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Sample records for acid residues sequence

  1. Amino acid sequence of the 203-residue fragment of the heavy chain of chicken gizzard myosin containing the SH1-type cysteine residue.

    PubMed

    Onishi, H; Maita, T; Miyanishi, T; Watanabe, S; Matsuda, G

    1986-12-01

    A fluorescent fragment of Mr = 23,800 was obtained by the papain digestion of N-iodoacetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylene diamine (abbreviated as IAEDANS)-modified chicken gizzard myosin. The fragment was isolated by gel filtration on a Sephadex G-100 column in the presence of 5 M guanidine-HCl followed by anion exchange chromatography on a QAE Sephadex A-50 column. This fragment contained 203 amino acid residues which could be assigned as a COOH-terminal part of the S-1 heavy chain based on the homology with the known sequence of rabbit skeletal myosin fragment. The amino acid sequence was K-G-M-F-R-T-V- G-Q-L-Y-K-E-Q-L-T-K-L-M-T-T-L-R-N-T-N-P-N-F-V-R-C-I-I-P-N-H-E-K-R-A- G-K-L-D-A-H-L-V-L-E-Q-L-R-C-N-G-V-L-E-G-I-R-I-C-R-Q-G-F-P-N-R-I-V-F-Q- E-F-R-Q-R-Y-E-I-L-A-A-N-A-I-P-K-G-F-M-D-G-K-Q-A-C-I-L-M -I-K-A-L-E-L- D-P-N-L-Y-R-I-G-Q-S-K-I-F-F-R-T-G-V-L-A-H-L-E-E-E-R-D-L-K- I-T-D-V-I-I-A- F-Q-A-Q-C-R-G-Y-L-A-R-K-A-F-A-K-R-Q-Q-Q-L-T-A-M-K-V-I-Q-R-N-C-A -A-Y-L-K-L-R-N-W-Q-W-W-R-L-F-T-K-V-K-P-L-L-Q-V-T-R. The cysteine residue which was modified with IAEDANS was of the SH1 type (Cys-65). Pro-197 was suggested to be the NH2-terminal boundary of the alpha-helical coiled-coil rod sequence of gizzard myosin, based on the homology with the nematode sequence reported by MacLachlan and Karn (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S. 80, 4253-4257 (1983)). Three different COOH-terminal peptides (Val-Lys-Pro-Leu-Leu-Gln-Val-Thr-Arg, Val-Lys-Pro-Leu-Leu-Gln, and Val-Lys-Pro-Leu-Leu) were isolated from the tryptic digest of this fragment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  2. Effects of amino acid sequence, buffers, and ionic strength on the rate and mechanism of deamidation of asparagine residues in small peptides.

    PubMed

    Tyler-Cross, R; Schirch, V

    1991-11-25

    The nonenzymatic rates of deamidation of Asn residues in a series of pentapeptides with the sequences VSNXV and VXNSV, where X is one of 10 different amino acids, were determined at neutral, alkaline, and acid pH values. The results demonstrate that in neutral and alkaline solutions the amino acid residue on the amino side of the Asn had little or no effect on the rate of deamidation regardless of its charge or size. The group on the carboxyl side of Asn affected the rate of deamidation significantly. Increasing size and branching in the side chain of this residue decreased the rate of deamidation by as much as 70-fold compared to glycine in the N-G sequence, which had the greatest rate of deamidation. In acidic solution, the rate of deamidation of the Asn residue was not affected by the amino acid sequence of the peptide. The products for each deamidation reaction were tested for the formation of isoAsp residues. In neutral and alkaline solutions, all products showed that the isoAsp:Asp peptide products were formed in about a 3:1 ratio. In acidic solution, the Asp peptide was the only deamidation product formed. All peptides in which a Ser residue follows the Asn residue were found to undergo a peptide cleavage reaction in neutral and alkaline solutions, yielding a tripeptide and a dipeptide. The rate of the cleavage reaction was about 10% of the rate of the deamidation pathway at neutral and alkaline pH values. The rates of deamidation of Asn residues in the peptides studied were not affected by ionic strength, and were not specific base catalyzed. General base catalysis was observed for small bases like ammonia. A model for the deamidation reaction is proposed to account for the observed effects. PMID:1939272

  3. Identification of functionally important amino acid residues in the mitochondria targeting sequence of Hepatitis B virus X protein

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Sai Kam; Ho, Sai Fan; Tsui, Kwok Wing; Fung, Kwok Pui; Waye, M.Y. Mary

    2008-11-10

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been strongly associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the X protein (HBx) is thought to mediate the cellular changes associated with carcinogenesis. Recently, isolation of the hepatitis B virus integrants from HCC tissue by others have established the fact that the X gene is often truncated at its C-terminus. Expression of the GFP fusion proteins of HBx and its truncation mutants with a GFP tag in human liver cell-lines in this study revealed that the C-terminus of HBx is indispensable for its specific localization in the mitochondria. A crucial region of seven amino acids at the C-terminus has been mapped out in which the cysteine residue at position 115 serves as the most important residue for the subcellular localization. When cysteine 115 of HBx is mutated to alanine the mitochondria targeting property of HBx is abrogated.

  4. Critical aspartic acid residues in pseudouridine synthases.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, V; Swann, S L; Paulson, J L; Spedaliere, C J; Mueller, E G

    1999-08-01

    The pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine at particular positions in certain RNA molecules. Genomic data base searches and sequence alignments using the first four identified pseudouridine synthases led Koonin (Koonin, E. V. (1996) Nucleic Acids Res. 24, 2411-2415) and, independently, Santi and co-workers (Gustafsson, C., Reid, R., Greene, P. J., and Santi, D. V. (1996) Nucleic Acids Res. 24, 3756-3762) to group this class of enzyme into four families, which display no statistically significant global sequence similarity to each other. Upon further scrutiny (Huang, H. L., Pookanjanatavip, M., Gu, X. G., and Santi, D. V. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 344-351), the Santi group discovered that a single aspartic acid residue is the only amino acid present in all of the aligned sequences; they then demonstrated that this aspartic acid residue is catalytically essential in one pseudouridine synthase. To test the functional significance of the sequence alignments in light of the global dissimilarity between the pseudouridine synthase families, we changed the aspartic acid residue in representatives of two additional families to both alanine and cysteine: the mutant enzymes are catalytically inactive but retain the ability to bind tRNA substrate. We have also verified that the mutant enzymes do not release uracil from the substrate at a rate significant relative to turnover by the wild-type pseudouridine synthases. Our results clearly show that the aligned aspartic acid residue is critical for the catalytic activity of pseudouridine synthases from two additional families of these enzymes, supporting the predictive power of the sequence alignments and suggesting that the sequence motif containing the aligned aspartic acid residue might be a prerequisite for pseudouridine synthase function.

  5. On the activation of bovine plasma factor XIII. Amino acid sequence of the peptide released by thrombin and the terminal residues of the subunit polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Iwanaga, S; Suzuki, T

    1975-12-01

    A blood coagulation factor, Factor XIII, was highly purified from bovine fresh plasma by a method similar to those used for human plasma Factor XIII. The isolated Factor XIII consisted of two subunit polypeptides, a and b chains, with molecular weights of 79,000 +/- 2,000 and 75,000 +/- 2,000, respectively. In the conversion of Factor XIII to the active enzyme, Factor XIIIa, by bovine thrombin [EC 3.4.21.5], a peptide was liberated. This peptide, designated tentatively as "activation peptide," was isolated by gel-filtration on a Sephadex G-75 column. It contained a total of 37 amino acid residues with a masked N-terminal residue and C-terminal arginine. The whole amino acid sequence of "Activation peptide" was established by the dansyl-Edman method and standard enzymatic techniques, and the masked N-terminal residue was identified as N-acetylserine by using a rat liver acylamino acid-releasing enzyme. This enzyme specifically cleaved the N-acetylserylglutamyl peptide bond serine and the remaining peptide, which was now reactive to 1-dimethylamino-naphthalene-5-sulfonyl chloride. A comparison of the sequences of human and bovine "Activation peptide" revealed five amino acids replacements, Ser-3 to Thr; Gly-5 to Arg; Ile-14 to Val; Thr-18 to Asn, and Pro-26 to Leu. Another difference was the deletion of Leu-34 in the human peptide. Adsorption chromatography on a hydroxylapatite column in the presence of 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate was developed as a preparative procedure for the resolution of the two subunit polypeptides, a or a' chain and b chain, constituting the protein molecule of Factor XIII or Factor XIIIa. End group analyses on the isolated pure chains revealed that the structural change of Factor XIII during activation with thrombin occurs only in the N-terminal portion of the a chain, not in the N-terminal end of the b chain or in the C-terminal ends of the a and b chains. From these results, it was concluded that the activation of bovine plasma Factor XIII

  6. Factor D of the alternative pathway of human complement. Purification, alignment and N-terminal amino acid sequences of the major cyanogen bromide fragments, and localization of the serine residue at the active site.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D M; Gagnon, J; Reid, K B

    1980-01-01

    The serine esterase factor D of the complement system was purified from outdated human plasma with a yield of 20% of the initial haemolytic activity found in serum. This represented an approx. 60 000-fold purification. The final product was homogeneous as judged by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis (with an apparent mol.wt. of 24 000), its migration as a single component in a variety of fractionation procedures based on size and charge, and its N-terminal amino-acid-sequence analysis. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the first 36 residues of the intact molecule was found to be homologous with the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the catalytic chains of other serine esterases. Factor D showed an especially strong homology (greater than 60% identity) with rat 'group-specific protease' [Woodbury, Katunuma, Kobayashi, Titani, & Neurath (1978) Biochemistry 17, 811-819] over the first 16 amino acid residues. This similarity is of interest since it is considered that both enzymes may be synthesized in their active, rather than zymogen, forms. The three major CNBr fragments of factor D, which had apparent mol.wts. of 15 800, 6600 and 1700, were purified and then aligned by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis and amino acid analysis. By using factor D labelled with di-[1,3-14C]isopropylphosphofluoridate it was shown that the CNBr fragment of apparent mol.wt. 6600, which is located in the C-terminal region of factor D, contained the active serine residue. The amino acid sequence around this residue was determined. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6821372

  7. Immobilized residue-specific endoproteinases for protein sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ronnenberg, J; Preitz, B; Wöstemeier, G; Diekmann, S

    1994-06-01

    Before proteins can be sequenced, the peptide chain has to be cut into small fragments of less than about 50 amino acids using residue-specific endoproteinases. These enzymes can be immobilized in a highly active form. Using immobilized endoproteinases for protein sequencing results in a series of advantages: (1) the high enzyme activity in the column results in short reaction times; (2) the protein fragments are easily eluted from the column whilst the endoproteinase is completely retained on the column; the protein fragments are clean yielding in low sequencing background; (3) the protein sample to be sequenced is free of exogenous enzymes; (4) endoproteinase self-digestion is prevented by immobilization; therefore, the sample solution does not contain any endoproteinase fragments; (5) enzymes are especially stable when immobilized. Columns with immobilized endoproteinases can be applied repeatedly and stored for many months.

  8. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  9. Predicting intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Zoran; Peng, Kang; Vucetic, Slobodan; Radivojac, Predrag; Brown, Celeste J; Dunker, A Keith

    2003-01-01

    Blind predictions of intrinsic order and disorder were made on 42 proteins subsequently revealed to contain 9,044 ordered residues, 284 disordered residues in 26 segments of length 30 residues or less, and 281 disordered residues in 2 disordered segments of length greater than 30 residues. The accuracies of the six predictors used in this experiment ranged from 77% to 91% for the ordered regions and from 56% to 78% for the disordered segments. The average of the order and disorder predictions ranged from 73% to 77%. The prediction of disorder in the shorter segments was poor, from 25% to 66% correct, while the prediction of disorder in the longer segments was better, from 75% to 95% correct. Four of the predictors were composed of ensembles of neural networks. This enabled them to deal more efficiently with the large asymmetry in the training data through diversified sampling from the significantly larger ordered set and achieve better accuracy on ordered and long disordered regions. The exclusive use of long disordered regions for predictor training likely contributed to the disparity of the predictions on long versus short disordered regions, while averaging the output values over 61-residue windows to eliminate short predictions of order or disorder probably contributed to the even greater disparity for three of the predictors. This experiment supports the predictability of intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence. PMID:14579347

  10. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  11. Sequence composition and environment effects on residue fluctuations in protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruvinsky, Anatoly M.; Vakser, Ilya A.

    2010-10-01

    Structure fluctuations in proteins affect a broad range of cell phenomena, including stability of proteins and their fragments, allosteric transitions, and energy transfer. This study presents a statistical-thermodynamic analysis of relationship between the sequence composition and the distribution of residue fluctuations in protein-protein complexes. A one-node-per-residue elastic network model accounting for the nonhomogeneous protein mass distribution and the interatomic interactions through the renormalized inter-residue potential is developed. Two factors, a protein mass distribution and a residue environment, were found to determine the scale of residue fluctuations. Surface residues undergo larger fluctuations than core residues in agreement with experimental observations. Ranking residues over the normalized scale of fluctuations yields a distinct classification of amino acids into three groups: (i) highly fluctuating-Gly, Ala, Ser, Pro, and Asp, (ii) moderately fluctuating-Thr, Asn, Gln, Lys, Glu, Arg, Val, and Cys, and (iii) weakly fluctuating-Ile, Leu, Met, Phe, Tyr, Trp, and His. The structural instability in proteins possibly relates to the high content of the highly fluctuating residues and a deficiency of the weakly fluctuating residues in irregular secondary structure elements (loops), chameleon sequences, and disordered proteins. Strong correlation between residue fluctuations and the sequence composition of protein loops supports this hypothesis. Comparing fluctuations of binding site residues (interface residues) with other surface residues shows that, on average, the interface is more rigid than the rest of the protein surface and Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys, Leu, and Trp have a propensity to form more stable docking patches on the interface. The findings have broad implications for understanding mechanisms of protein association and stability of protein structures.

  12. The amino-acid sequence of kangaroo pancreatic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Gaastra, W; Welling, G W; Beintema, J J

    1978-05-01

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue by affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence was determined by automatic sequencing of overlapping large fragments and by analysis of shorter peptides obtained by digestion with a number of proteolytic enzymes. The polypeptide chain consists of 122 amino acid residues. Compared to other ribonucleases, the N-terminal residue and residue 114 are deleted. In other pancreatic ribonucleases position 114 is occupied by a cis proline residue in an external loop at the surface of the molecule. Other remarkable substitutions are the presence of a tyrosine residue at position 123 instead of a serine which forms a hydrogen bond with the pyrimidine ring of a nucleotide substrate, and a number of hydrophobichydrophilic interchanges in the sequence 51-55, which forms part of an alpha-helix in bovine ribonuclease and exhibits few substitutions in the placental mammals. Kangaroo ribonuclease contains no carbohydrate, although the enzyme possesses a recognition site for carbohydrate attachment in the sequence Asn-Val-Thr (62-64). The enzyme differs at about 35-40% of the positions from all other mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases sequenced to date, which is in agreement with the early divergence between the marsupials and the placental mammals. From fragmentary data a tentative sequence of red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) pancreatic ribonuclease has been derived. Eight differences with the kangaroo sequence were found.

  13. The amino-acid sequence of kangaroo pancreatic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Gaastra, W; Welling, G W; Beintema, J J

    1978-05-01

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue by affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence was determined by automatic sequencing of overlapping large fragments and by analysis of shorter peptides obtained by digestion with a number of proteolytic enzymes. The polypeptide chain consists of 122 amino acid residues. Compared to other ribonucleases, the N-terminal residue and residue 114 are deleted. In other pancreatic ribonucleases position 114 is occupied by a cis proline residue in an external loop at the surface of the molecule. Other remarkable substitutions are the presence of a tyrosine residue at position 123 instead of a serine which forms a hydrogen bond with the pyrimidine ring of a nucleotide substrate, and a number of hydrophobichydrophilic interchanges in the sequence 51-55, which forms part of an alpha-helix in bovine ribonuclease and exhibits few substitutions in the placental mammals. Kangaroo ribonuclease contains no carbohydrate, although the enzyme possesses a recognition site for carbohydrate attachment in the sequence Asn-Val-Thr (62-64). The enzyme differs at about 35-40% of the positions from all other mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases sequenced to date, which is in agreement with the early divergence between the marsupials and the placental mammals. From fragmentary data a tentative sequence of red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) pancreatic ribonuclease has been derived. Eight differences with the kangaroo sequence were found. PMID:658039

  14. Amino acid sequence of horseshoe crab, Tachypleus tridentatus, striated muscle troponin C.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Kagami, O; Takagi, T; Konishi, K

    1989-05-01

    The amino acid sequence of troponin C obtained from horseshoe crab, Tachypleus tridentatus, striated muscle was determined by sequence analysis and alignments of chemically and enzymatically cleaved peptides. Troponin C is composed of 153 amino acid residues with a blocked N-terminus and contains no tryptophan or cysteine residue. The site I, one of the four Ca2+-binding sites, is considered to have lost its ability to bind Ca2+ owing to the replacements of certain amino acid residues.

  15. Structural and sequence features of two residue turns in beta-hairpins.

    PubMed

    Madan, Bharat; Seo, Sung Yong; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2014-09-01

    Beta-turns in beta-hairpins have been implicated as important sites in protein folding. In particular, two residue β-turns, the most abundant connecting elements in beta-hairpins, have been a major target for engineering protein stability and folding. In this study, we attempted to investigate and update the structural and sequence properties of two residue turns in beta-hairpins with a large data set. For this, 3977 beta-turns were extracted from 2394 nonhomologous protein chains and analyzed. First, the distribution, dihedral angles and twists of two residue turn types were determined, and compared with previous data. The trend of turn type occurrence and most structural features of the turn types were similar to previous results, but for the first time Type II turns in beta-hairpins were identified. Second, sequence motifs for the turn types were devised based on amino acid positional potentials of two-residue turns, and their distributions were examined. From this study, we could identify code-like sequence motifs for the two residue beta-turn types. Finally, structural and sequence properties of beta-strands in the beta-hairpins were analyzed, which revealed that the beta-strands showed no specific sequence and structural patterns for turn types. The analytical results in this study are expected to be a reference in the engineering or design of beta-hairpin turn structures and sequences.

  16. Amino acid sequences of proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona.

    PubMed

    Alves, S F; Lefebvre, R B; Probert, W

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a partial amino acid sequences from three putative outer envelope proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona. In order to obtain internal fragments for protein sequencing, enzymatic and chemical digestion was performed. The enzyme clostripain was used to digest the proteins 32 and 45 kDa. In situ digestion of 40 kDa molecular weight protein was accomplished using cyanogen bromide. The 32 kDa protein generated two fragments, one of 21 kDa and another of 10 kDa that yielded five residues. A fragment of 24 kDa that yielded nineteen residues of amino acids was obtained from 45 kDa protein. A fragment with a molecular weight of 20 kDa, yielding a twenty amino acids sequence from the 40 kDa protein.

  17. The amino acid sequence of Staphylococcus aureus penicillinase.

    PubMed Central

    Ambler, R P

    1975-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the penicillinase (penicillin amido-beta-lactamhydrolase, EC 3.5.2.6) from Staphylococcus aureus strain PC1 was determined. The protein consists of a single polypeptide chain of 257 residues, and the sequence was determined by characterization of tryptic, chymotryptic, peptic and CNBr peptides, with some additional evidence from thermolysin and S. aureus proteinase peptides. A mistake in the preliminary report of the sequence is corrected; residues 113-116 are now thought to be -Lys-Lys-Val-Lys- rather than -Lys-Val-Lys-Lys-. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequence has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50056 (91 pages) at the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms given in Biochem. J. (1975) 145, 5. PMID:1218078

  18. Amino acid residues modulating the activities of staphylococcal glutamyl endopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Ono, Toshio; Ohara-Nemoto, Yuko; Shimoyama, Yu; Okawara, Hisami; Kobayakawa, Takeshi; Baba, Tomomi T; Kimura, Shigenobu; Nemoto, Takayuki K

    2010-10-01

    The glutamyl endopeptidase family of enzymes from staphylococci has been shown to be important virulence determinants of pathogenic family members, such as Staphylococcus aureus. Previous studies have identified the N-terminus and residues from positions 185-195 as potentially important regions that determine the activity of three members of the family. Cloning and sequencing of the new family members from Staphylococcus caprae (GluScpr) and Staphylococcus cohnii (GluScoh) revealed that the N-terminal Val residue is maintained in all family members. Mutants of the GluV8 enzyme from S. aureus with altered N-terminal residues, including amino acids with similar properties, were inactive, indicating that the Val residue is specifically required at the N-terminus of this enzyme family in order for them to function correctly. Recombinant GluScpr was found to have peptidase activity intermediate between GluV8 and GluSE from Staphylococcus epidermis and to be somewhat less specific in its substrate requirements than other family members. The 185-195 region was found to contribute to the activity of GluScpr, although other regions of the enzyme must also play a role in defining the activity. Our results strongly indicate the importance of the N-terminal and the 185-195 region in the activity of the glutamyl endopeptidases of staphylococci. PMID:20707600

  19. Characterization and amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart.

    PubMed Central

    Offner, G D; Brecher, P; Sawlivich, W B; Costello, C E; Troxler, R F

    1988-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart was determined by automated Edman degradation of CNBr, BNPS-skatole [3'-bromo-3-methyl-2-(2-nitrobenzenesulphenyl)indolenine], hydroxylamine, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, tryptic and chymotryptic peptides, and by digestion of the protein with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of the blocked N-terminal tryptic peptide from citraconylated protein was determined by collisionally induced decomposition mass spectrometry. The protein contains 132 amino acid residues, is enriched with respect to threonine and lysine, lacks cysteine, has an acetylated valine residue at the N-terminus, and has an Mr of 14768 and an isoelectric point of 5.25. This protein contains two short internal repeated sequences from residues 48-54 and from residues 114-119 located within regions of predicted beta-structure and decreasing hydrophobicity. These short repeats are contained within two longer repeated regions from residues 48-60 and residues 114-125, which display 62% sequence similarity. These regions could accommodate the charged and uncharged moieties of long-chain fatty acids and may represent fatty acid-binding domains consistent with the finding that human heart fatty acid-binding protein binds 2 mol of oleate or palmitate/mol of protein. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences of the peptides has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50143 (23 pages) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained as indicated in Biochem. J. (1988) 249, 5. PMID:3421901

  20. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  1. Conformations of intrinsically disordered proteins are influenced by linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rahul K.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2013-01-01

    The functions of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are governed by relationships between information encoded in their amino acid sequences and the ensembles of conformations that they sample as autonomous units. Most IDPs are polyampholytes, with sequences that include both positively and negatively charged residues. Accordingly, we focus here on the sequence–ensemble relationships of polyampholytic IDPs. The fraction of charged residues discriminates between weak and strong polyampholytes. Using atomistic simulations, we show that weak polyampholytes form globules, whereas the conformational preferences of strong polyampholytes are determined by a combination of fraction of charged residues values and the linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues. We quantify the latter using a patterning parameter κ that lies between zero and one. The value of κ is low for well-mixed sequences, and in these sequences, intrachain electrostatic repulsions and attractions are counterbalanced, leading to the unmasking of preferences for conformations that resemble either self-avoiding random walks or generic Flory random coils. Segregation of oppositely charged residues within linear sequences leads to high κ-values and preferences for hairpin-like conformations caused by long-range electrostatic attractions induced by conformational fluctuations. We propose a scaling theory to explain the sequence-encoded conformational properties of strong polyampholytes. We show that naturally occurring strong polyampholytes have low κ-values, and this feature implies a selection for random coil ensembles. The design of sequences with different κ-values demonstrably alters the conformational preferences of polyampholytic IDPs, and this ability could become a useful tool for enabling direct inquiries into connections between sequence–ensemble relationships and functions of IDPs. PMID:23901099

  2. The amino acid sequence of Escherichia coli cyanase.

    PubMed

    Chin, C C; Anderson, P M; Wold, F

    1983-01-10

    The amino acid sequence of the enzyme cyanase (cyanate hydrolase) from Escherichia coli has been determined by automatic Edman degradation of the intact protein and of its component peptides. The primary peptides used in the sequencing were produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage at the methionine residues, yielding 4 peptides plus free homoserine from the NH2-terminal methionine, and by trypsin cleavage at the 7 arginine residues after acetylation of the lysines. Secondary peptides required for overlaps and COOH-terminal sequences were produced by chymotrypsin or clostripain cleavage of some of the larger peptides. The complete sequence of the cyanase subunit consists of 156 amino acid residues (Mr 16,350). Based on the observation that the cysteine-containing peptide is obtained as a disulfide-linked dimer, it is proposed that the covalent structure of cyanase is made up of two subunits linked by a disulfide bond between the single cystine residue in each subunit. The native enzyme (Mr 150,000) then appears to be a complex of four or five such subunit dimers.

  3. Distinguishing proteins from arbitrary amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Yau, Stephen S-T; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  4. Amino acid network for prediction of catalytic residues in enzymes: a comparison survey.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianhong; Yan, Wenying; Hu, Guang; Shen, Bairong

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic residues play a significant role in enzyme functions. With the recent accumulation of experimentally determined enzyme 3D structures and network theory on protein structures, the prediction of catalytic residues by amino acid network (AAN, where nodes are residues and links are residue interactions) has gained much interest. Computational methods of identifying catalytic residues are traditionally divided into two groups: sequence-based and structure-based methods. Two new structure- based methods are proposed in current advances: AAN and Elastic Network Model (ENM) of enzyme structures. By concentrating on AAN-based approach, we herein summarized network properties for predictions of catalytic residues. AAN attributes were showed responsible for performance improvement, and therefore the combination of AAN with previous sequence and structural information will be a promising direction for further improvement. Advantages and limitations of AAN-based methods, future perspectives on the application of AAN to the study of protein structure-function relationships are discussed.

  5. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  6. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  7. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1989-12-05

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

  8. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1987-02-27

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and thence quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal. 1 fig.

  9. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1989-01-01

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

  10. Bovine Parathyroid Hormone: Amino Acid Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, H. Bryan; Ronan, Rosemary

    1970-01-01

    Bovine parathyroid hormone has been isolated in homogeneous form, and its complete amino acid sequence determined. The bovine hormone is a single chain, 84 amino acids long. It contains amino-terminal alanine, and carboxyl-terminal glutamine. The bovine parathyroid hormone is approximately three times the length of the newly discovered hormone, thyrocalcitonin, whose action is reciprocal to parathyroid hormone. Images PMID:5275384

  11. Selective Deletion of the Internal Lysine Residue from the Peptide Sequence by Collisional Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shibdas; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2012-11-01

    The gas-phase peptide ion fragmentation chemistry is always the center of attraction in proteomics to analyze the amino acid sequence of peptides and proteins. In this work, we describe the formation of an anomalous fragment ion, which corresponds to the selective deletion of the internal lysine residue from a series of lysine containing peptides upon collisional activation in the ion trap. We detected several water-loss fragment ions and the maximum number of water molecules lost from a particular fragment ion was equal to the number of lysine residues in that fragment. As a consequence of this water-loss phenomenon, internal lysine residues were found to be deleted from the peptide ion. The N,N-dimethylation of all the amine functional groups of the peptide stopped the internal lysine deletion reaction, but selective N-terminal α-amino acetylation had no effect on this process indicating involvement of the side chains of the lysine residues. The detailed mechanism of the lysine deletion was investigated by multistage CID of the modified and unmodified peptides, by isotope labeling and by energy resolved CID studies. The results suggest that the lysine deletion might occur through a unimolecular multistep mechanism involving a seven-membered cyclic imine intermediate formed by the loss of water from a lysine residue in the protonated peptide. This intermediate subsequently undergoes degradation reaction to deplete the interior imine ring from the peptide backbone leading to the deletion of an internal lysine residue.

  12. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  13. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27324649

  14. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl- N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints.

  15. Microscopic residues of bone from dissolving human remains in acids.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Erwin; Zoon, Peter; van Wijk, Mayonne; Gerretsen, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Dissolving bodies is a current method of disposing of human remains and has been practiced throughout the years. During the last decade in the Netherlands, two cases have emerged in which human remains were treated with acid. In the first case, the remains of a cremated body were treated with hydrofluoric acid. In the second case, two complete bodies were dissolved in a mixture of hydrochloric and sulfuric acid. In both cases, a great variety of evidence was collected at the scene of crime, part of which was embedded in resin, polished, and investigated using SEM/EDX. Apart from macroscopic findings like residual bone and artificial teeth, in both cases, distinct microscopic residues of bone were found as follows: (partly) digested bone, thin-walled structures, and recrystallized calcium phosphate. Although some may believe it is possible to dissolve a body in acid completely, at least some of these microscopic residues will always be found.

  16. Microscopic residues of bone from dissolving human remains in acids.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Erwin; Zoon, Peter; van Wijk, Mayonne; Gerretsen, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Dissolving bodies is a current method of disposing of human remains and has been practiced throughout the years. During the last decade in the Netherlands, two cases have emerged in which human remains were treated with acid. In the first case, the remains of a cremated body were treated with hydrofluoric acid. In the second case, two complete bodies were dissolved in a mixture of hydrochloric and sulfuric acid. In both cases, a great variety of evidence was collected at the scene of crime, part of which was embedded in resin, polished, and investigated using SEM/EDX. Apart from macroscopic findings like residual bone and artificial teeth, in both cases, distinct microscopic residues of bone were found as follows: (partly) digested bone, thin-walled structures, and recrystallized calcium phosphate. Although some may believe it is possible to dissolve a body in acid completely, at least some of these microscopic residues will always be found. PMID:25677640

  17. Sequences of metanicins, 20-residue peptaibols from the ascomycetous fungus CBS 597.80.

    PubMed

    Kimonyo, Anastase; Brückner, Hans

    2013-05-01

    Four linear 20-residue peptaibols, named metanicins (MTCs) A-D, were isolated from submerged cultures of the ascomycetous fungus CBS 597.80. Structure elucidation was performed by a combination of fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS), electrospray ionization MS, Edman degradation of isolated fragments, and amino acid analysis by ion-exchange and gas chromatography, and enantioselective HPLC. The sequences of MTC A(B) are (amino acid exchange in B and C in parentheses): Ac-Aib-Ala-Aib-Ala-Aib-Ala-Gln-Aib-Val-Aib-Gly-Leu-Aib-Pro-Val-Aib-Aib(D-Iva)-Gln-Gln-Pheol and of MTC C(D) Ac-Aib-Ala-Aib-Ala-Aib-Ala-Gln-Aib-Val-Aib-Gly-Leu-Aib-Pro-Val-Aib-Aib(D-Iva)-Gln-Gln-Pheol (Ac, acetyl; Aib, α-aminoisobutyric acid; Iva, isovaline; Pheol, L-phenylalaninol). The peptides are related, and some of the sequences are identical, to other 20-residue peptaibols isolated from Trichoderma species. MTCs show moderate activities against Micrococcus luteus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus aureus, and very low activities against Bacillus subtilis. The producer has originally been identified and deposited as Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae CBS 597.80. Although this identification has been withdrawn by Centralbureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS) in the meantime, the accession number will be retained - independently from any taxonomic revisions. PMID:23681727

  18. On-line procedures for alkylation of cysteine residues with 3-bromopropylamine prior to protein sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Jue, R A; Hale, J E

    1994-09-01

    We have previously shown that 3-bromopropylamine offers several advantages over other alkylating reagents in the modification and subsequent identification of cysteine residues by protein sequencing. We describe here simple on-sequencer procedures for alkylating cysteines in proteins which employ the reduction of cystines in proteins with tri-n-butylphosphine and concomitant alkylation of the resulting cysteines with 3-bromopropylamine. Addition of an aqueous acetone wash to a modified reaction cycle on the Applied Biosystems 477A sequencer removes excess 3-bromopropylamine. As a result, very little background in the first step of the sequence analysis is seen. Under these conditions, cysteines are readily modified and identified during sequencing. Moreover, very little preview of the next amino acid is observed, which indicates that the N-terminal amino acid is not appreciably alkylated by 3-bromopropylamine. On-sequencer methods have been developed for proteins spotted onto glass fiber filters and proteins electroblotted onto polyvinylidene difluoride membranes.

  19. Ligatin binds phosphohexose residues on acidic hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Jakoi, E R; Kempe, K; Gaston, S M

    1981-01-01

    Ligatin, a receptor that recognizes phosphorylated sugars, was isolated from plasma membranes of mouse macrophages, rat ileum, and rat brain. Several acidic hydrolases including N-acetyl beta-D-glucosaminidase (beta-NAG) were solubilized with this receptor. The solubilized beta-NAG bound to ligatin in vitro as demonstrated by affinity chromatography using the immobilized receptor. beta-N-Acetyl D-glucosaminidase-ligatin complexes were dissociated by low concentrations of mannose 6-phosphate (Man6P) and/or glucose 1-phosphate (Glc 1P). The effectiveness of these two phosphomonosaccharides varied depending on the source of the enzyme: ileal beta-NAG-ligatin complexes showed a four-fold preferential dissociation with Man6P; macrophage complexes showed a 160-fold preferential dissociation with Glc 1P. Brain complexes dissociated with nearly equal preference for Man6P and Glc 1P. Heterologous complexes displayed the specificity characteristic of the source of the enzyme regardless of the source of the ligatin. Treatment of the solubilized hydrolases with endoglucosaminidase H released phosphorous-32 label from these enzymes and prevented binding of beta-NAG to ligatin. However, treatment of the solubilized hydrolases with alkaline phosphatase reduced the binding of beta-NAG to ligatin by no more than 30%. This apparent resistance of beta-NAG to dephosphorylation was consistent with the chromatographic behavior of QAE of 3H-labeled acidic oligosaccharides isolated from the solubilized hydrolases. The oligosaccharides that contain phosphorylated hexose were less acidic than phosphomonoesters and were insensitive to alkaline phosphatase until subjected to acid hydrolysis. These results suggested the presence of a phosphodiester on beta-NAG analogous to the NAC glucosamine 1 P6 mannose present on beta-glucuronidase isolated from mouse lymphoma cells (Tabas I, Kornfield, S: J Biol Chem 255: 6633, 1980). PMID:7299841

  20. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David L.; Kataeva, Irina; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  1. Electron microscopy of carbonaceous matter in Allende acid residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkin, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of characteristic diffuse ring diffraction patterns, much of the carbonaceous matter in a large suite of Allende acid residues has been identified as a variety of turbostratic carbon. Crystallites of this phase contain randomly stacked sp(2) hybridized carbon layers and diffraction patterns resemble those from carbon black and glassy carbon. Carbynes are probably absent, and are certainly restricted to less than 0.5% of these acid residues. The work of Ott et al. (1981) provides a basis for the possibility that turbostratic carbon is a carrier of noble gases, but an additional component - amorphous carbon - may be necessary to explain the high release temperatures of noble gases as well as the glassy character of many of the carbonaceous particles. Carbynes are considered to be questionable as important carriers of noble gases in the Allende acid residues.

  2. Electron microscopy of carbonaceous matter in Allende acid residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, G. R.

    On the basis of characteristic diffuse ring diffraction patterns, much of the carbonaceous matter in a large suite of Allende acid residues has been identified as a variety of turbostratic carbon. Crystallites of this phase contain randomly stacked sp(2) hybridized carbon layers and diffraction patterns resemble those from carbon black and glassy carbon. Carbynes are probably absent, and are certainly restricted to less than 0.5% of these acid residues. The work of Ott et al. (1981) provides a basis for the possibility that turbostratic carbon is a carrier of noble gases, but an additional component - amorphous carbon - may be necessary to explain the high release temperatures of noble gases as well as the glassy character of many of the carbonaceous particles. Carbynes are considered to be questionable as important carriers of noble gases in the Allende acid residues.

  3. Evolutionary diversification of aminopeptidase N in Lepidoptera by conserved clade-specific amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Austin L

    2014-07-01

    Members of the aminopepidase N (APN) gene family of the insect order Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) bind the naturally insecticidal Cry toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of seven lepidopteran APN classes provided strong support for the hypothesis that lepidopteran APN2 class arose by gene duplication prior to the most recent common ancestor of Lepidoptera and Diptera. The Cry toxin-binding region (BR) of lepidopteran and dipteran APNs was subject to stronger purifying selection within APN classes than was the remainder of the molecule, reflecting conservation of catalytic site and adjoining residues within the BR. Of lepidopteran APN classes, APN2, APN6, and APN8 showed the strongest evidence of functional specialization, both in expression patterns and in the occurrence of conserved derived amino acid residues. The latter three APN classes also shared a convergently evolved conserved residue close to the catalytic site. APN8 showed a particularly strong tendency towards class-specific conserved residues, including one of the catalytic site residues in the BR and ten others in close vicinity to the catalytic site residues. The occurrence of class-specific sequences along with the conservation of enzymatic function is consistent with the hypothesis that the presence of Cry toxins in the environment has been a factor shaping the evolution of this multi-gene family.

  4. Evolutionary Diversifaction of Aminopeptidase N in Lepidoptera by Conserved Clade-specific Amino Acid Residues

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Austin L.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the aminopepidase N (APN) gene family of the insect order Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) bind the naturally insecticidal Cry toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of seven lepidopteran APN classes provided strong support for the hypothesis that lepidopteran APN2 class arose by gene duplication prior to the most recent common ancestor of Lepidoptera and Diptera. The Cry toxin-binding region (BR) of lepidopteran and dipteran APNs was subject to stronger purifying selection within APN classes than was the remainder of the molecule, reflecting conservation of catalytic site and adjoining residues within the BR. Of lepidopteran APN classes, APN2, APN6, and APN8 showed the strongest evidence of functional specialization, both in expression patterns and in the occurrence of conserved derived amino acid residues. The latter three APN classes also shared a convergently evolved conserved residue close to the catalytic site. APN8 showed a particularly strong tendency towards class-specific conserved residues, including one of the catalytic site residues in the BR and ten others in close vicinity to the catalytic site residues. The occurrence of class-specific sequences along with the conservation of enzymatic function is consistent with the hypothesis that the presence of Cry toxins in the environment has been a factor shaping the evolution of this multi-gene family. PMID:24675701

  5. Revised Backbone-Virtual-Bond-Angle Potentials to Treat the l- and d-Amino Acid Residues in the Coarse-Grained United Residue (UNRES) Force Field

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Continuing our effort to introduce d-amino-acid residues in the united residue (UNRES) force field developed in our laboratory, in this work the Cα ··· Cα ··· Cα backbone-virtual-bond-valence-angle (θ) potentials for systems containing d-amino-acid residues have been developed. The potentials were determined by integrating the combined energy surfaces of all possible triplets of terminally blocked glycine, alanine, and proline obtained with ab initio molecular quantum mechanics at the MP2/6-31G(d,p) level to calculate the corresponding potentials of mean force (PMFs). Subsequently, analytical expressions were fitted to the PMFs to give the virtual-bond-valence potentials to be used in UNRES. Alanine represented all types of amino-acid residues except glycine and proline. The blocking groups were either the N-acetyl and N′,N′-dimethyl or N-acetyl and pyrrolidyl group, depending on whether the residue next in sequence was an alanine-type or a proline residue. A total of 126 potentials (63 symmetry-unrelated potentials for each set of terminally blocking groups) were determined. Together with the torsional, double-torsional, and side-chain-rotamer potentials for polypeptide chains containing d-amino-acid residues determined in our earlier work (Sieradzan et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2012, 8, 4746), the new virtual-bond-angle (θ) potentials now constitute the complete set of physics-based potentials with which to run coarse-grained simulations of systems containing d-amino-acid residues. The ability of the extended UNRES force field to reproduce thermodynamics of polypeptide systems with d-amino-acid residues was tested by comparing the experimentally measured and the calculated free energies of helix formation of model KLALKLALxxLKLALKLA peptides, where x denotes any d- or l- amino-acid residue. The obtained results demonstrate that the UNRES force field with the new potentials reproduce the changes of free energies of helix formation upon d

  6. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method is disclosed for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe. 11 figs.

  7. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe.

  8. Optimization of short amino acid sequences classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcz, Aleksy; Szymański, Zbigniew

    This article describes processing methods used for short amino acid sequences classification. The data processed are 9-symbols string representations of amino acid sequences, divided into 49 data sets - each one containing samples labeled as reacting or not with given enzyme. The goal of the classification is to determine for a single enzyme, whether an amino acid sequence would react with it or not. Each data set is processed separately. Feature selection is performed to reduce the number of dimensions for each data set. The method used for feature selection consists of two phases. During the first phase, significant positions are selected using Classification and Regression Trees. Afterwards, symbols appearing at the selected positions are substituted with numeric values of amino acid properties taken from the AAindex database. In the second phase the new set of features is reduced using a correlation-based ranking formula and Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization. Finally, the preprocessed data is used for training LS-SVM classifiers. SPDE, an evolutionary algorithm, is used to obtain optimal hyperparameters for the LS-SVM classifier, such as error penalty parameter C and kernel-specific hyperparameters. A simple score penalty is used to adapt the SPDE algorithm to the task of selecting classifiers with best performance measures values.

  9. Methods for analyzing nucleic acid sequences

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid. The method provides a complex comprising a polymerase enzyme, a target nucleic acid molecule, and a primer, wherein the complex is immobilized on a support Fluorescent label is attached to a terminal phosphate group of the nucleotide or nucleotide analog. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The time duration of the signal from labeled nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated is distinguished from freely diffusing labels by a longer retention in the observation volume for the nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated than for the freely diffusing labels.

  10. Identification of essential amino acid residues of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris white kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hiramoto, S; Wato, S; Nishimoto, T; Wada, Y; Nagai, K; Yamaguchi, H

    1999-11-01

    Kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitors, which are bivalent inhibitors with the subunit stoichiometry of (alphabeta)(2) complex, have been inferred to contain unique arginine, tryptophan, and tyrosine residues essential for the inhibitory activity. To test the validity of this inference, an attempt was made to identify the essential amino acid residues of a white kidney bean (P. vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor (PHA-I) by using the chemical modification technique combined with amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. Exhaustive modification of the arginine residues by phenylglyoxal did not lead to a marked loss of activity, suggesting that no arginine residue is directly associated with the inhibitory activity. N-Bromosuccinimide treatment of PHA-I in the presence or absence of a substrate alpha-amylase revealed the involvement of two tryptophan residues in alpha-amylase inhibition, and they were identified as Trp188 of the beta-subunit by amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry of lysylendopeptidase peptides. Further, two tyrosine residues were preferentially modified either by N-acetylimidazole or by tetranitromethane, resulting in a concomitant loss of most of the PHA-I activity. Amino acid sequencing of the lysylendopeptidase peptides from a tetranitromethane-modified PHA-I identified Tyr186 of the beta-subunit as an essential residue.

  11. Identification of essential amino acid residues of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris white kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hiramoto, S; Wato, S; Nishimoto, T; Wada, Y; Nagai, K; Yamaguchi, H

    1999-11-01

    Kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitors, which are bivalent inhibitors with the subunit stoichiometry of (alphabeta)(2) complex, have been inferred to contain unique arginine, tryptophan, and tyrosine residues essential for the inhibitory activity. To test the validity of this inference, an attempt was made to identify the essential amino acid residues of a white kidney bean (P. vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor (PHA-I) by using the chemical modification technique combined with amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. Exhaustive modification of the arginine residues by phenylglyoxal did not lead to a marked loss of activity, suggesting that no arginine residue is directly associated with the inhibitory activity. N-Bromosuccinimide treatment of PHA-I in the presence or absence of a substrate alpha-amylase revealed the involvement of two tryptophan residues in alpha-amylase inhibition, and they were identified as Trp188 of the beta-subunit by amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry of lysylendopeptidase peptides. Further, two tyrosine residues were preferentially modified either by N-acetylimidazole or by tetranitromethane, resulting in a concomitant loss of most of the PHA-I activity. Amino acid sequencing of the lysylendopeptidase peptides from a tetranitromethane-modified PHA-I identified Tyr186 of the beta-subunit as an essential residue. PMID:10544275

  12. Determination of free acidic and alkaline residues of protein via moving reaction boundary titration in microdevice electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hou-yu; Li, Si; Tang, Yun-yun; Dong, Jing-yu; Fan, Liu-yin; Cao, Cheng-xi

    2013-06-21

    As two important physico-chemical parameters, the acidic and alkaline residues of protein are of evident significance for the evaluation of protein properties and the design of relevant separation and analysis. However, there is still no electrophoretic method used for the direct detection of free acidic and alkaline residues of protein. Herein, we developed the concepts of moving reaction boundary (MRB) and MRB titration, relevant MRB titration theory, and the method of microdevice electrophoresis for the determination of free acidic and alkaline residues of protein. In the MRB titration, the boundary was created with acid or alkali and target protein immobilized via highly cross-linked polyacrylamide gel (PAG). It was theoretically revealed that the number of free acidic or alkaline residues of protein was as a function of MRB displacement in the electrophoretic titration system. As a proof of concept, seven model proteins were chosen for the determination of acidic or alkaline residues of protein via MRB titration. The results showed that the numbers of free acidic and alkaline residues of proteins detected were in good agreement with those obtained from the relevant amino sequences in the NCBI database, demonstrating the feasibility of the developed concept, theory and technique. The general methodology of MRB titration has potential application for inexpensive, facilitative and informative protein structure analysis of free acidic or alkaline residues of protein.

  13. The amino acid sequence of mitogenic lectin-B from the roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Yurino, N; Kino, M; Ishiguro, M; Funatsu, G

    1997-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pokeweed lectin-B (PL-B) has been analyzed by first sequencing seven lysylendopeptidase peptides derived from the reduced and S-pyridylethylated PL-B and then connecting them by analyzing the arginylendopeptidase peptides from the reduced and S-carboxymethylated PL-B. PL-B consists of 295 amino acid residues and two oligosaccharides linked to Asn96 and Asn139, and has a molecular mass of 34,493 Da. PL-B is composed of seven repetitive chitin-binding domains having 48-79% sequence homology with each other. Twelve amino acid residues including eight cysteine residues in these domains are absolutely conserved in all other chitin-binding domains of plant lectins and class I chitinases. Also, it was strongly suggested that the extremely high hemagglutinating and mitogenic activities of PL-B may be ascribed to its seven-domain structure.

  14. Lactic Acid and Biosurfactants Production from Residual Cellulose Films.

    PubMed

    Portilla Rivera, Oscar Manuel; Arzate Martínez, Guillermo; Jarquín Enríquez, Lorenzo; Vázquez Landaverde, Pedro Alberto; Domínguez González, José Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The increasing amounts of residual cellulose films generated as wastes all over the world represent a big scale problem for the meat industry regarding to environmental and economic issues. The use of residual cellulose films as a feedstock of glucose-containing solutions by acid hydrolysis and further fermentation into lactic acid and biosurfactants was evaluated as a method to diminish and revalorize these wastes. Under a treatment consisting in sulfuric acid 6% (v/v); reaction time 2 h; solid liquid ratio 9 g of film/100 mL of acid solution, and temperature 130 °C, 35 g/L of glucose and 49% of solubilized film was obtained. From five lactic acid strains, Lactobacillus plantarum was the most suitable for metabolizing the glucose generated. The process was scaled up under optimized conditions in a 2-L bioreactor, producing 3.4 g/L of biomass, 18 g/L of lactic acid, and 15 units of surface tension reduction of a buffer phosphate solution. Around 50% of the cellulose was degraded by the treatment applied, and the liqueurs generated were useful for an efficient production of lactic acid and biosurfactants using L. plantarum. Lactobacillus bacteria can efficiently utilize glucose from cellulose films hydrolysis without the need of clarification of the liqueurs.

  15. Phosphate acceptor amino acid residues in structural proteins of rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, F; Tan, K B; McFalls, M L; Madore, P

    1974-07-01

    Partial acid hydrolysates of the [(32)P]phosphate- or [(3)H]serine-labeled proteins of purified vesicular stomatitis, rabies, Lagos bat, Mokola, or spring viremia of carp virions and of purified intracellular nucleocapsids of these viruses have been analyzed by paper electrophoresis for the presence of phosphorylated amino acids. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine, with the former predominant, were present in virion and nucleocapsid preparations that contained phosphoproteins. An exception was the fish rhabdovirus, which contained only phosphoserine. When vesicular stomatitis or rabies virus proteins were phosphorylated in a cell-free system by the virion-associated protein kinase and analyzed for the presence of phosphorylated amino acid residues, phosphoserine was again found to be more abundant than phosphothreonine. After in vitro protein phosphorylation, another phospho-compound, possibly a third phosphoamino acid, was detected in the partial acid hydrolysates of these viruses. PMID:4365328

  16. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Amino Acid Sequence Disclosures ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid...

  17. Homology of amino acid sequences of rat liver cathepsins B and H with that of papain.

    PubMed Central

    Takio, K; Towatari, T; Katunuma, N; Teller, D C; Titani, K

    1983-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of rat liver lysosomal thiol endopeptidases, cathepsins B and H, are presented and compared with that of the plant thiol protease papain. The 252-residue sequence of cathepsin B and the 220-residue sequence of cathepsin H were determined largely by automated Edman degradation of their intact polypeptide chains and of the two chains of each enzyme generated by limited proteolysis. Subfragments of the chains were produced by enzymatic digestion and by chemical cleavage of methionyl and tryptophanyl bonds. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of cathepsins B and H with each other and with that of papain demonstrates a striking homology among their primary structures. Sequence identity is extremely high in regions which, according to the three-dimensional structure of papain, constitute the catalytic site. The results not only reveal the first structural features of mammalian thiol endopeptidases but also provide insight into the evolutionary relationships among plant and mammalian thiol proteases. PMID:6574504

  18. Amino acid sequence of a new mitochondrially synthesized proteolipid of the ATP synthase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Velours, J; Esparza, M; Hoppe, J; Sebald, W; Guerin, B

    1984-01-01

    The purification and the amino acid sequence of a proteolipid translated on ribosomes in yeast mitochondria is reported. This protein, which is a subunit of the ATP synthase, was purified by extraction with chloroform/methanol (2/1) and subsequent chromatography on phosphocellulose and reverse phase h.p.l.c. A mol. wt. of 5500 was estimated by chromatography on Bio-Gel P-30 in 80% formic acid. The complete amino acid sequence of this protein was determined by automated solid phase Edman degradation of the whole protein and of fragments obtained after cleavage with cyanogen bromide. The sequence analysis indicates a length of 48 amino acid residues. The calculated mol. wt. of 5870 corresponds to the value found by gel chromatography. This polypeptide contains three basic residues and no negatively charged side chain. The three basic residues are clustered at the C terminus. The primary structure of this protein is in full agreement with the predicted amino acid sequence of the putative polypeptide encoded by the mitochondrial aap1 gene recently discovered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover, this protein shows 50% homology with the amino acid sequence of a putative polypeptide encoded by an unidentified reading frame also discovered near the mitochondrial ATPase subunit 6 gene in Aspergillus nidulans. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6323165

  19. Multiple Amino Acid Sequence Alignment Nitrogenase Component 1: Insights into Phylogenetics and Structure-Function Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Howard, James B.; Kechris, Katerina J.; Rees, Douglas C.; Glazer, Alexander N.

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid residues critical for a protein's structure-function are retained by natural selection and these residues are identified by the level of variance in co-aligned homologous protein sequences. The relevant residues in the nitrogen fixation Component 1 α- and β-subunits were identified by the alignment of 95 protein sequences. Proteins were included from species encompassing multiple microbial phyla and diverse ecological niches as well as the nitrogen fixation genotypes, anf, nif, and vnf, which encode proteins associated with cofactors differing at one metal site. After adjusting for differences in sequence length, insertions, and deletions, the remaining >85% of the sequence co-aligned the subunits from the three genotypes. Six Groups, designated Anf, Vnf , and Nif I-IV, were assigned based upon genetic origin, sequence adjustments, and conserved residues. Both subunits subdivided into the same groups. Invariant and single variant residues were identified and were defined as “core” for nitrogenase function. Three species in Group Nif-III, Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii, and Thermodesulfatator indicus, were found to have a seleno-cysteine that replaces one cysteinyl ligand of the 8Fe:7S, P-cluster. Subsets of invariant residues, limited to individual groups, were identified; these unique residues help identify the gene of origin (anf, nif, or vnf) yet should not be considered diagnostic of the metal content of associated cofactors. Fourteen of the 19 residues that compose the cofactor pocket are invariant or single variant; the other five residues are highly variable but do not correlate with the putative metal content of the cofactor. The variable residues are clustered on one side of the cofactor, away from other functional centers in the three dimensional structure. Many of the invariant and single variant residues were not previously recognized as potentially critical and their identification provides the bases

  20. A color-determining amino acid residue of proteorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Yuya; Kawashima, Takayoshi; Abe-Yoshizumi, Rei; Kandori, Hideki

    2014-09-30

    Proteorhodopsin (PR) is a light-driven proton pump found in marine bacteria. More than 1000 PRs are classified as blue-absorbing (λmax ∼ 490 nm) and green-absorbing (λmax ∼ 525 nm) PRs. The color determinant is known to be at position 105, where blue-absorbing and green-absorbing PRs possess Gln and Leu, respectively. This suggests hydrophobicity at position 105 plays a key role in color tuning. Here we successfully introduced 19 amino acid residues into position 105 of green-absorbing PR in the membrane environment and investigated the absorption properties. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis shows that the isomeric composition of the all-trans form is >70% for all mutants, indicating little influence of different isomers on color tuning. Absorption spectra of the wild-type and 19 mutant proteins were well-characterized by the pH-dependent equilibria of the protonated and deprotonated counterion (Asp97) of the Schiff base, whereas the λmax values of these two states and the pKa value differed significantly among mutants. Although Gln and Leu are hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues, respectively, the λmax values of the two states and the pKa value did not correlate with the hydropathy index of residues. In contrast, the λmax and pKa were correlated with the volume of residues, though Gln and Leu possess similar volumes. This observation concludes that the λmax and pKa of Asp97 are determined by local and specific interactions in the Schiff base moiety, in which the volume of the residue at position 105 is more influential than its hydrophobicity. We suggest that the hydrogen-bonding network in the Schiff base moiety plays a key role in the λmax and pKa of Asp97, and the hydrogen-bonding network is significantly perturbed by large amino acid residues but may be preserved by additional water molecule(s) for small amino acid residues at position 105. PMID:25180875

  1. Methodology for detecting residual phosphoric acid in polybenzoxazole fibers.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Su; Sieber, John; Guttman, Charles; Rice, Kirk; Flynn, Kathleen; Watson, Stephanie; Holmes, Gale

    2009-12-01

    Because of the premature failure of in-service soft-body armor containing the ballistic fiber poly[(benzo-[1,2-d:5,4-d']-benzoxazole-2,6-diyl)-1,4-phenylene] (PBO), the Office of Law Enforcement Standards (OLES) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) initiated a research program to investigate the reasons for this failure and to develop testing methodologies and protocols to ensure that these types of failures do not reoccur. In a report that focused on the stability of the benzoxazole ring that is characteristic of PBO fibers, Holmes, G. A.; Rice, K.; Snyder, C. R. J. Mater. Sci. 2006, 41, 4105-4116, showed that the benzoxazole ring was susceptible to hydrolytic degradation under acid conditions. Because of the processing conditions for the fibers, it is suspected by many researchers that residual phosphoric acid may cause degradation of the benzoxazole ring resulting in a reduction of ballistic performance. Prior to this work, no definitive data have indicated the presence of phosphoric acid since the residual phosphorus is not easily extracted and the processed fibers are known to incorporate phosphorus containing processing aids. Methods to efficiently extract phosphorus from PBO are described in this article. Further, characterization determined that the majority of the extractable phosphorus in PBO was attributed to the octyldecyl phosphate processing aid with some phosphoric acid being detected. Analysis by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of model PBO oligomers indicates that the nonextractable phosphorus is attached to the PBO polymer chain as a monoaryl phosphate ester. The response of model aryl phosphates to NaOH exposure indicates that monoaryl phosphate ester is stable to NaOH washes used in the manufacturing process to neutralize the phosphoric acid reaction medium and to extract residual phosphorus impurities. PMID:19899783

  2. Methodology for detecting residual phosphoric acid in polybenzoxazole fibers.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Su; Sieber, John; Guttman, Charles; Rice, Kirk; Flynn, Kathleen; Watson, Stephanie; Holmes, Gale

    2009-12-01

    Because of the premature failure of in-service soft-body armor containing the ballistic fiber poly[(benzo-[1,2-d:5,4-d']-benzoxazole-2,6-diyl)-1,4-phenylene] (PBO), the Office of Law Enforcement Standards (OLES) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) initiated a research program to investigate the reasons for this failure and to develop testing methodologies and protocols to ensure that these types of failures do not reoccur. In a report that focused on the stability of the benzoxazole ring that is characteristic of PBO fibers, Holmes, G. A.; Rice, K.; Snyder, C. R. J. Mater. Sci. 2006, 41, 4105-4116, showed that the benzoxazole ring was susceptible to hydrolytic degradation under acid conditions. Because of the processing conditions for the fibers, it is suspected by many researchers that residual phosphoric acid may cause degradation of the benzoxazole ring resulting in a reduction of ballistic performance. Prior to this work, no definitive data have indicated the presence of phosphoric acid since the residual phosphorus is not easily extracted and the processed fibers are known to incorporate phosphorus containing processing aids. Methods to efficiently extract phosphorus from PBO are described in this article. Further, characterization determined that the majority of the extractable phosphorus in PBO was attributed to the octyldecyl phosphate processing aid with some phosphoric acid being detected. Analysis by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of model PBO oligomers indicates that the nonextractable phosphorus is attached to the PBO polymer chain as a monoaryl phosphate ester. The response of model aryl phosphates to NaOH exposure indicates that monoaryl phosphate ester is stable to NaOH washes used in the manufacturing process to neutralize the phosphoric acid reaction medium and to extract residual phosphorus impurities.

  3. Analysis and prediction of RNA-binding residues using sequence, evolutionary conservation, and predicted secondary structure and solvent accessibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Ke; Ruan, Jishou; Shen, Shiyi; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2010-11-01

    Identification and prediction of RNA-binding residues (RBRs) provides valuable insights into the mechanisms of protein-RNA interactions. We analyzed the contributions of a wide range of factors including amino acid sequence, evolutionary conservation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility, to the prediction/characterization of RBRs. Five feature sets were designed and feature selection was performed to find and investigate relevant features. We demonstrate that (1) interactions with positively charged amino acids Arg and Lys are preferred by the egatively charged nucleotides; (2) Gly provides flexibility for the RNA binding sites; (3) Glu with negatively charged side chain and several hydrophobic residues such as Leu, Val, Ala and Phe are disfavored in the RNA-binding sites; (4) coil residues, especially in long segments, are more flexible (than other secondary structures) and more likely to interact with RNA; (5) helical residues are more rigid and consequently they are less likely to bind RNA; and (6) residues partially exposed to the solvent are more likely to form RNA-binding sites. We introduce a novel sequence-based predictor of RBRs, RBRpred, which utilizes the selected features. RBRpred is comprehensively tested on three datasets with varied atom distance cutoffs by performing both five-fold cross validation and jackknife tests and achieves Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.51, 0.48 and 0.42, respectively. The quality is comparable to or better than that for state-of-the-art predictors that apply the distancebased cutoff definition. We show that the most important factor for RBRs prediction is evolutionary conservation, followed by the amino acid sequence, predicted secondary structure and predicted solvent accessibility. We also investigate the impact of using native vs. predicted secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The predictions are sufficient for the RBR prediction and the knowledge of the actual solvent accessibility

  4. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  5. The sequences of the eleven-residue peptaibiotics: suzukacillins-B.

    PubMed

    Röhrich, Christian René; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Brückner, Hans; Degenkolb, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    The filamentous fungus designated 'Trichoderma viride' strain 63 C-1 simultaneously produces suzukacillins (SZs), two microheterogeneous groups of peptaibols, under submerged culture conditions. Both groups are readily distinguishable by TLC: the major group is designated SZ-A, whereas the minor group with a higher Rf value is named SZ-B. The peptide mixture was obtained from a MeOH extract of the mycelium. SZ-B was separated from SZ-A by Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. Although it provided one single spot on silica-gel TLC plates, 15 individual peptides could be separated by C8 reversed-phase (RP) HPLC, and their sequences were determined by HPLC/QqTOF-ESI-HRMS. Fourteen peptides exhibit the C-terminal sequence Pro(6) -Lxx-Lxx-Aib-Pro-Vxxol/Lxxol(11) , which is common for eleven-residue peptaibols. The remaining peptide is tentatively assigned as a ten-residue sequence, in which the C-terminal 1,2-amino alcohol is deleted, thus terminating in free proline. Nine of the peptides carry an Ac-Aib residue at the N-terminus, very frequently found in eleven-residue peptaibols. Four peptides comprise the rare Ac-Ala N-terminus, and for two peptides, N-terminal Ac-D-Iva residues were identified. One peptide contains a C-terminal residue of yet undetermined structure. Comparison with previously reported eleven-residue peptaibol sequences reveals that eight of the peptides represent new sequence analogs. PMID:23681728

  6. Characteristics of lactic acid bacteria isolates and their effect on silage fermentation of fruit residues.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinsong; Tan, Haisheng; Cai, Yimin

    2016-07-01

    The natural lactic acid bacteria (LAB) population, chemical composition, and silage fermentation of fruit residues were studied. Eighty-two strains of LAB were isolated from fruit residues such as banana leaf and stem, pineapple peel, and papaya peel. All strains were gram-positive and catalase-negative bacteria, and they were divided into 7 groups (A-G) according to morphological and biochemical characters. Strains in groups A to F were rods, and group G was cocci. Group F produced gas from glucose; other groups did not. Groups A to C and F formed dl-lactic acid, whereas groups D, E, and G formed l-lactic acid. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and DNA-DNA hybridization analysis, groups A to G strains were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum (54.9% of the total isolates), Lactobacillus paraplantarum (3.6%), Lactobacillus nagelii (8.5%), Lactobacillus perolens (4.9%), Lactobacillus casei (11.0%), Lactobacillus fermentum (9.8%), and Enterococcus gallinarum (7.3%), respectively. Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus casei are the most frequently isolated from fruit residues as a dominant species, and they could grow at a lower pH conditions and produce more lactic acid than other isolates. Pineapple and papaya peels contained higher crude protein (11.5-13.8%) and water-soluble carbohydrate (16.8-22.4%), but lower acid detergent fiber contents (21.2 to 26.4%) than banana stems and leaves (8.2% crude protein, 42.8% acid detergent fiber, and 5.1% water-soluble carbohydrate). Compared with banana stem and leaf silages, the pineapple and papaya peel silages were well preserved with a lower pH and higher lactate content. The study suggests that the fruit residues contain excellent LAB species and abundant feed nutrients, and that they can be preserved as silage to be potential food resources for livestock. PMID:27108171

  7. Characteristics of lactic acid bacteria isolates and their effect on silage fermentation of fruit residues.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinsong; Tan, Haisheng; Cai, Yimin

    2016-07-01

    The natural lactic acid bacteria (LAB) population, chemical composition, and silage fermentation of fruit residues were studied. Eighty-two strains of LAB were isolated from fruit residues such as banana leaf and stem, pineapple peel, and papaya peel. All strains were gram-positive and catalase-negative bacteria, and they were divided into 7 groups (A-G) according to morphological and biochemical characters. Strains in groups A to F were rods, and group G was cocci. Group F produced gas from glucose; other groups did not. Groups A to C and F formed dl-lactic acid, whereas groups D, E, and G formed l-lactic acid. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and DNA-DNA hybridization analysis, groups A to G strains were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum (54.9% of the total isolates), Lactobacillus paraplantarum (3.6%), Lactobacillus nagelii (8.5%), Lactobacillus perolens (4.9%), Lactobacillus casei (11.0%), Lactobacillus fermentum (9.8%), and Enterococcus gallinarum (7.3%), respectively. Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus casei are the most frequently isolated from fruit residues as a dominant species, and they could grow at a lower pH conditions and produce more lactic acid than other isolates. Pineapple and papaya peels contained higher crude protein (11.5-13.8%) and water-soluble carbohydrate (16.8-22.4%), but lower acid detergent fiber contents (21.2 to 26.4%) than banana stems and leaves (8.2% crude protein, 42.8% acid detergent fiber, and 5.1% water-soluble carbohydrate). Compared with banana stem and leaf silages, the pineapple and papaya peel silages were well preserved with a lower pH and higher lactate content. The study suggests that the fruit residues contain excellent LAB species and abundant feed nutrients, and that they can be preserved as silage to be potential food resources for livestock.

  8. XPS and STEM studies of Allende acid insoluble residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.; Clarke, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Data on Allende acid residues obtained both before and after etching with hot HNO3 are presented. X-ray photoelectron spectra show predominantly carbonaceous material plus Fe-deficient chromite in both cases. The HNO3 oxidizes the carbonaceous material to some extent. The small chromites in these residues have a wide range of compositions somewhat paralleling those observed in larger Allende chromites and in Murchison chromites, especially in the high Al contents; however, they are deficient in divalent cations, which makes them metastable and indicates that they must have formed at relatively low temperatures. It is suggested that they formed by precipitation of Cr(3+) and Fe(3+) from olivine at low temperature or during rapid cooling.

  9. On species sampling sequences induced by residual allocation models

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Abel; Quintana, Fernando A.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss fully Bayesian inference in a class of species sampling models that are induced by residual allocation (sometimes called stick-breaking) priors on almost surely discrete random measures. This class provides a generalization of the well-known Ewens sampling formula that allows for additional flexibility while retaining computational tractability. In particular, the procedure is used to derive the exchangeable predictive probability functions associated with the generalized Dirichlet process of Hjort (2000) and the probit stick-breaking prior of Chung and Dunson (2009) and Rodriguez and Dunson (2011). The procedure is illustrated with applications to genetics and nonparametric mixture modeling. PMID:25477705

  10. On species sampling sequences induced by residual allocation models.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Abel; Quintana, Fernando A

    2015-02-01

    We discuss fully Bayesian inference in a class of species sampling models that are induced by residual allocation (sometimes called stick-breaking) priors on almost surely discrete random measures. This class provides a generalization of the well-known Ewens sampling formula that allows for additional flexibility while retaining computational tractability. In particular, the procedure is used to derive the exchangeable predictive probability functions associated with the generalized Dirichlet process of Hjort (2000) and the probit stick-breaking prior of Chung and Dunson (2009) and Rodriguez and Dunson (2011). The procedure is illustrated with applications to genetics and nonparametric mixture modeling. PMID:25477705

  11. A Quantitative Tool to Distinguish Isobaric Leucine and Isoleucine Residues for Mass Spectrometry-Based De Novo Monoclonal Antibody Sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poston, Chloe N.; Higgs, Richard E.; You, Jinsam; Gelfanova, Valentina; Hale, John E.; Knierman, Michael D.; Siegel, Robert; Gutierrez, Jesus A.

    2014-07-01

    De novo sequencing by mass spectrometry (MS) allows for the determination of the complete amino acid (AA) sequence of a given protein based on the mass difference of detected ions from MS/MS fragmentation spectra. The technique relies on obtaining specific masses that can be attributed to characteristic theoretical masses of AAs. A major limitation of de novo sequencing by MS is the inability to distinguish between the isobaric residues leucine (Leu) and isoleucine (Ile). Incorrect identification of Ile as Leu or vice versa often results in loss of activity in recombinant antibodies. This functional ambiguity is commonly resolved with costly and time-consuming AA mutation and peptide sequencing experiments. Here, we describe a set of orthogonal biochemical protocols, which experimentally determine the identity of Ile or Leu residues in monoclonal antibodies (mAb) based on the selectivity that leucine aminopeptidase shows for n-terminal Leu residues and the cleavage preference for Leu by chymotrypsin. The resulting observations are combined with germline frequencies and incorporated into a logistic regression model, called Predictor for Xle Sites (PXleS) to provide a statistical likelihood for the identity of Leu at an ambiguous site. We demonstrate that PXleS can generate a probability for an Xle site in mAbs with 96% accuracy. The implementation of PXleS precludes the expression of several possible sequences and, therefore, reduces the overall time and resources required to go from spectra generation to a biologically active sequence for a mAb when an Ile or Leu residue is in question.

  12. Involvement of Acidic Amino Acid Residues in Zn(2+) Binding to Respiratory Complex I.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Sébastien; Srour, Batoul; Steimle, Stefan; Friedrich, Thorsten; Hellwig, Petra

    2015-09-21

    Proton transfer across membranes and membrane proteins is a central process in biological systems. Zn(2+) ions are capable of binding to acidic residues, often found within such specific pathways, thereby leading to a blockage. Here we probed Zn(2+) inhibition of the proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from Escherichia coli by means of electrochemically induced FTIR difference spectroscopy. Numerous conformational changes were identified including those that arise from the reorganization of the membrane arm upon electron transfer in the peripheral arm of the protein. Signals at very high wavenumbers (1781 and 1756 cm(-1)) point to the perturbation of acidic residues in a highly hydrophobic environment upon Zn(2+) binding. In variant D563N(L), which lacks part of the proton pumping activity (residue located on the horizontal amphipathic helix), the spectral signature of Zn(2+) binding is changed. Our data support a role for this residue in proton translocation.

  13. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  14. Chemical and isotopic compositions in acid residues from various meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kano, N.; Yamakoshi, K.; Matsuzaki, H.; Nogami, K.

    1993-01-01

    We are planning to carry out systematic isotopic investigations of Ru, Mg, etc., in primordial samples. The investigations will be pursued in the context of a study of the pre-history of the solar system. It is hoped that the study will yield direct evidence for processes of nucleosynthesis in the pre-solar stage and detection of extinct radioactive nuclides. In this paper, we present the results of chemical compositions of acid residues obtained from three types of meteorites: Canyon Diablo (IA), Allende (CV3), and Nuevo Mercuro (H5); and the preliminary results of Ru isotopic compositions.

  15. The amino acid sequence of protein SCMK-B2C from the high-sulphur fraction of wool keratin.

    PubMed

    Elleman, T C

    1972-08-01

    1. The amino acid sequence of a protein from the reduced and carboxymethylated high-sulphur fraction of wool has been determined. 2. The sequence of this S-carboxymethylkerateine (SCMK-B2C) of 151 amino acid residues displays much internal homology and an unusual residue distribution. Thus a ten-residue sequence occurs four times near the N-terminus and five times near the C-terminus with few changes. These regions contain much of the molecule's half-cystine, whereas between them there is a region of 19 residues that are mainly small and devoid of cystine and proline. 3. Certain models of the wool fibre based on its mechanical and physical properties propose a matrix of small compact globular units linked together to form beaded chains. The unusual distribution of the component residues of protein SCMK-B2C suggests structures in the wool-fibre matrix compatible with certain features of the proposed models.

  16. Human liver apolipoprotein B-100 cDNA: complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S W; Grant, S M; Higuchi, K; Hospattankar, A; Lackner, K; Lee, N; Brewer, H B

    1986-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), the ligand on low density lipoproteins that interacts with the low density lipoprotein receptor and initiates receptor-mediated endocytosis and low density lipoprotein catabolism, has been cloned, and the complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequences have been determined. ApoB-100 cDNAs were isolated from normal human liver cDNA libraries utilizing immunoscreening as well as filter hybridization with radiolabeled apoB-100 oligodeoxynucleotides. The apoB-100 mRNA is 14.1 kilobases long encoding a mature apoB-100 protein of 4536 amino acids with a calculated amino acid molecular weight of 512,723. ApoB-100 contains 20 potential glycosylation sites, and 12 of a total of 25 cysteine residues are located in the amino-terminal region of the apolipoprotein providing a potential globular structure of the amino terminus of the protein. ApoB-100 contains relatively few regions of amphipathic helices, but compared to other human apolipoproteins it is enriched in beta-structure. The delineation of the entire human apoB-100 sequence will now permit a detailed analysis of the conformation of the protein, the low density lipoprotein receptor binding domain(s), and the structural relationship between apoB-100 and apoB-48 and will provide the basis for the study of genetic defects in apoB-100 in patients with dyslipoproteinemias. PMID:3464946

  17. The complete amino acid sequence of lectin-C from the roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Mori, A; Funatsu, G

    1995-07-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pokeweed lectin-C (PL-C) consisting of 126 residues has been determined. PL-C is an acidic simple protein with molecular mass of 13,747 Da and consists of three cysteine-rich domains with 51-63% homology. PL-C shows homology to chitin-binding proteins such as wheat germ agglutinin, and all eight cysteine residues in the three domains of PL-C are completely conserved in all other chitin-binding domains.

  18. Removal of coagulant aluminum from water treatment residuals by acid.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Tetsuji; Nishijima, Wataru; Sugimoto, Mayo; Saka, Naoyuki; Nakai, Satoshi; Tanabe, Kazuyasu; Ito, Junki; Takenaka, Kenji; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2014-09-01

    Sediment sludge during coagulation and sedimentation in drinking water treatment is called "water treatment residuals (WTR)". Polyaluminum chloride (PAC) is mainly used as a coagulant in Japan. The recycling of WTR has been desired; one method for its reuse is as plowed soil. However, WTR reuse in this way is inhibited by the aluminum from the added PAC, because of its high adsorption capacity for phosphate and other fertilizer components. The removal of such aluminum from WTR would therefore be advantageous for its reuse as plowed soil; this research clarified the effect of acid washing on aluminum removal from WTR and on plant growth in the treated soil. The percentage of aluminum removal from raw WTR by sulphuric acid solution was around 90% at pH 3, the percentage decreasing to 40% in the case of a sun-dried sample. The maximum phosphate adsorption capacity was decreased and the available phosphorus was increased by acid washing, with 90% of aluminum removal. The enhancement of Japanese mustard spinach growth and the increased in plant uptake of phosphates following acid washing were observed.

  19. Chondroitin 4-sulphotransferase-1 and chondroitin 6-sulphotransferase-1 are affected differently by uronic acid residues neighbouring the acceptor GalNAc residues

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    C4ST-1 (chondroitin 4-sulphotransferase-1) and C6ST-1 (chondroitin 6-sulphotransferase-1) transfer sulphate from PAPS (adenosine 3′-phosphate 5′-phosphosulphate) to positions 4 and 6 respectively of the GalNAc residues of chondroitin. We showed previously that C4ST-1 purified from rat chondrosarcoma and recombinant C4ST-1 both transfer sulphate efficiently to position 4 of the GalNAc residues of DSDS (desulphated dermatan sulphate). We report here the specificity of C4ST-1 and C6ST-1 in terms of uronic acid residue recognition around the GalNAc residue to which sulphate is transferred. When [35S]glycosaminoglycans formed from DSDS after incubation with [35S]PAPS and C4ST-1 were digested with chondroitinase ACII, a major part of the radioactivity was recovered in disaccharide fractions and the remainder distributed to tetrasaccharides and larger fractions, indicating that C4ST-1 mainly transferred sulphate to position 4 of the GalNAc residue located at the GlcA-GalNAc-GlcA sequence. Structural analysis of tetrasaccharide and larger oligosaccharide fractions indicated that C4ST-1 mainly transferred sulphate to the GalNAc residue adjacent to the reducing side of the GlcA residue. On the other hand, when [35S]glycosaminoglycans formed from DSDS after incubation with [35S]PAPS and C6ST-1 were digested with chondroitinase ACII, a major part of the radioactivity was recovered in fractions larger than hexasaccharides, indicating that C6ST-1 transferred sulphate to the GalNAc residues located in the L-iduronic acid-rich region. Structural analysis of the tetrasaccharide and larger oligosaccharide fractions indicated that C6ST-1 showed very little preference for the GalNAc residue neighbouring the GlcA residue. These results indicate that C4ST-1 and C6ST-1 differ from each other in the recognition of uronic acid residues adjacent to the targeted GalNAc residue. PMID:15324304

  20. The complete amino acid sequence of chitinase-B from the leaves of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, M; Yamagami, T; Funatsu, G

    1995-05-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pokeweed leaf chitinase-B (PLC-B) has been determined by first sequencing all 19 tryptic peptides derived from the reduced and S-carboxymethylated (RCm-) PLC-B and then connecting them by analyzing the chymotryptic peptides from three fragments produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage of RCm-PLC-B. PLC-B consists of 274 amino acid residues and has a molecular mass of 29,473 Da. Six cysteine residues are linked by disulfide bonds between Cys20 and Cys67, Cys50 and Cys57, and Cys159 and Cys188. From 58-68% sequence homology of PLC-B with five class III chitinases, it was concluded that PLC-B is a basic class III chitinase.

  1. Amino acid sequence of anionic peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei.

    PubMed

    Baker, Margaret R; Zhao, Hongwei; Sakharov, Ivan Yu; Li, Qing X

    2014-12-10

    Palm peroxidases are extremely stable and have uncommon substrate specificity. This study was designed to fill in the knowledge gap about the structures of a peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei. The complete amino acid sequence and partial glycosylation were determined by MALDI-top-down sequencing of native windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP), MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS of WPTP tryptic peptides, and cDNA sequencing. The propeptide of WPTP contained N- and C-terminal signal sequences which contained 21 and 17 amino acid residues, respectively. Mature WPTP was 306 amino acids in length, and its carbohydrate content ranged from 21% to 29%. Comparison to closely related royal palm tree peroxidase revealed structural features that may explain differences in their substrate specificity. The results can be used to guide engineering of WPTP and its novel applications.

  2. Complete amino acid sequence and structure characterization of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Theerasilp, S; Hitotsuya, H; Nakajo, S; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1989-04-25

    The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of modifying sour taste into sweet taste. The complete amino acid sequence of miraculin purified from miracle fruits by a newly developed method (Theerasilp, S., and Kurihara, Y. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11536-11539) was determined by an automatic Edman degradation method. Miraculin was a single polypeptide with 191 amino acid residues. The calculated molecular weight based on the amino acid sequence and the carbohydrate content (13.9%) was 24,600. Asn-42 and Asn-186 were linked N-glycosidically to carbohydrate chains. High homology was found between the amino acid sequences of miraculin and soybean trypsin inhibitor. PMID:2708331

  3. SigniSite: Identification of residue-level genotype-phenotype correlations in protein multiple sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Leon Eyrich; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2013-07-01

    Identifying which mutation(s) within a given genotype is responsible for an observable phenotype is important in many aspects of molecular biology. Here, we present SigniSite, an online application for subgroup-free residue-level genotype-phenotype correlation. In contrast to similar methods, SigniSite does not require any pre-definition of subgroups or binary classification. Input is a set of protein sequences where each sequence has an associated real number, quantifying a given phenotype. SigniSite will then identify which amino acid residues are significantly associated with the data set phenotype. As output, SigniSite displays a sequence logo, depicting the strength of the phenotype association of each residue and a heat-map identifying 'hot' or 'cold' regions. SigniSite was benchmarked against SPEER, a state-of-the-art method for the prediction of specificity determining positions (SDP) using a set of human immunodeficiency virus protease-inhibitor genotype-phenotype data and corresponding resistance mutation scores from the Stanford University HIV Drug Resistance Database, and a data set of protein families with experimentally annotated SDPs. For both data sets, SigniSite was found to outperform SPEER. SigniSite is available at: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/SigniSite/. PMID:23761454

  4. Determination of residue-specific acid dissociation constants for peptides by band-selective homonuclear-decoupled (1)H NMR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Rabenstein, Dallas L

    2007-09-01

    Acid dissociation constants of side-chain acidic groups of amino acid residues in peptides can be determined by 1H NMR, provided resonances can be resolved for carbon-bonded reporter protons located near the acidic group. We report here that the increased resolution of the band-selective homonuclear-decoupled (BASHD) TOCSY experiment greatly extends the range of application of the NMR method for determination of residue-specific, side-chain acid dissociation constants of peptides that contain multiple residues of the same amino acid. Chemical shift-pH titration curves are obtained from cross-peaks for reporter protons in BASHD-TOCSY spectra measured as a function of pH. The method is based on using sequence-dependent differences in the chemical shifts of resonances for the backbone CalphaH protons and the increased resolution in BASHD-TOCSY spectra from collapse of CalphaH multiplets to singlets in the F1 dimension to resolve resonances for the side-chain reporter protons. Application of the method is demonstrated by determination of residue-specific pKA values for each of the side-chain ammonium groups of the six lysine residues in the hexadecapeptide Ac-SRGKAKVKAKVKDQTK-NH2. Chemical shift-pH titration curves were obtained for the lysine side-chain CepsilonH2 reporter protons from their resolved CalphaH-CepsilonH2 TOCSY cross-peaks in BASHD-TOCSY spectra. Relative acidities of the six ammonium groups were also determined from the residue specific chemical shift-pH titration data by a pH-independent method, and calculation of fractional concentrations of protonation microspecies using the residue-specific pKAs is also described.

  5. Phase-cycled averaging for the suppression of residual magnetisation in SPI sequences.

    PubMed

    Kaffanke, Joachim B; Stöcker, Tony; Romanzetti, Sandro; Dierkes, Thomas; Leach, Martin O; Shah, N Jon

    2009-08-01

    Residual magnetisation is one of the major sources of artefacts in single point imaging sequences with short repetition times. The unwanted signal is caused by non-dephased transverse magnetisation excited in preceding acquisition cycles. Therefore, the problem emerges mainly around the centre of k-space and has been solved in the past by additional spoiling gradients. In this work, unwanted residual magnetisation acquired with the SPRITE sequence was investigated and a new method for the suppression of residual magnetisation is presented. It is shown that residual magnetisation experiences a different phase encoding leading to residual images with a different FOV. A phase cycling filter is able to eliminate the unwanted signal. Furthermore, a description of all signal components that occur is presented using an operator notation. The notation is new in this field with respect to its completeness. That is, the signal description is based on an understanding of single point imaging sequences, such as SPRITE, by the use of an extended phase encode graph. A prominent in vivo example is that of sodium imaging in biological tissue where transverse relaxation times are such that unwanted coherences can occur and therefore residual magnetisation becomes a significant problem. For instance, sodium in biological tissue has two transverse relaxation times of approximately 3ms and 15ms at 4T and this can result in significant artefacts if the encoding time is short and TR<3ms. PMID:19447054

  6. cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of myoglobins from nine species of whales and dolphins.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, Kentaro; Mita, Hajime; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Fujise, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Tadasu; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2006-10-01

    We determined the myoglobin (Mb) cDNA sequences of nine cetaceans, of which six are the first reports of Mb sequences: sei whale (Balaenoptera borealis), Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni), pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps), Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri), Longman's beaked whale (Indopacetus pacificus), and melon-headed whale (Peponocephala electra), and three confirm the previously determined chemical amino acid sequences: sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), common minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) and pantropical spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata). We found two types of Mb in the skeletal muscle of pantropical spotted dolphin: Mb I with the same amino acid sequence as that deposited in the protein database, and Mb II, which differs at two amino acid residues compared with Mb I. Using an alignment of the amino acid or cDNA sequences of cetacean Mb, we constructed a phylogenetic tree by the NJ method. Clustering of cetacean Mb amino acid and cDNA sequences essentially follows the classical taxonomy of cetaceans, suggesting that Mb sequence data is valid for classification of cetaceans at least to the family level. PMID:16962803

  7. Studies on monotreme proteins. VII. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from the platypus, Ornithoryhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W K; Thompson, E O

    1976-03-01

    Myoglobin isolated from skeletal muscle of the platypus contains 153 amino acid residues. The complete amino acid sequence has been determined following cleavage with cyanogen bromide and further digestion of the four fragments with trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin and thermolysin. Sequences of the purified peptides were determined by the dansyl-Edman procedure. The amino acid sequence showed 25 differences from human myoglobin and 24 from kangaroo myoglobin. Amino acid sequences in myoglobins are more conserved than sequences in the alpha- and beta-globin chains, and platypus myoglobin shows a similar number of variations in sequence to kangaroo myoglobin when compared with myoglobin of other species. The date of divergence of the platypus from other mammals was estimated at 102 +/- 31 million years, based on the number of amino acid differences between species and allowing for mutations during the evolutionary period. This estimate differs widely from the estimate given by similar treatment of the alpha- and beta-chain sequences and a constant rate of mutation of globin chains is not supported. PMID:962722

  8. The consensus sequence for self-catalyzed site-specific G residue depurination in DNA.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Olga; Smith, Alexander; Fresco, Jacques R

    2011-10-21

    The sequence variation tolerated within the stem-loop-forming genomic consensus sequence for self-catalyzed site-specific depurination of G residues is explored. The variation in self-depurination kinetics with sequence changes in the loop residues and stem base pairs, as well as with pH, provides insights into the self-catalytic mechanism. The observations suggest that self-catalyzed depurination of the 5' G residue of the loop consensus sequence 5'-G(T/A)GG-3' probably involves formation of some intraloop hydrogen-bonded base pair with the 3'-terminal G residue; although the electronic structure of both these G residues is retained, their 2-amino substituents are not critical for that interaction. The strong dependence of the self-depurination kinetics on stem stability suggests that the lifetime of some strained form of the loop is controlled by the integrity of the stem. In addition to the effects of length and base pair sequence on stem stability, there is a base pair requirement at the base of the loop: self-depurination is suppressed by 5'-C·G-3', 5'-A·T-3', or a mismatch but is most favored by 5'T·A3' and less so by 5'-G·C-3'. The occurrence in T and G of a similarly located carbonyl capable of hydrogen-bonding to the water molecule required for glycosyl bond hydrolysis may explain this sequence requirement. In toto, the more complete definition of the consensus sequence provided by this investigation enables a more accurate estimation of their number in the human genome and their distribution among different genes.

  9. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  10. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2006-07-04

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  11. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  12. Complete amino acid sequence of the myoglobin from the Pacific spotted dolphin, Stenella attenuata graffmani.

    PubMed

    Jones, B N; Wang, C C; Dwulet, F E; Lehman, L D; Meuth, J L; Bogardt, R A; Gurd, F R

    1979-04-25

    The complete amino acid sequence of the major component myoglobin from the Pacific spotted dolphin, Stenella attenuata graffmani, was determined by the automated Edman degradation of several large peptides obtained by specific cleavage of the protein. The acetimidated apomyoglobin was selectively cleaved at its two methionyl residues with cyanogen bromide and at its three arginyl residues by trypsin. By subjecting four of these peptides and the apomyoglobin to automated Edman degradation, over 80% of the primary structure of the protein was obtained. The remainder of the covalent structure was determined by the sequence analysis of peptides that resulted from further digestion of the central cyanogen bromide fragment. This fragment was cleaved at its glutamyl residues with staphylococcal protease and its lysyl residues with trypsin. The action of trypsin was restricted to the lysyl residues by chemical modification of the single arginyl residue of the fragment with 1,2-cyclohexanedione. The primary structure of this myoglobin proved to be identical with that from the Atlantic bottlenosed dolphin and Pacific common dolphin but differs from the myoglobins of the killer whale and pilot whale at two positions. The above sequence identities and differences reflect the close taxonomic relationship of these five species of Cetacea. PMID:454657

  13. 40 CFR 180.155 - 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Tolerances § 180.155 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established for the combined residues of the plant growth regulator 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and its... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid;...

  14. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  15. Solid phase sequencing of double-stranded nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Cantor, Charles R.; Koster, Hubert; Smith, Cassandra L.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing of target double-stranded nucleic acid sequences, to nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probe comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include nucleic acids in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated determination of molecular weights and identification of the target sequence.

  16. Extension of UNRES force field to treat polypeptide chains with D-amino-acid residues

    PubMed Central

    Sieradzan, Adam K.; Hansmann, Ulrich H.E.; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam

    2013-01-01

    gramicidin A, which is a dimer of two chains, each possessing an alternating D-Tyr-L-Tyr sequence, and similar peptides. The side-chain and correlation potentials for D-amino-acid residues were obtained by applying the reflection about the Ci-1α⋯Ciα⋯Ci+1α plane to the respective potentials for the L-amino-acid residues. PMID:24729761

  17. Cropping sequence and nitrogen fertilization impact on surface residue, soil carbon sequestration, and crop yields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information is needed on the effect of management practices on soil C storage for obtaining C credit. The effects of tillage, cropping sequence, and N fertilization were evaluated on dryland crop and surface residue C and soil organic C (SOC) at the 0-120 cm depth in a Williams loam from 2006 to 201...

  18. Shark myoglobins. II. Isolation, characterization and amino acid sequence of myoglobin from Galeorhinus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Suzuki, T; Yata, T

    1985-01-01

    Native oxymyoglobin (MbO2) was isolated from red muscle of G. japonicus by chromatographic separation from metmyoglobin (metMb) on DEAE-cellulose and the amino acid sequence of the major chain was determined with the aid of sequence homology with that of G. australis. It was shown to differ in amino acid sequence from that of G. australis by 10 replacements, to be acetylated at the amino terminus and to contain glutamine at the distal (E7) residue. It was also shown to have a spectrum very similar to that of mammalian MbO2. However, the pH-dependence for the autoxidation of MbO2 was seen to be quite different from that of sperm whale (Physeter catodon) MbO2. Although the sequence homology between sperm whale and G. japonicus myoglobins is about 40%, their hydropathy profiles were very similar, indicating that they have a similar geometry in their globin folding.

  19. Estimation of Position Specific Energy as a Feature of Protein Residues from Sequence Alone for Structural Classification.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Sumaiya; Hoque, Md Tamjidul

    2016-01-01

    A set of features computed from the primary amino acid sequence of proteins, is crucial in the process of inducing a machine learning model that is capable of accurately predicting three-dimensional protein structures. Solutions for existing protein structure prediction problems are in need of features that can capture the complexity of molecular level interactions. With a view to this, we propose a novel approach to estimate position specific estimated energy (PSEE) of a residue using contact energy and predicted relative solvent accessibility (RSA). Furthermore, we demonstrate PSEE can be reasonably estimated based on sequence information alone. PSEE is useful in identifying the structured as well as unstructured or, intrinsically disordered region of a protein by computing favorable and unfavorable energy respectively, characterized by appropriate threshold. The most intriguing finding, verified empirically, is the indication that the PSEE feature can effectively classify disorder versus ordered residues and can segregate different secondary structure type residues by computing the constituent energies. PSEE values for each amino acid strongly correlate with the hydrophobicity value of the corresponding amino acid. Further, PSEE can be used to detect the existence of critical binding regions that essentially undergo disorder-to-order transitions to perform crucial biological functions. Towards an application of disorder prediction using the PSEE feature, we have rigorously tested and found that a support vector machine model informed by a set of features including PSEE consistently outperforms a model with an identical set of features with PSEE removed. In addition, the new disorder predictor, DisPredict2, shows competitive performance in predicting protein disorder when compared with six existing disordered protein predictors. PMID:27588752

  20. Estimation of Position Specific Energy as a Feature of Protein Residues from Sequence Alone for Structural Classification

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Sumaiya; Hoque, Md Tamjidul

    2016-01-01

    A set of features computed from the primary amino acid sequence of proteins, is crucial in the process of inducing a machine learning model that is capable of accurately predicting three-dimensional protein structures. Solutions for existing protein structure prediction problems are in need of features that can capture the complexity of molecular level interactions. With a view to this, we propose a novel approach to estimate position specific estimated energy (PSEE) of a residue using contact energy and predicted relative solvent accessibility (RSA). Furthermore, we demonstrate PSEE can be reasonably estimated based on sequence information alone. PSEE is useful in identifying the structured as well as unstructured or, intrinsically disordered region of a protein by computing favorable and unfavorable energy respectively, characterized by appropriate threshold. The most intriguing finding, verified empirically, is the indication that the PSEE feature can effectively classify disorder versus ordered residues and can segregate different secondary structure type residues by computing the constituent energies. PSEE values for each amino acid strongly correlate with the hydrophobicity value of the corresponding amino acid. Further, PSEE can be used to detect the existence of critical binding regions that essentially undergo disorder-to-order transitions to perform crucial biological functions. Towards an application of disorder prediction using the PSEE feature, we have rigorously tested and found that a support vector machine model informed by a set of features including PSEE consistently outperforms a model with an identical set of features with PSEE removed. In addition, the new disorder predictor, DisPredict2, shows competitive performance in predicting protein disorder when compared with six existing disordered protein predictors. PMID:27588752

  1. SeqX: a tool to detect, analyze and visualize residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid structures

    PubMed Central

    Biro, Jan C; Fördös, Gergely

    2005-01-01

    Background The interacting residues of protein and nucleic acid sequences are close to each other – they are co-located. Structure databases (like Protein Data Bank, PDB and Nucleic Acid Data Bank, NDB) contain all information about these co-locations; however it is not an easy task to penetrate this complex information. We developed a JAVA tool, called SeqX for this purpose. Results SeqX tool is useful to detect, analyze and visualize residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid structures. The user a. selects a structure from PDB; b. chooses an atom that is commonly present in every residues of the nucleic acid and/or protein structure(s) c. defines a distance from these atoms (3–15 Å). The SeqX tool detects every residue that is located within the defined distances from the defined "backbone" atom(s); provides a DotPlot-like visualization (Residues Contact Map), and calculates the frequency of every possible residue pairs (Residue Contact Table) in the observed structure. It is possible to exclude +/- 1 to 10 neighbor residues in the same polymeric chain from detection, which greatly improves the specificity of detections (up to 60% when tested on dsDNA). Results obtained on protein structures showed highly significant correlations with results obtained from literature (p < 0.0001, n = 210, four different subsets). The co-location frequency of physico-chemically compatible amino acids is significantly higher than is calculated and expected in random protein sequences (p < 0.0001, n = 80). Conclusion The tool is simple and easy to use and provides a quick and reliable visualization and analyses of residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid structures. Availability and requirements SeqX, Java J2SE Runtime Environment 5.0 (available from [see Additional file 1] ) and at least a 1 GHz processor and with a minimum 256 Mb RAM. Source codes are available from the authors. PMID:16011796

  2. Protein meta-functional signatures from combining sequence, structure, evolution, and amino acid property information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Horst, Jeremy A; Cheng, Gong; Nickle, David C; Samudrala, Ram

    2008-09-26

    Protein function is mediated by different amino acid residues, both their positions and types, in a protein sequence. Some amino acids are responsible for the stability or overall shape of the protein, playing an indirect role in protein function. Others play a functionally important role as part of active or binding sites of the protein. For a given protein sequence, the residues and their degree of functional importance can be thought of as a signature representing the function of the protein. We have developed a combination of knowledge- and biophysics-based function prediction approaches to elucidate the relationships between the structural and the functional roles of individual residues and positions. Such a meta-functional signature (MFS), which is a collection of continuous values representing the functional significance of each residue in a protein, may be used to study proteins of known function in greater detail and to aid in experimental characterization of proteins of unknown function. We demonstrate the superior performance of MFS in predicting protein functional sites and also present four real-world examples to apply MFS in a wide range of settings to elucidate protein sequence-structure-function relationships. Our results indicate that the MFS approach, which can combine multiple sources of information and also give biological interpretation to each component, greatly facilitates the understanding and characterization of protein function.

  3. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V.

    PubMed Central

    Jenny, R J; Pittman, D D; Toole, J J; Kriz, R W; Aldape, R A; Hewick, R M; Kaufman, R J; Mann, K G

    1987-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A) tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approximately equal to 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approximately 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approximately 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues. Images PMID:3110773

  4. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, R.J.; Pittman, D.D.; Toole, J.J.; Kriz, R.W.; Aldape, R.A.; Hewick, R.M.; Kaufman, R.J.; Mann, K.G.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A)tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approx. 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approx. 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approx. 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues.

  5. Sequences and antimycoplasmic properties of longibrachins LGB II and LGB III, two novel 20-residue peptaibols from Trichoderma longibrachiatum.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, G; Goulard, C; Prigent, Y; Bodo, B; Wróblewski, H; Rebuffat, S

    2001-02-01

    Longibrachins are members of the class of natural Aib-containing peptides designated as peptaibols. Six longibrachins, LGA I-IV and LGB II and III, were purified from a Trichoderma longibrachiatum strain by a procedure employing several chromatography steps including reversed-phase HPLC. The amino acid sequence determination was based on a combination of liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (LSIMS) and two-dimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Longibrachins are 20-residue peptaibols with a C-terminal phenylalaninol and either neutral (LGA; Gln18) or acidic (LGB; Glu18) character. Longibrachins LGB II and III have novel sequences. Both longibrachins LGA and LGB show significant bactericidal activity against mycoplasmas (Acholeplasma, Mycoplasma, and Spiroplasma), with minimal inhibitory concentrations in the range 1.56-12.5 microM (3-25 micrograms/mL), and also perturb the permeability of membrane bilayers. Longibrachin LGA IV is the most potent of the presently known 18-20-residue peptaibols. The antimicrobial and membrane-perturbing properties of longibrachins, which are described here for the first time, were shown to be correlated. PMID:11429993

  6. Amino acid and cDNA sequences of lysozyme from Hyalophora cecropia

    PubMed Central

    Engström, Å.; Xanthopoulos, K. G.; Boman, H. G.; Bennich, H.

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid and cDNA sequences of lysozyme from the giant silk moth Hyalophora cecropia have been determined. This enzyme is one of several immune proteins produced by the diapausing pupae after injection of bacteria. Cecropia lysozyme is composed of 120 amino acids, has a mol. wt. of 13.8 kd and shows great similarity with vertebrate lysozymes of the chicken type. The amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity and for the binding of substrate are essentially conserved. Three allelic variants of the Cecropia enzyme are identified. A comparison of the chicken and the Cecropia lysozymes shows that there is a 40% identity at both the amino acid and the nucleotide level. Some evolutionary aspects of the sequence data are discussed. PMID:16453632

  7. From Artificial Amino Acids to Sequence-Defined Targeted Oligoaminoamides.

    PubMed

    Morys, Stephan; Wagner, Ernst; Lächelt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Artificial oligoamino acids with appropriate protecting groups can be used for the sequential assembly of oligoaminoamides on solid-phase. With the help of these oligoamino acids multifunctional nucleic acid (NA) carriers can be designed and produced in highly defined topologies. Here we describe the synthesis of the artificial oligoamino acid Fmoc-Stp(Boc3)-OH, the subsequent assembly into sequence-defined oligomers and the formulation of tumor-targeted plasmid DNA (pDNA) polyplexes. PMID:27436323

  8. Two-stage selection of sequences from a random phage display library delineates both core residues and permitted structural range within an epitope.

    PubMed

    Miceli, R M; DeGraaf, M E; Fischer, H D

    1994-01-01

    Libraries of random peptides can be screened to identify species which interact with antibodies or receptors. Similarly, maps of native molecular interactions can frequently be deduced by screening a limited set of peptide fragments derived from sequences within a native antigen or ligand. However, the existence of cross-reactive sequences that mimic original epitopes and the limited replaceability of amino acid residues suggest that the sequence space accessible by a receptor can be much broader. Definition of this space is of particular importance where structural information is required for peptidomimetic or drug design. We have used a two-stage selection scheme to expand the sequence space accessible by a phage display library and to define peptide epitopes of the anti-FLAG octapeptide monoclonal M2 antibody. Affinity selection of a primary library of 2 x 10(6) random decapeptides identified a non-contiguous core of three residues in the binding motif Tyr-Lys-Xaa-Xaa-Asp. A second stage library with 2 x 10(7) individual clones bearing the core motif but with the remaining flanking and internal residues re-randomized permitted access to a broader sequence space represented in a library equivalent to several orders of magnitude larger. Data here demonstrate that extended access to binding sequence space permitted by multi-stage screening of phage display libraries can reveal not only essential residues required for ligand binding, but also the ligand structural range permitted within the receptor binding pocket.

  9. Oxidation in Acidic Medium of Lignins from Agricultural Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labat, Gisele Aparecida Amaral; Gonçalves, Adilson Roberto

    Agricultural residues as sugarcane straw and bagasse are burned in boilers for generation of energy in sugar and alcohol industries. However, excess of those by-products could be used to obtain products with higher value. Pulping process generates cellulosic pulps and lignin. The lignin could be oxidized and applied in effluent treatments for heavy metal removal. Oxidized lignin presents very strong chelating properties. Lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse were obtained by ethanol-water pulping. Oxidation of lignins was carried out using acetic acid and Co/Mn/Br catalytical system at 50, 80, and 115 °C for 5 h. Kinetics of the reaction was accomplished by measuring the UV-visible region. Activation energy was calculated for lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse (34.2 and 23.4 kJ mol-1, respectively). The first value indicates higher cross-linked formation. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy data of samples collected during oxidation are very similar. Principal component analysis applied to spectra shows only slight structure modifications in lignins after oxidation reaction.

  10. Complete amino acid sequence of chitinase-A from leaves of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Yamagami, T; Tanigawa, M; Ishiguro, M; Funatsu, G

    1998-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pokeweed leaf chitinase-A was determined. First all 11 tryptic peptides from the reduced and S-carboxymethylated form of the enzyme were sequenced. Then the same form of the enzyme was cleaved with cyanogen bromide, giving three fragments. The fragments were digested with chymotrypsin or Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease. Last, the 11 tryptic peptides were put in order. Of seven cysteine residues, six were linked by disulfide bonds (between Cys25 and Cys74, Cys89 and Cys98, and Cys195 and Cys208); Cys176 was free. The enzyme consisted of 208 amino acid residues and had a molecular weight of 22,391. It consisted of only one polypeptide chain without a chitin-binding domain. The length of the chain was almost the same as that of the catalytic domains of class IL chitinases. These findings suggested that this enzyme is a new kind of class IIL chitinase, although its sequence resembles that of catalytic domains of class IL chitinases more than that of the class IIL chitinases reported so far. Discussion on the involvement of specific tryptophan residue in the active site of PLC-A is also given based on the sequence similarity with rye seed chitinase-c.

  11. Investigation of a substrate-specifying residue within Papaver somniferum and Catharanthus roseus aromatic amino acid decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Torrens-Spence, Michael P; Lazear, Michael; von Guggenberg, Renee; Ding, Haizhen; Li, Jianyong

    2014-10-01

    Plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs) catalyze the decarboxylation of aromatic amino acids with either benzene or indole rings. Because the substrate selectivity of AAADs is intimately related to their physiological functions, primary sequence data and their differentiation could provide significant physiological insights. However, due to general high sequence identity, plant AAAD substrate specificities have been difficult to identify through primary sequence comparison. In this study, bioinformatic approaches were utilized to identify several active site residues within plant AAAD enzymes that may impact substrate specificity. Next a Papaver somniferum tyrosine decarboxylase (TyDC) was selected as a model to verify our putative substrate-dictating residues through mutation. Results indicated that mutagenesis of serine 372 to glycine enables the P. somniferum TyDC to use 5-hydroxytryptophan as a substrate, and reduces the enzyme activity toward 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (dopa). Additionally, the reverse mutation in a Catharanthus roseus tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) enables the mutant enzyme to utilize tyrosine and dopa as substrates with a reduced affinity toward tryptophan. Molecular modeling and molecular docking of the P. somniferum TyDC and the C. roseus TDC enzymes provided a structural basis to explain alterations in substrate specificity. Identification of an active site residue that impacts substrate selectivity produces a primary sequence identifier that may help differentiate the indolic and phenolic substrate specificities of individual plant AAADs.

  12. Newly identified essential amino acid residues affecting Δ8-sphingolipid desaturase activity revealed by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Fen; Song, Li-Ying; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Yin, Wei-Bo; Chen, Yu-Hong; Wang, Richard R-C; Hu, Zan-Min

    2011-12-01

    In order to identify amino acid residues crucial for the enzymatic activity of Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturases, a sequence comparison was performed among Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturases and Δ(6)-fatty acid desaturases from various plants. In addition to the known conserved cytb(5) (cytochrome b(5)) HPGG motif and three conserved histidine boxes, they share additional 15 completely conserved residues. A series of site-directed mutants were generated using our previously isolated Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturase gene from Brassica rapa to evaluate the importance of these residues to the enzyme function. The mutants were functionally characterized by heterologous expression in yeast, allowing the identification of the products of the enzymes. The results revealed that residues H63, N203, D208, D210, and G368 were obligatorily required for the enzymatic activity, and substitution of the residues F59, W190, W345, L369 and Q372 markedly decreased the enzyme activity. Among them, replacement of the residues W190, L369 and Q372 also has significant influence on the ratio of the two enzyme products. Information obtained in this work provides the molecular basis for the Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturase activity and aids in our understanding of the structure-function relationships of the membrane-bound desaturases.

  13. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  14. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  15. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  16. Properties of nanocellulose isolated from corncob residue using sulfuric acid, formic acid, oxidative and mechanical methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Li, Bin; Du, Haishun; Lv, Dong; Zhang, Yuedong; Yu, Guang; Mu, Xindong; Peng, Hui

    2016-10-20

    In this work, nanocellulose was extracted from bleached corncob residue (CCR), an underutilized lignocellulose waste from furfural industry, using four different methods (i.e. sulfuric acid hydrolysis, formic acid (FA) hydrolysis, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation, and pulp refining, respectively). The self-assembled structure, morphology, dimension, crystallinity, chemical structure and thermal stability of prepared nanocellulose were investigated. FA hydrolysis produced longer cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) than the one obtained by sulfuric acid hydrolysis, and resulted in high crystallinity and thermal stability due to its preferential degradation of amorphous cellulose and lignin. The cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) with fine and individualized structure could be isolated by TEMPO-mediated oxidation. In comparison with other nanocellulose products, the intensive pulp refining led to the CNFs with the longest length and the thickest diameter. This comparative study can help to provide an insight into the utilization of CCR as a potential source for nanocellulose production. PMID:27474618

  17. Segments of amino acid sequence similarity in beta-amylases.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, F; Rhodes, C

    1988-01-01

    In alpha-amylases from animals, plants and bacteria and in beta-amylases from plants and bacteria a number of segments exhibit amino acid sequence similarity specific to the alpha or to the beta type, respectively. In the case of the beta-amylases the similar sequence regions are extensive and they are disrupted only by short interspersed dissimilar regions. Close to the C terminus, however, no such sequence similarity exist. PMID:2464171

  18. The amino acid sequence of Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) and golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) egg-white lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Kuramoto, M; Torikata, T

    1990-09-01

    The amino acids of Lady Amherst's pheasant and golden pheasant egg-white lysozymes have been sequenced. The carboxymethylated lysozymes were digested with trypsin followed by sequencing of the tryptic peptides. Lady Amherst's pheasant lysozyme proved to consist of 129 amino acid residues, and a relative molecular mass of 14,423 Da was calculated. This lysozyme had 6 amino acids substitutions when compared with hen egg-white lysozyme: Phe3 to Tyr, His15 to Leu, Gln41 to His, Asn77 to His, Gln 121 to Asn, and a newly found substitution of Ile124 to Thr. The amino acid sequence of golden pheasant lysozyme was identical to that of Lady Amherst's phesant lysozyme. The phylogenetic tree constructured by the comparison of amino acid sequences of phasianoid birds lysozymes revealed a minimum genetic distance between these pheasants and the turkey-peafowl group.

  19. The amino acid sequence of Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) and golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) egg-white lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Kuramoto, M; Torikata, T

    1990-09-01

    The amino acids of Lady Amherst's pheasant and golden pheasant egg-white lysozymes have been sequenced. The carboxymethylated lysozymes were digested with trypsin followed by sequencing of the tryptic peptides. Lady Amherst's pheasant lysozyme proved to consist of 129 amino acid residues, and a relative molecular mass of 14,423 Da was calculated. This lysozyme had 6 amino acids substitutions when compared with hen egg-white lysozyme: Phe3 to Tyr, His15 to Leu, Gln41 to His, Asn77 to His, Gln 121 to Asn, and a newly found substitution of Ile124 to Thr. The amino acid sequence of golden pheasant lysozyme was identical to that of Lady Amherst's phesant lysozyme. The phylogenetic tree constructured by the comparison of amino acid sequences of phasianoid birds lysozymes revealed a minimum genetic distance between these pheasants and the turkey-peafowl group. PMID:1368578

  20. Amino acid sequences of lower vertebrate parvalbumins and their evolution: parvalbumins of boa, turtle, and salamander.

    PubMed

    Maeda, N; Zhu, D X; Fitch, W M

    1984-11-01

    One major parvalbumin each was isolated from the skeletal muscle of two reptiles, a boa snake, Boa constrictor, and a map turtle, Graptemys geographica, while two parvalbumins were isolated from an amphibian, the salamander Amphiuma means. The amino acid sequences of all four parvalbumins were determined from the sequences of their tryptic peptides, which were ordered partially by homology to other parvalbumins. Phylogenetic study of these and 16 other parvalbumin sequences revealed that the turtle parvalbumin belongs to beta lineage, while the salamander sequences belong, one each, to the alpha and beta lineages defined by Goodman and Pechère (1977). Boa parvalbumin, however, while belonging to the beta lineage, clusters within the fish in all reasonably parsimonious trees. The most parsimonious trees show many parallel or back mutations in the evolution of many parvalbumin residues, although the residues responsible for Ca2+ binding are very well conserved. These most parsimonious trees show an actinopterygian rather than a crossoptyrigian origin of the tetrapods in both the alpha and beta groups. One of two electric eel parvalbumins is evolving more than 10 times faster than its paralogous partner, suggesting it may be on its way to becoming a pseudogene. It is concluded that varying rates of amino acid replacement, much homoplasy, considerable gene duplication, plus complicated lineages make the set of parvalbumin sequences unsuitable for systematic study of the origin of the tetrapods and other higher-taxa divergence, although it may be suitable within a genus or family.

  1. Amino-acid sequence of a cooperative, dimeric myoglobin from the gastropod mollusc, Buccinum undatum L.

    PubMed

    Wen, D; Laursen, R A

    1994-10-19

    The complete amino-acid sequence of a dimeric myoglobin from the radular mussel of the gastropod mollusc, Buccinum undatum L. has been determined. The globin, which shows cooperative binding of oxygen, contains 146 amino acids, is N-terminal aminoacetylated, and has histidine residues at position 65 and 97, corresponding to the heme-binding histidines seen in mammalian myoglobins. It shows about 75% and 50% homology, respectively, with the dimeric molluscan myoglobins from Busycon canaliculatum and Cerithidea rhizophorarum, the former of which also shows weak cooperatively, but much less similarity to other species of myoglobin and hemoglobin.

  2. Self-catalyzed site-specific depurination of guanine residues within gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Olga; Coulter, Richard; Fresco, Jacques R

    2006-03-21

    A self-catalyzed, site-specific guanine-depurination activity has been found to occur in short gene sequences with a potential to form a stem-loop structure. The critical features of that catalytic intermediate are a 5'-G-T-G-G-3' loop and an adjacent 5'-T.A-3' base pair of a short duplex stem stable enough to fix the loop structure required for depurination of its 5'-G residue. That residue is uniquely depurinated with a rate some 5 orders of magnitude faster than that of random "spontaneous" depurination. In contrast, all other purine residues in the sequence depurinate at the spontaneous background rate. The reaction requires no divalent cations or other cofactors and occurs under essentially physiological conditions. Such stem-loops can form in duplex DNA under superhelical stress, and their critical sequence features have been found at numerous sites in the human genome. Self-catalyzed stem-loop-mediated depurination leading to flexible apurinic sites may therefore serve some important biological role, e.g., in nucleosome positioning, genetic recombination, or chromosome superfolding.

  3. PDP-CON: prediction of domain/linker residues in protein sequences using a consensus approach.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Basu, Subhadip; Zubek, Julian; Kundu, Mahantapas; Nasipuri, Mita; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-04-01

    The prediction of domain/linker residues in protein sequences is a crucial task in the functional classification of proteins, homology-based protein structure prediction, and high-throughput structural genomics. In this work, a novel consensus-based machine-learning technique was applied for residue-level prediction of the domain/linker annotations in protein sequences using ordered/disordered regions along protein chains and a set of physicochemical properties. Six different classifiers-decision tree, Gaussian naïve Bayes, linear discriminant analysis, support vector machine, random forest, and multilayer perceptron-were exhaustively explored for the residue-level prediction of domain/linker regions. The protein sequences from the curated CATH database were used for training and cross-validation experiments. Test results obtained by applying the developed PDP-CON tool to the mutually exclusive, independent proteins of the CASP-8, CASP-9, and CASP-10 databases are reported. An n-star quality consensus approach was used to combine the results yielded by different classifiers. The average PDP-CON accuracy and F-measure values for the CASP targets were found to be 0.86 and 0.91, respectively. The dataset, source code, and all supplementary materials for this work are available at https://cmaterju.org/cmaterbioinfo/ for noncommercial use.

  4. Soil Organic Matter Quality of an Oxisol Affected by Plant Residues and Crop Sequence under No-Tillage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cora, Jose; Marcelo, Adolfo

    2013-04-01

    Plant residues are considered the primarily resource for soil organic matter (SOM) formation and the amounts and properties of plant litter are important controlling factors for the SOM quality. We determined the amounts, quality and decomposition rate of plant residues and the effects of summer and winter crop sequences on soil organic C (TOC) content, both particulate organic C (POC) and mineral-associated organic C (MOC) pools and humic substances in a Brazilian Rhodic Eutrudox soil under a no-tillage system. The organic C analysis in specifics pools used in this study was effective and should be adopted in tropical climates to evaluate the soil quality and the sustainability of various cropping systems. Continuous growth of soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) on summer provided higher contents of soil POC and continuous growth of maize (Zea mays L.) provided higher soil humic acid and MOC contents. Summer soybean-maize rotation provided the higher plant diversity, which likely improved the soil microbial activity and the soil organic C consumption. The winter sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.), pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp), oilseed radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum (L.) Leeke) enhanced the soil MOC, a finding that is attributable to the higher N content of the crop residue. Sunn hemp and pigeon pea provided the higher soil POC content. Sunn hemp showed better performance and positive effects on the SOM quality, making it a suitable winter crop choice for tropical conditions with a warm and dry winter.

  5. Stereochemical Sequence Ion Selectivity: Proline versus Pipecolic-acid-containing Protonated Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Guan, Shanshan; Bythell, Benjamin J.

    2016-10-01

    Substitution of proline by pipecolic acid, the six-membered ring congener of proline, results in vastly different tandem mass spectra. The well-known proline effect is eliminated and amide bond cleavage C-terminal to pipecolic acid dominates instead. Why do these two ostensibly similar residues produce dramatically differing spectra? Recent evidence indicates that the proton affinities of these residues are similar, so are unlikely to explain the result [Raulfs et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 25, 1705-1715 (2014)]. An additional hypothesis based on increased flexibility was also advocated. Here, we provide a computational investigation of the "pipecolic acid effect," to test this and other hypotheses to determine if theory can shed additional light on this fascinating result. Our calculations provide evidence for both the increased flexibility of pipecolic-acid-containing peptides, and structural changes in the transition structures necessary to produce the sequence ions. The most striking computational finding is inversion of the stereochemistry of the transition structures leading to "proline effect"-type amide bond fragmentation between the proline/pipecolic acid-congeners: R (proline) to S (pipecolic acid). Additionally, our calculations predict substantial stabilization of the amide bond cleavage barriers for the pipecolic acid congeners by reduction in deleterious steric interactions and provide evidence for the importance of experimental energy regime in rationalizing the spectra.

  6. Amino acid sequence analysis and characterization of a ribonuclease from starfish Asterias amurensis.

    PubMed

    Motoyoshi, Naomi; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Itagaki, Tadashi; Inokuchi, Norio

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to phylogenetically characterize the location of the RNase T2 enzyme in the starfish (Asterias amurensis). We isolated an RNase T2 ribonuclease (RNase Aa) from the ovaries of starfish and determined its amino acid sequence by protein chemistry and cloning cDNA encoding RNase Aa. The isolated protein had 231 amino acid residues, a predicted molecular mass of 25,906 Da, and an optimal pH of 5.0. RNase Aa preferentially released guanylic acid from the RNA. The catalytic sites of the RNase T2 family are conserved in RNase Aa; furthermore, the distribution of the cysteine residues in RNase Aa is similar to that in other animal and plant T2 RNases. RNase Aa is cleaved at two points: 21 residues from the N-terminus and 29 residues from the C-terminus; however, both fragments may remain attached to the protein via disulfide bridges, leading to the maintenance of its conformation, as suggested by circular dichroism spectrum analysis. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that starfish RNase Aa is evolutionarily an intermediate between protozoan and oyster RNases. PMID:26920046

  7. Acidic Residues in the Hfq Chaperone Increase the Selectivity of sRNA Binding and Annealing.

    PubMed

    Panja, Subrata; Santiago-Frangos, Andrew; Schu, Daniel J; Gottesman, Susan; Woodson, Sarah A

    2015-11-01

    Hfq facilitates gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), thereby affecting bacterial attributes such as biofilm formation and virulence. Escherichia coli Hfq recognizes specific U-rich and AAN motifs in sRNAs and target mRNAs, after which an arginine patch on the rim promotes base pairing between their complementary sequences. In the cell, Hfq must discriminate between many similar RNAs. Here, we report that acidic amino acids lining the sRNA binding channel between the inner pore and rim of the Hfq hexamer contribute to the selectivity of Hfq's chaperone activity. RNase footprinting, in vitro binding and stopped-flow fluorescence annealing assays showed that alanine substitution of D9, E18 or E37 strengthened RNA interactions with the rim of Hfq and increased annealing of non-specific or U-tailed RNA oligomers. Although the mutants were less able than wild-type Hfq to anneal sRNAs with wild-type rpoS mRNA, the D9A mutation bypassed recruitment of Hfq to an (AAN)4 motif in rpoS, both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that acidic residues normally modulate access of RNAs to the arginine patch. We propose that this selectivity limits indiscriminate target selection by E. coli Hfq and enforces binding modes that favor genuine sRNA and mRNA pairs.

  8. A new antifungal peptide from the seeds of Phytolacca americana: characterization, amino acid sequence and cDNA cloning.

    PubMed

    Shao, F; Hu, Z; Xiong, Y M; Huang, Q Z; WangCG; Zhu, R H; Wang, D C

    1999-03-19

    An antifungal peptide from seeds of Phytolacca americana, designated PAFP-s, has been isolated. The peptide is highly basic and consists of 38 residues with three disulfide bridges. Its molecular mass of 3929.0 was determined by mass spectrometry. The complete amino acid sequence was obtained from automated Edman degradation, and cDNA cloning was successfully performed by 3'-RACE. The deduced amino acid sequence of a partial cDNA corresponded to the amino acid sequence from chemical sequencing. PAFP-s exhibited a broad spectrum of antifungal activity, and its activities differed among various fungi. PAFP-s displayed no inhibitory activity towards Escherichia coli. PAFP-s shows significant sequence similarities and the same cysteine motif with Mj-AMPs, antimicrobial peptides from seeds of Mirabilis jalapa belonging to the knottin-type antimicrobial peptide.

  9. Sequence-specific formation of d-amino acids in a monoclonal antibody during light exposure.

    PubMed

    Mozziconacci, Olivier; Schöneich, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The photoirradiation of a monoclonal antibody 1 (mAb1) at λ = 254 nm and λmax = 305 nm resulted in the sequence-specific generation of d-Val, d-Tyr, and potentially d-Ala and d-Arg, in the heavy chain sequence [95-101] YCARVVY. d-Amino acid formation is most likely the product of reversible intermediary carbon-centered radical formation at the (α)C-positions of the respective amino acids ((α)C(•) radicals) through the action of Cys thiyl radicals (CysS(•)). The latter can be generated photochemically either through direct homolysis of cystine or through photoinduced electron transfer from Trp and/or Tyr residues. The potential of mAb1 sequences to undergo epimerization was first evaluated through covalent H/D exchange during photoirradiation in D2O, and proteolytic peptides exhibiting deuterium incorporation were monitored by HPLC-MS/MS analysis. Subsequently, mAb1 was photoirradiated in H2O, and peptides, for which deuterium incorporation in D2O had been documented, were purified by HPLC and subjected to hydrolysis and amino acid analysis. Importantly, not all peptide sequences which incorporated deuterium during photoirradiation in D2O also exhibited photoinduced d-amino acid formation. For example, the heavy chain sequence [12-18] VQPGGSL showed significant deuterium incorporation during photoirradiation in D2O, but no photoinduced formation of d-amino acids was detected. Instead this sequence contained ca. 22% d-Val in both a photoirradiated and a control sample. This observation could indicate that d-Val may have been generated either during production and/or storage or during sample preparation. While sample preparation did not lead to the formation of d-Val or other d-amino acids in the control sample for the heavy chain sequence [95-101] YCARVVY, we may have to consider that during hydrolysis N-terminal residues (such as in VQPGGSL) may be more prone to epimerization. We conclude that the photoinduced, radical-dependent formation of d-amino acids

  10. The amino acid sequence of the aspartate aminotransferase from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, V B; Maras, B; Barra, D; Doonan, S

    1991-01-01

    1. The single (cytosolic) aspartate aminotransferase was purified in high yield from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). 2. Amino-acid-sequence analysis was carried out by digestion of the protein with trypsin and with CNBr; some of the peptides produced were further subdigested with Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase or with pepsin. Peptides were sequenced by the dansyl-Edman method and/or by automated gas-phase methods. The amino acid sequence obtained was complete except for a probable gap of two residues as indicated by comparison with the structures of counterpart proteins in other species. 3. The N-terminus of the enzyme is blocked. Fast-atom-bombardment m.s. was used to identify the blocking group as an acetyl one. 4. Alignment of the sequence of the enzyme with those of vertebrate cytosolic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferases and with the enzyme from Escherichia coli showed that about 25% of residues are conserved between these distantly related forms. 5. Experimental details and confirmatory data for the results presented here are given in a Supplementary Publication (SUP 50164, 25 pages) that has been deposited at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa. Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7 BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1991) 273, 5. PMID:1859361

  11. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  12. PAIRpred: partner-specific prediction of interacting residues from sequence and structure.

    PubMed

    Minhas, Fayyaz ul Amir Afsar; Geiss, Brian J; Ben-Hur, Asa

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel partner-specific protein-protein interaction site prediction method called PAIRpred. Unlike most existing machine learning binding site prediction methods, PAIRpred uses information from both proteins in a protein complex to predict pairs of interacting residues from the two proteins. PAIRpred captures sequence and structure information about residue pairs through pairwise kernels that are used for training a support vector machine classifier. As a result, PAIRpred presents a more detailed model of protein binding, and offers state of the art accuracy in predicting binding sites at the protein level as well as inter-protein residue contacts at the complex level. We demonstrate PAIRpred's performance on Docking Benchmark 4.0 and recent CAPRI targets. We present a detailed performance analysis outlining the contribution of different sequence and structure features, together with a comparison to a variety of existing interface prediction techniques. We have also studied the impact of binding-associated conformational change on prediction accuracy and found PAIRpred to be more robust to such structural changes than existing schemes. As an illustration of the potential applications of PAIRpred, we provide a case study in which PAIRpred is used to analyze the nature and specificity of the interface in the interaction of human ISG15 protein with NS1 protein from influenza A virus. Python code for PAIRpred is available at http://combi.cs.colostate.edu/supplements/pairpred/. PMID:24243399

  13. 40 CFR 180.155 - 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues. 180.155 Section 180.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.155 1-Naphthaleneacetic...

  14. 40 CFR 180.155 - 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues. 180.155 Section 180.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.155 1-Naphthaleneacetic...

  15. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite p... million Bean, mung, sprouts 0.2 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with...

  16. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite p... million Bean, mung, sprouts 0.2 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with...

  17. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite p... million Bean, mung, sprouts 0.2 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with...

  18. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite p... million Bean, mung, sprouts 0.2 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with...

  19. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite p... million Bean, mung, sprouts 0.2 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with...

  20. Prognostic value of deep sequencing method for minimal residual disease detection in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Lahuerta, Juan J.; Pepin, François; González, Marcos; Barrio, Santiago; Ayala, Rosa; Puig, Noemí; Montalban, María A.; Paiva, Bruno; Weng, Li; Jiménez, Cristina; Sopena, María; Moorhead, Martin; Cedena, Teresa; Rapado, Immaculada; Mateos, María Victoria; Rosiñol, Laura; Oriol, Albert; Blanchard, María J.; Martínez, Rafael; Bladé, Joan; San Miguel, Jesús; Faham, Malek; García-Sanz, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the prognostic value of minimal residual disease (MRD) detection in multiple myeloma (MM) patients using a sequencing-based platform in bone marrow samples from 133 MM patients in at least very good partial response (VGPR) after front-line therapy. Deep sequencing was carried out in patients in whom a high-frequency myeloma clone was identified and MRD was assessed using the IGH-VDJH, IGH-DJH, and IGK assays. The results were contrasted with those of multiparametric flow cytometry (MFC) and allele-specific oligonucleotide polymerase chain reaction (ASO-PCR). The applicability of deep sequencing was 91%. Concordance between sequencing and MFC and ASO-PCR was 83% and 85%, respectively. Patients who were MRD– by sequencing had a significantly longer time to tumor progression (TTP) (median 80 vs 31 months; P < .0001) and overall survival (median not reached vs 81 months; P = .02), compared with patients who were MRD+. When stratifying patients by different levels of MRD, the respective TTP medians were: MRD ≥10−3 27 months, MRD 10−3 to 10−5 48 months, and MRD <10−5 80 months (P = .003 to .0001). Ninety-two percent of VGPR patients were MRD+. In complete response patients, the TTP remained significantly longer for MRD– compared with MRD+ patients (131 vs 35 months; P = .0009). PMID:24646471

  1. Prognostic value of deep sequencing method for minimal residual disease detection in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Lahuerta, Juan J; Pepin, François; González, Marcos; Barrio, Santiago; Ayala, Rosa; Puig, Noemí; Montalban, María A; Paiva, Bruno; Weng, Li; Jiménez, Cristina; Sopena, María; Moorhead, Martin; Cedena, Teresa; Rapado, Immaculada; Mateos, María Victoria; Rosiñol, Laura; Oriol, Albert; Blanchard, María J; Martínez, Rafael; Bladé, Joan; San Miguel, Jesús; Faham, Malek; García-Sanz, Ramón

    2014-05-15

    We assessed the prognostic value of minimal residual disease (MRD) detection in multiple myeloma (MM) patients using a sequencing-based platform in bone marrow samples from 133 MM patients in at least very good partial response (VGPR) after front-line therapy. Deep sequencing was carried out in patients in whom a high-frequency myeloma clone was identified and MRD was assessed using the IGH-VDJH, IGH-DJH, and IGK assays. The results were contrasted with those of multiparametric flow cytometry (MFC) and allele-specific oligonucleotide polymerase chain reaction (ASO-PCR). The applicability of deep sequencing was 91%. Concordance between sequencing and MFC and ASO-PCR was 83% and 85%, respectively. Patients who were MRD(-) by sequencing had a significantly longer time to tumor progression (TTP) (median 80 vs 31 months; P < .0001) and overall survival (median not reached vs 81 months; P = .02), compared with patients who were MRD(+). When stratifying patients by different levels of MRD, the respective TTP medians were: MRD ≥10(-3) 27 months, MRD 10(-3) to 10(-5) 48 months, and MRD <10(-5) 80 months (P = .003 to .0001). Ninety-two percent of VGPR patients were MRD(+). In complete response patients, the TTP remained significantly longer for MRD(-) compared with MRD(+) patients (131 vs 35 months; P = .0009).

  2. Significance of the C-terminal amino acid residue in mengovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Dmitrieva, Tatiana M; Alexeevski, Andrei V; Shatskaya, Galina S; Tolskaya, Elena A; Gmyl, Anatoly P; Khitrina, Elena V; Agol, Vadim I

    2007-08-15

    Replication of picornavirus genomes is accomplished by the virally encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). Although the primary structure of this enzyme exhibits a high level of conservation, there are several significant differences among different picornavirus genera. In particular, a comparative alignment indicates that the C-terminal sequences of cardiovirus RdRP (known also as 3D(pol)), are 1-amino-acid residue (arginine or tryptophan) longer than that of the enterovirus or rhinovirus enzymes. Here, it is shown that alterations of the last codon of the RdRP-encoding sequence of mengovirus RNA leading to deletion of the C-terminal Trp460 or its replacement by Ala or Phe dramatically impaired viral RNA replication and, in the former case, resulted in a quasi-infectious phenotype (i.e., the mutant RNA might generate a low yield of pseudorevertants acquiring a Tyr residue in place of the deleted Trp460). The replacement of Trp460 by His or Tyr did not appreciably alter the viral growth potential. Homology modeling of three-dimensional structure of mengovirus RdRP suggested that Trp460 may be involved in interaction between the thumb and palm domains of the enzyme. Specifically, Trp460 of the thumb may form a hydrogen bond with Thr219 and hydrophobically interact with Val216 of the palm. The proposed interactions were consistent with the results of in vivo SELEX experiment, which demonstrated that infectious virus could contain Ser or Thr at position 219 and hydrophobic Val, Leu, Ile, as well as Arg (whose side chain has a nonpolar part) at position 216. A similar thumb-palm domain interaction may be a general feature of several RdRPs and its possible functional significance is discussed. PMID:17467026

  3. A single gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residue in a novel cysteine-rich secretory protein without propeptide.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Karin; Thämlitz, Ann-Marie; Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara C; Stenflo, Johan

    2006-10-24

    Gamma-glutamyl carboxylase catalyzes the modification of specific glutamyl residues to gamma-carboxyglutamyl (Gla) residues in precursor proteins that possess the appropriate gamma-carboxylation recognition signal within the propeptide region. We describe the immunopurification and first biochemical characterization of an invertebrate high molecular weight Gla-containing protein with homologues in mammals. The protein, named GlaCrisp, was isolated from the venom of the marine cone snail Conus marmoreus. GlaCrisp gave intense signals in Western blot experiments employing the Gla-specific antibody M3B, and the presence of Gla was chemically confirmed by amino acid analysis after alkaline hydrolysis. Characterization of a full-length cDNA clone encoding GlaCrisp deduced a precursor containing an N-terminal signal peptide but, unlike other Gla-containing proteins, no apparent propeptide. The predicted mature protein of 265 amino acid residues showed considerable sequence similarity to the widely distributed cysteine-rich secretory protein family and closest similarity (65% identity) to the recently described substrate-specific protease Tex31. In addition, two cDNA clones encoding the precursors of two isoforms of GlaCrisp were identified. The predicted precursor isoforms differed at three amino acid positions (-6, 9, and 25). Analysis by Edman degradation and nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry, before and after methyl esterfication, identified a Gla residue at amino acid position 9 in GlaCrisp. This is the first example of a Gla-containing protein without an obvious gamma-carboxylation recognition site. The results define a new class of Gla proteins and support the notion that gamma-carboxylation of glutamyl residues is phylogenetically older than blood coagulation and the vertebrate lineage.

  4. Prebiotically plausible mechanisms increase compositional diversity of nucleic acid sequences

    PubMed Central

    Derr, Julien; Manapat, Michael L.; Rajamani, Sudha; Leu, Kevin; Xulvi-Brunet, Ramon; Joseph, Isaac; Nowak, Martin A.; Chen, Irene A.

    2012-01-01

    During the origin of life, the biological information of nucleic acid polymers must have increased to encode functional molecules (the RNA world). Ribozymes tend to be compositionally unbiased, as is the vast majority of possible sequence space. However, ribonucleotides vary greatly in synthetic yield, reactivity and degradation rate, and their non-enzymatic polymerization results in compositionally biased sequences. While natural selection could lead to complex sequences, molecules with some activity are required to begin this process. Was the emergence of compositionally diverse sequences a matter of chance, or could prebiotically plausible reactions counter chemical biases to increase the probability of finding a ribozyme? Our in silico simulations using a two-letter alphabet show that template-directed ligation and high concatenation rates counter compositional bias and shift the pool toward longer sequences, permitting greater exploration of sequence space and stable folding. We verified experimentally that unbiased DNA sequences are more efficient templates for ligation, thus increasing the compositional diversity of the pool. Our work suggests that prebiotically plausible chemical mechanisms of nucleic acid polymerization and ligation could predispose toward a diverse pool of longer, potentially structured molecules. Such mechanisms could have set the stage for the appearance of functional activity very early in the emergence of life. PMID:22319215

  5. Amino acid sequence of human cholinesterase. Annual report, 30 September 1984-30 September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Lockridge, O.

    1985-10-01

    The active-site serine residue is located 198 amino acids from the N-terminal. The active-site peptide was isolated from three different genetic types of human serum cholinesterase: from usual, atypical, and atypical-silent genotypes. It was found that the amino acid sequence of the active-site peptide was identical in all three genotypes. Comparison of the complete sequences of cholinesterase from human serum and acetylcholinesterase from the electric organ of Torpedo californica shows an identity of 53%. Cholinesterase is of interest to the Department of Defense because cholinesterase protects against organophosphate poisons of the type used in chemical warfare. The structural results presented here will serve as the basis for cloning the gene for cholinesterase. The potential uses of large amounts of cholinesterase would be for cleaning up spills of organophosphates and possibly for detoxifying exposed personnel.

  6. Intra-molecular cross-linking of acidic residues for protein structure studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Kruppa, Gary Hermann; Young, Malin M.; Novak, Petr; Schoeniger, Joseph S.

    2005-03-01

    Intra-molecular cross-linking has been suggested as a method of obtaining distance constraints that would be useful in developing structural models of proteins. Recent work published on intra-molecular cross-linking for protein structural studies has employed commercially available primary amine selective reagents that can cross-link lysine residues to other lysine residues or the amino terminus. Previous work using these cross-linkers has shown that for several proteins of known structure, the number of cross-links that can be obtained experimentally may be small compared to what would be expected from the known structure, due to the relative reactivity, distribution, and solvent accessibility of the lysines in the protein sequence. To overcome these limitations we have investigated the use of cross-linking reagents that can react with other reactive sidechains in proteins. We used 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) to activate the carboxylic acid containing residues, aspartic acid (D), glutamic acid (E), and the carboxy terminus (O), for cross-linking reactions. Once activated, the DEO sidechains can react to form 'zero-length' cross-links with nearby primary amine containing resides, lysines (K) and the amino terminus (X), via the formation of a new amide bond. We also show that the EDC-activated DEO sidechains can be cross-linked to each other using dihydrazides, two hydrazide moieties connected by an alkyl cross-linker ann of variable length. Using these reagents, we have found three new 'zero-length' cross-links in ubiquitin consistent with its known structure (M1-E16, M1-E18, and K63-E64). Using the dihydrazide cross-linkers, we have identified 2 new cross-links (D21-D32 and E24-D32) unambiguously. Using a library of dihydrazide cross-linkers with varying arm length, we have shown that there is a minimum arm length required for the DEO-DEO cross-links of 5.8 angstroms. These results show that additional structural information

  7. The amino acid sequence of GTP:AMP phosphotransferase from beef-heart mitochondria. Extensive homology with cytosolic adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Wieland, B; Tomasselli, A G; Noda, L H; Frank, R; Schulz, G E

    1984-09-01

    The amino acid sequence of GTP:AMP phosphotransferase (AK3) from beef-heart mitochondria has been determined, except for one segment of about 33 residues in the middle of the polypeptide chain. The established sequence has been unambiguously aligned to the sequence of cytosolic ATP:AMP phosphotransferase (AK1) from pig muscle, allowing for six insertions and deletions. With 30% of all aligned residues being identical, the homology between AK3 and AK1 is well established. As derived from the known three-dimensional structure of AK1, the missing segment is localized at a small surface area of the molecule, far apart from the active center. The pattern of conserved residues demonstrates that earlier views on substrate binding have to be modified. The observation of three different consecutive N-termini indicates enzyme processing.

  8. Amino acid sequence of a protease inhibitor isolated from Sarcophaga bullata determined by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Papayannopoulos, I A; Biemann, K

    1992-02-01

    The amino acid sequence of a protease inhibitor isolated from the hemolymph of Sarcophaga bullata larvae was determined by tandem mass spectrometry. Homology considerations with respect to other protease inhibitors with known primary structures assisted in the choice of the procedure followed in the sequence determination and in the alignment of the various peptides obtained from specific chemical cleavage at cysteines and enzyme digests of the S. bullata protease inhibitor. The resulting sequence of 57 residues is as follows: Val Asp Lys Ser Ala Cys Leu Gln Pro Lys Glu Val Gly Pro Cys Arg Lys Ser Asp Phe Val Phe Phe Tyr Asn Ala Asp Thr Lys Ala Cys Glu Glu Phe Leu Tyr Gly Gly Cys Arg Gly Asn Asp Asn Arg Phe Asn Thr Lys Glu Glu Cys Glu Lys Leu Cys Leu.

  9. Amino acid sequence of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase and cDNA sequence encoding Coprinus cinereus peroxidase. A new family of fungal peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Baunsgaard, L; Dalbøge, H; Houen, G; Rasmussen, E M; Welinder, K G

    1993-04-01

    Sequence analysis and cDNA cloning of Coprinus peroxidase (CIP) were undertaken to expand the understanding of the relationships of structure, function and molecular genetics of the secretory heme peroxidases from fungi and plants. Amino acid sequencing of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase, and cDNA sequencing of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase showed that the mature proteins are identical in amino acid sequence, 343 residues in size and preceded by a 20-residue signal peptide. Their likely identity to peroxidase from Arthromyces ramosus is discussed. CIP has an 8-residue, glycine-rich N-terminal extension blocked with a pyroglutamate residue which is absent in other fungal peroxidases. The presence of pyroglutamate, formed by cyclization of glutamine, and the finding of a minor fraction of a variant form lacking the N-terminal residue, indicate that signal peptidase cleavage is followed by further enzymic processing. CIP is 40-45% identical in amino-acid sequence to 11 lignin peroxidases from four fungal species, and 42-43% identical to the two known Mn-peroxidases. Like these white-rot fungal peroxidases, CIP has an additional segment of approximately 40 residues at the C-terminus which is absent in plant peroxidases. Although CIP is much more similar to horseradish peroxidase (HRP C) in substrate specificity, specific activity and pH optimum than to white-rot fungal peroxidases, the sequences of CIP and HRP C showed only 18% identity. Hence, CIP qualifies as the first member of a new family of fungal peroxidases. The nine invariant residues present in all plant, fungal and bacterial heme peroxidases are also found in CIP. The present data support the hypothesis that only one chromosomal CIP gene exists. In contrast, a large number of secretory plant and fungal peroxidases are expressed from several peroxidase gene clusters. Analyses of three batches of CIP protein and of 49 CIP clones revealed the existence of only two highly similar alleles indicating less

  10. Entropy reduction in unfolded peptides (and proteins) due to conformational preferences of amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Toal, Siobhan E

    2014-11-01

    As established by several groups over the last 20 years, amino acid residues in unfolded peptides and proteins do not exhibit the unspecific random distribution as assumed by the classical random coil model. Individual amino acid residues in small peptides were found to exhibit different conformational preferences. Here, we utilize recently obtained conformational distributions of guest amino acid residues in GxG peptides to estimate their conformational entropy, which we find to be significantly lower than the entropy of an assumed random coil like distribution. Only at high temperature do backbone entropies approach random coil like values. We utilized the obtained backbone entropies of the investigated amino acid residues to estimate the loss of conformational entropy caused by a coil → helix transition and identified two subsets of amino acid residues for which the thus calculated entropy losses correlate well with the respective Gibbs energy of helix formation obtained for alanine based host-guest systems. Calculated and experimentally derived entropic losses were found to be in good agreement. For most of the amino acid residues investigated entropic losses derived from our GxG distributions correlate very well with corresponding values recently obtained from MD simulations biased by conformational propensities derived from truncated coil libraries. Both, conformational entropy and the entropy of solvation exhibit a strong, residue specific temperature dependence, which can be expected to substantially affect the stability of unfolded states. Altogether, our results provide strong evidence for the notion that conformational preferences of amino acid residues matter with regard to the thermodynamics of peptide and protein folding.

  11. Core Amino Acid Residues in the Morphology-Regulating Protein, Mms6, for Intracellular Magnetite Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Narumiya, Kaori; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms produce finely tuned biomineral architectures with the aid of biomineral-associated proteins. The functional amino acid residues in these proteins have been previously identified using in vitro and in silico experimentation in different biomineralization systems. However, the investigation in living organisms is limited owing to the difficulty in establishing appropriate genetic techniques. Mms6 protein, isolated from the surface of magnetite crystals synthesized in magnetotactic bacteria, was shown to play a key role in the regulation of crystal morphology. In this study, we have demonstrated a defect in the specific region or substituted acidic amino acid residues in the Mms6 protein for observing their effect on magnetite biomineralization in vivo. Analysis of the gene deletion mutants and transformants of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 expressing partially truncated Mms6 protein revealed that deletions in the N-terminal or C-terminal regions disrupted proper protein localization to the magnetite surface, resulting in a change in the crystal morphology. Moreover, single amino acid substitutions at Asp123, Glu124, or Glu125 in the C-terminal region of Mms6 clearly indicated that these amino acid residues had a direct impact on magnetite crystal morphology. Thus, these consecutive acidic amino acid residues were found to be core residues regulating magnetite crystal morphology. PMID:27759096

  12. Development of an expert system for amino acid sequence identification.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Saulinskas, E F; Johnson, P; Harrington, P B

    1996-08-01

    An expert system for amino acid sequence identification has been developed. The algorithm uses heuristic rules developed by human experts in protein sequencing. The system is applied to the chromatographic data of phenylthiohydantoin-amino acids acquired from an automated sequencer. The peak intensities in the current cycle are compared with those in the previous cycle, while the calibration and succeeding cycles are used as ancillary identification criteria when necessary. The retention time for each chromatographic peak in each cycle is corrected by the corresponding peak in the calibration cycle at the same run. The main improvement of our system compared with the onboard software used by the Applied Biosystems 477A Protein/Peptide Sequencer is that each peak in each cycle is assigned an identification name according to the corrected retention time to be used for the comparison with different cycles. The system was developed from analyses of ribonuclease A and evaluated by runs of four other protein samples that were not used in rule development. This paper demonstrates that rules developed by human experts can be automatically applied to sequence assignment. The expert system performed more accurately than the onboard software of the protein sequencer, in that the misidentification rates for the expert system were around 7%, whereas those for the onboard software were between 13 and 21%.

  13. Antibody-specific model of amino acid substitution for immunological inferences from alignments of antibody sequences.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Alexander; Kazandjian, Linda; Anisimova, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins produced by the immune system as a dynamically adaptive line of defense against invading pathogens. Very elegant and specific mutational mechanisms allow B lymphocytes to produce a large and diversified repertoire of antibodies, which is modified and enhanced throughout all adulthood. One of these mechanisms is somatic hypermutation, which stochastically mutates nucleotides in the antibody genes, forming new sequences with different properties and, eventually, higher affinity and selectivity to the pathogenic target. As somatic hypermutation involves fast mutation of antibody sequences, this process can be described using a Markov substitution model of molecular evolution. Here, using large sets of antibody sequences from mice and humans, we infer an empirical amino acid substitution model AB, which is specific to antibody sequences. Compared with existing general amino acid models, we show that the AB model provides significantly better description for the somatic evolution of mice and human antibody sequences, as demonstrated on large next generation sequencing (NGS) antibody data. General amino acid models are reflective of conservation at the protein level due to functional constraints, with most frequent amino acids exchanges taking place between residues with the same or similar physicochemical properties. In contrast, within the variable part of antibody sequences we observed an elevated frequency of exchanges between amino acids with distinct physicochemical properties. This is indicative of a sui generis mutational mechanism, specific to antibody somatic hypermutation. We illustrate this property of antibody sequences by a comparative analysis of the network modularity implied by the AB model and general amino acid substitution models. We recommend using the new model for computational studies of antibody sequence maturation, including inference of alignments and phylogenetic trees describing antibody somatic hypermutation in

  14. High-throughput sequencing detects minimal residual disease in acute T lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wu, David; Sherwood, Anna; Fromm, Jonathan R; Winter, Stuart S; Dunsmore, Kimberly P; Loh, Mignon L; Greisman, Harvey A; Sabath, Daniel E; Wood, Brent L; Robins, Harlan

    2012-05-16

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) of lymphoid receptor genes is an emerging technology that can comprehensively assess the diversity of the immune system. Here, we applied HTS to the diagnosis of T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma. Using 43 paired patient samples, we then assessed minimal residual disease (MRD) at day 29 after treatment. The variable regions of TCRB and TCRG were sequenced using an Illumina HiSeq platform after performance of multiplexed polymerase chain reaction, which targeted all potential V-J rearrangement combinations. Pretreatment samples were used to define clonal T cell receptor (TCR) complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) sequences, and paired posttreatment samples were evaluated for MRD. Abnormal T lymphoblast identification by multiparametric flow cytometry was concurrently performed for comparison. We found that TCRB and TCRG HTS not only identified clonality at diagnosis in most cases (31 of 43 for TCRB and 27 of 43 for TCRG) but also detected subsequent MRD. As expected, HTS of TCRB and TCRG identified MRD that was not detected by flow cytometry in a subset of cases (25 of 35 HTS compared with 13 of 35, respectively), which highlights the potential of this technology to define lower detection thresholds for MRD that could affect clinical treatment decisions. Thus, next-generation sequencing of lymphoid receptor gene repertoire may improve clinical diagnosis and subsequent MRD monitoring of lymphoproliferative disorders.

  15. Triose phosphate isomerase from the coelacanth. An approach to the rapid determination of an amino acid sequence with small amounts of material.

    PubMed

    Kolb, E; Harris, J I; Bridgen, J

    1974-02-01

    The preparation and purification of cyanogen bromide fragments from [(14)C]carboxymethylated coelacanth triose phosphate isomerase is presented. The automated sequencing of these fragments, the lysine-blocked tryptic peptides derived from them, and also of the intact protein, is described. Combination with results from manual sequence analysis has given the 247-residue amino acid sequence of coelacanth triose phosphate isomerase in 4 months, by using 100mg of enzyme. (Two small adjacent peptides were placed by homology with the rabbit enzyme.) Comparison of this sequence with that of the rabbit muscle enzyme shows that 207 (84%) of the residues are identical. This slow rate of evolutionary change (corresponding to two amino acid substitutions per 100 residues per 100 million years) is similar to that found for glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The reliability of sequence information obtained by automated methods is discussed.

  16. Deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant proteolipid: SPL(pVal)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitsett, J.A.; Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.E.; Clark, J.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Meuth, J.; Fox, J.L.

    1987-05-01

    Hydrophobic, proteolipid-like protein of Mr 6500 was isolated from ether/ethanol extracts of human, canine and bovine pulmonary surfactant. Amino acid composition of the protein demonstrated a remarkable abundance of hydrophobic residues, particularly valine and leucine. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human protein was determined: N-Leu-Ile-Pro-Cys-Cys-Pro-Val-Asn-Leu-Lys-Arg-Leu-Leu-Ile-Val4... An oligonucleotide probe was used to screen an adult human lung cDNA library and resulted in detection of cDNA clones with predicted amino acid sequence with close identity to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human peptide. SPL(pVal) was found within the reading frame of a larger peptide. SPL(pVal) results from proteolytic processing of a larger preprotein. Northern blot analysis detected in a single 1.0 kilobase SPL(pVal) RNA which was less abundant in fetal than in adult lung. Mixtures of purified canine and bovine SPL(pVal) and synthetic phospholipids display properties of rapid adsorption and surface tension lowering activity characteristic of surfactant. Human SPL(pVal) is a pulmonary surfactant proteolipid which may therefore be useful in combination with phospholipids and/or other surfactant proteins for the treatment of surfactant deficiency such as hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants.

  17. Complete amino acid sequence of a human monocyte chemoattractant, a putative mediator of cellular immune reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, E A; Yoshimura, T; Leonard, E J; Tanaka, S; Griffin, P R; Shabanowitz, J; Hunt, D F; Appella, E

    1989-01-01

    In a study of the structural basis for leukocyte specificity of chemoattractants, we determined the complete amino acid sequence of human glioma-derived monocyte chemotactic factor (GDCF-2), a peptide that attracts human monocytes but not neutrophils. The choice of a tumor cell product for analysis was dictated by its relative abundance and an amino acid composition indistinguishable from that of lymphocyte-derived chemotactic factor (LDCF), the agonist thought to account for monocyte accumulation in cellular immune reactions. By a combination of Edman degradation and mass spectrometry, it was established that GDCF-2 comprises 76 amino acid residues, commencing at the N terminus with pyroglutamic acid. The peptide contains four half-cystines, at positions 11, 12, 36, and 52, which create a pair of loops, clustered at the disulfide bridges. The relative positions of the half-cystines are almost identical to those of monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor (MDNCF), a peptide of similar mass but with only 24% sequence identity to GDCF. Thus, GDCF and MDNCF have a similar gross secondary structure because of the loops formed by the clustered disulfides, and their different leukocyte specificities are most likely determined by the large differences in primary sequence. PMID:2648385

  18. /sup 113/Cd NMR studies of a 1:1 Cd adduct with an 18-residue finger peptide from HIV-1 nucleic acid binding protein, p7

    SciTech Connect

    South, T.L.; Kim, B.; Summers, M.F.

    1989-01-04

    The Zn/sup 2+/ and Cd/sup 2+/ adducts with the 18-residue peptide comprising the amino acid sequence of the first finger (residues 13 through 30) of retroviral nucleic acid binding proteins p7 from HIV-1 (the causative agent of AIDS) have been prepared. /sup 1/H NMR data indicate that the metal adducts are 1:1 compounds that are stable in aqueous solutions for at least a month. The /sup 113/Cd NMR spectral results for the adduct are presented and analyzed. 26 references, 3 figures.

  19. Highly Amino Acid Selective Hydrolysis of Myoglobin at Aspartate Residues as Promoted by Zirconium(IV)-Substituted Polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Ly, Hong Giang T; Absillis, Gregory; Janssens, Rik; Proost, Paul; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2015-06-15

    SDS-PAGE/Edman degradation and HPLC MS/MS showed that zirconium(IV)-substituted Lindqvist-, Keggin-, and Wells-Dawson-type polyoxometalates (POMs) selectively hydrolyze the protein myoglobin at Asp-X peptide bonds under mildly acidic and neutral conditions. This transformation is the first example of highly sequence selective protein hydrolysis by POMs, a novel class of protein-hydrolyzing agents. The selectivity is directed by Asp residues located on the surface of the protein and is further assisted by electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged POMs and positively charged surface patches in the vicinity of the cleavage site.

  20. The amino-acid sequence of the alpha-crystallin A chains of red kangaroo and Virginia opossum.

    PubMed

    De Jong, W W; Terwindt, E C

    1976-08-16

    The amino acid sequence of the A chain of the eye lens protein alpha-crystallin from the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) was completely determined by manual Edman degradation of tryptic, thermolytic and cyanogen bromide peptides. The sequence of the alpha-crystallin A chain from the Virginia opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) was deduced from amino acid analyses and partial Edman degradation of peptides. The 173-residue A chains of kangaroo and opossum differ in six positions, whereas comparison with the bovine alpha-crystallin A chain reveals 17 and 22 substitutions, respectively. Most substitutions occur in the COOH-terminal part of the chain.

  1. [Oxytetracycline and oxolinic acid residues in kuruma prawn (Penaeus japonicus) and the effect of cooking procedures on the residues].

    PubMed

    Uno, Kazuaki

    2002-04-01

    Tissue distribution and residue depletion of oxytetracycline (OTC) and oxolinic acid (OA) were studied in the kuruma prawn (Penaeus japonicus). The prawn were kept in tanks with recirculated artificial seawater at a salinity of 22-23@1000. The water temperature was maintained at 25 degrees C. The average body weight was 22.9 +/- 4.9 g for OTC and 22.5 +/- 3.6 g for OA. The drug was mixed with the diet and orally administered through a catheter to the prawn. The doses of OTC and OA, respectively, were 50 mg/kg body weight. At each sample time, four prawns were sacrificed and tissues were sampled. OTC and OA levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. At the highest levels, the concentrations of OTC were in the other: shell (13.57 micrograms/g) > hemolymph (12.20 micrograms/mL) > muscle (8.30 micrograms/g). For OA, the order was: shell (20.74 micrograms/g) > hemolymph (7.06 micrograms/mL) > muscle (2.05 micrograms/g). The elimination half-lives of hemolymph and muscle were 44.7 and 46.8 hours for OTC and 55.0 and 107.9 hours for OA, respectively. Residual OTC could not be detected in hemolymph and muscle at 20 days after dosing. Residual OA disappeared from hemolymph and muscle at 25 days after dosing. A 25-day period for OTC and 30-day period for OA could be regarded as the proper withdrawal time established for kuruma prawn by the Pharmaceutical Law in Japan. However, the elimination half-lives of shell for OTC and OA could not be calculated because both drug residues persisted in shell tissues, and the elimination phase was not completed during the experimental period. Residual OTC (14.10 +/- 2.26 micrograms/g, n = 6) and OA (0.32 +/- 0.06 microgram/g, n = 7) were detected in exuviae at 3 days and 4 days after dosing, respectively. Residual OTC was reduced to 50-70% in muscle by the usual methods of cooking (boiling, baking at 200 degrees C and frying at 180 degrees C), whereas reduction levels in shell were only 20-30%. Residual OA was

  2. The amino acid sequence of protein SCMK-B2C from the high-sulphur fraction of wool keratin

    PubMed Central

    Elleman, T. C.

    1972-01-01

    1. The amino acid sequence of a protein from the reduced and carboxymethylated high-sulphur fraction of wool has been determined. 2. The sequence of this S-carboxymethylkerateine (SCMK-B2C) of 151 amino acid residues displays much internal homology and an unusual residue distribution. Thus a ten-residue sequence occurs four times near the N-terminus and five times near the C-terminus with few changes. These regions contain much of the molecule's half-cystine, whereas between them there is a region of 19 residues that are mainly small and devoid of cystine and proline. 3. Certain models of the wool fibre based on its mechanical and physical properties propose a matrix of small compact globular units linked together to form beaded chains. The unusual distribution of the component residues of protein SCMK-B2C suggests structures in the wool-fibre matrix compatible with certain features of the proposed models. PMID:4678578

  3. PiRaNhA: a server for the computational prediction of RNA-binding residues in protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yoichi; Spriggs, Ruth V.; Nakamura, Haruki; Jones, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The PiRaNhA web server is a publicly available online resource that automatically predicts the location of RNA-binding residues (RBRs) in protein sequences. The goal of functional annotation of sequences in the field of RNA binding is to provide predictions of high accuracy that require only small numbers of targeted mutations for verification. The PiRaNhA server uses a support vector machine (SVM), with position-specific scoring matrices, residue interface propensity, predicted residue accessibility and residue hydrophobicity as features. The server allows the submission of up to 10 protein sequences, and the predictions for each sequence are provided on a web page and via email. The prediction results are provided in sequence format with predicted RBRs highlighted, in text format with the SVM threshold score indicated and as a graph which enables users to quickly identify those residues above any specific SVM threshold. The graph effectively enables the increase or decrease of the false positive rate. When tested on a non-redundant data set of 42 protein sequences not used in training, the PiRaNhA server achieved an accuracy of 85%, specificity of 90% and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.41 and outperformed other publicly available servers. The PiRaNhA prediction server is freely available at http://www.bioinformatics.sussex.ac.uk/PIRANHA. PMID:20507911

  4. The genome of RNA tumor viruses contains polyadenylic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Cartas, M

    1972-04-01

    The 70S genome of two RNA tumor viruses, murine sarcoma virus and avian myeloblastosis virus, binds to Millipore filters in buffer with high salt concentration and to glass fiber filters containing poly(U). These observations suggest that 70S RNA contains adenylic acid-rich sequences. When digested by pancreatic RNase, 70S RNA of murine sarcoma virus yielded poly(A) sequences that contain 91% adenylic acid. These poly(A) sequences sedimented as a relatively homogenous peak in sucrose gradients with a sedimentation coefficient of 4-5 S, but had a mobility during polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis that corresponds to molecules that sediment at 6-7 S. If we estimate a molecular weight for each sequence of 30,000-60,000 (100-200 nucleotides) and a molecular weight for viral 70S RNA of 3-12 million, each viral genome could contain 1-8 poly(A) sequences. Possible functions of poly(A) in the infecting viral RNA may include a role in the initiation of viral DNA or RNA synthesis, in protein maturation, or in the assembly of the viral genome.

  5. Membrane topology and essential amino acid residues of Phs1, a 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase involved in very long-chain fatty acid elongation.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Akio; Sakuraba, Hiroko; Ikeda, Mika; Denpoh, Aki; Igarashi, Yasuyuki

    2008-04-25

    Yeast Phs1 is the 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase that catalyzes the third reaction of the four-step cycle in the elongation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). In yeast, the hydrophobic backbone of sphingolipids, ceramide, consists of a long-chain base and an amide-linked C26 VLCFA. Therefore, defects in VLCFA synthesis would be expected to greatly affect sphingolipid synthesis. In fact, in this study we found that reduced Phs1 levels result in significant impairment of the conversion of ceramide to inositol phosphorylceramide. Phs1 proteins are conserved among eukaryotes, constituting a novel protein family. Phs1 family members exhibit no sequence similarity to other dehydratase families, so their active site sequence and catalytic mechanism have been completely unknown. Here, by mutating 22 residues conserved among Phs1 family members, we identified six amino acid residues important in Phs1 function, two of which (Tyr-149 and Glu-156) are indispensable. We also examined the membrane topology of Phs1 using an N-glycosylation reporter assay. Our results suggest that Phs1 is a membrane-spanning protein that traverses the membrane six times and has an N terminus and C terminus facing the cytosol. The important amino acids are concentrated in or near two of the six proposed transmembrane regions. Thus, we also propose a catalytic mechanism for Phs1 that is not unlike mechanisms used by other hydratases active in lipid synthesis.

  6. Early region 1B of adenovirus 2 encodes two coterminal proteins of 495 and 155 amino acid residues.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C W; Schmitt, R C; Smart, J E; Lewis, J B

    1984-01-01

    Partial sequence analysis of tryptic peptides has identified the E1B-495R (E1b-57K) (early transcription region 1B of 495 amino acid residues, with an approximate molecular weight of 57,000) protein of adenovirus 2 as encoded by the 495 amino acid open reading frame located in the adenovirus 2 DNA sequence between nucleotides 2016 and 3500. Additional proteins of 16,000 Mr and 18,000 Mr that are related to the E1B-495R protein were identified by cell-free translation of hybridization-selected mRNA. Analysis of [35S]methionine-containing amino terminal tryptic peptides by thin-layer chromatography showed that the E1B-495R, E1B-18K, and E1B-16K proteins all begin at the same initiation codon. The E1B-495R protein from 293 cells also has the same initial tryptic peptide, acetyl-methionyl-glutamyl-arginine. Sequence analysis of E1B-18K tryptic peptides indicated that this protein also has the same carboxy terminus as the E1B-495R protein and that it is derived from an mRNA that is spliced to remove sequences between nucleotides 2250 and 3269, resulting in a protein product of 155 amino acid residues. Analysis of E1B-16K tryptic peptides has not yet revealed the carboxy terminal structure of this protein. Both the E1B-495R and the E1B-155R (E1B-18K) proteins, as well as the E1B-16K protein, were precipitated from cell-free translations and from extracts of infected cells by antiserum against an amino terminal nonapeptide common to these proteins. Images PMID:6323739

  7. Characterization of Protective Epitopes in a Highly Conserved Plasmodium falciparum Antigenic Protein Containing Repeats of Acidic and Basic Residues

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pawan; Kumar, Anil; Singh, Balwan; Bharadwaj, Ashima; Sailaja, V. Naga; Adak, T.; Kushwaha, Ashima; Malhotra, Pawan; Chauhan, V. S.

    1998-01-01

    The delineation of putatively protective and immunogenic epitopes in vaccine candidate proteins constitutes a major research effort towards the development of an effective malaria vaccine. By virtue of its role in the formation of the immune clusters of merozoites, its location on the surface of merozoites, and its highly conserved nature both at the nucleotide sequence level and the amino acid sequence level, the antigen which contains repeats of acidic and basic residues (ABRA) of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum represents such an antigen. Based upon the predicted amino acid sequence of ABRA, we synthesized eight peptides, with six of these (AB-1 to AB-6) ranging from 12 to 18 residues covering the most hydrophilic regions of the protein, and two more peptides (AB-7 and AB-8) representing its repetitive sequences. We found that all eight constructs bound an appreciable amount of antibody in sera from a large proportion of P. falciparum malaria patients; two of these peptides (AB-1 and AB-3) also elicited a strong proliferation response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all 11 human subjects recovering from malaria. When used as carrier-free immunogens, six peptides induced a strong, boostable, immunoglobulin G-type antibody response in rabbits, indicating the presence of both B-cell determinants and T-helper-cell epitopes in these six constructs. These antibodies specifically cross-reacted with the parasite protein(s) in an immunoblot and in an immunofluorescence assay. In another immunoblot, rabbit antipeptide sera also recognized recombinant fragments of ABRA expressed in bacteria. More significantly, rabbit antibodies against two constructs (AB-1 and AB-5) inhibited the merozoite reinvasion of human erythrocytes in vitro up to ∼90%. These results favor further studies so as to determine possible inclusion of these two constructs in a multicomponent subunit vaccine against asexual blood stages of P. falciparum. PMID:9596765

  8. Sequences Of Amino Acids For Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    Sequences of amino acids defined for use in making polypeptides one-third to one-sixth as large as parent human serum albumin molecule. Smaller, chemically stable peptides have diverse applications including service as artificial human serum and as active components of biosensors and chromatographic matrices. In applications involving production of artificial sera from new sequences, little or no concern about viral contaminants. Smaller genetically engineered polypeptides more easily expressed and produced in large quantities, making commercial isolation and production more feasible and profitable.

  9. Nucleic acid sequence design via efficient ensemble defect optimization.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Joseph N; Wolfe, Brian R; Pierce, Niles A

    2011-02-01

    We describe an algorithm for designing the sequence of one or more interacting nucleic acid strands intended to adopt a target secondary structure at equilibrium. Sequence design is formulated as an optimization problem with the goal of reducing the ensemble defect below a user-specified stop condition. For a candidate sequence and a given target secondary structure, the ensemble defect is the average number of incorrectly paired nucleotides at equilibrium evaluated over the ensemble of unpseudoknotted secondary structures. To reduce the computational cost of accepting or rejecting mutations to a random initial sequence, candidate mutations are evaluated on the leaf nodes of a tree-decomposition of the target structure. During leaf optimization, defect-weighted mutation sampling is used to select each candidate mutation position with probability proportional to its contribution to the ensemble defect of the leaf. As subsequences are merged moving up the tree, emergent structural defects resulting from crosstalk between sibling sequences are eliminated via reoptimization within the defective subtree starting from new random subsequences. Using a Θ(N(3) ) dynamic program to evaluate the ensemble defect of a target structure with N nucleotides, this hierarchical approach implies an asymptotic optimality bound on design time: for sufficiently large N, the cost of sequence design is bounded below by 4/3 the cost of a single evaluation of the ensemble defect for the full sequence. Hence, the design algorithm has time complexity Ω(N(3) ). For target structures containing N ∈{100,200,400,800,1600,3200} nucleotides and duplex stems ranging from 1 to 30 base pairs, RNA sequence designs at 37°C typically succeed in satisfying a stop condition with ensemble defect less than N/100. Empirically, the sequence design algorithm exhibits asymptotic optimality and the exponent in the time complexity bound is sharp.

  10. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle ATP-AMP transphosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Palmieri, R H; Frischat, A; Fischer, A H; Wu, L H; Maland, L; Manship, M

    1984-05-22

    The total amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been determined, and the single polypeptide chain of 194 amino acid residues starts with N-acetylmethionine and ends with leucyllysine at its carboxyl terminus, in agreement with the earlier data on its amino acid composition [Mahowald, T. A., Noltmann, E. A., & Kuby, S. A. (1962) J. Biol. Chem. 237, 1138-1145] and its carboxyl-terminus sequence [Olson, O. E., & Kuby, S. A. (1964) J. Biol. Chem. 239, 460-467]. Elucidation of the primary structure was based on tryptic and chymotryptic cleavages of the performic acid oxidized protein, cyanogen bromide cleavages of the 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein at its five methionine sites (followed by maleylation of peptide fragments), and tryptic cleavages at its 12 arginine sites of the maleylated 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein. Calf muscle myokinase, whose sequence has also been established, differs primarily from the rabbit muscle myokinase's sequence in the following: His-30 is replaced by Gln-30; Lys-56 is replaced by Met-56; Ala-84 and Asp 85 are replaced by Val-84 and Asn-85. A comparison of the four muscle-type adenylate kinases, whose covalent structures have now been determined, viz., rabbit, calf, porcine, and human [for the latter two sequences see Heil, A., Müller, G., Noda, L., Pinder, T., Schirmer, H., Schirmer, I., & Von Zabern, I. (1974) Eur. J. Biochem. 43, 131-144, and Von Zabern, I., Wittmann-Liebold, B., Untucht-Grau, R., Schirmer, R. H., & Pai, E. F. (1976) Eur. J. Biochem. 68, 281-290], demonstrates an extraordinary degree of homology.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Intra-molecular cross-linking of acidic residues for protein structure studies.

    PubMed

    Novak, Petr; Kruppa, Gary H

    2008-01-01

    Intra-molecular cross-linking has been suggested as a method of obtaining distance constraints that would help to develop structural models of proteins. Recent work published on intra-molecular cross-linking for protein structural studies has employed commercially available primary amine (lysine, the amino terminus) selective reagents. Previous work using these cross-linkers has shown that for several proteins of known structure, the number of cross-links that can be obtained experimentally may be small compared to what would be expected from the known structure, due to the relative reactivity, distribution and solvent accessibility of the lysines in the protein sequence. To overcome these limitations, we have investigated the use of cross-linking reagents that can react with other reactive side chains in proteins. We used 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) to activate the carboxylic acid containing residues, aspartic acid (D), glutamic acid (E) and the carboxy terminus (O), for cross-linking reactions. Once activated, the DEO side chains can react to form "zero-length" cross-links with nearby primary amine containing residues, lysines (K) and the amino terminus (X), via the formation of a new amide bond. We also show that the EDC-activated DEO side chains can be cross-linked to each other using dihydrazides, two hydrazide moieties connected by an alkyl cross-linker arm of variable length. Using these reagents, we have found three new "zero-length" cross-links in ubiquitin consistent with its known structure (M1-E16, M1-E18 and K63-E64). Using the dihydrazide cross-linkers, we have identified two new cross-links (D21-D32 and E24-D32) unambiguously. Using a library of dihydrazide cross-linkers with varying arm length, we have shown that there is a minimum arm length required for the DEO-DEO cross-links of 5.8 A. These results show that additional structural information can be obtained by exploiting new cross-linker chemistry

  12. Identification of glutamic acid 646 as a zinc-coordinating residue in endopeptidase-24.11.

    PubMed

    Le Moual, H; Devault, A; Roques, B P; Crine, P; Boileau, G

    1991-08-25

    Neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.424.11, NEP) is a membrane-bound zinc-metallopeptidase. The substrate specificity and catalytic activity of NEP resemble those of thermolysin, a bacterial zinc-metalloprotease. Comparison of the primary structure of both enzymes suggests that several amino acids present in the active site of thermolysin are also found in NEP. Using site-directed mutagenesis of the cDNA encoding the NEP sequence, we have already shown that His residues 583 and 587 are two of the three zinc ligands. In order to identify the third zinc ligand, we have substituted Val or Asp for Glu616 or Glu646. Val616 NEP showed the same kinetic parameters as the non-mutated NEP. In contrast, the mutant Val646 NEP was almost completely devoid of catalytic activity and unable to bind the tritiated inhibitor [3H]N-[2(R,S)-3-hydroxyaminocarbonyl-2-benzyl-1-oxypropyl]gl ycine, the binding of which is dependent on the presence of the zinc ion. Replacing Glu for Asp at position 646 conserved the negative charge, and the mutant enzyme exhibited the same Km value as the non-mutated enzyme, but kCat was decreased to less than 3% of the value of the non-mutated enzyme. When compared to the non-mutated enzyme Asp646 NEP showed a higher susceptibility to chelating agents, but bound the tritiated inhibitor with the same affinity. Taken together, these observations strongly suggest that Glu646 of NEP is the third zinc-coordinating residue and is equivalent to Glu166 in thermolysin.

  13. On combining protein sequences and nucleic acid sequences in phylogenetic analysis: the homeobox protein case.

    PubMed

    Agosti, D; Jacobs, D; DeSalle, R

    1996-01-01

    Amino acid encoding genes contain character state information that may be useful for phylogenetic analysis on at least two levels. The nucleotide sequence and the translated amino acid sequences have both been employed separately as character states for cladistic studies of various taxa, including studies of the genealogy of genes in multigene families. In essence, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences are two different ways of character coding the information in a gene. Silent positions in the nucleotide sequence (first or third positions in codons that can accrue change without changing the identity of the amino acid that the triplet codes for) may accrue change relatively rapidly and become saturated, losing the pattern of historical divergence. On the other hand, non-silent nucleotide alterations and their accompanying amino acid changes may evolve too slowly to reveal relationships among closely related taxa. In general, the dynamics of sequence change in silent and non-silent positions in protein coding genes result in homoplasy and lack of resolution, respectively. We suggest that the combination of nucleic acid and the translated amino acid coded character states into the same data matrix for phylogenetic analysis addresses some of the problems caused by the rapid change of silent nucleotide positions and overall slow rate of change of non-silent nucleotide positions and slowly changing amino acid positions. One major theoretical problem with this approach is the apparent non-independence of the two sources of characters. However, there are at least three possible outcomes when comparing protein coding nucleic acid sequences with their translated amino acids in a phylogenetic context on a codon by codon basis. First, the two character sets for a codon may be entirely congruent with respect to the information they convey about the relationships of a certain set of taxa. Second, one character set may display no information concerning a phylogenetic

  14. Nanopores and nucleic acids: prospects for ultrarapid sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Akeson, M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA and RNA molecules can be detected as they are driven through a nanopore by an applied electric field at rates ranging from several hundred microseconds to a few milliseconds per molecule. The nanopore can rapidly discriminate between pyrimidine and purine segments along a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule. Nanopore detection and characterization of single molecules represents a new method for directly reading information encoded in linear polymers. If single-nucleotide resolution can be achieved, it is possible that nucleic acid sequences can be determined at rates exceeding a thousand bases per second.

  15. Isolation and a partial amino acid sequence of insulin from the islet tissue of cod (Gadus callarias)

    PubMed Central

    Grant, P. T.; Reid, K. B. M.

    1968-01-01

    1. Insulin has been isolated by gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography from extracts of the discrete islet tissue of cod. The final preparation yielded a single band on electrophoresis at two pH values. The biological potency was 11·5 international units/mg. in mouse-convulsion and other assay procedures. 2. Glycine and methionine were shown to be the N-terminal amino acids of the A and B chains respectively. An estimate of the molecular weight together with amino acid analyses indicated that cod insulin, like the bovine hormone, consists of 51 amino acid residues. In contrast, the amino acid composition differs markedly from bovine insulin. 3. Oxidation of insulin with performic acid yielded the A and B peptide chains, which were separated by ion-exchange chromatography. Sequence studies on smaller peptides isolated from enzymic digests or from dilute acetic acid hydrolysates of the two chains have established the sequential order of 14 of the 21 amino acid residues of the A chain and 25 of the 30 amino acid residues of the B chain. PMID:4866431

  16. Some properties and amino acid sequence of plastocyanin from a green alga, Ulva arasakii.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, F; Fukazawa, T; Mishina, Y; Sugimura, Y

    1989-08-01

    Plastocyanin was purified from a multicellular, marine green alga, Ulva arasakii, by conventional methods to homogeneity. The oxidized plastocyanin showed absorption maxima at 252, 276.8, 460, 595.3, and 775 nm, and shoulders at 259, 265, 269, and 282.5 nm; the ratio A276.8/A595.3 was 1.5. The midpoint redox potential was determined to be 0.356 V at pH 7.0 with a ferri- and ferrocyanide system. The molecular weight was estimated to be 10,200 and 11,000 by SDS-PAGE and by gel filtration, respectively. U. arasakii also has a small amount of cytochrome c6, like Enteromorpha prolifera. The amino acid sequence of U. arasakii plastocyanin was determined by Edman degradation and by carboxypeptidase digestion of the plastocyanin, six tryptic peptides, and five staphylococcal protease peptides. The plastocyanin contained 98 amino acid residues, giving a molecular weight of 10,236 including one copper atom. The complete sequence is as follows: AQIVKLGGDDGALAFVPSKISVAAGEAIEFVNNAGFPHNIVFDEDAVPAGVDADAISYDDYLNSKGETV VRKLSTPGVY G VYCEPHAGAGMKMTITVQ. The sequence of U. arasakii plastocyanin is closet to that of the E. prolifera protein (85% homology). A phylogenetic tree of five algal and two higher plant plastocyanins was constructed by comparing the amino acid differences. The branching order is considered to be as follows: a blue-green alga, unicellular green algae, multicellular green algae, and higher plants. PMID:2509442

  17. [MOLECULAR EVOLUTION OF ION CHANNELS: AMINO ACID SEQUENCES AND 3D STRUCTURES].

    PubMed

    Korkosh, V S; Zhorov, B S; Tikhonov, D B

    2016-01-01

    An integral part of modern evolutionary biology is comparative analysis of structure and function of macromolecules such as proteins. The first and critical step to understand evolution of homologous proteins is their amino acid sequence alignment. However, standard algorithms fop not provide unambiguous sequence alignments for proteins of poor homology. More reliable results can be obtained by comparing experimental 3D structures obtained at atomic resolution, for instance, with the aid of X-ray structural analysis. If such structures are lacking, homology modeling is used, which may take into account indirect experimental data on functional roles of individual amino-acid residues. An important problem is that the sequence alignment, which reflects genetic modifications, does not necessarily correspond to the functional homology. The latter depends on three-dimensional structures which are critical for natural selection. Since alignment techniques relying only on the analysis of primary structures carry no information on the functional properties of proteins, including 3D structures into consideration is very important. Here we consider several examples involving ion channels and demonstrate that alignment of their three-dimensional structures can significantly improve sequence alignments obtained by traditional methods.

  18. TCF bleaching sequence in kraft pulping of olive tree pruning residues.

    PubMed

    Requejo, A; Rodríguez, A; Colodette, J L; Gomide, J L; Jiménez, L

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present work was to find a suitable Kraft cooking process for olive tree pruning (OTP), in order to produce pulp of kappa number about 17. The Kraft pulp produced under optimized conditions showed a viscosity of 31.5 mPa·s and good physical, mechanical, and optical properties, which are suitable for paper production. The physical-mechanical and optical properties were measured before and after bleaching. Although the OTP pulp was bleached to 90.9% ISO brightness (kappa<1), the process demanded a long sequence of stages, OZQPOZQPO. The bleached pulp showed a brightness reversion equal to 1.3%. Furthermore, this bleached pulp did not need a high intensity of beating due to high drainability degree in the unbeaten pulp. So that, OTP is suggested as an interesting raw material for cellulosic pulp production because its properties are comparable to those of other agricultural residues, currently used in the paper industry.

  19. The sequence of rat leukosialin (W3/13 antigen) reveals a molecule with O-linked glycosylation of one third of its extracellular amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Killeen, N; Barclay, A N; Willis, A C; Williams, A F

    1987-01-01

    Leukosialin is one of the major glycoproteins of thymocytes and T lymphocytes and is notable for a very high content of O-linked carbohydrate structures. The full protein sequence for rat leukosialin as translated from cDNA clones is now reported. The molecule contains 371 amino acids with 224 residues outside the cell, one transmembrane sequence and 124 cytoplasmic residues. Data from the peptide sequence and carbohydrate composition suggest that one in three of the extracellular amino acids may be O-glycosylated with no N-linked glycosylation sites. The cDNA sequence contained a CpG rich region in the 3' coding sequence and a large 3' non-coding region which included tandem repeats of the sequence GGAT. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2965006

  20. Critical amino acid residues for the specific binding of the Ti-recognizing recombinant ferritin with oxide surfaces of titanium and silicon.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomohiro; Sano, Ken-Ichi; Shiba, Kiyotaka; Iwahori, Kenji; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hara, Masahiko

    2009-09-15

    The interactions of ferritins fused with a Ti-recognizing peptide (RKLPDA) and their mutants with titanium oxide substrates were explored with an atomic force microscope (AFM). The amino acid sequence of the peptide was systematically modified to elucidate the role of each amino acid residue in the specific interaction. Force measurements revealed a clear correlation among the sequences in the N-terminal domain of ferritin, surface potentials, and long-range electrostatic interactions. Measurements of adhesion forces clearly revealed that hydrogen bonds take part in the specific binding as well as the electrostatic interaction between charged residues and surface charges of Ti oxides. Moreover, our results indicated that not only the charged and polar residues but also a neutral residue (proline) govern the strength of the specific binding, with the order of the residues also being significant. These results demonstrate that the local structure of the peptide governs the special arrangement of charged residues and strongly affects the strength of the bindings.

  1. Amino acid sequence and variant forms of favin, a lectin from Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Hopp, T P; Hemperly, J J; Cunningham, B A

    1982-04-25

    We have determined the complete amino acid sequence (182 residues) of the beta chain of favin, the glucose-binding lectin from fava beans (Vicia faba), and have established that the carbohydrate moiety is attached to Asn 168. Together with the sequence of the alpha chain previously reported (Hemperly, J. J., Hopp, T. P., Becker, J. W., and Cunningham, B. A. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 6803-6810), these data complete the analysis of the primary structure of the lectin. We have also examined minor polypeptides that appear in all preparations of favin. Two lower molecular weight species (Mr = 9,500-11,600) appear to be fragments of the beta chain resulting from cleavage following Asn 76, whereas six high molecular weight forms (Mr = 25,000 or greater) appear to include aggregates of the beta chain and possibly some alternative products of chain processing. PMID:7068646

  2. ANTICALIgN: visualizing, editing and analyzing combined nucleotide and amino acid sequence alignments for combinatorial protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Jarasch, Alexander; Kopp, Melanie; Eggenstein, Evelyn; Richter, Antonia; Gebauer, Michaela; Skerra, Arne

    2016-07-01

    ANTIC ALIGN: is an interactive software developed to simultaneously visualize, analyze and modify alignments of DNA and/or protein sequences that arise during combinatorial protein engineering, design and selection. ANTIC ALIGN: combines powerful functions known from currently available sequence analysis tools with unique features for protein engineering, in particular the possibility to display and manipulate nucleotide sequences and their translated amino acid sequences at the same time. ANTIC ALIGN: offers both template-based multiple sequence alignment (MSA), using the unmutated protein as reference, and conventional global alignment, to compare sequences that share an evolutionary relationship. The application of similarity-based clustering algorithms facilitates the identification of duplicates or of conserved sequence features among a set of selected clones. Imported nucleotide sequences from DNA sequence analysis are automatically translated into the corresponding amino acid sequences and displayed, offering numerous options for selecting reading frames, highlighting of sequence features and graphical layout of the MSA. The MSA complexity can be reduced by hiding the conserved nucleotide and/or amino acid residues, thus putting emphasis on the relevant mutated positions. ANTIC ALIGN: is also able to handle suppressed stop codons or even to incorporate non-natural amino acids into a coding sequence. We demonstrate crucial functions of ANTIC ALIGN: in an example of Anticalins selected from a lipocalin random library against the fibronectin extradomain B (ED-B), an established marker of tumor vasculature. Apart from engineered protein scaffolds, ANTIC ALIGN: provides a powerful tool in the area of antibody engineering and for directed enzyme evolution.

  3. Functional analyses of carnivorous plant-specific amino acid residues in S-like ribonucleases.

    PubMed

    Arai, Naoki; Nishimura, Emi; Kikuchi, Yo; Ohyama, Takashi

    2015-09-11

    Unlike plants with no carnivory, carnivorous plants seem to use S-like ribonucleases (RNases) as an enzyme for carnivory. Carnivorous plant-specific conserved amino acid residues are present at four positions around the conserved active site (CAS). The roles of these conserved amino acid residues in the enzymatic function were explored in the current study by preparing five recombinant variants of DA-I, the S-like RNase of Drosera adelae. The kcat and kcat/Km values of the enzymes revealed that among the four variants with a single mutation, the serine to glycine mutation at position 111 most negatively influenced the enzymatic activity. The change in the bulkiness of the amino acid residue side-chain seemed to be the major cause of the above effect. Modeling of the three dimensional (3D) structures strongly suggested that the S to G mutation at 111 greatly altered the overall enzyme conformation. The conserved four amino acid residues are likely to function in keeping the two histidine residues, which are essential for the cleavage of RNA strands, and the CAS in the most functional enzymatic conformation.

  4. Functional analyses of carnivorous plant-specific amino acid residues in S-like ribonucleases.

    PubMed

    Arai, Naoki; Nishimura, Emi; Kikuchi, Yo; Ohyama, Takashi

    2015-09-11

    Unlike plants with no carnivory, carnivorous plants seem to use S-like ribonucleases (RNases) as an enzyme for carnivory. Carnivorous plant-specific conserved amino acid residues are present at four positions around the conserved active site (CAS). The roles of these conserved amino acid residues in the enzymatic function were explored in the current study by preparing five recombinant variants of DA-I, the S-like RNase of Drosera adelae. The kcat and kcat/Km values of the enzymes revealed that among the four variants with a single mutation, the serine to glycine mutation at position 111 most negatively influenced the enzymatic activity. The change in the bulkiness of the amino acid residue side-chain seemed to be the major cause of the above effect. Modeling of the three dimensional (3D) structures strongly suggested that the S to G mutation at 111 greatly altered the overall enzyme conformation. The conserved four amino acid residues are likely to function in keeping the two histidine residues, which are essential for the cleavage of RNA strands, and the CAS in the most functional enzymatic conformation. PMID:26235877

  5. Identification of amino acid residues in Streptococcus mutans glucosyltransferases influencing the structure of the glucan product.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, A; Nakano, Y J; Mukasa, H; Kuramitsu, H K

    1994-08-01

    The glucosyltransferases (GTFs) of mutans streptococci are important virulence factors in the sucrose-dependent colonization of tooth surfaces by these organisms. To investigate the structure-function relationship of the GTFs, an approach was initiated to identify amino acid residues of the GTFs which affect the incorporation of glucose residues into the glucan polymer. Conserved amino acid residues were identified in the GTF-S and GTF-I enzymes of the mutans streptococci and were selected for site-directed mutagenesis in the corresponding enzymes from Streptococcus mutans GS5. Conversion of six amino acid residues of the GTF-I enzyme to those present at the corresponding positions in GTF-S, either singly or in multiple combinations, resulted in enzymes synthesizing increased levels of soluble glucans. The enzyme containing six alterations synthesized 73% water-soluble glucan in the absence of acceptor dextran T10, while parental enzyme GTF-I synthesized no such glucan product. Conversely, when residue 589 of the GTF-S enzyme was converted from Thr to either Asp or Glu, the resulting enzyme synthesized primarily water-insoluble glucan in the absence of the acceptor. Therefore, this approach has identified several amino acid positions which influence the nature of the glucan product synthesized by GTFs.

  6. Quantum-Sequencing: Biophysics of quantum tunneling through nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy has extensively been used in physical surface sciences to study quantum tunneling to measure electronic local density of states of nanomaterials and to characterize adsorbed species. Quantum-Sequencing (Q-Seq) is a new method based on tunneling microscopy for electronic sequencing of single molecule of nucleic acids. A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the unique ``electronic fingerprints'' for all nucleotides on DNA and RNA using Q-Seq along their intrinsic biophysical parameters. We have analyzed tunneling spectra for the nucleotides at different pH conditions and analyzed the HOMO, LUMO and energy gap for all of them. In addition we show a number of biophysical parameters to further characterize all nucleobases (electron and hole transition voltage and energy barriers). These results highlight the robustness of Q-Seq as a technique for next-generation sequencing.

  7. A microalgae residue based carbon solid acid catalyst for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaobo; Li, Dianhong; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Yuanming; Huang, Weiya; Zhu, Yi; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Chengwu

    2013-10-01

    Biodiesel production from microalgae is recognized as one of the best solutions to deal with the energy crisis issues. However, after the oil extraction from the microalgae, the microalgae residue was generally discarded or burned. Here a novel carbon-based solid acid catalyst derived from microalgae residue by in situ hydrothermal partially carbonization were synthesized. The obtained catalyst was characterized and subjected to both the esterification of oleic acid and transesterification of triglyceride to produce biodiesel. The catalyst showed high catalytic activity and can be regenerated while its activity can be well maintained after five cycles.

  8. New charge-bearing amino acid residues that promote β-sheet secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Stacy J; Almeida, Aaron M; Yoshimi, Yasuharu; Gellman, Samuel H

    2014-11-26

    Proteinogenic amino acid residues that promote β-sheet secondary structure are hydrophobic (e.g., Ile or Val) or only moderately polar (e.g., Thr). The design of peptides intended to display β-sheet secondary structure in water typically requires one set of residues to ensure conformational stability and an orthogonal set, with charged side chains, to ensure aqueous solubility and discourage self-association. Here we describe new amino acids that manifest substantial β-sheet propensity, by virtue of β-branching, and also bear an ionizable group in the side chain. PMID:25393077

  9. Correlations Between Amino Acids at Different Sites in Local Sequences of Protein Fragments with Given Structural Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wen; Liu, Hai-yan

    2007-02-01

    Ample evidence suggests that the local structures of peptide fragments in native proteins are to some extent encoded by their local sequences. Detecting such local correlations is important but it is still an open question what would be the most appropriate method. This is partly because conventional sequence analyses treat amino acid preferences at each site of a protein sequence independently, while it is often the inter-site interactions that bring about local sequence-structure correlations. Here a new scheme is introduced to capture the correlation between amino acid preferences at different sites for different local structure types. A library of nine-residue fragments is constructed, and the fragments are divided into clusters based on their local structures. For each local structure cluster or type, chi-square tests are used to identify correlated preferences of amino acid combinations at pairs of sites. A score function is constructed including both the single site amino acid preferences and the dual-site amino acid combination preferences, which can be used to identify whether a sequence fragment would have a strong tendency to form a particular local structure in native proteins. The results show that, given a local structure pattern, dual-site amino acid combinations contain different information from single site amino acid preferences. Representative examples show that many of the statistically identified correlations agree with previously-proposed heuristic rules about local sequence-structure correlations, or are consistent with physical-chemical interactions required to stabilize particular local structures. Results also show that such dual-site correlations in the score function significantly improves the Z-score matching a sequence fragment to its native local structure relative to non-native local structures, and certain local structure types are highly predictable from the local sequence alone if inter-site correlations are considered.

  10. Catalytic residues are shared between two pseudosubunits of the dehydratase domain of the animal fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Pasta, Saloni; Witkowski, Andrzej; Joshi, Anil K; Smith, Stuart

    2007-12-01

    Expression, characterization, and mutagenesis of a series of N-terminal fragments of an animal fatty acid synthase, containing the beta-ketoacyl synthase, acyl transferase, and dehydratase domains, demonstrate that the dehydratase domain consists of two pseudosubunits, derived from contiguous regions of the same polypeptide, in which a single active site is formed by the cooperation of the catalytic histidine 878 residue of the first pseudosubunit with aspartate 1032 of the second pseudosubunit. Mutagenesis and modeling studies revealed an essential role for glutamine 1036 in anchoring the position of the catalytic aspartate. These findings establish that sequence elements previously assigned to a central structural core region of the type I fatty acid synthases and some modular polyketide synthase counterparts play an essential catalytic role as part of the dehydratase domain.

  11. Recent Galaxy Mergers and Residual Star Formation of Red Sequence Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Ree, Chang H.; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-08-01

    This study explored the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in four rich Abell clusters at z≤slant 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r\\prime colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5), and that number was doubled (˜72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5 × R 200. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R 200. We performed a Dressler–Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the substructures in the galaxy clusters. Within R 200 of each cluster, the RSF galaxies did not appear to be preferentially related to the clusters’ substructures. Our results suggested that only 30% of RSF red sequence galaxies show morphological hints of recent galaxy mergers. This implies that internal processes (e.g., stellar mass loss or hot gas cooling) for the supply of cold gas to early-type galaxies may play a significant role in the residual star formation of early-type galaxies at a recent epoch.

  12. Recent Galaxy Mergers and Residual Star Formation of Red Sequence Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Ree, Chang H.; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-08-01

    This study explored the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in four rich Abell clusters at z≤slant 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r\\prime colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5), and that number was doubled (˜72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5 × R 200. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R 200. We performed a Dressler-Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the substructures in the galaxy clusters. Within R 200 of each cluster, the RSF galaxies did not appear to be preferentially related to the clusters’ substructures. Our results suggested that only 30% of RSF red sequence galaxies show morphological hints of recent galaxy mergers. This implies that internal processes (e.g., stellar mass loss or hot gas cooling) for the supply of cold gas to early-type galaxies may play a significant role in the residual star formation of early-type galaxies at a recent epoch.

  13. Identification of glutamic acid 204 and aspartic acid 200 in chitinase A1 of Bacillus circulans WL-12 as essential residues for chitinase activity.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Kobori, K; Miyashita, K; Fujii, T; Sakai, H; Uchida, M; Tanaka, H

    1993-09-01

    Prokaryotic chitinases, class III plant chitinases, yeast chitinases, and endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidases share weak amino acid sequence similarities at the certain region of each enzyme. These regions have been assumed to be important for catalytic activities of the enzymes. To verify this assumption, three amino acid residues (Ser-160, Asp-200, Glu-204) in chitinase A1 of Bacillus circulans WL-12 were chosen, based on the amino acid sequence alignment of the regions sharing sequence similarity, and were replaced by site-directed mutagenesis. Kinetic parameters for 4-methylumbelliferyl-N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose hydrolysis were determined with wild-type and seven mutant chitinases. Chitinases with Glu-204-->Gln mutation and Glu-204-->Asp mutation were essentially inactive and kcat values of these chitinases were approximately 1/5,000 and 1/17,000 of that of wild-type chitinase, respectively. Asp-200-->Asn mutation decreased the kcat value to approximately 1/350 of that of the wild-type enzyme, while the Km value decreased only slightly. On the other hand, neither the kcat value nor the Km value was affected by Asp-200-->Glu mutation. Thus, it appeared that Glu-204 and Asp-200 are directly involved in the catalytic events of chitinase A1. The role of the carboxyl group of Asp-200 can be fully substituted by that of Glu residue. The Ser-160-->Ala mutant retained 10% activity of the wild-type chitinase indicating that the hydroxyl group of Ser-160 is not absolutely required for the catalytic activity. These results indicate a lysozyme-type catalytic mechanism of the chitinase.

  14. Detection of minimal residual disease in NPM1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Stephen J; Fromm, Jonathan R; Shendure, Jay; Wood, Brent L; Wu, David

    2014-11-01

    Detection of minimal residual disease predicts adverse outcome in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Currently, minimal residual disease may be detected by RQ-PCR or flow cytometry, both of which have practical and diagnostic limitations. Here, we describe a next-generation sequencing assay for minimal residual disease detection in NPM1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia, which encompasses ∼60% of patients with normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia. Exon 12 of NPM1 was PCR amplified using sequencing adaptor-linked primers and deep sequenced to enable detection of low-prevalence, acute myeloid leukemia-specific activating mutations. We benchmarked our results against flow cytometry, the standard of care for acute myeloid leukemia minimal residual disease diagnosis at our institution. The performance of both approaches was evaluated using defined dilutions of an NPM1 mutation-positive cell line and longitudinal clinical samples from acute myeloid leukemia patients. Using defined control material, we found this assay sensitive to approximately 0.001% mutant cells, outperforming flow cytometry by an order of magnitude. Next-generation sequencing was precise and semiquantitative over four orders of magnitude. In 22 longitudinal samples from six acute myeloid leukemia patients, next-generation sequencing detected minimal residual disease in all samples deemed negative by flow cytometry. Further, in one-third of patients, sequencing detected alternate NPM1 mutations in addition to the patient's index mutation, consistent with tumor heterogeneity. Next-generation sequencing provides information without prior knowledge of NPM1 mutation subtype or validation of allele-specific probes as required for RQ-PCR assays, and without generation and interpretation of complex multidimensional flow cytometry data. This approach may complement current technologies to enhance patient-specific clinical decision-making.

  15. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  16. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  17. Complete amino acid sequence of an acidic, cardiotoxic phospholipase A2 from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King Cobra): a novel cobra venom enzyme with "pancreatic loop".

    PubMed

    Huang, M Z; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Chung, M C; Kini, R M

    1997-02-15

    A phospholipase A2 (OHV A-PLA2) from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra) is an acidic protein exhibiting cardiotoxicity, myotoxicity, and antiplatelet activity. The complete amino acid sequence of OHV A-PLA2 has been determined using a combination of Edman degradation and mass spectrometric techniques. OHV A-PLA2 is composed of a single chain of 124 amino acid residues with 14 cysteines and a calculated molecular weight of 13719 Da. It contains the loop of residues (62-66) found in pancreatic PLA2s and hence belongs to class IB enzymes. This pancreatic loop is between two proline residues (Pro 59 and Pro 68) and contains several hydrophilic amino acids (Ser and Asp). This region has high degree of conformational flexibility and is on the surface of the molecule, and hence it may be a potential protein-protein interaction site. A relatively low sequence homology is found between OHV A-PLA2 and other known cardiotoxic PLA2s, and hence a contiguous segment could not be identified as a site responsible for the cardiotoxic activity.

  18. Differentiating N-terminal aspartic and isoaspartic acid residues in peptides.

    PubMed

    Sargaeva, Nadezda P; Lin, Cheng; O'Connor, Peter B

    2011-09-01

    Formation of isoaspartic acid (isoAsp) is a common modification of aspartic acid (Asp) or asparagine (Asn) residue in proteins. Differentiation of isoAsp and Asp residues is a challenging task owing to their similar properties and identical molecular mass. It was recently shown that they can be differentiated using ion-electron or ion-ion interaction fragmentation methods (ExD) because these methods provide diagnostic fragments c + 57 and z(•) - 57 specific to the isoAsp residue. To date, however, the presence of such fragments has not been explored on peptides with an N-terminal isoAsp residue. To address this question, several N-terminal isoAsp-containing peptides were analyzed using ExD methods alone or combined with chromatography. A diagnostic fragment [M + 2H - 74](+•) was observed for the doubly charged precursor ions with N-terminal isoAsp residues. For some peptides, identification of the N-terminal isoAsp residue was challenging because of the low diagnostic ion peak intensity and the presence of interfering peaks. Supplemental activation was used to improve diagnostic ion detection. Further, N-terminal acetylation was offered as a means to overcome the interference problem by shifting the diagnostic fragment peak to [M + 2H - 116](+•).

  19. Comparison of amino acid sequence of bovine coagulation Factor IX (Christmas Factor) with that of other vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Katayama, K; Ericsson, L H; Enfield, D L; Walsh, K A; Neurath, H; Davie, E W; Titani, K

    1979-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of bovine blood coagulation Factor IX (Christmas Factor) is presented and compared with the sequences of other vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins and pancreatic trypsinogen. The 416-residue sequence of Factor IX was determined largely by automated Edman degradation of two large segments, containing 181 and 235 residues, isolated after activating Factor IX with a protease from Russell's viper venom. Subfragments of the two segments were produced by enzymatic digestion and by chemical cleavage of methionyl, tryptophyl, and asparaginyl-glycyl bonds. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of Factor IX, Factor X, and Protein C demonstrates that they are homologous throughout. Their homology with prothrombin, however, is restricted to the amino-terminal region, which is rich in gamma-carboxyglutamic acid, and the carboxyl-terminal region, which represents the catalytic domain of these proteins and corresponds to that of pancreatic serine proteases.

  20. Purification to homogeneity and amino acid sequence analysis of two anionic species of human interleukin 1

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Two anionic species of human IL-1 have been purified to homogeneity. These molecules were characterized as having pI of 5.4 and 5.2 and molecular weights identical to IL-1/6.8 (17,500). The specific activities of IL-1/5.4 and IL-1/5.2, as measured in the mouse thymocyte co-mitogenic assay, were identical to that of IL-1/6.8, namely 1.2 X 10(7) U/mg, with half-maximal stimulation observed at 2 X 10(-11) M. IL- 1/5.4 and IL-1/5.2 were found to be antigenically distinct from IL- 1/6.8 in an ELISA. IL-1/5.4 was structurally distinct from IL-1/6.8 based on reverse-phase HPLC or CNBr peptides. Intact IL-1/5.2 and three intact CNBr peptides of IL-1/5.4 were sequenced, with the identification of 74 amino acid residues. These sequences were found to correspond exactly with the amino acid sequence deduced from the IL-1- alpha cDNA reported by March et al. PMID:3487613

  1. Isoelectric Point, Electric Charge, and Nomenclature of the Acid-Base Residues of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado, Andres A.; Ribeiro, Joao M.; Sillero, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The main object of this work is to present the pedagogical usefulness of the theoretical methods, developed in this laboratory, for the determination of the isoelectric point (pI) and the net electric charge of proteins together with some comments on the naming of the acid-base residues of proteins. (Contains 8 figures and 4 tables.)

  2. PINGU: PredIction of eNzyme catalytic residues usinG seqUence information

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Priyadarshini P.; Ranjani, S. S. Shree; Mondal, Sukanta

    2015-01-01

    Identification of catalytic residues can help unveil interesting attributes of enzyme function for various therapeutic and industrial applications. Based on their biochemical roles, the number of catalytic residues and sequence lengths of enzymes vary. This article describes a prediction approach (PINGU) for such a scenario. It uses models trained using physicochemical properties and evolutionary information of 650 non-redundant enzymes (2136 catalytic residues) in a support vector machines architecture. Independent testing on 200 non-redundant enzymes (683 catalytic residues) in predefined prediction settings, i.e., with non-catalytic per catalytic residue ranging from 1 to 30, suggested that the prediction approach was highly sensitive and specific, i.e., 80% or above, over the incremental challenges. To learn more about the discriminatory power of PINGU in real scenarios, where the prediction challenge is variable and susceptible to high false positives, the best model from independent testing was used on 60 diverse enzymes. Results suggested that PINGU was able to identify most catalytic residues and non-catalytic residues properly with 80% or above accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The effect of false positives on precision was addressed in this study by application of predicted ligand-binding residue information as a post-processing filter. An overall improvement of 20% in F-measure and 0.138 in Correlation Coefficient with 16% enhanced precision could be achieved. On account of its encouraging performance, PINGU is hoped to have eventual applications in boosting enzyme engineering and novel drug discovery. PMID:26261982

  3. Enzyme-free translation of DNA into sequence-defined synthetic polymers structurally unrelated to nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Jia; Hili, Ryan; Liu, David R.

    2013-04-01

    The translation of DNA sequences into corresponding biopolymers enables the production, function and evolution of the macromolecules of life. In contrast, methods to generate sequence-defined synthetic polymers with similar levels of control have remained elusive. Here, we report the development of a DNA-templated translation system that enables the enzyme-free translation of DNA templates into sequence-defined synthetic polymers that have no necessary structural relationship with nucleic acids. We demonstrate the efficiency, sequence-specificity and generality of this translation system by oligomerizing building blocks including polyethylene glycol, α-(D)-peptides, and β-peptides in a DNA-programmed manner. Sequence-defined synthetic polymers with molecular weights of 26 kDa containing 16 consecutively coupled building blocks and 90 densely functionalized β-amino acid residues were translated from DNA templates using this strategy. We integrated the DNA-templated translation system developed here into a complete cycle of translation, coding sequence replication, template regeneration and re-translation suitable for the iterated in vitro selection of functional sequence-defined synthetic polymers unrelated in structure to nucleic acids.

  4. Amino acid sequence and some properties of phytolacain G, a cysteine protease from growing fruit of pokeweed, Phytolacca americana.

    PubMed

    Uchikoba, T; Arima, K; Yonezawa, H; Shimada, M; Kaneda, M

    2000-10-18

    A protease, phytolacain G, has been found to appear on CM-Sepharose ion-exchange chromatography of greenish small-size fruits of pokeweed, Phytolacca americana L, from ca. 2 weeks after flowering, and increases during fruit enlargement. Reddish ripe fruit of the pokeweed contained both phytolacain G and R. The molecular mass of phytolacain G was estimated to be 25.5 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Its amino acid sequence was reconstructed by automated sequence analysis of the peptides obtained after cleavage with Achromobacter protease I, chymotrypsin, and cyanogen bromide. The enzyme is composed of 216 amino acid residues, of which it shares 152 identical amino acid residues (70%) with phytolacain R, 126 (58%) with melain G, 108 (50%) with papain, 106 (49%) with actinidain, and 96 (44%) with stem bromelain. The amino acid residues forming the substrate binding S(2) pocket of papain, Tyr67, Pro68, Trp69, Val133, and Phe207, were predicted to be replaced by Trp, Met, His, Ala, and Ser in phytolacain G, respectively. As a consequence of these substitutions, the S(2) pocket is expected to be less hydrophobic in phytolacain G than in papain.

  5. New approaches for computer analysis of nucleic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Karlin, S; Ghandour, G; Ost, F; Tavare, S; Korn, L J

    1983-09-01

    A new high-speed computer algorithm is outlined that ascertains within and between nucleic acid and protein sequences all direct repeats, dyad symmetries, and other structural relationships. Large repeats, repeats of high frequency, dyad symmetries of specified stem length and loop distance, and their distributions are determined. Significance of homologies is assessed by a hierarchy of permutation procedures. Applications are made to papovaviruses, the human papillomavirus HPV, lambda phage, the human and mouse mitochondrial genomes, and the human and mouse immunoglobulin kappa-chain genes. PMID:6577449

  6. Amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of human factor VII sub a from plasma and transfected baby hamster kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thim, L.; Bjoern, S.; Christensen, M.; Nicolaisen, E.M.; Lund-Hansen, T.; Pedersen, A.H.; Hedner, U. )

    1988-10-04

    Blood coagulation factor VII is a vitamin K dependent glycoprotein which in its activated form, factor VII{sub a}, participates in the coagulation process by activating factor X and/or factor IX in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} and tissue factor. Three types of potential posttranslational modifications exist in the human factor VII{sub a} molecule, namely, 10 {gamma}-carboxylated, N-terminally located glutamic acid residues, 1 {beta}-hydroxylated aspartic acid residue, and 2 N-glycosylated asparagine residues. In the present study, the amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of recombinant factor VII{sub a} as purified from the culture medium of a transfected baby hamster kidney cell line have been compared to human plasma factor VII{sub a}. By use of HPLC, amino acid analysis, peptide mapping, and automated Edman degradation, the protein backbone of recombinant factor VII{sub a} was found to be identical with human factor VII{sub a}. Asparagine residues 145 and 322 were found to be fully N-glycosylated in human plasma factor VII{sub a}. In the recombinant factor VII{sub a}, asparagine residue 322 was fully glycosylated whereas asparagine residue 145 was only partially (approximately 66%) glycosylated. Besides minor differences in the sialic acid and fucose contents, the overall carbohydrate compositions were nearly identical in recombinant factor VII{sub a} and human plasma factor VII{sub a}. These results show that factor VII{sub a} as produced in the transfected baby hamster kidney cells is very similar to human plasma factor VII{sub a} and that this cell line thus might represent an alternative source for human factor VII{sub a}.

  7. Delivery of a foreign epitope by sharing amino acid residues with the carrier matrix.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Wan-Shoo; Drummer, Heidi Edelgard; Netter, Hans-Jürgen

    2009-06-01

    A broad range of structural viral proteins has the ability to assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs). Under the condition that modified subunits are still competent to assemble into VLPs, they are epitope delivery platforms suitable for vaccination purposes. The insertion of foreign sequences can be detrimental for the formation of chimeric VLPs as a result of misfolded subunit proteins. Hence, a strategy was adopted to screen for locations allowing the use of shared residues between the wildtype subunit sequence and the foreign insert. The insertion of a cysteine-containing sequence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein 2 (E2) without adding an additional cysteine residue retained the ability of recombinant small hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg-S) to form secretion competent VLPs. A cysteine residue shared by the insert and the template protein avoided the formation of non-native disulfide bonds, and allowed the formation of VLPs. The chimeric HBsAg-S VLPs were similar to wildtype VLPs in density exposing the inserted foreign epitope and being immunogenic. Overall, the use of shared sequences between the insert and the subunit will facilitate the design of chimeric VLPs carrying multiple epitopes.

  8. Unconventional amino acid sequence of the sun anemone (Stoichactis helianthus) polypeptide neurotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Kem, W.; Dunn, B.; Parten, B.; Pennington, M.; Price, D.

    1986-05-01

    A 5000 dalton polypeptide neurotoxin (Sh-NI) purified by G50 Sephadex, P-cellulose, and SP-Sephadex chromatography was homogeneous by isoelectric focusing. Sh-NI was highly toxic to crayfish (LD/sub 50/ 0.6 ..mu..g/kg) but without effect upon mice at 15,000 ..mu..g/kg (i.p. injection). The reduced, /sup 3/H-carboxymethylated toxin and its fragments were subjected to automatic Edman degradation and the resulting PTH-amino acids were identified by HPLC, back hydrolysis, and scintillation counting. Peptides resulting from proteolytic (clostripain, staphylococcal protease) and chemical (tryptophan) cleavage were sequenced. The sequence is: AACKCDDEGPDIRTAPLTGTVDLGSCNAGWEKCASYYTIIADCCRKKK. This sequence differs considerably from the homologous Anemonia and Anthopleura toxins; many of the identical residues (6 half-cystines, G9, P10, R13, G19, G29, W30) are probably critical for folding rather than receptor recognition. However, the Sh-NI sequence closely resembles Radioanthus macrodactylus neurotoxin III and r. paumotensis II. The authors propose that Sh-NI and related Radioanthus toxins act upon a different site on the sodium channel.

  9. 40 CFR 180.550 - Arsanilic acid [(4-aminophenyl) arsonic acid]; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances... connection with the use of the pesticide under section 5 experimental use permit. The tolerance will...

  10. 40 CFR 180.550 - Arsanilic acid [(4-aminophenyl) arsonic acid]; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances... connection with the use of the pesticide under section 5 experimental use permit. The tolerance will...

  11. 40 CFR 180.550 - Arsanilic acid [(4-aminophenyl) arsonic acid]; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances... connection with the use of the pesticide under section 5 experimental use permit. The tolerance will...

  12. Residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential decreases unsaturated fatty acid level in sake yeast during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Kazutaka; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen, a key nutrient in alcoholic fermentation, is rapidly depleted during this process. Several pathways of oxygen utilization have been reported in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation, namely synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid, sterols and heme, and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. However, the interaction between these pathways has not been investigated. In this study, we showed that the major proportion of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids in sake fermentation mash is derived from the sake yeast rather than from rice or koji (rice fermented with Aspergillus). Additionally, during alcoholic fermentation, inhibition of the residual mitochondrial activity of sake yeast increases the levels of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids. These findings indicate that the residual activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain reduces molecular oxygen levels and decreases the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, thereby increasing the synthesis of estery flavors by sake yeast. This is the first report of a novel link between residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids by the brewery yeast during alcoholic fermentation. PMID:26839744

  13. Residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential decreases unsaturated fatty acid level in sake yeast during alcoholic fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Kazutaka

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen, a key nutrient in alcoholic fermentation, is rapidly depleted during this process. Several pathways of oxygen utilization have been reported in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation, namely synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid, sterols and heme, and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. However, the interaction between these pathways has not been investigated. In this study, we showed that the major proportion of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids in sake fermentation mash is derived from the sake yeast rather than from rice or koji (rice fermented with Aspergillus). Additionally, during alcoholic fermentation, inhibition of the residual mitochondrial activity of sake yeast increases the levels of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids. These findings indicate that the residual activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain reduces molecular oxygen levels and decreases the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, thereby increasing the synthesis of estery flavors by sake yeast. This is the first report of a novel link between residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids by the brewery yeast during alcoholic fermentation. PMID:26839744

  14. Amino acid sequence homology among the 2-hydroxy acid dehydrogenases: mitochondrial and cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenases form a homologous system with lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Birktoft, J J; Fernley, R T; Bradshaw, R A; Banaszak, L J

    1982-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of porcine heart mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH; L-malate: NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.37) has been compared with the sequences of six different lactate dehydrogenases (LDH; L-lactate: NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.27) and with the "x-ray" sequence of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase (sMDH). The main points are that (i) all three enzymes are homologous; (ii) invariant residues in the catalytic center of these enzymes include a histidine and an internally located aspartate that function as a proton relay system; (iii) numerous residues important to coenzyme binding are conserved, including several glycines and charged residues; and (iv) amino acid side chains present in the subunit interface common to the MDHs and LDHs appear to be better conserved than those in the protein interior. It is concluded that LDH, sMDH, and mMDH are derived from a common ancestral gene and probably have similar catalytic mechanisms. PMID:6959107

  15. Physicochemical pretreatments and hydrolysis of furfural residues via carbon-based sulfonated solid acid.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bao Jun; Sun, Yuan; Lin, Ke Ying; Li, Bing; Liu, Wan Yi

    2014-03-01

    Potential commercial physicochemical pretreatment methods, NaOH/microwave and NaOH/ultrasound were developed, and the carbon-based sulfonated solid acid catalysts were prepared for furfural residues conversion into reducing sugars. After the two optimum pretreatments, both the content of cellulose increased (74.03%, 72.28%, respectively) and the content of hemicellulose (94.11%, 94.17% of removal rate, respectively) and lignin (91.75%, 92.09% of removal rate, respectively) decreased in furfural residues. The reducing sugar yields of furfural residues with the two physicochemical pretreatments on coal tar-based solid acid reached 33.94% and 33.13%, respectively, higher than that pretreated via NaOH alone (27%) and comparable to that pretreated via NaOH/H2O2 (35.67%). The XRD patterns, IR spectra and SEM images show microwave and ultrasound improve the pretreatment effect. The results demonstrate the carbon-based sulfonated solid acids and the physicochemical pretreatments are green, effective, low-cost for furfural residues conversion.

  16. Amino acid sequence and some properties of lectin-D from the roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Mori, A; Funatsu, G

    1996-08-01

    Two pokeweed lectins, designated PL-D1 and PL-D2, have been isolated from the roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) using chitin affinity column chromatography followed by gel filtration on a Sephacryl S-200 column and fast protein liquid chromatography on a Mono-Q column, and their amino acid sequences have been analyzed. PL-D1 consists of 84 amino acid residues and has a molecular mass of 9317, while PL-D2 has an identical sequence with PL-D1 except lack of the C-terminal Leu-Thr. PL-D is composed of two chitin-binding domains, A and B, with 50% homology with each other. Both PL-Ds did not agglutinate native rabbit erythrocytes, but showed about 0.1% of the agglutinating activity of wheat germ agglutinin toward trypsin-treated erythrocytes. In the presence of beta (1-->4) linked oligomers of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, which inhibit the hemagglutination, PL-D1 had an ultraviolet-difference spectrum with maxima at 292-294 nm and 284-285 nm, attributed to the red shift of the tryptophan residue, suggesting the location of tryptophan residue(s) at or near saccharide-binding site of PL-D1.

  17. Identification of the amino acid residues rendering TI-VAMP insensitive toward botulinum neurotoxin B.

    PubMed

    Sikorra, Stefan; Henke, Tina; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Galli, Thierry; Binz, Thomas

    2006-03-24

    Botulinum neurotoxins types B, D, F, and G, and tetanus neurotoxin inhibit vesicular fusion via proteolytic cleavage of VAMP/Synaptobrevin, a core component of the membrane fusion machinery. Thus, these neurotoxins became widely used tools for investigating vesicular trafficking routes. Except for VAMP-1, VAMP-2, and Cellubrevin, no other member of the VAMP family represents a substrate for these neurotoxins. The molecular basis for this discrepancy is not known. A 34 amino acid residue segment of VAMP-2 was previously suggested to mediate the interaction with botulinum neurotoxin B, but the validity of the data was later questioned. To check whether this segment alone controls the susceptibility toward botulinum neurotoxin B, it was used to replace the corresponding segment in TI-VAMP. The resulting VAMP hybrid and VAMP-2 were hydrolysed at virtually identical rates. Resetting the VAMP-2 portion in the hybrid from either end to TI-VAMP residues gradually reduced the cleavability. A hybrid encompassing merely the VAMP-2 segment 71-80 around the Gln76/Phe77 scissile bond was still hydrolysed, albeit at a approximately tenfold lower cleavage rate. The contribution of each non-conserved amino acid of the whole 34-mer segment to the interaction was investigated employing VAMP-2. We find that the eight non-conserved residues of the 71-80 segment are all necessary for efficient cleavage. Mutation of an additional six residues located upstream and downstream of this segment affects substrate hydrolysis as well. Vice versa, a readily cleavable TI-VAMP molecule requires at the least the replacement of Ile158, Thr161, and the section 165-174 by Asp64, Ala67, and the 71-80 segment of VAMP-2, respectively. However, the insensitivity of TI-VAMP to botulinum neurotoxin B relies on at least 12 amino acid changes versus VAMP-2. These are scattered along an interface of 22 amino acid residues in length.

  18. Specific DNA binding to a major histocompatibility complex enhancer sequence by a synthetic 57-residue double zinc finger peptide from a human enhancer binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Omichinski, J G; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M

    1991-04-15

    Two 57-residue peptides containing one pair of "zinc fingers" from a human enhancer binding protein were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. One peptide (MBP-DF) contained the native sequence, while the second peptide ([Abu11]MBP-DF) has an alpha-aminobutyric acid residue substituted for a nonconserved cysteine residue at position 11. The peptides were characterized by several chemical and physical methods, and their DNA binding properties were evaluated using gel retardation experiments. Spectroscopic studies demonstrated that addition of metal ions such as zinc and cobalt resulted in specific conformational changes in both peptides, indicating that cysteine-11 does not appear to be involved in metal chelation. One-dimensional 1H NMR studies indicate that a stable folded structure is formed upon addition of zinc, and the chemical shift pattern is consistent with that previously observed for one constituent single finger (Omichinski, J., Clore, G. M., Appella, E., Sakaguchi, K., and Gronenborn, A. M. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 9324-9334). Gel retardation experiments demonstrate that the peptides are capable of interacting with a 15-mer oligonucleotide comprising a portion of the major histocompatibility complex enhancer sequence and that the interaction is zinc-dependent. The dissociation constant for the [Abu11]MBP-DF peptide is 1.4 x 10(-7) M with maximal binding occurring at a zinc-to-peptide ratio of 2 to 1. The binding specificity observed with respect to related enhancer sequences exhibits the same relative order as noted previously for the whole protein. Studies with point mutants of the major histocompatibility complex enhancer binding sequence indicate that the last GC base pair in a four-guanine stretch plays a pivotal role in the interaction between the peptide and DNA. PMID:2016331

  19. A genomic sequencing protocol that yields a positive display of 5-methylcytosine residues in individual DNA strands.

    PubMed Central

    Frommer, M; McDonald, L E; Millar, D S; Collis, C M; Watt, F; Grigg, G W; Molloy, P L; Paul, C L

    1992-01-01

    The modulation of DNA-protein interactions by methylation of protein-binding sites in DNA and the occurrence in genomic imprinting, X chromosome inactivation, and fragile X syndrome of different methylation patterns in DNA of different chromosomal origin have underlined the need to establish methylation patterns in individual strands of particular genomic sequences. We report a genomic sequencing method that provides positive identification of 5-methylcytosine residues and yields strand-specific sequences of individual molecules in genomic DNA. The method utilizes bisulfite-induced modification of genomic DNA, under conditions whereby cytosine is converted to uracil, but 5-methylcytosine remains nonreactive. The sequence under investigation is then amplified by PCR with two sets of strand-specific primers to yield a pair of fragments, one from each strand, in which all uracil and thymine residues have been amplified as thymine and only 5-methylcytosine residues have been amplified as cytosine. The PCR products can be sequenced directly to provide a strand-specific average sequence for the population of molecules or can be cloned and sequenced to provide methylation maps of single DNA molecules. We tested the method by defining the methylation status within single DNA strands of two closely spaced CpG dinucleotides in the promoter of the human kininogen gene. During the analysis, we encountered in sperm DNA an unusual methylation pattern, which suggests that the high methylation level of single-copy sequences in sperm may be locally modulated by binding of protein factors in germ-line cells. Images PMID:1542678

  20. Homology analyses of the protein sequences of fatty acid synthases from chicken liver, rat mammary gland, and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Soo-Ik ); Hammes, G.G. )

    1989-11-01

    Homology analyses of the protein sequences of chicken liver and rat mammary gland fatty acid synthases were carried out. The amino acid sequences of the chicken and rat enzymes are 67% identical. If conservative substitutions are allowed, 78% of the amino acids are matched. A region of low homologies exists between the functional domains, in particular around amino acid residues 1059-1264 of the chicken enzyme. Homologies between the active sites of chicken and rat and of chicken and yeast enzymes have been analyzed by an alignment method. A high degree of homology exists between the active sites of the chicken and rat enzymes. However, the chicken and yeast enzymes show a lower degree of homology. The DADPH-binding dinucleotide folds of the {beta}-ketoacyl reductase and the enoyl reductase sites were identified by comparison with a known consensus sequence for the DADP- and FAD-binding dinucleotide folds. The active sites of all of the enzymes are primarily in hydrophobic regions of the protein. This study suggests that the genes for the functional domains of fatty acid synthase were originally separated, and these genes were connected to each other by using different connecting nucleotide sequences in different species. An alternative explanation for the differences in rat and chicken is a common ancestry and mutations in the joining regions during evolution.

  1. A novel sono-assisted acid pretreatment of chili post harvest residue for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, Raveendran; Binod, Parameswaran; Pandey, Ashok

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a sono-assisted acid pretreatment strategy for the effective removal of lignin and hemicelluloses and to improve the sugar yield from chili post harvest residue. Operational parameters that affect the pretreatment efficiency were studied and optimized. Inhibitor analysis of the hydrolyzate revealed that major fermentation inhibitors like furfural, hydroxymethyl furfural and organic acids like citric acid, succinic acid and propionic acid were absent. Changes in structural properties of the biomass were studied in relation to the pretreatment process using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis, and the changes in chemical composition was also monitored. The biomass pretreated with the optimized novel method yielded 0.465g/g of reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis. Fermentation of the non-detoxified hydrolysate yielded 2.14% of bioethanol with a fermentation efficiency of 71.03%. PMID:26949055

  2. Molecular cloning, coding nucleotides and the deduced amino acid sequence of P-450BM-1 from Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    He, J S; Ruettinger, R T; Liu, H M; Fulco, A J

    1989-12-22

    The gene encoding barbiturate-inducible cytochrome P-450BM-1 from Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581 has been cloned and sequenced. An open reading frame in the 1.9 kb of cloned DNA correctly predicted the NH2-terminal sequence of P-450BM-1 previously determined by protein sequencing, and, in toto, predicted a polypeptide of 410 amino acid residues with an Mr of 47,439. The sequence is most, but less than 27%, similar to that of P-450CAM from Pseudomonas putida, so that P-450BM-1 clearly belongs to a new P-450-gene family, distinct especially from that of the P-450 domain of P-450BM-3, a barbiturate-inducible single polypeptide cytochrome P-450:NADPH-P-450 reductase from the same strain of B. megaterium (Ruettinger, R.T., Wen, L.-P. and Fulco, A.J. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 10987-10995). PMID:2597681

  3. Predicting free energy contributions to the conformational stability of folded proteins from the residue sequence with radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Casadio, R; Compiani, M; Fariselli, P; Vivarelli, F

    1995-01-01

    Radial basis function neural networks are trained on a data base comprising 38 globular proteins of well resolved crystallographic structure and the corresponding free energy contributions to the overall protein stability (as computed partially from chrystallographic analysis and partially with multiple regression from experimental thermodynamic data by Ponnuswamy and Gromiha (1994)). Starting from the residue sequence and using as input code the percentage of each residue and the total residue number of the protein, it is found with a cross-validation method that neural networks can optimally predict the free energy contributions due to hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic interactions and the unfolded state. Terms due to electrostatic and disulfide bonding free energies are poorly predicted. This is so also when other input codes, including the percentage of secondary structure type of the protein and/or residue-pair information are used. Furthermore, trained on the computed and/or experimental delta G values of the data base, neural networks predict a conformational stability ranging from about 10 to 20 kcal mol-1 rather independently of the residue sequence, with an average error per protein of about 9 kcal mol-1.

  4. A sequence of basic residues in the porcine circovirus type 2 capsid protein is crucial for its co-expression and co-localization with the replication protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Renne, Nicolaas Van; Liu, Changming; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2015-12-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) encodes two major proteins: the replication protein (Rep) and the capsid protein (Cap). Cap displays a conserved stretch of basic residues situated on the inside of the capsid, whose role is so far unknown. We used a reverse-genetics approach to investigate its function and found that mutations in these amino acids hindered Cap mRNA translation and hampered Cap/Rep co-localization, yielding unfit viruses. Intriguingly, co-transfection with a WT PCV2 of a different genotype partially rescued mutant Cap expression, showing the importance of this basic pattern for efficient translation of Cap mRNA into protein. Our results show that Cap and Rep are expressed independently of each other, and that this amino acid sequence of Cap is vital for virus propagation. This study provides a method for studying unfit PCV2 virions and offers new insights into the intracellular modus vivendi of PCV2. PMID:26415571

  5. Purification, properties and complete amino acid sequence of the ferredoxin from a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Schmitter, J M; Jacquot, J P; de Lamotte-Guéry, F; Beauvallet, C; Dutka, S; Gadal, P; Decottignies, P

    1988-03-01

    The ferredoxin was purified from the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The protein showed typical absorption and circular dichroism spectra of a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin. When compared with spinach ferredoxin, the C. reinhardtii protein was less effective in the catalysis of NADP+ photoreduction, but its activity was higher in the light activation of C. reinhardtii malate dehydrogenase (NADP). The complete amino acid sequence was determined by automated Edman degradation of the whole protein and of peptides obtained by trypsin and chymotrypsin digestions and by CNBr cleavage. The protein consists of 94 residues, with Tyr at both NH2 and COOH termini. The positions of the four cysteines binding the two iron atoms are similar to those found in other [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins. The primary structure of C. reinhardtii ferredoxin showed a great homology (about 80%) with ferredoxins from two other green algae.

  6. The cyst wall of Colpoda steinii. A substance rich in glutamic acid residues

    PubMed Central

    Tibbs, J.

    1966-01-01

    1. The cyst wall of Colpoda steinii has been isolated and its chemical nature examined. It had a nitrogen content 13·9±0·2% (s.d.) and an ash 8·6±1·6% (s.d.). After lipid and hot-acid extraction there was a variable residual phosphorus of 0·19–0·64%. The protein nature, indicated by infrared and ultraviolet absorption, was confirmed when 100μg. of hydrolysed wall gave a ninhydrin colour equivalent to that given by 0·88–1·01μmoles of glycine. Hexosamine, hexose, pentose, lipid and dipicolinic acid were absent. 2. Paper chromatography of hydrolysates, besides showing the presence of the usual protein amino acids and three unidentified ninhydrin-reacting spots, indicated the presence of large amounts of glutamic acid. Estimated by chromatography, the amount present was 52·9±0·6 (s.d.) g./100g. of ash-free wall; manometric estimation of l-glutamic acid with l-glutamate 1-carboxy-lyase gave 46·5±0·9 (s.d.) g./100g. 3. Free carboxyl groups were estimated by titration as 0·159±0·011 (s.d.) mole/100g. and those present as amide as 0·154±0·004 (s.d.) mole/100g., and the total was compared with the dicarboxylic acid content 0·360±0·010 (s.d.) mole/100g. 4. After treatment with 98% formic acid 25–30% of the wall material could be extracted by 0·05m-sodium carbonate solution (extract 1); after treatment of the residue with performic acid a further 62–63% based on the original weight could be extracted by 0·05m-sodium carbonate (extract 2). 5. The average values found for the glutamic acid contents were 21·7g./100g. for extract 1 and 58·0g./100g. for extract 2. The cysteic acid content of whole oxidized wall was about 5·8g./100g. and of extract 2 also about 5·8g./100g. The glutamic acid and cysteic acid contents of the final residue were also investigated. 6. The significance of these extraction experiments in relation to the wall structure is discussed. ImagesPlate 1. PMID:4957913

  7. Purification, Cloning, Characterization and Essential Amino Acid Residues Analysis of a New ι-Carrageenase from Cellulophaga sp. QY3

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Su; Duan, Gaofei; Chai, Wengang; Geng, Cunliang; Tan, Yulong; Wang, Lushan; Le Sourd, Frédéric; Michel, Gurvan; Yu, Wengong; Han, Feng

    2013-01-01

    ι-Carrageenases belong to family 82 of glycoside hydrolases that degrade sulfated galactans in the red algae known as ι-carrageenans. The catalytic mechanism and some substrate-binding residues of family GH82 have been studied but the substrate recognition and binding mechanism of this family have not been fully elucidated. We report here the purification, cloning and characterization of a new ι-carrageenase CgiA_Ce from the marine bacterium Cellulophaga sp. QY3. CgiA_Ce was the most thermostable carrageenase described so far. It was most active at 50°C and pH 7.0 and retained more than 70% of the original activity after incubation at 50°C for 1 h at pH 7.0 or at pH 5.0–10.6 for 24 h. CgiA_Ce was an endo-type ι-carrageenase; it cleaved ι-carrageenan yielding neo-ι-carrabiose and neo-ι-carratetraose as the main end products, and neo-ι-carrahexaose was the minimum substrate. Sequence analysis and structure modeling showed that CgiA_Ce is indeed a new member of family GH82. Moreover, sequence analysis of ι-carrageenases revealed that the amino acid residues at subsites −1 and +1 were more conserved than those at other subsites. Site-directed mutagenesis followed by kinetic analysis identified three strictly conserved residues at subsites −1 and +1 of ι-carrageenases, G228, Y229 and R254 in CgiA_Ce, which played important roles for substrate binding. Furthermore, our results suggested that Y229 and R254 in CgiA_Ce interacted specifically with the sulfate groups of the sugar moieties located at subsites −1 and +1, shedding light on the mechanism of ι-carrageenan recognition in the family GH82. PMID:23741363

  8. Complete amino acid sequence of a Lolium perenne (perennial rye grass) pollen allergen, Lol p II.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Shenbagamurthi, P; Marsh, D G

    1989-07-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergen, Lol p II was determined by automated Edman degradation of the protein and selected fragments. Cleavage of the protein by enzymatic and chemical techniques established an unambiguous sequence for the protein. Lol p II contains 97 amino acid residues, with a calculated molecular weight of 10,882. The protein lacks cysteine and glutamine and shows no evidence of glycosylation. Theoretical predictions by Fraga's (Fraga, S. (1982) Can. J. Chem. 60, 2606-2610) and Hopp and Woods' (Hopp, T. P., and Woods, K. R. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 78, 3824-3828) methods indicate the presence of four hydrophilic regions, which may contribute to sequential or parts of conformational B-cell epitopes. Analysis of amphipathic regions by Berzofsky's method indicates the presence of a highly amphipathic region, which may contain, or contribute to, an Ia/T-cell epitope. This latter segment of Lol p II was found to be highly homologous with an antibody-binding segment of the major rye allergen Lol p I and may explain why immune responsiveness to both the allergens is associated with HLA-DR3.

  9. Comparison between liquid and solid acids catalysts on reducing sugars conversion from furfural residues via pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Lin, Keying; Ma, Baojun; Sun, Yuan; Liu, Wanyi

    2014-09-01

    Liquid sulphuric acid is adopted and compared with carbon-based sulfonated solid acids (coal tar-based and active carbon-based) for furfural residues conversion into reducing sugars. The optimum hydrolysis conditions of liquid acid are at 4% of sulphuric acid, 25:1 of liquid and solid ratio, 175°C of reaction temperature and 120 min of reaction time. The reducing sugar yields are reached over 60% on liquid acid via NaOH/H2O2, NaOH/microwave and NaOH/ultrasonic pretreatments, whereas only over 30% on solid acids. The TOFs (turnover number frequency) via NaOH/H2O2 pretreatments are 0.093, 0.020 and 0.023 h(-1) for liquid sulphuric acid, coal tar-based and active carbon-based solid acids catalysts, respectively. Considering the efficiency, cost and environment factors, the liquid and solid acids have their own advantages of potential commercial application values.

  10. Predicting protein disorder by analyzing amino acid sequence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu

    2008-01-01

    Background Many protein regions and some entire proteins have no definite tertiary structure, presenting instead as dynamic, disorder ensembles under different physiochemical circumstances. These proteins and regions are known as Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins (IUP). IUP have been associated with a wide range of protein functions, along with roles in diseases characterized by protein misfolding and aggregation. Results Identifying IUP is important task in structural and functional genomics. We exact useful features from sequences and develop machine learning algorithms for the above task. We compare our IUP predictor with PONDRs (mainly neural-network-based predictors), disEMBL (also based on neural networks) and Globplot (based on disorder propensity). Conclusion We find that augmenting features derived from physiochemical properties of amino acids (such as hydrophobicity, complexity etc.) and using ensemble method proved beneficial. The IUP predictor is a viable alternative software tool for identifying IUP protein regions and proteins. PMID:18831799

  11. A Mutational Analysis of the Active Site Loop Residues in cis-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Gottfried K.; Huddleston, Jamison P.; Johnson, William H.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    cis -3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-CaaD) from Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170 and a homologue from Corynebacterium glutamicum designated Cg10062 share 34% sequence identity (54% similarity). The former catalyzes a key step in a bacterial catabolic pathway for the nematocide 1,3-dichloropropene, whereas the latter has no known biological activity. Although Cg10062 has the six active site residues (Pro-1, His-28, Arg-70, Arg-73, Tyr-103, Glu-114) that are critical for cis-CaaD activity, it shows only a low level cis-CaaD activity and lacks the specificity of cis-CaaD: Cg10062 processes both isomers of 3-chloroacrylate with a preference for the cis-isomer. Although the basis for these differences is unknown, a comparison of the crystal structures of the enzymes covalently modified by an adduct resulting from their incubation with the same inhibitor offers a possible explanation. A 6-residue active site loop in cis-CaaD shows a strikingly different conformation from that observed in Cg10062: the loop closes down on the active site of cis-CaaD, but not on that of Cg10062. In order to examine what this loop might contribute to cis-CaaD catalysis and specificity, the residues were changed individually to those found in Cg10062. Subsequent kinetic and mechanistic analysis suggests that the T34A mutant of cis-CaaD is more Cg10062-like. The mutant enzyme shows a 4-fold increase in Km (using cis-3-bromoacrylate), but not to the degree observed for Cg10062 (687-fold). The mutation also causes a 4-fold decrease in the burst rate (compared to the wild type cis-CaaD), whereas Cg10062 shows no burst rate. More telling is the reaction of the T34A mutant of cis-CaaD with the alternate substrate, 2,3-butadienoate. In the presence of NaBH4 and the allene, cis-CaaD is completely inactivated after one turnover due to the covalent modification of Pro-1. The same experiment with Cg10062 does not result in the covalent modification of Pro-1. The different outcomes are attributed to

  12. Identification of amino acid residues important for the function of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Irr protein.

    PubMed

    Bhubhanil, Sakkarin; Ruangkiattikul, Nantaporn; Niamyim, Phettree; Chamsing, Jareeya; Ngok-Ngam, Patchara; Sukchawalit, Rojana; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2012-10-01

    The key amino acid residues that influence the function of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens iron response regulator protein (Irr(At) ) were investigated. Several Irr(At) mutant proteins containing substitutions in amino acids corresponding to candidate metal- and haem-binding sites were constructed. The ability of the mutant proteins to repress the promoter of the membrane bound ferritin (mbfA) gene was investigated using a promoter-lacZ fusion assay. A single mutation at residue H94 significantly decreased the repressive activity of Irr(At) . Multiple mutation analysis revealed the importance of H45, H65, the HHH motif (H92, H93 and H94) and H127 for the repressor function of Irr(At) . H94 is essential for the iron responsiveness of Irr(At) . Furthermore, the Irr(At) mutant proteins showed differential abilities to complement the H(2) O(2) -hyper-resistant phenotype of an irr mutant. PMID:22817265

  13. Purification, amino acid sequence and characterisation of kangaroo IGF-I.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Francis, G L; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1998-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-II have been purified to homogeneity from kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) serum, thus this represents the first report of the purification, sequencing and characterisation of marsupial IGFs. N-Terminal protein sequencing reveals that there are six amino acid differences between kangaroo and human IGF-I. Kangaroo IGF-II has been partially sequenced and no differences were found between human and kangaroo IGF-II in the 53 residues identified. Thus the IGFs appear to be remarkably structurally conserved during mammalian radiation. In addition, in vitro characterisation of kangaroo IGF-I demonstrated that the functional properties of human, kangaroo and chicken IGF-I are very similar. In an assay measuring the ability of the proteins to stimulate protein synthesis in rat L6 myoblasts, all IGF-I proteins were found to be equally potent. The ability of all three proteins to compete for binding with radiolabelled human IGF-I to type-1 IGF receptors in L6 myoblasts and in Sminthopsis crassicaudata transformed lung fibroblasts, a marsupial cell line, was comparable. Furthermore, kangaroo and human IGF-I react equally in a human IGF-I RIA using a human reference standard, radiolabelled human IGF-I and a polyclonal antibody raised against recombinant human IGF-I. This study indicates that not only is the primary structure of eutherian and metatherian IGF-I conserved, but also the proteins appear to be functionally similar.

  14. Amino acid sequence and domain structure of entactin. Homology with epidermal growth factor precursor and low density lipoprotein receptor

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Entactin (nidogen), a 150-kD sulfated glycoprotein, is a major component of basement membranes and forms a highly stable noncovalent complex with laminin. The complete amino acid sequence of mouse entactin has been derived from sequencing of cDNA clones. The 5.9-kb cDNA contains a 3,735-bp open reading frame followed by a 3'- untranslated region of 2.2 kb. The open reading frame encodes a 1,245- residue polypeptide with an unglycosylated Mr of 136,500, a 28-residue signal peptide, two Asn-linked glycosylation sites, and two potential Ca2+-binding sites. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence predicts that the molecule consists of two globular domains of 70 and 36 kD separated by a cysteine-rich domain of 28 kD. The COOH-terminal globular domain shows homology to the EGF precursor and the low density lipoprotein receptor. Entactin contains six EGF-type cysteine-rich repeat units and one copy of a cysteine-repeat motif found in thyroglobulin. The Arg-Gly-Asp cell recognition sequence is present in one of the EGF-type repeats, and a synthetic peptide from the putative cell-binding site of entactin was found to promote the attachment of mouse mammary tumor cells. PMID:3264556

  15. Amino acid sequences of lysozymes newly purified from invertebrates imply wide distribution of a novel class in the lysozyme family.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Yoshikawa, A; Hotani, T; Fukuda, S; Sugimura, K; Imoto, T

    1999-01-01

    Lysozymes were purified from three invertebrates: a marine bivalve, a marine conch, and an earthworm. The purified lysozymes all showed a similar molecular weight of 13 kDa on SDS/PAGE. Their N-terminal sequences up to the 33rd residue determined here were apparently homologous among them; in addition, they had a homology with a partial sequence of a starfish lysozyme which had been reported before. The complete sequence of the bivalve lysozyme was determined by peptide mapping and subsequent sequence analysis. This was composed of 123 amino acids including as many as 14 cysteine residues and did not show a clear homology with the known types of lysozymes. However, the homology search of this protein on the protein or nucleic acid database revealed two homologous proteins. One of them was a gene product, CELF22 A3.6 of C. elegans, which was a functionally unknown protein. The other was an isopeptidase of a medicinal leech, named destabilase. Thus, a new type of lysozyme found in at least four species across the three classes of the invertebrates demonstrates a novel class of protein/lysozyme family in invertebrates. The bivalve lysozyme, first characterized here, showed extremely high protein stability and hen lysozyme-like enzymatic features.

  16. Amino acid sequences of lysozymes newly purified from invertebrates imply wide distribution of a novel class in the lysozyme family.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Yoshikawa, A; Hotani, T; Fukuda, S; Sugimura, K; Imoto, T

    1999-01-01

    Lysozymes were purified from three invertebrates: a marine bivalve, a marine conch, and an earthworm. The purified lysozymes all showed a similar molecular weight of 13 kDa on SDS/PAGE. Their N-terminal sequences up to the 33rd residue determined here were apparently homologous among them; in addition, they had a homology with a partial sequence of a starfish lysozyme which had been reported before. The complete sequence of the bivalve lysozyme was determined by peptide mapping and subsequent sequence analysis. This was composed of 123 amino acids including as many as 14 cysteine residues and did not show a clear homology with the known types of lysozymes. However, the homology search of this protein on the protein or nucleic acid database revealed two homologous proteins. One of them was a gene product, CELF22 A3.6 of C. elegans, which was a functionally unknown protein. The other was an isopeptidase of a medicinal leech, named destabilase. Thus, a new type of lysozyme found in at least four species across the three classes of the invertebrates demonstrates a novel class of protein/lysozyme family in invertebrates. The bivalve lysozyme, first characterized here, showed extremely high protein stability and hen lysozyme-like enzymatic features. PMID:9914527

  17. Role of interfacial amino acid residues in assembly, stability, and conformation of a spherical virus capsid

    PubMed Central

    Reguera, Juan; Carreira, Aura; Riolobos, Laura; Almendral, José María; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-eight amino acid residues involved in most noncovalent interactions between trimeric protein subunits in the capsid of the parvovirus minute virus of mice were truncated individually to alanine, and the effects on capsid assembly, thermostability, and conformation were analyzed. Only seven side chains were essential for protein subunit recognition. These side chains virtually corresponded with those that either buried a large hydrophobic surface on trimer association or formed buried intertrimer hydrogen bonds or salt bridges. The seven residues are evolutionarily conserved, and they define regularly spaced spots on a thin equatorial belt surrounding each trimer. Truncation of the many side chains that were dispensable for assembly, including those participating in solvent-accessible polar interactions, did not substantially affect capsid thermostability either. However, the interfacial residues located at the base of the pores delineating the capsid five-fold axes participated in a heat-induced conformational rearrangement associated with externalization of the capsid protein N terminus, and they were needed for infectivity. Thus, at the subunit interfaces of this model virus capsid, only key residues involved in the strongest interactions are critical for assembly and stability, but additional residues fulfill other important biological roles. PMID:14981262

  18. Gastropod arginine kinases from Cellana grata and Aplysia kurodai. Isolation and cDNA-derived amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Inoue, N; Higashi, T; Mizobuchi, R; Sugimura, N; Yokouchi, K; Furukohri, T

    2000-12-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) was isolated from the radular muscle of the gastropod molluscs Cellana grata (subclass Prosobranchia) and Aplysia kurodai (subclass Opisthobranchia), respectively, by ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and DEAE-ion exchange chromatography. The denatured relative molecular mass values were estimated to be 40 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isolated enzyme from Aplysia gave a Km value of 0.6 mM for arginine and a Vmax value of 13 micromole Pi min(-1) mg protein(-1) for the forward reaction. These values are comparable to other molluscan AKs. The cDNAs encoding Cellana and Aplysia AKs were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the nucleotide sequences of 1,608 and 1,239 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Cellana AK is 1044 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 347 amino acid residues, and that for A. kurodai is 1077 nucleotides and 354 residues. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequences were validated by chemical sequencing of internal lysyl endopeptidase peptides. The amino acid sequences of Cellana and Aplysia AKs showed the highest percent identity (66-73%) with those of the abalone Nordotis and turbanshell Battilus belonging to the same class Gastropoda. These AK sequences still have a strong homology (63-71%) with that of the chiton Liolophura (class Polyplacophora), which is believed to be one of the most primitive molluscs. On the other hand, these AK sequences are less homologous (55-57%) with that of the clam Pseudocardium (class Bivalvia), suggesting that the biological position of the class Polyplacophora should be reconsidered.

  19. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp) residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe) as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA), which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition) to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds) occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism. PMID:25588215

  20. Complete amino acid sequence of human plasma Zn-. cap alpha. /sub 2/-glycoprotein and its homology to histocompatibility antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, T.; Gejyo, F.; Takagaki, K.; Haupt, H.; Schwick, H.G.; Buergi, W.; Marti, T.; Schaller, J.; Rickli, E.; Brossmer, R.

    1988-02-01

    In the present study the complete amino acid sequence of human plasma Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein was determined. This protein whose biological function is unknown consists of a single polypeptide chain of 276 amino acid residues including 8 tryptophan residues and has a pyroglutamyl residue at the amino terminus. The location of the two disulfide bonds in the polypeptide chain was also established. The three glycans, whose structure was elucidated with the aid of 500 MHz /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy, were sialylated N-biantennas. The molecular weight calculated from the polypeptide and carbohydrate structure is 38,478, which is close to the reported value of approx. = 41,000 based on physicochemical measurements. The predicted secondary structure appeared to comprised of 23% ..cap alpha..-helix, 27% ..beta..-sheet, and 22% ..beta..-turns. The three N-glycans were found to be located in ..beta..-turn regions. An unexpected finding was made by computer analysis of the sequence data; this revealed that Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein is closely related to antigens of the major histocompatibility complex in amino acid sequence and in domain structure. There was an unusually high degree of sequence homology with the ..cap alpha.. chains of class I histocompatibility antigens. Moreover, this plasma protein was shown to be a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein appears to be truncated secretory major histocompatibility complex-related molecule, and it may have a role in the expression of the immune response.

  1. G glycoprotein amino acid residues required for human monoclonal antibody RAB1 neutralization are conserved in rabies virus street isolates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Rowley, Kirk J; Booth, Brian J; Sloan, Susan E; Ambrosino, Donna M; Babcock, Gregory J

    2011-08-01

    Replacement of polyclonal anti-rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) used in rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) with a monoclonal antibody will eliminate cost and availability constraints that currently exist using RIG in the developing world. The human monoclonal antibody RAB1 has been shown to neutralize all rabies street isolates tested; however for the laboratory-adapted fixed strain, CVS-11, mutation in the G glycoprotein of amino acid 336 from asparagine (N) to aspartic acid (D) resulted in resistance to neutralization. Interestingly, this same mutation in the G glycoprotein of a second laboratory-adapted fixed strain (ERA) did not confer resistance to RAB1 neutralization. Using cell surface staining and lentivirus pseudotyped with rabies virus G glycoprotein (RABVpp), we identified an amino acid alteration in CVS-11 (K346), not present in ERA (R346), which was required in combination with D336 to confer resistance to RAB1. A complete analysis of G glycoprotein sequences from GenBank demonstrated that no identified rabies isolates contain the necessary combination of G glycoprotein mutations for resistance to RAB1 neutralization, consistent with the broad neutralization of RAB1 observed in direct viral neutralization experiments with street isolates. All combinations of amino acids 336 and 346 reported in the sequence database were engineered into the ERA G glycoprotein and RAB1 was able to neutralize RABVpp bearing ERA G glycoprotein containing all known combinations at these critical residues. These data demonstrate that RAB1 has the capacity to neutralize all identified rabies isolates and a minimum of two distinct mutations in the G glycoprotein are required for abrogation of RAB1 neutralization.

  2. Heterogeneity of amino acid sequence in hippopotamus cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R B; Borden, D; Tarr, G E; Margoliash, E

    1978-12-25

    The amino acid sequences of chymotryptic and tryptic peptides of Hippopotamus amphibius cytochrome c were determined by a recent modification of the manual Edman sequential degradation procedure. They were ordered by comparison with the structure of the hog protein. The hippopotamus protein differs in three positions: serine, alanine, and glutamine replace alanine, glutamic acid, and lysine in positions 43, 92, and 100, respectively. Since the artiodactyl suborders diverged in the mid-Eocene some 50 million years ago, the fact that representatives of some of them show no differences in their cytochromes c (cow, sheep, and hog), while another exhibits as many as three such differences, verifies that even in relatively closely related lines of descent the rate at which cytochrome c changes in the course of evolution is not constant. Furthermore, 10.6% of the hippopotamus cytochrome c preparation was shown to contain isoleucine instead of valine at position 3, indicating that one of the four animals from which the protein was obtained was heterozygous in the cytochrome c gene. Such heterogeneity is a necessary condition of evolutionary variation and has not been previously observed in the cytochrome c of a wild mammalian population.

  3. Cloning and nucleotide sequencing of a novel 7 beta-(4-carboxybutanamido)cephalosporanic acid acylase gene of Bacillus laterosporus and its expression in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Aramori, I; Fukagawa, M; Tsumura, M; Iwami, M; Ono, H; Kojo, H; Kohsaka, M; Ueda, Y; Imanaka, H

    1991-12-01

    A strain of Bacillus species which produced an enzyme named glutaryl 7-ACA acylase which converts 7 beta-(4-carboxybutanamido)cephalosporanic acid (glutaryl 7-ACA) to 7-amino cephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) was isolated from soil. The gene for the glutaryl 7-ACA acylase was cloned with pHSG298 in Escherichia coli JM109, and the nucleotide sequence was determined by the M13 dideoxy chain termination method. The DNA sequence revealed only one large open reading frame composed of 1,902 bp corresponding to 634 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence contained a potential signal sequence in its amino-terminal region. Expression of the gene for glutaryl 7-ACA acylase was performed in both E. coli and Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme preparations purified from either recombinant strain of E. coli or B. subtilis were shown to be identical with each other as regards the profile of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and were composed of a single peptide with the molecular size of 70 kDa. Determination of the amino-terminal sequence of the two enzyme preparations revealed that both amino-terminal sequences (the first nine amino acids) were identical and completely coincided with residues 28 to 36 of the open reading frame. Extracellular excretion of the enzyme was observed in a recombinant strain of B. subtilis. PMID:1744041

  4. Amino acid residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 specify an antigenic determinant shared by HLA-A2 and HLA-B17.

    PubMed

    Ways, J P; Rothbard, J B; Parham, P

    1986-07-01

    The mouse monoclonal antibody MA2.1 was previously used to define an epitope shared by native HLA-A2 and HLA-B17 molecules and amino acid sequence comparison of nine HLA-A,B,C molecules identified residues 62 to 65 as the region most likely to form this epitope. An unabsorbed rabbit antiserum raised against a peptide corresponding to residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 gives highly specific reactions with HLA-A2 and HLA-B17 heavy chains in Western blots. No interactions with native HLA-A2 and B17 molecules were detected in a variety of assays. Although the topographic relationship between the epitopes recognized by the rabbit antiserum and the monoclonal antibody could not be determined, the results show that residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 can form epitopes with specificity for HLA-A2 and HLA-B17.

  5. Pinpointing the putative heparin/sialic acid-binding residues in the 'sushi' domain 7 of factor H: a molecular modeling study.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, S; Male, D A; Ormsby, R J; Giannakis, E; Gordon, D L

    2000-01-01

    Factor H, a secretory glycoprotein comprising 20 short consensus repeat (SCR) or 'sushi' domains of about 60 amino acids each, is a regulator of the complement system. The complement-regulatory functions of factor H are targeted by its binding to polyanions such as heparin/sialic acid, involving SCRs 7 and 20. Recently, the SCR 7 heparin-binding site was shown to be co-localized with the Streptococcus Group A M protein binding site on factor H (T.K. Blackmore et al., Infect. Immun. 66, 1427 (1998)). Using sequence analysis of all heparin-binding domains of factor H and its closest homologues, molecular modeling of SCRs 6 and 7, and surface electrostatic potential studies, the residues implicated in heparin/sialic acid binding to SCR 7 have been localized to four regions of sequence space containing stretches of basic as well as histidine residues. The heparin-binding site is spatially compact and lies near the interface between SCRs 6 and 7, with residues in the interdomain linker playing a significant role.

  6. Removal of copper from acid wastewater of bioleaching by adsorption onto ramie residue and uptake by Trichoderma viride.

    PubMed

    Wang, Buyun; Wang, Kai

    2013-05-01

    A continuous batch bioleaching was built to realize the bioleaching of sewage sludge in large scale. In the treatment, heavy metal in acid wastewater of bioleaching was removed by adsorption onto ramie residue. Then, acid wastewater was reused in next bioleaching batch. In this way, most time and water of bioleaching was saved and leaching efficiency of copper, lead and chromium kept at a high level in continuous batch bioleaching. It was found that residual heavy metal in sewage sludge is highly related to that in acid wastewater after bioleaching. To get a high leaching efficiency, concentration of heavy metal in acid wastewater should be low. Adsorption of copper from acid wastewater onto ramie residue can be described by pseudo first-order kinetics equation and Freundlich isotherm model. Trichoderma viride has the potential to be used for the concentration and recovery of heavy metal adsorbed onto ramie residue. PMID:23567687

  7. Identification of Ourmiavirus 30K movement protein amino acid residues involved in symptomatology, viral movement, subcellular localization and tubule formation.

    PubMed

    Margaria, Paolo; Anderson, Charles T; Turina, Massimo; Rosa, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Several plant viruses encode movement proteins (MPs) classified in the 30K superfamily. Despite a great functional diversity, alignment analysis of MP sequences belonging to the 30K superfamily revealed the presence of a central core region, including amino acids potentially critical for MP structure and functionality. We performed alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the Ourmia melon virus (OuMV) MP, and studied the effects of amino acid substitutions on MP properties and virus infection. We identified five OuMV mutants that were impaired in systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana, and two mutants showing necrosis and pronounced mosaic symptoms, respectively, in N. benthamiana. Green fluorescent protein fusion constructs (GFP:MP) of movement-defective MP alleles failed to localize in distinct foci at the cell wall, whereas a GFP fusion with wild-type MP (GFP:MPwt) mainly co-localized with plasmodesmata and accumulated at the periphery of epidermal cells. The movement-defective mutants also failed to produce tubular protrusions in protoplasts isolated from infected leaves, suggesting a link between tubule formation and the ability of OuMV to move. In addition to providing data to support the importance of specific amino acids for OuMV MP functionality, we predict that these conserved residues might be critical for the correct folding and/or function of the MP of other viral species in the 30K superfamily.

  8. Amino acid sequence of rabbit kidney neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (enkephalinase) deduced from a complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Devault, A; Lazure, C; Nault, C; Le Moual, H; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M; Kahn, P; Powell, J; Mallet, J; Beaumont, A

    1987-01-01

    Neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11) is a major constituent of kidney brush border membranes. It is also present in the brain where it has been shown to be involved in the inactivation of opioid peptides, methionine- and leucine-enkephalins. For this reason this enzyme is often called 'enkephalinase'. In order to characterize the primary structure of the enzyme, oligonucleotide probes were designed from partial amino acid sequences and used to isolate clones from kidney cDNA libraries. Sequencing of the cDNA inserts revealed the complete primary structure of the enzyme. Neutral endopeptidase consists of 750 amino acids. It contains a short N-terminal cytoplasmic domain (27 amino acids), a single membrane-spanning segment (23 amino acids) and an extracellular domain that comprises most of the protein mass. The comparison of the primary structure of neutral endopeptidase with that of thermolysin, a bacterial Zn-metallopeptidase, indicates that most of the amino acid residues involved in Zn coordination and catalytic activity in thermolysin are found within highly honmologous sequences in neutral endopeptidase. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2440677

  9. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Miller, Darcie J; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-18

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins. PMID:26774272

  10. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Miller, Darcie J; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-18

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins.

  11. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequence of hemoglobin II from Lucina pectinata.

    PubMed

    Torres-Mercado, Elineth; Renta, Jessicca Y; Rodríguez, Yolanda; López-Garriga, Juan; Cadilla, Carmen L

    2003-11-01

    Hemoglobin II from the clam Lucina pectinata is an oxygen-reactive protein with a unique structural organization in the heme pocket involving residues Gln65 (E7), Tyr30 (B10), Phe44 (CD1), and Phe69 (E11). We employed the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and methods to synthesize various cDNA(HbII). An initial 300-bp cDNA clone was amplified from total RNA by RT-PCR using degenerate oligonucleotides. Gene-specific primers derived from the HbII-partial cDNA sequence were used to obtain the 5' and 3' ends of the cDNA by RACE. The length of the HbII cDNA, estimated from overlapping clones, was approximately 2114 bases. Northern blot analysis revealed that the mRNA size of HbII agrees with the estimated size using cDNA data. The coding region of the full-length HbII cDNA codes for 151 amino acids. The calculated molecular weight of HbII, including the heme group and acetylated N-terminal residue, is 17,654.07 Da.

  12. Study of TATP: method for determination of residual acids in TATP.

    PubMed

    Matyáš, Robert; Chýlková, Jaromíra

    2013-05-10

    Triacetone triperoxide (3,3,6,6,9,9-hexamethyl-1,2,4,5,7,8-hexoxonane, TATP) is nowadays one of the most commonly used improvised explosives. It is prepared by the action of hydrogen peroxide on acetone in an acidic environment. Easily available mineral acids - hydrochloric, sulfuric, nitric and perchloric - are the most often recommended on the extremist web pages dealing with improvised production of explosives. The various TATP producers' choice of acid mainly depends on the author's experiences and the local availability of the acid. A knowledge of the kind of acid used for TATP production can help in detecting the person who has made the TATP, or who has committed a criminal act using TATP. Therefore, a capillary isotachophoretic method was developed for determination of residual anions (originating from the acid used during TATP synthesis) in the resulting TATP crystals. This analytical method has proved to be reliable; the acid used for TATP synthesis was correctly identified in all samples analyzed. PMID:23542054

  13. Amino Acid Residues in the ω-Minus Region Participate in Cellular Localization of Yeast Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Attached Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Kenji; Terashima, Hiromichi; Arisawa, Mikio; Yabuki, Nami; Kitada, Kunio

    1999-01-01

    The final destination of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-attached proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the plasma membrane or the cell wall. Two kinds of signals have been proposed for their cellular localization: (i) the specific amino acid residues V, I, or L at the site 4 or 5 amino acids upstream of the GPI attachment site (the ω site) and Y or N at the site 2 amino acids upstream of the ω site for cell wall localization and (ii) dibasic residues in the region upstream of the ω site (the ω-minus region) for plasma membrane localization. The relationships between these amino acid residues and efficiencies of cell wall incorporation were examined by constructing fusion reporter proteins from open reading frames encoding putative GPI-attached proteins. The levels of incorporation were high in the constructs containing the specific amino acid residues and quite low in those containing two basic amino acid residues in the ω-minus region. With constructs that contained neither specific residues nor two basic residues, levels of incorporation were moderate. These correlations clearly suggest that GPI-attached proteins have two different signals which act positively or negatively in cell wall incorporation for their cellular localization. PMID:10383953

  14. A conserved acidic residue in phenylalanine hydroxylase contributes to cofactor affinity and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ronau, Judith A; Paul, Lake N; Fuchs, Julian E; Liedl, Klaus R; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M; Das, Chittaranjan

    2014-11-01

    The catalytic domains of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases (AAAHs) contain a non-heme iron coordinated to a 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad and two water molecules. Asp139 from Chromobacterium violaceum PAH (cPAH) resides within the second coordination sphere and contributes key hydrogen bonds with three active site waters that mediate its interaction with an oxidized form of the cofactor, 7,8-dihydro-l-biopterin, in crystal structures. To determine the catalytic role of this residue, various point mutants were prepared and characterized. Our isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) analysis of iron binding implies that polarity at position 139 is not the sole criterion for metal affinity, as binding studies with D139E suggest that the size of the amino acid side chain also appears to be important. High-resolution crystal structures of the mutants reveal that Asp139 may not be essential for holding the bridging water molecules together, because many of these waters are retained even in the Ala mutant. However, interactions via the bridging waters contribute to cofactor binding at the active site, interactions for which charge of the residue is important, as the D139N mutant shows a 5-fold decrease in its affinity for pterin as revealed by ITC (compared to a 16-fold loss of affinity in the case of the Ala mutant). The Asn and Ala mutants show a much more pronounced defect in their kcat values, with nearly 16- and 100-fold changes relative to that of the wild type, respectively, indicating a substantial role of this residue in stabilization of the transition state by aligning the cofactor in a productive orientation, most likely through direct binding with the cofactor, supported by data from molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes. Our results indicate that the intervening water structure between the cofactor and the acidic residue masks direct interaction between the two, possibly to prevent uncoupled hydroxylation of the cofactor before the arrival of

  15. Amino acid residues 4425-4621 localized on the three-dimensional structure of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Benacquista, B L; Sharma, M R; Samsó, M; Zorzato, F; Treves, S; Wagenknecht, T

    2000-03-01

    We have localized a region contained within the sequence of amino acid residues 4425-4621 on the three-dimensional structure of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR). Mouse monoclonal antibodies raised against a peptide comprising these residues have been complexed with ryanodine receptors and imaged in the frozen-hydrated state by cryoelectron microscopy. These images, along with images of antibody-free ryanodine receptor, were used to compute two-dimensional averaged images and three-dimensional reconstructions. Two-dimensional averages of immunocomplexes in which the ryanodine receptor was in the fourfold symmetrical orientation disclosed four symmetrical regions of density located on the edges of the receptor's cytoplasmic assembly that were absent from control averages of receptor without added antibody. Three-dimensional reconstructions revealed the antibody-binding sites to be on the so-called handle domains of the ryanodine receptor's cytoplasmic assembly, near their junction with the transmembrane assembly. This study is the first to demonstrate epitope mapping on the three-dimensional structure of the ryanodine receptor.

  16. Acid hydrolysis of Curcuma longa residue for ethanol and lactic acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong Mai; Nguyen, Thanh Ngoc; Choi, Gyung Ja; Choi, Yong Ho; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Park, Youn-Je; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the acid hydrolysis of Curcuma longa waste, to obtain the hydrolysate containing lactic acid and ethanol fermentative sugars. A central composite design for describing regression equations of variables was used. The selected optimum condition was 4.91% sulphuric acid, 122.68°C and 50 min using the desirability function under the following conditions: the maximum reducing sugar (RS) yield is within the limited range of the 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and furfural concentrations. Under the condition, the obtained solution contained 144 g RS/L, 0.79 g furfural/L and 2.59 g HMF/L and was directly fermented without a detoxification step. The maximum product concentration, average productivity, RS conversion and product yield were 115.36 g/L, 2.88 g/L/h, 89.43% and 64% for L-lactic acid; 113.92 g/L, 2.59 g/L/h, 88.31% and 63.29% for D-lactic acid; and 55.03 g/L, 1.38 g/L/h, 42.66 and 30.57%, respectively, for ethanol using a 7-L jar fermenter.

  17. Acid hydrolysis of Curcuma longa residue for ethanol and lactic acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong Mai; Nguyen, Thanh Ngoc; Choi, Gyung Ja; Choi, Yong Ho; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Park, Youn-Je; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the acid hydrolysis of Curcuma longa waste, to obtain the hydrolysate containing lactic acid and ethanol fermentative sugars. A central composite design for describing regression equations of variables was used. The selected optimum condition was 4.91% sulphuric acid, 122.68°C and 50 min using the desirability function under the following conditions: the maximum reducing sugar (RS) yield is within the limited range of the 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and furfural concentrations. Under the condition, the obtained solution contained 144 g RS/L, 0.79 g furfural/L and 2.59 g HMF/L and was directly fermented without a detoxification step. The maximum product concentration, average productivity, RS conversion and product yield were 115.36 g/L, 2.88 g/L/h, 89.43% and 64% for L-lactic acid; 113.92 g/L, 2.59 g/L/h, 88.31% and 63.29% for D-lactic acid; and 55.03 g/L, 1.38 g/L/h, 42.66 and 30.57%, respectively, for ethanol using a 7-L jar fermenter. PMID:24240182

  18. Measuring Residual Dipolar Couplings in Excited Conformational States of Nucleic Acids by CEST NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Qi

    2015-10-28

    Nucleic acids undergo structural transitions to access sparsely populated and transiently lived conformational states--or excited conformational states--that play important roles in diverse biological processes. Despite ever-increasing detection of these functionally essential states, 3D structure determination of excited states (ESs) of RNA remains elusive. This is largely due to challenges in obtaining high-resolution structural constraints in these ESs by conventional structural biology approaches. Here, we present nucleic-acid-optimized chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) NMR spectroscopy for measuring residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), which provide unique long-range angular constraints in ESs of nucleic acids. We demonstrate these approaches on a fluoride riboswitch, where one-bond (13)C-(1)H RDCs from both base and sugar moieties provide direct structural probes into an ES of the ligand-free riboswitch.

  19. A Novel Treatment for Acid Mine Drainage Utilizing Reclaimed Limestone Residual

    SciTech Connect

    Horace K. Moo-Young; Charles E. Ochola

    2004-08-31

    The viability of utilizing Reclaimed Limestone Residual (RLR) to remediate Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) was investigated. Physical and chemical characterization of RLR showed that it is composed of various minerals that contain significant quantities of limestone or calcium bearing compounds that can be exploited for acid neutralization. Acid Neutralization Potential (ANP) test results showed that RLR has a neutralization potential of approximately 83% as calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}). Neutralization tests with most of the heavy metals associated with AMD showed removal efficiencies of over 99%. An unexpected benefit of utilizing RLR was the removal of hexavalent chromium Cr (VI) from the aqueous phase. Due to an elevation in pH by RLR most AMD heavy metals are removed from solution by precipitation as their metal hydroxides. Cr (VI) however is not removed by pH elevation and therefore subsequent ongoing tests to elucidate the mechanism responsible for this reaction were conducted.

  20. Leaching of lead from zinc leach residue in acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le; Mu, Wen-ning; Shen, Hong-tao; Liu, Shao-ming; Zhai, Yu-chun

    2015-05-01

    A process with potentially reduced environmental impacts and occupational hazards of lead-bearing zinc plant residue was studied to achieve a higher recovery of lead via a cost-effective and environmentally friendly process. This paper describes an optimization study on the leaching of lead from zinc leach residue using acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution. Six main process conditions, i.e., the solution pH value, stirring rate, concentration of CaCl2 aqueous solution, liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, leaching temperature, and leaching time, were investigated. The microstructure and components of the residue and tailing were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). On the basis of experimental results, the optimum reaction conditions were determined to be a solution pH value of 1, a stirring rate of 500 r·min-1, a CaCl2 aqueous solution concentration of 400 g·L-1, a liquid-to-solid mass ratio of 7:1, a leaching temperature of 80°C, and a leaching time of 45 min. The leaching rate of lead under these conditions reached 93.79%, with an iron dissolution rate of 19.28%. Silica did not take part in the chemical reaction during the leaching process and was accumulated in the residue.

  1. [Determination of clavulanic acid residue in milk by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Yang, Gang; Huang, Xianhui; Guo, Chunna; Fang, Qiuhua; He, Limin

    2012-06-01

    An analytical method was developed for the determination of clavulanic acid (CLAV) in milk by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). A 2 g milk sample was deproteinized by ethanol. The supernatant was transferred into a pear-shaped bottle to be evaporated to about 0.5 mL, and the residue was dissolved with ammonium acetate solution. The sample was determined by HPLC-MS/MS after the purification. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a Luna 5u C8 column using 0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile as mobile phases with gradient elution. The identification of CLAV was carried out by MS/MS equipped with electrospray ionization in negative scanning and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) modes. Matrix-matched calibration standard was used for the quantification. The calibration curve showed perfect linear in the range of 10 - 400 microg/kg with the correlation coefficient of 0.999. The limit of detection (LOD, S/N > or = 3) was 10 microg/kg in milk, and the limit of quantification (LOQ, S/N > or = 10) was 20 microg/kg. The mean recoveries varied from 80.00% to 91.25% at the four spiked levels of LOQ, 1/2MRL (the maximum residue limit), MRL, and 2MRL with the relative standard deviations of 5.60% -8.77%. In conclusion, the established method can be applied for the determination of CLAV residues in milk.

  2. Particulates in hydrometallurgy: Part III. Dewatering behavior of flocculated laterite acid leach residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceno, A.; Osseo-Asare, K.

    1995-02-01

    Three polyacrylamide-based polymers of different chemical properties (polymer A, 34 pct anionic, 11×106 mol wt; polymer B, 7 pct anionic, 7.5×106 mol wt; polymer C, nonionic, 13.5×106 mol wt) were used to evaluate the flocculation behavior of laterite acid leach residues. The solid-liquid separation characteristics of the leach residues were investigated with the aid of settling rate, supernatant turbidity, and slurry filtrability measurements. The polymeric flocculants were found to be effective in improving the dewatering properties of the acid leach residues. Polymer effectiveness increased with increasing polymer dosage for all the polymers, but an optimum polymer dose was only found for polymer A (34 pct anionic, 11×106 mol wt) in the studied range of polymer addition. Similarly, the dewatering behavior was improved at higher polymer molecular weight. In addition, it was found that the flocculation performance was adversely affected by an increase in the degree of polymer hydrolysis which, in turn, increases the ratio of carboxylic to amide functional groups in the polymer chain. Polymer C (nonionic ˜0 pct hydrolysis, 13.5×106 mol wt) was found to be the most efficient flocculant in terms of all the performance criteria investigated. The preceding results were rationalized in terms of bridging flocculation, the ionization and molecular configuration of the polymers, hydrogen bonding, and the solid/aqueous interfacial charge.

  3. Radionuclide Leaching from Residual Solids Remaining after Acid Dissolution of Composite K East Canister Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.; Soderquist, C.Z.; Fadeff, S.K.

    1999-04-02

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine mixed nitric/hydrofluoric acid leach treatments for decontaminating dissolver residual solids (KECDVSR24H-2) produced during a 20- to 24-hr dissolution of a composite K East (KE) Basin canister sludge in 95 C 6 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The scope of this testing has been described in Section 4.5 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basin Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the residual solids generated in the K Basin sludge treatment process can restrict disposal of this solid to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The starting dissolver residual solid for this testing, KECDVSR24H-2, contains radionuclides at concentrations which exceed the ERDF Waste Acceptance Criteria for TRU by about a factor of 70, for {sup 239}Pu by a factor of 200, and for {sup 241}Am by a factor of 50. The solids also exceed the ERDF criterion for {sup 137}Cs by a factor of 2 and uranium by a factor of 5. Therefore, the radionuclides of greatest interest in this leaching study are first {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am (both components of TRU) and then uranium and {sup 137}Cs.

  4. Amino acid sequence and chemical modification of a novel alpha-neurotoxin (Oh-5) from king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom.

    PubMed

    Lin, S R; Leu, L F; Chang, L S; Chang, C C

    1997-04-01

    A novel alpha-neurotoxin, Oh-5, was isolated from king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom and purified by successive SP-Sephadex C-25 column chromatography and reversed-phase HPLC. The complete sequence of Oh-5 was determined by Edman degradation of peptide fragments generated by endopeptidases, i.e., trypsin, Saccharomyces aureus V8 protease and lysyl endopeptidase. This novel toxin comprises 72 amino acid residues with 10 cysteines. The sequence shows 89% sequence homology with Oh-4, and 60% with Toxins a and b from the same venom. The tyrosine, tryptophan, lysine and arginine residues in Oh-5 were modified with tetranitromethane (TNM), 2-nitrophenylsulfenyl (NPS) chloride, trinitrobenzene sulfonate (TNBS), and p-hydroxyphenylglyoxal (HPG), respectively. Modification of Tyr-4 or Trp-27 did not affect the lethal toxicity at all, while the Tyr-4 and 23 nitrated derivative retained about 50% of the lethality of native toxin. Selective trinitrophenylation of Lys-51 or 69 resulted in a decrease in lethality by 29%, and 50% lethality was retained after modification of Lys-2, 51, and 69. A drastic decrease in lethality to 26% was observed when both Arg-35 and 37 were modified. The neurotoxicity was further decreased when Arg-9 was additionally modified. These results suggest that the aromatic residues, Tyr-4 and Trp-27, are not crucial for the neurotoxicity, whereas the cationic residues are involved in multipoint contact between the toxin molecule and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). The residues Tyr-23 and Arg-35 and 37 in the central loop of Oh-5 seem to contribute greatly to the neurotoxicity.

  5. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B.; Mellors, J.W.; Jeang, K.T.; Wain-Hobson, S.

    1997-04-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  6. [Nitrate nitrogen leaching and residue of humic acid fertilizer in field soil].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang-chun; Xing, Shang-jun; Duan, Chun-hua; Du, Zhen-yu; Ma, Hai-lin; Ma, Bing-yao

    2010-07-01

    To elucidate the potential influence of humic acidfertilizer on groundwater and soil quality in clay soil (CS) and sandy soil (SS), nitrate nitrogen leaching and residue of different fertilizers in field soil were studied using a self-made leaching field device. Nitrate nitrogen concentration in leaching water of fertilizer treatments was 28.1%-222.2% higher than that of non-nitrogen treatment in different times, but humic acid fertilizer could prevent nitrate nitrogen leaching both in CS and SS, especially in CS. Nitrate nitrogen concentration of leaching water in CS was 41.2%-59.1% less than that in SS and the inhibiting effect in CS was greater than that in SS. Nitrate nitrogen could be accumulated in soil profile by fertilizer application. The residue of nitrate nitrogen retained in 0-40 cm soil layer of humic acid fertilizer treatment was 59.8% and 54.4% respectively, higher than that of urea and compound fertilizer treatments. Nitrate nitrogen amount of humic acid, urea and compound fertilizer treatments in SS was significantly less than that in CS, being 81.7%, 81.1% and 47.6% respectively. Compared with the conventional fertilizer, humic acid fertilizer treatment improved the contents of organic matter, available nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium of upper layer soil as well as cation exchange capacity. Besides, total amount of water-soluble salts in humic acid fertilizer treatment was decreased by 24.8% and 22.5% in comparison to urea and compound fertilizer treatments in CS, respectively. In summary, the application of humic acid fertilizer could improve physical and chemical properties of upper layer soil and reduce the risk of potential pollution to groundwater.

  7. Cascade dissociations of peptide cation-radicals. Part 1. Scope and effects of amino acid residues in penta-, nona-, and decapeptides.

    PubMed

    Chung, Thomas W; Hui, Renjie; Ledvina, Aaron; Coon, Joshua J; Tureček, Frantisek

    2012-08-01

    Amino acid residue-specific backbone and side-chain dissociations of peptide z ions in MS(3) spectra were elucidated for over 40 pentapeptides with arginine C-terminated sequences of the AAXAR and AAHXR type, nonapeptides of the AAHAAXX"AR and AAHAXAX"AR type, and AAHAAXX"AAR decapeptides. Peptide z(n) ions containing amino acid residues with readily transferrable benzylic or tertiary β-hydrogen atoms (Phe, Tyr, His, Trp, Val) underwent facile backbone cleavages to form dominant z(n-2) or z(n-3) ions. These backbone cleavages are thought to be triggered by a side-chain β-hydrogen atom transfer to the z ion C(α) radical site followed by homolytic dissociation of the adjacent C(α)-CO bond, forming x(n-2) cation-radicals that spontaneously dissociate by loss of HNCO. Amino acid residues that do not have readily transferrable β-hydrogen atoms (Gly, Ala) do not undergo the z(n) → z(n-2) dissociations. The backbone cleavages compete with side-chain dissociations in z ions containing Asp and Asn residues. Side-chain dissociations are thought to be triggered by α-hydrogen atom transfers that activate the C(β)-C(γ) or C(β)-heteroatom bonds for dissociations that dominate the MS(3) spectra of z ions from peptides containing Leu, Cys, Lys, Met, Ser, Arg, Glu, and Gln residues. The Lys, Arg, Gln, and Glu residues also participate in γ-hydrogen atom transfers that trigger other side-chain dissociations. PMID:22669761

  8. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  9. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  10. A conserved amino acid residue critical for product and substrate specificity in plant triterpene synthases.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Melissa; Thimmappa, Ramesha B; Minto, Robert E; Melton, Rachel E; Hughes, Richard K; O'Maille, Paul E; Hemmings, Andrew M; Osbourn, Anne

    2016-07-26

    Triterpenes are structurally complex plant natural products with numerous medicinal applications. They are synthesized through an origami-like process that involves cyclization of the linear 30 carbon precursor 2,3-oxidosqualene into different triterpene scaffolds. Here, through a forward genetic screen in planta, we identify a conserved amino acid residue that determines product specificity in triterpene synthases from diverse plant species. Mutation of this residue results in a major change in triterpene cyclization, with production of tetracyclic rather than pentacyclic products. The mutated enzymes also use the more highly oxygenated substrate dioxidosqualene in preference to 2,3-oxidosqualene when expressed in yeast. Our discoveries provide new insights into triterpene cyclization, revealing hidden functional diversity within triterpene synthases. They further open up opportunities to engineer novel oxygenated triterpene scaffolds by manipulating the precursor supply. PMID:27412861

  11. A conserved amino acid residue critical for product and substrate specificity in plant triterpene synthases

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Melissa; Thimmappa, Ramesha B.; Minto, Robert E.; Melton, Rachel E.; O’Maille, Paul E.; Hemmings, Andrew M.; Osbourn, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Triterpenes are structurally complex plant natural products with numerous medicinal applications. They are synthesized through an origami-like process that involves cyclization of the linear 30 carbon precursor 2,3-oxidosqualene into different triterpene scaffolds. Here, through a forward genetic screen in planta, we identify a conserved amino acid residue that determines product specificity in triterpene synthases from diverse plant species. Mutation of this residue results in a major change in triterpene cyclization, with production of tetracyclic rather than pentacyclic products. The mutated enzymes also use the more highly oxygenated substrate dioxidosqualene in preference to 2,3-oxidosqualene when expressed in yeast. Our discoveries provide new insights into triterpene cyclization, revealing hidden functional diversity within triterpene synthases. They further open up opportunities to engineer novel oxygenated triterpene scaffolds by manipulating the precursor supply. PMID:27412861

  12. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones.

  13. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones. PMID:26656109

  14. Nucleotide and derived amino acid sequences of a cDNA coding for pre-uteroglobin from the lung of the hare (Lepus capensis).

    PubMed Central

    López de Haro, M S; Nieto, A

    1986-01-01

    An almost full-length cDNA coding for pre-uteroglobin from hare lung was cloned and sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence indicated that hare pre-uteroglobin contained 91 amino acids, including a signal peptide of 21 residues. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence of hare pre-uteroglobin cDNA with that previously reported for the rabbit gene indicated five silent point substitutions and six others leading to amino acid changes in the coding region. The untranslated regions of both pre-uteroglobin mRNAs were very similar. The amino acid changes observed are discussed in relation to the different progesterone-binding abilities of both homologous proteins. PMID:3019311

  15. The Loss and Gain of Functional Amino Acid Residues Is a Common Mechanism Causing Human Inherited Disease.

    PubMed

    Lugo-Martinez, Jose; Pejaver, Vikas; Pagel, Kymberleigh A; Jain, Shantanu; Mort, Matthew; Cooper, David N; Mooney, Sean D; Radivojac, Predrag

    2016-08-01

    Elucidating the precise molecular events altered by disease-causing genetic variants represents a major challenge in translational bioinformatics. To this end, many studies have investigated the structural and functional impact of amino acid substitutions. Most of these studies were however limited in scope to either individual molecular functions or were concerned with functional effects (e.g. deleterious vs. neutral) without specifically considering possible molecular alterations. The recent growth of structural, molecular and genetic data presents an opportunity for more comprehensive studies to consider the structural environment of a residue of interest, to hypothesize specific molecular effects of sequence variants and to statistically associate these effects with genetic disease. In this study, we analyzed data sets of disease-causing and putatively neutral human variants mapped to protein 3D structures as part of a systematic study of the loss and gain of various types of functional attribute potentially underlying pathogenic molecular alterations. We first propose a formal model to assess probabilistically function-impacting variants. We then develop an array of structure-based functional residue predictors, evaluate their performance, and use them to quantify the impact of disease-causing amino acid substitutions on catalytic activity, metal binding, macromolecular binding, ligand binding, allosteric regulation and post-translational modifications. We show that our methodology generates actionable biological hypotheses for up to 41% of disease-causing genetic variants mapped to protein structures suggesting that it can be reliably used to guide experimental validation. Our results suggest that a significant fraction of disease-causing human variants mapping to protein structures are function-altering both in the presence and absence of stability disruption. PMID:27564311

  16. The Loss and Gain of Functional Amino Acid Residues Is a Common Mechanism Causing Human Inherited Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lugo-Martinez, Jose; Pejaver, Vikas; Pagel, Kymberleigh A.; Mort, Matthew; Cooper, David N.; Mooney, Sean D.; Radivojac, Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the precise molecular events altered by disease-causing genetic variants represents a major challenge in translational bioinformatics. To this end, many studies have investigated the structural and functional impact of amino acid substitutions. Most of these studies were however limited in scope to either individual molecular functions or were concerned with functional effects (e.g. deleterious vs. neutral) without specifically considering possible molecular alterations. The recent growth of structural, molecular and genetic data presents an opportunity for more comprehensive studies to consider the structural environment of a residue of interest, to hypothesize specific molecular effects of sequence variants and to statistically associate these effects with genetic disease. In this study, we analyzed data sets of disease-causing and putatively neutral human variants mapped to protein 3D structures as part of a systematic study of the loss and gain of various types of functional attribute potentially underlying pathogenic molecular alterations. We first propose a formal model to assess probabilistically function-impacting variants. We then develop an array of structure-based functional residue predictors, evaluate their performance, and use them to quantify the impact of disease-causing amino acid substitutions on catalytic activity, metal binding, macromolecular binding, ligand binding, allosteric regulation and post-translational modifications. We show that our methodology generates actionable biological hypotheses for up to 41% of disease-causing genetic variants mapped to protein structures suggesting that it can be reliably used to guide experimental validation. Our results suggest that a significant fraction of disease-causing human variants mapping to protein structures are function-altering both in the presence and absence of stability disruption. PMID:27564311

  17. Zinc-Mediated Binding of Nucleic Acids to Amyloid-β Aggregates: Role of Histidine Residues.

    PubMed

    Khmeleva, Svetlana A; Radko, Sergey P; Kozin, Sergey A; Kiseleva, Yana Y; Mezentsev, Yuri V; Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Kurbatov, Leonid K; Ivanov, Alexis S; Makarov, Alexander A

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Besides extracellular Aβ, intraneuronal Aβ (iAβ) has been suggested to contribute to AD onset and development. Based on reported in vitro Aβ-DNA interactions and nuclear localization of iAβ, the interference of iAβ with the normal DNA expression has recently been proposed as a plausible pathway by which Aβ can exert neurotoxicity. Employing the sedimentation assay, thioflavin T fluorescence, and dynamic light scattering we have studied effects of zinc ions on binding of RNA and single- and double-stranded DNA molecules to Aβ42 aggregates. It has been found that zinc ions significantly enhance the binding of RNA and DNA molecules to pre-formed β-sheet rich Aβ42 aggregates. Another type of Aβ42 aggregates, the zinc-induced amorphous aggregates, was demonstrated to also bind all types of nucleic acids tested. To evaluate the role of the Aβ metal-binding domain's histidine residues in Aβ-nucleic acid interactions mediated by zinc, Aβ16 mutants with substitutions H6R and H6A-H13A and rat Aβ16 lacking histidine residue 13 were used. The zinc-induced interaction of Aβ16 with DNA was shown to critically depend on histidine residues 6 and 13. However, the inclusion of H6R mutation in Aβ42 peptide did not affect DNA binding to Aβ42 aggregates. Since oxidative and/or nitrosative stresses implicated in AD pathogenesis are known to release zinc ions from metallothioneins in cytoplasm and cell nuclei, our findings suggest that intracellular zinc can be an important player in iAβ-nucleic acid interactions. PMID:27567853

  18. Effect of lime on the availability of residual phosphorus and its extractability by dilute acid

    SciTech Connect

    Rhue, R.D.; Hensel, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the long-term effects of liming an acid, P-deficient Placid sand (sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Typic Humaquept) on the availability of residual fertilizer P to potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.). Dolomitic limestone was applied in November 1977, at rates of 0, 2240, 4480, and 8960 kg/ha in a split-plot design with lime as main plots and P treatments as subplots. Phosphorus was applied at rates of 0, 56, 112, and 168 kg/ha in 1978. In 1979 and 1980, P plots were split with one-half fertilized with 56 kg P/ha and the other one-half not fertilized with P (residual). In 1978, maximum tuber yields and top dry weights occurred at the 2240 kg/ha lime rate which resulted in a soil pH of 5.8. Plant P concentrations were unaffected by lime at any sampling rate. In 1979, availability of residual soil P decreased with lime rates > 2240 kg/ha but not enough to significantly affect yields. However, in 1980, overliming injury was observed for tuber yields at the higher lime rates which was the result of P deficiency. Application of P at planting eliminated the overliming injury with maximum yields occurring in the pH range of 6.0 to 6.5. It appears that liming to pH 6.5 in this study resulted in fertilizer reaction products that were more soluble in dilute acid but less plant available than those formed under more acid conditions. However, the Mehlich I extractant appeared to be a suitable extractant for P on this soil if pH was taken into account when interpreting soil-test P. 23 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Amino acid sequence surrounding the chondroitin sulfate attachment site of thrombomodulin regulates chondroitin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Izumikawa, Tomomi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is a cell-surface glycoprotein and a critical mediator of endothelial anticoagulant function. TM exists as both a chondroitin sulfate (CS) proteoglycan (PG) form and a non-PG form lacking a CS chain (α-TM); therefore, TM can be described as a part-time PG. Previously, we reported that α-TM bears an immature, truncated linkage tetrasaccharide structure (GlcAβ1-3Galβ1-3Galβ1-4Xyl). However, the biosynthetic mechanism to generate part-time PGs remains unclear. In this study, we used several mutants to demonstrate that the amino acid sequence surrounding the CS attachment site influences the efficiency of chondroitin polymerization. In particular, the presence of acidic residues surrounding the CS attachment site was indispensable for the elongation of CS. In addition, mutants defective in CS elongation did not exhibit anti-coagulant activity, as in the case with α-TM. Together, these data support a model for CS chain assembly in which specific core protein determinants are recognized by a key biosynthetic enzyme involved in chondroitin polymerization.

  20. Complete amino acid sequence of the major component myoglobin from the goose-beaked whale, Ziphius cavirostris.

    PubMed

    Lehman, L D; Jones, B N; Dwulet, F E; Bogardt, R A; Gurd, F R

    1980-10-21

    The complete primary structure of the major component myoglobin from the goose-beaked whale, Ziphius cavirostris, was determined by specific cleavage of the protein to obtain large peptides which are readily degraded by the automatic sequencer. Over 80% of the amino acid sequence was established from the three peptides resulting from the cleavage of the apomyoglobin at its two methionine residues with cyanogen bromide along with the four peptides resulting from the cleavage with trypsin of the citraconylated apomyoglobin at its three arginine residues. Further digestion of the central cyanogen bromide peptide with S. aureus strain V8 protease and the 1,2-cyclohexanedione-treated central cyanogen bromide peptide with trypsin enabled the determination of the remainder of the covalent structure. This myoglobin differs from the cetacean myoglobins determined to date at 12 to 17 positions. These large sequence differences reflect the distant taxonomic relationships between the goose-beaked whale and the other species of Cetacea the myoglobin sequences of which have previously been determined.

  1. Enzymatic generation of peptides flanked by basic amino acids to obtain MS/MS spectra with 2× sequence coverage

    PubMed Central

    Ebhardt, H Alexander; Nan, Jie; Chaulk, Steven G; Fahlman, Richard P; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE Tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra generated by collision-induced dissociation (CID) typically lack redundant peptide sequence information in the form of e.g. b- and y-ion series due to frequent use of sequence-specific endopeptidases cleaving C- or N-terminal to Arg or Lys residues. METHODS Here we introduce arginyl-tRNA protein transferase (ATE, EC 2.3.2.8) for proteomics. ATE recognizes acidic amino acids or oxidized Cys at the N-terminus of a substrate peptide and conjugates an arginine from an aminoacylated tRNAArg onto the N-terminus of the substrate peptide. This enzymatic reaction is carried out under physiological conditions and, in combination with Lys-C/Asp-N double digest, results in arginylated peptides with basic amino acids on both termini. RESULTS We demonstrate that in vitro arginylation of peptides using yeast arginyl tRNA protein transferase 1 (yATE1) is a robust enzymatic reaction, specific to only modifying N-terminal acidic amino acids. Precursors originating from arginylated peptides generally have an increased protonation state compared with their non-arginylated forms. Furthermore, the product ion spectra of arginylated peptides show near complete 2× fragment ladders within the same MS/MS spectrum using commonly available electrospray ionization peptide fragmentation modes. Unexpectedly, arginylated peptides generate complete y- and c-ion series using electron transfer dissociation (ETD) despite having an internal proline residue. CONCLUSIONS We introduce a rapid enzymatic method to generate peptides flanked on either terminus by basic amino acids, resulting in a rich, redundant MS/MS fragment pattern. © 2014 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25380496

  2. DNA Three Way Junction Core Decorated with Amino Acids-Like Residues-Synthesis and Characterization.

    PubMed

    Addamiano, Claudia; Gerland, Béatrice; Payrastre, Corinne; Escudier, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Construction and physico-chemical behavior of DNA three way junction (3WJ) functionalized by protein-like residues (imidazole, alcohol and carboxylic acid) at unpaired positions at the core is described. One 5'-C(S)-propargyl-thymidine nucleotide was specifically incorporated on each strand to react through a post synthetic CuACC reaction with either protected imidazolyl-, hydroxyl- or carboxyl-azide. Structural impacts of 5'-C(S)-functionalization were investigated to evaluate how 3WJ flexibility/stability is affected. PMID:27563857

  3. On the Accuracy of Sequence-Based Computational Inference of Protein Residues Involved in Interactions with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Zhenkun; Kuznetsov, Igor B.

    2009-01-01

    Methods for computational inference of DNA-binding residues in DNA-binding proteins are usually developed using classification techniques trained to distinguish between binding and non-binding residues on the basis of known examples observed in experimentally determined high-resolution structures of protein-DNA complexes. What degree of accuracy can be expected when a computational methods is applied to a particular novel protein remains largely unknown. We test the utility of classification methods on the example of Kernel Logistic Regression (KLR) predictors of DNA-binding residues. We show that predictors that utilize sequence properties of proteins can successfully predict DNA-binding residues in proteins from a novel structural class. We use Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) to establish a quantitative relationship between protein properties and the expected accuracy of KLR predictors. Present results indicate that in the case of novel proteins the expected accuracy provided by an MLR model is close to the actual accuracy and can be used to assess the overall confidence of the prediction. PMID:20209034

  4. The Periplasmic Bacterial Molecular Chaperone SurA Adapts Its Structure to Bind Peptides in Different Conformations to Assert a Sequence Preference for Aromatic Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Wang, S.; Hu, Y.-X.; McKay, D.B.

    2009-06-04

    The periplasmic molecular chaperone protein SurA facilitates correct folding and maturation of outer membrane proteins in Gram-negative bacteria. It preferentially binds peptides that have a high fraction of aromatic amino acids. Phage display selections, isothermal titration calorimetry and crystallographic structure determination have been used to elucidate the basis of the binding specificity. The peptide recognition is imparted by the first peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) domain of SurA. Crystal structures of complexes between peptides of sequence WEYIPNV and NFTLKFWDIFRK with the first PPIase domain of the Escherichia coli SurA protein at 1.3 A resolution, and of a complex between the dodecapeptide and a SurA fragment lacking the second PPIase domain at 3.4 A resolution, have been solved. SurA binds as a monomer to the heptapeptide in an extended conformation. It binds as a dimer to the dodecapeptide in an alpha-helical conformation, predicated on a substantial structural rearrangement of the SurA protein. In both cases, side-chains of aromatic residues of the peptides contribute a large fraction of the binding interactions. SurA therefore asserts a recognition preference for aromatic amino acids in a variety of sequence configurations by adopting alternative tertiary and quaternary structures to bind peptides in different conformations.

  5. Variable clinical manifestations of a glycine to glutamic acid substitution of the COL3A1 gene at residue 736

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, F.M.; Narcisi, P.; Richards, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    Glycine substitutions at the 3{prime} end of the COL3A1 gene generally produce a characteristic clinical phenotype including acrogeria and severe vascular fragility. Here we report a three generation British family in which the propositus presented with aneurysms of the groins. He, his mother, sister and elder daughter all had the external clinical phenotype of vascular EDS IV whilst another daughter and nephew were clinically normal. Cultured skin fibroblasts from the propositus and his clinically affected relatives poorly secreted normal and overmodified collagen III species. Normal components of secreted proteins predominated whilst overmodified molecules were prominent in intracellular material. Surprisingly the normal children also secreted less collagen type III than expected (though more than their clinically abnormal relatives). cDNA from bases 2671 to 3714 were amplified as four overlapping PCR fragments and analysed by DGGE. The region between 2671 and 3015 was heterozygous. Sequencing showed a mutation of glycine to glutamic acid at residue 736. This mutation created an extra Apa 1 restriction site which was suitable for family studies. These showed inheritance of the mutant gene by both vascular and non-vascular clinical phenotypes. This family therefore illustrates that replacement of glycine to glutamic acid at position 736 produces variable clinical and biochemical phenotypes ranging from easily recognizable vascular EDS IV with very poor collagen secretion to an EDS III-like picture and with less severe protein disturbance. The reasons for these differences are at present unexplained.

  6. Trypsin inhibitors from ridged gourd (Luffa acutangula Linn.) seeds: purification, properties, and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Haldar, U C; Saha, S K; Beavis, R C; Sinha, N K

    1996-02-01

    Two trypsin inhibitors, LA-1 and LA-2, have been isolated from ridged gourd (Luffa acutangula Linn.) seeds and purified to homogeneity by gel filtration followed by ion-exchange chromatography. The isoelectric point is at pH 4.55 for LA-1 and at pH 5.85 for LA-2. The Stokes radius of each inhibitor is 11.4 A. The fluorescence emission spectrum of each inhibitor is similar to that of the free tyrosine. The biomolecular rate constant of acrylamide quenching is 1.0 x 10(9) M-1 sec-1 for LA-1 and 0.8 x 10(9) M-1 sec-1 for LA-2 and that of K2HPO4 quenching is 1.6 x 10(11) M-1 sec-1 for LA-1 and 1.2 x 10(11) M-1 sec-1 for LA-2. Analysis of the circular dichroic spectra yields 40% alpha-helix and 60% beta-turn for La-1 and 45% alpha-helix and 55% beta-turn for LA-2. Inhibitors LA-1 and LA-2 consist of 28 and 29 amino acid residues, respectively. They lack threonine, alanine, valine, and tryptophan. Both inhibitors strongly inhibit trypsin by forming enzyme-inhibitor complexes at a molar ratio of unity. A chemical modification study suggests the involvement of arginine of LA-1 and lysine of LA-2 in their reactive sites. The inhibitors are very similar in their amino acid sequences, and show sequence homology with other squash family inhibitors. PMID:8924202

  7. A Nitrogen-concentrated Phase in IA Iron Meteorite Acid Residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, K.; Sugiura, N.

    1993-07-01

    Introduction: Iron meteorites are considered to have experienced a complex history, which is indicated by the variations in trace element chemistry (e.g., [1]). Among iron meteorite groups, the so called nonmagmatic groups, such as IAB, IIE, and IIICD, may have passed through different formation paths compared to others. Nitrogen isotopes can be a useful tool to understand the origin and formation processes of iron meteorites. Nikogen isotopes in a number of iron meteorites are measured [2,3], although trapping sites of nitrogen in iron meteorites are not yet clear. This is an important issue because nitrogen, a typical mobile element, may well reflect thermal history of their parent bodies (c.f., [4]). Generally, a major portion of nitrogen in iron meteorites is expected to be in a solid solution in Fe-Ni, especially in f.c.c. Fe-Ni (taenite). Franchi et al. [3] report that at least 25 to 35% of nitrogen in magmatic iron meteorites is in acid insoluble phases, however, not in those of non-magmatic meteorites. This result contradicts with the result [5] who report that a significant portion of nitrogen seems to be trapped in acid residues not only of magmatic meteorites but also of non- magmatic meteorites. To resolve the contradiction described above, and to identify the trapping site, we started measuring nitrogen isotopes in acid residues of iron metcorites. We report here preliminary results on acid residues of Canyon Diablo (IA). Procedures: Acid residues were prepared by Dr. J.-I. Matsuda and his colleagues. Different blocks of Canyon Diablo, "Can-1" and "Can-2" were treated by 14M HCl, 10M-HF + 1M-HCl, 1M-HCl, and by aqua regia, which destroyed Fe-Ni, sulfides, silicates, and shreibersite. Acid residues of these two blocks, "Can-1bn" and "Can-2b," yielded 0.102 wt% and 0.299 wt% of their original masses, respectively These residues seem to consist mostly of graphite No diamond was detected by powder X-ray analysis [6]. Preliminary Results: A predominant

  8. Differentiating amino acid residues and side chain orientations in peptides using scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Claridge, Shelley A; Thomas, John C; Silverman, Miles A; Schwartz, Jeffrey J; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Weiss, Paul S

    2013-12-11

    Single-molecule measurements of complex biological structures such as proteins are an attractive route for determining structures of the large number of important biomolecules that have proved refractory to analysis through standard techniques such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance. We use a custom-built low-current scanning tunneling microscope to image peptide structures at the single-molecule scale in a model peptide that forms β sheets, a structural motif common in protein misfolding diseases. We successfully differentiate between histidine and alanine amino acid residues, and further differentiate side chain orientations in individual histidine residues, by correlating features in scanning tunneling microscope images with those in energy-optimized models. Beta sheets containing histidine residues are used as a model system due to the role histidine plays in transition metal binding associated with amyloid oligomerization in Alzheimer's and other diseases. Such measurements are a first step toward analyzing peptide and protein structures at the single-molecule level.

  9. Mutation of aspartic acid residues in the fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975.

    PubMed Central

    Song, D D; Jacques, N A

    1999-01-01

    The site-directed mutated fructosyltransferases (Ftfs) of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, D312E, D312S, D312N and D312K were all active at 37 degrees C, indicating that Asp-312 present in the 'sucrose box' was not the nucleophilic Asp residue responsible for the formation of a covalent fructosyl-enzyme intermediate required for enzyme activity. Analysis of the kinetic constants of the purified mutated forms of the enzyme showed that Asp-312 was most likely an essential amino acid involved in determining acceptor recognition and/or stabilizing a beta-turn in the protein. In contrast, when the Asp-397 of the Ftf present in the conserved triplet RDP motif of all 60 bacterial and plant family-32 glycosylhydrolases was mutated to a Ser residue, both sucrose hydrolysis and polymerization ceased. Tryptophan emission spectra confirmed that this mutation did not alter protein structure. Comparison of published data from other site-directed mutated enzymes implicated the Asp residue in the RDP motif as the one that may form a transient covalent fructosyl intermediate during the catalysis of sucrose by the Ftf of S. salivarius. PMID:10548559

  10. Optimization of thermal-dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment for enhancement of methane production from cassava residues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghua; Tang, Lei; Zhang, Jianhua; Mao, Zhonggui; Jiang, Li

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the pretreatment of cassava residues by thermal-dilute sulfuric acid (TDSA) hydrolysis was investigated by means of a statistically designed set of experiments. A three-factor central composite design (CCD) was employed to identify the optimum pretreatment condition of cassava residues for methane production. The individual and interactive effects of temperature, H(2)SO(4) concentration and reaction time on increase of methane yield (IMY) were evaluated by applying response surface methodology (RSM). After optimization, the resulting optimum pretreatment condition was 157.84°C, utilizing 2.99% (w/w TS) H(2)SO(4) for 20.15 min, where the maximum methane yield (248 mL/g VS) was 56.96% higher than the control (158 mL/g VS), which was very close to the predict value 56.53%. These results indicate the model obtained through RSM analysis is suit to predict the optimum pretreatment condition and there is great potential of using TDSA pretreatment of cassava residues to enhance methane yield.

  11. Amino-terminal basic residues of Src mediate membrane binding through electrostatic interaction with acidic phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, C T; Zhou, W; Buser, C A; McLaughlin, S; Resh, M D

    1994-01-01

    Membrane targeting of pp60src (Src) is mediated by its myristoylated amino terminus. We demonstrate that, in addition to myristate, six basic residues in the amino terminus are essential for high-affinity binding to the lipid bilayer via electrostatic interaction with acidic phospholipids. Specifically, c-Src was shown to bind 2500-fold more strongly to vesicles composed of the physiological ratio of 2:1 phosphatidylcholine (PC)/phosphatidylserine (PS) than to neutral PC bilayer vesicles. The apparent Kd for binding of c-Src to the PC/PS bilayer was 6 x 10(-7) M. This interaction is sufficiently strong to account for c-Src membrane targeting. Mutants of c-Src in which the amino-terminal basic residues were replaced by neutral asparagine residues exhibited binding isotherms approaching that of wild-type binding to neutral bilayers (apparent Kd of 2 x 10(-3) M). The transforming v-Src and activated c-Src (Y527F) proteins also bound more strongly to PC/PS bilayers (apparent Kd of approximately 1 x 10(-5) M) than to neutral PC bilayers. In vivo experiments with Src mutants confirmed the role of positive charge in mediating membrane binding and cellular transformation. Images PMID:7527558

  12. Effects of the number of fatty acid residues on the phase behaviors of decaglycerol fatty acid esters.

    PubMed

    Ai, Sakiko; Ishitobi, Masahiko

    2006-04-15

    The effects of the number of fatty acid residues (n) in decaglycerol fatty acid esters, i.e., decaglycerol laurates (abbreviated to (C11)nG10), on the phase behaviors of three laurate esters, (C11)1.9G10, (C11)2.7G10, and (C11)3.4G10, were investigated. The unreacted decaglycerol remaining in each ester was removed by liquid extraction before use. (C11)1.9G10 formed hexagonal liquid crystals in aqueous solutions, while (C11)2.7G10 and (C11)3.4G10, which are more hydrophobic than (C11)1.9G10, formed lamellar liquid crystals. The cloud point in aqueous solution was measured for mixtures of these three esters. The cloud phenomenon was observed when the weight ratio of hydrophilic groups to the total surfactant (WH/WS) was around 0.6. The cloud point shifted to a markedly higher temperature, even with a slight increase in the WH/WS ratio. The solubilization abilities of (C11)nG10 for the oils m-xylene and (R)-(+)-limonene were also examined. When the WH/WS ratio was between 0.60 and 0.64, (C11)nG10 formed microemulsions and lyotropic liquid crystals in the presence of water and the oils. These self-organized structures were stable, even above 90 degrees C. It is concluded that the phase behavior of (C11)nG10 are insensitive to temperature, but strongly dependent on both the WH/WS ratio and the number of fatty acid residues (n).

  13. Solid substrate fermentation of cassava fibrous residue for production of alpha-amylase, lactic acid and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ramesh C; Mohapatra, Sabita; Panda, Shrutirupa; Kar, Shaktimay

    2008-01-01

    There is serious concern about the disposal of solid residues left after large scale extraction of starch from cassava. Owing to the high starch content (55-65% on dry weight basis) and organic matter of these wastes, an attempt has been made to utilize it for the production of three bioproducts, i.e. alpha-amylase, lactic acid and ethanol in solid substrate fermentation by incubating the solid residue at different moisture holding capacity (40-80%) and incubation period (12- 60 hr for alpha-amylase, 24-144 hr for ethanol and 2-10 days for lactic acid). The highest product yield was obtained at 60% moisture holding capacity of the residue and period of incubation varied from 36 hr (alpha-amylase), 120 hr (ethanol) to 6 days (lactic acid). This study showed that the solid residues from cassava starch factories could serve as a low-cost substrate for bioproducts production.

  14. Two Amino Acid Residues Confer Different Binding Affinities of Abelson Family Kinase Src Homology 2 Domains for Phosphorylated Cortactin*

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Stacey M.; Liu, Weizhi; Mader, Christopher C.; Halo, Tiffany L.; Machida, Kazuya; Boggon, Titus J.; Koleske, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    The closely related Abl family kinases, Arg and Abl, play important non-redundant roles in the regulation of cell morphogenesis and motility. Despite similar N-terminal sequences, Arg and Abl interact with different substrates and binding partners with varying affinities. This selectivity may be due to slight differences in amino acid sequence leading to differential interactions with target proteins. We report that the Arg Src homology (SH) 2 domain binds two specific phosphotyrosines on cortactin, a known Abl/Arg substrate, with over 10-fold higher affinity than the Abl SH2 domain. We show that this significant affinity difference is due to the substitution of arginine 161 and serine 187 in Abl to leucine 207 and threonine 233 in Arg, respectively. We constructed Abl SH2 domains with R161L and S187T mutations alone and in combination and find that these substitutions are sufficient to convert the low affinity Abl SH2 domain to a higher affinity “Arg-like” SH2 domain in binding to a phospho-cortactin peptide. We crystallized the Arg SH2 domain for structural comparison to existing crystal structures of the Abl SH2 domain. We show that these two residues are important determinants of Arg and Abl SH2 domain binding specificity. Finally, we expressed Arg containing an “Abl-like” low affinity mutant Arg SH2 domain (L207R/T233S) and find that this mutant, although properly localized to the cell periphery, does not support wild type levels of cell edge protrusion. Together, these observations indicate that these two amino acid positions confer different binding affinities and cellular functions on the distinct Abl family kinases. PMID:24891505

  15. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using a bifunctional hybridization probe

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detecting and isolating a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids is provided using a bifunctional hybridization probe capable of hybridizing to the target sequence that includes a detectable marker and a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent. A kit is also provided for detecting a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids using a bifunctional hybridization probe according to this method.

  16. Amino acid sequence and structural properties of protein p12, an African swine fever virus attachment protein.

    PubMed Central

    Alcamí, A; Angulo, A; López-Otín, C; Muñoz, M; Freije, J M; Carrascosa, A L; Viñuela, E

    1992-01-01

    The gene encoding the African swine fever virus protein p12, which is involved in virus attachment to the host cell, has been mapped and sequenced in the genome of the Vero-adapted virus strain BA71V. The determination of the N-terminal amino acid sequence and the hybridization of oligonucleotide probes derived from this sequence to cloned restriction fragments allowed the mapping of the gene in fragment EcoRI-O, located in the central region of the viral genome. The DNA sequence of an EcoRI-XbaI fragment showed an open reading frame which is predicted to encode a polypeptide of 61 amino acids. The expression of this open reading frame in rabbit reticulocyte lysates and in Escherichia coli gave rise to a 12-kDa polypeptide that was immunoprecipitated with a monoclonal antibody specific for protein p12. The hydrophilicity profile indicated the existence of a stretch of 22 hydrophobic residues in the central part that may anchor the protein in the virus envelope. Three forms of the protein with apparent molecular masses of 17, 12, and 10 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis have been observed, depending on the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol and alkylation with 4-vinylpyridine, indicating that disulfide bonds are responsible for the multimerization of the protein. This result was in agreement with the existence of a cysteine-rich domain in the C-terminal region of the predicted amino acid sequence. The protein was synthesized at late times of infection, and no posttranslational modifications such as glycosylation, phosphorylation, or fatty acid acylation were detected. Images PMID:1583732

  17. Functional analysis of three amino acid residues of purR repressor, Trpl47, Gln-218 and Gln-292 in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Wang, A

    2001-04-01

    The amber mutation sites of 6 purR(am) mutants were determined by cloning and DNA sequencing. The results showed that the mutations were distributed at three different sites in PurR coding region, G(721)(-->A), C(933)(-->T) and C(1155)(-->T), which respectively turn Trp-147, Gln-218 and Gln-292 of PurR into TAG terminal codon. To determine the effect of the three amino acid residues on regulatory function of PurR protein 5 different kinds of tRNA suppressor genes, Su3, Su4, Su6, Su7 and Su9 were used for creating the PurR protein variants with single amino acid substitution. The results indicated that Cys, Glu, Gly, His and Arg which substituted Trp-147 respectively all could not recover the regulation function of PurR. It confirmed that Trp-147 is a critical amino acid for the PurR function. Gln-292 substituted respectively by the same amino acids also could not recover the PurR function, demonstrating that Gln-292 is also an important amino acid residue in PurR.

  18. Role of enthalpy-entropy compensation interactions in determining the conformational propensities of amino acid residues in unfolded peptides.

    PubMed

    Toal, Siobhan E; Verbaro, Daniel J; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2014-02-01

    The driving forces governing the unique and restricted conformational preferences of amino acid residues in the unfolded state are still not well understood. In this study, we experimentally determine the individual thermodynamic components underlying intrinsic conformational propensities of these residues. Thermodynamic analysis of ultraviolet-circular dichroism (UV-CD) and (1)H NMR data for a series of glycine capped amino acid residues (i.e., G-x-G peptides) reveals the existence of a nearly exact enthalpy-entropy compensation for the polyproline II-β strand equilibrium for all investigated residues. The respective ΔHβ, ΔSβ values exhibit a nearly perfect linear relationship with an apparent compensation temperature of 295 ± 2 K. Moreover, we identified iso-equilibrium points for two subsets of residues at 297 and 305 K. Thus, our data suggest that within this temperature regime, which is only slightly below physiological temperatures, the conformational ensembles of amino acid residues in the unfolded state differ solely with respect to their capability to adopt turn-like conformations. Such iso-equilibria are rarely observed, and their existence herein indicates a common physical origin behind conformational preferences, which we are able to assign to side-chain dependent backbone solvation. Conformational effects such as differences between the number of sterically allowed side chain rotamers can contribute to enthalpy and entropy but not to the Gibbs energy associated with conformational preferences. Interestingly, we found that alanine, aspartic acid, and threonine are the only residues which do not share these iso-equilbiria. The enthalpy-entropy compensation discovered as well as the iso-equilbrium and thermodynamics obtained for each amino acid residue provide a new and informative way of identifying the determinants of amino acid propensities in unfolded and disordered states.

  19. Chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry targeting acidic residues in proteins and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A; Unverdorben, Pia; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Frydman, Judith; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-07-01

    The study of proteins and protein complexes using chemical cross-linking followed by the MS identification of the cross-linked peptides has found increasingly widespread use in recent years. Thus far, such analyses have used almost exclusively homobifunctional, amine-reactive cross-linking reagents. Here we report the development and application of an orthogonal cross-linking chemistry specific for carboxyl groups. Chemical cross-linking of acidic residues is achieved using homobifunctional dihydrazides as cross-linking reagents and a coupling chemistry at neutral pH that is compatible with the structural integrity of most protein complexes. In addition to cross-links formed through insertion of the dihydrazides with different spacer lengths, zero-length cross-link products are also obtained, thereby providing additional structural information. We demonstrate the application of the reaction and the MS identification of the resulting cross-linked peptides for the chaperonin TRiC/CCT and the 26S proteasome. The results indicate that the targeting of acidic residues for cross-linking provides distance restraints that are complementary and orthogonal to those obtained from lysine cross-linking, thereby expanding the yield of structural information that can be obtained from cross-linking studies and used in hybrid modeling approaches. PMID:24938783

  20. Chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry targeting acidic residues in proteins and protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A.; Unverdorben, Pia; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Frydman, Judith; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    The study of proteins and protein complexes using chemical cross-linking followed by the MS identification of the cross-linked peptides has found increasingly widespread use in recent years. Thus far, such analyses have used almost exclusively homobifunctional, amine-reactive cross-linking reagents. Here we report the development and application of an orthogonal cross-linking chemistry specific for carboxyl groups. Chemical cross-linking of acidic residues is achieved using homobifunctional dihydrazides as cross-linking reagents and a coupling chemistry at neutral pH that is compatible with the structural integrity of most protein complexes. In addition to cross-links formed through insertion of the dihydrazides with different spacer lengths, zero-length cross-link products are also obtained, thereby providing additional structural information. We demonstrate the application of the reaction and the MS identification of the resulting cross-linked peptides for the chaperonin TRiC/CCT and the 26S proteasome. The results indicate that the targeting of acidic residues for cross-linking provides distance restraints that are complementary and orthogonal to those obtained from lysine cross-linking, thereby expanding the yield of structural information that can be obtained from cross-linking studies and used in hybrid modeling approaches. PMID:24938783

  1. Glycolic acid-catalyzed deamidation of asparagine residues in degrading PLGA matrices: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Noriyoshi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2015-03-31

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is a strong candidate for being a drug carrier in drug delivery systems because of its biocompatibility and biodegradability. However, in degrading PLGA matrices, the encapsulated peptide and protein drugs can undergo various degradation reactions, including deamidation at asparagine (Asn) residues to give a succinimide species, which may affect their potency and/or safety. Here, we show computationally that glycolic acid (GA) in its undissociated form, which can exist in high concentration in degrading PLGA matrices, can catalyze the succinimide formation from Asn residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. A two-step mechanism was studied by quantum-chemical calculations using Ace-Asn-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHCH3) as a model compound. The first step is cyclization (intramolecular addition) to form a tetrahedral intermediate, and the second step is elimination of ammonia from the intermediate. Both steps involve an extensive bond reorganization mediated by a GA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The present findings are expected to be useful in the design of more effective and safe PLGA devices.

  2. Analysis of the distribution of charged residues in the N-terminal region of signal sequences: implications for protein export in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed Central

    von Heijne, G

    1984-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the distribution of charged residues in the N-terminal region of 39 prokaryotic and 134 eukaryotic signal sequences reveals a remarkable similarity between the two samples, both in terms of net charge and in terms of the position of charged residues within the N-terminal region, and suggests that the formyl group on Metf is not removed in prokaryotic signal sequences. PMID:6499832

  3. The Dual NOD1/NOD2 Agonism of Muropeptides Containing a Meso-Diaminopimelic Acid Residue

    PubMed Central

    Dagil, Yulia A.; Arbatsky, Nikolai P.; Alkhazova, Biana I.; L’vov, Vyacheslav L.; Mazurov, Dmitriy V.; Pashenkov, Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    Muropeptides are fragments of peptidoglycan that trigger innate immune responses by activating nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) 1 and NOD2. Muropeptides from Gram-negative bacteria contain a meso-diaminopimelic acid (meso-DAP) residue in either a terminal or a non-terminal position. While the former ones are known to be recognized by NOD1, much less is known about recognition of muropeptides with non-terminal meso-DAP, which are most abundant moieties of Gram-negative peptidoglycans. Here, we developed a novel system to assess biological activity of muropeptides, based on CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout (KO) of NOD1 and NOD2 genes in modified HEK293T cells. Using NOD1/NOD2 knockout and overexpression systems, as well as human monocytes and macrophages, we refine the current view of muropeptide recognition. We show that NOD2 can recognize different natural muropeptides containing a meso-DAP residue (preferably in a non-terminal position), provided they are present at micromolar concentrations. NOD2 accepts muropeptides with long and branched peptide chains and requires an intact N-acetylmuramyl residue. Muropeptides with non-terminal meso-DAP can activate NOD1 as well, but, in this case, probably require peptidase pre-processing to expose the meso-DAP residue. Depending on NOD1/NOD2 ratio in specific cell types, meso-DAP-containing muropeptides can be recognized either primarily via NOD2 (in monocytes) or via NOD1 (in monocyte-derived macrophages and HEK293T-derived cells). The dual NOD1/NOD2 agonism of meso-DAP-containing muropeptides should be taken into account when assessing cellular responses to muropeptides and designing muropeptide immunostimulants and vaccine adjuvants. PMID:27513337

  4. Acid-catalyzed hydrothermal severity on the fractionation of agricultural residues for xylose-rich hydrolyzates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Ye; Ryu, Hyun Jin; Oh, Kyeong Keun

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility of acid-catalyzed hydrothermal fractionation for maximum solubilization of the hemicellulosic portion of three agricultural residues. The fractionation conditions converted into combined severity factor (CS) in the range of 1.2-2.9. The highest hemicellulose yield of 87.88% was achieved when barley straw was fractionated at a CS of 2.19. However, the maximum glucose release of 15.29% was achieved for the case of rice straw. The maximum productions of various by-products were observed with the fractionation of rape straw: 0.88 g/L of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), 2.16 g/L of furfural, 0.44 g/L of levulinic acid, 1.59 g/L of formic acid, and 3.06 g/L of acetic acid. The highest selectivities, a criterion for evaluating the fractionation of 21.55 for fractionated solid and 7.48 for liquid hydrolyzate were obtained from barley straw.

  5. Identification of acid-base catalytic residues of high-Mr thioredoxin reductase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Paul J; Arscott, L David; Ballou, David P; Becker, Katja; Williams, Charles H; Müller, Sylke

    2006-11-01

    High-M(r) thioredoxin reductase from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfTrxR) contains three redox active centers (FAD, Cys-88/Cys-93, and Cys-535/Cys-540) that are in redox communication. The catalytic mechanism of PfTrxR, which involves dithiol-disulfide interchanges requiring acid-base catalysis, was studied by steady-state kinetics, spectral analyses of anaerobic static titrations, and rapid kinetics analysis of wild-type enzyme and variants involving the His-509-Glu-514 dyad as the presumed acid-base catalyst. The dyad is conserved in all members of the enzyme family. Substitution of His-509 with glutamine and Glu-514 with alanine led to TrxR with only 0.5 and 7% of wild type activity, respectively, thus demonstrating the crucial roles of these residues for enzymatic activity. The H509Q variant had rate constants in both the reductive and oxidative half-reactions that were dramatically less than those of wild-type enzyme, and no thiolateflavin charge-transfer complex was observed. Glu-514 was shown to be involved in dithiol-disulfide interchange between the Cys-88/Cys-93 and Cys-535/Cys-540 pairs. In addition, Glu-514 appears to greatly enhance the role of His-509 in acid-base catalysis. It can be concluded that the His-509-Glu-514 dyad, in analogy to those in related oxidoreductases, acts as the acid-base catalyst in PfTrxR.

  6. A critical amino acid residue, asp446, in UDP-glucuronosyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Iwano, H; Yokota, H; Ohgiya, S; Yotumoto, N; Yuasa, A

    1997-01-01

    An amino acid residue, Asp446, was found to be essential for the enzymic activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT). We obtained a rat phenol UGT (UGT1*06) cDNA (named Ysh) from male rat liver by reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR using pfu polymerase. A mutant Ysh having two different bases, A1337G and G1384A (named Ysh A1337GC1384A), that result in two amino acid substitutions, D446G and V462M, was obtained by RT-PCR using Taq polymerase. Ysh was expressed functionally in microsomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain AH22. However, the expressed protein from YshA1337GG1384A had no transferase activity. Two other mutant cDNAs with YshA1337G having one changed base, A1337G, resulting in one amino acid substitution, D446G, and YshG1384A having a changed base, G1384A, resulting in an amino acid substitution, V462M, were constructed and expressed in the yeast. The expressed protein from YshG1384A (named YshV462M) exhibited enzymic activity, but the one from YshA1337G (named YshD446G) did not show any activity at all. Asp446 was conserved in all UGTs and UDP-galactose:ceramide galactosyltransferases reported, suggesting that Asp446 plays a critical role in each enzyme. PMID:9271076

  7. Identification and localization of amino acid substitutions between two phenobarbital-inducible rat hepatic microsomal cytochromes P-450 by micro sequence analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, P M; Ryan, D E; Levin, W; Shively, J E

    1983-01-01

    Two isozymes of rat liver microsomal cytochrome P-450--P-450b and P-450e--were compared by micro sequence analyses of their NH2 termini and tryptic fragments. These two phenobarbital-inducible hemoproteins, which are immunochemically indistinguishable with antibody against cytochrome P-450b, have extensive sequence homology. Automated Edman degradation of the native proteins revealed identical amino acids for the first 35 residues. Sequence determinations of the tryptic peptides, which constitute approximately 75% of each protein molecule, have thus far shown 10 amino acid differences between the two isozymes. Results of our amino acid sequence analyses established that two of the cDNAs, pcP-450pb1 and pcP-450pb4, reported by Fujii-Kuriyama et al. [Fujii-Kuriyama, Y., Mizukami, Y., Kamajiri, K., Sogawa, K. & Muramatsu, M. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79, 2793-2797] encode cytochrome P-450b whereas pcP-450pb2, a third cDNA whose nucleotide sequence differed slightly from that of the other two (six amino acid substitutions), encodes cytochrome P-450e. In addition to establishing the identity of these cloned cDNAs we provide direct evidence for seven additional amino acid differences between cytochromes P-450b and P-450e that occur beyond the region (Arg358) encoded by the cloned cDNA for cytochrome P-450e. Together, the amino acid sequences determined by micro sequence analysis and recombinant DNA techniques reveal 13 amino acid differences between these two isozymes. This report highlights the complementary nature of two different molecular approaches to elucidation of the amino acid sequences of isozymes with extensive structural homology. PMID:6572377

  8. Amino acid sequence and glycosylation of functional unit RtH2-e from Rapana thomasiana (gastropod) hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Stoeva, Stanka; Idakieva, Krasimira; Betzel, Christian; Genov, Nicolay; Voelter, Wolfgang

    2002-03-15

    The complete amino acid sequence of Rapana thomasiana hemocyanin functional unit RtH2-e was determined by direct sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of peptides obtained by cleavage with EndoLysC proteinase, chymotrypsin, and trypsin. The single-polypeptide chain of RtH2-e consists of 413 amino acid residues and contains two consensus sequences NXS/T (positions 11-19 and 127-129), potential sites for N-glycosylation. Monosaccharide analysis of RtH2-e revealed a carbohydrate content of about 1.1% and the presence of xylose, fucose, mannose, and N-acetylglucosamine, demonstrating that only N-linked carbohydrate chains of high-mannose type seem to be present. On basis of the monosaccharide composition and MALDI-MS analysis of native and PNGase-F-treated chymotryptic glycopeptide fragment of RtH2-e the oligosaccharide Man(5)GlcNAc(2), attached to Asn(127), is suggested. Multiple sequence alignments with other molluscan hemocyanin e functional units revealed an identity of 63% to the cephalopod Octopus dofleini and of 69% to the gastropod Haliotis tuberculata. The present results are discussed in view of the recently determined X-ray structure of the functional unit g of the O. dofleini hemocyanin. PMID:11888200

  9. The complete amino acid sequence of the major Kunitz trypsin inhibitor from the seeds of Prosopsis juliflora.

    PubMed

    Negreiros, A N; Carvalho, M M; Xavier Filho, J; Blanco-Labra, A; Shewry, P R; Richardson, M

    1991-01-01

    The major inhibitor of trypsin in seeds of Prosopsis juliflora was purified by precipitation with ammonium sulphate, ion-exchange column chromatography on DEAE- and CM-Sepharose and preparative reverse phase HPLC on a Vydac C-18 column. The protein inhibited trypsin in the stoichiometric ratio of 1:1, but had only weak activity against chymotrypsin and did not inhibit human salivary or porcine pancreatic alpha-amylases. SDS-PAGE indicated that the inhibitor has a Mr of ca 20,000, and IEF-PAGE showed that the pI is 8.8. The complete amino acid sequence was determined by automatic degradation, and by DABITC/PITC microsequence analysis of peptides obtained from enzyme digestions of the reduced and S-carboxymethylated protein with trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, the Glu-specific protease from S. aureus and the Lys-specific protease from Lysobacter enzymogenes. The inhibitor consisted of two polypeptide chains, of 137 residues (alpha chain) and 38 residues (beta chain) linked together by a single disulphide bond. The amino acid sequence of the protein exhibited homology with a number of Kunitz proteinase inhibitors from other legume seeds, the bifunctional subtilisin/alpha-amylase inhibitors from cereals and the taste-modifying protein miraculin. PMID:1367792

  10. Identification of acidic and aromatic residues in the Zta activation domain essential for Epstein-Barr virus reactivation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z; Chen, C J; Zerby, D; Delecluse, H J; Lieberman, P M

    2001-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle transcription and DNA replication require the transcriptional activation function of the viral immediate-early protein Zta. We describe a series of alanine substitution mutations in the Zta activation domain that reveal two functional motifs based on amino acid composition. Alanine substitution of single or paired hydrophobic aromatic amino acid residues resulted in modest transcription activation defects, while combining four substitutions of aromatic residues (F22/F26/W74/F75) led to more severe transcription defects. Substitution of acidic amino acid residue E27, D35, or E54 caused severe transcription defects on most viral promoters. Promoter- and cell-specific defects were observed for some substitution mutants. Aromatic residues were required for Zta interaction with TFIIA-TFIID and the CREB-binding protein (CBP) and for stimulation of CBP histone acetyltransferase activity in vitro. In contrast, acidic amino acid substitution mutants interacted with TFIIA-TFIID and CBP indistinguishably from the wild type. The nuclear domain 10 (ND10) protein SP100 was dispersed by most Zta mutants, but acidic residue mutations led to reduced, while aromatic substitution mutants led to increased SP100 nuclear staining. Acidic residue substitution mutants had more pronounced defects in transcription activation of endogenous viral genes in latently infected cells and for viral replication, as measured by the production of infectious virus. One mutant, K12/F13, was incapable of stimulating EBV lytic replication but had only modest transcription defects. These results indicate that Zta stimulates viral reactivation through two nonredundant structural motifs, one of which interacts with general transcription factors and coactivators, and the other has an essential but as yet not understood function in lytic transcription.

  11. New force field parameters for metalloproteins I: Divalent copper ion centers including three histidine residues and an oxygen-ligated amino acid residue.

    PubMed

    Wise, Olivia; Coskuner, Orkid

    2014-06-30

    Transition metal ion complexation with proteins is ubiquitous across such diverse fields as neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. In this study, the structures of divalent copper ion centers including three histidine and one oxygen-ligated amino acid residues and the relative binding affinities of the oxygen-ligated amino acid residues with these metal ion centers, which are debated in the literature, are presented. Furthermore, new force field parameters, which are currently lacking for the full-length metal-ligand moieties, are developed for metalloproteins that have these centers. These new force field parameters enable investigations of metalloproteins possessing these binding sites using molecular simulations. In addition, the impact of using the atom equivalence and inequivalence atomic partial charge calculation procedures on the simulated structures of these metallopeptides, including hydration properties, is described.

  12. Comparative analysis of core amino acid residues of H-2D(b)-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition epitopes in simian virus 40 T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Deckhut, A M; Lippolis, J D; Tevethia, S S

    1992-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) tumor (T) antigen expressed in H-2b SV40-transformed cells induces the generation of Lyt-2+ (CD8+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), which are involved in tumor rejection, in syngeneic mice. Five CTL recognition sites on T antigen have been described by using mutant T antigens. Four of the sites (I, II, III, and V) are H-2Db restricted and have been broadly mapped with synthetic peptides of 15 amino acids in length overlapping by 5 residues at the amino and carboxy termini. The goal of this study was to define the minimal and optimal amino acid sequences of T antigen which would serve as recognition elements for the H-2Db-restricted CTL clones Y-1, Y-2, Y-3, and Y-5, which recognizes sites I, II, III, and V, respectively. The minimal and optimal residues of T antigen recognized by the four CTL clones were determined by using synthetic peptides truncated at the amino or carboxy terminus and an H-2Db peptide-binding motif. The minimal site recognized by CTL clone Y-1 was defined as amino acids 207 to 215 of SV40 T antigen. However, the optimal sequence recognized by CTL clone Y-1 spanned T-antigen amino acids 205 to 215. The T-antigen peptide sequence LT223-231 was the optimal and minimal sequence recognized by both CTL clones Y-2 and Y-3. Site V was determined to be contained within amino acids 489 to 497 of T antigen. The lytic activities of CTL clones Y-2 and Y-3, which recognize a single nonamer peptide, LT223-231, were affected differently by anti-Lyt-2 antibody, suggesting that the T-cell receptors of these two CTL clones differ in their avidities. As the minimal and optimal H-2Db-restricted CTL recognition sites have been defined by nonamer synthetic peptides, it is now possible to search for naturally processed H-2Db-restricted epitopes of T antigen and identify critical residues involved in processing, presentation, and recognition by SV40-specific CTL. PMID:1370091

  13. Evolution of vertebrate IgM: complete amino acid sequence of the constant region of Ambystoma mexicanum mu chain deduced from cDNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Fellah, J S; Wiles, M V; Charlemagne, J; Schwager, J

    1992-10-01

    cDNA clones coding for the constant region of the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) mu heavy immunoglobulin chain were selected from total spleen RNA, using a cDNA polymerase chain reaction technique. The specific 5'-end primer was an oligonucleotide homologous to the JH segment of Xenopus laevis mu chain. One of the clones, JHA/3, corresponded to the complete constant region of the axolotl mu chain, consisting of a 1362-nucleotide sequence coding for a polypeptide of 454 amino acids followed in 3' direction by a 179-nucleotide untranslated region and a polyA+ tail. The axolotl C mu is divided into four typical domains (C mu 1-C mu 4) and can be aligned with the Xenopus C mu with an overall identity of 56% at the nucleotide level. Percent identities were particularly high between C mu 1 (59%) and C mu 4 (71%). The C-terminal 20-amino acid segment which constitutes the secretory part of the mu chain is strongly homologous to the equivalent sequences of chondrichthyans and of other tetrapods, including a conserved N-linked oligosaccharide, the penultimate cysteine and the C-terminal lysine. The four C mu domains of 13 vertebrate species ranging from chondrichthyans to mammals were aligned and compared at the amino acid level. The significant number of mu-specific residues which are conserved into each of the four C mu domains argues for a continuous line of evolution of the vertebrate mu chain. This notion was confirmed by the ability to reconstitute a consistent vertebrate evolution tree based on the phylogenic parsimony analysis of the C mu 4 sequences. PMID:1382992

  14. Trichomonas vaginalis acidic phospholipase A2: isolation and partial amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Guajardo, Brenda L; González-Salazar, Francisco; Palacios-Corona, Rebeca; Torres de la Cruz, Víctor M; Morales-Vallarta, Mario; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito D; Garza-González, Jesús N; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are a major cause of acute disease worldwide, and trichomoniasis is the most common and curable disease, generating more than 170 million cases annually worldwide. Trichomonas vaginalis is the causal agent of trichomoniasis and has the ability to destroy in vitro cell monolayers of the vaginal mucosa, where the phospholipases A2 (PLA2) have been reported as potential virulence factors. These enzymes have been partially characterized from the subcellular fraction S30 of pathogenic T. vaginalis strains. The main objective of this study was to purify a phospholipase A2 from T. vaginalis, make a partial characterization, obtain a partial amino acid sequence, and determine its enzymatic participation as hemolytic factor causing lysis of erythrocytes. Trichomonas S30, RF30 and UFF30 sub-fractions from GT-15 strain have the capacity to hydrolyze [2-(14)C-PA]-PC at pH 6.0. Proteins from the UFF30 sub-fraction were separated by affinity chromatography into two eluted fractions with detectable PLA A2 activity. The EDTA-eluted fraction was analyzed by HPLC using on-line HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry and two protein peaks were observed at 8.2 and 13 kDa. Peptide sequences were identified from the proteins present in the eluted EDTA UFF30 fraction; bioinformatic analysis using Protein Link Global Server charged with T. vaginalis protein database suggests that eluted peptides correspond a putative ubiquitin protein in the 8.2 kDa fraction and a phospholipase preserved in the 13 kDa fraction. The EDTA-eluted fraction hydrolyzed [2-(14)C-PA]-PC lyses erythrocytes from Sprague-Dawley in a time and dose-dependent manner. The acidic hemolytic activity decreased by 84% with the addition of 100 μM of Rosenthal's inhibitor. PMID:24338313

  15. Trichomonas vaginalis acidic phospholipase A2: isolation and partial amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Guajardo, Brenda L; González-Salazar, Francisco; Palacios-Corona, Rebeca; Torres de la Cruz, Víctor M; Morales-Vallarta, Mario; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito D; Garza-González, Jesús N; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are a major cause of acute disease worldwide, and trichomoniasis is the most common and curable disease, generating more than 170 million cases annually worldwide. Trichomonas vaginalis is the causal agent of trichomoniasis and has the ability to destroy in vitro cell monolayers of the vaginal mucosa, where the phospholipases A2 (PLA2) have been reported as potential virulence factors. These enzymes have been partially characterized from the subcellular fraction S30 of pathogenic T. vaginalis strains. The main objective of this study was to purify a phospholipase A2 from T. vaginalis, make a partial characterization, obtain a partial amino acid sequence, and determine its enzymatic participation as hemolytic factor causing lysis of erythrocytes. Trichomonas S30, RF30 and UFF30 sub-fractions from GT-15 strain have the capacity to hydrolyze [2-(14)C-PA]-PC at pH 6.0. Proteins from the UFF30 sub-fraction were separated by affinity chromatography into two eluted fractions with detectable PLA A2 activity. The EDTA-eluted fraction was analyzed by HPLC using on-line HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry and two protein peaks were observed at 8.2 and 13 kDa. Peptide sequences were identified from the proteins present in the eluted EDTA UFF30 fraction; bioinformatic analysis using Protein Link Global Server charged with T. vaginalis protein database suggests that eluted peptides correspond a putative ubiquitin protein in the 8.2 kDa fraction and a phospholipase preserved in the 13 kDa fraction. The EDTA-eluted fraction hydrolyzed [2-(14)C-PA]-PC lyses erythrocytes from Sprague-Dawley in a time and dose-dependent manner. The acidic hemolytic activity decreased by 84% with the addition of 100 μM of Rosenthal's inhibitor.

  16. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA.

    PubMed

    Heather, James M; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way.

  17. tax and rex Sequences of bovine leukaemia virus from globally diverse isolates: rex amino acid sequence more variable than tax.

    PubMed

    McGirr, K M; Buehring, G C

    2005-02-01

    Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) is an important agricultural problem with high costs to the dairy industry. Here, we examine the variation of the tax and rex genes of BLV. The tax and rex genes share 420 bases and have overlapping reading frames. The tax gene encodes a protein that functions as a transactivator of the BLV promoter, is required for viral replication, acts on cellular promoters, and is responsible for oncogenesis. The rex facilitates the export of viral mRNAs from the nucleus and regulates transcription. We have sequenced five new isolates of the tax/rex gene. We examined the five new and three previously published tax/rex DNA and predicted amino acid sequences of BLV isolates from cattle in representative regions worldwide. The highest variation among nucleic acid sequences for tax and rex was 7% and 5%, respectively; among predicted amino acid sequences for Tax and Rex, 9% and 11%, respectively. Significantly more nucleotide changes resulted in predicted amino acid changes in the rex gene than in the tax gene (P < or = 0.0006). This variability is higher than previously reported for any region of the viral genome. This research may also have implications for the development of Tax-based vaccines. PMID:15702995

  18. A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification system for detection of Listeria monocytogenes hlyA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Blais, B W; Turner, G; Sooknanan, R; Malek, L T

    1997-01-01

    A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification system primarily targeting mRNA from the Listeria monocytogenes hlyA gene was developed. This system enabled the detection of low numbers (< 10 CFU/g) of L. monocytogenes cells inoculated into a variety of dairy and egg products after 48 h of enrichment in modified listeria enrichment broth. PMID:8979357

  19. Numerical Simulation to Study the Effect of Arc Travelling Speed and Welding Sequences on Residual Stresses in Welded Sections of New Ferritic P92 Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaowei; Gong, Jianming; Zhao, Yanping; Wang, Yanfei; Ge, Zhiqiang

    2016-02-01

    New ferritic P92 steel is widely used in modern power plants due to its good combination of mechanical and physical properties. However, cracks are often formed in the welded sections during the fabrication or service. In order to ensure the structure integrity, the effects of residual stresses need to be considered. The objective of this paper is to investigate the influence of arc travelling speed and welding sequences on the residual stresses distribution in the welded sections of P92 pipes by finite element method (FEM). Results show that arc travelling speed and welding sequences have great effects on residual stresses distribution. With the arc travelling speed increasing, the residual stresses increase. Meanwhile, welding sequences of case B present smaller residual stresses and more symmetrical distribution of residual stresses at the weld centre line. Therefore, using slower arc travelling speed and case B welding sequences can be useful to decrease the residual stresses, which provides a reference for optimizing the welding technology and improving the fabrication process of new ferritic P92 welded pipes with small diameter and thick wall.

  20. Radiolytic Modification of Sulfur Containing Acidic Amino Residues in Model Peptides: Fundamental Studies for Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Protein footprinting based on hydroxyl radical-mediated modification and quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis is a proven technique for examining protein structure, protein-ligand interactions, and structural allostery upon protein complex formation. The reactive and solvent-accessible amino acid side chains function as structural probes; however, correct structural analysis depends on the identification and quantification of all the relevant oxidative modifications within the protein sequence. Sulfur-containing amino acids are oxidized readily and the mechanisms of oxidation are particularly complex, although they have been extensively investigated by EPR and other spectroscopic methods. Here we have undertaken a detailed mass spectrometry study (using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry) of model peptides containing cysteine (Cys-SH), cystine (disulfide bonded Cys), and methionine after oxidation using {gamma}-rays or synchrotron X-rays and have compared these results to those expected from oxidation mechanisms proposed in the literature. Radiolysis of cysteine leads to cysteine sulfonic acid (+48 Da mass shift) and cystine as the major products; other minor products including cysteine sulfinic acid (+32 Da mass shift) and serine (-16 Da mass shift) are observed. Radiolysis of cystine results in the oxidative opening of the disulfide bond and generation of cysteine sulfonic acid and sulfinic acid; however, the rate of oxidation is significantly less than that for cysteine. Radiolysis of methionine gives rise primarily to methionine sulfoxide (+16 Da mass shift); this can be further oxidized to methionine sulfone (+32 Da mass shift) or another product with a -32 Da mass shift likely due to aldehyde formation at the {gamma}-carbon. Due to the high reactivity of sulfur-containing amino acids, the extent of oxidation is easily influenced by secondary oxidation events or the presence of redox reagents used in standard proteolytic

  1. Characterization of a benzyladenine binding-site peptide isolated from a wheat cytokinin-binding protein: Sequence analysis and identification of a single affinity-labeled histidine residue by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brinegar, A.C.; Cooper, G.; Stevens, A.; Hauer, C.R.; Shabanowitz, J.; Hunt, D.F.; Fox, J.E. )

    1988-08-01

    A wheat embryo cytokinin-binding protein was covalently modified with the radiolabeled photoaffinity ligand 2-azido-N{sup 6}-({sup 14}C)benzyladenine. A single labeled peptide was obtained after proteolytic digestion and isolation by reversed-phase and anion-exchange HPLC. Sequencing by classical Edman degradation identified 11 of the 12 residues but failed to identify the labeled amino acid. Analysis by laser photodissociation Fourier-transform mass spectrometry of 10 pmol of the peptide independently confirmed the Edman data and also demonstrated that the histidine residue nearest the C terminus (underlined) was modified by the reagent in the sequence Ala-Phe-Leu-Gln-Pro-Ser-His-His{und His}-Asp-Ala-Asp-Glu.

  2. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

  3. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-03-24

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. 14 figs.

  4. Evolution of phosphagen kinase V. cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of two molluscan arginine kinases from the chiton Liolophura japonica and the turbanshell Battilus cornutus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Ban, T; Furukohri, T

    1997-06-20

    The cDNAs of arginine kinases from the chiton Liolophura japonica (Polyplacophora) and the turbanshell Battilus cornutus (Gastropoda) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the complete nucleotide sequences of 1669 and 1624 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Liolophura arginine kinase is 1050 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 349 amino acid residues, and that for Battilus is 1077 nucleotides and 358 residues. The validity of the cDNA-derived amino acid sequence was supported by chemical sequencing of internal tryptic peptides. The molecular masses were calculated to be 39,057 and 39,795 Da, respectively. The amino acid sequence of Liolophura arginine kinase showed 65-68% identity with those of Battilus and Nordotis (abalone) arginine kinases, and the homology between Battilus and Nordotis was 79%. Molluscan arginine kinases also show lower, but significant homology (38-43%) with rabbit creatine kinase. The sequences of arginine kinases could be used as a molecular clock to elucidate the phylogeny of Mollusca, one of the most diverse animal phyla.

  5. The amino acid sequence of elephant (Elephas maximus) myoglobin and the phylogeny of Proboscidea.

    PubMed

    Dene, H; Goodman, M; Romero-Herrera, A E

    1980-02-13

    The complete amino acid sequence of skeletal myoglobin from the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) is reported. The functional significance of variations seen when this sequence is compared with that of sperm whale myoglobin is explored in the light of the crystallographic model available for the latter molecule. The phylogenetic implications of the elephant myoglobin amino acid sequence are evaluated by using the maximum parsimony technique. A similar analysis is also presented which incorporates all of the proteins sequenced from the elephant. These results are discussed with respect to current views on proboscidean phylogeny.

  6. A Mutational Analysis of Active Site Residues in trans-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase

    PubMed Central

    Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Serrano, Hector; Huddleston, Jamison P.; Johnson, William H.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    trans -3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (CaaD) catalyzes the hydrolytic dehalogenation of trans-3-haloacrylates to yield malonate semialdehyde by a mechanism utilizing βPro-1, αArg-8, αArg-11, and αGlu-52. These residues are implicated in a promiscuous hydratase activity where 2-oxo-3-pentynoate is processed to acetopyruvate. The roles of three nearby residues (βAsn-39, αPhe-39, and αPhe-50) are unexplored. Mutants were constructed at these positions (βN39A, αF39A, αF39T, αF50A and αF50Y) and kinetic parameters determined along with those of the αR8K and αR11K mutants. Analysis indicates that αArg-8, αArg-11, and βAsn-39 are critical for dehalogenase activity whereas αArg-11 and αPhe-50 are critical for hydratase activity. Docking studies suggest structural bases for these observations. PMID:23851010

  7. Chemical modification of an alpha 3-fucosyltransferase; definition of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Britten, C J; Bird, M I

    1997-02-11

    The biosynthesis of the carbohydrate antigen sialyl Lewis X (sLe(x)) is dependent on the activity of an alpha 3-fucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.152, GDP-fucose:Gal beta (1-4)GlcNAc-R alpha (1-3)fucosyltransferase). This enzyme catalyses the transfer of fucose from GDP-beta-fucose to the 3-OH of N-acetylglucosamine present in lactosamine acceptors. In this report, we have investigated the amino acids essential for the activity of a recombinant alpha 3-fucosyltransferase (FucT-VI) through chemical modification of the enzyme with group-selective reagents. FucT-VI activity was found to be particularly sensitive to the histidine-selective reagent diethylpyrocarbonate and the cysteine reagent N-ethylmaleimide, with IC50 values of less than 200 microM. Reagents selective for arginine and lysine had no effect on enzyme activity. The inclusion of GDP-beta-fucose during preincubation with NEM reduces the rate of inactivation whereas inclusion of an acceptor saccharide for the enzyme, Gal beta (1-4)GlcNAc, had no effect. No protective effect with either GDP-beta-fucose or Gal beta (1-4)GlcNAc was observed on treatment of the enzyme with diethylpyrocarbonate. These data suggest that in addition to an NEM-reactive cysteine in, or adjacent to, the substrate-binding site of the enzyme, FucT-VI possesses histidine residue(s) that are essential for enzyme activity.

  8. Amino acid residues 201-205 in C-terminal acidic tail region plays a crucial role in antibacterial activity of HMGB1

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Antibacterial activity is a novel function of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). However, the functional site for this new effect is presently unknown. Methods and Results In this study, recombinant human HMGB1 A box and B box (rHMGB1 A box, rHMGB1 B box), recombinant human HMGB1 (rHMGB1) and the truncated C-terminal acidic tail mutant (tHMGB1) were prepared by the prokaryotic expression system. The C-terminal acidic tail (C peptide) was synthesized, which was composed of 30 amino acid residues. Antibacterial assays showed that both the full length rHMGB1 and the synthetic C peptide alone could efficiently inhibit bacteria proliferation, but rHMGB1 A box and B box, and tHMGB1 lacking the C-terminal acidic tail had no antibacterial function. These results suggest that C-terminal acidic tail is the key region for the antibacterial activity of HMGB1. Furthermore, we prepared eleven different deleted mutants lacking several amino acid residues in C-terminal acidic tail of HMGB1. Antibacterial assays of these mutants demonstrate that the amino acid residues 201-205 in C-terminal acidic tail region is the core functional site for the antibacterial activity of the molecule. Conclusion In sum, these results define the key region and the crucial site in HMGB1 for its antibacterial function, which is helpful to illustrating the antibacterial mechanisms of HMGB1. PMID:19751520

  9. Characterisation of the products from pyrolysis of residues after acid hydrolysis of Miscanthus.

    PubMed

    Melligan, F; Dussan, K; Auccaise, R; Novotny, E H; Leahy, J J; Hayes, M H B; Kwapinski, W

    2012-03-01

    Platform chemicals such as furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural are major products formed during the acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass in second generation biorefining processes. Solid hydrolysis residues (HR) can amount to 50 wt.% of the starting biomass materials. Pyrolysis of the HRs gives rise to biochar, bio-liquids, and gases. Time and temperature were variables during the pyrolysis of HRs in a fixed bed tubular reactor, and both parameters have major influences on the amounts and properties of the products. Biochar, with potential for carbon sequestration and soil conditioning, composed about half of the HR pyrolysis product. The amounts (11-20 wt.%) and compositions (up to 77% of phenols in organic fraction) of the bio-liquids formed suggest that these have little value as fuels, but could be sources of phenols, and the gas can have application as a fuel. PMID:22281143

  10. pvSOAR: detecting similar surface patterns of pocket and void surfaces of amino acid residues on proteins.

    PubMed

    Binkowski, T Andrew; Freeman, Patrick; Liang, Jie

    2004-07-01

    Detecting similar protein surfaces provides an important route for discovering unrecognized or novel functional relationship between proteins. The web server pvSOAR (pocket and void Surfaces Of Amino acid Residues) provides an online resource to identify similar protein surface regions. pvSOAR can take a structure either uploaded by a user or obtained from the Protein Data Bank, and identifies similar surface patterns based on geometrically defined pockets and voids. It provides several search modes to compare protein surfaces by similarity in local sequence, local shape and local orientation. Statistically significant search results are reported for visualization and interactive exploration. pvSOAR can be used to predict biological functions of proteins with known three-dimensional structures but unknown biological roles. It can also be used to study functional relationship between proteins and for exploration of the evolutionary origins of structural elements important for protein function. We present an example using pvSOAR to explore the biological roles of a protein whose structure was solved by the structural genomics project. The pvSOAR web server is available at http://pvsoar.bioengr.uic.edu/.

  11. Facile Analysis and Sequencing of Linear and Branched Peptide Boronic Acids by MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Crumpton, Jason; Zhang, Wenyu; Santos, Webster

    2011-01-01

    Interest in peptides incorporating boronic acid moieties is increasing due to their potential as therapeutics/diagnostics for a variety of diseases such as cancer. The utility of peptide boronic acids may be expanded with access to vast libraries that can be deconvoluted rapidly and economically. Unfortunately, current detection protocols using mass spectrometry are laborious and confounded by boronic acid trimerization, which requires time consuming analysis of dehydration products. These issues are exacerbated when the peptide sequence is unknown, as with de novo sequencing, and especially when multiple boronic acid moieties are present. Thus, a rapid, reliable and simple method for peptide identification is of utmost importance. Herein, we report the identification and sequencing of linear and branched peptide boronic acids containing up to five boronic acid groups by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Protocols for preparation of pinacol boronic esters were adapted for efficient MALDI analysis of peptides. Additionally, a novel peptide boronic acid detection strategy was developed in which 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) served as both matrix and derivatizing agent in a convenient, in situ, on-plate esterification. Finally, we demonstrate that DHB-modified peptide boronic acids from a single bead can be analyzed by MALDI-MSMS analysis, validating our approach for the identification and sequencing of branched peptide boronic acid libraries. PMID:21449540

  12. Residue Geometry Networks: A Rigidity-Based Approach to the Amino Acid Network and Evolutionary Rate Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fokas, Alexander S.; Cole, Daniel J.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Chin, Alex W.

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid networks (AANs) abstract the protein structure by recording the amino acid contacts and can provide insight into protein function. Herein, we describe a novel AAN construction technique that employs the rigidity analysis tool, FIRST, to build the AAN, which we refer to as the residue geometry network (RGN). We show that this new construction can be combined with network theory methods to include the effects of allowed conformal motions and local chemical environments. Importantly, this is done without costly molecular dynamics simulations required by other AAN-related methods, which allows us to analyse large proteins and/or data sets. We have calculated the centrality of the residues belonging to 795 proteins. The results display a strong, negative correlation between residue centrality and the evolutionary rate. Furthermore, among residues with high closeness, those with low degree were particularly strongly conserved. Random walk simulations using the RGN were also successful in identifying allosteric residues in proteins involved in GPCR signalling. The dynamic function of these residues largely remain hidden in the traditional distance-cutoff construction technique. Despite being constructed from only the crystal structure, the results in this paper suggests that the RGN can identify residues that fulfil a dynamical function. PMID:27623708

  13. Residue Geometry Networks: A Rigidity-Based Approach to the Amino Acid Network and Evolutionary Rate Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fokas, Alexander S; Cole, Daniel J; Ahnert, Sebastian E; Chin, Alex W

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid networks (AANs) abstract the protein structure by recording the amino acid contacts and can provide insight into protein function. Herein, we describe a novel AAN construction technique that employs the rigidity analysis tool, FIRST, to build the AAN, which we refer to as the residue geometry network (RGN). We show that this new construction can be combined with network theory methods to include the effects of allowed conformal motions and local chemical environments. Importantly, this is done without costly molecular dynamics simulations required by other AAN-related methods, which allows us to analyse large proteins and/or data sets. We have calculated the centrality of the residues belonging to 795 proteins. The results display a strong, negative correlation between residue centrality and the evolutionary rate. Furthermore, among residues with high closeness, those with low degree were particularly strongly conserved. Random walk simulations using the RGN were also successful in identifying allosteric residues in proteins involved in GPCR signalling. The dynamic function of these residues largely remain hidden in the traditional distance-cutoff construction technique. Despite being constructed from only the crystal structure, the results in this paper suggests that the RGN can identify residues that fulfil a dynamical function.

  14. Residue Geometry Networks: A Rigidity-Based Approach to the Amino Acid Network and Evolutionary Rate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokas, Alexander S.; Cole, Daniel J.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Chin, Alex W.

    2016-09-01

    Amino acid networks (AANs) abstract the protein structure by recording the amino acid contacts and can provide insight into protein function. Herein, we describe a novel AAN construction technique that employs the rigidity analysis tool, FIRST, to build the AAN, which we refer to as the residue geometry network (RGN). We show that this new construction can be combined with network theory methods to include the effects of allowed conformal motions and local chemical environments. Importantly, this is done without costly molecular dynamics simulations required by other AAN-related methods, which allows us to analyse large proteins and/or data sets. We have calculated the centrality of the residues belonging to 795 proteins. The results display a strong, negative correlation between residue centrality and the evolutionary rate. Furthermore, among residues with high closeness, those with low degree were particularly strongly conserved. Random walk simulations using the RGN were also successful in identifying allosteric residues in proteins involved in GPCR signalling. The dynamic function of these residues largely remain hidden in the traditional distance-cutoff construction technique. Despite being constructed from only the crystal structure, the results in this paper suggests that the RGN can identify residues that fulfil a dynamical function.

  15. Residue Geometry Networks: A Rigidity-Based Approach to the Amino Acid Network and Evolutionary Rate Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fokas, Alexander S; Cole, Daniel J; Ahnert, Sebastian E; Chin, Alex W

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid networks (AANs) abstract the protein structure by recording the amino acid contacts and can provide insight into protein function. Herein, we describe a novel AAN construction technique that employs the rigidity analysis tool, FIRST, to build the AAN, which we refer to as the residue geometry network (RGN). We show that this new construction can be combined with network theory methods to include the effects of allowed conformal motions and local chemical environments. Importantly, this is done without costly molecular dynamics simulations required by other AAN-related methods, which allows us to analyse large proteins and/or data sets. We have calculated the centrality of the residues belonging to 795 proteins. The results display a strong, negative correlation between residue centrality and the evolutionary rate. Furthermore, among residues with high closeness, those with low degree were particularly strongly conserved. Random walk simulations using the RGN were also successful in identifying allosteric residues in proteins involved in GPCR signalling. The dynamic function of these residues largely remain hidden in the traditional distance-cutoff construction technique. Despite being constructed from only the crystal structure, the results in this paper suggests that the RGN can identify residues that fulfil a dynamical function. PMID:27623708

  16. Selective conversion of cellulose in corncob residue to levulinic acid in an aluminum trichloride-sodium chloride system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianmei; Jiang, Zhicheng; Hu, Libin; Hu, Changwei

    2014-09-01

    Increased energy consumption and environmental concerns have driven efforts to produce chemicals from renewable biomass with high selectivity. Here, the selective conversion of cellulose in corncob residue, a process waste from the production of xylose, to levulinic acid was carried out using AlCl3 as catalyst and NaCl as promoter by a hydrothermal method at relatively low temperature. A levulinic acid yield of 46.8 mol% was obtained, and the total selectivity to levulinic acid with formic acid was beyond 90%. NaCl selectively promoted the dissolution of cellulose from corncob residue, and significantly improved the yield and selectivity to levulinic acid by inhibiting lactic acid formation in the subsequent dehydration process. Owing to the salt effect of NaCl, the obtained levulinic acid could be efficiently extracted to tetrahydrofuran from aqueous solution. The aqueous solution with AlCl3 and NaCl could be recycled 4 times. Because of the limited conversion of lignin, this process allows for the production of levulinic acid with high selectivity directly from corncob residue in a simple separation process.

  17. Selective conversion of cellulose in corncob residue to levulinic acid in an aluminum trichloride-sodium chloride system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianmei; Jiang, Zhicheng; Hu, Libin; Hu, Changwei

    2014-09-01

    Increased energy consumption and environmental concerns have driven efforts to produce chemicals from renewable biomass with high selectivity. Here, the selective conversion of cellulose in corncob residue, a process waste from the production of xylose, to levulinic acid was carried out using AlCl3 as catalyst and NaCl as promoter by a hydrothermal method at relatively low temperature. A levulinic acid yield of 46.8 mol% was obtained, and the total selectivity to levulinic acid with formic acid was beyond 90%. NaCl selectively promoted the dissolution of cellulose from corncob residue, and significantly improved the yield and selectivity to levulinic acid by inhibiting lactic acid formation in the subsequent dehydration process. Owing to the salt effect of NaCl, the obtained levulinic acid could be efficiently extracted to tetrahydrofuran from aqueous solution. The aqueous solution with AlCl3 and NaCl could be recycled 4 times. Because of the limited conversion of lignin, this process allows for the production of levulinic acid with high selectivity directly from corncob residue in a simple separation process. PMID:25045141

  18. Isolation of alligator gar (Lepisosteus spatula) glucagon, oxyntomodulin, and glucagon-like peptide: amino acid sequences of oxyntomodulin and glucagon-like peptide.

    PubMed

    Pollock, H G; Kimmel, J R; Ebner, K E; Hamilton, J W; Rouse, J B; Lance, V; Rawitch, A B

    1988-01-01

    Oxyntomodulin, glucagon, and a glucagon-like peptide (GLP) have been isolated from the endocrine pancreas of the alligator gar (Lepisosteus spatula), a ganoid fish. The three peptides were isolated by gel filtration and HPLC and were identified by size, composition, and glucagon-like immunoreactivity. The amino acid sequences of the oxyntomodulin and GLP were determined. The oxyntomodulin contains 36 amino acid residues and its sequence is H S Q G T F T N D Y S K Y L D T R R A Q D F V Q W L M S T K R S G G I T. The composition of the glucagon is identical to the N-terminal 29 residues of the gar oxyntomodulin. The single form of GLP found contains 34 amino acid residues in the following sequence: H A D G T Y T S D V S S Y L Q D Q A A K K F V T W L K Q G Q D R R E. These findings suggest that all three peptides are derived from a common precursor. PMID:3282974

  19. Isolation of alligator gar (Lepisosteus spatula) glucagon, oxyntomodulin, and glucagon-like peptide: amino acid sequences of oxyntomodulin and glucagon-like peptide.

    PubMed

    Pollock, H G; Kimmel, J R; Ebner, K E; Hamilton, J W; Rouse, J B; Lance, V; Rawitch, A B

    1988-01-01

    Oxyntomodulin, glucagon, and a glucagon-like peptide (GLP) have been isolated from the endocrine pancreas of the alligator gar (Lepisosteus spatula), a ganoid fish. The three peptides were isolated by gel filtration and HPLC and were identified by size, composition, and glucagon-like immunoreactivity. The amino acid sequences of the oxyntomodulin and GLP were determined. The oxyntomodulin contains 36 amino acid residues and its sequence is H S Q G T F T N D Y S K Y L D T R R A Q D F V Q W L M S T K R S G G I T. The composition of the glucagon is identical to the N-terminal 29 residues of the gar oxyntomodulin. The single form of GLP found contains 34 amino acid residues in the following sequence: H A D G T Y T S D V S S Y L Q D Q A A K K F V T W L K Q G Q D R R E. These findings suggest that all three peptides are derived from a common precursor.

  20. Mapping of amino acid residues responsible for adhesion of cell culture-adapted foot-and-mouth disease SAT type viruses.

    PubMed

    Maree, Francois F; Blignaut, Belinda; de Beer, Tjaart A P; Visser, Nico; Rieder, Elizabeth A

    2010-10-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infects host cells by adhering to the alpha(V) subgroup of the integrin family of cellular receptors in a Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) dependent manner. FMD viruses, propagated in non-host cell cultures are reported to acquire the ability to enter cells via alternative cell surface molecules. Sequencing analysis of SAT1 and SAT2 cell culture-adapted variants showed acquisition of positively charged amino acid residues within surface-exposed loops of the outer capsid structural proteins. The fixation of positively charged residues at position 110-112 in the beta F-beta G loop of VP1 of SAT1 isolates is thought to correlate with the acquisition of the ability to utilise alternative glycosaminoglycan (GAG) molecules for cell entry. Similarly, two SAT2 viruses that adapted readily to BHK-21 cells accumulated positively charged residues at positions 83 and 85 of the beta D-beta E loop of VP1. Both regions surround the fivefold axis of the virion. Recombinant viruses containing positively charged residues at position 110 and 112 of VP1 were able to infect CHO-K1 cells (that expresses GAG) and demonstrated increased infectivity in BHK-21 cells. Therefore, recombinant SAT viruses engineered to express substitutions that induce GAG-binding could be exploited in the rational design of vaccine seed stocks with improved growth properties in cell cultures. PMID:20637812

  1. The amino acid residues at 102 and 104 in GP5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus regulate viral neutralization susceptibility to the porcine serum neutralizing antibody.

    PubMed

    Fan, Baochao; Liu, Xing; Bai, Juan; Zhang, Tingjie; Zhang, Qiaoya; Jiang, Ping

    2015-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is mainly responsible for the heavy economic losses in pig industry in the world. A number of neutralizing epitopes have been identified in the viral structural proteins GP3, GP4, GP5 and M. In this study, the important amino acid (aa) residues of HP-PRRSV strain BB affecting neutralization susceptibility of antibody were examined using resistant strains generated under neutralizing antibody (NAb) pressure in MARC-145 cells, reverse genetic technique and virus neutralization assay. HP-PRRSV strain BB was passaged under the pressure of porcine NAb serum in vitro. A resistant strain BB34s with 102 and 104 aa substitutions in GP5, which have been predicted to be the positive sites for pressure selection (Delisle et al., 2012), was cloned and identified. To determine the effect of the two aa residues on neutralization, eight recombinant PRRSV strains were generated, and neutralization assay results confirmed that the aa residues 102 and 104 in GP5 played an important role in NAbs against HP-PRRSV in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Alignment of GP5 sequences revealed that the variant aa residues at 102 and 104 were frequent among type 2 PRRSV strains. It may be helpful for understanding the mechanism regulating the neutralization susceptibility of PRRSV to the NAbs and monitoring the antigen variant strains in the field.

  2. Evolution of an Enzyme from a Noncatalytic Nucleic Acid Sequence.

    PubMed

    Gysbers, Rachel; Tram, Kha; Gu, Jimmy; Li, Yingfu

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which enzymes arose from both abiotic and biological worlds remains an unsolved natural mystery. We postulate that an enzyme can emerge from any sequence of any functional polymer under permissive evolutionary conditions. To support this premise, we have arbitrarily chosen a 50-nucleotide DNA fragment encoding for the Bos taurus (cattle) albumin mRNA and subjected it to test-tube evolution to derive a catalytic DNA (DNAzyme) with RNA-cleavage activity. After only a few weeks, a DNAzyme with significant catalytic activity has surfaced. Sequence comparison reveals that seven nucleotides are responsible for the conversion of the noncatalytic sequence into the enzyme. Deep sequencing analysis of DNA pools along the evolution trajectory has identified individual mutations as the progressive drivers of the molecular evolution. Our findings demonstrate that an enzyme can indeed arise from a sequence of a functional polymer via permissive molecular evolution, a mechanism that may have been exploited by nature for the creation of the enormous repertoire of enzymes in the biological world today. PMID:26091540

  3. Radiogenic Ar retention in residual silica from acid-treated micas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkowski, Arkadiusz; Szczerba, Marek; Środoń, Jan; Banaś, Michał

    2014-03-01

    In sedimentary basins, immediate equilibration with surface and pore waters of Ar, released from K-bearing minerals during their diagenesis or weathering, has been a paradigm for geochemistry and geochronology. Consequently, K-Ar and Ar-Ar isotope geochronology techniques applied to sedimentary rocks are based on an assumption that no measurable external radiogenic 40Ar (“excess argon”) has been locked in the rock components during their formation and alteration. Our results indicate that the reaction of micaceous sedimentary and diagenetic clay minerals (illite, glauconite) with acid produces microporous silica that retains a great fraction of the initial argon, releasing potassium to the solution. In all tested cases the evolution of K-Ar isotope ages followed the very same pattern: the apparent K-Ar isotope age increased enormously after acid treatment and dropped significantly after silica removal (with hot Na2CO3), but never decreased lower than the initial K-Ar isotope age of the untreated sample. The amorphous silica content and the apparent K-Ar age increased with the acid reaction time. Using the molecular dynamics simulations, the clay-acid reaction by-product was shown to bend and wrap, producing three-dimensional, protonated and hydrated silica. As a consequence of dramatically different hydration energies of Ar and K, potassium is instantaneously released and hydrated outside the residual structure while Ar atoms remain inside the silica network, adsorbed on the surface. This is, to our knowledge, the first experimental evidence that the excess argon can be retained in solid mineral reaction products formed under pressure and temperature close to those of the Earth surface (1 atm, <80 °C).

  4. Trace analysis of acidic pharmaceutical residues in waters with isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry via methylation derivatization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruikang; Yang, Zhaoguang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2011-09-30

    Acidic pharmaceutical residues are pollutants of emerging concern and are generally monitored by HPLC-MS/MS. However, due to the limited separation efficiency of HPLC column and lack of suitable mass transition for confirmation analysis, some interference may not be separated completely and differentiated from ibuprofen, which may cause the results with interference, especially in sample with complex matrix. The objective of this study is to develop a sensitive and reliable method for the determination of acidic pharmaceutical residues in water samples by GC-MS with better resolution by using methylation derivatization and isotope dilution techniques. TMSDM, a mild reagent, was used as the derivatization reagent coupling with the isotope dilution technique, for the first time, to improve the precision and accuracy of the analytical method to determine the pharmaceutical residues in water. The MDLs for the five acidic organic compounds: ibuprofen, gemfibrozil, naproxen, ketoprofen and diclofenac were from 0.7 to 1.1 ng/L, with recoveries ranging from 93 to 110%. Alternative to the HPLC-MS/MS method, the developed GC-MS protocols provides an additional option for the analysis of acidic pharmaceutical residues in water, with better separation efficiency in reducing interferences from complicated sample matrix, for determination of ibuprofen residues.

  5. Computer Simulation of the Determination of Amino Acid Sequences in Polypeptides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daubert, Stephen D.; Sontum, Stephen F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a computer program that generates a random string of amino acids and guides the student in determining the correct sequence of a given protein by using experimental analytic data for that protein. (MLH)

  6. Amino-acid residues involved in the expression of the activity of Escherichia coli TolC.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Hiroyasu; Morisada, Naoyuki; Miyano, Masaya; Tsuge, Hideaki; Shinoda, Sumio; Takahashi, Eizo; Okamoto, Keinosuke

    2004-01-01

    The Escherichia coli TolC, composed of 471 amino-acid residues, functions as a channel tunnel in the transport of various molecules across the outer membrane. We found previously that Leu-412, the 60th amino-acid residue from the carboxy terminal end, was crucial to the transport activity of TolC. Leu-412 is located in a domain which protrudes from the main body of TolC into the periplasm. Subsequent study indicated that the hydrophobicity generated by Leu-412 played an important role in the activity of TolC (H. Yamanaka, T. Nomura, N. Morisada, S. Shinoda, and K. Okamoto, Microb. Pathog. 33: 81-89, 2002). We predicted that other hydrophobic amino-acid residues around Leu-412 were also involved in the expression of the activity of TolC. To test this possibility, we substituted several hydrophobic residues around Leu-412, (Leu-3, Val-6, Leu-212, Leu-213, Leu-223, and Leu-224), with serine and examined the activity of these mutant TolCs. The result showed that Leu-3 is involved in the activity of TolC, but the other residues are not. The involvement of Leu-3 was confirmed by the residue deletion experiment. A subsequent point-mutational analysis of the residue showed that a hydrophobic side chain is required at position 3 for TolC to express its activity. As the distance between the alpha-carbons of Leu-3 and Leu-412 is just 7.45 angstroms, hydrophobic interaction between the two leucine residues might be involved in the activity of TolC. PMID:15502403

  7. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly).

  8. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly). PMID:9836434

  9. Tri-peptide reference structures for the calculation of relative solvent accessible surface area in protein amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Topham, Christopher M; Smith, Jeremy C

    2015-02-01

    Relative amino acid residue solvent accessibility values allow the quantitative comparison of atomic solvent-accessible surface areas in different residue types and physical environments in proteins and in protein structural alignments. Geometry-optimised tri-peptide structures in extended solvent-exposed reference conformations have been obtained for 43 amino acid residue types at a high level of quantum chemical theory. Significant increases in side-chain solvent accessibility, offset by reductions in main-chain atom solvent exposure, were observed for standard residue types in partially geometry-optimised structures when compared to non-minimised models built from identical sets of proper dihedral angles abstracted from the literature. Optimisation of proper dihedral angles led most notably to marked increases of up to 54% in proline main-chain atom solvent accessibility compared to literature values. Similar effects were observed for fully-optimised tri-peptides in implicit solvent. The relief of internal strain energy was associated with systematic variation in N, C(α) and C(β) atom solvent accessibility across all standard residue types. The results underline the importance of optimisation of 'hard' degrees of freedom (bond lengths and valence bond angles) and improper dihedral angle values from force field or other context-independent reference values, and impact on the use of standardised fixed internal co-ordinate geometry in sampling approaches to the determination of absolute values of protein amino acid residue solvent accessibility. Quantum chemical methods provide a useful and accurate alternative to molecular mechanics methods to perform energy minimisation of peptides containing non-standard (chemically modified) amino acid residues frequently present in experimental protein structure data sets, for which force field parameters may not be available. Reference tri-peptide atomic co-ordinate sets including hydrogen atoms are made freely available

  10. Hybrid character of a large neurofilament protein (NF-M): intermediate filament type sequence followed by a long and acidic carboxy-terminal extension.

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, N; Fischer, S; Vandekerckhove, J; Plessmann, U; Weber, K

    1984-01-01

    The sequence of the amino-terminal 436 residues of porcine neurofilament component NF-M (apparent mol. wt. in gel electrophoresis 160 kd), one of the two high mol. wt. components of mammalian neurofilaments, reveals the typical structural organization of an intermediate filament (IF) protein of the non-epithelial type. A non-alpha-helical arginine-rich headpiece with multiple beta-turns (residues 1-98) precedes a highly alpha-helical rod domain able to form double-stranded coiled-coils (residues 99-412) and a non-alpha-helical tailpiece array starting at residue 413. All extra mass of NF-M forms, as a carboxy-terminal tailpiece extension of approximately 500 residues, an autonomous domain of unique composition. Limited sequence data in the amino-terminal region of this domain document a lysine- and particularly glutamic acid-rich array somewhat reminiscent of the much shorter tailpiece extension of NF-L (apparent mol. wt. 68 kd), the major neurofilament protein. NF-M is therefore a true intermediate filament protein co-polymerized with NF-L via presumptive coiled-coil type interactions and not a peripherally bound associated protein of a filament backbone built exclusively from NF-L. Along the structurally conserved coiled-coil domains the two neurofilament proteins show only approximately 65% sequence identity, a value similar to that seen when NF-L and NF-M are compared with mesenchymal vimentin. The highly charged and acidic tailpiece extensions of all triplet proteins particularly rich in glutamic acid seem unique to the neurofilament type of IFs. They could form extra-filamentous scaffolds suitable for interactions with other neuronal components.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6439558

  11. Experimental test of the superheavy fission hypothesis in acid residues from the allende meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    A description of a series of experiments to find evidence to confirm or contradict the hypothesis that isotopically anomalous Xe (called CCF-Xe) in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites results from the fission decay of a superheavy element is given. The first two experiments were searches for fossil evidence - fission tracks and isotopic anomalies - of superheavy fission decay in the Allende carbonaceous chondrite. It was demonstrated that chromite, a mineral rich in CCF-Xe, records fission tracks, and a search for such tracks in Allende chromite was performed with negative results. It was also demonstrated in certain CCF-XE rich phases of Allende, isotopic anomalies like those seen in Xe should be detectable in Ba and the light rare earths. Preliminary results from a collaborative measurement (with the University of Paris) show the Ba isotopic ratios to be normal in a CCF-Xe rich Allende sample. The third experiment was motivated by reports of the detection of a live, fissioning superheavy element, using a neutron counting technique, in bulk Allende (Flerov, 1978). Since almost all of the allegedly fissiogenic Xe in Allende is concentrated in certain acid insoluble phases, we developed a technique to detect low-level fission activity in these phases. Allende acid insoluble residue (provided by the University of Chicago) was dispersed in a 1 mg/cm/sup 2/ layer, between two track recording detectors. An automatic track locating system was developed to allow large detector areas to be scanned for rate fission events.

  12. The thermostability of two kinds of recombinant ∆6-fatty acid desaturase with different N-terminal sequence lengths in low temperature.

    PubMed

    Lu, He; Zhu, Yu

    2013-09-01

    Two recombinant Rhizopus stolonifer ∆6-fatty acid desaturase enzymes with different-length N-termini were cloned and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain INVScl: LRsD6D begins with the sequence of the N-terminal of the R. stolonifer ∆6-fatty acid desaturase native, encoding a deduced polypeptide of 459 amino acids (M-S-T-L-D-R-Q-S-I-F-T-I-K-E-L-E-S-I-S-Q-R-I-H-D-G-D-E-E-A-M-K-F), whereas SRsD6D begins with the amino acid sequence of the predicted ORF, encoding a deduced polypeptide of 430 amino acids (M-K-F) and LRsD6D is longer than SRsD6D by 29 amino acids (M-S-T-L-D-R-Q-S-I-F-T-I-K-E-L-E-S-I-S-Q-R-I-H-D-G-D-E-E-A). Bioinformatic analysis characterized the two recombinant ∆6-fatty acid desaturase enzymes with different-length N-termini, including three conserved histidine-rich motifs, hydropathy profile, and a cytochrome b5-like domain in the N-terminus. When the coding sequence was expressed in S. cerevisiae strain INVScl, the coding produced ∆6-fatty acid desaturase activity exhibited by RsD6D, leading to a novel peak corresponding to γ-linolenic acid methyl ester standards, which was detected with the same retention time. The residual activity of LRsD6D was 74 % at 15 °C for 4 h and that of SRsD6D was 43 %. Purified recombinant LRsD6D was more stable than SRsD6D, indicating that the N-terminal extension, containing mostly hydrophobic residues, affected the overall stability of recombinant LRsD6D.

  13. Lysine Residues Are Not Required for Proteasome-Mediated Proteolysis of the Auxin/Indole Acidic Acid Protein IAA1.

    PubMed

    Gilkerson, Jonathan; Kelley, Dior R; Tam, Raymond; Estelle, Mark; Callis, Judy

    2015-06-01

    Although many ubiquitin-proteasome substrates have been characterized in plants, very little is known about the corresponding ubiquitin attachment(s) underlying regulated proteolysis. Current dogma asserts that ubiquitin is typically covalently attached to a substrate through an isopeptide bond between the ubiquitin carboxy terminus and a substrate lysyl amino group. However, nonlysine (non-Lys) ubiquitin attachment has been observed in other eukaryotes, including the N terminus, cysteine, and serine/threonine modification. Here, we investigate site(s) of ubiquitin attachment on indole-3-acetic acid1 (IAA1), a short-lived Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) family member. Most Aux/IAA proteins function as negative regulators of auxin responses and are targeted for degradation after ubiquitination by the ubiquitin ligase SCF(TIR1/AFB) (for S-Phase Kinase-Associated Protein1, Cullin, F-box [SCF] with Transport Inhibitor Response1 [TIR1]/Auxin Signaling F-box [AFB]) by an interaction directly facilitated by auxin. Surprisingly, using a Histidine-Hemaglutinin (HIS(6x)-HA(3x)) epitope-tagged version expressed in vivo, Lys-less IAA1 was ubiquitinated and rapidly degraded in vivo. Lys-substituted versions of IAA1 localized to the nucleus as Yellow Fluorescent Protein fusions and interacted with both TIR1 and IAA7 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid experiments, indicating that these proteins were functional. Ubiquitination on both HIS(6x)-HA(3x)-IAA1 and Lys-less HIS(6x)-HA(3x)-IAA1 proteins was sensitive to sodium hydroxide treatment, indicative of ubiquitin oxyester formation on serine or threonine residues. Additionally, base-resistant forms of ubiquitinated IAA1 were observed for HIS(6x)-HA(3x)-IAA1, suggesting additional lysyl-linked ubiquitin on this protein. Characterization of other Aux/IAA proteins showed that they have diverse degradation rates, adding additional complexity to auxin signaling. Altogether, these data

  14. Lysine Residues Are Not Required for Proteasome-Mediated Proteolysis of the Auxin/Indole Acidic Acid Protein IAA1.

    PubMed

    Gilkerson, Jonathan; Kelley, Dior R; Tam, Raymond; Estelle, Mark; Callis, Judy

    2015-06-01

    Although many ubiquitin-proteasome substrates have been characterized in plants, very little is known about the corresponding ubiquitin attachment(s) underlying regulated proteolysis. Current dogma asserts that ubiquitin is typically covalently attached to a substrate through an isopeptide bond between the ubiquitin carboxy terminus and a substrate lysyl amino group. However, nonlysine (non-Lys) ubiquitin attachment has been observed in other eukaryotes, including the N terminus, cysteine, and serine/threonine modification. Here, we investigate site(s) of ubiquitin attachment on indole-3-acetic acid1 (IAA1), a short-lived Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) family member. Most Aux/IAA proteins function as negative regulators of auxin responses and are targeted for degradation after ubiquitination by the ubiquitin ligase SCF(TIR1/AFB) (for S-Phase Kinase-Associated Protein1, Cullin, F-box [SCF] with Transport Inhibitor Response1 [TIR1]/Auxin Signaling F-box [AFB]) by an interaction directly facilitated by auxin. Surprisingly, using a Histidine-Hemaglutinin (HIS(6x)-HA(3x)) epitope-tagged version expressed in vivo, Lys-less IAA1 was ubiquitinated and rapidly degraded in vivo. Lys-substituted versions of IAA1 localized to the nucleus as Yellow Fluorescent Protein fusions and interacted with both TIR1 and IAA7 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid experiments, indicating that these proteins were functional. Ubiquitination on both HIS(6x)-HA(3x)-IAA1 and Lys-less HIS(6x)-HA(3x)-IAA1 proteins was sensitive to sodium hydroxide treatment, indicative of ubiquitin oxyester formation on serine or threonine residues. Additionally, base-resistant forms of ubiquitinated IAA1 were observed for HIS(6x)-HA(3x)-IAA1, suggesting additional lysyl-linked ubiquitin on this protein. Characterization of other Aux/IAA proteins showed that they have diverse degradation rates, adding additional complexity to auxin signaling. Altogether, these data

  15. Multiple Genome Sequences of Important Beer-Spoiling Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Andreas J.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2016-01-01

    Seven strains of important beer-spoiling lactic acid bacteria were sequenced using single-molecule real-time sequencing. Complete genomes were obtained for strains of Lactobacillus paracollinoides, Lactobacillus lindneri, and Pediococcus claussenii. The analysis of these genomes emphasizes the role of plasmids as the genomic foundation of beer-spoiling ability. PMID:27795248

  16. Amino acid sequence diversity of the major human papillomavirus capsid protein: implications for current and next generation vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Amina I; Bissett, Sara L; Beddows, Simon

    2013-08-01

    Despite the fidelity of host cell polymerases, the human papillomavirus (HPV) displays a degree of genomic polymorphism resulting in distinct genotypes and intra-type variants. The current HPV vaccines target the most prevalent genotypes associated with cervical cancer (HPV16/18) and genital warts (HPV6/11). Although these vaccines confer some measure of cross-protection, a multivalent HPV vaccine is in the pipeline that aims to broaden vaccine protection against other cervical cancer-associated genotypes including HPV31, HPV33, HPV45, HPV52 and HPV58. Both current and next generation vaccines comprise virus-like particles, based upon the major capsid protein, L1, and vaccine-induced, type-specific protection is likely mediated by neutralizing antibodies targeting L1 surface-exposed domains. The aim of this study was to perform an in silico analysis of existing full length L1 sequences representing vaccine-relevant HPV genotypes in order to address the degree of naturally-occurring, intra-type polymorphisms. In total, 1281 sequences from the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe were assembled. Intra-type entropy was low and/or limited to non-surface-exposed residues for HPV6, HPV11 and HPV52 suggesting a minimal effect on vaccine antibodies for these genotypes. For HPV16, intra-type entropy was high but the present analysis did not reveal any significant polymorphisms not previously identified. For HPV31, HPV33, HPV58, however, intra-type entropy was high, mostly mapped to surface-exposed domains and in some cases within known neutralizing antibody epitopes. For HPV18 and HPV45 there were too few sequences for a definitive analysis, but HPV45 displayed some degree of surface-exposed residue diversity. In most cases, the reference sequence for each genotype represented a minority variant and the consensus L1 sequences for HPV18, HPV31, HPV45 and HPV58 did not reflect the L1 sequence of the currently available HPV pseudoviruses. These data highlight a number of variant

  17. Bovine thrombospondin-2: complete complementary deoxyribonucleic acid sequence and immunolocalization in the external zones of the adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Danik, M; Chinn, A M; Lafeuillade, B; Keramidas, M; Aguesse-Germon, S; Penhoat, A; Chen, H; Mosher, D F; Chambaz, E M; Feige, J J

    1999-06-01

    Given the variety of biological functions in the adrenal cortex that are controlled by ACTH, we hypothesized that some extracellular proteins act as biological relays for this systemic hormone. One candidate protein [corticotropin-induced secreted protein (CISP)] was purified from the conditioned medium of bovine adrenocortical cells on the basis of a 5- to 14-fold increase in its synthesis after the addition of ACTH. We report here the cloning of overlapping complementary DNAs that span the sequence encoding the full-length protein (1170 amino acids). The deduced CISP protein sequence is 89% identical to that of human thrombospondin-2 (TSP2), but only 61% identical to that of bovine TSP1, confirming that CISP is the bovine ortholog of TSP2. The bovine TSP2 sequence aligned perfectly with human, mouse, and chicken TSP2 sequences, except for a gap of 2 amino acids located in a linker region. All 58 cysteine residues that are conserved in other species were present in the bovine sequence as well as most of the functional domains. Most endocrine tissues (adrenal cortex, testis, ovary, and placenta) appeared to express TSP2, as determined by Western blot analysis. The highest levels of TSP2 protein were found in the adrenal cortex, followed by the heart, spleen, brain, and kidney. A differential extent of N-glycosylation or tissular proteolytic maturation may be responsible for the mol wt differences observed between bovine TSP2 detected in the medium from primary cultures and that in fresh tissue extracts. The immunohistochemical analysis of the distribution of TSP2 in the bovine adrenal gland revealed that the protein is much more abundant in the external zones (zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculata) than in the internal reticularis zone, a pattern similar to that reported for ACTH receptors. This distribution clearly suggests that TSP2 is a candidate relay protein for a subset of ACTH actions in the adrenal cortex. PMID:10342868

  18. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the deep-sea tube worm haemoglobin remarkably resembles that of annelid haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, T; Takagi, T; Ohta, S

    1988-01-01

    The deep-sea giant tube worm Lamellibrachia, belonging to the phylum Vestimentifera, contains two extracellular haemoglobins, an Mr 3,000,000 haemoglobin and an Mr 440,000 haemoglobin. The former has a hexagonal bilayer structure and consists of six polypeptide chains (AI-VI); a study of its haem content shows that not all of the chains contain haem. The Mr 440,000 haemoglobin consists of four haem-containing chains (BI-IV). We isolated most of the chains by reverse-phase chromatography and determined the amino acid sequences of the 21-45 N-terminal residues. Eight chains (AI-IV and BI-IV) showed significant homology with haem-containing chains of annelid giant haemoglobin. The highest homology was found between Lamellibrachia chain AI and Tylorrhynchus chain I; surprisingly, 18 out of the 20 N-terminal residues are identical. On the other hand, chain AV, with an unusual Mr of 32,000, showed a rather different sequence and is likely to be a non-haem chain which might act as a linker protein in the assembly of the haem-containing chains. From these results, we conclude that the tube worm Mr 3,000,000 haemoglobin is highly homologous with annelid haemoglobin. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3202832

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Novel Acidimicrobiaceae Members from an Acid Mine Drainage Biofilm Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ameet J.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Yoder, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the family Acidimicrobiaceae are frequently encountered in heavy metal-contaminated acidic environments. However, their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is poorly resolved. We present draft genome sequences of two novel and phylogenetically distinct Acidimicrobiaceae members assembled from an acid mine drainage biofilm metagenome. PMID:26769942

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces clavuligerus F613-1, an Industrial Producer of Clavulanic Acid.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guangxiang; Zhong, Chuanqing; Zong, Gongli; Fu, Jiafang; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Guimin; Qin, Ronghuo

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus strain F613-1 is an industrial strain with high-yield clavulanic acid production. In this study, the complete genome sequence of S. clavuligerus strain F613-1 was determined, including one linear chromosome and one linear plasmid, carrying numerous sets of genes involving in the biosynthesis of clavulanic acid.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces clavuligerus F613-1, an Industrial Producer of Clavulanic Acid.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guangxiang; Zhong, Chuanqing; Zong, Gongli; Fu, Jiafang; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Guimin; Qin, Ronghuo

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus strain F613-1 is an industrial strain with high-yield clavulanic acid production. In this study, the complete genome sequence of S. clavuligerus strain F613-1 was determined, including one linear chromosome and one linear plasmid, carrying numerous sets of genes involving in the biosynthesis of clavulanic acid. PMID:27660792

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces clavuligerus F613-1, an Industrial Producer of Clavulanic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Chuanqing; Zong, Gongli; Fu, Jiafang; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Guimin; Qin, Ronghuo

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus strain F613-1 is an industrial strain with high-yield clavulanic acid production. In this study, the complete genome sequence of S. clavuligerus strain F613-1 was determined, including one linear chromosome and one linear plasmid, carrying numerous sets of genes involving in the biosynthesis of clavulanic acid. PMID:27660792

  3. Parvalbumins from coelacanth muscle. III. Amino acid sequence of the major component.

    PubMed

    Jauregui-Adell, J; Pechere, J F

    1978-09-26

    The primary structure of the major parvalbumin (pI = 4.52) from coelacanth muscle (Latimeria chalumnae) has been determined. Sequence analysis of the tryptic peptides, in some cases obtained with beta-trypsin, accounts for the total amino acid content of the protein. Chymotryptic peptides provide appropriate sequence overlaps, to complete the localization of the tryptic peptides. Examination of the amino acid sequence of this protein shows the typical structure of a beta-parvalbumin. Its position in the dendrogram of related calcium-binding proteins corresponds to that usually accepted for crossopterygians.

  4. Amino acid sequence and location of the disulfide bonds in bovine beta 2 glycoprotein I: the presence of five Sushi domains.

    PubMed

    Kato, H; Enjyoji, K

    1991-12-17

    beta 2 glycoprotein I is a plasma protein with the ability to bind with various kinds of negatively charged substances. The complete amino acid sequence and the location of all the disulfide bonds of bovine beta 2 glycoprotein I were determined. Bovine beta 2 glycoprotein I consists of 326 amino acid residues with five asparagine-linked carbohydrate chains. Homology with the human protein was calculated to be 83%. Eleven disulfide bonds in bovine beta 2 glycoprotein I constitute four characteristic domains, Sushi domains, and one modified form of a Sushi domain.

  5. Amino Acid Residues in Transmembrane Domain 10 of Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 1B3 are Critical for Cholecystokinin Octapeptide Transport†

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Chunshan; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Human organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1 and 1B3 are multi-specific transporters that mediate uptake of amphipathic organic compounds into hepatocytes. The two OATPs contain twelve transmembrane domains (TMs) and share 80% amino acid sequence identity. Besides common substrates with OATP1B1, OATP1B3 specifically transports cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8). To determine which structural domains/residues are important for the substrate selectivity of OATP1B3, we constructed a series of chimeric proteins between OATP1B3 and 1B1, expressed them in HEK293 cells and determined uptake of CCK-8 along with surface expression of the proteins. Replacing TM10 in OATP1B3 with TM10 of OATP1B1 resulted in dramatically reduced CCK-8 transport, indicating that TM10 is crucial for recognition and/or translocation of CCK-8. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified three key residues within TM10, namely Y537, S545 and T550. When we replaced these residues by the corresponding amino acid residues found in OATP1B1, CCK-8 transport was similarly low as for the replacement of the whole TM10. Kinetic experiments showedthat the Km values for CCK-8 transport in the TM10-replacement and triple mutant were only 1.3 and 1.1 μM, respectively as compared to 16.3 μM for wild-type OATP1B3. Similarly, the Vmax values dropped from 495.5 pmol/normalized mg/min for wild-type OATP1B3 to 13.3 and 19.0 for the TM10-replacement and triple mutant, respectively. Molecular modeling indicated that two of the three identified residues might form hydrogen bonds with CCK-8. In conclusion, we have identified three amino acid residues (Y537, S545 and T550) in TM10 of OATP1B3 that are important for CCK-8 transport. PMID:18690707

  6. Sequencing and computational analysis of complete genome sequences of Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus from acid lime and pummelo.

    PubMed

    Borah, Basanta K; Johnson, A M Anthony; Sai Gopal, D V R; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2009-08-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus (CMBV), a member of the Family Caulimoviridae, Genus Badnavirus, is the causative agent of Citrus mosaic disease in India. Although the virus has been detected in several citrus species, only two full-length genomes, one each from Sweet orange and Rangpur lime, are available in publicly accessible databases. In order to obtain a better understanding of the genetic variability of the virus in other citrus mosaic-affected citrus species, we performed the cloning and sequence analysis of complete genomes of CMBV from two additional citrus species, Acid lime and Pummelo. We show that CMBV genomes from the two hosts share high homology with previously reported CMBV sequences and hence conclude that the new isolates represent variants of the virus present in these species. Based on in silico sequence analysis, we predict the possible function of the protein encoded by one of the five ORFs.

  7. The complete amino-acid sequence of the alpha and beta subunits of B-phycoerythrin from the rhodophytan alga Porphyridium cruentum.

    PubMed

    Sidler, W; Kumpf, B; Suter, F; Klotz, A V; Glazer, A N; Zuber, H

    1989-02-01

    Determination of the complete amino-acid sequence of the subunits of B-phycoerythrin from Porphyridium cruentum has shown that the alpha subunit contains 164 amino-acid residues and the beta subunit contains 177 residues. When the sequences of B- and C-phycoerythrins are aligned with those of other phycobiliproteins, it is obvious that B-phycoerythrin lacks a deletion at beta-21-22 present in C-phycoerythrin. However, relative to C-phycoerythrin from Fremyella diplosiphon (Calothrix) (Sidler, W., Kumpf, B., Rüdiger, W. and Zuber, H. (1986) Biol. Chem. Hoppe-Seyler 367, 627-642), B-phycoerythrin has deletions at beta-141k-o, beta-142, beta-143, beta-147 and beta-148. The four singly-linked phycoerythrobilins at positions alpha-84, alpha-143a, beta-84 and beta-155, and the doubly-linked phycoerythrobilin at position beta-50/61 are at sites homologous to the attachment sites in C-phycoerythrin. The aspartyl residues (alpha-87, beta-87, and beta-39), that interact with the bilins at alpha-84, beta-84, and beta-155 in C-phycocyanin, are found in the homologous positions in B-phycoerythrin. B-Phycoerythrin, in common with other phycobiliproteins, contains a N gamma-methylasparagine residue at position beta-72.

  8. TranslatorX: multiple alignment of nucleotide sequences guided by amino acid translations.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Zardoya, Rafael; Telford, Maximilian J

    2010-07-01

    We present TranslatorX, a web server designed to align protein-coding nucleotide sequences based on their corresponding amino acid translations. Many comparisons between biological sequences (nucleic acids and proteins) involve the construction of multiple alignments. Alignments represent a statement regarding the homology between individual nucleotides or amino acids within homologous genes. As protein-coding DNA sequences evolve as triplets of nucleotides (codons) and it is known that sequence similarity degrades more rapidly at the DNA than at the amino acid level, alignments are generally more accurate when based on amino acids than on their corresponding nucleotides. TranslatorX novelties include: (i) use of all documented genetic codes and the possibility of assigning different genetic codes for each sequence; (ii) a battery of different multiple alignment programs; (iii) translation of ambiguous codons when possible; (iv) an innovative criterion to clean nucleotide alignments with GBlocks based on protein information; and (v) a rich output, including Jalview-powered graphical visualization of the alignments, codon-based alignments coloured according to the corresponding amino acids, measures of compositional bias and first, second and third codon position specific alignments. The TranslatorX server is freely available at http://translatorx.co.uk.

  9. Peptide nucleic acids tagged with four lysine residues for amperometric genosensors

    PubMed Central

    Zanardi, Chiara; Terzi, Fabio; Seeber, Renato; Baldoli, Clara; Licandro, Emanuela; Maiorana, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    A homothymine PNA decamer bearing four lysine residues has been synthesized as a probe for the development of amperometric sensors. On one hand, the four amino groups introduced make this derivative nine times more soluble than the corresponding homothymine PNA decamer and, on the other hand, allow the stable anchoring of this molecule on Au nanostructured surface through the terminal -NH2 moieties. In particular, XPS and electrochemical investigations performed with hexylamine, as a model molecule, indicate that the stable deposition of primary amine derivatives on such a nanostructured surface is possible and involves the free electron doublet on the nitrogen atom. This finding indicates that this PNA derivative is suitable to act as the probe molecule for the development of amperometric sensors.   Thanks to the molecular probe chosen and to the use of a nanostructured surface as the substrate for the sensor assembly, the device proposed makes possible the selective recognition of the target oligonucleotide sequence with very high sensitivity. PMID:22772036

  10. Thimet oligopeptidase: similarity to 'soluble angiotensin II-binding protein' and some corrections to the published amino acid sequence of the rat testis enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    McKie, N; Dando, P M; Rawlings, N D; Barrett, A J

    1993-01-01

    The deduced amino acid sequence of pig liver soluble angiotensin II-binding protein [Sugiura, Hagiwara and Hirose (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 18067-18072] is similar over most of its length to that reported for rat testis thimet oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.15) by Pierotti, Dong, Glucksman, Orlowski and Roberts [(1990) (Biochemistry 29, 10323-10329]. We have found that homogeneous rat testis thimet oligopeptidase binds angiotensin II with the same distinctive characteristics as the pig liver protein. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences reported for the two proteins pointed to the likelihood that sequencing errors had caused two segments of the amino acid sequence of the rat protein to be translated out of frame, and re-sequencing of selected parts of the clone (kindly provided by the previous authors) confirmed this. The revised deduced amino acid sequence of rat thimet oligopeptidase contains 687 residues, representing a protein of 78,308 Da, and is more closely related to those of the pig liver protein and other known homologues of thimet oligopeptidase than that described previously. Images Figure 1 PMID:8216239

  11. Effect of low molecular weight organic acids on phosphorus adsorption by ferric-alum water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Wang, Ziyuan; Lin, Lu; Tian, Binghui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2012-02-15

    Effects of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs; citric acid, oxalic acid and tartaric acid) on phosphorus (P) adsorption by ferric-alum water treatment residuals (FARs) were studied. Both batch and column experiments indicated that the effects of LMWOAs on P adsorption were closely related to adsorption time. Initially, all acids presented inhibitory function on P adsorption. The inhibition became weaker with time, eventually promoting P adsorption for citric acid and tartaric acid. In the column experiment with a 61-day duration, high P adsorption rates (>55%) were observed for the test groups containing citric acid and tartaric acid. Interestingly, higher pH likely enhanced P adsorption with the effects of LMWOAs and a distinct relationship between LMWOAs' effects on P adsorption and their concentrations was not observed. Moreover, fractionation of the adsorbed P from the FARs demonstrated that oxalic acid reduced P adsorption capacity, while citric acid and tartaric acid increased. Based on the forms of Fe and Al existing in the FARs and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses, LMWOAs can promote P adsorption through activating crystalline Fe/Al and preventing crystallization of amorphous Fe/Al to increase P adsorption sites, and can also inhibit P adsorption by competition with adsorption sites.

  12. Residues 39-56 of Stem Cell Factor Protein Sequence Are Capable of Stimulating the Expansion of Cord Blood CD34+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bin; Jiang, Wenhong; Fan, Jie; Dai, Wei; Ding, Xinxin; Jiang, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Background Stem cell factor (SCF) can stimulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expansion; however, the specific structural region(s) of SCF protein that are critical for this function are still unknown. A novel monoclonal antibody (named 23C8) against recombinant human SCF (rhSCF) was previously found to inhibit the ability of rhSCF to enhance HSC expansion, making it possible to identify the relevant active region to HSC. Methods Eleven polypeptides were synthesized, which were designed to cover the full-length of rhSCF, with overlaps that are at least 3 amino acids long. ELISA was used to identify the polypeptide(s) that specifically react with the anti-SCF. The effects of the synthetic polypeptides on human HSC expansion, or on the ability of the full-length rhSCF to stimulate cell proliferation, were evaluated ex vivo. Total cell number was monitored using hemocytometer whereas CD34+ cell number was calculated based on the proportion determined via flow cytometry on day 6 of culture. Results Of all polypeptides analyzed, only one, named P0, corresponding to the SCF protein sequence at residues 39–56, was recognized by 23C8 mAb during ELISA. P0 stimulated the expansion of CD34+ cells derived from human umbilical cord blood (UCB). Addition of P0 increased the numbers of total mononucleated cells and CD34+ cells, by ~2 fold on day 6. P0 also showed partial competition against full-length rhSCF in the ex vivo cell expansion assay. Conclusion Residues 39–56 of rhSCF comprise a critical functional region for its ability to enhance expansion of human UCB CD34+ cells. The peptide P0 is a potential candidate for further development as a synthetic substitute for rhSCF in laboratory and clinical applications. PMID:26505626

  13. Amino acid sequence and some properties of phytolacain R, a cysteine protease from full-growth fruits of pokeweed, Phytolacca americana.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, H; Uchikoba, T; Arima, K; Shimada, M; Kaneda, M

    1999-07-01

    A cysteine protease, phytolacain R from full-growth greenish fruits of pokeweed, Phytolacca americana L, was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by a simple purification procedure employing CM-Sepharose ion-exchange chromatography. The enzyme was present in low content in the young fruits about 50 d after flowering but gradually accumulated in growing fruits. Its molecular mass was estimated to be ca. 23 kDa by SDS-PAGE, and its sugar content was zero. Its amino acid sequence was established by automated sequence analysis of the peptides obtained by cleavage with Achromobacter protease I, chymotrypsin, trypsin, and cyanogen bromide. The enzyme is composed of 218 amino acid residues, of which it shares 110 residues (50%) with papain, 104 (47%) with actinidain, and 87 (40%) with stem bromelain. The amino acid residues forming the substrate-binding the S2 pocket of papain, Tyr61, Tyr67, Pro68, Trp69, Val133, and Phe207, were predicted to be replaced by Gly, Trp, Met, His, Ala, and Met in phytolacain R, respectively. As a consequence of these substitutions, the S2 pocket is expected to be less hydrophobic in phytolacain R than in papain.

  14. Amino acid sequence of toxin XI of the scorpion Buthus occitanus tunetanus. Evidence of a mutation having an important effect upon neurotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, F; Habersetzer-Rochat, C; Martin, M F; Kopeyan, C; Rochat, H

    1987-02-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of toxin XI of the North African scorpion Buthus occitanus tunetanus has been elucidated by automatic sequencing of the reduced and alkylated toxin and of the peptides obtained after tryptic cleavage restricted to arginyl bonds. This toxin is structurally homologous to toxin II of Androctonus australis Hector, the most active among the alpha-toxins, but is far less potent, both in vivo and in vitro. This work points out 12 mutations, many of which are conservative. Nevertheless, the most striking difference is the replacement of the lysine residue at position 58, known to be important in the activity of AaH toxin II, by a valine residue. Thus, it seems that the presence of a positive charge at this location facilitates the interactions between the receptor on the sodium channel and the alpha-type toxins.

  15. Solid acid catalysts pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of macroalgae cellulosic residue for the production of bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Tan, Inn Shi; Lee, Keat Teong

    2015-06-25

    The aim of this study is to investigate the technical feasibility of converting macroalgae cellulosic residue (MCR) into bioethanol. An attempt was made to present a novel, environmental friendly and economical pretreatment process that enhances enzymatic conversion of MCR to sugars using Dowex (TM) Dr-G8 as catalyst. The optimum yield of glucose reached 99.8% under the optimal condition for solid acid pretreatment (10%, w/v biomass loading, 4%, w/v catalyst loading, 30min, 120°C) followed by enzymatic hydrolysis (45FPU/g of cellulase, 52CBU/g of β-glucosidase, 50°C, pH 4.8, 30h). The yield of sugar obtained was found more superior than conventional pretreatment process using H2SO4 and NaOH. Biomass loading for the subsequent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the pretreated MCR was then optimized, giving an optimum bioethanol yield of 81.5%. The catalyst was separated and reused for six times, with only a slight drop in glucose yield.

  16. Solid acid catalysts pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of macroalgae cellulosic residue for the production of bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Tan, Inn Shi; Lee, Keat Teong

    2015-06-25

    The aim of this study is to investigate the technical feasibility of converting macroalgae cellulosic residue (MCR) into bioethanol. An attempt was made to present a novel, environmental friendly and economical pretreatment process that enhances enzymatic conversion of MCR to sugars using Dowex (TM) Dr-G8 as catalyst. The optimum yield of glucose reached 99.8% under the optimal condition for solid acid pretreatment (10%, w/v biomass loading, 4%, w/v catalyst loading, 30min, 120°C) followed by enzymatic hydrolysis (45FPU/g of cellulase, 52CBU/g of β-glucosidase, 50°C, pH 4.8, 30h). The yield of sugar obtained was found more superior than conventional pretreatment process using H2SO4 and NaOH. Biomass loading for the subsequent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the pretreated MCR was then optimized, giving an optimum bioethanol yield of 81.5%. The catalyst was separated and reused for six times, with only a slight drop in glucose yield. PMID:25839825

  17. A single amino acid residue controls ROS production in the respiratory Complex I from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Knuuti, Juho; Belevich, Galina; Sharma, Vivek; Bloch, Dmitry A; Verkhovskaya, Marina

    2013-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by respiratory Complex I from Escherichia coli was studied in bacterial membrane fragments and in the isolated and purified enzyme, either solubilized or incorporated in proteoliposomes. We found that the replacement of a single amino acid residue in close proximity to the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-binding catalytic site (E95 in the NuoF subunit) dramatically increases the reactivity of Complex I towards dioxygen (O2 ). In the E95Q variant short-chain ubiquinones exhibit strong artificial one-electron reduction at the catalytic site, also leading to a stronger increase in ROS production. Two mechanisms can contribute to the observed kinetic effects: (a) a change in the reactivity of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) towards dioxygen at the catalytic site, and (b) a change in the population of the ROS-generating state. We propose the existence of two (closed and open) states of the NAD(+) -bound enzyme as one feature of the substrate-binding site of Complex I. The analysis of the kinetic model of ROS production allowed us to propose that the population of Complex I with reduced FMN is always low in the wild-type enzyme even at low ambient redox potentials, minimizing the rate of reaction with O2 in contrast to E95Q variant.

  18. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from the chiton Liolophura japonica and a phylogenetic tree for molluscan globins.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Furukohri, T; Okamoto, S

    1993-02-01

    Myoglobin was isolated from the radular muscle of the chiton Liolophura japonica, a primitive archigastropodic mollusc. Liolophura contains three monomeric myoglobins (I, II, and III), and the complete amino acid sequence of myoglobin I has been determined. It is composed of 145 amino acid residues, and the molecular mass was calculated to be 16,070 D. The E7 distal histidine, which is replaced by valine or glutamine in several molluscan globins, is conserved in Liolophura myoglobin. The autoxidation rate at physiological conditions indicated that Liolophura oxymyoglobin is fairly stable when compared with other molluscan myoglobins. The amino acid sequence of Liolophura myoglobin shows low homology (11-21%) with molluscan dimeric myoglobins and hemoglobins, but shows higher homology (26-29%) with monomeric myoglobins from the gastropodic molluscs Aplysia, Dolabella, and Bursatella. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from 19 molluscan globin sequences. The tree separated them into two distinct clusters, a cluster for muscle myoglobins and a cluster for erythrocyte or gill hemoglobins. The myoglobin cluster is divided further into two subclusters, corresponding to monomeric and dimeric myoglobins, respectively. Liolophura myoglobin was placed on the branch of monomeric myoglobin lineage, showing that it diverged earlier from other monomeric myoglobins. The hemoglobin cluster is also divided into two subclusters. One cluster contains homodimeric, heterodimeric, tetrameric, and didomain chains of erythrocyte hemoglobins of the blood clams Anadara, Scapharca, and Barbatia. Of special interest is the other subcluster. It consists of three hemoglobin chains derived from the bacterial symbiontharboring clams Calyptogena and Lucina, in which hemoglobins are supposed to play an important role in maintaining the symbiosis with sulfide bacteria.

  19. Role of certain amino acid residues of the coelenterazine-binding cavity in bioluminescence of light-sensitive Ca(2+)-regulated photoprotein berovin.

    PubMed

    Burakova, Ludmila P; Stepanyuk, Galina A; Eremeeva, Elena V; Vysotski, Eugene S

    2016-05-11

    Bright bioluminescence of ctenophores is caused by Ca(2+)-regulated photoproteins. Although these photoproteins are functionally identical to and share many properties of cnidarian photoproteins, like aequorin and obelin, and retain the same spatial architecture, they are extremely sensitive to light, i.e. lose the ability to bioluminesce on exposure to light over the entire absorption spectrum. In addition, the degree of identity of their amino acid sequences with those of cnidarian photoproteins is only 29.4%. This suggests that the residues involved in bioluminescence of ctenophore and cnidarian photoproteins significantly differ. Here we describe the bioluminescent properties of berovin mutants with substitution of the residues located in the photoprotein internal cavity. Since the spatial structure of berovin bound with a substrate is not determined yet, to identify these residues we have modeled it with an accommodated substrate using the structures of some cnidarian Ca(2+)-regulated photoproteins with bound coelenterazine or coelenteramide as templates in order to obtain an adequate sampling and to take into account all possible conformers and variants for ligand-protein docking. Based on the impact of substitutions on the bioluminescent properties and model structures we speculate that within the internal cavity of ctenophore photoproteins, coelenterazine is bound as a 2-peroxy anion adduct which is stabilized owing to Coulomb interaction with a positively charged guanidinium group of Arg41 paired with Tyr204. In this case, the bioluminescence reaction is triggered by only calcium-induced conformational changes leading to the disturbance of charge-charge interaction.

  20. Mutagenesis identifies the critical amino acid residues of human endonuclease G involved in catalysis, magnesium coordination, and substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shih-Lu; Li, Chia-Cheng; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Chen, Yi-Jin; Lin, Ching-Ting; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2009-01-01

    Background Endonuclease G (EndoG), a member of DNA/RNA nonspecific ββα-Me-finger nucleases, is involved in apoptosis and normal cellular proliferation. In this study, we analyzed the critical amino acid residues of EndoG and proposed the catalytic mechanism of EndoG. Methods To identify the critical amino acid residues of human EndoG, we replaced the conserved histidine, asparagine, and arginine residues with alanine. The catalytic efficacies of Escherichia coli-expressed EndoG variants were further analyzed by kinetic studies. Results Diethyl pyrocarbonate modification assay revealed that histidine residues were involved in EndoG activity. His-141, Asn-163, and Asn-172 in the H-N-H motif of EndoG were critical for catalysis and substrate specificity. H141A mutant required a higher magnesium concentration to achieve its activity, suggesting the unique role of His-141 in both catalysis and magnesium coordination. Furthermore, an additional catalytic residue (Asn-251) and an additional metal ion binding site (Glu-271) of human EndoG were identified. Conclusion Based on the mutational analysis and homology modeling, we proposed that human EndoG shared a similar catalytic mechanism with nuclease A from Anabaena. PMID:19272175

  1. Preparation of a novel carbon-based solid acid from cassava stillage residue and its use for the esterification of free fatty acids in waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingtao; Dong, Xiuqin; Jiang, Haoxi; Li, Guiming; Zhang, Minhua

    2014-04-01

    A novel carbon-based solid acid catalyst was prepared by the sulfonation of incompletely carbonized cassava stillage residue (CSR) with concentrated sulfuric acid, and employed to catalyze the esterification of methanol and free fatty acids (FFAs) in waste cooking oil (WCO). The effects of the carbonization and the sulfonation temperatures on the pore structure, acid density and catalytic activity of the CSR-derived catalysts were systematically investigated. Low temperature carbonization and high temperature sulfonation can cause the collapse of the carbon framework, while high temperature carbonization is not conducive to the attachment of SO3H groups on the surface. The catalyst showed high catalytic activity for esterification, and the acid value for WCO is reduced to below 2mg KOH/g after reaction. The activity of catalyst can be well maintained after five cycles. CSR can be considered a promising raw material for the production of a new eco-friendly solid acid catalyst.

  2. Amino acid sequence heterogeneity of the chromosomal encoded Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato major antigen P100.

    PubMed

    Fellinger, W; Farencena, A; Redl, B; Sambri, V; Cevenini, R; Stöffler, G

    1995-04-01

    The entire nucleotide sequence of the chromosomal encoded major antigen p100 of the European Borrelia garinii isolate B29 was determined and the deduced amino acid sequence was compared to the homologous antigen p83 of the North American Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strain B31 and the p100 of the European Borrelia afzelii (group VS461) strain PKo. p100 of strain B29 shows 87% amino acid sequence identity to strain B31 and 79.2% to strain PKo, p100 of strain B31 and PKo shows 62.5% identity to each other. In addition, partial nucleotide sequences of the most heterogeneous region of the p100 gene of two other Borrelia garinii isolates (PBi and VS286) have been determined and the deduced amino acid sequences were compared with all p100 of Borrelia garinii published so far. We found an amino acid sequence identity between 88.6 and 100% within the same genospecies. The N-terminal part of the p100 proteins is highly conserved whereas a striking heterogeneous region within the C-terminal part of the proteins was observed.

  3. Electrostatic effects of surface acidic amino acid residues on the oxidation-reduction potentials of the flavodoxin from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Z; Swenson, R P

    1995-03-14

    The flavodoxin from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) is a member of a family of small, acidic proteins that contain a single noncovalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor. These proteins function as low-potential one-electron transferases in bacteria. A distinguishing feature of these flavoproteins is the dramatic decrease in the midpoint potential of the semiquinone/hydroquinone couple of the FMN upon binding to the apoprotein (-172 mV for FMN free in solution versus -443 mV when bound), a perturbation thought to be essential for physiological function. The structural basis of this phenomenon is not yet thoroughly understood. In this study, the contribution of six acidic residues (Asp62, Asp63, Glu66, Asp95, Glu99, and Asp106) to the perturbation of the redox properties of the cofactor has been investigated. These residues are clustered about the FMN binding site within 13 A of the N(1) atom of the cofactor. Using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, these residues were neutralized in various combinations through the substitution of asparagine for aspartate and glutamine for glutamate. Seventeen mutant flavodoxins were generated in which one to all six acidic residues were systematically neutralized, often in various spatial configurations. There was no obvious correlation between the midpoint potentials for the oxidized/semiquinone couple and general electrostatic environment, although some differences were noted. However, the midpoint potential for the semiquinone/hydroquinone couple for each of the mutants was less negative than that of the wild type. These increases are strongly correlated with the number of acid to amide substitutions, with an average contribution of about 15 mV per substitution. Collectively, the unfavorable electrostatic environment provided by these acidic residues accounts for approximately one-third of the large midpoint potential shift for the semiquinone/hydroquinone couple that typifies the flavodoxin family

  4. L-Rhamnose-binding lectin from eggs of the Echinometra lucunter: Amino acid sequence and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Rômulo Farias; Teixeira, Claudener Souza; de Melo, Arthur Alves; de Almeida, Alexandra Sampaio; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; de Sousa, Oscarina Viana; da Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2015-01-01

    An L-rhamnose-binding lectin named ELEL was isolated from eggs of the rock boring sea urchin Echinometra lucunter by affinity chromatography on lactosyl-agarose. ELEL is a homodimer linked by a disulfide bond with subunits of 11 kDa each. The new lectin was inhibited by saccharides possessing the same configuration of hydroxyl groups at C-2 and C-4, such as L-rhamnose, melibiose, galactose and lactose. The amino acid sequence of ELEL was determined by tandem mass spectrometry. The ELEL subunit has 103 amino acids, including nine cysteine residues involved in four conserved intrachain disulfide bonds and one interchain disulfide bond. The full sequence of ELEL presents conserved motifs commonly found in rhamnose-binding lectins, including YGR, DPC and KYL. A three-dimensional model of ELEL was created, and molecular docking revealed favorable binding energies for interactions between ELEL and rhamnose, melibiose and Gb3 (Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glcβ1-Cer). Furthermore, ELEL was able to agglutinate Gram-positive bacterial cells, suggesting its ability to recognize pathogens.

  5. Recognition of protein phosphorylation site based on amino acids sequence features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Ding, Changjiang; Lu, Jun

    2012-09-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important reversible post-translational modifications (PTMs), and the theoretical recognition of the phosphorylation site is one of the important content of the computational biology. In the paper, we use the amino acid component, the position-dependent residue statistics and the non-adjacent residue pair frequency as the recognition parameters, and use Jensen-Shannon Divergence with Quadratic Discriminant analysis(JSDQD) as the method for predicting the phosphorylation sites. The 7-fold cross-validation test accuracies for the CK2, PKA and PKC kinase families are 90%, 90% and 86%, respectively.

  6. Direct fermentation of potato starch and potato residues to lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus under non-sterile conditions

    PubMed Central

    Smerilli, Marina; Neureiter, Markus; Wurz, Stefan; Haas, Cornelia; Frühauf, Sabine; Fuchs, Werner

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lactic acid is an important biorefinery platform chemical. The use of thermophilic amylolytic microorganisms to produce lactic acid by fermentation constitutes an efficient strategy to reduce operating costs, including raw materials and sterilization costs. RESULTS A process for the thermophilic production of lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus directly from potato starch was characterized and optimized. Geobacillus stearothermophilus DSM 494 was selected out of 12 strains screened for amylolytic activity and the ability to form lactic acid as the major product of the anaerobic metabolism. In total more than 30 batches at 3–l scale were run at 60 °C under non-sterile conditions. The process developed produced 37 g L−1 optically pure (98%) L-lactic acid in 20 h from 50 g L−1 raw potato starch. As co-metabolites smaller amounts (<7% w/v) of acetate, formate and ethanol were formed. Yields of lactic acid increased from 66% to 81% when potato residues from food processing were used as a starchy substrate in place of raw potato starch. CONCLUSIONS Potato starch and residues were successfully converted to lactic acid by G. stearothermophilus. The process described in this study provides major benefits in industrial applications and for the valorization of starch-rich waste streams. © 2015 The Authors.Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:25937690

  7. Acidic Residues Control the Dimerization of the N-terminal Domain of Black Widow Spiders’ Major Ampullate Spidroin 1

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Joschka; Schaal, Daniel; Eisoldt, Lukas; Schweimer, Kristian; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Scheibel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dragline silk is the most prominent amongst spider silks and comprises two types of major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) differing in their proline content. In the natural spinning process, the conversion of soluble MaSp into a tough fiber is, amongst other factors, triggered by dimerization and conformational switching of their helical amino-terminal domains (NRN). Both processes are induced by protonation of acidic residues upon acidification along the spinning duct. Here, the structure and monomer-dimer-equilibrium of the domain NRN1 of Latrodectus hesperus MaSp1 and variants thereof have been investigated, and the key residues for both could be identified. Changes in ionic composition and strength within the spinning duct enable electrostatic interactions between the acidic and basic pole of two monomers which prearrange into an antiparallel dimer. Upon naturally occurring acidification this dimer is stabilized by protonation of residue E114. A conformational change is independently triggered by protonation of clustered acidic residues (D39, E76, E81). Such step-by-step mechanism allows a controlled spidroin assembly in a pH- and salt sensitive manner, preventing premature aggregation of spider silk proteins in the gland and at the same time ensuring fast and efficient dimer formation and stabilization on demand in the spinning duct. PMID:27681031

  8. Acidic Residues Control the Dimerization of the N-terminal Domain of Black Widow Spiders’ Major Ampullate Spidroin 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Joschka; Schaal, Daniel; Eisoldt, Lukas; Schweimer, Kristian; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Scheibel, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Dragline silk is the most prominent amongst spider silks and comprises two types of major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) differing in their proline content. In the natural spinning process, the conversion of soluble MaSp into a tough fiber is, amongst other factors, triggered by dimerization and conformational switching of their helical amino-terminal domains (NRN). Both processes are induced by protonation of acidic residues upon acidification along the spinning duct. Here, the structure and monomer-dimer-equilibrium of the domain NRN1 of Latrodectus hesperus MaSp1 and variants thereof have been investigated, and the key residues for both could be identified. Changes in ionic composition and strength within the spinning duct enable electrostatic interactions between the acidic and basic pole of two monomers which prearrange into an antiparallel dimer. Upon naturally occurring acidification this dimer is stabilized by protonation of residue E114. A conformational change is independently triggered by protonation of clustered acidic residues (D39, E76, E81). Such step-by-step mechanism allows a controlled spidroin assembly in a pH- and salt sensitive manner, preventing premature aggregation of spider silk proteins in the gland and at the same time ensuring fast and efficient dimer formation and stabilization on demand in the spinning duct.

  9. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided.

  10. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1997-04-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided. 7 figs.

  11. The isotopic composition of zinc, palladium, silver, cadmium, tin, and tellurium in acid-etched residues of the Allende meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Loss, R.D.; Rosman, K.J.R.; De Laeter, J.R. )

    1990-12-01

    The isotopic and elemental abundances of Zn, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, and Te have been measured in three acid-resistant residues extracted from the Allende meteorite. High-efficiency, low-contamination ion-exchange procedures were developed to separate and purify the nanogram amounts of these elements present. Elemental-abundance determinations performed by Mass Spectrometric Isotope Dilution agree with previously published work for similarly derived residues. No isotope anomalies similar to those found for Xe (Xe-HL) in these samples were detected for any of these elements, which is consistent with the residues not being derived directly from the Xe-HL carriers. The lack of major Te-isotope anomalies does not support earlier reports of {sup 126}Te and {sup 130}Te excesses which were measured by neutron activation in similar samples. Small excesses were detected in the minor isotopes of Sn and Te, but these may be due to measurement problems associated with the small ion currents obtained for these samples. Two of the residue solutions contain Cd with up to several percent excesses for {sup 106}Cd and {sup 108}Cd. Interpretations of these results are limited by the unknown nature of the carrier minerals in the residues but may indicate the presence of a p-process component in Allende residues.

  12. Molecular cloning of the. alpha. -subunit of human prolyl 4-hydroxylase: The complete cDNA-derived amino acid sequence and evidence for alternative splicing of RNA transcripts

    SciTech Connect

    Helaakoski, T.; Vuori, K.; Myllylae, R.; Kivirikko, K.I.; Pihlajaniemi, T. )

    1989-06-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} tetramer, catalyzes the formation of 4-hydroxyproline in collagens by the hydroxylation of proline residues in peptide linkages. The authors report here on the isolation of cDNA clones encoding the {alpha}-subunit of the enzyme from human tumor HT-1080, placenta, and fibroblast cDNA libraries. Eight overlapping clones covering almost all of the corresponding 3,000-nucleotide mRNA, including all the coding sequences, were characterized. These clones encode a polypeptide of 517 amino acid residues and a signal peptide of 17 amino acids. Previous characterization of cDNA clones for the {beta}-subunit of prolyl 4-hydroxylase has indicated that its C terminus has the amino acid sequence Lys-Asp-Gly-Leu, which, it has been suggested, is necessary for the retention of a polypeptide within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. The {alpha}-subunit does not have this C-terminal sequence, and thus one function of the {beta}-subunit in the prolyl 4-hydroxylase tetramer appears to be to retain the enzyme within this cell organelle. Southern blot analyses of human genomic DNA with a cDNA probe for the {alpha}-subunit suggested the presence of only one gene encoding the two types of mRNA, which appear to result from mutually exclusive alternative splicing of primary transcripts of one gene.

  13. Ligation with nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Ong, Carmichael; Tai, Warren; Sarma, Aartik; Opal, Steven M; Artenstein, Andrew W; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel method for detecting nucleic acid targets using a ligation step along with an isothermal, exponential amplification step. We use an engineered ssDNA with two variable regions on the ends, allowing us to design the probe for optimal reaction kinetics and primer binding. This two-part probe is ligated by T4 DNA Ligase only when both parts bind adjacently to the target. The assay demonstrates that the expected 72-nt RNA product appears only when the synthetic target, T4 ligase, and both probe fragments are present during the ligation step. An extraneous 38-nt RNA product also appears due to linear amplification of unligated probe (P3), but its presence does not cause a false-positive result. In addition, 40 mmol/L KCl in the final amplification mix was found to be optimal. It was also found that increasing P5 in excess of P3 helped with ligation and reduced the extraneous 38-nt RNA product. The assay was also tested with a single nucleotide polymorphism target, changing one base at the ligation site. The assay was able to yield a negative signal despite only a single-base change. Finally, using P3 and P5 with longer binding sites results in increased overall sensitivity of the reaction, showing that increasing ligation efficiency can improve the assay overall. We believe that this method can be used effectively for a number of diagnostic assays. PMID:22449695

  14. ConSurf 2010: calculating evolutionary conservation in sequence and structure of proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazy, Haim; Erez, Elana; Martz, Eric; Pupko, Tal; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2010-07-01

    It is informative to detect highly conserved positions in proteins and nucleic acid sequence/structure since they are often indicative of structural and/or functional importance. ConSurf (http://consurf.tau.ac.il) and ConSeq (http://conseq.tau.ac.il) are two well-established web servers for calculating the evolutionary conservation of amino acid positions in proteins using an empirical Bayesian inference, starting from protein structure and sequence, respectively. Here, we present the new version of the ConSurf web server that combines the two independent servers, providing an easier and more intuitive step-by-step interface, while offering the user more flexibility during the process. In addition, the new version of ConSurf calculates the evolutionary rates for nucleic acid sequences. The new version is freely available at: http://consurf.tau.ac.il/.

  15. Amino acid repeats cause extraordinary coding sequence variation in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Scala, Clea; Tian, Xiangjun; Mehdiabadi, Natasha J; Smith, Margaret H; Saxer, Gerda; Stephens, Katie; Buzombo, Prince; Strassmann, Joan E; Queller, David C

    2012-01-01

    Protein sequences are normally the most conserved elements of genomes owing to purifying selection to maintain their functions. We document an extraordinary amount of within-species protein sequence variation in the model eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum stemming from triplet DNA repeats coding for long strings of single amino acids. D. discoideum has a very large number of such strings, many of which are polyglutamine repeats, the same sequence that causes various human neurological disorders in humans, like Huntington's disease. We show here that D. discoideum coding repeat loci are highly variable among individuals, making D. discoideum a candidate for the most variable proteome. The coding repeat loci are not significantly less variable than similar non-coding triplet repeats. This pattern is consistent with these amino-acid repeats being largely non-functional sequences evolving primarily by mutation and drift. PMID:23029418

  16. Conservation of Shannon's redundancy for proteins. [information theory applied to amino acid sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts of information theory are applied to examine various proteins in terms of their redundancy in natural originators such as animals and plants. The Monte Carlo method is used to derive information parameters for random protein sequences. Real protein sequence parameters are compared with the standard parameters of protein sequences having a specific length. The tendency of a chain to contain some amino acids more frequently than others and the tendency of a chain to contain certain amino acid pairs more frequently than other pairs are used as randomness measures of individual protein sequences. Non-periodic proteins are generally found to have random Shannon redundancies except in cases of constraints due to short chain length and genetic codes. Redundant characteristics of highly periodic proteins are discussed. A degree of periodicity parameter is derived.

  17. Conversion of amino-acid sequence in proteins to classical music: search for auditory patterns

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    We have converted genome-encoded protein sequences into musical notes to reveal auditory patterns without compromising musicality. We derived a reduced range of 13 base notes by pairing similar amino acids and distinguishing them using variations of three-note chords and codon distribution to dictate rhythm. The conversion will help make genomic coding sequences more approachable for the general public, young children, and vision-impaired scientists. PMID:17477882

  18. Amino acid residues in the GerAB protein important in the function and assembly of the alanine spore germination receptor of Bacillus subtilis 168.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Gareth R; Moir, Anne

    2011-05-01

    The paradigm gerA operon is required for endospore germination in response to c-alanine as the sole germinant, and the three protein products, GerAA, GerAB, and GerAC are predicted to form a receptor complex in the spore inner membrane. GerAB shows homology to the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) family of single-component transporters and is predicted to be an integral membrane protein with 10 membrane-spanning helices. Site-directed mutations were introduced into the gerAB gene at its natural location on the chromosome. Alterations to some charged or potential helix-breaking residues within membrane spans affected receptor function dramatically. In some cases, this is likely to reflect the complete loss of the GerA receptor complex, as judged by the absence of the germinant receptor protein GerAC, which suggests that the altered GerAB protein itself may be unstable or that the altered structure destabilizes the complex. Mutants that have a null phenotype for Instituto de Biotecnología de León, INBIOTEC, Parque Científico de León, Av. Real, 1, 24006 León, Spain-alanine germination but retain GerAC protein at near-normal levels are more likely to define amino acid residues of functional, rather than structural, importance. Single-amino-acid substitutions in each of the GerAB and GerAA proteins can prevent incorporation of GerAC protein into the spore; this provides strong evidence that the proteins within a specific receptor interact and that these interactions are required for receptor assembly. The lipoprotein nature of the GerAC receptor subunit is also important; an amino acid change in the prelipoprotein signal sequence in the gerAC1 mutant results in the absence of GerAC protein from the spore.

  19. T Cell Determinants Incorporating [beta]-Amino Acid Residues Are Protease Resistant and Remain Immunogenic In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Andrew I.; Dunstone, Michelle A.; Williamson, Nicholas A.; Price, Jason D.; Kauwe, Andreade; Chen, Weisan; Oakley, Aaron; Perlmutter, Patrick; McCluskey, James; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Rossjohn, Jamie; Purcell, Anthony W.

    2010-07-20

    A major hurdle in designing successful epitope-based vaccines resides in the delivery, stability, and immunogenicity of the peptide immunogen. The short-lived nature of unmodified peptide-based vaccines in vivo limits their therapeutic application in the immunotherapy of cancers and chronic viral infections as well as their use in generating prophylactic immunity. The incorporation of {beta}-amino acids into peptides decreases proteolysis, yet its potential application in the rational design of T cell mimotopes is poorly understood. To address this, we have replaced each residue of the SIINFEKL epitope individually with the corresponding {beta}-amino acid and examined the resultant efficacy of these mimotopes. Some analogs displayed similar MHC binding and superior protease stability compared with the native epitope. Importantly, these analogs were able to generate cross-reactive CTLs in vivo that were capable of lysing tumor cells that expressed the unmodified epitope as a surrogate tumor Ag. Structural analysis of peptides in which anchor residues were substituted with {beta}-amino acids revealed the basis for enhanced MHC binding and retention of immunogenicity observed for these analogs and paves the way for future vaccine design using {beta}-amino acids. We conclude that the rational incorporation of {beta}-amino acids into T cell determinants is a powerful alternative to the traditional homologous substitution of randomly chosen naturally occurring {alpha}-amino acids, and these mimotopes may prove particularly useful for inclusion in epitope-based vaccines.

  20. Minimal Residual Disease Detection and Evolved IGH Clones Analysis in Acute B Lymphoblastic Leukemia Using IGH Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinghua; Jia, Shan; Wang, Changxi; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Sixi; Zeng, Xiaojing; Mai, Huirong; Yuan, Xiuli; Du, Yuanping; Wang, Xiaodong; Hong, Xueyu; Li, Xuemei; Wen, Feiqiu; Xu, Xun; Pan, Jianhua; Li, Changgang; Liu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Acute B lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is one of the most common types of childhood cancer worldwide and chemotherapy is the main treatment approach. Despite good response rates to chemotherapy regiments, many patients eventually relapse and minimal residual disease (MRD) is the leading risk factor for relapse. The evolution of leukemic clones during disease development and treatment may have clinical significance. In this study, we performed immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) repertoire high throughput sequencing (HTS) on the diagnostic and post-treatment samples of 51 pediatric B-ALL patients. We identified leukemic IGH clones in 92.2% of the diagnostic samples and nearly half of the patients were polyclonal. About one-third of the leukemic clones have correct open reading frame in the complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) of IGH, which demonstrates that the leukemic B cells were in the early developmental stage. We also demonstrated the higher sensitivity of HTS in MRD detection and investigated the clinical value of using peripheral blood in MRD detection and monitoring the clonal IGH evolution. In addition, we found leukemic clones were extensively undergoing continuous clonal IGH evolution by variable gene replacement. Dynamic frequency change and newly emerged evolved IGH clones were identified upon the pressure of chemotherapy. In summary, we confirmed the high sensitivity and universal applicability of HTS in MRD detection. We also reported the ubiquitous evolved IGH clones in B-ALL samples and their response to chemotherapy during treatment. PMID:27757113

  1. Next-generation sequencing of FLT3 internal tandem duplications for minimal residual disease monitoring in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bibault, Jean-Emmanuel; Figeac, Martin; Hélevaut, Nathalie; Rodriguez, Céline; Quief, Sabine; Sebda, Shéhérazade; Renneville, Aline; Nibourel, Olivier; Rousselot, Philippe; Gruson, Bérengère; Dombret, Hervé; Castaigne, Sylvie; Preudhomme, Claude

    2015-09-01

    Minimal Residual Disease (MRD) detection can be used for early intervention in relapse, risk stratification, and treatment guidance. FLT3 ITD is the most common mutation found in AML patients with normal karyotype. We evaluated the feasibility of NGS with high coverage (up to 2.4.10(6) PE fragments) for MRD monitoring on FLT3 ITD. We sequenced 37 adult patients at diagnosis and various times of their disease (64 samples) and compared the results with FLT3 ITD ratios measured by fragment analysis. We found that NGS could detect variable insertion sites and lengths in a single test for several patients. We also showed mutational shifts between diagnosis and relapse, with the outgrowth of a clone at relapse different from that dominant at diagnosis. Since NGS is scalable, we were able to adapt sensitivity by increasing the number of reads obtained for follow-up samples, compared to diagnosis samples. This technique could be applied to detect biological relapse before its clinical consequences and to better tailor treatments through the use of FLT3 inhibitors. Larger cohorts should be assessed in order to validate this approach.

  2. Visible sensing of nucleic acid sequences using a genetically encodable unmodified mRNA probe.

    PubMed

    Narita, Atsushi; Ogawa, Kazumasa; Sando, Shinsuke; Aoyama, Yasuhiro

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported a molecular beacon-mRNA (MB-mRNA) strategy for nucleic acid detection/sensing in a cell-free translation system using unmodified RNA as a probe. Here in this presentation, we report that a combination with RNase H activity, which induces an additional process of irreversible cleavage of MB-domain, achieves an improved sequence selectivity (one nucleotide selectivity) and an enhanced sensitivity. This improved system finally enabled visible sensing of target nucleic acid sequence at a single nucleotide resolution under isothermal conditions.

  3. Reuse of acid coagulant-recovered drinking waterworks sludge residual to remove phosphorus from wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lan; Wei, Jie; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Jianli; Wang, Dongtian

    2014-06-01

    Acid coagulant-recovered drinking waterworks sludge residual (DWSR) is a waste product from drinking waterworks sludge (DWS) treatment with acid for coagulant recovery. In this study, we evaluated DWSR as a potential phosphorus (P) removing material in wastewater treatment by conducting a series of batch and semi-continuous tests. Batch tests were carried out to study the effects of pH, initial concentration, and sludge dose on P removal. Batch test results showed that the P removal efficiency of DWSR was highly dependent on pH. Calcinated DWSR (C-DWSR) performed better in P removal than DWSR due to its higher pH. At an optimum initial pH value of 5-6 and a sludge dose of 10 g/L, the P removal rates of DWSR and DWS decreased from 99% and 93% to 84% and 14%, respectively, and the specific P uptake of DWSR and DWS increased from 0.19 and 0.19 mg P/g to 33.60 and 5.72 mg P/g, respectively, when the initial concentration was increased from 2 to 400 mg/L. The effective minimum sludge doses of DWSR and DWS were 0.5 g/L and 10 g/L, respectively, when the P removal rates of 90% were obtained at an initial concentration of 10 mg/L. Results from semi-continuous test indicated that P removal rates over 99% were quickly achieved for both synthetic and actual wastewater (lake water and domestic sewage). These rates could be maintained over a certain time under a certain operational conditions including sludge dose, feed flow, and initial concentration. The physicochemical properties analysis results showed that the contents of aluminum (Al) and iron (Fe) in DWSR were reduced by 50% and 70%, respectively, compared with DWS. The insoluble Al and Fe hydroxide in DWS converted into soluble Al and Fe in DWSR. Metal leaching test results revealed that little soluble Al and Fe remained in effluent when DWSR was used for P removal. We deduced that chemical precipitation might be the major action for P removal by DWSR and that adsorption played only a marginal role.

  4. A complete enzymatic recovery of ferulic acid from corn residues with extracellular enzymes from Neosartorya spinosa NRRL185.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun-Dong; McClendon, Shara; Le, Tien; Taylor, Frank; Chen, Rachel Ruizhen

    2006-12-20

    An economic ferulic acid recovery from biomass via biological methods is of interest for a number of reasons. Ferulic acid is a precursor to vanillin synthesis. It is also a known antioxidant with potential food and medical applications. Despite its universal presence in all plant cell wall material, the complex structure of the plant cell wall makes ferulic acid recovery from biomass a challenging bioprocess. Previously, without pretreatment, very low (3-13%) recovery of ferulic acid from corn residues was achieved. We report here the discovery of a filamentous fungus Neosartorya spinosa NRRL185 capable of producing a full complement of enzymes to release ferulic acid and the development of an enzymatic process for a complete recovery of ferulic acid from corn bran and corn fibers. A partial characterization of the extracellular proteome of the microbe revealed the presence of at least seven cellulases and hemicellulases activities, including multiple iso-forms of xylanase and ferulic acid esterase. The recovered ferulic acid was bio-converted to vanillin, demonstrating its potential application in natural vanillin synthesis. The enzymatic ferulic acid recovery accompanied a significant release of reducing sugars (76-100%), suggesting much broader applications of the enzymes and enzyme mixtures from this organism.

  5. Dynamics of linker residues modulate the nucleic acid binding properties of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein zinc fingers.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, Loussiné; Tisné, Carine; Barraud, Pierre; Xu, Xiaoqian; Morellet, Nelly; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) is a small basic protein containing two zinc fingers (ZF) separated by a short linker. It is involved in several steps of the replication cycle and acts as a nucleic acid chaperone protein in facilitating nucleic acid strand transfers occurring during reverse transcription. Recent analysis of three-dimensional structures of NC-nucleic acids complexes established a new property: the unpaired guanines targeted by NC are more often inserted in the C-terminal zinc finger (ZF2) than in the N-terminal zinc finger (ZF1). Although previous NMR dynamic studies were performed with NC, the dynamic behavior of the linker residues connecting the two ZF domains remains unclear. This prompted us to investigate the dynamic behavior of the linker residues. Here, we collected 15N NMR relaxation data and used for the first time data at several fields to probe the protein dynamics. The analysis at two fields allows us to detect a slow motion occurring between the two domains around a hinge located in the linker at the G35 position. However, the amplitude of motion appears limited in our conditions. In addition, we showed that the neighboring linker residues R29, A30, P31, R32, K33 displayed restricted motion and numerous contacts with residues of ZF1. Our results are fully consistent with a model in which the ZF1-linker contacts prevent the ZF1 domain to interact with unpaired guanines, whereas the ZF2 domain is more accessible and competent to interact with unpaired guanines. In contrast, ZF1 with its large hydrophobic plateau is able to destabilize the double-stranded regions adjacent to the guanines bound by ZF2. The linker residues and the internal dynamics of NC regulate therefore the different functions of the two zinc fingers that are required for an optimal chaperone activity.

  6. Isolation and amino acid sequence of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone precursor-related peptides.

    PubMed

    Tensen, C P; Verhoeven, A H; Gaus, G; Janssen, K P; Keller, R; Van Herp, F

    1991-01-01

    The crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) is synthesized as part of a larger preprohormone in which the sequence of CHH is N-terminally flanked by a peptide for which the name CPRP (CHH precursor-related peptide) is proposed. Both CHH and CPRP are present in the sinus gland, the neurohemal organ of neurosecretory cells located in the eyestalk of decapod crustaceans. This paper describes the isolation and sequence analysis of CPRPs isolated from sinus glands of the crab Carcinus maenas, the crayfish Orconectes limosus and the lobster Homarus americanus. The published sequence of "peptide H" isolated from the land crab, Cardisoma carnifex, has now been recognized as a CPRP in this species. Sequence comparison reveals a high level of identity for the N-terminal region (residues 1-13) between all four peptides, while identity in the C-terminal domain is high between lobster and crayfish CPRP on the one hand, and between both crab species on the other. Conserved N-terminal residues include a putative monobasic processing site at position 11, which suggests that CPRP may be a biosynthetic intermediate from which a potentially bioactive decapeptide can be derived.

  7. Draft genome sequence of the docosahexaenoic acid producing thraustochytrid Aurantiochytrium sp. T66.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Ertesvåg, Helga; Aasen, Inga Marie; Vadstein, Olav; Brautaset, Trygve; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan

    2016-06-01

    Thraustochytrids are unicellular, marine protists, and there is a growing industrial interest in these organisms, particularly because some species, including strains belonging to the genus Aurantiochytrium, accumulate high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Aurantiochytrium sp. T66 (ATCC PRA-276), with a size of 43 Mbp, and 11,683 predicted protein-coding sequences. The data has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/Genbank under the accession LNGJ00000000. The genome sequence will contribute new insight into DHA biosynthesis and regulation, providing a basis for metabolic engineering of thraustochytrids. PMID:27222814

  8. Draft genome sequence of the docosahexaenoic acid producing thraustochytrid Aurantiochytrium sp. T66.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Ertesvåg, Helga; Aasen, Inga Marie; Vadstein, Olav; Brautaset, Trygve; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan

    2016-06-01

    Thraustochytrids are unicellular, marine protists, and there is a growing industrial interest in these organisms, particularly because some species, including strains belonging to the genus Aurantiochytrium, accumulate high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Aurantiochytrium sp. T66 (ATCC PRA-276), with a size of 43 Mbp, and 11,683 predicted protein-coding sequences. The data has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/Genbank under the accession LNGJ00000000. The genome sequence will contribute new insight into DHA biosynthesis and regulation, providing a basis for metabolic engineering of thraustochytrids.

  9. A requirement of hydrophobic and basic amino acid residues for substrate recognition by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Ia.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J C; Kwon, Y G; Lawrence, D S; Edelman, A M

    1994-01-01

    The substrate recognition determinants of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Ia were investigated by using peptide analogues based on the amino acid sequence around Ser-9 of synapsin I. The Km and Vmax for the synthetic peptide Leu-Arg-Arg-Arg-Leu-Ser-Asp-Ala-Asn-Phe are 3.9 microM and 18.5 mumol/(min.mg), respectively. Deletion of Leu at the -5 position lowers the Vmax/Km by 470-fold. The requirement for a hydrophobic residue at -5 was confirmed by the 90- to 2400-fold reduction in Vmax/Km produced by Arg, Ala, or Asp substitutions, but only 2.6-fold decrease after Phe substitution at this position. A hydrophobic residue is similarly required at the +4 position. Deletion of Phe at this position produces a 67-fold reduction, and substitution of Ala for Phe a 43-fold reduction in Vmax/Km. In contrast, substitution with Leu increases Vmax/Km by 1.8-fold. Arg at -3 is also required for recognition as shown by an approximately 240-fold decrease in Vmax/Km after Ala substitution at this position. Positions -2, -4, and +1 appear to play secondary roles in substrate recognition. Arg at -2 and -4 are positive determinants, since Ala substitution at these positions decreases Vmax/Km by 4.7- and 11-fold, respectively. Asp at +1 is a negative influence, since Ala and Leu substitutions at this position increase Vmax/Km by 2.3- and 6.3-fold, respectively. Substitution of Ala for Leu at -1 or Thr for Ser at the 0 position has little effect on phosphorylation kinetics. Thus, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Ia has the minimal substrate recognition motif of Hyd-Xaa-Arg-Xaa-Xaa-(Ser*/Thr*)-Xaa-Xaa-Xaa-Hyd, where Hyd represents a hydrophobic amino acid residue. PMID:8022798

  10. Treatment of air pollution control residues with iron rich waste sulfuric acid: does it work for antimony (Sb)?

    PubMed

    Okkenhaug, Gudny; Breedveld, Gijs D; Kirkeng, Terje; Lægreid, Marit; Mæhlum, Trond; Mulder, Jan

    2013-03-15

    Antimony (Sb) in air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration has gained increased focus due to strict Sb leaching limits set by the EU landfill directive. Here we study the chemical speciation and solubility of Sb at the APC treatment facility NOAH Langøya (Norway), where iron (Fe)-rich sulfuric acid (∼3.6M, 2.3% Fe(II)), a waste product from the industrial extraction of ilmenite, is used for neutralization. Antimony in water extracts of untreated APC residues occurred exclusively as pentavalent antimonate, even at low pH and Eh values. The Sb solubility increased substantially at pH<10, possibly due to the dissolution of ettringite (at alkaline pH) or calcium (Ca)-antimonate. Treated APC residues, stored anoxically in the laboratory, simulating the conditions at the NOAH Langøya landfill, gave rise to decreasing concentrations of Sb in porewater, occurring exclusively as Sb(V). Concentrations of Sb decreased from 87-918μgL(-1) (day 3) to 18-69μgL(-1) (day 600). We hypothesize that an initial sorption of Sb to Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rust) and eventually precipitation of Ca- and Fe-antimonates (tripuhyite; FeSbO4) occurred. We conclude that Fe-rich, sulfuric acid waste is efficient to immobilize Sb in APC residues from waste incineration. PMID:23465722

  11. In silico comparative analysis of DNA and amino acid sequences for prion protein gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Lee, J; Lee, C

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variability might contribute to species specificity of prion diseases in various organisms. In this study, structures of the prion protein gene (PRNP) and its amino acids were compared among species of which sequence data were available. Comparisons of PRNP DNA sequences among 12 species including human, chimpanzee, monkey, bovine, ovine, dog, mouse, rat, wallaby, opossum, chicken and zebrafish allowed us to identify candidate regulatory regions in intron 1 and 3'-untranslated region (UTR) in addition to the coding region. Highly conserved putative binding sites for transcription factors, such as heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) and myocite enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), were discovered in the intron 1. In 3'-UTR, the functional sequence (ATTAAA) for nucleus-specific polyadenylation was found in all the analysed species. The functional sequence (TTTTTAT) for maturation-specific polyadenylation was identically observed only in ovine, and one or two nucleotide mismatches in the other species. A comparison of the amino acid sequences in 53 species revealed a large sequence identity. Especially the octapeptide repeat region was observed in all the species but frog and zebrafish. Functional changes and susceptibility to prion diseases with various isoforms of prion protein could be caused by numeric variability and conformational changes discovered in the repeat sequences.

  12. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND356-58, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3.

  13. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND356-58, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3. PMID:25600804

  14. Computational study on the roles of amino acid residues in the active site formation mechanism of blue-light photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ryuma; Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka; Ando, Koji; Yamato, Takahisa

    2015-07-01

    To examine the functional roles of the active site methionine (M-site) and glutamic acid (E-site) residues of blue-light photoreceptors, we performed in silico mutation at the M-site in a systematic manner and focused on the hydrogen bonding between the E-site and the substrate: the cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimer (CPD). Fragment molecular orbital calculations with electron correlations demonstrated that substitution of the M-site methionine with either alanine or glutamine always destabilizes the interaction energy between the E-site and the CPD by more than 12.0 kcal/mol, indicating that the methionine and glutamic acid residues cooperatively facilitate the enzymatic reaction in the active site.

  15. AcalPred: a sequence-based tool for discriminating between acidic and alkaline enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The structure and activity of enzymes are influenced by pH value of their surroundings. Although many enzymes work well in the pH range from 6 to 8, some specific enzymes have good efficiencies only in acidic (pH<5) or alkaline (pH>9) solution. Studies have demonstrated that the activities of enzymes correlate with their primary sequences. It is crucial to judge enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment from its amino acid sequence in molecular mechanism clarification and the design of high efficient enzymes. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate acidic enzymes from alkaline enzymes. The analysis of variance was used to choose the optimized discriminating features derived from g-gap dipeptide compositions. And support vector machine was utilized to establish the prediction model. In the rigorous jackknife cross-validation, the overall accuracy of 96.7% was achieved. The method can correctly predict 96.3% acidic and 97.1% alkaline enzymes. Through the comparison between the proposed method and previous methods, it is demonstrated that the proposed method is more accurate. On the basis of this proposed method, we have built an online web-server called AcalPred which can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/AcalPred). We believe that the AcalPred will become a powerful tool to study enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment.

  16. AcalPred: A Sequence-Based Tool for Discriminating between Acidic and Alkaline Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The structure and activity of enzymes are influenced by pH value of their surroundings. Although many enzymes work well in the pH range from 6 to 8, some specific enzymes have good efficiencies only in acidic (pH<5) or alkaline (pH>9) solution. Studies have demonstrated that the activities of enzymes correlate with their primary sequences. It is crucial to judge enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment from its amino acid sequence in molecular mechanism clarification and the design of high efficient enzymes. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate acidic enzymes from alkaline enzymes. The analysis of variance was used to choose the optimized discriminating features derived from g-gap dipeptide compositions. And support vector machine was utilized to establish the prediction model. In the rigorous jackknife cross-validation, the overall accuracy of 96.7% was achieved. The method can correctly predict 96.3% acidic and 97.1% alkaline enzymes. Through the comparison between the proposed method and previous methods, it is demonstrated that the proposed method is more accurate. On the basis of this proposed method, we have built an online web-server called AcalPred which can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/AcalPred). We believe that the AcalPred will become a powerful tool to study enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment. PMID:24130738

  17. The value of short amino acid sequence matches for prediction of protein allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Silvanovich, Andre; Nemeth, Margaret A; Song, Ping; Herman, Rod; Tagliani, Laura; Bannon, Gary A

    2006-03-01

    Typically, genetically engineered crops contain traits encoded by one or a few newly expressed proteins. The allergenicity assessment of newly expressed proteins is an important component in the safety evaluation of genetically engineered plants. One aspect of this assessment involves sequence searches that compare the amino acid sequence of the protein to all known allergens. Analyses are performed to determine the potential for immunologically based cross-reactivity where IgE directed against a known allergen could bind to the protein and elicit a clinical reaction in sensitized individuals. Bioinformatic searches are designed to detect global sequence similarity and short contiguous amino acid sequence identity. It has been suggested that potential allergen cross-reactivity may be predicted by identifying matches as short as six to eight contiguous amino acids between the protein of interest and a known allergen. A series of analyses were performed, and match probabilities were calculated for different size peptides to determine if there was a scientifically justified search window size that identified allergen sequence characteristics. Four probability modeling methods were tested: (1) a mock protein and a mock allergen database, (2) a mock protein and genuine allergen database, (3) a genuine allergen and genuine protein database, and (4) a genuine allergen and genuine protein database combined with a correction for repeating peptides. These analyses indicated that searches for short amino acid sequence matches of eight amino acids or fewer to identify proteins as potential cross-reactive allergens is a product of chance and adds little value to allergy assessments for newly expressed proteins.

  18. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of the major immunogen from three serotypes of foot and mouth disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Makoff, A J; Paynter, C A; Rowlands, D J; Boothroyd, J C

    1982-01-01

    Cloned cDNA molecules from three serotypes of FMDV have been sequenced around the VP1-coding region. The predicted amino acid sequences for VP1 were compared with the published sequences and variable regions identified. The amino acid sequences were also analysed for hydrophilic regions. Two of the variable regions, numbered 129-160 and 193-204 overlapped hydrophilic regions, and were therefore identified as potentially immunogenic. These regions overlap regions shown by others to be immunogenic. PMID:6298715

  19. Biosynthesis of D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid by Lactobacillus casei: interchain transacylation of D-alanyl ester residues

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, W.C. 3d.; Taron, D.J.; Neuhaus, F.C.

    1985-06-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Lactobacillus casei contains poly(glycerophosphate) substituted with D-alanyl ester residues. The distribution of these residues in the in vitro-synthesized polymer is uniform. Esterification of LTA with D-alanine may occur in one of two modes: (i) addition at random or (ii) addition at a defined locus in the poly(glycerophosphate) chain followed by redistribution of the ester residues. A time-dependent transacylation of these residues from D-(/sup 14/C)alanyl-lipophilic LTA to hydrophilic acceptor was observed. The hydrophilic acceptor was characterized as D-alanyl-hydrophilic LTA. This transacylation requires neither ATP nor the D-alanine incorporation system, i.e., the D-alanine activating enzyme and D-alanine:membrane acceptor ligase. No evidence for an enzyme-catalyzed transacylation reaction was observed. The authors propose that this process of transacylation may be responsible for the redistribution of D-alanyl residues after esterification to the poly(glycerophosphate). As a result, it is difficult to distinguish between these proposed modes of addition.

  20. Effect of 3' terminal adenylic acid residue on the uridylation of human small RNAs in vitro and in frog oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Sinha, K; Perumal, K; Reddy, R

    2000-01-01

    It is known that several small RNAs including human and Xenopus signal recognition particle (SRP) RNA, U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and 7SK RNAs are posttranscriptionally adenylated, whereas U6 snRNA and ribosomal 5S RNA are posttranscriptionally uridylated on their 3' ends. In this study, we provide evidence that a small fraction of U6 snRNA and 5S ribosomal RNA molecules from human as well as Xenopus oocytes contain a single posttranscriptionally added adenylic acid residue on their 3' ends. These data show that U6 snRNA and 5S rRNAs are posttranscriptionally modified on their 3' ends by both uridylation and adenylation. Although the SRP RNA, 7SK RNA, 5S RNA, and U6 snRNA with the uridylic acid residue on their 3' ends were readily uridylated, all these RNAs with posttranscriptionally added adenylic acid residue on their 3' ends were not uridylated in vitro, or when U6 snRNA with 3' A(OH) was injected into Xenopus oocytes. These results show that the presence of a single posttranscriptionally added adenylic acid residue on the 3' end of SRP RNA, U6 snRNA, 5S rRNA, or 7SK RNA prevents 3' uridylation. These data also show that adenylation and uridylation are two competing processes that add nucleotides on the 3' end of some small RNAs and suggest that one of the functions of the 3' adenylation may be to negatively affect the 3' uridylation of small RNAs. PMID:10999605

  1. Unexpected functional diversity in the fatty acid desaturases of the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and identification of key residues determining activity.

    PubMed

    Haritos, Victoria S; Horne, Irene; Damcevski, Katherine; Glover, Karen; Gibb, Nerida

    2014-08-01

    Desaturases catalyse modifications to fatty acids which are essential to homeostasis and for pheromone and defensive chemical production. All desaturases of the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum were investigated via query of the sequenced genome which yielded 15 putative acyl-Coenzyme A genes. Eleven desaturase mRNA were obtained in full length and functionally expressed in yeast. Phylogenetic analysis separated the desaturases into 4 distinct clades; one clade contained conserved beetle Δ9 desaturases, second clade was Tribolium-specific having diverse activities including Δ5, Δ9 and Δ12 desaturation and the other 2 clades had mixed insect representatives. Three members of this clade contained unusual inserted sequences of ∼20 residues in the C-terminal region and were related to desaturases that all contained similar inserts. Deletion of the entirety of the insert in the flour beetle Δ12 desaturase abolished its activity but this was partially restored by the reintroduction of two histidine residues, suggesting the histidine(s) are required for activity but the full length insert is not. Five new desaturase activities were discovered: Δ9 desaturation of C12:0-C16:0 substrates; two unprecedented Δ5 enzymes acting on C18:0 and C16:0; Δ9 activity exclusively on C16:0 and a further stearate Δ9 desaturase. qPCR analysis ruled out a role in sex pheromone synthesis for the Δ5 and Δ9/C16:0 desaturases. The flour beetle genome has underpinned an examination of all transcribed desaturases in the organism and revealed a diversity of novel and unusual activities, an improved understanding of the evolutionary relationships among insect desaturases and sequence determinants of activity.

  2. Amino acid residues required for fast Na(+)-channel inactivation: charge neutralizations and deletions in the III-IV linker.

    PubMed Central

    Patton, D E; West, J W; Catterall, W A; Goldin, A L

    1992-01-01

    The cytoplasmic linker connecting domains III and IV of the voltage-gated Na+ channel is thought to be involved in fast inactivation. This linker is highly conserved among the various Na+ channels that have been cloned. In the rat brain IIA Na+ channel, it consists of 53 amino acids of which 15 are charged. To investigate the role of this linker in inactivation, we mutated all 15 of the charged residues in various combinations. All but one of these mutants expressed functional channels, and all of these inactivated with kinetics similar to the wild-type channel. We then constructed a series of deletion mutations that span the III-IV linker to determine if any region of the linker is essential for fast inactivation. Deletion of the first 10 amino acids completely eliminated fast inactivation in the channel, whereas deletion of the last 10 amino acids had no substantial effect on inactivation. These results demonstrate that some residues in the amino end of the III-IV linker are critical for fast Na(+)-channel inactivation, but that the highly conserved positively charged and paired negatively charged residues are not essential. PMID:1332059

  3. Quantitative detection of Aspergillus spp. by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanan; Perlin, David S

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and quantitative detection of Aspergillus from clinical samples may facilitate an early diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). As nucleic acid-based detection is a viable option, we demonstrate that Aspergillus burdens can be rapidly and accurately detected by a novel real-time nucleic acid assay other than qPCR by using the combination of nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) and the molecular beacon (MB) technology. Here, we detail a real-time NASBA assay to determine quantitative Aspergillus burdens in lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids of rats with experimental IPA.

  4. Human immunoglobulin subclasses. Partial amino acid sequence of the constant region of a γ4 chain

    PubMed Central

    Pink, J. R. L.; Buttery, S. H.; De Vries, G. M.; Milstein, C.

    1970-01-01

    The heavy chain of a human myeloma protein (Vin) belonging to the γ4 subclass was subjected to tryptic digestion after reduction and carboxymethylation. Cyanogen bromide fragments were also prepared and all 19 tryptic peptides that account for one of them (the Fc-like fragment) were studied. Selected peptic peptides were isolated and provided evidence for the order of 15 of the tryptic peptides. In addition the sequence of two large peptic peptides derived from two sections of the molecule including all the interchain bridges is presented. Comparison with published data on other chains allows us to propose a sequence of γ4 chains that extends from just before the presumed starting point of the invariable region (at about residue 113) to the C-terminal end of the chain (approx. residue 446), except for a section of about 50 residues. The results of the comparison suggest that the immunoglobulin subclasses have a recent independent evolutionary origin in different species. Implications for complement fixation and for the evolutionary origin of antibody diversity are also discussed. PMID:4192699

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Butyric Acid Producer Clostridium tyrobutyricum Strain CIP I-776 (IFP923)

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Benjamin; Lopes Ferreira, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium tyrobutyricum CIP I-776 (IFP923), an efficient producer of butyric acid. The genome consists of a single chromosome of 3.19 Mb and provides useful data concerning the metabolic capacities of the strain. PMID:26941139

  6. Amino acid sequence of the encephalitogenic basic protein from human myelin

    PubMed Central

    Carnegie, P. R.

    1971-01-01

    Myelin from the central nervous system contains an unusual basic protein, which can induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. The basic protein from human brain was digested with trypsin and other enzymes and the sequence of the 170 amino acids was determined. The localization of the encephalitogenic determinants was described. Possible roles for the protein in the structure and function of myelin are discussed. PMID:4108501

  7. Probing the S-adenosylmethionine-binding site of rat guanidinoacetate methyltransferase. Effect of site-directed mutagenesis of residues that are conserved across mammalian non-nucleic acid methyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    Hamahata, A; Takata, Y; Gomi, T; Fujioka, M

    1996-01-01

    Most mammalian non-nucleic acid methyltransferases share three sequence motifs. To gain insight into the S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet)-binding site of guanidinoacetate methyltransferase, we mutated several conserved residues that are found in or near motifs I and II. Conversion of either of two glycine residues of motif I (Gly67 and Gly69) to an alanine resulted in an inactive enzyme. These enzymes, although having UV absorption, fluorescence and far-UV CD spectra virtually identical with those of the wild-type enzyme, seem to be conformationally different from the wild-type enzyme as judged by near-UV CD spectra and the extent of urea denaturation, and are apparently not capable of binding AdoMet. Mutation of Tyr136 of motif II to a valine resulted in a decrease in Kcat/Km values for substrates. Changing this residue to a phenylalanine caused only a minor change in Kcat/Km for AdoMet. This suggests that the aromatic side chain stabilizes the binding of AdoMet. Mutagenic changes of Glu89, which is the residue corresponding to the conserved acidic residue on the C-terminal side of motif I, indicated its contribution to AdoMet binding. These results are consistent with the idea that both motifs I and II are crucial in forming the AdoMet binding site of guanidinoacetate methyltransferase. PMID:8694756

  8. Pyruvate decarboxylase from Pisum sativum. Properties, nucleotide and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Mücke, U; Wohlfarth, T; Fiedler, U; Bäumlein, H; Rücknagel, K P; König, S

    1996-04-15

    To study the molecular structure and function of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) from plants the protein was isolated from pea seeds and partially characterised. The active enzyme which occurs in the form of higher oligomers consists of two different subunits appearing in SDS/PAGE and mass spectroscopy experiments. For further experiments, like X-ray crystallography, it was necessary to elucidate the protein sequence. Partial cDNA clones encoding pyruvate decarboxylase from seeds of Pisum sativum cv. Miko have been obtained by means of polymerase chain reaction techniques. The first sequences were found using degenerate oligonucleotide primers designated according to conserved amino acid sequences of known pyruvate decarboxylases. The missing parts of one cDNA were amplified applying the 3'- and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends systems. The amino acid sequence deduced from the entire cDNA sequence displays strong similarity to pyruvate decarboxylases from other organisms, especially from plants. A molecular mass of 64 kDa was calculated for this protein correlating with estimations for the smaller subunit of the oligomeric enzyme. The PCR experiments led to at least three different clones representing the middle part of the PDC cDNA indicating the existence of three isozymes. Two of these isoforms could be confirmed on the protein level by sequencing tryptic peptides. Only anaerobically treated roots showed a positive signal for PDC mRNA in Northern analysis although the cDNA from imbibed seeds was successfully used for PCR.

  9. Amino acid sequence coevolution in the insect bursicon ligand-receptor system.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Austin L

    2012-06-01

    The pattern of amino acid residue replacement in the components of the bursicon signaling system (involving the BURSα/BURSβ heterodimer and its receptor BURSrec) was reconstructed across a phylogeny of 17 insect species, in order to test for the co-occurrence of replacements at sets of individual sites. Sets of three or more branches with perfectly concordant changes occurred to a greater extent than expected by chance, given the observed level of amino acid change. The latter sites (SPC sites) were found to have distinctive characteristics: (1) the mean number of changes was significantly lower at SPC sites than that at other sites with multiple changes; (2) SPC sites had a significantly greater tendency toward parallel amino acid changes than other sites with multiple changes, but no greater tendency toward convergent changes; and (3) parallel changes tended to involve relatively similar amino acids, as indicated by relatively low mean chemical distances. The results implicated functional constraint, permitting only a limited subset of amino acids in a given site, as a major factor in causing both parallel amino acid replacement and coordinated amino acid changes in different sites of the same protein and of interacting proteins in this system.

  10. Allelic polymorphism in arabian camel ribonuclease and the amino acid sequence of bactrian camel ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Welling, G W; Mulder, H; Beintema, J J

    1976-04-01

    Pancreatic ribonucleases from several species (whitetail deer, roe deer, guinea pig, and arabian camel) exhibit more than one amino acid at particular positions in their amino acid sequences. Since these enzymes were isolated from pooled pancreas, the origin of this heterogeneity is not clear. The pancreatic ribonucleases from 11 individual arabian camels (Camelus dromedarius) have been investigated with respect to the lysine-glutamine heterogeneity at position 103 (Welling et al., 1975). Six ribonucleases showed only one basic band and five showed two bands after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, suggesting a gene frequency of about 0.75 for the Lys gene and about 0.25 for the Gln gene. The amino acid sequence of bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) ribonuclease isolated from individual pancreatic tissue was determined and compared with that of arabian camel ribonuclease. The only difference was observed at position 103. In the ribonucleases from two unrelated bactrian camels, only glutamine was observed at that position. PMID:962846

  11. Urea, Glycolic Acid, and Glycerol in an Organic Residue Produced by Ultraviolet Irradiation of Interstellar/Pre-Cometary Ice Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuevo, Michel; Bredehöft, Jan Hendrik; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.; d'Hendecourt, Louis; Thiemann, Wolfram H.-P.

    2010-03-01

    More than 50 stable organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM), from ground-based and onboard-satellite astronomical observations, in the gas and solid phases. Some of these organics may be prebiotic compounds that were delivered to early Earth by comets and meteorites and may have triggered the first chemical reactions involved in the origin of life. Ultraviolet irradiation of ices simulating photoprocesses of cold solid matter in astrophysical environments have shown that photochemistry can lead to the formation of amino acids and related compounds. In this work, we experimentally searched for other organic molecules of prebiotic interest, namely, oxidized acid labile compounds. In a setup that simulates conditions relevant to the ISM and Solar System icy bodies such as comets, a condensed CH3OH:NH3â = 1:1 ice mixture was UV irradiated at ˜80 K. The molecular constituents of the nonvolatile organic residue that remained at room temperature were separated by capillary gas chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. Urea, glycolic acid, and glycerol were detected in this residue, as well as hydroxyacetamide, glycerolic acid, and glycerol amide. These organics are interesting target molecules to be searched for in space. Finally, tentative mechanisms of formation for these compounds under interstellar/pre-cometary conditions are proposed.

  12. Urea, glycolic acid, and glycerol in an organic residue produced by ultraviolet irradiation of interstellar/pre-cometary ice analogs.

    PubMed

    Nuevo, Michel; Bredehöft, Jan Hendrik; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; d'Hendecourt, Louis; Thiemann, Wolfram H-P

    2010-03-01

    More than 50 stable organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM), from ground-based and onboard-satellite astronomical observations, in the gas and solid phases. Some of these organics may be prebiotic compounds that were delivered to early Earth by comets and meteorites and may have triggered the first chemical reactions involved in the origin of life. Ultraviolet irradiation of ices simulating photoprocesses of cold solid matter in astrophysical environments have shown that photochemistry can lead to the formation of amino acids and related compounds. In this work, we experimentally searched for other organic molecules of prebiotic interest, namely, oxidized acid labile compounds. In a setup that simulates conditions relevant to the ISM and Solar System icy bodies such as comets, a condensed CH(3)OH:NH(3) = 1:1 ice mixture was UV irradiated at approximately 80 K. The molecular constituents of the nonvolatile organic residue that remained at room temperature were separated by capillary gas chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. Urea, glycolic acid, and glycerol were detected in this residue, as well as hydroxyacetamide, glycerolic acid, and glycerol amide. These organics are interesting target molecules to be searched for in space. Finally, tentative mechanisms of formation for these compounds under interstellar/pre-cometary conditions are proposed.

  13. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Shiheido, Hirokazu Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND3{sub 56–58}, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3. - Highlights: • BEND3 localizes to the nucleus. • The N-terminal 60 amino acids region of BEND3 contains NLS. • Amino acids located between 56 and 58 of BEND3 (KRK) are part of NLS. • KRK motif is highly conserved among BEND3 homologs.

  14. Urea, glycolic acid, and glycerol in an organic residue produced by ultraviolet irradiation of interstellar/pre-cometary ice analogs.

    PubMed

    Nuevo, Michel; Bredehöft, Jan Hendrik; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; d'Hendecourt, Louis; Thiemann, Wolfram H-P

    2010-03-01

    More than 50 stable organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM), from ground-based and onboard-satellite astronomical observations, in the gas and solid phases. Some of these organics may be prebiotic compounds that were delivered to early Earth by comets and meteorites and may have triggered the first chemical reactions involved in the origin of life. Ultraviolet irradiation of ices simulating photoprocesses of cold solid matter in astrophysical environments have shown that photochemistry can lead to the formation of amino acids and related compounds. In this work, we experimentally searched for other organic molecules of prebiotic interest, namely, oxidized acid labile compounds. In a setup that simulates conditions relevant to the ISM and Solar System icy bodies such as comets, a condensed CH(3)OH:NH(3) = 1:1 ice mixture was UV irradiated at approximately 80 K. The molecular constituents of the nonvolatile organic residue that remained at room temperature were separated by capillary gas chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. Urea, glycolic acid, and glycerol were detected in this residue, as well as hydroxyacetamide, glycerolic acid, and glycerol amide. These organics are interesting target molecules to be searched for in space. Finally, tentative mechanisms of formation for these compounds under interstellar/pre-cometary conditions are proposed. PMID:20402585

  15. Nucleotide sequence of Crithidia fasciculata cytosol 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    MacKay, R M; Gray, M W; Doolittle, W F

    1980-11-11

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the cytosol 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid of the trypanosomatid protozoan Crithidia fasciculata has been determined by a combination of T1-oligonucleotide catalog and gel sequencing techniques. The sequence is: GAGUACGACCAUACUUGAGUGAAAACACCAUAUCCCGUCCGAUUUGUGAAGUUAAGCACC CACAGGCUUAGUUAGUACUGAGGUCAGUGAUGACUCGGGAACCCUGAGUGCCGUACUCCCOH. This 5S ribosomal RNA is unique in having GAUU in place of the GAAC or GAUC found in all other prokaryotic and eukaryotic 5S RNAs, and thought to be involved in interactions with tRNAs. Comparisons to other eukaryotic cytosol 5S ribosomal RNA sequences indicate that the four major eukaryotic kingdoms (animals, plants, fungi, and protists) are about equally remote from each other, and that the latter kingdom may be the most internally diverse.

  16. Pattern recognition in nucleic acid sequences. II. An efficient method for finding locally stable secondary structures.

    PubMed Central

    Kanehisa, M I; Goad, W B

    1982-01-01

    We present a method for calculating all possible single hairpin loop secondary structures in a nucleic acid sequence by the order of N2 operations where N is the total number of bases. Each structure may contain any number of bulges and internal loops. Most natural sequences are found to be indistinguishable from random sequences in the potential of forming secondary structures, which is defined by the frequency of possible secondary structures calculated by the method. There is a strong correlation between the higher G+C content and the higher structure forming potential. Interestingly, the removal of intervening sequences in mRNAs is almost always accompanied by an increase in the G+C content, which may suggest an involvement of structural stabilization in the mRNA maturation. PMID:6174936

  17. Murine elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) is posttranslationally modified by novel amide-linked ethanolamine-phosphoglycerol moieties. Addition of ethanolamine-phosphoglycerol to specific glutamic acid residues on EF-1 alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteheart, S.W.; Shenbagamurthi, P.; Chen, L.; Cotter, R.J.; Hart, G.W. )

    1989-08-25

    Elongation Factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha), an important eukaryotic translation factor, transports charged aminoacyl-tRNA from the cytosol to the ribosomes during poly-peptide synthesis. Metabolic radiolabeling with ({sup 3}H) ethanolamine shows that, in all cells examined, EF-1 alpha is the major radiolabeled protein. Radiolabeled EF-1 alpha has an apparent Mr = 53,000 and a basic isoelectric point. It is cytosolic and does not contain N-linked oligosaccharides. Trypsin digestion of murine EF-1 alpha generated two major ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine-labeled peptides. Three peptides were sequenced and were identical to two distinct regions of the human EF-1 alpha protein. Blank sequencing cycles coinciding with glutamic acid in the human cDNA-derived sequence were also found to release ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine, and compositional analysis of these peptides confirmed the presence of glutamic acid. Dansylation analysis demonstrates that the amine group of the ethanolamine is blocked. These results indicate that EF-1 alpha is posttranslationally modified by the covalent attachment of ethanolamine via an amide bond to at least two specific glutamic acid residues (Glu-301 and Glu-374). The hydroxyl group of the attached ethanolamine was shown by mass spectrometry and compositional analysis, to be further modified by the addition of a phosphoglycerol unit. This novel posttranslational modification may represent an important alteration of EF-1 alpha, comparable to the regulatory effects of posttranslational methylation of EF-1 alpha lysine residues.

  18. Complete replacement of basic amino acid residues with cysteines in Rickettsia prowazekii ATP/ADP translocase.

    PubMed

    Alexeyev, Mikhail F; Winkler, Herbert H

    2002-09-20

    The ATP/ADP translocase (Tlc) of Rickettsia prowazekii is a basic protein with isoelectric point (pI)=9.84. It is conceivable, therefore, that basic residues in this protein are involved in electrostatic interactions with negatively charged substrates. We tested this hypothesis by individually mutating all basic residues in Tlc to Cys. Unexpectedly, mutations of only 20 out of 51 basic residues resulted in greater than 80% inhibition of transport activity. Moreover, 12 of 51Cys-substitution mutants exhibited higher than wild-type (WT) activity. At least in one case this up-effect was additive and the double mutant Lys422Cys Lys427Cys transported ATP five-fold better than WT protein. Since in these two single mutants and in the corresponding double mutant K(m)'s were similar to that of WT protein, we conclude that Tlc may have evolved a mechanism that limits the transporter's exchange rate and that at least these two basic residues play a key role in that mechanism. Based on the alignment of 16 Tlc homologs, the loss of activity in the mutants poorly correlates with charge conservation within the Tlc family. Also, despite the presence of three positively charged and one negatively charged intramembrane residues, we have failed to identify potential charge pairs (salt bridges) by either charge reversal or charge neutralization approaches. PMID:12225862

  19. Efficient Nucleic Acid Extraction and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Bacterial Community Characterization.

    PubMed

    Anahtar, Melis N; Bowman, Brittany A; Kwon, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the role of microbial communities as critical modulators of human health and disease. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the rapid and efficient characterization of bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene sequencing from a variety of sources. Although readily available tools for 16S rRNA sequence analysis have standardized computational workflows, sample processing for DNA extraction remains a continued source of variability across studies. Here we describe an efficient, robust, and cost effective method for extracting nucleic acid from swabs. We also delineate downstream methods for 16S rRNA gene sequencing, including generation of sequencing libraries, data quality control, and sequence analysis. The workflow can accommodate multiple samples types, including stool and swabs collected from a variety of anatomical locations and host species. Additionally, recovered DNA and RNA can be separated and used for other applications, including whole genome sequencing or RNA-seq. The method described allows for a common processing approach for multiple sample types and accommodates downstream analysis of genomic, metagenomic and transcriptional information. PMID:27168460

  20. Efficient Nucleic Acid Extraction and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Bacterial Community Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Anahtar, Melis N.; Bowman, Brittany A.; Kwon, Douglas S.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the role of microbial communities as critical modulators of human health and disease. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the rapid and efficient characterization of bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene sequencing from a variety of sources. Although readily available tools for 16S rRNA sequence analysis have standardized computational workflows, sample processing for DNA extraction remains a continued source of variability across studies. Here we describe an efficient, robust, and cost effective method for extracting nucleic acid from swabs. We also delineate downstream methods for 16S rRNA gene sequencing, including generation of sequencing libraries, data quality control, and sequence analysis. The workflow can accommodate multiple samples types, including stool and swabs collected from a variety of anatomical locations and host species. Additionally, recovered DNA and RNA can be separated and used for other applications, including whole genome sequencing or RNA-seq. The method described allows for a common processing approach for multiple sample types and accommodates downstream analysis of genomic, metagenomic and transcriptional information. PMID:27168460

  1. Design of nucleic acid sequences for DNA computing based on a thermodynamic approach.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Fumiaki; Kameda, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Masahito; Ohuchi, Azuma

    2005-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm for designing multiple sequences of nucleic acids that have a uniform melting temperature between the sequence and its complement and that do not hybridize non-specifically with each other based on the minimum free energy (DeltaG (min)). Sequences that satisfy these constraints can be utilized in computations, various engineering applications such as microarrays, and nano-fabrications. Our algorithm is a random generate-and-test algorithm: it generates a candidate sequence randomly and tests whether the sequence satisfies the constraints. The novelty of our algorithm is that the filtering method uses a greedy search to calculate DeltaG (min). This effectively excludes inappropriate sequences before DeltaG (min) is calculated, thereby reducing computation time drastically when compared with an algorithm without the filtering. Experimental results in silico showed the superiority of the greedy search over the traditional approach based on the hamming distance. In addition, experimental results in vitro demonstrated that the experimental free energy (DeltaG (exp)) of 126 sequences correlated well with DeltaG (min) (|R| = 0.90) than with the hamming distance (|R| = 0.80). These results validate the rationality of a thermodynamic approach. We implemented our algorithm in a graphic user interface-based program written in Java.

  2. Identification of residues in ABCG2 affecting protein trafficking and drug transport, using co-evolutionary analysis of ABCG sequences

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Ameena J.; Cox, Megan H.; Jones, Natalie; Goode, Alice J.; Bridge, Katherine S.; Wong, Kelvin; Briggs, Deborah; Kerr, Ian D.

    2015-01-01

    ABCG2 is an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter with a physiological role in urate transport in the kidney and is also implicated in multi-drug efflux from a number of organs in the body. The trafficking of the protein and the mechanism by which it recognizes and transports diverse drugs are important areas of research. In the current study, we have made a series of single amino acid mutations in ABCG2 on the basis of sequence analysis. Mutant isoforms were characterized for cell surface expression and function. One mutant (I573A) showed disrupted glycosylation and reduced trafficking kinetics. In contrast with many ABC transporter folding mutations which appear to be ‘rescued’ by chemical chaperones or low temperature incubation, the I573A mutation was not enriched at the cell surface by either treatment, with the majority of the protein being retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Two other mutations (P485A and M549A) showed distinct effects on transport of ABCG2 substrates reinforcing the role of TM helix 3 in drug recognition and transport and indicating the presence of intracellular coupling regions in ABCG2. PMID:26294421

  3. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Patel, Kamlesh D [Ken; SNL,

    2016-07-12

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  4. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Kamlesh D; SNL,

    2012-06-01

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  5. KM+, a mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia: amino acid sequence, predicted tertiary structure, carbohydrate recognition, and analysis of the beta-prism fold.

    PubMed

    Rosa, J C; De Oliveira, P S; Garratt, R; Beltramini, L; Resing, K; Roque-Barreira, M C; Greene, L J

    1999-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the lectin KM+ from Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit), which contains 149 residues/mol, is reported and compared to those of other members of the Moraceae family, particularly that of jacalin, also from jackfruit, with which it shares 52% sequence identity. KM+ presents an acetyl-blocked N-terminus and is not posttranslationally modified by proteolytic cleavage as is the case for jacalin. Rather, it possesses a short, glycine-rich linker that unites the regions homologous to the alpha- and beta-chains of jacalin. The results of homology modeling implicate the linker sequence in sterically impeding rotation of the side chain of Asp141 within the binding site pocket. As a consequence, the aspartic acid is locked into a conformation adequate only for the recognition of equatorial hydroxyl groups on the C4 epimeric center (alpha-D-mannose, alpha-D-glucose, and their derivatives). In contrast, the internal cleavage of the jacalin chain permits free rotation of the homologous aspartic acid, rendering it capable of accepting hydrogen bonds from both possible hydroxyl configurations on C4. We suggest that, together with direct recognition of epimeric hydroxyls and the steric exclusion of disfavored ligands, conformational restriction of the lectin should be considered to be a new mechanism by which selectivity may be built into carbohydrate binding sites. Jacalin and KM+ adopt the beta-prism fold already observed in two unrelated protein families. Despite presenting little or no sequence similarity, an analysis of the beta-prism reveals a canonical feature repeatedly present in all such structures, which is based on six largely hydrophobic residues within a beta-hairpin containing two classic-type beta-bulges. We suggest the term beta-prism motif to describe this feature.

  6. Two Arginine Residues of Streptococcus gordonii Sialic Acid-Binding Adhesin Hsa Are Essential for Interaction to Host Cell Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Oguchi, Riyo; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hsa is a large, serine-rich protein of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 that mediates binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid termini of glycoproteins, including platelet glycoprotein Ibα, and erythrocyte membrane protein glycophorin A, and band 3. The binding of Hsa to platelet glycoprotein Ibα contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. This interaction appears to be mediated by a second non-repetitive region (NR2) of Hsa. However, the molecular details of the interaction between the Hsa NR2 region and these glycoproteins are not well understood. In the present study, we identified the amino acid residues of the Hsa NR2 region that are involved in sialic acid recognition. To identify the sialic acid-binding site of Hsa NR2 region, we prepared various mutants of Hsa NR2 fused with glutathione transferase. Fusion proteins harboring Arg340 to Asn (R340N) or Arg365 to Asn (R365N) substitutions in the NR2 domain exhibited significantly reduced binding to human erythrocytes and platelets. A sugar-binding assay showed that these mutant proteins abolished binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, we established S. gordonii DL1 derivatives that encoded the corresponding Hsa mutant protein. In whole-cell assays, these mutant strains showed significant reductions in hemagglutination, in platelet aggregation, and in adhesion to human leukocytes. These results indicate that the Arg340 and Arg365 residues of Hsa play an important role in the binding of Hsa to α2-3-linked sialic acid-containing glycoproteins. PMID:27101147

  7. Two Arginine Residues of Streptococcus gordonii Sialic Acid-Binding Adhesin Hsa Are Essential for Interaction to Host Cell Receptors.

    PubMed

    Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Oguchi, Riyo; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hsa is a large, serine-rich protein of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 that mediates binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid termini of glycoproteins, including platelet glycoprotein Ibα, and erythrocyte membrane protein glycophorin A, and band 3. The binding of Hsa to platelet glycoprotein Ibα contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. This interaction appears to be mediated by a second non-repetitive region (NR2) of Hsa. However, the molecular details of the interaction between the Hsa NR2 region and these glycoproteins are not well understood. In the present study, we identified the amino acid residues of the Hsa NR2 region that are involved in sialic acid recognition. To identify the sialic acid-binding site of Hsa NR2 region, we prepared various mutants of Hsa NR2 fused with glutathione transferase. Fusion proteins harboring Arg340 to Asn (R340N) or Arg365 to Asn (R365N) substitutions in the NR2 domain exhibited significantly reduced binding to human erythrocytes and platelets. A sugar-binding assay showed that these mutant proteins abolished binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, we established S. gordonii DL1 derivatives that encoded the corresponding Hsa mutant protein. In whole-cell assays, these mutant strains showed significant reductions in hemagglutination, in platelet aggregation, and in adhesion to human leukocytes. These results indicate that the Arg340 and Arg365 residues of Hsa play an important role in the binding of Hsa to α2-3-linked sialic acid-containing glycoproteins. PMID:27101147

  8. Insertion of multiple alpha-amino gamma-lactam (Agl) residues into a peptide sequence by solid-phase synthesis on synphase lanterns.

    PubMed

    Ronga, Luisa; Jamieson, Andrew G; Beauregard, Kim; Quiniou, Christiane; Chemtob, Sylvain; Lubell, William D

    2010-01-01

    The insertion of lactams into peptide analogs can enhance potency and improve receptor selectivity. The synthesis of lactam-bridged peptide sequences has been accomplished by a solid-phase approach on SynPhase lanterns using cyclic (R)- and (S)-oxathiazinane ester (2) to annulate the amino lactam residue onto the peptide chain. Parallel synthesis of alpha-amino gamma-lactam analogs of the allosteric modulator of IL-1 receptor 101.10 (D-Arg-D-Tyr-D-Thr-D-Val-D-Glu-D-Leu-D-Ala: rytvela) was performed by split-mix chemistry on the lanterns. In particular, the double insertion of alpha-amino gamma-lactams in the same peptide sequence has been accomplished by this effective method for the solid-supported combinatorial synthesis of lactam-bridged peptides. Peptides bearing an Agl residue exhibited curve shapes indicative of turn conformations in their circular dichroism spectra. PMID:20225301

  9. Interconversion of ketoprofen recognition in firefly luciferase-catalyzed enantioselective thioesterification reaction using from Pylocoeria miyako (PmL) and Hotaria parvura (HpL) just by mutating two amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Kato, Dai-ichiro; Hiraishi, Yoshihiro; Maenaka, Mika; Yokoyama, Keisuke; Niwa, Kazuki; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Takeo, Masahiro; Negoro, Seiji

    2013-11-01

    We identified the critical amino acid residues for substrate recognition using two firefly luciferases from Pylocoeria miyako (PmL) and Hotaria parvura (HpL), as these two luciferase enzymes exhibit different activities toward ketoprofen. Specifically, PmL can catalyze the apparent enantioselective thioesterification reaction, while HpL cannot. By comparing the amino acid sequences around the active site, we identified two residues (I350 and M397 in PmL and F351 and S398 in HpL) that were different between the two enzymes, and the replacement of these amino acids resulted in changing the ketoprofen recognition pattern. The inactive HpL was converted to the active enzyme toward ketoprofen and vice versa for PmL. These residues also affected the enantioselectivity toward ketoprofen; however, the bioluminescent color was not affected. In addition, using molecular dynamics calculations, the replacement of these two amino acids induced changes in the state of hydrogen bonding between ketoprofen and the S349 side chain through the active site water. As S349 is not considered to influence color tuning, these changes specifically caused the differences in ketoprofen recognition in the enzyme.

  10. Key amino acid residues for the endo-processive activity of GH74 xyloglucanase.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Saito, Yuji; Yaoi, Katsuro

    2014-05-01

    Unlike endo-dissociative-xyloglucanases, Paenibacillus XEG74 is an endo-processive xyloglucanase that contains four unique tryptophan residues in the negative subsites (W61 and W64) and the positive subsites (W318 and W319), as indicated by three-dimensional homology modelling. Selective replacement of the positive subsite residues with alanine mutations reduced the degree of processive activity and resulted in the more endo-dissociative-activity. The results showed that W318 and W319, which are found in the positive subsites, are essential for processive degradation and are responsible for maintaining binding interactions with xyloglucan polysaccharide through a stacking effect. PMID:24657616

  11. DNA Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Gene: Amino Acid Sequence of Repetitive Epitope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enea, Vincenzo; Ellis, Joan; Zavala, Fidel; Arnot, David E.; Asavanich, Achara; Masuda, Aoi; Quakyi, Isabella; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1984-08-01

    A clone of complementary DNA encoding the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been isolated by screening an Escherichia coli complementary DNA library with a monoclonal antibody to the CS protein. The DNA sequence of the complementary DNA insert encodes a four-amino acid sequence: proline-asparagine-alanine-asparagine, tandemly repeated 23 times. The CS β -lactamase fusion protein specifically binds monoclonal antibodies to the CS protein and inhibits the binding of these antibodies to native Plasmodium falciparum CS protein. These findings provide a basis for the development of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

  12. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase: close homology to placental alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.S.; Raducha, M.; Edwards, Y.H.; Weiss, M.J.; Slaughter, C.; Lafferty, M.A.; Harris, H.

    1987-03-01

    A cDNA clone for human adult intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum); EC 3.1.3.1) was isolated from a lambdagt11 expression library. The cDNA insert of this clone is 2513 base pairs in length and contains an open reading frame that encodes a 528-amino acid polypeptide. This deduced polypeptide contains the first 40 amino acids of human intestinal ALP, as determined by direct protein sequencing. Intestinal ALP shows 86.5% amino acid identity to placental (type 1) ALP and 56.6% amino acid identity to liver/bone/kidney ALP. In the 3'-untranslated regions, intestinal and placental ALP cDNAs are 73.5% identical (excluding gaps). The evolution of this multigene enzyme family is discussed.

  13. A facile route to preparation of high purity nanoporous silica from acid-leached residue of serpentine.

    PubMed

    Bai, Penn; Sharratt, Paul; Yeo, Tze Yuen; Bu, Jie

    2014-09-01

    As the current cost of mineral carbonation is too high for an economically viable industrial process, it is desirable to produce value-added products from CO2 mineralization process. In this work, a facile and cost-effective process was developed for the production of high purity SiO2 from acid-leached serpentine residue. The Si extraction rate is fast even under ambient conditions due to the highly defective structure of the residue. The reaction kinetics were studied and it was found that the Si extraction rate was under a combination of chemical reaction control and film diffusion control. The SiO2 sample prepared has high purity with a nanoporous structure, which renders it a potential candidate for applications such as an adsorbent and a catalyst support.

  14. Peptide hairpins with strand segments containing alpha- and beta-amino acid residues: cross-strand aromatic interactions of facing Phe residues.

    PubMed

    Roy, Rituparna S; Gopi, Hosahudya N; Raghothama, S; Gilardi, Richard D; Karle, Isabella L; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2005-01-01

    The incporation of beta-amino acid residues into the strand segments of designed beta-hairpin leads to the formation of polar sheets, since in the case of beta-peptide strands, all adjacent carbonyl groups point in one direction and the amide groups orient in the opposite direction. The conformational analysis of two designed peptide hairpins composed of alpha/beta-hybrid segments are described: Boc-Leu-betaPhe-Val-(D)-Pro-Gly-Leu-betaPhe-Val-OMe (1) and Boc-betaLeu-Phe-betaVal-D-Pro-Gly-betaLeu-Phe-betaVal-OMe (2). A 500-MHz 1H-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) analysis in methanol supports a significant population of hairpin conformations in both peptides. Diagnostic nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) are observed in both cases. X-ray diffraction studies on single crystals of peptide 1 reveal a beta-hairpin conformation in both the molecules, which constitute the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Three cross-strand hydrogen bonds and a nucleating type II' beta-turn at the D-Pro-Gly segment are observed in the two independent molecules. In peptide 1, the betaPhe residues at positions 2 and 7 occur at the nonhydrogen-bonding position, with the benzyl side chains pointing on opposite faces of the beta-sheet. The observed aromatic centroid-to-centroid distances are 8.92 A (molecule A) and 8.94 A (molecule B). In peptide 2, the aromatic rings must occupy facing positions in antiparallel strands, in the NMR-derived structure. Peptide 1 yields a normal "hairpin-like" CD spectrum in methanol with a minimum at 224 nm. The CD spectrum of peptide 2 reveals a negative band at 234 nm and a positive band at 221 nm, suggestive of an exciton split doublet. Modeling of the facing Phe side chains at the hydrogen-bonding position of a canonical beta-hairpin suggests that interring separation is approximately 4.78 A for the gauche+ gauche- (g+ g-) rotamer. A previously reported peptide beta-hairpin composed of only alpha-amino acids, Boc-Leu-Phe-Val-D-Pro-Gly-Leu-Phe-Val-OMe also

  15. Membrane binding and endoplasmic reticulum retention sequences of rotavirus VP7 are distinct: role of carboxy-terminal and other residues in membrane binding.

    PubMed

    Clarke, M L; Lockett, L J; Both, G W

    1995-10-01

    The sequences responsible for binding rotavirus glycoprotein VP7 to the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) have not been identified. Here we show that the sequences which promote membrane binding in vitro are distinct from the N-terminal sequences which promote retention of VP7 in the ER in vivo. The role of the C-terminal region in membrane binding was also examined by using truncation mutants. Membrane binding in vitro was reduced but not abolished by removing up to 102 residues from the C terminus. The data suggest that the last 36 residues of VP7 may be present in the membrane or translocation pore, possibly with the C terminus protruding into the cytoplasm, since these residues contribute to, but do not account for, membrane binding. Surprisingly, modified forms of VP7 which are secreted from transfected cells showed the same membrane-binding properties in vitro as the protein retained in the ER membrane. Thus, secreted VP7 may not be present as a soluble polypeptide in the ER. A model to explain these results is presented. Previously published data are consistent with the idea that the highly conserved C terminus of nascent VP7 could have a cytoplasmic orientation which is important for assembly of mature virus particles. PMID:7666548

  16. Method for high-volume sequencing of nucleic acids: random and directed priming with libraries of oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.

    1995-04-18

    Random and directed priming methods for determining nucleotide sequences by enzymatic sequencing techniques, using libraries of primers of lengths 8, 9 or 10 bases, are disclosed. These methods permit direct sequencing of nucleic acids as large as 45,000 base pairs or larger without the necessity for subcloning. Individual primers are used repeatedly to prime sequence reactions in many different nucleic acid molecules. Libraries containing as few as 10,000 octamers, 14,200 nonamers, or 44,000 decamers would have the capacity to determine the sequence of almost any cosmid DNA. Random priming with a fixed set of primers from a smaller library can also be used to initiate the sequencing of individual nucleic acid molecules, with the sequence being completed by directed priming with primers from the library. In contrast to random cloning techniques, a combined random and directed priming strategy is far more efficient. 2 figs.

  17. Method for high-volume sequencing of nucleic acids: random and directed priming with libraries of oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William

    1995-04-18

    Random and directed priming methods for determining nucleotide sequences by enzymatic sequencing techniques, using libraries of primers of lengths 8, 9 or 10 bases, are disclosed. These methods permit direct sequencing of nucleic acids as large as 45,000 base pairs or larger without the necessity for subcloning. Individual primers are used repeatedly to prime sequence reactions in many different nucleic acid molecules. Libraries containing as few as 10,000 octamers, 14,200 nonamers, or 44,000 decamers would have the capacity to determine the sequence of almost any cosmid DNA. Random priming with a fixed set of primers from a smaller library can also be used to initiate the sequencing of individual nucleic acid molecules, with the sequence being completed by directed priming with primers from the library. In contrast to random cloning techniques, a combined random and directed priming strategy is far more efficient.

  18. Identification of important amino acid residues that modulate binding of Escherichia coli GroEL to its various cochaperones.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, G; Georgopoulos, C

    2001-01-01

    Genetic experiments have shown that the GroEL/GroES chaperone machine of Escherichia coli is absolutely essential, not only for bacterial growth but also for the propagation of many bacteriophages including lambda. The virulent bacteriophages T4 and RB49 are independent of the host GroES function, because they encode their own cochaperone proteins, Gp31 and CocO, respectively. E. coli groEL44 mutant bacteria do not form colonies above 42 degrees nor do they propagate bacteriophages lambda, T4, or RB49. We found that the vast majority (40/46) of spontaneous groEL44 temperature-resistant colonies at 43 degrees were due to the presence of an intragenic suppressor mutation. These suppressors define 21 different amino acid substitutions in GroEL, each affecting one of 13 different amino acid residues. All of these amino acid residues are located at or near the hinge, which regulates the large en bloc movements of the GroEL apical domain. All of these intragenic suppressors support bacteriophages lambda, T4, and RB49 growth to various extents in the presence of the groEL44 allele. Since it is known that the GroEL44 mutant protein does not interact effectively with Gp31, the suppressor mutations should enhance cochaperone binding. Analogous intragenic suppressor studies were conducted with the groEL673 temperature-sensitive allele. PMID:11404317

  19. ASCORBIC ACID REDUCTION ON RESIDUAL ACTIVE CHLORINE IN POTABLE WATER PRIOR TO HALOCARBOXYLATE DETERMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In studies on the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), it is necessary to scavenge residual active (odxidizing) chlorine in order to fix the chlorination byproducts (such as haloethanoates) at a point in time . Such research projects often have distinct needs from requi...

  20. ASCORBIC ACID REDUCTION OF RESIDUAL ACTIVE CHLORINE IN POTABLE WATER PRIOR TO HALOCARBOXYLATE DETERMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In studies on the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), it is necessary to scavenge residual active (oxidizing) chlorine in order to fix the chlorination byproducts (such as haloethanoates) at a point in time. Thus, methods designed for compliance monitoring are not alway...

  1. Reaction sequences in simulated neutralized current acid waste slurry during processing with formic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.; Wiemers, K.D.; Langowski, M.H.; Powell, M.R.; Larson, D.E.

    1993-11-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed for the Department of Energy to immobilize high-level and transuranic wastes as glass for permanent disposal. Pacific Northwest Laboratory is supporting the HWVP design activities by conducting laboratory-scale studies using a HWVP simulated waste slurry. Conditions which affect the slurry processing chemistry were evaluated in terms of offgas composition and peak generation rate and changes in slurry composition. A standard offgas profile defined in terms of three reaction phases, decomposition of H{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, destruction of NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, and production of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} was used as a baseline against which changes were evaluated. The test variables include nitrite concentration, acid neutralization capacity, temperature, and formic acid addition rate. Results to date indicate that pH is an important parameter influencing the N{sub 2}O/NO{sub x} generation ratio; nitrite can both inhibit and activate rhodium as a catalyst for formic acid decomposition to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}; and a separate reduced metal phase forms in the reducing environment. These data are being compiled to provide a basis for predicting the HWVP feed processing chemistry as a function of feed composition and operation variables, recommending criteria for chemical adjustments, and providing guidelines with respect to important control parameters to consider during routine and upset plant operation.

  2. Amino acid sequences in the alpha 1 domain and not glycosylation are important in HLA-A2/beta 2-microglobulin association and cell surface expression.

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Aguado, J; Biro, P A; Fuhrmann, U; Strominger, J L; Barbosa, J A

    1987-01-01

    The role of the single carbohydrate moiety present on the HLA-A2 molecule was studied by introducing several amino acid substitutions (by site-directed mutagenesis of the HLA-A2 gene) in the consensus glycosylation sequence Asn-X-Ser. Two different amino acid substitutions of the asparagine residue at position 86 (glutamine and aspartic acid) resulted in the synthesis of ca. 39,000-molecular-weight nonglycosylated heavy chains that were detected in the cytoplasm but not on the surface of mouse L-cell transfectants. However, a low level of surface expression was detected following transfection of human (rhabdomyosarcoma) cells or mouse L cells containing human beta 2-microglobulin. The defect in surface expression was not due to the absence of the glycan moiety, since the substitution of a glycine for a serine at amino acid 88 did not have the same drastic effect in the presence of human beta 2-microglobulin. These and other data suggest that the asparagine residue may play a critical role in the conformation of the HLA heavy chain and its interaction with beta 2-microglobulin. Immunofluorescence microscopy following permeabilization of the transfectants demonstrated that the unglycosylated HLA heavy chains are sequestered in an unidentified cellular compartment that is different from the Golgi structure. Images PMID:3550437

  3. Analysis of a nucleotide-binding site of 5-lipoxygenase by affinity labelling: binding characteristics and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y Y; Hammarberg, T; Radmark, O; Samuelsson, B; Ng, C F; Funk, C D; Loscalzo, J

    2000-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) catalyses the first two steps in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, which are inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid. 5LO activity is stimulated by ATP; however, a consensus ATP-binding site or nucleotide-binding site has not been found in its protein sequence. In the present study, affinity and photoaffinity labelling of 5LO with 5'-p-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine (FSBA) and 2-azido-ATP showed that 5LO bound to the ATP analogues quantitatively and specifically and that the incorporation of either analogue inhibited ATP stimulation of 5LO activity. The stoichiometry of the labelling was 1.4 mol of FSBA/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 1 mol/mol) or 0.94 mol of 2-azido-ATP/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 0.77 mol/mol). Labelling with FSBA prevented further labelling with 2-azido-ATP, indicating that the same binding site was occupied by both analogues. Other nucleotides (ADP, AMP, GTP, CTP and UTP) also competed with 2-azido-ATP labelling, suggesting that the site was a general nucleotide-binding site rather than a strict ATP-binding site. Ca(2+), which also stimulates 5LO activity, had no effect on the labelling of the nucleotide-binding site. Digestion with trypsin and peptide sequencing showed that two fragments of 5LO were labelled by 2-azido-ATP. These fragments correspond to residues 73-83 (KYWLNDDWYLK, in single-letter amino acid code) and 193-209 (FMHMFQSSWNDFADFEK) in the 5LO sequence. Trp-75 and Trp-201 in these peptides were modified by the labelling, suggesting that they were immediately adjacent to the C-2 position of the adenine ring of ATP. Given the stoichiometry of the labelling, the two peptide sequences of 5LO were probably near each other in the enzyme's tertiary structure, composing or surrounding the ATP-binding site of 5LO. PMID:11042125

  4. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Alexander; Wincker, Patrick; Mauger, Stéphane; Jaillon, Olivier; Malarme, Karine; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2001-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a nonpathogenic AT-rich gram-positive bacterium closely related to the genus Streptococcus and is the most commonly used cheese starter. It is also the best-characterized lactic acid bacterium. We sequenced the genome of the laboratory strain IL1403, using a novel two-step strategy that comprises diagnostic sequencing of the entire genome and a shotgun polishing step. The genome contains 2,365,589 base pairs and encodes 2310 proteins, including 293 protein-coding genes belonging to six prophages and 43 insertion sequence (IS) elements. Nonrandom distribution of IS elements indicates that the chromosome of the sequenced strain may be a product of recent recombination between two closely related genomes. A complete set of late competence genes is present, indicating the ability of L. lactis to undergo DNA transformation. Genomic sequence revealed new possibilities for fermentation pathways and for aerobic respiration. It also indicated a horizontal transfer of genetic information from Lactococcus to gram-negative enteric bacteria of Salmonella-Escherichia group. [The sequence data described in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AE005176.] PMID:11337471

  5. Simulation of acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic residues to fermentable sugars for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidiras, Dimitris

    2012-12-01

    The dilute acid hydrolysis of fir sawdust with sulfuric acid was undertaken in a batch reactor system (autoclave). The experimental data and reaction kinetic analysis indicate that this is a potential process for cellulose and hemicelluloses hydrolysis, due to a rapid hydrolysis reaction for acid concentration 0.045 N at 160-180°C. It was found that significant sugar degradation occurred at these conditions. The optimum conditions gave a yield of 38% total fermentable sugars. The kinetics of dilute acid hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses (polysaccharides) were simulated using four pseudo-kinetic models. The reaction rate constants were calculated in each case.

  6. Function of aspartic acid residues in optimum pH control of L-arabinose isomerase from Lactobacillus fermentum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Li, Sha; Feng, Xiaohai; Zhan, Yijing; Xu, Hong

    2014-05-01

    L-Arabinose isomerase (L-AI) catalyzes the isomerization of L-arabinose to L-ribulose and D-galactose to D-tagatose. Most reported L-AIs exhibit neutral or alkaline optimum pH, which is less beneficial than acidophilic ones in industrial D-tagatose production. Lactobacillus fermentum L-AI (LFAI) is a thermostable enzyme that can achieve a high conversion rate for D-galactose isomerization. However, its biocatalytic activity at acidic conditions can still be further improved. In this study, we report the single- and multiple-site mutagenesis on LFAI targeting three aspartic acid residues (D268, D269, and D299). Some of the lysine mutants, especially D268K/D269K/D299K, exhibited significant optimum pH shifts (from 6.5 to 5.0) and enhancement of pH stability (half-life time increased from 30 to 62 h at pH 6.0), which are more favorable for industrial applications. With the addition of borate, D-galactose was isomerized into D-tagatose by D268K/D269K/D299K at pH 5.0, resulting in a high conversion rate of 62 %. Based on the obtained 3.2-Å crystal structure of LFAI, the three aspartic acid residues were found to be distant from the active site and possibly did not participate in substrate catalysis. However, they were proven to possess similar optimum pH control ability in other L-AI, such as that derived from Escherichia coli. This study sheds light on the essential residues of L-AIs that can be modified for desired optimum pH and better pH stability, which are useful in D-tagatose bioproduction.

  7. KV4.3 expression and gating: S2 and S3 acidic and S4 innermost basic residues.

    PubMed

    Skerritt, Matthew R; Campbell, Donald L

    2009-11-01

    Effects of neutralizing individual negatively charged (acidic [E,D]) and innermost positively charged (basic [K,R]) residues in transmembrane segments S2 (D230Q, E240Q), S3 (D263Q) and S4 (K299A/Q, R302A/Q) of the K(V)4.3 putative voltage sensing domain (VSD) were determined. S2 D230Q generated large macroscopic currents, depolarized steady-state activation ("a(4)") and isochronal (1 sec) inactivation ("i") relationships, and significantly accelerated kinetics of deactivation and recovery (from both macroscopic and closed state inactivation [CSI]). D230Q thus stabilized non-inactivated closed states. These effects were attributable to structural perturbations, and indicated D230 is not primarily involved in voltage sensing. Both S2 E240Q and S3 D263Q failed to generate measurable ionic currents, suggesting deletion of negative charges at these putatively more intracellular acidic positions were functionally "lethal" to macroscopic K(V)4.3 function. S4 innermost positive charge deletion mutants K299A/Q and R032A/Q generated functional currents with reduced peak amplitudes. While reduced K299A/Q and R302A/Q currents prevented accurate determination of "a(4)" and estimates of potential electrostatic perturbations, both sets of mutants: (i) depolarized potentials at which currents could be macroscopically detected, consistent with stabilization of closed states (structural perturbations); and (ii) accelerated macroscopic recovery. These results provide further evidence that: (i) basic residues in S4 are involved not only in regulating K(V)4.3 activation and deactivation, but also CSI and recovery; and (ii) suggest putative electrostatic interactions between acidic S2/S3 and basic S4 residues may be different in K(V)4.3 from those proposed to exist in Shaker. Functional implications are discussed.

  8. Amino acid sequence differences in pancreatic ribonucleases from water buffalo breeds from Indonesia and Italy.

    PubMed

    Sidik, A; Martena, B; Beintema, J J

    1979-12-01

    The amino acid sequences of the pancreatic ribonucleases from river-breed water buffaloes from Italy and swamp-breed water buffaloes from Indonesia differ at three positions. One of the differences involves a replacement of asparagine-34, with covalently attached carbohydrate on all molecules, in the river-breed enzyme by serine in the swamp-breed enzyme. The ribonuclease content of the pancreas differs considerably between breeds and is lower in river buffaloes. A ribonuclease preparation from two swamp buffaloes contained a minor glycosylated component. Preliminary evidence was obtained that the amino acid sequence of this component has factors in common with the main component of the swamp-breed ribonuclease and with the river-breed enzyme.

  9. On human disease-causing amino acid variants: statistical study of sequence and structural patterns

    PubMed Central

    Alexov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Statistical analysis was carried out on large set of naturally occurring human amino acid variations and it was demonstrated that there is a preference for some amino acid substitutions to be associated with diseases. At an amino acid sequence level, it was shown that the disease-causing variants frequently involve drastic changes of amino acid physico-chemical properties of proteins such as charge, hydrophobicity and geometry. Structural analysis of variants involved in diseases and being frequently observed in human population showed similar trends: disease-causing variants tend to cause more changes of hydrogen bond network and salt bridges as compared with harmless amino acid mutations. Analysis of thermodynamics data reported in literature, both experimental and computational, indicated that disease-causing variants tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions, which prompted us to investigate the effects of amino acid mutations on large databases of experimentally measured energy changes in unrelated proteins. Although the experimental datasets were linked neither to diseases nor exclusory to human proteins, the observed trends were the same: amino acid mutations tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions. Having in mind that structural and thermodynamics properties are interrelated, it is pointed out that any large change of any of them is anticipated to cause a disease. PMID:25689729

  10. Self-sequencing of amino acids and origins of polyfunctional protocells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1984-01-01

    The role of proteins in the origin of living things is discussed. It has been experimentally established that amino acids can sequence themselves under simulated geological conditions with highly nonrandom products which accordingly contain diverse information. Multiple copies of each type of macromolecule are formed, resulting in greater power for any protoenzymic molecule than would accrue from a single copy of each type. Thermal proteins are readily incorporated into laboratory protocells. The experimental evidence for original polyfunctional protocells is discussed.

  11. Comparisons of the Distribution of Nucleotides and Common Sequences in Deoxyribonucleic Acid from Selected Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Skalka, A.; Hanson, P.

    1972-01-01

    Results from comparisons of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from several classes of bacteriophages suggest that most phage chromosomes contain either a homogeneous distribution of nucleotides or are made up of a few, rather large segments of different quanine plus cytosine (G + C) contents which are internally homogeneous. Among those temperate phages tested, most contained segmented DNA. Comparisons of sequence similarities among segments from lambdoid phage DNA species revealed the following order in relatedness to λ: 82 (and 434) > 21 > 424 > φ80. Most common sequences are found in the highest G + C segments, which in λ contain head and tail genes. Hybridization tests with λ and 186 or P2 DNA species verified that the lambdoids and 186 and P2 belong to two distinct groups. There are fewer homologous sequences between the DNA species of coliphages λ and P2 or 186 than there are between the DNA species of coliphage λ and salmonella phage P22. PMID:4553679

  12. Structure of the fully modified left-handed cyclohexene nucleic acid sequence GTGTACAC.

    PubMed

    Robeyns, Koen; Herdewijn, Piet; Van Meervelt, Luc

    2008-02-13

    CeNA oligonucleotides consist of a phosphorylated backbone where the deoxyribose sugars are replaced by cyclohexene moieties. The X-ray structure determination and analysis of a fully modified octamer sequence GTGTACAC, which is the first crystal structure of a carbocyclic-based nucleic acid, is presented. This particular sequence was built with left-handed building blocks and crystallizes as a left-handed double helix. The helix can be characterized as belonging to the (mirrored) A-type family. Crystallographic data were processed up to 1.53 A, and the octamer sequence crystallizes in the space group R32. The sugar puckering is found to adopt the 3H2 half-chair conformation which mimics the C3'-endo conformation of the ribose sugar. The double helices stack on top of each other to form continuous helices, and static disorder is observed due to this end-to-end stacking.

  13. Fatty Acid Profile and Unigene-Derived Simple Sequence Repeat Markers in Tung Tree (Vernicia fordii)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Jia, Baoguang; Tan, Xiaofeng; Thammina, Chandra S.; Long, Hongxu; Liu, Min; Wen, Shanna; Song, Xianliang; Cao, Heping

    2014-01-01

    Tung tree (Vernicia fordii) provides the sole source of tung oil widely used in industry. Lack of fatty acid composition and molecular markers hinders biochemical, genetic and breeding research. The objectives of this study were to determine fatty acid profiles and develop unigene-derived simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in tung tree. Fatty acid profiles of 41 accessions showed that the ratio of α-eleostearic acid was increasing continuously with a parallel trend to the amount of tung oil accumulation while the ratios of other fatty acids were decreasing in different stages of the seeds and that α-eleostearic acid (18∶3) consisted of 77% of the total fatty acids in tung oil. Transcriptome sequencing identified 81,805 unigenes from tung cDNA library constructed using seed mRNA and discovered 6,366 SSRs in 5,404 unigenes. The di- and tri-nucleotide microsatellites accounted for 92% of the SSRs with AG/CT and AAG/CTT being the most abundant SSR motifs. Fifteen polymorphic genic-SSR markers were developed from 98 unigene loci tested in 41 cultivated tung accessions by agarose gel and capillary electrophoresis. Genbank database search identified 10 of them putatively coding for functional proteins. Quantitative PCR demonstrated that all 15 polymorphic SSR-associated unigenes were expressed in tung seeds and some of them were highly correlated with oil composition in the seeds. Dendrogram revealed that most of the 41 accessions were clustered according to the geographic region. These new polymorphic genic-SSR markers will facilitate future studies on genetic diversity, molecular fingerprinting, comparative genomics and genetic mapping in tung tree. The lipid profiles in the seeds of 41 tung accessions will be valuable for biochemical and breeding studies. PMID:25167054

  14. Characterization of the microbial acid mine drainage microbial community using culturing and direct sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Auld, Ryan R; Myre, Maxine; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Leduc, Leo G; Merritt, Thomas J S

    2013-05-01

    We characterized the bacterial community from an AMD tailings pond using both classical culturing and modern direct sequencing techniques and compared the two methods. Acid mine drainage (AMD) is produced by the environmental and microbial oxidation of minerals dissolved from mining waste. Surprisingly, we know little about the microbial communities associated with AMD, despite the fundamental ecological roles of these organisms and large-scale economic impact of these waste sites. AMD microbial communities have classically been characterized by laboratory culturing-based techniques and more recently by direct sequencing of marker gene sequences, primarily the 16S rRNA gene. In our comparison of the techniques, we find that their results are complementary, overall indicating very similar community structure with similar dominant species, but with each method identifying some species that were missed by the other. We were able to culture the majority of species that our direct sequencing results indicated were present, primarily species within the Acidithiobacillus and Acidiphilium genera, although estimates of relative species abundance were only obtained from direct sequencing. Interestingly, our culture-based methods recovered four species that had been overlooked from our sequencing results because of the rarity of the marker gene sequences, likely members of the rare biosphere. Further, direct sequencing indicated that a single genus, completely missed in our culture-based study, Legionella, was a dominant member of the microbial community. Our results suggest that while either method does a reasonable job of identifying the dominant members of the AMD microbial community, together the methods combine to give a more complete picture of the true diversity of this environment. PMID:23485423

  15. Metazoan remaining genes for essential amino acid biosynthesis: sequence conservation and evolutionary analyses.

    PubMed

    Costa, Igor R; Thompson, Julie D; Ortega, José Miguel; Prosdocimi, Francisco

    2014-12-24

    Essential amino acids (EAA) consist of a group of nine amino acids that animals are unable to synthesize via de novo pathways. Recently, it has been found that most metazoans lack the same set of enzymes responsible for the de novo EAA biosynthesis. Here we investigate the sequence conservation and evolution of all the metazoan remaining genes for EAA pathways. Initially, the set of all 49 enzymes responsible for the EAA de novo biosynthesis in yeast was retrieved. These enzymes were used as BLAST queries to search for similar sequences in a database containing 10 complete metazoan genomes. Eight enzymes typically attributed to EAA pathways were found to be ubiquitous in metazoan genomes, suggesting a conserved functional role. In this study, we address the question of how these genes evolved after losing their pathway partners. To do this, we compared metazoan genes with their fungal and plant orthologs. Using phylogenetic analysis with maximum likelihood, we found that acetolactate synthase (ALS) and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) diverged from the expected Tree of Life (ToL) relationships. High sequence conservation in the paraphyletic group Plant-Fungi was identified for these two genes using a newly developed Python algorithm. Selective pressure analysis of ALS and BHMT protein sequences showed higher non-synonymous mutation ratios in comparisons between metazoans/fungi and metazoans/plants, supporting the hypothesis that these two genes have undergone non-ToL evolution in animals.

  16. Purification, N-terminal amino acid sequence, and some properties of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase from Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) hepato-pancreas.

    PubMed

    Osatomi, K; Masuda, Y; Hara, K; Ishihara, T

    2001-04-01

    Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) has been purified to homogeneity from Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus hepato-pancreas. The purification of the enzyme was carried out by an ethanol/chloroform treatment and acetone precipitation, and then followed by column chromatographies on Q-Sepharose, S-Sepharose and Ultrogel AcA 54. On SDS-PAGE, the purified enzyme gave a single protein band with molecular mass of 17.8 kDa under reducing conditions, and showed approximately equal proportions of 17.8 and 36 kDa molecular mass under non-reducing conditions. Three bands were obtained when the purified enzyme was subjected to native-PAGE, both on protein and activity staining, but the electrophoretic mobility of the purified enzyme differed from that of bovine erythrocyte Cu, Zn-SOD. Isoelectric point values of 5.9, 6.0 and 6.2, respectively, were obtained for the three components. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified enzyme was determined for 25 amino acid residues, and the sequence was compared with other Cu, Zn-SODs. The N-terminal alanine residue was unacetylated, as in the case of swordfish SOD. Above 60 degrees C, the thermostability of the enzyme was much lower than that of bovine Cu, Zn-SOD. PMID:11290457

  17. Stabile Chlorine Isotope Study of Martian Shergottites and Nakhlites; Whole Rock and Acid Leachates and Residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    We have established a precise analytical technique for stable chlorine isotope measurements of tiny planetary materials by TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) [1], for which the results are basically consistent with the IRMS tech-nique (gas source mass spectrometry) [2,3,4]. We present here results for Martian shergottites and nakhlites; whole rocks, HNO3-leachates and residues, and discuss the chlorine isotope evolution of planetary Mars.

  18. Radionuclide Leaching from Residual Solids Remaining after Acid Dissolution of K East Area Sludge Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.; Carlson, C.D.; Soderquist, C.Z.; Fadeff, S.K.

    1999-04-02

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of various leach treatments for decontaminating dissolver residual solids (KEACRESID1) produced during a 24-hour dissolution of K East Basin floor and Weasel Pit sludge composite in boiling 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The scope of this testing has been described in Section 4.5 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basin Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the residual solids generated in the K Basin sludge treatment process can restrict disposal of this solid to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The starting dissolver residual solid for this testing, KEACRESID1, is a visibly heterogeneous material. This material contains radionuclides at concentrations above the ERDF Waste Acceptance Criteria for transuranics (TRU) by about a factor of 3, for {sup 239}Pu by a factor of 10, and for {sup 241}Am by a factor of 1.6. It meets the ERDF criterion for {sup 137}Cs by a factor of 4 and for uranium by a factor of 10. Therefore, the radionuclides of greatest interest in this leaching study are first {sup 239}Pu, and then {sup 241}Am, {sup 137}Cs, and uranium.

  19. An Acidic Thermostable Recombinant Aspergillus nidulans Endoglucanase Is Active towards Distinct Agriculture Residues

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Eveline Queiroz de Pinho; Rubini, Marciano Regis; Mello-de-Sousa, Thiago Machado; Duarte, Gilvan Caetano; de Faria, Fabrícia Paula; Ferreira Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes; Kyaw, Cynthia Maria; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio Jose

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans is poorly exploited as a source of enzymes for lignocellulosic residues degradation for biotechnological purposes. This work describes the A. nidulans Endoglucanase A heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris, the purification and biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme. Active recombinant endoglucanase A (rEG A) was efficiently secreted as a 35 kDa protein which was purified through a two-step chromatography procedure. The highest enzyme activity was detected at 50°C/pH 4. rEG A retained 100% of activity when incubated at 45 and 55°C for 72 h. Purified rEG A kinetic parameters towards CMC were determined as Km = 27.5 ± 4.33 mg/mL, Vmax = 1.185 ± 0.11 mmol/min, and 55.8 IU (international units)/mg specific activity. Recombinant P. pastoris supernatant presented hydrolytic activity towards lignocellulosic residues such as banana stalk, sugarcane bagasse, soybean residues, and corn straw. These data indicate that rEG A is suitable for plant biomass conversion into products of commercial importance, such as second-generation fuel ethanol. PMID:23936633

  20. Optimization of a Nucleic Acids united-RESidue 2-Point model (NARES-2P) with a maximum-likelihood approach

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam

    2015-12-28

    Coarse-grained models are useful tools to investigate the structural and thermodynamic properties of biomolecules. They are obtained by merging several atoms into one interaction site. Such simplified models try to capture as much as possible information of the original biomolecular system in all-atom representation but the resulting parameters of these coarse-grained force fields still need further optimization. In this paper, a force field optimization method, which is based on maximum-likelihood fitting of the simulated to the experimental conformational ensembles and least-squares fitting of the simulated to the experimental heat-capacity curves, is applied to optimize the Nucleic Acid united-RESidue 2-point (NARES-2P) model for coarse-grained simulations of nucleic acids recently developed in our laboratory. The optimized NARES-2P force field reproduces the structural and thermodynamic data of small DNA molecules much better than the original force field.

  1. Controlling fine particulate and acid mist emissions from a residual oil fired utility boiler with an EDV{trademark} system

    SciTech Connect

    Olen, K.R.; Vincent, H.B.; Jones, G.

    1995-06-01

    Florida Power & Light Company (FPL), in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Belco Technologies Corporation, evaluated the performance of an EDV system to remove fine particulate and acid mist from untreated flue gas from a residual oil-fired utility boiler. The cosponsored project was carried out using a full-scale EDV module in a slip stream from one of the 400 MW wall-fired boilers at FPL`s Sanford Plant. Particulate, acid gas and chemical analytical data are presented, and used to illustrate the effects of operating variables on EDV performance. EDV system efficiencies of 90% were achieved, which resulted in controlled particulate and SO{sub 3} emissions of less than 10 mg/Nm{sup 3} (0.0065 lbs/10{sup 6}Btu) and 1 ppmv, respectively.

  2. Optimization of a Nucleic Acids united-RESidue 2-Point model (NARES-2P) with a maximum-likelihood approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2015-12-01

    Coarse-grained models are useful tools to investigate the structural and thermodynamic properties of biomolecules. They are obtained by merging several atoms into one interaction site. Such simplified models try to capture as much as possible information of the original biomolecular system in all-atom representation but the resulting parameters of these coarse-grained force fields still need further optimization. In this paper, a force field optimization method, which is based on maximum-likelihood fitting of the simulated to the experimental conformational ensembles and least-squares fitting of the simulated to the experimental heat-capacity curves, is applied to optimize the Nucleic Acid united-RESidue 2-point (NARES-2P) model for coarse-grained simulations of nucleic acids recently developed in our laboratory. The optimized NARES-2P force field reproduces the structural and thermodynamic data of small DNA molecules much better than the original force field.

  3. Mutational analysis of amino acid residues involved in catalytic activity of a family 18 chitinase from tulip bulbs.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Keisuke; Yamagami, Takeshi; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kuhara, Satoru; Aso, Yoichi; Ishiguro, Masatsune

    2003-02-01

    We expressed chitinase-1 (TBC-1) from tulip bulbs (Tulipa bakeri) in E. coli cells and used site-directed mutagenesis to identify amino acid residues essential for catalytic activity. Mutations at Glu-125 and Trp-251 completely abolished enzyme activity, and activity decreased with mutations at Asp-123 and Trp-172 when glycolchitin was the substrate. Activity changed with the mutations of Trp-251 to one of several amino acids with side-chains of little hydrophobicity, suggesting that hydrophobic interaction of Trp-251 is important for the activity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation analysis with hevamine as the model compound showed that the distance between Asp-123 and Glu-125 was extended by mutation of Trp-251. Kinetic studies of Trp-251-mutated chitinases confirmed these various phenomena. The results suggested that Glu-125 and Trp-251 are essential for enzyme activity and that Trp-251 had a direct role in ligand binding.

  4. Key Amino Acid Residues of Ankyrin-Sensitive Phosphatidylethanolamine/Phosphatidylcholine-Lipid Binding Site of βI-Spectrin

    PubMed Central

    Wolny, Marcin; Grzybek, Michał; Bok, Ewa; Chorzalska, Anna; Lenoir, Marc; Czogalla, Aleksander; Adamczyk, Klaudia; Kolondra, Adam; Diakowski, Witold; Overduin, Michael; Sikorski, Aleksander F.

    2011-01-01

    It was shown previously that an ankyrin-sensitive, phosphatidylethanolamine/phosphatidylcholine (PE/PC) binding site maps to the N-terminal part of the ankyrin-binding domain of β-spectrin (ankBDn). Here we have identified the amino acid residues within this domain which are responsible for recognizing monolayers and bilayers composed of PE/PC mixtures. In vitro binding studies revealed that a quadruple mutant with substituted hydrophobic residues W1771, L1775, M1778 and W1779 not only failed to effectively bind PE/PC, but its residual PE/PC-binding activity was insensitive to inhibition with ankyrin. Structure prediction and analysis, supported by in vitro experiments, suggests that “opening” of the coiled-coil structure underlies the mechanism of this interaction. Experiments on red blood cells and HeLa cells supported the conclusions derived from the model and in vitro lipid-protein interaction results, and showed the potential physiological role of this binding. We postulate that direct interactions between spectrin ankBDn and PE-rich domains play an important role in stabilizing the structure of the spectrin-based membrane skeleton. PMID:21738695

  5. The role of amino acid residues in the active site of L-methionine γ-lyase from Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Mitsuki; Kudou, Daizou; Murano, Shouko; Shiba, Tomoo; Sato, Dan; Tamura, Takashi; Harada, Shigeharu; Inagaki, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Cys116, Lys240*, and Asp241* (asterisks indicate residues from the second subunit of the active dimer) at the active site of L-methionine γ-lyase of Pseudomonas putida (MGL_Pp) are highly conserved among heterologous MGLs. In a previous study, we found that substitution of Cys116 for His led to a drastic increase in activity toward L-cysteine and a decrease in that toward L-methionine. In this study, we examined some properties of the C116H mutant by kinetic analysis and 3D structural analysis. We assumed that substitution of Cys116 for His broke the original hydrogen-bond network and that this induced a significant effect of Tyr114 as a general acid catalyst, possibly due to the narrow space in the active site. The C116H mutant acquired a novel β-elimination activity and lead a drastic conformation change in the histidine residue at position 116 by binding the substrate, suggesting that this His residue affects the reaction specificity of C116H. Furthermore, we suggest that Lys240* is important for substrate recognition and structural stability and that Asp241* is also involved in substrate specificity in the elimination reaction. Based on this, we suggest that the hydrogen-bond network among Cys116, Lys240*, and Asp241* contributes to substrate specificity that is, to L-methionine recognition at the active site in MGL_Pp.

  6. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA

    PubMed Central

    Heather, James M.; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way. PMID:26554401

  7. Purification and amino acid sequence of halystase from snake venom of Agkistrodon halys blomhoffii, a serine protease that cleaves specifically fibrinogen and kininogen.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Sakurai, Y; Fujimura, Y; Hayashi, I; Oh-Ishi, S; Suzuki, M; Hamako, J; Yamamoto, Y; Yamazaki, J; Kinoshita, M; Titani, K

    1998-03-15

    We have isolated a serine protease, halystase, from Agkistrodon halys blomhoffii venom by chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose, heparin-Sepharose and Q-Sepharose columns, and have determined the complete amino acid sequence by Edman degradation and by mass spectral analysis of peptides generated by enzymatic and chemical cleavage. The 238-residue sequence of halystase, containing N-linked carbohydrates (about 13%) at two sites showed significant similarity to other thrombin-like snake venom serine proteases (66-72%), mammalian tissue kallikrein (42%) and thrombin (26%). Halystase contained the tentative catalytic triad of His43, Asp88 and Ser184 common to all serine proteases and Asp178 in the primary substrate-binding site. Although halystase contained an RGD sequence at residues 181-183, it did not inhibit platelet aggregation induced by ADP or collagen. It hydrolyzed most efficiently a tissue-kallikrein substrate, prolylphenylalanylarginyl-4-methyl-coumaryl-7-amide, and released bradykinin from bovine kininogen. Halystase did not coagulate human plasma, but it cleaved the fibrinogen B beta chain at the carboxyl side of Arg42 and cleaved slowly the fibrogen A alpha chain. Fibrinogen thus treated gradually became insensitive to thrombin. The proteolytic activity was inhibited with diisopropyl fluorophosphate, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride or leupeptin. These results indicate that halystase is a serine protease structurally similar to coagulating thrombin-like snake venom proteases, but it specifically cleaves fibrinogen at sites different from thrombin without inducing fibrin clotting, and hydrolyzes kininogen to produce bradykinin, resulting in the reduction of blood pressure.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brélan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Bruce, D.; Goodwin, L.; Chertkov, O.; Brettin, T.; Han, C.; Detter, C.; Pitluck, S.; Land, Miriam L.; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 and ferments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemicellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome sequence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed. PMID:22675583

  9. BeadCons: detection of nucleic acid sequences by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Horejsh, Douglas; Martini, Federico; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria

    2005-11-01

    Molecular beacons are single-stranded nucleic acid structures with a terminal fluorophore and a distal, terminal quencher. These molecules are typically used in real-time PCR assays, but have also been conjugated with solid matrices. This unit describes protocols related to molecular beacon-conjugated beads (BeadCons), whose specific hybridization with complementary target sequences can be resolved by cytometry. Assay sensitivity is achieved through the concentration of fluorescence signal on discrete particles. By using molecular beacons with different fluorophores and microspheres of different sizes, it is possible to construct a fluid array system with each bead corresponding to a specific target nucleic acid. Methods are presented for the design, construction, and use of BeadCons for the specific, multiplexed detection of unlabeled nucleic acids in solution. The use of bead-based detection methods will likely lead to the design of new multiplex molecular diagnostic tools.

  10. Measuring nanometer distances in nucleic acids using a sequence-independent nitroxide probe

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Peter Z; Haworth, Ian S; Cai, Qi; Kusnetzow, Ana K; Grant, Gian Paola G; Price, Eric A; Sowa, Glenna Z; Popova, Anna; Herreros, Bruno; He, Honghang

    2008-01-01

    This protocol describes the procedures for measuring nanometer distances in nucleic acids using a nitroxide probe that can be attached to any nucleotide within a given sequence. Two nitroxides are attached to phosphorothioates that are chemically substituted at specific sites of DNA or RNA. Inter-nitroxide distances are measured using a four-pulse double electron–electron resonance technique, and the measured distances are correlated to the parent structures using a Web-accessible computer program. Four to five days are needed for sample labeling, purification and distance measurement. The procedures described herein provide a method for probing global structures and studying conformational changes of nucleic acids and protein/nucleic acid complexes. PMID:17947978

  11. [Partial sequence homology of FtsZ in phylogenetics analysis of lactic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Dong, Xiu-zhu

    2005-10-01

    FtsZ is a structurally conserved protein, which is universal among the prokaryotes. It plays a key role in prokaryote cell division. A partial fragment of the ftsZ gene about 800bp in length was amplified and sequenced and a partial FtsZ protein phylogenetic tree for the lactic acid bacteria was constructed. By comparing the FtsZ phylogenetic tree with the 16S rDNA tree, it was shown that the two trees were similar in topology. Both trees revealed that Pediococcus spp. were closely related with L. casei group of Lactobacillus spp. , but less related with other lactic acid cocci such as Enterococcus and Streptococcus. The results also showed that the discriminative power of FtsZ was higher than that of 16S rDNA for either inter-species or inter-genus and could be a very useful tool in species identification of lactic acid bacteria. PMID:16342751

  12. Residue-residue contact substitution probabilities derived from aligned three-dimensional structures and the identificat