochemical and biophysical correlates of biological activity. While thermal stability is a standard monitor of TFO biophysical activity, we find that T(m) values do not distinguish bioactive and inactive TFOs. In contrast, measurements of TFO association rates appear to correlate well with bioactivity, in that triplex formation occurs disproportionately faster with the TFOs containing three or four 2'-AE residues. We asked if extending the incubation time prior to photoactivation would enhance the bioactivity of a TFO with a slow on rate relative to the TFO with a faster association rate. However, there was no change in bioactivity differential. These results are compatible with a model in which TFO binding in vivo is followed by relatively rapid elution by cellular functions, similar to that described for transcription factors. Under these circumstances, TFOs with faster on rates would be favored because they would be more likely to be in triplexes at the time of photoactivation.

  1. High residue levels and the chemical form of mercury in tissues and organs of seabirds

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.Y.; Murakami, Toru; Saeki, Kazutoshi; Tatsukawa, Ryo

    1995-12-31

    Total and organic (methyl) mercury in liver, muscle, kidney and feather of 9 species of seabirds were analyzed to determine the levels and their distribution and to clarify the occurrences of high mercury levels and their detoxification process in seabirds. Total mercury levels in liver showed great variations in intra and interspecies, while organic mercury levels were less variable. As compared with species in relatively low mercury levels, the species which accumulated the high concentration of mercury like black-footed albatross exhibited the different distribution of mercury in the body: in total mercury burden, albatross species contained less than 10% in feather and over 50% in liver, while other species contained over 40% in feather and less than 20% in liver. The order of organic mercury concentrations in tissues were as follows: liver > kidney > muscle in seabirds examined, except oldsquaw. The mean percentage of organic mercury in total was 35%, 66%, and 36% in liver, muscle and kidney, respectively, for all the species. The significant negative correlations were found between organic mercury percentage to total mercury and total mercury concentrations in the liver and muscle of black-footed albatross and in the liver of laysan albatross. Furthermore, in liver, muscle, and kidney of all the species, the percentages of organic mercury had a negative trend with an increase of total mercury concentrations. The results suggest that albatross species may be capable for demethylating organic mercury in the tissues (mainly in liver), and for storing the mercury as immobilizable inorganic form in the liver as substitution for delivering organic mercury to other organs. It is noteworthy that the species with high degree of demethylation showed the lower mercury burdens in feather and slow moulting pattern.

  2. Americium recovery from reduction residues

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.; Proctor, S.G.

    1973-12-25

    A process for separation and recovery of americium values from container or bomb'' reduction residues comprising dissolving the residues in a suitable acid, adjusting the hydrogen ion concentration to a desired level by adding a base, precipitating the americium as americium oxalate by adding oxalic acid, digesting the solution, separating the precipitate, and thereafter calcining the americium oxalate precipitate to form americium oxide. (Official Gazette)

  3. Modular organization of residue-level contacts shape the selection pressure on individual amino acid sites of ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Saurav; Kundu, Sudip

    2017-02-22

    Understanding the molecular evolution of macromolecular complexes in the light of their structure, assembly and stability is of central importance. Here we address how the modular organization of native molecular contacts shapes the selection pressure on individual residue sites of ribosomal complexes. The bacterial ribosomal complex is represented as a residue contact network where nodes represent amino acid/nucleotide residues and edges represent their van der Waals interactions. We find statistically overrepresented native amino acid-nucleotide contacts (OaantC, one amino acid contacts one or multiple nucleotides, inter-nucleotide contacts are disregarded). Contact number is defined as the number of nucleotides contacted. Involvement of individual amino acids in OaantCs with smaller contact numbers is more random, while only a few amino acids significantly contribute to OaantCs with higher contact numbers. An investigation of structure, stability and assembly of bacterial ribosome depicts the involvement of these OaantCs in diverse biophysical interactions stabilizing the complex, including high-affinity protein-RNA contacts, inter-protein cooperativity, inter-subunit bridge, packing of multiple ribosomal RNA domains etc. Amino acid-nucleotide constituents of OaantCs with higher contact numbers are generally associated with significantly slower substitution rates compared to that of OaantCs with smaller contact numbers. This evolutionary rate heterogeneity emerges from the strong purifying selection pressure that conserves the respective amino acid physicochemical properties relevant to the stabilizing interaction with OaantC nucleotides. An analysis of relative molecular orientations of OaantC residues and their interaction energetics provides the biophysical ground of purifying selection conserving OaantC amino acid physicochemical properties.

  4. Micellular Electrokinetic Capillary Chromatography in the Undergraduate Curriculum: Separation and Identification of the Amino Acid Residues in an Unknown Dipeptide Using FMOC Derivatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strein, Timothy G.; Poechmann, James L.; Prudenti, Mark

    1999-06-01

    This manuscript describes our efforts to introduce biochemistry students to micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MEKC), a mode of capillary electrophoresis that employs micelles in the operating buffer. Unlike free solution capillary electrophoresis, MEKC is capable of resolving both charged and uncharged analytes because the micellar pseudo stationary phase allows for the separation of uncharged species. The experiment described herein includes a comparison of MEKC, employing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as the micelle-forming species, with reverse-phase HPLC. Both methods are used to determine the amino acid residues in an unknown dipeptide. Advanced undergraduate chemistry, biochemistry, and biology majors perform this experiment in the Biochemical Methods course at Bucknell University. The students cleave the peptide bond, derivatize the resultant amino acids with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (FMOC), and separate the FMOC-amino acid derivatives using HPLC and MEKC. This manuscript details the analytical procedures for the MEKC separation and presents typical student data obtained using this relatively new method.

  5. Heavily fractionated noble gases in an acid residue from the Klein Glacier 98300 EH3 chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Daisuke; Ott, Ulrich; El Goresy, Ahmed; Nakamura, Tomoki

    2010-09-01

    Noble gases were measured both in bulk samples (stepped pyrolysis and total extraction) and in a HF/HCl residue (stepped pyrolysis and combustion) from the Klein Glacier (KLE) 98300 EH3 chondrite. Like the bulk meteorite and as seen in previous studies of bulk type 3 E chondrites ("sub-Q"), the acid residue contains elementally fractionated primordial noble gases. As we show here, isotopically these are like those in phase-Q of primitive meteorites, but elementally they are heavily fractionated relative to these. The observed noble gases are different from "normal" Q noble gases also with respect to release patterns, which are similar to those of Ar-rich noble gases in anhydrous carbonaceous chondrites and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (with also similar isotopic compositions). While we cannot completely rule out a role for parent body processes such as thermal and shock metamorphism (including a later thermal event) in creating the fractionated elemental compositions, parent body processes in general seem not be able to account for the distinct release patterns from those of normal Q noble gases. The fractionated gases may have originated from ion implantation from a nebular plasma as has been suggested for other types of primordial noble gases, including Q, Ar-rich, and ureilite noble gases. With solar starting composition, the corresponding effective electron temperature is about 5000 K. This is lower than inferred for other primordial noble gases (10,000-6000 K). Thus, if ion implantation from a solar composition reservoir was a common process for the acquisition of primordial gas, electron temperatures in the early solar system must have varied spatially or temporally between 10,000 and 5000 K. Neon and xenon isotopic ratios of the residue suggest the presence of presolar silicon carbide and diamond in abundances lower than in the Qingzhen EH3 and Indarch EH4 chondrites. Parent body processes including thermal and shock metamorphism and a late thermal

  6. The N-Terminal Residues 43 to 60 Form the Interface for Dopamine Mediated α-Synuclein Dimerisation

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Su Ling; Hinds, Mark G.; Connor, Andrea R.; Smith, David P.; Illes-Toth, Eva; Pham, Chi L. L.; Barnham, Kevin J.; Cappai, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    α-synuclein (α-syn) is a major component of the intracellular inclusions called Lewy bodies, which are a key pathological feature in the brains of Parkinson’s disease patients. The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) inhibits the fibrillisation of α-syn into amyloid, and promotes α-syn aggregation into SDS-stable soluble oligomers. While this inhibition of amyloid formation requires the oxidation of both DA and the methionines in α-syn, the molecular basis for these processes is still unclear. This study sought to define the protein sequences required for the generation of oligomers. We tested N- (α-syn residues 43–140) and C-terminally (1–95) truncated α-syn, and found that similar to full-length protein both truncated species formed soluble DA:α-syn oligomers, albeit 1–95 had a different profile. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and the N-terminally truncated α-syn 43–140 protein, we analysed the structural characteristics of the DA:α-syn 43–140 dimer and α-syn 43–140 monomer and found the dimerisation interface encompassed residues 43 to 60. Narrowing the interface to this small region will help define the mechanism by which DA mediates the formation of SDS-stable soluble DA:α-syn oligomers. PMID:25679387

  7. Effect of ferrous sulfate and nitrohumic acid neutralization on the leaching of metals from a combined bauxite residue.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jie; Liu, Jidong; Chen, Juan; Liu, Xiaolian; Li, Fasheng; Du, Ping

    2017-02-23

    Bauxite residue neutralization is intended to open opportunities for revegetation and reuse of the residue. Ferrous sulfate (FS) and nitrohumic acid (NA) were two kinds of materials studied for pH reduction of the residue from 10.6 to 8.3 and 8.1, respectively. The effects of FS and NA on the leaching of metals from a combined bauxite residue were investigated by using sequential and multiple extraction procedures. Neutralization with FS and NA restricted the leaching of Al, V, and Pb from the residue but promoted the leaching of Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni, consistent with the changes in the potentially mobile fractions. With the exceptions of Pb and Ni, leaching of metals increased during a 10-day extraction period. However, the maximum leaching of Al, V, Pb, Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni from neutralized bauxite residue were 0.46 mg/L, 59.3, 12.9, 167, 95.3, 15.5, and 14.5 μg/L, respectively, which were under the corresponding limits in the National Standard (GB/T 14848-93). Although it is necessary to consider the continued leaching of metals during neutralization, both maximum and accumulation leaching concentrations of metals from a combined bauxite residue were too low to pose a potential environmental risk.

  8. Removal of acidic residues of the prodomain of PCSK9 increases its activity towards the LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Holla, Øystein L; Laerdahl, Jon K; Strøm, Thea Bismo; Tveten, Kristian; Cameron, Jamie; Berge, Knut Erik; Leren, Trond P

    2011-03-11

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) binds to the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) at the cell surface and mediates intracellular degradation of the LDLR. The amino-terminus of mature PCSK9, residues 31-53 of the prodomain, has an inhibitory effect on this function of PCSK9, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we have identified two highly conserved negatively charged segments (residues 32-40 and 48-50, respectively) within this part of the prodomain and performed deletions and substitutions to study their importance for degradation of the LDLRs. Deletion of the acidic residues of the longest negatively charged segment increased PCSK9's ability to degrade the LDLR by 31%, whereas a modest 8% increase was observed when these residues were mutated to uncharged amino acids. Thus, both the length and the charge of this part of the prodomain were important for its inhibitory effect. Deletion of the residues of the shorter second negatively charged segment only increased PCSK9's activity by 8%. Substitution of the amino acids of both charged segments to uncharged residues increased PCSK9's activity by 36%. These findings indicate that the inhibitory effect of residues 31-53 of the prodomain is due to the negative charge of this segment. The underlying mechanism could involve the binding of this peptide segment to positively charged structures which are important for PCSK9's activity. One possible candidate could be the histidine-rich C-terminal domain of PCSK9.

  9. Influence of different forms of acidities on soil microbiological properties and enzyme activities at an acid mine drainage contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Prafulla Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Pradip; Tripathy, Subhasish; Equeenuddin, Sk Md; Panigrahi, M K

    2010-07-15

    Assessment of microbial parameters, viz. microbial biomass, fluorescence diacetate, microbial respiration, acid phosphatase, beta-glucosidase and urease with respect to acidity helps in evaluating the quality of soils. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different forms of acidities on soil microbial parameters in an acid mine drainage contaminated site around coal deposits in Jainta Hills of India. Total potential and exchangeable acidity, extractable and exchangeable aluminium were significantly higher in contaminated soil compared to the baseline (p<0.01). Different forms of acidity were significantly and positively correlated with each other (p<0.05). Further, all microbial properties were positively and significantly correlated with organic carbon and clay (p<0.05). The ratios of microbial parameters with organic carbon were negatively correlated with different forms of acidity. Principal component analysis and cluster analyses showed that the microbial activities are not directly influenced by the total potential acidity and extractable aluminium. Though acid mine drainage affected soils had higher microbial biomass and activities due to higher organic matter content than those of the baseline soils, the ratios of microbial parameters/organic carbon indicated suppression of microbial growth and activities due to acidity stress.

  10. Conserved Amino Acid Residues of the NuoD Segment Important for Structure and Function of Escherichia coli NDH-1 (Complex I)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The NuoD segment (homologue of mitochondrial 49 kDa subunit) of the proton-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I/NDH-1) from Escherichia coli is in the hydrophilic domain and bears many highly conserved amino acid residues. The three-dimensional structural model of NDH-1 suggests that the NuoD segment, together with the neighboring subunits, constitutes a putative quinone binding cavity. We used the homologous DNA recombination technique to clarify the role of selected key amino acid residues of the NuoD segment. Among them, residues Tyr273 and His224 were considered candidates for having important interactions with the quinone headgroup. Mutant Y273F retained partial activity but lost sensitivity to capsaicin-40. Mutant H224R scarcely affected the activity, suggesting that this residue may not be essential. His224 is located in a loop near the N-terminus of the NuoD segment (Gly217–Phe227) which is considered to form part of the quinone binding cavity. In contrast to the His224 mutation, mutants G217V, P218A, and G225V almost completely lost the activity. One region of this loop is positioned close to a cytosolic loop of the NuoA subunit in the membrane domain, and together they seem to be important in keeping the quinone binding cavity intact. The structural role of the longest helix in the NuoD segment located behind the quinone binding cavity was also investigated. Possible roles of other highly conserved residues of the NuoD segment are discussed. PMID:25545070

  11. SucStruct: Prediction of succinylated lysine residues by using structural properties of amino acids.

    PubMed

    López, Yosvany; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Lal, Sunil Pranit; Taherzadeh, Ghazaleh; Michaelson, Jacob; Sattar, Abdul; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Sharma, Alok

    2017-03-28

    Post-Translational Modification (PTM) is a biological reaction which contributes to diversify the proteome. Despite many modifications with important roles in the cellular activity, lysine succinylation has recently emerged as an important PTM mark. It alters the chemical structure of lysines, leading to remarkable changes in the structure and function of proteins. Given the huge amount of proteins being sequenced in the post-genome era, the experimental detection of succinylated residues remains expensive, inefficient and time-consuming. Therefore, the development of computational tools for accurately predicting succinylated lysines is an urgent necessity. To date, several approaches have been proposed but their sensitivity has been reportedly poor. In this paper, we propose an approach that utilizes structural features of amino acids to improve lysine succinylation prediction. Succinylated and non-succinylated lysines were first retrieved from 670 proteins and characteristics such as accessible surface area, backbone torsion angles, and local structure conformations were incorporated. We used the k-nearest neighbors cleaning for dealing with class imbalance and designed a pruned decision tree for classification. Our predictor, referred as SucStruct (Succinylation using Structural features), proved to significantly improve performance when compared to previous predictors, with sensitivity, accuracy and Mathew's correlation coefficient equal to 0.7334-0.7946, 0.7444-0.7608 and 0.4884-0.5240, respectively.

  12. Peptide bond formation does not involve acid-base catalysis by ribosomal residues.

    PubMed

    Bieling, Peter; Beringer, Malte; Adio, Sarah; Rodnina, Marina V

    2006-05-01

    Ribosomes catalyze the formation of peptide bonds between aminoacyl esters of transfer RNAs within a catalytic center composed of ribosomal RNA only. Here we show that the reaction of P-site formylmethionine (fMet)-tRNA(fMet) with a modified A-site tRNA substrate, Phelac-tRNA(Phe), in which the nucleophilic amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl group, does not show the pH dependence observed with small substrate analogs such as puromycin and hydroxypuromycin. This indicates that acid-base catalysis by ribosomal residues is not important in the reaction with the full-size substrate. Rather, the ribosome catalyzes peptide bond formation by positioning the tRNAs, or their 3' termini, through interactions with rRNA that induce and/or stabilize a pH-insensitive conformation of the active site and provide a preorganized environment facilitating the reaction. The rate of peptide bond formation with unmodified Phe-tRNA(Phe) is estimated to be >300 s(-1).

  13. Biosorption of heavy metal ions onto agricultural residues buckwheat hulls functionalized with 1-hydroxylethylidenediphosphonic acid.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ping; Wang, Zengdi; Qu, Rongjun; Liu, Xiguang; Zhang, Jiang; Xu, Qiang

    2012-11-28

    Novel biosorbent materials obtained from agricultural residues buckwheat hulls (BH) were successfully developed through functionalization with 1-hydroxylethylidenediphosphonic acid (HEDP), and they were characterized. This paper reports the feasibility of using HEDP-BH for removal of heavy metals from stimulated wastewater, the experimental results revealed that the adsorption property of functionalized buckwheat hulls with 120 mesh 120-HEDP-BH for Au(III) was very excellent, and the monolayer maximum adsorption capacity for Au(III) calculated from the Langmuir isotherm models was up to 450.45 mg/g at 35 °C. The combined effect of initial solution pH, 120-HEDP-BH dosage, and initial Au(III) concentration was investigated using response surface methodology (RSM), and the result showed that biomass dosage exerted a stronger influence on Au(III) uptake than those of initial pH and initial Au(III) concentration. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the quadratic model demonstrated that the model was highly significant. Moreover, investigation on the adsorption selectivity showed that 120-HEDP-BH displayed strong affinity for gold in aqueous solutions and even exhibited 100% selectivity for Au(III) ions in the presence of Zn(II) and Co(II). Regeneration capacities of 120-HEDP-BH were studied using the eluent solutions of 0.0-5.0% thiourea in 0.1 mmol/L HCl, and it was found that the adsorption capability remains high after several cycles of adsorption-desorption process.

  14. Aspartic Acid Residue D3 Critically Determines Cx50 Gap Junction Channel Transjunctional Voltage-Dependent Gating and Unitary Conductance

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Li; Nakagawa, So; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Bai, Donglin

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the aspartic acid residue (D) at the third position is critical in determining the voltage polarity of fast Vj-gating of Cx50 channels. To test whether another negatively charged residue (a glutamic acid residue, E) could fulfill the role of the D3 residue, we generated the mutant Cx50D3E. Vj-dependent gating properties of this mutant channel were characterized by double-patch-clamp recordings in N2A cells. Macroscopically, the D3E substitution reduced the residual conductance (Gmin) to near zero and outwardly shifted the half-inactivation voltage (V0), which is a result of both a reduced aggregate gating charge (z) and a reduced free-energy difference between the open and closed states. Single Cx50D3E gap junction channels showed reduced unitary conductance (γj) of the main open state, reduced open dwell time at ±40 mV, and absence of a long-lived substate. In contrast, a G8E substitution tested to compare the effects of the E residue at the third and eighth positions did not modify the Vj-dependent gating profile or γj. In summary, this study is the first that we know of to suggest that the D3 residue plays an essential role, in addition to serving as a negative-charge provider, as a critical determinant of the Vj-dependent gating sensitivity, open-closed stability, and unitary conductance of Cx50 gap junction channels. PMID:22404924

  15. Isomerization of HNO to HON in the singlet state assisted by amino acid residues and/or water molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junyou; Li, Ping; Bu, Yuxiang; Wang, Weihua; Mou, Zhaoxia; Song, Rui

    The effects of amino acid residues in the presence or absence of water molecules on the isomerization of the singlet state of HNO/HON have been systematically investigated at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory. The structural characteristics, proton transfer (PT) mechanisms, and the corresponding thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, have been discussed, respectively. All the optimized complexes have been characterized by the ring structures through the intermolecular H-bonds. The origin of the increase in N bond H stretching frequency (blue shifts) occurring in the reactants has also been investigated using the natural bonding orbital (NBO) analyses, which is mainly attributed to the decrease of the electron densities in the antibonding orbital of the N bond H bonds as well as the increase of the polarization of the N bond H bond. All the PTs proceed with the concerted mechanisms since no ionic intermediates have been located during PT processes. At the same time, the cooperative effects of amino acid residues and water molecules on the selected PT processes have been observed, where the PTs assisted solely by the selected residues cannot occur without the participation of the water molecule. Overall, the introductions of one or two water molecules are more favorable for the isomerization of HNO assisted by the amino acid residues.

  16. Acidic Residues Control the Dimerization of the N-terminal Domain of Black Widow Spiders’ Major Ampullate Spidroin 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Joschka; Schaal, Daniel; Eisoldt, Lukas; Schweimer, Kristian; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Scheibel, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Dragline silk is the most prominent amongst spider silks and comprises two types of major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) differing in their proline content. In the natural spinning process, the conversion of soluble MaSp into a tough fiber is, amongst other factors, triggered by dimerization and conformational switching of their helical amino-terminal domains (NRN). Both processes are induced by protonation of acidic residues upon acidification along the spinning duct. Here, the structure and monomer-dimer-equilibrium of the domain NRN1 of Latrodectus hesperus MaSp1 and variants thereof have been investigated, and the key residues for both could be identified. Changes in ionic composition and strength within the spinning duct enable electrostatic interactions between the acidic and basic pole of two monomers which prearrange into an antiparallel dimer. Upon naturally occurring acidification this dimer is stabilized by protonation of residue E114. A conformational change is independently triggered by protonation of clustered acidic residues (D39, E76, E81). Such step-by-step mechanism allows a controlled spidroin assembly in a pH- and salt sensitive manner, preventing premature aggregation of spider silk proteins in the gland and at the same time ensuring fast and efficient dimer formation and stabilization on demand in the spinning duct.

  17. Acidic Residues Control the Dimerization of the N-terminal Domain of Black Widow Spiders’ Major Ampullate Spidroin 1

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Joschka; Schaal, Daniel; Eisoldt, Lukas; Schweimer, Kristian; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Scheibel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dragline silk is the most prominent amongst spider silks and comprises two types of major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) differing in their proline content. In the natural spinning process, the conversion of soluble MaSp into a tough fiber is, amongst other factors, triggered by dimerization and conformational switching of their helical amino-terminal domains (NRN). Both processes are induced by protonation of acidic residues upon acidification along the spinning duct. Here, the structure and monomer-dimer-equilibrium of the domain NRN1 of Latrodectus hesperus MaSp1 and variants thereof have been investigated, and the key residues for both could be identified. Changes in ionic composition and strength within the spinning duct enable electrostatic interactions between the acidic and basic pole of two monomers which prearrange into an antiparallel dimer. Upon naturally occurring acidification this dimer is stabilized by protonation of residue E114. A conformational change is independently triggered by protonation of clustered acidic residues (D39, E76, E81). Such step-by-step mechanism allows a controlled spidroin assembly in a pH- and salt sensitive manner, preventing premature aggregation of spider silk proteins in the gland and at the same time ensuring fast and efficient dimer formation and stabilization on demand in the spinning duct. PMID:27681031

  18. Preparation of a novel carbon-based solid acid from cassava stillage residue and its use for the esterification of free fatty acids in waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingtao; Dong, Xiuqin; Jiang, Haoxi; Li, Guiming; Zhang, Minhua

    2014-04-01

    A novel carbon-based solid acid catalyst was prepared by the sulfonation of incompletely carbonized cassava stillage residue (CSR) with concentrated sulfuric acid, and employed to catalyze the esterification of methanol and free fatty acids (FFAs) in waste cooking oil (WCO). The effects of the carbonization and the sulfonation temperatures on the pore structure, acid density and catalytic activity of the CSR-derived catalysts were systematically investigated. Low temperature carbonization and high temperature sulfonation can cause the collapse of the carbon framework, while high temperature carbonization is not conducive to the attachment of SO3H groups on the surface. The catalyst showed high catalytic activity for esterification, and the acid value for WCO is reduced to below 2mg KOH/g after reaction. The activity of catalyst can be well maintained after five cycles. CSR can be considered a promising raw material for the production of a new eco-friendly solid acid catalyst.

  19. Solution conformations of the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid domain of bovine prothrombin fragment 1, residues 1-65.

    PubMed

    Charifson, P S; Darden, T; Tulinsky, A; Hughey, J L; Hiskey, R G; Pedersen, L G

    1991-01-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed (AMBER version 3.1) on solvated residues 1-65 of bovine prothrombin fragment 1 (BF1) by using the 2.8-A resolution crystallographic coordinates as the starting conformation for understanding calcium ion-induced conformational changes that precede experimentally observable phospholipid binding. Simulations were performed on the non-metal-bound crystal structure, the form resulting from addition of eight calcium ions to the 1-65 region of the crystal structure, the form resulting from removal of calcium ions after 107 ps and continuing the simulation, and an isolated hexapeptide loop (residues 18-23). In all cases, the 100-ps time scale seemed adequate to sample an ensemble of solution conformers within a particular region of conformation space. The non-metal-containing BF1 did not unfold appreciably during a 106-ps simulation starting from the crystallographic geometry. The calcium ion-containing structure (Ca-BF1) underwent an interesting conformational reorganization during its evolution from the crystal structure: during the time course of a 107-ps simulation, Ca-BF1 experienced a trans----cis isomerization of the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-21 (Gla-21)-Pro-22 peptide bond. Removal of the calcium ions from this structure followed by 114 ps of additional molecular dynamics showed significant unfolding relative to the final 20-ps average structure of the 107-ps simulation; however, the Gla-21-Pro-22 peptide bond remained cis. A 265-ps simulation on the termini-protected hexapeptide loop (Cys-18 to Cys-23) containing two calcium ions also did not undergo a trans----cis isomerization. It is believed that the necessary activation energy for the transitional event observed in the Ca-BF1 simulation was largely supplied by global conformational events with a possible assist from relief of intermolecular crystal packing forces. The presence of a Gla preceding Pro-22, the inclusion of Pro-22 in a highly strained loop

  20. The highly conserved aspartic acid residue between hypervariable regions 1 and 2 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 is important for early stages of virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W K; Essex, M; Lee, T H

    1995-01-01

    Between hypervariable regions V1 and V2 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 lies a cluster of relatively conserved residues. The contribution of nine charged residues in this region to virus infectivity was evaluated by single-amino-acid substitutions in an infectious provirus clone. Three of the HIV-1 mutants studied had slower growth kinetics than the wild-type virus. The delay was most pronounced in a mutant with an alanine substituted for an aspartic acid residue at position 180. This aspartic acid is conserved by all HIV-1 isolates with known nucleotide sequences. Substitutions with three other residues at this position, including a negatively charged glutamic acid, all affected virus infectivity. The defect identified in these mutants suggests that this aspartic acid residue is involved in the early stages of HIV-1 replication. PMID:7983752

  1. Effect of adding amino acids residues in N- and C-terminus of Vip3Aa16 (L121I) toxin.

    PubMed

    Sellami, Sameh; Cherif, Marwa; Jamoussi, Kaïs

    2016-06-01

    To study the importance of N- and C-terminus of Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa16 (L121I) toxin (88 kDa), a number of mutants were generated. The addition of two (2R: RS) or eleven (11R: RSRPGHHHHHH) amino acid residues at the Vip3Aa16 (L121I) C-terminus allowed to an unappropriated folding illustrated by the abundant presence of the 62 kDa proteolytic form. The produced Vip3Aa16 (L121I) full length form was less detected when increasing the number of amino acids residues in the C-terminus. Bioassays demonstrated that the growth of the lepidopteran Ephestia kuehniella was slightly affected by Vip3Aa16 (L121I)-2R and not affected by Vip3Aa16 (L121I)-11R. Additionally, the fusion at the Vip3Aa16 (L121I) N-terminus of 39 amino acids harboring the E. coli OmpA leader peptide and the His-tag sequence allowed to the increase of protease sensitivity of Vip3Aa16 (L121I) full length form, as only the 62 kDa proteolysis form was detected. Remarkably, this fused protein produced in Escherichia coli (E. coli) was biologically inactive toward Ephestia kuehniella larvae. Thus, the N-terminus of the protein is required to the accomplishment of the insecticidal activity of Vip3 proteins. This report serves as guideline for the study of Vip3Aa16 (L121I) protein stability and activity.

  2. A Mutational Analysis of the Active Site Loop Residues in cis-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Gottfried K.; Huddleston, Jamison P.; Johnson, William H.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    cis -3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-CaaD) from Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170 and a homologue from Corynebacterium glutamicum designated Cg10062 share 34% sequence identity (54% similarity). The former catalyzes a key step in a bacterial catabolic pathway for the nematocide 1,3-dichloropropene, whereas the latter has no known biological activity. Although Cg10062 has the six active site residues (Pro-1, His-28, Arg-70, Arg-73, Tyr-103, Glu-114) that are critical for cis-CaaD activity, it shows only a low level cis-CaaD activity and lacks the specificity of cis-CaaD: Cg10062 processes both isomers of 3-chloroacrylate with a preference for the cis-isomer. Although the basis for these differences is unknown, a comparison of the crystal structures of the enzymes covalently modified by an adduct resulting from their incubation with the same inhibitor offers a possible explanation. A 6-residue active site loop in cis-CaaD shows a strikingly different conformation from that observed in Cg10062: the loop closes down on the active site of cis-CaaD, but not on that of Cg10062. In order to examine what this loop might contribute to cis-CaaD catalysis and specificity, the residues were changed individually to those found in Cg10062. Subsequent kinetic and mechanistic analysis suggests that the T34A mutant of cis-CaaD is more Cg10062-like. The mutant enzyme shows a 4-fold increase in Km (using cis-3-bromoacrylate), but not to the degree observed for Cg10062 (687-fold). The mutation also causes a 4-fold decrease in the burst rate (compared to the wild type cis-CaaD), whereas Cg10062 shows no burst rate. More telling is the reaction of the T34A mutant of cis-CaaD with the alternate substrate, 2,3-butadienoate. In the presence of NaBH4 and the allene, cis-CaaD is completely inactivated after one turnover due to the covalent modification of Pro-1. The same experiment with Cg10062 does not result in the covalent modification of Pro-1. The different outcomes are attributed to

  3. Identification of amino acid residues that determine the substrate specificity of mammalian membrane-bound front-end fatty acid desaturases[S

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kenshi; Ohno, Makoto; Taguchi, Masahiro; Kawamoto, Seiji; Ono, Kazuhisa; Aki, Tsunehiro

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-bound desaturases are physiologically and industrially important enzymes that are involved in the production of diverse fatty acids such as polyunsaturated fatty acids and their derivatives. Here, we identified amino acid residues that determine the substrate specificity of rat Δ6 desaturase (D6d) acting on linoleoyl-CoA by comparing its amino acid sequence with that of Δ5 desaturase (D5d), which converts dihomo-γ-linolenoyl-CoA. The N-terminal cytochrome b5-like domain was excluded as a determinant by domain swapping analysis. Substitution of eight amino acid residues (Ser209, Asn211, Arg216, Ser235, Leu236, Trp244, Gln245, and Val344) of D6d with the corresponding residues of D5d by site-directed mutagenesis switched the substrate specificity from linoleoyl-CoA to dihomo-γ-linolenoyl-CoA. In addition, replacement of Leu323 of D6d with Phe323 on the basis of the amino acid sequence of zebra fish Δ5/6 bifunctional desaturase was found to render D6d bifunctional. Homology modeling of D6d using recent crystal structure data of human stearoyl-CoA (Δ9) desaturase revealed that Arg216, Trp244, Gln245, and Leu323 are located near the substrate-binding pocket. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the structural basis of the substrate specificity of a mammalian front-end fatty acid desaturase, which will aid in efficient production of value-added fatty acids. PMID:26590171

  4. T Cell Determinants Incorporating [beta]-Amino Acid Residues Are Protease Resistant and Remain Immunogenic In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Andrew I.; Dunstone, Michelle A.; Williamson, Nicholas A.; Price, Jason D.; Kauwe, Andreade; Chen, Weisan; Oakley, Aaron; Perlmutter, Patrick; McCluskey, James; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Rossjohn, Jamie; Purcell, Anthony W.

    2010-07-20

    A major hurdle in designing successful epitope-based vaccines resides in the delivery, stability, and immunogenicity of the peptide immunogen. The short-lived nature of unmodified peptide-based vaccines in vivo limits their therapeutic application in the immunotherapy of cancers and chronic viral infections as well as their use in generating prophylactic immunity. The incorporation of {beta}-amino acids into peptides decreases proteolysis, yet its potential application in the rational design of T cell mimotopes is poorly understood. To address this, we have replaced each residue of the SIINFEKL epitope individually with the corresponding {beta}-amino acid and examined the resultant efficacy of these mimotopes. Some analogs displayed similar MHC binding and superior protease stability compared with the native epitope. Importantly, these analogs were able to generate cross-reactive CTLs in vivo that were capable of lysing tumor cells that expressed the unmodified epitope as a surrogate tumor Ag. Structural analysis of peptides in which anchor residues were substituted with {beta}-amino acids revealed the basis for enhanced MHC binding and retention of immunogenicity observed for these analogs and paves the way for future vaccine design using {beta}-amino acids. We conclude that the rational incorporation of {beta}-amino acids into T cell determinants is a powerful alternative to the traditional homologous substitution of randomly chosen naturally occurring {alpha}-amino acids, and these mimotopes may prove particularly useful for inclusion in epitope-based vaccines.

  5. Solid-State Forms of β-Resorcylic Acid: How Exhaustive Should a Polymorph Screen Be?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational study was undertaken to establish the solid-state forms of β-resorcylic acid (2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid). The experimental search resulted in nine crystalline forms: two concomitantly crystallizing polymorphs, five novel solvates (with acetic acid, dimethyl sulfoxide, 1,4-dioxane, and two with N,N-dimethyl formamide), in addition to the known hemihydrate and a new monohydrate. Form II°, the thermodynamically stable polymorph at room temperature, was found to be the dominant crystallization product. A new, enantiotropically related polymorph (form I) was obtained by desolvation of certain solvates, sublimation experiments, and via a thermally induced solid−solid transformation of form II° above 150 °C. To establish their structural features, interconversions, and relative stability, all solid-state forms were characterized with thermal, spectroscopic, X-ray crystallographic methods, and moisture-sorption analysis. The hemihydrate is very stable, while the five solvates and the monohydrate are rather unstable phases that occur as crystallization intermediates. Complementary computational work confirmed that the two experimentally observed β-resorcylic acid forms I and II° are the most probable polymorphs and supported the experimental evidence for form I being disordered in the p-OH proton position. These consistent outcomes suggest that the most practically important features of β-resorcylic acid crystallization under ambient conditions have been established; however, it appears impractical to guarantee that no additional metastable solid-state form could be found. PMID:21218174

  6. Mutation in aspartic acid residues modifies catalytic and haemolytic activities of Bacillus cereus sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, H; Tameishi, K; Yamada, A; Tomita, M; Matsuo, Y; Nishikawa, K; Ikezawa, H

    1995-01-01

    Four aspartic acid residues (Asp126, Asp156, Asp233 and Asp295) of Bacillus cereus sphingomyelinase (SMase) in the conservative regions were changed to glycine by in vitro mutagenesis, and the mutant SMases [D126G (Asp126-->Gly etc.), D156G, D233G and D295G] were produced in Bacillus brevis 47, a protein-producing strain. The sphingomyelin (SM)-hydrolysing activity of D295G was completely abolished and those of D126G and D156G were reduced by more than 80%, whereas that of D233G was not so profoundly affected. Two mutant enzymes (D126G and D156G) were purified and characterized further. The hydrolytic activities of D126G and D156G toward four phosphocholine-containing substrates with different hydrophobicities, SM, 2-hexadecanoylamino-4-nitrophenylphosphocholine(HNP), lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) and p-nitro-phenylphosphocholine (p-NPPC), were compared with those of the wild-type. The activity of D126G toward water-soluble p-NPPC was comparable with that of the wild-type. On the other hand, D156G catalysed the hydrolysis of hydrophilic substrates such as HNP and p-NPPC more efficiently (> 4-fold) than the wild-type. These results suggested that Asp126 and Asp156, located in the highly conserved region, may well be involved in a substrate recognition process rather than catalytic action. Haemolytic activities of the mutant enzymes were found to be parallel with their SM-hydrolysing activities. Two regions, including the C-terminal region containing Asp295, were found to show considerable sequence identity with the corresponding regions of bovine pancreatic DNase I. Structural predictions indicated structural similarity between SMase and DNase I. An evolutionary relationship based on the catalytic function was suggested between the structures of these two phosphodiesterases. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7639690

  7. Reuse of acid coagulant-recovered drinking waterworks sludge residual to remove phosphorus from wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lan; Wei, Jie; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Jianli; Wang, Dongtian

    2014-06-01

    Acid coagulant-recovered drinking waterworks sludge residual (DWSR) is a waste product from drinking waterworks sludge (DWS) treatment with acid for coagulant recovery. In this study, we evaluated DWSR as a potential phosphorus (P) removing material in wastewater treatment by conducting a series of batch and semi-continuous tests. Batch tests were carried out to study the effects of pH, initial concentration, and sludge dose on P removal. Batch test results showed that the P removal efficiency of DWSR was highly dependent on pH. Calcinated DWSR (C-DWSR) performed better in P removal than DWSR due to its higher pH. At an optimum initial pH value of 5-6 and a sludge dose of 10 g/L, the P removal rates of DWSR and DWS decreased from 99% and 93% to 84% and 14%, respectively, and the specific P uptake of DWSR and DWS increased from 0.19 and 0.19 mg P/g to 33.60 and 5.72 mg P/g, respectively, when the initial concentration was increased from 2 to 400 mg/L. The effective minimum sludge doses of DWSR and DWS were 0.5 g/L and 10 g/L, respectively, when the P removal rates of 90% were obtained at an initial concentration of 10 mg/L. Results from semi-continuous test indicated that P removal rates over 99% were quickly achieved for both synthetic and actual wastewater (lake water and domestic sewage). These rates could be maintained over a certain time under a certain operational conditions including sludge dose, feed flow, and initial concentration. The physicochemical properties analysis results showed that the contents of aluminum (Al) and iron (Fe) in DWSR were reduced by 50% and 70%, respectively, compared with DWS. The insoluble Al and Fe hydroxide in DWS converted into soluble Al and Fe in DWSR. Metal leaching test results revealed that little soluble Al and Fe remained in effluent when DWSR was used for P removal. We deduced that chemical precipitation might be the major action for P removal by DWSR and that adsorption played only a marginal role.

  8. Localization of key amino acid residues in the dominant conformational epitopes on thyroid peroxidase recognized by mouse monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Godlewska, Marlena; Czarnocka, Barbara; Gora, Monika

    2012-09-01

    Autoantibodies to thyroid peroxidase (TPO), the major target autoantigen in autoimmune thyroid diseases, recognize conformational epitopes limited to two immunodominant regions (IDRs) termed IDR-A and -B. The apparent restricted heterogeneity of TPO autoantibodies was discovered using TPO-specific mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and later confirmed by human recombinant Fabs. In earlier studies we identified key amino acids crucial for the interaction of human autoantibodies with TPO. Here we show the critical residues that participate in binding of five mAbs to the conformational epitopes on the TPO surface. Using ELISA we tested the reactivity of single and multiple TPO mutants expressed in CHO cells with a panel of mAbs specifically recognizing IDR-A (mAb 2 and 9) and IDR-B (mAb 15, 18, 64). We show that antibodies recognizing very similar regions on the TPO surface may interact with different sets of residues. We found that residues K713 and E716 contribute to the interaction between mAb 2 and TPO. The epitope for mAb 9 is critically dependent on residues R646 and E716. Moreover, we demonstrate that amino acids E604 and D630 are part of the functional epitope for mAb 15, and amino acids D624 and K627 for mAb 18. Finally, residues E604, D620, D624, K627, and D630 constitute the epitope for mAb 64. This is the first detailed study identifying the key resides for binding of mAbs 2, 9, 15, 18, and 64. Better understanding of those antibodies' specificity will be helpful in elucidating the properties of TPO as an antigen in autoimmune disorders.

  9. Dynamics of linker residues modulate the nucleic acid binding properties of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein zinc fingers.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, Loussiné; Tisné, Carine; Barraud, Pierre; Xu, Xiaoqian; Morellet, Nelly; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) is a small basic protein containing two zinc fingers (ZF) separated by a short linker. It is involved in several steps of the replication cycle and acts as a nucleic acid chaperone protein in facilitating nucleic acid strand transfers occurring during reverse transcription. Recent analysis of three-dimensional structures of NC-nucleic acids complexes established a new property: the unpaired guanines targeted by NC are more often inserted in the C-terminal zinc finger (ZF2) than in the N-terminal zinc finger (ZF1). Although previous NMR dynamic studies were performed with NC, the dynamic behavior of the linker residues connecting the two ZF domains remains unclear. This prompted us to investigate the dynamic behavior of the linker residues. Here, we collected 15N NMR relaxation data and used for the first time data at several fields to probe the protein dynamics. The analysis at two fields allows us to detect a slow motion occurring between the two domains around a hinge located in the linker at the G35 position. However, the amplitude of motion appears limited in our conditions. In addition, we showed that the neighboring linker residues R29, A30, P31, R32, K33 displayed restricted motion and numerous contacts with residues of ZF1. Our results are fully consistent with a model in which the ZF1-linker contacts prevent the ZF1 domain to interact with unpaired guanines, whereas the ZF2 domain is more accessible and competent to interact with unpaired guanines. In contrast, ZF1 with its large hydrophobic plateau is able to destabilize the double-stranded regions adjacent to the guanines bound by ZF2. The linker residues and the internal dynamics of NC regulate therefore the different functions of the two zinc fingers that are required for an optimal chaperone activity.

  10. Probing catalysis by Escherichia coli dTDP-glucose-4,6-dehydratase: identification and preliminary characterization of functional amino acid residues at the active site.

    PubMed

    Hegeman, A D; Gross, J W; Frey, P A

    2001-06-05

    A model of the Escherichia coli dTDP-glucose-4,6-dehydratase (4,6-dehydratase) active site has been generated by combining amino acid sequence alignment information with the 3-dimensional structure of UDP-galactose-4-epimerase. The active site configuration is consistent with the partially refined 3-dimensional structure of 4,6-dehydratase, which lacks substrate-nucleotide but contains NAD(+) (PDB file ). From the model, two groups of active site residues were identified. The first group consists of Asp135(DEH), Glu136(DEH), Glu198(DEH), Lys199(DEH), and Tyr301(DEH). These residues are near the substrate-pyranose binding pocket in the model, they are completely conserved in 4,6-dehydratase, and they differ from the corresponding equally well-conserved residues in 4-epimerase. The second group of residues is Cys187(DEH), Asn190(DEH), and His232(DEH), which form a motif on the re face of the cofactor nicotinamide binding pocket that resembles the catalytic triad of cysteine-proteases. The importance of both groups of residues was tested by mutagenesis and steady-state kinetic analysis. In all but one case, a decrease in catalytic efficiency of approximately 2 orders of magnitude below wild-type activity was observed. Mutagenesis of each of these residues, with the exception of Cys187(DEH), which showed near-wild-type activity, clearly has important negative consequences for catalysis. The allocation of specific functions to these residues and the absolute magnitude of these effects are obscured by the complex chemistry in this multistep mechanism. Tools will be needed to characterize each chemical step individually in order to assign loss of catalytic efficiency to specific residue functions. To this end, the effects of each of these variants on the initial dehydrogenation step were evaluated using a the substrate analogue dTDP-xylose. Additional steady-state techniques were employed in an attempt to further limit the assignment of rate limitation. The results are

  11. Control of the Biofilms Formed by Curli- and Cellulose-Expressing Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Using Treatments with Organic Acids and Commercial Sanitizers.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoen Ju; Chen, Jinru

    2015-05-01

    Biofilms are a mixture of bacteria and extracellular products secreted by bacterial cells and are of great concern to the food industry because they offer physical, mechanical, and biological protection to bacterial cells. This study was conducted to quantify biofilms formed by different Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains on polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces and to determine the effectiveness of sanitizing treatments in control of these biofilms. STEC producing various amounts of cellulose (n = 6) or curli (n = 6) were allowed to develop biofilms on polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces at 28°C for 7 days. The biofilms were treated with 2% acetic or lactic acid and manufacturer-recommended concentrations of acidic or alkaline sanitizers, and residual biofilms were quantified. Treatments with the acidic and alkaline sanitizers were more effective than those with the organic acids for removing the biofilms. Compared with their counterparts, cells expressing a greater amount of cellulose or curli formed more biofilm mass and had greater residual mass after sanitizing treatments on polystyrene than on stainless steel. Research suggests that the organic acids and sanitizers used in the present study differed in their ability to control biofilms. Bacterial surface components and cell contact surfaces can influence both biofilm formation and the efficacy of sanitizing treatments. These results provide additional information on control of biofilms formed by STEC.

  12. Single-chain site-specific mutations of fluorescein-amino acid contact residues in high affinity monoclonal antibody 4-4-20.

    PubMed

    Denzin, L K; Whitlow, M; Voss, E W

    1991-07-25

    Previous crystallographic studies of high affinity anti-fluorescein monoclonal antibody 4-4-20 (Ka = 1.7 x 10(10) M-1) complexed with fluorescyl ligand resolved active site contact residues involved in binding. For better definition of the relative roles of three light chain antigen contact residues (L27dhis, L32tyr and L34arg), four site-specific mutations (L27dhis to L27lys, L32tyr to L32phe, and L34arg to L34lys and L34his) were generated and expressed in single-chain antigen binding derivatives of monoclonal antibody 4-4-20 containing two different polypeptide linkers (SCA 4-4-20/205c, 25 amino acids and SCA 4-4-20/212, 14 amino acids). Results showed that L27dhis and L32tyr were necessary for wild type binding affinities, however, were not required for near-wild type Qmax values (where Qmax is the maximum fluoroscein fluorescence quenching expressed as percent). Tyrosine L32 which hydrogen bonds with ligand was also characterized at the haptenic level through the use of 9-hydroxyphenylfluoron which lacks the carboxyl group to which L32 tyrosine forms a hydrogen bond. Results demonstrated that wild type SCA and mutant L32phe possessed similar HPF binding characteristics. Active site contact residue L34arg was important for fluorescein quenching maxima and binding affinity (L34his mutant), however, substitution of lysine for arginine at L34 did not have a significant effect on observed Qmax value. In addition, substitutions had no effect on structural and topological characteristics, since all mutants retained similar idiotypic and metatypic properties. Finally, two linkers were comparatively examined to determine relative contributions to mutant binding properties and stability. No linker effects were observed. Collectively, these results verified the importance of these light chain fluorescein contact residues in the binding pocket of monoclonal antibody 4-4-20.

  13. Saturated fatty acids and fatty acid esters promote the polymorphic transition of clarithromycin metastable form I crystal.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Miteki; Mizoguchi, Midori; Aoki, Hajime; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2016-10-15

    The phase transition of active pharmaceutical ingredients should be taken into account during manufacturing, processing- and storage, because different crystal forms lead to different physical properties of formulations. The phase transition of clarithromycin (CAM) metastable form I to stable form II was investigated on heating with additives such as fatty acids or fatty acid esters. Differential scanning calorimetry analyses revealed that when form I was heated with additives, the phase transition temperature of form I decreased close to the melting points of the additives. Powder X-ray diffraction analyses indicated the tentative presence of a non-crystalline component during the transition of form I to form II on heating with additives. These observations implied that CAM form I dissolved in the melted additives on heating and the dissolved CAM crystallized to form II. Reduction of transition temperatures in the presence of additives were also observed for the crystals of nifedipine form B and carbamazepine form III. These results suggested that the phenomena can be widely applicable for simultaneous crystalline phase transition and granulation using binder additives.

  14. Treatment of air pollution control residues with iron rich waste sulfuric acid: does it work for antimony (Sb)?

    PubMed

    Okkenhaug, Gudny; Breedveld, Gijs D; Kirkeng, Terje; Lægreid, Marit; Mæhlum, Trond; Mulder, Jan

    2013-03-15

    Antimony (Sb) in air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration has gained increased focus due to strict Sb leaching limits set by the EU landfill directive. Here we study the chemical speciation and solubility of Sb at the APC treatment facility NOAH Langøya (Norway), where iron (Fe)-rich sulfuric acid (∼3.6M, 2.3% Fe(II)), a waste product from the industrial extraction of ilmenite, is used for neutralization. Antimony in water extracts of untreated APC residues occurred exclusively as pentavalent antimonate, even at low pH and Eh values. The Sb solubility increased substantially at pH<10, possibly due to the dissolution of ettringite (at alkaline pH) or calcium (Ca)-antimonate. Treated APC residues, stored anoxically in the laboratory, simulating the conditions at the NOAH Langøya landfill, gave rise to decreasing concentrations of Sb in porewater, occurring exclusively as Sb(V). Concentrations of Sb decreased from 87-918μgL(-1) (day 3) to 18-69μgL(-1) (day 600). We hypothesize that an initial sorption of Sb to Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rust) and eventually precipitation of Ca- and Fe-antimonates (tripuhyite; FeSbO4) occurred. We conclude that Fe-rich, sulfuric acid waste is efficient to immobilize Sb in APC residues from waste incineration.

  15. Two amino acid residues confer type specificity to a neutralizing, conformationally dependent epitope on human papillomavirus type 11.

    PubMed Central

    Ludmerer, S W; Benincasa, D; Mark, G E

    1996-01-01

    Characterization of virus binding by neutralizing antibodies is important both in understanding early events in viral infectivity and in development of vaccines. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to human papillomavirus type 11 (HPV11) have been described, but mapping the binding site has been difficult because of the conformational nature of key type-specific neutralization epitopes on the L1 coat protein. We have determined those residues of the L1 protein of HPV11 which confer type specificity to the binding of HPV11-neutralizing MAbs. Binding of three HPV11-specific neutralizing MAbs could be redirected to HPV6 L1 virus-like particles in which as few as two substitutions of corresponding amino acid residues from HPV11 L1 have been made, thus demonstrating the importance of these residues to MAb binding through the transfer of a conformationally dependent epitope. In addition, a fourth neutralizing MAb could be distinguished from the other neutralizing MAbs in terms of the amino acid residues which affect binding, suggesting the possibility that it neutralizes HPV11 through a different mechanism. PMID:8676509

  16. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND356-58, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3.

  17. Crystal Structures of the Reduced, Sulfenic Acid, and Mixed Disulfide Forms of SarZ, a Redox Active Global Regulator in Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Poor, Catherine B.; Chen, Peng R.; Duguid, Erica; Rice, Phoebe A.; He, Chuan

    2010-01-20

    SarZ is a global transcriptional regulator that uses a single cysteine residue, Cys{sup 13}, to sense peroxide stress and control metabolic switching and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus. SarZ belongs to the single-cysteine class of OhrR-MgrA proteins that play key roles in oxidative resistance and virulence regulation in various bacteria. We present the crystal structures of the reduced form, sulfenic acid form, and mixed disulfide form of SarZ. Both the sulfenic acid and mixed disulfide forms are structurally characterized for the first time for this class of proteins. The Cys{sup 13} sulfenic acid modification is stabilized through two hydrogen bonds with surrounding residues, and the overall DNA-binding conformation is retained. A further reaction of the Cys{sup 13} sulfenic acid with an external thiol leads to formation of a mixed disulfide bond, which results in an allosteric change in the DNA-binding domains, disrupting DNA binding. Thus, the crystal structures of SarZ in three different states provide molecular level pictures delineating the mechanism by which this class of redox active regulators undergoes activation. These structures help to understand redox-mediated virulence regulation in S. aureus and activation of the MarR family proteins in general.

  18. Bovine lactoferrin binds oleic acid to form an anti-tumor complex similar to HAMLET.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bing; Zhang, Ming; Tian, Mai; Jiang, Lu; Guo, Hui Yuan; Ren, Fa Zheng

    2014-04-04

    α-Lactalbumin (α-LA) can bind oleic acid (OA) to form HAMLET-like complexes, which exhibited highly selective anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Considering the structural similarity to α-LA, we conjectured that lactoferrin (LF) could also bind OA to obtain a complex with anti-tumor activity. In this study, LF-OA was prepared and its activity and structural changes were compared with α-LA-OA. The anti-tumor activity was evaluated by methylene blue assay, while the apoptosis mechanism was analyzed using flow cytometry and Western blot. Structural changes of LF-OA were measured by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism. The interactions of OA with LF and α-LA were evaluated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). LF-OA was obtained by heat-treatment at pH8.0 with LD50 of 4.88, 4.95 and 4.62μM for HepG2, HT29, and MCF-7 cells, respectively, all of which were 10 times higher than those of α-LA-OA. Similar to HAMLET, LF-OA induced apoptosis in tumor cells through both death receptor- and mitochondrial-mediated pathways. Exposure of tryptophan residues and the hydrophobic regions as well as the loss of tertiary structure were observed in LF-OA. Besides these similarities, LF showed different secondary structure changes when compared with α-LA, with a decrease of α-helix and β-turn and an increase of β-sheet and random coil. ITC results showed that there was a higher binding number of OA to LF than to α-LA, while both of the proteins interacted with OA through van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds. This study provides a theoretical basis for further exploration of protein-OA complexes.

  19. A pore-forming toxin requires a specific residue for its activity in membranes with particular physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Morante, Koldo; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Tanaka, Koji; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-04-24

    The physicochemical landscape of the bilayer modulates membrane protein function. Actinoporins are a family of potent hemolytic proteins from sea anemones acting at the membrane level. This family of cytolysins preferentially binds to target membranes containing sphingomyelin, where they form lytic pores giving rise to cell death. Although the cytolytic activity of the actinoporin fragaceatoxin C (FraC) is sensitive to vesicles made of various lipid compositions, it is far from clear how this toxin adjusts its mechanism of action to a broad range of physiochemical landscapes. Herein, we show that the conserved residue Phe-16 of FraC is critical for pore formation in cholesterol-rich membranes such as those of red blood cells. The interaction of a panel of muteins of Phe-16 with model membranes composed of raft-like lipid domains is inactivated in cholesterol-rich membranes but not in cholesterol-depleted membranes. These results indicate that actinoporins recognize different membrane environments, resulting in a wider repertoire of susceptible target membranes (and preys) for sea anemones. In addition, this study has unveiled promising candidates for the development of protein-based biosensors highly sensitive to the concentration of cholesterol within the membrane.

  20. Biosynthesis of D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid by Lactobacillus casei: interchain transacylation of D-alanyl ester residues

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, W.C. 3d.; Taron, D.J.; Neuhaus, F.C.

    1985-06-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Lactobacillus casei contains poly(glycerophosphate) substituted with D-alanyl ester residues. The distribution of these residues in the in vitro-synthesized polymer is uniform. Esterification of LTA with D-alanine may occur in one of two modes: (i) addition at random or (ii) addition at a defined locus in the poly(glycerophosphate) chain followed by redistribution of the ester residues. A time-dependent transacylation of these residues from D-(/sup 14/C)alanyl-lipophilic LTA to hydrophilic acceptor was observed. The hydrophilic acceptor was characterized as D-alanyl-hydrophilic LTA. This transacylation requires neither ATP nor the D-alanine incorporation system, i.e., the D-alanine activating enzyme and D-alanine:membrane acceptor ligase. No evidence for an enzyme-catalyzed transacylation reaction was observed. The authors propose that this process of transacylation may be responsible for the redistribution of D-alanyl residues after esterification to the poly(glycerophosphate). As a result, it is difficult to distinguish between these proposed modes of addition.

  1. A highly Conserved Aspartic Acid Residue of the Chitosanase from Bacillus Sp. TS Is Involved in the Substrate Binding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanping; Zhao, Shuangzhi; Liu, Yang; Chang, Zhengying; Ma, Yanhe; Li, Jian; Song, Jiangning

    2016-11-01

    The chitosanase from Bacillus sp. TS (CsnTS) is an enzyme belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 8. The sequence of CsnTS shares 98 % identity with the chitosanase from Bacillus sp. K17. Crystallography analysis and site-direct mutagenesis of the chitosanase from Bacillus sp. K17 identified the important residues involved in the catalytic interaction and substrate binding. However, despite progress in understanding the catalytic mechanism of the chitosanase from the family GH8, the functional roles of some residues that are highly conserved throughout this family have not been fully elucidated. This study focused on one of these residues, i.e., the aspartic acid residue at position 318. We found that apart from asparagine, mutation of Asp318 resulted in significant loss of enzyme activity. In-depth investigations showed that mutation of this residue not only impaired enzymatic activity but also affected substrate binding. Taken together, our results showed that Asp318 plays an important role in CsnTS activity.

  2. Formation of [b3 - 1 + cat]+ ions from metal-cationized tetrapeptides containing beta-alanine, gamma-aminobutyric acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid residues.

    PubMed

    Osburn, Sandra M; Ochola, Sila O; Talaty, Erach R; Van Stipdonk, Michael J

    2008-11-01

    The presence and position of a single beta-alanine (betaA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (gammaABu) or epsilon-aminocaproic acid (Cap) residue has been shown to have a significant influence on the formation of b(n)+ and y(n)+ product ions from a series of model, protonated peptides. In this study, we examined the effect of the same residues on the formation of analogous [b3 - 1 + cat]+ products from metal (Li+, Na+ and Ag+)-cationized peptides. The larger amino acids suppress formation of b3+ from protonated peptides with general sequence AAXG (where X = beta-alanine, gamma-aminobutyric acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid), presumably because of the prohibitive effect of larger cyclic intermediates in the 'oxazolone' pathway. However, abundant [b3 - 1 + cat]+ products are generated from metal-cationized versions of AAXG. Using a group of deuterium-labeled and exchanged peptides, we found that formation of [b3 - 1 + cat]+ involves transfer of either amide or alpha-carbon position H atoms, and the tendency to transfer the atom from the alpha-carbon position increases with the size of the amino acid in position X. To account for the transfer of the H atom, a mechanism involving formation of a ketene product as [b3 - 1 + cat]+ is proposed.

  3. Plasmodium falciparum Field Isolates Commonly Use Erythrocyte Invasion Pathways That Are Independent of Sialic Acid Residues of Glycophorin A

    PubMed Central

    Okoyeh, Jude Nnaemeka; Pillai, C. R.; Chitnis, Chetan E.

    1999-01-01

    Erythrocyte invasion by malaria parasites is mediated by specific molecular interactions. Sialic acid residues of glycophorin A are used as invasion receptors by Plasmodium falciparum. In vitro invasion studies have demonstrated that some cloned P. falciparum lines can use alternate receptors independent of sialic acid residues of glycophorin A. It is not known if invasion by alternate pathways occurs commonly in the field. In this study, we used in vitro growth assays and erythrocyte invasion assays to determine the invasion phenotypes of 15 P. falciparum field isolates. Of the 15 field isolates tested, 5 multiply in both neuraminidase and trypsin-treated erythrocytes, 3 multiply in neuraminidase-treated but not trypsin-treated erythrocytes, and 4 multiply in trypsin-treated but not neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes; 12 of the 15 field isolates tested use alternate invasion pathways that are not dependent on sialic acid residues of glycophorin A. Alternate invasion pathways are thus commonly used by P. falciparum field isolates. Typing based on two polymorphic markers, MSP-1 and MSP-2, and two microsatellite markers suggests that only 1 of the 15 field isolates tested contains multiple parasite genotypes. Individual P. falciparum lines can thus use multiple invasion pathways in the field. These observations have important implications for malaria vaccine development efforts based on EBA-175, the P. falciparum protein that binds sialic acid residues of glycophorin A during invasion. It may be necessary to target parasite ligands responsible for the alternate invasion pathways in addition to EBA-175 to effectively block erythrocyte invasion by P. falciparum. PMID:10531229

  4. Effects of Different Forms of Selenium Fertilizers on Se Accumulation, Distribution, and Residual Effect in Winter Wheat-Summer Maize Rotation System.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Yu, Yao; Li, Jixiang; Wan, Yanan; Huang, Qingqing; Guo, Yanbin; Li, Huafen

    2017-02-15

    Foliar Se fertilizers were applied to investigate the effects of Se forms on Se accumulation and distribution in the wheat-maize rotation system and residual concentration of Se in subsequent crops. Sodium selenite, sodium selenate, selenomethionine, chemical nano-Se, humic acid + sodium selenite, and compound fertilizer + sodium selenite were applied once at the flowering stage of wheat (30 g ha(-1)) and at the bell stage of maize (60 g ha(-1)). Compared with the control treatment, foliar Se applications significant increased the grain Se concentration of wheat and maize by 0.02-0.31 and 0.07-1.09 mg kg(-1), respectively. Wheat and maize grain Se recoveries were 3.0-10.4 and 4.1-18.5%, respectively. However, Se concentrations in the grain of subsequent wheat and maize significantly decreased by 77.9 and 91.2%, respectively. The change of Se concentration in soil was a dynamic process with Se depletion after harvest of maize.

  5. Molecular analysis of the acid sphingomyelinase deficiency in a family with an intermediate form of Niemann-Pick disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ferlinz, K; Hurwitz, R; Weiler, M; Suzuki, K; Sandhoff, K; Vanier, M T

    1995-01-01

    A novel point mutation in the lysosomal acid sphingomyelinase gene has been identified in the recently reported Serbian family with a clinically and biochemically atypical intermediate form of Niemann-Pick disease. The mutation was a T1171-->G transversion resulting in substitution of glycine for normal tryptophan at amino acid residue 391. The coding sequence was otherwise normal. All of the five affected individuals were almost certainly homoallelic, and both of the two obligate heterozygotes studied also carried the same mutation. This mutation is therefore likely to be directly associated with the atypical phenotype of these patients. Expression in COS-1 cells suggested a higher residual activity than that in cultured fibroblasts. A recently developed high-affinity rabbit antihuman sphingomyelinase antibody allowed us to study for the first time the biosynthesis, processing, and targeting of a mutant sphingomyelinase by metabolic labeling of cultured fibroblasts. The mutant enzyme protein was normally synthesized, processed, and routed to the lysosome but was apparently unstable and degraded rapidly once it reached the lysosome. Together with the finding of the relatively high residual activity in COS-1 cells, we interpret our observations to mean that instability and rapid breakdown of the mature mutant enzyme protein, due to the mutation rather than direct inactivation of the catalytic activity, is the primary mechanism for the deficiency of sphingomyelinase activity in these patients. A high prevalence of this mutation in the Serbian population is likely, since the family pedigree indicates that members from four reportedly unrelated families must have contributed the same mutation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7762557

  6. Functional analysis of amino acid residues essential for activity in the Na+/H+ exchanger of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Dibrov, P; Young, P G; Fliegel, L

    1998-06-09

    We identified amino acid residues important for activity of sod2, the Na+/H+ antiporter of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We mutated all eight His residues of sod2 into Arg. Only His367-->Arg affected function and resulted in complete inability of sod2 to allow growth of S. pombe in LiCl-containing medium. Mutant S. pombe (H367R) could not expel sodium in acidic (pH 4.0) medium and were defective in their ability to alkalinize external medium. When His367 was replaced by Asp, sodium export of S. pombe was suppressed at acidic pH while the sodium-dependent proton influx at pH 6.1 was increased compared to wild type. We also mutated three residues conserved in putative membrane regions of various eukaryotic and prokaryotic Na+/H+ exchangers. S. pombe containing Asp241-->Asn and Asp266, 267-->Asn mutations had greatly impaired growth in LiCl-containing medium. In addition, sodium-dependent proton influx at external pH 6. 1 was impaired. Sodium export from S. pombe cells at external pH 4.0 was also almost completely abolished by the D266,267N mutation; however, the D241N mutant protein retained almost normal Na+ export. The results demonstrate that His367, Asp241, and Asp266,267 are important in the function of the eukaryotic Na+/H+ exchanger sod2.

  7. Increased adhesion between neutral lipid bilayers: interbilayer bridges formed by tannic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, S A; Disalvo, E A; Gawrisch, K; Borovyagin, V; Toone, E; Schiffman, S S; Needham, D; McIntosh, T J

    1994-01-01

    Tannic acid (TA) is a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound that aggregates membranes and neutral phosolipid vesicles and precipitates many proteins. This study analyzes TA binding to lipid membranes and the ensuing aggregation. The optical density of dispersions of phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles increased upon the addition of TA and electron micrographs showed that TA caused the vesicles to aggregate and form stacks of tightly packed disks. Solution calorimetry showed that TA bound to PC bilayers with a molar binding enthalpy of -8.3 kcal/mol and zeta potential measurements revealed that TA imparted a small negative charge to PC vesicles. Monolayer studies showed that TA bound to PC with a dissociation constant of 1.5 microM and reduced the dipole potential by up to 250 mV. Both the increase in optical density and decrease in dipole potential produced by TA could be reversed by the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone, a compound that chelates TA by providing H-bond acceptor groups. NMR, micropipette aspiration, and x-ray diffraction experiments showed that TA incorporated into liquid crystalline PC membranes, increasing the area per lipid molecule and decreasing the bilayer thickness by 2 to 4%. 2H-NMR quadrupole splitting measurements also showed that TA associated with a PC molecule for times much less than 10(-4) s. In gel phase bilayers, TA caused the hydrocarbon chains from apposing monolayers to fully interdigitate. X-ray diffraction measurements of both gel and liquid crystalline dispersions showed that TA, at a critical concentration of about 1 mM, reduced the fluid spacing between adjacent bilayers by 8-10 A. These data place severe constraints on how TA can pack between adjacent bilayers and cause vesicles to adhere. We conclude that TA promotes vesicle aggregation by reducing the fluid spacing between bilayers by the formation of transient interbilayer bridges by inserting its digallic acid residues into the interfacial regions of adjacent bilayers

  8. Spectroscopic studies of solid-state forms of donepezil free base and salt forms with various salicylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brittain, Harry G.

    2014-12-01

    The polymorphic forms of donepezil free base have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. None of the free base crystal forms was observed to exhibit detectable fluorescence in the solid state under ambient conditions. Crystalline salt products were obtained by the reaction of donepezil with salicylic and methyl-substituted salicylic acids, with the salicylate and 4-methylsalicylate salts being obtained as non-solvated products, and the 3-methylsalicylate and 5-methylsalicylate salts being obtained as methanol solvated products. The intensity of solid-state fluorescence from donepezil salicylate and donepezil 4-methylsalicylate was found to be reduced relative to the fluorescence intensity of the corresponding free acids, while the solid-state fluorescence intensity of donepezil 3-methylsalicylate methanolate and donepezil 5-methylsalicylate methanolate was greatly increased relative to the fluorescence intensity of the corresponding free acids. Desolvation of the solvated salt products led to formation of glassy solids that exhibited strong green fluorescence.

  9. Effect of second coagulant addition on coagulation efficiency, floc properties and residual Al for humic acid treatment by Al13 polymer and polyaluminum chloride (PACl).

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiying; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Yan; Yue, Qinyan; Ren, Haijing

    2012-05-15

    Influence of second dose on coagulation efficiency, floc re-growth, fractal structure and residual Al of the effluent in humic acid (HA) coagulation with Al(13) polymer ([Al(13)O(4)(OH)(24)(H(2)O)(12)](7+)) and PACl were comparatively investigated in this study. Effects of breakage shear on the floc properties generated in the coagulation with and without additional dose were also investigated. The results indicated that additional dose during breakage could essentially improve the HA removal efficiency and floc re-growth in both Al(13) and PACl coagulations. Second doses of Al(13) at 0.5 and 1.0mg/L resulted in better turbidity and UV(254) removal as well as floc re-growth rather than higher additional dose of 1.5 and 2.0mg/L; while in PACl coagulation, more efficient HA removal and better floc re-growth were obtained at higher additional doses (1.0, 1.5 and 2.0mg/L). Small additional Al(13) could apparently increase the D(f) of re-formed flocs while the additional PACl displayed inconspicuous effect on floc D(f). The additional coagulant dose could alleviate the further decrease of re-grown floc size with increased breakage shear for both coagulants. The residual Al analysis implied that two-stage addition contributed to lower residual Al in effluent than one-time addition mode with the same total coagulant concentration.

  10. Influence of oxalic acid formed on the degradation of phenol by Fenton reagent.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Emi

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this work is to examine the influence of oxalic acid formed on the degradation of phenol by Fenton reagent. Oxalic acid formed at initial stage within 30 min significantly suppresses the reduction of ferric ion, thus terminating degradation reaction. The yield of oxalic acid is dependent on the amount of ferrous ion dosed since the minimal amount of oxalic acid is formed after the degradation reaction terminates. Mineralization of phenol by Fenton reagent stagnates after 120 min under the conditions used in this study. The reason why the mineralization stagnated can be assumed to be following two mechanisms other than the depletion of H(2)O(2). In the case where a small amount of ferrous ions is dosed, the reduction of ferric ions is minimal by oxalic acid formed. In the case where a large amount of ferrous ions is dosed, the amount of degradable organic compounds is insufficient owing to preferential conversion to oxalic acid. The mineralization can be enhanced by the intermittent dosing of ferrous ions, which facilitates the suppression of oxalic acid formation during the degradation by Fenton reagent.

  11. Hexavalent chromium reduction in solution and in chromite ore processing residue-enriched soil by tartaric Acid with isopropyl alcohol and divalent manganese as co-reductants.

    PubMed

    Brose, Dominic A; James, Bruce R

    2013-01-01

    Chromite ore processing residue (COPR), the solid waste product from the high-temperature alkaline processing of ferrochromite (FeO·CrO), contains Cr(VI) in soluble and insoluble compounds formed in the roasting process. This research investigated tartaric acid in combination with Mn and isopropyl alcohol (IPOH ) as co-reductants for reagent- and COPR-derived Cr(VI). The reduction of Cr(VI) by tartaric acid alone at pH 5.0 or greater was negligible; however, in the presence of Mn or IPOH, reduction occurred in hours. Isopropyl alcohol enhanced Cr(VI) reduction, probably via formation of a termolecular complex with the alcohol, tartaric acid, and Cr(VI). In aqueous solutions of reagent-derived Cr(VI) at pH 4, 12 mmol L tartaric acid with 1.0 mmol L Mn or 1.0 mmol L Mn and 0.29 mol L (2% v/v) IPOH reduced 1.0 mmol L Cr(VI) in 48 h. The same treatments at pH 5.5 reduced 0.60 and 0.58 mmol L Cr(VI) (60%) in 96 h, respectively. A minimum half-life of 10.2 h was calculated from first-order rate constants obtained from Mn and IPOH-Mn co-reductant treatments with tartaric acid at pH 4. The most COPR-derived Cr(VI) reduced in suspension was by IPOH and Mn at high acidity (pH 5.8), which reduced 0.52 mmol L (52%) of the COPR-derived soluble Cr(VI) at 96 h. The enhanced reduction of soluble Cr(VI) by tartaric acid by the addition of Mn proceeds within a complex formed by an esterification reaction between tartaric acid and Cr(VI) with Mn bound to tartaric acid. The combined treatment of tartaric acid, IPOH, Mn, and a strong acid to lower the pH of COPR-enriched soils would be effective in field applications of this chemistry. By creating a slurry of the field soil with these amendments, mass transfer limitations would be overcome, and Cr(VI) would be reduced to Cr(III) in days.

  12. Integrated assessment of acid deposition impacts using reduced-form modeling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, R.; Small, M.J.

    1996-05-01

    Emissions of sulfates and other acidic pollutants from anthropogenic sources result in the deposition of these acidic pollutants on the earth`s surface, downwind of the source. These pollutants reach surface waters, including streams and lakes, and acidify them, resulting in a change in the chemical composition of the surface water. Sometimes the water chemistry is sufficiently altered so that the lake can no longer support aquatic life. This document traces the efforts by many researchers to understand and quantify the effect of acid deposition on the water chemistry of populations of lakes, in particular the improvements to the MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) modeling effort, and describes its reduced-form representation in a decision and uncertainty analysis tool. Previous reduced-form approximations to the MAGIC model are discussed in detail, and their drawbacks are highlighted. An improved reduced-form model for acid neutralizing capacity is presented, which incorporates long-term depletion of the watershed acid neutralization fraction. In addition, improved fish biota models are incorporated in the integrated assessment model, which includes reduced-form models for other physical and chemical processes of acid deposition, as well as the resulting socio-economic and health related effects. The new reduced-form lake chemistry and fish biota models are applied to the Adirondacks region of New York.

  13. Amino acid sequence of homologous rat atrial peptides: natriuretic activity of native and synthetic forms.

    PubMed Central

    Seidah, N G; Lazure, C; Chrétien, M; Thibault, G; Garcia, R; Cantin, M; Genest, J; Nutt, R F; Brady, S F; Lyle, T A

    1984-01-01

    A substance called atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), localized in secretory granules of atrial cardiocytes, was isolated as four homologous natriuretic peptides from homogenates of rat atria. The complete sequence of the longest form showed that it is composed of 33 amino acids. The three other shorter forms (2-33, 3-33, and 8-33) represent amino-terminally truncated versions of the 33 amino acid parent molecule as shown by analysis of sequence, amino acid composition, or both. The proposed primary structure agrees entirely with the amino acid composition and reveals no significant sequence homology with any known protein or segment of protein. The short form ANF-(8-33) was synthesized by a multi-fragment condensation approach and the synthetic product was shown to exhibit specific activity comparable to that of the natural ANF-(3-33). PMID:6232612

  14. Microbiological degradation of bile acids. Nitrogenous hexahydroindane derivatives formed from cholic acid by Streptomyces rubescens.

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, S; Hashimoto, S; Onaka, T

    1976-01-01

    The metabolism of cholic acid (I) by Streptomyces rubescens was investigated. This organism effected ring A cleavage, side-chain shortening and amide bond formation and gave the following metabolites: (4R)-4-[4alpha-(2-carboxyethyl)-3aalpha-hexahydro-7abeta-methyl-5-oxoindan-1 beta-yl]valeric acid (IIa) and its mono-amide (valeramide) (IIb); and 2,3,4,6, 6abeta,7,8,9,9aalpha,9bbeta-decahydro-6abeta-methyl-1H-cyclopenta[f]quinoline-3,7-dione(IIIe)and its homologues with the beta-oriented side chains, valeric acid, valeramide, butanone and propionic acid, in the place of the oxo group at C-7, i.e.compounds (IIIa), (IIIb), (IIIc) and (IIId) respectively. All the nitrogenous metabolites were new compounds, and their structures were established by partial synthesis except for the metabolite (IIIc). The mechanism of formation of these metabolites is considered. A degradative pathway of cholic acid (I) into the metabolites is also tentatively proposed. PMID:1016253

  15. Urea, glycolic acid, and glycerol in an organic residue produced by ultraviolet irradiation of interstellar/pre-cometary ice analogs.

    PubMed

    Nuevo, Michel; Bredehöft, Jan Hendrik; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; d'Hendecourt, Louis; Thiemann, Wolfram H-P

    2010-03-01

    More than 50 stable organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM), from ground-based and onboard-satellite astronomical observations, in the gas and solid phases. Some of these organics may be prebiotic compounds that were delivered to early Earth by comets and meteorites and may have triggered the first chemical reactions involved in the origin of life. Ultraviolet irradiation of ices simulating photoprocesses of cold solid matter in astrophysical environments have shown that photochemistry can lead to the formation of amino acids and related compounds. In this work, we experimentally searched for other organic molecules of prebiotic interest, namely, oxidized acid labile compounds. In a setup that simulates conditions relevant to the ISM and Solar System icy bodies such as comets, a condensed CH(3)OH:NH(3) = 1:1 ice mixture was UV irradiated at approximately 80 K. The molecular constituents of the nonvolatile organic residue that remained at room temperature were separated by capillary gas chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. Urea, glycolic acid, and glycerol were detected in this residue, as well as hydroxyacetamide, glycerolic acid, and glycerol amide. These organics are interesting target molecules to be searched for in space. Finally, tentative mechanisms of formation for these compounds under interstellar/pre-cometary conditions are proposed.

  16. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Shiheido, Hirokazu Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND3{sub 56–58}, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3. - Highlights: • BEND3 localizes to the nucleus. • The N-terminal 60 amino acids region of BEND3 contains NLS. • Amino acids located between 56 and 58 of BEND3 (KRK) are part of NLS. • KRK motif is highly conserved among BEND3 homologs.

  17. Growth behavior of anodic porous alumina formed in malic acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2013-11-01

    The growth behavior of anodic porous alumina formed on aluminum by anodizing in malic acid solutions was investigated. High-purity aluminum plates were electropolished in CH3COOH/HClO4 solutions and then anodized in 0.5 M malic acid solutions at 293 K and constant cell voltages of 200-350 V. The anodic porous alumina grew on the aluminum substrate at voltages of 200-250 V, and a black, burned oxide film was formed at higher voltages. The nanopores of the anodic oxide were only formed at grain boundaries of the aluminum substrate during the initial stage of anodizing, and then the growth region extended to the entire aluminum surface as the anodizing time increased. The anodic porous alumina with several defects was formed by anodizing in malic acid solution at 250 V, and oxide cells were approximately 300-800 nm in diameter.

  18. A replacement of the active-site aspartic acid residue 293 in mouse cathepsin D affects its intracellular stability, processing and transport in HEK-293 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, Sanna; Storch, Stephan; Löffler, Hans-Gerhard; Hasilik, Andrej; Tyynelä, Jaana; Braulke, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The substitution of an active-site aspartic acid residue by asparagine in the lysosomal protease cathepsin D (CTSD) results in a loss of enzyme activity and severe cerebrocortical atrophy in a novel form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in sheep [Tyynelä, Sohar, Sleat, Gin, Donnelly, Baumann, Haltia and Lobel (2000) EMBO J. 19, 2786-2792]. In the present study we have introduced the corresponding mutation by replacing aspartic acid residue 293 with asparagine (D293N) into the mouse CTSD cDNA to analyse its effect on synthesis, transport and stability in transfected HEK-293 cells. The complete inactivation of mutant D293N mouse CTSD was confirmed by a newly developed fluorimetric quantification system. Moreover, in the heterologous overexpression systems used, mutant D293N mouse CTSD was apparently unstable and proteolytically modified during early steps of the secretory pathway, resulting in a loss of mass by about 1 kDa. In the affected sheep, the endogenous mutant enzyme was stable but also showed the shift in its molecular mass. In HEK-293 cells, the transport of the mutant D293N mouse CTSD to the lysosome was delayed and associated with a low secretion rate compared with wild-type CTSD. These data suggest that the mutation may result in a conformational change which affects stability, processing and transport of the enzyme. PMID:12350228

  19. Charged Amino Acid Residues 997–1000 of Human Apolipoprotein B100 Are Critical for the Initiation of Lipoprotein Assembly and the Formation of a Stable Lipidated Primordial Particle in McA-RH7777 Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Manchekar, Medha; Richardson, Paul E.; Sun, Zhihuan; Liu, Yanwen; Segrest, Jere P.; Dashti, Nassrin

    2008-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a portion, or perhaps all, of the residues between 931 and 1000 of apolipoprotein (apo) B100 are required for the initiation of apoB-containing particle assembly. Based on our structural model of the first 1000 residues of apoB (designated as apoB:1000), we hypothesized that this domain folds into a three-sided lipovitellin-like “lipid pocket” via a hairpin-bridge mechanism. We proposed that salt bridges are formed between four tandem charged residues 717–720 in the turn of the hairpin bridge and four tandem complementary residues 997–1000 located at the C-terminal end of the model. To identify the specific motif within residues 931 and 1000 that is critical for apoB particle assembly, apoB:956 and apoB:986 were produced. To test the hairpin-bridge hypothesis, the following mutations were made: 1) residues 997–1000 deletion (apoB:996), 2) residues 717–720 deletion (apoB:1000Δ717–720), and 3) substitution of charged residues 997–1000 with alanines (apoB:996 + 4Ala). Characterization of particles secreted by stable transformants of McA-RH7777 cells demonstrated the following. 1) ApoB:956 did not form stable particles and was secreted as large lipid-rich aggregates. 2) ApoB:986 formed both a lipidated particle that was denser than HDL3 and large lipid-rich aggregates. 3) Compared with wild-type apoB:1000, apoB:1000Δ717–720 displayed the following: (i) significantly diminished capacity to form intact lipidated particles and (ii) increased propensity to form large lipid-rich aggregates. 4) In striking contrast to wild-type apoB:1000, (i) apoB:996 and apoB:996 + 4Ala were highly susceptible to intracellular degradation, (ii) only a small proportion of the secreted proteins formed stable HDL3-like lipoproteins, and (iii) a majority of the secreted proteins formed large lipid-rich aggregates. We conclude that the first 1000 amino acid residues of human apoB100 are required for the initiation of nascent apo

  20. Pulsed EPR Determination of Water Accessibility to Spin-Labeled Amino Acid Residues in LHCIIb

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, A.; Dockter, C.; Bund, T.; Paulsen, H.; Jeschke, G.

    2009-01-01

    Membrane proteins reside in a structured environment in which some of their residues are accessible to water, some are in contact with alkyl chains of lipid molecules, and some are buried in the protein. Water accessibility of residues may change during folding or function-related structural dynamics. Several techniques based on the combination of pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with site-directed spin labeling can be used to quantify such water accessibility. Accessibility parameters for different residues in major plant light-harvesting complex IIb are determined by electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy in the presence of deuterated water, deuterium contrast in transversal relaxation rates, analysis of longitudinal relaxation rates, and line shape analysis of electron-spin-echo-detected EPR spectra as well as by the conventional techniques of measuring the maximum hyperfine splitting and progressive saturation in continuous-wave EPR. Systematic comparison of these parameters allows for a more detailed characterization of the environment of the spin-labeled residues. These techniques are applicable independently of protein size and require ∼10–20 nmol of singly spin-labeled protein per sample. For a residue close to the N-terminus, in a domain unresolved in the existing x-ray structures of light-harvesting complex IIb, all methods indicate high water accessibility. PMID:19186148

  1. Influence of shear force on floc properties and residual aluminum in humic acid treatment by nano-Al₁₃.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiying; Gao, Baoyu; Du, Bin; Xu, Zhenghe; Zhang, Yongfang; Wei, Dong

    2014-04-30

    The impacts of various shear forces on floc sizes and structures in humic acid coagulations by polyaluminum chloride (PACl) and nano-Al13 were comparatively studied in this paper. The dynamic floc size was monitored by use of a laser diffraction particle sizing device. The floc structure was evaluated in terms of fractal dimension, analyzed by small-angle laser light scattering (SALLS). The effect of increased shear rate on residual Al of the coagulation effluents was then analyzed on the basis of different floc characteristics generated under various shear conditions. The results showed that floc size decreased with the increasing shear rate for both Al13 and PACl. Besides, floc strength and re-formation ability were also weakened by the enhanced shear force. Al13 resulted in small, strong and better recoverable flocs than PACl and moreover, in the shear range of 100-300 revolution per minute (rpm) (G=40.7-178.3s(-1)), the characteristics of HA-Al13 flocs displayed smaller scale changes than those of HA-PACl flocs. The results of residual Al measurements proved that with shear increased, the residual Al increased continuously but Al13 presented less sensitivity to the varying shear forces. PACl contributed higher residual Al than Al13 under the same shear condition.

  2. Amino acid residues in the GerAB protein important in the function and assembly of the alanine spore germination receptor of Bacillus subtilis 168.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Gareth R; Moir, Anne

    2011-05-01

    The paradigm gerA operon is required for endospore germination in response to c-alanine as the sole germinant, and the three protein products, GerAA, GerAB, and GerAC are predicted to form a receptor complex in the spore inner membrane. GerAB shows homology to the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) family of single-component transporters and is predicted to be an integral membrane protein with 10 membrane-spanning helices. Site-directed mutations were introduced into the gerAB gene at its natural location on the chromosome. Alterations to some charged or potential helix-breaking residues within membrane spans affected receptor function dramatically. In some cases, this is likely to reflect the complete loss of the GerA receptor complex, as judged by the absence of the germinant receptor protein GerAC, which suggests that the altered GerAB protein itself may be unstable or that the altered structure destabilizes the complex. Mutants that have a null phenotype for Instituto de Biotecnología de León, INBIOTEC, Parque Científico de León, Av. Real, 1, 24006 León, Spain-alanine germination but retain GerAC protein at near-normal levels are more likely to define amino acid residues of functional, rather than structural, importance. Single-amino-acid substitutions in each of the GerAB and GerAA proteins can prevent incorporation of GerAC protein into the spore; this provides strong evidence that the proteins within a specific receptor interact and that these interactions are required for receptor assembly. The lipoprotein nature of the GerAC receptor subunit is also important; an amino acid change in the prelipoprotein signal sequence in the gerAC1 mutant results in the absence of GerAC protein from the spore.

  3. Isolation of acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    PubMed

    Cibis, Katharina Gabriela; Gneipel, Armin; König, Helmut

    2016-02-20

    In this study, acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria were isolated from thermophilic and mesophilic biogas plants (BGP) located in Germany. The fermenters were fed with maize silage and cattle or swine manure. Furthermore, pressurized laboratory fermenters digesting maize silage were sampled. Enrichment cultures for the isolation of acid-forming bacteria were grown in minimal medium supplemented with one of the following carbon sources: Na(+)-dl-lactate, succinate, ethanol, glycerol, glucose or a mixture of amino acids. These substrates could be converted by the isolates to acetic, propionic or butyric acid. In total, 49 isolates were obtained, which belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Tenericutes or Thermotogae. According to 16S rRNA gene sequences, most isolates were related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides, Defluviitoga tunisiensis and Dendrosporobacter quercicolus. Acetic, propionic or butyric acid were produced in cultures of isolates affiliated to Bacillus thermoamylovorans, Clostridium aminovalericum, Clostridium cochlearium/Clostridium tetani, C. sporosphaeroides, D. quercicolus, Proteiniborus ethanoligenes, Selenomonas bovis and Tepidanaerobacter sp. Isolates related to Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum produced acetic, butyric and lactic acid, and isolates related to D. tunisiensis formed acetic acid. Specific primer sets targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences were designed and used for real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The isolates were physiologically characterized and their role in BGP discussed.

  4. Identification of functionally important amino acid residues in the mitochondria targeting sequence of Hepatitis B virus X protein

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Sai Kam; Ho, Sai Fan; Tsui, Kwok Wing; Fung, Kwok Pui; Waye, M.Y. Mary

    2008-11-10

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been strongly associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the X protein (HBx) is thought to mediate the cellular changes associated with carcinogenesis. Recently, isolation of the hepatitis B virus integrants from HCC tissue by others have established the fact that the X gene is often truncated at its C-terminus. Expression of the GFP fusion proteins of HBx and its truncation mutants with a GFP tag in human liver cell-lines in this study revealed that the C-terminus of HBx is indispensable for its specific localization in the mitochondria. A crucial region of seven amino acids at the C-terminus has been mapped out in which the cysteine residue at position 115 serves as the most important residue for the subcellular localization. When cysteine 115 of HBx is mutated to alanine the mitochondria targeting property of HBx is abrogated.

  5. A facile route to preparation of high purity nanoporous silica from acid-leached residue of serpentine.

    PubMed

    Bai, Penn; Sharratt, Paul; Yeo, Tze Yuen; Bu, Jie

    2014-09-01

    As the current cost of mineral carbonation is too high for an economically viable industrial process, it is desirable to produce value-added products from CO2 mineralization process. In this work, a facile and cost-effective process was developed for the production of high purity SiO2 from acid-leached serpentine residue. The Si extraction rate is fast even under ambient conditions due to the highly defective structure of the residue. The reaction kinetics were studied and it was found that the Si extraction rate was under a combination of chemical reaction control and film diffusion control. The SiO2 sample prepared has high purity with a nanoporous structure, which renders it a potential candidate for applications such as an adsorbent and a catalyst support.

  6. Effects of particle size and acid addition on the remediation of chromite ore processing residue using ferrous sulfate.

    PubMed

    Jagupilla, Santhi Chandra; Moon, Deok Hyun; Wazne, Mahmoud; Christodoulatos, Christos; Kim, Min Gyu

    2009-08-30

    A bench-scale treatability study was conducted to assess the effects of particle size and acid addition on the remediation of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) using ferrous sulfate. The remediation scheme entailed the chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and the mitigation of swell potential. Leaching tests and the EQ3/6 geochemical model were used to estimate the acid dosage required to destabilize Cr(VI)-bearing and swell-causing minerals. The model predicted greater acid dosage than that estimated from the batch leaching tests. This indicated that mass transfer limitation may be playing a significant role in impeding the dissolution of COPR minerals following acid addition and hence hindering the remediation of COPR. Cr(VI) concentrations determined by alkaline digestion for the treated samples were less than the current NJDEP standard. However, Cr(VI) concentrations measured by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) were greater than those measured by alkaline digestion. Greater Cr(VI) percentages were reduced for acid pretreated and also for smaller particle size COPR samples. Upon treatment, brownmillerite content was greatly reduced for the acid pretreated samples. Conversely, ettringite, a swell-causing mineral, was not observed in the treated COPR.

  7. 37 CFR 1.824 - Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form. 1.824 Section 1.824 Patents... submissions in computer readable form. (a) The computer readable form required by § 1.821(e) shall meet the following requirements: (1) The computer readable form shall contain a single “Sequence Listing” as either...

  8. ASCORBIC ACID REDUCTION ON RESIDUAL ACTIVE CHLORINE IN POTABLE WATER PRIOR TO HALOCARBOXYLATE DETERMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In studies on the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), it is necessary to scavenge residual active (odxidizing) chlorine in order to fix the chlorination byproducts (such as haloethanoates) at a point in time . Such research projects often have distinct needs from requi...

  9. ASCORBIC ACID REDUCTION OF RESIDUAL ACTIVE CHLORINE IN POTABLE WATER PRIOR TO HALOCARBOXYLATE DETERMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In studies on the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), it is necessary to scavenge residual active (oxidizing) chlorine in order to fix the chlorination byproducts (such as haloethanoates) at a point in time. Thus, methods designed for compliance monitoring are not alway...

  10. 40 CFR 180.155 - 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific... ammonium, sodium, or potassium salts, ethyl ester, and acetamide in or on food commodities as follows: Commodity Parts per million Cherry, sweet 0.1 Fruit, pome, group 11 0.15 Olive 0.7 Orange 0.1 Pineapple1...

  11. Dissimilar roles of the four conserved acidic residues in the thermal stability of poly(A)-specific ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    He, Guang-Jun; Liu, Wei-Feng; Yan, Yong-Bin

    2011-01-01

    Divalent metal ions are essential for the efficient catalysis and structural stability of many nucleotidyl-transfer enzymes. Poly(A)-specific ribonuclease (PARN) belongs to the DEDD superfamily of 3'-exonucleases, and the active site of PARN contains four conserved acidic amino acid residues that coordinate two Mg(2+) ions. In this research, we studied the roles of these four acidic residues in PARN thermal stability by mutational analysis. It was found that Mg(2+) significantly decreased the rate but increased the aggregate size of the 54 kDa wild-type PARN in a concentration-dependent manner. All of the four mutants decreased PARN thermal aggregation, while the aggregation kinetics of the mutants exhibited dissimilar Mg(2+)-dependent behavior. A comparison of the kinetic parameters indicated that Asp28 was the most crucial one to the binding of the two Mg(2+) ions, while metal B might be more important in PARN structural stability. The spectroscopic and aggregation results also suggested that the alterations in the active site structure by metal binding or mutations might lead to a global conformational change of the PARN molecule.

  12. Uptake of nitric acid, ammonia, and organics in orographic clouds: mass spectrometric analyses of droplet residual and interstitial aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Johannes; Mertes, Stephan; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Herrmann, Hartmut; Borrmann, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Concurrent in situ analyses of interstitial aerosol and cloud droplet residues have been conducted at the Schmücke mountain site during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia campaign in central Germany in September and October 2010. Cloud droplets were sampled from warm clouds (temperatures between -3 and +16 °C) by a counterflow virtual impactor and the submicron-sized residues were analyzed by a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS), while the interstitial aerosol composition was measured by an high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). During cloud-free periods, the submicron out-of-cloud aerosol was analyzed using both instruments, allowing for intercomparison between the two instruments. Further instrumentation included black carbon measurements and optical particle counters for the aerosol particles as well as optical sizing instrumentation for the cloud droplets. The results show that, under cloud conditions, on average 85 % of the submicron aerosol mass partitioned into the cloud liquid phase. Scavenging efficiencies of nitrate, ammonium, sulfate, and organics ranged between 60 and 100 %, with nitrate having, in general, the highest values. For black carbon, the scavenging efficiency was markedly lower (about 24 %). The nitrate and ammonium mass fractions were found to be markedly enhanced in cloud residues, indicating uptake of gaseous nitric acid and ammonia into the aqueous phase. This effect was found to be temperature dependent: at lower temperatures, the nitrate and ammonium mass fractions in the residues were higher. Also, the oxidation state of the organic matter in cloud residues was found to be temperature dependent: the O : C ratio was lower at higher temperatures. A possible explanation for this observation is a more effective uptake and/or higher concentrations of low-oxidized water-soluble volatile organic compounds, possibly of biogenic origin, at higher temperatures. Organic nitrates were observed

  13. Biofilm-forming bacteria with varying tolerance to peracetic acid from a paper machine.

    PubMed

    Rasimus, Stiina; Kolari, Marko; Rita, Hannu; Hoornstra, Douwe; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja

    2011-09-01

    Biofilms cause runnability problems in paper machines and are therefore controlled with biocides. Peracetic acid is usually effective in preventing bulky biofilms. This study investigated the microbiological status of a paper machine where low concentrations (≤ 15 ppm active ingredient) of peracetic acid had been used for several years. The paper machine contained a low amount of biofilms. Biofilm-forming bacteria from this environment were isolated and characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, whole-cell fatty acid analysis, biochemical tests, and DNA fingerprinting. Seventy-five percent of the isolates were identified as members of the subclades Sphingomonas trueperi and S. aquatilis, and the others as species of the genera Burkholderia (B. cepacia complex), Methylobacterium, and Rhizobium. Although the isolation media were suitable for the common paper machine biofoulers Deinococcus, Meiothermus, and Pseudoxanthomonas, none of these were found, indicating that peracetic acid had prevented their growth. Spontaneous, irreversible loss of the ability to form biofilm was observed during subculturing of certain isolates of the subclade S. trueperi. The Sphingomonas isolates formed monoculture biofilms that tolerated peracetic acid at concentrations (10 ppm active ingredient) used for antifouling in paper machines. High pH and low conductivity of the process waters favored the peracetic acid tolerance of Sphingomonas sp. biofilms. This appears to be the first report on sphingomonads as biofilm formers in warm water using industries.

  14. Preparation of a modified flue gas desulphurization residue and its effect on pot sorghum growth and acidic soil amelioration.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lin; Xu, Peizhi; Xie, Kaizhi; Tang, Shuanhu; Li, Yongli

    2011-09-15

    A modified flue gas desulphurization residue (MFGDR) was prepared and its effects on sorghum growth and acidic soil amelioration were evaluated in this paper. The MFGDR was prepared by calcining a mixture of dry/semi-dry flue gas desulphurization (FGD) residue from a coal-fired power plant, sorted potash feldspar and/or limestone powder. The available nutrients from the MFGDR were determined with 4.91 wt% K(+), 1.15 wt% Mg(2+), 22.4 wt% Ca(2+), 7.01 wt% Si(4+) and 2.07 wt% SO(4)(2-)-S in 0.1 mol L(-1) citric acid solution. Its pH value was held at 9.60 displaying slightly alkaline. The results of sorghum pot growth in both red and crimson acidic soil for 30 days indicated that adding the MFGDR at a dosage of 2 g kg(-1) in total soil weight would increase the growth rate of biomass by 24.3-149% (wet weight basis) and 47.3-157% (dry weight), the stem length and thickness increase by 5.75-22.1% and 4.76-30.9% in contrast with CK treatment for two test cuttings, respectively. The effect on sorghum growth was attributed to the increase of available nutrients, the enhancement of soil pH value and the reduction of aluminum toxicity in acidic soil due to the addition of the MFGDR. The experimental results also suggested that the MFGDR could be effectively used to ameliorate the acidic soil which is widely distributed throughout the southern China.

  15. Simulation of acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic residues to fermentable sugars for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidiras, Dimitris

    2012-12-01

    The dilute acid hydrolysis of fir sawdust with sulfuric acid was undertaken in a batch reactor system (autoclave). The experimental data and reaction kinetic analysis indicate that this is a potential process for cellulose and hemicelluloses hydrolysis, due to a rapid hydrolysis reaction for acid concentration 0.045 N at 160-180°C. It was found that significant sugar degradation occurred at these conditions. The optimum conditions gave a yield of 38% total fermentable sugars. The kinetics of dilute acid hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses (polysaccharides) were simulated using four pseudo-kinetic models. The reaction rate constants were calculated in each case.

  16. Kinetics of color development of melanoidins formed from fructose/amino acid model systems.

    PubMed

    Echavarría, A P; Pagán, J; Ibarz, A

    2014-03-01

    The formation of soluble melanoidins from a single combination of sugar (fructose) and amino acid model systems were evaluated kinetically. The selected amino acids, commonly found in apple juice and highly reactive in the Maillard reaction, were asparagine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. The effect of these reagents and the treatment at different temperatures (50 , 85 , and 100 ) during 96 h on the color intensity of the melanoidin formed was measured by absorbance at different wavelengths (280, 325, 405, and 420 nm). The absorbance of the melanoidin formed from all model systems was located on the wavelength of 405 nm, that is, the area of the visible spectrum close to the UV region. The color of the melanoidins was directly measured using the CIELAB color space system. A first-order kinetic model was applied to the evolution of the ΔE * (color difference) and L * (lightness) of the color. The fructose/aspartic acid model system values of a * (redness) and b * (yellowness) were found in the brown-red zone. Therefore, the color development of the melanoidins was influenced by the type of amino acid and temperature. Especially, it is thought that the a * and b * values can be used to explain the differences among the amino acids in the color development of melanoidins.

  17. Amino acid residues in the Ler protein critical for derepression of the LEE5 promoter in enteropathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Su-Mi; Jeong, Jae-Ho; Choy, Hyon E; Shin, Minsang

    2016-08-01

    Enteropathogenic E. coli causes attaching and effacing (A/E) intestinal lesions. The genes involved in the formation of A/E lesions are encoded within a chromosomal island comprising of five major operons, LEE1-5. The global regulator H-NS represses the expression of these operons. Ler, a H-NS homologue, counteracts the H-NS-mediated repression. Using a novel genetic approach, we identified the amino acid residues in Ler that are involved in the interaction with H-NS: I20 and L23 in the C-terminal portion of α-helix 3, and I42 in the following unstructured linker region.

  18. Monoclonal antipeptide antibodies against amino acid residues 1101-1106 of human C4 distinguish C4A from C4B.

    PubMed

    Reilly, B D; Levine, P; Rothbard, J; Skanes, V M

    1991-01-01

    Comparison of amino acid sequences of the alpha-chain fragment of human C4, C4d, has shown C4A- and C4B-specific sequences at residues 1101-1106 in which the aspartic acid-histidine substitution at position 1106 may be related to the amide and ester bond forming properties of these molecules. Peptides containing twelve amino acid residues of the C4A- or C4B-specific sequences were synthesized and injected into female Balb/c mice. Serum from 2 mice, one immunized with the C4A-specific peptide and the other with the C4B-specific peptide, gave strong isotype-specific responses in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against affinity-purified C4A3 and C4B2B1. Spleen cells from these mice were fused with the mouse myeloma SP2/0-Ag 14, and two cloned cell lines, AII-1 and BII-1, were established from hybrids. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting of monoclonal antibodies AII-1 and BII-1 show that the former reacts with the C4A but not with the C4B alpha-chain and the latter with C4B but not with the C4A alpha-chain. Furthermore, immunoblotting of C4 allelic variants showed that AII-1 reacted with all C4A allotypes tested, including A6, A4, A3 and A2, whereas BII-1 reacted with all C4B allotypes tested, including B5, B3, B2, and B1.

  19. The selective reaction of methoxyamine with cytidine residues in mammalian initiator transfer ribonucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Peter W.; Clark, Brian F.C.

    1974-01-01

    Methoxyamine reacts selectively with tRNA molecules at certain exposed cytosine residues usually located in non base-paired regions of the two dimensional clover leaf structure. Here methoxyamine is used for the first time in a study of a mammalian tRNA structure. One of the sequence abnormalities of myeloma initiator tRNA is a cytosine instead of the usual uracil immediately preceding the anticodon. A study of the reaction of the cytosine residues with methoxyamine indicates that the accessibility of bases to chemical reagents in the anticodon loop of this mammalian initiator tRNA is very similar to that observed for the bacterial initiator tRNA. Images PMID:10793658

  20. The Analytic Reconciliation of Classic Mayan Elite Pottery: Squaring Pottery Function with Form, Adornment, and Residual Contents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughmiller-Newman, Jennifer Ann

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation presents a multidisciplinary means of determining the actual content (foodstuff, non-foodstuff, or lack of contents) of Classic Mayan (A.D. 250-900) vessels. Based on previous studies that have identified the residues of foodstuffs named in hieroglyphic texts (e.g. cacao), this study is designed to further investigate foodstuff…

  1. Sub-structures formed in the excited state are responsible for tryptophan residues fluorescence in β-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Albani, Jihad-Rene

    2011-07-01

    Origin of tryptophan residues fluorescence in β-lactoglobulin is analyzed. Fluorescence lifetimes and spectra of β-lactoglobulin solution are measured at pH going from 2 to 12 and in 6 M guanidine. Tryptophan residues emit with three lifetimes at all conditions. Two lifetimes (0.4-0.5 ns and 2-4 ns) are in the same range of those measured for tryptophan free in solution. Lifetimes in the denatured states are lower than those measured in the native state. Pre-exponential values are modified with the protein structure. Data are identical to those already obtained for other proteins. Fluorescence lifetimes characterize internal states of the tryptophan residues (Tryptophan sub-structures) independently of the tryptophan environments, the third lifetime results from the interaction that is occurring between the Trp residues and its environment. Pre-exponential values characterize substructures populations. In conclusion, tryptophan mission occurs from substates generated in the excited state. This is in good agreement with the theory we described in recent works.

  2. Effects of Lactic Acid Bacteria on Residual Nitrite in a Summer Style Sausage.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Lactobacillus leichmannii, Streptococcus faecalis, and several atypical lactobacilli isolated from fresh beef and mutton reduced 200-1000 ppm nitrite...faecalis and an atypical lactobacillus isolated from beef) showed abilities to reduce pH and residual nitrite to levels similar to L. plantarum and P...Leuconostoc mesenteroides reduced nitrite at a faster rate than either Lactobacillus plantarum or Lactobacillus viridescens, while Lactobacillus

  3. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of some new non-proteinogenic amino acids containing thiazole residues.

    PubMed

    Stanchev, M; Pajpanova, T; Golovinsky, E

    2000-01-01

    Some new thioamides and thiazoles have been synthesized using canavanine, S-cysteine, homo-S-cysteinesulfonamides and their N-omega aminoethylated derivatives as adducts in order to investigate the structure-antimicrobial activity relationships. The compounds showed substantial antibacterial activity in vitro against various gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus etc.) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris etc.) bacteria. These findings indicate that the presence of the thiazole residue is an essential factor for the antibacterial effect.

  4. Stabile Chlorine Isotope Study of Martian Shergottites and Nakhlites; Whole Rock and Acid Leachates and Residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    We have established a precise analytical technique for stable chlorine isotope measurements of tiny planetary materials by TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) [1], for which the results are basically consistent with the IRMS tech-nique (gas source mass spectrometry) [2,3,4]. We present here results for Martian shergottites and nakhlites; whole rocks, HNO3-leachates and residues, and discuss the chlorine isotope evolution of planetary Mars.

  5. Amino acid residues 196–225 of LcrV represent a plague protective epitope

    PubMed Central

    Quenee, Lauriane E.; Berube, Bryan J.; Segal, Joshua; Elli, Derek; Ciletti, Nancy A.; Anderson, Deborah; Schneewind, Olaf

    2010-01-01

    LcrV, a protein that resides at the tip of the type III secretion needles of Yersinia pestis, is the single most important plague protective antigen. Earlier work reported monoclonal antibody MAb 7.3, which binds a conformational epitope of LcrV and protects experimental animals against lethal plague challenge. By screening monoclonal antibodies directed against LcrV for their ability to protect immunized mice against bubonic plague challenge, we examined here the possibility of additional protective epitopes. MAb BA5 protected animals against plague, neutralized the Y. pestis type III secretion pathway and promoted opsonophagocytic clearance of bacteria in blood. LcrV residues 196–225 were necessary and sufficient for MAb-BA5 binding. Compared to full length LcrV, a variant lacking its residues 196–225 retained the ability of eliciting plague protection. These results identify LcrV residues 196–225 as a linear epitope that is recognized by the murine immune system to confer plague protection. PMID:20005318

  6. Radionuclide Leaching from Residual Solids Remaining after Acid Dissolution of K East Area Sludge Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.; Carlson, C.D.; Soderquist, C.Z.; Fadeff, S.K.

    1999-04-02

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of various leach treatments for decontaminating dissolver residual solids (KEACRESID1) produced during a 24-hour dissolution of K East Basin floor and Weasel Pit sludge composite in boiling 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The scope of this testing has been described in Section 4.5 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basin Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the residual solids generated in the K Basin sludge treatment process can restrict disposal of this solid to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The starting dissolver residual solid for this testing, KEACRESID1, is a visibly heterogeneous material. This material contains radionuclides at concentrations above the ERDF Waste Acceptance Criteria for transuranics (TRU) by about a factor of 3, for {sup 239}Pu by a factor of 10, and for {sup 241}Am by a factor of 1.6. It meets the ERDF criterion for {sup 137}Cs by a factor of 4 and for uranium by a factor of 10. Therefore, the radionuclides of greatest interest in this leaching study are first {sup 239}Pu, and then {sup 241}Am, {sup 137}Cs, and uranium.

  7. Advantages of using glycolic acid as a retardant in a brushite forming cement.

    PubMed

    Mariño, Faleh Tamimi; Torres, Jesús; Hamdan, Mohammad; Rodríguez, Carmen Rueda; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2007-11-01

    In this study we have compared the effect of using acetic, glycolic, and citric acids on the brushite cement setting reaction and the properties of the resultant cement. The cement solid phase was made by mixing beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), monocalcium dihydrogen phosphate anhydrate (MCPA), and sodium pyrophosphate, whereas the cement liquid phase consisted of aqueous solutions of carboxy acids at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 3.5M. Cements were prepared by mixing the solid phase with the liquid phase to form a workable paste. The cement setting time was longer for glycolic and citric acids. The best mechanical properties in dry environments were obtained using glycolic and citric acid liquid phases. In a wet environment at 37 degrees C, the cement set with glycolic acid was the strongest one. Brushite cement diametral tensile strength seems to be affected by the calcium-carboxyl phase produced in the setting reaction. The acceptable setting time and mechanical properties of cements set in glycolic acid solutions are attributed to the additional hydrophilic groups in the carboxylic acid and the low solubility in water of the calcium salt produced in the reaction. Moreover, at high concentrations, carboxylic acids add chemically to the cement matrix becoming reactants themselves.

  8. Comparison of the nucleic acids of helical and coccoid forms of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Narikawa, S; Kawai, S; Aoshima, H; Kawamata, O; Kawaguchi, R; Hikiji, K; Kato, M; Iino, S; Mizushima, Y

    1997-01-01

    The nucleic acids of the helical and coccoid forms of Helicobacter pylori were studied to determine if the coccoid forms are "viable (capable of growing) but nonculturable." Using a reference strain (NCTC 11638) and five clinical strains, the nucleic acid contents, DNA integrity, and results of PCR and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) were compared for helical H. pylori and coccoid forms induced using glycochenodeoxycholic acid or bismuth citrate. The DNA and RNA contents of the coccoid forms were respectively 6.8- and 8.1-fold lower than those of helical H. pylori after 3 days of induction and 11.5- and 14.7-fold lower after 7 days. Agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA extracted from the coccoid forms after 3 days of induction showed a smear pattern indicating DNA cleavage, whereas DNA from helical H. pylori showed a single band with a high molecular mass. After 12 days of induction, all RNA samples from 100% coccoid cultures were negative for the mRNA of urease A or the 26-kDa species-specific protein by RT-PCR. However, most RNA samples obtained after 3 or 7 days of induction were positive at low levels despite the lack of recovery from these cultures. These results suggest that the coccoid form of H. pylori has impaired genomic DNA and is in the process of cellular degeneration, thus being still alive but nonincreasable. PMID:9144365

  9. Optimization of a Nucleic Acids united-RESidue 2-Point model (NARES-2P) with a maximum-likelihood approach

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam

    2015-12-28

    Coarse-grained models are useful tools to investigate the structural and thermodynamic properties of biomolecules. They are obtained by merging several atoms into one interaction site. Such simplified models try to capture as much as possible information of the original biomolecular system in all-atom representation but the resulting parameters of these coarse-grained force fields still need further optimization. In this paper, a force field optimization method, which is based on maximum-likelihood fitting of the simulated to the experimental conformational ensembles and least-squares fitting of the simulated to the experimental heat-capacity curves, is applied to optimize the Nucleic Acid united-RESidue 2-point (NARES-2P) model for coarse-grained simulations of nucleic acids recently developed in our laboratory. The optimized NARES-2P force field reproduces the structural and thermodynamic data of small DNA molecules much better than the original force field.

  10. Influence of the amino acid residue downstream of (Asp)4Lys on enterokinase cleavage of a fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Hosfield, T; Lu, Q

    1999-04-10

    We have studied the cleavage efficiency of the protease enterokinase (EK) using the novel vector pESP4. pESP4 is a yeast expression vector equipped with ligation-independent cloning sites, a GST purification tag, and a FLAG epitope tag. EK is used to cleave the FLAG and GST tags leaving the protein of interest without any extraneously added amino acids. We have found that EK is relatively permissive of the amino acid residue downstream of the recognition sequence (the P'1 position). This makes EK an ideal choice to use as a protease to cleave any protein of interest cloned within the pESP4 yeast expression vector.

  11. Optimization of a Nucleic Acids united-RESidue 2-Point model (NARES-2P) with a maximum-likelihood approach

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2015-01-01

    Coarse-grained models are useful tools to investigate the structural and thermodynamic properties of biomolecules. They are obtained by merging several atoms into one interaction site. Such simplified models try to capture as much as possible information of the original biomolecular system in all-atom representation but the resulting parameters of these coarse-grained force fields still need further optimization. In this paper, a force field optimization method, which is based on maximum-likelihood fitting of the simulated to the experimental conformational ensembles and least-squares fitting of the simulated to the experimental heat-capacity curves, is applied to optimize the Nucleic Acid united-RESidue 2-point (NARES-2P) model for coarse-grained simulations of nucleic acids recently developed in our laboratory. The optimized NARES-2P force field reproduces the structural and thermodynamic data of small DNA molecules much better than the original force field. PMID:26723596

  12. Mutational analysis of amino acid residues involved in catalytic activity of a family 18 chitinase from tulip bulbs.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Keisuke; Yamagami, Takeshi; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kuhara, Satoru; Aso, Yoichi; Ishiguro, Masatsune

    2003-02-01

    We expressed chitinase-1 (TBC-1) from tulip bulbs (Tulipa bakeri) in E. coli cells and used site-directed mutagenesis to identify amino acid residues essential for catalytic activity. Mutations at Glu-125 and Trp-251 completely abolished enzyme activity, and activity decreased with mutations at Asp-123 and Trp-172 when glycolchitin was the substrate. Activity changed with the mutations of Trp-251 to one of several amino acids with side-chains of little hydrophobicity, suggesting that hydrophobic interaction of Trp-251 is important for the activity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation analysis with hevamine as the model compound showed that the distance between Asp-123 and Glu-125 was extended by mutation of Trp-251. Kinetic studies of Trp-251-mutated chitinases confirmed these various phenomena. The results suggested that Glu-125 and Trp-251 are essential for enzyme activity and that Trp-251 had a direct role in ligand binding.

  13. Molecular design of glycoprotein mimetics: glycoblotting by engineered proteins with an oxylamino-functionalized amino acid residue.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Naoki; Oiwa, Kei; Hohsaka, Takahiro; Sadamoto, Reiko; Niikura, Kenichi; Fukuhara, Norio; Takimoto, Akio; Kondo, Hirosato; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2005-11-18

    The general and efficient method for the site-directed glycosylation of proteins is a key step in order to understand the biological importance of the carbohydrate chains of proteins and to control functional roles of the engineered glycoproteins in terms of the development of improved glycoprotein therapeutics. We have developed a novel method for site-directed glycosylation of proteins based on chemoselective blotting of common reducing sugars by genetically encoded proteins. The oxylamino-functionalized L-homoserine residues, 2-amino-4-O-(N-methylaminooxy) butanoic acid and 2-amino-4-aminooxy butanoic acid, were efficiently incorporated into proteins by using the four-base codon/anticodon pair strategy in Escherichia coli in vitro translation. Direct and chemoselective coupling between unmodified simple sugars and N-methylaminooxy group displayed on the engineered streptavidin allowed for the combinatorial synthesis of novel glycoprotein mimetics.

  14. Improving volatile fatty acids production by exploiting the residual substrates in post-fermented sludge: Protease catalysis of refractory protein.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bo; Liu, Hongbo; Wang, Yuanyuan; Bai, Jie; Liu, He; Fu, Bo

    2016-03-01

    The real cause to the low yield of volatile fatty acids (VFAs), from inhibition or low biodegradation, is uncertain in sludge anaerobic fermentation. In this study, poor biodegradability of proteins and fast decrease of the indigenous hydrolase activity in the residual post-fermented sludge were found to be the major reasons. With the addition of trypsin or alkaline protease in residual post-fermented sludge after primary alkaline fermentation, degradation efficiency of refractory protein increased by 33.6% and 34.8%, respectively. Accordingly, the VFAs yields were improved by 69.7% and 106.1%, respectively. Furthermore, the activities of added trypsin and alkaline protease could maintain at 13.52 U/mL and 19.11 U/mL in the alkaline fermentation process. This study demonstrated that exploiting the refractory proteins in residual post-fermented sludge by protease addition seems to be a very promising way for improving VFAs yield of conventional alkaline fermentations with waste activated sludge.

  15. An eleven amino acid residue deletion expands the substrate specificity of acetyl xylan esterase II (AXE II) from Penicillium purpurogenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombres, Marcela; Garate, José A.; Lagos, Carlos F.; Araya-Secchi, Raúl; Norambuena, Patricia; Quiroz, Soledad; Larrondo, Luis; Pérez-Acle, Tomas; Eyzaguirre, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    The soft-rot fungus Penicillium purpurogenum secretes to the culture medium a variety of enzymes related to xylan biodegradation, among them three acetyl xylan esterases (AXE I, II and III). AXE II has 207 amino acids; it belongs to family 5 of the carbohydrate esterases and its structure has been determined by X-ray crystallography at 0.9 Å resolution (PDB 1G66). The enzyme possesses the α/β hydrolase fold and the catalytic triad typical of serine esterases (Ser90, His187 and Asp175). AXE II can hydrolyze esters of a large variety of alcohols, but it is restricted to short chain fatty acids. An analysis of its three-dimensional structure shows that a loop that covers the active site may be responsible for this strict specificity. Cutinase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes esters of long chain fatty acids and shows a structure similar to AXE II, lacks this loop. In order to generate an AXE II with this broader specificity, the preparation of a mutant lacking residues involving this loop (Gly104 to Ala114) was proposed. A set of molecular simulation experiments based on a comparative model of the mutant enzyme predicted a stable structure. Using site-directed mutagenesis, the loop's residues have been eliminated from the AXE II cDNA. The mutant protein has been expressed in Aspergillus nidulans A722 and Pichia pastoris, and it is active towards a range of fatty acid esters of up to at least 14 carbons. The availability of an esterase with broader specificity may have biotechnological applications for the synthesis of sugar esters.

  16. Phenolic acids identified in sorghum distillery residue demonstrated antioxidative and anti-cold-stress properties in cultured tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shin-Mei; Lin, Jing-Jen; Liao, Chih-Yuan; Cheng, Hui-Ling; Pan, Bonnie Sun

    2014-05-21

    This study aimed to identify the bioactive compounds and evaluate the anti-cold-stress function of the sorghum distillery residue (SDR) using tilapia as an alternative animal model. The highest contents of water-soluble bioactive compounds in SDR were polyphenols, followed by tannins, anthocyanins, and flavonoids. SDR was extracted with double-distilled water, 95% ethanol, and ethyl acetate, separately. The ethanol extract (SDR-E) yielded the highest polyphenol content [15.03 mg/g of SDR dry weight (dw)], of which the EC50 value of R,R-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging efficiency was 0.56 ± 0.04 mg/mL. The SDR-E suppressed the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) more efficiently than that of other extracts. Tilapia fed a diet containing 3.6% SDR-E decreased accumulative mortality during cold stress, of 46.2%. The accumulative morality of the control was 92.9%. The phenolic acids identified in SDR included gallic acid (0.36 ± 0.08 mg/g of SDR dw), 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (0.16 ± 0.12 mg/g of SDR dw), and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (0.49 ± 0.23 mg/g of SDR dw). Diets supplemented with 0.5% 4-hydroxybenzoic acid fed to tilapia showed a lower mortality rate than that fed 1.0% 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, comparable to that of the tilapia fed 20% SDR. The latter showed lower mortality than that of the control. These results suggested that 4-hydroxybenzoic acid is one of the major anti-cold-stress compounds in SDR.

  17. Acidic pH triggers conformational changes at the NH2-terminal propeptide of the precursor of pulmonary surfactant protein B to form a coiled coil structure.

    PubMed

    Bañares-Hidalgo, A; Pérez-Gil, J; Estrada, P

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein SP-B is synthesized as a larger precursor, proSP-B. We report that a recombinant form of human SP-BN forms a coiled coil structure at acidic pH. The protonation of a residue with pK=4.8±0.06 is the responsible of conformational changes detected by circular dichroism and intrinsic fluorescence emission. Sedimentation velocity analysis showed protein oligomerisation at any pH condition, with an enrichment of the species compatible with a tetramer at acidic pH. Low 2,2,2,-trifluoroethanol concentration promoted β-sheet structures in SP-BN, which bind Thioflavin T, at acidic pH, whereas it promoted coiled coil structures at neutral pH. The amino acid stretch predicted to form β-sheet parallel association in SP-BN overlaps with the sequence predicted by several programs to form coiled coil structure. A synthetic peptide ((60)W-E(85)) designed from the sequence of the amino acid stretch of SP-BN predicted to form coiled coil structure showed random coil conformation at neutral pH but concentration-dependent helical structure at acidic pH. Sedimentation velocity analysis of the peptide indicated monomeric state at neutral pH (s20, w=0.55S; Mr~3kDa) and peptide association (s20, w=1.735S; Mr=~14kDa) at acidic pH, with sedimentation equilibrium fitting to a Monomer-Nmer-Mmer model with N=6 and M=4 (Mr=14692Da). We propose that protein oligomerisation through coiled-coil motifs could then be a general feature in the assembly of functional units in saposin-like proteins in general and in the organization of SP-B in a functional surfactant, in particular.

  18. Amino acid sequence around the active-site serine residue in the acyltransferase domain of goat mammary fatty acid synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, J; Højrup, P; Rasmussen, M M; Roepstorff, P; Knudsen, J

    1985-01-01

    Goat mammary fatty acid synthetase was labelled in the acyltransferase domain by formation of O-ester intermediates by incubation with [1-14C]acetyl-CoA and [2-14C]malonyl-CoA. Tryptic-digest and CNBr-cleavage peptides were isolated and purified by high-performance reverse-phase and ion-exchange liquid chromatography. The sequences of the malonyl- and acetyl-labelled peptides were shown to be identical. The results confirm the hypothesis that both acetyl and malonyl groups are transferred to the mammalian fatty acid synthetase complex by the same transferase. The sequence is compared with those of other fatty acid synthetase transferases. PMID:3922356

  19. Abscisic acid form, concentration, and application timing influence phenology and bud cold hardiness in Merlot grapevines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of abscisic acid (ABA) form, concentration and application timing on bud cold hardiness, phenology and fruiting performance on ‘Merlot’ grapevines (Vitis vinifera) were evaluated in a three year field trial with site locations in British Columbia Canada, Ontario Canada, Washington U.S. ...

  20. The Effect of Voluntary Ventilation on Acid-base Responses to a Moo Duk Tkow Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetzler, Ronald K.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from a study that investigated the acid-base and lactate reponses to voluntary integration of breathing and exercise movements during beginning level form Ki Cho I, performed at competitive intensities. Findings suggest that respiratory compensation does not occur and that respiratory acidosis may contribute to metabolic…

  1. Prediction of fatty acid-binding residues on protein surfaces with three-dimensional probability distributions of interacting atoms.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Rajasekaran; Peng, Hung-Pin; Yang, An-Suei

    2014-08-01

    Protein-fatty acid interaction is vital for many cellular processes and understanding this interaction is important for functional annotation as well as drug discovery. In this work, we present a method for predicting the fatty acid (FA)-binding residues by using three-dimensional probability density distributions of interacting atoms of FAs on protein surfaces which are derived from the known protein-FA complex structures. A machine learning algorithm was established to learn the characteristic patterns of the probability density maps specific to the FA-binding sites. The predictor was trained with five-fold cross validation on a non-redundant training set and then evaluated with an independent test set as well as on holo-apo pair's dataset. The results showed good accuracy in predicting the FA-binding residues. Further, the predictor developed in this study is implemented as an online server which is freely accessible at the following website, http://ismblab.genomics.sinica.edu.tw/.

  2. Proteomic Investigation of Protein Profile Changes and Amino Acid Residue Level Modification in Cooked Lamb Meat: The Effect of Boiling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tzer-Yang; Morton, James D; Clerens, Stefan; Dyer, Jolon M

    2015-10-21

    Hydrothermal treatment (heating in water) is a common method of general food processing and preparation. For red-meat-based foods, boiling is common; however, how the molecular level effects of this treatment correlate to the overall food properties is not yet well-understood. The effects of differing boiling times on lamb meat and the resultant cooking water were here examined through proteomic evaluation. The longer boiling time was found to result in increased protein aggregation involving particularly proteins such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, as well as truncation in proteins such as in α-actinin-2. Heat-induced protein backbone cleavage was observed adjacent to aspartic acid and asparagine residues. Side-chain modifications of amino acid residues resulting from the heating, including oxidation of phenylalanine and formation of carboxyethyllysine, were characterized in the cooked samples. Actin and myoglobin bands from the cooked meat per se remained visible on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, even after significant cooking time. These proteins were also found to be the major source of observed heat-induced modifications. This study provides new insights into molecular-level modifications occurring in lamb meat proteins during boiling and a protein chemistry basis for better understanding the effect of this common treatment on the nutritional and functional properties of red-meat-based foods.

  3. Analysis of amino acids in latent fingerprint residue by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Atherton, Tom; Croxton, Ruth; Baron, Mark; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Jose; Gámiz-Gracia, Laura; García-Campaña, Ana M

    2012-11-01

    The analysis of the chemical composition of fingerprints is important for the development and improvement of existing fingerprint enhancement techniques. This study demonstrates the first analysis of a latent fingerprint sample, using an optimized CE-MS method. In total 12 amino acids were detected in the fingerprint sample. MS/MS fragmentation was used to provide additional identity confirmation, for which eight of the twelve detected amino acids generated confirmatory product ions. Nine amino acids were quantified and their relative abundances were consistent with previous studies with serine and glycine being the most abundant. The successful detection of amino acids from latent fingerprints demonstrates that CE-MS is a potential future technique for further study of such compounds in fingerprint samples.

  4. [Forming mechanism of humic acid-kaolin complexes and the adsorption of trichloroethylene].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-jing; He, Jiang-tao; Su, Si-hui

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between soil organic components and mineral components was explored in this study. Humic acid and kaolin were used for the preparation of organic-mineral complexes with different contents of organic matter, for experimental study of the adsorption of trichloroethylene. The results showed that the adsorption of trichlorethylene fitted the Freundlich isotherm model. The existence of interaction between humic acid and kaolin was indicated by the significant difference between the actual value and the theoretically overlaid value of the adsorption capacity. With various characterizations, such as FTIR and surface area & pore analysis, the mechanism of interaction between humic acid and kaolin was suggested as follows. When their contents were low, humic acid molecules firstly loaded on the surface binding sites of kaolin. Then with the content increased, as O/M( organic-mineral mass ratio) was 0.02-0.04, some surface pores of kaolin were filled by part of the molecules. After reaching a relatively stable stage, as O/M was 0.04-0.08, humic molecules continued to load on the surface of kaolin and formed the first humic molecule-layer. With humic acid content continued increasing, as O/M was 0.08-0.10, more humic molecules attached to kaolin surface through the interaction with the first layer of molecules and then formed the second layer. O/M was 0.10-0.16 as the whole second layer stage, meanwhile the first layer was compressed. Then when O/M was 0.16-0.4, there were still some humic loadings onto the second layer as the third layer, and further compressed the inner humic acid layers. Besides, some humic acid molecules or aggregates might go on attaching to form as further outer layer.

  5. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential for mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. This study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin. PMID:25724962

  6. Influence of residual elements in lead on oxygen- and hydrogen-gassing rates of lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, L. T.; Ceylan, H.; Haigh, N. P.; Lwin, T.; Rand, D. A. J.

    Raw lead materials contain many residual elements. With respect to setting 'safe' levels for these elements, each country has its own standard, but the majority of the present specifications for the lead used to prepare battery oxide apply to flooded batteries that employ antimonial grids. In these batteries, the antimony in the positive and negative grids dominates gassing characteristics so that the influence of residual elements is of little importance. This is, however, not the case for valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries, which use antimony-free grids and less sulfuric acid solution. Thus, it is necessary to specify 'acceptable' levels of residual elements for the production of VRLA batteries. In this study, 17 elements are examined, namely: antimony, arsenic, bismuth, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, germanium, iron, manganese, nickel, selenium, silver, tellurium, thallium, tin, and zinc. The following strategy has been formulated to determine the acceptable levels: (i) selection of a control oxide; (ii) determination of critical float, hydrogen and oxygen currents; (iii) establishment of a screening plan for the elements; (iv) development of a statistical method for analysis of the experimental results. The critical values of the float, hydrogen and oxygen currents are calculated from a field survey of battery failure data. The values serve as a base-line for comparison with the corresponding measured currents from cells using positive and negative plates produced either from the control oxide or from oxide doped with different levels of the 17 elements in combination. The latter levels are determined by means of a screening plan which is based on the Plackett-Burman experimental design. Following this systematic and thorough exercise, two specifications are proposed for the purity of the lead to be used in oxide production for VRLA technology.

  7. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; ...

    2015-02-27

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential formore » mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. Ultimately, this study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin.« less

  8. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-02-27

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential for mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. Ultimately, this study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin.

  9. Process for the removal of acid forming gases from exhaust gases and production of phosphoric acid

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Liu, David K.

    1992-01-01

    Exhaust gases are treated to remove NO or NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2 by contacting the gases with an aqueous emulsion or suspension of yellow phosphorous preferably in a wet scrubber. The addition of yellow phosphorous in the system induces the production of O.sub.3 which subsequently oxidizes NO to NO.sub.2. The resulting NO.sub.2 dissolves readily and can be reduced to form ammonium ions by dissolved SO.sub.2 under appropriate conditions. In a 20 acfm system, yellow phosphorous is oxidized to yield P.sub.2 O.sub.5 which picks up water to form H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 mists and can be collected as a valuable product. The pressure is not critical, and ambient pressures are used. Hot water temperatures are best, but economics suggest about 50.degree. C. The amount of yellow phosphorus used will vary with the composition of the exhaust gas, less than 3% for small concentrations of NO, and 10% or higher for concentrations above say 1000 ppm. Similarly, the pH will vary with the composition being treated, and it is adjusted with a suitable alkali. For mixtures of NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, alkalis that are used for flue gas desulfurization are preferred. With this process, better than 90% of SO.sub.2 and NO in simulated flue gas can be removed. Stoichiometric ratios (P/NO) ranging between 0.6 and 1.5 were obtained.

  10. Remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil washing residues with amino polycarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Arwidsson, Zandra; Elgh-Dalgren, Kristin; von Kronhelm, Thomas; Sjöberg, Ragnar; Allard, Bert; van Hees, Patrick

    2010-01-15

    Removal of Cu, Pb, and Zn by the action of the two biodegradable chelating agents [S,S]-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS) and methylglycinediacetic acid (MGDA), as well as citric acid, was tested. Three soil samples, which had previously been treated by conventional soil washing (water), were utilized in the leaching tests. Experiments were performed in batches (0.3 kg-scale) and with a WTC-mixer system (Water Treatment Construction, 10 kg-scale). EDDS and MGDA were most often equally efficient in removing Cu, Pb, and Zn after 10-60 min. Nonetheless, after 10d, there were occasionally significant differences in extraction efficiencies. Extraction with citric acid was generally less efficient, however equal for Zn (mainly) after 10d. Metal removal was similar in batch and WTC-mixer systems, which indicates that a dynamic mixer system could be used in full-scale. Use of biodegradable amino polycarboxylic acids for metal removal, as a second step after soil washing, would release most remaining metals (Cu, Pb and Zn) from the present soils, however only after long leaching time. Thus, a full-scale procedure, based on enhanced metal leaching by amino polycarboxylic acids from soil of the present kind, would require a pre-leaching step lasting several days in order to be efficient.

  11. Identification of critical amino acid residues and functional conservation of the Neurospora crassa and Rattus norvegicus orthologues of neuronal calcium sensor-1.

    PubMed

    Gohain, Dibakar; Deka, Rekha; Tamuli, Ranjan

    2016-12-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1) is a member of neuronal calcium sensor family of proteins consisting of an amino terminal myristoylation domain and four conserved calcium (Ca(2+)) binding EF-hand domains. We performed site-directed mutational analysis of three key amino acid residues that are glycine in the conserved site for the N-terminal myristoylation, a conserved glutamic acid residue responsible for Ca(2+) binding in the third EF-hand (EF3), and an unusual non-conserved amino acid arginine at position 175 in the Neurospora crassa NCS-1. The N. crassa strains possessing the ncs-1 mutant allele of these three amino acid residues showed impairment in functions ranging from growth, Ca(2+) stress tolerance, and ultraviolet survival. In addition, heterologous expression of the NCS-1 from Rattus norvegicus in N. crassa confirmed its interspecies functional conservation. Moreover, functions of glutamic acid at position 120, the first Ca(2+) binding residue among all the EF-hands of the R. norvegicus NCS-1 was found conserved. Thus, we identified three critical amino acid residues of N. crassa NCS-1, and demonstrated its functional conservation across species using the orthologue from R. norvegicus.

  12. Amino acid sequence requirements at residues 69 and 238 for the SME-1 beta-lactamase to confer resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Majiduddin, Fahd K; Palzkill, Timothy

    2003-03-01

    Carbapenem antibiotics have been used to counteract resistant strains of bacteria harboring beta-lactamases and extended-spectrum beta-lactamases. Four enzymes from the class A group of beta-lactamases, NMC-A, IMI-1, SME-1, and KPC-1, efficiently hydrolyze carbapenem antibiotics. Sequence comparisons and structural information indicate that cysteines at amino acid residues 69 and 238, which are conserved in all four of these enzymes, form a disulfide bond that is unique to these beta-lactamases. To test whether this disulfide bond is required for catalytic activity, the codons for residues Cys69 and Cys238 were randomized individually and simultaneously by PCR-based mutagenesis to create random replacement libraries for these positions. Mutants that were able to confer resistance to ampicillin, imipenem, or cefotaxime were selected from these libraries. The results indicate that positions Cys69 and Cys238 are critical for hydrolysis of all of the antibiotics tested, suggesting that the disulfide bond is generally required for this enzyme to catalyze the hydrolysis of beta-lactam antibiotics.

  13. Identification of conserved amino acid residues critical for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase function in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Craigie, R

    1992-01-01

    We have probed the structural organization of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase protein by limited proteolysis and the functional organization by site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acid residues. A central region of the protein was relatively resistant to proteolysis. Proteins with altered amino acids in this region, or in the N-terminal part of the protein that includes a putative zinc-binding motif, were purified and assayed for 3' processing, DNA strand transfer, and disintegration activities in vitro. In general, these mutations had parallel effects on 3' processing and DNA strand transfer, suggesting that integrase may utilize a single active site for both reactions. The only proteins that were completely inactive in all three assays contained mutations at conserved amino acids in the central region, suggesting that this part of the protein may be involved in catalysis. In contrast, none of the mutations in the N-terminal region resulted in a protein that was inactive in all three assays, suggesting that this part of integrase may not be essential for catalysis. The disintegration reaction was particularly insensitive to these amino acid substitutions, indicating that some function that is important for 3' processing and DNA strand transfer may be dispensable for disintegration. Images PMID:1404595

  14. Radiolytic Modification of Sulfur Containing Acidic Amino Residues in Model Peptides: Fundamental Studies for Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Protein footprinting based on hydroxyl radical-mediated modification and quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis is a proven technique for examining protein structure, protein-ligand interactions, and structural allostery upon protein complex formation. The reactive and solvent-accessible amino acid side chains function as structural probes; however, correct structural analysis depends on the identification and quantification of all the relevant oxidative modifications within the protein sequence. Sulfur-containing amino acids are oxidized readily and the mechanisms of oxidation are particularly complex, although they have been extensively investigated by EPR and other spectroscopic methods. Here we have undertaken a detailed mass spectrometry study (using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry) of model peptides containing cysteine (Cys-SH), cystine (disulfide bonded Cys), and methionine after oxidation using {gamma}-rays or synchrotron X-rays and have compared these results to those expected from oxidation mechanisms proposed in the literature. Radiolysis of cysteine leads to cysteine sulfonic acid (+48 Da mass shift) and cystine as the major products; other minor products including cysteine sulfinic acid (+32 Da mass shift) and serine (-16 Da mass shift) are observed. Radiolysis of cystine results in the oxidative opening of the disulfide bond and generation of cysteine sulfonic acid and sulfinic acid; however, the rate of oxidation is significantly less than that for cysteine. Radiolysis of methionine gives rise primarily to methionine sulfoxide (+16 Da mass shift); this can be further oxidized to methionine sulfone (+32 Da mass shift) or another product with a -32 Da mass shift likely due to aldehyde formation at the {gamma}-carbon. Due to the high reactivity of sulfur-containing amino acids, the extent of oxidation is easily influenced by secondary oxidation events or the presence of redox reagents used in standard proteolytic

  15. Conformational study reveals amino acid residues essential for hemagglutinating and anti-proliferative activities of Clematis montana lectin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bangmin; Zhang, Bin; Qi, Wei; Zhu, Yanan; Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Nan; Sun, Rong; Bao, Jinku; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-11-01

    Clematis montana lectin (CML), a novel mannose-binding lectin purified from C. montana Buch.-Ham stem (Ranunculaceae), has been proved to have hemagglutinating activity in rabbit erythrocytes and apoptosis-inducing activity in tumor cells. However, the biochemical properties of CML have not revealed and its structural information still needs to be elucidated. In this study, it was found that CML possessed quite good thermostability and alkaline resistance, and its hemagglutinating activity was bivalent metal cation dependent. In addition, hemagglutination test and fluorescence spectroscopy proved that GuHCl, urea, and sodium dodecyl sulfate could change the conformation of CML and further caused the loss of hemagglutination activity. Moreover, the changes of fluorescence spectrum indicated that the tryptophan (Trp) microenvironment conversion might be related to the conformation and bioactivities of CML. In addition, it was also found that Trp residues, arginine (Arg) residues, and sulfhydryl were important for the hemagglutinating activity of CML, but only Trp was proved to be crucial for the CML conformation. Furthermore, the Trp, Arg, and sulfhydryl-modified CML exhibited 97.17%, 76.99%, and 49.64% loss of its anti-proliferative activity, respectively, which was consistent with the alterations of its hemagglutinating activity. Given these findings, Trp residues on the surface of CML are essential for the active center to form substrate-accessible conformation and suitable environment for carbohydrate binding.

  16. Nonenzymatic oligomerization reactions on templates containing inosinic acid or diaminopurine nucleotide residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The template-directed oligomerization of nucleoside-5'-phosphoro-2-methyl imidazolides on standard oligonucleotide templates has been studied extensively. Here, we describe experiments with templates in which inosinic acid (I) is substituted for guanylic acid, or 2,6-diaminopurine nucleotide (D) for adenylic acid. We find that the substitution of I for G in a template is strongly inhibitory and prevents any incorporation of C into internal positions in the oligomeric products of the reaction. The substitution of D for A, on the contrary, leads to increased incorporation of U into the products. We found no evidence for the template-directed facilitation of oligomerization of A or I through A-I base pairing. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  17. Early region 1B of adenovirus 2 encodes two coterminal proteins of 495 and 155 amino acid residues.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C W; Schmitt, R C; Smart, J E; Lewis, J B

    1984-01-01

    Partial sequence analysis of tryptic peptides has identified the E1B-495R (E1b-57K) (early transcription region 1B of 495 amino acid residues, with an approximate molecular weight of 57,000) protein of adenovirus 2 as encoded by the 495 amino acid open reading frame located in the adenovirus 2 DNA sequence between nucleotides 2016 and 3500. Additional proteins of 16,000 Mr and 18,000 Mr that are related to the E1B-495R protein were identified by cell-free translation of hybridization-selected mRNA. Analysis of [35S]methionine-containing amino terminal tryptic peptides by thin-layer chromatography showed that the E1B-495R, E1B-18K, and E1B-16K proteins all begin at the same initiation codon. The E1B-495R protein from 293 cells also has the same initial tryptic peptide, acetyl-methionyl-glutamyl-arginine. Sequence analysis of E1B-18K tryptic peptides indicated that this protein also has the same carboxy terminus as the E1B-495R protein and that it is derived from an mRNA that is spliced to remove sequences between nucleotides 2250 and 3269, resulting in a protein product of 155 amino acid residues. Analysis of E1B-16K tryptic peptides has not yet revealed the carboxy terminal structure of this protein. Both the E1B-495R and the E1B-155R (E1B-18K) proteins, as well as the E1B-16K protein, were precipitated from cell-free translations and from extracts of infected cells by antiserum against an amino terminal nonapeptide common to these proteins. Images PMID:6323739

  18. Extended amino acid sequences around the active-site lysine residue of class-I fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases from rabbit muscle, sturgeon muscle, trout muscle and ox liver.

    PubMed Central

    Benfield, P A; Forcina, B G; Gibbons, I; Perham, R N

    1979-01-01

    1. Amino acid sequences covering the region between residues 173 and 248 [adopting the numbering system proposed by Lai, Nakai & Chang (1974) Science 183, 1204-1206] were derived for trout (Salmo trutta) muscle aldolase and for ox liver aldolase. A comparable sequence was derived for residues 180-248 of sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) muscle aldolase. The close homology with the rabbit muscle enzyme was used to align the peptides of the other aldolases from which the sequences were derived. The results also allowed a partial sequence for the N-terminal 39 residues for the ox liver enzyme to be deduced. 2. In the light of the strong homology evinced for these enzymes, a re-investigation of the amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle aldolase between residues 181 and 185 was undertaken. This indicated the presence of a hitherto unsuspected -Ile-Val-sequence between residues 181 and 182 and the need to invert the sequence -Glu-Val- to -Val-Glx- at positions 184 and 185. 3. Comparison of the available amino acid sequences of these enzymes suggested an early evolutionary divergence of the genes for muscle and liver aldolases. It was also consistent with other evidence that the central region of the primary structure of these enzymes (which includes the active-site lysine-227) forms part of a conserved folding domain in the protein subunit. 4. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences proposed has been deposited as Suy Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1978) 169, 5. PMID:534504

  19. Insights into the crystallisation process from anhydrous, hydrated and solvated crystal forms of diatrizoic acid.

    PubMed

    Fucke, Katharina; McIntyre, Garry J; Lemée-Cailleau, Marie-Hélène; Wilkinson, Clive; Edwards, Alison J; Howard, Judith A K; Steed, Jonathan W

    2015-01-12

    Diatrizoic acid (DTA), a clinically used X-ray contrast agent, crystallises in two hydrated, three anhydrous and nine solvated solid forms, all of which have been characterised by X-ray crystallography. Single-crystal neutron structures of DTA dihydrate and monosodium DTA tetrahydrate have been determined. All of the solid-state structures have been analysed using partial atomic charges and hardness algorithm (PACHA) calculations. Even though in general all DTA crystal forms reveal similar intermolecular interactions, the overall crystal packing differs considerably from form to form. The water of the dihydrate is encapsulated between a pair of host molecules, which calculations reveal to be an extraordinarily stable motif. DTA presents functionalities that enable hydrogen and halogen bonding, and whilst an extended hydrogen-bonding network is realised in all crystal forms, halogen bonding is not present in the hydrated crystal forms. This is due to the formation of a hydrogen-bonding network based on individual enclosed water squares, which is not amenable to the concomitant formation of halogen bonds. The main interaction in the solvates involves the carboxylic acid, which corroborates the hypothesis that this strong interaction is the last one to be broken during the crystal desolvation and nucleation process.

  20. Monitoring of the fermentation media of citric acid by the trimethylsilyl derivatives of the organic acids formed.

    PubMed

    Ghassempour, Alireza; Nojavan, Saeed; Talebpour, Zahra; Amiri, Ali Asghar; Najafi, Nahid Mashkouri

    2004-10-20

    In this approach, a derivatization method is described for monitoring of organic acids in fermentation media without any separation step. The aqueous phase of fermentation media was evaporated and heated in a silylation reagent to form trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives. The silylated compounds are analyzed by 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (29Si NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). 29Si NMR can qualitatively monitor the components produced in the Krebs cycle. Quantification of these compounds is investigated by using selected ion monitoring mode of mass spectrometry. In this mode, mass to charge (m/z) values of their [M - 15]+ ions, which are 465, 275, 247, 221, 335, 251, and 313 of TMS derivatives of citric, alpha-ketoglutaric, succinic, fumaric, l-malic, oxaloacetic, and palmitic (as an internal standard), acids, respectively, are used. The limit of detection and the linear working range for derivatized citric acid were found to be 0.1 mg L(-1) and 10-3 x 10(4) mg L(-1). The relative standard deviation of the method for five replicates was 2.1%. The average recovery efficiency for citric acid added to culture media was approximately 97.2%. Quantitative results of GC-MS are compared with those obtained by an ultraviolet-visible method.

  1. Factors contributing to decreased protein stability when aspartic acid residues are in {beta}-sheet regions.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Cai, X.; Raffen, R.; Gu, M.; Stevens, F. J.; Schiffer, M.

    2002-07-01

    Asp residues are significantly under represented in {beta}-sheet regions of proteins, especially in the middle of {beta}-strands, as found by a number of studies using statistical, modeling, or experimental methods. To further understand the reasons for this under representation of Asp, we prepared and analyzed mutants of a {beta}-domain. Two Gln residues of the immunoglobulin light-chain variable domain (V{sub L}) of protein Len were replaced with Asp, and then the effects of these changes on protein stability and protein structure were studied. The replacement of Q38D, located at the end of a {beta}-strand, and that of Q89D, located in the middle of a {beta}-strand, reduced the stability of the parent immunoglobulin VL domain by 2.0 kcal/mol and 5.3 kcal/mol, respectively. Because the Q89D mutant of the wild-type V{sub L}-Len domain was too unstable to be expressed as a soluble protein, we prepared the Q89D mutant in a triple mutant background, V{sub L}-Len M4L/Y27dD/T94H, which was 4.2 kcal/mol more stable than the wild-type V{sub L}-Len domain. The structures of mutants V{sub L}-Len Q38D and V{sub L}-Len Q89D/M4L/Y27dD/T94H were determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.6 A resolution. We found no major perturbances in the structures of these QD mutant proteins relative to structures of the parent proteins. The observed stability changes have to be accounted for by cumulative effects of the following several factors: (1) by changes in main-chain dihedral angles and in side-chain rotomers, (2) by close contacts between some atoms, and, most significantly, (3) by the unfavorable electrostatic interactions between the Asp side chain and the carbonyls of the main chain. We show that the Asn side chain, which is of similar size but neutral, is less destabilizing. The detrimental effect of Asp within a {beta}-sheet of an immunoglobulin-type domain can have very serious consequences. A somatic mutation of a {beta}-strand residue to Asp could prevent the expression of the

  2. Factors contributing to decreased protein stability when aspartic acid residues are in β-sheet regions

    PubMed Central

    Pokkuluri, P.R.; Gu, M.; Cai, X.; Raffen, R.; Stevens, F.J.; Schiffer, M.

    2002-01-01

    Asp residues are significantly under represented in β-sheet regions of proteins, especially in the middle of β-strands, as found by a number of studies using statistical, modeling, or experimental methods. To further understand the reasons for this under representation of Asp, we prepared and analyzed mutants of a β-domain. Two Gln residues of the immunoglobulin light-chain variable domain (VL) of protein Len were replaced with Asp, and then the effects of these changes on protein stability and protein structure were studied. The replacement of Q38D, located at the end of a β-strand, and that of Q89D, located in the middle of a β-strand, reduced the stability of the parent immunoglobulin VL domain by 2.0 kcal/mol and 5.3 kcal/mol, respectively. Because the Q89D mutant of the wild-type VL-Len domain was too unstable to be expressed as a soluble protein, we prepared the Q89D mutant in a triple mutant background, VL-Len M4L/Y27dD/T94H, which was 4.2 kcal/mol more stable than the wild-type VL-Len domain. The structures of mutants VL-Len Q38D and VL-Len Q89D/M4L/Y27dD/T94H were determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.6 Å resolution. We found no major perturbances in the structures of these Q→D mutant proteins relative to structures of the parent proteins. The observed stability changes have to be accounted for by cumulative effects of the following several factors: (1) by changes in main-chain dihedral angles and in side-chain rotomers, (2) by close contacts between some atoms, and, most significantly, (3) by the unfavorable electrostatic interactions between the Asp side chain and the carbonyls of the main chain. We show that the Asn side chain, which is of similar size but neutral, is less destabilizing. The detrimental effect of Asp within a β-sheet of an immunoglobulin-type domain can have very serious consequences. A somatic mutation of a β-strand residue to Asp could prevent the expression of the domain both in vitro and in vivo, or it could contribute to

  3. Glutamic Acid Residues in HIV-1 p6 Regulate Virus Budding and Membrane Association of Gag.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Melanie; Setz, Christian; Hahn, Friedrich; Matthaei, Alina; Fraedrich, Kirsten; Rauch, Pia; Henklein, Petra; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2016-04-25

    The HIV-1 Gag p6 protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of its two late (L-) domains, which recruit Tsg101 and ALIX, components of the ESCRT system. Even though p6 consists of only 52 amino acids, it is encoded by one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and undergoes various posttranslational modifications including sumoylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. In addition, it mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into budding virions. Despite its small size, p6 exhibits an unusually high charge density. In this study, we show that mutation of the conserved glutamic acids within p6 increases the membrane association of Pr55 Gag followed by enhanced polyubiquitination and MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag-derived epitopes, possibly due to prolonged exposure to membrane bound E3 ligases. The replication capacity of the total glutamic acid mutant E0A was almost completely impaired, which was accompanied by defective virus release that could not be rescued by ALIX overexpression. Altogether, our data indicate that the glutamic acids within p6 contribute to the late steps of viral replication and may contribute to the interaction of Gag with the plasma membrane.

  4. Influence of washing time on residual contamination of carcasses sprayed with lauric acid-potassium hydroxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine reductions in bacterial contamination of broiler carcasses washed for various times in a spray cabinet with a 2% lauric acid (LA)-1% potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution (w/v). Forty eviscerated carcasses and 5 ceca were obtained from the processing li...

  5. Influence of washing time on residual contamination of carcasses sprayed with lauric acid-potassium hydroxide.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine reductions in bacterial contamination of broiler carcasses washed for various times in a spray cabinet with a 2% lauric acid (LA)-1% potassium hydroxide (KOH) (w/v) solution. Forty eviscerated carcasses and 5 ceca were obtained from the processing l...

  6. pH responsive poly amino-acid hydrogels formed via silk sericin templating.

    PubMed

    Kurland, Nicholas E; Ragland, Robert B; Zhang, Aolin; Moustafa, Mahmoud E; Kundu, Subhas C; Yadavalli, Vamsi K

    2014-09-01

    Poly(amino acid) hydrogels have attracted a great deal of attention as biodegradable biomaterials that can limit products of synthetic polymer degradation. Here we report on a stimuli-responsive, porous, composite biomaterial based on the protein templating of the poly(amino acid) hydrogel from poly(aspartic acid) with the silk protein sericin. This low-cost, biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogel demonstrates a greatly increased porosity and improvement in volumetric swelling over networks formed from pure poly(aspartic acid). The swelling capacity measured over a range of pH values surrounding physiological pH 7.0 demonstrates a linear profile, in which hydrogel volume and mass increase to a maximum, with an increase as a function of higher sericin content. In comparison to pure poly(aspartic acid), this demonstrates a nearly 3-fold increase in retention volume at basic pH. The increase in swelling is also demonstrated by the increase in porosity and internal micro-architecture of the hydrogel networks. The biomaterial is then shown to perform well as a scaffold for cells with high mechanical strength and integrity. This protein- and homo poly(amino acid)-based super-swelling hydrogel has applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering as an economical and environmentally friendly biomaterial, in addition to ensuring the species incorporated maintain their biocompatibility during processing.

  7. Model membranes prepared with ceramide EOS, cholesterol and free fatty acids form a unique lamellar phase.

    PubMed

    Groen, Daniel; Gooris, Gert S; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2010-03-16

    The lipid matrix present in the human stratum corneum (the thin, uppermost layer of the skin) is considered to play a crucial role in the skin barrier function. The lipid matrix consists of ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. The 13 nm lamellar phase present in the lipid matrix of the stratum corneum is very characteristic and plays an important role in the skin barrier function. One subclass of ceramides with a linoleic acid linked to a very long acyl (referred to as EOS) plays a crucial role in the formation of the 13 nm lamellar phase. In this article, we focus on the lipid phase behavior of EOS mixed with cholesterol or with cholesterol and free fatty acids. Our studies reveal that an equimolar ratio of EOS, cholesterol, and free fatty acids forms a lamellar phase with a very long repeat distance of approximately 14.7 nm. This phase exhibits exceptional behavior in that in the thermotropic response the fatty acid chains and the ceramide chains undergo an order-disorder transition in different temperature ranges while part of the hydrocarbon chains of ceramides and fatty acids are mixing in the orthorhombic lattice. On the basis of these observations, a molecular model for the 14.7 nm phase has been proposed in which the lipids are organized in a lamellar phase with three different lipid layers in a symmetric unit cell.

  8. Determination of water-soluble forms of oxalic and formic acids in soils by ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karicheva, E.; Guseva, N.; Kambalina, M.

    2016-03-01

    Carboxylic acids (CA) play an important role in the chemical composition origin of soils and migration of elements. The content of these acids and their salts is one of the important characteristics for agrochemical, ecological, ameliorative and hygienic assessment of soils. The aim of the article is to determine water-soluble forms of same carboxylic acids — (oxalic and formic acids) in soils by ion chromatography with gradient elution. For the separation and determination of water-soluble carboxylic acids we used reagent-free gradient elution ion-exchange chromatography ICS-2000 (Dionex, USA), the model solutions of oxalate and formate ions, and leachates from soils of the Kola Peninsula. The optimal gradient program was established for separation and detection of oxalate and formate ions in water solutions by ion chromatography. A stability indicating method was developed for the simultaneous determination of water-soluble organic acids in soils. The method has shown high detection limits such as 0.03 mg/L for oxalate ion and 0.02 mg/L for formate ion. High signal reproducibility was achieved in wide range of intensities which correspond to the following ion concentrations: from 0.04 mg/g to 10 mg/L (formate), from 0.1 mg/g to 25 mg/L (oxalate). The concentration of formate and oxalate ions in soil samples is from 0.04 to 0.9 mg/L and 0.45 to 17 mg/L respectively.

  9. Characteristics of weak base-induced vacuoles formed around individual acidic organelles.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Hiromi; Kawakami, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    We have previously found that the weak base 4-aminopyridine induces Brownian motion of acidic organelles around which vacuoles are formed, causing organelle traffic disorder in neurons. Our present study investigated the characteristics of vacuoles induced by weak bases (NH(4)Cl, aminopyridines, and chloroquine) using mouse cells. Individual vacuoles included acidic organelles identified by fluorescent protein expression. Mitochondria and actin filaments were extruded outside the vacuoles, composing the vacuole rim. Staining with amine-reactive fluorescence showed no protein/amino acid content in vacuoles. Thus, serous vacuolar contents are probably partitioned by viscous cytosol, other organelles, and cytoskeletons, but not membrane. The weak base (chloroquine) was immunochemically detected in intravacuolar organelles, but not in vacuoles. Early vacuolization was reversible, but long-term vacuolization caused cell death. The vacuolization and cell death were blocked by the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase inhibitor and Cl--free medium. Staining with LysoTracker or LysoSensor indicated that intravacuolar organelles were strongly acidic and vacuoles were slightly acidic. This suggests that vacuolization is caused by accumulation of weak base and H(+) in acidic organelles, driven by vacuolar H(+)-ATPase associated with Cl(-) entering, and probably by subsequent extrusion of H(+) and water from organelles to the surrounding cytoplasm.

  10. Study on the conversion of three natural statins from lactone forms to their corresponding hydroxy acid forms and their determination in Pu-Erh tea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Deng-Jye; Hwang, Lucy Sun

    2006-06-30

    Conversions of statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, from lactone forms to their corresponding hydroxy acid form in 0.1 N NaOH or 0.05 N KOH (prepared with 25, 50, 75, 90% acetonitrile or methanol in water or 100% water) were evaluated. Results showed that lactone form statins could be transformed almost completely only in alkaline solutions prepared with 25 or 50% acetonitrile. In all methanolic alkaline solutions, lactone form statins could also be converted entirely, nevertheless, they would be further transformed to the methyl ester of the hydroxy acid form and the transformation increased as methanol rises. When lactone and hydroxy acid forms of statins were in methanol, ethyl acetate, 70% acetonitrile in water (with 0.5% acetic acid or no) for 0-48 h at room temperature or in 100 degrees C water for 0-2 h, lactone form statins were converted to their corresponding hydroxy acids, which were raised as time extends and the highest conversions of them were about 35% in 100 degrees C water and 70% acetonitrile, slightly transformed for lactone form statins in 70% acetonitrile (with 0.5% acetic acid) after 8 h, and the other treatments for all statins showed no significant changes. Interferences would be reduced efficiently when statins were extracted from Pu-Erh tea with methanol, ethyl acetate or 100 degrees C water followed by purifying through a C18 solid-phase extraction cartridge. Lovastatin was the only statin found in Pu-Erh tea and the highest content of it was found under ethyl acetate extraction. In ethyl acetate and methanol extracts, lovastatin existed merely as lactone form. The lowest content of lovastatin was found in the 100 degrees C water extract of Pu-Erh tea, however, both of lactone and hydroxy acid forms were found to exist in the extract.

  11. Spectroscopic Properties of Star-Forming Host Galaxies and Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals in a Nearly Unbiased Sample

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, Chris B.; et al.

    2011-12-20

    We examine the correlation between supernova host galaxy properties and their residuals on the Hubble diagram. We use supernovae discovered during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II - Supernova Survey, and focus on objects at a redshift of z < 0.15, where the selection effects of the survey are known to yield a complete Type Ia supernova sample. To minimize the bias in our analysis with respect to measured host-galaxy properties, spectra were obtained for nearly all hosts, spanning a range in magnitude of -23 < M_r < -17. In contrast to previous works that use photometric estimates of host mass as a proxy for global metallicity, we analyze host-galaxy spectra to obtain gas-phase metallicities and star-formation rates from host galaxies with active star formation. From a final sample of ~ 40 emission-line galaxies, we find that light-curve corrected Type Ia supernovae are ~ 0.1 magnitudes brighter in high-metallicity hosts than in low-metallicity hosts. We also find a significant (> 3{\\sigma}) correlation between the Hubble residuals of Type Ia supernovae and the specific star-formation rate of the host galaxy. We comment on the importance of supernova/host-galaxy correlations as a source of systematic bias in future deep supernova surveys.

  12. SPECTROSCOPIC PROPERTIES OF STAR-FORMING HOST GALAXIES AND TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA HUBBLE RESIDUALS IN A NEARLY UNBIASED SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, Chris B.; Gupta, Ravi R.; Sako, Masao; Morris, Matt; Nichol, Robert C.; Campbell, Heather; Lampeitl, Hubert; Brown, Peter J.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Kessler, Richard; Garnavich, Peter; Jha, Saurabh W.; Marriner, John; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, Mathew

    2011-12-20

    We examine the correlation between supernova (SN) host-galaxy properties and their residuals in the Hubble diagram. We use SNe discovered during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey, and focus on objects at a redshift of z < 0.15, where the selection effects of the survey are known to yield a complete Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) sample. To minimize the bias in our analysis with respect to measured host-galaxy properties, spectra were obtained for nearly all hosts, spanning a range in magnitude of -23 < M{sub r} < -17. In contrast to previous works that use photometric estimates of host mass as a proxy for global metallicity, we analyze host-galaxy spectra to obtain gas-phase metallicities and star formation rates (SFRs) from host galaxies with active star formation. From a final sample of {approx}40 emission-line galaxies, we find that light-curve-corrected SNe Ia are {approx}0.1 mag brighter in high-metallicity hosts than in low-metallicity hosts. We also find a significant (>3{sigma}) correlation between the Hubble Residuals of SNe Ia and the specific SFR of the host galaxy. We comment on the importance of SN/host-galaxy correlations as a source of systematic bias in future deep SN surveys.

  13. Two crystalline polymorphic forms of α-( N-benzoxazolin-2-one)acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashurov, J. M.; Izotova, L. Yu.; Ibragimov, B. T.; Mukhamedov, N. S.

    2017-01-01

    Two crystalline polymorphic forms of α-( N-benzoxazolin-2-one)acetic acid (BAA) are prepared by changing the temperature of its crystallization from solution in ethanol. Crystallographic data of the α-form are determined: a = 12.7769(17) Å, b = 8.2574(9) Å, c = 16.7390(19) Å, β = 105.087(13)°, space group C2/ c, V = 1705.2(4) Å3, and Z = 8, while those of β form are a = 5.2854(4) Å, b = 5.9880(4) Å, c = 13.4509(5) Å, β = 94.666(4)°, space group P21, V = 424.30(4) Å3, and Z = 2. It is found that BAA molecules of the α form combine into infinite one-dimensional chains arranged along axis b by means of O‒H···O and C‒H···O hydrogen bonds, and these chains are crosslinked via C‒H···O hydrogen bonds to form a threedimensional structure. The β form has another system of hydrogen bonds, one of which is bifurcated (O4···O2, O4···O3), and the π-π-interactions between the benzoxazolinone fragments of BAA molecules combined into a chain also arranged along axis b are observed. Calorimetric analysis shows that the polymorphic transition from the α form to the β form occurs at 129°C.

  14. Effects of amino acid mutations in the pore-forming domain of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Tomonao; Masaki, Risa; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2016-10-01

    The hemolytic lectin CEL-III forms transmembrane pores in the membranes of target cells. A study on the effect of site-directed mutation at Lys405 in domain 3 of CEL-III indicated that replacements of this residue by relatively smaller residues lead to a marked increase in hemolytic activity, suggesting that moderately destabilizing domain 3 facilitates formation of transmembrane pores through conformational changes.

  15. Isolation of residual lignin from softwood kraft pulp. Advantages of the acetic acid acidolysis method.

    PubMed

    Lachenal, Dominique; Mortha, Gérard; Sevillano, Rose-Marie; Zaroubine, Michail

    2004-01-01

    Lignin in kraft pulp was extracted by enzymatic hydrolysis of the carbohydrates, acidolysis with dioxane-water-HCl (conventional method), and acidolysis with acetic acid-water-ZnCl2. The latter method was shown to extract lignin with a better yield than for conventional acidolysis and with a much lower content in impurities than for enzymatic hydrolysis. It was confirmed by 13C NMR analysis of the lignin samples that conventional hydrolysis modified the lignin polymer, causing the cleavage of some aryl-ether linkages. The cleavage was also observed on a model compound submitted to the same extraction conditions. In that respect, the acetic acid-water-ZnCl2 method was less damaging and consequently more suitable for analytical purposes.

  16. Förster energy-transfer studies between Trp residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) and the glycosylation site of the protein.

    PubMed

    Albani, Jihad R

    2003-10-10

    Energy-transfer studies between Trp residues of alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein and the fluorescent probe Calcofluor White were performed. Calcofluor White interacts with carbohydrate residues of the protein, while the three Trp residues are located at the surface (Trp-160) and in hydrophobic domains of the protein (Trp-25 and Trp-122). Binding of Calcofluor to the protein induces a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of the Trp residues accompanied by an increase of that of Calcofluor White. Efficiency (E) of Trp fluorescence quenching was determined to be equal to 45%, and the Förster distance R(o), at which the efficiency of energy transfer is 50%, was calculated to be 18.13 A. This low distance and the value of the efficiency clearly indicate that energy transfer between Trp residues and Calcofluor White is weak.

  17. FKBP12.6 activates RyR1: investigating the amino acid residues critical for channel modulation.

    PubMed

    Venturi, Elisa; Galfré, Elena; O'Brien, Fiona; Pitt, Samantha J; Bellamy, Stuart; Sessions, Richard B; Sitsapesan, Rebecca

    2014-02-18

    We have previously shown that FKBP12 associates with RyR2 in cardiac muscle and that it modulates RyR2 function differently to FKBP12.6. We now investigate how these proteins affect the single-channel behavior of RyR1 derived from rabbit skeletal muscle. Our results show that FKBP12.6 activates and FKBP12 inhibits RyR1. It is likely that both proteins compete for the same binding sites on RyR1 because channels that are preactivated by FKBP12.6 cannot be subsequently inhibited by FKBP12. We produced a mutant FKBP12 molecule (FKBP12E31Q/D32N/W59F) where the residues Glu(31), Asp(32), and Trp(59) were converted to the corresponding residues in FKBP12.6. With respect to the functional regulation of RyR1 and RyR2, the FKBP12E31Q/D32N/W59F mutant lost all ability to behave like FKBP12 and instead behaved like FKBP12.6. FKBP12E31Q/D32N/W59F activated RyR1 but was not capable of activating RyR2. In conclusion, FKBP12.6 activates RyR1, whereas FKBP12 activates RyR2 and this selective activator phenotype is determined within the amino acid residues Glu(31), Asp(32), and Trp(59) in FKBP12 and Gln(31), Asn(32), and Phe(59) in FKBP12.6. The opposing but different effects of FKBP12 and FKBP12.6 on RyR1 and RyR2 channel gating provide scope for diversity of regulation in different tissues.

  18. Identification of Amino Acid Residues of ERH Required for Its Recruitment to Nuclear Speckles and Replication Foci in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Banko, Monika I.; Krzyzanowski, Marek K.; Turcza, Paulina; Maniecka, Zuzanna; Kulis, Marta; Kozlowski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    ERH is a small, highly evolutionarily conserved nuclear protein of unknown function. Its three-dimensional structure is absolutely unique and it can form a homodimer through a β sheet surface. ERH has been shown to interact, among others, with PDIP46/SKAR and Ciz1. When coexpressed with the latter protein, ERH accumulates in replication foci in the nucleus of HeLa cells. Here, we report that when ERH is coexpressed with PDIP46/SKAR in HeLa cells, it is recruited to nuclear speckles, and identify amino acid residues critical for targeting ERH to both these subnuclear structures. ERH H3A Q9A shows a diminished recruitment to nuclear speckles but it is recruited to replication foci. ERH E37A T51A is very poorly recruited to replication foci while still accumulating in nuclear speckles. Consequently, ERH H3A Q9A E37A T51A is recruited neither to nuclear speckles nor to replication foci. The lack of interactions of these three ERH forms with PDIP46/SKAR and/or Ciz1 was further confirmed in vitro by GST pull-down assay. The residues whose substitutions interfere with the accumulation in nuclear speckles are situated on the β sheet surface of ERH, indicating that only the monomer of ERH can interact with PDIP46/SKAR. Substitutions affecting the recruitment to replication foci map to the other side of ERH, near a long loop between the α1 and α2 helices, thus both the monomer and the dimer of ERH could interact with Ciz1. The construction of the ERH mutants not recruited to nuclear speckles or replication foci will facilitate further studies on ERH actions in these subnuclear structures. PMID:24015320

  19. Red fluorescent protein DsRed: parametrization of its chromophore as an amino acid residue for computer modeling in the OPLS-AA force field.

    PubMed

    Dmitrienko, D V; Vrzheshch, E P; Drutsa, V L; Vrzheshch, P V

    2006-10-01

    Topology of the neutral form of the DsRed fluorescent protein chromophore as a residue of [(4-cis)-2-[(1-cis)-4-amino-4-oxobutanimidoyl]-4-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-5-oxo-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-1-yl]acetic acid was calculated with OPLS-AA force field. Use of this topology and molecular dynamics simulation allows calculating the parameters of proteins that contain such residue in their polypeptide chains. The chromophore parameters were obtained by ab initio (RHF/6-31G**) quantum chemical calculations applying density functional theory (B3LYP). Using this chromophore, we have calculated the molecular dynamics trajectory of tetrameric fluorescent protein DsRed in solution at 300 K (4 nsec). Correctness of the chromophore parametrization was revealed by comparison of quantitative characteristics of the chromophore structure obtained from the molecular dynamic simulations of DsRed protein with the quantitative characteristics of the chromophore based on the crystallographic X-ray data of fluorescent protein DsRed (PDB ID: 1ZGO, 1G7K, and 1GGX), and also with the quantitative characteristics of the chromophore obtained by quantum chemical calculations. Inclusion of the neutral form of DsRed protein chromophore topology into the OPLS-AA force field yielded the extended force field OPLS-AA/DsRed. This force field can be used for molecular dynamics calculations of proteins containing the DsRed chromophore. The parameter set presented in this study can be applied for similar extension in any other force fields.

  20. Amino acids formed from the UV/EUV irradiation of inorganic ices of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuevo, M.; Chen, Y.-J.; Yih, T.-S.; Ip, W.-H.; Fung, H.-S.; Cheng, C.-Y.; Tsai, H.-R.; Wu, C.-Y. R.

    An experiment where a H 2O:CO 2:NH 3 = 1:1:1 ice mixture was irradiated using the ultraviolet/extreme ultraviolet (UV/EUV) light provided by a synchrotron beam in the broad 4-20 eV (62-310 nm) range at 16 K is presented here. The main originalities of the present work are the composition of the starting ice mixture, since it did not contain any organic compound, in particular no methanol (CH 3OH) nor methane (CH 4) as for previous similar experiments, and the photon energy range. Several amino acids were produced: nine were identified of which seven could be quantified, and some others tentatively identified using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This result shows that it is possible to form complex organics such as amino acids from the irradiation of ice mixtures containing C-, H-, O- and N-atom bearing compounds, whatever the organic/inorganic nature of these compounds. Only the distribution of the formed amino acids is different from previous experiments. This discrepancy may be due to the starting mixture composition and/or the different energy range used for the irradiation. These two parameters are discussed in regard of their implications for the formation of amino acids in the laboratory and in astrophysical environments.

  1. Near-UV Photodissociation of Tryptic Peptide Cation Radicals. Scope and Effects of Amino Acid Residues and Radical Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Huong T. H.; Tureček, František

    2017-02-01

    Peptide cation-radical fragment ions of the z-type, [●AXAR+], [●AXAK+], and [●XAR+], where X = A, C, D, E, F, G, H, K, L, M, N, P, Y, and W, were generated by electron transfer dissociation of peptide dications and investigated by MS3-near-ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) at 355 nm. Laser-pulse dependence measurements indicated that the ion populations were homogeneous for most X residues except phenylalanine. UVPD resulted in dissociations of backbone CO-NH bonds that were accompanied by hydrogen atom transfer, producing fragment ions of the [yn]+ type. Compared with collision-induced dissociation, UVPD yielded less side-chain dissociations even for residues that are sensitive to radical-induced side-chain bond cleavages. The backbone dissociations are triggered by transitions to second (B) excited electronic states in the peptide ion R-CH●-CONH- chromophores that are resonant with the 355-nm photon energy. Electron promotion increases the polarity of the B excited states, R-CH+-C●(O-)NH-, and steers the reaction to proceed by transfer of protons from proximate acidic Cα and amide nitrogen positions.

  2. Amino acid residues Leu135 and Tyr236 are required for RNA binding activity of CFIm25 in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ospina-Villa, Juan David; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom; Lopez-Camarillo, Cesar; Castañon-Sanchez, Carlos A; Soto-Sanchez, Jacqueline; Ramirez-Moreno, Esther; Marchat, Laurence A

    2015-08-01

    Pre-mRNA 3' end processing in the nucleus is essential for mRNA stability, efficient nuclear transport, and translation in eukaryotic cells. In Human, the cleavage/polyadenylation machinery contains the 25 kDa subunit of the Cleavage Factor Im (CFIm25), which specifically recognizes two UGUA elements and regulates the assembly of polyadenylation factors, poly(A) site selection and polyadenylation. In Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan parasite responsible for human amoebiasis, EhCFIm25 has been reported as a RNA binding protein that interacts with the Poly(A) Polymerase. Here, we follow-up with the study of EhCFIm25 to characterize its interaction with RNA. Using in silico strategy, we identified Leu135 and Tyr236 in EhCFIm25 as conserved amino acids among CFIm25 homologues. We therefore generated mutant EhCFIm25 proteins to investigate the role of these residues for RNA interaction. Results showed that RNA binding activity was totally abrogated when Leu135 and Tyr236 were replaced with Ala residue, and Tyr236 was changed for Phe. In contrast, RNA binding activity was less affected when Leu135 was substituted by Thr. Our data revealed for the first time -until we know-the functional relevance of the conserved Leu135 and Tyr236 in EhCFIm25 for RNA binding activity. They also gave some insights about the possible chemical groups that could be interacting with the RNA molecule.

  3. Observing Vibrational Energy Flow in a Protein with the Spatial Resolution of a Single Amino Acid Residue.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoki; Mizuno, Misao; Ishikawa, Haruto; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2014-09-18

    One of the challenges in physical chemistry has been understanding how energy flows in a condensed phase from the microscopic viewpoint. To address this, space-resolved information at the molecular scale is required but has been lacking due to experimental difficulties. We succeeded in the real-time mapping of the vibrational energy flow in a protein with the spatial resolution of a single amino acid residue by combining time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy and site-directed single-Trp mutagenesis. Anti-Stokes Raman intensities of the Trp residues at different sites exhibited different temporal evolutions, reflecting propagation of the energy released by the heme group. A classical heat transport model was not able to reproduce the entire experimental data set, showing that we need a molecular-level description to explain the energy flow in a protein. The systematic application of our general methodology to proteins with different structural motifs may provide a greatly increased understanding of the energy flow in proteins.

  4. Amino acid residues 4425-4621 localized on the three-dimensional structure of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Benacquista, B L; Sharma, M R; Samsó, M; Zorzato, F; Treves, S; Wagenknecht, T

    2000-01-01

    We have localized a region contained within the sequence of amino acid residues 4425-4621 on the three-dimensional structure of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR). Mouse monoclonal antibodies raised against a peptide comprising these residues have been complexed with ryanodine receptors and imaged in the frozen-hydrated state by cryoelectron microscopy. These images, along with images of antibody-free ryanodine receptor, were used to compute two-dimensional averaged images and three-dimensional reconstructions. Two-dimensional averages of immunocomplexes in which the ryanodine receptor was in the fourfold symmetrical orientation disclosed four symmetrical regions of density located on the edges of the receptor's cytoplasmic assembly that were absent from control averages of receptor without added antibody. Three-dimensional reconstructions revealed the antibody-binding sites to be on the so-called handle domains of the ryanodine receptor's cytoplasmic assembly, near their junction with the transmembrane assembly. This study is the first to demonstrate epitope mapping on the three-dimensional structure of the ryanodine receptor. PMID:10692321

  5. [Determination of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid residues in foods using high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Deng, Xiaojun; Guo, Dehua; Jin, Shuping

    2007-07-01

    A method for the determination of glyphosate (PMG) and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) residues in plant products, such as rice, wheat, vegetables, fruits and tea, pig and chicken muscles, aquatic products, chestnut, honey, etc., was developed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). In this method, PMG and AMPA were extracted with water from samples, defatted using an extraction step with dichloromethane, and purified using a cation-exchange (CAX) solid phase extraction cartridge. Then, these were derived using fluorenylmethylchloroformate (FMOC-Cl) in borate buffer for subsequent HPLC-MS/MS analysis. Isotope-labeled PMG 1, 2(13)- C(15) N was used as the internal standard for the quantitative analysis of two residues. For all samples, the recoveries ranged from 80.0% to 104% and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 6.7% to 18.2%. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was determined to be 0.05 mg/kg with a linear range of 0.20-10 microg/L. It is demonstrated that this method is reliable and sensitive for the analysis of PMG and APMA with low concentrations in foods.

  6. Functionally important amino acid residues in the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel – an overview of the current mutational data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to create an overview of the currently available results of site-directed mutagenesis studies on transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. Systematization of the vast number of data on the functionally important amino acid mutations of TRPV1 may provide a clearer picture of this field, and may promote a better understanding of the relationship between the structure and function of TRPV1. The review summarizes information on 112 unique mutated sites along the TRPV1, exchanged to multiple different residues in many cases. These mutations influence the effect or binding of different agonists, antagonists, and channel blockers, alter the responsiveness to heat, acid, and voltage dependence, affect the channel pore characteristics, and influence the regulation of the receptor function by phosphorylation, glycosylation, calmodulin, PIP2, ATP, and lipid binding. The main goal of this paper is to publish the above mentioned data in a form that facilitates in silico molecular modelling of the receptor by promoting easier establishment of boundary conditions. The better understanding of the structure-function relationship of TRPV1 may promote discovery of new, promising, more effective and safe drugs for treatment of neurogenic inflammation and pain-related diseases and may offer new opportunities for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23800232

  7. Lactic Acid Bacteria in Total Mixed Ration Silage Containing Soybean Curd Residue: Their Isolation, Identification and Ability to Inhibit Aerobic Deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.; Wang, F.; Nishino, N.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the predominant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on the fermentation characteristics and aerobic stability of total mixed ration (TMR) silage containing soybean curd residue (SC-TMR silage). The SC-TMR materials were ensiled in laboratory silos for 14 or 56 days. LAB predominant in SC-TMR silage were identified (Exp. 1). Lactobacillus fermentum (L. fermentum) and Streptococcus bovis (S. bovis) were found in the untreated materials, Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides (L. pseudomesenteroides) in 14-day silage and Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) in all silages. Pediococcus acidilactici (P. acidilactici), Lactobacillus paracasei (L. paracasei), and Lactobacillus brevis (L. brevis) formed more than 90% of the isolates in 56-day silage. Italian ryegrass and whole crop maize were inoculated with P. acidilactici and L. brevis isolates and the fermentation and aerobic stability determined (Exp. 2). Inoculation with P. acidilactici and L. brevis alone or combined improved the fermentation products in ryegrass silage and markedly enhanced its aerobic stability. In maize silage, P. acidilactici and L. brevis inoculation caused no changes and suppressed deterioration when combined with increases in acetic acid content. The results indicate that P. acidilactici and L. brevis may produce a synergistic effect to inhibit SC-TMR silage deterioration. Further studies are needed to identify the inhibitory substances, which may be useful for developing potential antifungal agents. PMID:26949952

  8. A Hexasaccharide Containing Rare 2‐O‐Sulfate‐Glucuronic Acid Residues Selectively Activates Heparin Cofactor II

    PubMed Central

    Sankarayanarayanan, Nehru Viji; Strebel, Tamara R.; Boothello, Rio S.; Sheerin, Kevin; Raghuraman, Arjun; Sallas, Florence; Mosier, Philip D.; Watermeyer, Nicholas D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) sequences that selectively target heparin cofactor II (HCII), a key serpin present in human plasma, remain unknown. Using a computational strategy on a library of 46 656 heparan sulfate hexasaccharides we identified a rare sequence consisting of consecutive glucuronic acid 2‐O‐sulfate residues as selectively targeting HCII. This and four other unique hexasaccharides were chemically synthesized. The designed sequence was found to activate HCII ca. 250‐fold, while leaving aside antithrombin, a closely related serpin, essentially unactivated. This group of rare designed hexasaccharides will help understand HCII function. More importantly, our results show for the first time that rigorous use of computational techniques can lead to discovery of unique GAG sequences that can selectively target GAG‐binding protein(s), which may lead to chemical biology or drug discovery tools. PMID:28124818

  9. Measurement of the individual pKa values of acidic residues of hen and turkey lysozymes by two-dimensional 1H NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Bartik, K; Redfield, C; Dobson, C M

    1994-01-01

    The pH dependence of the two-dimensional 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of hen and turkey egg-white lysozymes has been recorded over the pH range 1-7. By monitoring the chemical shifts of the resonances of the various protons of ionizable residues, individual pKa values for the acidic residues have been determined for both proteins. The pKa values are displaced, with the exception of those of the residues in the active site cleft, by an average of 1 unit to low pH compared to model compounds. PMID:8038389

  10. Roles of basic amino acid residues in the activity of μ-conotoxin GIIIA and GIIIB, peptide blockers of muscle sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuki; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Ishida, Yukisato; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2015-04-01

    To study in detail the roles of basic amino acid residues in the activity of μ-conotoxin GIIIA (μ-GIIIA) and GIIIB (μ-GIIIB), specific blockers of muscle sodium channels, seven analogs of μ-GIIIA, and two analogs of μ-GIIIB were synthesized. μ-GIIIA analogs were synthesized by replacing systematically the three Arg residues (Arg1, Arg13, and Arg19) with one, two, and three Lys residues. μ-GIIIB analogs were synthesized by replacing simultaneously all four Lys residues (Lys9, Lys11, Lys16, and Lys19) with Arg residues and further replacement of acidic Asp residues with neutral Ala residues. Circular dichroism spectra of the synthesized analogs suggested that the replacement did not affect the three dimensional structure. The inhibitory effects on the twitch contractions of the rat diaphragm showed that the side chain guanidino group of Arg13 of μ-GIIIA was important for the activity, whereas that of Arg19 had little role for biological activity. Although [Arg9,11,16,19]μ-GIIIB showed higher activity than native μ-GIIIB, highly basic [Ala2,12, Arg9,11,16,19]μ-GIIIB showed lower activity, suggesting that there was an appropriate molecular basicity for the maximum activity.

  11. The Loss and Gain of Functional Amino Acid Residues Is a Common Mechanism Causing Human Inherited Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lugo-Martinez, Jose; Pejaver, Vikas; Pagel, Kymberleigh A.; Mort, Matthew; Cooper, David N.; Mooney, Sean D.; Radivojac, Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the precise molecular events altered by disease-causing genetic variants represents a major challenge in translational bioinformatics. To this end, many studies have investigated the structural and functional impact of amino acid substitutions. Most of these studies were however limited in scope to either individual molecular functions or were concerned with functional effects (e.g. deleterious vs. neutral) without specifically considering possible molecular alterations. The recent growth of structural, molecular and genetic data presents an opportunity for more comprehensive studies to consider the structural environment of a residue of interest, to hypothesize specific molecular effects of sequence variants and to statistically associate these effects with genetic disease. In this study, we analyzed data sets of disease-causing and putatively neutral human variants mapped to protein 3D structures as part of a systematic study of the loss and gain of various types of functional attribute potentially underlying pathogenic molecular alterations. We first propose a formal model to assess probabilistically function-impacting variants. We then develop an array of structure-based functional residue predictors, evaluate their performance, and use them to quantify the impact of disease-causing amino acid substitutions on catalytic activity, metal binding, macromolecular binding, ligand binding, allosteric regulation and post-translational modifications. We show that our methodology generates actionable biological hypotheses for up to 41% of disease-causing genetic variants mapped to protein structures suggesting that it can be reliably used to guide experimental validation. Our results suggest that a significant fraction of disease-causing human variants mapping to protein structures are function-altering both in the presence and absence of stability disruption. PMID:27564311

  12. Determination of cyanuric acid residues in catfish, trout, tilapia, salmon and shrimp by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Karbiwnyk, Christine M; Andersen, Wendy C; Turnipseed, Sherri B; Storey, Joseph M; Madson, Mark R; Miller, Keith E; Gieseker, Charles M; Miller, Ron A; Rummel, Nathan G; Reimschuessel, Renate

    2009-04-01

    In May 2007, investigators discovered that waste material from the pet food manufacturing process contaminated with melamine (MEL) and/or cyanuric acid (CYA) had been added to hog and chicken feeds. At this time, investigators also learned that adulterated wheat gluten had been used in the manufacture of aquaculture feeds. Concern that the contaminated feed had been used in aquaculture and could enter the human food supply prompted the development of a method for the determination of CYA residues in the edible tissues of fish and shrimp. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was employed as a sensitive technique for the analysis of CYA in catfish, tilapia, salmon, trout and shrimp tissue. CYA was extracted from ground fish or shrimp with an acetic acid solution, defatted with hexane, and isolated with a graphitic carbon black solid-phase extraction column. Residues were separated from matrix components using a porous graphitic carbon LC column, and then analyzed with electrospray ionization in negative ion mode on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Selective reaction monitoring was performed on the [M-H](-)m/z 128 ion resulting in the product ions m/z 85 and 42. Recoveries from catfish, tilapia and trout fortified with 10-100 microgkg(-1) of CYA averaged 67% with a relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of 18% (n=107). The average method detection limit (MDL) for catfish, tilapia and trout is 3.5 microgkg(-1). An internal standard, (13)C(3)-labeled CYA, was used in the salmon and shrimp extractions. Average recovery of CYA from salmon was 91% (R.S.D.=15%, n=18) with an MDL of 7.4 microgkg(-1). Average recovery of CYA from shrimp was 85% (R.S.D.=10%, n=13) with an MDL of 3.5 microgkg(-1).

  13. Residues of the human nuclear vitamin D receptor that form hydrogen bonding interactions with the three hydroxyl groups of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Madhuri D; Stoynova, Ludmilla; Acevedo, Alejandra; Collins, Elaine D

    2007-03-01

    Most of the biological effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (hormone D) are mediated through the nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR). Hormone binding induces conformational changes in VDR that enable the receptor to activate gene transcription. It is known that residues S237 and R274 form hydrogen bonds with the 1-hydroxyl group of hormone D, while residues Y143 and S278, and residues H305 and H397 form hydrogen bonds with the 3-hydroxyl and the 25-hydroxyl groups of the hormone. A series of VDR mutations were constructed (S237A, R274A, R274Q, Y143F, Y143A, S278A, H305A, and H397F; double mutants: S237A/R274A, Y143F/S278A, Y143A/S278A, and H305A/H397F). The relative binding affinities of the wild-type and variant VDRs were assessed. All of the mutants except H397F resulted in lower binding affinity compared to wild-type VDR. Binding to hormone was barely detectable in Y143F, H305A, and H305A/H397F mutants, and undetectable in mutants R274A, R274Q, Y143A, S237A/R274A, and Y143A/S278A, indicating the importance of these residues. Ability to activate gene transcription was also assessed. All of the VDR mutants, except the single mutant S278A, required higher doses of hormone D for half-maximal response. Defining the role of hormone D-VDR binding will lead to a better understanding of the vitamin D signal transduction pathway.

  14. Amino acid residues that contribute to substrate specificity of class A beta-lactamase SME-1.

    PubMed

    Majiduddin, Fahd K; Palzkill, Timothy

    2005-08-01

    Carbapenem antibiotics are used as antibiotics of last resort because they possess a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity and are not easily hydrolyzed by beta-lactamases. Recently, class A enzymes, such as the SME-1, NMC-A, and IMI-1 beta-lactamases, have been identified with the capacity to hydrolyze carbapenem antibiotics. Traditional class A beta-lactamases, such as TEM-1 and SHV-1, are unable to hydrolyze carbapenem antibiotics and exhibit some differences in sequence from those that are able to hydrolyze carbapenem antibiotics. The positions that differ may contribute to the unique substrate specificity of the class A carbapenemase SME-1. Codons in the SME-1 gene representing residues 104, 105, 132, 167, 237, and 241 were randomized by site-directed mutagenesis, and functional mutants were selected for the ability to hydrolyze imipenem, ampicillin, or cefotaxime. Although several positions are important for hydrolysis of beta-lactam antibiotics, no single position was found to uniquely contribute to carbapenem hydrolysis. The results of this study support a model whereby the carbapenemase activity of SME-1 is due to a highly distributed set of interactions that subtly alter the structure of the active-site pocket.

  15. Electrochemical treatment of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) in groundwater impacted by aqueous film forming foams (AFFFs).

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Charles E; Andaya, Christina; Urtiaga, Ana; McKenzie, Erica R; Higgins, Christopher P

    2015-09-15

    Laboratory experiments were performed to evaluate the use of electrochemical treatment for the decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), as well as other perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), in aqueous film forming foam (AFFF)-impacted groundwater collected from a former firefighter training area and PFAA-spiked synthetic groundwater. Using a commercially-produced Ti/RuO2 anode in a divided electrochemical cell, PFOA and PFOS decomposition was evaluated as a function of current density (0-20 mA/cm(2)). Decomposition of both PFOA and PFOS increased with increasing current density, although the decomposition of PFOS did not increase as the current density was increased above 2.5 mA/cm(2). At a current density of 10 mA/cm(2), the first-order rate constants, normalized for current density and treatment volume, for electrochemical treatment of both PFOA and PFOS were 46 × 10(-5) and 70 × 10(-5) [(min(-1)) (mA/cm(2))(-1) (L)], respectively. Defluorination was confirmed for both PFOA and PFOS, with 58% and 98% recovery as fluoride, respectively (based upon the mass of PFOA and PFOS degraded). Treatment of other PFAAs present in the groundwater also was observed, with shorter chain PFAAs generally being more recalcitrant. Results highlight the potential for electrochemical treatment of PFAAs, particularly PFOA and PFOS, in AFFF-impacted groundwater.

  16. Study of the nature of the binding of phosphate residues in the phosphorylated form of succinyl-CoA synthetase from pigeon breast muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Valiulina, D.S.; Skalbe, T.A.; Matveeva, L.N.

    1987-01-10

    The hydrolytic stability of the phosphorylated protein was investigated within a wide pH range. It was shown that the bond of the phosphate residue to protein in complex I is hydrolyzed at alkaline pH values (11.0 and 13.0). At acid pH values this bond is 50% hydrolyzed. The bond of the phosphate residue to protein in complex II is hydrolyzed at acid pH values and is stable at alkaline pH values of the medium. The phosphorylation reaction of the enzyme I, both with hydroxylamine and with diisopropyl fluorophosphate, led to 50% dephosphorylation of the protein. An analysis of an alkaline hydrolysate (3 N NaOH, 3 h, 100/sup 0/C) of the radioactive phosphorylated enzyme II by ion exchange chromatography showed that the radioactive label of the protein is distributed in the fractions of 1-N- and 3-N-phosphohistidine, as well as 1,3-N-diphosphohistidine. The data obtained suggested that phosphate in the phosphorylated enzyme I is bound to protein, with the formation of acyl phosphate and phosphoester bonds. Phosphate in the phosphorylated enzyme II is bound to protein with the formation of a phosphoamide bond.

  17. Orientation Preferences of Backbone Secondary Amide Functional Groups in Peptide Nucleic Acid Complexes: Quantum Chemical Calculations Reveal an Intrinsic Preference of Cationic D-Amino Acid-Based Chiral PNA Analogues for the P-form

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeremy C; Topham, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like base pair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the binding of a water molecule to an O2 base atom in glycine-based PNA thymine dimers indicate that junctions modeled with P-form backbone conformations are lower in energy than a dimer comprising the predominant conformation observed in A-like helices. It is further shown in model systems that PNA analogs based on D-lysine are better able to preorganize in a conformation exclusive to P-form helices than is glycine-based PNA. An intrinsic preference for this conformation is also exhibited by positively charged chiral PNA dimers carrying 3-amino-D-alanine or 4-aza-D-leucine residue units that provide for additional rigidity by side-chain hydrogen bonding to the backbone carbonyl oxygen. Structural modifications stabilizing P-form helices may obviate the need for large heterocycles to target DNA pyrimidine bases via PNADNA-PNA triplex formation. Quantum chemical modeling methods are used to propose candidate PNA Hoogsteen strand designs.

  18. Dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of agricultural and agro-industrial residues for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Martin, Carlos; Alriksson, Björn; Sjöde, Anders; Nilvebrant, Nils-Olof; Jönsson, Leif J

    2007-04-01

    The potential of dilute-acid prehydrolysis as a pretreatment method for sugarcane bagasse, rice hulls, peanut shells, and cassava stalks was investigated. The prehydrolysis was performed at 122 degrees C during 20, 40, or 60 min using 2% H(2)SO(4) at a solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:10. Sugar formation increased with increasing reaction time. Xylose, glucose, arabinose, and galactose were detected in all of the prehydrolysates, whereas mannose was found only in the prehydrolysates of peanut shells and cassava stalks. The hemicelluloses of bagasse were hydrolyzed to a high-extent yielding concentrations of xylose and arabinose of 19.1 and 2.2 g/L, respectively, and a xylan conversion of more than 80%. High-glucose concentrations (26-33.5 g/L) were found in the prehydrolysates of rice hulls, probably because of hydrolysis of starch of grain remains in the hulls. Peanut shells and cassava stalks rendered low amounts of sugars on prehydrolysis, indicating that the conditions were not severe enough to hydrolyze the hemicelluloses in these materials quantitatively. All prehydrolysates were readily fermentable by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The dilute-acid prehydrolysis resulted in a 2.7- to 3.7-fold increase of the enzymatic convertibility of bagasse, but was not efficient for improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of peanut shells, cassava stalks, or rice hulls.

  19. ACID EVAPORATION OF ULTIMA GOLD TM AB LIQUID SCINTILLATION COCKTAIL RESIDUE

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E.; Fondeur, F.; Crump, S.

    2011-12-21

    Prior analyses of samples from the F/H Lab solutions showed the presence of diisopropylnapthalene (DIN), a major component of Ultima Gold{trademark} AB liquid scintillation cocktail (LSC). These solutions are processed through H-Canyon Tank 10.5 and ultimately through the 17.8E evaporator. Similar solutions originated in SRNL streams sent to the same H Canyon tanks. This study examined whether the presence of these organics poses a process-significant hazard for the evaporator. Evaporation and calorimetry testing of surrogate samples containing 2000 ppm of Ultima Gold{trademark} AB LSC in 8 M nitric acid have been completed. These experiments showed that although reactions between nitric acid and the organic components do occur, they do not appear to pose a significant hazard for runaway reactions or generation of energetic compounds in canyon evaporators. The amount of off-gas generated was relatively modest and appeared to be well within the venting capacity of the H-Canyon evaporators. A significant fraction of the organic components likely survives the evaporation process primarily as non-volatile components that are not expected to represent any new process concerns during downstream operations such as neutralization. Laboratory Waste solutions containing minor amounts of DIN can be safely received, stored, transferred, and processed through the canyon waste evaporator.

  20. Dilute Sulfuric Acid Pretreatment of Agricultural and Agro-Industrial Residues for Ethanol Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Carlos; Alriksson, Björn; Sjöde, Anders; Nilvebrant, Nils-Olof; Jönsson, Leif J.

    The potential of dilute-acid prehydrolysis as a pretreatment method for sugarcane bagasse, rice hulls, peanut shells, and cassava stalks was investigated. The prehydrolysis was performed at 122°C during 20, 40, or 60 min using 2% H2SO4 at a solid-to-liquid ratio of 1∶10. Sugar formation increased with increasing reaction time. Xylose, glucose, arabinose, and galactose were detected in all of the prehydrolysates, whereas mannose was found only in the prehydrolysates of peanut shells and cassava stalks. The hemicelluloses of bagasse were hydrolyzed to a high-extent yielding concentrations of xylose and arabinose of 19.1 and 2.2 g/L, respectively, and a xylan conversion of more than 80%. High-glucose concentrations (26-33.5 g/L) were found in the prehydrolysates of rice hulls, probably because of hydrolysis of starch of grain remains in the hulls. Peanut shells and cassava stalks rendered low amounts of sugars on prehydrolysis, indicating that the conditions were not severe enough to hydrolyze the hemicelluloses in these materials quantitatively. All prehydrolysates were readily fermentable by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The dilute-acid prehydrolysis resulted in a 2.7-to 3.7-fold increase of the enzymatic convertibility of bagasse, but was not efficient for improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of peanut shells, cassava stalks, or rice hulls.

  1. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of lignocellulosic residues pretreated with phosphoric acid-acetone for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Kim, Nag-Jong; Jiang, Min; Kang, Jong Won; Chang, Ho Nam

    2009-07-01

    Bermudagrass, reed and rapeseed were pretreated with phosphoric acid-acetone and used for ethanol production by means of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) with a batch and fed-batch mode. When the batch SSF experiments were conducted in a 3% low effective cellulose, about 16 g/L of ethanol were obtained after 96 h of fermentation. When batch SSF experiments were conducted with a higher cellulose content (10% effective cellulose for reed and bermudagrass and 5% for rapeseed), higher ethanol concentrations and yields (of more than 93%) were obtained. The fed-batch SSF strategy was adopted to increase the ethanol concentration further. When a higher water-insoluble solid (up to 36%) was applied, the ethanol concentration reached 56 g/L of an inhibitory concentration of the yeast strain used in this study at 38 degrees C. The results show that the pretreated materials can be used as good feedstocks for bioethanol production, and that the phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment can effectively yield a higher ethanol concentration.

  2. 37 CFR 1.824 - Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... readable form may be created by any means, such as word processors, nucleotide/amino acid sequence editors... which the data were recorded on the computer readable form, the operating system used, a reference... Line Feed. (3) 8mm Data Cartridge: Format: Unix tar command; specify blocking factor (not “block...

  3. Synergy of Lewis and Brønsted acids on catalytic hydrothermal decomposition of carbohydrates and corncob acid hydrolysis residues to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Liming; Zhou, Tian; Chen, Jiachuan; Xu, Feng

    2017-01-01

    5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is an important platform molecule in the synthesis of various chemicals and materials. Herein, we reported a simple and effective dehydration of glucose-based carbohydrates to HMF in a biphasic system containing cyclopentyl methyl ether as the organic phase and AlCl3 with minute amounts of HCl as co-catalysts. The results showed that the mixed catalysts had a positive synergistic catalytic effect on glucose conversion to HMF compared with single AlCl3 or HCl catalyst. For glucose, the highest HMF yield of 54.5% was achieved at 175 °C for 20 min. More importantly, the optimal catalytic system was so efficient that it achieved one of the highest reported yields of HMF (30.5%) directly from corncob acid hydrolysis residues. Thus, the catalytic system can become a promising route for effective utilization of biomass in future biorefineries. PMID:28084456

  4. Amino acid residues in ribonuclease MC1 from bitter gourd seeds which are essential for uridine specificity.

    PubMed

    Numata, T; Suzuki, A; Yao, M; Tanaka, I; Kimura, M

    2001-01-16

    The ribonuclease MC1 (RNase MC1), isolated from seeds of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia), consists of 190 amino acids and is characterized by specific cleavage at the 5'-side of uridine. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to evaluate the contribution of four amino acids, Asn71, Val72, Leu73, and Arg74, at the alpha4-alpha5 loop between alpha4 and alpha5 helices for recognition of uracil base by RNase MC1. Four mutants, N71T, V72L, L73A, and R74S, in which Asn71, Val72, Leu73, and Arg74 in RNase MC1 were substituted for the corresponding amino acids, Thr, Leu, Ala, and Ser, respectively, in a guanylic acid preferential RNase NW from Nicotiana glutinosa, were prepared and characterized with respect to enzymatic activity. Kinetic analysis with a dinucleoside monophosphate, CpU, showed that the mutant N71T exhibited 7.0-fold increased K(m) and 2.3-fold decreased k(cat), while the mutant L73A had 14.4-fold increased K(m), although it did retain the k(cat) value comparable to that of the wild-type. In contrast, replacements of Val72 and Arg74 by the corresponding amino acids Leu and Ser, respectively, had little effect on the enzymatic activity. This observation is consistent with findings in the crystal structure analysis that Asn71 and Leu73 are responsible for a uridine specificity for RNase MC1. The role of Asn71 in enzymatic reaction of RNase MC1 was further investigated by substituting amino acids Ala, Ser, Gln, and Asp. Our observations suggest that Asn71 has at least two roles: one is base recognition by hydrogen bonding, and the other is to stabilize the conformation of the alpha4-alpha5 loop by hydrogen bonding to the peptide backbone, events which possibly result in an appropriate orientation of the alpha-helix (alpha5) containing active site residues. Mutants N71T and N71S showed a remarkable shift from uracil to guanine specificity, as evaluated by cleavage of CpG, although they did exhibit uridine specificity against yeast RNA and homopolynucleotides.

  5. Hydrothermal liquefaction of Undaria pinnatifida residues to organic acids with recyclable trimethylamine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongxing; Ren, Xiulian; Wei, Qifeng; Guo, Jingjing

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of trimethylamine (TMA) on the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) process and the recycle of TMA. The results suggest that the peeling reaction occurred on the surface and the cleavage of cellulose leading to water-soluble substances and bio-oil. The highest content of organic acids was found in the water-soluble phase. Model compounds, different glucides with TMA were used to investigate the mechanism of the HTL. Results suggest that the OH(-) appeared to selectively interact with C-O-C bonds, and thus causing the key linkages of cellulose to become much easier to be cleaved under mild conditions. In addition, the conditions for TMA recovery were optimized and the highest TMA recovery rate reached 98.89%. The recovered TMA had the same properties as the original compound, and it was perfectly re-usable in the conversion process of HTL.

  6. Wastewater disinfection by peracetic acid: assessment of models for tracking residual measurements and inactivation.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Domenico; Gehr, Ronald; Bartrand, Timothy A; Liberti, Lorenzo; Notarnicola, Michele; Dell'Erba, Adele; Falsanisi, Dario; Haas, Charles N

    2007-07-01

    With its potential for low (if any) disinfection byproduct formation and easy retrofit for chlorine contactors, peracetic acid (PAA) or use of PAA in combination with other disinfectant technologies may be an attractive alternative to chlorine-based disinfection. Examples of systems that might benefit from use of PAA are water reuse schemes or plants discharging to sensitive receiving water bodies. Though PAA is in use in numerous wastewater treatment plants in Europe, its chemical kinetics, microbial inactivation rates, and mode of action against microorganisms are not thoroughly understood. This paper presents results from experimental studies of PAA demand, PAA decay, and microbial inactivation, with a complementary modeling analysis. Model results are used to evaluate techniques for measurement of PAA concentration and to develop hypotheses regarding the mode of action of PAA in bacterial inactivation. Kinetic and microbial inactivation rate data were collected for typical wastewaters and may be useful for engineers in evaluating whether to convert from chlorine to PAA disinfection.

  7. Position dependence of amino acid intrinsic helical propensities II: non-charged polar residues: Ser, Thr, Asn, and Gln.

    PubMed Central

    Petukhov, M.; Uegaki, K.; Yumoto, N.; Yoshikawa, S.; Serrano, L.

    1999-01-01

    The assumption that the intrinsic alpha-helical propensities of the amino acids are position independent was critical in several helix/coil transition theories. In the first paper of these series, we reported that this is not the case for Gly and nonpolar aliphatic amino acids (Val, Leu, Met, and Ile). Here we have analyzed the helical intrinsic propensities of noncharged polar residues (Ser, Thr, Asn, and Gln) at different positions of a model polyalanine-based peptide. We found that Thr is more favorable (by approximately 0.3 kcal/mol) at positions N1 and N2 than in the helix center, although for Ser, Asn, and Gln the differences are smaller (+/-0.2 kcal/mol), and in many cases within the experimental error. There is a reasonable agreement (+/-0.2 kcal/mol) between the calculated free energies, using the ECEPP/2 force field equipped with a hydration potential, and the experimental data, except at position N1. PMID:10548060

  8. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Listiyani, M A D; Campbell, R E; Miracle, R E; Dean, L O; Drake, M A

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations in dried whey products. No legal limit exists in the United States for BP use in whey, but international concerns exist. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide (HP) or BP bleaching on the flavor of 34% WPC (WPC34) and to evaluate residual BA in commercial and experimental WPC bleached with and without BP. Cheddar whey was manufactured in duplicate. Pasteurized fat-separated whey was subjected to hot bleaching with either HP at 500 mg/kg, BP at 50 or 100 mg/kg, or no bleach. Whey was ultrafiltered and spray dried into WPC34. Color [L*(lightness), a* (red-green), and b* (yellow-blue)] measurements and norbixin extractions were conducted to compare bleaching efficacy. Descriptive sensory and instrumental volatile analyses were used to evaluate bleaching effects on flavor. Benzoic acid was extracted from experimental and commercial WPC34 and 80% WPC (WPC80) and quantified by HPLC. The b* value and norbixin concentration of BP-bleached WPC34 were lower than HP-bleached and control WPC34. Hydrogen peroxide-bleached WPC34 displayed higher cardboard flavor and had higher volatile lipid oxidation products than BP-bleached or control WPC34. Benzoyl peroxide-bleached WPC34 had higher BA concentrations than unbleached and HP-bleached WPC34 and BA concentrations were also higher in BP-bleached WPC80 compared with unbleached and HP-bleached WPC80, with smaller differences than those observed in WPC34. Benzoic acid extraction from permeate showed that WPC80 permeate contained more BA than did WPC34 permeate. Benzoyl peroxide is more effective in color removal of whey and results in fewer flavor side effects compared with HP and residual BA is

  9. Photodissociation of organic molecules in star-forming regions. II. Acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilling, S.; Santos, A. C. F.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.

    2006-04-01

    Fragments from organic molecule dissociation (such as reactive ions and radicals) can form interstellar complex molecules like amino acids. The goal of this work is to experimentally study photoionization and photodissociation processes of acetic acid (CH3COOH), a glycine (NH2CH2COOH) precursor molecule, by soft X-ray photons. The measurements were taken at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), employing soft X-ray photons from a toroidal grating monochromator (TGM) beamline (100-310 eV). Mass spectra were obtained using the photoelectron photoion coincidence (PEPICO) method. Kinetic energy distribution and abundances for each ionic fragment have been obtained from the analysis of the corresponding peak shapes in the mass spectra. Absolute photoionization and photodissociation cross sections were also determined. We have found, among the channels leading to ionization, that only 4-6% of CH3COOH survive the strong ionization field. CH3CO^+, COOH+ and CH3+ ions are the main fragments, and the presence of the former may indicate that the production-destruction process of acetic acid in hot molecular cores (HMCs) could decrease the H2O abundance since the net result of this process converts H2O into OH + H^+. The COOH+ ion plays an important role in ion-molecule reactions to form large biomolecules like glycine.

  10. Spectral investigation and theoretical study of zwitterionic and neutral forms of quinolinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, M.; Sinha, L.; Prasad, O.; Bilgili, S.; Sachan, Alok K.; Asiri, A. M.; Atac, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, molecular structure and vibrational analysis of quinolinic acid (2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid), in zwitterionic and neutral forms, were presented using FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR, UV experimental techniques and quantum chemical calculations. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (2,3-PDCA) in the solid phase were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and 3500-0 cm-1, respectively. The geometrical parameters and energies were obtained for zwitter and neutral forms by using density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. 3D potential energy scan was performed by varying the selected dihedral angles using M06-2X and B3LYP functionals at 6-31G(d) level of theory and thus the most stable conformer of the title compound was determined. The most stable conformer was further optimized at higher level and vibrational wavenumbers were calculated. Theoretical vibrational assignment of 2,3-PDCA, using percentage potential energy distribution (PED) was done with MOLVIB program. 13C and 1H NMR spectra were recorded in DMSO. Chemical shifts were calculated at the same level of theory. The UV absorption spectra of the studied compound in ethanol and water were recorded in the range of 200-400 nm. The optimized geometric parameters were compared with experimental data.

  11. Chemical ionization of clusters formed from sulfuric acid and dimethylamine or diamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Coty N.; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H.; Hanson, David R.

    2016-10-01

    Chemical ionization (CI) mass spectrometers are used to study atmospheric nucleation by detecting clusters produced by reactions of sulfuric acid and various basic gases. These instruments typically use nitrate to deprotonate and thus chemically ionize the clusters. In this study, we compare cluster concentrations measured using either nitrate or acetate. Clusters were formed in a flow reactor from vapors of sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, ethylene diamine, tetramethylethylene diamine, or butanediamine (also known as putrescine). These comparisons show that nitrate is unable to chemically ionize clusters with high base content. In addition, we vary the ion-molecule reaction time to probe ion processes which include proton-transfer, ion-molecule clustering, and decomposition of ions. Ion decomposition upon deprotonation by acetate/nitrate was observed. More studies are needed to quantify to what extent ion decomposition affects observed cluster content and concentrations, especially those chemically ionized with acetate since it deprotonates more types of clusters than nitrate.Model calculations of the neutral and ion cluster formation pathways are also presented to better identify the cluster types that are not efficiently deprotonated by nitrate. Comparison of model and measured clusters indicate that sulfuric acid dimers with two diamines and sulfuric acid trimers with two or more base molecules are not efficiently chemical ionized by nitrate. We conclude that acetate CI provides better information on cluster abundancies and their base content than nitrate CI.

  12. Leaching and selective copper recovery from acidic leachates of Três Marias zinc plant (MG, Brazil) metallurgical purification residues.

    PubMed

    Sethurajan, Manivannan; Huguenot, David; Lens, Piet N L; Horn, Heinrich A; Figueiredo, Luiz H A; van Hullebusch, Eric D

    2016-07-15

    Zinc plant purification residue (ZPR), a typical Zn-hydrometallurgical waste, was collected from the Três Marias Zn plant (MG, Brazil). ZPR was characterized for its metal content and fractionation, mineralogy, toxicity and leachability. Toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP) and European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction results revealed that this ZPR displays high percentages of metals (Cd, Cu, Zn and Pb) in the highly mobilizable fractions, increasing its hazardous potential. Bulk chemical analysis, pH dependent leaching and acid (H2SO4) leaching studies confirm that the ZPR is polymetallic, rich in Cd, Cu and Zn. The sulfuric acid concentration (1 M), agitation speed (450 rpm), temperature (40 °C) and pulp density (20 g L(-1)) were optimized to leach the maximum amount of heavy metals (Cd, Cu and Zn). Under optimum conditions, more than 50%, 70% and 60% of the total Cd, Cu and Zn present in the ZPR can be leached, respectively. The metals in the acid leachates were investigated for metal sulfide precipitation with an emphasis on selective Cu recovery. Metal sulfide precipitation process parameters such as initial pH and Cu to sulfide ratio were optimized as pH 1.5 and 1:0.5 (Cu:sulfide) mass ratio, respectively. Under optimum conditions, more than 95% of Cu can be selectively recovered from the polymetallic ZPR leachates. The Cu precipitates characterization studies reveal that they are approximately 0.1 μm in diameter and mainly consist of Cu and S. XRD analysis showed covellite (CuS), chalcanthite (CuSO4·5H2O) and natrochalcite (NaCu2(SO4)2(OH)·H2O) as the mineral phases. ZPRs can thus be considered as an alternative resource for copper production.

  13. Probing the chemical mechanism and critical regulatory amino acid residues of Drosophila melanogaster arylalkylamine N-acyltransferase like 2.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Daniel R; Carpenter, Anne-Marie; Ospina, Santiago Rodriguez; Merkler, David J

    2015-11-01

    Arylalkylamine N-acyltransferase like 2 (AANATL2) catalyzes the formation of N-acylarylalkylamides from the corresponding acyl-CoA and arylalkylamine. The N-acylation of biogenic amines in Drosophila melanogaster is a critical step for the inactivation of neurotransmitters, cuticle sclerotization, and melatonin biosynthesis. In addition, D. melanogaster has been used as a model system to evaluate the biosynthesis of fatty acid amides: a family of potent cell signaling lipids. We have previously showed that AANATL2 catalyzes the formation of N-acylarylakylamides, including long-chain N-acylserotonins and N-acyldopamines. Herein, we define the kinetic mechanism for AANATL2 as an ordered sequential mechanism with acetyl-CoA binding first followed by tyramine to generate the ternary complex prior to catalysis. Bell shaped kcat,app - acetyl-CoA and (kcat/Km)app - acetyl-CoA pH-rate profiles identified two apparent pKa,app values of ∼7.4 and ∼8.9 that are critical to catalysis, suggesting the AANATL2-catalyzed formation of N-acetyltyramine occurs through an acid/base chemical mechanism. Site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved glutamate that corresponds to the catalytic base for other D. melanogaster AANATL enzymes did not produce a substantial depression in the kcat,app value nor did it abolish the pKa,app value attributed to the general base in catalysis (pKa ∼7.4). These data suggest that AANATL2 catalyzes the formation of N-acylarylalkylamides using either different catalytic residues or a different chemical mechanism relative to other D. melanogaster AANATL enzymes. In addition, we constructed other site-directed mutants of AANATL2 to help define the role of targeted amino acids in substrate binding and/or enzyme catalysis.

  14. The adsorption of chromium (VI) from industrial wastewater by acid and base-activated lignocellulosic residues.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Patricia; Blanco, Clara; Granda, Marcos

    2007-06-01

    This study deals with the adsorption of Cr(VI) from synthetic and industrial wastewater, produced by a sewage plant. The activated carbons were prepared from a lignocellulosic raw material by thermal treatment at 450 and 650 degrees C in the presence of acid (AlCl(3), HCl, H(3)PO(4) and H(2)SO(4)) and base (NaOH) agents. To optimize the adsorption of Cr(VI), the chemical modifications caused by each activating agent (related to the capability of Cr(VI) removal), and the optimal experimental conditions of the pH, Cr(VI) concentration, adsorbent dose and residence time, were studied. Thus, treatment with H(3)PO(4) gives rise to carbons with a high surface area and high efficiency for Cr(VI) removal at short equilibrium times. In contrast, the generation of active surface sites by means of NaOH requires longer equilibrium times, the adsorption being less effective than in the former case. The adsorption isotherms obey the Langmuir equation only in the first stages of the reaction but fit the Freundlich equations over the whole range studied, so the heat of adsorption can be easily calculated. The results also show that the activated carbons obtained can be recovered by filtration with an efficiency of 30% in the third cycle.

  15. Rare earth element concentrations in dissolved and acid available particulate forms for eastern UK rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, C.

    2007-01-01

    Variations in concentration of yttrium (Y), lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), neodymium (Nd), samarium (Sm) and gadolinium (Gd) among rivers of eastern England and the border with Scotland are described in relation to the dissolved (<0.45 µM) fraction and acid-available particulate (AAP) fractions. The rivers cover a range of rural, agricultural and urban/industrial environments. Yttrium and the lanthanides show significant levels of both dissolved and acid-available particulate forms (typically about 40% in the dissolved form). For the dissolved phase, Y and the lanthanides are linearly correlated with each other and with iron: most of this dissolved component may be in a micro-particulate/colloidal form. The Y and lanthanide relationships show marked scatter and there are anomalously high La concentrations at times for the rivers Great Ouse, Thames and Wear that are probably linked to pollutant sources. For the Ouse, and especially for one of its tributaries, the Swale, relatively high Sm concentrations are probably associated with mineralisation within the catchment and contamination of the associated flood plain. For the AAP components, there are strong linear relationships with Y and the lanthanides across all the rivers. There is also a strong link between these AAP associated REE and AAP iron, although the scatter is greater and the industrial rivers have a lower lanthanide to iron ratio, probably due to iron-rich contaminants.

  16. Lead-acid bipolar battery assembled with primary chemically formed positive pasted electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, H.; Shamsipur, M.; Ghasemi, S.; Mousavi, M. F.

    Primary chemically formed lead dioxide (PbO 2) was used as positive electrode in preparation of lead-acid bipolar batteries. Chemical oxidation was carried out by both mixing and dipping methods using an optimized amount of ammonium persulfate as a suitable oxidizing agent. X-ray diffraction studies showed that the weight ratio of β-PbO 2 to α-PbO 2 is more for mixing method before electrochemical forming. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to investigate charge transfer resistance of the lead dioxide obtained by mixing and dipping methods before and after electrochemical forming. Four types of bipolar lead-acid batteries were produced with: (1) lead substrate and conventional electroforming; (2) carbon doped polyethylene substrate with conventional electroforming; (3) carbon doped polyethylene substrate with chemical forming after curing and drying steps in oxidant bath, followed by electrochemical forming, and (4) carbon doped polyethylene substrate with primary chemical oxidation in mixing step, followed by conventional electroforming. The capacity and cycle-life tests of the prepared bipolar batteries were performed by a home-made battery tester and using the pulsed current method. The prepared batteries showed low weight, high capacity, high energy density and high power density. The first capacities of bipolar batteries of type 1-4 were found to be 152, 150, 180 and 198 mAh g -1, respectively. The experimental results showed that the prepared 6 V bipolar batteries of type 1-4 have power density (per cell unit) of 59.7, 57.4, 78.46 and 83.30 mW g -1 (W kg -1), respectively.

  17. Conserved Aspartic Acid Residues Lining the Extracellular Loop I of Sodium-coupled Bile Acid Transporter ASBT Interact with Na+ and 7α-OH Moieties on the Ligand Cholestane Skeleton*

    PubMed Central

    Hussainzada, Naissan; Da Silva, Tatiana Claro; Zhang, Eric Y.; Swaan, Peter W.

    2008-01-01

    Functional contributions of residues Val-99—Ser-126 lining extracellular loop (EL) 1 of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter were determined via cysteine-scanning mutagenesis, thiol modification, and in silico interpretation. Despite membrane expression for all but three constructs (S112C, Y117C, S126C), most EL1 mutants (64%) were inactivated by cysteine mutation, suggesting a functional role during sodium/bile acid co-transport. A negative charge at conserved residues Asp-120 and Asp-122 is required for transport function, whereas neutralization of charge at Asp-124 yields a functionally active transporter. D124A exerts low affinity for common bile acids except deoxycholic acid, which uniquely lacks a 7α-hydroxyl (OH) group. Overall, we conclude that (i) Asp-122 functions as a Na+ sensor, binding one of two co-transported Na+ ions, (ii) Asp-124 interacts with 7α-OH groups of bile acids, and (iii) apolar EL1 residues map to hydrophobic ligand pharmacophore features. Based on these data, we propose a comprehensive mechanistic model involving dynamic salt bridge pairs and hydrogen bonding involving multiple residues to describe sodium-dependent bile acid transporter-mediated bile acid and cation translocation. PMID:18508772

  18. Evaluation of net acid generation pH as a single indicator for acid forming potential of rocks using geochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chamteut; Ji, Sangwoo; Yim, Giljae; Cheong, Youngwook

    2017-04-01

    The main purpose of this research was to evaluate the geochemical properties of rocks for a single indicator of acid-forming potential. The indicators, such as net acid generation (NAG), NAG pH and total S, were applied to 312 rock samples of various geological characteristics. Additional indicators, such as a Modified NAG pH, paste pH and available acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), were applied to 22 selected samples. Among them, NAG pH was considered the most plausible single indicator in evaluating acid-forming potential, as it is simple to measure, widely applicable to various samples and can be used to estimate the NAG value. The acid-forming potential of 287 samples (92% of samples examined in this research) was classified as either non-acid forming (NAF) or potentially acid forming (PAF) by NAG pH, with an NAF criteria of <3.21 and PAF of >4.52. The NAG pH was also a good estimate of the risk of short-term acid release when combined with paste pH information. However, application of NAG pH to coal mine wastes, with high organic carbon contents, produced erroneous results due to the generation of organic acid during the NAG test. In this research, a Modified NAG pH was assessed as an alternative to NAG pH in such situations.

  19. Effects of Fungicide Treatment on Free Amino Acid Concentration and Acrylamide-Forming Potential in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Tanya Y; Powers, Stephen J; Halford, Nigel G

    2016-12-28

    Acrylamide forms from free asparagine and reducing sugars during frying, baking, roasting, or high-temperature processing, and cereal products are major contributors to dietary acrylamide intake. Free asparagine concentration is the determining factor for acrylamide-forming potential in cereals, and this study investigated the effect of fungicide application on free asparagine accumulation in wheat grain. Free amino acid concentrations were measured in flour from 47 varieties of wheat grown in a field trial in 2011-2012. The wheat had been supplied with nitrogen and sulfur and treated with growth regulators and fungicides. Acrylamide formation was measured after the flour had been heated at 180 °C for 20 min. Flour was also analyzed from 24 (of the 47) varieties grown in adjacent plots that were treated in identical fashion except that no fungicide was applied, resulting in visible infection by Septoria tritici, yellow rust, and brown rust. Free asparagine concentration in the fungicide-treated wheat ranged from 1.596 to 3.987 mmol kg(-1), with a significant (p < 0.001 to p = 0.006, F test) effect of variety for not only free asparagine but all of the free amino acids apart from cysteine and ornithine. There was also a significant (p < 0.001, F test) effect of variety on acrylamide formation, which ranged from 134 to 992 μg kg(-1). There was a significant (p < 0.001, F test) correlation between free asparagine concentration and acrylamide formation. Both free asparagine concentration and acrylamide formation increased in response to a lack of fungicide treatment, the increases in acrylamide ranging from 2.7 to 370%. Free aspartic acid concentration also increased, whereas free glutamic acid concentration increased in some varieties but decreased in others, and free proline concentration decreased. The study showed disease control by fungicide application to be an important crop management measure for mitigating the problem of acrylamide formation in wheat

  20. The role of aspartic acid residues 405 and 416 of the kidney isotype of sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter 1 in its targeting to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kucher, Volodymyr; Li, Emily Y.; Conforti, Laura; Zahedi, Kamyar A.

    2012-01-01

    The NH2 terminus of the sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter 1 (NBCe1) plays an important role in its targeting to the plasma membrane. To identify the amino acid residues that contribute to the targeting of NBCe1 to the plasma membrane, polarized MDCK cells were transfected with expression constructs coding for green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged NBCe1 NH2-terminal deletion mutants, and the localization of GFP-tagged proteins was analyzed by confocal microscopy. Our results indicate that the amino acids between residues 399 and 424 of NBCe1A contain important sequences that contribute to its localization to the plasma membrane. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that GFP-NBCe1A mutants D405A and D416A are retained in the cytoplasm of the polarized MDCK epithelial cells. Examination of functional activities of D405A and D416A reveals that their activities are reduced compared with the wild-type NBCe1A. Similarly, aspartic acid residues 449 and 460 of pancreatic NBCe1 (NBCe1B), which correspond to residues 405 and 416 of NBCe1A, are also required for its full functional activity and accurate targeting to the plasma membrane. In addition, while replacement of D416 with glutamic acid did not affect the targeting or functional activity of NBCe1A, substitution of D405 with glutamic acid led to the retention of the mutated protein in the intracellular compartment and impaired functional activity. These studies demonstrate that aspartic acid residues 405 and 416 in the NH2 terminus of NBCe1A are important in its accurate targeting to the plasma membrane. PMID:22442137

  1. Sequence selective recognition of double-stranded RNA using triple helix-forming peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Zengeya, Thomas; Gupta, Pankaj; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs are attractive targets for molecular recognition because of the central role they play in gene expression. Since most noncoding RNAs are in a double-helical conformation, recognition of such structures is a formidable problem. Herein, we describe a method for sequence-selective recognition of biologically relevant double-helical RNA (illustrated on ribosomal A-site RNA) using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) that form a triple helix in the major grove of RNA under physiologically relevant conditions. Protocols for PNA preparation and binding studies using isothermal titration calorimetry are described in detail.

  2. Enzymes in Glycolysis and the Citric Acid Cycle in the Yeast and Mycelial Forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori; Carbonell, Luis M.

    1966-01-01

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas, Venezuela), and Luis M. Carbonell. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1315–1320. 1966.—Enzymatic activities in glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, and the citric acid cycle in cell-free extracts of the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were examined comparatively. Both forms have the enzymes of these pathways. Activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malic dehydrogenase of the mycelial form were higher than those of the yeast form. Another 15 enzymatic activities of the mycelial form were lower than those of the yeast form. The activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase showed the most marked difference between the two forms, its activity in the mycelial form being about 20% of that in the yeast form. PMID:5924267

  3. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Kanetsuna, F; Carbonell, L M

    1966-11-01

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas, Venezuela), and Luis M. Carbonell. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1315-1320. 1966.-Enzymatic activities in glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, and the citric acid cycle in cell-free extracts of the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were examined comparatively. Both forms have the enzymes of these pathways. Activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malic dehydrogenase of the mycelial form were higher than those of the yeast form. Another 15 enzymatic activities of the mycelial form were lower than those of the yeast form. The activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase showed the most marked difference between the two forms, its activity in the mycelial form being about 20% of that in the yeast form.

  4. Reaction of primary and secondary amines to form carbamic acid glucuronides.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, William H

    2006-12-01

    Glucuronidation is an important mechanism used by mammalian systems to clear and eliminate both endogenous and foreign chemicals. Many functional groups are susceptible to conjugation with glucuronic acid, including hydroxyls, phenols, carboxyls, activated carbons, thiols, amines, and selenium. Primary and secondary amines can also react with carbon dioxide (CO(2)) via a reversible reaction to form a carbamic acid. The carbamic acid is also a substrate for glucuronidation and results in a stable carbamate glucuronide metabolite. The detection and characterization of these products has been facilitated greatly by the advent of soft ionization mass spectrometry techniques and high field NMR instrumentation. The formation of carbamate glucuronide metabolites has been described for numerous pharmaceuticals and they have been identified in all of the species commonly used in drug metabolism studies (rat, dog, mouse, rabbit, guinea pig, and human). There has been no obvious species specificity for their formation and no preference for 1 degrees or 2 degrees amines. Many biological reactions have also been described in the literature that involve the reaction of CO(2) with amino groups of biomolecules. For example, CO(2) generated from cellular respiration is expired in part through the reversible formation of a carbamate between CO(2) and the alpha-amino groups of the alpha- and beta-chains of hemoglobin. Also, carbamic acid products of several amines, such as beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), ethylenediamine, and L-cysteine have been implicated in toxicity. Studies suggested that a significant portion of amino-compounds in biological samples (that naturally contain CO(2)/bicarbonate) can be present as a carbamic acid.

  5. Chemical structures of corn stover and its residue after dilute acid prehydrolysis and enzymatic hydrolysis: Insight into factors limiting enzymatic hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advanced solid-state NMR techniques and wet chemical analyses were applied to investigate untreated corn stover (UCS) and its residues after dilute acid prehydrolysis (DAP) and enzymatic hydrolysis (RES) to provide evidence for the limitations to the effectiveness of enzyme hydrolysis. Advanced soli...

  6. Effect of binding of Calcofluor White on the carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) on the structure and dynamics of the protein moiety. A fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R

    2001-08-23

    Calcofluor White is a fluorescent probe that interacts with polysaccharides and is commonly used in clinical studies. Interaction between Calcofluor White and carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) was previously studied at low and high concentrations of Calcofluor compared to that of the protein. alpha1-Acid glycoprotein contains 40% carbohydrate by weight and has up to 16 sialic acid residues. At equimolar concentrations of Calcofluor and alpha1-acid glycoprotein, the fluorophore displays free motions [Albani, J. R.; Sillen, A.; Coddeville, B.; Plancke, Y. D.; Engelborghs, Y. Carbohydr. Res. 1999, 322, 87-94], while at high concentration of Calcofluor, its surrounding microenvironment is rigid, inducing the rigidity of the fluorophore itself [Albani, J. R.; Sillen, A.; Plancke, Y. D.; Coddeville, B.; Engelborghs, Y. Carbohydr. Res. 2000, 327, 333-340]. In the present work, red-edge excitation spectra and steady-state anisotropy studies performed on Trp residues in the presence of Calcofluor, showed that the apparent dynamics of Trp residues are not modified. However, deconvoluting the emission spectra with two different methods into different components, reveals that the structure of the protein matrix has been disrupted in the presence of high Calcofluor concentrations.

  7. Anthranilimide-based glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes: 2. Optimization of serine and threonine ether amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Steven M; Banker, Pierette; Bickett, David M; Clancy, Daphne C; Dickerson, Scott H; Garrido, Dulce M; Golden, Pamela L; Peat, Andrew J; Sheckler, Lauren R; Tavares, Francis X; Thomson, Stephen A; Weiel, James E

    2009-02-01

    Optimization of the amino acid residue of a series of anthranilimide-based glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors is described leading to the identification of serine and threonine ether analogs. t-Butylthreonine analog 20 displayed potent in vitro inhibition of GPa, low potential for P450 inhibition, and excellent pharmacokinetic properties.

  8. Amino acid residues involved in the substrate specificity of TauT/SLC6A6 for taurine and γ-aminobutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Yahara, Tohru; Tachikawa, Masanori; Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Hosoya, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Taurine transporter (TauT/SLC6A6) is an "honorary" γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter because of its low affinity for GABA. The sequence analysis of TauT implied the role of Gly57, Phe58, Leu306 and Glu406 in the substrate recognition of TauT, and amino acid-substitutions were performed. Immunocytochemistry supported no marked effect of mutations on the expression of TauT. TauT-expressing oocytes showed a reduction in [(3)H]taurine uptake by G57E, F58I, L306Q and E406C, and change in [(3)H]GABA uptake by G57E and E406C, suggesting their significant roles in the function of TauT. G57E lost the activity of [(3)H]taurine and [(3)H]GABA uptake, suggesting that Gly57 is involved in the determination of substrate pocket volume and in the interaction with substrates. E406C exhibited a decrease and an increase in the affinity for taurine and GABA, respectively, suggesting the involvement of Glu406 in the substrate specificity of TauT. The inhibition study supported the role of Glu406 in the substrate specificity since [(3)H]taurine and [(3)H]GABA uptake by E406C was less sensitive to taurine and β-alanine, and more sensitive to GABA and nipecotic acid than was the case with wild type of TauT. F58I had an increased affinity for GABA, suggesting the involvement of Phe58 in the substrate accessibility. The kinetic parameters showed the decreased and increased affinities of L306Q for taurine and GABA, respectively, supporting that substrate recognition of TauT is conformationally regulated by the branched-side chain of Leu306. In conclusion, the present results suggest that these residues play important roles in the transport function and substrate specificity of TauT.

  9. Cavity residue leucine 95 and channel residues glutamine 204, aspartic acid 211, and phenylalanine 269 of toluene o-xylene monooxygenase influence catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Cansu; Sönmez, Burcu; Vardar, Nurcan; Yanık-Yıldırım, K Cansu; Vardar-Schara, Gönül

    2016-09-01

    Structural analysis of toluene-o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) hydroxylase revealed the presence of three hydrophobic cavities, a channel, and a pore leading from the protein surface to the active site. Here, saturation mutagenesis was used to investigate the catalytic roles of alpha-subunit (TouA) second cavity residue L95 and TouA channel residues Q204, D211, and F269. By testing the substrates toluene, phenol, nitrobenzene, and/or naphthalene, these positions were found to influence the catalytic activity of ToMO. Several regiospecific variants were identified from TouA positions Q204, F269, and L95. For example, TouA variant Q204H had the regiospecificity of nitrobenzene changed significantly from 30 to 61 % p-nitrophenol. Interestingly, a combination of mutations at Q204H and A106V altered the regiospecificity of nitrobenzene back to 27 % p-nitrophenol. TouA variants F269Y, F269P, Q204E, and L95D improved the meta-hydroxylating capability of nitrobenzene by producing 87, 85, 82, and 77 % m-nitrophenol, respectively. For naphthalene oxidation, TouA variants F269V, Q204A, Q204S/S222N, and F269T had the regiospecificity changed from 16 to 9, 10, 23, and 25 % 2-naphthol, respectively. Here, two additional TouA residues, S222 and A106, were also identified that may have important roles in catalysis. Most of the isolated variants from D211 remained active, whereas having a hydrophobic residue at this position appeared to diminish the catalytic activity toward naphthalene. The mutational effects on the ToMO regiospecificity described here suggest that it is possible to further fine tune and engineer the reactivity of multicomponent diiron monooxygenases toward different substrates at positions that are relatively distant from the active site.

  10. New method for ethephon ((2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid) residue analysis, and detection of residual levels in the fruit and vegetables of Western Japan.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Shigeyuki

    2002-12-18

    A new method for the detection and quantification of ethephon residues in fruit and vegetables was developed. The present study indicates that fruit and vegetables require a rapid and simple cleanup step before using gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry. The recovery and precision of the new method were evaluated by spiking the fruit and vegetable samples with 0.01-0.1 microg/g of ethephon. The amount of ethephon residue can be determined with good accuracy (recovery, 78.6-109%; coefficient variation, 2.65-6.41%), and the detection limit, defined as the amount of ethephon equivalent to three standard deviations (SD) of the noise level in observations at the baseline level of the selected ion (m/z 110), was 4 pg. The determination limit, defined as the equivalent to 8 SD of the noise level, was 11 pg. The working range was between 10 and 1000 ng/mL, and the correlation coefficient was 0.999 in the five experiments. Ethephon residues were determined between <2 and 97 ng/g in commercial pineapples from Western Japan.

  11. Molecular structure of two crystal forms of cyclic triadenylic acid at 1A resolution.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y G; Robinson, H; Guan, Y; Liaw, Y C; van Boom, J H; van der Marel, G A; Wang, A H

    1998-08-01

    The three dimensional structures of cyclic deoxytriadenylic acid, c-d(ApApAp), from two different trigonal crystal forms (space groups P3 and R32) have been determined by x-ray diffraction analysis at 1A resolution. Both structures were solved by direct methods and refined by anisotropic least squares refinement to R-factors of 0.109 and 0.137 for the P3 and R32 forms, respectively. In both crystal forms, each of the two independent c-d(ApApAp) molecules sits on the crystallographic 3-fold axis. All four independent c-d(ApApAp) molecules have similar backbone conformations. The deoxyriboses are in the S-type pucker with pseudorotation angles ranging from 156.7 degrees to 168.6 degrees and the bases have anti glycosyl torsion angles (chi falling in two ranges, one at -104.3 degrees and the other ranging from -141.0 degrees to -143.8 degrees). In the R32 form, a hexahydrated cobalt(II) ion is found to coordinate through bridging water molecules to N1, N3, and N7 atoms of three adjacent adenines and oxygen atoms of phosphates. Comparison with other structures of cyclic oligonucleotides indicates that the sugar adopts N-type pucker in cyclic dinucleotides and S-type pucker in cyclic trinucleotides, regardless whether the sugar is a ribose or a deoxyribose.

  12. Intrinsic propensities of amino acid residues in GxG peptides inferred from amide I' band profiles and NMR scalar coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Hagarman, Andrew; Measey, Thomas J; Mathieu, Daniel; Schwalbe, Harald; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2010-01-20

    A reliable intrinsic propensity scale of amino acid residues is indispensable for an assessment of how local conformational distributions in the unfolded state can affect the folding of peptides and proteins. Short host-guest peptides, such as GxG tripeptides, are suitable tools for probing such propensities. To explore the conformational distributions sampled by the central amino acid residue in these motifs, we combined vibrational (IR, Raman, and VCD) with NMR spectroscopy. The data were analyzed in terms of a superposition of two-dimensional Gaussian distribution functions in the Ramachandran space pertaining to subensembles of polyproline II, beta-strand, right- and left-handed helical, and gamma-turn-like conformations. The intrinsic propensities of eight amino acid residues (x = A, V, F, L, S, E, K, and M) in GxG peptides were determined as mole fractions of these subensembles. Our results show that alanine adopts primarily (approximately 80%) a PPII-like conformation, while valine and phenylalanine were found to sample PPII and beta-strand-like conformations equally. The centers of the respective beta-strand distributions generally do not coincide with canonical values of dihedral angles of residues in parallel or antiparallel beta-strands. In fact, the distributions for most residues found in the beta-region significantly overlap the PPII-region. A comparison with earlier reported results for trivaline reveals that the terminal valines increase the beta-strand propensity of the central valine residue even further. Of the remaining investigated amino acids, methionine preferred PPII the most (0.64), and E, S, L, and K exhibit moderate (0.56-0.45) PPII propensities. Residues V, F, S, E, and L sample, to a significant extent, a region between the canonical PPII and (antiparallel) beta-strand conformations. This region coincides with the sampling reported for L and V using theoretical predictions (Tran et al. Biochemistry 2005, 44, 11369). The distributions of

  13. An adult form of Alexander disease: a novel mutation in glial fibrillary acidic protein.

    PubMed

    Ohnari, K; Yamano, M; Uozumi, T; Hashimoto, T; Tsuji, S; Nakagawa, M

    2007-10-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mutation has been reported in Alexander disease. We report a patient with the adult form of Alexander disease who shows a novel mutation in GFAP. This case presented with progressive dysarthria, dysphagia and spastic gait on the right side. Brain and spinal cord MRI showed marked atrophy of the medulla oblongata and spinal cord. Abnormal high signal intensities in the ventral medulla oblongata were detected bilaterally. There were no white matter lesions or contrast enhancing lesions. Recently, there have been reports of patients with a juvenile form of Alexander disease presenting with atrophy or signal abnormalities of the medulla or spinal cord. Atrophy of the medulla and spinal cord have specifically been described as suggestive of Alexander disease [1]. Sequence analysis of the GFAP gene of this patient showed a heterozygous c.221T>C mutation, predicting a p.M74T amino acid change. In all patients suspected of Alexander disease on the basis of MRI findings, GFAP analysis is necessary to confirm the diagnosis.

  14. Effects of water availability on free amino acids, sugars, and acrylamide-forming potential in potato.

    PubMed

    Muttucumaru, Nira; Powers, Stephen J; Elmore, J Stephen; Mottram, Donald S; Halford, Nigel G

    2015-03-11

    Irrigation is used frequently in potato cultivation to maximize yield, but water availability may also affect the composition of the crop, with implications for processing properties and food safety. Five varieties of potatoes, including drought-tolerant and -sensitive types, which had been grown with and without irrigation, were analyzed to show the effect of water supply on concentrations of free asparagine, other free amino acids, and sugars and on the acrylamide-forming potential of the tubers. Two varieties were also analyzed under more severe drought stress in a glasshouse. Water availability had profound effects on tuber free amino acid and sugar concentrations, and it was concluded that potato farmers should irrigate only if necessary to maintain the health and yield of the crop, because irrigation may increase the acrylamide-forming potential of potatoes. Even mild drought stress caused significant changes in composition, but these differed from those caused by more extreme drought stress. Free proline concentration, for example, increased in the field-grown potatoes of one variety from 7.02 mmol/kg with irrigation to 104.58 mmol/kg without irrigation, whereas free asparagine concentration was not affected significantly in the field but almost doubled from 132.03 to 242.26 mmol/kg in response to more severe drought stress in the glasshouse. Furthermore, the different genotypes were affected in dissimilar fashion by the same treatment, indicating that there is no single, unifying potato tuber drought stress response.

  15. Interaction of acid mine drainage with Ordinary Portland Cement blended solid residues generated from active treatment of acid mine drainage with coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Gitari, Wilson M; Petrik, Leslie F; Key, David L; Okujeni, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Fly ash (FA) has been investigated as a possible treatment agent for Acid mine drainage (AMD) and established to be an alternative, cheap and economically viable agent compared to the conventional alkaline agents. However, this treatment option also leads to generation of solid residues (SR) that require disposal and one of the proposed disposal method is a backfill in coal mine voids. In this study, the interaction of the SR with AMD that is likely to be present in such backfill scenario was simulated by draining columns packed with SR and SR + 6% Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) unsaturated with simulated AMD over a 6 month period. The evolving geochemistry of the liquid/solid (L/S) system was evaluated in-terms of the mineral phases likely or controlling contaminants attenuation at the different pH regimes generated. Stepwise acidification of the percolates was observed as the drainage progressed. Two pH buffer zones were observed (7.5-9 and 3-4) for SR and (11.2-11.3 and 3.5-4) for SR + 6% OPC. The solid residue cores (SR) appeared to have a significant buffering capacity, maintaining a neutral to slightly alkaline pH in the leachates for an extended period of time (97 days: L/S 4.3) while SR + 6% OPC reduced this neutralization capacity to 22 days (L/S 1.9). Interaction of AMD with SR or SR + 6% OPC generated alkaline conditions that favored precipitation of Fe, Al, Mn-(oxy) hydroxides, Fe and Ca-Al hydroxysulphates that greatly contributed to the contaminants removal. However, precipitation of these phases was restricted to the pH of the leachates remaining at neutral to circum-neutral levels. Backfill of mine voids with SR promises to be a feasible technology for the disposal of the SR but its success will greatly depend on the disposal scenario, AMD generated and the alkalinity generating potential of the SR. A disadvantage would be the possible re-dissolution of the precipitated phases at pH < 4 that would release the contaminants back to the water column

  16. Why sulfuric acid forms particles so extremely well, and how organics might still compete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurten, T.; Ehn, M.; Kupiainen, O.; Olenius, T.; Rissanen, M.; Thornton, J. A.; Nielsen, L.; Jørgensen, S.; Ortega Colomer, I. K.; Kjaergaard, H. G.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2013-12-01

    It is a well-known result in aerosol science that the single most important molecule for the first steps of new-particle formation in our atmosphere is sulfuric acid, H2SO4. From a chemical perspective, this seems somewhat counterintuitive: the atmosphere contains thousands of different organic compounds, many of which can potentially form oxidation products with even lower volatility than H2SO4. The unique role of sulfuric acid is due to its formation kinetics. The conversion of sulfur dioxide, SO2 to H2SO4 requires only a single oxidant molecule (e.g. OH), as subsequent steps are extremely rapid. Still, the saturation vapor pressure of H2SO4 is over 108 times lower than that of SO2. In contrast, the oxidation reactions of organic molecules typically lower their saturation vapor pressure by only a factor of 10-1000 per oxidation step. Therefore, organic compounds are usually lost to pre-existing aerosol surfaces before they have undergone sufficiently many oxidation reactions to nucleate on their own. The presence of strong nitrogen-containing base molecules such as amines enhances the particle-forming advantages of sulfuric acid even further. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that the evaporation rate of sulfuric acid from key clusters containing two acid molecules may decrease by a factor of 108 in the presence of ppt-level concentrations of amines, implying a total decrease of up to 1016 in the effective vapor pressure going from SO2 to H2SO4. In some circumstances, this decrease causes the energy barrier for new-particle formation to disappear: the process is no longer nucleation, and some common applications of e.g. the nucleation theorem cease to apply. Cluster kinetic models combined with first-principles evaporation rates appear to describe this sulfuric acid - base clustering reasonably well, and result in cluster formation rates close to those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN. There may nevertheless exist exceptions to the general rule that

  17. Enhancement of l-lactic acid production via synergism in open co-fermentation of Sophora flavescens residues and food waste.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jin; Gao, Ming; Wang, Qunhui; Wang, Juan; Sun, Xiaohong; Chang, Qiang; Tashiro, Yukihiro

    2017-02-01

    In this study, Sophora flavescens residues (SFR) were used for l-lactic acid production and were mixed with food waste (FW) to assess the effects of different compositions of SFR and FW. Positive synergistic effects of mixed substrates were achieved with co-fermentation. Co-fermentation increased the proportion of l-lactic acid by decreasing the co-products of ethanol and other organic acids. A maximum l-lactic acid concentration of 48.4g/L and l-lactic acid conversion rate of 0.904g/g total sugar were obtained through co-fermentation of SFR and FW at the optimal ratio of 1:1.5. These results were approximately 6-fold those obtained during mono-fermentation of SFR. Co-fermentation of SFR and FW provides a suitable C/N ratio and pH for effective open fermentative production of l-lactic acid.

  18. Factors affecting the absorption maxima of acidic forms of bacteriorhodopsin. A study with artificial pigments.

    PubMed Central

    Albeck, A.; Friedman, N.; Sheves, M.; Ottolenghi, M.

    1989-01-01

    The absorption maximum (568 nm) of light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin bR568 undergoes reversible changes after acidification. At pH 2.9, the absorption shifts to 605 nm (forming bR605) and it blue shifts to 565 nm, after further acidification to pH approximately 0.5 (forming bR565). Molecular models accounting for such acid-induced changes are relevant to the structure and function of bacteriorhodopsin. In the present study we approached the problem by applying artificial bR pigments based on selectively modified synthetic retinals. This may allow direct identification of the specific regions in the retinal binding site where the above changes in the protein-retinal interactions take place. We investigated the spectroscopic effects of acid in a variety of artificial pigments, including cyaninelike retinals, retinals bearing bulky groups at C4, short polyenes, and retinals in which the beta-ionone ring was substituted by aromatic rings. The results provide direct evidence for the hypothesis that the generation of bR605 is due to changes in polyene-opsin interactions in the vicinity of the Schiff base linkage. The second transition (to bR565) was not observed in artificial pigments bearing major changes in the ring structure of the retinal. Two approaches accounting for this observation are presented. One argues that the generation of bR565 is associated with acid-induced changes in retinal-protein interactions in the vicinity of the retinal ring. The second involves changes in polyene-opsin interactions in the vicinity of the Schiff base linkage. For both bRw and bRN5, our results do not discriminate between the direct titration of negative or dipolar protein groups in the binding site and changes in the retinal-protein interactions induced by changes in the protein structure outside of the binding site. PMID:2611336

  19. High-performance liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance study of linear tetrapeptides and octapeptides containing N-methylated amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Sýkora, David; Záková, Lenka; Budesínský, Milos

    2007-08-10

    Chromatographic behavior of a series of N-methylated tetra and octapeptides on a reversed-phase sorbent was studied considering the information obtained on these compounds by NMR spectroscopy. The modified tetrapeptides were derived from GFFY-NH2, GFFF-NH2 and GFFH-NH2 primary structures by N-methylation at various peptide bond positions. Similarly, the N-methylated octapeptides were based on TPK(Pac)T C-terminally elongated forms of GFFY and GFFF. It was found that many studied N-methylated peptides provide broad peaks as a consequence of cis/trans isomerism of the R1CON(CH3)R2 peptide bond. The extent of the peak spreading depends on the following important factors: the nature of the surrounding amino acid residues, the location of the modified peptide bond within the peptide chain, temperature, and mobile phase flow-rate. All these aspects were critically evaluated. Nearly complete separation of the individual conformers of GF(NMe)FY-NH2 was obtained applying fast chromatography on short column packed with 20-30 microm reversed-phase sorbent.

  20. Residue-specific Incorporation of Noncanonical Amino Acids into Model Proteins Using an Escherichia coli Cell-free Transcription-translation System

    PubMed Central

    Worst, Emanuel G.; Exner, Matthias P.; De Simone, Alessandro; Schenkelberger, Marc; Noireaux, Vincent; Budisa, Nediljko; Ott, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    The canonical set of amino acids leads to an exceptionally wide range of protein functionality. Nevertheless, the set of residues still imposes limitations on potential protein applications. The incorporation of noncanonical amino acids can enlarge this scope. There are two complementary approaches for the incorporation of noncanonical amino acids. For site-specific incorporation, in addition to the endogenous canonical translational machineries, an orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetase-tRNA pair must be provided that does not interact with the canonical ones. Consequently, a codon that is not assigned to a canonical amino acid, usually a stop codon, is also required. This genetic code expansion enables the incorporation of a noncanonical amino acid at a single, given site within the protein. The here presented work describes residue-specific incorporation where the genetic code is reassigned within the endogenous translational system. The translation machinery accepts the noncanonical amino acid as a surrogate to incorporate it at canonically prescribed locations, i.e., all occurrences of a canonical amino acid in the protein are replaced by the noncanonical one. The incorporation of noncanonical amino acids can change the protein structure, causing considerably modified physical and chemical properties. Noncanonical amino acid analogs often act as cell growth inhibitors for expression hosts since they modify endogenous proteins, limiting in vivo protein production. In vivo incorporation of toxic noncanonical amino acids into proteins remains particularly challenging. Here, a cell-free approach for a complete replacement of L-arginine by the noncanonical amino acid L-canavanine is presented. It circumvents the inherent difficulties of in vivo expression. Additionally, a protocol to prepare target proteins for mass spectral analysis is included. It is shown that L-lysine can be replaced by L-hydroxy-lysine, albeit with lower efficiency. In principle, any

  1. The deletion of several amino acid stretches of Escherichia coli alpha-hemolysin (HlyA) suggests that the channel-forming domain contains beta-strands.

    PubMed

    Benz, Roland; Maier, Elke; Bauer, Susanne; Ludwig, Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli α-hemolysin (HlyA) is a pore-forming protein of 110 kDa belonging to the family of RTX toxins. A hydrophobic region between the amino acid residues 238 and 410 in the N-terminal half of HlyA has previously been suggested to form hydrophobic and/or amphipathic α-helices and has been shown to be important for hemolytic activity and pore formation in biological and artificial membranes. The structure of the HlyA transmembrane channel is, however, largely unknown. For further investigation of the channel structure, we deleted in HlyA different stretches of amino acids that could form amphipathic β-strands according to secondary structure predictions (residues 71-110, 158-167, 180-203, and 264-286). These deletions resulted in HlyA mutants with strongly reduced hemolytic activity. Lipid bilayer measurements demonstrated that HlyAΔ71-110 and HlyAΔ264-286 formed channels with much smaller single-channel conductance than wildtype HlyA, whereas their channel-forming activity was virtually as high as that of the wildtype toxin. HlyAΔ158-167 and HlyAΔ180-203 were unable to form defined channels in lipid bilayers. Calculations based on the single-channel data indicated that the channels generated by HlyAΔ71-110 and HlyAΔ264-286 had a smaller size (diameter about 1.4 to 1.8 nm) than wildtype HlyA channels (diameter about 2.0 to 2.6 nm), suggesting that in these mutants part of the channel-forming domain was removed. Osmotic protection experiments with erythrocytes confirmed that HlyA, HlyAΔ71-110, and HlyAΔ264-286 form defined transmembrane pores and suggested channel diameters that largely agreed with those estimated from the single-channel data. Taken together, these results suggest that the channel-forming domain of HlyA might contain β-strands, possibly in addition to α-helical structures.

  2. The Deletion of Several Amino Acid Stretches of Escherichia coli Alpha-Hemolysin (HlyA) Suggests That the Channel-Forming Domain Contains Beta-Strands

    PubMed Central

    Benz, Roland; Maier, Elke; Bauer, Susanne; Ludwig, Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli α-hemolysin (HlyA) is a pore-forming protein of 110 kDa belonging to the family of RTX toxins. A hydrophobic region between the amino acid residues 238 and 410 in the N-terminal half of HlyA has previously been suggested to form hydrophobic and/or amphipathic α-helices and has been shown to be important for hemolytic activity and pore formation in biological and artificial membranes. The structure of the HlyA transmembrane channel is, however, largely unknown. For further investigation of the channel structure, we deleted in HlyA different stretches of amino acids that could form amphipathic β-strands according to secondary structure predictions (residues 71–110, 158–167, 180–203, and 264–286). These deletions resulted in HlyA mutants with strongly reduced hemolytic activity. Lipid bilayer measurements demonstrated that HlyAΔ71–110 and HlyAΔ264–286 formed channels with much smaller single-channel conductance than wildtype HlyA, whereas their channel-forming activity was virtually as high as that of the wildtype toxin. HlyAΔ158–167 and HlyAΔ180–203 were unable to form defined channels in lipid bilayers. Calculations based on the single-channel data indicated that the channels generated by HlyAΔ71–110 and HlyAΔ264–286 had a smaller size (diameter about 1.4 to 1.8 nm) than wildtype HlyA channels (diameter about 2.0 to 2.6 nm), suggesting that in these mutants part of the channel-forming domain was removed. Osmotic protection experiments with erythrocytes confirmed that HlyA, HlyAΔ71–110, and HlyAΔ264–286 form defined transmembrane pores and suggested channel diameters that largely agreed with those estimated from the single-channel data. Taken together, these results suggest that the channel-forming domain of HlyA might contain β-strands, possibly in addition to α-helical structures. PMID:25463653

  3. Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Disulfide and Sulfenic Acid to Form the Strongly Nucleophilic Persulfide.

    PubMed

    Cuevasanta, Ernesto; Lange, Mike; Bonanata, Jenner; Coitiño, E Laura; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Filipovic, Milos R; Alvarez, Beatriz

    2015-11-06

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is increasingly recognized to modulate physiological processes in mammals through mechanisms that are currently under scrutiny. H2S is not able to react with reduced thiols (RSH). However, H2S, more precisely HS(-), is able to react with oxidized thiol derivatives. We performed a systematic study of the reactivity of HS(-) toward symmetric low molecular weight disulfides (RSSR) and mixed albumin (HSA) disulfides. Correlations with thiol acidity and computational modeling showed that the reaction occurs through a concerted mechanism. Comparison with analogous reactions of thiolates indicated that the intrinsic reactivity of HS(-) is 1 order of magnitude lower than that of thiolates. In addition, H2S is able to react with sulfenic acids (RSOH). The rate constant of the reaction of H2S with the sulfenic acid formed in HSA was determined. Both reactions of H2S with disulfides and sulfenic acids yield persulfides (RSSH), recently identified post-translational modifications. The formation of this derivative in HSA was determined, and the rate constants of its reactions with a reporter disulfide and with peroxynitrite revealed that persulfides are better nucleophiles than thiols, which is consistent with the α effect. Experiments with cells in culture showed that treatment with hydrogen peroxide enhanced the formation of persulfides. Biological implications are discussed. Our results give light on the mechanisms of persulfide formation and provide quantitative evidence for the high nucleophilicity of these novel derivatives, setting the stage for understanding the contribution of the reactions of H2S with oxidized thiol derivatives to H2S effector processes.

  4. The evolution of polar fish hemoglobin: a phylogenetic analysis of the ancestral amino acid residues linked to the root effect.

    PubMed

    Verde, Cinzia; Parisi, Elio; di Prisco, Guido

    2003-01-01

    Originating from a benthic ancestor, the suborder Notothenioidei (the dominant fish fauna component of the Antarctic sea) underwent a remarkable radiation, which led notothenioids to fill several niches. The ecological importance of notothenioids in Antarctica and their biochemical adaptations have prompted great efforts to study their physiology and phylogeny, with special attention to the evolutionary adaptation of the oxygen-transport system. We herewith report the evolutionary history of alpha- and beta-globins under the assumption of the molecular clock hypothesis as a basis for reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships among species. These studies have been extended to fish species of other latitudes, including the Arctic region. The northern and southern polar oceans have very different characteristics; indeed, in many respects the Antarctic and Arctic ichthyofaunas are more dissimilar than similar. Our results show that the inferred phylogeny of Arctic and Antarctic globins is different. Taking advantage of the wealth of information collected on structure and function of hemoglobins, we have attempted to investigate the evolutionary history of an important physiological feature in fish, the Root effect. The results suggest that the amino acid residues reported to play a key role in the Root effect may be regarded as ancestor characters, but the lack of this effect in extant species can hardly be associated with the presence of synapomorphies.

  5. Identifying the Types of Ion Channel-Targeted Conotoxins by Incorporating New Properties of Residues into Pseudo Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Conotoxins are a kind of neurotoxin which can specifically interact with potassium, sodium type, and calcium channels. They have become potential drug candidates to treat diseases such as chronic pain, epilepsy, and cardiovascular diseases. Thus, correctly identifying the types of ion channel-targeted conotoxins will provide important clue to understand their function and find potential drugs. Based on this consideration, we developed a new computational method to rapidly and accurately predict the types of ion-targeted conotoxins. Three kinds of new properties of residues were proposed to use in pseudo amino acid composition to formulate conotoxins samples. The support vector machine was utilized as classifier. A feature selection technique based on F-score was used to optimize features. Jackknife cross-validated results showed that the overall accuracy of 94.6% was achieved, which is higher than other published results, demonstrating that the proposed method is superior to published methods. Hence the current method may play a complementary role to other existing methods for recognizing the types of ion-target conotoxins. PMID:27631006

  6. The roles of active-site residues in the catalytic mechanism of trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase: a kinetic, NMR, and mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Azurmendi, Hugo F; Wang, Susan C; Massiah, Michael A; Poelarends, Gerrit J; Whitman, Christian P; Mildvan, Albert S

    2004-04-13

    trans-3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (CaaD) converts trans-3-chloroacrylic acid to malonate semialdehyde by the addition of H(2)O to the C-2, C-3 double bond, followed by the loss of HCl from the C-3 position. Sequence similarity between CaaD, an (alphabeta)(3) heterohexamer (molecular weight 47,547), and 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), an (alpha)(6) homohexamer, distinguishes CaaD from those hydrolytic dehalogenases that form alkyl-enzyme intermediates. The recently solved X-ray structure of CaaD demonstrates that betaPro-1 (i.e., Pro-1 of the beta subunit), alphaArg-8, alphaArg-11, and alphaGlu-52 are at or near the active site, and the >or=10(3.4)-fold decreases in k(cat) on mutating these residues implicate them as mechanistically important. The effect of pH on k(cat)/K(m) indicates a catalytic base with a pK(a) of 7.6 and an acid with a pK(a) of 9.2. NMR titration of (15)N-labeled wild-type CaaD yielded pK(a) values of 9.3 and 11.1 for the N-terminal prolines, while the fully active but unstable alphaP1A mutant showed a pK(a) of 9.7 (for the betaPro-1), implicating betaPro-1 as the acid catalyst, which may protonate C-2 of the substrate. These results provide the first evidence for an amino-terminal proline, conserved in all known tautomerase superfamily members, functioning as a general acid, rather than as a general base as in 4-OT. Hence, a reasonable candidate for the general base in CaaD is the active site residue alphaGlu-52. CaaD has 10 arginine residues, six in the alpha-subunit (Arg-8, Arg-11, Arg-17, Arg-25, Arg-35, and Arg-43), and four in the beta-subunit (Arg-15, Arg-21, Arg-55, and Arg-65). (1)H-(15)N-heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra of CaaD showed seven to nine Arg-NepsilonH resonances (denoted R(A) to R(I)) depending on the protein concentration and pH. One of these signals (R(D)) disappeared in the spectrum of the largely inactive alphaR11A mutant (deltaH = 7.11 ppm, deltaN = 89.5 ppm), and another one (R

  7. Mutational Insights into the Roles of Amino Acid Residues in Ligand Binding for Two Closely Related Family 16 Carbohydrate Binding Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Xiaoyun; Agarwal, Vinayak; Dodd, Dylan; Bae, Brian; Mackie, Roderick I.; Nair, Satish K.; Cann, Isaac K.O.

    2010-11-22

    Carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) are specialized proteins that bind to polysaccharides and oligosaccharides. Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5ACBM16-1/CBM16-2 bind to glucose-, mannose-, and glucose/mannose-configured substrates. The crystal structures of the two proteins represent the only examples in CBM family 16, and studies that evaluate the roles of amino acid residues in ligand binding in this family are lacking. In this study, we probed the roles of amino acids (selected based on CBM16-1/ligand co-crystal structures) on substrate binding. Two tryptophan (Trp-20 and Trp-125) and two glutamine (Gln-81 and Gln-93) residues are shown to be critical in ligand binding. Additionally, several polar residues that flank the critical residues also contribute to ligand binding. The CBM16-1 Q121E mutation increased affinity for all substrates tested, whereas the Q21G and N97R mutants exhibited decreased substrate affinity. We solved CBM/substrate co-crystal structures to elucidate the molecular basis of the increased substrate binding by CBM16-1 Q121E. The Gln-121, Gln-21, and Asn-97 residues can be manipulated to fine-tune ligand binding by the Man5A CBMs. Surprisingly, none of the eight residues investigated was absolutely conserved in CBM family 16. Thus, the critical residues in the Man5A CBMs are either not essential for substrate binding in the other members of this family or the two CBMs are evolutionarily distinct from the members available in the current protein database. Man5A is dependent on its CBMs for robust activity, and insights from this study should serve to enhance our understanding of the interdependence of its catalytic and substrate binding modules.

  8. Dynamics of carbohydrate residues of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) followed by red-edge excitation spectra and emission anisotropy studies of Calcofluor White.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R; Sillen, A; Coddeville, B; Plancke, Y D; Engelborghs, Y

    1999-11-23

    Dynamics studies on Calcofluor White bound to the carbohydrate residues of sialylated and asialylated alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) have been performed. The interaction between the fluorophore and the protein was found to occur preferentially with the glycan residues with a dependence on their spatial conformation. In the presence of sialylated alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, excitation at the red edge of the absorption spectrum of calcofluor does not lead to a shift in the fluorescence emission maximum (440 nm) of the fluorophore. Thus, the emission of calcofluor occurs from a relaxed state. This is confirmed by anisotropy studies as a function of temperature (Perrin plot). In the presence of asialylated alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, red-edge excitation spectra show an important shift (8 nm) of the fluorescence emission maximum of the probe. This reveals that emission of calcofluor occurs before relaxation of the surrounding carbohydrate residues occurs. Emission from a non-relaxed state means that Calcofluor molecules are bound tightly to the carbohydrate residues, a result confirmed by anisotropy studies.

  9. Stabilization of an α/β-Hydrolase by Introducing Proline Residues: Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 from Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Jones, Bryan J; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2015-07-21

    α/β-Hydrolases are important enzymes for biocatalysis, but their stability often limits their application. We investigated a plant esterase, salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2), as a model α/β-hydrolase. SABP2 shows typical stability to urea (unfolding free energy 6.9 ± 1.5 kcal/mol) and to heat inactivation (T1/2 15min 49.2 ± 0.5 °C). Denaturation in urea occurs in two steps, but heat inactivation occurs in a single step. The first unfolding step in urea eliminates catalytic activity. Surprisingly, we found that the first unfolding likely corresponds to the unfolding of the larger catalytic domain. Replacing selected amino acid residues with proline stabilized SABP2. Proline restricts the flexibility of the unfolded protein, thereby shifting the equilibrium toward the folded conformation. Seven locations for proline substitution were chosen either by amino acid sequence alignment with a more stable homologue or by targeting flexible regions in SABP2. Introducing proline in the catalytic domain stabilized SABP2 to the first unfolding in urea for three of five cases: L46P (+0.2 M urea), S70P (+0.1), and E215P (+0.9). Introducing proline in the cap domain did not stabilize SABP2 (two of two cases), supporting the assignment that the first unfolding corresponds to the catalytic domain. Proline substitutions in both domains stabilized SABP2 to heat inactivation: L46P (ΔT1/2 15min = +6.4 °C), S70P (+5.4), S115P (+1.8), S141P (+4.9), and E215P (+4.2). Combining substitutions did not further increase the stability to urea denaturation, but dramatically increased resistance to heat inactivation: L46P−S70P ΔT1/2 15min = +25.7 °C. This straightforward proline substitution approach may also stabilize other α/β-hydrolases.

  10. Deduced amino acid sequence, functional expression, and unique enzymatic properties of the form I and form II ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the chemoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, J M; Baker, S H; Lorbach, S C; Shively, J M; Tabita, F R

    1996-01-01

    The cbbL cbbS and cbbM genes of Thiobacillus denitrificans, encoding form I and form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), respectively, were found to complement a RubisCO-negative mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides to autotrophic growth. Endogenous T. denitrificans promoters were shown to function in R. sphaeroides, resulting in high levels of cbbL cbbS and cbbM expression in the R. sphaeroides host. This expression system provided high levels of both T. denitrificans enzymes, each of which was highly purified. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form I enzyme indicated that the large subunit was closely homologous to previously sequenced form I RubisCO enzymes from sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. The form I T. denitrificans enzyme possessed a very low substrate specificity factor and did not exhibit fallover, and yet this enzyme showed a poor ability to recover from incubation with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form II T. denitrificans enzyme resembled those of other form II RubisCO enzymes. The substrate specificity factor was characteristically low, and the lack of fallover and the inhibition by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate were similar to those of form II RubisCO obtained from nonsulfur purple bacteria. Both form I and form II RubisCO from T. denitrificans possessed high KCO2 values, suggesting that this organism might suffer in environments containing low levels of dissolved CO2. These studies present the initial description of the kinetic properties of form I and form II RubisCO from a chemoautotrophic bacterium that synthesizes both types of enzyme.

  11. Deduced amino acid sequence, functional expression, and unique enzymatic properties of the form I and form II ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the chemoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, J M; Baker, S H; Lorbach, S C; Shively, J M; Tabita, F R

    1996-01-01

    The cbbL cbbS and cbbM genes of Thiobacillus denitrificans, encoding form I and form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), respectively, were found to complement a RubisCO-negative mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides to autotrophic growth. Endogenous T. denitrificans promoters were shown to function in R. sphaeroides, resulting in high levels of cbbL cbbS and cbbM expression in the R. sphaeroides host. This expression system provided high levels of both T. denitrificans enzymes, each of which was highly purified. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form I enzyme indicated that the large subunit was closely homologous to previously sequenced form I RubisCO enzymes from sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. The form I T. denitrificans enzyme possessed a very low substrate specificity factor and did not exhibit fallover, and yet this enzyme showed a poor ability to recover from incubation with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. The deduced amino acid sequence of the form II T. denitrificans enzyme resembled those of other form II RubisCO enzymes. The substrate specificity factor was characteristically low, and the lack of fallover and the inhibition by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate were similar to those of form II RubisCO obtained from nonsulfur purple bacteria. Both form I and form II RubisCO from T. denitrificans possessed high KCO2 values, suggesting that this organism might suffer in environments containing low levels of dissolved CO2. These studies present the initial description of the kinetic properties of form I and form II RubisCO from a chemoautotrophic bacterium that synthesizes both types of enzyme. PMID:8550452

  12. An oxazetidine amino acid for chemical protein synthesis by rapid, serine-forming ligations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusterla, Ivano; Bode, Jeffrey W.

    2015-08-01

    Amide-forming ligation reactions allow the chemical synthesis of proteins by the union of unprotected peptide segments, and enable the preparation of protein derivatives not accessible by expression or bioengineering approaches. The native chemical ligation (NCL) of thioesters and N-terminal cysteines is unquestionably the most successful approach, but is not ideal for all synthetic targets. Here we describe the synthesis of an Fmoc-protected oxazetidine amino acid for use in the α-ketoacid-hydroxylamine (KAHA) amide ligation. When incorporated at the N-terminus of a peptide segment, this four-membered cyclic hydroxylamine can be used for rapid serine-forming ligations with peptide α-ketoacids. This ligation operates at low concentration (100 μM-5 mM) and mild temperatures (20-25 °C). The utility of the reaction was demonstrated by the synthesis of S100A4, a 12 kDa calcium-binding protein not easily accessible by NCL or other amide-forming reactions due to its primary sequence and properties.

  13. Reflectance and Emittance Properties of Spring-formed Ferricretes and Acid Mine Drainage Materials: Relevance to Remote Sensing of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrand, W. H.; Lane, M. D.

    1999-03-01

    The reflectance and emittance properties of minerals associated with spring formed ferricretes and acid mine drainage materials is described. It is suggested that they may be appropriate analog materials for certain regions on Mars.

  14. Reclamation of acidic mine residues by creation of technosoils with the addition of biochar and marble waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Barriga, Fabián; Díaz, Vicente; Acosta, José; Faz, Ángel; Zornoza, Raul

    2016-04-01

    This study reports the short-term effect of biochar and marble waste addition for the reclamation of acidic mine residues. A lab incubation was carried out for 90 days. Biochars derived from pig manure (PM), crop residues (CR) and municipal solid waste (MSW) were added to the soil at a rate of 20 g kg-1. The marble waste (MW) was added at a rate of 200 g kg-1. Bochars and MW were applied independently and combined. A control soil was used without application of amendments. The evolution of different physical, chemical and biochemical properties and availability of heavy metals was periodically monitored. Results showed that original pH (2.8) was increased with all amendments, those samples containing MW being the ones with the highest pH (~8.0). The electrical conductivity (EC) decreased from 6.6 to 3.0-4.5 mS cm-1 in all the treatments receiving MW. Soil organic C (SOC) increased in all samples receiving biochar up to 18-20 g kg-1, with no shifts during the 90 d incubation, indicating the high stability of the C supplied. Recalcitrant organic C accounted for ~90-98% of the SOC. No significant effect of amendment addition was observed for carbohydrates, soluble C, microbial biomass C and β-glucosidase activity. However, arylesterase activity increased with amendments, highly related to pH. The availability of heavy metals decreased up to 90-95% owing to the addition of amendments, mainly in samples containing MW. The MW provided conditions to increase pH and decrease EC and metals mobility. Biochar was an effective strategy to increase SOC, recalcitrant C and AS, essential to create soil structure. However, a labile source of organic matter should be added together with the proposed amendments to promote the activation of microbial communities. Acknowledgement : This work has been funded by Fundación Séneca (Agency of Science and Technology of the Region of Murcia, Spain) by the project 18920/JLI/13

  15. Conversion of citrate synthase into citryl-CoA lyase as a result of mutation of the active-site aspartic acid residue to glutamic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Man, W J; Li, Y; O'Connor, C D; Wilton, D C

    1991-01-01

    The active-site aspartic acid residue, Asp-362, of Escherichia coli citrate synthase was changed by site-directed mutagenesis to Glu-362, Asn-362 or Gly-362. Only very low catalytic activity could be detected with the Asp----Asn and Asp----Gly mutations. The Asp----Glu mutation produced an enzyme that expressed about 0.8% of the overall catalytic rate, and the hydrolysis step in the reaction, monitored as citryl-CoA hydrolysis, was inhibited to a similar extent. However, the condensation reaction, measured in the reverse direction as citryl-CoA cleavage to oxaloacetate and acetyl-CoA, was not affected by the mutation, and this citryl-CoA lyase activity was the major catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme. This high condensation activity in an enzyme in which the subsequent hydrolysis step was about 98% inhibited permitted considerable exchange of the methyl protons of acetyl-CoA during catalysis by the mutant enzyme. The Km for oxaloacetate was not significantly altered in the D362E mutant enzyme, whereas the Km for acetyl-CoA was about 5 times lower. A mechanism is proposed in which Asp-362 is involved in the hydrolysis reaction of this enzyme, and not as a base in the deprotonation of acetyl-CoA as recently suggested by others. [Karpusas, Branchaud & Remington (1990) Biochemistry 29, 2213-2219; Alter, Casazza, Zhi, Nemeth, Srere & Evans, (1990) Biochemistry 29, 7557-7563]. PMID:1684105

  16. Multivariate analysis of properties of amino acid residues in proteins from a viewpoint of functional site prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Shiqiao; Sakurai, Minoru

    2010-03-01

    For the prediction of a protein's function from its 3D-structure alone, it is of importance to elucidate by which properties functional site residues in a protein are discriminated from other residues. Here, we calculated five kinds of geometrical or physical properties of each residue in a protein. Those properties were integrated with techniques of multivariate analysis such as principal component analysis (PCA) or kernel PCA. Consequently, functional residues were found to show some distinct distributions in the scatter plot of those integrated data, which led to the proposal of a method for functional site prediction with a good performance.

  17. Effect of Sulfuric Acid Concentration on Electrochemical Characteristics of Nano Porous Structure Formed by Anodizing Process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hyung; Lee, Seung-Jun; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2016-02-01

    Aluminum alloy is a very strong reactivity material, but it has excellent corrosion resistance due to protective oxide film created in air. However, it is not practical because the film thickness is uneven and varies depending on the generation condition. Therefore, aluminum anodizing was performed to form film with commercially applicable hardness, corrosion resistance, and wear resistance. This offers such advantages as commercial applicability to large areas and low prices. In this study, the electrochemical characteristics with concentration of sulfuric acid electrolyte were compared with the two-step anodizing method which is widely used. A surface observation revealed regular structures and pores with the size of several tens of nm, and the anodized film presented excellent corrosion resistance with considerably low corrosion current density in sea water.

  18. Structural study of complexes formed by acidic and neutral organophosphorus reagents

    DOE PAGES

    Braatz, Alexander D.; Oak Ridge National Lab.; Antonio, Mark R.; ...

    2017-01-01

    The coordination of the trivalent 4f ions, Ln = La3+, Dy3+, and Lu3+, with neutral and acidic organophosphorus reagents, both individually and combined, was studied by use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These studies provide metrical information about the interatomic interactions between these cations and the ligands tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and di-n-butyl phosphoric acid (HDBP), whose behavior are of practical importance to chemical separation processes that are currently used on an industrial scale. Previous studies have suggested the existence of complexes involving a mixture of ligands, accounting for extraction synergy. Through systematic variation of the aqueous phase acidity and extractant concentrationmore » and combination, we have found that complexes with Ln and TBP : HDBP at any mixture and HDBP alone involve direct Ln–O interactions involving 6 oxygen atoms and distant Ln–P interactions involving on average 3–5 phosphorus atoms per Ln ion. It was also found that Ln complexes formed by TBP alone seem to favor eight oxygen coordination, though we were unable to obtain metrical results regarding the distant Ln–P interactions due to the low signal attributed to a lower concentration of Ln ions in the organic phases. Our study does not support the existence of mixed Ln–TBP–HDBP complexes but, rather, indicates that the lanthanides are extracted as either Ln–HDBP complexes or Ln–TBP complexes and that these complexes exist in different ratios depending on the conditions of the extraction system. This fundamental structural information offers insight into the solvent extraction processes that are taking place and are of particular importance to issues arising from the separation and disposal of radioactive materials from used nuclear fuel.« less

  19. Structural study of complexes formed by acidic and neutral organophosphorus reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Braatz, Alexander D.; Antonio, Mark R.; Nilsson, Mikael

    2017-01-01

    The coordination of the trivalent 4f ions, Ln = La3+, Dy3+, and Lu3+, with neutral and acidic organophosphorus reagents, both individually and combined, was studied by use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These studies provide metrical information about the interatomic interactions between these cations and the ligands tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and di-n-butyl phosphoric acid (HDBP), whose behavior are of practical importance to chemical separation processes that are currently used on an industrial scale. Previous studies have suggested the existence of complexes involving a mixture of ligands, accounting for extraction synergy. Through systematic variation of the aqueous phase acidity and extractant concentration and combination, we have found that complexes with Ln and TBP : HDBP at any mixture and HDBP alone involve direct Ln–O interactions involving 6 oxygen atoms and distant Ln–P interactions involving on average 3–5 phosphorus atoms per Ln ion. It was also found that Ln complexes formed by TBP alone seem to favor eight oxygen coordination, though we were unable to obtain metrical results regarding the distant Ln–P interactions due to the low signal attributed to a lower concentration of Ln ions in the organic phases. Our study does not support the existence of mixed Ln–TBP–HDBP complexes but, rather, indicates that the lanthanides are extracted as either Ln–HDBP complexes or Ln–TBP complexes and that these complexes exist in different ratios depending on the conditions of the extraction system. This fundamental structural information offers insight into the solvent extraction processes that are taking place and are of particular importance to issues arising from the separation and disposal of radioactive materials from used nuclear fuel.

  20. Structural Properties, Order–Disorder Phenomena, and Phase Stability of Orotic Acid Crystal Forms

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Orotic acid (OTA) is reported to exist in the anhydrous (AH), monohydrate (Hy1), and dimethyl sulfoxide monosolvate (SDMSO) forms. In this study we investigate the (de)hydration/desolvation behavior, aiming at an understanding of the elusive structural features of anhydrous OTA by a combination of experimental and computational techniques, namely, thermal analytical methods, gravimetric moisture (de)sorption studies, water activity measurements, X-ray powder diffraction, spectroscopy (vibrational, solid-state NMR), crystal energy landscape, and chemical shift calculations. The Hy1 is a highly stable hydrate, which dissociates above 135 °C and loses only a small part of the water when stored over desiccants (25 °C) for more than one year. In Hy1, orotic acid and water molecules are linked by strong hydrogen bonds in nearly perfectly planar arranged stacked layers. The layers are spaced by 3.1 Å and not linked via hydrogen bonds. Upon dehydration the X-ray powder diffraction and solid-state NMR peaks become broader, indicating some disorder in the anhydrous form. The Hy1 stacking reflection (122) is maintained, suggesting that the OTA molecules are still arranged in stacked layers in the dehydration product. Desolvation of SDMSO, a nonlayer structure, results in the same AH phase as observed upon dehydrating Hy1. Depending on the desolvation conditions, different levels of order–disorder of layers present in anhydrous OTA are observed, which is also suggested by the computed low energy crystal structures. These structures provide models for stacking faults as intergrowth of different layers is possible. The variability in anhydrate crystals is of practical concern as it affects the moisture dependent stability of AH with respect to hydration. PMID:26741914

  1. Monomeric banana lectin at acidic pH overrules conformational stability of its native dimeric form.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed M; Qadeer, Atiyatul; Ahmad, Ejaz; Ashraf, Raghib; Bhushan, Bharat; Chaturvedi, Sumit K; Rabbani, Gulam; Khan, Rizwan H

    2013-01-01

    Banana lectin (BL) is a homodimeric protein categorized among jacalin-related family of lectins. The effect of acidic pH was examined on conformational stability of BL by using circular dichroism, intrinsic fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-napthalene sulfonate (ANS) binding, size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). During acid denaturation of BL, the monomerization of native dimeric protein was found at pH 2.0. The elution profile from SEC showed two different peaks (59.65 ml & 87.98 ml) at pH 2.0 while single peak (61.45 ml) at pH 7.4. The hydrodynamic radii (R h) of native BL was 2.9 nm while at pH 2.0 two species were found with R h of 1.7 and 3.7 nm. Furthermore at, pH 2.0 the secondary structures of BL remained unaltered while tertiary structure was significantly disrupted with the exposure of hydrophobic clusters confirming the existence of molten globule like state. The unfolding of BL with different subunit status was further evaluated by urea and temperature mediated denaturation to check their stability. As inferred from high Cm and ΔG values, the monomeric form of BL offers more resistance towards chemical denaturation than the native dimeric form. Besides, dimeric BL exhibited a Tm of 77°C while no loss in secondary structures was observed in monomers even up to 95°C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on monomeric subunit of lectins showing more stability against denaturants than its native dimeric state.

  2. Understanding the Nonproductive Enzyme Adsorption and Physicochemical Properties of Residual Lignins in Moso Bamboo Pretreated with Sulfuric Acid and Kraft Pulping.

    PubMed

    Huang, Caoxing; He, Juan; Min, Douyong; Lai, Chenhuan; Yong, Qiang

    2016-12-01

    In this work, to elucidate why the acid-pretreated bamboo shows disappointingly low enzymatic digestibility comparing to the alkali-pretreated bamboo, residual lignins in acid-pretreated and kraft pulped bamboo were isolated and analyzed by adsorption isotherm to evaluate their extents of nonproductive enzyme adsorption. Meanwhile, physicochemical properties of the isolated lignins were analyzed and a relationship was established with non-productive adsorption. Results showed that the adsorption affinity and binding strength of cellulase on acid-pretreated bamboo lignin (MWLa) was significantly higher than that on residual lignin in pulped bamboo (MWLp). The maximum adsorption capacity of cellulase on MWLp was 129.49 mg/g lignin, which was lower than that on MWLa (160.25 mg/g lignin). When isolated lignins were added into the Avicel hydrolysis solution, the inhibitory effect on enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency of MWLa was found to be considerably stronger than that with MWLp. The cellulase adsorption on isolated lignins was correlated positively with hydrophobicity, phenolic hydroxyl group, and degree of condensation but negatively with surface charges and aliphatic hydroxyl group. These results suggest that the higher nonproductive cellulase adsorption and physicochemical properties of residual lignin in acid-pretreated bamboo may be responsible for its disappointingly low enzymatic digestibility.

  3. A residue in the TRPM2 channel outer pore is crucial in determining species-dependent sensitivity to extracellular acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jie; Yang, Wei; Beech, David J; Jiang, Lin-Hua

    2011-08-01

    Acidic pH is an important parameter regulating ion channel activity and its biological function. This study investigated inhibition of the hTRPM2 channels by extracellular acidic pH and compared the sensitivity of human (h) and mouse (m) TRPM2 channel to such an inhibition. The initial inhibition of hTRPM2 channel currents was substantially reversible, but the reversibility progressively diminished as the exposure to acidic pH was prolonged and it was essentially lost in the steady state, suggesting that extracellular acidic pH induces initial reversible inhibition and subsequent irreversible inactivation. Like the hTRPM2 channel, the mTRPM2 channel was sensitive to inhibition by pH 4.0-5.5, but the kinetics was significantly slower. Moreover, in contrast to the complete inhibition of the hTRPM2 channel, the mTRPM2 channel was insensitive to pH 6.0. Replacement of residue Gln(992) in the outer pore with the equivalent residue His(995) in the hTRPM2 channel resulted in a mutant mTRPM2 channel with the pH sensitivity and kinetics of inhibition of the wild-type hTRPM2 channel. Conversely, the reciprocal mutation H995Q in the hTRPM2 channel dramatically slowed down the kinetics of inhibition. Swapping other residues in the pore region failed to produce such opposing effects. Taken together, our results suggest a crucial role of residue His(995)/Gln(992) in the outer pore of TRPM2 channels in determining species-dependent effects of extracellular acidic pH.

  4. Aspartic Acid 397 in Subunit B of the Na+-pumping NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae Forms Part of a Sodium-binding Site, Is Involved in Cation Selectivity, and Affects Cation-binding Site Cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Michael E.; Juárez, Oscar; Cho, Jonathan; Barquera, Blanca

    2013-01-01

    The Na+-pumping NADH:quinone complex is found in Vibrio cholerae and other marine and pathogenic bacteria. NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase oxidizes NADH and reduces ubiquinone, using the free energy released by this reaction to pump sodium ions across the cell membrane. In a previous report, a conserved aspartic acid residue in the NqrB subunit at position 397, located in the cytosolic face of this protein, was proposed to be involved in the capture of sodium. Here, we studied the role of this residue through the characterization of mutant enzymes in which this aspartic acid was substituted by other residues that change charge and size, such as arginine, serine, lysine, glutamic acid, and cysteine. Our results indicate that NqrB-Asp-397 forms part of one of the at least two sodium-binding sites and that both size and charge at this position are critical for the function of the enzyme. Moreover, we demonstrate that this residue is involved in cation selectivity, has a critical role in the communication between sodium-binding sites, by promoting cooperativity, and controls the electron transfer step involved in sodium uptake (2Fe-2S → FMNC). PMID:24030824

  5. Side-chain conformational thermodynamics of aspartic acid residue in the peptides and achatin-I in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tomohiro; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Nakahara, Masaru

    2004-02-01

    Sequence-position dependence of the side-chain conformational equilibrium of aspartic acid (Asp) residue is investigated for both model Asp peptides (di- to tetra-) and neuropeptide achatin-I (Gly--Phe-Ala-Asp) in aqueous solution. The trans-to-gauche conformational changes on the dihedral angle of C-C(alpha)-C(beta)-C are analyzed in terms of the standard free energy DeltaG(0), enthalpy DeltaH(0), and entropy -TDeltaS(0). The thermodynamic quantities are obtained by measuring the dihedral-angle-dependent vicinal (1)H-(1)H coupling constants in nuclear magnetic resonance over a wide temperature range. When the carboxyl groups of Asp are ionized, DeltaG(0) in the aqueous phase depends by approximately 1-2 kJ mol(-1) on the sequence position, whereas the energy change in the gas phase (absence of solvent) depends by tens of kJ mol(-1). Therefore, the weak position dependence of DeltaG(0) is a result of the compensation for the intramolecular effect by the hydration (= DeltaG(0)-). The DeltaH(0) and -TDeltaS(0) components, on the other hand, exhibit a notable trend at the C-terminus. The C-terminal DeltaH(0) is larger than the N- and nonterminal DeltaH(0) values due to the intramolecular repulsion between alpha- and beta-. The C-terminal -TDeltaS(0) is negative and larger in magnitude than the others, and an attractive solute-solvent interaction at the C-terminus serves as a structure breaker of the water solvent.

  6. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  7. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-04-23

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion.

  8. Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels Support Cord-Like Structures from Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Derek; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Bose, Vivek; Luong, Eli

    2011-01-01

    The generation of functional vascular networks has the potential to improve treatment for vascular diseases and to facilitate successful organ transplantation. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) have robust proliferative potential and can form vascular networks in vivo. ECFCs are recruited from a bone marrow niche to the site of vascularization, where cues from the extracellular matrix instigate vascular morphogenesis. Although this process has been elucidated using natural matrix, little is known about vascular morphogenesis by ECFCs in synthetic matrix, a xeno-free scaffold that can provide a more controllable and clinically relevant alternative for regenerative medicine. We sought to study hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels as three-dimensional scaffolds for capillary-like structure formation from ECFCs, and to determine the crucial parameters needed to design such synthetic scaffolds. We found that ECFCs express HA-specific receptors and that vascular endothelial growth factor stimulates hyaluronidase expression in ECFCs. Using a well-defined and controllable three-dimensional HA culture system, we were able to decouple the effect of matrix viscoelasticity from changes in adhesion peptide density. We determined that decreasing matrix viscoelasticity, which corresponds to a loose ultrastructure, significantly increases ECFC vascular tube length and area, and that the effect of local delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor within the hydrogel depends on the makeup of the synthetic environment. Collectively, these results set forth initial design criteria that need to be considered in developing vascularized tissue constructs. PMID:21247340

  9. Alteration of Fatty-Acid-Metabolizing Enzymes Affects Mitochondrial Form and Function in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Christelle; Nawara, Magdalena; Salih, Mustafa A.M.; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Zaki, Maha S.; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Schule, Rebecca; Mignot, Cyril; Obre, Emilie; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Durand, Christelle M.; Oteyza, Andrés Caballero; El-Hachimi, Khalid H.; Al Drees, Abdulmajeed; Bouslam, Naima; Lamari, Foudil; Elmalik, Salah A.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Esteves, Typhaine; Gaussen, Marion; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Gyapay, Gabor; Lechner, Doris; Gonzalez, Michael; Depienne, Christel; Mochel, Fanny; Lavie, Julie; Schols, Ludger; Lacombe, Didier; Yahyaoui, Mohamed; Al Abdulkareem, Ibrahim; Zuchner, Stephan; Yamashita, Atsushi; Benomar, Ali; Goizet, Cyril; Durr, Alexandra; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Darios, Frederic; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is considered one of the most heterogeneous groups of neurological disorders, both clinically and genetically. The disease comprises pure and complex forms that clinically include slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity resulting from degeneration of the corticospinal tract. At least 48 loci accounting for these diseases have been mapped to date, and mutations have been identified in 22 genes, most of which play a role in intracellular trafficking. Here, we identified mutations in two functionally related genes (DDHD1 and CYP2U1) in individuals with autosomal-recessive forms of HSP by using either the classical positional cloning or a combination of whole-genome linkage mapping and next-generation sequencing. Interestingly, three subjects with CYP2U1 mutations presented with a thin corpus callosum, white-matter abnormalities, and/or calcification of the basal ganglia. These genes code for two enzymes involved in fatty-acid metabolism, and we have demonstrated in human cells that the HSP pathophysiology includes alteration of mitochondrial architecture and bioenergetics with increased oxidative stress. Our combined results focus attention on lipid metabolism as a critical HSP pathway with a deleterious impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic function. PMID:23176821

  10. Complexes Formed in Solution Between Vanadium(IV)/(V) and the Cyclic Dihydroxamic Acid Putrebactin or Linear Suberodihydroxamic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An aerobic solution prepared from V(IV) and the cyclic dihydroxamic acid putrebactin (pbH2) in 1:1 H2O/CH3OH at pH = 2 turned from blue to orange and gave a signal in the positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) at m/zobs 437.0 attributed to the monooxoV(V) species [VVO(pb)]+ ([C16H26N4O7V]+, m/zcalc 437.3). A solution prepared as above gave a signal in the 51V NMR spectrum at δV = −443.3 ppm (VOCl3, δV = 0 ppm) and was electron paramagnetic resonance silent, consistent with the presence of [VVO(pb)]+. The formation of [VVO(pb)]+ was invariant of [V(IV)]:[pbH2] and of pH values over pH = 2–7. In contrast, an aerobic solution prepared from V(IV) and the linear dihydroxamic acid suberodihydroxamic acid (sbhaH4) in 1:1 H2O/CH3OH at pH values of 2, 5, or 7 gave multiple signals in the positive and negative ion ESI-MS, which were assigned to monomeric or dimeric V(V)– or V(IV)–sbhaH4 complexes or mixed-valence V(V)/(IV)–sbhaH4 complexes. The complexity of the V-sbhaH4 system has been attributed to dimerization (2[VVO(sbhaH2)]+ ↔ [(VVO)2(sbhaH2)2]2+), deprotonation ([VVO(sbhaH2)]+ – H+ ↔ [VVO(sbhaH)]0), and oxidation ([VIVO(sbhaH2)]0 –e– ↔ [VVO(sbhaH2)]+) phenomena and could be described as the sum of two pH-dependent vectors, the first comprising the deprotonation of hydroxamate (low pH) to hydroximate (high pH) and the second comprising the oxidation of V(IV) (low pH) to V(V) (high pH). Macrocyclic pbH2 was preorganized to form [VVO(pb)]+, which would provide an entropy-based increase in its thermodynamic stability compared to V(V)–sbhaH4 complexes. The half-wave potentials from solutions of [V(IV)]:[pbH2] (1:1) or [V(IV)]:[sbhaH4] (1:2) at pH = 2 were E1/2 −335 or −352 mV, respectively, which differed from the expected trend (E1/2 [VO(pb)]+/0 < VV/IV–sbhaH4). The complex solution speciation of the V(V)/(IV)–sbhaH4 system prevented the determination of half-wave potentials for single species. The characterization

  11. Terpenylic and Related Lactone-Containing Acids: Novel Monoterpene Secondary Organic Aerosol Tracers with Dimer-Forming Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, M.; Iinuma, Y.; Szmigielski, R.; Farhat, Y.; Surratt, J. D.; Blockhuys, F.; van Alsenoy, C.; Böge, O.; Sierau, B.; Gómez-González, Y.; Vermeylen, R.; van der Veken, P.; Shahgholi, M.; Chan, A. W.; Herrmann, H.; Seinfeld, J.; Maenhaut, W.

    2009-12-01

    Blue haze is a natural phenomenon that is observed in forested regions worldwide and is due to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles. While evidence exists for organic molecular clusters in the size range of < 2 nm, the chemical structures of the nucleating particles have remained unresolved. In the present study, novel SOA products from the monoterpene α-pinene with unique dimer-forming properties have been identified as lactone-containing terpenoic acids, i.e., terpenylic (molecular weight (MW) 172), terebic (MW 158) and 2-hydroxyterpenylic acid (MW 188), and diaterpenylic acid acetate (MW 232). The structural characterizations were based on synthesis of reference compounds and detailed interpretation of negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectral [(-)ESI-MS] data, including accurate mass and MSn ion trap measurements. Terpenylic acid and diaterpenylic acid acetate are early oxidation products formed upon both photooxidation and ozonolysis, and are abundant SOA tracers in ambient fine aerosol from coniferous forest sites (e.g., K-puszta, Hungary). Terebic and 2-hydroxyterpenylic acid can be explained by further oxidation of terpenylic acid, and are also prominent tracers in ambient fine aerosol. Quantum chemical calculations support that non-covalent dimer formation involving double hydrogen bonding interactions between carboxyl groups of the monomers is energetically favorable. Lactone-containing terpenoic acids also form through photooxidation from monoterpenes other than α-pinene, i.e., terebic acid from Δ3-carene, and terpenylic, homoterpenylic (MW 186), and terebic acid from β-pinene. A distinct feature of terpenylic acid and related lactone-containing acids is that they can be selectively detected in positive ion (+)ESI-MS, unlike isobaric dicarboxylic terpenoic acids such as norpinic (MW 172) and pinic acid (MW 186). Interestingly, terpenylic, terebic and homoterpenylic acid were already reported in the early German

  12. Effect of lactic acid bacteria inoculant and beet pulp addition on fermentation characteristics and in vitro ruminal digestion of vegetable residue silage.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Cai, Y; Takahashi, T; Yoshida, N; Tohno, M; Uegaki, R; Nonaka, K; Terada, F

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of beet pulp (BP) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on silage fermentation quality and in vitro ruminal dry matter (DM) digestion of vegetable residues, including white cabbage, Chinese cabbage, red cabbage, and lettuce. Silage was prepared using a small-scale fermentation system, and treatments were designed as control silage without additive or with BP (30% fresh matter basis), LAB inoculant Chikuso-1 (Lactobacillus plantarum, 5mg/kg, fresh matter basis), and BP+LAB. In vitro incubation was performed using rumen fluid mixed with McDougall's artificial saliva (at a ratio of 1:4, vol/vol) at 39°C for 6h to determine the ruminal fermentability of the vegetable residue silages. These vegetable residues contained high levels of crude protein (20.6-22.8% of DM) and moderate levels of neutral detergent fiber (22.7-33.6% of DM). In all silages, the pH sharply decreased and lactic acid increased, and the growth of bacilli, coliform bacteria, molds, and yeasts was inhibited by the low pH at the early stage of ensiling. The silage treated with BP or LAB had a lower pH and a higher lactic acid content than the control silage. After 6h of incubation, all silages had relatively high DM digestibility (38.6-44.9%); in particular, the LAB-inoculated silage had the highest DM digestibility and the lowest methane production. The vegetable residues had high nutritional content and high in vitro DM digestibility. Also, both the addition of a LAB inoculant and moisture adjustment with BP improved the fermentation quality of the vegetable residue silages. In addition, LAB increased DM digestibility and decreased ruminal methane production.

  13. Permethylation Linkage Analysis Techniques for Residual Carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Permethylation analysis is the classic approach to establishing the position of glycosidic linkages between sugar residues. Typically, the carbohydrate is derivatized to form acid-stable methyl ethers, hydrolyzed, peracetylated, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The pos...

  14. Copper(II) complexes of bis(amino amide) ligands: effect of changes in the amino acid residue.

    PubMed

    Martí, Inés; Ferrer, Armando; Escorihuela, Jorge; Burguete, M Isabel; Luis, Santiago V

    2012-06-14

    A family of ligands derived from bis(amino amides) containing aliphatic spacers has been prepared, and their protonation and stability constants for the formation of Cu(2+) complexes have been determined potentiometrically. Important differences are associated to both the length of the aliphatic spacer and the nature of the side chains derived from the amino acid. In general, ligands containing aliphatic side chains display higher basicities as well as stability constants with Cu(2+). In the same way, basicities and stability constants tend to increase when decreasing the steric hindrance caused by the corresponding side-chain. FT-IR, UV-vis and ESI-MS were used for analyzing the complex species detected in the speciation diagram. UV-vis studies showed the presence of different coordination environments for the copper(II) complexes. Complexes with different stoi