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Sample records for acid residues sequence

  1. Amino acid sequences around the cysteine residues of rabbit muscle triose phosphate isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Janet C.; Waley, S. G.

    1971-01-01

    1. The nature of the subunits in rabbit muscle triose phosphate isomerase has been investigated. 2. Amino acid analyses show that there are five cysteine residues and two methionine residues/subunit. 3. The amino acid sequences around the cysteine residues have been determined; these account for about 75 residues. 4. Cleavage at the methionine residues with cyanogen bromide gave three fragments. 5. These results show that the subunits correspond to polypeptide chains, containing about 230 amino acid residues. The chains in triose phosphate isomerase seem to be shorter than those of other glycolytic enzymes. PMID:5165707

  2. Prediction of Residue Status to Be Protected or Not Protected From Hy-drogen Exchange Using Amino Acid Sequence Only.

    PubMed

    Nikita V, Dovidchenko; Oxana V, Galzitskaya

    2008-01-01

    We have outlined here some structural aspects of local flexibility. Important functional properties are related to flexible segments. We try to predict regions that have been shown to exhibit the highest probability of being folded in the equilibrium intermediate or native state and will be protected from hydrogen exchange using amino acid sequence only. Our approach FoldUnfold for the prediction of unstructured regions has been applied to seven different proteins. For 80% of the residues considered in this paper we can predict correctly their status: will they be protected or not from hydrogen exchange. An additional goal of our study is to assess whether properties inferred using the bioinformatics approach are easily applicable to predict behavior of proteins in solution. PMID:18949078

  3. Prediction of Residue Status to Be Protected or Not Protected From Hy-drogen Exchange Using Amino Acid Sequence Only

    PubMed Central

    Dovidchenko, Nikita V; Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2008-01-01

    We have outlined here some structural aspects of local flexibility. Important functional properties are related to flexible segments. We try to predict regions that have been shown to exhibit the highest probability of being folded in the equilibrium intermediate or native state and will be protected from hydrogen exchange using amino acid sequence only. Our approach FoldUnfold for the prediction of unstructured regions has been applied to seven different proteins. For 80% of the residues considered in this paper we can predict correctly their status: will they be protected or not from hydrogen exchange. An additional goal of our study is to assess whether properties inferred using the bioinformatics approach are easily applicable to predict behavior of proteins in solution. PMID:18949078

  4. Identification of functionally important amino acid residues in the mitochondria targeting sequence of Hepatitis B virus X protein

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Sai Kam; Ho, Sai Fan; Tsui, Kwok Wing; Fung, Kwok Pui; Waye, M.Y. Mary

    2008-11-10

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been strongly associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the X protein (HBx) is thought to mediate the cellular changes associated with carcinogenesis. Recently, isolation of the hepatitis B virus integrants from HCC tissue by others have established the fact that the X gene is often truncated at its C-terminus. Expression of the GFP fusion proteins of HBx and its truncation mutants with a GFP tag in human liver cell-lines in this study revealed that the C-terminus of HBx is indispensable for its specific localization in the mitochondria. A crucial region of seven amino acids at the C-terminus has been mapped out in which the cysteine residue at position 115 serves as the most important residue for the subcellular localization. When cysteine 115 of HBx is mutated to alanine the mitochondria targeting property of HBx is abrogated.

  5. Prediction of DNA-binding residues in proteins from amino acid sequences using a random forest model with a hybrid feature

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiansheng; Liu, Hongde; Duan, Xueye; Ding, Yan; Wu, Hongtao; Bai, Yunfei; Sun, Xiao

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: In this work, we aim to develop a computational approach for predicting DNA-binding sites in proteins from amino acid sequences. To avoid overfitting with this method, all available DNA-binding proteins from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are used to construct the models. The random forest (RF) algorithm is used because it is fast and has robust performance for different parameter values. A novel hybrid feature is presented which incorporates evolutionary information of the amino acid sequence, secondary structure (SS) information and orthogonal binary vector (OBV) information which reflects the characteristics of 20 kinds of amino acids for two physical–chemical properties (dipoles and volumes of the side chains). The numbers of binding and non-binding residues in proteins are highly unbalanced, so a novel scheme is proposed to deal with the problem of imbalanced datasets by downsizing the majority class. Results: The results show that the RF model achieves 91.41% overall accuracy with Matthew's correlation coefficient of 0.70 and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.913. To our knowledge, the RF method using the hybrid feature is currently the computationally optimal approach for predicting DNA-binding sites in proteins from amino acid sequences without using three-dimensional (3D) structural information. We have demonstrated that the prediction results are useful for understanding protein–DNA interactions. Availability: DBindR web server implementation is freely available at http://www.cbi.seu.edu.cn/DBindR/DBindR.htm. Contact: xsun@seu.edu.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19008251

  6. Sequence Polymorphism, Segmental Recombination and Toggling Amino Acid Residues within the DBL3X Domain of the VAR2CSA Placental Malaria Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Talundzic, Eldin; Shah, Sheel; Fawole, Ope; Owino, Simon; Moore, Julie M.; Peterson, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains one of the world's foremost health problems, primarily in highly endemic regions such as Sub-Saharan Africa, where it is responsible for substantial morbidity, mortality and economic losses. Malaria is a significant cause of severe disease and death in pregnant women and newborns, with pathogenesis being associated with expression of a unique variant of the multidomain Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1) called VAR2CSA. Here, we characterize the polymorphism of the DBL3X domain of VAR2CSA and identify regions under selective pressure among placental parasites from women living in endemic western Kenya. In addition to significant levels of polymorphism, our analysis reveals evidence for diversification through intra-segmental recombination and novel mutations that likely contributed to the high number of unique VAR2CSA sequence types identified in this study. Interestingly, we also identified a number of critical residues that may be implicated in immune evasion through switching (or toggling) to alternative amino acids, including an arginine residue within the predicted binding pocket in subdomain III, which was previously implicated in binding to placental CSA. Overall, these findings are important for understanding parasite diversity in pregnant women and will be useful for identifying epitopes and variants of DBL3X to be included in a vaccine against placental malaria. PMID:22347496

  7. Amino-Acid Sequence of Porcine Pepsin

    PubMed Central

    Tang, J.; Sepulveda, P.; Marciniszyn, J.; Chen, K. C. S.; Huang, W-Y.; Tao, N.; Liu, D.; Lanier, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    As the culmination of several years of experiments, we propose a complete amino-acid sequence for porcine pepsin, an enzyme containing 327 amino-acid residues in a single polypeptide chain. In the sequence determination, the enzyme was treated with cyanogen bromide. Five resulting fragments were purified. The amino-acid sequence of four of the fragments accounted for 290 residues. Because the structure of a 37-residue carboxyl-terminal fragment was already known, it was not studied. The alignment of these fragments was determined from the sequence of methionyl-peptides we had previously reported. We also discovered the locations of activesite aspartyl residues, as well as the pairing of the three disulfide bridges. A minor component of commercial crystalline pepsin was found to contain two extra amino-acid residues, Ala-Leu-, at the amino-terminus of the molecule. This minor component was apparently derived from a different site of cleavage during the activation of porcine pepsinogen. PMID:4587252

  8. Effect of fly ash, organic wastes and chemical fertilizers on yield, nutrient uptake, heavy metal content and residual fertility in a rice-mustard cropping sequence under acid lateritic soils.

    PubMed

    Rautaray, S K; Ghosh, B C; Mittra, B N

    2003-12-01

    A field experiment was conducted for two years in sandy loam acid lateritic soil to study the direct effect of fly ash, organic wastes and chemical fertilizers on rice (Oryza sativa) and their residual effect on mustard (Brassica napus var glauca) grown in sequence. Rice yields were higher when fly ash, organic wastes and chemical fertilizers were used in an integrated manner as compared to sole application of chemical fertilizers. Yields of mustard were also higher under the residual effect of the former rather than the latter. However, this beneficial residual effect under integrated nutrient sources was inadequate for the mustard crop in the low fertility test soil. Hence, direct application of fertilizers was needed, in addition to residual fertility. The effect of fly ash on mean rice equivalent yield of the rice-mustard cropping sequence was highest (up to 14%) when it was used in combination with organic wastes and chemical fertilizers. While the yield increase was 10% when it was used in combination with only chemical fertilizers. The minimum yield advantage, 3%, occurred when fly ash was applied alone. The equivalent yield of the rice-mustard cropping sequence was equally influenced by either of the organic wastes. Cadmium and Ni content in rice grain and straw were less under the direct effect of fly ash. The residual effect on mustard was similar for Ni content in seed and stover; however, Cd content was increased. Beneficial residual soil chemical properties in terms of pH, organic carbon and available N, P and K were noted for integrated nutrient treatments involved fly ash, organic wastes and chemical fertilizers as compared to continuous use of only chemical fertilizers. Application of fly ash alone was effective in raising soil available P. Thus, integrated use of fly ash, organic wastes and chemical fertilizers was beneficial in improving crop yield, soil pH, organic carbon and available N, P and K in sandy loam acid lateritic soil. PMID:14575950

  9. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  10. Evidence for the vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylation of the first glutamic acid residue in peptide substrates containing a diglutamyl sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, A I; Esnouf, M P; Rose, K; Offord, R E

    1983-01-01

    The peptide substrate commonly used in vitamin K-dependent carboxylation, Phe-Leu-Glu-Glu-Val, has been shown, by the use of high-voltage paper electrophoresis, to be degraded from the N-terminus by a microsomal leucine amino-peptidase. The replacement of phenylalanine with a N-t-butoxycarbonyl group resulted in a tetrapeptide substrate with a blocked N-terminus resistant to enzymic degradation. Vitamin K-dependent carboxylation of this non-degradable substrate gave a unique carboxylated product, which was separated from microsomal protein and unchanged substrate by using DEAE-Sephadex A25 as a final step. The carboxylated product was subsequently decarboxylated in 2HCl and analysed by using g.l.c. coupled to a mass spectrometer. This showed that only the first glutamic acid residue in the peptide substrate was carboxylated. PMID:6138032

  11. Predicting intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Zoran; Peng, Kang; Vucetic, Slobodan; Radivojac, Predrag; Brown, Celeste J; Dunker, A Keith

    2003-01-01

    Blind predictions of intrinsic order and disorder were made on 42 proteins subsequently revealed to contain 9,044 ordered residues, 284 disordered residues in 26 segments of length 30 residues or less, and 281 disordered residues in 2 disordered segments of length greater than 30 residues. The accuracies of the six predictors used in this experiment ranged from 77% to 91% for the ordered regions and from 56% to 78% for the disordered segments. The average of the order and disorder predictions ranged from 73% to 77%. The prediction of disorder in the shorter segments was poor, from 25% to 66% correct, while the prediction of disorder in the longer segments was better, from 75% to 95% correct. Four of the predictors were composed of ensembles of neural networks. This enabled them to deal more efficiently with the large asymmetry in the training data through diversified sampling from the significantly larger ordered set and achieve better accuracy on ordered and long disordered regions. The exclusive use of long disordered regions for predictor training likely contributed to the disparity of the predictions on long versus short disordered regions, while averaging the output values over 61-residue windows to eliminate short predictions of order or disorder probably contributed to the even greater disparity for three of the predictors. This experiment supports the predictability of intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence. PMID:14579347

  12. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  13. Interplay among side chain sequence, backbone composition, and residue rigidification in polypeptide folding and assembly

    PubMed Central

    Horne, W. Seth; Price, Joshua L.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2008-01-01

    The extent to which polypeptide conformation depends on side-chain composition and sequence has been widely studied, but less is known about the importance of maintaining an α-amino acid backbone. Here, we examine a series of peptides with backbones that feature different repeating patterns of α- and β-amino acid residues but an invariant side-chain sequence. In the pure α-backbone, this sequence corresponds to the previously studied peptide GCN4-pLI, which forms a very stable four-helix bundle quaternary structure. Physical characterization in solution and crystallographic structure determination show that a variety of α/β-peptide backbones can adopt sequence-encoded quaternary structures similar to that of the α prototype. There is a loss in helix bundle stability upon β-residue incorporation; however, stability of the quaternary structure is not a simple function of β-residue content. We find that cyclically constrained β-amino acid residues can stabilize the folds of α/β-peptide GCN4-pLI analogues and restore quaternary structure formation to backbones that are predominantly unfolded in the absence of cyclic residues. Our results show a surprising degree of plasticity in terms of the backbone compositions that can manifest the structural information encoded in a sequence of amino acid side chains. These findings offer a framework for the design of nonnatural oligomers that mimic the structural and functional properties of proteins. PMID:18587049

  14. The amino-acid sequence of kangaroo pancreatic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Gaastra, W; Welling, G W; Beintema, J J

    1978-05-01

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue by affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence was determined by automatic sequencing of overlapping large fragments and by analysis of shorter peptides obtained by digestion with a number of proteolytic enzymes. The polypeptide chain consists of 122 amino acid residues. Compared to other ribonucleases, the N-terminal residue and residue 114 are deleted. In other pancreatic ribonucleases position 114 is occupied by a cis proline residue in an external loop at the surface of the molecule. Other remarkable substitutions are the presence of a tyrosine residue at position 123 instead of a serine which forms a hydrogen bond with the pyrimidine ring of a nucleotide substrate, and a number of hydrophobichydrophilic interchanges in the sequence 51-55, which forms part of an alpha-helix in bovine ribonuclease and exhibits few substitutions in the placental mammals. Kangaroo ribonuclease contains no carbohydrate, although the enzyme possesses a recognition site for carbohydrate attachment in the sequence Asn-Val-Thr (62-64). The enzyme differs at about 35-40% of the positions from all other mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases sequenced to date, which is in agreement with the early divergence between the marsupials and the placental mammals. From fragmentary data a tentative sequence of red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) pancreatic ribonuclease has been derived. Eight differences with the kangaroo sequence were found. PMID:658039

  15. Amino acid sequence of the nonsecretory ribonuclease of human urine.

    PubMed

    Beintema, J J; Hofsteenge, J; Iwama, M; Morita, T; Ohgi, K; Irie, M; Sugiyama, R H; Schieven, G L; Dekker, C A; Glitz, D G

    1988-06-14

    The amino acid sequence of a nonsecretory ribonuclease isolated from human urine was determined except for the identity of the residue at position 7. Sequence information indicates that the ribonucleases of human liver and spleen and an eosinophil-derived neurotoxin are identical or very closely related gene products. The sequence is identical at about 30% of the amino acid positions with those of all of the secreted mammalian ribonucleases for which information is available. Identical residues include active-site residues histidine-12, histidine-119, and lysine-41, other residues known to be important for substrate binding and catalytic activity, and all eight half-cystine residues common to these enzymes. Major differences include a deletion of six residues in the (so-called) S-peptide loop, insertions of two, and nine residues, respectively, in three other external loops of the molecule, and an addition of three residues at the amino terminus. The sequence shows the human nonsecretory ribonuclease to belong to the same ribonuclease superfamily as the mammalian secretory ribonucleases, turtle pancreatic ribonuclease, and human angiogenin. Sequence data suggest that a gene duplication occurred in an ancient vertebrate ancestor; one branch led to the nonsecretory ribonuclease, while the other branch led to a second duplication, with one line leading to the secretory ribonucleases (in mammals) and the second line leading to pancreatic ribonuclease in turtle and an angiogenic factor in mammals (human angiogenin). The nonsecretory ribonuclease has five short carbohydrate chains attached via asparagine residues at the surface of the molecule; these chains may have been shortened by exoglycosidase action.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3166997

  16. Characterization and amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart.

    PubMed

    Offner, G D; Brecher, P; Sawlivich, W B; Costello, C E; Troxler, R F

    1988-05-15

    The complete amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart was determined by automated Edman degradation of CNBr, BNPS-skatole [3'-bromo-3-methyl-2-(2-nitrobenzenesulphenyl)indolenine], hydroxylamine, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, tryptic and chymotryptic peptides, and by digestion of the protein with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of the blocked N-terminal tryptic peptide from citraconylated protein was determined by collisionally induced decomposition mass spectrometry. The protein contains 132 amino acid residues, is enriched with respect to threonine and lysine, lacks cysteine, has an acetylated valine residue at the N-terminus, and has an Mr of 14768 and an isoelectric point of 5.25. This protein contains two short internal repeated sequences from residues 48-54 and from residues 114-119 located within regions of predicted beta-structure and decreasing hydrophobicity. These short repeats are contained within two longer repeated regions from residues 48-60 and residues 114-125, which display 62% sequence similarity. These regions could accommodate the charged and uncharged moieties of long-chain fatty acids and may represent fatty acid-binding domains consistent with the finding that human heart fatty acid-binding protein binds 2 mol of oleate or palmitate/mol of protein. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences of the peptides has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50143 (23 pages) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained as indicated in Biochem. J. (1988) 249, 5. PMID:3421901

  17. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  18. Conformations of intrinsically disordered proteins are influenced by linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues.

    PubMed

    Das, Rahul K; Pappu, Rohit V

    2013-08-13

    The functions of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are governed by relationships between information encoded in their amino acid sequences and the ensembles of conformations that they sample as autonomous units. Most IDPs are polyampholytes, with sequences that include both positively and negatively charged residues. Accordingly, we focus here on the sequence-ensemble relationships of polyampholytic IDPs. The fraction of charged residues discriminates between weak and strong polyampholytes. Using atomistic simulations, we show that weak polyampholytes form globules, whereas the conformational preferences of strong polyampholytes are determined by a combination of fraction of charged residues values and the linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues. We quantify the latter using a patterning parameter κ that lies between zero and one. The value of κ is low for well-mixed sequences, and in these sequences, intrachain electrostatic repulsions and attractions are counterbalanced, leading to the unmasking of preferences for conformations that resemble either self-avoiding random walks or generic Flory random coils. Segregation of oppositely charged residues within linear sequences leads to high κ-values and preferences for hairpin-like conformations caused by long-range electrostatic attractions induced by conformational fluctuations. We propose a scaling theory to explain the sequence-encoded conformational properties of strong polyampholytes. We show that naturally occurring strong polyampholytes have low κ-values, and this feature implies a selection for random coil ensembles. The design of sequences with different κ-values demonstrably alters the conformational preferences of polyampholytic IDPs, and this ability could become a useful tool for enabling direct inquiries into connections between sequence-ensemble relationships and functions of IDPs. PMID:23901099

  19. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  20. Conformations of intrinsically disordered proteins are influenced by linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rahul K.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2013-01-01

    The functions of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are governed by relationships between information encoded in their amino acid sequences and the ensembles of conformations that they sample as autonomous units. Most IDPs are polyampholytes, with sequences that include both positively and negatively charged residues. Accordingly, we focus here on the sequence–ensemble relationships of polyampholytic IDPs. The fraction of charged residues discriminates between weak and strong polyampholytes. Using atomistic simulations, we show that weak polyampholytes form globules, whereas the conformational preferences of strong polyampholytes are determined by a combination of fraction of charged residues values and the linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues. We quantify the latter using a patterning parameter κ that lies between zero and one. The value of κ is low for well-mixed sequences, and in these sequences, intrachain electrostatic repulsions and attractions are counterbalanced, leading to the unmasking of preferences for conformations that resemble either self-avoiding random walks or generic Flory random coils. Segregation of oppositely charged residues within linear sequences leads to high κ-values and preferences for hairpin-like conformations caused by long-range electrostatic attractions induced by conformational fluctuations. We propose a scaling theory to explain the sequence-encoded conformational properties of strong polyampholytes. We show that naturally occurring strong polyampholytes have low κ-values, and this feature implies a selection for random coil ensembles. The design of sequences with different κ-values demonstrably alters the conformational preferences of polyampholytic IDPs, and this ability could become a useful tool for enabling direct inquiries into connections between sequence–ensemble relationships and functions of IDPs. PMID:23901099

  1. Amino acid sequence repertoire of the bacterial proteome and the occurrence of untranslatable sequences.

    PubMed

    Navon, Sharon Penias; Kornberg, Guy; Chen, Jin; Schwartzman, Tali; Tsai, Albert; Puglisi, Elisabetta Viani; Puglisi, Joseph D; Adir, Noam

    2016-06-28

    Bioinformatic analysis of Escherichia coli proteomes revealed that all possible amino acid triplet sequences occur at their expected frequencies, with four exceptions. Two of the four underrepresented sequences (URSs) were shown to interfere with translation in vivo and in vitro. Enlarging the URS by a single amino acid resulted in increased translational inhibition. Single-molecule methods revealed stalling of translation at the entrance of the peptide exit tunnel of the ribosome, adjacent to ribosomal nucleotides A2062 and U2585. Interaction with these same ribosomal residues is involved in regulation of translation by longer, naturally occurring protein sequences. The E. coli exit tunnel has evidently evolved to minimize interaction with the exit tunnel and maximize the sequence diversity of the proteome, although allowing some interactions for regulatory purposes. Bioinformatic analysis of the human proteome revealed no underrepresented triplet sequences, possibly reflecting an absence of regulation by interaction with the exit tunnel. PMID:27307442

  2. Amino acid sequence of Salmonella typhimurium branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Feild, M J; Nguyen, D C; Armstrong, F B

    1989-06-13

    The complete amino acid sequence of the subunit of branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase (transaminase B, EC 2.6.1.42) of Salmonella typhimurium was determined. An Escherichia coli recombinant containing the ilvGEDAY gene cluster of Salmonella was used as the source of the hexameric enzyme. The peptide fragments used for sequencing were generated by treatment with trypsin, Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, endoproteinase Lys-C, and cyanogen bromide. The enzyme subunit contains 308 residues and has a molecular weight of 33,920. To determine the coenzyme-binding site, the pyridoxal 5-phosphate containing enzyme was treated with tritiated sodium borohydride prior to trypsin digestion. Peptide map comparisons with an apoenzyme tryptic digest and monitoring radioactivity incorporation allowed identification of the pyridoxylated peptide, which was then isolated and sequenced. The coenzyme-binding site is the lysyl residue at position 159. The amino acid sequence of Salmonella transaminase B is 97.4% identical with that of Escherichia coli, differing in only eight amino acid positions. Sequence comparisons of transaminase B to other known aminotransferase sequences revealed limited sequence similarity (24-33%) when conserved amino acid substitutions are allowed and alignments were forced to occur on the coenzyme-binding site. PMID:2669973

  3. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  4. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  5. 40 CFR 180.180 - Orthoarsenic acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... residues. 180.180 Section 180.180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... § 180.180 Orthoarsenic acid; tolerance for residues. (a) General. A tolerance that expires on July 1... exemptions. (c) Tolerances with regional registrations. (d) Indirect or inadvertent residues....

  6. 40 CFR 180.180 - Orthoarsenic acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... residues. 180.180 Section 180.180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... § 180.180 Orthoarsenic acid; tolerance for residues. (a) General. A tolerance that expires on July 1... exemptions. (c) Tolerances with regional registrations. (d) Indirect or inadvertent residues....

  7. 40 CFR 180.180 - Orthoarsenic acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... residues. 180.180 Section 180.180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... § 180.180 Orthoarsenic acid; tolerance for residues. (a) General. A tolerance that expires on July 1... exemptions. (c) Tolerances with regional registrations. (d) Indirect or inadvertent residues....

  8. The amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle triose phosphate isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Corran, P H; Waley, S G

    1975-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle triose phosphate isomerase was deduced by characterizing peptides that overlap the tryptic peptides. Thiol groups were modified by oxidation, carboxymethylation or aminoen. About 50 peptides that provided information about overlaps were isolated; the peptides were mostly characterized by their compositions and N-terminal residues. The peptide chains contain 248 amino acid residues, and no evidence for dissimilarity of the two subunits that comprise the native enzyme was found. The sequence of the rabbit muscle enzyme may be compared with that of the coelacanth enzyme (Kolb et al., 1974): 84% of the residues are in identical positions. Similarly, comparison of the sequence with that inferred for the chicken enzyme (Furth et al., 1974) shows that 87% of the residues are in identical positions. Limited though these comparisons are, they suggest that triose phosphate isomerase has one of the lowest rates of evolutionary change. An extended version of the present paper has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50040 (42 pages) at the British Library (Lending Division) (formerly the National Lending Library for Science and Technology), Boston Spa, Yorks. LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms given in Biochem. J. (1975) 145, 5. PMID:1171682

  9. Sequence-Specific Solvent Accessibilities of Protein Residues in Unfolded Protein Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Bernadó, Pau; Blackledge, Martin; Sancho, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Protein stability cannot be understood without the correct description of the unfolded state. We present here an efficient method for accurate calculation of atomic solvent exposures for denatured protein ensembles. The method used to generate the ensembles has been shown to reproduce diverse biophysical experimental data corresponding to natively and chemically unfolded proteins. Using a data set of 19 nonhomologous proteins containing from 98 to 579 residues, we report average accessibilities for all residue types. These averaged accessibilities are considerably lower than those previously reported for tripeptides and close to the lower limit reported by Creamer and co-workers. Of importance, we observe remarkable sequence dependence for the exposure to solvent of all residue types, which indicates that average residue solvent exposures can be inappropriate to interpret mutational studies. In addition, we observe smaller influences of both protein size and protein amino acid composition in the averaged residue solvent exposures for individual proteins. Calculating residue-specific solvent accessibilities within the context of real sequences is thus necessary and feasible. The approach presented here may allow a more precise parameterization of protein energetics as a function of polar- and apolar-area burial and opens new ways to investigate the energetics of the unfolded state of proteins. PMID:17012314

  10. Amino acid sequence of bovine heart coupling factor 6.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, J K; Jacobs, J W; Kanner, B I; Racker, E; Bradshaw, R A

    1984-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of bovine heart mitochondrial coupling factor 6 (F6) has been determined by automated Edman degradation of the whole protein and derived peptides. Preparations based on heat precipitation and ethanol extraction showed allotypic variation at three positions while material further purified by HPLC yielded only one sequence that also differed by a Phe-Thr replacement at residue 62. The mature protein contains 76 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 9006 and a pI of approximately equal to 5, in good agreement with experimentally measured values. The charged amino acids are mainly clustered at the termini and in one section in the middle; these three polar segments are separated by two segments relatively rich in nonpolar residues. Chou-Fasman analysis suggests three stretches of alpha-helix coinciding (or within) the high-charge-density sequences with a single beta-turn at the first polar-nonpolar junction. Comparison of the F6 sequence with those of other proteins did not reveal any homologous structures. PMID:6149548

  11. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1987-02-27

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and thence quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal. 1 fig.

  12. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1989-01-01

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

  13. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1989-12-05

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

  14. The amino acid sequence of protein CM-3 from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Joubert, F J

    1985-01-01

    Protein CM-3 from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom was purified by gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. It comprises 65 amino acids including eight half-cystines. The complete amino acid sequence of protein CM-3 has been elucidated. The sequence (residues 1-50) resembles that of the N-terminal sequence of the subunits of a synergistic type protein and residues 51-65 that of the C-terminal sequence of an angusticeps type protein. Mixtures of protein CM-3 and angusticeps type proteins showed no apparent synergistic effect, in that their toxicity in combination was no greater than the sum of their individual toxicities. PMID:4029488

  15. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27324649

  16. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl- N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints.

  17. Effect of co-evolving amino acid residues on topology of phylogenetic trees.

    PubMed

    Sherbakov, D Yu; Triboy, T I

    2007-12-01

    The presence in proteins of amino acid residues that change in concert during evolution is associated with keeping constant the protein spatial structure and functions. As in the case with morphological features, correlated substitutions may become the cause of homoplasies--the independent evolution of identical non-homological adaptations. Our data obtained on model phylogenetic trees and corresponding sets of sequences have shown that the presence of correlated substitutions distorts the results of phylogenetic reconstructions. A method for accounting for co-evolving amino acid residues in phylogenetic analysis is proposed. According to this method, only a single site from the group of correlated amino acid positions should remain, whereas other positions should not be used in further phylogenetic analysis. Simulations performed have shown that replacement on the average of 8% of variable positions in a pair of model sequences by coordinately evolving amino acid residues is able to change the tree topology. The removal of such amino acid residues from sequences before phylogenetic analysis restores the correct topology. PMID:18205620

  18. Amino acid sequence prerequisites for the formation of cn ions.

    PubMed

    Downard, K M; Biemann, K

    1993-11-01

    Ammo acid sequence prerequisites are described for the formation of c, ions observed in high-energy collision-induced decomposition spectra of peptides. It is shown that the formation of cn ions is promoted by the nature of the amino acid C-terminal to the cleavage site. A propensity for cn cleavage preceding threonine, and to a lesser extent tryptophan, lysine, and serine, is demonstrated where fragmentation is directed N-terminally at these residues. In addition, the nature of the residue N-terminal to the cleavage site is shown to have little effect on cn ion formation. A mechanism for cn ion formation is proposed and its applicability to the results observed is discussed. PMID:24227531

  19. Selective Deletion of the Internal Lysine Residue from the Peptide Sequence by Collisional Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shibdas; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2012-11-01

    The gas-phase peptide ion fragmentation chemistry is always the center of attraction in proteomics to analyze the amino acid sequence of peptides and proteins. In this work, we describe the formation of an anomalous fragment ion, which corresponds to the selective deletion of the internal lysine residue from a series of lysine containing peptides upon collisional activation in the ion trap. We detected several water-loss fragment ions and the maximum number of water molecules lost from a particular fragment ion was equal to the number of lysine residues in that fragment. As a consequence of this water-loss phenomenon, internal lysine residues were found to be deleted from the peptide ion. The N,N-dimethylation of all the amine functional groups of the peptide stopped the internal lysine deletion reaction, but selective N-terminal α-amino acetylation had no effect on this process indicating involvement of the side chains of the lysine residues. The detailed mechanism of the lysine deletion was investigated by multistage CID of the modified and unmodified peptides, by isotope labeling and by energy resolved CID studies. The results suggest that the lysine deletion might occur through a unimolecular multistep mechanism involving a seven-membered cyclic imine intermediate formed by the loss of water from a lysine residue in the protonated peptide. This intermediate subsequently undergoes degradation reaction to deplete the interior imine ring from the peptide backbone leading to the deletion of an internal lysine residue.

  20. Correlation between fibroin amino acid sequence and physical silk properties.

    PubMed

    Fedic, Robert; Zurovec, Michal; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2003-09-12

    The fiber properties of lepidopteran silk depend on the amino acid repeats that interact during H-fibroin polymerization. The aim of our research was to relate repeat composition to insect biology and fiber strength. Representative regions of the H-fibroin genes were sequenced and analyzed in three pyralid species: wax moth (Galleria mellonella), European flour moth (Ephestia kuehniella), and Indian meal moth (Plodia interpunctella). The amino acid repeats are species-specific, evidently a diversification of an ancestral region of 43 residues, and include three types of regularly dispersed motifs: modifications of GSSAASAA sequence, stretches of tripeptides GXZ where X and Z represent bulky residues, and sequences similar to PVIVIEE. No concatenations of GX dipeptide or alanine, which are typical for Bombyx silkworms and Antheraea silk moths, respectively, were found. Despite different repeat structure, the silks of G. mellonella and E. kuehniella exhibit similar tensile strength as the Bombyx and Antheraea silks. We suggest that in these latter two species, variations in the repeat length obstruct repeat alignment, but sufficiently long stretches of iterated residues get superposed to interact. In the pyralid H-fibroins, interactions of the widely separated and diverse motifs depend on the precision of repeat matching; silk is strong in G. mellonella and E. kuehniella, with 2-3 types of long homogeneous repeats, and nearly 10 times weaker in P. interpunctella, with seven types of shorter erratic repeats. The high proportion of large amino acids in the H-fibroin of pyralids has probably evolved in connection with the spinning habit of caterpillars that live in protective silk tubes and spin continuously, enlarging the tubes on one end and partly devouring the other one. The silk serves as a depot of energetically rich and essential amino acids that may be scarce in the diet. PMID:12816957

  1. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David L.; Kataeva, Irina; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  2. Microscopic residues of bone from dissolving human remains in acids.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Erwin; Zoon, Peter; van Wijk, Mayonne; Gerretsen, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Dissolving bodies is a current method of disposing of human remains and has been practiced throughout the years. During the last decade in the Netherlands, two cases have emerged in which human remains were treated with acid. In the first case, the remains of a cremated body were treated with hydrofluoric acid. In the second case, two complete bodies were dissolved in a mixture of hydrochloric and sulfuric acid. In both cases, a great variety of evidence was collected at the scene of crime, part of which was embedded in resin, polished, and investigated using SEM/EDX. Apart from macroscopic findings like residual bone and artificial teeth, in both cases, distinct microscopic residues of bone were found as follows: (partly) digested bone, thin-walled structures, and recrystallized calcium phosphate. Although some may believe it is possible to dissolve a body in acid completely, at least some of these microscopic residues will always be found. PMID:25677640

  3. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe.

  4. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method is disclosed for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe. 11 figs.

  5. The amino acid sequence of chymopapain from Carica papaya.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, D C; Yaguchi, M; Lynn, K R

    1990-01-01

    Chymopapain is a polypeptide of 218 amino acid residues. It has considerable structural similarity with papain and papaya proteinase omega, including conservation of the catalytic site and of the disulphide bonding. Chymopapain is like papaya proteinase omega in carrying four extra residues between papain positions 168 and 169, but differs from both papaya proteinases in the composition of its S2 subsite, as well as in having a second thiol group, Cys-117. Some evidence for the amino acid sequence of chymopapain has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50153 (12 pages) at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa., Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1990) 265, 5. The information comprises Supplement Tables 1-4, which contain, in order, amino acid compositions of peptides from tryptic, peptic, CNBr and mild acid cleavages, Supplement Fig. 1, showing re-fractionation of selected peaks from Fig. 2 of the main paper. Supplement Fig. 2, showing cation-exchange chromatography of the earliest-eluted peak of Fig. 3 of the main paper, Supplement Fig. 3, showing reverse-phase h.p.l.c. of the later-eluted peak from Fig. 3 of the main paper, and Supplement Fig. 4, showing the separation of peptides after mild acid hydrolysis of CNBr-cleavage fragment CB3. PMID:2106878

  6. The amino acid sequence of chymopapain from Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Watson, D C; Yaguchi, M; Lynn, K R

    1990-02-15

    Chymopapain is a polypeptide of 218 amino acid residues. It has considerable structural similarity with papain and papaya proteinase omega, including conservation of the catalytic site and of the disulphide bonding. Chymopapain is like papaya proteinase omega in carrying four extra residues between papain positions 168 and 169, but differs from both papaya proteinases in the composition of its S2 subsite, as well as in having a second thiol group, Cys-117. Some evidence for the amino acid sequence of chymopapain has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50153 (12 pages) at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa., Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1990) 265, 5. The information comprises Supplement Tables 1-4, which contain, in order, amino acid compositions of peptides from tryptic, peptic, CNBr and mild acid cleavages, Supplement Fig. 1, showing re-fractionation of selected peaks from Fig. 2 of the main paper. Supplement Fig. 2, showing cation-exchange chromatography of the earliest-eluted peak of Fig. 3 of the main paper, Supplement Fig. 3, showing reverse-phase h.p.l.c. of the later-eluted peak from Fig. 3 of the main paper, and Supplement Fig. 4, showing the separation of peptides after mild acid hydrolysis of CNBr-cleavage fragment CB3. PMID:2106878

  7. 40 CFR 180.550 - Arsanilic acid [(4-aminophenyl) arsonic acid]; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arsanilic acid ; tolerances for residues. 180.550 Section 180.550 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.550 Arsanilic acid ; tolerances...

  8. Electron microscopy of carbonaceous matter in Allende acid residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkin, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of characteristic diffuse ring diffraction patterns, much of the carbonaceous matter in a large suite of Allende acid residues has been identified as a variety of turbostratic carbon. Crystallites of this phase contain randomly stacked sp(2) hybridized carbon layers and diffraction patterns resemble those from carbon black and glassy carbon. Carbynes are probably absent, and are certainly restricted to less than 0.5% of these acid residues. The work of Ott et al. (1981) provides a basis for the possibility that turbostratic carbon is a carrier of noble gases, but an additional component - amorphous carbon - may be necessary to explain the high release temperatures of noble gases as well as the glassy character of many of the carbonaceous particles. Carbynes are considered to be questionable as important carriers of noble gases in the Allende acid residues.

  9. Methods for analyzing nucleic acid sequences

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid. The method provides a complex comprising a polymerase enzyme, a target nucleic acid molecule, and a primer, wherein the complex is immobilized on a support Fluorescent label is attached to a terminal phosphate group of the nucleotide or nucleotide analog. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The time duration of the signal from labeled nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated is distinguished from freely diffusing labels by a longer retention in the observation volume for the nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated than for the freely diffusing labels.

  10. Newly identified essential amino acid residues affecting ^8-sphingolipid desaturase activity revealed by site-directed mutagenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to identify amino acid residues crucial for the enzymatic activity of ^8-sphingolipid desaturases, a sequence comparison was performed among ^8-sphingolipid desaturases and ^6-fatty acid desaturase from various plants. In addition to the known conserved cytb5 (cytochrome b5) HPGG motif and...

  11. Structural gene and complete amino acid sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa IFO 3455 elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, J; Yamamoto, S; Morihara, K; Atsumi, Y; Takeuchi, H; Kawamoto, S; Okuda, K

    1989-01-01

    The DNA encoding the elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa IFO 3455 was cloned, and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined. When the cloned gene was ligated to pUC18, the Escherichia coli expression vector, bacteria carrying the gene exhibited high levels of both elastase activity and elastase antigens. The amino acid sequence, deduced from the nucleotide sequence, revealed that the mature elastase consisted of 301 amino acids with a relative molecular mass of 32,926 daltons. The amino acid composition predicted from the DNA sequence was quite similar to the chemically determined composition of purified elastase reported previously. We also observed nucleotide sequence encoding a signal peptide and "pro" sequence consisting of 197 amino acids upstream from the mature elastase protein gene. The amino acid sequence analysis revealed that both the N-terminal sequence of the purified elastase and the N-terminal side sequences of the C-terminal tryptic peptide as well as the internal lysyl peptide fragment were completely identical to the deduced amino acid sequences. The pattern of identity of amino acid sequences was quite evident in the regions that include structurally and functionally important residues of Bacillus subtilis thermolysin. PMID:2493453

  12. Accuracy of sequence alignment and fold assessment using reduced amino acid alphabets.

    PubMed

    Melo, Francisco; Marti-Renom, Marc A

    2006-06-01

    Reduced or simplified amino acid alphabets group the 20 naturally occurring amino acids into a smaller number of representative protein residues. To date, several reduced amino acid alphabets have been proposed, which have been derived and optimized by a variety of methods. The resulting reduced amino acid alphabets have been applied to pattern recognition, generation of consensus sequences from multiple alignments, protein folding, and protein structure prediction. In this work, amino acid substitution matrices and statistical potentials were derived based on several reduced amino acid alphabets and their performance assessed in a large benchmark for the tasks of sequence alignment and fold assessment of protein structure models, using as a reference frame the standard alphabet of 20 amino acids. The results showed that a large reduction in the total number of residue types does not necessarily translate into a significant loss of discriminative power for sequence alignment and fold assessment. Therefore, some definitions of a few residue types are able to encode most of the relevant sequence/structure information that is present in the 20 standard amino acids. Based on these results, we suggest that the use of reduced amino acid alphabets may allow to increasing the accuracy of current substitution matrices and statistical potentials for the prediction of protein structure of remote homologs. PMID:16506243

  13. Identification of essential amino acid residues of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris white kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hiramoto, S; Wato, S; Nishimoto, T; Wada, Y; Nagai, K; Yamaguchi, H

    1999-11-01

    Kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitors, which are bivalent inhibitors with the subunit stoichiometry of (alphabeta)(2) complex, have been inferred to contain unique arginine, tryptophan, and tyrosine residues essential for the inhibitory activity. To test the validity of this inference, an attempt was made to identify the essential amino acid residues of a white kidney bean (P. vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor (PHA-I) by using the chemical modification technique combined with amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. Exhaustive modification of the arginine residues by phenylglyoxal did not lead to a marked loss of activity, suggesting that no arginine residue is directly associated with the inhibitory activity. N-Bromosuccinimide treatment of PHA-I in the presence or absence of a substrate alpha-amylase revealed the involvement of two tryptophan residues in alpha-amylase inhibition, and they were identified as Trp188 of the beta-subunit by amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry of lysylendopeptidase peptides. Further, two tyrosine residues were preferentially modified either by N-acetylimidazole or by tetranitromethane, resulting in a concomitant loss of most of the PHA-I activity. Amino acid sequencing of the lysylendopeptidase peptides from a tetranitromethane-modified PHA-I identified Tyr186 of the beta-subunit as an essential residue. PMID:10544275

  14. Identification of three critical acidic residues of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase involved in catalysis: determining the PARG catalytic domain

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Chandra N.; Koh, David W.; Jacobson, Myron K.; Oliveira, Marcos A.

    2005-01-01

    PARG [poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase] catalyses the hydrolysis of α(1″→2′) or α(1‴→2″) O-glycosidic linkages of ADP-ribose polymers to produce free ADP-ribose. We investigated possible mechanistic similarities between PARG and glycosidases, which also cleave O-glycosidic linkages. Glycosidases typically utilize two acidic residues for catalysis, thus we targeted acidic residues within a conserved region of bovine PARG that has been shown to contain an inhibitor-binding site. The targeted glutamate and aspartate residues were changed to asparagine in order to minimize structural alterations. Mutants were purified and assayed for catalytic activity, as well as binding, to an immobilized PARG inhibitor to determine ability to recognize substrate. Our investigation revealed residues essential for PARG catalytic activity. Two adjacent glutamic acid residues are found in the conserved sequence Gln755-Glu-Glu757, and a third residue found in the conserved sequence Val737-Asp-Phe-Ala-Asn741. Our functional characterization of PARG residues, along with recent identification of an inhibitor-binding residue Tyr796 and a glycine-rich region Gly745-Gly-Gly747 important for PARG function, allowed us to define a PARG ‘signature sequence’ [vDFA-X3-GGg-X6–8-vQEEIRF-X3-PE-X14-E-X12-YTGYa], which we used to identify putative PARG sequences across a range of organisms. Sequence alignments, along with our mapping of PARG functional residues, suggest the presence of a conserved catalytic domain of approx. 185 residues which spans residues 610–795 in bovine PARG. PMID:15658938

  15. Lactic Acid and Biosurfactants Production from Residual Cellulose Films.

    PubMed

    Portilla Rivera, Oscar Manuel; Arzate Martínez, Guillermo; Jarquín Enríquez, Lorenzo; Vázquez Landaverde, Pedro Alberto; Domínguez González, José Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The increasing amounts of residual cellulose films generated as wastes all over the world represent a big scale problem for the meat industry regarding to environmental and economic issues. The use of residual cellulose films as a feedstock of glucose-containing solutions by acid hydrolysis and further fermentation into lactic acid and biosurfactants was evaluated as a method to diminish and revalorize these wastes. Under a treatment consisting in sulfuric acid 6% (v/v); reaction time 2 h; solid liquid ratio 9 g of film/100 mL of acid solution, and temperature 130 °C, 35 g/L of glucose and 49% of solubilized film was obtained. From five lactic acid strains, Lactobacillus plantarum was the most suitable for metabolizing the glucose generated. The process was scaled up under optimized conditions in a 2-L bioreactor, producing 3.4 g/L of biomass, 18 g/L of lactic acid, and 15 units of surface tension reduction of a buffer phosphate solution. Around 50% of the cellulose was degraded by the treatment applied, and the liqueurs generated were useful for an efficient production of lactic acid and biosurfactants using L. plantarum. Lactobacillus bacteria can efficiently utilize glucose from cellulose films hydrolysis without the need of clarification of the liqueurs. PMID:26293409

  16. Phosphate acceptor amino acid residues in structural proteins of rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, F; Tan, K B; McFalls, M L; Madore, P

    1974-07-01

    Partial acid hydrolysates of the [(32)P]phosphate- or [(3)H]serine-labeled proteins of purified vesicular stomatitis, rabies, Lagos bat, Mokola, or spring viremia of carp virions and of purified intracellular nucleocapsids of these viruses have been analyzed by paper electrophoresis for the presence of phosphorylated amino acids. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine, with the former predominant, were present in virion and nucleocapsid preparations that contained phosphoproteins. An exception was the fish rhabdovirus, which contained only phosphoserine. When vesicular stomatitis or rabies virus proteins were phosphorylated in a cell-free system by the virion-associated protein kinase and analyzed for the presence of phosphorylated amino acid residues, phosphoserine was again found to be more abundant than phosphothreonine. After in vitro protein phosphorylation, another phospho-compound, possibly a third phosphoamino acid, was detected in the partial acid hydrolysates of these viruses. PMID:4365328

  17. Search for conserved amino acid residues of the [Formula: see text]-crystallin proteins of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Shiliaev, Nikita G; Selivanova, Olga M; Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2016-04-01

    [Formula: see text]-crystallin is the major eye lens protein and a member of the small heat-shock protein (sHsp) family. [Formula: see text]-crystallins have been shown to support lens clarity by preventing the aggregation of lens proteins. We performed the bioinformatics analysis of [Formula: see text]-crystallin sequences from vertebrates to find conserved amino acid residues as the three-dimensional (3D) structure of [Formula: see text]-crystallin is not identified yet. We are the first who demonstrated that the N-terminal region is conservative along with the central domain for vertebrate organisms. We have found that there is correlation between the conserved and structured regions. Moreover, amyloidogenic regions also correspond to the structured regions. We analyzed the amino acid composition of [Formula: see text]-crystallin A and B chains. Analyzing the occurrence of each individual amino acid residue, we have found that such amino acid residues as leucine, serine, lysine, proline, phenylalanine, histidine, isoleucine, glutamic acid, and valine change their content simultaneously in A and B chains in different classes of vertebrates. Aromatic amino acids occur more often in [Formula: see text]-crystallins from vertebrates than on the average in proteins among 17 animal proteomes. We obtained that the identity between A and B chains in the mammalian group is 0.35, which is lower than the published 0.60. PMID:26972563

  18. Involvement of phylogenetically conserved acidic amino acid residues in catalysis by an oxidative DNA damage enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Lavrukhin, O V; Lloyd, R S

    2000-12-12

    Formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (Fpg) is an important bacterial base excision repair enzyme, which initiates removal of damaged purines such as the highly mutagenic 8-oxoguanine. Similar to other glycosylase/AP lyases, catalysis by Fpg is known to proceed by a nucleophilic attack by an amino group (the secondary amine of its N-terminal proline) on C1' of the deoxyribose sugar at a damaged base, which results in the departure of the base from the DNA and removal of the sugar ring by beta/delta-elimination. However, in contrast to other enzymes in this class, in which acidic amino acids have been shown to be essential for glycosyl and phosphodiester bond scission, the catalytically essential acidic residues have not been documented for Fpg. Multiple sequence alignments of conserved acidic residues in all known bacterial Fpg-like proteins revealed six conserved glutamic and aspartic acid residues. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to change glutamic and aspartic acid residues to glutamines and asparagines, respectively. While the Asp to Asn mutants had no effect on the incision activity on 8-oxoguanine-containing DNA, several of the substitutions at glutamates reduced Fpg activity on the 8-oxoguanosine DNA, with the E3Q and E174Q mutants being essentially devoid of activity. The AP lyase activity of all of the glutamic acid mutants was slightly reduced as compared to the wild-type enzyme. Sodium borohydride trapping of wild-type Fpg and its E3Q and E174Q mutants on 8-oxoguanosine or AP site containing DNA correlated with the relative activity of the mutants on either of these substrates. PMID:11106507

  19. Amino acid sequence of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) and northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Goodson, John; Beckstead, Robert B; Payne, Jason; Singh, Rakesh K; Mohan, Anand

    2015-08-15

    Myoglobin has an important physiological role in vertebrates, and as the primary sarcoplasmic pigment in meat, influences quality perception and consumer acceptability. In this study, the amino acid sequences of Japanese quail and northern bobwhite myoglobin were deduced by cDNA cloning of the coding sequence from mRNA. Japanese quail myoglobin was isolated from quail cardiac muscles, purified using ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel-filtration, and subjected to multiple enzymatic digestions. Mass spectrometry corroborated the deduced protein amino acid sequence at the protein level. Sequence analysis revealed both species' myoglobin structures consist of 153 amino acids, differing at only three positions. When compared with chicken myoglobin, Japanese quail showed 98% sequence identity, and northern bobwhite 97% sequence identity. The myoglobin in both quail species contained eight histidine residues instead of the nine present in chicken and turkey. PMID:25794748

  20. Amino acid sequence of a vitamin K-dependent Ca2+-binding peptide from bovine prothrombin.

    PubMed

    Howard, J B; Fausch, M D

    1975-08-10

    The amino acid sequence of a 31-residue peptide from bovine prothrombin has been determined. This peptide has been shown to contain the vitamin K-dependent modification required for Ca2+ binding (Nelsestuen, G. L., and Suttie, J. W. (1973) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 70, 3366-3370) and the modified amino acid, gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Nelsestuen, G. L., Zytkovicz, T., and Howard, J. B. (1974) J. Biol. Chem. 249, 6347-6350). The peptide was shown to correspond to residues 12 to 42 of prothrombin. PMID:807581

  1. The amino acid sequence of cytochrome c-555 from the methane-oxidizing bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Ambler, R P; Dalton, H; Meyer, T E; Bartsch, R G; Kamen, M D

    1986-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the cytochrome c-555 from the obligate methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus strain Bath (N.C.I.B. 11132) was determined. It is a single polypeptide chain of 96 residues, binding a haem group through the cysteine residues at positions 19 and 22, and the only methionine residue is a position 59. The sequence does not closely resemble that of any other cytochrome c that has yet been characterized. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequence of the protein has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50131 (12 pages) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies are available on prepayment. PMID:3006666

  2. Multiple Amino Acid Sequence Alignment Nitrogenase Component 1: Insights into Phylogenetics and Structure-Function Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Howard, James B.; Kechris, Katerina J.; Rees, Douglas C.; Glazer, Alexander N.

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid residues critical for a protein's structure-function are retained by natural selection and these residues are identified by the level of variance in co-aligned homologous protein sequences. The relevant residues in the nitrogen fixation Component 1 α- and β-subunits were identified by the alignment of 95 protein sequences. Proteins were included from species encompassing multiple microbial phyla and diverse ecological niches as well as the nitrogen fixation genotypes, anf, nif, and vnf, which encode proteins associated with cofactors differing at one metal site. After adjusting for differences in sequence length, insertions, and deletions, the remaining >85% of the sequence co-aligned the subunits from the three genotypes. Six Groups, designated Anf, Vnf , and Nif I-IV, were assigned based upon genetic origin, sequence adjustments, and conserved residues. Both subunits subdivided into the same groups. Invariant and single variant residues were identified and were defined as “core” for nitrogenase function. Three species in Group Nif-III, Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii, and Thermodesulfatator indicus, were found to have a seleno-cysteine that replaces one cysteinyl ligand of the 8Fe:7S, P-cluster. Subsets of invariant residues, limited to individual groups, were identified; these unique residues help identify the gene of origin (anf, nif, or vnf) yet should not be considered diagnostic of the metal content of associated cofactors. Fourteen of the 19 residues that compose the cofactor pocket are invariant or single variant; the other five residues are highly variable but do not correlate with the putative metal content of the cofactor. The variable residues are clustered on one side of the cofactor, away from other functional centers in the three dimensional structure. Many of the invariant and single variant residues were not previously recognized as potentially critical and their identification provides the bases

  3. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  4. The Chinese hamster Alu-equivalent sequence: a conserved highly repetitious, interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid sequence in mammals has a structure suggestive of a transposable element.

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, S R; Toomey, T P; Leinwand, L; Jelinek, W R

    1981-01-01

    A consensus sequence has been determined for a major interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid repeat in the genome of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO cells). This sequence is extensively homologous to (i) the human Alu sequence (P. L. Deininger et al., J. Mol. Biol., in press), (ii) the mouse B1 interspersed repetitious sequence (Krayev et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1201-1215, 1980) (iii) an interspersed repetitious sequence from African green monkey deoxyribonucleic acid (Dhruva et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:4514-4518, 1980) and (iv) the CHO and mouse 4.5S ribonucleic acid (this report; F. Harada and N. Kato, Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1273-1285, 1980). Because the CHO consensus sequence shows significant homology to the human Alu sequence it is termed the CHO Alu-equivalent sequence. A conserved structure surrounding CHO Alu-equivalent family members can be recognized. It is similar to that surrounding the human Alu and the mouse B1 sequences, and is represented as follows: direct repeat-CHO-Alu-A-rich sequence-direct repeat. A composite interspersed repetitious sequence has been identified. Its structure is represented as follows: direct repeat-residue 47 to 107 of CHO-Alu-non-Alu repetitious sequence-A-rich sequence-direct repeat. Because the Alu flanking sequences resemble those that flank known transposable elements, we think it likely that the Alu sequence dispersed throughout the mammalian genome by transposition. Images PMID:9279371

  5. Methodology for detecting residual phosphoric acid in polybenzoxazole fibers.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Su; Sieber, John; Guttman, Charles; Rice, Kirk; Flynn, Kathleen; Watson, Stephanie; Holmes, Gale

    2009-12-01

    Because of the premature failure of in-service soft-body armor containing the ballistic fiber poly[(benzo-[1,2-d:5,4-d']-benzoxazole-2,6-diyl)-1,4-phenylene] (PBO), the Office of Law Enforcement Standards (OLES) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) initiated a research program to investigate the reasons for this failure and to develop testing methodologies and protocols to ensure that these types of failures do not reoccur. In a report that focused on the stability of the benzoxazole ring that is characteristic of PBO fibers, Holmes, G. A.; Rice, K.; Snyder, C. R. J. Mater. Sci. 2006, 41, 4105-4116, showed that the benzoxazole ring was susceptible to hydrolytic degradation under acid conditions. Because of the processing conditions for the fibers, it is suspected by many researchers that residual phosphoric acid may cause degradation of the benzoxazole ring resulting in a reduction of ballistic performance. Prior to this work, no definitive data have indicated the presence of phosphoric acid since the residual phosphorus is not easily extracted and the processed fibers are known to incorporate phosphorus containing processing aids. Methods to efficiently extract phosphorus from PBO are described in this article. Further, characterization determined that the majority of the extractable phosphorus in PBO was attributed to the octyldecyl phosphate processing aid with some phosphoric acid being detected. Analysis by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of model PBO oligomers indicates that the nonextractable phosphorus is attached to the PBO polymer chain as a monoaryl phosphate ester. The response of model aryl phosphates to NaOH exposure indicates that monoaryl phosphate ester is stable to NaOH washes used in the manufacturing process to neutralize the phosphoric acid reaction medium and to extract residual phosphorus impurities. PMID:19899783

  6. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  7. Characteristics of lactic acid bacteria isolates and their effect on silage fermentation of fruit residues.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinsong; Tan, Haisheng; Cai, Yimin

    2016-07-01

    The natural lactic acid bacteria (LAB) population, chemical composition, and silage fermentation of fruit residues were studied. Eighty-two strains of LAB were isolated from fruit residues such as banana leaf and stem, pineapple peel, and papaya peel. All strains were gram-positive and catalase-negative bacteria, and they were divided into 7 groups (A-G) according to morphological and biochemical characters. Strains in groups A to F were rods, and group G was cocci. Group F produced gas from glucose; other groups did not. Groups A to C and F formed dl-lactic acid, whereas groups D, E, and G formed l-lactic acid. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and DNA-DNA hybridization analysis, groups A to G strains were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum (54.9% of the total isolates), Lactobacillus paraplantarum (3.6%), Lactobacillus nagelii (8.5%), Lactobacillus perolens (4.9%), Lactobacillus casei (11.0%), Lactobacillus fermentum (9.8%), and Enterococcus gallinarum (7.3%), respectively. Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus casei are the most frequently isolated from fruit residues as a dominant species, and they could grow at a lower pH conditions and produce more lactic acid than other isolates. Pineapple and papaya peels contained higher crude protein (11.5-13.8%) and water-soluble carbohydrate (16.8-22.4%), but lower acid detergent fiber contents (21.2 to 26.4%) than banana stems and leaves (8.2% crude protein, 42.8% acid detergent fiber, and 5.1% water-soluble carbohydrate). Compared with banana stem and leaf silages, the pineapple and papaya peel silages were well preserved with a lower pH and higher lactate content. The study suggests that the fruit residues contain excellent LAB species and abundant feed nutrients, and that they can be preserved as silage to be potential food resources for livestock. PMID:27108171

  8. Matrix genes of measles virus and canine distemper virus: cloning, nucleotide sequences, and deduced amino acid sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, W J; Englund, G; Richardson, C D; Rozenblatt, S; Lazzarini, R A

    1986-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences encoding the matrix (M) proteins of measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) were determined from cDNA clones containing these genes in their entirety. In both cases, single open reading frames specifying basic proteins of 335 amino acid residues were predicted from the nucleotide sequences. Both viral messages were composed of approximately 1,450 nucleotides and contained 400 nucleotides of presumptive noncoding sequences at their respective 3' ends. MV and CDV M-protein-coding regions were 67% homologous at the nucleotide level and 76% homologous at the amino acid level. Only chance homology was observed in the 400-nucleotide trailer sequences. Comparisons of the M protein sequences of MV and CDV with the sequence reported for Sendai virus (B. M. Blumberg, K. Rose, M. G. Simona, L. Roux, C. Giorgi, and D. Kolakofsky, J. Virol. 52:656-663; Y. Hidaka, T. Kanda, K. Iwasaki, A. Nomoto, T. Shioda, and H. Shibuta, Nucleic Acids Res. 12:7965-7973) indicated the greatest homology among these M proteins in the carboxyterminal third of the molecule. Secondary-structure analyses of this shared region indicated a structurally conserved, hydrophobic sequence which possibly interacted with the lipid bilayer. Images PMID:3754588

  9. XPS and STEM studies of Allende acid insoluble residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.; Clarke, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Data on Allende acid residues obtained both before and after etching with hot HNO3 are presented. X-ray photoelectron spectra show predominantly carbonaceous material plus Fe-deficient chromite in both cases. The HNO3 oxidizes the carbonaceous material to some extent. The small chromites in these residues have a wide range of compositions somewhat paralleling those observed in larger Allende chromites and in Murchison chromites, especially in the high Al contents; however, they are deficient in divalent cations, which makes them metastable and indicates that they must have formed at relatively low temperatures. It is suggested that they formed by precipitation of Cr(3+) and Fe(3+) from olivine at low temperature or during rapid cooling.

  10. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Amino Acid Sequence Disclosures ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures must include a copy of the sequence listing in accordance with the requirements in 37 CFR...

  11. Nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences of cloned human and mouse preprocathepsin B cDNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, S J; San Segundo, B; McCormick, M B; Steiner, D F

    1986-01-01

    Cathepsin B is a lysosomal thiol proteinase that may have additional extralysosomal functions. To further our investigations on the structure, mode of biosynthesis, and intracellular sorting of this enzyme, we have determined the complete coding sequences for human and mouse preprocathepsin B by using cDNA clones isolated from human hepatoma and kidney phage libraries. The nucleotide sequences predict that the primary structure of preprocathepsin B contains 339 amino acids organized as follows: a 17-residue NH2-terminal prepeptide sequence followed by a 62-residue propeptide region, 254 residues in mature (single chain) cathepsin B, and a 6-residue extension at the COOH terminus. A comparison of procathepsin B sequences from three species (human, mouse, and rat) reveals that the homology between the propeptides is relatively conserved with a minimum of 68% sequence identity. In particular, two conserved sequences in the propeptide that may be functionally significant include a potential glycosylation site and the presence of a single cysteine at position 59. Comparative analysis of the three sequences also suggests that processing of procathepsin B is a multistep process, during which enzymatically active intermediate forms may be generated. The availability of the cDNA clones will facilitate the identification of possible active or inactive intermediate processive forms as well as studies on the transcriptional regulation of the cathepsin B gene. PMID:3463996

  12. Chemical and isotopic compositions in acid residues from various meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kano, N.; Yamakoshi, K.; Matsuzaki, H.; Nogami, K.

    1993-01-01

    We are planning to carry out systematic isotopic investigations of Ru, Mg, etc., in primordial samples. The investigations will be pursued in the context of a study of the pre-history of the solar system. It is hoped that the study will yield direct evidence for processes of nucleosynthesis in the pre-solar stage and detection of extinct radioactive nuclides. In this paper, we present the results of chemical compositions of acid residues obtained from three types of meteorites: Canyon Diablo (IA), Allende (CV3), and Nuevo Mercuro (H5); and the preliminary results of Ru isotopic compositions.

  13. A Quantitative Tool to Distinguish Isobaric Leucine and Isoleucine Residues for Mass Spectrometry-Based De Novo Monoclonal Antibody Sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poston, Chloe N.; Higgs, Richard E.; You, Jinsam; Gelfanova, Valentina; Hale, John E.; Knierman, Michael D.; Siegel, Robert; Gutierrez, Jesus A.

    2014-07-01

    De novo sequencing by mass spectrometry (MS) allows for the determination of the complete amino acid (AA) sequence of a given protein based on the mass difference of detected ions from MS/MS fragmentation spectra. The technique relies on obtaining specific masses that can be attributed to characteristic theoretical masses of AAs. A major limitation of de novo sequencing by MS is the inability to distinguish between the isobaric residues leucine (Leu) and isoleucine (Ile). Incorrect identification of Ile as Leu or vice versa often results in loss of activity in recombinant antibodies. This functional ambiguity is commonly resolved with costly and time-consuming AA mutation and peptide sequencing experiments. Here, we describe a set of orthogonal biochemical protocols, which experimentally determine the identity of Ile or Leu residues in monoclonal antibodies (mAb) based on the selectivity that leucine aminopeptidase shows for n-terminal Leu residues and the cleavage preference for Leu by chymotrypsin. The resulting observations are combined with germline frequencies and incorporated into a logistic regression model, called Predictor for Xle Sites (PXleS) to provide a statistical likelihood for the identity of Leu at an ambiguous site. We demonstrate that PXleS can generate a probability for an Xle site in mAbs with 96% accuracy. The implementation of PXleS precludes the expression of several possible sequences and, therefore, reduces the overall time and resources required to go from spectra generation to a biologically active sequence for a mAb when an Ile or Leu residue is in question.

  14. Amino acid residue doublet propensity in the protein-RNA interface and its application to RNA interface prediction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Oanh T P; Yura, Kei; Go, Nobuhiro

    2006-01-01

    Protein-RNA interactions play essential roles in a number of regulatory mechanisms for gene expression such as RNA splicing, transport, translation and post-transcriptional control. As the number of available protein-RNA complex 3D structures has increased, it is now possible to statistically examine protein-RNA interactions based on 3D structures. We performed computational analyses of 86 representative protein-RNA complexes retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. Interface residue propensity, a measure of the relative importance of different amino acid residues in the RNA interface, was calculated for each amino acid residue type (residue singlet interface propensity). In addition to the residue singlet propensity, we introduce a new residue-based propensity, which gives a measure of residue pairing preferences in the RNA interface of a protein (residue doublet interface propensity). The residue doublet interface propensity contains much more information than the sum of two singlet propensities alone. The prediction of the RNA interface using the two types of propensities plus a position-specific multiple sequence profile can achieve a specificity of about 80%. The prediction method was then applied to the 3D structure of two mRNA export factors, TAP (Mex67) and UAP56 (Sub2). The prediction enables us to point out candidate RNA interfaces, part of which are consistent with previous experimental studies and may contribute to elucidation of atomic mechanisms of mRNA export. PMID:17130160

  15. Oxolinic acid in the trout: bioavailability and tissue residues.

    PubMed

    Archimbault, P; Ambroggi, G; Nicolas, S

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed on the serum bioavailability and tissue elimination of oxolinic acid in the trout. The compound was added to the diet and administered at a dosage-level of 12 mg/kg/day for 7 consecutive days. The study utilized an analytical technique, high performance liquid chromatography, which has been described in detail here. The results obtained demonstrate that serum concentrations higher than the MIC for the control of the target pathogens (Aeromonas and Yersinia) can by sustained throughout the treatment period. The same positive results were observed in the tissues. Besides, on the base of a tolerance level of 0.05 ppm for the residue levels of oxolinic acid in the edible tissues (muscle mass and skin), a withdrawal time of six days after interruption of the prescribed treatment can be proposed. PMID:3400972

  16. On species sampling sequences induced by residual allocation models.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Abel; Quintana, Fernando A

    2015-02-01

    We discuss fully Bayesian inference in a class of species sampling models that are induced by residual allocation (sometimes called stick-breaking) priors on almost surely discrete random measures. This class provides a generalization of the well-known Ewens sampling formula that allows for additional flexibility while retaining computational tractability. In particular, the procedure is used to derive the exchangeable predictive probability functions associated with the generalized Dirichlet process of Hjort (2000) and the probit stick-breaking prior of Chung and Dunson (2009) and Rodriguez and Dunson (2011). The procedure is illustrated with applications to genetics and nonparametric mixture modeling. PMID:25477705

  17. On species sampling sequences induced by residual allocation models

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Abel; Quintana, Fernando A.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss fully Bayesian inference in a class of species sampling models that are induced by residual allocation (sometimes called stick-breaking) priors on almost surely discrete random measures. This class provides a generalization of the well-known Ewens sampling formula that allows for additional flexibility while retaining computational tractability. In particular, the procedure is used to derive the exchangeable predictive probability functions associated with the generalized Dirichlet process of Hjort (2000) and the probit stick-breaking prior of Chung and Dunson (2009) and Rodriguez and Dunson (2011). The procedure is illustrated with applications to genetics and nonparametric mixture modeling. PMID:25477705

  18. Amino Acid Sequence of Anionic Peroxidase from the Windmill Palm Tree Trachycarpus fortunei

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Palm peroxidases are extremely stable and have uncommon substrate specificity. This study was designed to fill in the knowledge gap about the structures of a peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei. The complete amino acid sequence and partial glycosylation were determined by MALDI-top-down sequencing of native windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP), MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS of WPTP tryptic peptides, and cDNA sequencing. The propeptide of WPTP contained N- and C-terminal signal sequences which contained 21 and 17 amino acid residues, respectively. Mature WPTP was 306 amino acids in length, and its carbohydrate content ranged from 21% to 29%. Comparison to closely related royal palm tree peroxidase revealed structural features that may explain differences in their substrate specificity. The results can be used to guide engineering of WPTP and its novel applications. PMID:25383699

  19. A Soluble, Folded Protein without Charged Amino Acid Residues.

    PubMed

    Højgaard, Casper; Kofoed, Christian; Espersen, Roall; Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe; Villa, Mara; Willemoës, Martin; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Teilum, Kaare; Winther, Jakob R

    2016-07-19

    Charges are considered an integral part of protein structure and function, enhancing solubility and providing specificity in molecular interactions. We wished to investigate whether charged amino acids are indeed required for protein biogenesis and whether a protein completely free of titratable side chains can maintain solubility, stability, and function. As a model, we used a cellulose-binding domain from Cellulomonas fimi, which, among proteins of more than 100 amino acids, presently is the least charged in the Protein Data Bank, with a total of only four titratable residues. We find that the protein shows a surprising resilience toward extremes of pH, demonstrating stability and function (cellulose binding) in the pH range from 2 to 11. To ask whether the four charged residues present were required for these properties of this protein, we altered them to nontitratable ones. Remarkably, this chargeless protein is produced reasonably well in Escherichia coli, retains its stable three-dimensional structure, and is still capable of strong cellulose binding. To further deprive this protein of charges, we removed the N-terminal charge by acetylation and studied the protein at pH 2, where the C-terminus is effectively protonated. Under these conditions, the protein retains its function and proved to be both soluble and have a reversible folding-unfolding transition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a soluble, functional protein with no titratable side chains has been produced. PMID:27307139

  20. Protein chemotaxonomy. XIII. Amino acid sequence of ferredoxin from Panax ginseng.

    PubMed

    Mino, Yoshiki

    2006-08-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin from Panax ginseng (Araliaceae) has been determined by automated Edman degradation of the entire S-carboxymethylcysteinyl protein and of the peptides obtained by enzymatic digestion. This ferredoxin has a unique amino acid sequence, which includes an insertion of Tyr at the 3rd position from the amino-terminus and a deletion of two amino acid residues at the carboxyl terminus. This ferredoxin had 18 differences in its amino acid sequence compared to that of Petroselinum sativum (Umbelliferae). In contrast, 23-33 differences were observed compared to other dicotyledonous plants. This suggests that Panax ginseng is related taxonomically to umbelliferous plants. PMID:16880642

  1. Complete amino acid sequence and structure characterization of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Theerasilp, S; Hitotsuya, H; Nakajo, S; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1989-04-25

    The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of modifying sour taste into sweet taste. The complete amino acid sequence of miraculin purified from miracle fruits by a newly developed method (Theerasilp, S., and Kurihara, Y. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11536-11539) was determined by an automatic Edman degradation method. Miraculin was a single polypeptide with 191 amino acid residues. The calculated molecular weight based on the amino acid sequence and the carbohydrate content (13.9%) was 24,600. Asn-42 and Asn-186 were linked N-glycosidically to carbohydrate chains. High homology was found between the amino acid sequences of miraculin and soybean trypsin inhibitor. PMID:2708331

  2. Nucleotide and derived amino acid sequences of the major porin of Comamonas acidovorans and comparison of porin primary structures.

    PubMed Central

    Gerbl-Rieger, S; Peters, J; Kellermann, J; Lottspeich, F; Baumeister, W

    1991-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the gene which codes for the major outer membrane porin (Omp32) of Comamonas acidovorans has been determined. The structural gene encodes a precursor consisting of 351 amino acid residues with a signal peptide of 19 amino acid residues. Comparisons with amino acid sequences of outer membrane proteins and porins from several other members of the class Proteobacteria and of the Chlamydia trachomatis porin and the Neurospora crassa mitochondrial porin revealed a motif of eight regions of local homology. The results of this analysis are discussed with regard to common structural features of porins. PMID:1848840

  3. Removal of coagulant aluminum from water treatment residuals by acid.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Tetsuji; Nishijima, Wataru; Sugimoto, Mayo; Saka, Naoyuki; Nakai, Satoshi; Tanabe, Kazuyasu; Ito, Junki; Takenaka, Kenji; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2014-09-01

    Sediment sludge during coagulation and sedimentation in drinking water treatment is called "water treatment residuals (WTR)". Polyaluminum chloride (PAC) is mainly used as a coagulant in Japan. The recycling of WTR has been desired; one method for its reuse is as plowed soil. However, WTR reuse in this way is inhibited by the aluminum from the added PAC, because of its high adsorption capacity for phosphate and other fertilizer components. The removal of such aluminum from WTR would therefore be advantageous for its reuse as plowed soil; this research clarified the effect of acid washing on aluminum removal from WTR and on plant growth in the treated soil. The percentage of aluminum removal from raw WTR by sulphuric acid solution was around 90% at pH 3, the percentage decreasing to 40% in the case of a sun-dried sample. The maximum phosphate adsorption capacity was decreased and the available phosphorus was increased by acid washing, with 90% of aluminum removal. The enhancement of Japanese mustard spinach growth and the increased in plant uptake of phosphates following acid washing were observed. PMID:24835954

  4. Studies on monotreme proteins. VII. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from the platypus, Ornithoryhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W K; Thompson, E O

    1976-03-01

    Myoglobin isolated from skeletal muscle of the platypus contains 153 amino acid residues. The complete amino acid sequence has been determined following cleavage with cyanogen bromide and further digestion of the four fragments with trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin and thermolysin. Sequences of the purified peptides were determined by the dansyl-Edman procedure. The amino acid sequence showed 25 differences from human myoglobin and 24 from kangaroo myoglobin. Amino acid sequences in myoglobins are more conserved than sequences in the alpha- and beta-globin chains, and platypus myoglobin shows a similar number of variations in sequence to kangaroo myoglobin when compared with myoglobin of other species. The date of divergence of the platypus from other mammals was estimated at 102 +/- 31 million years, based on the number of amino acid differences between species and allowing for mutations during the evolutionary period. This estimate differs widely from the estimate given by similar treatment of the alpha- and beta-chain sequences and a constant rate of mutation of globin chains is not supported. PMID:962722

  5. cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of myoglobins from nine species of whales and dolphins.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, Kentaro; Mita, Hajime; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Fujise, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Tadasu; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2006-10-01

    We determined the myoglobin (Mb) cDNA sequences of nine cetaceans, of which six are the first reports of Mb sequences: sei whale (Balaenoptera borealis), Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni), pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps), Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri), Longman's beaked whale (Indopacetus pacificus), and melon-headed whale (Peponocephala electra), and three confirm the previously determined chemical amino acid sequences: sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), common minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) and pantropical spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata). We found two types of Mb in the skeletal muscle of pantropical spotted dolphin: Mb I with the same amino acid sequence as that deposited in the protein database, and Mb II, which differs at two amino acid residues compared with Mb I. Using an alignment of the amino acid or cDNA sequences of cetacean Mb, we constructed a phylogenetic tree by the NJ method. Clustering of cetacean Mb amino acid and cDNA sequences essentially follows the classical taxonomy of cetaceans, suggesting that Mb sequence data is valid for classification of cetaceans at least to the family level. PMID:16962803

  6. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  7. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2006-07-04

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  8. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  9. Complete amino acid sequence of the myoglobin from the Pacific spotted dolphin, Stenella attenuata graffmani.

    PubMed

    Jones, B N; Wang, C C; Dwulet, F E; Lehman, L D; Meuth, J L; Bogardt, R A; Gurd, F R

    1979-04-25

    The complete amino acid sequence of the major component myoglobin from the Pacific spotted dolphin, Stenella attenuata graffmani, was determined by the automated Edman degradation of several large peptides obtained by specific cleavage of the protein. The acetimidated apomyoglobin was selectively cleaved at its two methionyl residues with cyanogen bromide and at its three arginyl residues by trypsin. By subjecting four of these peptides and the apomyoglobin to automated Edman degradation, over 80% of the primary structure of the protein was obtained. The remainder of the covalent structure was determined by the sequence analysis of peptides that resulted from further digestion of the central cyanogen bromide fragment. This fragment was cleaved at its glutamyl residues with staphylococcal protease and its lysyl residues with trypsin. The action of trypsin was restricted to the lysyl residues by chemical modification of the single arginyl residue of the fragment with 1,2-cyclohexanedione. The primary structure of this myoglobin proved to be identical with that from the Atlantic bottlenosed dolphin and Pacific common dolphin but differs from the myoglobins of the killer whale and pilot whale at two positions. The above sequence identities and differences reflect the close taxonomic relationship of these five species of Cetacea. PMID:454657

  10. Complete amino acid sequence of the medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thio ester hydrolase from rat mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Randhawa, Z.I.; Smith, S.

    1987-03-10

    The complete amino acid sequence of the medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thio ester hydrolase (thioesterase II) from rat mammary gland is presented. Most of the sequence was derived by analysis of (/sup 14/C)-labelled peptide fragments produced by cleavage at methionyl, glutamyl, lysyl, arginyl, and tryptophanyl residues. A small section of the sequence was deduced from a previously analyzed cDNA clone. The protein consists of 260 residues and has a blocked amino-terminal methionine and calculated M/sub r/ of 29,212. The carboxy-terminal sequence, verified by Edman degradation of the carboxy-terminal cyanogen bromide fragment and carboxypeptidase Y digestion of the intact thioesterase II, terminates with a serine residue and lacks three additional residues predicted by the cDNA sequence. The native enzyme contains three cysteine residues but no disulfide bridges. The active site serine residue is located at position 101. The rat mammary gland thioesterase II exhibits approximately 40% homology with a thioesterase from mallard uropygial gland, the sequence of which was recently determined by cDNA analysis. Thus the two enzymes may share similar structural features and a common evolutionary origin. The location of the active site in these thioesterases differs from that of other serine active site esterases; indeed, the enzymes do not exhibit any significant homology with other serine esterases, suggesting that they may constitute a separate new family of serine active site enzymes.

  11. Solid phase sequencing of double-stranded nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Cantor, Charles R.; Koster, Hubert; Smith, Cassandra L.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing of target double-stranded nucleic acid sequences, to nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probe comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include nucleic acids in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated determination of molecular weights and identification of the target sequence.

  12. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  13. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    David J. States

    1998-08-01

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  14. SigniSite: Identification of residue-level genotype-phenotype correlations in protein multiple sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Leon Eyrich; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2013-07-01

    Identifying which mutation(s) within a given genotype is responsible for an observable phenotype is important in many aspects of molecular biology. Here, we present SigniSite, an online application for subgroup-free residue-level genotype-phenotype correlation. In contrast to similar methods, SigniSite does not require any pre-definition of subgroups or binary classification. Input is a set of protein sequences where each sequence has an associated real number, quantifying a given phenotype. SigniSite will then identify which amino acid residues are significantly associated with the data set phenotype. As output, SigniSite displays a sequence logo, depicting the strength of the phenotype association of each residue and a heat-map identifying 'hot' or 'cold' regions. SigniSite was benchmarked against SPEER, a state-of-the-art method for the prediction of specificity determining positions (SDP) using a set of human immunodeficiency virus protease-inhibitor genotype-phenotype data and corresponding resistance mutation scores from the Stanford University HIV Drug Resistance Database, and a data set of protein families with experimentally annotated SDPs. For both data sets, SigniSite was found to outperform SPEER. SigniSite is available at: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/SigniSite/. PMID:23761454

  15. The Nature of Intermolecular Interactions Between Aromatic Amino Acid Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Gervasio, Francesco; Chelli, Riccardo; Procacci, Piero; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2002-05-01

    The nature of intermolecular interactions between aromatic amino acid residues has been investigated by a combination of molecular dynamics and ab initio methods. The potential energy surface of various interacting pairs, including tryptophan, phenilalanine, and tyrosine, was scanned for determining all the relevant local minima by a combined molecular dynamics and conjugate gradient methodology with the AMBER force field. For each of these minima, single-point correlated ab initio calculations of the binding energy were performed. The agreement between empirical force field and ab initio binding energies of the minimum energy structures is excellent. Aromatic-aromatic interactions can be rationalized on the basis of electrostatic and van der Waals interactions, whereas charge transfer or polarization phenomena are small for all intermolecular complexes and, particularly, for stacked structures.

  16. Degradation of articular cartilage keratan sulphates using hydrazinolysis and nitrous acid. Environment of fucose residues.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, G M; Huckerby, T N; Morris, H G; Nieduszynski, I A

    1992-01-01

    Alkaline borohydride-reduced keratan sulphate (KS) chains from bovine articular cartilage (6-8-year-old animals) were fragmented by an anhydrous hydrazine/nitrous acid procedure, previously used on KS by Hopwood & Elliott to isolate the major disaccharides from the poly-N-acetyl-lactosamine repeat sequence [Hopwood & Elliott (1983) Carbohydr. Res. 117, 263-274]. The resulting oligosaccharides were reduced with NaB3H4 or NaBH4 and subjected to ion-exchange chromatography on a Nucleosil 5SB column. In addition to the major disaccharides, two fucose-containing oligosaccharides were examined by high-field 1H n.m.r. spectroscopy, and shown to have the following structures (where AnManOH is 2,5-anhydro-D-mannitol): [formula: see text] It is evident that the presence of fucose protects the N-acetylglucosamine residue from de-N-acetylation, and therefore fragments are produced which preserve the immediate environment of the fucose residue. It may be of biosynthetic significance that these two oligosaccharides contain an unsulphated galactose on the non-reducing side of the fucose residue. The hydrazine/nitrous acid/NaB3H4 method followed by h.p.l.c. provides a sensitive fingerprinting technique for the assay of KS composition and sub-populations. PMID:1520275

  17. 40 CFR 180.325 - 2-(m-Chlorophenoxy) propionic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 2-(m-Chlorophenoxy) propionic acid... Tolerances § 180.325 2-(m-Chlorophenoxy) propionic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance is established for negligible residues of the plant regulator 2-(m-chlorophenoxy) propionic acid from...

  18. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances... Tolerances § 180.202 p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance is established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite...

  19. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances... Tolerances § 180.202 p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance is established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite...

  20. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances... Tolerances § 180.202 p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance is established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite...

  1. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances... Tolerances § 180.202 p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance is established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite...

  2. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances... Tolerances § 180.202 p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance is established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite...

  3. Protein engineering of selected residues from conserved sequence regions of a novel Anoxybacillus α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Ranjani, Velayudhan; Janeček, Stefan; Chai, Kian Piaw; Shahir, Shafinaz; Abdul Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Kian Mau

    2014-01-01

    The α-amylases from Anoxybacillus species (ASKA and ADTA), Bacillus aquimaris (BaqA) and Geobacillus thermoleovorans (GTA, Pizzo and GtamyII) were proposed as a novel group of the α-amylase family GH13. An ASKA yielding a high percentage of maltose upon its reaction on starch was chosen as a model to study the residues responsible for the biochemical properties. Four residues from conserved sequence regions (CSRs) were thus selected, and the mutants F113V (CSR-I), Y187F and L189I (CSR-II) and A161D (CSR-V) were characterised. Few changes in the optimum reaction temperature and pH were observed for all mutants. Whereas the Y187F (t1/2 43 h) and L189I (t1/2 36 h) mutants had a lower thermostability at 65°C than the native ASKA (t1/2 48 h), the mutants F113V and A161D exhibited an improved t1/2 of 51 h and 53 h, respectively. Among the mutants, only the A161D had a specific activity, k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) higher (1.23-, 1.17- and 2.88-times, respectively) than the values determined for the ASKA. The replacement of the Ala-161 in the CSR-V with an aspartic acid also caused a significant reduction in the ratio of maltose formed. This finding suggests the Ala-161 may contribute to the high maltose production of the ASKA. PMID:25069018

  4. The Ising model for prediction of disordered residues from protein sequence alone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, Michail Yu; Galzitskaya, Oxana V.

    2011-06-01

    Intrinsically disordered regions serve as molecular recognition elements, which play an important role in the control of many cellular processes and signaling pathways. It is useful to be able to predict positions of disordered residues and disordered regions in protein chains using protein sequence alone. A new method (IsUnstruct) based on the Ising model for prediction of disordered residues from protein sequence alone has been developed. According to this model, each residue can be in one of two states: ordered or disordered. The model is an approximation of the Ising model in which the interaction term between neighbors has been replaced by a penalty for changing between states (the energy of border). The IsUnstruct has been compared with other available methods and found to perform well. The method correctly finds 77% of disordered residues as well as 87% of ordered residues in the CASP8 database, and 72% of disordered residues as well as 85% of ordered residues in the DisProt database.

  5. Studies on the high-sulphur proteins of reduced Merino wool. Amino acid sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB4

    PubMed Central

    Swart, L. S.; Haylett, T.

    1971-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB4 is presented. It is closely related to the sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB3 (Haylett, Swart & Parris, 1971) differing in only four positions. The peptic and thermolysin peptides of protein SCMKB-IIIB4 were analysed by the dansyl–Edman method (Gray, 1967) and by tritium-labelling of C-terminal residues (Matsuo, Fujimoto & Tatsuno, 1966). This protein is the third member of a group of high-sulphur wool proteins with molecular weight of about 11400. It consists of 98 residues and has acetylalanine and carboxymethylcysteine as N- and C-terminal residues respectively. PMID:4942536

  6. Self-sequencing of amino acids and origins of polyfunctional protocells.

    PubMed

    Fox, S W

    1984-01-01

    The primal role of the origins of proteins in molecular evolution is discussed. On the basis of this premise, the significance of the experimentally established self-sequencing of amino acids under simulated geological conditions is explained as due to the fact that the products are highly nonrandom and accordingly contain many kinds of information. When such thermal proteins are aggregated into laboratory protocells, an action that occurs readily, the resultant protocells also contain many kinds of information. Residue-by-residue order, enzymic activities, and lipid quality accordingly occur within each preparation of proteinoid (thermal protein). In this paper are reviewed briefly the phenomenon of self-sequencing of amino acids, its relationship to evolutionary processes, other significance of such self-ordering, and the experimental evidence for original polyfunctional protocells. PMID:6462684

  7. Self-Sequencing of Amino Acids and Origins of Polyfunctional Protocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Sidney W.

    1984-12-01

    The primal role of the origins of proteins in molecular evolution is discussed. On the basis of this premise, the significance of the experimentally established self-sequencing of amino acids under simulated geological conditions is explained as due to the fact that the products are highly nonrandom and accordingly contain many kinds of information. When such thermal proteins are aggregated into laboratory protocells, an action that occurs readily, the resultant protocells also contain many kinds of information. Residue-by-residue order, enzymic activities, and lipid quality accordingly occur within each preparation of proteinoid (thermal protein). In this paper are reviewed briefly the phenomenon of self-sequencing of amino acids, its relationship to evolutionary processes, other significance of such self-ordering, and the experimental evidence for original polyfunctional protocells.

  8. Functional role of polar amino acid residues in Na+/H+ exchangers.

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, C A; Dibattista, E R; Fliegel, L

    2001-01-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchangers are a family of ubiquitous membrane proteins. In higher eukaryotes they regulate cytosolic pH by removing an intracellular H(+) in exchange for an extracellular Na(+). In yeast and Escherichia coli, Na(+)/H(+) exchangers function in the opposite direction to remove intracellular Na(+) in exchange for extracellular H(+). Na(+)/H(+) exchangers display an internal pH-sensitivity that varies with the different antiporter types. Only recently have investigations examined the amino acids involved in pH-sensitivity and in cation binding and transport. Histidine residues are good candidates for H(+)-sensing amino acids, since they can ionize within the physiological pH range. Histidine residues have been shown to be important in the function of the E. coli Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NhaA and in the yeast Na(+)/H(+) exchanger sod2. In E. coli, His(225) of NhaA may function to interact with, or regulate, the pH-sensory region of NhaA. In sod2, His(367) is also critical to transport and may be a functional analogue of His(225) of NhaA. Histidine residues are not critical for the function of the mammalian Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, although an unusual histidine-rich sequence of the C-terminal tail has some influence on activity. Other amino acids involved in cation binding and transport by Na(+)/H(+) exchangers are only beginning to be studied. Amino acids with polar side chains such as aspartate and glutamate have been implicated in transport activity of NhaA and sod2, but have not been studied in the mammalian Na(+)/H(+) exchanger. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in pH-sensitivity and cation binding and transport by Na(+)/H(+) exchangers. PMID:11415429

  9. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, R.J.; Pittman, D.D.; Toole, J.J.; Kriz, R.W.; Aldape, R.A.; Hewick, R.M.; Kaufman, R.J.; Mann, K.G.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A)tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approx. 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approx. 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approx. 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues.

  10. Differential contribution of basic residues to HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein’s nucleic acid chaperone function and retroviral replication

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Mitra, Mithun; Naufer, M. Nabuan; McCauley, Micah J.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Williams, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid (NC) protein contains 15 basic residues located throughout its 55-amino acid sequence, as well as one aromatic residue in each of its two CCHC-type zinc finger motifs. NC facilitates nucleic acid (NA) rearrangements via its chaperone activity, but the structural basis for this activity and its consequences in vivo are not completely understood. Here, we investigate the role played by basic residues in the N-terminal domain, the N-terminal zinc finger and the linker region between the two zinc fingers. We use in vitro ensemble and single-molecule DNA stretching experiments to measure the characteristics of wild-type and mutant HIV-1 NC proteins, and correlate these results with cell-based HIV-1 replication assays. All of the cationic residue mutations lead to NA interaction defects, as well as reduced HIV-1 infectivity, and these effects are most pronounced on neutralizing all five N-terminal cationic residues. HIV-1 infectivity in cells is correlated most strongly with NC’s NA annealing capabilities as well as its ability to intercalate the DNA duplex. Although NC’s aromatic residues participate directly in DNA intercalation, our findings suggest that specific basic residues enhance these interactions, resulting in optimal NA chaperone activity. PMID:24293648

  11. From Artificial Amino Acids to Sequence-Defined Targeted Oligoaminoamides.

    PubMed

    Morys, Stephan; Wagner, Ernst; Lächelt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Artificial oligoamino acids with appropriate protecting groups can be used for the sequential assembly of oligoaminoamides on solid-phase. With the help of these oligoamino acids multifunctional nucleic acid (NA) carriers can be designed and produced in highly defined topologies. Here we describe the synthesis of the artificial oligoamino acid Fmoc-Stp(Boc3)-OH, the subsequent assembly into sequence-defined oligomers and the formulation of tumor-targeted plasmid DNA (pDNA) polyplexes. PMID:27436323

  12. The Role of HIV-1 gp41 Glycoprotein in Infectious Tropism Inferred from Physico-Chemical Properties of its Amino Acid Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, E.; Villarreal, C.; Huerta, L.; Cocho, G.

    2006-09-01

    We performed a statistical analysis of the amino acid sequence of the gp41 ectodomain of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1. We found strong correlations between physicochemical properties of highly variable residues and the viral infectious tropism.

  13. Snake venom. The amino acid sequence of protein A from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Joubert, F J; Strydom, D J

    1980-12-01

    Protein A from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom comprises 81 amino acids, including ten half-cystine residues. The complete primary structures of protein A and its variant A' were elucidated. The sequences of proteins A and A', which differ in a single position, show no homology with various neurotoxins and non-neurotoxic proteins and represent a new type of elapid venom protein. PMID:7461607

  14. SeqX: a tool to detect, analyze and visualize residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid structures

    PubMed Central

    Biro, Jan C; Fördös, Gergely

    2005-01-01

    Background The interacting residues of protein and nucleic acid sequences are close to each other – they are co-located. Structure databases (like Protein Data Bank, PDB and Nucleic Acid Data Bank, NDB) contain all information about these co-locations; however it is not an easy task to penetrate this complex information. We developed a JAVA tool, called SeqX for this purpose. Results SeqX tool is useful to detect, analyze and visualize residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid structures. The user a. selects a structure from PDB; b. chooses an atom that is commonly present in every residues of the nucleic acid and/or protein structure(s) c. defines a distance from these atoms (3–15 Å). The SeqX tool detects every residue that is located within the defined distances from the defined "backbone" atom(s); provides a DotPlot-like visualization (Residues Contact Map), and calculates the frequency of every possible residue pairs (Residue Contact Table) in the observed structure. It is possible to exclude +/- 1 to 10 neighbor residues in the same polymeric chain from detection, which greatly improves the specificity of detections (up to 60% when tested on dsDNA). Results obtained on protein structures showed highly significant correlations with results obtained from literature (p < 0.0001, n = 210, four different subsets). The co-location frequency of physico-chemically compatible amino acids is significantly higher than is calculated and expected in random protein sequences (p < 0.0001, n = 80). Conclusion The tool is simple and easy to use and provides a quick and reliable visualization and analyses of residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid structures. Availability and requirements SeqX, Java J2SE Runtime Environment 5.0 (available from [see Additional file 1] ) and at least a 1 GHz processor and with a minimum 256 Mb RAM. Source codes are available from the authors. PMID:16011796

  15. Cropping sequence and nitrogen fertilization impact on surface residue, soil carbon sequestration, and crop yields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information is needed on the effect of management practices on soil C storage for obtaining C credit. The effects of tillage, cropping sequence, and N fertilization were evaluated on dryland crop and surface residue C and soil organic C (SOC) at the 0-120 cm depth in a Williams loam from 2006 to 201...

  16. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... established for the combined residues, free and conjugated, of the herbicide MCPB, 4-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following...

  17. Snake venom toxins. The amino acid sequence of toxin Vi2, a homologue of pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Strydom, D J

    1977-04-25

    The amino acid sequence of venom component Vi2, a protein of low toxicity from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom was determined by automatic sequence analysis in combination with sequence studies on tryptic peptides. This protein, the most retarded fraction of this venom on a cation-exchange resin, is a homologue of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor consisting of a single chain of 57 amino acid residues containing six half-cystine residues. The active site lysyl residue of bovine trypsin inhibitor is conserved in Vi2 although large differences are found in the rest of the molecule. PMID:857902

  18. Estimation of Position Specific Energy as a Feature of Protein Residues from Sequence Alone for Structural Classification.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Sumaiya; Hoque, Md Tamjidul

    2016-01-01

    A set of features computed from the primary amino acid sequence of proteins, is crucial in the process of inducing a machine learning model that is capable of accurately predicting three-dimensional protein structures. Solutions for existing protein structure prediction problems are in need of features that can capture the complexity of molecular level interactions. With a view to this, we propose a novel approach to estimate position specific estimated energy (PSEE) of a residue using contact energy and predicted relative solvent accessibility (RSA). Furthermore, we demonstrate PSEE can be reasonably estimated based on sequence information alone. PSEE is useful in identifying the structured as well as unstructured or, intrinsically disordered region of a protein by computing favorable and unfavorable energy respectively, characterized by appropriate threshold. The most intriguing finding, verified empirically, is the indication that the PSEE feature can effectively classify disorder versus ordered residues and can segregate different secondary structure type residues by computing the constituent energies. PSEE values for each amino acid strongly correlate with the hydrophobicity value of the corresponding amino acid. Further, PSEE can be used to detect the existence of critical binding regions that essentially undergo disorder-to-order transitions to perform crucial biological functions. Towards an application of disorder prediction using the PSEE feature, we have rigorously tested and found that a support vector machine model informed by a set of features including PSEE consistently outperforms a model with an identical set of features with PSEE removed. In addition, the new disorder predictor, DisPredict2, shows competitive performance in predicting protein disorder when compared with six existing disordered protein predictors. PMID:27588752

  19. Detecting frame shifts by amino acid sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Claverie, J M

    1993-12-20

    Various amino acid substitution scoring matrices are used in conjunction with local alignments programs to detect regions of similarity and infer potential common ancestry between proteins. The usual scoring schemes derive from the implicit hypothesis that related proteins evolve from a common ancestor by the accumulation of point mutations and that amino acids tend to be progressively substituted by others with similar properties. However, other frequent single mutation events, like nucleotide insertion or deletion and gene inversion, change the translation reading frame and cause previously encoded amino acid sequences to become unrecognizable at once. Here, I derive five new types of scoring matrix, each capable of detecting a specific frame shift (deletion, insertion and inversion in 3 frames) and use them with a regular local alignments program to detect amino acid sequences that may have derived from alternative reading frames of the same nucleotide sequence. Frame shifts are inferred from the sole comparison of the protein sequences. The five scoring matrices were used with the BLASTP program to compare all the protein sequences in the Swissprot database. Surprisingly, the searches revealed hundreds of highly significant frame shift matches, of which many are likely to represent sequencing errors. Others provide some evidence that frame shift mutations might be used in protein evolution as a way to create new amino acid sequences from pre-existing coding regions. PMID:7903399

  20. 40 CFR 180.155 - 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for residues. 180.155 Section 180.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Tolerances § 180.155 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are... Avocado 0.05 12/31/12 (c) Tolerances with regional registrations. (d) Indirect or inadvertent residues....

  1. Radiolytic Modification and Reactivity of Amino Acid Residues Serving as Structural Probes for Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical-mediated protein footprinting is a convenient and sensitive technique for mapping solvent-accessible surfaces of proteins and examining the structure and dynamics of biological assemblies. In this study, the reactivities and tendencies to form easily detectible products for all 20 (common) amino acid side chains along with cystine are directly compared using various standards. Although we have previously reported on the oxidation of many of these residues, this study includes a detailed examination of the less reactive residues and better defines their usefulness in hydroxyl radical-mediated footprinting experiments. All 20 amino amides along with cystine and a few tripeptides were irradiated by -rays, the products were analyzed by electrospray mass spectrometry, and rate constants of modification were measured. The reactivities of amino acid side chains were compared based on their loss of mass spectral signal normalized to the rate of loss for Phe or Pro that were radiolyzed simultaneously to serve as internal standards. In this way, accurate quantitation of relative rates could be assured. A reactivity order of amino acid side chains was obtained as Cys > Met > Trp > Tyr > Phe > cystine > His > Leu, Ile > Arg, Lys, Val > Ser, Thr, Pro > Gln, Glu > Asp, Asn > Ala > Gly. Ala and Gly are far too unreactive to be useful probes in typical experiments and Asp and Asn are unlikely to be useful as well. Although Ser and Thr are more reactive than Pro, which is known to be a useful probe, their oxidation products are not easily detectible. Thus, it appears that 14 of the 20 side chains (plus cystine) are most likely to be useful in typical experiments. Since these residues comprise 65% of the sequence of a typical protein, the footprinting approach provides excellent coverage of the side-chain reactivity for proteins.

  2. Segments of amino acid sequence similarity in beta-amylases.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, F; Rhodes, C

    1988-01-01

    In alpha-amylases from animals, plants and bacteria and in beta-amylases from plants and bacteria a number of segments exhibit amino acid sequence similarity specific to the alpha or to the beta type, respectively. In the case of the beta-amylases the similar sequence regions are extensive and they are disrupted only by short interspersed dissimilar regions. Close to the C terminus, however, no such sequence similarity exist. PMID:2464171

  3. Investigation of a substrate-specifying residue within Papaver somniferum and Catharanthus roseus aromatic amino acid decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Torrens-Spence, Michael P; Lazear, Michael; von Guggenberg, Renee; Ding, Haizhen; Li, Jianyong

    2014-10-01

    Plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs) catalyze the decarboxylation of aromatic amino acids with either benzene or indole rings. Because the substrate selectivity of AAADs is intimately related to their physiological functions, primary sequence data and their differentiation could provide significant physiological insights. However, due to general high sequence identity, plant AAAD substrate specificities have been difficult to identify through primary sequence comparison. In this study, bioinformatic approaches were utilized to identify several active site residues within plant AAAD enzymes that may impact substrate specificity. Next a Papaver somniferum tyrosine decarboxylase (TyDC) was selected as a model to verify our putative substrate-dictating residues through mutation. Results indicated that mutagenesis of serine 372 to glycine enables the P. somniferum TyDC to use 5-hydroxytryptophan as a substrate, and reduces the enzyme activity toward 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (dopa). Additionally, the reverse mutation in a Catharanthus roseus tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) enables the mutant enzyme to utilize tyrosine and dopa as substrates with a reduced affinity toward tryptophan. Molecular modeling and molecular docking of the P. somniferum TyDC and the C. roseus TDC enzymes provided a structural basis to explain alterations in substrate specificity. Identification of an active site residue that impacts substrate selectivity produces a primary sequence identifier that may help differentiate the indolic and phenolic substrate specificities of individual plant AAADs. PMID:25107664

  4. Pyrolytic characteristics of biomass acid hydrolysis residue rich in lignin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanqin; Wei, Zhiguo; Yin, Xiuli; Wu, Chuangzhi

    2012-01-01

    Pyrolytic characteristics of acid hydrolysis residue (AHR) of corncob and pinewood (CAHR, WAHR) were investigated using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a self-designed pyrolysis apparatus. Gasification reactivity of CAHR char was then examined using TGA and X-ray diffractometer. Result of TGA showed that thermal degradation curves of AHR descended smoothly along with temperature increasing from 150 °C to 850 °C, while a "sharp mass loss stage" for original biomass feedstock (OBF) was observed. Char yield from AHR (42.64-30.35 wt.%) was found to be much greater than that from OBF (26.4-19.15 wt.%). In addition, gasification reactivity of CAHR char was lower than that of corncob char, and there was big difference in micro-crystallite structure. It was also found that CAHR char reactivity decreased with pyrolysis temperature, but increased with pyrolysis heating rate and gasification temperature at 850-950 °C. Furthermore, CAHR char reactivity performed better under steam atmosphere than under CO2 atmosphere. PMID:22055106

  5. Oxidation in Acidic Medium of Lignins from Agricultural Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labat, Gisele Aparecida Amaral; Gonçalves, Adilson Roberto

    Agricultural residues as sugarcane straw and bagasse are burned in boilers for generation of energy in sugar and alcohol industries. However, excess of those by-products could be used to obtain products with higher value. Pulping process generates cellulosic pulps and lignin. The lignin could be oxidized and applied in effluent treatments for heavy metal removal. Oxidized lignin presents very strong chelating properties. Lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse were obtained by ethanol-water pulping. Oxidation of lignins was carried out using acetic acid and Co/Mn/Br catalytical system at 50, 80, and 115 °C for 5 h. Kinetics of the reaction was accomplished by measuring the UV-visible region. Activation energy was calculated for lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse (34.2 and 23.4 kJ mol-1, respectively). The first value indicates higher cross-linked formation. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy data of samples collected during oxidation are very similar. Principal component analysis applied to spectra shows only slight structure modifications in lignins after oxidation reaction.

  6. The amino acid sequence of Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) and golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) egg-white lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Kuramoto, M; Torikata, T

    1990-09-01

    The amino acids of Lady Amherst's pheasant and golden pheasant egg-white lysozymes have been sequenced. The carboxymethylated lysozymes were digested with trypsin followed by sequencing of the tryptic peptides. Lady Amherst's pheasant lysozyme proved to consist of 129 amino acid residues, and a relative molecular mass of 14,423 Da was calculated. This lysozyme had 6 amino acids substitutions when compared with hen egg-white lysozyme: Phe3 to Tyr, His15 to Leu, Gln41 to His, Asn77 to His, Gln 121 to Asn, and a newly found substitution of Ile124 to Thr. The amino acid sequence of golden pheasant lysozyme was identical to that of Lady Amherst's phesant lysozyme. The phylogenetic tree constructured by the comparison of amino acid sequences of phasianoid birds lysozymes revealed a minimum genetic distance between these pheasants and the turkey-peafowl group. PMID:1368578

  7. Properties of nanocellulose isolated from corncob residue using sulfuric acid, formic acid, oxidative and mechanical methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Li, Bin; Du, Haishun; Lv, Dong; Zhang, Yuedong; Yu, Guang; Mu, Xindong; Peng, Hui

    2016-10-20

    In this work, nanocellulose was extracted from bleached corncob residue (CCR), an underutilized lignocellulose waste from furfural industry, using four different methods (i.e. sulfuric acid hydrolysis, formic acid (FA) hydrolysis, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation, and pulp refining, respectively). The self-assembled structure, morphology, dimension, crystallinity, chemical structure and thermal stability of prepared nanocellulose were investigated. FA hydrolysis produced longer cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) than the one obtained by sulfuric acid hydrolysis, and resulted in high crystallinity and thermal stability due to its preferential degradation of amorphous cellulose and lignin. The cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) with fine and individualized structure could be isolated by TEMPO-mediated oxidation. In comparison with other nanocellulose products, the intensive pulp refining led to the CNFs with the longest length and the thickest diameter. This comparative study can help to provide an insight into the utilization of CCR as a potential source for nanocellulose production. PMID:27474618

  8. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  9. Partner-Aware Prediction of Interacting Residues in Protein-Protein Complexes from Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shandar; Mizuguchi, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Computational prediction of residues that participate in protein-protein interactions is a difficult task, and state of the art methods have shown only limited success in this arena. One possible problem with these methods is that they try to predict interacting residues without incorporating information about the partner protein, although it is unclear how much partner information could enhance prediction performance. To address this issue, the two following comparisons are of crucial significance: (a) comparison between the predictability of inter-protein residue pairs, i.e., predicting exactly which residue pairs interact with each other given two protein sequences; this can be achieved by either combining conventional single-protein predictions or making predictions using a new model trained directly on the residue pairs, and the performance of these two approaches may be compared: (b) comparison between the predictability of the interacting residues in a single protein (irrespective of the partner residue or protein) from conventional methods and predictions converted from the pair-wise trained model. Using these two streams of training and validation procedures and employing similar two-stage neural networks, we showed that the models trained on pair-wise contacts outperformed the partner-unaware models in predicting both interacting pairs and interacting single-protein residues. Prediction performance decreased with the size of the conformational change upon complex formation; this trend is similar to docking, even though no structural information was used in our prediction. An example application that predicts two partner-specific interfaces of a protein was shown to be effective, highlighting the potential of the proposed approach. Finally, a preliminary attempt was made to score docking decoy poses using prediction of interacting residue pairs; this analysis produced an encouraging result. PMID:22194998

  10. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... acids are not intended to be embraced by this definition. Any amino acid sequence that contains post-translationally modified amino acids may be described as the amino acid sequence that is initially translated... sequence of four or more amino acids or an unbranched sequence of ten or more nucleotides....

  11. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... acids are not intended to be embraced by this definition. Any amino acid sequence that contains post-translationally modified amino acids may be described as the amino acid sequence that is initially translated... sequence of four or more amino acids or an unbranched sequence of ten or more nucleotides....

  12. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... acids are not intended to be embraced by this definition. Any amino acid sequence that contains post-translationally modified amino acids may be described as the amino acid sequence that is initially translated... sequence of four or more amino acids or an unbranched sequence of ten or more nucleotides....

  13. The amino-acid sequence of leghemoglobin component a from Phaseolus vulgaris (kidney bean).

    PubMed

    Lehtovaara, P; Ellfolk, N

    1975-06-01

    1. Leghemoglobin component a from Phaseolus vulgaris (kidney bean) was digested with trypsin; 15 tryptic peptides and free lysine were purified and the amino acid sequences of the peptides determined. 2. The internal order of the tryptic peptides was determined by the bridge peptides obtained from the thermolytic digest and the dilute acid hydrolyzate of kidney bean leghemoglobin a; 12 thermolytic peptides and two acid hydrolysis peptides were purified and the sequences were partially or completely determined. 3. The complete amino acid sequence of kidney bean leghemoglobin a is compared to that of leghemoglobin a from soybean (Glycine max) and to some animal globins. As regards sequence, the kidney bean globin has 79% identity with the soybean globin and 21% identity with human hemoglobin gamma-chain. Seven of the 14 amino acid residues common to most globins are found in the kidney bean globin. Trp-15 and Tyr-145 are evolutionarily conserved in this globin, which confirms the concept of a common origin of animal and plant globins. PMID:809270

  14. Chemical fragmentation by o-iodosobenzoic acid of. cap alpha. -chain of histidine decarboxylase from Micrococcus sp. n. at tryptophan residues

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseeva, E.A.; Grebenshchikova, O.G.; Prozorovskii, V.N.

    1987-02-10

    The carboxymethylated ..cap alpha..-chain of histidine decarboxylase from Micrococcus sp. n., which contains four tryptophan residues, was cleaved by o-iodosobenzoic acid. Five fragments were isolated in homogeneous form by means of gel filtration on Sephadex, rechromatography, and high-voltage paper electrophoresis. The molecular weight, amino acid composition, and N-terminal amino acid sequence were determined for all the peptides isolated.

  15. Identification of amino acid residues that determine the substrate specificity of mammalian membrane-bound front-end fatty acid desaturases.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kenshi; Ohno, Makoto; Taguchi, Masahiro; Kawamoto, Seiji; Ono, Kazuhisa; Aki, Tsunehiro

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-bound desaturases are physiologically and industrially important enzymes that are involved in the production of diverse fatty acids such as polyunsaturated fatty acids and their derivatives. Here, we identified amino acid residues that determine the substrate specificity of rat Δ6 desaturase (D6d) acting on linoleoyl-CoA by comparing its amino acid sequence with that of Δ5 desaturase (D5d), which converts dihomo-γ-linolenoyl-CoA. The N-terminal cytochrome b5-like domain was excluded as a determinant by domain swapping analysis. Substitution of eight amino acid residues (Ser209, Asn211, Arg216, Ser235, Leu236, Trp244, Gln245, and Val344) of D6d with the corresponding residues of D5d by site-directed mutagenesis switched the substrate specificity from linoleoyl-CoA to dihomo-γ-linolenoyl-CoA. In addition, replacement of Leu323 of D6d with Phe323 on the basis of the amino acid sequence of zebra fish Δ5/6 bifunctional desaturase was found to render D6d bifunctional. Homology modeling of D6d using recent crystal structure data of human stearoyl-CoA (Δ9) desaturase revealed that Arg216, Trp244, Gln245, and Leu323 are located near the substrate-binding pocket. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the structural basis of the substrate specificity of a mammalian front-end fatty acid desaturase, which will aid in efficient production of value-added fatty acids. PMID:26590171

  16. The complete amino acid sequence of the A-chain of human plasma alpha 2HS-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Y; Gejyo, F; Marti, T; Rickli, E E; Bürgi, W; Offner, G D; Troxler, R F; Schmid, K

    1986-02-01

    Normal human plasma alpha 2HS-glycoprotein has earlier been shown to be comprised of two polypeptide chains. Recently, the amino acid and carbohydrate sequences of the short chain were elucidated (Gejyo, F., Chang, J.-L., Bürgi, W., Schmid, K., Offner, G. D., Troxler, R.F., van Halbeck, H., Dorland, L., Gerwig, G. J., and Vliegenthart, J.F.G. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 4966-4971). In the present study, the amino acid sequence of the long chain of this protein, designated A-chain, was determined and found to consist of 282 amino acid residues. Twenty-four amino acid doublets were found; the most abundant of these are Pro-Pro and Ala-Ala which each occur five times. Of particular interest is the presence of three Gly-X-Pro and one Gly-Pro-X sequences that are characteristic of the repeating sequences of collagens. Chou-Fasman evaluation of the secondary structure suggested that the A-chain contains 29% alpha-helix, 24% beta-pleated sheet, and 26% reverse turns and, thus, approximately 80% of the polypeptide chain may display ordered structure. Four glycosylation sites were identified. The two N-glycosidic oligosaccharides were found in the center region (residues 138 and 158), whereas the two O-glycosidic heterosaccharides, both linked to threonine (residues 238 and 252), occur within the carboxyl-terminal region. The N-glycans are linked to Asn residues in beta-turns, while the O-glycans are located in short random segments. Comparison of the sequence of the amino- and carboxyl-terminal 30 residues with protein sequences in a data bank demonstrated that the A-chain is not significantly related to any known proteins. However, the proline-rich carboxyl-terminal region of the A-chain displays some sequence similarity to collagens and the collagen-like domains of complement subcomponent C1q. PMID:3944104

  17. Amino acid sequence of mouse nidogen, a multidomain basement membrane protein with binding activity for laminin, collagen IV and cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, K; Deutzmann, R; Aumailley, M; Timpl, R; Raimondi, L; Yamada, Y; Pan, T C; Conway, D; Chu, M L

    1989-01-01

    The whole amino acid sequence of nidogen was deduced from cDNA clones isolated from expression libraries and confirmed to approximately 50% by Edman degradation of peptides. The protein consists of some 1217 amino acid residues and a 28-residue signal peptide. The data support a previously proposed dumb-bell model of nidogen by demonstrating a large N-terminal globular domain (641 residues), five EGF-like repeats constituting the rod-like domain (248 residues) and a smaller C-terminal globule (328 residues). Two more EGF-like repeats interrupt the N-terminal and terminate the C-terminal sequences. Weak sequence homologies (25%) were detected between some regions of nidogen, the LDL receptor, thyroglobulin and the EGF precursor. Nidogen contains two consensus sequences for tyrosine sulfation and for asparagine beta-hydroxylation, two N-linked carbohydrate acceptor sites and, within one of the EGF-like repeats an Arg-Gly-Asp sequence. The latter was shown to be functional in cell attachment to nidogen. Binding sites for laminin and collagen IV are present on the C-terminal globule but not yet precisely localized. Images PMID:2496973

  18. A method to find palindromes in nucleic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Anjana, Ramnath; Shankar, Mani; Vaishnavi, Marthandan Kirti; Sekar, Kanagaraj

    2013-01-01

    Various types of sequences in the human genome are known to play important roles in different aspects of genomic functioning. Among these sequences, palindromic nucleic acid sequences are one such type that have been studied in detail and found to influence a wide variety of genomic characteristics. For a nucleotide sequence to be considered as a palindrome, its complementary strand must read the same in the opposite direction. For example, both the strands i.e the strand going from 5' to 3' and its complementary strand from 3' to 5' must be complementary. A typical nucleotide palindromic sequence would be TATA (5' to 3') and its complimentary sequence from 3' to 5' would be ATAT. Thus, a new method has been developed using dynamic programming to fetch the palindromic nucleic acid sequences. The new method uses less memory and thereby it increases the overall speed and efficiency. The proposed method has been tested using the bacterial (3891 KB bases) and human chromosomal sequences (Chr-18: 74366 kb and Chr-Y: 25554 kb) and the computation time for finding the palindromic sequences is in milli seconds. PMID:23515654

  19. Chlorine residuals and haloacetic acid reduction in rapid sand filtration.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yi-Hsueh; Wang, Gen-Shuch; Tung, Hsin-hsin

    2011-11-01

    It is quite rare to find biodegradation in rapid sand filtration for drinking water treatment. This might be due to frequent backwashes and low substrate levels. High chlorine concentrations may inhibit biofilm development, especially for plants with pre-chlorination. However, in tropical or subtropical regions, bioactivity on the sand surface may be quite significant due to high biofilm development--a result of year-round high temperature. The objective of this study is to explore the correlation between biodegradation and chlorine concentration in rapid sand filters, especially for the water treatment plants that practise pre-chlorination. In this study, haloacetic acid (HAA) biodegradation was found in conventional rapid sand filters practising pre-chlorination. Laboratory column studies and field investigations were conducted to explore the association between the biodegradation of HAAs and chlorine concentrations. The results showed that chlorine residual was an important factor that alters bioactivity development. A model based on filter influent and effluent chlorine was developed for determining threshold chlorine for biodegradation. From the model, a temperature independent chlorine concentration threshold (Cl(threshold)) for biodegradation was estimated at 0.46-0.5mgL(-1). The results imply that conventional filters with adequate control could be conducive to bioactivity, resulting in lower HAA concentrations. Optimizing biodegradable disinfection by-product removal in conventional rapid sand filter could be achieved with minor variation and a lower-than-Cl(threshold) influent chlorine concentration. Bacteria isolation was also carried out, successfully identifying several HAA degraders. These degraders are very commonly seen in drinking water systems and can be speculated as the main contributor of HAA loss. PMID:21974919

  20. The acid lability of the glycosidic bonds of L-iduronic acid residues in glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, H E

    1980-01-01

    Heparan sulphate, heparin and dermatan sulphate were hydrolysed in 0.5M-H2SO4 at 100 degrees C. At intervals portions of the hydrolysate were removed and treated with HNO2 at pH 4.0 to cleave the glycosidic bonds of the N-unsubstituted hexosamine residues and to convert both free and combined hexosamines into anhydrohexoses. These hydrolysis/deamination mixtures were reduced with NaB3H4 and analysed by radiochromatography for alpha-L-iduronosylanhydrohexose, beta-D-glucuronosylanhydrohexose, and the free uronic acids and anhydrohexose. These data gave a kinetic profile of the cleavage of the alpha-L-iduronosyl and the beta-D-glucuronosyl bonds in these glycosaminoglycans. The beta-D-glucuronosyl bonds showed the expected resistance to acid hydrolysis, but the alpha-L-iduronosyl bonds were found to be as labile to acid as some neutral sugar glycosides. This unusual lability of alpha-D-iduronosyl-anhydromannitol and beta-D-glucuronosylanhydromannitol. The procedures used to follow the kinetics of glycosaminoglycan hydrolysis can also be sued to obtain quantitative analyses of L-iduronic acid, D-glucuronic acid and hexosamine in these polymers. PMID:6453583

  1. Amino acid sequence analysis and characterization of a ribonuclease from starfish Asterias amurensis.

    PubMed

    Motoyoshi, Naomi; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Itagaki, Tadashi; Inokuchi, Norio

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to phylogenetically characterize the location of the RNase T2 enzyme in the starfish (Asterias amurensis). We isolated an RNase T2 ribonuclease (RNase Aa) from the ovaries of starfish and determined its amino acid sequence by protein chemistry and cloning cDNA encoding RNase Aa. The isolated protein had 231 amino acid residues, a predicted molecular mass of 25,906 Da, and an optimal pH of 5.0. RNase Aa preferentially released guanylic acid from the RNA. The catalytic sites of the RNase T2 family are conserved in RNase Aa; furthermore, the distribution of the cysteine residues in RNase Aa is similar to that in other animal and plant T2 RNases. RNase Aa is cleaved at two points: 21 residues from the N-terminus and 29 residues from the C-terminus; however, both fragments may remain attached to the protein via disulfide bridges, leading to the maintenance of its conformation, as suggested by circular dichroism spectrum analysis. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that starfish RNase Aa is evolutionarily an intermediate between protozoan and oyster RNases. PMID:26920046

  2. Amplification of residual DNA sequences in sterile bronchoscopes leading to false-positive PCR results.

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, K; Luke, S; McGurn, C; Snowden, N; Monti, C; Fry, W A

    1996-01-01

    PCR has been used successfully for the direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in uncultured patient samples. Its potential is hindered by the risk of false-positive results as a result of either amplicon carryover of cross-contamination between patient samples. In the present study, we investigated whether residual amplifiable human or M. tuberculosis DNA could remain in sterile bronchoscopes and potentially be a cause of false-positive PCR results in subsequent patient samples. Sterilized bronchoscopes were flushed with sterile saline, and the collected eluate was submitted for PCR amplification of IS6110 sequences and exon 8 of the human p53 gene. Of a total of 55 washes of sterile bronchoscopes from two institutions, 2 (3.6%) contained amplifiable M. tuberculosis DNA and 11 (20%) contained residual human DNA. These findings indicate that residual DNA can remain in sterilized bronchoscopes and can be a source of false-positive PCR results. PMID:8818888

  3. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  4. PDP-CON: prediction of domain/linker residues in protein sequences using a consensus approach.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Basu, Subhadip; Zubek, Julian; Kundu, Mahantapas; Nasipuri, Mita; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-04-01

    The prediction of domain/linker residues in protein sequences is a crucial task in the functional classification of proteins, homology-based protein structure prediction, and high-throughput structural genomics. In this work, a novel consensus-based machine-learning technique was applied for residue-level prediction of the domain/linker annotations in protein sequences using ordered/disordered regions along protein chains and a set of physicochemical properties. Six different classifiers-decision tree, Gaussian naïve Bayes, linear discriminant analysis, support vector machine, random forest, and multilayer perceptron-were exhaustively explored for the residue-level prediction of domain/linker regions. The protein sequences from the curated CATH database were used for training and cross-validation experiments. Test results obtained by applying the developed PDP-CON tool to the mutually exclusive, independent proteins of the CASP-8, CASP-9, and CASP-10 databases are reported. An n-star quality consensus approach was used to combine the results yielded by different classifiers. The average PDP-CON accuracy and F-measure values for the CASP targets were found to be 0.86 and 0.91, respectively. The dataset, source code, and all supplementary materials for this work are available at https://cmaterju.org/cmaterbioinfo/ for noncommercial use. PMID:26969678

  5. Acidic Residues in the Hfq Chaperone Increase the Selectivity of sRNA Binding and Annealing.

    PubMed

    Panja, Subrata; Santiago-Frangos, Andrew; Schu, Daniel J; Gottesman, Susan; Woodson, Sarah A

    2015-11-01

    Hfq facilitates gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), thereby affecting bacterial attributes such as biofilm formation and virulence. Escherichia coli Hfq recognizes specific U-rich and AAN motifs in sRNAs and target mRNAs, after which an arginine patch on the rim promotes base pairing between their complementary sequences. In the cell, Hfq must discriminate between many similar RNAs. Here, we report that acidic amino acids lining the sRNA binding channel between the inner pore and rim of the Hfq hexamer contribute to the selectivity of Hfq's chaperone activity. RNase footprinting, in vitro binding and stopped-flow fluorescence annealing assays showed that alanine substitution of D9, E18 or E37 strengthened RNA interactions with the rim of Hfq and increased annealing of non-specific or U-tailed RNA oligomers. Although the mutants were less able than wild-type Hfq to anneal sRNAs with wild-type rpoS mRNA, the D9A mutation bypassed recruitment of Hfq to an (AAN)4 motif in rpoS, both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that acidic residues normally modulate access of RNAs to the arginine patch. We propose that this selectivity limits indiscriminate target selection by E. coli Hfq and enforces binding modes that favor genuine sRNA and mRNA pairs. PMID:26196441

  6. Soil Organic Matter Quality of an Oxisol Affected by Plant Residues and Crop Sequence under No-Tillage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cora, Jose; Marcelo, Adolfo

    2013-04-01

    Plant residues are considered the primarily resource for soil organic matter (SOM) formation and the amounts and properties of plant litter are important controlling factors for the SOM quality. We determined the amounts, quality and decomposition rate of plant residues and the effects of summer and winter crop sequences on soil organic C (TOC) content, both particulate organic C (POC) and mineral-associated organic C (MOC) pools and humic substances in a Brazilian Rhodic Eutrudox soil under a no-tillage system. The organic C analysis in specifics pools used in this study was effective and should be adopted in tropical climates to evaluate the soil quality and the sustainability of various cropping systems. Continuous growth of soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) on summer provided higher contents of soil POC and continuous growth of maize (Zea mays L.) provided higher soil humic acid and MOC contents. Summer soybean-maize rotation provided the higher plant diversity, which likely improved the soil microbial activity and the soil organic C consumption. The winter sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.), pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp), oilseed radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum (L.) Leeke) enhanced the soil MOC, a finding that is attributable to the higher N content of the crop residue. Sunn hemp and pigeon pea provided the higher soil POC content. Sunn hemp showed better performance and positive effects on the SOM quality, making it a suitable winter crop choice for tropical conditions with a warm and dry winter.

  7. D-amino acid residue in a defensin-like peptide from platypus venom: effect on structure and chromatographic properties.

    PubMed

    Torres, Allan M; Tsampazi, Chryssanthi; Geraghty, Dominic P; Bansal, Paramjit S; Alewood, Paul F; Kuchel, Philip W

    2005-10-15

    The recent discovery that the natriuretic peptide OvCNPb (Ornithorhynchus venom C-type natriuretic peptide B) from platypus (Ornithorynchus anatinus) venom contains a D-amino acid residue suggested that other D-amino-acid-containing peptides might be present in the venom. In the present study, we show that DLP-2 (defensin-like peptide-2), a 42-amino-acid residue polypeptide in the platypus venom, also contains a D-amino acid residue, D-methionine, at position 2, while DLP-4, which has an identical amino acid sequence, has all amino acids in the L-form. These findings were supported further by the detection of isomerase activity in the platypus gland venom extract that converts DLP-4 into DLP-2. In the light of this new information, the tertiary structure of DLP-2 was recalculated using a new structural template with D-Met2. The structure of DLP-4 was also determined in order to evaluate the effect of a D-amino acid at position 2 on the structure and possibly to explain the large retention time difference observed for the two molecules in reverse-phase HPLC. The solution structures of the DLP-2 and DLP-4 are very similar to each other and to the earlier reported structure of DLP-2, which assumed that all amino acids were in the L-form. Our results suggest that the incorporation of the D-amino acid at position 2 has minimal effect on the overall fold in solution. PMID:16033333

  8. Amino-terminal amino acid sequence of the major structural polypeptides of avian retroviruses: sequence homology between reticuloendotheliosis virus p30 and p30s of mammalian retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, E; Bhown, A S; Bennett, J C

    1978-01-01

    The major structural polypeptides, p30 of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) (strain T) and p27 of avian sarcoma virus B77, have been compared with regard to amino acid composition. NH2-terminal amino acid sequence, and immunological crossreactions. The amino acid composition of the two polypeptides is distinct, and a comparison of the first 30 NH2-terminal amino acids of REV p30 with that for the first 25 of B77 p27 yields only three homologous residues. In competition radioimmunoassays the polypeptides show no crossreactivity. A comparison of the amino acid composition and NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of REV p30 with those reported for several mammalian retrovirus p30s shows remarkable similarities. Both REV and mammalian p30s contain a large number of polar residues in their amino acid composition and show approximately 40% homology in the first 30 NH2-terminal amino acids. No crossreactivity could be observed, however, in competition radioimmunoassays between Rauscher murine leukemia virus p30 and that of REV. The observations reported here suggest a close evolutionary relationship between REV and the mammalian retroviruses. Images PMID:208072

  9. Complete amino acid sequence of a histidine-rich proteolytic fragment of human ceruloplasmin.

    PubMed

    Kingston, I B; Kingston, B L; Putnam, F W

    1979-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence has been determined for a fragment of human ceruloplasmin [ferroxidase; iron(II):oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.16.3.1]. The fragment (designated Cp F5) contains 159 amino acid residues and has a molecular weight of 18,650; it lacks carbohydrate, is rich in histidine, and contains one free cysteine that may be part of a copper-binding site. This fragment is present in most commercial preparations of ceruloplasmin, probably owing to proteolytic degradation, but can also be obtained by limited cleavage of single-chain ceruloplasmin with plasmin. Cp F5 probably is an intact domain attached to the COOH-terminal end of single-chain ceruloplasmin via a labile interdomain peptide bond. A model of the secondary structure predicted by empirical methods suggests that almost one-third of the amino acid residues are distributed in alpha helices, about a third in beta-sheet structure, and the remainder in beta turns and unidentified structures. Computer analysis of the amino acid sequence has not demonstrated a statistically significant relationship between this ceruloplasmin fragment and any other protein, but there is some evidence for an internal duplication. PMID:287005

  10. Partial amino acid sequence of apolipoprotein(a) shows that it is homologous to plasminogen

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, D.L.; Fless, G.M.; Kohr, W.J.; McLean, J.W.; Xu, Q.T.; Miller, C.G.; Lawn, R.M.; Scanu, A.M.

    1987-05-01

    Apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) is a glycoprotein with M/sub r/ approx. 280,000 that is disulfide linked to apolipoprotein B in lipoprotein(a) particles. Elevated plasma levels of lipoprotein(a) are correlated with atherosclerosis. Partial amino acid sequence of apo(a) shows that it has striking homology to plasminogen. Plasminogen is a plasma serine protease zymogen that consists of five homologous and tandemly repeated domains called kringles and a trypsin-like protease domain. The amino-terminal sequence obtained for apo(a) is homologous to the beginning of kringle 4 but not the amino terminus of plasminogen. Apo(a) was subjected to limited proteolysis by trypsin or V8 protease, and fragments generated were isolated and sequenced. Sequences obtained from several of these fragments are highly (77-100%) homologous to plasminogen residues 391-421, which reside within kringle 4. Analysis of these internal apo(a) sequences revealed that apo(a) may contain at least two kringle 4-like domains. A sequence obtained from another tryptic fragment also shows homology to the end of kringle 4 and the beginning of kringle 5. Sequence data obtained from the two tryptic fragments shows homology with the protease domain of plasminogen. One of these sequences is homologous to the sequences surrounding the activation site of plasminogen. Plasminogen is activated by the cleavage of a specific arginine residue by urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator; however, the corresponding site in apo(a) is a serine that would not be cleaved by tissue plasminogen activator or urokinase. Using a plasmin-specific assay, no proteolytic activity could be demonstrated for lipoprotein(a) particles. These results suggest that apo(a) contains kringle-like domains and an inactive protease domain.

  11. On Quantum Algorithm for Multiple Alignment of Amino Acid Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iriyama, Satoshi; Ohya, Masanori

    2009-02-01

    The alignment of genome sequences or amino acid sequences is one of fundamental operations for the study of life. Usual computational complexity for the multiple alignment of N sequences with common length L by dynamic programming is O(LN). This alignment is considered as one of the NP problems, so that it is desirable to find a nice algorithm of the multiple alignment. Thus in this paper we propose the quantum algorithm for the multiple alignment based on the works12,1,2 in which the NP complete problem was shown to be the P problem by means of quantum algorithm and chaos information dynamics.

  12. Nuclear localization of the Hermes transposase depends on basic amino acid residues at the N-terminus of the protein.

    PubMed

    Michel, K; Atkinson, P W

    2003-07-01

    For the Hermes transposable element to be mobilized in its eukaryotic host, the transposase, encoded by the element, must make contact with its DNA. After synthesis in the cytoplasm, the transposase has to be actively imported into the nucleus because its size of 70.1 kDa prevents passive diffusion through the nuclear pore. Studies in vitro using transient expression of a Hermes-EGFP fusion protein in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 cells showed the transposase was located predominantly in the nucleus. In silico sequence analysis, however, did not reveal any nuclear localization signal (NLS). To identify the sequence(s) responsible for localization of Hermes transposase in the nucleus, truncated or mutated forms of the transposase were examined for their influence on sub-cellular localization of marker proteins fused to the transposase. Using the same expression system and a GFP-GUS fusion double marker, residues 1-110 were recognized as sufficient, and residues 1-32 as necessary, for nuclear localization. Amino acid K25 greatly facilitated nuclear localization, indicating that at least this basic amino acid plays a significant role in this process. This sequence overlaps the proposed DNA binding region of the Hermes transposase and is not necessarily conserved in all members of the hAT transposable element family. PMID:12858343

  13. Nucleotide sequence of the phosphoglycerate kinase gene from the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with that of the mesophilic yeast phosphoglycerate kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, D; Littlechild, J A; Fothergill, J E; Watson, H C; Hall, L

    1988-01-01

    Using oligonucleotide probes derived from amino acid sequencing information, the structural gene for phosphoglycerate kinase from the extreme thermophile, Thermus thermophilus, was cloned in Escherichia coli and its complete nucleotide sequence determined. The gene consists of an open reading frame corresponding to a protein of 390 amino acid residues (calculated Mr 41,791) with an extreme bias for G or C (93.1%) in the codon third base position. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with that of the corresponding mesophilic yeast enzyme indicated a number of significant differences. These are discussed in terms of the unusual codon bias and their possible role in enhanced protein thermal stability. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3052437

  14. Prebiotically plausible mechanisms increase compositional diversity of nucleic acid sequences

    PubMed Central

    Derr, Julien; Manapat, Michael L.; Rajamani, Sudha; Leu, Kevin; Xulvi-Brunet, Ramon; Joseph, Isaac; Nowak, Martin A.; Chen, Irene A.

    2012-01-01

    During the origin of life, the biological information of nucleic acid polymers must have increased to encode functional molecules (the RNA world). Ribozymes tend to be compositionally unbiased, as is the vast majority of possible sequence space. However, ribonucleotides vary greatly in synthetic yield, reactivity and degradation rate, and their non-enzymatic polymerization results in compositionally biased sequences. While natural selection could lead to complex sequences, molecules with some activity are required to begin this process. Was the emergence of compositionally diverse sequences a matter of chance, or could prebiotically plausible reactions counter chemical biases to increase the probability of finding a ribozyme? Our in silico simulations using a two-letter alphabet show that template-directed ligation and high concatenation rates counter compositional bias and shift the pool toward longer sequences, permitting greater exploration of sequence space and stable folding. We verified experimentally that unbiased DNA sequences are more efficient templates for ligation, thus increasing the compositional diversity of the pool. Our work suggests that prebiotically plausible chemical mechanisms of nucleic acid polymerization and ligation could predispose toward a diverse pool of longer, potentially structured molecules. Such mechanisms could have set the stage for the appearance of functional activity very early in the emergence of life. PMID:22319215

  15. Structure of the genetic code suggested by the hydropathy correlation between anticodons and amino acid residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias, Sávio Torres De; Moreira, Carlos Henrique Costa; Guimarães, Romeu Cardoso

    2007-02-01

    The correlation between hydropathies of anticodons and amino acids, detected by other authors utilizing scales of amino acid molecules in solution, was improved with the utilization of scales of amino acid residues in proteins. Three partitions were discerned in the correlation plot with the principal dinucleotides of anticodons (pDiN, excluding the wobble position). (a) The set of outliers of the correlation: Gly-CC, Pro-GG, Ser-GA and Ser-CU. The amino acids are consistently small, hydro-apathetic, stabilizers of protein N-ends, preferred in aperiodic protein conformations and belong to synthetases class II. The pDiN sequences are representative of the homogeneous sector (triplets N RR and N YY), distinguished from the mixed sector (triplets N RY and N YR), that depict a 70% correspondence to the synthetases class II and I, respectively. The triplet pairs proposed to be responsible for the coherence in the set of outliers are of the palindromic kind, where the lateral bases are the same, C CC: G GG and A GA: U CU. This suggests that U CU previously belonged to Ser, adding to other indications that the attribution of Arg to Y CU was due to an expansion of the Arg- tRNA synthetase specificity. The other attributions produced two correlation sets. (b) One corresponds to the remaining pDiN of the homogeneous sector, containing both synthetase classes; its regression line overlapped the one formed by the remaining attributions to class II. (c) The other contains the pDiN of the mixed sector and produced steeper slopes, especially with the class I attributions. It is suggested that the correlation was established when the amino acid composition of the protein synthetases became progressively enriched and that the set of outliers were the earliest to have been fixed.

  16. Analysis of the code relating sequence to conformation in globular proteins. Development of a stereochemical alphabet on the basis of intra-residue information

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Barry; Pain, Roger H.

    1974-01-01

    1. The relation of primary sequence to all residue backbone conformations was explored to test out starting conformations for protein folding. 2. Information theory was used to obtain measures of information which quantitate the role of each residue in determining its own conformation; i.e. intra-residue information. 3. The information measures are plotted as a function of ϕ, ψ peptide-backbone angles and ϕ, ψ contour maps obtained for each of the 20 amino acids. These show characteristic differences between residues. 4. To find practical ways of relating sequence to ϕ, ψ angles, several types of stereochemical alphabet were investigated. The value of these was tested by using them to predict the ϕ, ψ angles of nine different proteins. 5. A difference plot was constructed to show regions of the sequence that require little or no information extra to the intra-residue information in order to predict a correct conformation. These regions are suggested to be candidates for nucleating sites in the protein. PMID:4463966

  17. Teichuronic acid reducing terminal N-acetylglucosamine residue linked by phosphodiester to peptidoglycan of Micrococcus luteus

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner, G.T.; Dickie, J.P.; Hamerski, D.A.; Magnuson, J.K.; Anderson, J.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Teichuronic acid-peptidoglycan complex isolated from Micrococcus luteus cells by lysozyme digestion in osmotically stabilized medium was treated with mild acid to cleave the linkage joining teichuronic acid to peptidoglycan. This labile linkage was shown to be the phosphodiester which joins N-acetylglucosamine, the residue located at the reducing end of the teichuronic acid, through its anomeric hydroxyl group to a 6-phosphomuramic acid, a residue of the glycan strand of peptidoglycan. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the lysozyme digest of cell walls demonstrated the presence of a phosphodiester which was converted to a phosphomonoester by the conditions which released teichuronic acid from cell walls. Reduction of acid-liberated reducing end groups by NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} followed by complete acid hydrolysis yielded ({sup 3}H) glucosaminitol from the true reducing end residue of teichuronic acid and ({sup 3}H)glucitol from the sites of fragmentation of teichuronic acid. The amount of N-acetylglucosamine detected was approximately stoichiometric with the amount of phosphate in the complex. Partial fragmentation of teichuronic acid provides an explanation of the previous erroneous identification of the reducing end residue.

  18. The acid and enzymic hydrolysis of O-acetylated sialic acid residues from rabbit Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, A.; Ratcliffe, Wendy A.

    1972-01-01

    Rabbit Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein and bovine submaxillary glycoprotein were both found to contain sialic acid residues which are released at a slow rate by the standard conditions of acid hydrolysis. These residues are also resistant to neuraminidases from Vibrio cholerae and Clostridium perfringens. This behaviour was attributed to the presence of O-acetylated sialic acid, since the removal of O-acetyl groups by mild alkaline treatment normalized the subsequent release of sialic acid from rabbit Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein by acid and by enzymic hydrolysis. Determination of the O-acetyl residues in rabbit Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein indicated that on average two hydroxyl groups of sialic acid are O-acetylated, and these were located on the polyhydroxy side-chain of sialic acid or on C-4 and C-8. These findings confirm the assumption that certain O-acetylated forms of sialic acid are not substrates for bacterial neuraminidases. Several explanations have been suggested to explain the effect of O-acetylation of the side-chain on the rate of acidcatalysed hydrolysis of sialic acid residues. PMID:4349114

  19. 40 CFR 180.155 - 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues. 180.155 Section 180.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.155 1-Naphthaleneacetic...

  20. 40 CFR 180.155 - 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues. 180.155 Section 180.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.155 1-Naphthaleneacetic...

  1. 40 CFR 180.155 - 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues. 180.155 Section 180.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.155 1-Naphthaleneacetic...

  2. 40 CFR 180.155 - 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues. 180.155 Section 180.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.155 1-Naphthaleneacetic...

  3. Antibody-specific model of amino acid substitution for immunological inferences from alignments of antibody sequences.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Alexander; Kazandjian, Linda; Anisimova, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins produced by the immune system as a dynamically adaptive line of defense against invading pathogens. Very elegant and specific mutational mechanisms allow B lymphocytes to produce a large and diversified repertoire of antibodies, which is modified and enhanced throughout all adulthood. One of these mechanisms is somatic hypermutation, which stochastically mutates nucleotides in the antibody genes, forming new sequences with different properties and, eventually, higher affinity and selectivity to the pathogenic target. As somatic hypermutation involves fast mutation of antibody sequences, this process can be described using a Markov substitution model of molecular evolution. Here, using large sets of antibody sequences from mice and humans, we infer an empirical amino acid substitution model AB, which is specific to antibody sequences. Compared with existing general amino acid models, we show that the AB model provides significantly better description for the somatic evolution of mice and human antibody sequences, as demonstrated on large next generation sequencing (NGS) antibody data. General amino acid models are reflective of conservation at the protein level due to functional constraints, with most frequent amino acids exchanges taking place between residues with the same or similar physicochemical properties. In contrast, within the variable part of antibody sequences we observed an elevated frequency of exchanges between amino acids with distinct physicochemical properties. This is indicative of a sui generis mutational mechanism, specific to antibody somatic hypermutation. We illustrate this property of antibody sequences by a comparative analysis of the network modularity implied by the AB model and general amino acid substitution models. We recommend using the new model for computational studies of antibody sequence maturation, including inference of alignments and phylogenetic trees describing antibody somatic hypermutation in

  4. Generation of organic acids and monosaccharides by hydrolytic and oxidative transformation of food processing residues.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Klaus; Bipp, Hans-Peter

    2005-05-01

    Carbohydrate-rich biomass residues, i.e. sugar beet molasses, whey powder, wine yeast, potato peel sludge, spent hops, malt dust and apple marc, were tested as starting materials for the generation of marketable chemicals, e.g. aliphatic acids, sugar acids and mono-/disaccharides. Residues were oxidized or hydrolyzed under acidic or alkaline conditions applying conventional laboratory digestion methods and microwave assisted techniques. Yields and compositions of the oxidation products differed according to the oxidizing agent used. Main products of oxidation by 30% HNO(3) were acetic, glucaric, oxalic and glycolic acids. Applying H(2)O(2)/CuO in alkaline solution, the organic acid yields were remarkably lower with formic, acetic and threonic acids as main products. Gluconic acid was formed instead of glucaric acid throughout. Reaction of a 10% H(2)O(2) solution with sugar beet molasses generated formic and lactic acids mainly. Na(2)S(2)O(8) solutions were very inefficient at oxidizing the residues. Glucose, arabinose and galactose were formed during acidic hydrolysis of malt dust and apple marc. The glucose content reached 0.35 g per gram of residue. Important advantages of the microwave application were lower reaction times and reduced reagent demands. PMID:15607197

  5. Identification of family determining residues in Jumonji-C lysine demethylases: A sequence-based, family wide classification.

    PubMed

    Slama, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Histone post-translational modifications play a critical role in the regulation of gene expression. Methylation of lysines at N-terminal tails of histones has been shown to be involved in such regulation. While this modification was long considered to be irreversible, two different classes of enzymes capable of carrying out the demethylation of histone lysines were recently identified: the oxidases, such as LSD1, and the oxygenases (JmjC-containing). Here, a family-wide analysis of the second of these classes is proposed, with over 300 proteins studied at the sequence level. We show that a correlated evolution analysis yields some position/residue pairs which are critical at comparing JmjC sequences and enables the classification of JmjC domains into five families. A few positions appear more frequently among conditions, such as positions 23 (directly C-terminal to the second iron ligand), 24, 252 and 253 (directly N-terminal to a conserved Asn). Implications of family conditions are studied in detail on PHF2, revealing the meaningfulness of the sequence-derived conditions at the structural level. These results should help obtain insights on the diversity of JmjC-containing proteins solely by considering some of the amino acids present in their JmjC domain. PMID:26757344

  6. Intra-molecular cross-linking of acidic residues for protein structure studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Kruppa, Gary Hermann; Young, Malin M.; Novak, Petr; Schoeniger, Joseph S.

    2005-03-01

    Intra-molecular cross-linking has been suggested as a method of obtaining distance constraints that would be useful in developing structural models of proteins. Recent work published on intra-molecular cross-linking for protein structural studies has employed commercially available primary amine selective reagents that can cross-link lysine residues to other lysine residues or the amino terminus. Previous work using these cross-linkers has shown that for several proteins of known structure, the number of cross-links that can be obtained experimentally may be small compared to what would be expected from the known structure, due to the relative reactivity, distribution, and solvent accessibility of the lysines in the protein sequence. To overcome these limitations we have investigated the use of cross-linking reagents that can react with other reactive sidechains in proteins. We used 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) to activate the carboxylic acid containing residues, aspartic acid (D), glutamic acid (E), and the carboxy terminus (O), for cross-linking reactions. Once activated, the DEO sidechains can react to form 'zero-length' cross-links with nearby primary amine containing resides, lysines (K) and the amino terminus (X), via the formation of a new amide bond. We also show that the EDC-activated DEO sidechains can be cross-linked to each other using dihydrazides, two hydrazide moieties connected by an alkyl cross-linker ann of variable length. Using these reagents, we have found three new 'zero-length' cross-links in ubiquitin consistent with its known structure (M1-E16, M1-E18, and K63-E64). Using the dihydrazide cross-linkers, we have identified 2 new cross-links (D21-D32 and E24-D32) unambiguously. Using a library of dihydrazide cross-linkers with varying arm length, we have shown that there is a minimum arm length required for the DEO-DEO cross-links of 5.8 angstroms. These results show that additional structural information

  7. Identification of carboxylic acid residues in glucoamylase G2 from Aspergillus niger that participate in catalysis and substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Svensson, B; Clarke, A J; Svendsen, I; Møller, H

    1990-02-22

    Functionally important carboxyl groups in glucoamylase G2 from Aspergillus niger were identified using a differential labelling approach which involved modification of the acarbose-inhibited enzyme with 1-ethyl-3-(4-azonia-4,4-dimethylpentyl)carbodiimide (EAC) and inactivation by [3H]EAC following removal of acarbose. Subsequent sequence localization of the substituted acidic residues was facilitated by specific phenylthiohydantoins. The acid cluster Asp176, Glu179 and Glu180 reacted exclusively with [3H]EAC, while Asp112, Asp153, Glu259 and Glu389 had incorporated both [3H]EAC and EAC. It is conceivable that one or two of the [3H]EAC-labelled side chains act in catalysis while the other fully protected residue(s) participates in substrate binding probably together with the partially protected ones. Twelve carboxyl groups that reacted with EAC in the enzyme-acarbose complex were also identified. Asp176, Glu179 and Glu180 are all invariant in fungal glucoamylases. Glu180 was tentatively identified as a catalytic group on the basis of sequence alignments to catalytic regions in isomaltase and alpha-amylase. The partially radiolabelled Asp112 corresponds in Taka-amylase A to Tyr75 situated in a substrate binding loop at a distance from the site of cleavage. A possible correlation between carbodiimide modification of an essential carboxyl group and its role in the glucoamylase catalysis is discussed. PMID:2108020

  8. Snake venoms. The amino acid sequences of two proteinase inhibitor homologues from Dendroaspis angusticeps venom.

    PubMed

    Joubert, F J; Taljaard, N

    1980-05-01

    Toxins C13S1C3 and C13S2C3 from D. angusticeps venom were purified by gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. Whereas C13S1C3 contains 57 amino acids, C13S2C3 contains 59 but each include six half-cystine residues. The complete primary structure of the low toxicity proteins have been elucidated. The sequences and the invariant residues of toxins C13S1C3 and C13S2C3 from D. angusticeps venom resemble, respectively, those of the proteinase inhibitor homologues K and I from D. polylepis polylepis venom and they are also homologous to the active proteinase inhibitors from various sources. In C13S1C3 and K the active site lysyl residue of active bovine pancreatic proteinase inhibitor is conserved but the site residue alanine, is replaced by lysine. In C13S2C3 and I the active site residue is replaced by tyrosine. PMID:7429422

  9. Deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant proteolipid: SPL(pVal)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitsett, J.A.; Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.E.; Clark, J.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Meuth, J.; Fox, J.L.

    1987-05-01

    Hydrophobic, proteolipid-like protein of Mr 6500 was isolated from ether/ethanol extracts of human, canine and bovine pulmonary surfactant. Amino acid composition of the protein demonstrated a remarkable abundance of hydrophobic residues, particularly valine and leucine. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human protein was determined: N-Leu-Ile-Pro-Cys-Cys-Pro-Val-Asn-Leu-Lys-Arg-Leu-Leu-Ile-Val4... An oligonucleotide probe was used to screen an adult human lung cDNA library and resulted in detection of cDNA clones with predicted amino acid sequence with close identity to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human peptide. SPL(pVal) was found within the reading frame of a larger peptide. SPL(pVal) results from proteolytic processing of a larger preprotein. Northern blot analysis detected in a single 1.0 kilobase SPL(pVal) RNA which was less abundant in fetal than in adult lung. Mixtures of purified canine and bovine SPL(pVal) and synthetic phospholipids display properties of rapid adsorption and surface tension lowering activity characteristic of surfactant. Human SPL(pVal) is a pulmonary surfactant proteolipid which may therefore be useful in combination with phospholipids and/or other surfactant proteins for the treatment of surfactant deficiency such as hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants.

  10. Use of a structural alphabet to find compatible folds for amino acid sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Swapnil; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Sanejouand, Yves-Henri; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Offmann, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The structural annotation of proteins with no detectable homologs of known 3D structure identified using sequence-search methods is a major challenge today. We propose an original method that computes the conditional probabilities for the amino-acid sequence of a protein to fit to known protein 3D structures using a structural alphabet, known as “Protein Blocks” (PBs). PBs constitute a library of 16 local structural prototypes that approximate every part of protein backbone structures. It is used to encode 3D protein structures into 1D PB sequences and to capture sequence to structure relationships. Our method relies on amino acid occurrence matrices, one for each PB, to score global and local threading of query amino acid sequences to protein folds encoded into PB sequences. It does not use any information from residue contacts or sequence-search methods or explicit incorporation of hydrophobic effect. The performance of the method was assessed with independent test datasets derived from SCOP 1.75A. With a Z-score cutoff that achieved 95% specificity (i.e., less than 5% false positives), global and local threading showed sensitivity of 64.1% and 34.2%, respectively. We further tested its performance on 57 difficult CASP10 targets that had no known homologs in PDB: 38 compatible templates were identified by our approach and 66% of these hits yielded correctly predicted structures. This method scales-up well and offers promising perspectives for structural annotations at genomic level. It has been implemented in the form of a web-server that is freely available at http://www.bo-protscience.fr/forsa. PMID:25297700

  11. Use of a structural alphabet to find compatible folds for amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Swapnil; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Sanejouand, Yves-Henri; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Offmann, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The structural annotation of proteins with no detectable homologs of known 3D structure identified using sequence-search methods is a major challenge today. We propose an original method that computes the conditional probabilities for the amino-acid sequence of a protein to fit to known protein 3D structures using a structural alphabet, known as "Protein Blocks" (PBs). PBs constitute a library of 16 local structural prototypes that approximate every part of protein backbone structures. It is used to encode 3D protein structures into 1D PB sequences and to capture sequence to structure relationships. Our method relies on amino acid occurrence matrices, one for each PB, to score global and local threading of query amino acid sequences to protein folds encoded into PB sequences. It does not use any information from residue contacts or sequence-search methods or explicit incorporation of hydrophobic effect. The performance of the method was assessed with independent test datasets derived from SCOP 1.75A. With a Z-score cutoff that achieved 95% specificity (i.e., less than 5% false positives), global and local threading showed sensitivity of 64.1% and 34.2%, respectively. We further tested its performance on 57 difficult CASP10 targets that had no known homologs in PDB: 38 compatible templates were identified by our approach and 66% of these hits yielded correctly predicted structures. This method scales-up well and offers promising perspectives for structural annotations at genomic level. It has been implemented in the form of a web-server that is freely available at http://www.bo-protscience.fr/forsa. PMID:25297700

  12. RBRIdent: An algorithm for improved identification of RNA-binding residues in proteins from primary sequences.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dapeng; Zeng, Jianyang; Gong, Haipeng

    2015-06-01

    Rapid and correct identification of RNA-binding residues based on the protein primary sequences is of great importance. In most prevalent machine-learning-based identification methods; however, either some features are inefficiently represented, or the redundancy between features is not effectively removed. Both problems may weaken the performance of a classifier system and raise its computational complexity. Here, we addressed the above problems and developed a better classifier (RBRIdent) to identify the RNA-binding residues. In an independent benchmark test, RBRIdent achieved an accuracy of 76.79%, Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.3819 and F-measure of 75.58%, remarkably outperforming all prevalent methods. These results suggest the necessity of proper feature description and the essential role of feature selection in this project. All source data and codes are freely available at http://166.111.152.91/RBRIdent. PMID:25846271

  13. Complete amino acid sequence of globin chains and biological activity of fragmented crocodile hemoglobin (Crocodylus siamensis).

    PubMed

    Srihongthong, Saowaluck; Pakdeesuwan, Anawat; Daduang, Sakda; Araki, Tomohiro; Dhiravisit, Apisak; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2012-08-01

    Hemoglobin, α-chain, β-chain and fragmented hemoglobin of Crocodylus siamensis demonstrated both antibacterial and antioxidant activities. Antibacterial and antioxidant properties of the hemoglobin did not depend on the heme structure but could result from the compositions of amino acid residues and structures present in their primary structure. Furthermore, thirteen purified active peptides were obtained by RP-HPLC analyses, corresponding to fragments in the α-globin chain and the β-globin chain which are mostly located at the N-terminal and C-terminal parts. These active peptides operate on the bacterial cell membrane. The globin chains of Crocodylus siamensis showed similar amino acids to the sequences of Crocodylus niloticus. The novel amino acid substitutions of α-chain and β-chain are not associated with the heme binding site or the bicarbonate ion binding site, but could be important through their interactions with membranes of bacteria. PMID:22648692

  14. Effects of stacking sequence on impact damage resistance and residual strength for quasi-isotropic laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dost, Ernest F.; Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Avery, William B.; Coxon, Brian R.

    1991-01-01

    Residual strength of an impacted composite laminate is dependent on details of the damage state. Stacking sequence was varied to judge its effect on damage caused by low-velocity impact. This was done for quasi-isotropic layups of a toughened composite material. Experimental observations on changes in the impact damage state and postimpact compressive performance were presented for seven different laminate stacking sequences. The applicability and limitations of analysis compared to experimental results were also discussed. Postimpact compressive behavior was found to be a strong function of the laminate stacking sequence. This relationship was found to depend on thickness, stacking sequence, size, and location of sublaminates that comprise the impact damage state. The postimpact strength for specimens with a relatively symmetric distribution of damage through the laminate thickness was accurately predicted by models that accounted for sublaminate stability and in-plane stress redistribution. An asymmetric distribution of damage in some laminate stacking sequences tended to alter specimen stability. Geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis was used to predict this behavior.

  15. Solution structure of gamma-bungarotoxin: the functional significance of amino acid residues flanking the RGD motif in integrin binding.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Jia-Hau; Chen, Chiu-Yueh; Chang, Long-Sen; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yen-Chin; Lo, Yu-Hui; Liu, Yu-Chen; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2004-12-01

    Gamma-bungarotoxin, a snake venom protein isolated from Bungarus multicinctus, contains 68 amino acids, including 10 cysteine residues and a TAVRGDGP sequence at positions 30-37. The solution structure of gamma-bungarotoxin has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The structure is similar to that of the short-chain neurotoxins that contain three loops extending from a disulfide-bridged core. The tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence is located at the apex of the flexible loop and is similar to that of other RGD-containing proteins. However, gamma-bungarotoxin only inhibits platelet aggregations with an IC50 of 34 microM. To understand its weak activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation, we mutated the RGD loop sequences of rhodostomin, a potent platelet aggregation inhibitor, from RIPRGDMP to TAVRGDGP, resulting in a 196-fold decrease in activity. In addition, the average Calpha-to-Calpha distance between R33 and G36 of gamma-bungarotoxin is 6.02 A, i.e., shorter than that of other RGD-containing proteins that range from 6.55 to 7.46 A. These results suggested that the amino acid residues flanking the RGD motif might control the width of the RGD loop. This structural difference may be responsible for its decrease in platelet aggregation inhibition compared with other RGD-containing proteins. PMID:15390258

  16. The amino acid sequence of protein SCMK-B2C from the high-sulphur fraction of wool keratin

    PubMed Central

    Elleman, T. C.

    1972-01-01

    1. The amino acid sequence of a protein from the reduced and carboxymethylated high-sulphur fraction of wool has been determined. 2. The sequence of this S-carboxymethylkerateine (SCMK-B2C) of 151 amino acid residues displays much internal homology and an unusual residue distribution. Thus a ten-residue sequence occurs four times near the N-terminus and five times near the C-terminus with few changes. These regions contain much of the molecule's half-cystine, whereas between them there is a region of 19 residues that are mainly small and devoid of cystine and proline. 3. Certain models of the wool fibre based on its mechanical and physical properties propose a matrix of small compact globular units linked together to form beaded chains. The unusual distribution of the component residues of protein SCMK-B2C suggests structures in the wool-fibre matrix compatible with certain features of the proposed models. PMID:4678578

  17. /sup 113/Cd NMR studies of a 1:1 Cd adduct with an 18-residue finger peptide from HIV-1 nucleic acid binding protein, p7

    SciTech Connect

    South, T.L.; Kim, B.; Summers, M.F.

    1989-01-04

    The Zn/sup 2+/ and Cd/sup 2+/ adducts with the 18-residue peptide comprising the amino acid sequence of the first finger (residues 13 through 30) of retroviral nucleic acid binding proteins p7 from HIV-1 (the causative agent of AIDS) have been prepared. /sup 1/H NMR data indicate that the metal adducts are 1:1 compounds that are stable in aqueous solutions for at least a month. The /sup 113/Cd NMR spectral results for the adduct are presented and analyzed. 26 references, 3 figures.

  18. Sequences Of Amino Acids For Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    Sequences of amino acids defined for use in making polypeptides one-third to one-sixth as large as parent human serum albumin molecule. Smaller, chemically stable peptides have diverse applications including service as artificial human serum and as active components of biosensors and chromatographic matrices. In applications involving production of artificial sera from new sequences, little or no concern about viral contaminants. Smaller genetically engineered polypeptides more easily expressed and produced in large quantities, making commercial isolation and production more feasible and profitable.

  19. Highly Amino Acid Selective Hydrolysis of Myoglobin at Aspartate Residues as Promoted by Zirconium(IV)-Substituted Polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Ly, Hong Giang T; Absillis, Gregory; Janssens, Rik; Proost, Paul; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2015-06-15

    SDS-PAGE/Edman degradation and HPLC MS/MS showed that zirconium(IV)-substituted Lindqvist-, Keggin-, and Wells-Dawson-type polyoxometalates (POMs) selectively hydrolyze the protein myoglobin at Asp-X peptide bonds under mildly acidic and neutral conditions. This transformation is the first example of highly sequence selective protein hydrolysis by POMs, a novel class of protein-hydrolyzing agents. The selectivity is directed by Asp residues located on the surface of the protein and is further assisted by electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged POMs and positively charged surface patches in the vicinity of the cleavage site. PMID:25950869

  20. The amino acid sequence of ribonuclease U2 from Ustilago sphaerogena.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, S; Uchida, T

    1975-01-01

    1. RNAase (ribonuclease) U2, a purine-specific RNAase, was reduced, aminoethylated and hydrolysed with trypsin, chymotrypsin and thermolysin. On the basis of the analyses of the resulting peptides, the complete amino acid sequence of RNAase U2 was determined, 2. When the sequence was compared with the amino acid sequence of RNAase T1 (EC 3.1.4.8), the following regions were found to be similar in the two enzymes; Tyr-Pro-His-Gln-Tyr (38-42) in RNAase U2 and Tyr-Pro-His-Lys-Tyr (38-42) in RNAase T1, Glu-Phe-Pro-Leu-Val (61-65) in RNAase U2 and Glu-Trp-Pro-Ile-Leu (58-62) in RNAase T1, Asp-Arg-Val-Ile-Tyr-Gln (83-88) in RNAase U2 and Asp-Arg-Val-Phe-Asn (76-81) in RNAase T1 and Val-Thr-His-Thr-Gly-Ala (98-103) in RNAase U2 and Ile-Thr-His-Thr-Gly-Ala (90-95) in RNAase T1. All of the amino acid residues, histidine-40, glutamate-58, arginine-77 and histidine-92, which were found to play a crucial role in the biological activity of RNAase T1, were included in the regions cited here. 3. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequence of the sequence of the proteins has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50041 (33 PAGES) AT THE British Library (Lending Division)(formerly the National Lending Library for Science and Technology), Boston Spa, Yorks. LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1975), 145, 5. PMID:1156364

  1. Nanopores and nucleic acids: prospects for ultrarapid sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Akeson, M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA and RNA molecules can be detected as they are driven through a nanopore by an applied electric field at rates ranging from several hundred microseconds to a few milliseconds per molecule. The nanopore can rapidly discriminate between pyrimidine and purine segments along a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule. Nanopore detection and characterization of single molecules represents a new method for directly reading information encoded in linear polymers. If single-nucleotide resolution can be achieved, it is possible that nucleic acid sequences can be determined at rates exceeding a thousand bases per second.

  2. Accurate Sample Assignment in a Multiplexed, Ultrasensitive, High-Throughput Sequencing Assay for Minimal Residual Disease.

    PubMed

    Bartram, Jack; Mountjoy, Edward; Brooks, Tony; Hancock, Jeremy; Williamson, Helen; Wright, Gary; Moppett, John; Goulden, Nick; Hubank, Mike

    2016-07-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) (next-generation sequencing) of the rearranged Ig and T-cell receptor genes promises to be less expensive and more sensitive than current methods of monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD) in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the adoption of new approaches by clinical laboratories requires careful evaluation of all potential sources of error and the development of strategies to ensure the highest accuracy. Timely and efficient clinical use of HTS platforms will depend on combining multiple samples (multiplexing) in each sequencing run. Here we examine the Ig heavy-chain gene HTS on the Illumina MiSeq platform for MRD. We identify errors associated with multiplexing that could potentially impact the accuracy of MRD analysis. We optimize a strategy that combines high-purity, sequence-optimized oligonucleotides, dual indexing, and an error-aware demultiplexing approach to minimize errors and maximize sensitivity. We present a probability-based, demultiplexing pipeline Error-Aware Demultiplexer that is suitable for all MiSeq strategies and accurately assigns samples to the correct identifier without excessive loss of data. Finally, using controls quantified by digital PCR, we show that HTS-MRD can accurately detect as few as 1 in 10(6) copies of specific leukemic MRD. PMID:27183494

  3. Amino acid sequence of the Amur tiger prion protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changde; Pang, Wanyong; Zhao, Deming

    2006-10-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders in human and animal associated with conformational conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into the pathologic isoform (PrP(Sc)). Various data indicate that the polymorphisms within the open reading frame (ORF) of PrP are associated with the susceptibility and control the species barrier in prion diseases. In the present study, partial Prnp from 25 Amur tigers (tPrnp) were cloned and screened for polymorphisms. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (T423C, A501G, C511A, A610G) were found; the C511A and A610G nucleotide substitutions resulted in the amino acid changes Lysine171Glutamine and Alanine204Threoine, respectively. The tPrnp amino acid sequence is similar to house cat (Felis catus ) and sheep, but differs significantly from other two cat Prnp sequences that were previously deposited in GenBank. PMID:16780982

  4. Characterization of Protective Epitopes in a Highly Conserved Plasmodium falciparum Antigenic Protein Containing Repeats of Acidic and Basic Residues

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pawan; Kumar, Anil; Singh, Balwan; Bharadwaj, Ashima; Sailaja, V. Naga; Adak, T.; Kushwaha, Ashima; Malhotra, Pawan; Chauhan, V. S.

    1998-01-01

    The delineation of putatively protective and immunogenic epitopes in vaccine candidate proteins constitutes a major research effort towards the development of an effective malaria vaccine. By virtue of its role in the formation of the immune clusters of merozoites, its location on the surface of merozoites, and its highly conserved nature both at the nucleotide sequence level and the amino acid sequence level, the antigen which contains repeats of acidic and basic residues (ABRA) of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum represents such an antigen. Based upon the predicted amino acid sequence of ABRA, we synthesized eight peptides, with six of these (AB-1 to AB-6) ranging from 12 to 18 residues covering the most hydrophilic regions of the protein, and two more peptides (AB-7 and AB-8) representing its repetitive sequences. We found that all eight constructs bound an appreciable amount of antibody in sera from a large proportion of P. falciparum malaria patients; two of these peptides (AB-1 and AB-3) also elicited a strong proliferation response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all 11 human subjects recovering from malaria. When used as carrier-free immunogens, six peptides induced a strong, boostable, immunoglobulin G-type antibody response in rabbits, indicating the presence of both B-cell determinants and T-helper-cell epitopes in these six constructs. These antibodies specifically cross-reacted with the parasite protein(s) in an immunoblot and in an immunofluorescence assay. In another immunoblot, rabbit antipeptide sera also recognized recombinant fragments of ABRA expressed in bacteria. More significantly, rabbit antibodies against two constructs (AB-1 and AB-5) inhibited the merozoite reinvasion of human erythrocytes in vitro up to ∼90%. These results favor further studies so as to determine possible inclusion of these two constructs in a multicomponent subunit vaccine against asexual blood stages of P. falciparum. PMID:9596765

  5. Early region 1B of adenovirus 2 encodes two coterminal proteins of 495 and 155 amino acid residues.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C W; Schmitt, R C; Smart, J E; Lewis, J B

    1984-01-01

    Partial sequence analysis of tryptic peptides has identified the E1B-495R (E1b-57K) (early transcription region 1B of 495 amino acid residues, with an approximate molecular weight of 57,000) protein of adenovirus 2 as encoded by the 495 amino acid open reading frame located in the adenovirus 2 DNA sequence between nucleotides 2016 and 3500. Additional proteins of 16,000 Mr and 18,000 Mr that are related to the E1B-495R protein were identified by cell-free translation of hybridization-selected mRNA. Analysis of [35S]methionine-containing amino terminal tryptic peptides by thin-layer chromatography showed that the E1B-495R, E1B-18K, and E1B-16K proteins all begin at the same initiation codon. The E1B-495R protein from 293 cells also has the same initial tryptic peptide, acetyl-methionyl-glutamyl-arginine. Sequence analysis of E1B-18K tryptic peptides indicated that this protein also has the same carboxy terminus as the E1B-495R protein and that it is derived from an mRNA that is spliced to remove sequences between nucleotides 2250 and 3269, resulting in a protein product of 155 amino acid residues. Analysis of E1B-16K tryptic peptides has not yet revealed the carboxy terminal structure of this protein. Both the E1B-495R and the E1B-155R (E1B-18K) proteins, as well as the E1B-16K protein, were precipitated from cell-free translations and from extracts of infected cells by antiserum against an amino terminal nonapeptide common to these proteins. Images PMID:6323739

  6. Influence of tacking sequence on residual stress and distortion of single sided fillet submerged arc welded joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Arpan Kumar; Biswas, Pankaj; Bag, Swarup

    2015-07-01

    Submerged arc welding (SAW) is advantageous for joining high thickness materials in large structure due to high material deposition rate. The non-uniform heating and cooling generates the thermal stresses and subsequently the residual stresses and distortion. The longitudinal and transverse residual stresses and angular distortion are generally measured in large panel structure of submerged arc welded fillet joints. Hence, the objective of this present work is to quantify the amount of residual stress and distortion in and around the weld joint due to positioning of stiffeners tack. The tacking sequence influences the level of residual stress and proper controlling of tacking sequences is required to minimize the stress. In present study, an elasto-plastic material behavior is considered to develop the thermo mechanical model which predicts the residual stress and angular distortion with varying tacking sequences. The simulated result reveals that the tacking sequence heavily influences the residual stress and deformation pattern of the single sided fillet joint. The finite element based numerical model is calibrated by comparing the experimental data from published literature. Henceforth, the angular distortions are measured from an in-house developed experimental set-up. A fair agreement between the predicted and experimental results indicates the robustness of the developed numerical model. However, the most significant conclusion from present study states that tack weld position should be placed opposite to the fillet weld side to minimize the residual stress.

  7. The sequence of rat leukosialin (W3/13 antigen) reveals a molecule with O-linked glycosylation of one third of its extracellular amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Killeen, N; Barclay, A N; Willis, A C; Williams, A F

    1987-01-01

    Leukosialin is one of the major glycoproteins of thymocytes and T lymphocytes and is notable for a very high content of O-linked carbohydrate structures. The full protein sequence for rat leukosialin as translated from cDNA clones is now reported. The molecule contains 371 amino acids with 224 residues outside the cell, one transmembrane sequence and 124 cytoplasmic residues. Data from the peptide sequence and carbohydrate composition suggest that one in three of the extracellular amino acids may be O-glycosylated with no N-linked glycosylation sites. The cDNA sequence contained a CpG rich region in the 3' coding sequence and a large 3' non-coding region which included tandem repeats of the sequence GGAT. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2965006

  8. Optimization of acid hydrolysis from the hemicellulosic fraction of Eucalyptus grandis residue using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Canettieri, Eliana Vieira; de Moraes Rocha, George Jackson; de Carvalho, João Andrade; de Almeida e Silva, João Batista

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnological conversion of biomass into fuels and chemicals requires hydrolysis of the polysaccharide fraction into monomeric sugars. Hydrolysis can be performed enzymatically and with dilute or concentrate mineral acids. The present study used dilute sulfuric acid as a catalyst for hydrolysis of Eucalyptus grandis residue. The purpose of this paper was to optimize the hydrolysis process in a 1.4 l pilot-scale reactor and investigate the effects of the acid concentration, temperature and residue/acid solution ratio on the hemicellulose removal and consequently on the production of sugars (xylose, glucose and arabinose) as well as on the formation of by-products (furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and acetic acid). This study was based on a model composition corresponding to a 2(3) orthogonal factorial design and employed the response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize the hydrolysis conditions, aiming to attain maximum xylose extraction from hemicellulose of residue. The considered optimum conditions were: H(2)SO(4) concentration of 0.65%, temperature of 157 degrees C and residue/acid solution ratio of 1/8.6 with a reaction time of 20 min. Under these conditions, 79.6% of the total xylose was removed and the hydrolysate contained 1.65 g/l glucose, 13.65 g/l xylose, 1.55 g/l arabinose, 3.10 g/l acetic acid, 1.23 g/l furfural and 0.20 g/l 5-hydroxymethylfurfural. PMID:16473004

  9. Intra-molecular cross-linking of acidic residues for protein structure studies.

    PubMed

    Novak, Petr; Kruppa, Gary H

    2008-01-01

    Intra-molecular cross-linking has been suggested as a method of obtaining distance constraints that would help to develop structural models of proteins. Recent work published on intra-molecular cross-linking for protein structural studies has employed commercially available primary amine (lysine, the amino terminus) selective reagents. Previous work using these cross-linkers has shown that for several proteins of known structure, the number of cross-links that can be obtained experimentally may be small compared to what would be expected from the known structure, due to the relative reactivity, distribution and solvent accessibility of the lysines in the protein sequence. To overcome these limitations, we have investigated the use of cross-linking reagents that can react with other reactive side chains in proteins. We used 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) to activate the carboxylic acid containing residues, aspartic acid (D), glutamic acid (E) and the carboxy terminus (O), for cross-linking reactions. Once activated, the DEO side chains can react to form "zero-length" cross-links with nearby primary amine containing residues, lysines (K) and the amino terminus (X), via the formation of a new amide bond. We also show that the EDC-activated DEO side chains can be cross-linked to each other using dihydrazides, two hydrazide moieties connected by an alkyl cross-linker arm of variable length. Using these reagents, we have found three new "zero-length" cross-links in ubiquitin consistent with its known structure (M1-E16, M1-E18 and K63-E64). Using the dihydrazide cross-linkers, we have identified two new cross-links (D21-D32 and E24-D32) unambiguously. Using a library of dihydrazide cross-linkers with varying arm length, we have shown that there is a minimum arm length required for the DEO-DEO cross-links of 5.8 A. These results show that additional structural information can be obtained by exploiting new cross-linker chemistry

  10. ANTICALIgN: visualizing, editing and analyzing combined nucleotide and amino acid sequence alignments for combinatorial protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Jarasch, Alexander; Kopp, Melanie; Eggenstein, Evelyn; Richter, Antonia; Gebauer, Michaela; Skerra, Arne

    2016-07-01

    ANTIC ALIGN: is an interactive software developed to simultaneously visualize, analyze and modify alignments of DNA and/or protein sequences that arise during combinatorial protein engineering, design and selection. ANTIC ALIGN: combines powerful functions known from currently available sequence analysis tools with unique features for protein engineering, in particular the possibility to display and manipulate nucleotide sequences and their translated amino acid sequences at the same time. ANTIC ALIGN: offers both template-based multiple sequence alignment (MSA), using the unmutated protein as reference, and conventional global alignment, to compare sequences that share an evolutionary relationship. The application of similarity-based clustering algorithms facilitates the identification of duplicates or of conserved sequence features among a set of selected clones. Imported nucleotide sequences from DNA sequence analysis are automatically translated into the corresponding amino acid sequences and displayed, offering numerous options for selecting reading frames, highlighting of sequence features and graphical layout of the MSA. The MSA complexity can be reduced by hiding the conserved nucleotide and/or amino acid residues, thus putting emphasis on the relevant mutated positions. ANTIC ALIGN: is also able to handle suppressed stop codons or even to incorporate non-natural amino acids into a coding sequence. We demonstrate crucial functions of ANTIC ALIGN: in an example of Anticalins selected from a lipocalin random library against the fibronectin extradomain B (ED-B), an established marker of tumor vasculature. Apart from engineered protein scaffolds, ANTIC ALIGN: provides a powerful tool in the area of antibody engineering and for directed enzyme evolution. PMID:27261456

  11. Quantum-Sequencing: Biophysics of quantum tunneling through nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy has extensively been used in physical surface sciences to study quantum tunneling to measure electronic local density of states of nanomaterials and to characterize adsorbed species. Quantum-Sequencing (Q-Seq) is a new method based on tunneling microscopy for electronic sequencing of single molecule of nucleic acids. A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the unique ``electronic fingerprints'' for all nucleotides on DNA and RNA using Q-Seq along their intrinsic biophysical parameters. We have analyzed tunneling spectra for the nucleotides at different pH conditions and analyzed the HOMO, LUMO and energy gap for all of them. In addition we show a number of biophysical parameters to further characterize all nucleobases (electron and hole transition voltage and energy barriers). These results highlight the robustness of Q-Seq as a technique for next-generation sequencing.

  12. Residual Activity of Thermally Denatured Transforming Deoxyribonucleic Acid from Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Benjamin J.

    1965-01-01

    Barnhart, Benjamin J. (Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Md.). Residual activity of thermally denatured transforming deoxyribonucleic acid from Haemophilus influenzae. J. Bacteriol. 89:1271–1279. 1965.—The level of residual transforming activity of heated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (i.e., 1 to a few per cent of native DNA-transforming activity) was found to be independent of the heating and quenching temperatures and less susceptible than native or renatured DNA to heat inactivation upon prolonged heating above or below the critical melting temperature. Similar dose-response curves were obtained for inactivation by formamide of native and renatured DNA, but the residual-active material was much more resistant. Heating DNA above the Tm in the presence of 1% formaldehyde resulted in a level of residual activity 4 logs lower than that obtained without formaldehyde. Residual-active material was not inactivated by Escherichia coli phosphodiesterase, but it was susceptible to snake venom phosphodiesterase. A new genetic marker was induced in heated-quenched DNA but not in purified residual-active material following nitrous acid treatment. Residual activity was found to be less susceptible to ultraviolet inactivation and to band at a higher density region in CsCl than native DNA. In conclusion, it is suggested that the residual-active material is a structure formed by intrastrand hydrogen bonding of the separated units of heated-quenched DNA. Such a configuration would result in at least a partially double-stranded structure, which is probably the essential characteristic of the residual-active material endowing it with biological activity. PMID:14292997

  13. Snake venoms. The amino-acid sequence of trypsin inhibitor E of Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (Black Mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Joubert, F J; Strydom, D J

    1978-06-01

    Trypsin inhibitor E from black mamba venom comprises 59 amino acid residues in a single polypeptide chain, cross-linked by three intrachain disulphide bridges. The complete primary structure of inhibitor E was elucidated. The sequence is homologous with trypsin inhibitors from different sources. Unique among this homologous series of proteinase inhibitors, inhibitor E has an affinity for transition metal ions, exemplified here by Cu2 and Co2+. PMID:668688

  14. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  15. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  16. Identification of amino acid residues in Streptococcus mutans glucosyltransferases influencing the structure of the glucan product.

    PubMed Central

    Shimamura, A; Nakano, Y J; Mukasa, H; Kuramitsu, H K

    1994-01-01

    The glucosyltransferases (GTFs) of mutans streptococci are important virulence factors in the sucrose-dependent colonization of tooth surfaces by these organisms. To investigate the structure-function relationship of the GTFs, an approach was initiated to identify amino acid residues of the GTFs which affect the incorporation of glucose residues into the glucan polymer. Conserved amino acid residues were identified in the GTF-S and GTF-I enzymes of the mutans streptococci and were selected for site-directed mutagenesis in the corresponding enzymes from Streptococcus mutans GS5. Conversion of six amino acid residues of the GTF-I enzyme to those present at the corresponding positions in GTF-S, either singly or in multiple combinations, resulted in enzymes synthesizing increased levels of soluble glucans. The enzyme containing six alterations synthesized 73% water-soluble glucan in the absence of acceptor dextran T10, while parental enzyme GTF-I synthesized no such glucan product. Conversely, when residue 589 of the GTF-S enzyme was converted from Thr to either Asp or Glu, the resulting enzyme synthesized primarily water-insoluble glucan in the absence of the acceptor. Therefore, this approach has identified several amino acid positions which influence the nature of the glucan product synthesized by GTFs. PMID:8050997

  17. Functional analyses of carnivorous plant-specific amino acid residues in S-like ribonucleases.

    PubMed

    Arai, Naoki; Nishimura, Emi; Kikuchi, Yo; Ohyama, Takashi

    2015-09-11

    Unlike plants with no carnivory, carnivorous plants seem to use S-like ribonucleases (RNases) as an enzyme for carnivory. Carnivorous plant-specific conserved amino acid residues are present at four positions around the conserved active site (CAS). The roles of these conserved amino acid residues in the enzymatic function were explored in the current study by preparing five recombinant variants of DA-I, the S-like RNase of Drosera adelae. The kcat and kcat/Km values of the enzymes revealed that among the four variants with a single mutation, the serine to glycine mutation at position 111 most negatively influenced the enzymatic activity. The change in the bulkiness of the amino acid residue side-chain seemed to be the major cause of the above effect. Modeling of the three dimensional (3D) structures strongly suggested that the S to G mutation at 111 greatly altered the overall enzyme conformation. The conserved four amino acid residues are likely to function in keeping the two histidine residues, which are essential for the cleavage of RNA strands, and the CAS in the most functional enzymatic conformation. PMID:26235877

  18. New charge-bearing amino acid residues that promote β-sheet secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Stacy J; Almeida, Aaron M; Yoshimi, Yasuharu; Gellman, Samuel H

    2014-11-26

    Proteinogenic amino acid residues that promote β-sheet secondary structure are hydrophobic (e.g., Ile or Val) or only moderately polar (e.g., Thr). The design of peptides intended to display β-sheet secondary structure in water typically requires one set of residues to ensure conformational stability and an orthogonal set, with charged side chains, to ensure aqueous solubility and discourage self-association. Here we describe new amino acids that manifest substantial β-sheet propensity, by virtue of β-branching, and also bear an ionizable group in the side chain. PMID:25393077

  19. Ultrasensitive nucleic acid sequence detection by single-molecule electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A; Shera, E.B.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year laboratory-directed research and development project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. There has been considerable interest in the development of very sensitive clinical diagnostic techniques over the last few years. Many pathogenic agents are often present in extremely small concentrations in clinical samples, especially at the initial stages of infection, making their detection very difficult. This project sought to develop a new technique for the detection and accurate quantification of specific bacterial and viral nucleic acid sequences in clinical samples. The scheme involved the use of novel hybridization probes for the detection of nucleic acids combined with our recently developed technique of single-molecule electrophoresis. This project is directly relevant to the DOE`s Defense Programs strategic directions in the area of biological warfare counter-proliferation.

  20. Prediction of nucleic acid binding probability in proteins: a neighboring residue network based score.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2015-06-23

    We describe a general binding score for predicting the nucleic acid binding probability in proteins. The score is directly derived from physicochemical and evolutionary features and integrates a residue neighboring network approach. Our process achieves stable and high accuracies on both DNA- and RNA-binding proteins and illustrates how the main driving forces for nucleic acid binding are common. Because of the effective integration of the synergetic effects of the network of neighboring residues and the fact that the prediction yields a hierarchical scoring on the protein surface, energy funnels for nucleic acid binding appear on protein surfaces, pointing to the dynamic process occurring in the binding of nucleic acids to proteins. PMID:25940624

  1. Prediction of nucleic acid binding probability in proteins: a neighboring residue network based score

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We describe a general binding score for predicting the nucleic acid binding probability in proteins. The score is directly derived from physicochemical and evolutionary features and integrates a residue neighboring network approach. Our process achieves stable and high accuracies on both DNA- and RNA-binding proteins and illustrates how the main driving forces for nucleic acid binding are common. Because of the effective integration of the synergetic effects of the network of neighboring residues and the fact that the prediction yields a hierarchical scoring on the protein surface, energy funnels for nucleic acid binding appear on protein surfaces, pointing to the dynamic process occurring in the binding of nucleic acids to proteins. PMID:25940624

  2. Amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of human factor VII sub a from plasma and transfected baby hamster kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thim, L.; Bjoern, S.; Christensen, M.; Nicolaisen, E.M.; Lund-Hansen, T.; Pedersen, A.H.; Hedner, U. )

    1988-10-04

    Blood coagulation factor VII is a vitamin K dependent glycoprotein which in its activated form, factor VII{sub a}, participates in the coagulation process by activating factor X and/or factor IX in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} and tissue factor. Three types of potential posttranslational modifications exist in the human factor VII{sub a} molecule, namely, 10 {gamma}-carboxylated, N-terminally located glutamic acid residues, 1 {beta}-hydroxylated aspartic acid residue, and 2 N-glycosylated asparagine residues. In the present study, the amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of recombinant factor VII{sub a} as purified from the culture medium of a transfected baby hamster kidney cell line have been compared to human plasma factor VII{sub a}. By use of HPLC, amino acid analysis, peptide mapping, and automated Edman degradation, the protein backbone of recombinant factor VII{sub a} was found to be identical with human factor VII{sub a}. Asparagine residues 145 and 322 were found to be fully N-glycosylated in human plasma factor VII{sub a}. In the recombinant factor VII{sub a}, asparagine residue 322 was fully glycosylated whereas asparagine residue 145 was only partially (approximately 66%) glycosylated. Besides minor differences in the sialic acid and fucose contents, the overall carbohydrate compositions were nearly identical in recombinant factor VII{sub a} and human plasma factor VII{sub a}. These results show that factor VII{sub a} as produced in the transfected baby hamster kidney cells is very similar to human plasma factor VII{sub a} and that this cell line thus might represent an alternative source for human factor VII{sub a}.

  3. Does the autoantibody immunodominant region on thyroid peroxidase include amino acid residues 742-771?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Z; Farilla, L; Guo, J; McLachlan, S; Rapoport, B

    2001-03-01

    Identification of the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) amino acid residues that comprise the autoantibody immunodominant region is an important goal that has proven difficult because of the conformational nature of the epitopes involved. Recent data suggest that the immunodominant region has been located. Thus, by autoantibody recognition of tryptic fragments of native TPO, as well as of conformational portions of TPO expressed as cell-free translates, the autoantibody immunodominant region appears to include amino acid residues 742-771, near the C terminus of the ectodomain. To evaluate this deduction, we expressed as cell-free translates the full TPO ectodomain, as well as TPO truncated after residues 741 and 771. The epitopic integrity of these molecules was first confirmed by immunoprecipitation by patient sera containing TPO autoantibodies. However, autoantibody recognition could involve a minority of TPO autoantibodies with the individual sera, not fulfilling the strict criteria for immunodominance. In order to obtain definitive data, we performed immunoprecipitations on these TPO variants with four recombinant human monoclonal autoantibodies that define the immunodominant region. All four monoclonal autoantibodies immunoprecipitated TPO 1-741 to the same extent as they did TPO 1-771 and the full TPO ectodomain, indicating that the immunodominant region comprises (at least in large part) amino acid residues upstream of residue 741. PMID:11327613

  4. Unconventional amino acid sequence of the sun anemone (Stoichactis helianthus) polypeptide neurotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Kem, W.; Dunn, B.; Parten, B.; Pennington, M.; Price, D.

    1986-05-01

    A 5000 dalton polypeptide neurotoxin (Sh-NI) purified by G50 Sephadex, P-cellulose, and SP-Sephadex chromatography was homogeneous by isoelectric focusing. Sh-NI was highly toxic to crayfish (LD/sub 50/ 0.6 ..mu..g/kg) but without effect upon mice at 15,000 ..mu..g/kg (i.p. injection). The reduced, /sup 3/H-carboxymethylated toxin and its fragments were subjected to automatic Edman degradation and the resulting PTH-amino acids were identified by HPLC, back hydrolysis, and scintillation counting. Peptides resulting from proteolytic (clostripain, staphylococcal protease) and chemical (tryptophan) cleavage were sequenced. The sequence is: AACKCDDEGPDIRTAPLTGTVDLGSCNAGWEKCASYYTIIADCCRKKK. This sequence differs considerably from the homologous Anemonia and Anthopleura toxins; many of the identical residues (6 half-cystines, G9, P10, R13, G19, G29, W30) are probably critical for folding rather than receptor recognition. However, the Sh-NI sequence closely resembles Radioanthus macrodactylus neurotoxin III and r. paumotensis II. The authors propose that Sh-NI and related Radioanthus toxins act upon a different site on the sodium channel.

  5. Recent Galaxy Mergers and Residual Star Formation of Red Sequence Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Ree, Chang H.; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-08-01

    This study explored the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in four rich Abell clusters at z≤slant 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r\\prime colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5), and that number was doubled (∼72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5 × R 200. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R 200. We performed a Dressler–Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the substructures in the galaxy clusters. Within R 200 of each cluster, the RSF galaxies did not appear to be preferentially related to the clusters’ substructures. Our results suggested that only 30% of RSF red sequence galaxies show morphological hints of recent galaxy mergers. This implies that internal processes (e.g., stellar mass loss or hot gas cooling) for the supply of cold gas to early-type galaxies may play a significant role in the residual star formation of early-type galaxies at a recent epoch.

  6. Recent Galaxy Mergers and Residual Star Formation of Red Sequence Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Ree, Chang H.; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-08-01

    This study explored the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in four rich Abell clusters at z≤slant 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r\\prime colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5), and that number was doubled (˜72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5 × R 200. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R 200. We performed a Dressler–Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the substructures in the galaxy clusters. Within R 200 of each cluster, the RSF galaxies did not appear to be preferentially related to the clusters’ substructures. Our results suggested that only 30% of RSF red sequence galaxies show morphological hints of recent galaxy mergers. This implies that internal processes (e.g., stellar mass loss or hot gas cooling) for the supply of cold gas to early-type galaxies may play a significant role in the residual star formation of early-type galaxies at a recent epoch.

  7. Multiple Roles of the Extracellular Vestibule Amino Acid Residues in the Function of the Rat P2X4 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Rokic, Milos B.; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Vavra, Vojtech; Kuzyk, Pavlo; Tvrdonova, Vendula; Zemkova, Hana

    2013-01-01

    The binding of ATP to trimeric P2X receptors (P2XR) causes an enlargement of the receptor extracellular vestibule, leading to opening of the cation-selective transmembrane pore, but specific roles of vestibule amino acid residues in receptor activation have not been evaluated systematically. In this study, alanine or cysteine scanning mutagenesis of V47–V61 and F324–N338 sequences of rat P2X4R revealed that V49, Y54, Q55, F324, and G325 mutants were poorly responsive to ATP and trafficking was only affected by the V49 mutation. The Y54F and Y54W mutations, but not the Y54L mutation, rescued receptor function, suggesting that an aromatic residue is important at this position. Furthermore, the Y54A and Y54C receptor function was partially rescued by ivermectin, a positive allosteric modulator of P2X4R, suggesting a rightward shift in the potency of ATP to activate P2X4R. The Q55T, Q55N, Q55E, and Q55K mutations resulted in non-responsive receptors and only the Q55E mutant was ivermectin-sensitive. The F324L, F324Y, and F324W mutations also rescued receptor function partially or completely, ivermectin action on channel gating was preserved in all mutants, and changes in ATP responsiveness correlated with the hydrophobicity and side chain volume of the substituent. The G325P mutant had a normal response to ATP, suggesting that G325 is a flexible hinge. A topological analysis revealed that the G325 and F324 residues disrupt a β-sheet upon ATP binding. These results indicate multiple roles of the extracellular vestibule amino acid residues in the P2X4R function: the V49 residue is important for receptor trafficking to plasma membrane, the Y54 and Q55 residues play a critical role in channel gating and the F324 and G325 residues are critical for vestibule widening. PMID:23555667

  8. Protein reactivity with singlet oxygen: Influence of the solvent exposure of the reactive amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Béatrice; Foley, Sarah; Staicu, Angela; Pascu, Alexandru; Pascu, Mihail; Enescu, Mironel

    2016-06-01

    The singlet oxygen quenching rate constants were measured for three model proteins, bovine serum albumin, β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme. The results were analyzed by comparing them with the corresponding singlet oxygen quenching rate constants for a series of tripeptides with the basic formula GlyAAGly where the central amino acid (AA) was the oxidizable amino acid, tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and histidine. It was found that the reaction rate constant in proteins can be satisfactorily modelled by the sum of the individual contributions of the oxidizable AA residues corrected for the solvent accessible surface area (SASA) effects. The best results were obtained when the SASA of the AA residues were determined by averaging over molecular dynamics simulated trajectories of the proteins. The limits of this geometrical correction of the AA residue reactivity are also discussed. PMID:27045278

  9. Isoelectric Point, Electric Charge, and Nomenclature of the Acid-Base Residues of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado, Andres A.; Ribeiro, Joao M.; Sillero, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The main object of this work is to present the pedagogical usefulness of the theoretical methods, developed in this laboratory, for the determination of the isoelectric point (pI) and the net electric charge of proteins together with some comments on the naming of the acid-base residues of proteins. (Contains 8 figures and 4 tables.)

  10. The amino acid sequence of protein SCMK-B2A from the high-sulphur fraction of wool keratin

    PubMed Central

    Elleman, T. C.

    1972-01-01

    1. The amino acid sequence of protein SCMK-B2A, a reduced and S-carboxymethylated protein from the high-sulphur fraction of wool, has been determined. 2. This protein of 171 amino acid residues displays both a high degree of internal homology and extensive external homology with other members of the SCMK-B2 group of proteins. 3. Evidence is presented which suggests that the SCMK-B2 group of proteins are produced by separate non-allelic genes. ImagesPLATE 1 PMID:4679226

  11. Effect of the replacement of aspartic acid/glutamic acid residues with asparagine/glutamine residues in RNase He1 from Hericium erinaceus on inhibition of human leukemia cell line proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroko; Motoyoshi, Naomi; Itagaki, Tadashi; Suzuki, Mamoru; Inokuchi, Norio

    2015-01-01

    RNase He1 from Hericium erinaceus, a member of the RNase T1 family, has high identity with RNase Po1 from Pleurotus ostreatus with complete conservation of the catalytic sequence. However, the optimal pH for RNase He1 activity is lower than that of RNase Po1, and the enzyme shows little inhibition of human tumor cell proliferation. Hence, to investigate the potential antitumor activity of recombinant RNase He1 and to possibly enhance its optimum pH, we generated RNase He1 mutants by replacing 12 Asn/Gln residues with Asp/Glu residues; the amino acid sequence of RNase Po1 was taken as reference. These mutants were then expressed in Escherichia coli. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we successfully modified the optimal pH for enzyme activity and generated a recombinant RNase He1 that inhibited the proliferation of cells in the human leukemia cell line. These properties are extremely important in the production of anticancer biologics that are based on RNase activity. PMID:25338779

  12. Homology analyses of the protein sequences of fatty acid synthases from chicken liver, rat mammary gland, and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Soo-Ik ); Hammes, G.G. )

    1989-11-01

    Homology analyses of the protein sequences of chicken liver and rat mammary gland fatty acid synthases were carried out. The amino acid sequences of the chicken and rat enzymes are 67% identical. If conservative substitutions are allowed, 78% of the amino acids are matched. A region of low homologies exists between the functional domains, in particular around amino acid residues 1059-1264 of the chicken enzyme. Homologies between the active sites of chicken and rat and of chicken and yeast enzymes have been analyzed by an alignment method. A high degree of homology exists between the active sites of the chicken and rat enzymes. However, the chicken and yeast enzymes show a lower degree of homology. The DADPH-binding dinucleotide folds of the {beta}-ketoacyl reductase and the enoyl reductase sites were identified by comparison with a known consensus sequence for the DADP- and FAD-binding dinucleotide folds. The active sites of all of the enzymes are primarily in hydrophobic regions of the protein. This study suggests that the genes for the functional domains of fatty acid synthase were originally separated, and these genes were connected to each other by using different connecting nucleotide sequences in different species. An alternative explanation for the differences in rat and chicken is a common ancestry and mutations in the joining regions during evolution.

  13. Residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential decreases unsaturated fatty acid level in sake yeast during alcoholic fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Kazutaka

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen, a key nutrient in alcoholic fermentation, is rapidly depleted during this process. Several pathways of oxygen utilization have been reported in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation, namely synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid, sterols and heme, and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. However, the interaction between these pathways has not been investigated. In this study, we showed that the major proportion of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids in sake fermentation mash is derived from the sake yeast rather than from rice or koji (rice fermented with Aspergillus). Additionally, during alcoholic fermentation, inhibition of the residual mitochondrial activity of sake yeast increases the levels of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids. These findings indicate that the residual activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain reduces molecular oxygen levels and decreases the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, thereby increasing the synthesis of estery flavors by sake yeast. This is the first report of a novel link between residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids by the brewery yeast during alcoholic fermentation. PMID:26839744

  14. Residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential decreases unsaturated fatty acid level in sake yeast during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Kazutaka; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen, a key nutrient in alcoholic fermentation, is rapidly depleted during this process. Several pathways of oxygen utilization have been reported in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation, namely synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid, sterols and heme, and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. However, the interaction between these pathways has not been investigated. In this study, we showed that the major proportion of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids in sake fermentation mash is derived from the sake yeast rather than from rice or koji (rice fermented with Aspergillus). Additionally, during alcoholic fermentation, inhibition of the residual mitochondrial activity of sake yeast increases the levels of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids. These findings indicate that the residual activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain reduces molecular oxygen levels and decreases the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, thereby increasing the synthesis of estery flavors by sake yeast. This is the first report of a novel link between residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids by the brewery yeast during alcoholic fermentation. PMID:26839744

  15. Thermostability Improvement of a Streptomyces Xylanase by Introducing Proline and Glutamic Acid Residues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Tian, Jian; Turunen, Ossi; Huang, Huoqing; Shi, Pengjun; Hua, Huifang; Wang, Caihong; Wang, Shuanghe

    2014-01-01

    Protein engineering is commonly used to improve the robustness of enzymes for activity and stability at high temperatures. In this study, we identified four residues expected to affect the thermostability of Streptomyces sp. strain S9 xylanase XynAS9 through multiple-sequence analysis (MSA) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS). Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to construct five mutants by replacing these residues with proline or glutamic acid (V81P, G82E, V81P/G82E, D185P/S186E, and V81P/G82E/D185P/S186E), and the mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in Pichia pastoris. Compared to the wild-type XynAS9, all five mutant enzymes showed improved thermal properties. The activity and stability assays, including circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry, showed that the mutations at positions 81 and 82 increased the thermal performance more than the mutations at positions 185 and 186. The mutants with combined substitutions (V81P/G82E and V81P/G82E/D185P/S186E) showed the most pronounced shifts in temperature optima, about 17°C upward, and their half-lives for thermal inactivation at 70°C and melting temperatures were increased by >9 times and approximately 7.0°C, respectively. The mutation combination of V81P and G82E in adjacent positions more than doubled the effect of single mutations. Both mutation regions were at the end of long secondary-structure elements and probably rigidified the local structure. MDS indicated that a long loop region after positions 81 and 82 located at the end of the inner β-barrel was prone to unfold. The rigidified main chain and filling of a groove by the mutations on the bottom of the active site canyon may stabilize the mutants and thus improve their thermostability. PMID:24463976

  16. cDNA cloning and structural characterization of a lectin from the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus with a unique amino acid sequence and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Svetlana N; Chikalovets, Irina V; Chernikov, Oleg V; Molchanova, Valentina I; Li, Wei; Rasskazov, Valery A; Lukyanov, Pavel A

    2013-10-01

    An amino acid sequence of GalNAc/Gal-specific lectin from the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus (CGL) was determined by cDNA sequencing. CGL consists of 150 amino acid residues, contains three tandem repeats with high sequence similarities to each other (up to 73%) and does not belong to any known lectins family. According to circular dichroism results CGL is a β/α-protein with the predominance of β-structure. CGL was predicted to adopt a ß-trefoil fold. The lectin exhibits antibacterial activity and might be involved in the recognition and clearance of bacterial pathogens in the shellfish. PMID:23886951

  17. Primary structure of a histidine-rich proteolytic fragment of human ceruloplasmin. I. Amino acid sequence of the cyanogen bromide peptides.

    PubMed

    Kingston, I B; Kingston, B L; Putnam, F W

    1980-04-10

    A histidine-rich fragment, Cp F5, with a molecular weight of 18,650 was isolated from human ceruloplasmin. It consists of 159 amino acids and contains a possible copper-binding site. The sequence of the first 18 NH2-terminal residues of Cp F5 was determined by automated Edman degradation. Cp F5 was cleaved by cyanogen bromide to produce nine fragments of from 2 to 63 residues. The amino acid sequence of all of the cyanogen bromide fragments was investigated using automated and manual Edman degradation, the fragments being digested with trypsin, chymotrypsin, thermolysin, staphylococcal protease, and pepsin as appropriate. The results, in conjunction with the data on the tryptic peptides reported in the accompanying paper (Kingston, I.B., Kingston, B.L., and Putnam, F.L. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 2886-2896), establish the complete amino acid sequence of Cp F5. PMID:6987229

  18. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... in the sequence. (4) The enumeration of amino acids may start at the first amino acid of the first..., counting backwards starting with the amino acid next to number 1. Otherwise, the enumeration of amino acids... sequence every 5 amino acids. The enumeration method for amino acid sequences that is set forth......

  19. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in the sequence. (4) The enumeration of amino acids may start at the first amino acid of the first..., counting backwards starting with the amino acid next to number 1. Otherwise, the enumeration of amino acids... sequence every 5 amino acids. The enumeration method for amino acid sequences that is set forth......

  20. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in the sequence. (4) The enumeration of amino acids may start at the first amino acid of the first..., counting backwards starting with the amino acid next to number 1. Otherwise, the enumeration of amino acids... sequence every 5 amino acids. The enumeration method for amino acid sequences that is set forth......

  1. Intramolecular cyclization of aspartic acid residues assisted by three water molecules: a density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota

    2014-01-01

    Aspartic acid (Asp) residues in peptides and proteins (l-Asp) are known to undergo spontaneous nonenzymatic reactions to form l-β-Asp, d-Asp, and d-β-Asp residues. The formation of these abnormal Asp residues in proteins may affect their three-dimensional structures and hence their properties and functions. Indeed, the reactions have been thought to contribute to aging and pathologies. Most of the above reactions of the l-Asp residues proceed via a cyclic succinimide intermediate. In this paper, a novel three-water-assisted mechanism is proposed for cyclization of an Asp residue (forming a gem-diol precursor of the succinimide) by the B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) density functional theory calculations carried out for an Asp-containing model compound (Ace-Asp-Nme, where Ace = acetyl and Nme = NHCH3). The three water molecules act as catalysts by mediating ‘long-range’ proton transfers. In the proposed mechanism, the amide group on the C-terminal side of the Asp residue is first converted to the tautomeric iminol form (iminolization). Then, reorientation of a water molecule and a conformational change occur successively, followed by the nucleophilic attack of the iminol nitrogen on the carboxyl carbon of the Asp side chain to form the gem-diol species. A satisfactory agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental energetics.

  2. A novel sono-assisted acid pretreatment of chili post harvest residue for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, Raveendran; Binod, Parameswaran; Pandey, Ashok

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a sono-assisted acid pretreatment strategy for the effective removal of lignin and hemicelluloses and to improve the sugar yield from chili post harvest residue. Operational parameters that affect the pretreatment efficiency were studied and optimized. Inhibitor analysis of the hydrolyzate revealed that major fermentation inhibitors like furfural, hydroxymethyl furfural and organic acids like citric acid, succinic acid and propionic acid were absent. Changes in structural properties of the biomass were studied in relation to the pretreatment process using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis, and the changes in chemical composition was also monitored. The biomass pretreated with the optimized novel method yielded 0.465g/g of reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis. Fermentation of the non-detoxified hydrolysate yielded 2.14% of bioethanol with a fermentation efficiency of 71.03%. PMID:26949055

  3. Predicting protein disorder by analyzing amino acid sequence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu

    2008-01-01

    Background Many protein regions and some entire proteins have no definite tertiary structure, presenting instead as dynamic, disorder ensembles under different physiochemical circumstances. These proteins and regions are known as Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins (IUP). IUP have been associated with a wide range of protein functions, along with roles in diseases characterized by protein misfolding and aggregation. Results Identifying IUP is important task in structural and functional genomics. We exact useful features from sequences and develop machine learning algorithms for the above task. We compare our IUP predictor with PONDRs (mainly neural-network-based predictors), disEMBL (also based on neural networks) and Globplot (based on disorder propensity). Conclusion We find that augmenting features derived from physiochemical properties of amino acids (such as hydrophobicity, complexity etc.) and using ensemble method proved beneficial. The IUP predictor is a viable alternative software tool for identifying IUP protein regions and proteins. PMID:18831799

  4. Amino acid sequences of two novel long-chain neurotoxins from the venom of the sea snake Laticauda colubrina.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Tamiya, N

    1982-11-01

    From the venom of a population of the sea snake Laticauda colubrina from the Solomon Islands, a neurotoxic component, Laticauda colubrina a (toxin Lc a), was isolated in 16.6% (A280) yield. Similarly, from the venom of a population of L. colubrina from the Philippines, a neurotoxic component, Laticauda colubrina b (toxin Lc b), was obtained in 10.0% (A280) yield. The LD50 values of these toxins were 0.12 microgram/g body wt. on intramuscular injection in mice. Toxins Lc a and Lc b were each composed of molecules containing 69 amino acid residues with eight half-cystine residues. The complete amino acid sequences of these two toxins were elucidated. Toxins Lc a and Lc b are different from each other at five positions of their sequences, namely at positions 31 (Phe/Ser), 32 (Leu/Ile), 33 (Lys/Arg), 50 (Pro/Arg) and 53 (Asp/His) (residues in parentheses give the residues in toxins Lc a and Lc b respectively). Toxins Lc a and Lc b have a novel structure in that they have only four disulphide bridges, although the whole amino acid sequences are homologous to those of other known long-chain neurotoxins. It is remarkable that toxins Lc a and Lc b are not coexistent at the detection error of 6% of the other toxin. Populations of Laticauda colubrina from the Solomon Islands and from the Philippines have either toxin Lc a or toxin Lc b and not both of them. PMID:7159381

  5. Specific DNA binding to a major histocompatibility complex enhancer sequence by a synthetic 57-residue double zinc finger peptide from a human enhancer binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Omichinski, J G; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M

    1991-04-15

    Two 57-residue peptides containing one pair of "zinc fingers" from a human enhancer binding protein were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. One peptide (MBP-DF) contained the native sequence, while the second peptide ([Abu11]MBP-DF) has an alpha-aminobutyric acid residue substituted for a nonconserved cysteine residue at position 11. The peptides were characterized by several chemical and physical methods, and their DNA binding properties were evaluated using gel retardation experiments. Spectroscopic studies demonstrated that addition of metal ions such as zinc and cobalt resulted in specific conformational changes in both peptides, indicating that cysteine-11 does not appear to be involved in metal chelation. One-dimensional 1H NMR studies indicate that a stable folded structure is formed upon addition of zinc, and the chemical shift pattern is consistent with that previously observed for one constituent single finger (Omichinski, J., Clore, G. M., Appella, E., Sakaguchi, K., and Gronenborn, A. M. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 9324-9334). Gel retardation experiments demonstrate that the peptides are capable of interacting with a 15-mer oligonucleotide comprising a portion of the major histocompatibility complex enhancer sequence and that the interaction is zinc-dependent. The dissociation constant for the [Abu11]MBP-DF peptide is 1.4 x 10(-7) M with maximal binding occurring at a zinc-to-peptide ratio of 2 to 1. The binding specificity observed with respect to related enhancer sequences exhibits the same relative order as noted previously for the whole protein. Studies with point mutants of the major histocompatibility complex enhancer binding sequence indicate that the last GC base pair in a four-guanine stretch plays a pivotal role in the interaction between the peptide and DNA. PMID:2016331

  6. Bile acid sulfotransferase I from rat liver sulfates bile acids and 3-hydroxy steroids: purification, N-terminal amino acid sequence, and kinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Barnes, S; Buchina, E S; King, R J; McBurnett, T; Taylor, K B

    1989-04-01

    A bile acid:3'phosphoadenosine-5'phosphosulfate:sulfotransferase (BAST I) from adult female rat liver cytosol has been purified 157-fold by a two-step isolation procedure. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 30,000 subunit has been determined for the first 35 residues. The Vmax of purified BAST I is 18.7 nmol/min per mg protein with N-(3-hydroxy-5 beta-cholanoyl)glycine (glycolithocholic acid) as substrate, comparable to that of the corresponding purified human BAST (Chen, L-J., and I. H. Segel, 1985. Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 241: 371-379). BAST I activity has a broad pH optimum from 5.5-7.5. Although maximum activity occurs with 5 mM MgCl2, Mg2+ is not essential for BAST I activity. The greatest sulfotransferase activity and the highest substrate affinity is observed with bile acids or steroids that have a steroid nucleus containing a 3 beta-hydroxy group and a 5-6 double bond or a trans A-B ring junction. These substrates have normal hyperbolic initial velocity curves with substrate inhibition occurring above 5 microM. Of the saturated 5 beta-bile acids, those with a single 3-hydroxy group are the most active. The addition of a second hydroxy group at the 6- or 7-position eliminates more than 99% of the activity. In contrast, 3 alpha,12 alpha-dihydroxy-5 beta-cholan-24-oic acid (deoxycholic acid) is an excellent substrate. The initial velocity curves for glycolithocholic and deoxycholic acid conjugates are sigmoidal rather than hyperbolic, suggestive of an allosteric effect. Maximum activity is observed at 80 microM for glycolithocholic acid. All substrates, bile acids and steroids, are inhibited by the 5 beta-bile acid, 3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid. The data suggest that BAST I is the same protein as hydrosteroid sulfotransferase 2 (Marcus, C. J., et al. 1980. Anal. Biochem. 107: 296-304). PMID:2754334

  7. Amino acid sequence of the serine-repeat antigen (SERA) of Plasmodium falciparum determined from cloned cDNA.

    PubMed

    Bzik, D J; Li, W B; Horii, T; Inselburg, J

    1988-09-01

    We report the isolation of cDNA clones for a Plasmodium falciparum gene that encodes the complete amino acid sequence of a previously identified exported blood stage antigen. The Mr of this antigen protein had been determined by sodium dodecylsulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis, by different workers, to be 113,000, 126,000, and 140,000. We show, by cDNA nucleotide sequence analysis, that this antigen gene encodes a 989 amino acid protein (111 kDa) that contains a potential signal peptide, but not a membrane anchor domain. In the FCR3 strain the serine content of the protein was 11%, of which 57% of the serine residues were localized within a 201 amino acid sequence that included 35 consecutive serine residues. The protein also contained three possible N-linked glycosylation sites and numerous possible O-linked glycosylation sites. The mRNA was abundant during late trophozoite-schizont parasite stages. We propose to identity this antigen, which had been called p126, by the acronym SERA, serine-repeat antigen, based on its complete structure. The usefulness of the cloned cDNA as a source of a possible malaria vaccine is considered in view of the previously demonstrated ability of the antigen to induce parasite-inhibitory antibodies and a protective immune response in Saimiri monkeys. PMID:2847041

  8. Characterization of N-glycosylation and amino acid sequence features of immunoglobulins from swine.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Paul G; Girard, Lauren; Buist, Marjorie; de Oliveira, Andrey Giovanni Gomes; Bodnar, Edward; Salama, Apolline; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Perreault, Hélène

    2016-02-01

    The primary goal of this study was to develop a method to study the N-glycosylation of IgG from swine in order to detect epitopes containing N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) and/or terminal galactose residues linked in α1-3 susceptible to cause xenograft-related problems. Samples of immunoglobulin were isolated from porcine serum using protein-A affinity chromatography. The eluate was then separated on electrophoretic gel, and bands corresponding to the N-glycosylated heavy chains were cut off the gel and subjected to tryptic digestion. Peptides and glycopeptides were separated by reversed phase liquid chromatography and fractions were collected for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis. Overall no α1-3 galactose was detected, as demonstrated by complete susceptibility of terminal galactose residues to β-galactosidase digestion. Neu5Gc was detected on singly sialylated structures. Two major N-glycopeptides were found, EEQFNSTYR and EAQFNSTYR as determined by tandem MS (MS/MS), as previously reported by Butler et al. (Immunogenetics, 61, 2009, 209-230), who found 11 subclasses for porcine IgG. Out of the 11, ten include the sequence corresponding to EEQFNSTYR, and only one codes for EAQFNSTYR. In this study, glycosylation patterns associated with both chains were slightly different, in that EEQFNSTYR had a higher content of galactose. The last step of this study consisted of peptide-mapping the 11 reported porcine IgG sequences. Although there was considerable overlap, at least one unique tryptic peptide was found per IgG sequence. The workflow presented in this manuscript constitutes the first study to use MALDI-TOF-MS in the investigation of porcine IgG structural features. PMID:26586247

  9. Amino acid sequences of lysozymes newly purified from invertebrates imply wide distribution of a novel class in the lysozyme family.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Yoshikawa, A; Hotani, T; Fukuda, S; Sugimura, K; Imoto, T

    1999-01-01

    Lysozymes were purified from three invertebrates: a marine bivalve, a marine conch, and an earthworm. The purified lysozymes all showed a similar molecular weight of 13 kDa on SDS/PAGE. Their N-terminal sequences up to the 33rd residue determined here were apparently homologous among them; in addition, they had a homology with a partial sequence of a starfish lysozyme which had been reported before. The complete sequence of the bivalve lysozyme was determined by peptide mapping and subsequent sequence analysis. This was composed of 123 amino acids including as many as 14 cysteine residues and did not show a clear homology with the known types of lysozymes. However, the homology search of this protein on the protein or nucleic acid database revealed two homologous proteins. One of them was a gene product, CELF22 A3.6 of C. elegans, which was a functionally unknown protein. The other was an isopeptidase of a medicinal leech, named destabilase. Thus, a new type of lysozyme found in at least four species across the three classes of the invertebrates demonstrates a novel class of protein/lysozyme family in invertebrates. The bivalve lysozyme, first characterized here, showed extremely high protein stability and hen lysozyme-like enzymatic features. PMID:9914527

  10. Gastropod arginine kinases from Cellana grata and Aplysia kurodai. Isolation and cDNA-derived amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Inoue, N; Higashi, T; Mizobuchi, R; Sugimura, N; Yokouchi, K; Furukohri, T

    2000-12-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) was isolated from the radular muscle of the gastropod molluscs Cellana grata (subclass Prosobranchia) and Aplysia kurodai (subclass Opisthobranchia), respectively, by ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and DEAE-ion exchange chromatography. The denatured relative molecular mass values were estimated to be 40 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isolated enzyme from Aplysia gave a Km value of 0.6 mM for arginine and a Vmax value of 13 micromole Pi min(-1) mg protein(-1) for the forward reaction. These values are comparable to other molluscan AKs. The cDNAs encoding Cellana and Aplysia AKs were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the nucleotide sequences of 1,608 and 1,239 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Cellana AK is 1044 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 347 amino acid residues, and that for A. kurodai is 1077 nucleotides and 354 residues. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequences were validated by chemical sequencing of internal lysyl endopeptidase peptides. The amino acid sequences of Cellana and Aplysia AKs showed the highest percent identity (66-73%) with those of the abalone Nordotis and turbanshell Battilus belonging to the same class Gastropoda. These AK sequences still have a strong homology (63-71%) with that of the chiton Liolophura (class Polyplacophora), which is believed to be one of the most primitive molluscs. On the other hand, these AK sequences are less homologous (55-57%) with that of the clam Pseudocardium (class Bivalvia), suggesting that the biological position of the class Polyplacophora should be reconsidered. PMID:11281267

  11. The cyst wall of Colpoda steinii. A substance rich in glutamic acid residues

    PubMed Central

    Tibbs, J.

    1966-01-01

    1. The cyst wall of Colpoda steinii has been isolated and its chemical nature examined. It had a nitrogen content 13·9±0·2% (s.d.) and an ash 8·6±1·6% (s.d.). After lipid and hot-acid extraction there was a variable residual phosphorus of 0·19–0·64%. The protein nature, indicated by infrared and ultraviolet absorption, was confirmed when 100μg. of hydrolysed wall gave a ninhydrin colour equivalent to that given by 0·88–1·01μmoles of glycine. Hexosamine, hexose, pentose, lipid and dipicolinic acid were absent. 2. Paper chromatography of hydrolysates, besides showing the presence of the usual protein amino acids and three unidentified ninhydrin-reacting spots, indicated the presence of large amounts of glutamic acid. Estimated by chromatography, the amount present was 52·9±0·6 (s.d.) g./100g. of ash-free wall; manometric estimation of l-glutamic acid with l-glutamate 1-carboxy-lyase gave 46·5±0·9 (s.d.) g./100g. 3. Free carboxyl groups were estimated by titration as 0·159±0·011 (s.d.) mole/100g. and those present as amide as 0·154±0·004 (s.d.) mole/100g., and the total was compared with the dicarboxylic acid content 0·360±0·010 (s.d.) mole/100g. 4. After treatment with 98% formic acid 25–30% of the wall material could be extracted by 0·05m-sodium carbonate solution (extract 1); after treatment of the residue with performic acid a further 62–63% based on the original weight could be extracted by 0·05m-sodium carbonate (extract 2). 5. The average values found for the glutamic acid contents were 21·7g./100g. for extract 1 and 58·0g./100g. for extract 2. The cysteic acid content of whole oxidized wall was about 5·8g./100g. and of extract 2 also about 5·8g./100g. The glutamic acid and cysteic acid contents of the final residue were also investigated. 6. The significance of these extraction experiments in relation to the wall structure is discussed. ImagesPlate 1. PMID:4957913

  12. A genomic sequencing protocol that yields a positive display of 5-methylcytosine residues in individual DNA strands.

    PubMed Central

    Frommer, M; McDonald, L E; Millar, D S; Collis, C M; Watt, F; Grigg, G W; Molloy, P L; Paul, C L

    1992-01-01

    The modulation of DNA-protein interactions by methylation of protein-binding sites in DNA and the occurrence in genomic imprinting, X chromosome inactivation, and fragile X syndrome of different methylation patterns in DNA of different chromosomal origin have underlined the need to establish methylation patterns in individual strands of particular genomic sequences. We report a genomic sequencing method that provides positive identification of 5-methylcytosine residues and yields strand-specific sequences of individual molecules in genomic DNA. The method utilizes bisulfite-induced modification of genomic DNA, under conditions whereby cytosine is converted to uracil, but 5-methylcytosine remains nonreactive. The sequence under investigation is then amplified by PCR with two sets of strand-specific primers to yield a pair of fragments, one from each strand, in which all uracil and thymine residues have been amplified as thymine and only 5-methylcytosine residues have been amplified as cytosine. The PCR products can be sequenced directly to provide a strand-specific average sequence for the population of molecules or can be cloned and sequenced to provide methylation maps of single DNA molecules. We tested the method by defining the methylation status within single DNA strands of two closely spaced CpG dinucleotides in the promoter of the human kininogen gene. During the analysis, we encountered in sperm DNA an unusual methylation pattern, which suggests that the high methylation level of single-copy sequences in sperm may be locally modulated by binding of protein factors in germ-line cells. Images PMID:1542678

  13. Purification, Cloning, Characterization and Essential Amino Acid Residues Analysis of a New ι-Carrageenase from Cellulophaga sp. QY3

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Su; Duan, Gaofei; Chai, Wengang; Geng, Cunliang; Tan, Yulong; Wang, Lushan; Le Sourd, Frédéric; Michel, Gurvan; Yu, Wengong; Han, Feng

    2013-01-01

    ι-Carrageenases belong to family 82 of glycoside hydrolases that degrade sulfated galactans in the red algae known as ι-carrageenans. The catalytic mechanism and some substrate-binding residues of family GH82 have been studied but the substrate recognition and binding mechanism of this family have not been fully elucidated. We report here the purification, cloning and characterization of a new ι-carrageenase CgiA_Ce from the marine bacterium Cellulophaga sp. QY3. CgiA_Ce was the most thermostable carrageenase described so far. It was most active at 50°C and pH 7.0 and retained more than 70% of the original activity after incubation at 50°C for 1 h at pH 7.0 or at pH 5.0–10.6 for 24 h. CgiA_Ce was an endo-type ι-carrageenase; it cleaved ι-carrageenan yielding neo-ι-carrabiose and neo-ι-carratetraose as the main end products, and neo-ι-carrahexaose was the minimum substrate. Sequence analysis and structure modeling showed that CgiA_Ce is indeed a new member of family GH82. Moreover, sequence analysis of ι-carrageenases revealed that the amino acid residues at subsites −1 and +1 were more conserved than those at other subsites. Site-directed mutagenesis followed by kinetic analysis identified three strictly conserved residues at subsites −1 and +1 of ι-carrageenases, G228, Y229 and R254 in CgiA_Ce, which played important roles for substrate binding. Furthermore, our results suggested that Y229 and R254 in CgiA_Ce interacted specifically with the sulfate groups of the sugar moieties located at subsites −1 and +1, shedding light on the mechanism of ι-carrageenan recognition in the family GH82. PMID:23741363

  14. D-Amino acid residue in the C-type natriuretic peptide from the venom of the mammal, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, the Australian platypus.

    PubMed

    Torres, Allan M; Menz, Ian; Alewood, Paul F; Bansal, Paramjit; Lahnstein, Jelle; Gallagher, Clifford H; Kuchel, Philip W

    2002-07-31

    The C-type natriuretic peptide from the platypus venom (OvCNP) exists in two forms, OvCNPa and OvCNPb, whose amino acid sequences are identical. Through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, and peptidase digestion studies, we discovered that OvCNPb incorporates a D-amino acid at position 2 in the primary structure. Peptides containing a D-amino acid have been found in lower forms of organism, but this report is the first for a D-amino acid in a biologically active peptide from a mammal. The result implies the existence of a specific isomerase in the platypus that converts an L-amino acid residue in the protein to the D-configuration. PMID:12135762

  15. Cloning and nucleotide sequencing of a novel 7 beta-(4-carboxybutanamido)cephalosporanic acid acylase gene of Bacillus laterosporus and its expression in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Aramori, I; Fukagawa, M; Tsumura, M; Iwami, M; Ono, H; Kojo, H; Kohsaka, M; Ueda, Y; Imanaka, H

    1991-12-01

    A strain of Bacillus species which produced an enzyme named glutaryl 7-ACA acylase which converts 7 beta-(4-carboxybutanamido)cephalosporanic acid (glutaryl 7-ACA) to 7-amino cephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) was isolated from soil. The gene for the glutaryl 7-ACA acylase was cloned with pHSG298 in Escherichia coli JM109, and the nucleotide sequence was determined by the M13 dideoxy chain termination method. The DNA sequence revealed only one large open reading frame composed of 1,902 bp corresponding to 634 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence contained a potential signal sequence in its amino-terminal region. Expression of the gene for glutaryl 7-ACA acylase was performed in both E. coli and Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme preparations purified from either recombinant strain of E. coli or B. subtilis were shown to be identical with each other as regards the profile of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and were composed of a single peptide with the molecular size of 70 kDa. Determination of the amino-terminal sequence of the two enzyme preparations revealed that both amino-terminal sequences (the first nine amino acids) were identical and completely coincided with residues 28 to 36 of the open reading frame. Extracellular excretion of the enzyme was observed in a recombinant strain of B. subtilis. PMID:1744041

  16. Complete amino acid sequence of human plasma Zn-. cap alpha. /sub 2/-glycoprotein and its homology to histocompatibility antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, T.; Gejyo, F.; Takagaki, K.; Haupt, H.; Schwick, H.G.; Buergi, W.; Marti, T.; Schaller, J.; Rickli, E.; Brossmer, R.

    1988-02-01

    In the present study the complete amino acid sequence of human plasma Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein was determined. This protein whose biological function is unknown consists of a single polypeptide chain of 276 amino acid residues including 8 tryptophan residues and has a pyroglutamyl residue at the amino terminus. The location of the two disulfide bonds in the polypeptide chain was also established. The three glycans, whose structure was elucidated with the aid of 500 MHz /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy, were sialylated N-biantennas. The molecular weight calculated from the polypeptide and carbohydrate structure is 38,478, which is close to the reported value of approx. = 41,000 based on physicochemical measurements. The predicted secondary structure appeared to comprised of 23% ..cap alpha..-helix, 27% ..beta..-sheet, and 22% ..beta..-turns. The three N-glycans were found to be located in ..beta..-turn regions. An unexpected finding was made by computer analysis of the sequence data; this revealed that Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein is closely related to antigens of the major histocompatibility complex in amino acid sequence and in domain structure. There was an unusually high degree of sequence homology with the ..cap alpha.. chains of class I histocompatibility antigens. Moreover, this plasma protein was shown to be a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein appears to be truncated secretory major histocompatibility complex-related molecule, and it may have a role in the expression of the immune response.

  17. Identification of Catalytic Amino Acid Residues by Chemical Modification in Dextranase.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jin-A; Nam, Seung-Hee; Kim, Doman; Lee, Jun-Ho; Kim, Young-Min

    2016-05-28

    A novel endodextranase isolated from Paenibacillus sp. was found to produce isomaltotetraose and small amounts of cycloisomaltooligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization of 7-14 from dextran. To determine the active site, the enzyme was modified with 1-ethyl-3-[3- (dimethylamino)-propyl]-carbodiimide (EDC) and α-epoxyalkyl α-glucosides (EAGs), an affinity labeling reagent. The inactivation followed pseudo first-order kinetics. Kinetic analysis and chemical modification using EDC and EAGs indicated that carboxyl groups are essential for the enzymatic activity. Three Asp and one Glu residues were identified as candidate catalytic amino acids, since these residues are completely conserved across the GH family of 66 enzymes. Replacement of Asp189, Asp340, or Glu412 completely abolished the enzyme activity, indicating that these residues are essential for catalytic activity. PMID:26907761

  18. A sequence of basic residues in the porcine circovirus type 2 capsid protein is crucial for its co-expression and co-localization with the replication protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Renne, Nicolaas Van; Liu, Changming; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2015-12-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) encodes two major proteins: the replication protein (Rep) and the capsid protein (Cap). Cap displays a conserved stretch of basic residues situated on the inside of the capsid, whose role is so far unknown. We used a reverse-genetics approach to investigate its function and found that mutations in these amino acids hindered Cap mRNA translation and hampered Cap/Rep co-localization, yielding unfit viruses. Intriguingly, co-transfection with a WT PCV2 of a different genotype partially rescued mutant Cap expression, showing the importance of this basic pattern for efficient translation of Cap mRNA into protein. Our results show that Cap and Rep are expressed independently of each other, and that this amino acid sequence of Cap is vital for virus propagation. This study provides a method for studying unfit PCV2 virions and offers new insights into the intracellular modus vivendi of PCV2. PMID:26415571

  19. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp) residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe) as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA), which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition) to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds) occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism. PMID:25588215

  20. Amino acid sequence of rabbit kidney neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (enkephalinase) deduced from a complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Devault, A; Lazure, C; Nault, C; Le Moual, H; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M; Kahn, P; Powell, J; Mallet, J; Beaumont, A

    1987-01-01

    Neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11) is a major constituent of kidney brush border membranes. It is also present in the brain where it has been shown to be involved in the inactivation of opioid peptides, methionine- and leucine-enkephalins. For this reason this enzyme is often called 'enkephalinase'. In order to characterize the primary structure of the enzyme, oligonucleotide probes were designed from partial amino acid sequences and used to isolate clones from kidney cDNA libraries. Sequencing of the cDNA inserts revealed the complete primary structure of the enzyme. Neutral endopeptidase consists of 750 amino acids. It contains a short N-terminal cytoplasmic domain (27 amino acids), a single membrane-spanning segment (23 amino acids) and an extracellular domain that comprises most of the protein mass. The comparison of the primary structure of neutral endopeptidase with that of thermolysin, a bacterial Zn-metallopeptidase, indicates that most of the amino acid residues involved in Zn coordination and catalytic activity in thermolysin are found within highly honmologous sequences in neutral endopeptidase. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2440677

  1. G glycoprotein amino acid residues required for human monoclonal antibody RAB1 neutralization are conserved in rabies virus street isolates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Rowley, Kirk J; Booth, Brian J; Sloan, Susan E; Ambrosino, Donna M; Babcock, Gregory J

    2011-08-01

    Replacement of polyclonal anti-rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) used in rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) with a monoclonal antibody will eliminate cost and availability constraints that currently exist using RIG in the developing world. The human monoclonal antibody RAB1 has been shown to neutralize all rabies street isolates tested; however for the laboratory-adapted fixed strain, CVS-11, mutation in the G glycoprotein of amino acid 336 from asparagine (N) to aspartic acid (D) resulted in resistance to neutralization. Interestingly, this same mutation in the G glycoprotein of a second laboratory-adapted fixed strain (ERA) did not confer resistance to RAB1 neutralization. Using cell surface staining and lentivirus pseudotyped with rabies virus G glycoprotein (RABVpp), we identified an amino acid alteration in CVS-11 (K346), not present in ERA (R346), which was required in combination with D336 to confer resistance to RAB1. A complete analysis of G glycoprotein sequences from GenBank demonstrated that no identified rabies isolates contain the necessary combination of G glycoprotein mutations for resistance to RAB1 neutralization, consistent with the broad neutralization of RAB1 observed in direct viral neutralization experiments with street isolates. All combinations of amino acids 336 and 346 reported in the sequence database were engineered into the ERA G glycoprotein and RAB1 was able to neutralize RABVpp bearing ERA G glycoprotein containing all known combinations at these critical residues. These data demonstrate that RAB1 has the capacity to neutralize all identified rabies isolates and a minimum of two distinct mutations in the G glycoprotein are required for abrogation of RAB1 neutralization. PMID:21693135

  2. Camphorquinone-10-sulfonic acid and derivatives: convenient reagents for reversible modification of arginine residues

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, C.S.; Pelzig, M.; Glass, J.D.

    1980-02-01

    Camphorquinone-10-sulfonic acid hydrate was prepared by the action of selenous acid on camphor-10-sulfonic acid. Camphorquinone-10-sulfonylnorleucine was prepared either from the sulfonic acid via the sulfonyl chloride or by selenous acid oxidation of camphor-10-sulfonylnorleucine. These reagents are useful for specific, reversible modification of the guanidino groups of arginine residues. Camphorquinonsulfonic acid is a crystalline water-soluble reagent that is especially suitable for use with small arginine-containing molecules, because the sulfonic acid group of the reagent is a convenient handle for analytical and preparative separation of products. Camphorquinonesulfonylnorleucine is more useful for work with large polypeptides and proteins, because hydrolysates of modified proteins may be analyzed for norleucine to determine the extent of arginine modification. The adducts of the camphorquinone derivatives with the guanidino group are stable to 0.5 M hydroxylamine solutions at pH 7, the recommended conditions for cleavage of the corresponding cyclohexanedione adducts. At pH 8-9 the adducts of the camphorquinone derivatives with the guanidino group are cleaved by o-phenylenediamine. The modification and regeneration of arginine, of the dipeptide arginylaspartic acid, of ribonuclease S-peptide, and of soybean trypsin inhibitor are presented as demonstrations of the use of the reagents.The use of camphorquinonesulfonyl chloride to prepare polymers containing arginine-specific ligands is discussed.

  3. Ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase of Cyanophora paradoxa: purification, partial characterization, and N-terminal amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Gebhart, U B; Maier, T L; Stevanović, S; Bayer, M G; Schenk, H E

    1992-06-01

    The ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase of the protist Cyanophora paradoxa, as a descendant of a former symbiotic consortium, an important model organism in view of the Endosymbiosis Theory, is the first enzyme purified from a formerly original endocytobiont (cyanelle) that is found to be encoded in the nucleus of the host. This cyanoplast enzyme was isolated by FPLC (19% yield) and characterized with respect to the uv-vis spectrum, pH optimum (pH 9), molecular mass of 34 kDa, and an N-terminal amino acid sequence (24 residues). The enzyme shows, as known from other organisms, molecular heterogeneity. The N-terminus of a further ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase polypeptide represents a shorter sequence missing the first four amino acids of the mature enzyme. PMID:1392619

  4. Purification, characterization, and amino acid sequencing of a. delta. /sup 5/-3-oxosteroid isomerase from Pseudomonas putida biotype B

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were performed on the ..delta../sup 5/-3-oxosteroid isomerase from Pseudomonas putida biotype B. The studies have involved three broad areas: improvement in the purification of the enzyme, further characterization of the purified enzyme, and completion of the amino acid sequence of the enzyme. For the purification of the enzyme, techniques for removing the isomerase from whole cells were studied, the effects of ionic strength on the binding of the isomerase to steroidal affinity resins was explored, and a new affinity resin was developed. Absorption spectra and the proton NMR spectra of the isomerase were obtained. Amino acid sequencing of the oxosteroid isomerase indicates that the enzyme is a dimeric protein consisting of two identical subunits each consisting of a polypeptide chain of 131 residues and a M/sub r/ = 14,536.

  5. Identification of Ourmiavirus 30K movement protein amino acid residues involved in symptomatology, viral movement, subcellular localization and tubule formation.

    PubMed

    Margaria, Paolo; Anderson, Charles T; Turina, Massimo; Rosa, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Several plant viruses encode movement proteins (MPs) classified in the 30K superfamily. Despite a great functional diversity, alignment analysis of MP sequences belonging to the 30K superfamily revealed the presence of a central core region, including amino acids potentially critical for MP structure and functionality. We performed alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the Ourmia melon virus (OuMV) MP, and studied the effects of amino acid substitutions on MP properties and virus infection. We identified five OuMV mutants that were impaired in systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana, and two mutants showing necrosis and pronounced mosaic symptoms, respectively, in N. benthamiana. Green fluorescent protein fusion constructs (GFP:MP) of movement-defective MP alleles failed to localize in distinct foci at the cell wall, whereas a GFP fusion with wild-type MP (GFP:MPwt) mainly co-localized with plasmodesmata and accumulated at the periphery of epidermal cells. The movement-defective mutants also failed to produce tubular protrusions in protoplasts isolated from infected leaves, suggesting a link between tubule formation and the ability of OuMV to move. In addition to providing data to support the importance of specific amino acids for OuMV MP functionality, we predict that these conserved residues might be critical for the correct folding and/or function of the MP of other viral species in the 30K superfamily. PMID:26637973

  6. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B.; Mellors, J.W.; Jeang, K.T.; Wain-Hobson, S.

    1997-04-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  7. Identification by mutational analysis of amino acid residues essential in the chaperone function of calreticulin.

    PubMed

    Martin, Virginie; Groenendyk, Jody; Steiner, Simone S; Guo, Lei; Dabrowska, Monika; Parker, J M Robert; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Opas, Michal; Michalak, Marek

    2006-01-27

    Calreticulin is a Ca2+ -binding chaperone that resides in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum and is involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and in the folding of newly synthesized glycoproteins. In this study, we have used site-specific mutagenesis to map amino acid residues that are critical in calreticulin function. We have focused on two cysteine residues (Cys(88) and Cys(120)), which form a disulfide bridge in the N-terminal domain of calreticulin, on a tryptophan residue located in the carbohydrate binding site (Trp(302)), and on certain residues located at the tip of the "hairpin-like" P-domain of the protein (Glu(238), Glu(239), Asp(241), Glu(243), and Trp(244)). Calreticulin mutants were expressed in crt(-/-) fibroblasts, and bradykinin-dependent Ca2+ release was measured as a marker of calreticulin function. Bradykinin-dependent Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum was rescued by wild-type calreticulin and by the Glu(238), Glu(239), Asp(241), and Glu(243) mutants. The Cys(88) and Cys(120) mutants rescued the calreticulin-deficient phenotype only partially ( approximately 40%), and the Trp(244) and Trp(302) mutants did not rescue it at all. We identified four amino acid residues (Glu(239), Asp(241), Glu(243), and Trp(244)) at the hairpin tip of the P-domain that are critical in the formation of a complex between ERp57 and calreticulin. Although the Glu(239), Asp(241), and Glu(243) mutants did not bind ERp57 efficiently, they fully restored bradykinin-dependent Ca2+ release in crt(-/-) cells. This indicates that binding of ERp57 to calreticulin may not be critical for the chaperone function of calreticulin with respect to the bradykinin receptor. PMID:16291754

  8. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Miller, Darcie J; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-18

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins. PMID:26774272

  9. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones. PMID:26656109

  10. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  11. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  12. Surface lysine residues modulate the collisional transfer of fatty acid from adipocyte fatty acid binding protein to membranes.

    PubMed

    Herr, F M; Matarese, V; Bernlohr, D A; Storch, J

    1995-09-19

    The transfer of unesterified fatty acids (FA) from adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) to phospholipid membranes is proposed to occur via a collisional mechanism involving transient ionic and hydrophobic interactions [Wootan & Storch (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 10517-10523]. In particular, it was suggested that membrane acidic phospholipids might specifically interact with basic residues on the surface of A-FABP. Here we addressed whether lysine residues on the surface of the protein are involved in this collisional transfer mechanism. Recombinant A-FABP was acetylated to neutralize all positively charged surface lysine residues. Protein fluorescence, CD spectra, and chemical denaturant data indicate that acetylation did not substantially alter the conformational integrity of the protein, and nearly identical affinities were obtained for binding of the fluorescently labeled FA [12-(9-anthroyloxy)oleate] to native and acetylated protein. Transfer of 2-(9-anthroyloxy)palmitate (2AP) from acetylated A-FABP to small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) was 35-fold slower than from native protein. In addition, whereas the 2AP transfer rate from native A-FABP was directly dependent on SUV concentration, 2AP transfer from acetylated protein was independent on the concentration of acceptor membranes. Factors which alter aqueous-phase solubility of FA, such as ionic strength and acyl chain length and saturation, affected the AOFA transfer rate from acetylated but not native A-FABP. Finally, an increase in the negative charge density of the acceptor SUV resulted in a marked increase in the rate of transfer from native A-FABP but did not increase the rate from acetylated A-FABP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7547918

  13. Xylanase B from Neocallimastix patriciarum contains a non-catalytic 455-residue linker sequence comprised of 57 repeats of an octapeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Black, G W; Hazlewood, G P; Xue, G P; Orpin, C G; Gilbert, H J

    1994-01-01

    A Neocallimastix patriciarum cDNA library was screened for xylanase-expressing clones, which were distinct from the previously characterized N. patriciarum xynA cDNA encoding xylanase A. A single cDNA, designated xynB, which did not exhibit homology with xynA, was isolated. Northern-blot analysis of mRNA from Avicel-grown N. patriciarum showed that xynB hybridized to a 3.4 kb mRNA species. The nucleotide sequence of xynB revealed a single open reading frame of 2580 bp coding for a protein designated xylanase B (XYLB), of M(r) 88,066. The primary structure of XYLB was comprised of a 21-residue N-terminal signal peptide, followed by a 304-amino acid sequence that exhibited substantial homology with the catalytic domains of family F xylanases. The N-terminal domain was linked to a C-terminal 70-residue sequence by a putative linker region, comprising 12 tandem repeats of a sequence containing TLPG as the core sequence, followed by an octapeptide XSKTLPGG where X can be S, K or N, which was repeated in tandem 45 times. Truncated derivatives of xynB encoding the N-terminal 338 residues directed the synthesis of a functional xylanase, confirming that the region of XYLB, which exhibited homology with family F xylanases, constitutes the catalytic domain. To investigate the catalytic properties of XYLB, the catalytic domain was fused to the Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein, and the fusion protein purified by amylose affinity chromatography. The purified enzyme hydrolysed oat, rye and wheat arabinoxylan releasing primarily xylobiose, xylotriose and some xylose. The XYLB fusion did not cleave any cellulosic substrates. The data presented in this report suggest that the multiple xylanases of N. patriciarum arose, not through the duplication of a single gene, but by the transfer of distinct xylanase-encoding DNA sequences into the anaerobic fungus. The possible origin of the xynB gene is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8172598

  14. A Conserved Acidic Residue in Phenylalanine Hydroxylase Contributes to Cofactor Affinity and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic domains of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases (AAAHs) contain a non-heme iron coordinated to a 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad and two water molecules. Asp139 from Chromobacterium violaceum PAH (cPAH) resides within the second coordination sphere and contributes key hydrogen bonds with three active site waters that mediate its interaction with an oxidized form of the cofactor, 7,8-dihydro-l-biopterin, in crystal structures. To determine the catalytic role of this residue, various point mutants were prepared and characterized. Our isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) analysis of iron binding implies that polarity at position 139 is not the sole criterion for metal affinity, as binding studies with D139E suggest that the size of the amino acid side chain also appears to be important. High-resolution crystal structures of the mutants reveal that Asp139 may not be essential for holding the bridging water molecules together, because many of these waters are retained even in the Ala mutant. However, interactions via the bridging waters contribute to cofactor binding at the active site, interactions for which charge of the residue is important, as the D139N mutant shows a 5-fold decrease in its affinity for pterin as revealed by ITC (compared to a 16-fold loss of affinity in the case of the Ala mutant). The Asn and Ala mutants show a much more pronounced defect in their kcat values, with nearly 16- and 100-fold changes relative to that of the wild type, respectively, indicating a substantial role of this residue in stabilization of the transition state by aligning the cofactor in a productive orientation, most likely through direct binding with the cofactor, supported by data from molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes. Our results indicate that the intervening water structure between the cofactor and the acidic residue masks direct interaction between the two, possibly to prevent uncoupled hydroxylation of the cofactor before the arrival of

  15. Composition, texture and methane potential of cellulosic residues from Lewis acids organosolv pulping of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Constant, Sandra; Barakat, Abdellatif; Robitzer, Mike; Di Renzo, Francesco; Dumas, Claire; Quignard, Françoise

    2016-09-01

    Cellulosic pulps have been successfully isolated from wheat straw through a Lewis acids organosolv treatment. The use of Lewis acids with different hardness produced pulps with different delignification degrees. The cellulosic residue was characterised by chemical composition, X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, N2 physisorption, scanning electron microscopy and potential for anaerobic digestibility. Surface area and pore volume increased with the hardness of the Lewis acid, in correspondence with the decrease of the amount of lignin and hemicellulose in the pulp. The non linearity of the correlation between porosity and composition suggests that an agglomeration of cellulose fibrils occurs in the early stages of pulping. All organosolv pulps presented a significantly higher methane potential than the parent straw. A methane evolution of 295Ncm(3)/g OM was reached by a moderate improvement of the accessibility of the native straw. PMID:27295251

  16. A Novel Treatment for Acid Mine Drainage Utilizing Reclaimed Limestone Residual

    SciTech Connect

    Horace K. Moo-Young; Charles E. Ochola

    2004-08-31

    The viability of utilizing Reclaimed Limestone Residual (RLR) to remediate Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) was investigated. Physical and chemical characterization of RLR showed that it is composed of various minerals that contain significant quantities of limestone or calcium bearing compounds that can be exploited for acid neutralization. Acid Neutralization Potential (ANP) test results showed that RLR has a neutralization potential of approximately 83% as calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}). Neutralization tests with most of the heavy metals associated with AMD showed removal efficiencies of over 99%. An unexpected benefit of utilizing RLR was the removal of hexavalent chromium Cr (VI) from the aqueous phase. Due to an elevation in pH by RLR most AMD heavy metals are removed from solution by precipitation as their metal hydroxides. Cr (VI) however is not removed by pH elevation and therefore subsequent ongoing tests to elucidate the mechanism responsible for this reaction were conducted.

  17. Conformational characterization of the 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid residue in model peptides.

    PubMed

    Gatos, M; Formaggio, F; Crisma, M; Toniolo, C; Bonora, G M; Benedetti, Z; Di Blasio, B; Iacovino, R; Santini, A; Saviano, M; Kamphuis, J

    1997-01-01

    A series of N- and C-protected, monodispersed homo-oligopeptides (to the dodecamer level) from the small-ring alicyclic C alpha, alpha-dialkylated glycine 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (Ac4c) and two Ala/Ac4c tripeptides were synthesized by solution methods and fully characterized. The conformational preferences of all the model peptides were determined in deuterochloroform solution by FT-IR absorption and 1H-NMR. The molecular structures of the amino acid derivatives Z-Ac4c-OH and Z2-Ac4c-OH, the tripeptides Z-(Ac4c)3-OtBu, Z-Ac4c-(L-Ala)2-OMe and Z-L-Ala-Ac4c-L-Ala-OMe, and the tetrapeptide Z-(Ac4c)4-OtBu were determined in the crystal state by X-ray diffraction. The average geometry of the cyclobutyl moiety of the Ac4c residue was assessed and the tau(N-C alpha-C') bond angle was found to be significantly expanded from the regular tetrahedral value. The conformational data are strongly in favour of the conclusion that the Ac4c residue is an effective beta-turn and helix former. A comparison with the structural propensities of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, the prototype of C alpha, alpha-dialkylated glycines, and the other extensively investigated members of the family of 1-aminocycloalkane-1-carboxylic acids (Acnc, with n = 3, 5-8) is made and the implications for the use of the Ac4c residue in conformationally constrained peptide analogues are briefly examined. PMID:9230476

  18. Particulates in hydrometallurgy: Part III. Dewatering behavior of flocculated laterite acid leach residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceno, A.; Osseo-Asare, K.

    1995-02-01

    Three polyacrylamide-based polymers of different chemical properties (polymer A, 34 pct anionic, 11×106 mol wt; polymer B, 7 pct anionic, 7.5×106 mol wt; polymer C, nonionic, 13.5×106 mol wt) were used to evaluate the flocculation behavior of laterite acid leach residues. The solid-liquid separation characteristics of the leach residues were investigated with the aid of settling rate, supernatant turbidity, and slurry filtrability measurements. The polymeric flocculants were found to be effective in improving the dewatering properties of the acid leach residues. Polymer effectiveness increased with increasing polymer dosage for all the polymers, but an optimum polymer dose was only found for polymer A (34 pct anionic, 11×106 mol wt) in the studied range of polymer addition. Similarly, the dewatering behavior was improved at higher polymer molecular weight. In addition, it was found that the flocculation performance was adversely affected by an increase in the degree of polymer hydrolysis which, in turn, increases the ratio of carboxylic to amide functional groups in the polymer chain. Polymer C (nonionic ˜0 pct hydrolysis, 13.5×106 mol wt) was found to be the most efficient flocculant in terms of all the performance criteria investigated. The preceding results were rationalized in terms of bridging flocculation, the ionization and molecular configuration of the polymers, hydrogen bonding, and the solid/aqueous interfacial charge.

  19. Radionuclide Leaching from Residual Solids Remaining after Acid Dissolution of Composite K East Canister Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.; Soderquist, C.Z.; Fadeff, S.K.

    1999-04-02

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine mixed nitric/hydrofluoric acid leach treatments for decontaminating dissolver residual solids (KECDVSR24H-2) produced during a 20- to 24-hr dissolution of a composite K East (KE) Basin canister sludge in 95 C 6 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The scope of this testing has been described in Section 4.5 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basin Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the residual solids generated in the K Basin sludge treatment process can restrict disposal of this solid to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The starting dissolver residual solid for this testing, KECDVSR24H-2, contains radionuclides at concentrations which exceed the ERDF Waste Acceptance Criteria for TRU by about a factor of 70, for {sup 239}Pu by a factor of 200, and for {sup 241}Am by a factor of 50. The solids also exceed the ERDF criterion for {sup 137}Cs by a factor of 2 and uranium by a factor of 5. Therefore, the radionuclides of greatest interest in this leaching study are first {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am (both components of TRU) and then uranium and {sup 137}Cs.

  20. Leaching of lead from zinc leach residue in acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le; Mu, Wen-ning; Shen, Hong-tao; Liu, Shao-ming; Zhai, Yu-chun

    2015-05-01

    A process with potentially reduced environmental impacts and occupational hazards of lead-bearing zinc plant residue was studied to achieve a higher recovery of lead via a cost-effective and environmentally friendly process. This paper describes an optimization study on the leaching of lead from zinc leach residue using acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution. Six main process conditions, i.e., the solution pH value, stirring rate, concentration of CaCl2 aqueous solution, liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, leaching temperature, and leaching time, were investigated. The microstructure and components of the residue and tailing were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). On the basis of experimental results, the optimum reaction conditions were determined to be a solution pH value of 1, a stirring rate of 500 r·min-1, a CaCl2 aqueous solution concentration of 400 g·L-1, a liquid-to-solid mass ratio of 7:1, a leaching temperature of 80°C, and a leaching time of 45 min. The leaching rate of lead under these conditions reached 93.79%, with an iron dissolution rate of 19.28%. Silica did not take part in the chemical reaction during the leaching process and was accumulated in the residue.

  1. Human parainfluenza type 3 virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein: nucleotide sequence of mRNA and limited amino acid sequence of the purified protein.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Coligan, J E; Jambou, R C; Venkatesan, S

    1986-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of mRNA for the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of human parainfluenza type 3 virus obtained from the corresponding cDNA clone had a single long open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 64,254 daltons consisting of 572 amino acids. The deduced protein sequence was confirmed by limited N-terminal amino acid microsequencing of CNBr cleavage fragments of native HN that was purified by immunoprecipitation. The HN protein is moderately hydrophobic and has four potential sites (Asn-X-Ser/Thr) of N-glycosylation in the C-terminal half of the molecule. It is devoid of both the N-terminal signal sequence and the C-terminal membrane anchorage domain characteristic of the hemagglutinin of influenza virus and the fusion (F0) protein of the paramyxoviruses. Instead, it has a single prominent hydrophobic region capable of membrane insertion beginning at 32 residues from the N terminus. This N-terminal membrane insertion is similar to that of influenza virus neuraminidase and the recently reported structures of HN proteins of Sendai virus and simian virus 5. Images PMID:3003381

  2. Enzymatic generation of peptides flanked by basic amino acids to obtain MS/MS spectra with 2× sequence coverage

    PubMed Central

    Ebhardt, H Alexander; Nan, Jie; Chaulk, Steven G; Fahlman, Richard P; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE Tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra generated by collision-induced dissociation (CID) typically lack redundant peptide sequence information in the form of e.g. b- and y-ion series due to frequent use of sequence-specific endopeptidases cleaving C- or N-terminal to Arg or Lys residues. METHODS Here we introduce arginyl-tRNA protein transferase (ATE, EC 2.3.2.8) for proteomics. ATE recognizes acidic amino acids or oxidized Cys at the N-terminus of a substrate peptide and conjugates an arginine from an aminoacylated tRNAArg onto the N-terminus of the substrate peptide. This enzymatic reaction is carried out under physiological conditions and, in combination with Lys-C/Asp-N double digest, results in arginylated peptides with basic amino acids on both termini. RESULTS We demonstrate that in vitro arginylation of peptides using yeast arginyl tRNA protein transferase 1 (yATE1) is a robust enzymatic reaction, specific to only modifying N-terminal acidic amino acids. Precursors originating from arginylated peptides generally have an increased protonation state compared with their non-arginylated forms. Furthermore, the product ion spectra of arginylated peptides show near complete 2× fragment ladders within the same MS/MS spectrum using commonly available electrospray ionization peptide fragmentation modes. Unexpectedly, arginylated peptides generate complete y- and c-ion series using electron transfer dissociation (ETD) despite having an internal proline residue. CONCLUSIONS We introduce a rapid enzymatic method to generate peptides flanked on either terminus by basic amino acids, resulting in a rich, redundant MS/MS fragment pattern. © 2014 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25380496

  3. Volatile fatty acids distribution during acidogenesis of algal residues with pH control.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Hua, Dongliang; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yuxiao; Xu, Haipeng; Liang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2013-06-01

    The anaerobic acidification of protein-rich algal residues with pH control (4, 6, 8, 10) was studied in batch reactors, which was operated at mesophilic(35 °C) condition. The distribution of major volatile fatty acids (VFAs) during acidogenesis was emphasized in this paper. The results showed that the acidification efficiency and VFAs distribution in the acid reactor strongly depended on the pH. The main product for all the runs involved acetic acid except that the proportion of butyric acid acidified at pH 6 was relatively higher. The other organic acids remained at lower levels. The VFAs yield reached the maximum value with about 0.6 g VFAs/g volatile solid (VS) added as pH was 8, and also the content of total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) reached the highest values of 9,629 mg/l. Low acidification degrees were obtained under the conditions at pH 4 and 10, which was not suitable for the metabolism of acidogens. Hydralic retention time (HRT) required for different conditions varied. As a consequence, it was indicated that pH was crucial to the acidification efficiency and products distribution. The investigation of acidogenesis process, which was producing the major substrates, short-chain fatty acids, would play the primary role in the efficient operation of methanogenesis. PMID:23381617

  4. 75 FR 1773 - Notice of Receipt of a Pesticide Petition Filed for Residues of Polymeric Polyhydroxy Acid in or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ...This notice announces the Agency's receipt of an initial filing of a pesticide petition proposing the establishment of a regulation for residues of the plant growth regulator, polymeric polyhydroxy acid, in or on all food...

  5. A conserved amino acid residue critical for product and substrate specificity in plant triterpene synthases.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Melissa; Thimmappa, Ramesha B; Minto, Robert E; Melton, Rachel E; Hughes, Richard K; O'Maille, Paul E; Hemmings, Andrew M; Osbourn, Anne

    2016-07-26

    Triterpenes are structurally complex plant natural products with numerous medicinal applications. They are synthesized through an origami-like process that involves cyclization of the linear 30 carbon precursor 2,3-oxidosqualene into different triterpene scaffolds. Here, through a forward genetic screen in planta, we identify a conserved amino acid residue that determines product specificity in triterpene synthases from diverse plant species. Mutation of this residue results in a major change in triterpene cyclization, with production of tetracyclic rather than pentacyclic products. The mutated enzymes also use the more highly oxygenated substrate dioxidosqualene in preference to 2,3-oxidosqualene when expressed in yeast. Our discoveries provide new insights into triterpene cyclization, revealing hidden functional diversity within triterpene synthases. They further open up opportunities to engineer novel oxygenated triterpene scaffolds by manipulating the precursor supply. PMID:27412861

  6. Determination of thymine glycol residues in irradiated or oxidized DNA by formation of methylglyceric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, K.A.; Shaeffer, J.

    1986-05-01

    Treatment of DNA solutions with X-irradiation various oxidants including hydrogen peroxide plus ferrous ion, hydrogen peroxide plus copper ion and ascorbate, permanganate, or sonication in the presence of dissolved oxygen all produced varying amounts of thymine glycol residues. After denaturing the DNA with heat, the glycol residues were reduced and labeled at the 6 position with tritium- labeled sodium borohydride. Subsequent reaction with anhydrous methanolic HCl gave a quantitative yield of the methyl ester of methylglyceric acid, which was determined by thin layer chromatography. The method, developed using thymidine as a model, was used to ascertain the requirements for glycol formation in DNA. It was shown that hydroxyl radical generating systems, permanganate, X-irradiation, or sonication in presence of oxygen were required, but hydrogen peroxide in the absence of iron or copper and ascorbate was inactive. Application to determination of DNA damage in vivo is being explored.

  7. A conserved amino acid residue critical for product and substrate specificity in plant triterpene synthases

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Melissa; Thimmappa, Ramesha B.; Minto, Robert E.; Melton, Rachel E.; O’Maille, Paul E.; Hemmings, Andrew M.; Osbourn, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Triterpenes are structurally complex plant natural products with numerous medicinal applications. They are synthesized through an origami-like process that involves cyclization of the linear 30 carbon precursor 2,3-oxidosqualene into different triterpene scaffolds. Here, through a forward genetic screen in planta, we identify a conserved amino acid residue that determines product specificity in triterpene synthases from diverse plant species. Mutation of this residue results in a major change in triterpene cyclization, with production of tetracyclic rather than pentacyclic products. The mutated enzymes also use the more highly oxygenated substrate dioxidosqualene in preference to 2,3-oxidosqualene when expressed in yeast. Our discoveries provide new insights into triterpene cyclization, revealing hidden functional diversity within triterpene synthases. They further open up opportunities to engineer novel oxygenated triterpene scaffolds by manipulating the precursor supply. PMID:27412861

  8. The Loss and Gain of Functional Amino Acid Residues Is a Common Mechanism Causing Human Inherited Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lugo-Martinez, Jose; Pejaver, Vikas; Pagel, Kymberleigh A.; Mort, Matthew; Cooper, David N.; Mooney, Sean D.; Radivojac, Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the precise molecular events altered by disease-causing genetic variants represents a major challenge in translational bioinformatics. To this end, many studies have investigated the structural and functional impact of amino acid substitutions. Most of these studies were however limited in scope to either individual molecular functions or were concerned with functional effects (e.g. deleterious vs. neutral) without specifically considering possible molecular alterations. The recent growth of structural, molecular and genetic data presents an opportunity for more comprehensive studies to consider the structural environment of a residue of interest, to hypothesize specific molecular effects of sequence variants and to statistically associate these effects with genetic disease. In this study, we analyzed data sets of disease-causing and putatively neutral human variants mapped to protein 3D structures as part of a systematic study of the loss and gain of various types of functional attribute potentially underlying pathogenic molecular alterations. We first propose a formal model to assess probabilistically function-impacting variants. We then develop an array of structure-based functional residue predictors, evaluate their performance, and use them to quantify the impact of disease-causing amino acid substitutions on catalytic activity, metal binding, macromolecular binding, ligand binding, allosteric regulation and post-translational modifications. We show that our methodology generates actionable biological hypotheses for up to 41% of disease-causing genetic variants mapped to protein structures suggesting that it can be reliably used to guide experimental validation. Our results suggest that a significant fraction of disease-causing human variants mapping to protein structures are function-altering both in the presence and absence of stability disruption. PMID:27564311

  9. Trypsin inhibitors from ridged gourd (Luffa acutangula Linn.) seeds: purification, properties, and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Haldar, U C; Saha, S K; Beavis, R C; Sinha, N K

    1996-02-01

    Two trypsin inhibitors, LA-1 and LA-2, have been isolated from ridged gourd (Luffa acutangula Linn.) seeds and purified to homogeneity by gel filtration followed by ion-exchange chromatography. The isoelectric point is at pH 4.55 for LA-1 and at pH 5.85 for LA-2. The Stokes radius of each inhibitor is 11.4 A. The fluorescence emission spectrum of each inhibitor is similar to that of the free tyrosine. The biomolecular rate constant of acrylamide quenching is 1.0 x 10(9) M-1 sec-1 for LA-1 and 0.8 x 10(9) M-1 sec-1 for LA-2 and that of K2HPO4 quenching is 1.6 x 10(11) M-1 sec-1 for LA-1 and 1.2 x 10(11) M-1 sec-1 for LA-2. Analysis of the circular dichroic spectra yields 40% alpha-helix and 60% beta-turn for La-1 and 45% alpha-helix and 55% beta-turn for LA-2. Inhibitors LA-1 and LA-2 consist of 28 and 29 amino acid residues, respectively. They lack threonine, alanine, valine, and tryptophan. Both inhibitors strongly inhibit trypsin by forming enzyme-inhibitor complexes at a molar ratio of unity. A chemical modification study suggests the involvement of arginine of LA-1 and lysine of LA-2 in their reactive sites. The inhibitors are very similar in their amino acid sequences, and show sequence homology with other squash family inhibitors. PMID:8924202

  10. Toxicity of boric acid to Blattella germanica (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae) and analysis of residues in several organs.

    PubMed

    Habes, D; Kilani-Morakchi, S; Aribi, N; Farine, J P; Soltani, N

    2001-01-01

    Pestiferous cockroach species are associated closely with humans and are important from medical and public health points of view. Conventional insecticides have been used widely to control cockroaches which have developed resistance to these compounds. Thus, interest has again centered on lesser-used compounds such as boric acid. Boric acid has been used as an insecticide for many years, especially against cockroach. Its mode of action on insects has not been satisfactorily established. In Algeria, Blattella germanica (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae) is a serious pest in the urban environment and their infestation were controlled for many years by organophosphate, carbamate or pyrethroid insecticides. In order to obtain more information on the mode of action of boric acid, we first evaluated the oral toxicity of boric acid on B. germanica adults. Then, the compound was determined in several organs by an colorimetric method. This insecticide was incorporated into the diet and orally administered at different concentrations ranging from 1 to 40% (w/w) to newly emerged adults. Mortality was recorded at different times during treatment (24, 48, 72 and 144 h). Treatment resulted in a dose-dependent mortality since the LD50 (%) recorded are 85 at 24 h, 67 at 48 h, 39 at 72 h and 8 at 144 h, respectively. Then the quantity of boric acid accumulated in several organs (hemolymph, gut, ovaries, testicles and fat body) was determined as function the duration of treatment (1 to 5 days) for two doses (LD50 and LD90). Results revealed that bioaccumulation of residues in these organs increased as function the duration of treatment. In addition, relatively important amounts of residues, are detected in fat body. PMID:12425074

  11. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using a bifunctional hybridization probe

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detecting and isolating a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids is provided using a bifunctional hybridization probe capable of hybridizing to the target sequence that includes a detectable marker and a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent. A kit is also provided for detecting a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids using a bifunctional hybridization probe according to this method.

  12. Effect of lime on the availability of residual phosphorus and its extractability by dilute acid

    SciTech Connect

    Rhue, R.D.; Hensel, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the long-term effects of liming an acid, P-deficient Placid sand (sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Typic Humaquept) on the availability of residual fertilizer P to potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.). Dolomitic limestone was applied in November 1977, at rates of 0, 2240, 4480, and 8960 kg/ha in a split-plot design with lime as main plots and P treatments as subplots. Phosphorus was applied at rates of 0, 56, 112, and 168 kg/ha in 1978. In 1979 and 1980, P plots were split with one-half fertilized with 56 kg P/ha and the other one-half not fertilized with P (residual). In 1978, maximum tuber yields and top dry weights occurred at the 2240 kg/ha lime rate which resulted in a soil pH of 5.8. Plant P concentrations were unaffected by lime at any sampling rate. In 1979, availability of residual soil P decreased with lime rates > 2240 kg/ha but not enough to significantly affect yields. However, in 1980, overliming injury was observed for tuber yields at the higher lime rates which was the result of P deficiency. Application of P at planting eliminated the overliming injury with maximum yields occurring in the pH range of 6.0 to 6.5. It appears that liming to pH 6.5 in this study resulted in fertilizer reaction products that were more soluble in dilute acid but less plant available than those formed under more acid conditions. However, the Mehlich I extractant appeared to be a suitable extractant for P on this soil if pH was taken into account when interpreting soil-test P. 23 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  13. His-311 and Arg-559 are key residues involved in fatty acid oxygenation in pathogen-inducible oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Krol, Adam C; Simmons, Danielle M; Goulah, Christopher C; Wroblewski, Liliana; Malkowski, Michael G

    2008-09-01

    Pathogen-inducible oxygenase (PIOX) oxygenates fatty acids into 2R-hydroperoxides. PIOX belongs to the fatty acid alpha-dioxygenase family, which exhibits homology to cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2). Although these enzymes share common catalytic features, including the use of a tyrosine radical during catalysis, little is known about other residues involved in the dioxygenase reaction of PIOX. We generated a model of linoleic acid (LA) bound to PIOX based on computational sequence alignment and secondary structure predictions with COX-1 and experimental observations that governed the placement of carbon-2 of LA below the catalytic Tyr-379. Examination of the model identified His-311, Arg-558, and Arg-559 as potential molecular determinants of the dioxygenase reaction. Substitutions at His-311 and Arg-559 resulted in mutant constructs that retained virtually no oxygenase activity, whereas substitutions of Arg-558 caused only moderate decreases in activity. Arg-559 mutant constructs exhibited increases of greater than 140-fold in Km, whereas no substantial change in Km was observed for His-311 or Arg-558 mutant constructs. Thermal shift assays used to measure ligand binding affinity show that the binding of LA is significantly reduced in a Y379F/R559A mutant construct compared with that observed for Y379F/R558A construct. Although Oryza sativa PIOX exhibited oxygenase activity against a variety of 14-20-carbon fatty acids, the enzyme did not oxygenate substrates containing modifications at the carboxylate, carbon-1, or carbon-2. Taken together, these data suggest that Arg-559 is required for high affinity binding of substrates to PIOX, whereas His-311 is involved in optimally aligning carbon-2 below Tyr-379 for catalysis. PMID:18596034

  14. Variable clinical manifestations of a glycine to glutamic acid substitution of the COL3A1 gene at residue 736

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, F.M.; Narcisi, P.; Richards, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    Glycine substitutions at the 3{prime} end of the COL3A1 gene generally produce a characteristic clinical phenotype including acrogeria and severe vascular fragility. Here we report a three generation British family in which the propositus presented with aneurysms of the groins. He, his mother, sister and elder daughter all had the external clinical phenotype of vascular EDS IV whilst another daughter and nephew were clinically normal. Cultured skin fibroblasts from the propositus and his clinically affected relatives poorly secreted normal and overmodified collagen III species. Normal components of secreted proteins predominated whilst overmodified molecules were prominent in intracellular material. Surprisingly the normal children also secreted less collagen type III than expected (though more than their clinically abnormal relatives). cDNA from bases 2671 to 3714 were amplified as four overlapping PCR fragments and analysed by DGGE. The region between 2671 and 3015 was heterozygous. Sequencing showed a mutation of glycine to glutamic acid at residue 736. This mutation created an extra Apa 1 restriction site which was suitable for family studies. These showed inheritance of the mutant gene by both vascular and non-vascular clinical phenotypes. This family therefore illustrates that replacement of glycine to glutamic acid at position 736 produces variable clinical and biochemical phenotypes ranging from easily recognizable vascular EDS IV with very poor collagen secretion to an EDS III-like picture and with less severe protein disturbance. The reasons for these differences are at present unexplained.

  15. DNA Three Way Junction Core Decorated with Amino Acids-Like Residues-Synthesis and Characterization.

    PubMed

    Addamiano, Claudia; Gerland, Béatrice; Payrastre, Corinne; Escudier, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Construction and physico-chemical behavior of DNA three way junction (3WJ) functionalized by protein-like residues (imidazole, alcohol and carboxylic acid) at unpaired positions at the core is described. One 5'-C(S)-propargyl-thymidine nucleotide was specifically incorporated on each strand to react through a post synthetic CuACC reaction with either protected imidazolyl-, hydroxyl- or carboxyl-azide. Structural impacts of 5'-C(S)-functionalization were investigated to evaluate how 3WJ flexibility/stability is affected. PMID:27563857

  16. The Periplasmic Bacterial Molecular Chaperone SurA Adapts Its Structure to Bind Peptides in Different Conformations to Assert a Sequence Preference for Aromatic Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Wang, S.; Hu, Y.-X.; McKay, D.B.

    2009-06-04

    The periplasmic molecular chaperone protein SurA facilitates correct folding and maturation of outer membrane proteins in Gram-negative bacteria. It preferentially binds peptides that have a high fraction of aromatic amino acids. Phage display selections, isothermal titration calorimetry and crystallographic structure determination have been used to elucidate the basis of the binding specificity. The peptide recognition is imparted by the first peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) domain of SurA. Crystal structures of complexes between peptides of sequence WEYIPNV and NFTLKFWDIFRK with the first PPIase domain of the Escherichia coli SurA protein at 1.3 A resolution, and of a complex between the dodecapeptide and a SurA fragment lacking the second PPIase domain at 3.4 A resolution, have been solved. SurA binds as a monomer to the heptapeptide in an extended conformation. It binds as a dimer to the dodecapeptide in an alpha-helical conformation, predicated on a substantial structural rearrangement of the SurA protein. In both cases, side-chains of aromatic residues of the peptides contribute a large fraction of the binding interactions. SurA therefore asserts a recognition preference for aromatic amino acids in a variety of sequence configurations by adopting alternative tertiary and quaternary structures to bind peptides in different conformations.

  17. Role of surface lysine residues of adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein in fatty acid transfer to phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Liou, H L; Storch, J

    2001-05-29

    The tertiary structure of murine adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (AFABP) is a flattened 10-stranded beta-barrel capped by a helix-turn-helix segment. This helical domain is hypothesized to behave as a "lid" or portal for ligand entry into and exit from the binding cavity. Previously, we demonstrated that anthroyloxy-labeled fatty acid (AOFA) transfer from AFABP to phospholipid membranes occurs by a collisional process, in which ionic interactions between positively charged lysine residues on the protein surface and negatively charged phospholipid headgroups are involved. In the present study, the role of specific lysine residues located in the portal and other regions of AFABP was directly examined using site-directed mutagenesis. The results showed that isoleucine replacement for lysine in the portal region, including the alphaI- and alphaII-helices and the beta C-D turn, resulted in much slower 2-(9-anthroyloxy)palmitate (2AP) transfer rates to acidic membranes than those of native AFABP. An additive effect was found for mutant K22,59I, displaying the slowest rates of FA transfer. Rates of 2AP transfer from "nonportal" mutants on the beta-G and I strands were affected only moderately; however, a lysine --> isoleucine mutation in the nonportal beta-A strand decreased the 2AP transfer rate. These studies suggest that lysines in the helical cap domain are important for governing ionic interactions between AFABP and membranes. Furthermore, it appears that more than one distinct region, including the alphaI-helix, alphaII-helix, beta C-D turn, and the beta-A strand, is involved in these charge-charge interactions. PMID:11371211

  18. cDNA-derived amino-acid sequence of a land turtle (Geochelone carbonaria) beta-chain hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Bordin, S; Meza, A N; Saad, S T; Ogo, S H; Costa, F F

    1997-06-01

    The cDNA sequence encoding the turtle Geochelone carbonaria beta-chain was determinated. The isolation of hemoglobin mRNA was based on degenerate primers' PCR in combination with 5'- and 3'-RACE protocol. The full length cDNA is 615 bp with the ATG start codon at position 53 and TGA stop codon at position 495; The AATAAA polyadenylation signal is found at position 599. The deduced polypeptyde contains 146 amino-acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence shares 83% identity with the beta-globin of a related specie, the aquatic turtle C. p. belli. Otherwise, identity is higher when compared with chicken beta-Hb (80%) than with other reptilian orders (Squamata, 69%, and Crocodilia, 61%). Compared with human HbA, there is 67% identity, and at least three amino acid substitutions could be of some functional significance (Glu43 beta-->Ser, His116 beta-->Thr and His143 beta-->Leu). To our knowledge this represents the first cDNA sequence of a reptile globin gene described. PMID:9238523

  19. Purification and partial amino acid sequence of the chloroplast cytochrome b-559.

    PubMed

    Widger, W R; Cramer, W A; Hermodson, M; Meyer, D; Gullifor, M

    1984-03-25

    The hydrophobic cytochrome b-559, purified from unstacked, ethanol-washed spinach thylakoid membranes, using extraction with 2% Triton X-100 in 4 M urea and three chromatographic steps in the presence of protease inhibitors, has a dominant band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea gels corresponding to Mr = 10,000. The yield of this preparation is 30-50% (5-10 mg) starting with 600 mg of chlorophyll. The heme content yields a calculated molecular weight of no more than 17,500/heme, and perhaps somewhat smaller after correction for impurities. The Mr = 10,000 band is stained by the tetramethylbenzidine-H2O2 heme reagent on lithium dodecyl sulfate gels run at 0 degrees C. The Mr = 10,000 protein, further separated by high performance liquid chromatography, contains a unique NH2 terminus that is not blocked, and the amino acid sequence for the first 27 residues is NH2-Ser-Gly-Ser-Thr-Gly-Glu-Arg-Ser-Phe-Ala-Asp-Ile-Ile-Thr-Ser-Ile-Arg-Tyr-Trp -Val-Ile-X-Ser-Ile-Thr-Ile-Pro. . . COOH. Approximately 55% of the amino acids are hydrophobic, based on amino acid analysis of the Mr = 10,000 peptide, which also indicated the presence of at least one histidine. Only one cytochrome b-559 component could be identified, whose yield indicated that it arises from a single b-559 protein in chloroplasts corresponding to the in situ high potential cytochrome of the chloroplast photosystem II. PMID:6706983

  20. Mutation of aspartic acid residues in the fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975.

    PubMed Central

    Song, D D; Jacques, N A

    1999-01-01

    The site-directed mutated fructosyltransferases (Ftfs) of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, D312E, D312S, D312N and D312K were all active at 37 degrees C, indicating that Asp-312 present in the 'sucrose box' was not the nucleophilic Asp residue responsible for the formation of a covalent fructosyl-enzyme intermediate required for enzyme activity. Analysis of the kinetic constants of the purified mutated forms of the enzyme showed that Asp-312 was most likely an essential amino acid involved in determining acceptor recognition and/or stabilizing a beta-turn in the protein. In contrast, when the Asp-397 of the Ftf present in the conserved triplet RDP motif of all 60 bacterial and plant family-32 glycosylhydrolases was mutated to a Ser residue, both sucrose hydrolysis and polymerization ceased. Tryptophan emission spectra confirmed that this mutation did not alter protein structure. Comparison of published data from other site-directed mutated enzymes implicated the Asp residue in the RDP motif as the one that may form a transient covalent fructosyl intermediate during the catalysis of sucrose by the Ftf of S. salivarius. PMID:10548559

  1. Targeting of pro-apoptotic TLR adaptor SARM to mitochondria: definition of the critical region and residues in the signal sequence.

    PubMed

    Panneerselvam, Porkodi; Singh, Laishram Pradeepkumar; Ho, Bow; Chen, Jianzhu; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2012-03-01

    The fifth and the most well-conserved member of the TLR (Toll-like receptor) adaptor, SARM (sterile α- and HEAT/armadillo-motif-containing protein), has been reported to be an important mediator of apoptosis. However, the exact cellular localization of SARM with respect to its role is unclear. In the present study we show that SARM specifically co-localizes with mitochondria. Endogenous SARM is mainly found in the mitochondria. We demonstrate that the N-terminal 27 amino acids (S27) of SARM, which is hydrophobic and polybasic, acts as a mitochondria-targeting signal sequence, associating SARM to the mitochondria. The S27 peptide has an inherent ability to bind to lipids and mitochondria. This sequence effectively translocates the soluble EGFP (enhanced green fluorescence protein) reporter into the mitochondria. Positioning S27 downstream of the EGFP abrogates its mitochondria-targeting ability. Transmission electron microscopy confirms the ability of S27 to import EGFP into the mitochondria. Importantly, by mutagenesis study, we delineated the specificity of the mitochondria-targeting ability to the arginine residue at the 14th position. The R14A SARM mutant also showed reduced apoptotic potential when compared with the wild-type. Taken together, S27, which is a bona fide signal sequence that targets SARM to the mitochondria, explains the pro-apoptotic activity of SARM. PMID:22145856

  2. On the Accuracy of Sequence-Based Computational Inference of Protein Residues Involved in Interactions with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Zhenkun; Kuznetsov, Igor B.

    2009-01-01

    Methods for computational inference of DNA-binding residues in DNA-binding proteins are usually developed using classification techniques trained to distinguish between binding and non-binding residues on the basis of known examples observed in experimentally determined high-resolution structures of protein-DNA complexes. What degree of accuracy can be expected when a computational methods is applied to a particular novel protein remains largely unknown. We test the utility of classification methods on the example of Kernel Logistic Regression (KLR) predictors of DNA-binding residues. We show that predictors that utilize sequence properties of proteins can successfully predict DNA-binding residues in proteins from a novel structural class. We use Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) to establish a quantitative relationship between protein properties and the expected accuracy of KLR predictors. Present results indicate that in the case of novel proteins the expected accuracy provided by an MLR model is close to the actual accuracy and can be used to assess the overall confidence of the prediction. PMID:20209034

  3. Identification of Key Amino Acid Residues Modulating Intracellular and In vitro Microcin E492 Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Paulina; Marcoleta, Andrés; Lobos-Ruiz, Pablo; Arranz, Rocío; Valpuesta, José M.; Monasterio, Octavio; Lagos, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Microcin E492 (MccE492) is a pore-forming bacteriocin produced and exported by Klebsiella pneumoniae RYC492. Besides its antibacterial activity, excreted MccE492 can form amyloid fibrils in vivo as well as in vitro. It has been proposed that bacterial amyloids can be functional playing a biological role, and in the particular case of MccE492 it would control the antibacterial activity. MccE492 amyloid fibril’s morphology and formation kinetics in vitro have been well-characterized, however, it is not known which amino acid residues determine its amyloidogenic propensity, nor if it forms intracellular amyloid inclusions as has been reported for other bacterial amyloids. In this work we found the conditions in which MccE492 forms intracellular amyloids in Escherichia coli cells, that were visualized as round-shaped inclusion bodies recognized by two amyloidophilic probes, 2-4′-methylaminophenyl benzothiazole and thioflavin-S. We used this property to perform a flow cytometry-based assay to evaluate the aggregation propensity of MccE492 mutants, that were designed using an in silico prediction of putative aggregation hotspots. We established that the predicted amino acid residues 54–63, effectively act as a pro-amyloidogenic stretch. As in the case of other amyloidogenic proteins, this region presented two gatekeeper residues (P57 and P59), which disfavor both intracellular and in vitro MccE492 amyloid formation, preventing an uncontrolled aggregation. Mutants in each of these gatekeeper residues showed faster in vitro aggregation and bactericidal inactivation kinetics, and the two mutants were accumulated as dense amyloid inclusions in more than 80% of E. coli cells expressing these variants. In contrast, the MccE492 mutant lacking residues 54–63 showed a significantly lower intracellular aggregation propensity and slower in vitro polymerization kinetics. Electron microscopy analysis of the amyloids formed in vitro by these mutants revealed that, although

  4. Partial amino acid sequence of human factor D:homology with serine proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Volanakis, J E; Bhown, A; Bennett, J C; Mole, J E

    1980-01-01

    Human factor D purified to homogeneity by a modified procedure was subjected to NH2-terminal amino acid sequence analysis by using a modified automated Beckman sequencer. We identified 48 of the first 57 NH2-terminal amino acids in a single sequencer run, using microgram quantities of factor D. The deduced amino acid sequence represents approximately 25% of the primary structure of factor D. This extended NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of factor D was compared to that of other trypsin-related serine proteases. By visual inspection, strong homologies (33--50% identity) were observed with all the serine proteases included in the comparison. Interestingly, factor D showed a higher degree of homology to serine proteases of pancreatic origin than to those of serum origin. Images PMID:6987665

  5. The complete amino acid sequence of the major Kunitz trypsin inhibitor from the seeds of Prosopsis juliflora.

    PubMed

    Negreiros, A N; Carvalho, M M; Xavier Filho, J; Blanco-Labra, A; Shewry, P R; Richardson, M

    1991-01-01

    The major inhibitor of trypsin in seeds of Prosopsis juliflora was purified by precipitation with ammonium sulphate, ion-exchange column chromatography on DEAE- and CM-Sepharose and preparative reverse phase HPLC on a Vydac C-18 column. The protein inhibited trypsin in the stoichiometric ratio of 1:1, but had only weak activity against chymotrypsin and did not inhibit human salivary or porcine pancreatic alpha-amylases. SDS-PAGE indicated that the inhibitor has a Mr of ca 20,000, and IEF-PAGE showed that the pI is 8.8. The complete amino acid sequence was determined by automatic degradation, and by DABITC/PITC microsequence analysis of peptides obtained from enzyme digestions of the reduced and S-carboxymethylated protein with trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, the Glu-specific protease from S. aureus and the Lys-specific protease from Lysobacter enzymogenes. The inhibitor consisted of two polypeptide chains, of 137 residues (alpha chain) and 38 residues (beta chain) linked together by a single disulphide bond. The amino acid sequence of the protein exhibited homology with a number of Kunitz proteinase inhibitors from other legume seeds, the bifunctional subtilisin/alpha-amylase inhibitors from cereals and the taste-modifying protein miraculin. PMID:1367792

  6. Improving the acidic stability of Staphylococcus aureus α-acetolactate decarboxylase in Bacillus subtilis by changing basic residues to acidic residues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Rao, Zhiming; Li, Jingjing; Zhou, Junping; Yang, Taowei; Xu, Meijuan; Bao, Teng; Zhao, Xiaojing

    2015-04-01

    The α-acetolactate decarboxylase (ALDC) can reduce diacetyl fleetly to promote mature beer. A safe strain Bacillus subtilis WB600 for high-yield production of ALDC was constructed with the ALDC gene saald from Staphylococcus aureus L3-15. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that S. aureus α-acetolactate decarboxylase (SaALDC) was successfully expressed in recombinant B. siutilis strain. The enzyme SaALDC was purified using Ni-affinity chromatography and showed a maximum activity at 45 °C and pH 6.0. The values of K m and V max were 17.7 μM and 2.06 mM min(-1), respectively. Due to the unstable property of SaALDC at low pH conditions that needed in brewing process, site-directed mutagenesis was proposed for improving the acidic stability of SaALDC. Homology comparative modeling analysis showed that the mutation (K52D) gave rise to the negative-electrostatic potential on the surface of protein while the numbers of hydrogen bonds between the mutation site (N43D) and the around residues increased. Taken together the effect of mutation N43D-K52D, recombinant SaALDCN43D-K52D showed dramatically improved acidic stability with prolonged half-life of 3.5 h (compared to the WT of 1.5 h) at pH 4.0. In a 5-L fermenter, the recombinant B. subtilis strain that could over-express SaALDCN43D-K52D exhibited a high yield of 135.8 U mL(-1) of SaALDC activity, about 320 times higher comparing to 0.42 U mL(-1) of S. aureus L3-15. This work proposed a  strategy for improving the acidic stability of SaALDC in the  B. subtilis host. PMID:25543264

  7. Chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry targeting acidic residues in proteins and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A; Unverdorben, Pia; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Frydman, Judith; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-07-01

    The study of proteins and protein complexes using chemical cross-linking followed by the MS identification of the cross-linked peptides has found increasingly widespread use in recent years. Thus far, such analyses have used almost exclusively homobifunctional, amine-reactive cross-linking reagents. Here we report the development and application of an orthogonal cross-linking chemistry specific for carboxyl groups. Chemical cross-linking of acidic residues is achieved using homobifunctional dihydrazides as cross-linking reagents and a coupling chemistry at neutral pH that is compatible with the structural integrity of most protein complexes. In addition to cross-links formed through insertion of the dihydrazides with different spacer lengths, zero-length cross-link products are also obtained, thereby providing additional structural information. We demonstrate the application of the reaction and the MS identification of the resulting cross-linked peptides for the chaperonin TRiC/CCT and the 26S proteasome. The results indicate that the targeting of acidic residues for cross-linking provides distance restraints that are complementary and orthogonal to those obtained from lysine cross-linking, thereby expanding the yield of structural information that can be obtained from cross-linking studies and used in hybrid modeling approaches. PMID:24938783

  8. Chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry targeting acidic residues in proteins and protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A.; Unverdorben, Pia; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Frydman, Judith; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    The study of proteins and protein complexes using chemical cross-linking followed by the MS identification of the cross-linked peptides has found increasingly widespread use in recent years. Thus far, such analyses have used almost exclusively homobifunctional, amine-reactive cross-linking reagents. Here we report the development and application of an orthogonal cross-linking chemistry specific for carboxyl groups. Chemical cross-linking of acidic residues is achieved using homobifunctional dihydrazides as cross-linking reagents and a coupling chemistry at neutral pH that is compatible with the structural integrity of most protein complexes. In addition to cross-links formed through insertion of the dihydrazides with different spacer lengths, zero-length cross-link products are also obtained, thereby providing additional structural information. We demonstrate the application of the reaction and the MS identification of the resulting cross-linked peptides for the chaperonin TRiC/CCT and the 26S proteasome. The results indicate that the targeting of acidic residues for cross-linking provides distance restraints that are complementary and orthogonal to those obtained from lysine cross-linking, thereby expanding the yield of structural information that can be obtained from cross-linking studies and used in hybrid modeling approaches. PMID:24938783

  9. Quantitative solid state NMR analysis of residues from acid hydrolysis of loblolly pine wood.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Carsten; Marzialetti, Teresita; Hoskins, Travis J C; Valenzuela Olarte, Mariefel B; Agrawal, Pradeep K; Jones, Christopher W

    2009-10-01

    The composition of solid residues from hydrolysis reactions of loblolly pine wood with dilute mineral acids is analyzed by (13)C Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Using this method, the carbohydrate and lignin fractions are quantified in less than 3h as compared to over a day using wet chemical methods. In addition to the quantitative information, (13)C CP MAS NMR spectroscopy provides information on the formation of additional extractives and pseudo lignin from the carbohydrates. Being a non-destructive technique, NMR spectroscopy provides unambiguous evidence of the presence of side reactions and products, which is a clear advantage over the wet chemical analytical methods. Quantitative results from NMR spectroscopy and proximate analysis are compared for the residues from hydrolysis of loblolly pine wood under 13 different conditions; samples were treated either at 150 degrees C or 200 degrees C in the presence of various acids (HCl, H(2)SO(4), H(3)PO(4), HNO(3) and TFA) or water. The lignin content determined by both methods differed on averaged by 2.9 wt% resulting in a standard deviation of 3.5 wt%. It is shown that solid degradation products are formed from saccharide precursors under harsh reaction conditions. These degradation reactions limit the total possible yield of monosaccharides from any subsequent reaction. PMID:19477123

  10. The Dual NOD1/NOD2 Agonism of Muropeptides Containing a Meso-Diaminopimelic Acid Residue

    PubMed Central

    Dagil, Yulia A.; Arbatsky, Nikolai P.; Alkhazova, Biana I.; L’vov, Vyacheslav L.; Mazurov, Dmitriy V.; Pashenkov, Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    Muropeptides are fragments of peptidoglycan that trigger innate immune responses by activating nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) 1 and NOD2. Muropeptides from Gram-negative bacteria contain a meso-diaminopimelic acid (meso-DAP) residue in either a terminal or a non-terminal position. While the former ones are known to be recognized by NOD1, much less is known about recognition of muropeptides with non-terminal meso-DAP, which are most abundant moieties of Gram-negative peptidoglycans. Here, we developed a novel system to assess biological activity of muropeptides, based on CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout (KO) of NOD1 and NOD2 genes in modified HEK293T cells. Using NOD1/NOD2 knockout and overexpression systems, as well as human monocytes and macrophages, we refine the current view of muropeptide recognition. We show that NOD2 can recognize different natural muropeptides containing a meso-DAP residue (preferably in a non-terminal position), provided they are present at micromolar concentrations. NOD2 accepts muropeptides with long and branched peptide chains and requires an intact N-acetylmuramyl residue. Muropeptides with non-terminal meso-DAP can activate NOD1 as well, but, in this case, probably require peptidase pre-processing to expose the meso-DAP residue. Depending on NOD1/NOD2 ratio in specific cell types, meso-DAP-containing muropeptides can be recognized either primarily via NOD2 (in monocytes) or via NOD1 (in monocyte-derived macrophages and HEK293T-derived cells). The dual NOD1/NOD2 agonism of meso-DAP-containing muropeptides should be taken into account when assessing cellular responses to muropeptides and designing muropeptide immunostimulants and vaccine adjuvants. PMID:27513337

  11. Kinetics of sulfuric acid leaching of cadmium from Cd-Ni zinc plant residues.

    PubMed

    Safarzadeh, Mohammad Sadegh; Moradkhani, Davood; Ojaghi-Ilkhchi, Mehdi

    2009-04-30

    Cd-Ni filtercakes are produced continuously at the third purification step in the electrolytic production of zinc in the National Iranian Lead and Zinc Company (NILZ) in northwestern Iran. In this research, the dissolution kinetics of cadmium from Cd-Ni residues produced in NILZ plant has been investigated. Hence, the effects of temperature, sulfuric acid concentration, particle size and stirring speed on the kinetics of cadmium dissolution in sulfuric acid were studied. The dissolution kinetics at 25-55 degrees C and tacid concentration, solid/liquid ratio and particle size were also achieved. The rate of reaction at first 5 min based on diffusion-controlled process can be expressed by a semi-empirical equation as:It was determined that the dissolution rate increased with increasing sulfuric acid concentration and decreasing particle size. PMID:18755541

  12. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

  13. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-03-24

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. 14 figs.

  14. Evolution of vertebrate IgM: complete amino acid sequence of the constant region of Ambystoma mexicanum mu chain deduced from cDNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Fellah, J S; Wiles, M V; Charlemagne, J; Schwager, J

    1992-10-01

    cDNA clones coding for the constant region of the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) mu heavy immunoglobulin chain were selected from total spleen RNA, using a cDNA polymerase chain reaction technique. The specific 5'-end primer was an oligonucleotide homologous to the JH segment of Xenopus laevis mu chain. One of the clones, JHA/3, corresponded to the complete constant region of the axolotl mu chain, consisting of a 1362-nucleotide sequence coding for a polypeptide of 454 amino acids followed in 3' direction by a 179-nucleotide untranslated region and a polyA+ tail. The axolotl C mu is divided into four typical domains (C mu 1-C mu 4) and can be aligned with the Xenopus C mu with an overall identity of 56% at the nucleotide level. Percent identities were particularly high between C mu 1 (59%) and C mu 4 (71%). The C-terminal 20-amino acid segment which constitutes the secretory part of the mu chain is strongly homologous to the equivalent sequences of chondrichthyans and of other tetrapods, including a conserved N-linked oligosaccharide, the penultimate cysteine and the C-terminal lysine. The four C mu domains of 13 vertebrate species ranging from chondrichthyans to mammals were aligned and compared at the amino acid level. The significant number of mu-specific residues which are conserved into each of the four C mu domains argues for a continuous line of evolution of the vertebrate mu chain. This notion was confirmed by the ability to reconstitute a consistent vertebrate evolution tree based on the phylogenic parsimony analysis of the C mu 4 sequences. PMID:1382992

  15. tax and rex Sequences of bovine leukaemia virus from globally diverse isolates: rex amino acid sequence more variable than tax.

    PubMed

    McGirr, K M; Buehring, G C

    2005-02-01

    Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) is an important agricultural problem with high costs to the dairy industry. Here, we examine the variation of the tax and rex genes of BLV. The tax and rex genes share 420 bases and have overlapping reading frames. The tax gene encodes a protein that functions as a transactivator of the BLV promoter, is required for viral replication, acts on cellular promoters, and is responsible for oncogenesis. The rex facilitates the export of viral mRNAs from the nucleus and regulates transcription. We have sequenced five new isolates of the tax/rex gene. We examined the five new and three previously published tax/rex DNA and predicted amino acid sequences of BLV isolates from cattle in representative regions worldwide. The highest variation among nucleic acid sequences for tax and rex was 7% and 5%, respectively; among predicted amino acid sequences for Tax and Rex, 9% and 11%, respectively. Significantly more nucleotide changes resulted in predicted amino acid changes in the rex gene than in the tax gene (P < or = 0.0006). This variability is higher than previously reported for any region of the viral genome. This research may also have implications for the development of Tax-based vaccines. PMID:15702995

  16. Nucleotide sequence neighbouring a late modified guanylic residue within the 28S ribosomal RNA of several eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eladari, M E; Hampe, A; Galibert, F

    1977-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a particular T1 oligonucleotide found in 41S and 28S RNAs of several cellular cell lines (human, mouse, rat and chicken fibroblast) but absent in 45S ribosomal RNA has been deduced. Its primary structure : A-U-U*-G*-psi-U-C-A-C-C-C-A-C-U-A-A-U-A-Gp shows the presence of a modified G residue which explains the existence of this oligonucleotide in the T1 fingerprint of 41S RNA and 28S. Its absence on the 45S RNA T1 fingerprint is accounted for by a late modification. Images PMID:561392

  17. Comparative analysis of core amino acid residues of H-2D(b)-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition epitopes in simian virus 40 T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Deckhut, A M; Lippolis, J D; Tevethia, S S

    1992-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) tumor (T) antigen expressed in H-2b SV40-transformed cells induces the generation of Lyt-2+ (CD8+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), which are involved in tumor rejection, in syngeneic mice. Five CTL recognition sites on T antigen have been described by using mutant T antigens. Four of the sites (I, II, III, and V) are H-2Db restricted and have been broadly mapped with synthetic peptides of 15 amino acids in length overlapping by 5 residues at the amino and carboxy termini. The goal of this study was to define the minimal and optimal amino acid sequences of T antigen which would serve as recognition elements for the H-2Db-restricted CTL clones Y-1, Y-2, Y-3, and Y-5, which recognizes sites I, II, III, and V, respectively. The minimal and optimal residues of T antigen recognized by the four CTL clones were determined by using synthetic peptides truncated at the amino or carboxy terminus and an H-2Db peptide-binding motif. The minimal site recognized by CTL clone Y-1 was defined as amino acids 207 to 215 of SV40 T antigen. However, the optimal sequence recognized by CTL clone Y-1 spanned T-antigen amino acids 205 to 215. The T-antigen peptide sequence LT223-231 was the optimal and minimal sequence recognized by both CTL clones Y-2 and Y-3. Site V was determined to be contained within amino acids 489 to 497 of T antigen. The lytic activities of CTL clones Y-2 and Y-3, which recognize a single nonamer peptide, LT223-231, were affected differently by anti-Lyt-2 antibody, suggesting that the T-cell receptors of these two CTL clones differ in their avidities. As the minimal and optimal H-2Db-restricted CTL recognition sites have been defined by nonamer synthetic peptides, it is now possible to search for naturally processed H-2Db-restricted epitopes of T antigen and identify critical residues involved in processing, presentation, and recognition by SV40-specific CTL. PMID:1370091

  18. Information contained in the amino acid sequence of the alpha1(I)-chain of collagen and its consequences upon the formation of the triple helix, of fibrils and crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Fietzek, P P; Kühn, K

    1975-09-30

    The molecule of type I collagen from skin consists of two alpha1(I)-chains and one alpha2-chain. The sequence of the entire alpha1-chain comprising 1052 residues is summarily presented and discussed. Apart from the 279 residues of alpha1(I)-CB8 whose sequence has been established for rat skin collagen, all sequences have been determined for calf skin collagen. In order to facilitate sequence analysis, the alpha1-chain was cleaved into defined fragments by cyanogen bromide or hydroxylamine or limited collagenase digestion. Most of the sequence was established by automated stepwise Edman degradation. The alpha1-chain contains two basically different types of sequences: the triple helical region of 1011 amino acid residues in which every third position is occupied by glycine and the N- and C-terminal regions not displaying this type of regularity. Both of these non-triple helical regions carry oxidizable lysine or hydroxylysine residues as functional sites for the intermolecular crosslink formation. Implications of the amino acid sequence for the stability of the triple helix and the fibril as well as for formation of crosslinks are discussed. Evaluation of the sequence in connection with electron microscopical investigations yielded the parameters of the axial arrangement of the molecules within the fibrils. Axial stagger of the molecules by a distance D = 670 angstrom = 233 amino acid residues results in maximal interaction of polar sequence regions of adjacent molecules and similarly of regions of hydrophobic residues. Ordered aggregation of molecules into fibrils is, therefore, regulated by electrostatic and electrophobic forces. Possible loci of intermolecular crosslinks between the alpha1-chains of adjacent molecules may be deduced from the dimensions of the axial aggregation of molecules. PMID:171554

  19. Radiolytic Modification of Sulfur Containing Acidic Amino Residues in Model Peptides: Fundamental Studies for Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Protein footprinting based on hydroxyl radical-mediated modification and quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis is a proven technique for examining protein structure, protein-ligand interactions, and structural allostery upon protein complex formation. The reactive and solvent-accessible amino acid side chains function as structural probes; however, correct structural analysis depends on the identification and quantification of all the relevant oxidative modifications within the protein sequence. Sulfur-containing amino acids are oxidized readily and the mechanisms of oxidation are particularly complex, although they have been extensively investigated by EPR and other spectroscopic methods. Here we have undertaken a detailed mass spectrometry study (using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry) of model peptides containing cysteine (Cys-SH), cystine (disulfide bonded Cys), and methionine after oxidation using {gamma}-rays or synchrotron X-rays and have compared these results to those expected from oxidation mechanisms proposed in the literature. Radiolysis of cysteine leads to cysteine sulfonic acid (+48 Da mass shift) and cystine as the major products; other minor products including cysteine sulfinic acid (+32 Da mass shift) and serine (-16 Da mass shift) are observed. Radiolysis of cystine results in the oxidative opening of the disulfide bond and generation of cysteine sulfonic acid and sulfinic acid; however, the rate of oxidation is significantly less than that for cysteine. Radiolysis of methionine gives rise primarily to methionine sulfoxide (+16 Da mass shift); this can be further oxidized to methionine sulfone (+32 Da mass shift) or another product with a -32 Da mass shift likely due to aldehyde formation at the {gamma}-carbon. Due to the high reactivity of sulfur-containing amino acids, the extent of oxidation is easily influenced by secondary oxidation events or the presence of redox reagents used in standard proteolytic

  20. A systematic study of fundamentals in α-helical coiled coil mimicry by alternating sequences of β- and γ-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rezaei Araghi, Raheleh; Baldauf, Carsten; Gerling, Ulla I M; Cadicamo, Cosimo Damiano; Koksch, Beate

    2011-08-01

    Aimed at understanding the crucially important structural features for the integrity of α-helical mimicry by βγ-sequences, an α-amino acid sequence in a native peptide was substituted by differently arranged βγ-sequences. The self- and hetero-assembly of a series of αβγ-chimeric sequences based on a 33-residue GCN4-derived peptide was investigated by means of molecular dynamics, circular dichroism, and a disulfide exchange assay. Despite the native-like behavior of βγ alternating sequences such as retention of α-helix dipole and the formation of 13-membered α-helix turns, the αβγ-chimeras with different βγ substitution patterns do not equally mimic the structural behavior of the native parent peptide in solution. The preservation of the key residue contacts such as van der Waals interactions and intrahelical H-bonding, which can be met only by particular substitution patterns, thermodynamically favor the adoption of coiled coil folding motif. In this study, we show how successfully the destabilizing structural consequences of α → βγ modification can be harnessed by reducing the solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface area and placing of suitably long and bulky helix-forming side chains at the hydrophobic core. The pairing of αβγ-chimeric sequences with the native wild-type are thermodynamically allowed in the case of ideal arrangement of β- and γ-residues. This indicates a similarity in local side chain packing of β- and γ-amino acids at the helical interface of αβγ-chimeras and the native α-peptide. Consequently, the backbone extended residues are able to participate in classical "knob-into-hole" packing with native α-peptide. PMID:21638022

  1. Computer Simulation of the Determination of Amino Acid Sequences in Polypeptides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daubert, Stephen D.; Sontum, Stephen F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a computer program that generates a random string of amino acids and guides the student in determining the correct sequence of a given protein by using experimental analytic data for that protein. (MLH)

  2. Dendronylation: Residue-specific chemoselective attachment of oligoglycerol dendrimers on proteins with noncanonical amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Thota, Bala N S; Haag, Rainer; Budisa, Nediljko

    2015-11-15

    Polyglycerol dendrimers as an important class of polymeric materials especially attractive for covalent attachment to therapeutic proteins as a useful alternative to traditional PEGylation procedures. Herein, we combine in vivo noncanonical amino acid (ncAA) incorporation and chemoselective conjugation in vitro to produce novel hybrid protein-dendrimer conjugates with the defined architectures. We incorporated Azidohomoalanine (Aha) as methionine substitute in vivo into various protein scaffolds to allow non-invasive dendrimer conjugations (dendronylation). Our approach makes recombinant proteins accessible for the design of multivalent dendrimer conjugates since it enables the preparation of many sequences with various positions for regioselective dendronylation. PMID:26483199

  3. Amino acid residues 201-205 in C-terminal acidic tail region plays a crucial role in antibacterial activity of HMGB1

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Antibacterial activity is a novel function of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). However, the functional site for this new effect is presently unknown. Methods and Results In this study, recombinant human HMGB1 A box and B box (rHMGB1 A box, rHMGB1 B box), recombinant human HMGB1 (rHMGB1) and the truncated C-terminal acidic tail mutant (tHMGB1) were prepared by the prokaryotic expression system. The C-terminal acidic tail (C peptide) was synthesized, which was composed of 30 amino acid residues. Antibacterial assays showed that both the full length rHMGB1 and the synthetic C peptide alone could efficiently inhibit bacteria proliferation, but rHMGB1 A box and B box, and tHMGB1 lacking the C-terminal acidic tail had no antibacterial function. These results suggest that C-terminal acidic tail is the key region for the antibacterial activity of HMGB1. Furthermore, we prepared eleven different deleted mutants lacking several amino acid residues in C-terminal acidic tail of HMGB1. Antibacterial assays of these mutants demonstrate that the amino acid residues 201-205 in C-terminal acidic tail region is the core functional site for the antibacterial activity of the molecule. Conclusion In sum, these results define the key region and the crucial site in HMGB1 for its antibacterial function, which is helpful to illustrating the antibacterial mechanisms of HMGB1. PMID:19751520

  4. Characterization of a benzyladenine binding-site peptide isolated from a wheat cytokinin-binding protein: Sequence analysis and identification of a single affinity-labeled histidine residue by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brinegar, A.C.; Cooper, G.; Stevens, A.; Hauer, C.R.; Shabanowitz, J.; Hunt, D.F.; Fox, J.E. )

    1988-08-01

    A wheat embryo cytokinin-binding protein was covalently modified with the radiolabeled photoaffinity ligand 2-azido-N{sup 6}-({sup 14}C)benzyladenine. A single labeled peptide was obtained after proteolytic digestion and isolation by reversed-phase and anion-exchange HPLC. Sequencing by classical Edman degradation identified 11 of the 12 residues but failed to identify the labeled amino acid. Analysis by laser photodissociation Fourier-transform mass spectrometry of 10 pmol of the peptide independently confirmed the Edman data and also demonstrated that the histidine residue nearest the C terminus (underlined) was modified by the reagent in the sequence Ala-Phe-Leu-Gln-Pro-Ser-His-His{und His}-Asp-Ala-Asp-Glu.

  5. Q-learning residual analysis: application to the effectiveness of sequences of antipsychotic medications for patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ertefaie, Ashkan; Shortreed, Susan; Chakraborty, Bibhas

    2016-06-15

    Q-learning is a regression-based approach that uses longitudinal data to construct dynamic treatment regimes, which are sequences of decision rules that use patient information to inform future treatment decisions. An optimal dynamic treatment regime is composed of a sequence of decision rules that indicate how to optimally individualize treatment using the patients' baseline and time-varying characteristics to optimize the final outcome. Constructing optimal dynamic regimes using Q-learning depends heavily on the assumption that regression models at each decision point are correctly specified; yet model checking in the context of Q-learning has been largely overlooked in the current literature. In this article, we show that residual plots obtained from standard Q-learning models may fail to adequately check the quality of the model fit. We present a modified Q-learning procedure that accommodates residual analyses using standard tools. We present simulation studies showing the advantage of the proposed modification over standard Q-learning. We illustrate this new Q-learning approach using data collected from a sequential multiple assignment randomized trial of patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26750518

  6. Computed tomography evaluation of residual root thickness after pre-flaring using gates Glidden drills: The sequence effect

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Nahid M; Naghdi, Amirali; Bajgiran, Laleh Mohammadian; Behrooz, Elahe

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the residual root thickness in mesiolingual (ML) canals of mandibular molars after pre-flaring using different sequences of Gates-Glidden (GG) drills. Materials and Methods: Computed tomography (CT) scans of the ML canals of 60 mandibular first molars were provided from areas within 1, 2, 3 and 4 mm of the furcation area and minimum initial root thickness (MIRT) of concave areas was measured at each level. The samples were divided into two groups (G1 and G2) which were prepared by the step-back and crown-down techniques, respectively. In both groups, anti-curvature filing was used. On secondary CT images of the samples in the same position, the minimum residual root thickness (MRRT) and the amount of removed dentin were analyzed by t-test and ANOVA. Results: There was no significant difference for MIRT between the two groups. The MRRT was greater in the G2 group in all the sections, with no significant difference between them. The average of MRRT was not <0.5 mm in any of the groups or sections. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study when the appropriate root thickness is present initially, GG drills used in any sequence may be suitable, safe and cost effective for pre-flaring of mesial canals of mandibular first molars with preserving the root thickness of furcation areas. PMID:24778510

  7. Cloning and identification of amino acid residues of human phospholipase C delta 1 essential for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H F; Jiang, M J; Chen, C L; Liu, S M; Wong, L P; Lomasney, J W; King, K

    1995-03-10

    In vitro single point mutagenesis, inositol phospholipid hydrolysis, and substrate protection experiments were used to identify catalytic residues of human phosphatidylinositide-specific phospholipase C delta 1 (PLC delta 1) isolated from a human aorta cDNA library. Invariant amino acid residues containing a functional side chain in the highly conserved X region were changed by in vitro mutagenesis. Most of the mutant enzymes were still able to hydrolyze inositol phospholipid with activity ranging from 10 to 100% of levels in the wild type enzyme. Exceptions were mutants with the conversion of Arg338 to Leu (R338L), Glu341 to Gly (E341G), or His356 to Leu (H356L), which made the enzyme severely defective in hydrolyzing inositol phospholipid. Phospholipid vesicle binding experiments showed that these three cleavage-defective mutant forms of PLC delta 1 could specifically bind to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) with an affinity similar to that of wild type enzyme. Western blotting analysis of trypsin-treated enzyme-PIP2 complexes revealed that a 67-kDa major protein fragment survived trypsin digestion if the wild type enzyme, E341G, or H356L mutant PLC delta 1 was preincubated with 7.5 microM PIP2, whereas if it was preincubated with 80 microM PIP2, the size of major protein surviving was comparable to that of intact enzyme. However, mutant enzyme R338L was not protected from trypsin degradation by PIP2 binding. These observations suggest that PLC delta 1 can recognize PIP2 through a high affinity and a low affinity binding site and that residues Glu341 and His356 are not involved in either high affinity or low affinity PIP2 binding but rather are essential for the Ca(2+)-dependent cleavage activity of PLC. PMID:7890667

  8. Characterization of mouse cellular deoxyribonucleic acid homologous to Abelson murine leukemia virus-specific sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Dale, B; Ozanne, B

    1981-01-01

    The genome of Abelson murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) consists of sequences derived from both BALB/c mouse deoxyribonucleic acid and the genome of Moloney murine leukemia virus. Using deoxyribonucleic acid linear intermediates as a source of retroviral deoxyribonucleic acid, we isolated a recombinant plasmid which contained 1.9 kilobases of the 3.5-kilobase mouse-derived sequences found in A-MuLV (A-MuLV-specific sequences). We used this clone, designated pSA-17, as a probe restriction enzyme and Southern blot analyses to examine the arrangement of homologous sequences in BALB/c deoxyribonucleic acid (endogenous Abelson sequences). The endogenous Abelson sequences within the mouse genome were interrupted by noncoding regions, suggesting that a rearrangement of the cell sequences was required to produce the sequence found in the virus. Endogenous Abelson sequences were arranged similarly in mice that were susceptible to A-MuLV tumors and in mice that were resistant to A-MuLV tumors. An examination of three BALB/c plasmacytomas and a BALB/c early B-cell tumor likewise revealed no alteration in the arrangement of the endogenous Abelson sequences. Homology to pSA-17 was also observed in deoxyribonucleic acids prepared from rat, hamster, chicken, and human cells. An isolate of A-MuLV which encoded a 160,000-dalton transforming protein (P160) contained 700 more base pairs of mouse sequences than the standard A-MuLV isolate, which encoded a 120,000-dalton transforming protein (P120). Images PMID:9279386

  9. Long-term tillage and cropping sequence effects on dryland residue and soil carbon fractions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dryland soil N conservation and mineralization as influenced by long-term management practices is needed to reduce N fertilization rate, N leaching, and N2O (a greenhouse gas) emission. We evaluated the 21-yr effects of combinations of tillage and cropping sequences on dryland crop biomass (stems + ...

  10. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly). PMID:9836434

  11. Numerical Simulation to Study the Effect of Arc Travelling Speed and Welding Sequences on Residual Stresses in Welded Sections of New Ferritic P92 Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaowei; Gong, Jianming; Zhao, Yanping; Wang, Yanfei; Ge, Zhiqiang

    2016-02-01

    New ferritic P92 steel is widely used in modern power plants due to its good combination of mechanical and physical properties. However, cracks are often formed in the welded sections during the fabrication or service. In order to ensure the structure integrity, the effects of residual stresses need to be considered. The objective of this paper is to investigate the influence of arc travelling speed and welding sequences on the residual stresses distribution in the welded sections of P92 pipes by finite element method (FEM). Results show that arc travelling speed and welding sequences have great effects on residual stresses distribution. With the arc travelling speed increasing, the residual stresses increase. Meanwhile, welding sequences of case B present smaller residual stresses and more symmetrical distribution of residual stresses at the weld centre line. Therefore, using slower arc travelling speed and case B welding sequences can be useful to decrease the residual stresses, which provides a reference for optimizing the welding technology and improving the fabrication process of new ferritic P92 welded pipes with small diameter and thick wall.

  12. Characterisation of the products from pyrolysis of residues after acid hydrolysis of Miscanthus.

    PubMed

    Melligan, F; Dussan, K; Auccaise, R; Novotny, E H; Leahy, J J; Hayes, M H B; Kwapinski, W

    2012-03-01

    Platform chemicals such as furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural are major products formed during the acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass in second generation biorefining processes. Solid hydrolysis residues (HR) can amount to 50 wt.% of the starting biomass materials. Pyrolysis of the HRs gives rise to biochar, bio-liquids, and gases. Time and temperature were variables during the pyrolysis of HRs in a fixed bed tubular reactor, and both parameters have major influences on the amounts and properties of the products. Biochar, with potential for carbon sequestration and soil conditioning, composed about half of the HR pyrolysis product. The amounts (11-20 wt.%) and compositions (up to 77% of phenols in organic fraction) of the bio-liquids formed suggest that these have little value as fuels, but could be sources of phenols, and the gas can have application as a fuel. PMID:22281143

  13. A Mutational Analysis of Active Site Residues in trans-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase

    PubMed Central

    Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Serrano, Hector; Huddleston, Jamison P.; Johnson, William H.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    trans -3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (CaaD) catalyzes the hydrolytic dehalogenation of trans-3-haloacrylates to yield malonate semialdehyde by a mechanism utilizing βPro-1, αArg-8, αArg-11, and αGlu-52. These residues are implicated in a promiscuous hydratase activity where 2-oxo-3-pentynoate is processed to acetopyruvate. The roles of three nearby residues (βAsn-39, αPhe-39, and αPhe-50) are unexplored. Mutants were constructed at these positions (βN39A, αF39A, αF39T, αF50A and αF50Y) and kinetic parameters determined along with those of the αR8K and αR11K mutants. Analysis indicates that αArg-8, αArg-11, and βAsn-39 are critical for dehalogenase activity whereas αArg-11 and αPhe-50 are critical for hydratase activity. Docking studies suggest structural bases for these observations. PMID:23851010

  14. Selective conversion of cellulose in corncob residue to levulinic acid in an aluminum trichloride-sodium chloride system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianmei; Jiang, Zhicheng; Hu, Libin; Hu, Changwei

    2014-09-01

    Increased energy consumption and environmental concerns have driven efforts to produce chemicals from renewable biomass with high selectivity. Here, the selective conversion of cellulose in corncob residue, a process waste from the production of xylose, to levulinic acid was carried out using AlCl3 as catalyst and NaCl as promoter by a hydrothermal method at relatively low temperature. A levulinic acid yield of 46.8 mol% was obtained, and the total selectivity to levulinic acid with formic acid was beyond 90%. NaCl selectively promoted the dissolution of cellulose from corncob residue, and significantly improved the yield and selectivity to levulinic acid by inhibiting lactic acid formation in the subsequent dehydration process. Owing to the salt effect of NaCl, the obtained levulinic acid could be efficiently extracted to tetrahydrofuran from aqueous solution. The aqueous solution with AlCl3 and NaCl could be recycled 4 times. Because of the limited conversion of lignin, this process allows for the production of levulinic acid with high selectivity directly from corncob residue in a simple separation process. PMID:25045141

  15. Mapping of amino acid residues responsible for adhesion of cell culture-adapted foot-and-mouth disease SAT type viruses.

    PubMed

    Maree, Francois F; Blignaut, Belinda; de Beer, Tjaart A P; Visser, Nico; Rieder, Elizabeth A

    2010-10-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infects host cells by adhering to the alpha(V) subgroup of the integrin family of cellular receptors in a Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) dependent manner. FMD viruses, propagated in non-host cell cultures are reported to acquire the ability to enter cells via alternative cell surface molecules. Sequencing analysis of SAT1 and SAT2 cell culture-adapted variants showed acquisition of positively charged amino acid residues within surface-exposed loops of the outer capsid structural proteins. The fixation of positively charged residues at position 110-112 in the beta F-beta G loop of VP1 of SAT1 isolates is thought to correlate with the acquisition of the ability to utilise alternative glycosaminoglycan (GAG) molecules for cell entry. Similarly, two SAT2 viruses that adapted readily to BHK-21 cells accumulated positively charged residues at positions 83 and 85 of the beta D-beta E loop of VP1. Both regions surround the fivefold axis of the virion. Recombinant viruses containing positively charged residues at position 110 and 112 of VP1 were able to infect CHO-K1 cells (that expresses GAG) and demonstrated increased infectivity in BHK-21 cells. Therefore, recombinant SAT viruses engineered to express substitutions that induce GAG-binding could be exploited in the rational design of vaccine seed stocks with improved growth properties in cell cultures. PMID:20637812

  16. Lysine residues direct the chlorination of tyrosines in YXXK motifs of apolipoprotein A-I when hypochlorous acid oxidizes high density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Bergt, Constanze; Fu, Xiaoyun; Huq, Nabiha P; Kao, Jeff; Heinecke, Jay W

    2004-02-27

    Oxidized lipoproteins may play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Elevated levels of 3-chlorotyrosine, a specific end product of the reaction between hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and tyrosine residues of proteins, have been detected in atherosclerotic tissue. Thus, HOCl generated by the phagocyte enzyme myeloperoxidase represents one pathway for protein oxidation in humans. One important target of the myeloperoxidase pathway may be high density lipoprotein (HDL), which mobilizes cholesterol from artery wall cells. To determine whether activated phagocytes preferentially chlorinate specific sites in HDL, we used tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to analyze apolipoprotein A-I that had been oxidized by HOCl. The major site of chlorination was a single tyrosine residue located in one of the protein's YXXK motifs (where X represents a nonreactive amino acid). To investigate the mechanism of chlorination, we exposed synthetic peptides to HOCl. The peptides encompassed the amino acid sequences YKXXY, YXXKY, or YXXXY. MS/MS analysis demonstrated that chlorination of tyrosine in the peptides that contained lysine was regioselective and occurred in high yield if the substrate was KXXY or YXXK. NMR and MS analyses revealed that the N(epsilon) amino group of lysine was initially chlorinated, which suggests that chloramine formation is the first step in tyrosine chlorination. Molecular modeling of the YXXK motif in apolipoprotein A-I demonstrated that these tyrosine and lysine residues are adjacent on the same face of an amphipathic alpha-helix. Our observations suggest that HOCl selectively targets tyrosine residues that are suitably juxtaposed to primary amino groups in proteins. This mechanism might enable phagocytes to efficiently damage proteins when they destroy microbial proteins during infection or damage host tissue during inflammation. PMID:14660678

  17. Residue Geometry Networks: A Rigidity-Based Approach to the Amino Acid Network and Evolutionary Rate Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fokas, Alexander S; Cole, Daniel J; Ahnert, Sebastian E; Chin, Alex W

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid networks (AANs) abstract the protein structure by recording the amino acid contacts and can provide insight into protein function. Herein, we describe a novel AAN construction technique that employs the rigidity analysis tool, FIRST, to build the AAN, which we refer to as the residue geometry network (RGN). We show that this new construction can be combined with network theory methods to include the effects of allowed conformal motions and local chemical environments. Importantly, this is done without costly molecular dynamics simulations required by other AAN-related methods, which allows us to analyse large proteins and/or data sets. We have calculated the centrality of the residues belonging to 795 proteins. The results display a strong, negative correlation between residue centrality and the evolutionary rate. Furthermore, among residues with high closeness, those with low degree were particularly strongly conserved. Random walk simulations using the RGN were also successful in identifying allosteric residues in proteins involved in GPCR signalling. The dynamic function of these residues largely remain hidden in the traditional distance-cutoff construction technique. Despite being constructed from only the crystal structure, the results in this paper suggests that the RGN can identify residues that fulfil a dynamical function. PMID:27623708

  18. Radiogenic Ar retention in residual silica from acid-treated micas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkowski, Arkadiusz; Szczerba, Marek; Środoń, Jan; Banaś, Michał

    2014-03-01

    In sedimentary basins, immediate equilibration with surface and pore waters of Ar, released from K-bearing minerals during their diagenesis or weathering, has been a paradigm for geochemistry and geochronology. Consequently, K-Ar and Ar-Ar isotope geochronology techniques applied to sedimentary rocks are based on an assumption that no measurable external radiogenic 40Ar (“excess argon”) has been locked in the rock components during their formation and alteration. Our results indicate that the reaction of micaceous sedimentary and diagenetic clay minerals (illite, glauconite) with acid produces microporous silica that retains a great fraction of the initial argon, releasing potassium to the solution. In all tested cases the evolution of K-Ar isotope ages followed the very same pattern: the apparent K-Ar isotope age increased enormously after acid treatment and dropped significantly after silica removal (with hot Na2CO3), but never decreased lower than the initial K-Ar isotope age of the untreated sample. The amorphous silica content and the apparent K-Ar age increased with the acid reaction time. Using the molecular dynamics simulations, the clay-acid reaction by-product was shown to bend and wrap, producing three-dimensional, protonated and hydrated silica. As a consequence of dramatically different hydration energies of Ar and K, potassium is instantaneously released and hydrated outside the residual structure while Ar atoms remain inside the silica network, adsorbed on the surface. This is, to our knowledge, the first experimental evidence that the excess argon can be retained in solid mineral reaction products formed under pressure and temperature close to those of the Earth surface (1 atm, <80 °C).

  19. Using Chou's pseudo amino acid composition to predict protein quaternary structure: a sequence-segmented PseAAC approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Wu; Chen, Wei; Yang, Feng; Pan, Quan

    2008-10-01

    In the protein universe, many proteins are composed of two or more polypeptide chains, generally referred to as subunits, which associate through noncovalent interactions and, occasionally, disulfide bonds to form protein quaternary structures. It has long been known that the functions of proteins are closely related to their quaternary structures; some examples include enzymes, hemoglobin, DNA polymerase, and ion channels. However, it is extremely labor-expensive and even impossible to quickly determine the structures of hundreds of thousands of protein sequences solely from experiments. Since the number of protein sequences entering databanks is increasing rapidly, it is highly desirable to develop computational methods for classifying the quaternary structures of proteins from their primary sequences. Since the concept of Chou's pseudo amino acid composition (PseAAC) was introduced, a variety of approaches, such as residue conservation scores, von Neumann entropy, multiscale energy, autocorrelation function, moment descriptors, and cellular automata, have been utilized to formulate the PseAAC for predicting different attributes of proteins. Here, in a different approach, a sequence-segmented PseAAC is introduced to represent protein samples. Meanwhile, multiclass SVM classifier modules were adopted to classify protein quaternary structures. As a demonstration, the dataset constructed by Chou and Cai [(2003) Proteins 53:282-289] was adopted as a benchmark dataset. The overall jackknife success rates thus obtained were 88.2-89.1%, indicating that the new approach is quite promising for predicting protein quaternary structure. PMID:18427713

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Novel Acidimicrobiaceae Members from an Acid Mine Drainage Biofilm Metagenome.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ameet J; Sharp, Jonathan O; Yoder, Michael J; Almstrand, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the family Acidimicrobiaceae are frequently encountered in heavy metal-contaminated acidic environments. However, their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is poorly resolved. We present draft genome sequences of two novel and phylogenetically distinct Acidimicrobiaceae members assembled from an acid mine drainage biofilm metagenome. PMID:26769942

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Novel Acidimicrobiaceae Members from an Acid Mine Drainage Biofilm Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ameet J.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Yoder, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the family Acidimicrobiaceae are frequently encountered in heavy metal-contaminated acidic environments. However, their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is poorly resolved. We present draft genome sequences of two novel and phylogenetically distinct Acidimicrobiaceae members assembled from an acid mine drainage biofilm metagenome. PMID:26769942

  2. Minimal Residual Disease by Next-Generation Sequencing: Pros and Cons.

    PubMed

    Avet-Loiseau, Herve

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of data recently generated highlights that minimal residual disease (MRD)-negative status can be achieved in a large proportion of patients. These studies, in addition to a meta-analysis, clearly suggest significant improvement in both event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) among those patients achieving MRD-negative status, especially with sensitivity of one cell in 1 million bone marrow cells. There is an evolving consensus that achieving MRD-negative status should become the ultimate goal of therapeutic intervention. Further future efforts should now be directed at determining how MRD status can be used to guide and personalize further therapy including type of consolidation and maintenance therapy. PMID:27249750

  3. Polyunsaturated fatty acids inhibit Kv1.4 by interacting with positively charged extracellular pore residues.

    PubMed

    Farag, N E; Jeong, D; Claydon, T; Warwicker, J; Boyett, M R

    2016-08-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) modulate voltage-gated K(+) channel inactivation by an unknown site and mechanism. The effects of ω-6 and ω-3 PUFAs were investigated on the heterologously expressed Kv1.4 channel. PUFAs inhibited wild-type Kv1.4 during repetitive pulsing as a result of slowing of recovery from inactivation. In a mutant Kv1.4 channel lacking N-type inactivation, PUFAs reversibly enhanced C-type inactivation (Kd, 15-43 μM). C-type inactivation was affected by extracellular H(+) and K(+) as well as PUFAs and there was an interaction among the three: the effect of PUFAs was reversed during acidosis and abolished on raising K(+) Replacement of two positively charged residues in the extracellular pore (H508 and K532) abolished the effects of the PUFAs (and extracellular H(+) and K(+)) on C-type inactivation but had no effect on the lipoelectric modulation of voltage sensor activation, suggesting two separable interaction sites/mechanisms of action of PUFAs. Charge calculations suggest that the acidic head group of the PUFAs raises the pKa of H508 and this reduces the K(+) occupancy of the selectivity filter, stabilizing the C-type inactivated state. PMID:27281482

  4. Degradation of carbohydrates during dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment can interfere with lignin measurements in solid residues.

    PubMed

    Katahira, Rui; Sluiter, Justin B; Schell, Daniel J; Davis, Mark F

    2013-04-01

    The lignin content measured after dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover indicates more lignin than could be accounted for on the basis of the untreated corn stover lignin content. This phenomenon was investigated using a combination of (13)C cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and lignin removal using acid chlorite bleaching. Only minimal contamination with carbohydrates and proteins was observed in the pretreated corn stover. Incorporating degradation products from sugars was also investigated using (13)C-labeled sugars. The results indicate that sugar degradation products are present in the pretreatment residue and may be intimately associated with the lignin. Studies comparing whole corn stover (CS) to extractives-free corn stover [CS(Ext)] clearly demonstrated that extractives are a key contributor to the high-lignin mass balance closure (MBC). Sugars and other low molecular weight compounds present in plant extractives polymerize and form solids during pretreatment, resulting in apparent Klason lignin measurements that are biased high. PMID:23428141

  5. Tri-peptide reference structures for the calculation of relative solvent accessible surface area in protein amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Topham, Christopher M; Smith, Jeremy C

    2015-02-01

    Relative amino acid residue solvent accessibility values allow the quantitative comparison of atomic solvent-accessible surface areas in different residue types and physical environments in proteins and in protein structural alignments. Geometry-optimised tri-peptide structures in extended solvent-exposed reference conformations have been obtained for 43 amino acid residue types at a high level of quantum chemical theory. Significant increases in side-chain solvent accessibility, offset by reductions in main-chain atom solvent exposure, were observed for standard residue types in partially geometry-optimised structures when compared to non-minimised models built from identical sets of proper dihedral angles abstracted from the literature. Optimisation of proper dihedral angles led most notably to marked increases of up to 54% in proline main-chain atom solvent accessibility compared to literature values. Similar effects were observed for fully-optimised tri-peptides in implicit solvent. The relief of internal strain energy was associated with systematic variation in N, C(α) and C(β) atom solvent accessibility across all standard residue types. The results underline the importance of optimisation of 'hard' degrees of freedom (bond lengths and valence bond angles) and improper dihedral angle values from force field or other context-independent reference values, and impact on the use of standardised fixed internal co-ordinate geometry in sampling approaches to the determination of absolute values of protein amino acid residue solvent accessibility. Quantum chemical methods provide a useful and accurate alternative to molecular mechanics methods to perform energy minimisation of peptides containing non-standard (chemically modified) amino acid residues frequently present in experimental protein structure data sets, for which force field parameters may not be available. Reference tri-peptide atomic co-ordinate sets including hydrogen atoms are made freely available

  6. Two distinct ferredoxins from Rhodobacter capsulatus: complete amino acid sequences and molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Saeki, K; Suetsugu, Y; Yao, Y; Horio, T; Marrs, B L; Matsubara, H

    1990-09-01

    Two distinct ferredoxins were purified from Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003. Their complete amino acid sequences were determined by a combination of protease digestion, BrCN cleavage and Edman degradation. Ferredoxins I and II were composed of 64 and 111 amino acids, respectively, with molecular weights of 6,728 and 12,549 excluding iron and sulfur atoms. Both contained two Cys clusters in their amino acid sequences. The first cluster of ferredoxin I and the second cluster of ferredoxin II had a sequence, CxxCxxCxxxCP, in common with the ferredoxins found in Clostridia. The second cluster of ferredoxin I had a sequence, CxxCxxxxxxxxCxxxCM, with extra amino acids between the second and third Cys, which has been reported for other photosynthetic bacterial ferredoxins and putative ferredoxins (nif-gene products) from nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and with a unique occurrence of Met. The first cluster of ferredoxin II had a CxxCxxxxCxxxCP sequence, with two additional amino acids between the second and third Cys, a characteristics feature of Azotobacter-[3Fe-4S] [4Fe-4S]-ferredoxin. Ferredoxin II was also similar to Azotobacter-type ferredoxins with an extended carboxyl (C-) terminal sequence compared to the common Clostridium-type. The evolutionary relationship of the two together with a putative one recently found to be encoded in nifENXQ region in this bacterium [Moreno-Vivian et al. (1989) J. Bacteriol. 171, 2591-2598] is discussed. PMID:2277040

  7. Residue energy and mobility in sequence to global structure and dynamics of a HIV-1 protease (1DIFA) by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. B.; Farmer, B. L.

    2009-01-01

    Energy, mobility, and structural profiles of residues in a specific sequence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 protease chain and its global conformation and dynamics are studied by a coarse-grained computer simulation model on a cubic lattice. HIV-1 protease is described by a chain of 99 residues (nodes) in a specific sequence (1DIFA) with N- and C-terminals on the lattice, where empty lattice sites represent an effective solvent medium. Internal structures of the residues are ignored but their specificities are captured via an interaction (ɛij) matrix (residue-residue, residue-solvent) of the coefficient (fɛij) of the Lennard-Jones potential. Simulations are performed for a range of interaction strength (f ) with the solvent-residue interaction describing the quality of the solvent. Snapshots of the protein show considerable changes in the conformation of the protein on varying the interaction. From the mobility and energy profiles of the residues, it is possible to identify the active (and not so active) segments of the protein and consequently their role in proteolysis. Contrary to interaction thermodynamics, the hydrophobic residues possess higher configurational energy and lower mobility while the electrostatic and polar residues are more mobile despite their lower interaction energy. Segments of hydrophobic core residues, crucial for the structural evolution of the protein are identified—some of which are consistent with recent molecular dynamics simulation in context to possible clinical observations. Global energy and radius of gyration of the protein exhibit nonmonotonic dependence on the interaction strength (f) with opposite trends, e.g., rapid transition into globular structure with higher energy. Variations of the rms displacement of the protein and that of a tracer residue, Gly49, with the time steps show how they slow down on increasing the interaction strength.

  8. A single amino acid change, Q114R, in the cleavage-site sequence of Newcastle disease virus fusion protein attenuates viral replication and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sweety; Kumar, Sachin; Khattar, Sunil K; Samal, Siba K

    2011-10-01

    A key determinant of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) virulence is the amino acid sequence at the fusion (F) protein cleavage site. The NDV F protein is synthesized as an inactive precursor, F(0), and is activated by proteolytic cleavage between amino acids 116 and 117 to produce two disulfide-linked subunits, F(1) and F(2). The consensus sequence of the F protein cleavage site of virulent [(112)(R/K)-R-Q-(R/K)-R↓F-I(118)] and avirulent [(112)(G/E)-(K/R)-Q-(G/E)-R↓L-I(118)] strains contains a conserved glutamine residue at position 114. Recently, some NDV strains from Africa and Madagascar were isolated from healthy birds and have been reported to contain five basic residues (R-R-R-K-R↓F-I/V or R-R-R-R-R↓F-I/V) at the F protein cleavage site. In this study, we have evaluated the role of this conserved glutamine residue in the replication and pathogenicity of NDV by using the moderately pathogenic Beaudette C strain and by making Q114R, K115R and I118V mutants of the F protein in this strain. Our results showed that changing the glutamine to a basic arginine residue reduced viral replication and attenuated the pathogenicity of the virus in chickens. The pathogenicity was further reduced when the isoleucine at position 118 was substituted for valine. PMID:21677091

  9. Recombination by sequence repeats with formation of suppressive or residual mitochondrial DNA in Neurospora

    SciTech Connect

    Almasan, A.; Mishra, N.C. )

    1991-09-01

    Recombination junctions of several Neurospora mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutants and their revertants were identified. Their nucleotide sequences and putative secondary structures were determined in order to understand the nature of the elements involved in intramolecular recombination. Multiple deletions, involving the same portion of Neurospora mtDNA, were identified in six independently isolated mutants. A 9-nucleotide repeat element, CCCCNCCCC, was found to be involved in these and other Neurospora mitochondrial recombination events. The repeat elements were clustered as hot spots on the Neurospora mtDNA and were associated with palindromic DNA sequences. The palindromes have a potential to generate hairpin structures. A much lower free energy of the putative hairpins at the 5{prime} end of the recombination site, and the possible formation of non-B-DNA structure by polypyrimidine tracks, may be important in the initiation of recombination. Using PCR, the authors found low levels of a specific mitochondrial deletion in certain Neurospora mutants. Their presence in low amounts in a population with a much larger number of normal mtDNA is unexpected. Contrary to earlier belief, this finding supports the view that deleted, smaller DNA molecules are not always suppressive relative to normal mtDNAs.

  10. From Amino Acid to Glucosinolate Biosynthesis: Protein Sequence Changes in the Evolution of Methylthioalkylmalate Synthase in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    de Kraker, Jan-Willem; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Methylthioalkylmalate synthase (MAM) catalyzes the committed step in the side chain elongation of Met, yielding important precursors for glucosinolate biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana and other Brassicaceae species. MAM is believed to have evolved from isopropylmalate synthase (IPMS), an enzyme involved in Leu biosynthesis, based on phylogenetic analyses and an overlap of catalytic abilities. Here, we investigated the changes in protein structure that have occurred during the recruitment of IPMS from amino acid to glucosinolate metabolism. The major sequence difference between IPMS and MAM is the absence of 120 amino acids at the C-terminal end of MAM that constitute a regulatory domain for Leu-mediated feedback inhibition. Truncation of this domain in Arabidopsis IPMS2 results in loss of Leu feedback inhibition and quaternary structure, two features common to MAM enzymes, plus an 8.4-fold increase in the kcat/Km for a MAM substrate. Additional exchange of two amino acids in the active site resulted in a MAM-like enzyme that had little residual IPMS activity. Hence, combination of the loss of the regulatory domain and a few additional amino acid exchanges can explain the evolution of MAM from IPMS during its recruitment from primary to secondary metabolism. PMID:21205930

  11. N-terminal sequence of amino acids and some properties of an acid-stable alpha-amylase from citric acid-koji (Aspergillus usamii var.).

    PubMed

    Suganuma, T; Tahara, N; Kitahara, K; Nagahama, T; Inuzuka, K

    1996-01-01

    An acid-stable alpha-amylase (AA) was purified from an acidic extract of citric acid-koji (A. usamii var.). The N-terminal sequence of the first 20 amino acids of the enzyme was identical with that of AA from A. niger, but the two enzymes differed in molecular weight. HPLC analysis for identifying the anomers of products indicated that the AA hydrolyzed maltopentaose (G5) at the third glycoside bond predominantly, which differed from Taka-amylase A and the neutral alpha-amylase (NA) from the citric acid-koji. PMID:8824843

  12. Peptide vaccine against canine parvovirus: identification of two neutralization subsites in the N terminus of VP2 and optimization of the amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Casal, J I; Langeveld, J P; Cortés, E; Schaaper, W W; van Dijk, E; Vela, C; Kamstrup, S; Meloen, R H

    1995-11-01

    The N-terminal domain of the major capsid protein VP2 of canine parvovirus was shown to be an excellent target for development of a synthetic peptide vaccine, but detailed information about number of epitopes, optimal length, sequence choice, and site of coupling to the carrier protein was lacking. Therefore, several overlapping peptides based on this N terminus were synthesized to establish conditions for optimal and reproducible induction of neutralizing antibodies in rabbits. The specificity and neutralizing ability of the antibody response for these peptides were determined. Within the N-terminal 23 residues of VP2, two subsites able to induce neutralizing antibodies and which overlapped by only two glycine residues at positions 10 and 11 could be discriminated. The shortest sequence sufficient for neutralization induction was nine residues. Peptides longer than 13 residues consistently induced neutralization, provided that their N termini were located between positions 1 and 11 of VP2. The orientation of the peptides at the carrier protein was also of importance, being more effective when coupled through the N terminus than through the C terminus to keyhole limpet hemocyanin. The results suggest that the presence of amino acid residues 2 to 21 (and probably 3 to 17) of VP2 in a single peptide is preferable for a synthetic peptide vaccine. PMID:7474152

  13. Complex formation of cadmium with sugar residues, nucleobases, phosphates, nucleotides, and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Sigel, Roland K O; Skilandat, Miriam; Sigel, Astrid; Operschall, Bert P; Sigel, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium(II), commonly classified as a relatively soft metal ion, prefers indeed aromatic-nitrogen sites (e.g., N7 of purines) over oxygen sites (like sugar-hydroxyl groups). However, matters are not that simple, though it is true that the affinity of Cd(2+) towards ribose-hydroxyl groups is very small; yet, a correct orientation brought about by a suitable primary binding site and a reduced solvent polarity, as it is expected to occur in a folded nucleic acid, may facilitate metal ion-hydroxyl group binding very effectively. Cd(2+) prefers the guanine(N7) over the adenine(N7), mainly because of the steric hindrance of the (C6)NH(2) group in the adenine residue. This Cd(2+)-(N7) interaction in a guanine moiety leads to a significant acidification of the (N1)H meaning that the deprotonation reaction occurs now in the physiological pH range. N3 of the cytosine residue, together with the neighboring (C2)O, is also a remarkable Cd(2+) binding site, though replacement of (C2)O by (C2)S enhances the affinity towards Cd(2+) dramatically, giving in addition rise to the deprotonation of the (C4)NH(2) group. The phosphodiester bridge is only a weak binding site but the affinity increases further from the mono- to the di- and the triphosphate. The same also holds for the corresponding nucleotides. Complex stability of the pyrimidine-nucleotides is solely determined by the coordination tendency of the phosphate group(s), whereas in the case of purine-nucleotides macrochelate formation takes place by the interaction of the phosphate-coordinated Cd(2+) with N7. The extents of the formation degrees of these chelates are summarized and the effect of a non-bridging sulfur atom in a thiophosphate group (versus a normal phosphate group) is considered. Mixed ligand complexes containing a nucleotide and a further mono- or bidentate ligand are covered and it is concluded that in these species N7 is released from the coordination sphere of Cd(2+). In the case that the other ligand

  14. Logistic regression models to predict solvent accessible residues using sequence- and homology-based qualitative and quantitative descriptors applied to a domain-complete X-ray structure learning set

    PubMed Central

    Nepal, Reecha; Spencer, Joanna; Bhogal, Guneet; Nedunuri, Amulya; Poelman, Thomas; Kamath, Thejas; Chung, Edwin; Kantardjieff, Katherine; Gottlieb, Andrea; Lustig, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    A working example of relative solvent accessibility (RSA) prediction for proteins is presented. Novel logistic regression models with various qualitative descriptors that include amino acid type and quantitative descriptors that include 20- and six-term sequence entropy have been built and validated. A domain-complete learning set of over 1300 proteins is used to fit initial models with various sequence homology descriptors as well as query residue qualitative descriptors. Homology descriptors are derived from BLASTp sequence alignments, whereas the RSA values are determined directly from the crystal structure. The logistic regression models are fitted using dichotomous responses indicating buried or accessible solvent, with binary classifications obtained from the RSA values. The fitted models determine binary predictions of residue solvent accessibility with accuracies comparable to other less computationally intensive methods using the standard RSA threshold criteria 20 and 25% as solvent accessible. When an additional non-homology descriptor describing Lobanov–Galzitskaya residue disorder propensity is included, incremental improvements in accuracy are achieved with 25% threshold accuracies of 76.12 and 74.79% for the Manesh-215 and CASP(8+9) test sets, respectively. Moreover, the described software and the accompanying learning and validation sets allow students and researchers to explore the utility of RSA prediction with simple, physically intuitive models in any number of related applications. PMID:26664348

  15. The myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant hypothiocyanous acid inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases via oxidation of key cysteine residues.

    PubMed

    Cook, Naomi L; Moeke, Cassidy H; Fantoni, Luca I; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues is critical to cellular processes, and is regulated by kinases and phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs contain a redox-sensitive active site Cys residue, which is readily oxidized. Myeloperoxidase, released from activated leukocytes, catalyzes thiocyanate ion (SCN(-)) oxidation by H2O2 to form hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN), an oxidant that targets Cys residues. Dysregulated phosphorylation and elevated MPO levels have been associated with chronic inflammatory diseases where HOSCN can be generated. Previous studies have shown that HOSCN inhibits isolated PTP1B and induces cellular dysfunction in cultured macrophage-like cells. The present study extends this previous work and shows that physiologically-relevant concentrations of HOSCN alter the activity and structure of other members of the wider PTP family (including leukocyte antigen-related PTP, PTP-LAR; T-cell PTP, TC-PTP; CD45 and Src homology phosphatase-1, Shp-1) by targeting Cys residues. Isolated PTP activity, and activity in lysates of human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) was inhibited by 0-100 µM HOSCN with this being accompanied by reversible oxidation of Cys residues, formation of sulfenic acids or sulfenyl-thiocyanates (detected by Western blotting, and LC-MS as dimedone adducts), and structural changes. LC-MS/MS peptide mass-mapping has provided data on the modified Cys residues in PTP-LAR. This study indicates that inflammation-induced oxidants, and particularly myeloperoxidase-derived species, can modulate the activity of multiple members of the PTP superfamily via oxidation of Cys residues to sulfenic acids. This alteration of the balance of PTP/kinase activity may perturb protein phosphorylation and disrupt cell signaling with subsequent induction of apoptosis at sites of inflammation. PMID:26616646

  16. Purification, amino acid sequence and mode of action of bifidocin B produced by Bifidobacterium bifidum NCFB 1454.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Z; Winters, D K; Johnson, M G

    1999-01-01

    Bifidocin B produced by Bifidobacterium bifidum NCFB 1454 was purified to homogeneity by a rapid and simple three step purification procedure which included freeze drying, Micro-Cel adsorption/desorption and cation exchange chromatography. The purification resulted in 18% recovery and an approximately 1900-fold increase in the specific activity and purity of bifidocin B. Treatment with bifidocin B caused sensitive cells to lose high amounts of intracellular K+ ions and u.v.-absorbing materials, and to become more permeable to ONPG. Bifidocin B adsorbed to the Gram-positive bacteria but not the Gram-negative bacteria tested. Its adsorption was pH-dependent but not time-dependent. For sensitive cells, the adsorption and lethal action of bifidocin B was very rapid. In 5 min, 95% of bifidocin B adsorbed onto sensitive cells. Several salts inhibited the binding of bifidocin B, which could be overcome by increasing the amount of bifidocin B added. Pre-treatment of sensitive cells and cell walls with detergents, organic solvents or enzymes did not cause a reduction in subsequent cellular binding of bifidocin B, but cell wall preparations treated with methanol:chloroform and hot 20% (w/v) TCA lost the ability to adsorb bifidocin B. Also, the addition of purified heterologous lipoteichoic acid to sensitive cells completely blocked the adsorption of bifidocin B. The amino acid sequence indicated that the bacteriocin contained 36 residues. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis yielded a sequence of KYYGNGVTCGLHDCRVDRGKATCGIINNGGMWGDIG. Curing experiments with 20 micrograms ml-1 acriflavine yielded cell derivatives that no longer produced bifidocin B but retained immunity to bifidocin B. Production of bifidocin B, but not immunity to bifidocin B, was associated with a plasmid of about 8 kb in this strain. PMID:10030011

  17. Trace metal occurrences in acid-insoluble residues of the Ordovician Galena Group, southeastern Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Lively, R.S.; Mossler, J.H.; Morey, G.B. ); Hauck, S.A. . Natural Resources Research Inst.)

    1993-03-01

    Regional geochemical, studies on insoluble residues from Paleozoic carbonate rocks have become an integral part of the search for new Upper Mississippi Valley-type mineral deposits in the northern Midcontinent. The authors have extended these studies to southeastern Minnesota, an area well to the north of known lead-zinc deposits of commercial size and grade. In this region, a thin sequence of Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician strata unconformably overlies a complex Precambrian basement. More than 500 samples of limestone and dolomite from 40 drill holes and outcrops were analyzed for 29 related trace elements. Preliminary interpretations are based on the analysis of 380 samples of the Ordovician Galena Group from 37 localities. Results indicate that anomalous concentrations of Pb, Cu, zn, As, Cd, and Ni are confined to the southern half of the Galena subgroup area and extend less than 30 miles north of the Iowa border. The anomalous areas, as well as saddles between the, have a distinct northwest trend, coincident with structural features previously recognized in the Precambrian basement. The spatial relationships of the anomalies and the lack of direct correlation imply deposition from fluids moving north out of the main lead-zinc district along structural pathways. The lack of significant anomalies in the northern part of the subcrop area implies northwest weakening of the forces driving the metal-bearing fluids, as well as a decrease over distance in the absolute metal content of the migrating fluids.

  18. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided.

  19. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1997-04-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided. 7 figs.

  20. Effect of charged amino acid side chain length on lateral cross-strand interactions between carboxylate- and guanidinium-containing residues in a β-hairpin.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsiou-Ting; Liu, Shing-Lung; Chiu, Wen-Chieh; Fang, Chun-Jen; Chang, Hsien-Chen; Wang, Wei-Ren; Yang, Po-An; Li, Jhe-Hao; Huang, Shing-Jong; Huang, Shou-Ling; Cheng, Richard P

    2015-05-01

    β-Sheet is one of the major protein secondary structures. Oppositely charged residues are frequently observed across neighboring strands in antiparallel sheets, suggesting the importance of cross-strand ion pairing interactions. The charged amino acids Asp, Glu, Arg, and Lys have different numbers of hydrophobic methylenes linking the charged functionality to the backbone. To investigate the effect of side chain length of guanidinium- and carboxylate-containing residues on lateral cross-strand ion pairing interactions at non-hydrogen-bonded positions, β-hairpin peptides containing Zbb-Agx (Zbb = Asp, Glu, Aad in increasing length; Agx = Agh, Arg, Agb, Agp in decreasing length) sequence patterns were studied by NMR methods. The fraction folded population and folding energy were derived from the chemical shift deviation data. Peptides with high fraction folded populations involved charged residue side chain lengths that supported high strand propensity. Double mutant cycle analysis was used to determine the interaction energy for the potential lateral ion pairs. Minimal interaction was observed between residues with short side chains, most likely due to the diffused positive charge on the guanidinium group, which weakened cross-strand electrostatic interactions with the carboxylate side chain. Only the Aad-Arg/Agh interactions with long side chains clearly exhibited stabilizing energetics, possibly relying on hydrophobics. A survey of a non-redundant protein structure database revealed that the statistical sheet pair propensity followed the trend Asp-Arg < Glu-Arg, implying the need for matching long side chains. This suggested the need for long side chains on both guanidinium-bearing and carboxylate-bearing residues to stabilize the β-hairpin motif. PMID:25646959

  1. Preparation of a novel carbon-based solid acid from cassava stillage residue and its use for the esterification of free fatty acids in waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingtao; Dong, Xiuqin; Jiang, Haoxi; Li, Guiming; Zhang, Minhua

    2014-04-01

    A novel carbon-based solid acid catalyst was prepared by the sulfonation of incompletely carbonized cassava stillage residue (CSR) with concentrated sulfuric acid, and employed to catalyze the esterification of methanol and free fatty acids (FFAs) in waste cooking oil (WCO). The effects of the carbonization and the sulfonation temperatures on the pore structure, acid density and catalytic activity of the CSR-derived catalysts were systematically investigated. Low temperature carbonization and high temperature sulfonation can cause the collapse of the carbon framework, while high temperature carbonization is not conducive to the attachment of SO3H groups on the surface. The catalyst showed high catalytic activity for esterification, and the acid value for WCO is reduced to below 2mg KOH/g after reaction. The activity of catalyst can be well maintained after five cycles. CSR can be considered a promising raw material for the production of a new eco-friendly solid acid catalyst. PMID:24661813

  2. Molecular cloning of the. alpha. -subunit of human prolyl 4-hydroxylase: The complete cDNA-derived amino acid sequence and evidence for alternative splicing of RNA transcripts

    SciTech Connect

    Helaakoski, T.; Vuori, K.; Myllylae, R.; Kivirikko, K.I.; Pihlajaniemi, T. )

    1989-06-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} tetramer, catalyzes the formation of 4-hydroxyproline in collagens by the hydroxylation of proline residues in peptide linkages. The authors report here on the isolation of cDNA clones encoding the {alpha}-subunit of the enzyme from human tumor HT-1080, placenta, and fibroblast cDNA libraries. Eight overlapping clones covering almost all of the corresponding 3,000-nucleotide mRNA, including all the coding sequences, were characterized. These clones encode a polypeptide of 517 amino acid residues and a signal peptide of 17 amino acids. Previous characterization of cDNA clones for the {beta}-subunit of prolyl 4-hydroxylase has indicated that its C terminus has the amino acid sequence Lys-Asp-Gly-Leu, which, it has been suggested, is necessary for the retention of a polypeptide within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. The {alpha}-subunit does not have this C-terminal sequence, and thus one function of the {beta}-subunit in the prolyl 4-hydroxylase tetramer appears to be to retain the enzyme within this cell organelle. Southern blot analyses of human genomic DNA with a cDNA probe for the {alpha}-subunit suggested the presence of only one gene encoding the two types of mRNA, which appear to result from mutually exclusive alternative splicing of primary transcripts of one gene.

  3. Distributions of amino acids suggest that certain residue types more effectively determine protein secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Saraswathi, S; Fernández-Martínez, J L; Koliński, A; Jernigan, R L; Kloczkowski, A

    2013-10-01

    Exponential growth in the number of available protein sequences is unmatched by the slower growth in the number of structures. As a result, the development of efficient and fast protein secondary structure prediction methods is essential for the broad comprehension of protein structures. Computational methods that can efficiently determine secondary structure can in turn facilitate protein tertiary structure prediction, since most methods rely initially on secondary structure predictions. Recently, we have developed a fast learning optimized prediction methodology (FLOPRED) for predicting protein secondary structure (Saraswathi et al. in JMM 18:4275, 2012). Data are generated by using knowledge-based potentials combined with structure information from the CATH database. A neural network-based extreme learning machine (ELM) and advanced particle swarm optimization (PSO) are used with this data to obtain better and faster convergence to more accurate secondary structure predicted results. A five-fold cross-validated testing accuracy of 83.8 % and a segment overlap (SOV) score of 78.3 % are obtained in this study. Secondary structure predictions and their accuracy are usually presented for three secondary structure elements: α-helix, β-strand and coil but rarely have the results been analyzed with respect to their constituent amino acids. In this paper, we use the results obtained with FLOPRED to provide detailed behaviors for different amino acid types in the secondary structure prediction. We investigate the influence of the composition, physico-chemical properties and position specific occurrence preferences of amino acids within secondary structure elements. In addition, we identify the correlation between these properties and prediction accuracy. The present detailed results suggest several important ways that secondary structure predictions can be improved in the future that might lead to improved protein design and engineering. PMID:23907551

  4. Solid acid catalysts pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of macroalgae cellulosic residue for the production of bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Tan, Inn Shi; Lee, Keat Teong

    2015-06-25

    The aim of this study is to investigate the technical feasibility of converting macroalgae cellulosic residue (MCR) into bioethanol. An attempt was made to present a novel, environmental friendly and economical pretreatment process that enhances enzymatic conversion of MCR to sugars using Dowex (TM) Dr-G8 as catalyst. The optimum yield of glucose reached 99.8% under the optimal condition for solid acid pretreatment (10%, w/v biomass loading, 4%, w/v catalyst loading, 30min, 120°C) followed by enzymatic hydrolysis (45FPU/g of cellulase, 52CBU/g of β-glucosidase, 50°C, pH 4.8, 30h). The yield of sugar obtained was found more superior than conventional pretreatment process using H2SO4 and NaOH. Biomass loading for the subsequent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the pretreated MCR was then optimized, giving an optimum bioethanol yield of 81.5%. The catalyst was separated and reused for six times, with only a slight drop in glucose yield. PMID:25839825

  5. Conservation of Shannon's redundancy for proteins. [information theory applied to amino acid sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts of information theory are applied to examine various proteins in terms of their redundancy in natural originators such as animals and plants. The Monte Carlo method is used to derive information parameters for random protein sequences. Real protein sequence parameters are compared with the standard parameters of protein sequences having a specific length. The tendency of a chain to contain some amino acids more frequently than others and the tendency of a chain to contain certain amino acid pairs more frequently than other pairs are used as randomness measures of individual protein sequences. Non-periodic proteins are generally found to have random Shannon redundancies except in cases of constraints due to short chain length and genetic codes. Redundant characteristics of highly periodic proteins are discussed. A degree of periodicity parameter is derived.

  6. Single amino acid sequence polymorphisms in rat cardiac troponin revealed by top-down tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sancho Solis, Raquel; Ge, Ying; Walker, Jeffery W

    2008-01-01

    Heterotrimeric cardiac troponin (cTn) is a critical component of the thin filament regulatory complex in cardiac muscle. Two of the three subunits, cTnI and cTnT, are subject to post-translational modifications such as proteolysis and phosphorylation, but linking modification patterns to function remains a major challenge. To obtain a global view of the biochemical state of cTn in native tissue, we performed high resolution top-down mass spectrometry of cTn heterotrimers from healthy adult rat hearts. cTn heterotrimers were affinity purified, desalted and then directly subjected to mass spectrometry using a 7 Tesla Thermo LTQ-FT-ICR instrument equipped with an ESI source. Molecular ions for N-terminally processed and acetylated cTnI and cTnT were readily detected as were other post-translationally modified forms of these proteins. cTnI was phosphorylated with a distribution of un-, mono- and bisphosphorylated forms of 41 +/- 3%, 46 +/- 1%, 13 +/- 3%, respectively. cTnT was predominantly monophosphorylated and partially proteolyzed at the Glu(29)-Pro(30) peptide bond. Also observed in high resolution spectra were 'shadow' peaks of similar intensity to 'parent' peaks exhibiting masses of cTnI+16 Da and cTnT+128 Da, subsequently shown by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to be single amino acid polymorphisms. Intact and protease-digested cTn subunits were fragmented by electron capture dissociation or collision activated dissociation to localize an Ala/Ser polymorphism at residue 7 of cTnI. Similar analysis of cTnT localized an additional Gln within a three residue alternative splice site beginning at residue 192. Besides being able to provide unique insights into the global state of post-translational modification of cTn subunits, high resolution top-down mass spectrometry readily revealed naturally occurring single amino acid sequence variants including a genetic polymorphism at residue 7 in cTnI, and an alternative splice isoform that affects a putative hinge region

  7. High-throughput VDJ sequencing for quantification of minimal residual disease in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and immune reconstitution assessment.

    PubMed

    Logan, Aaron C; Gao, Hong; Wang, Chunlin; Sahaf, Bita; Jones, Carol D; Marshall, Eleanor L; Buño, Ismael; Armstrong, Randall; Fire, Andrew Z; Weinberg, Kenneth I; Mindrinos, Michael; Zehnder, James L; Boyd, Scott D; Xiao, Wenzhong; Davis, Ronald W; Miklos, David B

    2011-12-27

    The primary cause of poor outcome following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is disease recurrence. Detection of increasing minimal residual disease (MRD) following HCT may permit early intervention to prevent clinical relapse; however, MRD quantification remains an uncommon diagnostic test because of logistical and financial barriers to widespread use. Here we describe a method for quantifying CLL MRD using widely available consensus primers for amplification of all Ig heavy chain (IGH) genes in a mixture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, followed by high-throughput sequencing (HTS) for disease-specific IGH sequence quantification. To achieve accurate MRD quantification, we developed a systematic bioinformatic methodology to aggregate cancer clone sequence variants arising from systematic and random artifacts occurring during IGH-HTS. We then compared the sensitivity of IGH-HTS, flow cytometry, and allele-specific oligonucleotide PCR for MRD quantification in 28 samples collected from 6 CLL patients following allogeneic HCT. Using amplimer libraries generated with consensus primers from patient blood samples, we demonstrate the sensitivity of IGH-HTS with 454 pyrosequencing to be 10(-5), with a high correlation between quantification by allele-specific oligonucleotide PCR and IGH-HTS (r = 0.85). From the same dataset used to quantify MRD, IGH-HTS also allowed us to profile IGH repertoire reconstitution after HCT-information not provided by the other MRD methods. IGH-HTS using consensus primers will broaden the availability of MRD quantification in CLL and other B cell malignancies, and this approach has potential for quantitative evaluation of immune diversification following transplant and nontransplant therapies. PMID:22160699

  8. High-throughput VDJ sequencing for quantification of minimal residual disease in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and immune reconstitution assessment

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Aaron C.; Gao, Hong; Wang, Chunlin; Sahaf, Bita; Jones, Carol D.; Marshall, Eleanor L.; Buño, Ismael; Armstrong, Randall; Fire, Andrew Z.; Weinberg, Kenneth I.; Mindrinos, Michael; Zehnder, James L.; Boyd, Scott D.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Davis, Ronald W.; Miklos, David B.

    2011-01-01

    The primary cause of poor outcome following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is disease recurrence. Detection of increasing minimal residual disease (MRD) following HCT may permit early intervention to prevent clinical relapse; however, MRD quantification remains an uncommon diagnostic test because of logistical and financial barriers to widespread use. Here we describe a method for quantifying CLL MRD using widely available consensus primers for amplification of all Ig heavy chain (IGH) genes in a mixture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, followed by high-throughput sequencing (HTS) for disease-specific IGH sequence quantification. To achieve accurate MRD quantification, we developed a systematic bioinformatic methodology to aggregate cancer clone sequence variants arising from systematic and random artifacts occurring during IGH-HTS. We then compared the sensitivity of IGH-HTS, flow cytometry, and allele-specific oligonucleotide PCR for MRD quantification in 28 samples collected from 6 CLL patients following allogeneic HCT. Using amplimer libraries generated with consensus primers from patient blood samples, we demonstrate the sensitivity of IGH-HTS with 454 pyrosequencing to be 10−5, with a high correlation between quantification by allele-specific oligonucleotide PCR and IGH-HTS (r = 0.85). From the same dataset used to quantify MRD, IGH-HTS also allowed us to profile IGH repertoire reconstitution after HCT—information not provided by the other MRD methods. IGH-HTS using consensus primers will broaden the availability of MRD quantification in CLL and other B cell malignancies, and this approach has potential for quantitative evaluation of immune diversification following transplant and nontransplant therapies. PMID:22160699

  9. Residues 39-56 of Stem Cell Factor Protein Sequence Are Capable of Stimulating the Expansion of Cord Blood CD34+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bin; Jiang, Wenhong; Fan, Jie; Dai, Wei; Ding, Xinxin; Jiang, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Background Stem cell factor (SCF) can stimulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expansion; however, the specific structural region(s) of SCF protein that are critical for this function are still unknown. A novel monoclonal antibody (named 23C8) against recombinant human SCF (rhSCF) was previously found to inhibit the ability of rhSCF to enhance HSC expansion, making it possible to identify the relevant active region to HSC. Methods Eleven polypeptides were synthesized, which were designed to cover the full-length of rhSCF, with overlaps that are at least 3 amino acids long. ELISA was used to identify the polypeptide(s) that specifically react with the anti-SCF. The effects of the synthetic polypeptides on human HSC expansion, or on the ability of the full-length rhSCF to stimulate cell proliferation, were evaluated ex vivo. Total cell number was monitored using hemocytometer whereas CD34+ cell number was calculated based on the proportion determined via flow cytometry on day 6 of culture. Results Of all polypeptides analyzed, only one, named P0, corresponding to the SCF protein sequence at residues 39–56, was recognized by 23C8 mAb during ELISA. P0 stimulated the expansion of CD34+ cells derived from human umbilical cord blood (UCB). Addition of P0 increased the numbers of total mononucleated cells and CD34+ cells, by ~2 fold on day 6. P0 also showed partial competition against full-length rhSCF in the ex vivo cell expansion assay. Conclusion Residues 39–56 of rhSCF comprise a critical functional region for its ability to enhance expansion of human UCB CD34+ cells. The peptide P0 is a potential candidate for further development as a synthetic substitute for rhSCF in laboratory and clinical applications. PMID:26505626

  10. Mutagenesis identifies the critical amino acid residues of human endonuclease G involved in catalysis, magnesium coordination, and substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shih-Lu; Li, Chia-Cheng; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Chen, Yi-Jin; Lin, Ching-Ting; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2009-01-01

    Background Endonuclease G (EndoG), a member of DNA/RNA nonspecific ββα-Me-finger nucleases, is involved in apoptosis and normal cellular proliferation. In this study, we analyzed the critical amino acid residues of EndoG and proposed the catalytic mechanism of EndoG. Methods To identify the critical amino acid residues of human EndoG, we replaced the conserved histidine, asparagine, and arginine residues with alanine. The catalytic efficacies of Escherichia coli-expressed EndoG variants were further analyzed by kinetic studies. Results Diethyl pyrocarbonate modification assay revealed that histidine residues were involved in EndoG activity. His-141, Asn-163, and Asn-172 in the H-N-H motif of EndoG were critical for catalysis and substrate specificity. H141A mutant required a higher magnesium concentration to achieve its activity, suggesting the unique role of His-141 in both catalysis and magnesium coordination. Furthermore, an additional catalytic residue (Asn-251) and an additional metal ion binding site (Glu-271) of human EndoG were identified. Conclusion Based on the mutational analysis and homology modeling, we proposed that human EndoG shared a similar catalytic mechanism with nuclease A from Anabaena. PMID:19272175

  11. Direct fermentation of potato starch and potato residues to lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus under non-sterile conditions

    PubMed Central

    Smerilli, Marina; Neureiter, Markus; Wurz, Stefan; Haas, Cornelia; Frühauf, Sabine; Fuchs, Werner

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lactic acid is an important biorefinery platform chemical. The use of thermophilic amylolytic microorganisms to produce lactic acid by fermentation constitutes an efficient strategy to reduce operating costs, including raw materials and sterilization costs. RESULTS A process for the thermophilic production of lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus directly from potato starch was characterized and optimized. Geobacillus stearothermophilus DSM 494 was selected out of 12 strains screened for amylolytic activity and the ability to form lactic acid as the major product of the anaerobic metabolism. In total more than 30 batches at 3–l scale were run at 60 °C under non-sterile conditions. The process developed produced 37 g L−1 optically pure (98%) L-lactic acid in 20 h from 50 g L−1 raw potato starch. As co-metabolites smaller amounts (<7% w/v) of acetate, formate and ethanol were formed. Yields of lactic acid increased from 66% to 81% when potato residues from food processing were used as a starchy substrate in place of raw potato starch. CONCLUSIONS Potato starch and residues were successfully converted to lactic acid by G. stearothermophilus. The process described in this study provides major benefits in industrial applications and for the valorization of starch-rich waste streams. © 2015 The Authors.Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:25937690

  12. Conversion of amino-acid sequence in proteins to classical music: search for auditory patterns

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    We have converted genome-encoded protein sequences into musical notes to reveal auditory patterns without compromising musicality. We derived a reduced range of 13 base notes by pairing similar amino acids and distinguishing them using variations of three-note chords and codon distribution to dictate rhythm. The conversion will help make genomic coding sequences more approachable for the general public, young children, and vision-impaired scientists. PMID:17477882

  13. Protein location prediction using atomic composition and global features of the amino acid sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Cherian, Betsy Sheena; Nair, Achuthsankar S.

    2010-01-22

    Subcellular location of protein is constructive information in determining its function, screening for drug candidates, vaccine design, annotation of gene products and in selecting relevant proteins for further studies. Computational prediction of subcellular localization deals with predicting the location of a protein from its amino acid sequence. For a computational localization prediction method to be more accurate, it should exploit all possible relevant biological features that contribute to the subcellular localization. In this work, we extracted the biological features from the full length protein sequence to incorporate more biological information. A new biological feature, distribution of atomic composition is effectively used with, multiple physiochemical properties, amino acid composition, three part amino acid composition, and sequence similarity for predicting the subcellular location of the protein. Support Vector Machines are designed for four modules and prediction is made by a weighted voting system. Our system makes prediction with an accuracy of 100, 82.47, 88.81 for self-consistency test, jackknife test and independent data test respectively. Our results provide evidence that the prediction based on the biological features derived from the full length amino acid sequence gives better accuracy than those derived from N-terminal alone. Considering the features as a distribution within the entire sequence will bring out underlying property distribution to a greater detail to enhance the prediction accuracy.

  14. Ab initio detection of fuzzy amino acid tandem repeats in protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tandem repetitions within protein amino acid sequences often correspond to regular secondary structures and form multi-repeat 3D assemblies of varied size and function. Developing internal repetitions is one of the evolutionary mechanisms that proteins employ to adapt their structure and function under evolutionary pressure. While there is keen interest in understanding such phenomena, detection of repeating structures based only on sequence analysis is considered an arduous task, since structure and function is often preserved even under considerable sequence divergence (fuzzy tandem repeats). Results In this paper we present PTRStalker, a new algorithm for ab-initio detection of fuzzy tandem repeats in protein amino acid sequences. In the reported results we show that by feeding PTRStalker with amino acid sequences from the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot database we detect novel tandemly repeated structures not captured by other state-of-the-art tools. Experiments with membrane proteins indicate that PTRStalker can detect global symmetries in the primary structure which are then reflected in the tertiary structure. Conclusions PTRStalker is able to detect fuzzy tandem repeating structures in protein sequences, with performance beyond the current state-of-the art. Such a tool may be a valuable support to investigating protein structural properties when tertiary X-ray data is not available. PMID:22536906

  15. Multimodal phylogeny for taxonomy: integrating information from nucleotide and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Bicego, Manuele; Dellaglio, Franco; Felis, Giovanna E

    2007-10-01

    The crucial role played by the analysis of microbial diversity in biotechnology-based innovations has increased the interest in the microbial taxonomy research area. Phylogenetic sequence analyses have contributed significantly to the advances in this field, also in the view of the large amount of sequence data collected in recent years. Phylogenetic analyses could be realized on the basis of protein-encoding nucleotide sequences or encoded amino acid molecules: these two mechanisms present different peculiarities, still starting from two alternative representations of the same information. This complementarity could be exploited to achieve a multimodal phylogenetic scheme that is able to integrate gene and protein information in order to realize a single final tree. This aspect has been poorly addressed in the literature. In this paper, we propose to integrate the two phylogenetic analyses using basic schemes derived from the multimodality fusion theory (or multiclassifier systems theory), a well-founded and rigorous branch for which its powerfulness has already been demonstrated in other pattern recognition contexts. The proposed approach could be applied to distance matrix-based phylogenetic techniques (like neighbor joining), resulting in a smart and fast method. The proposed methodology has been tested in a real case involving sequences of some species of lactic acid bacteria. With this dataset, both nucleotide sequence- and amino acid sequence-based phylogenetic analyses present some drawbacks, which are overcome with the multimodal analysis. PMID:17933011

  16. Draft genome sequence of the docosahexaenoic acid producing thraustochytrid Aurantiochytrium sp. T66.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Ertesvåg, Helga; Aasen, Inga Marie; Vadstein, Olav; Brautaset, Trygve; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan

    2016-06-01

    Thraustochytrids are unicellular, marine protists, and there is a growing industrial interest in these organisms, particularly because some species, including strains belonging to the genus Aurantiochytrium, accumulate high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Aurantiochytrium sp. T66 (ATCC PRA-276), with a size of 43 Mbp, and 11,683 predicted protein-coding sequences. The data has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/Genbank under the accession LNGJ00000000. The genome sequence will contribute new insight into DHA biosynthesis and regulation, providing a basis for metabolic engineering of thraustochytrids. PMID:27222814

  17. A classification of glycosyl hydrolases based on amino acid sequence similarities.

    PubMed Central

    Henrissat, B

    1991-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of 301 glycosyl hydrolases and related enzymes have been compared. A total of 291 sequences corresponding to 39 EC entries could be classified into 35 families. Only ten sequences (less than 5% of the sample) could not be assigned to any family. With the sequences available for this analysis, 18 families were found to be monospecific (containing only one EC number) and 17 were found to be polyspecific (containing at least two EC numbers). Implications on the folding characteristics and mechanism of action of these enzymes and on the evolution of carbohydrate metabolism are discussed. With the steady increase in sequence and structural data, it is suggested that the enzyme classification system should perhaps be revised. PMID:1747104

  18. New families in the classification of glycosyl hydrolases based on amino acid sequence similarities.

    PubMed Central

    Henrissat, B; Bairoch, A

    1993-01-01

    301 glycosyl hydrolases and related enzymes corresponding to 39 EC entries of the I.U.B. classification system have been classified into 35 families on the basis of amino-acid-sequence similarities [Henrissat (1991) Biochem. J. 280, 309-316]. Approximately half of the families were found to be monospecific (containing only one EC number), whereas the other half were found to be polyspecific (containing at least two EC numbers). A > 60% increase in sequence data for glycosyl hydrolases (181 additional enzymes or enzyme domains sequences have since become available) allowed us to update the classification not only by the addition of more members to already identified families, but also by the finding of ten new families. On the basis of a comparison of 482 sequences corresponding to 52 EC entries, 45 families, out of which 22 are polyspecific, can now be defined. This classification has been implemented in the SWISS-PROT protein sequence data bank. PMID:8352747

  19. Sequence-specific purification of nucleic acids by PNA-controlled hybrid selection.

    PubMed

    Orum, H; Nielsen, P E; Jørgensen, M; Larsson, C; Stanley, C; Koch, T

    1995-09-01

    Using an oligohistidine peptide nucleic acids (oligohistidine-PNA) chimera, we have developed a rapid hybrid selection method that allows efficient, sequence-specific purification of a target nucleic acid. The method exploits two fundamental features of PNA. First, that PNA binds with high affinity and specificity to its complementary nucleic acid. Second, that amino acids are easily attached to the PNA oligomer during synthesis. We show that a (His)6-PNA chimera exhibits strong binding to chelated Ni2+ ions without compromising its native PNA hybridization properties. We further show that these characteristics allow the (His)6-PNA/DNA complex to be purified by the well-established method of metal ion affinity chromatography using a Ni(2+)-NTA (nitrilotriactic acid) resin. Specificity and efficiency are the touchstones of any nucleic acid purification scheme. We show that the specificity of the (His)6-PNA selection approach is such that oligonucleotides differing by only a single nucleotide can be selectively purified. We also show that large RNAs (2224 nucleotides) can be captured with high efficiency by using multiple (His)6-PNA probes. PNA can hybridize to nucleic acids in low-salt concentrations that destabilize native nucleic acid structures. We demonstrate that this property of PNA can be utilized to purify an oligonucleotide in which the target sequence forms part of an intramolecular stem/loop structure. PMID:7495562

  20. In silico comparative analysis of DNA and amino acid sequences for prion protein gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Lee, J; Lee, C

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variability might contribute to species specificity of prion diseases in various organisms. In this study, structures of the prion protein gene (PRNP) and its amino acids were compared among species of which sequence data were available. Comparisons of PRNP DNA sequences among 12 species including human, chimpanzee, monkey, bovine, ovine, dog, mouse, rat, wallaby, opossum, chicken and zebrafish allowed us to identify candidate regulatory regions in intron 1 and 3'-untranslated region (UTR) in addition to the coding region. Highly conserved putative binding sites for transcription factors, such as heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) and myocite enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), were discovered in the intron 1. In 3'-UTR, the functional sequence (ATTAAA) for nucleus-specific polyadenylation was found in all the analysed species. The functional sequence (TTTTTAT) for maturation-specific polyadenylation was identically observed only in ovine, and one or two nucleotide mismatches in the other species. A comparison of the amino acid sequences in 53 species revealed a large sequence identity. Especially the octapeptide repeat region was observed in all the species but frog and zebrafish. Functional changes and susceptibility to prion diseases with various isoforms of prion protein could be caused by numeric variability and conformational changes discovered in the repeat sequences. PMID:18397498

  1. A 13C{31P} REDOR NMR Investigation of the Role of Glutamic Acid Residues in Statherin-Hydroxyapatite Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ndao, Moise; Ash, Jason T.; Breen, Nicholas F.; Goobes, Gil; Stayton, Patrick S.; Drobny, Gary P.

    2011-01-01

    The side chain carboxyl groups of acidic proteins found in the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) of mineralized tissues play a key role in promoting or inhibiting the growth of minerals such as hydroxyapatite (HAP), the principal mineral component of bone and teeth. Among the acidic proteins found in the saliva is statherin, a 43-residue tyrosine-rich peptide that is a potent lubricant in the salivary pellicle and an inhibitor of both HAP crystal nucleation and growth. Three acidic amino acids – D1, E4, and E5 – are located in the N-terminal 15 amino acid segment, with a fourth amino acid, E26, located outside the N-terminus. We have utilized 13C{31P} REDOR NMR to analyze the role played by acidic amino acids in the binding mechanism of statherin to the HAP surface by measuring the distance between the δ-carboxyl 13C spins of the three glutamic acid side chains of statherin (residues E4, E5, E26) and 31P spins of the phosphate groups at the HAP surface. 13C{31P} REDOR studies of glutamic-5-13C acid incorporated at positions E4 and E26 indicate a 13C–31P distance of more than 6.5 Å between the side chain carboxyl 13C spin of E4 and the closest 31P in the HAP surface. In contrast, the carboxyl 13C spin at E5 has a much shorter 13C–31P internuclear distance of 4.25±0.09 Å, indicating that the carboxyl group of this side chain interacts directly with the surface. 13C T1ρ and slow-spinning MAS studies indicate that the motions of the side chains of E4 and E5 are more restricted than that of E26. Together, these results provide further insight into the molecular interactions of statherin with HAP surfaces. PMID:19678690

  2. Amino acid residues in the GerAB protein important in the function and assembly of the alanine spore germination receptor of Bacillus subtilis 168.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Gareth R; Moir, Anne

    2011-05-01

    The paradigm gerA operon is required for endospore germination in response to c-alanine as the sole germinant, and the three protein products, GerAA, GerAB, and GerAC are predicted to form a receptor complex in the spore inner membrane. GerAB shows homology to the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) family of single-component transporters and is predicted to be an integral membrane protein with 10 membrane-spanning helices. Site-directed mutations were introduced into the gerAB gene at its natural location on the chromosome. Alterations to some charged or potential helix-breaking residues within membrane spans affected receptor function dramatically. In some cases, this is likely to reflect the complete loss of the GerA receptor complex, as judged by the absence of the germinant receptor protein GerAC, which suggests that the altered GerAB protein itself may be unstable or that the altered structure destabilizes the complex. Mutants that have a null phenotype for Instituto de Biotecnología de León, INBIOTEC, Parque Científico de León, Av. Real, 1, 24006 León, Spain-alanine germination but retain GerAC protein at near-normal levels are more likely to define amino acid residues of functional, rather than structural, importance. Single-amino-acid substitutions in each of the GerAB and GerAA proteins can prevent incorporation of GerAC protein into the spore; this provides strong evidence that the proteins within a specific receptor interact and that these interactions are required for receptor assembly. The lipoprotein nature of the GerAC receptor subunit is also important; an amino acid change in the prelipoprotein signal sequence in the gerAC1 mutant results in the absence of GerAC protein from the spore. PMID:21378181

  3. Characterization and Profiling of Liver microRNAs by RNA-sequencing in Cattle Divergently Selected for Residual Feed Intake.

    PubMed

    Al-Husseini, Wijdan; Chen, Yizhou; Gondro, Cedric; Herd, Robert M; Gibson, John P; Arthur, Paul F

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate expression of mRNAs in many biological pathways. Liver plays an important role in the feed efficiency of animals and high and low efficient cattle demonstrated different gene expression profiles by microarray. Here we report comprehensive miRNAs profiles by next-gen deep sequencing in Angus cattle divergently selected for residual feed intake (RFI) and identify miRNAs related to feed efficiency in beef cattle. Two microRNA libraries were constructed from pooled RNA extracted from livers of low and high RFI cattle, and sequenced by Illumina genome analyser. In total, 23,628,103 high quality short sequence reads were obtained and more than half of these reads were matched to the bovine genome (UMD 3.1). We identified 305 known bovine miRNAs. Bta-miR-143, bta-miR-30, bta-miR-122, bta-miR-378, and bta-let-7 were the top five most abundant miRNAs families expressed in liver, representing more than 63% of expressed miRNAs. We also identified 52 homologous miRNAs and 10 novel putative bovine-specific miRNAs, based on precursor sequence and the secondary structure and utilizing the miRBase (v. 21). We compared the miRNAs profile between high and low RFI animals and ranked the most differentially expressed bovine known miRNAs. Bovine miR-143 was the most abundant miRNA in the bovine liver and comprised 20% of total expressed mapped miRNAs. The most highly expressed miRNA in liver of mice and humans, miR-122, was the third most abundant in our cattle liver samples. We also identified 10 putative novel bovine-specific miRNA candidates. Differentially expressed miRNAs between high and low RFI cattle were identified with 18 miRNAs being up-regulated and 7 other miRNAs down-regulated in low RFI cattle. Our study has identified comprehensive miRNAs expressed in bovine liver. Some of the expressed miRNAs are novel in cattle. The differentially expressed miRNAs between high and low RFI give some

  4. T Cell Determinants Incorporating [beta]-Amino Acid Residues Are Protease Resistant and Remain Immunogenic In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Andrew I.; Dunstone, Michelle A.; Williamson, Nicholas A.; Price, Jason D.; Kauwe, Andreade; Chen, Weisan; Oakley, Aaron; Perlmutter, Patrick; McCluskey, James; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Rossjohn, Jamie; Purcell, Anthony W.

    2010-07-20

    A major hurdle in designing successful epitope-based vaccines resides in the delivery, stability, and immunogenicity of the peptide immunogen. The short-lived nature of unmodified peptide-based vaccines in vivo limits their therapeutic application in the immunotherapy of cancers and chronic viral infections as well as their use in generating prophylactic immunity. The incorporation of {beta}-amino acids into peptides decreases proteolysis, yet its potential application in the rational design of T cell mimotopes is poorly understood. To address this, we have replaced each residue of the SIINFEKL epitope individually with the corresponding {beta}-amino acid and examined the resultant efficacy of these mimotopes. Some analogs displayed similar MHC binding and superior protease stability compared with the native epitope. Importantly, these analogs were able to generate cross-reactive CTLs in vivo that were capable of lysing tumor cells that expressed the unmodified epitope as a surrogate tumor Ag. Structural analysis of peptides in which anchor residues were substituted with {beta}-amino acids revealed the basis for enhanced MHC binding and retention of immunogenicity observed for these analogs and paves the way for future vaccine design using {beta}-amino acids. We conclude that the rational incorporation of {beta}-amino acids into T cell determinants is a powerful alternative to the traditional homologous substitution of randomly chosen naturally occurring {alpha}-amino acids, and these mimotopes may prove particularly useful for inclusion in epitope-based vaccines.

  5. Residual cadmium forms in acid-extracted anaerobically digested sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Feltz, R.E.; Logan, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of phosphorus and lime additions after acid extraction on residual Cd solubility and chemical forms in an anaerobically digested sewage sludge were investigated. High Cd content anaerobically digested sewage sludge was aerated and then acidified to pH 2 to solubilize Cd. After 18 h of acidification, the sludge was dewatered and the supernatant and solids separated. Seventy or more percent of the Cd was removed from the solids. Similar amounts of Ni, Mn and Zn were also removed, but Cu removal was only 26% and that of Pb was < 5%. Before liming the sludge was amended with rock phosphate (RP) or monocalcium phosphate (MCP). The RP was insoluble while MCP dissolved, providing a high level of phosphate ligand for Cd precipitation or coprecipitation. Estimated sludge solution solubility products for major Fe, Al and Ca phosphates showed that several of these minerals could have precipitated with P addition, especially with MCP, and Cd may have coprecipitated with these solid phases. Cadmium phosphate may also have been formed in the MCP sludge. Chemical fractionation indicated that 50% of the Cd in the aerated unextracted sludge existed as inorganic precipitates with another 40% Na/sub 4/P/sub 2/O/sub 7/ extractable. Acidification solubilized 98% of the inorganic Cd and 86% of the organically bound Cd. Seventy-nine percent of the Cd remaining in the dewatered acidified sludge was in the KNO/sub 3/ extractable (exchangeable) fraction. Liming redistributed the Cd with 13 to 19% as inorganic precipitates, 70 to 85% organically bound and < 3% in the exchangeable fraction. Phosphate addition had no significant effect on Cd fractionation.

  6. Reuse of acid coagulant-recovered drinking waterworks sludge residual to remove phosphorus from wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lan; Wei, Jie; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Jianli; Wang, Dongtian

    2014-06-01

    Acid coagulant-recovered drinking waterworks sludge residual (DWSR) is a waste product from drinking waterworks sludge (DWS) treatment with acid for coagulant recovery. In this study, we evaluated DWSR as a potential phosphorus (P) removing material in wastewater treatment by conducting a series of batch and semi-continuous tests. Batch tests were carried out to study the effects of pH, initial concentration, and sludge dose on P removal. Batch test results showed that the P removal efficiency of DWSR was highly dependent on pH. Calcinated DWSR (C-DWSR) performed better in P removal than DWSR due to its higher pH. At an optimum initial pH value of 5-6 and a sludge dose of 10 g/L, the P removal rates of DWSR and DWS decreased from 99% and 93% to 84% and 14%, respectively, and the specific P uptake of DWSR and DWS increased from 0.19 and 0.19 mg P/g to 33.60 and 5.72 mg P/g, respectively, when the initial concentration was increased from 2 to 400 mg/L. The effective minimum sludge doses of DWSR and DWS were 0.5 g/L and 10 g/L, respectively, when the P removal rates of 90% were obtained at an initial concentration of 10 mg/L. Results from semi-continuous test indicated that P removal rates over 99% were quickly achieved for both synthetic and actual wastewater (lake water and domestic sewage). These rates could be maintained over a certain time under a certain operational conditions including sludge dose, feed flow, and initial concentration. The physicochemical properties analysis results showed that the contents of aluminum (Al) and iron (Fe) in DWSR were reduced by 50% and 70%, respectively, compared with DWS. The insoluble Al and Fe hydroxide in DWS converted into soluble Al and Fe in DWSR. Metal leaching test results revealed that little soluble Al and Fe remained in effluent when DWSR was used for P removal. We deduced that chemical precipitation might be the major action for P removal by DWSR and that adsorption played only a marginal role.

  7. Complete amino acid sequence of the Mu heavy chain of a human IgM immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Putnam, F W; Florent, G; Paul, C; Shinoda, T; Shimizu, A

    1973-10-19

    The amino acid sequence of the micro, chain of a human IgM immunoglobulin, including the location of all disulfide bridges and oligosaccharides, has been determined. The homology of the constant regions of immunoglobulin micro, gamma, alpha, and epsilon heavy chains reveals evolutionary relationships and suggests that two genes code for each heavy chain. PMID:4742735

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Butyric Acid Producer Clostridium tyrobutyricum Strain CIP I-776 (IFP923)

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Benjamin; Lopes Ferreira, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium tyrobutyricum CIP I-776 (IFP923), an efficient producer of butyric acid. The genome consists of a single chromosome of 3.19 Mb and provides useful data concerning the metabolic capacities of the strain. PMID:26941139

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Perfluorooctane Acid-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas parafulva YAB-1

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chongjian; Peng, Qingjing; Peng, Qingzhong

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas parafulva YAB-1, isolated from perfluorinated compound-contaminated soil, has the ability to degrade perfluorooctane acid (PFOA) compound. Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of the PFOA-degrading bacterium P. parafulva YAB-1. The data provide the basis to investigate the molecular mechanism of PFOA metabolism. PMID:26337877

  10. Sequence of subunit a of the Na(+)-translocating F1F0-ATPase of Acetobacterium woodii: proposal for residues involved in Na+ binding.

    PubMed

    Rahlfs, S; Müller, V

    1999-06-18

    Na+ transport through the F0 domain of Na(+)-F1F0-ATPases involves the combined action of subunits c and a but the residues involved in Na+ liganding in subunit a are unknown. As a first step towards the identification of these residues, we have cloned and sequenced the gene encoding subunit a of the Na(+)-F1F0-ATPase of Acetobacterium woodii. This is the second sequence available now for this subunit from Na(+)-F1F0-ATPases. A comparison of subunit a from Na(+)-F1F0-ATPases with those from H(+)-translocating enzymes unraveled structural similarity in a C-terminal segment including the ultimate and penultimate transmembrane helix. Seven residues are conserved in this region and, therefore, likely to be involved in Na+ liganding. PMID:10403370

  11. Computational study on the roles of amino acid residues in the active site formation mechanism of blue-light photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ryuma; Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka; Ando, Koji; Yamato, Takahisa

    2015-07-01

    To examine the functional roles of the active site methionine (M-site) and glutamic acid (E-site) residues of blue-light photoreceptors, we performed in silico mutation at the M-site in a systematic manner and focused on the hydrogen bonding between the E-site and the substrate: the cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimer (CPD). Fragment molecular orbital calculations with electron correlations demonstrated that substitution of the M-site methionine with either alanine or glutamine always destabilizes the interaction energy between the E-site and the CPD by more than 12.0 kcal/mol, indicating that the methionine and glutamic acid residues cooperatively facilitate the enzymatic reaction in the active site.

  12. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND356-58, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3. PMID:25600804

  13. Identification of highly conserved residues involved in inhibition of HIV-1 RNase H function by Diketo acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Corona, Angela; Di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Thierry, Sylvain; Pescatori, Luca; Cuzzucoli Crucitti, Giuliana; Subra, Frederic; Delelis, Olivier; Esposito, Francesca; Rigogliuso, Giuseppe; Costi, Roberta; Cosconati, Sandro; Novellino, Ettore; Di Santo, Roberto; Tramontano, Enzo

    2014-10-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT)-associated RNase H activity is an essential function in viral genome retrotranscription. RNase H is a promising drug target for which no inhibitor is available for therapy. Diketo acid (DKA) derivatives are active site Mg(2+)-binding inhibitors of both HIV-1 RNase H and integrase (IN) activities. To investigate the DKA binding site of RNase H and the mechanism of action, six couples of ester and acid DKAs, derived from 6-[1-(4-fluorophenyl)methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)]-2,4-dioxo-5-hexenoic acid ethyl ester (RDS1643), were synthesized and tested on both RNase H and IN functions. Most of the ester derivatives showed selectivity for HIV-1 RNase H versus IN, while acids inhibited both functions. Molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis studies on the RNase H domain demonstrated different binding poses for ester and acid DKAs and proved that DKAs interact with residues (R448, N474, Q475, Y501, and R557) involved not in the catalytic motif but in highly conserved portions of the RNase H primer grip motif. The ester derivative RDS1759 selectively inhibited RNase H activity and viral replication in the low micromolar range, making contacts with residues Q475, N474, and Y501. Quantitative PCR studies and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analyses showed that RDS1759 selectively inhibited reverse transcription in cell-based assays. Overall, we provide the first demonstration that RNase H inhibition by DKAs is due not only to their chelating properties but also to specific interactions with highly conserved amino acid residues in the RNase H domain, leading to effective targeting of HIV retrotranscription in cells and hence offering important insights for the rational design of RNase H inhibitors. PMID:25092689

  14. Treatment of air pollution control residues with iron rich waste sulfuric acid: does it work for antimony (Sb)?

    PubMed

    Okkenhaug, Gudny; Breedveld, Gijs D; Kirkeng, Terje; Lægreid, Marit; Mæhlum, Trond; Mulder, Jan

    2013-03-15

    Antimony (Sb) in air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration has gained increased focus due to strict Sb leaching limits set by the EU landfill directive. Here we study the chemical speciation and solubility of Sb at the APC treatment facility NOAH Langøya (Norway), where iron (Fe)-rich sulfuric acid (∼3.6M, 2.3% Fe(II)), a waste product from the industrial extraction of ilmenite, is used for neutralization. Antimony in water extracts of untreated APC residues occurred exclusively as pentavalent antimonate, even at low pH and Eh values. The Sb solubility increased substantially at pH<10, possibly due to the dissolution of ettringite (at alkaline pH) or calcium (Ca)-antimonate. Treated APC residues, stored anoxically in the laboratory, simulating the conditions at the NOAH Langøya landfill, gave rise to decreasing concentrations of Sb in porewater, occurring exclusively as Sb(V). Concentrations of Sb decreased from 87-918μgL(-1) (day 3) to 18-69μgL(-1) (day 600). We hypothesize that an initial sorption of Sb to Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rust) and eventually precipitation of Ca- and Fe-antimonates (tripuhyite; FeSbO4) occurred. We conclude that Fe-rich, sulfuric acid waste is efficient to immobilize Sb in APC residues from waste incineration. PMID:23465722

  15. Amino acid sequence alignment of bacterial and mammalian pancreatic serine proteases based on topological equivalences.

    PubMed

    James, M N; Delbaere, L T; Brayer, G D

    1978-06-01

    The three-dimensional structures of the bacterial serine proteases SGPA, SGPB, and alpha-lytic protease have been compared with those of the pancreatic enzymes alpha-chymotrypsin and elastase. This comparison shows that approximately 60% (55-64%) of the alpha-carbon atom positions of the bacterial serine proteases are topologically equivalent to the alpha-carbon atom positions of the pancreatic enzymes. The corresponding value for a comparison of the bacterial enzymes among themselves is approximately 84%. The results of these topological comparisons have been used to deduce an experimentally sound sequence alignment for these several enzymes. This alignment shows that there is extensive tertiary structural homology among the bacteria and pancreatic enzymes without significant primary sequence identity (less than 21%). The acquisition of a zymogen function by the pancreatic enzymes is accompanied by two major changes to the bacterial enzymes' architecture: an insertion of 9 residues to increase the length of the N-terminal loop, and one of 12 residues to a loop near the activation salt bridge. In addition, in these two enzyme families, the methionine loop (residues 164-182) adopts very different comformations which are associated with their altered substrate specificities. PMID:96920

  16. Analysis of the peroxiredoxin family: using active site structure and sequence information for global classification and residue analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kimberly J.; Knutson, Stacy T.; Soito, Laura; Klomsiri, Chananat; Poole, Leslie B.; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are a widespread and highly expressed family of cysteine-based peroxidases that react very rapidly with H2O2, organic peroxides, and peroxynitrite. Correct subfamily classification has been problematic since Prx subfamilies are frequently not correlated with phylogenetic distribution and diverge in their preferred reductant, oligomerization state, and tendency towards overoxidation. We have developed a method that uses the Deacon Active Site Profiler (DASP) tool to extract functional site profiles from structurally characterized proteins, to computationally define subfamilies, and to identify new Prx subfamily members from GenBank(nr). For the 58 literature-defined Prx test proteins, 57 were correctly assigned and none were assigned to the incorrect subfamily. The >3500 putative Prx sequences identified were then used to analyze residue conservation in the active site of each Prx subfamily. Our results indicate that the existence and location of the resolving cysteine varies in some subfamilies (e.g. Prx5) to a greater degree than previously appreciated and that interactions at the A interface (common to Prx5, Tpx and higher order AhpC/Prx1 structures) are important for stabilization of the correct active site geometry. Interestingly, this method also allows us to further divide the AhpC/Prx1 into four groups that are correlated with functional characteristics. The DASP method provides more accurate subfamily classification than PSI-BLAST for members of the Prx family and can now readily be applied to other large protein families. PMID:21287625

  17. Next-generation sequencing of FLT3 internal tandem duplications for minimal residual disease monitoring in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hélevaut, Nathalie; Rodriguez, Céline; Quief, Sabine; Sebda, Shéhérazade; Renneville, Aline; Nibourel, Olivier; Rousselot, Philippe; Gruson, Bérengère; Dombret, Hervé; Castaigne, Sylvie; Preudhomme, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Minimal Residual Disease (MRD) detection can be used for early intervention in relapse, risk stratification, and treatment guidance. FLT3 ITD is the most common mutation found in AML patients with normal karyotype. We evaluated the feasibility of NGS with high coverage (up to 2.4.106 PE fragments) for MRD monitoring on FLT3 ITD. We sequenced 37 adult patients at diagnosis and various times of their disease (64 samples) and compared the results with FLT3 ITD ratios measured by fragment analysis. We found that NGS could detect variable insertion sites and lengths in a single test for several patients. We also showed mutational shifts between diagnosis and relapse, with the outgrowth of a clone at relapse different from that dominant at diagnosis. Since NGS is scalable, we were able to adapt sensitivity by increasing the number of reads obtained for follow-up samples, compared to diagnosis samples. This technique could be applied to detect biological relapse before its clinical consequences and to better tailor treatments through the use of FLT3 inhibitors. Larger cohorts should be assessed in order to validate this approach. PMID:26078355

  18. Unexpected functional diversity in the fatty acid desaturases of the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and identification of key residues determining activity.

    PubMed

    Haritos, Victoria S; Horne, Irene; Damcevski, Katherine; Glover, Karen; Gibb, Nerida

    2014-08-01

    Desaturases catalyse modifications to fatty acids which are essential to homeostasis and for pheromone and defensive chemical production. All desaturases of the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum were investigated via query of the sequenced genome which yielded 15 putative acyl-Coenzyme A genes. Eleven desaturase mRNA were obtained in full length and functionally expressed in yeast. Phylogenetic analysis separated the desaturases into 4 distinct clades; one clade contained conserved beetle Δ9 desaturases, second clade was Tribolium-specific having diverse activities including Δ5, Δ9 and Δ12 desaturation and the other 2 clades had mixed insect representatives. Three members of this clade contained unusual inserted sequences of ∼20 residues in the C-terminal region and were related to desaturases that all contained similar inserts. Deletion of the entirety of the insert in the flour beetle Δ12 desaturase abolished its activity but this was partially restored by the reintroduction of two histidine residues, suggesting the histidine(s) are required for activity but the full length insert is not. Five new desaturase activities were discovered: Δ9 desaturation of C12:0-C16:0 substrates; two unprecedented Δ5 enzymes acting on C18:0 and C16:0; Δ9 activity exclusively on C16:0 and a further stearate Δ9 desaturase. qPCR analysis ruled out a role in sex pheromone synthesis for the Δ5 and Δ9/C16:0 desaturases. The flour beetle genome has underpinned an examination of all transcribed desaturases in the organism and revealed a diversity of novel and unusual activities, an improved understanding of the evolutionary relationships among insect desaturases and sequence determinants of activity. PMID:24880119

  19. Active-site amino acid residues in γ-glutamyltransferase and the nature of the γ-glutamyl-enzyme bond

    PubMed Central

    Elce, John S.

    1980-01-01

    Active-site residues in rat kidney γ-glutamyltransferase (EC 2.3.2.2) were investigated by means of chemical modification. 1. In the presence of maleate, the activity was inhibited by phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride, and the inhibition was not reversed by β-mercaptoethanol, suggesting that a serine residue is close to the active site, but is shielded except in the presence of maleate. 2. Treatment of the enzyme with N-acetylimidazole modified an amino group, exposed a previously inaccessible cysteine residue and inhibited hydrolysis of the γ-glutamyl-enzyme intermediate, but not its formation. 3. After reaction of the enzyme successively with N-acetylimidazole and with non-radioactive iodoacetamide/serine/borate, two active-site residues reacted with iodo[14C]acetamide. One of these possessed a carboxy group, which formed a [14C]glycollamide ester, and the other was cysteine, shown by isolation of S-[14C]carboxymethylcysteine after acid hydrolysis. When N-acetylimidazole treatment was omitted, only the carboxy group reacted with iodo[14C]acetamide. 4. Isolation of the γ-[14C]glutamyl-enzyme intermediate was made easier by prior treatment of the enzyme with N-acetylimidazole. The γ-glutamyl-enzyme bond was stable to performic acid, and to hydroxylamine/urea at pH10, but was hydrolysed slowly at pH12, indicating attachment of the γ-[14C]glutamyl group in amide linkage to an amino group on the enzyme. Proteolysis of the γ-[14C]glutamyl-enzyme after performic acid oxidation gave rise to a small acidic radioactive peptide that was resistant to further proteolysis and was not identical with γ-glutamyl-ε-lysine. 5. A scheme for the catalytic mechanism is proposed. PMID:6104953

  20. Effect of 3' terminal adenylic acid residue on the uridylation of human small RNAs in vitro and in frog oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Sinha, K; Perumal, K; Reddy, R

    2000-01-01

    It is known that several small RNAs including human and Xenopus signal recognition particle (SRP) RNA, U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and 7SK RNAs are posttranscriptionally adenylated, whereas U6 snRNA and ribosomal 5S RNA are posttranscriptionally uridylated on their 3' ends. In this study, we provide evidence that a small fraction of U6 snRNA and 5S ribosomal RNA molecules from human as well as Xenopus oocytes contain a single posttranscriptionally added adenylic acid residue on their 3' ends. These data show that U6 snRNA and 5S rRNAs are posttranscriptionally modified on their 3' ends by both uridylation and adenylation. Although the SRP RNA, 7SK RNA, 5S RNA, and U6 snRNA with the uridylic acid residue on their 3' ends were readily uridylated, all these RNAs with posttranscriptionally added adenylic acid residue on their 3' ends were not uridylated in vitro, or when U6 snRNA with 3' A(OH) was injected into Xenopus oocytes. These results show that the presence of a single posttranscriptionally added adenylic acid residue on the 3' end of SRP RNA, U6 snRNA, 5S rRNA, or 7SK RNA prevents 3' uridylation. These data also show that adenylation and uridylation are two competing processes that add nucleotides on the 3' end of some small RNAs and suggest that one of the functions of the 3' adenylation may be to negatively affect the 3' uridylation of small RNAs. PMID:10999605

  1. Allelic polymorphism in arabian camel ribonuclease and the amino acid sequence of bactrian camel ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Welling, G W; Mulder, H; Beintema, J J

    1976-04-01

    Pancreatic ribonucleases from several species (whitetail deer, roe deer, guinea pig, and arabian camel) exhibit more than one amino acid at particular positions in their amino acid sequences. Since these enzymes were isolated from pooled pancreas, the origin of this heterogeneity is not clear. The pancreatic ribonucleases from 11 individual arabian camels (Camelus dromedarius) have been investigated with respect to the lysine-glutamine heterogeneity at position 103 (Welling et al., 1975). Six ribonucleases showed only one basic band and five showed two bands after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, suggesting a gene frequency of about 0.75 for the Lys gene and about 0.25 for the Gln gene. The amino acid sequence of bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) ribonuclease isolated from individual pancreatic tissue was determined and compared with that of arabian camel ribonuclease. The only difference was observed at position 103. In the ribonucleases from two unrelated bactrian camels, only glutamine was observed at that position. PMID:962846

  2. Complete cDNA and deduced amino acid sequence of the chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT) delta subunit from Aedes triseriatus mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Blitvich, B J; Rayms-Keller, A; Blair, C D; Beaty, B J

    2001-01-01

    The chaperonin containing t-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT) assists in the ATP-dependent folding and assembly of newly translated actin and tubulin in the eukaryotic cytosol. CCT is composed of eight different subunits, each encoded by an independent gene. In this report, we used RT-PCR amplification and 5'- and 3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to determine the complete cDNA sequence of the CCT delta subunit from Aedes triseriatus mosquitoes. The CCT delta cDNA is 1936 nucleotides in length and encodes a putative 533 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 57,179 daltons and pI of 7.15. Hydrophobic residues comprise 39.8% of the amino acid sequence and putative motifs for ATP-binding and ATPase-activity are present. The amino acid sequence displays strong sequence similarity to Drosophila melanogaster (92%), human (85%), puffer fish (84%) and mouse (84%) counterparts. CCT delta mRNA was detected in both biosynthetically active (embryonating) and dormant (diapausing) Ae. triseriatus embryos by RT-PCR analysis. PMID:11762197

  3. Biosynthesis of D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid by Lactobacillus casei: interchain transacylation of D-alanyl ester residues

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, W.C. 3d.; Taron, D.J.; Neuhaus, F.C.

    1985-06-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Lactobacillus casei contains poly(glycerophosphate) substituted with D-alanyl ester residues. The distribution of these residues in the in vitro-synthesized polymer is uniform. Esterification of LTA with D-alanine may occur in one of two modes: (i) addition at random or (ii) addition at a defined locus in the poly(glycerophosphate) chain followed by redistribution of the ester residues. A time-dependent transacylation of these residues from D-(/sup 14/C)alanyl-lipophilic LTA to hydrophilic acceptor was observed. The hydrophilic acceptor was characterized as D-alanyl-hydrophilic LTA. This transacylation requires neither ATP nor the D-alanine incorporation system, i.e., the D-alanine activating enzyme and D-alanine:membrane acceptor ligase. No evidence for an enzyme-catalyzed transacylation reaction was observed. The authors propose that this process of transacylation may be responsible for the redistribution of D-alanyl residues after esterification to the poly(glycerophosphate). As a result, it is difficult to distinguish between these proposed modes of addition.

  4. Amino acid residues required for fast Na(+)-channel inactivation: charge neutralizations and deletions in the III-IV linker.

    PubMed Central

    Patton, D E; West, J W; Catterall, W A; Goldin, A L

    1992-01-01

    The cytoplasmic linker connecting domains III and IV of the voltage-gated Na+ channel is thought to be involved in fast inactivation. This linker is highly conserved among the various Na+ channels that have been cloned. In the rat brain IIA Na+ channel, it consists of 53 amino acids of which 15 are charged. To investigate the role of this linker in inactivation, we mutated all 15 of the charged residues in various combinations. All but one of these mutants expressed functional channels, and all of these inactivated with kinetics similar to the wild-type channel. We then constructed a series of deletion mutations that span the III-IV linker to determine if any region of the linker is essential for fast inactivation. Deletion of the first 10 amino acids completely eliminated fast inactivation in the channel, whereas deletion of the last 10 amino acids had no substantial effect on inactivation. These results demonstrate that some residues in the amino end of the III-IV linker are critical for fast Na(+)-channel inactivation, but that the highly conserved positively charged and paired negatively charged residues are not essential. PMID:1332059

  5. Role of acidic residues in helices TH8-TH9 in membrane interactions of the diphtheria toxin T domain.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Chiranjib; Rodnin, Mykola V; Vargas-Uribe, Mauricio; McCluskey, Andrew J; Flores-Canales, Jose C; Kurnikova, Maria; Ladokhin, Alexey S

    2015-04-01

    The pH-triggered membrane insertion of the diphtheria toxin translocation domain (T domain) results in transferring the catalytic domain into the cytosol, which is relevant to potential biomedical applications as a cargo-delivery system. Protonation of residues is suggested to play a key role in the process, and residues E349, D352 and E362 are of particular interest because of their location within the membrane insertion unit TH8-TH9. We have used various spectroscopic, computational and functional assays to characterize the properties of the T domain carrying the double mutation E349Q/D352N or the single mutation E362Q. Vesicle leakage measurements indicate that both mutants interact with the membrane under less acidic conditions than the wild-type. Thermal unfolding and fluorescence measurements, complemented with molecular dynamics simulations, suggest that the mutant E362Q is more susceptible to acid destabilization because of disruption of native intramolecular contacts. Fluorescence experiments show that removal of the charge in E362Q, and not in E349Q/D352N, is important for insertion of TH8-TH9. Both mutants adopt a final functional state upon further acidification. We conclude that these acidic residues are involved in the pH-dependent action of the T domain, and their replacements can be used for fine tuning the pH range of membrane interactions. PMID:25875295

  6. Primary structure of a histidine-rich proteolytic fragment of human ceruloplasmin. II. Amino acid sequence of the tryptic peptides.

    PubMed

    Kingston, I B; Kingston, B L; Putnam, F W

    1980-04-10

    Amino acid sequence studies of tryptic peptides isolated from a histidine-rich fragment (Cp F5) of human ceruloplasmin are described. Nineteen tryptic peptides were isolated from unmodified Cp F5 and five tryptic peptides were isolated from citraconylated Cp F5. These peptides, together with the cyanogen bromide fragments reported previously, allowed the assembly of the complete sequence of Cp F5. The fragment has 159 residues and a molecular weight of 18,650; it lacks carbohydrate, is rich in histidine, and contains 1 free cysteine that may be part of a copper-binding site. Human ceruloplasmin is a single polypeptide chain with a molecular weight of about 130,000 that is readily cleaved to large fragments by proteolytic enzymes; the relationships of Cp F5 to intact ceruloplasmin and to structural subunits earlier proposed is described. Cp F5 probably is an intact globular domain that is attached to the COOH-terminal end of ceruloplasmin by a labile interdomain peptide bond. PMID:6987230

  7. Software scripts for quality checking of high-throughput nucleic acid sequencers.

    PubMed

    Lazo, G R; Tong, J; Miller, R; Hsia, C; Rausch, C; Kang, Y; Anderson, O D

    2001-06-01

    We have developed a graphical interface to allow the researcher to view and assess the quality of sequencing results using a series of program scripts developed to process data generated by automated sequencers. The scripts are written in Perl programming language and are executable under the cgibin directory of a Web server environment. The scripts direct nucleic acid sequencing trace file data output from automated sequencers to be analyzed by the phred molecular biology program and are displayed as graphical hypertext mark-up language (HTML) pages. The scripts are mainly designed to handle 96-well microtiter dish samples, but the scripts are also able to read data from 384-well microtiter dishes 96 samples at a time. The scripts may be customized for different laboratory environments and computer configurations. Web links to the sources and discussion page are provided. PMID:11414222

  8. Nucleotide sequences and characterization of liv genes encoding components of the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, K; Ohnishi, K; Kiritani, K

    1992-07-01

    A 7.6-kb fragment of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 containing the liv gene cluster, which specifies the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system (LIV-I), has been isolated. The upstream region contains the livB and livC genes encoding the leucine-isoleucine-valine-threonine and leucine-specific binding proteins, respectively. In this study, the nucleotide sequence of the 4-kb downstream segment was determined and found to contain four reading frames, designated as livA, livE, livF, and livG, that encode putative membrane-associated proteins. The livA and livE genes encode hydrophobic proteins composed of 308 and 425 amino acid residues, respectively. The livF and livG genes encode hydrophilic proteins of 255 and 237 amino acids, respectively; both the proteins contain consensus amino acid sequences found in proteins with ATP-binding sites. These four genes linked together have a potential rho-independent transcriptional terminator adjacent to the 3'-end of livG. No promoter sequence was found in the immediate upstream region of the livAEFG cluster. The livA, livE, livF, and livG gene products were identified as proteins with apparent M(r)s of 25,500, 34,500, 28,000, and 26,000, respectively, by SDS-polyacryl-amide gel electrophoresis. The deduced amino acid sequences of these four proteins showed strong homology to those of the corresponding membrane-associated proteins required for the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport systems from both Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:1429514

  9. Effect of adding amino acids residues in N- and C-terminus of Vip3Aa16 (L121I) toxin.

    PubMed

    Sellami, Sameh; Cherif, Marwa; Jamoussi, Kaïs

    2016-06-01

    To study the importance of N- and C-terminus of Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa16 (L121I) toxin (88 kDa), a number of mutants were generated. The addition of two (2R: RS) or eleven (11R: RSRPGHHHHHH) amino acid residues at the Vip3Aa16 (L121I) C-terminus allowed to an unappropriated folding illustrated by the abundant presence of the 62 kDa proteolytic form. The produced Vip3Aa16 (L121I) full length form was less detected when increasing the number of amino acids residues in the C-terminus. Bioassays demonstrated that the growth of the lepidopteran Ephestia kuehniella was slightly affected by Vip3Aa16 (L121I)-2R and not affected by Vip3Aa16 (L121I)-11R. Additionally, the fusion at the Vip3Aa16 (L121I) N-terminus of 39 amino acids harboring the E. coli OmpA leader peptide and the His-tag sequence allowed to the increase of protease sensitivity of Vip3Aa16 (L121I) full length form, as only the 62 kDa proteolysis form was detected. Remarkably, this fused protein produced in Escherichia coli (E. coli) was biologically inactive toward Ephestia kuehniella larvae. Thus, the N-terminus of the protein is required to the accomplishment of the insecticidal activity of Vip3 proteins. This report serves as guideline for the study of Vip3Aa16 (L121I) protein stability and activity. PMID:26876111

  10. Human recombinant endopeptidase PHEX has a strict S1' specificity for acidic residues and cleaves peptides derived from fibroblast growth factor-23 and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Marcelo; Couture, Constance; Hirata, Izaura Y; Juliano, Maria A; Loisel, Thomas P; Crine, Philippe; Juliano, Luiz; Boileau, Guy; Carmona, Adriana K

    2003-01-01

    The PHEX gene (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome) encodes a protein (PHEX) with structural homologies to members of the M13 family of zinc metallo-endopeptidases. Mutations in the PHEX gene are responsible for X-linked hypophosphataemia in humans. However, the mechanism by which loss of PHEX function results in the disease phenotype, and the endogenous PHEX substrate(s) remain unknown. In order to study PHEX substrate specificity, combinatorial fluorescent-quenched peptide libraries containing o -aminobenzoic acid (Abz) and 2,4-dinitrophenyl (Dnp) as the donor-acceptor pair were synthesized and tested as PHEX substrates. PHEX showed a strict requirement for acidic amino acid residues (aspartate or glutamate) in S(1)' subsite, with a strong preference for aspartate. Subsites S(2)', S(1) and S(2) exhibited less defined specificity requirements, but the presence of leucine, proline or glycine in P(2)', or valine, isoleucine or histidine in P(1) precluded hydrolysis of the substrate by the enzyme. The peptide Abz-GFSDYK(Dnp)-OH, which contains the most favourable residues in the P(2) to P(2)' positions, was hydrolysed by PHEX at the N-terminus of aspartate with a k(cat)/ K(m) of 167 mM(-1) x s(-1). In addition, using quenched fluorescence peptides derived from fibroblast growth factor-23 and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein sequences flanked by Abz and N -(2,4-dinitrophenyl)ethylenediamine, we showed that these physiologically relevant proteins are potential PHEX substrates. Finally, our results clearly indicate that PHEX does not have neprilysin-like substrate specificity. PMID:12678920

  11. Efficient Nucleic Acid Extraction and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Bacterial Community Characterization.

    PubMed

    Anahtar, Melis N; Bowman, Brittany A; Kwon, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the role of microbial communities as critical modulators of human health and disease. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the rapid and efficient characterization of bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene sequencing from a variety of sources. Although readily available tools for 16S rRNA sequence analysis have standardized computational workflows, sample processing for DNA extraction remains a continued source of variability across studies. Here we describe an efficient, robust, and cost effective method for extracting nucleic acid from swabs. We also delineate downstream methods for 16S rRNA gene sequencing, including generation of sequencing libraries, data quality control, and sequence analysis. The workflow can accommodate multiple samples types, including stool and swabs collected from a variety of anatomical locations and host species. Additionally, recovered DNA and RNA can be separated and used for other applications, including whole genome sequencing or RNA-seq. The method described allows for a common processing approach for multiple sample types and accommodates downstream analysis of genomic, metagenomic and transcriptional information. PMID:27168460

  12. Efficient Nucleic Acid Extraction and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Bacterial Community Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Anahtar, Melis N.; Bowman, Brittany A.; Kwon, Douglas S.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the role of microbial communities as critical modulators of human health and disease. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the rapid and efficient characterization of bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene sequencing from a variety of sources. Although readily available tools for 16S rRNA sequence analysis have standardized computational workflows, sample processing for DNA extraction remains a continued source of variability across studies. Here we describe an efficient, robust, and cost effective method for extracting nucleic acid from swabs. We also delineate downstream methods for 16S rRNA gene sequencing, including generation of sequencing libraries, data quality control, and sequence analysis. The workflow can accommodate multiple samples types, including stool and swabs collected from a variety of anatomical locations and host species. Additionally, recovered DNA and RNA can be separated and used for other applications, including whole genome sequencing or RNA-seq. The method described allows for a common processing approach for multiple sample types and accommodates downstream analysis of genomic, metagenomic and transcriptional information. PMID:27168460

  13. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Patel, Kamlesh D [Ken]; SNL,

    2013-01-25

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  14. Complete nucleic acid sequence of Penaeus stylirostris densovirus (PstDNV) from India.

    PubMed

    Rai, Praveen; Safeena, Muhammed P; Karunasagar, Iddya; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2011-06-01

    Infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) of shrimp, recently been classified as Penaeus stylirostris densovirus (PstDNV). The complete nucleic acid sequence of PstDNV from India was obtained by cloning and sequencing of different DNA fragment of the virus. The genome organisation of PstDNV revealed that there were three major coding domains: a left ORF (NS1) of 2001 bp, a mid ORF (NS2) of 1092 bp and a right ORF (VP) of 990 bp. The complete genome and amino acid sequences of three proteins viz., NS1, NS2 and VP were compared with the genomes of the virus reported from Hawaii, China and Mexico and with partial sequence available from isolates from different regions. The phylogenetic analysis of shrimp, insect and vertebrate parvovirus sequences showed that the Indian PstDNV isolate is phylogenetically more closely related to one of the three isolates from Taiwan (AY355307), and two isolates (AY362547 and AY102034) from Thailand. PMID:21402111

  15. Human liver type pyruvate kinase: complete amino acid sequence and the expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tani, K; Fujii, H; Nagata, S; Miwa, S

    1988-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) has four isozymes (L, R, M1, M2) that are encoded by two different genes. Among these isozymes, abnormalities of liver (L)-type PK is considered to be associated with hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia in humans. We isolated and determined the full-length sequence of human L-type PK cDNA. The cDNA contains 1629 base pairs encoding 543 amino acids, 68 base pairs of 5'-noncoding sequence, and 734 base pairs of 3'-noncoding sequence. The similarity between human and rat L-type PK was 86.9% at the nucleotide sequence level and 92.4% at the amino acid sequence level. The full-length L-type PK cDNA was placed under the promoter of simian virus 40 and introduced into monkey COS cells. Human L-type PK activity was detected in the extract of COS cells by the classical PK electrophoresis method. Images PMID:3126495

  16. Human liver type pyruvate kinase: Complete amino acid sequence and the expression in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Kenzaburo; Nagata, Shigekazu ); Fujii, Hisaichi ); Miwa, Shiro )

    1988-03-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) has four isozymes (L, R, M{sub 1}, M{sub 2}) that are encoded by two different genes. Among these isozymes, abnormalities of liver (L)-type PK is considered to be associated with hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia in humans. The authors isolated and determined the full-length sequence of human L-type PK cDNA. The cDNA contains 1,629 base pairs encoding 543 amino acids, 68 base pairs of 5{prime}-noncoding sequence, and 734 base pairs of 3{prime}-noncoding sequence. The similarity between human and rat L-type PK was 86.9% at the nucleotide sequence level and 92.4% at the amino acid sequence level. The full-length L-type PK cDNA was placed under the promoter of simian virus 40 and introduced into monkey COS cells. Human L-type PK activity was detected in the extract of COS cells by the classical PK electrophoresis method.

  17. Molecular cloning and expression of partial cDNAs and deduced amino acid sequence of a carboxyl-terminal fragment of human apolipoprotein B-100.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, C F; Chen, S H; Yang, C Y; Marcel, Y L; Milne, R W; Li, W H; Sparrow, J T; Gotto, A M; Chan, L

    1985-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) B-100 cDNAs were identified in a human liver cDNA library cloned in the expression vector lambda gt11. The beta-galactosidase-apoB-100 fusion protein was detected by two independently produced low density lipoprotein polyclonal antisera and by three apoB-100 monoclonal antibodies that crossreact with apoB-74. It was not recognized by two apoB-100 monoclonal antibodies that crossreact with apoB-26. The longest clone, lambda B8, was completely sequenced. It contains a 2.8-kilobase DNA fragment containing the codons for the carboxyl-terminal 836 amino acid residues of apo-B-100, as well as the 3' untranslated region of apoB-100 mRNA. We have thus mapped apoB-74 to the carboxyl-terminal portion of apoB-100. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cloned DNA matches the sequences of 14 apoB-100 peptides determined in our laboratory. Minor differences in amino acid sequence were noted in three of the peptides, suggesting polymorphism of apoB-100 at the protein and DNA levels. Secondary structure predictions reveal an unusual pattern for apolipoproteins, consisting of beta-structure (24%), alpha-helical content (33%), and random structure (30%). Ten amphipathic helical regions of 10-24 residues were identified. This carboxyl-terminal fragment of apoB-100 is considerably more hydrophobic than other apolipoproteins with known structure. Its lipid binding regions might include stretches of highly hydrophobic beta-sheets as well as amphipathic helices. Our findings on apoB structure might be important for understanding the role of apoB-100-containing lipoproteins in atherosclerosis. PMID:2932736

  18. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Shiheido, Hirokazu Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND3{sub 56–58}, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3. - Highlights: • BEND3 localizes to the nucleus. • The N-terminal 60 amino acids region of BEND3 contains NLS. • Amino acids located between 56 and 58 of BEND3 (KRK) are part of NLS. • KRK motif is highly conserved among BEND3 homologs.

  19. Urea, glycolic acid, and glycerol in an organic residue produced by ultraviolet irradiation of interstellar/pre-cometary ice analogs.

    PubMed

    Nuevo, Michel; Bredehöft, Jan Hendrik; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; d'Hendecourt, Louis; Thiemann, Wolfram H-P

    2010-03-01

    More than 50 stable organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM), from ground-based and onboard-satellite astronomical observations, in the gas and solid phases. Some of these organics may be prebiotic compounds that were delivered to early Earth by comets and meteorites and may have triggered the first chemical reactions involved in the origin of life. Ultraviolet irradiation of ices simulating photoprocesses of cold solid matter in astrophysical environments have shown that photochemistry can lead to the formation of amino acids and related compounds. In this work, we experimentally searched for other organic molecules of prebiotic interest, namely, oxidized acid labile compounds. In a setup that simulates conditions relevant to the ISM and Solar System icy bodies such as comets, a condensed CH(3)OH:NH(3) = 1:1 ice mixture was UV irradiated at approximately 80 K. The molecular constituents of the nonvolatile organic residue that remained at room temperature were separated by capillary gas chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. Urea, glycolic acid, and glycerol were detected in this residue, as well as hydroxyacetamide, glycerolic acid, and glycerol amide. These organics are interesting target molecules to be searched for in space. Finally, tentative mechanisms of formation for these compounds under interstellar/pre-cometary conditions are proposed. PMID:20402585

  20. Molecular cytogenetics by polymerase catalyzed amplification or in situ labelling of specific nucleic acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bolund, L.; Brandt, C.; Hindkjaer, J.; Koch, J.; Koelvraa, S.; Pedersen, S. )

    1993-01-01

    The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) can be performed on isolated cells or chromosomes and the product can be analyzed by DNA technology or by FISH to test metaphases. The authors have good experiences analyzing aberrant chromosomes by FACS sorting, PCR with degenerated primers and painting of test metaphases with the PCR product. They also utilize polymerases for PRimed IN Situ labelling (PRINS) of specific nucleic acid sequences. In PRINS oligonucleotides are hybridized to their target sequences and labeled nucleotides are incorporated at the site of hybridization with the oligonucleotide as primer. PRINS may eventually allow the study of individual genes, gene expression and even somatic mutations (in mRNA) in single cells.

  1. DNA Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Gene: Amino Acid Sequence of Repetitive Epitope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enea, Vincenzo; Ellis, Joan; Zavala, Fidel; Arnot, David E.; Asavanich, Achara; Masuda, Aoi; Quakyi, Isabella; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1984-08-01

    A clone of complementary DNA encoding the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been isolated by screening an Escherichia coli complementary DNA library with a monoclonal antibody to the CS protein. The DNA sequence of the complementary DNA insert encodes a four-amino acid sequence: proline-asparagine-alanine-asparagine, tandemly repeated 23 times. The CS β -lactamase fusion protein specifically binds monoclonal antibodies to the CS protein and inhibits the binding of these antibodies to native Plasmodium falciparum CS protein. These findings provide a basis for the development of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

  2. Significance of amino acid variation at human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase residue 210 for zidovudine susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Harrigan, P R; Kinghorn, I; Bloor, S; Kemp, S D; Nájera, I; Kohli, A; Larder, B A

    1996-01-01

    Amino acid variation at reverse transcriptase (RT) codon 210 (generally Leu-210 to Trp [L210W], TTG-->TGG) is occasionally detected after the initiation of azidothymidine (AZT) therapy. The impact of this variation on AZT resistance and viral replication was addressed by four different approaches. The frequency and genetic background of the L210W mutation in vivo were assessed by analyzing sera of AZT-naive and AZT-experienced patients by RT-PCR and DNA sequencing. The degree of AZT resistance (50% infective concentration [IC50]) of recombinant viruses constructed by using the RT of 21 clinical isolates was stratified by the presence or absence of the 210 mutation. The AZT IC50S of a panel of mutant viruses (with or without W-210) constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in an HXB2 background were assayed by using a HeLa CD4 plaque reduction assay. Finally, the effect of the 210 mutation on viral replication was assessed by replication competition of an AZT-resistant virus, RTMN (L-41/Y-215), and RTMN with the W-210 mutation in the presence and in the absence of AZT. In AZT-naive patients, tryptophan at RT residue 210 was rare. After AZT exposure, W-210 appeared in a minority of those patients, most commonly in association with L-41 and Y-215. The presence of W-210 increased the AZTIC50 by two- to fourfold, as determined by both the recombinant virus assay and site-directed mutagenesis. A significant replication advantage in favor of the wild-type L-210 over W-210 was observed, although the selection against the 210 mutant was two- to threefold lower when the viruses were grown in the presence of 5 microM AZT. In summary, the L210W mutation appears to be of marginal significance, conferring approximately two- to fourfold-reduced sensitivity to AZT compared with similar AZT-resistant genomes with L-210. The selection pressure against W-210 may account for the modest proportion of patients in which W-210 appears in vivo. PMID:8709214

  3. Method for high-volume sequencing of nucleic acids: random and directed priming with libraries of oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.

    1995-04-18

    Random and directed priming methods for determining nucleotide sequences by enzymatic sequencing techniques, using libraries of primers of lengths 8, 9 or 10 bases, are disclosed. These methods permit direct sequencing of nucleic acids as large as 45,000 base pairs or larger without the necessity for subcloning. Individual primers are used repeatedly to prime sequence reactions in many different nucleic acid molecules. Libraries containing as few as 10,000 octamers, 14,200 nonamers, or 44,000 decamers would have the capacity to determine the sequence of almost any cosmid DNA. Random priming with a fixed set of primers from a smaller library can also be used to initiate the sequencing of individual nucleic acid molecules, with the sequence being completed by directed priming with primers from the library. In contrast to random cloning techniques, a combined random and directed priming strategy is far more efficient. 2 figs.

  4. Method for high-volume sequencing of nucleic acids: random and directed priming with libraries of oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William

    1995-04-18

    Random and directed priming methods for determining nucleotide sequences by enzymatic sequencing techniques, using libraries of primers of lengths 8, 9 or 10 bases, are disclosed. These methods permit direct sequencing of nucleic acids as large as 45,000 base pairs or larger without the necessity for subcloning. Individual primers are used repeatedly to prime sequence reactions in many different nucleic acid molecules. Libraries containing as few as 10,000 octamers, 14,200 nonamers, or 44,000 decamers would have the capacity to determine the sequence of almost any cosmid DNA. Random priming with a fixed set of primers from a smaller library can also be used to initiate the sequencing of individual nucleic acid molecules, with the sequence being completed by directed priming with primers from the library. In contrast to random cloning techniques, a combined random and directed priming strategy is far more efficient.

  5. Influence of shear force on floc properties and residual aluminum in humic acid treatment by nano-Al₁₃.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiying; Gao, Baoyu; Du, Bin; Xu, Zhenghe; Zhang, Yongfang; Wei, Dong

    2014-04-30

    The impacts of various shear forces on floc sizes and structures in humic acid coagulations by polyaluminum chloride (PACl) and nano-Al13 were comparatively studied in this paper. The dynamic floc size was monitored by use of a laser diffraction particle sizing device. The floc structure was evaluated in terms of fractal dimension, analyzed by small-angle laser light scattering (SALLS). The effect of increased shear rate on residual Al of the coagulation effluents was then analyzed on the basis of different floc characteristics generated under various shear conditions. The results showed that floc size decreased with the increasing shear rate for both Al13 and PACl. Besides, floc strength and re-formation ability were also weakened by the enhanced shear force. Al13 resulted in small, strong and better recoverable flocs than PACl and moreover, in the shear range of 100-300 revolution per minute (rpm) (G=40.7-178.3s(-1)), the characteristics of HA-Al13 flocs displayed smaller scale changes than those of HA-PACl flocs. The results of residual Al measurements proved that with shear increased, the residual Al increased continuously but Al13 presented less sensitivity to the varying shear forces. PACl contributed higher residual Al than Al13 under the same shear condition. PMID:24583809

  6. Two Arginine Residues of Streptococcus gordonii Sialic Acid-Binding Adhesin Hsa Are Essential for Interaction to Host Cell Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Oguchi, Riyo; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hsa is a large, serine-rich protein of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 that mediates binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid termini of glycoproteins, including platelet glycoprotein Ibα, and erythrocyte membrane protein glycophorin A, and band 3. The binding of Hsa to platelet glycoprotein Ibα contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. This interaction appears to be mediated by a second non-repetitive region (NR2) of Hsa. However, the molecular details of the interaction between the Hsa NR2 region and these glycoproteins are not well understood. In the present study, we identified the amino acid residues of the Hsa NR2 region that are involved in sialic acid recognition. To identify the sialic acid-binding site of Hsa NR2 region, we prepared various mutants of Hsa NR2 fused with glutathione transferase. Fusion proteins harboring Arg340 to Asn (R340N) or Arg365 to Asn (R365N) substitutions in the NR2 domain exhibited significantly reduced binding to human erythrocytes and platelets. A sugar-binding assay showed that these mutant proteins abolished binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, we established S. gordonii DL1 derivatives that encoded the corresponding Hsa mutant protein. In whole-cell assays, these mutant strains showed significant reductions in hemagglutination, in platelet aggregation, and in adhesion to human leukocytes. These results indicate that the Arg340 and Arg365 residues of Hsa play an important role in the binding of Hsa to α2-3-linked sialic acid-containing glycoproteins. PMID:27101147

  7. Two Arginine Residues of Streptococcus gordonii Sialic Acid-Binding Adhesin Hsa Are Essential for Interaction to Host Cell Receptors.

    PubMed

    Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Oguchi, Riyo; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hsa is a large, serine-rich protein of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 that mediates binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid termini of glycoproteins, including platelet glycoprotein Ibα, and erythrocyte membrane protein glycophorin A, and band 3. The binding of Hsa to platelet glycoprotein Ibα contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. This interaction appears to be mediated by a second non-repetitive region (NR2) of Hsa. However, the molecular details of the interaction between the Hsa NR2 region and these glycoproteins are not well understood. In the present study, we identified the amino acid residues of the Hsa NR2 region that are involved in sialic acid recognition. To identify the sialic acid-binding site of Hsa NR2 region, we prepared various mutants of Hsa NR2 fused with glutathione transferase. Fusion proteins harboring Arg340 to Asn (R340N) or Arg365 to Asn (R365N) substitutions in the NR2 domain exhibited significantly reduced binding to human erythrocytes and platelets. A sugar-binding assay showed that these mutant proteins abolished binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, we established S. gordonii DL1 derivatives that encoded the corresponding Hsa mutant protein. In whole-cell assays, these mutant strains showed significant reductions in hemagglutination, in platelet aggregation, and in adhesion to human leukocytes. These results indicate that the Arg340 and Arg365 residues of Hsa play an important role in the binding of Hsa to α2-3-linked sialic acid-containing glycoproteins. PMID:27101147

  8. Analysis of a nucleotide-binding site of 5-lipoxygenase by affinity labelling: binding characteristics and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y Y; Hammarberg, T; Radmark, O; Samuelsson, B; Ng, C F; Funk, C D; Loscalzo, J

    2000-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) catalyses the first two steps in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, which are inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid. 5LO activity is stimulated by ATP; however, a consensus ATP-binding site or nucleotide-binding site has not been found in its protein sequence. In the present study, affinity and photoaffinity labelling of 5LO with 5'-p-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine (FSBA) and 2-azido-ATP showed that 5LO bound to the ATP analogues quantitatively and specifically and that the incorporation of either analogue inhibited ATP stimulation of 5LO activity. The stoichiometry of the labelling was 1.4 mol of FSBA/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 1 mol/mol) or 0.94 mol of 2-azido-ATP/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 0.77 mol/mol). Labelling with FSBA prevented further labelling with 2-azido-ATP, indicating that the same binding site was occupied by both analogues. Other nucleotides (ADP, AMP, GTP, CTP and UTP) also competed with 2-azido-ATP labelling, suggesting that the site was a general nucleotide-binding site rather than a strict ATP-binding site. Ca(2+), which also stimulates 5LO activity, had no effect on the labelling of the nucleotide-binding site. Digestion with trypsin and peptide sequencing showed that two fragments of 5LO were labelled by 2-azido-ATP. These fragments correspond to residues 73-83 (KYWLNDDWYLK, in single-letter amino acid code) and 193-209 (FMHMFQSSWNDFADFEK) in the 5LO sequence. Trp-75 and Trp-201 in these peptides were modified by the labelling, suggesting that they were immediately adjacent to the C-2 position of the adenine ring of ATP. Given the stoichiometry of the labelling, the two peptide sequences of 5LO were probably near each other in the enzyme's tertiary structure, composing or surrounding the ATP-binding site of 5LO. PMID:11042125

  9. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Alexander; Wincker, Patrick; Mauger, Stéphane; Jaillon, Olivier; Malarme, Karine; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2001-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a nonpathogenic AT-rich gram-positive bacterium closely related to the genus Streptococcus and is the most commonly used cheese starter. It is also the best-characterized lactic acid bacterium. We sequenced the genome of the laboratory strain IL1403, using a novel two-step strategy that comprises diagnostic sequencing of the entire genome and a shotgun polishing step. The genome contains 2,365,589 base pairs and encodes 2310 proteins, including 293 protein-coding genes belonging to six prophages and 43 insertion sequence (IS) elements. Nonrandom distribution of IS elements indicates that the chromosome of the sequenced strain may be a product of recent recombination between two closely related genomes. A complete set of late competence genes is present, indicating the ability of L. lactis to undergo DNA transformation. Genomic sequence revealed new possibilities for fermentation pathways and for aerobic respiration. It also indicated a horizontal transfer of genetic information from Lactococcus to gram-negative enteric bacteria of Salmonella-Escherichia group. [The sequence data described in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AE005176.] PMID:11337471

  10. On human disease-causing amino acid variants: statistical study of sequence and structural patterns

    PubMed Central

    Alexov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Statistical analysis was carried out on large set of naturally occurring human amino acid variations and it was demonstrated that there is a preference for some amino acid substitutions to be associated with diseases. At an amino acid sequence level, it was shown that the disease-causing variants frequently involve drastic changes of amino acid physico-chemical properties of proteins such as charge, hydrophobicity and geometry. Structural analysis of variants involved in diseases and being frequently observed in human population showed similar trends: disease-causing variants tend to cause more changes of hydrogen bond network and salt bridges as compared with harmless amino acid mutations. Analysis of thermodynamics data reported in literature, both experimental and computational, indicated that disease-causing variants tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions, which prompted us to investigate the effects of amino acid mutations on large databases of experimentally measured energy changes in unrelated proteins. Although the experimental datasets were linked neither to diseases nor exclusory to human proteins, the observed trends were the same: amino acid mutations tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions. Having in mind that structural and thermodynamics properties are interrelated, it is pointed out that any large change of any of them is anticipated to cause a disease. PMID:25689729

  11. Histidine residues in the Na+-coupled ascorbic acid transporter-2 (SVCT2) are central regulators of SVCT2 function, modulating pH sensitivity, transporter kinetics, Na+ cooperativity, conformational stability, and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Ormazabal, Valeska; Zuñiga, Felipe A; Escobar, Elizabeth; Aylwin, Carlos; Salas-Burgos, Alexis; Godoy, Alejandro; Reyes, Alejandro M; Vera, Juan Carlos; Rivas, Coralia I

    2010-11-19

    Na(+)-coupled ascorbic acid transporter-2 (SVCT2) activity is impaired at acid pH, but little is known about the molecular determinants that define the transporter pH sensitivity. SVCT2 contains six histidine residues in its primary sequence, three of which are exofacial in the transporter secondary structure model. We used site-directed mutagenesis and treatment with diethylpyrocarbonate to identify histidine residues responsible for SVCT2 pH sensitivity. We conclude that five histidine residues, His(109), His(203), His(206), His(269), and His(413), are central regulators of SVCT2 function, participating to different degrees in modulating pH sensitivity, transporter kinetics, Na(+) cooperativity, conformational stability, and subcellular localization. Our results are compatible with a model in which (i) a single exofacial histidine residue, His(413), localized in the exofacial loop IV that connects transmembrane helices VII-VIII defines the pH sensitivity of SVCT2 through a mechanism involving a marked attenuation of the activation by Na(+) and loss of Na(+) cooperativity, which leads to a decreased V(max) without altering the transport K(m); (ii) exofacial histidine residues His(203), His(206), and His(413) may be involved in maintaining a functional interaction between exofacial loops II and IV and influence the general folding of the transporter; (iii) histidines 203, 206, 269, and 413 affect the transporter kinetics by modulating the apparent transport K(m); and (iv) histidine 109, localized at the center of transmembrane helix I, might be fundamental for the interaction of SVCT2 with the transported substrate ascorbic acid. Thus, histidine residues are central regulators of SVCT2 function. PMID:20843809

  12. Extension of microwave-accelerated residue-specific acid cleavage to proteins with carbohydrate side chains and disulfide linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinxi; Shefcheck, Kevin; Callahan, John; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-12-01

    This laboratory has introduced a chemical method for residue-specific protein cleavage and has provided a preliminary assessment of the suitability of microwave-accelerated acid cleavage as a proteomic tool. This report is a continuing assessment of the fate of common protein modifications in microwave-accelerated acid cleavage. We have examined the cleavage of ribonuclease A and the related N-linked glycoprotein ribonuclease B, and the O-linked glycoprotein alpha crystallin A chain, using MALDI-TOF and LC-ESI-MS to identify the peptide products. RNase A and B each contains four disulfide bonds, and the addition of a reducing reagent, such as dithiothreitol, was found to be required to achieve efficient acidic proteolysis. The linkage of the glycosidic group to the asparagine side chain in ribonuclease B was found not to be cleaved by brief microwave treatment in 12.5% acetic acid. The distribution of the heterogeneous carbohydrate side chain in the glycopeptide products of acid cleavage was compared to that of the glycopeptide products of tryptic digestion. Hydrolysis within the carbohydrate chain itself is minimal under the conditions used. The O-linked side chain on alpha crystalline A was found to be cleaved during acid cleavage of the protein.

  13. Sequence of morphological transitions in two-dimensional pattern growth from aqueous ascorbic Acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Paranjpe, A S

    2002-08-12

    A sequence of morphological transitions in two-dimensional dehydration patterns of aqueous solutions of ascorbic acid is observed with humidity as a control parameter. Change in morphology occurs due to humidity induced variation in the concentration of the metastable supersaturated solution phase formed after initial solvent evaporation. As percent humidity is varied from 40 to 80, patterns change from compact circular --> radial --> density modulated radial (a new morphology) --> density modulated circular --> density modulated dendritic (a new morphology) --> dense branching. PMID:12190528

  14. Self-sequencing of amino acids and origins of polyfunctional protocells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1984-01-01

    The role of proteins in the origin of living things is discussed. It has been experimentally established that amino acids can sequence themselves under simulated geological conditions with highly nonrandom products which accordingly contain diverse information. Multiple copies of each type of macromolecule are formed, resulting in greater power for any protoenzymic molecule than would accrue from a single copy of each type. Thermal proteins are readily incorporated into laboratory protocells. The experimental evidence for original polyfunctional protocells is discussed.

  15. Role of certain amino acid residues of the coelenterazine-binding cavity in bioluminescence of light-sensitive Ca(2+)-regulated photoprotein berovin.

    PubMed

    Burakova, Ludmila P; Stepanyuk, Galina A; Eremeeva, Elena V; Vysotski, Eugene S

    2016-05-11

    Bright bioluminescence of ctenophores is caused by Ca(2+)-regulated photoproteins. Although these photoproteins are functionally identical to and share many properties of cnidarian photoproteins, like aequorin and obelin, and retain the same spatial architecture, they are extremely sensitive to light, i.e. lose the ability to bioluminesce on exposure to light over the entire absorption spectrum. In addition, the degree of identity of their amino acid sequences with those of cnidarian photoproteins is only 29.4%. This suggests that the residues involved in bioluminescence of ctenophore and cnidarian photoproteins significantly differ. Here we describe the bioluminescent properties of berovin mutants with substitution of the residues located in the photoprotein internal cavity. Since the spatial structure of berovin bound with a substrate is not determined yet, to identify these residues we have modeled it with an accommodated substrate using the structures of some cnidarian Ca(2+)-regulated photoproteins with bound coelenterazine or coelenteramide as templates in order to obtain an adequate sampling and to take into account all possible conformers and variants for ligand-protein docking. Based on the impact of substitutions on the bioluminescent properties and model structures we speculate that within the internal cavity of ctenophore photoproteins, coelenterazine is bound as a 2-peroxy anion adduct which is stabilized owing to Coulomb interaction with a positively charged guanidinium group of Arg41 paired with Tyr204. In this case, the bioluminescence reaction is triggered by only calcium-induced conformational changes leading to the disturbance of charge-charge interaction. PMID:27117544

  16. Key amino acid residues for the endo-processive activity of GH74 xyloglucanase.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Saito, Yuji; Yaoi, Katsuro

    2014-05-01

    Unlike endo-dissociative-xyloglucanases, Paenibacillus XEG74 is an endo-processive xyloglucanase that contains four unique tryptophan residues in the negative subsites (W61 and W64) and the positive subsites (W318 and W319), as indicated by three-dimensional homology modelling. Selective replacement of the positive subsite residues with alanine mutations reduced the degree of processive activity and resulted in the more endo-dissociative-activity. The results showed that W318 and W319, which are found in the positive subsites, are essential for processive degradation and are responsible for maintaining binding interactions with xyloglucan polysaccharide through a stacking effect. PMID:24657616

  17. Identification of residues in ABCG2 affecting protein trafficking and drug transport, using co-evolutionary analysis of ABCG sequences

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Ameena J.; Cox, Megan H.; Jones, Natalie; Goode, Alice J.; Bridge, Katherine S.; Wong, Kelvin; Briggs, Deborah; Kerr, Ian D.

    2015-01-01

    ABCG2 is an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter with a physiological role in urate transport in the kidney and is also implicated in multi-drug efflux from a number of organs in the body. The trafficking of the protein and the mechanism by which it recognizes and transports diverse drugs are important areas of research. In the current study, we have made a series of single amino acid mutations in ABCG2 on the basis of sequence analysis. Mutant isoforms were characterized for cell surface expression and function. One mutant (I573A) showed disrupted glycosylation and reduced trafficking kinetics. In contrast with many ABC transporter folding mutations which appear to be ‘rescued’ by chemical chaperones or low temperature incubation, the I573A mutation was not enriched at the cell surface by either treatment, with the majority of the protein being retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Two other mutations (P485A and M549A) showed distinct effects on transport of ABCG2 substrates reinforcing the role of TM helix 3 in drug recognition and transport and indicating the presence of intracellular coupling regions in ABCG2. PMID:26294421

  18. Characterization of the microbial acid mine drainage microbial community using culturing and direct sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Auld, Ryan R; Myre, Maxine; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Leduc, Leo G; Merritt, Thomas J S

    2013-05-01

    We characterized the bacterial community from an AMD tailings pond using both classical culturing and modern direct sequencing techniques and compared the two methods. Acid mine drainage (AMD) is produced by the environmental and microbial oxidation of minerals dissolved from mining waste. Surprisingly, we know little about the microbial communities associated with AMD, despite the fundamental ecological roles of these organisms and large-scale economic impact of these waste sites. AMD microbial communities have classically been characterized by laboratory culturing-based techniques and more recently by direct sequencing of marker gene sequences, primarily the 16S rRNA gene. In our comparison of the techniques, we find that their results are complementary, overall indicating very similar community structure with similar dominant species, but with each method identifying some species that were missed by the other. We were able to culture the majority of species that our direct sequencing results indicated were present, primarily species within the Acidithiobacillus and Acidiphilium genera, although estimates of relative species abundance were only obtained from direct sequencing. Interestingly, our culture-based methods recovered four species that had been overlooked from our sequencing results because of the rarity of the marker gene sequences, likely members of the rare biosphere. Further, direct sequencing indicated that a single genus, completely missed in our culture-based study, Legionella, was a dominant member of the microbial community. Our results suggest that while either method does a reasonable job of identifying the dominant members of the AMD microbial community, together the methods combine to give a more complete picture of the true diversity of this environment. PMID:23485423

  19. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... base or modified or unusual amino acid may be presented in a given sequence as the corresponding unmodified base or amino acid if the modified base or modified or unusual amino acid is one of those...

  20. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... base or modified or unusual amino acid may be presented in a given sequence as the corresponding unmodified base or amino acid if the modified base or modified or unusual amino acid is one of those...

  1. Nanopore Analysis of Nucleic Acids: Single-Molecule Studies of Molecular Dynamics, Structure, and Base Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasagasti, Felix; Deamer, David W.

    Nucleic acids are linear polynucleotides in which each base is covalently linked to a pentose sugar and a phosphate group carrying a negative charge. If a pore having roughly the crosssectional diameter of a single-stranded nucleic acid is embedded in a thin membrane and a voltage of 100 mV or more is applied, individual nucleic acids in solution can be captured by the electrical field in the pore and translocated through by single-molecule electrophoresis. The dimensions of the pore cannot accommodate anything larger than a single strand, so each base in the molecule passes through the pore in strict linear sequence. The nucleic acid strand occupies a large fraction of the pore's volume during translocation and therefore produces a transient blockade of the ionic current created by the applied voltage. If it could be demonstrated that each nucleotide in the polymer produced a characteristic modulation of the ionic current during its passage through the nanopore, the sequence of current modulations would reflect the sequence of bases in the polymer. According to this basic concept, nanopores are analogous to a Coulter counter that detects nanoscopic molecules rather than microscopic [1,2]. However, the advantage of nanopores is that individual macromolecules can be characterized because different chemical and physical properties affect their passage through the pore. Because macromolecules can be captured in the pore as well as translocated, the nanopore can be used to detect individual functional complexes that form between a nucleic acid and an enzyme. No other technique has this capability.

  2. Insertion of multiple alpha-amino gamma-lactam (Agl) residues into a peptide sequence by solid-phase synthesis on synphase lanterns.

    PubMed

    Ronga, Luisa; Jamieson, Andrew G; Beauregard, Kim; Quiniou, Christiane; Chemtob, Sylvain; Lubell, William D

    2010-01-01

    The insertion of lactams into peptide analogs can enhance potency and improve receptor selectivity. The synthesis of lactam-bridged peptide sequences has been accomplished by a solid-phase approach on SynPhase lanterns using cyclic (R)- and (S)-oxathiazinane ester (2) to annulate the amino lactam residue onto the peptide chain. Parallel synthesis of alpha-amino gamma-lactam analogs of the allosteric modulator of IL-1 receptor 101.10 (D-Arg-D-Tyr-D-Thr-D-Val-D-Glu-D-Leu-D-Ala: rytvela) was performed by split-mix chemistry on the lanterns. In particular, the double insertion of alpha-amino gamma-lactams in the same peptide sequence has been accomplished by this effective method for the solid-supported combinatorial synthesis of lactam-bridged peptides. Peptides bearing an Agl residue exhibited curve shapes indicative of turn conformations in their circular dichroism spectra. PMID:20225301

  3. Identification of important amino acid residues that modulate binding of Escherichia coli GroEL to its various cochaperones.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, G; Georgopoulos, C

    2001-01-01

    Genetic experiments have shown that the GroEL/GroES chaperone machine of Escherichia coli is absolutely essential, not only for bacterial growth but also for the propagation of many bacteriophages including lambda. The virulent bacteriophages T4 and RB49 are independent of the host GroES function, because they encode their own cochaperone proteins, Gp31 and CocO, respectively. E. coli groEL44 mutant bacteria do not form colonies above 42 degrees nor do they propagate bacteriophages lambda, T4, or RB49. We found that the vast majority (40/46) of spontaneous groEL44 temperature-resistant colonies at 43 degrees were due to the presence of an intragenic suppressor mutation. These suppressors define 21 different amino acid substitutions in GroEL, each affecting one of 13 different amino acid residues. All of these amino acid residues are located at or near the hinge, which regulates the large en bloc movements of the GroEL apical domain. All of these intragenic suppressors support bacteriophages lambda, T4, and RB49 growth to various extents in the presence of the groEL44 allele. Since it is known that the GroEL44 mutant protein does not interact effectively with Gp31, the suppressor mutations should enhance cochaperone binding. Analogous intragenic suppressor studies were conducted with the groEL673 temperature-sensitive allele. PMID:11404317

  4. Purification, N-terminal amino acid sequence, and some properties of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase from Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) hepato-pancreas.

    PubMed

    Osatomi, K; Masuda, Y; Hara, K; Ishihara, T

    2001-04-01

    Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) has been purified to homogeneity from Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus hepato-pancreas. The purification of the enzyme was carried out by an ethanol/chloroform treatment and acetone precipitation, and then followed by column chromatographies on Q-Sepharose, S-Sepharose and Ultrogel AcA 54. On SDS-PAGE, the purified enzyme gave a single protein band with molecular mass of 17.8 kDa under reducing conditions, and showed approximately equal proportions of 17.8 and 36 kDa molecular mass under non-reducing conditions. Three bands were obtained when the purified enzyme was subjected to native-PAGE, both on protein and activity staining, but the electrophoretic mobility of the purified enzyme differed from that of bovine erythrocyte Cu, Zn-SOD. Isoelectric point values of 5.9, 6.0 and 6.2, respectively, were obtained for the three components. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified enzyme was determined for 25 amino acid residues, and the sequence was compared with other Cu, Zn-SODs. The N-terminal alanine residue was unacetylated, as in the case of swordfish SOD. Above 60 degrees C, the thermostability of the enzyme was much lower than that of bovine Cu, Zn-SOD. PMID:11290457

  5. Complete amino acid sequence of the lentil trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor LCI-1.7 and a discussion of atypical binding sites of Bowman-Birk inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Weder, Jürgen K P; Hinkers, Sabine C

    2004-06-30

    The complete primary structure of the lentil (Lens culinaris) trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor LCI-1.7 was determined by conventional methods in order to find relationships between partial sequences and the difference in action against human and bovine chymotrypsin. As other Bowman-Birk type inhibitors, LCI-1.7 contained 68 amino acid residues, seven disulfide bridges, and two reactive sites, Arg16-Ser17 for trypsin and Tyr42-Ser43 for chymotrypsin. Evaluation of sequence homologies showed that it belonged to the group III Bowman-Birk inhibitors. The atypical additional binding site of LCI-1.7 for human chymotrypsin was discussed and compared with such binding sites of two other Bowman-Birk inhibitors, the Bowman-Birk soybean proteinase inhibitor BBI, and the lima bean proteinase inhibitor LBI I, for human and bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin. A concept to reduce the action of these inhibitors against human enzymes by genetic engineering was proposed. PMID:15212472

  6. Toxin acidic residue evolutionary function-guided design of de novo peptide drugs for the immunotherapeutic target, the Kv1.3 channel

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zongyun; Hu, Youtian; Hong, Jing; Hu, Jun; Yang, Weishan; Xiang, Fang; Yang, Fan; Xie, Zili; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin; Lin, Donghai; Wu, Yingliang

    2015-01-01

    During the long-term evolution of animal toxins acting on potassium channels, the acidic residues can orientate the toxin binding interfaces by adjusting the molecular polarity. Based on the evolutionary function of toxin acidic residues, de novo peptide drugs with distinct binding interfaces were designed for the immunotherapeutic target, the Kv1.3 channel. Using a natural basic toxin, BmKTX, as a template, which contains 2 acidic residues (Asp19 and Asp33), we engineered two new peptides BmKTX-19 with 1 acidic residue (Asp33), and BmKTX-196 with 2 acidic residues (Asp6 and Asp33) through only adjusting acidic residue distribution for reorientation of BmKTX binding interface. Pharmacological experiments indicated that BmKTX-19 and BmKTX-196 peptides were specific inhibitors of the Kv1.3 channel and effectively suppressed cytokine secretion. In addition to the structural similarity between the designed and native peptides, both experimental alanine-scanning mutagenesis and computational simulation further indicated that the binding interface of wild-type BmKTX was successfully reoriented in BmKTX-19 and BmKTX-196, which adopted distinct toxin surfaces as binding interfaces. Together, these findings indicate not only the promising prospect of BmKTX-19 and BmKTX-196 as drug candidates but also the desirable feasibility of the evolution-guided peptide drug design for discovering numerous peptide drugs for the Kv1.3 channel. PMID:25955787

  7. Preparation of a modified flue gas desulphurization residue and its effect on pot sorghum growth and acidic soil amelioration.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lin; Xu, Peizhi; Xie, Kaizhi; Tang, Shuanhu; Li, Yongli

    2011-09-15

    A modified flue gas desulphurization residue (MFGDR) was prepared and its effects on sorghum growth and acidic soil amelioration were evaluated in this paper. The MFGDR was prepared by calcining a mixture of dry/semi-dry flue gas desulphurization (FGD) residue from a coal-fired power plant, sorted potash feldspar and/or limestone powder. The available nutrients from the MFGDR were determined with 4.91 wt% K(+), 1.15 wt% Mg(2+), 22.4 wt% Ca(2+), 7.01 wt% Si(4+) and 2.07 wt% SO(4)(2-)-S in 0.1 mol L(-1) citric acid solution. Its pH value was held at 9.60 displaying slightly alkaline. The results of sorghum pot growth in both red and crimson acidic soil for 30 days indicated that adding the MFGDR at a dosage of 2 g kg(-1) in total soil weight would increase the growth rate of biomass by 24.3-149% (wet weight basis) and 47.3-157% (dry weight), the stem length and thickness increase by 5.75-22.1% and 4.76-30.9% in contrast with CK treatment for two test cuttings, respectively. The effect on sorghum growth was attributed to the increase of available nutrients, the enhancement of soil pH value and the reduction of aluminum toxicity in acidic soil due to the addition of the MFGDR. The experimental results also suggested that the MFGDR could be effectively used to ameliorate the acidic soil which is widely distributed throughout the southern China. PMID:21763070

  8. Simulation of acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic residues to fermentable sugars for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidiras, Dimitris

    2012-12-01

    The dilute acid hydrolysis of fir sawdust with sulfuric acid was undertaken in a batch reactor system (autoclave). The experimental data and reaction kinetic analysis indicate that this is a potential process for cellulose and hemicelluloses hydrolysis, due to a rapid hydrolysis reaction for acid concentration 0.045 N at 160-180°C. It was found that significant sugar degradation occurred at these conditions. The optimum conditions gave a yield of 38% total fermentable sugars. The kinetics of dilute acid hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses (polysaccharides) were simulated using four pseudo-kinetic models. The reaction rate constants were calculated in each case.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brélan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Bruce, D.; Goodwin, L.; Chertkov, O.; Brettin, T.; Han, C.; Detter, C.; Pitluck, S.; Land, Miriam L.; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 and ferments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemicellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome sequence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed. PMID:22675583

  10. [Partial sequence homology of FtsZ in phylogenetics analysis of lactic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Dong, Xiu-zhu

    2005-10-01

    FtsZ is a structurally conserved protein, which is universal among the prokaryotes. It plays a key role in prokaryote cell division. A partial fragment of the ftsZ gene about 800bp in length was amplified and sequenced and a partial FtsZ protein phylogenetic tree for the lactic acid bacteria was constructed. By comparing the FtsZ phylogenetic tree with the 16S rDNA tree, it was shown that the two trees were similar in topology. Both trees revealed that Pediococcus spp. were closely related with L. casei group of Lactobacillus spp. , but less related with other lactic acid cocci such as Enterococcus and Streptococcus. The results also showed that the discriminative power of FtsZ was higher than that of 16S rDNA for either inter-species or inter-genus and could be a very useful tool in species identification of lactic acid bacteria. PMID:16342751

  11. Amino acid residues in the Ler protein critical for derepression of the LEE5 promoter in enteropathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Su-Mi; Jeong, Jae-Ho; Choy, Hyon E; Shin, Minsang

    2016-08-01

    Enteropathogenic E. coli causes attaching and effacing (A/E) intestinal lesions. The genes involved in the formation of A/E lesions are encoded within a chromosomal island comprising of five major operons, LEE1-5. The global regulator H-NS represses the expression of these operons. Ler, a H-NS homologue, counteracts the H-NS-mediated repression. Using a novel genetic approach, we identified the amino acid residues in Ler that are involved in the interaction with H-NS: I20 and L23 in the C-terminal portion of α-helix 3, and I42 in the following unstructured linker region. PMID:27480636

  12. Comparative characterization of random-sequence proteins consisting of 5, 12, and 20 kinds of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Junko; Doi, Nobuhide; Takashima, Hideaki; Yanagawa, Hiroshi

    2010-04-01

    Screening of functional proteins from a random-sequence library has been used to evolve novel proteins in the field of evolutionary protein engineering. However, random-sequence proteins consisting of the 20 natural amino acids tend to aggregate, and the occurrence rate of functional proteins in a random-sequence library is low. From the viewpoint of the origin of life, it has been proposed that primordial proteins consisted of a limited set of amino acids that could have been abundantly formed early during chemical evolution. We have previously found that members of a random-sequence protein library constructed with five primitive amino acids show high solubility (Doi et al., Protein Eng Des Sel 2005;18:279-284). Although such a library is expected to be appropriate for finding functional proteins, the functionality may be limited, because they have no positively charged amino acid. Here, we constructed three libraries of 120-amino acid, random-sequence proteins using alphabets of 5, 12, and 20 amino acids by preselection using mRNA display (to eliminate sequences containing stop codons and frameshifts) and characterized and compared the structural properties of random-sequence proteins arbitrarily chosen from these libraries. We found that random-sequence proteins constructed with the 12-member alphabet (including five primitive amino acids and positively charged amino acids) have higher solubility than those constructed with the 20-member alphabet, though other biophysical properties are very similar in the two libraries. Thus, a library of moderate complexity constructed from 12 amino acids may be a more appropriate resource for functional screening than one constructed from 20 amino acids. PMID:20162614

  13. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA

    PubMed Central

    Heather, James M.; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way. PMID:26554401

  14. N-Terminal Amino Acid Sequence Determination of Proteins by N-Terminal Dimethyl Labeling: Pitfalls and Advantages When Compared with Edman Degradation Sequence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Elizabeth; Pourmal, Sergei; Zhou, Chun; Kumar, Rupesh; Teplova, Marianna; Pavletich, Nikola P; Marians, Kenneth J; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye

    2016-07-01

    In recent history, alternative approaches to Edman sequencing have been investigated, and to this end, the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Protein Sequencing Research Group (PSRG) initiated studies in 2014 and 2015, looking into bottom-up and top-down N-terminal (Nt) dimethyl derivatization of standard quantities of intact proteins with the aim to determine Nt sequence information. We have expanded this initiative and used low picomole amounts of myoglobin to determine the efficiency of Nt-dimethylation. Application of this approach on protein domains, generated by limited proteolysis of overexpressed proteins, confirms that it is a universal labeling technique and is very sensitive when compared with Edman sequencing. Finally, we compared Edman sequencing and Nt-dimethylation of the same polypeptide fragments; results confirm that there is agreement in the identity of the Nt amino acid sequence between these 2 methods. PMID:27006647

  15. N-Terminal Amino Acid Sequence Determination of Proteins by N-Terminal Dimethyl Labeling: Pitfalls and Advantages When Compared with Edman Degradation Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Elizabeth; Pourmal, Sergei; Zhou, Chun; Kumar, Rupesh; Teplova, Marianna; Pavletich, Nikola P.; Marians, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    In recent history, alternative approaches to Edman sequencing have been investigated, and to this end, the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Protein Sequencing Research Group (PSRG) initiated studies in 2014 and 2015, looking into bottom-up and top-down N-terminal (Nt) dimethyl derivatization of standard quantities of intact proteins with the aim to determine Nt sequence information. We have expanded this initiative and used low picomole amounts of myoglobin to determine the efficiency of Nt-dimethylation. Application of this approach on protein domains, generated by limited proteolysis of overexpressed proteins, confirms that it is a universal labeling technique and is very sensitive when compared with Edman sequencing. Finally, we compared Edman sequencing and Nt-dimethylation of the same polypeptide fragments; results confirm that there is agreement in the identity of the Nt amino acid sequence between these 2 methods. PMID:27006647

  16. Partial amino acid sequence of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase from the blue-green algae Synechococcus leopoliensis.

    PubMed

    Marcus, F; Latshaw, S P; Steup, M; Gerbling, K P

    1989-08-01

    Purified fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis was S-carboxymethylated and cleaved with trypsin. The resulting peptides were purified by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography and the amino acid sequence of six of the purified peptides was determined by gas-phase microsequencing. The results revealed sequence homology with other fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases. The obtained sequence data provides information required for the design of oligonucleotide hybridization probes to screen existing libraries of cyanobacterial DNA. The determination of the amino acid sequence of cyanobacterial proteins may yield important information with respect to the endosymbiotic theory of evolution. PMID:2550924

  17. Protein sequence analysis by incorporating modified chaos game and physicochemical properties into Chou's general pseudo amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunrui; Sun, Dandan; Liu, Shenghui; Zhang, Yusen

    2016-10-01

    In this contribution we introduced a novel graphical method to compare protein sequences. By mapping a protein sequence into 3D space based on codons and physicochemical properties of 20 amino acids, we are able to get a unique P-vector from the 3D curve. This approach is consistent with wobble theory of amino acids. We compute the distance between sequences by their P-vectors to measure similarities/dissimilarities among protein sequences. Finally, we use our method to analyze four datasets and get better results compared with previous approaches. PMID:27375218

  18. Incorporating substrate sequence motifs and spatial amino acid composition to identify kinase-specific phosphorylation sites on protein three-dimensional structures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein phosphorylation catalyzed by kinases plays crucial regulatory roles in cellular processes. Given the high-throughput mass spectrometry-based experiments, the desire to annotate the catalytic kinases for in vivo phosphorylation sites has motivated. Thus, a variety of computational methods have been developed for performing a large-scale prediction of kinase-specific phosphorylation sites. However, most of the proposed methods solely rely on the local amino acid sequences surrounding the phosphorylation sites. An increasing number of three-dimensional structures make it possible to physically investigate the structural environment of phosphorylation sites. Results In this work, all of the experimental phosphorylation sites are mapped to the protein entries of Protein Data Bank by sequence identity. It resulted in a total of 4508 phosphorylation sites containing the protein three-dimensional (3D) structures. To identify phosphorylation sites on protein 3D structures, this work incorporates support vector machines (SVMs) with the information of linear motifs and spatial amino acid composition, which is determined for each kinase group by calculating the relative frequencies of 20 amino acid types within a specific radial distance from central phosphorylated amino acid residue. After the cross-validation evaluation, most of the kinase-specific models trained with the consideration of structural information outperform the models considering only the sequence information. Furthermore, the independent testing set which is not included in training set has demonstrated that the proposed method could provide a comparable performance to other popular tools. Conclusion The proposed method is shown to be capable of predicting kinase-specific phosphorylation sites on 3D structures and has been implemented as a web server which is freely accessible at http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/PhosK3D/. Due to the difficulty of identifying the kinase-specific phosphorylation

  19. Optimization of a Nucleic Acids united-RESidue 2-Point model (NARES-2P) with a maximum-likelihood approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2015-12-01

    Coarse-grained models are useful tools to investigate the structural and thermodynamic properties of biomolecules. They are obtained by merging several atoms into one interaction site. Such simplified models try to capture as much as possible information of the original biomolecular system in all-atom representation but the resulting parameters of these coarse-grained force fields still need further optimization. In this paper, a force field optimization method, which is based on maximum-likelihood fitting of the simulated to the experimental conformational ensembles and least-squares fitting of the simulated to the experimental heat-capacity curves, is applied to optimize the Nucleic Acid united-RESidue 2-point (NARES-2P) model for coarse-grained simulations of nucleic acids recently developed in our laboratory. The optimized NARES-2P force field reproduces the structural and thermodynamic data of small DNA molecules much better than the original force field.

  20. Tsetse Salivary Gland Proteins 1 and 2 Are High Affinity Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins with Residual Nuclease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Caljon, Guy; Ridder, Karin De; Stijlemans, Benoît; Coosemans, Marc; Magez, Stefan; De Baetselier, Patrick; Van Den Abbeele, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of the tsetse fly salivary gland EST database revealed the presence of a highly enriched cluster of putative endonuclease genes, including tsal1 and tsal2. Tsal proteins are the major components of tsetse fly (G. morsitans morsitans) saliva where they are present as monomers as well as high molecular weight complexes with other saliva proteins. We demonstrate that the recombinant tsetse salivary gland proteins 1&2 (Tsal1&2) display DNA/RNA non-specific, high affinity nucleic acid binding with KD values in the low nanomolar range and a non-exclusive preference for duplex. These Tsal proteins exert only a residual nuclease activity with a preference for dsDNA in a broad pH range. Knockdown of Tsal expression by in vivo RNA interference in the tsetse fly revealed a partially impaired blood digestion phenotype as evidenced by higher gut nucleic acid, hematin and protein contents. PMID:23110062

  1. Controlling fine particulate and acid mist emissions from a residual oil fired utility boiler with an EDV{trademark} system

    SciTech Connect

    Olen, K.R.; Vincent, H.B.; Jones, G.

    1995-06-01

    Florida Power & Light Company (FPL), in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Belco Technologies Corporation, evaluated the performance of an EDV system to remove fine particulate and acid mist from untreated flue gas from a residual oil-fired utility boiler. The cosponsored project was carried out using a full-scale EDV module in a slip stream from one of the 400 MW wall-fired boilers at FPL`s Sanford Plant. Particulate, acid gas and chemical analytical data are presented, and used to illustrate the effects of operating variables on EDV performance. EDV system efficiencies of 90% were achieved, which resulted in controlled particulate and SO{sub 3} emissions of less than 10 mg/Nm{sup 3} (0.0065 lbs/10{sup 6}Btu) and 1 ppmv, respectively.

  2. Optimization of a Nucleic Acids united-RESidue 2-Point model (NARES-2P) with a maximum-likelihood approach

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam

    2015-12-28

    Coarse-grained models are useful tools to investigate the structural and thermodynamic properties of biomolecules. They are obtained by merging several atoms into one interaction site. Such simplified models try to capture as much as possible information of the original biomolecular system in all-atom representation but the resulting parameters of these coarse-grained force fields still need further optimization. In this paper, a force field optimization method, which is based on maximum-likelihood fitting of the simulated to the experimental conformational ensembles and least-squares fitting of the simulated to the experimental heat-capacity curves, is applied to optimize the Nucleic Acid united-RESidue 2-point (NARES-2P) model for coarse-grained simulations of nucleic acids recently developed in our laboratory. The optimized NARES-2P force field reproduces the structural and thermodynamic data of small DNA molecules much better than the original force field.

  3. Stabile Chlorine Isotope Study of Martian Shergottites and Nakhlites; Whole Rock and Acid Leachates and Residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    We have established a precise analytical technique for stable chlorine isotope measurements of tiny planetary materials by TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) [1], for which the results are basically consistent with the IRMS tech-nique (gas source mass spectrometry) [2,3,4]. We present here results for Martian shergottites and nakhlites; whole rocks, HNO3-leachates and residues, and discuss the chlorine isotope evolution of planetary Mars.

  4. Radionuclide Leaching from Residual Solids Remaining after Acid Dissolution of K East Area Sludge Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.; Carlson, C.D.; Soderquist, C.Z.; Fadeff, S.K.

    1999-04-02

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of various leach treatments for decontaminating dissolver residual solids (KEACRESID1) produced during a 24-hour dissolution of K East Basin floor and Weasel Pit sludge composite in boiling 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The scope of this testing has been described in Section 4.5 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basin Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the residual solids generated in the K Basin sludge treatment process can restrict disposal of this solid to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The starting dissolver residual solid for this testing, KEACRESID1, is a visibly heterogeneous material. This material contains radionuclides at concentrations above the ERDF Waste Acceptance Criteria for transuranics (TRU) by about a factor of 3, for {sup 239}Pu by a factor of 10, and for {sup 241}Am by a factor of 1.6. It meets the ERDF criterion for {sup 137}Cs by a factor of 4 and for uranium by a factor of 10. Therefore, the radionuclides of greatest interest in this leaching study are first {sup 239}Pu, and then {sup 241}Am, {sup 137}Cs, and uranium.

  5. An Acidic Thermostable Recombinant Aspergillus nidulans Endoglucanase Is Active towards Distinct Agriculture Residues

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Eveline Queiroz de Pinho; Rubini, Marciano Regis; Mello-de-Sousa, Thiago Machado; Duarte, Gilvan Caetano; de Faria, Fabrícia Paula; Ferreira Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes; Kyaw, Cynthia Maria; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio Jose

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans is poorly exploited as a source of enzymes for lignocellulosic residues degradation for biotechnological purposes. This work describes the A. nidulans Endoglucanase A heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris, the purification and biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme. Active recombinant endoglucanase A (rEG A) was efficiently secreted as a 35 kDa protein which was purified through a two-step chromatography procedure. The highest enzyme activity was detected at 50°C/pH 4. rEG A retained 100% of activity when incubated at 45 and 55°C for 72 h. Purified rEG A kinetic parameters towards CMC were determined as Km = 27.5 ± 4.33 mg/mL, Vmax = 1.185 ± 0.11 mmol/min, and 55.8 IU (international units)/mg specific activity. Recombinant P. pastoris supernatant presented hydrolytic activity towards lignocellulosic residues such as banana stalk, sugarcane bagasse, soybean residues, and corn straw. These data indicate that rEG A is suitable for plant biomass conversion into products of commercial importance, such as second-generation fuel ethanol. PMID:23936633

  6. Purification and complete amino acid sequence of a new type of sweet protein taste-modifying activity, curculin.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, H; Theerasilp, S; Aiuchi, T; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1990-09-15

    A new taste-modifying protein named curculin was extracted with 0.5 M NaCl from the fruits of Curculigo latifolia and purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, CM-Sepharose ion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration. Purified curculin thus obtained gave a single band having a Mr of 12,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of 8 M urea. The molecular weight determined by low-angle laser light scattering was 27,800. These results suggest that native curculin is a dimer of a 12,000-Da polypeptide. The complete amino acid sequence of curculin was determined by automatic Edman degradation. Curculin consists of 114 residues. Curculin itself elicits a sweet taste. After curculin, water elicits a sweet taste, and sour substances induce a stronger sense of sweetness. No protein with both sweet-tasting and taste-modifying activities has ever been found. There are five sets of tripeptides common to miraculin (a taste-modifying protein), six sets of tripeptides common to thaumatin (a sweet protein), and two sets of tripeptides common to monellin (a sweet protein). Anti-miraculin serum was not immunologically reactive with curculin. The mechanism of the taste-modifying action of curculin is discussed. PMID:2394746

  7. Differential Recognition of Influenza A Viruses by M158–66 Epitope-Specific CD8+ T Cells Is Determined by Extraepitopic Amino Acid Residues

    PubMed Central

    van de Sandt, Carolien E.; Kreijtz, Joost H. C. M.; Geelhoed-Mieras, Martina M.; Nieuwkoop, Nella J.; Spronken, Monique I.; van de Vijver, David A. M. C.; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural influenza A virus infections elicit both virus-specific antibody and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Influenza A virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) contribute to clearance of influenza virus infections. Viral CTL epitopes can display variation, allowing influenza A viruses to evade recognition by epitope-specific CTLs. Due to functional constraints, some epitopes, like the immunodominant HLA-A*0201-restricted matrix protein 1 (M158–66) epitope, are highly conserved between influenza A viruses regardless of their subtype or host species of origin. We hypothesized that human influenza A viruses evade recognition of this epitope by impairing antigen processing and presentation by extraepitopic amino acid substitutions. Activation of specific T cells was used as an indication of antigen presentation. Here, we show that the M158–66 epitope in the M1 protein derived from human influenza A virus was poorly recognized compared to the M1 protein derived from avian influenza A virus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that naturally occurring variations at extraepitopic amino acid residues affect CD8+ T cell recognition of the M158–66 epitope. These data indicate that human influenza A viruses can impair recognition by M158–66-specific CTLs while retaining the conserved amino acid sequence of the epitope, which may represent a yet-unknown immune evasion strategy for influenza A viruses. This difference in recognition may have implications for the viral replication kinetics in HLA-A*0201 individuals and spread of influenza A viruses in the human population. The findings may aid the rational design of universal influenza vaccines that aim at the induction of cross-reactive virus-specific CTL responses. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses are an important cause of acute respiratory tract infections. Natural influenza A virus infections elicit both humoral and cellular immunity. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are directed predominantly against

  8. Synthesis and application of boronic acid-functionalized magnetic adsorbent for sensitive analysis of salbutamol residues in pig tissues.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hua; Wang, Chaozhan; Wei, Yinmao

    2015-12-01

    Salbutamol (SAL) is the most widely used β2 -agonist drug for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary patients, but it is also often abused as feed additive. In recent years, the abuse of SAL has led to a large number of food safety incidents. Therefore, the monitoring of SAL residues in animal products is very important. A highly selective boronate affinity magnetic adsorbent was synthesized and developed for detection of trace levels of SAL residues in pig tissue samples. The obtained Fe3O4@SiO2@FPBA(4-formylphenylboronic acid) magnetic adsorbent showed good adsorption ability to catechol and SAL, and then it was successfully applied as special magnetic solid-phase phase extraction adsorbent coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for simultaneous isolation and determination of cis-diol compounds. The binding capacity of catechol and SAL reached 96 and 50 µmol/g, respectively. The method was successfully established for the detection of trace levels of SAL in pig tissue samples. The linear range extended from 0.32 to 800 µg/kg (R(2) = 0.9994). The limit of detection of SAL was 0.19 µg/kg. The recoveries were satisfactory (89.5-108.0%) at three spiked levels with RSD between 2.1 and 11.3%. These results indicated that the method has potential for enrichment and detection of trace levels of SAL residual in animal food products. PMID:26061980

  9. Improving volatile fatty acids production by exploiting the residual substrates in post-fermented sludge: Protease catalysis of refractory protein.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bo; Liu, Hongbo; Wang, Yuanyuan; Bai, Jie; Liu, He; Fu, Bo

    2016-03-01

    The real cause to the low yield of volatile fatty acids (VFAs), from inhibition or low biodegradation, is uncertain in sludge anaerobic fermentation. In this study, poor biodegradability of proteins and fast decrease of the indigenous hydrolase activity in the residual post-fermented sludge were found to be the major reasons. With the addition of trypsin or alkaline protease in residual post-fermented sludge after primary alkaline fermentation, degradation efficiency of refractory protein increased by 33.6% and 34.8%, respectively. Accordingly, the VFAs yields were improved by 69.7% and 106.1%, respectively. Furthermore, the activities of added trypsin and alkaline protease could maintain at 13.52 U/mL and 19.11 U/mL in the alkaline fermentation process. This study demonstrated that exploiting the refractory proteins in residual post-fermented sludge by protease addition seems to be a very promising way for improving VFAs yield of conventional alkaline fermentations with waste activated sludge. PMID:26722812

  10. Two neurotoxins (BmK I and BmK II) from the venom of the scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch: purification, amino acid sequences and assessment of specific activity.

    PubMed

    Ji, Y H; Mansuelle, P; Terakawa, S; Kopeyan, C; Yanaihara, N; Hsu, K; Rochat, H

    1996-09-01

    Two neurotoxins, BmK I and BmK II, were purified from the venom of the Chinese scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch. The complete amino acid sequences of both toxins, each containing 64 amino acid residues, were determined by the automatic sequencing of reduced and S-carboxymethylated toxins and their peptides, obtained after cleavage with TPCK-treated trypsin and Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, respectively. Toxicity as minimum lethal dose tested by i.c.v. injection in mice showed that BmK I was six times more potent than BmK II. Only two amino acid replacements were found: at position 59 Val in BmK I was replaced by Ile in BmK II, and at position 62 a basic Lys residue in BmK I was substituted by a neutral Asn residue in BmK II. These features suggest that the positively charged residue (Lys or Arg) in the C-terminal position 62 (or 61 or 63) may also play an important role in facilitating the interaction between scorpion neurotoxins and the receptor on sodium channels. The effects of BmK I on nerve excitability were examined with the crayfish axon using intracellular recording and voltage-clamp conditions. The results indicate that BmK I preferentially blocks the sodium channel inactivation process. Thus, functional and structural similarities suggest that BmK I and BmK II belong to group 3 of scorpion alpha-type toxins. PMID:8896191

  11. Bacteria obtained from a sequencing batch reactor that are capable of growth on dehydroabietic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Mohn, W W

    1995-01-01

    Eleven isolates capable of growth on the resin acid dehydroabietic acid (DhA) were obtained from a sequencing batch reactor designed to treat a high-strength process stream from a paper mill. The isolates belonged to two groups, represented by strains DhA-33 and DhA-35, which were characterized. In the bioreactor, bacteria like DhA-35 were more abundant than those like DhA-33. The population in the bioreactor of organisms capable of growth on DhA was estimated to be 1.1 x 10(6) propagules per ml, based on a most-probable-number determination. Analysis of small-subunit rRNA partial sequences indicated that DhA-33 was most closely related to Sphingomonas yanoikuyae (Sab = 0.875) and that DhA-35 was most closely related to Zoogloea ramigera (Sab = 0.849). Both isolates additionally grew on other abietanes, i.e., abietic and palustric acids, but not on the pimaranes, pimaric and isopimaric acids. For DhA-33 and DhA-35 with DhA as the sole organic substrate, doubling times were 2.7 and 2.2 h, respectively, and growth yields were 0.30 and 0.25 g of protein per g of DhA, respectively. Glucose as a cosubstrate stimulated growth of DhA-33 on DhA and stimulated DhA degradation by the culture. Pyruvate as a cosubstrate did not stimulate growth of DhA-35 on DhA and reduced the specific rate of DhA degradation of the culture. DhA induced DhA and abietic acid degradation activities in both strains, and these activities were heat labile. Cell suspensions of both strains consumed DhA at a rate of 6 mumol mg of protein-1 h-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7793937

  12. Proteomic Investigation of Protein Profile Changes and Amino Acid Residue Level Modification in Cooked Lamb Meat: The Effect of Boiling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tzer-Yang; Morton, James D; Clerens, Stefan; Dyer, Jolon M

    2015-10-21

    Hydrothermal treatment (heating in water) is a common method of general food processing and preparation. For red-meat-based foods, boiling is common; however, how the molecular level effects of this treatment correlate to the overall food properties is not yet well-understood. The effects of differing boiling times on lamb meat and the resultant cooking water were here examined through proteomic evaluation. The longer boiling time was found to result in increased protein aggregation involving particularly proteins such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, as well as truncation in proteins such as in α-actinin-2. Heat-induced protein backbone cleavage was observed adjacent to aspartic acid and asparagine residues. Side-chain modifications of amino acid residues resulting from the heating, including oxidation of phenylalanine and formation of carboxyethyllysine, were characterized in the cooked samples. Actin and myoglobin bands from the cooked meat per se remained visible on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, even after significant cooking time. These proteins were also found to be the major source of observed heat-induced modifications. This study provides new insights into molecular-level modifications occurring in lamb meat proteins during boiling and a protein chemistry basis for better understanding the effect of this common treatment on the nutritional and functional properties of red-meat-based foods. PMID:26381020

  13. Nucleic and amino acid sequences relating to a novel transketolase, and methods for the expression thereof

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wildung, Mark Raymond; Lange, Bernd Markus; McCaskill, David G.

    2001-01-01

    cDNAs encoding 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase from peppermint (Mentha piperita) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences have been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:5, SEQ ID NO:7) are provided which code for the expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase from plants. In another aspect the present invention provides for isolated, recombinant DXPS proteins, such as the proteins having the sequences set forth in SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:6 and SEQ ID NO:8. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for plant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthases, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding a plant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate, or its derivatives such as isopentenyl diphosphate (BP), or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase, or the production of its products.

  14. Novel method for PIK3CA mutation analysis: locked nucleic acid--PCR sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ang, Daphne; O'Gara, Rebecca; Schilling, Amy; Beadling, Carol; Warrick, Andrea; Troxell, Megan L; Corless, Christopher L

    2013-05-01

    Somatic mutations in PIK3CA are commonly seen in invasive breast cancer and several other carcinomas, occurring in three hotspots: codons 542 and 545 of exon 9 and in codon 1047 of exon 20. We designed a locked nucleic acid (LNA)-PCR sequencing assay to detect low levels of mutant PIK3CA DNA with attention to avoiding amplification of a pseudogene on chromosome 22 that has >95% homology to exon 9 of PIK3CA. We tested 60 FFPE breast DNA samples with known PIK3CA mutation status (48 cases had one or more PIK3CA mutations, and 12 were wild type) as identified by PCR-mass spectrometry. PIK3CA exons 9 and 20 were amplified in the presence or absence of LNA-oligonucleotides designed to bind to the wild-type sequences for codons 542, 545, and 1047, and partially suppress their amplification. LNA-PCR sequencing confirmed all 51 PIK3CA mutations; however, the mutation detection rate by standard Sanger sequencing was only 69% (35 of 51). Of the 12 PIK3CA wild-type cases, LNA-PCR sequencing detected three additional H1047R mutations in "normal" breast tissue and one E545K in usual ductal hyperplasia. Histopathological review of these three normal breast specimens showed columnar cell change in two (both with known H1047R mutations) and apocrine metaplasia in one. The novel LNA-PCR shows higher sensitivity than standard Sanger sequencing and did not amplify the known pseudogene. PMID:23541593

  15. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential for mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. This study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin. PMID:25724962

  16. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-02-27

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential for mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. Ultimately, this study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin.

  17. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-02-27

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential formore » mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. Ultimately, this study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin.« less

  18. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Meili; Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  19. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E.; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  20. Enrichment of anhydrous milk fat in polyunsaturated fatty acid residues from linseed and rapeseed oils through enzymatic interesterification.

    PubMed

    Aguedo, Mario; Hanon, Emilien; Danthine, Sabine; Paquot, Michel; Lognay, Georges; Thomas, Annick; Vandenbol, Micheline; Thonart, Philippe; Wathelet, Jean-Paul; Blecker, Christophe

    2008-03-12

    Lipozyme TL IM was used in a solvent-free batch and microaqueous system for enzymatic interesterification of anhydrous milkfat (AMF) with linseed oil (LO) in binary blends and with rapeseed oil (RO) in one ternary blend. The aim was to obtain and characterize physicochemically fats enriched with unsaturated C 18 fatty acids (oleic, linoleic, and, especially, linolenic acids) from natural vegetable oils. Binary blends of AMF/LO 100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 70/30, and 60/40 (w/w) were interesterified. The change in triacylglycerol (TAG) profiles showed that quasi-equilibrium conditions were reached after 4-6 h of reaction. Free fatty acid contents <1%. The decrease in solid fat content and in dropping point temperature obtained with increasing content of LO and interesterification resulted in good plastic properties for the products originating from the blends 70/30 and 60/40. This was confirmed by textural measurements. Melting profiles determined by differential scanning calorimetry showed complete disappearance of low-melting TAGs from LO and the formation of intermediary species with a lower melting temperature. Oxidative stability of the interesterified products was diminished with increasing LO content, resulting in low oxidation induction times. A ternary blend composed of AMF/RO/LO 70/20/10 gave satisfactory rheological and oxidative properties, fulfilling the requirements for a marketable spread and, moreover, offering increased potential health benefits due to the enriched content in polyunsaturated fatty acid residues. PMID:18271538

  1. Sequence-defined bioactive macrocycles via an acid-catalysed cascade reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porel, Mintu; Thornlow, Dana N.; Phan, Ngoc N.; Alabi, Christopher A.

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic macrocycles derived from sequence-defined oligomers are a unique structural class whose ring size, sequence and structure can be tuned via precise organization of the primary sequence. Similar to peptides and other peptidomimetics, these well-defined synthetic macromolecules become pharmacologically relevant when bioactive side chains are incorporated into their primary sequence. In this article, we report the synthesis of oligothioetheramide (oligoTEA) macrocycles via a one-pot acid-catalysed cascade reaction. The versatility of the cyclization chemistry and modularity of the assembly process was demonstrated via the synthesis of >20 diverse oligoTEA macrocycles. Structural characterization via NMR spectroscopy revealed the presence of conformational isomers, which enabled the determination of local chain dynamics within the macromolecular structure. Finally, we demonstrate the biological activity of oligoTEA macrocycles designed to mimic facially amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides. The preliminary results indicate that macrocyclic oligoTEAs with just two-to-three cationic charge centres can elicit potent antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  2. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOEpatents

    Weier, H.U.G.; Gray, J.W.

    1995-06-27

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers and probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity. 18 figs.

  3. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOEpatents

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Gray, Joe W.

    1995-01-01

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers ard probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity.

  4. Peptides Composed of Alternating L- and D-Amino Acids Inhibit Amyloidogenesis in Three Distinct Amyloid Systems Independent of Sequence.

    PubMed

    Kellock, Jackson; Hopping, Gene; Caughey, Byron; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-06-01

    There is now substantial evidence that soluble oligomers are primary toxic agents in amyloid diseases. The development of an antibody recognizing the toxic soluble oligomeric forms of different and unrelated amyloid species suggests a common conformational intermediate during amyloidogenesis. We previously observed a common occurrence of a novel secondary structure element, which we call α-sheet, in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of various amyloidogenic proteins, and we hypothesized that the toxic conformer is composed of α-sheet structure. As such, α-sheet may represent a conformational signature of the misfolded intermediates of amyloidogenesis and a potential unique binding target for peptide inhibitors. Recently, we reported the design and characterization of a novel hairpin peptide (α1 or AP90) that adopts stable α-sheet structure and inhibits the aggregation of the β-Amyloid Peptide Aβ42 and transthyretin. AP90 is a 23-residue hairpin peptide featuring alternating D- and L-amino acids with favorable conformational propensities for α-sheet formation, and a designed turn. For this study, we reverse engineered AP90 to identify which of its design features is most responsible for conferring α-sheet stability and inhibitory activity. We present experimental characterization (CD and FTIR) of seven peptides designed to accomplish this. In addition, we measured their ability to inhibit aggregation in three unrelated amyloid species: Aβ42, transthyretin, and human islet amylin polypeptide. We found that a hairpin peptide featuring alternating L- and D-amino acids, independent of sequence, is sufficient for conferring α-sheet structure and inhibition of aggregation. Additionally, we show a correlation between α-sheet structural stability and inhibitory activity. PMID:27012425

  5. Detection of Nucleic Acids with Graphene Nanopores: Ab Initio Characterization of a Novel Sequencing Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Tammie; Zhang, Bo; Prezhdo, Oleg

    2010-03-01

    We report an ab initio study of the interaction of two nucleobases, cytosine and adenine, with a novel graphene nanopore device for detecting the base sequence of a single-stranded nucleic acid (ssDNA or RNA). The nucleobases were inserted into a pore in a graphene nanoribbon, and the electrical current and conductance spectra were calculated as functions of voltage applied across the nanoribbon. The conductance spectra and charge densities were analyzed in the presence of each nucleobase in the graphene nanopore. The results indicate that, due to significant differences in the conductance spectra, the proposed device has adequate sensitivity to discriminate between different nucleotides. Moreover, we show that the nucleotide conductance spectra is not affected by its orientation inside the graphene nanopore. The proposed technique may be extremely useful for real applications in developing ultrafast, low cost DNA sequencing methods.

  6. cDNA-derived amino acid sequence of rat mitochondrial 3-oxoacyl-CoA thiolase with no transient presequence: structural relationship with peroxisomal isozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, H; Takiguchi, M; Amaya, Y; Nagata, S; Hayashi, H; Mori, M

    1987-01-01

    The sorting of homologous proteins between two separate intracellular organelles is a major unsolved problem. 3-Oxoacyl-CoA thiolase is localized in mitochondria and peroxisomes, and provides a good system for the study on the problem. Unlike most mitochondrial matrix proteins, mitochondrial 3-oxoacyl-CoA thiolase in rats is synthesized with no transient presequence and possess information for mitochondrial targeting and import in the mature protein. Two overlapping cDNA clones contained an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 397 amino acid residues (predicted Mr = 41,868), a 5' untranslated sequence of 164 bp, a 3' untranslated sequence of 264 bp and a poly(A) tract. The amino acid sequence of the mitochondrial thiolase is 37% identical with that of the mature portion of rat peroxisomal 3-oxoacyl-CoA thiolase precursor. These results suggest that the two thiolases have a common origin and obtained information for targeting to respective organelles during evolution. Two portions in the mitochondrial thiolase that may serve as a mitochondrial targeting signal are presented. PMID:3038520

  7. Amino acid sequence and carbohydrate-binding analysis of the N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific C-type lectin, CEL-I, from the Holothuroidea, Cucumaria echinata.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Matsuo, Noriaki; Shiba, Kouhei; Nishinohara, Shoichi; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Sugawara, Hajime; Aoyagi, Haruhiko

    2002-01-01

    CEL-I is one of the Ca2+-dependent lectins that has been isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata. This protein is composed of two identical subunits held by a single disulfide bond. The complete amino acid sequence of CEL-I was determined by sequencing the peptides produced by proteolytic fragmentation of S-pyridylethylated CEL-I. A subunit of CEL-I is composed of 140 amino acid residues. Two intrachain (Cys3-Cys14 and Cys31-Cys135) and one interchain (Cys36) disulfide bonds were also identified from an analysis of the cystine-containing peptides obtained from the intact protein. The similarity between the sequence of CEL-I and that of other C-type lectins was low, while the C-terminal region, including the putative Ca2+ and carbohydrate-binding sites, was relatively well conserved. When the carbohydrate-binding activity was examined by a solid-phase microplate assay, CEL-I showed much higher affinity for N-acetyl-D-galactosamine than for other galactose-related carbohydrates. The association constant of CEL-I for p-nitrophenyl N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosaminide (NP-GalNAc) was determined to be 2.3 x 10(4) M(-1), and the maximum number of bound NP-GalNAc was estimated to be 1.6 by an equilibrium dialysis experiment. PMID:11866098

  8. Morphological tranformation of calcite crystal growth by prismatic "acidic" polypeptide sequences.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, I; Giocondi, J L; Orme, C A; Collino, J; Evans, J S

    2007-02-13

    Many of the interesting mechanical and materials properties of the mollusk shell are thought to stem from the prismatic calcite crystal assemblies within this composite structure. It is now evident that proteins play a major role in the formation of these assemblies. Recently, a superfamily of 7 conserved prismatic layer-specific mollusk shell proteins, Asprich, were sequenced, and the 42 AA C-terminal sequence region of this protein superfamily was found to introduce surface voids or porosities on calcite crystals in vitro. Using AFM imaging techniques, we further investigate the effect that this 42 AA domain (Fragment-2) and its constituent subdomains, DEAD-17 and Acidic-2, have on the morphology and growth kinetics of calcite dislocation hillocks. We find that Fragment-2 adsorbs on terrace surfaces and pins acute steps, accelerates then decelerates the growth of obtuse steps, forms clusters and voids on terrace surfaces, and transforms calcite hillock morphology from a rhombohedral form to a rounded one. These results mirror yet are distinct from some of the earlier findings obtained for nacreous polypeptides. The subdomains Acidic-2 and DEAD-17 were found to accelerate then decelerate obtuse steps and induce oval rather than rounded hillock morphologies. Unlike DEAD-17, Acidic-2 does form clusters on terrace surfaces and exhibits stronger obtuse velocity inhibition effects than either DEAD-17 or Fragment-2. Interestingly, a 1:1 mixture of both subdomains induces an irregular polygonal morphology to hillocks, and exhibits the highest degree of acute step pinning and obtuse step velocity inhibition. This suggests that there is some interplay between subdomains within an intra (Fragment-2) or intermolecular (1:1 mixture) context, and sequence interplay phenomena may be employed by biomineralization proteins to exert net effects on crystal growth and morphology.

  9. Purification, characterization, and complete amino acid sequence of a trypsin inhibitor from amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Valdes-Rodriguez, S; Segura-Nieto, M; Chagolla-Lopez, A; Verver y Vargas-Cortina, A; Martinez-Gallardo, N; Blanco-Labra, A

    1993-01-01

    A protein proteinase inhibitor was purified from a seed extract of amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) by precipitation with (NH4)2SO4, gel-filtration chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. It is a 69-amino acid protein with a high content of valine, arginine, and glutamic acid, but lacking in methionine. The inhibitor has a relative molecular weight of 7400 and an isoelectric point of 7.5. It is a serine proteinase inhibitor that recognizes chymotrypsin, trypsin, and trypsin-like proteinase activities extracted from larvae of the insect Prostephanus truncatus. This inhibitor belongs to the potato-I inhibitor family, showing the closest homology (59.5%) with the Lycopersicum peruvianum trypsin inhibitor, and (51%) with the proteinase inhibitor 5 extracted from the seeds of Cucurbita maxima. The position of the lysine-aspartic acid residues present in the active site of the amaranth inhibitor are found in almost the same relative position as in the inhibitor from C. maxima. PMID:8290633

  10. Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary amino acid sequence

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pratul Kumar

    2011-07-19

    The present invention provides a method utilizing primary amino acid sequence of a protein, energy minimization, molecular dynamics and protein vibrational modes to predict three-dimensional structure of a protein. The present invention also determines possible intermediates in the protein folding pathway. The present invention has important applications to the design of novel drugs as well as protein engineering. The present invention predicts the three-dimensional structure of a protein independent of size of the protein, overcoming a significant limitation in the prior art.

  11. Cloning, nucleotide sequences, and identification of products of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO bra genes, which encode the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system.

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, T; Kose, K

    1990-01-01

    A DNA fragment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO containing genes specifying the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system (LIV-I) was isolated. The fragment contained the braC gene, encoding the binding protein for branched-chain amino acids, and the 4-kilobase DNA segment adjacent to 3' of braC. The nucleotide sequence of the 4-kilobase DNA fragment was determined and found to contain four open reading frames, designated braD, braE, braF, and braG. The braD and braE genes specify very hydrophobic proteins of 307 and 417 amino acid residues, respectively. The braD gene product showed extensive homology (67% identical) to the livH gene product, a component required for the Escherichia coli high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport systems. The braF and braG genes encode proteins of 255 and 233 amino acids, respectively, both containing amino acid sequences typical of proteins with ATP-binding sites. By using a T7 RNA polymerase/promoter system together with plasmids having various deletions in the braDEFG region, the braD, braE, braF, and braG gene products were identified as proteins with apparent Mrs of 25,500, 34,000, 30,000, and 27,000, respectively. These proteins were found among cell membrane proteins on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel stained with Coomassie blue. Images PMID:2120183

  12. Nonenzymatic oligomerization reactions on templates containing inosinic acid or diaminopurine nucleotide residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The template-directed oligomerization of nucleoside-5'-phosphoro-2-methyl imidazolides on standard oligonucleotide templates has been studied extensively. Here, we describe experiments with templates in which inosinic acid (I) is substituted for guanylic acid, or 2,6-diaminopurine nucleotide (D) for adenylic acid. We find that the substitution of I for G in a template is strongly inhibitory and prevents any incorporation of C into internal positions in the oligomeric products of the reaction. The substitution of D for A, on the contrary, leads to increased incorporation of U into the products. We found no evidence for the template-directed facilitation of oligomerization of A or I through A-I base pairing. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  13. Purification and amino acid sequence of aminopeptidase P from pig kidney.

    PubMed

    Vergas Romero, C; Neudorfer, I; Mann, K; Schäfer, W

    1995-04-01

    Aminopeptidase P from kidney cortex was purified in high yield (recovery greater than or equal to 20%) by a series of column chromatographic steps after solubilization of the membrane-bound glycoprotein with n-butanol. A coupled enzymic assay, using Gly-Pro-Pro-NH-Nap as substrate and dipeptidyl-peptidase IV as auxilliary enzyme, was used to monitor the purification. The purification procedure yielded two forms of aminopeptidase P differing in their carbohydrate composition (glycoforms). Both enzyme preparations were homogeneous as assessed by SDS/PAGE silver staining, and isoelectric focusing. Both forms possessed the same substrate specificity, catalysed the same reaction, and consisted of identical protein chains. The amino acid sequence determined by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry consisted of 623 amino acids. Six N-glycosylation sites, all contained in the N-terminal half of the protein, were characterized. PMID:7744038

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Cupriavidus sp. Strain SK-3, a 4-Chlorobiphenyl- and 4-Clorobenzoic Acid-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Vilo, Claudia; Benedik, Michael J.; Ilori, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Cupriavidus sp. strain SK-3, which can use 4-chlorobiphenyl and 4-clorobenzoic acid as the sole carbon source for growth. The draft genome sequence allowed the study of the polychlorinated biphenyl degradation mechanism and the recharacterization of the strain SK-3 as a Cupriavidus species. PMID:24994805

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto Strain CGMCC 2108, a High Producer of Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Siyuan; Su, Anping; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 4.1-Mb draft genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108, a high producer of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA). This sequence will provide further help for the biosynthesis of γ-PGA and will greatly facilitate research efforts in metabolic engineering of B. subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108. PMID:27231363

  16. New monoclonal antibodies to the Ebola virus glycoprotein: Identification and analysis of the amino acid sequence of the variable domains.

    PubMed

    Panina, A A; Aliev, T K; Shemchukova, O B; Dement'yeva, I G; Varlamov, N E; Pozdnyakova, L P; Bokov, M N; Dolgikh, D A; Sveshnikov, P G; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2016-03-01

    We determined the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of variable domains of three new monoclonal antibodies to the glycoprotein of Ebola virus capsid. The framework and hypervariable regions of immunoglobulin heavy and light chains were identified. The primary structures were confirmed using massspectrometry analysis. Immunoglobulin database search showed the uniqueness of the sequences obtained. PMID:27193713

  17. Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, Isolated from a Nonscalded Curd Pressed Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Velly, H.; Abraham, A.-L.; Loux, V.; Delacroix-Buchet, A.; Fonseca, F.; Bouix, M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium used in the production of many fermented foods, such as dairy products. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, isolated from nonscalded curd pressed cheese. This genome sequence provides information in relation to dairy environment adaptation. PMID:25377704

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto Strain CGMCC 2108, a High Producer of Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid.

    PubMed

    Tan, Siyuan; Meng, Yonghong; Su, Anping; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 4.1-Mb draft genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108, a high producer of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA). This sequence will provide further help for the biosynthesis of γ-PGA and will greatly facilitate research efforts in metabolic engineering of B. subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108. PMID:27231363

  19. Clofibrate-induced cytochrome P450-lauric acid omega hydroxylase(P450LA omega):purification, cDNA cloning, sequence and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hardwick, J.P.; Song, B.J.; Gonzalez, F.J.

    1986-05-01

    A cytochrome P450 that hydroxylates lauric acid at the 12 position (P450LA omega) was isolated from liver microsomes of clofibrate treated rats. P450LA omega was immunologically distinct from P450s a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,j,PB1, and PCN1. Polyclonal antibody against P450LA omega was utilized to screen a gt11 cDNA library. A clone (pP450LA omega), was isolated and its sequence determined. The P450LA omega mRNA is a minimum 2387 nts in length and codes for a P450 of Mr.58,222 daltons. This protein shares less than 35% amino acid similarity with P450s b,c,d,e,f,PB1, and PCN1; however, it does contain a hydrophobic amino terminal peptide and a conserved sequence surrounding the Cys residue at position 456, which is similar to other microsomal P450s. P450LA omega is present at high levels in untreated rat kidney and is induced by clofibrate in both kidney and liver. This induction is the result of an accumulation of mRNA through a rapid transcriptional activation of the P450LA gene. Southern blotting data suggest the presence of 2 or 3 genes in the P450LA omega family. This P450 gene family may be associated with arachidonic acid and prostraglandin metabolism in kidney and other tissues.

  20. Formation Sequences of Iron Minerals in the Acidic Alteration Products and Variation of Hydrothermal Fluid Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, H.; Yoshizawa, M.

    2008-12-01

    Iron minerals have important role in environmental issues not only on the Earth but also other terrestrial planets. Iron mineral species related to alteration products of primary minerals with surface or subsurface fluids are characterized by temperature, acidity and redox conditions of the fluids. We can see various iron- bearing alteration products in alteration products around fumaroles in geothermal/volcanic areas. In this study, zonal structures of iron minerals in alteration products of the geothermal area are observed to elucidate temporal and spatial variation of hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of the pyroxene-amphibole andesite of Garan-dake volcano, Oita, Japan occurs by the acidic hydrothermal fluid to form cristobalite leaching out elements other than Si. Hand specimens with unaltered or weakly altered core and cristobalite crust show various sequences of layers. XRD analysis revealed that the alteration degree is represented by abundance of cristobalite. Intermediately altered layers are characterized by occurrence including alunite, pyrite, kaolinite, goethite and hematite. A specimen with reddish brown core surrounded by cristobalite-rich white crust has brown colored layers at the boundary of core and the crust. Reddish core is characterized by occurrence of crystalline hematite by XRD. Another hand specimen has light gray core, which represents reduced conditions, and white cristobalite crust with light brown and reddish brown layers of ferric iron minerals between the core and the crust. On the other hand, hornblende crystals, typical ferrous iron-bearing mineral of the host rock, are well preserved in some samples with strongly decolorized cristobalite-rich groundmass. Hydrothermal alteration experiments of iron-rich basaltic material shows iron mineral species depend on acidity and temperature of the fluid. Oxidation states of the iron-bearing mineral species are strongly influenced by the acidity and redox conditions. Variations of alteration

  1. Amino acid binding by the class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases: role for a conserved proline in the signature sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Burbaum, J. J.; Schimmel, P.

    1992-01-01

    Although partial or complete three-dimensional structures are known for three Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, the amino acid-binding sites in these proteins remain poorly characterized. To explore the methionine binding site of Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase, we chose to study a specific, randomly generated methionine auxotroph that contains a mutant methionyl-tRNA synthetase whose defect is manifested in an elevated Km for methionine (Barker, D.G., Ebel, J.-P., Jakes, R.C., & Bruton, C.J., 1982, Eur. J. Biochem. 127, 449-457), and employed the polymerase chain reaction to sequence this mutant synthetase directly. We identified a Pro 14 to Ser replacement (P14S), which accounts for a greater than 300-fold elevation in Km for methionine and has little effect on either the Km for ATP or the kcat of the amino acid activation reaction. This mutation destabilizes the protein in vivo, which may partly account for the observed auxotrophy. The altered proline is found in the "signature sequence" of the Class I synthetases and is conserved. This sequence motif is 1 of 2 found in the 10 Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and, in the known structures, it is in the nucleotide-binding fold as part of a loop between the end of a beta-strand and the start of an alpha-helix. The phenotype of the mutant and the stability and affinity for methionine of the wild-type and mutant enzymes are influenced by the amino acid that is 25 residues beyond the C-terminus of the signature sequence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1304356

  2. A role for residue 151 of LamB in bacteriophage lambda adsorption: possible steric effect of amino acid substitutions.

    PubMed

    Charbit, A; Werts, C; Michel, V; Klebba, P E; Quillardet, P; Hofnung, M

    1994-06-01

    LamB is the cell surface receptor for bacteriophage lambda. LamB missense mutations yielding resistance to lambda have been previously grouped in two classes. Class I mutants block growth of lambda with wild-type host range (lambda h+) but support growth of one-step extended-host-range mutants (lambda h). Class II mutants block lambda h but support growth of two-step extended host range mutants (lambda hh*). While Class I mutations occur at 11 different amino acid sites, in five distinct portions of LamB, all the Class II mutations analyzed previously correspond to the same G-to-D change at amino acid 151. We generated by in vitro mutagenesis four different new substitutions at site 151 (to S, V, R, and C). Two of the mutants (G-151-->V [G151V] and G151R) were of Class II, while the two others (G151S and G151C) were of Class I, demonstrating that not only the site but also the nature of the substitutions at residue 151 was critical for the phage sensitivity phenotypes. The introduction of a negatively charged, a positively charged, or an aliphatic nonpolar residue at site 151 of LamB prevented both lambda h+ and lambda h adsorption, indicating that the block is not due to a charge effect. In contrast to G151D, which was sensitive to all the lambda hh* phages, G151V and G151R conferred sensitivity to only four of the five lambda hh* phages. Thus, G151V and G151R represent a new subclass of Class II LamB mutations that is more restrictive with respect to the growth of lambda hh*. Our results agree with the hypothesis that residue 151 belongs to an accessibility gate controlling the access to the phage tight-binding site and that substitutions at this residue affect the access of the phage to the binding site in relation to the size of the substitute side chain (surface area): the most restrictive changes are G151V and G151R, followed to a lesser extent by G151D and they by G151S and G151C. PMID:8195074

  3. Glutamic Acid Residues in HIV-1 p6 Regulate Virus Budding and Membrane Association of Gag

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Melanie; Setz, Christian; Hahn, Friedrich; Matthaei, Alina; Fraedrich, Kirsten; Rauch, Pia; Henklein, Petra; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 Gag p6 protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of its two late (l-) domains, which recruit Tsg101 and ALIX, components of the ESCRT system. Even though p6 consists of only 52 amino acids, it is encoded by one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and undergoes various posttranslational modifications including sumoylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. In addition, it mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into budding virions. Despite its small size, p6 exhibits an unusually high charge density. In this study, we show that mutation of the conserved glutamic acids within p6 increases the membrane association of Pr55 Gag followed by enhanced polyubiquitination and MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag-derived epitopes, possibly due to prolonged exposure to membrane bound E3 ligases. The replication capacity of the total glutamic acid mutant E0A was almost completely impaired, which was accompanied by defective virus release that could not be rescued by ALIX overexpression. Altogether, our data indicate that the glutamic acids within p6 contribute to the late steps of viral replication and may contribute to the interaction of Gag with the plasma membrane. PMID:27120610

  4. Influence of washing time on residual contamination of carcasses sprayed with lauric acid-potassium hydroxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine reductions in bacterial contamination of broiler carcasses washed for various times in a spray cabinet with a 2% lauric acid (LA)-1% potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution (w/v). Forty eviscerated carcasses and 5 ceca were obtained from the processing li...

  5. Influence of washing time on residual contamination of carcasses sprayed with lauric acid-potassium hydroxide.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine reductions in bacterial contamination of broiler carcasses washed for various times in a spray cabinet with a 2% lauric acid (LA)-1% potassium hydroxide (KOH) (w/v) solution. Forty eviscerated carcasses and 5 ceca were obtained from the processing l...

  6. Cloning and sequencing of a cDNA for Akazara scallop troponin T.

    PubMed

    Inoue, A; Ojima, T; Nishita, K

    1996-10-01

    A cDNA clone encoding troponin T of Akazara scallop (Chlamys nipponensis akazara) striated adductor muscle has been isolated and sequenced. The complete sequence deduced consists of 314 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 37,206. Akazara scallop troponin T contains 55 amino acid residues more and 82 residues fewer than rabbit skeletal muscle troponin T and Drosophila melanogaster troponin T, respectively, showing almost the lowest sequence homology with rabbit troponin T (26%) but the highest homology with Drosophila troponin T (33%). Further, high sequence homology was seen in the functional regions: residues 33-120 and 174-227, corresponding respectively to residues 71-158 and 197-250 of rabbit troponin T (tropomyosin-binding regions); and residues 200-204, corresponding to 223 227 of rabbit troponin T (troponin I-binding region). In residues 1-70 (tropomyosin-binding region), however, only six residues are identical with rabbit troponin T. PMID:8947849

  7. Factors contributing to decreased protein stability when aspartic acid residues are in {beta}-sheet regions.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Cai, X.; Raffen, R.; Gu, M.; Stevens, F. J.; Schiffer, M.

    2002-07-01

    Asp residues are significantly under represented in {beta}-sheet regions of proteins, especially in the middle of {beta}-strands, as found by a number of studies using statistical, modeling, or experimental methods. To further understand the reasons for this under representation of Asp, we prepared and analyzed mutants of a {beta}-domain. Two Gln residues of the immunoglobulin light-chain variable domain (V{sub L}) of protein Len were replaced with Asp, and then the effects of these changes on protein stability and protein structure were studied. The replacement of Q38D, located at the end of a {beta}-strand, and that of Q89D, located in the middle of a {beta}-strand, reduced the stability of the parent immunoglobulin VL domain by 2.0 kcal/mol and 5.3 kcal/mol, respectively. Because the Q89D mutant of the wild-type V{sub L}-Len domain was too unstable to be expressed as a soluble protein, we prepared the Q89D mutant in a triple mutant background, V{sub L}-Len M4L/Y27dD/T94H, which was 4.2 kcal/mol more stable than the wild-type V{sub L}-Len domain. The structures of mutants V{sub L}-Len Q38D and V{sub L}-Len Q89D/M4L/Y27dD/T94H were determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.6 A resolution. We found no major perturbances in the structures of these QD mutant proteins relative to structures of the parent proteins. The observed stability changes have to be accounted for by cumulative effects of the following several factors: (1) by changes in main-chain dihedral angles and in side-chain rotomers, (2) by close contacts between some atoms, and, most significantly, (3) by the unfavorable electrostatic interactions between the Asp side chain and the carbonyls of the main chain. We show that the Asn side chain, which is of similar size but neutral, is less destabilizing. The detrimental effect of Asp within a {beta}-sheet of an immunoglobulin-type domain can have very serious consequences. A somatic mutation of a {beta}-strand residue to Asp could prevent the expression of the

  8. Amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Batten, Margaret R; Senior, Bernard W; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M

    2003-03-01

    The amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by IgA1 proteases of different species of Streptococcus were investigated. Recombinant IgA1 antibodies were generated with point mutations at proline 227 and threonine 228, the residues lying on either side of the peptide bond at which all streptococcal IgA1 proteases cleave wild-type human IgA1. The amino acid substitutions produced no major effect upon the structure of the mutant IgA1 antibodies or their functional ability to bind to Fcalpha receptors. However, the substitutions had a substantial effect upon sensitivity to cleavage with some streptococcal IgA1 proteases, with, in some cases, a single point mutation rendering the antibody resistant to a particular IgA1 protease. This effect was least marked with the IgA1 protease from Streptococcus pneumoniae, which showed no absolute requirement for either proline or threonine at residues 227 to 228. By contrast, the IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus mitis had an absolute requirement for proline at 227 but not for threonine at 228, which could be replaced by valine. There was evidence in S. mitis that proteases from different strains may have different amino acid requirements for cleavage. Remarkably, some streptococcal proteases appeared able to cleave the hinge at a distant alternative site if substitution prevented efficient cleavage of the original site. Hence, this study has identified key residues required for the recognition of the IgA1 hinge as a substrate by streptococcal IgA1 proteases, and it marks a preliminary step towards development of specific enzyme inhibitors. PMID:12595464

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Gluconobacter cerinus CECT 9110 and Gluconobacter japonicus CECT 8443, Acetic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Grape Must

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of Gluconobacter cerinus strain CECT9110 and Gluconobacter japonicus CECT8443, acetic acid bacteria isolated from grape must. Gluconobacter species are well known for their ability to oxidize sugar alcohols into the corresponding acids. Our objective was to select strains to oxidize effectively d-glucose. PMID:27365351

  10. Next-generation sequencing for minimal residual disease monitoring in acute myeloid leukemia patients with FLT3-ITD or NPM1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Thol, Felicitas; Kölking, Britta; Damm, Frederik; Reinhardt, Katarina; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Reinhardt, Dirk; von Neuhoff, Nils; Brugman, Martijn H; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Krauter, Jürgen; Ganser, Arnold; Heuser, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Systematic assessment of minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients has been hampered by lack of a reliable, uniform MRD marker applicable to all patients. We evaluated next-generation sequencing (NGS) for MRD assessment in AML patients (n = 80 samples). The ability of NGS technologies to generate thousands of clonal sequences makes it possible to determine the allelic ratio of sequence variants. Using NGS, we were able to determine the allelic ratio of different FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD) clones within one patient sample, in addition to resolution of FLT3-ITD insertion site, length, and sequence in a single analysis. Furthermore, NGS allowed us to study emergence of clonal dominance. Parallel assessment of MRD by NGS and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in NPM1 mutated patients was concordant in 95% of analyzed samples (n = 38). The frequency of mutated alleles was linearly quantified by NGS. As NGS sensitivity is scalable depending on sequence coverage, it reflects a highly flexible and reliable tool to assess MRD in leukemia patients. PMID:22454318

  11. Swfoldrate: predicting protein folding rates from amino acid sequence with sliding window method.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiang; Xiao, Xuan; Wu, Zhi-cheng; Wang, Pu; Lin, Wei-zhong

    2013-01-01

    Protein folding is the process by which a protein processes from its denatured state to its specific biologically active conformation. Understanding the relationship between sequences and the folding rates of proteins remains an important challenge. Most previous methods of predicting protein folding rate require the tertiary structure of a protein as an input. In this study, the long-range and short-range contact in protein were used to derive extended version of the pseudo amino acid composition based on sliding window method. This method is capable of predicting the protein folding rates just from the amino acid sequence without the aid of any structural class information. We systematically studied the contributions of individual features to folding rate prediction. The optimal feature selection procedures are adopted by means of combining the forward feature selection and sequential backward selection method. Using the jackknife cross validation test, the method was demonstrated on the large dataset. The predictor was achieved on the basis of multitudinous physicochemical features and statistical features from protein using nonlinear support vector machine (SVM) regression model, the method obtained an excellent agreement between predicted and experimentally observed folding rates of proteins. The correlation coefficient is 0.9313 and the standard error is 2.2692. The prediction server is freely available at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/swfrate/input.jsp. PMID:22933332

  12. From amino acid sequence to bioactivity: The biomedical potential of antitumor peptides.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Míguez, Aitor; Gutiérrez-Jácome, Alberto; Pérez-Pérez, Martín; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gael; Catalán-García, Sandra; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Lourenço, Anália; Sánchez, Borja

    2016-06-01

    Chemoprevention is the use of natural and/or synthetic substances to block, reverse, or retard the process of carcinogenesis. In this field, the use of antitumor peptides is of interest as, (i) these molecules are small in size, (ii) they show good cell diffusion and permeability, (iii) they affect one or more specific molecular pathways involved in carcinogenesis, and (iv) they are not usually genotoxic. We have checked the Web of Science Database (23/11/2015) in order to collect papers reporting on bioactive peptide (1691 registers), which was further filtered searching terms such as "antiproliferative," "antitumoral," or "apoptosis" among others. Works reporting the amino acid sequence of an antiproliferative peptide were kept (60 registers), and this was complemented with the peptides included in CancerPPD, an extensive resource for antiproliferative peptides and proteins. Peptides were grouped according to one of the following mechanism of action: inhibition of cell migration, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, antioxidative mechanisms, inhibition of gene transcription/cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, disorganization of tubulin structure, cytotoxicity, or unknown mechanisms. The main mechanisms of action of those antiproliferative peptides with known amino acid sequences are presented and finally, their potential clinical usefulness and future challenges on their application is discussed. PMID:27010507

  13. The amino acid sequences and activities of synergistic hemolysins from Staphylococcus cohnii.

    PubMed

    Mak, Pawel; Maszewska, Agnieszka; Rozalska, Malgorzata

    2008-10-01

    Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. cohnii and S. cohnii ssp. urealyticus are a coagulase-negative staphylococci considered for a long time as unable to cause infections. This situation changed recently and pathogenic strains of these bacteria were isolated from hospital environments, patients and medical staff. Most of the isolated strains were resistant to many antibiotics. The present work describes isolation and characterization of several synergistic peptide hemolysins produced by these bacteria and acting as virulence factors responsible for hemolytic and cytotoxic activities. Amino acid sequences of respective hemolysins from S. cohnii ssp. cohnii (named as H1C, H2C and H3C) and S. cohnii ssp. urealyticus (H1U, H2U and H3U) were identical. Peptides H1 and H3 possessed significant amino acid homology to three synergistic hemolysins secreted by Staphylococcus lugdunensis and to putative antibacterial peptide produced by Staphylococcus saprophyticus ssp. saprophyticus. On the other hand, hemolysin H2 had a unique sequence. All isolated peptides lysed red cells from different mammalian species and exerted a cytotoxic effect on human fibroblasts. PMID:18752624

  14. Distinguishing of Ile/Leu amino acid residues in the PP3 protein by (hot) electron capture dissociation in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, Frank; Haselmann, Kim F; Sørensen, Esben S; Zubarev, Roman A

    2003-03-15

    In hot electron capture dissociation (HECD), multiply protonated polypeptides fragment upon capturing approximately 11-eV electrons. The excess of energy upon the primary c, z* cleavage induces secondary fragmentation in z* fragments. The resultant w ions allow one to distinguish between the isomeric Ile and Leu residues. The analytical utility of HECD is evaluated using tryptic peptides from the bovine milk protein PP3 containing totally 135 amino acid residues. Using a formal procedure for Ile/Leu (Xle) residue assignment, the identities of 20 out of 25 Xle residues (80%) were determined. The identity of an additional two residues could be correctly guessed from the absence of the alternative w ions, and only two residues, for which neither expected nor alternative w ions were observed, remained unassigned. Reinspection of conventional ECD spectra also revealed the presence of Xle w ions, although at lower abundances, with 44% of all Xle residues distinguished. Using a dispenser cathode as an electron source, identification of four out of five Xle residues in a 2.7-kDa peptide was possible with one acquisition 2 s long, with identification of all five residues by averaging of five such acquisitions. Unlike the case of high-energy collision-induced dissociation, no d ions were observed in the HECD of tryptic peptides. PMID:12659185

  15. Clostridium sticklandii, a specialist in amino acid degradation:revisiting its metabolism through its genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clostridium sticklandii belongs to a cluster of non-pathogenic proteolytic clostridia which utilize amino acids as carbon and energy sources. Isolated by T.C. Stadtman in 1954, it has been generally regarded as a "gold mine" for novel biochemical reactions and is used as a model organism for studying metabolic aspects such as the Stickland reaction, coenzyme-B12- and selenium-dependent reactions of amino acids. With the goal of revisiting its carbon, nitrogen, and energy metabolism, and comparing studies with other clostridia, its genome has been sequenced and analyzed. Results C. sticklandii is one of the best biochemically studied proteolytic clostridial species. Useful additional information has been obtained from the sequencing and annotation of its genome, which is presented in this paper. Besides, experimental procedures reveal that C. sticklandii degrades amino acids in a preferential and sequential way. The organism prefers threonine, arginine, serine, cysteine, proline, and glycine, whereas glutamate, aspartate and alanine are excreted. Energy conservation is primarily obtained by substrate-level phosphorylation in fermentative pathways. The reactions catalyzed by different ferredoxin oxidoreductases and the exergonic NADH-dependent reduction of crotonyl-CoA point to a possible chemiosmotic energy conservation via the Rnf complex. C. sticklandii possesses both the F-type and V-type ATPases. The discovery of an as yet unrecognized selenoprotein in the D-proline reductase operon suggests a more detailed mechanism for NADH-dependent D-proline reduction. A rather unusual metabolic feature is the presence of genes for all the enzymes involved in two different CO2-fixation pathways: C. sticklandii harbours both the glycine synthase/glycine reductase and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathways. This unusual pathway combination has retrospectively been observed in only four other sequenced microorganisms. Conclusions Analysis of the C. sticklandii genome and

  16. Isolation and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciurea) insulin and glucagon.</